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Sample records for idiopathic epilepsy caused

  1. ADHD in idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Duran, Marcos H C; Guimarães, Catarina A; Montenegro, Maria Augusta; Neri, Marina L; Guerreiro, Marilisa M

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to clarify the correlation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with epilepsy and behavior problems. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty children with idiopathic epilepsy were interviewed using the MTA-SNAP IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and Conners' Rating Scales. We used the chi-square test to analyze the correlation of epilepsy variables in patients with and without ADHD with a significance level of 0.05. Eight patients had ADHD symptoms (13%), seven had the inattentive ADHD subtype and only three had behavioral problems. When epileptic patients with and without ADHD symptoms were compared we found no significant difference in regard to epilepsy variables. All patients were controlled and 43% were either without AED or undergoing withdrawal. Our study revealed a low comorbidity of ADHD symptoms and epilepsy due to low interference of seizures and drug treatment on the comorbid condition.

  2. Cognitive function of idiopathic childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    You, Su Jeong

    2012-05-01

    Most children with epilepsy are of normal intelligence. However, a significant subset will have temporary or permanent cognitive impairment. Factors that affect cognitive function are myriad and include the underlying neuropathology of the epilepsy, seizures, epileptiform discharges, psychosocial problems, age at seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, and side effects associated with antiepileptic drugs. This review article discusses cognitive function in children with idiopathic epilepsy and the effects of antiepileptic drugs on cognitive function in children.

  3. Idiopathic focal epilepsies: the "lost tribe".

    PubMed

    Pal, Deb K; Ferrie, Colin; Addis, Laura; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Caraballo, Roberto; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Fejerman, Natalio; Guerrini, Renzo; Hamandi, Khalid; Helbig, Ingo; Ioannides, Andreas A; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Lal, Dennis; Lesca, Gaetan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Neubauer, Bernd A; Pisano, Tiziana; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Shibata, Takashi; Smith, Anna; Striano, Pasquale; Strug, Lisa J; Szepetowski, Pierre; Valeta, Thalia; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2016-09-01

    The term idiopathic focal epilepsies of childhood (IFE) is not formally recognised by the ILAE in its 2010 revision (Berg et al., 2010), nor are its members and boundaries precisely delineated. The IFEs are amongst the most commonly encountered epilepsy syndromes affecting children. They are fascinating disorders that hold many "treats" for both clinicians and researchers. For example, the IFEs pose many of the most interesting questions central to epileptology: how are functional brain networks involved in the manifestation of epilepsy? What are the shared mechanisms of comorbidity between epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders? How do focal EEG discharges impact cognitive functioning? What explains the age-related expression of these syndromes? Why are EEG discharges and seizures so tightly locked to slow-wave sleep? In the last few decades, the clinical symptomatology and the respective courses of many IFEs have been described, although they are still not widely appreciated beyond the specialist community. Most neurologists would recognise the core syndromes of IFE to comprise: benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes or Rolandic epilepsy (BECTS/RE); Panayiotopoulos syndrome; and the idiopathic occipital epilepsies (Gastaut and photosensitive types). The Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the related (idiopathic) epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves in sleep (CSWS or ESES) are also often included, both as a consequence of the shared morphology of the interictal discharges and their potential evolution from core syndromes, for example, CSWS from BECTS. Atypical benign focal epilepsy of childhood also has shared electro-clinical features warranting inclusion. In addition, a number of less well-defined syndromes of IFE have been proposed, including benign childhood seizures with affective symptoms, benign childhood epilepsy with parietal spikes, benign childhood seizures with frontal or midline spikes, and benign focal seizures of adolescence. The

  4. Zonisamide monotherapy for idiopathic epilepsy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Y; Hwang, C Y; Chae, J S; Ahn, J O; Kim, T H; Seo, K W; Lee, S Y; Youn, H Y

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of zonisamide as a monotherapy in dogs with idiopathic epileptic seizure. The experiment was conducted on 10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that were treated at the Seoul National University Hospital for Animals. A diagnosis was conducted based on physical and neurologic examination, complete blood count and chemical analysis, magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. Idiopathic epilepsy was diagnosed when all of these examinations were normal. Oral zonisamide was administrated to 10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy at 5-15 mg/kg per os every 12 h to achieve a concentration of zonisamide in serum of 10-40 μg/mL. The frequency of seizures before and after the administration of zonisamide therapy was recorded and the concentrations of zonisamide in serum were measured. Six (60%) of the dogs were favourable responders to treatment, showing a ≥50% reduction in monthly frequency of seizures. Of the remaining four, two dogs did not show a reduction and the other two showed an increase in frequency of seizures. The mean dosage of zonisamide for favourable responders was 7.92 (SD 3.79) mg/kg, which was administered orally twice a day. Only one dog, which was one of the unfavourable responders in the whole study, experienced mild side effects. Among the dogs treated with oral zonisamide, 60% responded favourably. The effect of zonisamide as an anticonvulsant drug was demonstrated in this study. Based on these results, zonisamide monotherapy is effective in some dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

  5. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Sometimes doctors can find out what is causing pulmonary fibrosis (lung scarring). For example, exposure to environmental pollutants ...

  6. Focal seizure symptoms in idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Udaya; Woo, Jia J; Boston, Ray C; Cook, Mark; D'Souza, Wendyl

    2015-08-18

    We sought to study the frequency and prognostic value of focal seizure symptoms (FSS) in idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE) using a validated tool: Epilepsy Diagnostic Interview Questionnaire and Partial Seizure Symptom Definitions. Participants with IGE were recruited from epilepsy clinics at 2 tertiary hospitals. The diagnosis was validated and classified into syndromes according to the International League Against Epilepsy criteria by 2 epileptologists independently with discordance resolved by consensus. The Epilepsy Diagnostic Interview Questionnaire utilizes both open- and closed-ended questions to elicit FSS in association with generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonus, and absences. The elicited FSS were classified according to the Partial Seizure Symptom Definitions. Regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between the duration of seizure freedom and FSS. A total of 135 patients were studied, of whom 70 (51.9%) reported FSS. Those symptoms occurred in association with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (53.1%) as well as myoclonus and absences (58%). FSS were reported with similar frequency in juvenile absence epilepsy (62.5%) and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (60%), and with a lesser frequency in generalized epilepsy with tonic-clonic seizures only (39.5%) and childhood absence epilepsy (33.3%). A strong relationship between FSS and duration of seizure freedom was found (regression coefficient -0.665, p = 0.037). FSS are frequently reported by patients with IGE. A shorter duration of seizure freedom is associated with FSS. Recognition of the presence of FSS in IGE is important to avoid misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis as well as to choose appropriate antiepileptic drug therapy. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Gastaut type idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Macedo, Eugenia Fialho; Costa Neves, Rafael Scarpa; Costa, Lívia Vianez; Tudesco, Ivanda S S; Carvalho, Kelly C; Carrete, Henrique; Caboclo, Luis Otavio; Yacubian, Elza Marcia; Hamad, Ana Paula

    2013-03-01

    Gastaut type idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy is an uncommon epileptic syndrome characterised by frequent seizures, most commonly presenting as elementary visual hallucinations or blindness. Other occipital (non-visual) symptoms may also occur. Interictal EEG typically shows occipital paroxysms, often with fixation-off sensitivity. Ictal EEG is usually characterised by interruption by paroxysms and sudden appearance of low-voltage, occipital, fast rhythm and/or spikes. Despite well described clinical and EEG patterns, to our knowledge, there are very few reports in the literature with video-EEG recording of either seizure semiology or fixation-off phenomena. We present a video-EEG recording of a 12-year-old girl with Gastaut type epilepsy, illustrating the interictal and ictal aspects of this syndrome. Our aim was to demonstrate the clinical and neurophysiological pattern of a typical seizure of Gastaut type epilepsy, as well as the fixation-off phenomena, in order to further clarify the typical presentation of this syndrome. [Published with video sequences].

  8. [Effects of temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy on cognitive function and emotion in children].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Long, Li-Li; Xiao, Bo

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy on cognitive function and emotion in children and the risk factors for cognitive impairment. A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 38 children with temporal lobe epilepsy and 40 children with idiopathic epilepsy. The controls were 42 healthy children. All subjects received the following neuropsychological tests: Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scale, verbal fluency test, digit span test, block design test, Social Anxiety Scale for Children (SASC), and Depression Self-rating Scale for Children (DSRSC). Compared with the control group, the temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy groups showed significantly lower scores of MoCA, verbal fluency, digit span, and block design (P<0.05) and significantly higher scores on SASC and DSRSC (P<0.05). Compared with the idiopathic epilepsy group, the temporal lobe epilepsy group showed significantly lower scores of MoCA, verbal fluency, digit span, and block design (P<0.05) and significantly higher scores on SASC and DSRSC (P<0.05). In the temporal lobe epilepsy group, MoCA score was negatively correlated with SASC score, DSRSC score, and seizure frequency (r=-0.571, -0.529, and -0.545 respectively; P<0.01). In the idiopathic epilepsy group, MoCA score was also negatively correlated with SASC score, DSRSC score, and seizure frequency (r=-0.542, -0.487, and -0.555 respectively; P<0.01). Children with temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy show impaired whole cognition, verbal fluency, memory, and executive function and have anxiety and depression, which are more significant in children with temporal lobe epilepsy. High levels of anxiety, depression, and seizure frequency are risk factors for impaired cognitive function.

  9. Do Helminths cause Epilepsy?

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Ryan G; Newton, Charles R

    2012-01-01

    Both helminthiases and epilepsy occur globally, and are particularly prevalent in developing regions of the world. Studies have suggested an association between epilepsy and helminth infection, but a causal relationship is not established in many helminths, except perhaps with neurocysticercosis. We review the available literature on the global burden of helminths, and the epidemiological evidence linking helminths to epilepsy. We discuss possible routes that helminths affect the central nervous system of humans and the immunological response to helminth infection in the central nervous system, looking at possible mechanisms of epileptogenesis. Finally, we discuss the current gaps in knowledge about the interaction between helminths and epilepsy. PMID:19825109

  10. Impaired object identification in idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Brancati, Claudia; Barba, Carmen; Metitieri, Tiziana; Melani, Federico; Pellacani, Simona; Viggiano, Maria Pia; Guerrini, Renzo

    2012-04-01

    To investigate whether children with epilepsy primarily affecting the occipital cortex exhibit impairment of visual object identification and to what extent such a hypothesized dysfunction is related to an interfering functional, rather than structural, process. We studied nine children with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy (ICOE) and compared them to eight children with lesional posterior cortex epilepsy (PCEs) and to 60 age-matched controls. We applied an "ascendent" paradigm of object identification, using a coarse-to-fine order procedure, which gradually integrated spatial frequency information from the most blurred image to the complete figure. In children with ICOE, we explored how epilepsy-related variables might be related to object identification task. Children with ICOE and those with PCEs needed more physical information than controls to identify visual stimuli. There was a decreasing accuracy from controls to children with ICOE and from children with ICOE to those with PCEs. Children with ICOE demonstrated slight selective impairment in visuospatial processing and those among them having experienced a higher number of seizures or in whom interictal electroencephalography (EEG) discharges had been present for a longer time, required a higher level of physical information to recognize objects. The observation that children with ICOE performed worse than controls in object identification, although better than children with PCEs, might indicate that functional disruption caused by epileptiform EEG abnormalities and seizures, can interfere per se with perceptual processes, even in the absence of a lesion. This effect appears to be detected only by perceptual and cognitive screening. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Retrospective clinical comparison of idiopathic versus symptomatic epilepsy in 240 dogs with seizures.

    PubMed

    Pákozdy, Akos; Leschnik, Michael; Tichy, Alexander G; Thalhammer, Johann G

    2008-12-01

    In the present study, 240 cases of dogs with seizures were analysed retrospectively. The aim was to examine the underlying aetiology and to compare primary or idiopathic epilepsy (IE) with symptomatic epilepsy (SE) concerning signalment, history, ictal pattern, clinical and neurological findings. The diagnosis of symptomatic epilepsy was based on confirmed pathological changes in haematology, serum biochemistry, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and morphological changes of the brain by CT/MRI or histopathological examination. Seizure aetiologies were classified as idiopathic epilepsy (IE, n = 115) and symptomatic epilepsy (SE, n = 125). Symptomatic epilepsy was mainly caused by intracranial neoplasia (39) and encephalitis (23). The following variables showed significant difference between the IE and SE group: age, body weight, presence of partial seizures, cluster seizures, status epilepticus, ictal vocalisation and neurological deficits. In 48% of the cases, seizures were found to be due to IE, while 16% were due to intracranial neoplasia and 10% to encephalitis. Status epilepticus, cluster seizures, partial seizures, vocalisation during seizure and impaired neurological status were more readily seen with symptomatic epilepsy. If the first seizure occurred between one and five years of age or the seizures occurred during resting condition, the diagnosis was more likely IE than SE.

  12. Treatment with gabapentin of 11 dogs with refractory idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Platt, S R; Adams, V; Garosi, L S; Abramson, C J; Penderis, J; De Stefani, A; Matiasek, L

    Eleven dogs diagnosed with refractory idiopathic epilepsy were treated orally with gabapentin for a minimum of three months at an initial dose of 10 mg/kg every eight hours. They were all experiencing episodes of generalised tonic-clonic seizures and had been treated chronically with a combination of phenobarbital and potassium bromide at doses sufficient to reach acceptable therapeutic serum levels without causing significant side effects. In each dog, the number of seizures per week, the average duration of the seizures and the number of days on which seizures occurred were compared for the three months before and after they were treated with gabapentin. A minimum 50 per cent reduction in the number of seizures per week was interpreted as a positive response to gabapentin, and six of the dogs showed a positive response. After the addition of gabapentin, both the number of seizures per week (P= 0.005) and the number of days with any seizures in a one-week period (P=0.03) were significantly reduced. Mild side effects of ataxia and sedation were observed in five of the dogs, but they were not severe enough to warrant the treatment being discontinued during the trial.

  13. Behavior and social competency in idiopathic and cryptogenic childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Berg, Anne T; Vickrey, Barbara G; Testa, Francine M; Levy, Susan R; Shinnar, Shlomo; DiMario, Francis

    2007-07-01

    Behavioral and related disorders are frequently reported in association with childhood epilepsy but the reasons for this are unclear. In a long-term prospective, community-based study of newly-diagnosed childhood epilepsy, behavioral assessments (Child Behavior Checklist) were performed in children 8 to 9 years after the initial diagnosis of epilepsy to determine the impact of remission and medication status on behavioral problems. Children with epilepsy were also compared with sibling controls. A total of 226 children (108 females, 118 males; mean age 13y 1mo [SD 2y 8mo], range 8-17y) with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy were included in the analyses. One hundred and twenty-eight matched pairs were included in analyses of case-sibling differences. Lack of remission and current medication use were associated with worse behavioral problem and competency scores. Lack of remission generally had a greater effect than medication use, except for attention problems; medication status had the more deleterious effect (p<0.001). Children with epilepsy had significantly worse behavioral problems and competency scores relative to sibling controls. Even in paris in which the patient was seizure-free and off medication, significant case-sibling differences persisted for most scales (p=0.05 to p=0.001). Lack of remission and continued use of antiepileptic drugs have a negative influence on behavioral problems in children with epilepsy but do not fully explain the worse scores relative to siblings. This suggests an independent effect associated with the epilepsy itself.

  14. Ethnic variation of genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kheng Seang; Ng, Ching Ching; Chan, Chung Kin; Foo, Wee Shean; Low, Joyce Siew Yong; Tan, Chong Tin

    2017-02-01

    Ethnic variation in epilepsy classification was reported in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project. This study aimed to determine the ethnic variation in the prevalence of genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy (GGE) and GGE with family history in a multi-ethnic Asian population in Malaysia. In this cross-sectional study, 392 patients with a clinical diagnosis of GGE were recruited in the neurology outpatient clinic, University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), from January 2011 till April 2016. In our epilepsy cohort (n=2100), 18.7% were diagnosed to have GGE. Of those, 28.6% >(N=112) had family history of epilepsy with a mean age of seizure onset of 16.5 years old, and 42.0% had myoclonic seizures (N=47). The lifetime prevalence of epilepsy among first-degree relative of those with GGE and positive family history was 15.0%. Analysis according to ethnicity showed that Malaysian Chinese had the lowest percentage of GGE among those with epilepsy (12.3%), as compared with Indian and Malay (25.3% and 21.3%, p<0.001). In addition, 32.1% of these Indian patients with GGE had positive family history, which is more than the Malay (26.4%) and Chinese (27.5%) ethnic groups. Consanguineous marriage was noted in 5 Indian families with positive family history (9.6%). There was ethnic variation in the prevalence of GGE, whereby the Malaysian Chinese had the lowest percentage of GGE as compared with Indian and Malay. A substantial proportion of GGE had positive family history among the three ethnics groups. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut: report of 12 patients.

    PubMed

    Wakamoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Hideo; Fukuda, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Shohei; Motoki, Takahiro; Ohmori, Hiromitsu; Ishii, Eiichi

    2011-03-01

    This study sought to present clinical and outcome data of patients with idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut, to validate previously reported characteristics of this epilepsy. The study group was comprised of 12 affected children (three boys and nine girls), with a median age of onset at 10.3 years. Common ictal manifestations included elementary visual hallucinations (75.0%), blindness or blurring of vision (50.0%), headache (50.0%), and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures (58.3%). Interictal electroencephalography revealed occipital spike-wave paroxysms reactive to eye closure and opening in all patients, accompanied by spike-wave activity in the extra-occipital areas in four (33.3%), and by generalized spike-wave discharges in two (16.7%). One patient exhibited the onset of occipital lobe seizures 1 year after manifesting absence epilepsy. Seizure remission occurred in 81.8% of cases, in half of which medication was discontinued by late adolescence. This study confirmed the previously delineated electroclinical features of epilepsy syndrome, with additional aspects including the frequent association of generalized tonic-clonic seizures and atypical evolution from childhood absence epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Narcolepsy Type 1 and Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges in Dual Cases

    PubMed Central

    Baiardi, Simone; Vandi, Stefano; Pizza, Fabio; Alvisi, Lara; Toscani, Lucia; Zambrelli, Elena; Tinuper, Paolo; Mayer, Geert; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study is to describe the possible co-occurrence of narcolepsy type 1 and generalized epilepsy, focusing on diagnostic challenge and safety of dual treatments. Methods and Results: Four patients with comorbidity for narcolepsy type 1 and idiopathic generalized epilepsy are reported: in three cases the onset of epilepsy preceded narcolepsy type 1 appearance, whereas in one case epileptic spells onset was subsequent. Patients presented with absences, myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizure type: in the patient with tonic-clonic seizures the dual pathology was easily recognized, in the other cases the first diagnosis caused the comorbid disease to be overlooked, independent of the time-course sequence. All four patients underwent neurological examination, video-electroencephalogram during which ictal and interictal epileptic discharges were recorded, and sleep polysomnographic studies. Repeated sleep onset rapid eye movement periods (SOREMPs) were documented with the multiple sleep latency test (MLST) in all the four cases. All patients had unremarkable brain magnetic resonance imaging studies and cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 was assessed in two patients, revealing undetectable levels. The association of antiepileptic drugs and substances currently used to treat narcolepsy type 1, including sodium oxybate, was effective in improving seizures, sleep disturbance, and cataplexy. Conclusions: Narcolepsy type 1 may occur in association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, leading to remarkable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Electrophysiological studies as well as a comprehensive somnologic interview can help confirm the diagnosis in patients with ambiguous neurological history. Sodium oxybate in combination with antiepileptic drugs is safe and effective in treating cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness. Citation: Baiardi S, Vandi S, Pizza F, Alvisi L, Toscani L, Zambrelli E, Tinuper P, Mayer G, Plazzi G. Narcolepsy type 1 and

  17. Idiopathic photosensitive occipital epilepsy: clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) features.

    PubMed

    Politi-Elishkevich, Keren; Kivity, Sara; Shuper, Avinoam; Levine, Hagit; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa

    2014-03-01

    Idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy is a reflex, age- and localization-related syndrome. We describe the clinical and electroencephalographic features, therapy, and outcome of 16 children/adolescents with this syndrome. The cohort included 2 sets of siblings and 7 patients with other first- or second-degree relatives with a seizure history. All patients had occipital onset seizures and 15 had secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Seizure frequency was relatively low in all patients but one. Myoclonic seizures later developed in 2 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Eight patients achieved full seizure control with monotherapy, and 5 required a second drug; 3 patients had rare seizures and were not treated with antiepileptics. Seven patients required special education or developmental assistance. This interesting syndrome sheds light on the pathophysiology and genetic etiology of common phenomena such as photosensitivity and headache. Further large prospective studies are required to better define this unique syndrome and its implications.

  18. Obesity and its association with generalised epilepsy, idiopathic syndrome, and family history of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ladino, Lady D; Hernández-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2014-09-01

    Aim. Previous studies support the concept that obesity is a common comorbid condition in patients with epilepsy (PWE). In this study, we present the body mass index (BMI) and data from a survey to assess physical activity in a sample of PWE from an epilepsy clinic. Methods. Between June of 2011 and January of 2013, 100 PWE from an adult epilepsy clinic were included. We obtained BMI, waist circumference, and information regarding physical activity using a standardised questionnaire. Clinical, demographic, electrographic, and imaging parameters were collected from charts. Results. Mean age of patients was 40 ± 14 (18-77) years. The BMI distribution was as follows: 2 patients (2%) underweight, 26 (26%) normal weight, 34 (34%) overweight, 25 (25%) obese, and 13 (13%) with morbid obesity. In our study, obesity was defined as having a BMI ≥ 30. We found 38 (38%) patients in this range. There was no difference in the rate of drug-resistant epilepsy between obese and non-obese patients (55 vs. 55%; p=0.05). Leisure time habit was reported in 82% of obese patients and 79% of patients without obesity. Overall, the most frequent activity was walking (70%). Factors associated with obesity were generalised epilepsy (OR: 2.7, 1.1-6.6; p=0.012), idiopathic syndrome (OR: 2.7, 1.04-7; p=0.018), and family history of epilepsy (OR: 6.1, 1.5-24.2; p=0.002). Conclusion. Our study suggests an association between obesity, idiopathic generalised epilepsy, and family history of epilepsy. Our study shows that PWE are physically active and there is no clear relation between exercise and obesity. We could not identify any association between drug-resistant epilepsy and obesity. Absence of direct comparison with a control non-epileptic population; a cross-sectional design not allowing evaluation of a causal association among variables; and reliance on self-reported physical activity are to be considered as limitations of the present study.

  19. Choice of Antiepileptic Drugs in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: UAE Experience.

    PubMed

    Alsaadi, Taoufik; Taha, Haytham; Al Hammadi, Fatema

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the electroencephalogram (EEG) reports of patients at our EEG lab from the years 2005-2010 to identify patients referred from the epilepsy clinic, with a confirmed diagnosis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) by EEG criteria. We sought to report our experience in UAE of how often patients with IGE are placed on nonspecific antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) before being evaluated at an epilepsy referral clinic. 109 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of IGE based on EEG criteria were identified. When initially seen, 32.11% were taking a broad-spectrum (specific) AED only, 25.69% were taking a narrow-spectrum (nonspecific) AED, and 15.59% were placed on various combinations. Of the total patients who were receiving nonspecific AEDs, 35.71% were seizure-free and 64.28% were poorly controlled accounting for "pseudointractability status." When converted to broad-spectrum (specific) AEDs, 50% became well controlled. Furthermore, 26.6% of patients, who were previously on no AED prior to the clinic visit, became well controlled once placed on specific AED.

  20. Prevalence and characteristics of visual aura in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gungor-Tuncer, Ozlem; Baykan, Betul; Altindag, Ebru; Bebek, Nerses; Gurses, Candan; Gokyigit, Aysen

    2012-12-01

    Some patients with idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE) experience visual aura, which can confuse the diagnosis. We sought to determine the frequency and characteristics of visual auras in IGE patients. Among the 176 IGE patients, 4 men and 7 women reported visual auras (mean age - 24 years). Syndromic diagnoses were juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in four, eyelid myoclonia with absences (EMA) in three, juvenile absence epilepsy in three, and other in one. Visual auras consisted of flashing lights, macropsia, illusional movements, and blindness. Eyelid myoclonia with absences was significantly more common in the group with visual aura (3 of 11 patients vs. 8 of 165 IGE patients; P=0.02). Furthermore, photosensitivity was found significantly more common in IGE patients with visual aura (90% vs 46% of the total IGE patients) (P=0.004). In conclusion, the visual auras do not exclude a diagnosis of IGE. The presence of visual aura in the EMA syndrome is also remarkable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitamin D Deficiency in Children With Newly Diagnosed Idiopathic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Donmez, Ahsen; Namuslu, Mehmet; Canbal, Metin; Orun, Emel

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have shown a link between vitamin D deficiency and epilepsy. This study includes 60 newly diagnosed idiopathic epilepsy patients and 101 healthy controls (between the ages of 5 and 16). Each group was also divided into two subgroups according to seasonal changes in terms of months of longer versus shorter daylight. We retrospectively evaluated the levels of calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, and 25-OH vitamin-D3 in the study participants. Levels below 20 ng/ml were defined as vitamin D deficiency and levels of 20-30 ng/ml as insufficiency. There were no significant differences in age, gender distribution and levels of calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and parathyroid hormone between the groups. The level of 25-OH vitamin-D3 in the patient group was significantly lower when compared to the control group (p < 0.05) (14.07 ± 8.12 and 23.38 ± 12.80 ng/ml, respectively). This difference also held true when evaluation was made according to seasonal evaluation (12.38 ± 6.53 and 17.64 ± 1.14 in shorter daylight and 18.71 ± 9.87 and 30.82 ± 1.04 in longer daylight). © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Narcolepsy Type 1 and Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges in Dual Cases.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, Simone; Vandi, Stefano; Pizza, Fabio; Alvisi, Lara; Toscani, Lucia; Zambrelli, Elena; Tinuper, Paolo; Mayer, Geert; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to describe the possible co-occurrence of narcolepsy type 1 and generalized epilepsy, focusing on diagnostic challenge and safety of dual treatments. Four patients with comorbidity for narcolepsy type 1 and idiopathic generalized epilepsy are reported: in three cases the onset of epilepsy preceded narcolepsy type 1 appearance, whereas in one case epileptic spells onset was subsequent. Patients presented with absences, myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizure type: in the patient with tonic-clonic seizures the dual pathology was easily recognized, in the other cases the first diagnosis caused the comorbid disease to be overlooked, independent of the time-course sequence. All four patients underwent neurological examination, video-electroencephalogram during which ictal and interictal epileptic discharges were recorded, and sleep polysomnographic studies. Repeated sleep onset rapid eye movement periods (SOREMPs) were documented with the multiple sleep latency test (MLST) in all the four cases. All patients had unremarkable brain magnetic resonance imaging studies and cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 was assessed in two patients, revealing undetectable levels. The association of antiepileptic drugs and substances currently used to treat narcolepsy type 1, including sodium oxybate, was effective in improving seizures, sleep disturbance, and cataplexy. Narcolepsy type 1 may occur in association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, leading to remarkable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Electrophysiological studies as well as a comprehensive somnologic interview can help confirm the diagnosis in patients with ambiguous neurological history. Sodium oxybate in combination with antiepileptic drugs is safe and effective in treating cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  3. Auditory verbal memory and psychosocial symptoms are related in children with idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Yael; Ben Zeev, Bruria; Cohen, Roni; Shuper, Avinoam; Geva, Ronny

    2015-07-01

    Idiopathic epilepsies are considered to have relatively good prognoses and normal or near normal developmental outcomes. Nevertheless, accumulating studies demonstrate memory and psychosocial deficits in this population, and the prevalence, severity and relationships between these domains are still not well defined. We aimed to assess memory, psychosocial function, and the relationships between these two domains among children with idiopathic epilepsy syndromes using an extended neuropsychological battery and psychosocial questionnaires. Cognitive abilities, neuropsychological performance, and socioemotional behavior of 33 early adolescent children, diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy, ages 9-14years, were assessed and compared with 27 age- and education-matched healthy controls. Compared to controls, patients with stabilized idiopathic epilepsy exhibited higher risks for short-term memory deficits (auditory verbal and visual) (p<0.0001), working memory deficits (p<0.003), auditory verbal long-term memory deficits (p<0.0021), and more frequent psychosocial symptoms (p<0.0001). The severity of auditory verbal memory deficits was related to severity of psychosocial symptoms among the children with epilepsy but not in the healthy controls. Results suggest that deficient auditory verbal memory may be compromising psychosocial functioning in children with idiopathic epilepsy, possibly underscoring that cognitive variables, such as auditory verbal memory, should be assessed and treated in this population to prevent secondary symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Early prediction of medication refractoriness in children with idiopathic epilepsy based on scalp EEG analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Ouyang, Chen-Sen; Chiang, Ching-Tai; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Wu, Rong-Ching; Wu, Hui-Chuan

    2014-11-01

    Refractory epilepsy often has deleterious effects on an individual's health and quality of life. Early identification of patients whose seizures are refractory to antiepileptic drugs is important in considering the use of alternative treatments. Although idiopathic epilepsy is regarded as having a significantly lower risk factor of developing refractory epilepsy, still a subset of patients with idiopathic epilepsy might be refractory to medical treatment. In this study, we developed an effective method to predict the refractoriness of idiopathic epilepsy. Sixteen EEG segments from 12 well-controlled patients and 14 EEG segments from 11 refractory patients were analyzed at the time of first EEG recordings before antiepileptic drug treatment. Ten crucial EEG feature descriptors were selected for classification. Three of 10 were related to decorrelation time, and four of 10 were related to relative power of delta/gamma. There were significantly higher values in these seven feature descriptors in the well-controlled group as compared to the refractory group. On the contrary, the remaining three feature descriptors related to spectral edge frequency, kurtosis, and energy of wavelet coefficients demonstrated significantly lower values in the well-controlled group as compared to the refractory group. The analyses yielded a weighted precision rate of 94.2%, and a 93.3% recall rate. Therefore, the developed method is a useful tool in identifying the possibility of developing refractory epilepsy in patients with idiopathic epilepsy.

  5. Risk factors for cluster seizures in canine idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Packer, Rowena M A; Shihab, Nadia K; Torres, Bruno B J; Volk, Holger A

    2016-04-01

    Cluster seizures (CS), two or more seizures within a 24-hour period, are reported in 38-77% of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE). Negative outcomes associated with CS include a reduced likelihood of achieving seizure freedom, decreased survival time and increased likelihood of euthanasia. Previous studies have found factors including breed, sex and neuter status are associated with CS in dogs with IE; however, only one UK study in a multi-breed study of CS in IE patients exists to the author's knowledge, and thus further data is required to confirm these results. Data from 384 dogs treated at a multi-breed canine specific epilepsy clinic were retrospectively collected from electronic patient records. 384 dogs were included in the study, of which nearly half had a history of CS (49.1%). Dogs with a history of CS had a younger age at onset than those without (p = 0.033). In a multivariate model, three variables predicted risk of CS: a history of status epilepticus (p = 0.047), age at seizure onset (p = 0.066) and breed (German Shepherd Dog) (p < 0.001). Dogs with a history of status epilepticus and dogs with an older age at seizure onset were less likely to be affected by cluster seizures. German Shepherd Dogs (71% experiencing CS) were significantly more likely to suffer from CS compared to Labrador Retrievers (25%) (p < 0.001). There was no association between sex, neuter status, body size and CS. Further studies into the pathophysiology and genetics of CS are required to further understand this phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Autobiographical memory in children with Idiopathic Generalised Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gascoigne, Michael B; Barton, Belinda; Webster, Richard; Gill, Deepak; Lah, Suncica

    2015-01-01

    Autobiographical memory involves the recall of both personal facts (semantic memory) and the re-experiencing of past personal events (episodic memory). The recall of autobiographical episodic details has been associated with a specific network, which involves the prefrontal and medial temporal lobes, in addition to posterior regions of the brain. Seizure activity has been previously shown to disrupt the consolidation of newly-learned information into long-term memory, but it is not yet known whether primary generalised seizures alone are also associated with deficits in the recall of autobiographical memories. Here we examined this recall in children who experience generalised rather than localisation-related seizures: children with Idiopathic Generalised Epilepsy (IGE). In this study, 18 children with IGE and 42 healthy controls of comparable age (6-16 years), sex and socio-economic status were administered the Children's Autobiographical Interview (CAI). Compared with controls, children with IGE recalled significantly fewer episodic details, even when retrieval prompts were provided. In contrast, no group difference was found for the recall of semantic autobiographic details. Within the IGE group, hierarchical regression analyses showed that patient age and earlier age of diagnosis were significantly related to the recall of episodic autobiographical details over different conditions of the CAI, explaining up to 37% of variance. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence of autobiographical episodic memory deficits in patients with primary generalised seizures. As no evidence of localisation-related epilepsy is apparent in patients with IGE, our findings suggest that generalised seizures alone, especially when developed at an early age, could compromise memories for personally-experienced events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Towards identification of an epilepsy gene in a large family with idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Roussear, M.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Berkovic, S.F.

    1994-09-01

    To identify the disease gene in a large, multiplex family segregating an autosomal dominant form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). The IGEs have been recognized for several decades as being genetically determined. However, large pedigrees with a clear Mendelian inheritance are not commonly available. This, and the presence of locus heterogeneity have been obstacles to the identification of linkage in several IGE syndromes. We have identified a large IGE kindred with fifty-eight living individuals, including 26 affecteds, showing a clear autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Forty-fur informative individuals, including 23 affecteds, were selected for the linkage studies. We have chosen 200 polymorphic microsatellite markers, about 20 cM apart, throughout the human autosomes as a genome-search linkage strategy. To date, 47 markers, representing 30% of the human genome, have been excluded for linkage in the Australian kindred. As our study progresses, we will report up-to-date results.

  8. Levetiracetam in the treatment of idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice in 1999, levetiracetam, the S enantiomer of piracetam, has rapidly found a secure place, initially in the therapy of partial onset seizures and subsequently in the treatment of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). It has many of the properties of an "ideal" antiepileptic drug, including rapid absorption, linear pharmokinetics, and sparse drug interactions. Tolerabiliy is generally excellent in both adults and children, although tiredness is a common dose-limiting adverse effect. Occasionally the drug can precipitate behavioral abnormalities, especially in patients with learning disability. There is a wide safety margin in overdose. In common with most antiepileptic drugs its mode of action remains uncertain. Levetiracetam binds to a specific site in the brain, influences intracellular calcium currents and reverses negative allosteric modulators of GABA- and glycine-gated currents in vitro. Its effectiveness has been demonstrated in animal models of epilepsy and in clinical trials of partial onset and IGE. Treatment of IGEs may be straightforward, with many patients demonstrating an excellent and robust response to valproate monotherapy. However, there remains a significant minority of patients for whom valproate is unsuitable, including those who experience unacceptable adverse effects (e.g., weight gain or hair loss) and women of childbearing age in whom the teratogenic potential of valproate is unacceptable. Therapeutic response to lamotrigine in this group is often disappointing, and many clinicians now are turning to the choice of levetiracetam. Efficacy in generalized tonic-clonic seizures and myoclonus is usually apparent and some patients experience improvement in typical absences. Experience of combinations of levetiracetam with other antiepileptic drugs is limited in IGE and the responses are largely anecdotal. In our hands, patients with refractory IGEs may respond to combinations of levetiracetam with

  9. Role of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes in juvenile idiopathic epilepsy in Arabian foals.

    PubMed

    Lichter-Peled, Anat; Polani, Sagi; Stanyon, Roscoe; Rocchi, Mariano; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila

    2013-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic epilepsy (JIE) in Arabian foals resembles benign-familial neonatal convulsion (BFNC) syndrome, a rare idiopathic epilepsy of new-born humans. BFNC syndrome exhibits genetic heterogeneity, as has been hypothesised to occur in Arabian foals, and is known to be caused by mutations in the voltage-gated potassium channel subunit KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes. The close phenotypic characteristics of both Arabian foals and children suggest these epileptic syndromes are caused by the same genetic disorder. In horses, the KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes are located on the terminal region of chromosomes 22 and 9, respectively, essentially homologous to their location on chromosomes 20q13.3 and 8q24 in humans. Gene trees for the KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes between horses and other mammals, particularly humans and mice, were constructed and compared to widely accepted mammalian phylogenetic trees. The KCNQ2 gene tree exhibited close clustering between horses and humans, relative to horses and mice, in contrast to the evolutionary trees of other mammals. Distance values between the horse and human groups were lower as opposed to those found between the horse and mouse groups. The similarity between the horse and the human, especially for the KCNQ2 gene, where the majority of mutations causing BFNC have been found, supports the hypothesis of similar heritable and genetic patterns of the disease in both species and suggests that contrary to the classic mouse-model concept, humans may be a more suitable model for the study of JIE in Arabian foals.

  10. Epilepsy in Qatar: Causes, treatment, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Naim; Melikyan, Gayane; Al Hail, Hassan; Al Jurdi, Ayman; Aqeel, Faten; Elzafarany, Abdullah; Abuhadra, Nour; Laswi, Mujahed; Alsamman, Yasser; Uthman, Basim; Deleu, Dirk; Mesraoua, Boulenouar; Alarcon, Gonzalo; Azar, Nabil; Streletz, Leopold; Mahfoud, Ziyad

    2016-10-01

    Qatar is a small country on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula. Its population is a unique mixture of native citizens and immigrants. We aimed to describe the features of epilepsy in Qatar as such information is virtually lacking from the current literature. We summarized information retrospectively collected from 468 patients with epilepsy seen through the national health system adult neurology clinic. Epilepsy was classified as focal in 65.5% of the cases and generalized in 23%. Common causes of epilepsy were as follows: stroke (9%), hippocampal sclerosis (7%), infections (6%), and trauma (6%). Sixty-six percent of patients were receiving a single antiepileptic drug, with levetiracetam being the most frequently prescribed drug (41% of subjects). When the patients were divided by geographical background, remote infections caused the epilepsy in 15% of Asian patients (with neurocysticercosis accounting for 10%) but only in 1% of Qatari and 3% of Middle East/North African subjects (with no reported neurocysticercosis) (p<0.001). Cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative etiologies were the most prominent in Qataris, accounting for 14% (p=0.005) and 4% (p=0.03) of cases, respectively. The choice of antiepileptic drugs varied also according to the regional background, but the seizure freedom rate did not, averaging at 54% on the last clinic visit. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed information about epilepsy in Qatar. The geographical origin of patients adds to the heterogeneity of this disorder. Neurocysticercosis should be in the etiological differential diagnosis of epilepsy in patients coming from Southeast Asian countries, despite the fact that it is not endemic to Qatar. The choice of antiepileptic drugs is influenced by the availability of individual agents in the patients' native countries but had no bearing on the final seizure outcome. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Gregory L.; Wechsler, Robert T.; Wang, Xue-Feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O'Brien, Terence J.; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Methods: In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel uptitrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated dose) and 13-week maintenance period. The primary endpoint was percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (titration plus maintenance vs baseline). The key secondary endpoint (primary endpoint for European Union registration) was 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (patients achieving ≥50% reduction in PGTC seizure frequency; maintenance vs baseline). Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored. Results: Of 164 randomized patients, 162 comprised the full analysis set (placebo, 81; perampanel, 81). Compared with placebo, perampanel conferred a greater median percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (−38.4% vs −76.5%; p < 0.0001) and greater 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (39.5% vs 64.2%; p = 0.0019). During maintenance, 12.3% of placebo-treated patients and 30.9% of perampanel-treated patients achieved PGTC seizure freedom. For the safety analysis (placebo, 82; perampanel, 81), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events with perampanel were dizziness (32.1%) and fatigue (14.8%). Conclusions: Adjunctive perampanel was well tolerated and improved control of drug-resistant PGTC seizures in patients with IGE. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that adjunctive perampanel reduces PGTC seizure frequency, compared with placebo, in patients with drug-resistant PGTC seizures in IGE. PMID:26296511

  12. Myoclonus precipitated by oral suspension of oxcarbazepine in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Songqing; Luo, Rong; Mao, Meng; Huang, Liang

    2012-04-01

    Oxcarbazepine (OXC) is widely registered for the treatment of partial seizures and generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). Myoclonic seizures induced by OXC are uncommon. We report a child with idiopathic generalized epilepsy who developed myoclonic seizures and had an abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) when oral suspension of OXC was introduced. This study suggests that oral suspension of OXC can precipitate myoclonus.

  13. Idiopathic familial gingival fibromatosis associated with mental retardation, epilepsy and hypertrichosis.

    PubMed

    Anavi, Y; Lerman, P; Mintz, S; Kiviti, S

    1989-08-01

    Gingival fibromatosis, a rare but often familial condition, is described in two siblings, associated with mental retardation, epilepsy and hypertrichosis. In one child a maxillary giant-cell tumour was found and excised. It is important to distinguish idiopathic gingival fibromatosis from phenytoin-induced gingival hypertrophy.

  14. Exonic microdeletions of the gephyrin gene impair GABAergic synaptic inhibition in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dejanovic, Borislav; Lal, Dennis; Catarino, Claudia B; Arjune, Sita; Belaidi, Abdel A; Trucks, Holger; Vollmar, Christian; Surges, Rainer; Kunz, Wolfram S; Motameny, Susanne; Altmüller, Janine; Köhler, Anna; Neubauer, Bernd A; Epicure Consortium; Nürnberg, Peter; Noachtar, Soheyl; Schwarz, Günter; Sander, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Gephyrin is a postsynaptic scaffolding protein, essential for the clustering of glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs) at inhibitory synapses. An impairment of GABAergic synaptic inhibition represents a key pathway of epileptogenesis. Recently, exonic microdeletions in the gephyrin (GPHN) gene have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and epileptic seizures. Here we report the identification of novel exonic GPHN microdeletions in two patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), representing the most common group of genetically determined epilepsies. The identified GPHN microdeletions involve exons 5-9 (Δ5-9) and 2-3 (Δ2-3), both affecting the gephyrin G-domain. Molecular characterization of the GPHN Δ5-9 variant demonstrated that it perturbs the clustering of regular gephyrin at inhibitory synapses in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons in a dominant-negative manner, resulting in a significant loss of γ2-subunit containing GABAARs. GPHN Δ2-3 causes a frameshift resulting in a premature stop codon (p.V22Gfs*7) leading to haplo-insufficiency of the gene. Our results demonstrate that structural exonic microdeletions affecting the GPHN gene constitute a rare genetic risk factor for IGE and other neuropsychiatric disorders by an impairment of the GABAergic inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  15. Visual cortex hyperexcitability in idiopathic generalized epilepsies with photosensitivity: a TMS pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Francesco; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Nardone, Raffaele; Trinka, Eugen; Tezzon, Frediano; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2013-05-01

    The current understanding of the mechanisms underlying photosensitivity is still limited, although most studies point to a hyperexcitability of the visual cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation, we determined the resting motor threshold (rMT) and the phosphene threshold (PT) in 33 patients with IGEs (8 with photosensitivity) compared with 12 healthy controls. Eleven controls (92%) reported phosphenes compared with fifteen (46%) patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (p=0.015). Phosphenes were reported more frequently among patients with epilepsy with photosensitivity (87.5%) than in patients with active epilepsy without photosensitivity (30.8%) (p=0.038) and patients with epilepsy in remission without photosensitivity (33.3%) (p=0.054); no differences were found between patients with epilepsy with photosensitivity and controls (p=0.648). Resting motor threshold and phosphene threshold were significantly higher among patients with epilepsy (active epilepsy or epilepsy in remission without photosensitivity) compared to healthy controls (p<0.01). Conversely, patients with active epilepsy and photosensitivity had significantly lower values than controls (p=0.03). The marked decrease in PT and the high phosphene prevalence in patients with IGE with photosensitivity indicate a regional hyperexcitability of the primary visual cortex. Results of this study also suggest that the PT may serve as a biomarker for excitability in patients with IGE and photosensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters ... may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, ...

  17. Behavior and Social Competency in Idiopathic and Cryptogenic Childhood Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Anne T.; Vickrey, Barbara G.; Testa, Francine M.; Levy, Susan R.; Shinnar, Shlomo; DiMario, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Behavioral and related disorders are frequently reported in association with childhood epilepsy but the reasons for this are unclear. In a long-term prospective, community-based study of newly-diagnosed childhood epilepsy, behavioral assessments (Child Behavior Checklist) were performed in children 8 to 9 years after the initial diagnosis of…

  18. Behavior and Social Competency in Idiopathic and Cryptogenic Childhood Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Anne T.; Vickrey, Barbara G.; Testa, Francine M.; Levy, Susan R.; Shinnar, Shlomo; DiMario, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Behavioral and related disorders are frequently reported in association with childhood epilepsy but the reasons for this are unclear. In a long-term prospective, community-based study of newly-diagnosed childhood epilepsy, behavioral assessments (Child Behavior Checklist) were performed in children 8 to 9 years after the initial diagnosis of…

  19. mRNA Blood Expression Patterns In New Onset Idiopathic Pediatric Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Hansel M; Horn, Paul S; Holland, Katherine; Collins, James; Hershey, Andrew D; Glauser, Tracy A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Determine if blood mRNA expression patterns in children with newly diagnosed untreated idiopathic epilepsy are different than those in healthy controls. Determine the differential expression patterns between epilepsy subjects with generalized onset or partial onset seizures compared to healthy controls. Methods Whole blood was obtained from otherwise healthy pediatric subjects with newly diagnosed untreated idiopathic epilepsy along with healthy pediatric controls. mRNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix HGU 133 2.0+ microarrays. Analysis was performed using Genespring. Differentially expressed gene lists resulted from comparison of i) epilepsy and control groups and ii) seizure type subgroups with controls.. Tissue expression and gene ontology analysis was performed using DAVID. Key findings Thirty-seven epilepsy patients and 28 controls were included. Overall, 575 genes were differentially expressed in subjects with epilepsy compared to controls. The generalized seizure subgroup versus control (GvC) gene list and the partial seizure subgroup versus control (PvC) gene list were different (p < 0.05). Tissue expression analysis identified almost half of the genes in GvC and PvC as brain based. Functional group analysis identified several biologically relevant pathways. In GvC, these included mitochondria and lymphocyte activation. In PvC, apoptosis, inflammatory defense and cell motion pathways were identified. Significance A unique, biologically meaningful mRNA expression pattern is detectable in whole blood of pediatric subjects with new onset and untreated epilepsy. This analysis finds many similar pathways to those identified in brain studies examining lesional intractable epilepsy. Blood mRNA expression patterns show promise as a target for biomarker development in pediatric epilepsy. PMID:23167847

  20. Altered functional-structural coupling of large-scale brain networks in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Liao, Wei; Chen, Huafu; Mantini, Dante; Ding, Ju-Rong; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Zhengge; Yuan, Cuiping; Chen, Guanghui; Jiao, Qing; Lu, Guangming

    2011-10-01

    The human brain is a large-scale integrated network in the functional and structural domain. Graph theoretical analysis provides a novel framework for analysing such complex networks. While previous neuroimaging studies have uncovered abnormalities in several specific brain networks in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by tonic-clonic seizures, little is known about changes in whole-brain functional and structural connectivity networks. Regarding functional and structural connectivity, networks are intimately related and share common small-world topological features. We predict that patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy would exhibit a decoupling between functional and structural networks. In this study, 26 patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by tonic-clonic seizures and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal correlations and diffusion tensor image tractography were used to generate functional and structural connectivity networks. Graph theoretical analysis revealed that the patients lost optimal topological organization in both functional and structural connectivity networks. Moreover, the patients showed significant increases in nodal topological characteristics in several cortical and subcortical regions, including mesial frontal cortex, putamen, thalamus and amygdala relative to controls, supporting the hypothesis that regions playing important roles in the pathogenesis of epilepsy may display abnormal hub properties in network analysis. Relative to controls, patients showed further decreases in nodal topological characteristics in areas of the default mode network, such as the posterior cingulate gyrus and inferior temporal gyrus. Most importantly, the degree of coupling between functional and structural connectivity networks was decreased, and exhibited a negative correlation with epilepsy duration in patients. Our findings

  1. [Persistence of point-waves in the encephalogram (EEG) in idiopathic generalized epilepsy and therapeutic decisions].

    PubMed

    Pedespan, J M; Brissaud, O; Loiseau, P

    1998-07-01

    We reviewed the literature on the following issues in idiopathic generalized epilepsy, is there a correlation between the persistence of seizures and electroencephalographic anomalies? Do point-waves observed in well-controlled patients constitute a factor predicting relapse? Do changes in paroxysmal anomalies during the disease course mean poor prognosis? Actually, there is very little literature on these issues and some disagreement in those data which have been published. Documented studies have been conducted in search of factors predicting relapse at treatment withdrawal, but little has been published concerning the role of the EEG. Few studies specifically mention idiopathic generalized epilepsy. In terms of the syndrome studied, they concern heterogeneous groups of patients. Generally, it is accepted that the EEG helps predict clinical course in idiopathic generalized epilepsy as it does in other epilepsies, given the characteristic EEG signs. This is true in patients under treatment and after treatment withdrawal. Risk errors were not however reported. II would appear reasonable to assume that no one EEG anomaly is determinant outside the clinical context.

  2. Lymphoedema caused by idiopathic lymphatic thrombus.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hisako; Mihara, Makoto; Seki, Yukio; Koshima, Isao

    2013-12-01

    Primary lymphoedema includes some diseases whose genetic anomaly is detected and others whose pathology is unknown. In this article, we report a lymphatic thrombus found in a limb with lymphoedema during lymphatico-venous anastomosis (LVA). A 32-year-old man was aware of oedema in his left calcar pedis 3 years previously, which appeared without any trigger. Indocyanine green lymphography indicated lymphatic stasis in the left calf and thigh region, and we performed LVA for the patient. During the operation, we found yellow vessels, which were thought to be lymphatic vessels filled with a yellow solid substance, just beneath the superficial fascia at the left ankle. Pathological examination of the thrombi revealed hyaline material mixed with cell components. The cells were categorised as lymphatic endothelial cells, as they were positive for podoplanin. There was no evidence of malignancy. Causes of idiopathic lymphatic thrombus such as this may be one of the causes of so-called primary lymphoedema, and evaluation of such cases may be the first step towards elucidating the mechanisms involved in the development of primary lymphoedema.

  3. [Epileptic seizures during childbirth in a patient with idiopathic generalised epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Voermans, N C; Zwarts, M J; Renier, W O; Bloem, B R

    2005-06-18

    During her first pregnancy, a 37-year-old woman with idiopathic generalised epilepsy that was adequately controlled with lamotrigine experienced a series of epileptic seizures following an elective caesarean section. The attacks were terminated with diazepam. The following day, she developed EEG-confirmed status epilepticus, for which midazolam was administered intravenously. No further attacks were observed and the patient was later discharged in good condition with a healthy newborn son. She remained on lamotrigine therapy. At the end of her second pregnancy, the patient again experienced tonic-clonic seizures. The dosage of lamotrigine was increased and the patient received clonazepam intravenously, but a new seizure quickly occurred. Following an emergency caesarean section with midazolam treatment, a healthy daughter was born. No further attacks were observed. This case history illustrates the occurrence of adult idiopathic generalised epilepsy and highlights the problems that can arise late in pregnancy and during childbirth.

  4. Evaluation of quality of life of carers of Italian spinoni with idiopathic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    De Risio, Luisa; Freeman, Julia; Shea, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The carers of all UK Kennel Club registered Italian spinoni (IS) born between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011 were invited to participate in the study. The carers of 47 of 63 IS diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) returned the questionnaire, which included numerous questions on various aspects of IE including the effect of IE on the dog's carer's quality of life. Median epileptic seizure number in the three months before study end or death was five epileptic seizures, 72 per cent of dogs had cluster seizures, 94 per cent of dogs were administered one or more antiepileptic medications and 36 per cent of dogs were euthanased due to poorly controlled IE. Seventy-one per cent and 65 per cent of the participants were moderately to extremely worried about the frequency and severity of their dog's epileptic seizures, respectively. Caring for an IS with IE caused conflict with the carer's work, education or daily activity often or very often in 50 per cent of the participants. Overall the limitations on the carer's life due to caring for an IS with IE were considered as very to extremely bothersome in 29 per cent of the participants, a little to moderately bothersome in 40 per cent of the participants and not at all bothersome in 31 per cent of the participants. PMID:27403328

  5. Social cognition dysfunctions in patients with epilepsy: Evidence from patients with temporal lobe and idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Realmuto, Sabrina; Zummo, Leila; Cerami, Chiara; Agrò, Luigi; Dodich, Alessandra; Canessa, Nicola; Zizzo, Andrea; Fierro, Brigida; Daniele, Ornella

    2015-06-01

    Despite an extensive literature on cognitive impairments in focal and generalized epilepsy, only a few number of studies specifically explored social cognition disorders in epilepsy syndromes. The aim of our study was to investigate social cognition abilities in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Thirty-nine patients (21 patients with TLE and 18 patients with IGE) and 21 matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. All subjects underwent a basic neuropsychological battery plus two experimental tasks evaluating emotion recognition from facial expression (Ekman-60-Faces test, Ek-60F) and mental state attribution (Story-based Empathy Task, SET). In particular, the latter is a newly developed task that assesses the ability to infer others' intentions (i.e., intention attribution - IA) and emotions (i.e., emotion attribution - EA) compared with a control condition of physical causality (i.e., causal inferences - CI). Compared with HCs, patients with TLE showed significantly lower performances on both social cognition tasks. In particular, all SET subconditions as well as the recognition of negative emotions were significantly impaired in patients with TLE vs. HCs. On the contrary, patients with IGE showed impairments on anger recognition only without any deficit at the SET task. Emotion recognition deficits occur in patients with epilepsy, possibly because of a global disruption of a pathway involving frontal, temporal, and limbic regions. Impairments of mental state attribution specifically characterize the neuropsychological profile of patients with TLE in the context of the in-depth temporal dysfunction typical of such patients. Impairments of socioemotional processing have to be considered as part of the neuropsychological assessment in both TLE and IGE in view of a correct management and for future therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Behavioral changes in dogs associated with the development of idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shihab, Nadia; Bowen, Jon; Volk, Holger A

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate behavioral changes with the development of epilepsy in dogs, a species proposed as a naturally occurring animal model for human epilepsy. Owners of dogs diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy (n=80) completed a modified, previously-validated behavioral and seizure questionnaire. Principal axis factor analysis identified behavioral factors, the scores for which were compared before and after the development of epilepsy. Drug-naïve dogs showed an increase in the behavior factors Fear/Anxiety, Defensive Aggression, and Abnormal Perception. In dogs receiving antiepileptic medication, there were still increases in Fear/Anxiety and Abnormal Perception, but no longer in Defensive Aggression. Additional increases were observed in Abnormal Reactivity, Attachment Disorder, Demented Behavior, and Apathetic Behavior. Pharmacoresistant dogs had larger increases in Controlling Aggression, Abnormal Perception, and Demented Behavior than drug responders. Our data suggest that dogs, like humans and rodents, exhibit neurobehavioral comorbidities with the development of epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Developmental dyscalculia in children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsies in a Brazilian sample.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Ursula; Paixão Alves, Sandra Regina da; Guerreiro, Sabrina Mendonça; Machado da Costa, Célia Regina Carvalho; Souza Moreira, Fernanda de; Bandeira Lima, Andrea; Ferreira Tavares, Maria Rita; Souza Maia Filho, Heber

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic disorders of childhood which can threaten child development and mental health. Among cognitive disorders, dyscalculia is one of the most important. In this study, 39 children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy underwent clinical and neuropsychological assessment to determine the intellectual level, math skills, reading and writing performance and neuropsychological profile. It was observed that the mathematical ability was below schooling expectations in a higher frequency than expected. There were no significant differences in mathematical performance among groups divided by number of antiepileptic drugs used, duration of disease and types and frequency of seizures. There was a positive correlation with intelligence quotient and attentional and reading level. These results suggest the existence not only of dyscalculia, but the concurrence of attentional and reading problems for the poor mathematical performance in this population.

  8. Transient neuromyopathy after bromide intoxication in a dog with idiopathic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A seven-year old Australian Shepherd, suffering from idiopathic epilepsy under treatment with phenobarbitone and potassium bromide, was presented with generalised lower motor neuron signs. Electrophysiology and muscle-nerve biopsies revealed a neuromyopathy. The serum bromide concentration was increased more than two-fold above the upper reference value. Clinical signs disappeared after applying diuretics and reducing the potassium bromide dose rate. This is the first case report describing electrophysiological and histopathological findings associated with bromide induced lower motor neuron dysfunction in a dog. PMID:23216950

  9. Evaluation of creative thinking in children with idiopathic epilepsy (absence epilepsy).

    PubMed

    Di Filippo, T; Parisi, L; Roccella, M

    2012-02-01

    Creativity represents the silent character of human behaviour. In children with epilepsy, cognitive performance of has mainly been investigated under the assumption that the disorder represents a risk factor for the development of intellectual function. In subjects with different forms of epilepsy, neuropsychologic disorders have been detected even when cognitive-global functioning is unimpaired. The cognitive functions of subjects with epilepsy have been widely studied, but their creativity has been never evaluated to date. The aim of this study was to describe the development of creative thinking in a group of children with absence epilepsy. The test battery included: the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-revised (WISC-R) and the Goodenough Human Figure Drawing Test. Statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) showed a statistically significant difference (P <0.05) in test scores between two groups of subjects (children with epilesy vs control group), with higher scores for figure originality, figure fluidity and figure elaboration in the control group. There was a significant correlation (Spearman's rho) between verbal IQ and verbal fluidity and verbal flexibility subscale scores and between performance IQ and figure elaboration, between total IQ and verbal fluidity and verbal flexibility subscales (P <0.05; r >0.30). Low scores on the figure originality subscales seem to confirm the hypothesis that adverse psychodynamic and relational factors impoverish autonomy, flexibility and manipulator interests. The communication channels between subjects with epilepsy and their family members were affected by the disorder, as were the type of emotional dynamics and affective flux.

  10. Effects of a ketogenic diet on ADHD-like behavior in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Packer, Rowena M A; Law, Tsz Hong; Davies, Emma; Zanghi, Brian; Pan, Yuanlong; Volk, Holger A

    2016-02-01

    Epilepsy in humans and rodent models of epilepsy can be associated with behavioral comorbidities including an increased prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and seizure frequency have been successfully reduced in humans and rodents using a ketogenic diet (KD). The aims of this study were (i) to describe the behavioral profile of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) while on a standardized nonketogenic placebo diet, to determine whether ADHD-like behaviors are present, and (ii) to examine the effect of a ketogenic medium chain triglyceride diet (MCTD) on the behavioral profile of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) compared with the standardized placebo control diet, including ADHD-like behaviors. A 6-month prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover dietary trial comparing the effects of the MCTD with a standardized placebo diet on canine behavior was carried out. Dogs diagnosed with IE, with a seizure frequency of at least 3 seizures in the past 3months (n=21), were fed the MCTD or placebo diet for 3months and were then switched to the alternative diet for 3months. Owners completed a validated behavioral questionnaire to measure 11 defined behavioral factors at the end of each diet period to report their dogs' behavior, with three specific behaviors hypothesized to be related to ADHD: excitability, chasing, and trainability. The highest scoring behavioral factors in the placebo and MCTD periods were excitability (mean±SE: 1.910±0.127) and chasing (mean±SE: 1.824±0.210). A markedly lower trainability score (mean±SE: 0.437±0.125) than that of previously studied canine populations was observed. The MCTD resulted in a significant improvement in the ADHD-related behavioral factor chasing and a reduction in stranger-directed fear (p<0.05) compared with the placebo diet. The latter effect may be attributed to previously described anxiolytic effects of a KD. These

  11. Clinical course and seizure outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy: determinants of early and long-term prognosis.

    PubMed

    Dragoumi, Pinelopi; Tzetzi, Olga; Vargiami, Efthimia; Pavlou, Evangelos; Krikonis, Konstantinos; Kontopoulos, Eleftherios; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2013-12-18

    Idiopathic epilepsies and epileptic syndromes predominate childhood and adolescence epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical course and outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy and identify variables determining both early and long-term prognosis. We followed 303 children with newly diagnosed idiopathic epilepsy aged 1-14 years old, both prospectively and retrospectively. Outcome was defined at one, 2 and 4 years of follow-up, as well as at the end of the study period for all patients. Based on the data collected, patients were classified in four patterns of clinical course: "excellent", "improving", "relapsing" and "poor". Variables defined at intake and after the initial year of treatment were analyzed for their prognostic relevance towards the clinical course and outcome of the patients. The mean age at seizure onset was 6.7 years and the mean duration of follow-up was 8.3 years (range 2,0-22,0,SD 4,24). During the initial year of treatment, 70,3% of patients were seizure-free. The course of epilepsy was "excellent" in 53,1% of the subjects, "improving" in 22,8%, "relapsing" in 22,1% whereas only 6 children with idiopathic epilepsy (2%) had a "poor" clinical course exhibiting drug-resistance. After multivariate analysis, variables predictive of a poor initial response to therapy were early seizure onset, multiple seizure types and history of status epilepticus. At the end of follow-up, early response to treatment was of significant positive predictive value, while the presence of multiple seizure types and the history of migraine had a negative impact on prognosis. In the vast majority of children, the long-term prognosis of idiopathic epilepsy is favorable. More than half of the patients attain seizure freedom immediately and their clinical course is considered "excellent". About one fifth exhibit either an improving or a fluctuating course. Early seizure onset, multiple seizure types and status epilepticus are predictive of an

  12. Clinical course and seizure outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy: determinants of early and long-term prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic epilepsies and epileptic syndromes predominate childhood and adolescence epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical course and outcome of idiopathic childhood epilepsy and identify variables determining both early and long-term prognosis. Methods We followed 303 children with newly diagnosed idiopathic epilepsy aged 1–14 years old, both prospectively and retrospectively. Outcome was defined at one, 2 and 4 years of follow-up, as well as at the end of the study period for all patients. Based on the data collected, patients were classified in four patterns of clinical course: “excellent”, “improving”, “relapsing” and “poor”. Variables defined at intake and after the initial year of treatment were analyzed for their prognostic relevance towards the clinical course and outcome of the patients. Results The mean age at seizure onset was 6,7 years and the mean duration of follow-up was 8,3 years (range 2,0-22,0,SD 4,24). During the initial year of treatment, 70,3% of patients were seizure-free. The course of epilepsy was “excellent” in 53,1% of the subjects, “improving” in 22,8%, “relapsing” in 22,1% whereas only 6 children with idiopathic epilepsy (2%) had a “poor” clinical course exhibiting drug-resistance. After multivariate analysis, variables predictive of a poor initial response to therapy were early seizure onset, multiple seizure types and history of status epilepticus. At the end of follow-up, early response to treatment was of significant positive predictive value, while the presence of multiple seizure types and the history of migraine had a negative impact on prognosis. Conclusions In the vast majority of children, the long-term prognosis of idiopathic epilepsy is favorable. More than half of the patients attain seizure freedom immediately and their clinical course is considered “excellent”. About one fifth exhibit either an improving or a fluctuating course. Early

  13. Screening of GABRB3 in French-Canadian families with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Martin, Caroline; Poulin, Chantal; Gravel, Micheline; Carmant, Lionel; Cossette, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Mutations in the GABRB3 have been recently associated with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) in families from Honduras and Mexico. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of mutation in this gene in our cohort of families with CAE and other related idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) syndromes. We screened the open reading frame of GABRB3 in 183 French-Canadian individuals with IGE, including 88 with CAE. A total of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified,five of which are novel. The previously described P11S missense mutation was found in three affected and one unaffected individuals from a French-Canadian family. However, the P11S variant was also found in one of our 190 control individuals of French-Canadian origin, suggesting that this variant is rather a rare polymorphism in this population. Further screening of other IGE cohorts from various ethnic origins would help to confirm the association between this rare functional variant and epilepsy.

  14. EEG after sleep deprivation is a sensitive tool in the first diagnosis of idiopathic generalized but not focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Renzel, Roland; Baumann, Christian R; Poryazova, Rositsa

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an essential tool in the diagnosis of epilepsy. EEG after sleep deprivation might increase the likelihood of finding specific epileptiform abnormalities. However conflicting data exist concerning the sensitivity and specificity of this method. We aimed to evaluate the role of EEG after sleep deprivation in the first diagnosis of epilepsy. We analyzed retrospectively the medical histories of patients who underwent at least one unspecific standard EEG and a subsequent EEG after sleep deprivation during the time period from 2001 to 2014 at the University Hospital Zurich because of suspected epilepsy. Out of 237 patients who fulfilled all inclusion criteria, 69 were finally diagnosed with epilepsy. Seventeen of them showed interictal epileptiform patterns in EEGs after sleep deprivation, giving this method an overall sensitivity of 25%. Sensitivity of EEG after sleep deprivation was superior in patients with primary generalized epilepsies compared to patients with focal epilepsies (64% vs. 17%, p=0.0011). Overall EEG after sleep deprivation was not more sensitive than a subsequent repeated standard EEG in a subgroup of 55 patients (22% vs. 9%; p=0.065). After an unspecific standard EEG, EEG after sleep deprivation is a useful tool to increase diagnostic sensitivity in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy but not in those with focal epilepsy. This study provides further evidence about the usefulness of EEG after sleep deprivation as an additional diagnostic tool in epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Causes of neuropathy in patients referred as "idiopathic neuropathy".

    PubMed

    Farhad, Khosro; Traub, Rebecca; Ruzhansky, Katherine M; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    The etiology of neuropathy was idiopathic in 20%-30% of patients despite thorough investigation, based on results from the 1980s and 1990s. Since then, new etiologies have been recognized, and skin biopsy has been used to confirm small-fiber neuropathy. The authors reviewed the charts of 373 patients with idiopathic neuropathy who were referred to a neuropathy center between 2002 and 2012. Among the 284 eligible patients, 93 (32.7%) remained idiopathic. The most common cause was impaired glucose metabolism (72 patients, 25.3%), including diabetes in 26 and prediabetes in 46. Other etiologies were chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in 57 (20%) and monoclonal gammopathy in 20 (7%), as well as toxic, Sjögren disease, celiac disease, other immune-mediated diseases, vitamin B12 deficiency, amyloidosis, vitamin B1 and B6 deficiency, vasculitis, hypothyroidism, hereditary, Lyme disease, and anti-sulfatide antibody. The major causes of undiagnosed neuropathies were impaired glucose metabolism, CIDP, and monoclonal gammopathies. Despite thorough evaluation 32.7% remained idiopathic. Muscle Nerve 53: 856-861, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Pathophysiology of mitochondrial disease causing epilepsy and status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shamima

    2015-08-01

    Epilepsy is part of the clinical phenotype in nearly 40% of children with mitochondrial disease, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Energy depletion has been postulated as the cause of mitochondrial epilepsy, but if this were the case, then 100% of patients with mitochondrial disease would be expected to present with seizures. This review explores other potential disease mechanisms underlying mitochondrial epilepsy, including oxidative stress, impaired calcium homeostasis, immune dysfunction, and deficiency of vitamins, cofactors, reducing equivalents, and other metabolites. Different mechanisms are likely to predominate in different mitochondrial disorders, since mitochondrial function varies between neurons and astrocytes, between different types of neurons, and in different brain regions. Systematic studies in cell and animal models of mitochondrial disease are needed in order to develop effective therapies for mitochondrial epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidence-based treatment of idiopathic generalized epilepsies with new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bergey, Gregory K

    2005-01-01

    With the introduction of over ten new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) since 1993, the hope has been that at least some of these agents would be useful for not just partial seizures, but also for the primary generalized seizures of the idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). The development of evidence-based treatment guidelines in the IGE, however, faces a number of challenges, particularly after an antiepileptic drug (AED) receives approval for one indication. The majority of patients with IGE are controlled with first-line therapy if appropriately selected. Case reports or series typically appear with use in refractory patients, but these studies lack the rigor to allow formulation of guidelines. Still we are beginning to see some good class I and II data to support use of selected second-generation AEDs. It is postulated that lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV), topiramate (TPM), and zonisamide (ZSM) may have efficacy for a broad spectrum of seizure types including those of IGE. At the present time good class I and II evidence exists to support the use of LTG for typical absence, LEV for idiopathic myoclonic seizures, and TPM for primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures, even though only TPM has FDA approval for primary generalized seizures. This article examines the available rigorous evidence that can support these uses and also discusses some selected other reports that suggest a spectrum of efficacy for these new agents.

  18. Comparison of background EEG activity of different groups of patients with idiopathic epilepsy using Shannon spectral entropy and cluster-based permutation statistical testing

    PubMed Central

    Artieda, Julio; Iriarte, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic epilepsy is characterized by generalized seizures with no apparent cause. One of its main problems is the lack of biomarkers to monitor the evolution of patients. The only tools they can use are limited to inspecting the amount of seizures during previous periods of time and assessing the existence of interictal discharges. As a result, there is a need for improving the tools to assist the diagnosis and follow up of these patients. The goal of the present study is to compare and find a way to differentiate between two groups of patients suffering from idiopathic epilepsy, one group that could be followed-up by means of specific electroencephalographic (EEG) signatures (intercritical activity present), and another one that could not due to the absence of these markers. To do that, we analyzed the background EEG activity of each in the absence of seizures and epileptic intercritical activity. We used the Shannon spectral entropy (SSE) as a metric to discriminate between the two groups and performed permutation-based statistical tests to detect the set of frequencies that show significant differences. By constraining the spectral entropy estimation to the [6.25–12.89) Hz range, we detect statistical differences (at below 0.05 alpha-level) between both types of epileptic patients at all available recording channels. Interestingly, entropy values follow a trend that is inversely related to the elapsed time from the last seizure. Indeed, this trend shows asymptotical convergence to the SSE values measured in a group of healthy subjects, which present SSE values lower than any of the two groups of patients. All these results suggest that the SSE, measured in a specific range of frequencies, could serve to follow up the evolution of patients suffering from idiopathic epilepsy. Future studies remain to be conducted in order to assess the predictive value of this approach for the anticipation of seizures. PMID:28922360

  19. Comparison of background EEG activity of different groups of patients with idiopathic epilepsy using Shannon spectral entropy and cluster-based permutation statistical testing.

    PubMed

    Urigüen, Jose Antonio; García-Zapirain, Begoña; Artieda, Julio; Iriarte, Jorge; Valencia, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic epilepsy is characterized by generalized seizures with no apparent cause. One of its main problems is the lack of biomarkers to monitor the evolution of patients. The only tools they can use are limited to inspecting the amount of seizures during previous periods of time and assessing the existence of interictal discharges. As a result, there is a need for improving the tools to assist the diagnosis and follow up of these patients. The goal of the present study is to compare and find a way to differentiate between two groups of patients suffering from idiopathic epilepsy, one group that could be followed-up by means of specific electroencephalographic (EEG) signatures (intercritical activity present), and another one that could not due to the absence of these markers. To do that, we analyzed the background EEG activity of each in the absence of seizures and epileptic intercritical activity. We used the Shannon spectral entropy (SSE) as a metric to discriminate between the two groups and performed permutation-based statistical tests to detect the set of frequencies that show significant differences. By constraining the spectral entropy estimation to the [6.25-12.89) Hz range, we detect statistical differences (at below 0.05 alpha-level) between both types of epileptic patients at all available recording channels. Interestingly, entropy values follow a trend that is inversely related to the elapsed time from the last seizure. Indeed, this trend shows asymptotical convergence to the SSE values measured in a group of healthy subjects, which present SSE values lower than any of the two groups of patients. All these results suggest that the SSE, measured in a specific range of frequencies, could serve to follow up the evolution of patients suffering from idiopathic epilepsy. Future studies remain to be conducted in order to assess the predictive value of this approach for the anticipation of seizures.

  20. Long-Term Clinical and Electroencephalography (EEG) Consequences of Idiopathic Partial Epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Dörtcan, Nimet; Tekin Guveli, Betul; Dervent, Aysin

    2016-05-03

    BACKGROUND Idiopathic partial epilepsies of childhood (IPE) affect a considerable proportion of children. Three main electroclinical syndromes of IPE are the Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Centro-temporal Spikes (BECTS), Panayiotopoulos Syndrome (PS), and Childhood Epilepsy with Occipital Paroxysms (CEOP). In this study we investigated the long-term prognosis of patients with IPE and discussed the semiological and electroencephalography (EEG) data in terms of syndromic characteristics. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study included a group of consecutive patients with IPE who had been followed since 1990. Demographic and clinical variables were investigated. Patients were divided into 3 groups - A: Cases suitable for a single IPE (BECTS, PS and CEOP); B: cases with intermediate characteristics within IPEs; and C: cases with both IPE and IGE characteristics. Long-term data regarding the individual seizure types and EEG findings were re-evaluated. RESULTS A total of 61 patients were included in the study. Mean follow-up duration was 7.8 ± 4.50 years. The mean age at onset of seizures was 7.7 years. There were 40 patients in group A 40, 14 in group B, and 7 in group C. Seizure and EEG characteristics were also explored independently from the syndromic approach. Incidence of autonomic seizures is considerably high at 2-5 years and incidence of oromotor seizures is high at age 9-11 years. The EEG is most abnormal at 6-8 years. The vast majority (86%) of epileptic activity (EA) with parietooccipital is present at 2-5 years, whereas EA with fronto-temporal or multiple sites become more abundant between ages 6 and 11. CONCLUSIONS Results of the present study provide support for the age-related characteristics of the seizures and EEGs in IPE syndromes. Acknowledgement of those phenomena may improve the management of IPEs and give a better estimate of the future consequences.

  1. Clinical evaluation of a combination therapy of imepitoin with phenobarbital in dogs with refractory idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Neßler, Jasmin; Rundfeldt, Chris; Löscher, Wolfgang; Kostic, Draginja; Keefe, Thomas; Tipold, Andrea

    2017-01-25

    Imepitoin was tested as a combination treatment with phenobarbital in an open-label mono-centre cohort study in dogs with drug-resistant epilepsy. Diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy was based on clinical findings, magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Three cohorts were treated. In cohort A, dogs not responding to phenobarbital with or without established add-on treatment of potassium bromide or levetiracetam were treated add-on with imepitoin, starting at 10 mg/kg BID, with titration allowed to 30 mg/kg BID. In cohort B, the only difference to cohort A was that the starting dose of imepitoin was reduced to 5 mg/kg BID. In cohort C, animals not responding to imepitoin at >20 mg/kg BID were treated with phenobarbital add-on starting at 0.5 mg/kg BID. The add-on treatment resulted in a reduction in monthly seizure frequency (MSF) in all three cohorts. A reduction of ≥50% was obtained in 36-42% of all animals, without significant difference between cohorts. The lower starting dose of 5 mg/kg BID imepitoin was better tolerated, and an up-titration to on average of 15 mg/kg BID was sufficient in cohort A and B. In cohort C, a mean add-on dose of 1.5 mg/kg BID phenobarbital was sufficient to achieve a clinically meaningful effect. Six dogs developed a clinically meaningful increase in MSF of ≥ 50%, mostly in cohort A. Neither imepitoin nor phenobarbital add-on treatment was capable of suppressing cluster seizure activity, making cluster seizure activity an important predictor for drug-resistance. A combination treatment of imepitoin and phenobarbital is a useful treatment option for a subpopulation of dogs with drug-resistant epilepsy, a low starting dose with 5 mg/kg BID is recommended.

  2. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Epilepsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Epilepsy A A A What's ... With Epilepsy Different? en español Epilepsia What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy comes from a Greek word meaning "to ...

  3. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Epilepsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Epilepsy Print A A A ... With Epilepsy Different? en español Epilepsia What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy comes from a Greek word meaning "to ...

  4. Inadequate cervical mucus--a cause of "idiopathic" infertility.

    PubMed

    Sher, G; Katz, M

    1976-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and treat a group of patients referred for "idiopathic" infertility in whom no apparent cause for infertility, apart from inadequate cervical mucus, was found. Hormone investigations revealed that these patients could be divided into two groups: those with low sex steroid profiles despite apparent ovulation, and a second group with normal sex steroid profiles. All patients were treated with ovulation-inducing agents in an attempt to produce "controlled" ovarian hyperstimulation and an improved cervical mucus. Four of six patients conceived. The rationale behind the use of ovulation-inducing agents in this situation is discussed.

  5. The spectrum of epilepsy caused by POLG mutations.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Wouter; Quaegebeur, Annelies; Van Goethem, Gert; Ann, Löfgren; Smets, Katrien; Vandenberghe, Rik; Van Paesschen, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in POLG are increasingly recognized as a cause of refractory occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) and status epilepticus (SE). Our aim was to describe the epilepsy syndrome in seven patients with POLG mutations. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of seven patients with POLG mutations and epilepsy. Mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing of the coding exons of the POLG gene. Disease onset was at a median age of 18 years (range 12-26). Epilepsy was the presenting problem in six patients. All had focal seizures, with motor (n = 6) and visual (n = 6) phenomena. Six patients had secondarily generalized seizures and two patients had myoclonic seizures. Six patients had one or more episodes of refractory SE, including focal (n = 5), subtle (n = 4), myoclonic (n = 2) and convulsive (n = 3) SE. During or after SE, brain MRI showed lesions affecting the occipital lobe in all patients, probably due to continuous epileptic activity. Five of the six patients with SE died during treatment of SE, one due to valproate-induced hepatotoxicity. Associated clinical symptoms were ataxia (n = 6), polyneuropathy (n = 6), progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) (n = 3) and migraine (n = 3). Epilepsy may be the first and dominant neurological problem caused by POLG mutations. The epilepsy may be severe and the condition of the patient may end in fatal SE. Refractory OLE and SE in a patient with polyneuropathy, ataxia, PEO or migraine warrant screening for POLG mutations. In this clinical setting, valproate should not be given in view of the risk of fatal hepatotoxicity.

  6. Astrocyte uncoupling as a cause of human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bedner, Peter; Dupper, Alexander; Hüttmann, Kerstin; Müller, Julia; Herde, Michel K; Dublin, Pavel; Deshpande, Tushar; Schramm, Johannes; Häussler, Ute; Haas, Carola A; Henneberger, Christian; Theis, Martin; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Glial cells are now recognized as active communication partners in the central nervous system, and this new perspective has rekindled the question of their role in pathology. In the present study we analysed functional properties of astrocytes in hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without (n = 44) and with sclerosis (n = 75) combining patch clamp recording, K(+) concentration analysis, electroencephalography/video-monitoring, and fate mapping analysis. We found that the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis is completely devoid of bona fide astrocytes and gap junction coupling, whereas coupled astrocytes were abundantly present in non-sclerotic specimens. To decide whether these glial changes represent cause or effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, we developed a mouse model that reproduced key features of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis. In this model, uncoupling impaired K(+) buffering and temporally preceded apoptotic neuronal death and the generation of spontaneous seizures. Uncoupling was induced through intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide, prevented in Toll-like receptor4 knockout mice and reproduced in situ through acute cytokine or lipopolysaccharide incubation. Fate mapping confirmed that in the course of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, astrocytes acquire an atypical functional phenotype and lose coupling. These data suggest that astrocyte dysfunction might be a prime cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis and identify novel targets for anti-epileptogenic therapeutic intervention. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Resting motor threshold in idiopathic generalized epilepsies: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Francesco; Storti, Monica; Benedetti, Maria Donata; Rossini, Fabio; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Fiaschi, Antonio; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Manganotti, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    Resting motor threshold (rMT) assessed by means of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is thought to reflect trans-synaptic excitability of cortico-spinal neurons. TMS studies reporting rMT in idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) yielded discrepant results, so that it is difficult to draw a definitive conclusion on cortico-spinal excitability in IGEs by simple summation of previous results regarding this measure. Our purpose was to carry out a systematic review and a meta-analysis of studies evaluating rMT values obtained during single-pulse TMS in patients with IGEs. Controlled studies measuring rMT by single-pulse TMS in drug-naive patients older than 12 years affected by IGEs were systematically reviewed. rMT values were assessed calculating mean difference and odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Fourteen trials (265 epileptic patients and 424 controls) were included. Patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) have a statistically significant lower rMT compared with controls (mean difference: -6.78; 95% CI -10.55 to -3.00); when considering all subtypes of IGEs and IGEs other than JME no statistically significant differences were found. Overall considered, the results are indicative of a cortico-spinal hyper-excitability in JME, providing not enough evidence for motor hyper-excitability in other subtypes of IGE. The considerable variability across studies probably reflects the presence of relevant clinical and methodological heterogeneity, and higher temporal variability among rMT measurements over time, related to unstable cortical excitability in these patients.

  8. Extrastriate visual cortex in idiopathic occipital epilepsies: The contribution of retinotopic areas to spike generation.

    PubMed

    Meletti, Stefano; Ruggieri, Andrea; Avanzini, Pietro; Caramaschi, Elisa; Filippini, Melissa; Bergonzini, Patrizia; Monti, Giulia; Vignoli, Aglaia; Olivotto, Sara; Mastrangelo, Massimo; Santucci, Margherita; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Vaudano, Anna Elisabetta

    2016-06-01

    To provide insight into the pathophysiology of idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsies (ICOEs), by mapping the contribution of retinotopic visual areas to the generation and sustainment of epileptic activity. Thirteen patients affected by ICOEs (mean age = 10.9 years) underwent a video electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) study. A flexible-related fMRI analysis was applied to estimate the shape of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response in each patient. Second-level analysis was performed using the interictal EEG discharge (IED)-specific response shape for the ICOE group. The resulting fMRI t-maps were warped to the Population-Average, Landmark- and Surface-based (PALS)-B12 atlas in Caret. For localization purposes, functional results were plotted and compared against 19 retinotopic areas for each hemisphere. A correlation analysis was performed between the hemodynamic maps and electroclinical variables. The shape of the group-averaged hemodynamic response in ICOE patients showed an earlier time-to-peak and a more pronounced undershoot than the canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF). The random-effect analysis showed positive hemodynamic changes in the bilateral temporooccipital network. With regard to the retinotopic subdivision of the visual cortex, the primary visual area was consistently spared. Conversely, an extensive involvement of the occipitotemporal cortex, including the fusiform gyrus, and the occipitoparietal areas was observed. Moreover, a linear relationship was detected between the occipital spike-density and BOLD increases at the postcentral gyrus and temporooccipital cortex. Our data indicate that both the ventral and dorsal visual pathways are involved in spike generation in ICOEs, to extents that vary between patients, and reinforce the concept of benign childhood seizure susceptibility syndrome as a substrate for ICOEs. Finally, these results underscore the need for appropriate

  9. Effects of Marijuana on Ictal and Interictal EEG Activities in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Sanjeev; Zutshi, Deepti; Seraji-Bozorgzad, Navid; Shah, Aashit K

    2017-01-01

    Marijuana-based treatment for refractory epilepsy shows promise in surveys, case series, and clinical trials. However, literature on their EEG effects is sparse. Our objective is to analyze the effect of marijuana on EEG in a 24-year-old patient with idiopathic generalized epilepsy treated with cannabis. We blindly reviewed 3 long-term EEGs-a 24-hour study while only on antiepileptic drugs, a 72-hour EEG with Cannabis indica smoked on days 1 and 3 in addition to antiepileptic drugs, and a 48-hour EEG with combination C indica/sativa smoked on day 1 plus antiepileptic drugs. Generalized spike-wave discharges and diffuse paroxysmal fast activity were categorized as interictal and ictal, based on duration of less than 10 seconds or greater, respectively. Data from three studies concatenated into contiguous time series, with usage of marijuana modeled as time-dependent discrete variable while interictal and ictal events constituted dependent variables. Analysis of variance as initial test for significance followed by time series analysis using Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity model was performed. Statistical significance for lower interictal events (analysis of variance P = 0.001) was seen during C indica use, but not for C indica/sativa mixture (P = 0.629) or ictal events (P = 0.087). However, time series analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation between marijuana use, with interictal (P < 0.0004) and ictal (P = 0.002) event rates. Using a novel approach to EEG data, we demonstrate a decrease in interictal and ictal electrographic events during marijuana use. Larger samples of patients and EEG, with standardized cannabinoid formulation and dosing, are needed to validate our findings.

  10. Increased thalamus levels of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) in patients with idiopathic generalised epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Helms, G; Ciumas, C; Kyaga, S; Savic, I

    2006-04-01

    Abnormal thalamo-cortical oscillations underlie idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE). Although thalamic involvement has long been indicated by electrophysiological data, it has only recently become feasible to test this with independent methods. In this magnetic resonance (MR) study, we investigated the metabolic and structural integrity of the thalamus. Possible changes in glutamine and glutamate concentrations and signs of neuronal damage were of particular interest. Forty three IGE patients and 38 age and sex matched healthy controls were investigated. Quantitative single volume MR spectroscopy (MRS, 1.5 T) was used to measure concentrations of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) in thalamus and occipital cortex. We also measured thalamic volumes on high resolution gradient-echo images and estimated fractions of thalamic grey and white matter with voxel based morphometry (VBM). IGE patients showed elevated Glx and reduced NAA concentrations in the thalamus compared to controls (12.2+/-2.6 v 8.9+/-4.1 mM, p = 0.0022 for Glx, and 9.9+/-1.0 v 10.7+/-0.9 mM, p = 0.017 for NAA). Thalamic grey matter fraction was reduced in IGE patients, and white matter fraction was increased with the greatest increase in the dorso-medial thalamus. Mean thalamic volume was reduced in patients (6.7+/-0.7 v 7.2+/-0.6 ml in controls, p = 0.0001), as was mean cerebral volume (1163+/-128 v 1250+/-102 ml, p = 0.0003). Patients' thalamus/whole brain ratios were normal. Quantitative MRS and VBM provide further evidence for involvement of the thalamus in IGE. The observed elevation of Glx levels together with reductions in NAA levels and grey matter fractions are consistent with epilepsy related excitoxicity as a possible underlying mechanism.

  11. EEG-LORETA endophenotypes of the common idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Clemens, B; Puskás, S; Besenyei, M; Emri, M; Opposits, G; Kis, S A; Hollódy, K; Fogarasi, A; Kondákor, I; Füle, K; Bense, K; Fekete, I

    2012-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the cortical areas with abnormal local EEG synchronization are dissimilar in the three common idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) phenotypes: IGE patients with absence seizures (ABS), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) and epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures exclusively (EGTCS). Groups of unmedicated ABS, JME and EGTCS patients were investigated. Waking EEG background activity (without any epileptiform potentials) was analyzed by a source localization method, LORETA (Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography). Each patient group was compared to a separate, age-matched group of healthy control persons. Voxel-based, normalized broad-band (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) and very narrow band (VNB, 1Hz bandwidth, from 1 to 25Hz) LORETA activity (=current source density, A/m(2)) were computed for each person. Group comparison included subtraction (average patient data minus average control data) and group statistics (multiple t-tests, where Bonferroni-corrected p<0.05 values were accepted as statistically significant). Statistically not significant main findings were: overall increased delta and theta broad band activity in the ABS and JME groups; decrease of alpha and beta activity in the EGTCS group. Statistically significant main findings were as follows. JME group: bilaterally increased theta activity in posterior (temporal, parietal, and occipital) cortical areas; bilaterally increased activity in the medial and basal prefrontal area in the 8Hz VNB; bilaterally decreased activity in the precuneus, posterior cingulate and superior parietal lobule in the 11Hz and 21-22Hz VNBs. ABS group: bilaterally increased theta activity emerged in the basal prefrontal and medial temporal limbic areas. Decreased activity was found at 19-21Hz in the right postcentral gyrus and parts of the right superior and medial temporal gyri. EGTCS group: decreased activity was found in the frontal cortex and the postcentral gyrus at 10-11Hz, increased

  12. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Epilepsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Epilepsy A A A What's ... embarrass himself or scare his friends. What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy is a condition of the nervous system ...

  13. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Epilepsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Epilepsy Print A A A ... embarrass himself or scare his friends. What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy is a condition of the nervous system ...

  14. Elementary visual hallucinations, blindness, and headache in idiopathic occipital epilepsy: differentiation from migraine

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotopoulos, C

    1999-01-01

    This is a qualitative and chronological analysis of ictal and postictal symptoms, frequency of seizures, family history, response to treatment, and prognosis in nine patients with idiopathic occipital epilepsy and visual seizures. Ictal elementary visual hallucinations are stereotyped for each patient, usually lasting for seconds. They consist of mainly multiple, bright coloured, small circular spots, circles, or balls. Mostly, they appear in a temporal hemifield often moving contralaterally or in the centre where they may be flashing. They may multiply and increase in size in the course of the seizure and may progress to other non-visual occipital seizure symptoms and more rarely to extra-occipital manifestations and convulsions. Blindness occurs usually from the beginning and postictal headache, often indistinguishable from migraine, is common. It is concluded that elementary visual hallucinations in occipital seizures are entirely different from visual aura of migraine when individual elements of colour, shape, size, location, movement, speed of development, duration, and progress are synthesised together. Postictal headache does not show preference for those with a family history of migraine. Most of the patients are misdiagnosed as having migraine with aura, basilar migraine, acephalgic migraine, or migralepsy simply because physicians are not properly informed of differential diagnostic criteria. As a result, treatment may be delayed for years. Response to carbamazepine is excellent and seizures may remit.

 PMID:10201433

  15. Imepitoin as novel treatment option for canine idiopathic epilepsy: pharmacokinetics, distribution, and metabolism in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rundfeldt, C; Gasparic, A; Wlaź, P

    2014-01-01

    Imepitoin is a novel anti-epileptic licensed in the European Union for the treatment of canine idiopathic epilepsy. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of imepitoin in dogs and to evaluate the interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. Upon administration of imepitoin tablets at a dose of 30 mg/kg to beagle dogs, high plasma levels were observed within 30 min following oral dosing, with maximal plasma concentrations of 14.9–17.2 μg/mL reached after 2–3 h. In a crossover study, co-administration of imepitoin tablets with food reduced the total AUC by 30%, but it did not result in significant changes in Tmax and Cmax, indicating lack of clinical relevance. No clinically relevant effects of sex and no accumulation or metabolic tolerance were observed upon twice daily dosing. Following single dose administration of 10–100 mg/kg, dose linearity was found. Administering [14C] imepitoin, high enteral absorption of 92% and primary fecal excretion were identified. Plasma protein binding was only 55%. At therapeutic plasma concentrations, imepitoin did not inhibit microsomal cytochrome P450 family liver enzymes in vitro. In rats, no relevant induction of liver enzymes was found. Therefore, protein binding or metabolism-derived drug–drug interactions are unlikely. Based on these data, imepitoin can be dosed twice daily, but the timing of tablet administration in relation to feeding should be kept consistent. PMID:24611573

  16. Magnetoencephalography Reveals a Widespread Increase in Network Connectivity in Idiopathic/Genetic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Elshahabi, Adham; Klamer, Silke; Sahib, Ashish Kaul; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Focke, Niels K.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE) is characterized by seizures, which start and rapidly engage widely distributed networks, and result in symptoms such as absences, generalized myoclonic and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although routine magnetic resonance imaging is apparently normal, many studies have reported structural alterations in IGE/GGE patients using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Changes have also been reported in functional networks during generalized spike wave discharges. However, network function in the resting-state without epileptiforme discharges has been less well studied. We hypothesize that resting-state networks are more representative of the underlying pathophysiology and abnormal network synchrony. We studied functional network connectivity derived from whole-brain magnetoencephalography recordings in thirteen IGE/GGE and nineteen healthy controls. Using graph theoretical network analysis, we found a widespread increase in connectivity in patients compared to controls. These changes were most pronounced in the motor network, the mesio-frontal and temporal cortex. We did not, however, find any significant difference between the normalized clustering coefficients, indicating preserved gross network architecture. Our findings suggest that increased resting state connectivity could be an important factor for seizure spread and/or generation in IGE/GGE, and could serve as a biomarker for the disease. PMID:26368933

  17. Altered Effective Connectivity among Core Neurocognitive Networks in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: An fMRI Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Huilin; An, Jie; Shen, Hui; Zeng, Ling-Li; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) suffer long-term cognitive impairments, and present a higher incidence of psychosocial and psychiatric disturbances than healthy people. It is possible that the cognitive dysfunctions and higher psychopathological risk in IGE-GTCS derive from disturbed causal relationship among core neurocognitive brain networks. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effective connectivity across the salience network (SN), default mode network (DMN), and central executive network (CEN) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data collected from 27 IGE-GTCS patients and 29 healthy controls. In the study, a combination framework of time domain and frequency domain multivariate Granger causality analysis was firstly proposed, and proved to be valid and accurate by simulation experiments. Using this method, we then observed significant differences in the effective connectivity graphs between the patient and control groups. Specifically, between-group statistical analysis revealed that relative to the healthy controls, the patients established significantly enhanced Granger causal influence from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, which is coherent both in the time and frequency domains analyses. Meanwhile, time domain analysis also revealed decreased Granger causal influence from the right fronto-insular cortex to the posterior cingulate cortex in the patients. These findings may provide new evidence for functional brain organization disruption underlying cognitive dysfunctions and psychopathological risk in IGE-GTCS. PMID:27656137

  18. Electroclinical features of idiopathic generalised epilepsy with persisting absences in adult life.

    PubMed Central

    Michelucci, R; Rubboli, G; Passarelli, D; Riguzzi, P; Volpi, L; Parmeggiani, L; Rizzi, R; Gardella, E; Tassinari, C A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the electroclinical features of typical absences persisting in adult life. METHODS: Twelve adult patients (aged 21 to 56 years) with idiopathic generalised epilepsy featuring typical absences as the prominent clinical feature were studied. All patients underwent a full clinical and neurophysiological investigation including ictal documentation of seizures. RESULTS: Neurological examination and neuroradiological investigations were normal in all cases. Clinical findings included a median age at onset of absences of 14 (range 4-32) years, almost constant tonic-clonic seizures (in 83% of patients), frequent episodes of absence status (in 33% of patients), and associated cognitive or psychiatric disturbances. Interictal EEG findings showed normal background activity, generalised paroxysms of spike waves or polyspike waves, and inconstant focal spikes (in five patients); runs of polyspikes were seen during non-REM sleep. Ictal EEG findings showed generalised spike waves at 3 Hz, sometimes preceded by multiple spikes, or more complex EEG patterns with sequences of polyspikes intermingled with spike waves or polyspike waves, showing discharge fragmentation or variation of intradischarge frequency. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study show that absences persisting in adult life may show particular clinical and EEG patterns, distinct from those in childhood or adolescence. PMID:8937341

  19. Idiopathic generalised epilepsy in adults manifested by phantom absences, generalised tonic-clonic seizures, and frequent absence status

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotopoulos, C; Koutroumanidis, M; Giannakodimos, S; Agathonikou, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To describe the clinical and EEG features of adult patients with very mild absences, late onset generalised tonic clonic seizures, and frequent absence status.
METHODS—Patients were referrals to a clinic for epilepsies. They all had clinical assessment and EEG, video EEG, or both for documentation of absences.
RESULTS—Of 86 adults with idiopathic generalised epilepsies and EEG/video-EEG documented absences, 13 patients showed similar clinico-EEG features with: (a) "phantom absences" consisting of mild ictal impairment of cognition associated with brief (3-4 s), generalised 3-4 Hz spike/multiple spike and slow wave discharges; (b) infrequent, mainly late onset, generalised tonic clonic seizures, and (c), absence status which occurred in six of them either in isolation or terminating with generalised tonic clonic seizures. None of the patients had myoclonic jerks or photosensitivity. Two patients were father and daughter and another patient had a family history of infrequent generalised tonic clonic seizures.
CONCLUSION—It seems that this is an idiopathic generalised epilepsy syndrome in adults which has not been previously recognised.

 PMID:9408104

  20. Alterations in the α2 δ ligand, thrombospondin-1, in a rat model of spontaneous absence epilepsy and in patients with idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Santolini, Ines; Celli, Roberta; Cannella, Milena; Imbriglio, Tiziana; Guiducci, Michela; Parisi, Pasquale; Schubert, Julian; Iacomino, Michele; Zara, Federico; Lerche, Holger; Moyanova, Slavianka; Ngomba, Richard Teke; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Striano, Pasquale; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2017-09-15

    Thrombospondins, which are known to interact with the α2 δ subunit of voltage-sensitive calcium channels to stimulate the formation of excitatory synapses, have recently been implicated in the process of epileptogenesis. No studies have been so far performed on thrombospondins in models of absence epilepsy. We examined whether expression of the gene encoding for thrombospondin-1 was altered in the brain of WAG/Rij rats, which model absence epilepsy in humans. In addition, we examined the frequency of genetic variants of THBS1 in a large cohort of children affected by idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsies (IGE/GGEs). We measured the transcripts of thrombospondin-1 and α2 δ subunit, and protein levels of α2 δ, Rab3A, and the vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1, in the somatosensory cortex and ventrobasal thalamus of presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats and in two control strains by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunoblotting. We examined the genetic variants of THBS1 and CACNA2D1 in two independent cohorts of patients affected by IGE/GGE recruited through the Genetic Commission of the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE) and the EuroEPINOMICS-CoGIE Consortium. Thrombospondin-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were largely reduced in the ventrobasal thalamus of both presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats, whereas levels in the somatosensory cortex were unchanged. VGLUT1 protein levels were also reduced in the ventrobasal thalamus of WAG/Rij rats. Genetic variants of THBS1 were significantly more frequent in patients affected by IGE/GGE than in nonepileptic controls, whereas the frequency of CACNA2D1 was unchanged. These findings suggest that thrombospondin-1 may have a role in the pathogenesis of IGE/GGEs. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Cognitive impairment in childhood onset epilepsy: up-to-date information about its causes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment associated with childhood-onset epilepsy is an important consequence in the developing brain owing to its negative effects on neurodevelopmental and social outcomes. While the cause of cognitive impairment in epilepsy appears to be multifactorial, epilepsy-related factors such as type of epilepsy and underlying etiology, age at onset, frequency of seizures, duration of epilepsy, and its treatment are considered important. In recent studies, antecedent cognitive impairment before the first recognized seizure and microstructural and functional alteration of the brain at onset of epilepsy suggest the presence of a common neurobiological mechanism between epilepsy and cognitive comorbidity. However, the overall impact of cognitive comorbidity in children with epilepsy and the independent contribution of each of these factors to cognitive impairment have not been clearly delineated. This review article focuses on the significant contributors to cognitive impairment in children with epilepsy. PMID:27186225

  2. Dynamic functional network connectivity in idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Meiling; Wang, Wenqin; Li, Rong; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Huafu

    2017-02-01

    Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) has been linked with disrupted intra-network connectivity of multiple resting-state networks (RSNs); however, whether impairment is present in inter-network interactions between RSNs, remains largely unclear. Here, 50 patients with IGE characterized by generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) and 50 demographically matched healthy controls underwent resting-state fMRI scans. A dynamic method was implemented to investigate functional network connectivity (FNC) in patients with IGE-GTCS. Specifically, independent component analysis was first carried out to extract RSNs, and then sliding window correlation approach was employed to obtain dynamic FNC patterns. Finally, k-mean clustering was performed to characterize six discrete functional connectivity states, and state analysis was conducted to explore the potential alterations in FNC and other dynamic metrics. Our results revealed that state-specific FNC disruptions were observed in IGE-GTCS and the majority of aberrant functional connectivity manifested itself in default mode network. In addition, temporal metrics derived from state transition vectors were altered in patients including the total number of transitions across states and the mean dwell time, the fraction of time spent and the number of subjects in specific FNC state. Furthermore, the alterations were significantly correlated with disease duration and seizure frequency. It was also found that dynamic FNC could distinguish patients with IGE-GTCS from controls with an accuracy of 77.91% (P < 0.001). Taken together, this study not only provided novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of IGE-GTCS but also suggested that the dynamic FNC analysis was a promising avenue to deepen our understanding of this disease. Hum Brain Mapp 38:957-973, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    French, Jacqueline A; Krauss, Gregory L; Wechsler, Robert T; Wang, Xue-Feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O'Brien, Terence J; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-09-15

    To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel up titrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated dose) and 13-week maintenance period. The primary endpoint was percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (titration plus maintenance vs baseline). The key secondary endpoint (primary endpoint for European Union registration) was 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (patients achieving $50% reduction in PGTC seizure frequency; maintenance vs baseline). Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored. Of 164 randomized patients, 162 comprised the full analysis set (placebo, 81; perampanel, 81). Compared with placebo, perampanel conferred a greater median percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (238.4%vs 276.5%; p , 0.0001) and greater 50%PGTC seizure responder rate (39.5% vs 64.2%; p 5 0.0019). During maintenance, 12.3% of placebo treated patients and 30.9%of perampanel-treated patients achieved PGTC seizure freedom. For the safety analysis (placebo, 82; perampanel, 81), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events with perampanel were dizziness (32.1%) and fatigue (14.8%). Adjunctive perampanel was well tolerated and improved control of drug-resistant PGTC seizures in patients with IGE. This study provides Class I evidence that adjunctive perampanel reduces PGTC seizure frequency, compared with placebo, in patients with drug-resistant PGTC seizures in IGE.

  4. Frequency-Specific Alterations of Local Synchronization in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Ji, Gong-Jun; Xu, Qiang; Huang, Yubin; Wang, Zhengge; Jiao, Qing; Yang, Fang; Zang, Yu-Feng; Liao, Wei; Lu, Guangming

    2015-08-01

    Recurrently and abnormally hypersynchronous discharge is a striking feature of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging has revealed aberrant spontaneous brain synchronization, predominately in low-frequency range (<0.1 Hz), in individuals with IGE. Little is known, however, about these changes in local synchronization across different frequency bands. We examined alterations to frequency-specific local synchronization in terms of spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations across 5 bands, spanning 0 to 0.25 Hz. Specifically, we compared brain activity in a large cohort of IGE patients (n = 86) to age- and sex-matched normal controls (n = 86). IGE patients showed decreased local synchronization in low frequency (<0.073 Hz), primarily in the default mode network (DMN). IGE patients also exhibited increased local synchronization in high-frequency (>0.073 Hz) in a "conscious perception network," which is anchored by the pregenual and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, as well as the bilateral insular cortices, possibly contributing to impaired consciousness. Furthermore, we found frequency-specific alternating local synchronization in the posterior portion of the DMN relative to the anterior part, suggesting an interaction between the disease and frequency bands. Importantly, the aberrant high-frequency local synchronization in the middle cingulate cortex was associated with disease duration, thus linking BOLD frequency changes to disease severity. These findings provide an overview of frequency-specific local synchronization of BOLD fluctuations, and may be helpful in uncovering abnormal synchronous neuronal activity in patients with IGE at specific frequency bands.

  5. Frequency-Specific Alterations of Local Synchronization in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jue; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Ji, Gong-Jun; Xu, Qiang; Huang, Yubin; Wang, Zhengge; Jiao, Qing; Yang, Fang; Zang, Yu-Feng; Liao, Wei; Lu, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recurrently and abnormally hypersynchronous discharge is a striking feature of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging has revealed aberrant spontaneous brain synchronization, predominately in low-frequency range (<0.1 Hz), in individuals with IGE. Little is known, however, about these changes in local synchronization across different frequency bands. We examined alterations to frequency-specific local synchronization in terms of spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations across 5 bands, spanning 0 to 0.25 Hz. Specifically, we compared brain activity in a large cohort of IGE patients (n = 86) to age- and sex-matched normal controls (n = 86). IGE patients showed decreased local synchronization in low frequency (<0.073 Hz), primarily in the default mode network (DMN). IGE patients also exhibited increased local synchronization in high-frequency (>0.073 Hz) in a “conscious perception network,” which is anchored by the pregenual and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, as well as the bilateral insular cortices, possibly contributing to impaired consciousness. Furthermore, we found frequency-specific alternating local synchronization in the posterior portion of the DMN relative to the anterior part, suggesting an interaction between the disease and frequency bands. Importantly, the aberrant high-frequency local synchronization in the middle cingulate cortex was associated with disease duration, thus linking BOLD frequency changes to disease severity. These findings provide an overview of frequency-specific local synchronization of BOLD fluctuations, and may be helpful in uncovering abnormal synchronous neuronal activity in patients with IGE at specific frequency bands. PMID:26266394

  6. Long-term efficacy of imepitoin in the treatment of naive dogs affected by idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, A; Gagliardo, T; Menchetti, M; Bianchi, E; Bucci, D; Gandini, G

    2017-08-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term (12 months) efficacy and tolerability of imepitoin as first-choice treatment in 56 dogs suffering from idiopathic epilepsy and identify possible factors affecting the outcome. Primary treatment success (PTS) was defined as the achievement of a seizure-free interval three times longer than the pretreatment interictal interval (at least three months). Secondary treatment success (STS) was achieved by a decrease in seizure frequency ≥50 per cent compared with the pretreatment frequency. In the long-term follow-up, PTS was recorded in 14 (25 per cent) dogs and responder-dogs (PTS+STS) were 30 (54 per cent) showing significant reduction in the monthly average number of seizures (P<0.001). Median seizure frequency per month was 1.69 pretreatment and 0.3 at 12-month follow-up. Dogs with cluster seizures were significantly reduced (P=0.02). PTS at three and six months was associated with PTS (P=0.006 and <0.001, respectively) and with the status of responder dogs (P=0.002) at 12-month follow-up. Dogs aged >36 months at the start of imepitoin treatment had a positive association to become responder dogs (P<0.001) and achieve PTS (P=0.004). 16 dogs (29 per cent) discontinued imepitoin due to its inefficacy. The receiver operator curve highlighted ≥19 mg/kg twice a day as the most effective minimal dosage. Mild and transient side effects were observed in 16 dogs (29 per cent). British Veterinary Association.

  7. Post-mortem evidence of idiopathic left ventricular hypertrophy and idiopathic interstitial myocardial fibrosis: is exercise the cause?

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Gregory; Sheppard, Mary; George, Keith; Shave, Robert; Prasad, Sanjay; O’Hanlon, Rory; Sharma, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of an experienced, highly trained marathon runner who died suddenly while running. On post-mortem examination, left ventricle hypertrophy and idiopathic interstitial myocardial fibrosis was found. We believe that life-long, repetitive bouts of arduous physical activity resulted in fibrous replacement of the myocardium, causing a pathological substrate for the propagation of fatal arrhythmias. PMID:21686644

  8. Prevalence of lateral ventricle asymmetry in brain MRI studies of neurologically normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pivetta, Mauro; De Risio, Luisa; Newton, Richard; Dennis, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the cerebral lateral ventricles is a common finding in cross-sectional imaging of otherwise normal canine brains and has been assumed to be incidental. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of ventricular asymmetry in brain MRI studies of normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Brain MRI archives were searched for 100 neurologically normal dogs (Group 1) and 100 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (Group 2). For each dog, asymmetry of the lateral ventricles was subjectively classified as absent, mild, moderate, and severe based on a consensus of two observers who were unaware of group status. Ventricular areas were measured from transverse T1W images at the level of the interthalamic adhesion. An asymmetry ratio was calculated as the ratio of the larger to smaller ventricular transverse area. There was excellent agreement between subjective assessments of ventricular asymmetry and quantitative assessments using asymmetry ratios (k = 0.995). The prevalence of asymmetry was 38% in Group 1 dogs and 44% in Group 2 dogs. Assymmetry was scored as mild in the majority of Group 2 dogs. There was no significant association between presence/absence and degree of ventricular asymmetry vs. dog group, age, gender, or skull conformation. Findings from the current study supported previously published assumptions that asymmetry of the lateral cerebral ventricles is an incidental finding in MRI studies of the canine brain.

  9. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy caused by a mutation in the GATOR1 complex gene NPRL3.

    PubMed

    Korenke, Georg-Christoph; Eggert, Marlene; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in NPRL3, one of three genes that encode proteins of the mTORC1-regulating GATOR1 complex, have recently been reported to cause cortical dysplasia with focal epilepsy. We have now analyzed a multiplex epilepsy family by whole exome sequencing and identified a frameshift mutation (NM_001077350.2; c.1522delG; p.E508Rfs*46) within exon 13 of NPRL3. This truncating mutation causes an epilepsy phenotype characterized by early childhood onset of mainly nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The penetrance in our family was low (three affected out of six mutation carriers), compared to families with either ion channel- or DEPDC5-associated familial nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The absence of apparent structural brain abnormalities suggests that mutations in NPRL3 are not necessarily associated with focal cortical dysplasia but might be able to cause epilepsy by different, yet unknown pathomechanisms. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Dominant KCNA2 mutation causes episodic ataxia and pharmacoresponsive epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Mark A; Bellows, Susannah T; Li, Melody; Carroll, Renée; Micallef, Silvana; Carvill, Gemma L; Myers, Candace T; Howell, Katherine B; Maljevic, Snezana; Lerche, Holger; Gazina, Elena V; Mefford, Heather C; Bahlo, Melanie; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Gecz, Jozef

    2016-11-08

    To identify the genetic basis of a family segregating episodic ataxia, infantile seizures, and heterogeneous epilepsies and to study the phenotypic spectrum of KCNA2 mutations. A family with 7 affected individuals over 3 generations underwent detailed phenotyping. Whole genome sequencing was performed on a mildly affected grandmother and her grandson with epileptic encephalopathy (EE). Segregating variants were filtered and prioritized based on functional annotations. The effects of the mutation on channel function were analyzed in vitro by voltage clamp assay and in silico by molecular modeling. KCNA2 was sequenced in 35 probands with heterogeneous phenotypes. The 7 family members had episodic ataxia (5), self-limited infantile seizures (5), evolving to genetic generalized epilepsy (4), focal seizures (2), and EE (1). They had a segregating novel mutation in the shaker type voltage-gated potassium channel KCNA2 (CCDS_827.1: c.765_773del; p.255_257del). A rare missense SCN2A (rs200884216) variant was also found in 2 affected siblings and their unaffected mother. The p.255_257del mutation caused dominant negative loss of channel function. Molecular modeling predicted repositioning of critical arginine residues in the voltage-sensing domain. KCNA2 sequencing revealed 1 de novo mutation (CCDS_827.1: c.890G>A; p.Arg297Gln) in a girl with EE, ataxia, and tremor. A KCNA2 mutation caused dominantly inherited episodic ataxia, mild infantile-onset seizures, and later generalized and focal epilepsies in the setting of normal intellect. This observation expands the KCNA2 phenotypic spectrum from EE often associated with chronic ataxia, reflecting the marked variation in severity observed in many ion channel disorders. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Dural arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of epilepsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Caksen, H; Unal, O; Tombul, T; Cesur, Y; Abuhandan, M

    2001-09-01

    A 3 year and 6 month old girl with epilepsy associated with dural arteriovenous malformation (DAVM), diagnosed on the MRI, is presented to emphasise the importance of DAVM in the aetiology of childhood epilepsy.

  12. Effectiveness of Rufinamide in the Treatment of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy With Atypical Evolution: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Albini, Mariarita; Morano, Alessandra; Fanella, Martina; Lapenta, Leonardo; Casciato, Sara; Fattouch, Jinane; Manfredi, Mario; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Rufinamide (RFD) is a novel drug that was recently approved as an adjunctive treatment for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Despite its reported effectiveness in generalized seizures (tonic, atonic, or tonic-clonic) in this syndrome, few data on its use in idiopathic generalized epilepsy are available. Indeed, the scientific evidence to date is limited to anecdotal cases or isolated clinical experiences. We report an uncommon, though paradigmatic, case of a woman affected by juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) who, following a prolonged seizure-freedom period and the consequent withdrawal of valproate, presented a seizure relapse accompanied by a worsening in her electroclinical pattern. In view of this atypical evolution of JAE, characterized by drug-resistant seizures (absence and generalized tonic-clonic) and the progressive increase in electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities, several antiepileptic drugs were used, though to no benefit. The use of RFD instead led to a gradual control of the seizures and normalization of the EEG findings. In addition to this clinical experience, we briefly review the literature on the use of RFD in refractory generalized epilepsy. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  13. [Heterotopic gray matter: A rare cause of epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Aissa, A; Ben Lassoued, M; Alouini, R

    2013-03-01

    Various etiologic diagnoses are put forward for certain forms of infant epilepsy. We report four cases illustrating a rare cause: gray matter heterotopia. There were three girls and one boy, aged 3 months to 4 years at onset of seizures and 8 to 30 years at diagnosis of gray matter heterotopia. All patients sought healthcare because of repeated seizures. One patient also presented severe mental retardation. No consanguinity was noted. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the interposition of an ectopic ribbon of gray matter within the white matter in all cases. Ectopic gray matter formed bilateral subependymal nodules in one patient and bilateral nodules in the subcortical region suggestive of concentric laminar organization in another. The two other patients presented both of these forms. Other anomalies were associated: partial agenesis of the corpus callosum associated with colpocephaly causing cortical atrophy in one patient and hippocampal sclerosis in another.

  14. Endoscopic disconnection of hypothalamic astrocytoma causing gelastic epilepsy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Seok; Lee, Yun Ho; Shim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Heung Dong

    2009-08-01

    The authors report on a case of juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) and concomitant hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) with gelastic epilepsy that was successfully treated with endoscopic disconnection. This 6-year-old girl presented with prolonged, medically intractable gelastic seizures that were often followed by generalized tonic seizures. An enhancing, low-grade hypothalamic tumor was identified on MR images obtained when she was 11 months old, but no surgical intervention was attempted at that time apart from bur hole drainage of a chronic subdural hemorrhage. In the first surgery, performed when she was 6 years of age, the authors attempted disconnection and tumor sampling; the lesion was revealed to be a JPA. A second endoscopic disconnection was performed 1 year later to improve seizure control and obtain a pathological specimen from the nonenhancing contralateral side. The pathological results after the second surgery revealed that the enhancing mass was a spontaneously regressing JPA and the contralateral nonenhancing mass was an HH. The HH was found as latent tumor and the JPA was the mass causing gelastic epilepsy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with a spontaneously regressing JPA and concomitant HH, both of which were treated by endoscopic disconnection.

  15. Multiple Pyogenic Liver Abscesses Caused by Microperforation of an Idiopathic Cecal Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Dong Han; Sohn, Ki Chang; Chu, Min Su; Jo, Dong Ho; Cho, Eun Young; Kim, Haak Cheoul

    2016-01-25

    Idiopathic cecal ulcer is a rare disease entity of unknown cause diagnosed by ruling out other known causes of cecal ulceration. The most common complication of an idiopathic cecal ulcer is bleeding; perforation, peritonitis, abscess, and stricture formation have been noted. The authors treated a 53-year-old woman who presented with fever and intermittent right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Multiple pyogenic liver abscess and a solitary cecal ulcer were diagnosed by radiologic, endoscopic, and pathologic examination, followed by laparoscopic cecectomy. After extensive study, we concluded that this patient's liver abscesses were a complication of the idiopathic cecal ulcer. Herein, we report a case of multiple pyogenic liver abscess caused by microperforation of idiopathic cecal ulcer.

  16. Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis causing unilateral ureteral and sigmoid colon obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ting; Wang, Yujuan; Liu, Zhijun; Zhang, Xiaolei; Wu, Qian; Xi, Mingrong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The present report aimed to present a unique case of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) presenting features of unilateral ureteral and sigmoid colon obstruction. RPF is a rare disorder with unclear etiology. Case report: A 43-year-old female had a 10-day history of lower right abdominal and lumbar pain. Gynecological examination, ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT) were all suggestive of right ovarian tumor. An enhanced CT showed right-sided hydronephrosis. The patient was diagnosed as having ovarian cancer. Ten days after hospitalization, a right intraureteral stent with a double-J catheter was inserted. Upon exploring the abdomen, unyielding RPF was encountered. A partial sigmoidectomy and colostomy were performed. Postoperative pathological results suggested idiopathic RPF. She received steroid treatments. Conclusion: RPF is a rare disease that can be misdiagnosed. Our understanding about its presentation has to be improved and it should be considered as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with abdominal diseases. PMID:28207528

  17. Heterozygous Reelin Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Lateral Temporal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  18. Linkage analysis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and marker loci on chromosome 6p in families of patients with juvenile myocloni epilepsy: No evidence for an epilepsy locus in the HLA region

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, W.P.; Rees, M.; Curtis, D.; Sundqvist, A.; Parker, K.; Chung, E.; Baralle, D.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    Evidence for a locus (EJM1) in the HLA region of chromosome 6p predisposing to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) in the families of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has been obtained in two previous studies of separately ascertained groups of kindreds. Linkage analysis has been undertaken in a third set of 25 families including a patient with JME and at least one first-degree relative with IGE. Family members were typed for eight polymorphic loci on chromosome 6p: F13A, D6889, D6S109, D6S105, D6S10, C4B, DQA1/A2, and TCTE1. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance and age-dependent high or low penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage was obtained at any locus. Multipoint linkage analysis generated significant exclusion data (lod score < -2.0) at HLA and for a region 10-30 cM telomeric to HLA, the extent of which varied with the level of penetrance assumed. These observations indicate that genetic heterogeneity exists within this epilepsy phenotype. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Follow-up study of idiopathic generalized epilepsy with associated absence seizure and myoclonic epilepsy of infancy.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; Giordano, Lucio; Pruna, Dario; Peruzzi, Cinzia; Casellato, Susanna; Barca, Salvatore; Carlone, Giorgia; Striano, Pasquale; Verrotti, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the long-term prognosis of patients featuring the association of absences and myoclonic epilepsy of infancy. Our cohort consisted of 10 male subjects with mean age at seizure onset of 29 months. Follow-up data included seizure outcome and EEG findings. All individuals received antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as monotherapy (6 patients) or polytherapy (4 patients) for a mean period of 24 months. Over a 30-60 month evaluation period (mean: 43 months), all patients were seizure-free. Follow-up data after withdrawal of antiepileptic therapy were obtained for a mean period of 22 months. None of the children did develop other age-related epileptic syndrome after AEDs discontinuation. Furthermore, follow-up EEG data after drugs withdrawal were normal and none of the patients showed cognitive impairment. In conclusion, we confirm that absence seizures may occur in association with myoclonic epilepsy of infancy. This condition shows excellent prognosis with either favourable neurologic development and seizure outcome in these children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: A Meta-Analysis of Voxel-Based Morphology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hongwu; He, Xiaoming; Li, Feng; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Bingsheng

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to identify the consistent regions of gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), and to study the difference of GMV abnormalities among IGE subsyndromes by applying activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis. Methods A systematic review of VBM studies on GMV of patients with absence epilepsy (AE), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), IGE and controls indexed in PubMed and ScienceDirect from January 1999 to June 2016 was conducted. A total of 12 IGE studies, including 7 JME and 3 AE studies, were selected. Meta-analysis was performed on these studies by using the pooled and within-subtypes analysis (www.brainmap.org). Based on the above results, between-subtypes contrast analysis was carried out to detect the abnormal GMV regions common in and unique to each subtype as well. Results IGE demonstrated significant GMV increase in right ventral lateral nucleus (VL) and right medial frontal gyrus, and significant GMV decrease in bilateral pulvinar. For JME, significant GMV increase was seen in right medial frontal gyrus, right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), while significant GMV decrease was found in right pulvinar. In AE, the most significant GMV increase was found in right VL, and slight GMV reduction was seen in right medial dorsal nucleus, right subcallosal gyrus, left caudate and left precuneus. No overlapped and unique regions with significant GMV abnormalities were found between JME and AE. Significance This meta-analysis demonstrated that thalamo-frontal network was a structure with significant GMV abnormality in IGE, and the IGE subsyndromes showed different GMV abnormal regions. These observations may provide instructions on the clinical diagnosis of IGE. PMID:28060866

  1. RFT1-congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) syndrome: a cause of early-onset severe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Aeby, Alec; Prigogine, Cynthia; Vilain, Catheline; Malfilatre, Geneviève; Jaeken, Jaak; Lederer, Damien; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    RFT1-congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) syndrome, a recessive N-glycosylation disorder caused by mutation in the RFT1 gene, is a very rare subtype of CDG syndrome associated with deafness, developmental delay, and non-specific epilepsy. The aim of this report is to describe the electroclinical presentation of epilepsy associated with this condition. [Published with video sequences online].

  2. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Møller, Rikke S; Heron, Sarah E; Larsen, Line H G; Lim, Chiao Xin; Ricos, Michael G; Bayly, Marta A; van Kempen, Marjan J A; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Andrews, Ian; Kelley, Kent; Ronen, Gabriel M; Callen, David; McMahon, Jacinta M; Yendle, Simone C; Carvill, Gemma L; Mefford, Heather C; Nabbout, Rima; Poduri, Annapurna; Striano, Pasquale; Baglietto, Maria G; Zara, Federico; Smith, Nicholas J; Pridmore, Clair; Gardella, Elena; Nikanorova, Marina; Dahl, Hans Atli; Gellert, Pia; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Gunning, Boudewijn; Kragh-Olsen, Bente; Dibbens, Leanne M

    2015-09-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associated with KCNT1, we examined individuals affected with focal epilepsy or an epileptic encephalopathy for mutations in the gene. We identified KCNT1 mutations in 12 previously unreported patients with focal epilepsy, multifocal epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and in a family with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), in addition to patients with NFLE and MMFSI. In contrast to the 100% penetrance so far reported for KCNT1 mutations, we observed incomplete penetrance. It is notable that we report that the one KCNT1 mutation, p.Arg398Gln, can lead to either of the two distinct phenotypes, ADNFLE or MMFSI, even within the same family. This indicates that genotype-phenotype relationships for KCNT1 mutations are not straightforward. We demonstrate that KCNT1 mutations are highly pleiotropic and are associated with phenotypes other than ADNFLE and MMFSI. KCNT1 mutations are now associated with Ohtahara syndrome, MMFSI, and nocturnal focal epilepsy. They may also be associated with multifocal epilepsy and cardiac disturbances.

  3. A prospective study of the modified Atkins diet for adults with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kverneland, Magnhild; Selmer, Kaja K; Nakken, Karl O; Iversen, Per O; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-12-01

    For children with pharmacoresistant epilepsy, the ketogenic diet is an established treatment option worldwide. However, for adults, this treatment is less frequently offered, and its efficacy less well-documented. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and tolerability of such a diet as an adjuvant therapy to antiepileptic drugs for adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. Thirteen patients (12 women) aged 16-57 years were included prospectively. They were treated with a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks. Nine of the 13 participants had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), two had childhood absence epilepsy, one had Jeavons syndrome, and one had generalized epilepsy of unknown type. Six participants, all with JME, completed the 12-week study period. Among these six, four had >50% seizure reduction. Their seizure severity, using the revised Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale, was reduced by 1, 5, 57.5, and 70 points, respectively (scale: 1-100 points). In three of these four responders, quality of life, assessed by QOLIE-89, increased more than 20 points (scale: 0-100 points). Mean reduction of body weight after 12 weeks on diet was 6.5 (range: 4.3-8.1) kg. Lack of motivation, poor compliance, and seizure aggravation were the main reasons for premature termination of the diet. Apart from one patient who developed gallstones when ending the treatment after 10 months, no adverse effects were noted. In conclusion, using a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks led to a clinically relevant reduction of seizure frequency in four of thirteen adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. All responders were diagnosed with JME. In three of the four, the benefits of diet were so considerable that they chose to continue the treatment.

  4. Unstable minisatellite expansion causing recessively inherited myoclonus epilepsy, EPM1.

    PubMed

    Virtaneva, K; D'Amato, E; Miao, J; Koskiniemi, M; Norio, R; Avanzini, G; Franceschetti, S; Michelucci, R; Tassinari, C A; Omer, S; Pennacchio, L A; Myers, R M; Dieguez-Lucena, J L; Krahe, R; de la Chapelle, A; Lehesjoki, A E

    1997-04-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy of Unverricht-Lundborg type (EPM1; MIM 254800) is an autosomal recessive disorder that occurs with a low frequency in many populations but is more common in Finland and the Mediterranean region. It is characterized by stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and tonic-clonic seizures with onset at age 6-15 years, typical electroencephalographic abnormalities and a variable rate of progression between and within families. Following the initial mapping of the EPM1 gene to chromosome 21 (ref. 6) and the refinement of the critical region to a small interval, positional cloning identified the gene encoding cystatin B (CST6), a cysteine protease inhibitor, as the gene underlying EPM1 (ref. 10). Levels of messenger RNA encoded by CST6 were dramatically decreased in patients. A 3' splice site and a stop codon mutation were identified in three families, leaving most mutations uncharacterized. In this study, we report a novel type of disease-causing mutation, an unstable 15- to 18-mer minisatellite repeat expansion in the putative promoter region of the CST6 gene. The mutation accounts for the majority of EPM1 patients worldwide. Haplotype data are compatible with a single ancestral founder mutation. The length of the repeat array differs between chromosomes and families, but changes in repeat number seem to be comparatively rare events.

  5. Cysticercosis as a major cause of epilepsy in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, H. H.; Gilman, R.; Martinez, M.; Tsang, V. C. W.; Pilcher, J. B.; Herrera, G.; Diaz, F.; Alvarado, M.; Miranda, E.

    2010-01-01

    In countries where cysticercosis is endemic, the proportion of epilepsy due to cysticercosis is not well documented. To investigate the association between cysticercosis and epilepsy, we used the enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) assay to detect serum antibodies to Taenia solium in 498 consecutive outpatients at a neurology clinic in Lima, Peru. Every patient was classified as epileptic (n = 189) or non-epileptic (n = 309) after neurological, and where possible electroencephalographic, examination. A substantially higher proportion of epileptic than non-epileptic patients was seropositive in the EITB (22 [12%] vs 8 [3%], p < 0·00l). 19% of epileptic patients born outside Lima, 20% of those with late-onset epilepsy, and 29% of patients with both these characteristics were seropositive. Thus, in Peru, cysticercosis is an important aetiological factor for epilepsy. PMID:8093496

  6. A randomised trial of a medium-chain TAG diet as treatment for dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Law, Tsz Hong; Davies, Emma S S; Pan, Yuanlong; Zanghi, Brian; Want, Elizabeth; Volk, Holger A

    2015-11-14

    Despite appropriate antiepileptic drug treatment, approximately one-third of humans and dogs with epilepsy continue experiencing seizures, emphasising the importance for new treatment strategies to improve the quality of life of people or dogs with epilepsy. A 6-month prospective, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over dietary trial was designed to compare a ketogenic medium-chain TAG diet (MCTD) with a standardised placebo diet in chronically antiepileptic drug-treated dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Dogs were fed either MCTD or placebo diet for 3 months followed by a subsequent respective switch of diet for a further 3 months. Seizure frequency, clinical and laboratory data were collected and evaluated for twenty-one dogs completing the study. Seizure frequency was significantly lower when dogs were fed the MCTD (2·31/month, 0-9·89/month) in comparison with the placebo diet (2·67/month, 0·33-22·92/month, P=0·020); three dogs achieved seizure freedom, seven additional dogs had ≥50 % reduction in seizure frequency, five had an overall <50 % reduction in seizures (38·87 %, 35·68-43·27 %) and six showed no response. Seizure day frequency were also significantly lower when dogs were fed the MCTD (1·63/month, 0-7·58/month) in comparison with the placebo diet (1·69/month, 0·33-13·82/month, P=0·022). Consumption of the MCTD also resulted in significant elevation of blood β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in comparison with placebo diet (0·041 (sd 0·004) v. 0·031 (sd 0·016) mmol/l, P=0·028). There were no significant changes in serum concentrations of glucose (P=0·903), phenobarbital (P=0·422), potassium bromide (P=0·404) and weight (P=0·300) between diet groups. In conclusion, the data show antiepileptic properties associated with ketogenic diets and provide evidence for the efficacy of the MCTD used in this study as a therapeutic option for epilepsy treatment.

  7. Preventable and unpreventable causes of childhood-onset epilepsy plus mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Camfield, Carol; Camfield, Peter

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the causes of childhood epilepsy associated with mental retardation and determine whether these causes are preventable. We selected all patients from the Nova Scotia population-based childhood epilepsy cohort (n = 692) who had mental retardation and had epilepsy onset between 1977 and 1985. Causes and family history were determined by chart review and caregiver interview after 18.8 (SD: +/-7) years of follow-up. Overall, 147 patients had mental retardation and epilepsy (21% of all childhood epilepsy). Standard psychological testing was available for 57%; 38.5% were too impaired for testing, which left 4% with the degree of mental retardation assessed clinically. Severe/profound mental retardation predominated (mild: 24%; moderate: 23%, severe/profound: 53%). Fifty-nine percent had additional severe neurologic deficits, most often associated with severe mental retardation. Epilepsy syndromes were symptomatic generalized (n = 73), partial (n = 58), and other (n = 16). Most had a brain imaging study: 91% had a computed tomography scan, and 12% had an MRI scan. Sixty-three percent had a defined cause; 37% had an unknown cause. A defined cause was more likely in those with severe mental retardation (60 of 78 vs 31 of 65). Identified causes were prenatal or genetic (65%), perinatal (8%), or complications of prematurity (13%). Only 11 (7%) had an acquired cause that was potentially preventable. Many (36%) had a first- or second-degree relative with epilepsy, more often in those without a clear cause (54% vs 30%) and without additional neurologic disability (57% vs 26%). Approximately 20% of children with epilepsy have mental retardation. The cause is prenatal or genetic in nearly two thirds, and only 7% have an acquired, preventable cause. Important genetic influences may be present, especially in the absence of a defined cause.

  8. LGI2 Truncation Causes a Remitting Focal Epilepsy in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Eija H.; Jokinen, Tarja S.; Fukata, Masaki; Fukata, Yuko; Webster, Matthew T.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Kilpinen, Sami K.; Steffen, Frank; Dietschi, Elisabeth; Leeb, Tosso; Eklund, Ranja; Zhao, Xiaochu; Rilstone, Jennifer J.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Minassian, Berge A.; Lohi, Hannes

    2011-01-01

    One quadrillion synapses are laid in the first two years of postnatal construction of the human brain, which are then pruned until age 10 to 500 trillion synapses composing the final network. Genetic epilepsies are the most common neurological diseases with onset during pruning, affecting 0.5% of 2–10-year-old children, and these epilepsies are often characterized by spontaneous remission. We previously described a remitting epilepsy in the Lagotto romagnolo canine breed. Here, we identify the gene defect and affected neurochemical pathway. We reconstructed a large Lagotto pedigree of around 34 affected animals. Using genome-wide association in 11 discordant sib-pairs from this pedigree, we mapped the disease locus to a 1.7 Mb region of homozygosity in chromosome 3 where we identified a protein-truncating mutation in the Lgi2 gene, a homologue of the human epilepsy gene LGI1. We show that LGI2, like LGI1, is neuronally secreted and acts on metalloproteinase-lacking members of the ADAM family of neuronal receptors, which function in synapse remodeling, and that LGI2 truncation, like LGI1 truncations, prevents secretion and ADAM interaction. The resulting epilepsy onsets at around seven weeks (equivalent to human two years), and remits by four months (human eight years), versus onset after age eight in the majority of human patients with LGI1 mutations. Finally, we show that Lgi2 is expressed highly in the immediate post-natal period until halfway through pruning, unlike Lgi1, which is expressed in the latter part of pruning and beyond. LGI2 acts at least in part through the same ADAM receptors as LGI1, but earlier, ensuring electrical stability (absence of epilepsy) during pruning years, preceding this same function performed by LGI1 in later years. LGI2 should be considered a candidate gene for common remitting childhood epilepsies, and LGI2-to-LGI1 transition for mechanisms of childhood epilepsy remission. PMID:21829378

  9. Baseline Cognition, Behavior, and Motor Skills in Children with New-Onset, Idiopathic Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhise, Vikram V.; Burack, Gail D.; Mandelbaum, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Epilepsy is associated with difficulties in cognition and behavior in children. These problems have been attributed to genetics, ongoing seizures, psychosocial issues, underlying abnormality of the brain, and/or antiepileptic drugs. In a previous study, we found baseline cognitive differences between children with partial versus generalized…

  10. Baseline Cognition, Behavior, and Motor Skills in Children with New-Onset, Idiopathic Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhise, Vikram V.; Burack, Gail D.; Mandelbaum, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Epilepsy is associated with difficulties in cognition and behavior in children. These problems have been attributed to genetics, ongoing seizures, psychosocial issues, underlying abnormality of the brain, and/or antiepileptic drugs. In a previous study, we found baseline cognitive differences between children with partial versus generalized…

  11. Idiopathic postpartum intussusception: a rare cause of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kocakoc, Ercan; Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Koc, Mustafa; Balaban, Mehtap

    2010-01-01

    To present a case with acute abdominal pain due to idiopathic intestinal intussusception diagnosed by ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) during the early postpartum period. A 21-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain, nausea and emesis after a normal vaginal delivery. Laboratory tests done at admission were within normal limits except for leukocytosis. Physical examination revealed abdominal distention, guarding and rebound tenderness. Abdominal ultrasound and oral contrast-enhanced CT showed a complex mass in the hypogastrium, with a typical configuration of intussusception. Emergent laparotomy revealed ileoileal invagination approximately 70 cm to the ileocecal valve but no lead point. A partial ileal resection was performed. This case shows that when intussusception is suspected, an abdominal ultrasound should be performed even in patients with atypical symptoms. CT may be used to confirm the diagnosis. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Genome arrays for the detection of copy number variations in idiopathic mental retardation, idiopathic generalized epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders: lessons for diagnostic workflow and research.

    PubMed

    Hochstenbach, R; Buizer-Voskamp, J E; Vorstman, J A S; Ophoff, R A

    2011-01-01

    We review the contributions and limitations of genome-wide array-based identification of copy number variants (CNVs) in the clinical diagnostic evaluation of patients with mental retardation (MR) and other brain-related disorders. In unselected MR referrals a causative genomic gain or loss is detected in 14-18% of cases. Usually, such CNVs arise de novo, are not found in healthy subjects, and have a major impact on the phenotype by altering the dosage of multiple genes. This high diagnostic yield justifies array-based segmental aneuploidy screening as the initial genetic test in these patients. This also pertains to patients with autism (expected yield about 5-10% in nonsyndromic and 10-20% in syndromic patients) and schizophrenia (at least 5% yield). CNV studies in idiopathic generalized epilepsy, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, major depressive disorder and Tourette syndrome indicate that patients have, on average, a larger CNV burden as compared to controls. Collectively, the CNV studies suggest that a wide spectrum of disease-susceptibility variants exists, most of which are rare (<0.1%) and of variable and usually small effect. Notwithstanding, a rare CNV can have a major impact on the phenotype. Exome sequencing in MR and autism patients revealed de novo mutations in protein coding genes in 60 and 20% of cases, respectively. Therefore, it is likely that arrays will be supplanted by next-generation sequencing methods as the initial and perhaps ultimate diagnostic tool in patients with brain-related disorders, revealing both CNVs and mutations in a single test. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Epidemiology, causes, and treatment of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ba-Diop, Awa; Marin, Benoît; Druet-Cabanac, Michel; Ngoungou, Edgard B; Newton, Charles R; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disease in tropical countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Previous work on epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa has shown that many cases are severe, partly a result of some specific causes, that it carries a stigma, and that it is not adequately treated in many cases. Many studies on the epidemiology, aetiology, and management of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa have been reported in the past 10 years. The prevalence estimated from door-to-door studies is almost double that in Asia, Europe, and North America. The most commonly implicated risk factors are birth trauma, CNS infections, and traumatic brain injury. About 60% of patients with epilepsy receive no antiepileptic treatment, largely for economic and social reasons. Further epidemiological studies should be a priority to improve understanding of possible risk factors and thereby the prevention of epilepsy in Africa, and action should be taken to improve access to treatment. PMID:25231525

  14. The causes of new-onset epilepsy and seizures in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shasha; Yu, Weihua; Lü, Yang

    2016-01-01

    With increasing age, the prevalence and incidence of epilepsy and seizures increases correspondingly. New-onset epilepsy in elderly people often has underlying etiology, including cerebrovascular diseases, primary neuron degenerative disorders, intracerebral tumors, and traumatic head injury. In addition, an acute symptomatic seizure cannot be called epilepsy, which manifests usually as a common symptom secondary to metabolic or toxicity factors in older people. In this review, we have mainly focused on the causes of new-onset epilepsy and seizures in elderly people. This knowledge will certainly help us to understand the reasons for high incidences of epilepsy and seizures in elderly people. We look forward to controlling epileptic seizures via the treatment of primary diseases in the future. PMID:27382285

  15. The causes of new-onset epilepsy and seizures in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Yu, Weihua; Lü, Yang

    2016-01-01

    With increasing age, the prevalence and incidence of epilepsy and seizures increases correspondingly. New-onset epilepsy in elderly people often has underlying etiology, including cerebrovascular diseases, primary neuron degenerative disorders, intracerebral tumors, and traumatic head injury. In addition, an acute symptomatic seizure cannot be called epilepsy, which manifests usually as a common symptom secondary to metabolic or toxicity factors in older people. In this review, we have mainly focused on the causes of new-onset epilepsy and seizures in elderly people. This knowledge will certainly help us to understand the reasons for high incidences of epilepsy and seizures in elderly people. We look forward to controlling epileptic seizures via the treatment of primary diseases in the future.

  16. Mutations in DEPDC5 cause familial focal epilepsy with variable foci.

    PubMed

    Dibbens, Leanne M; de Vries, Boukje; Donatello, Simona; Heron, Sarah E; Hodgson, Bree L; Chintawar, Satyan; Crompton, Douglas E; Hughes, James N; Bellows, Susannah T; Klein, Karl Martin; Callenbach, Petra M C; Corbett, Mark A; Gardner, Alison E; Kivity, Sara; Iona, Xenia; Regan, Brigid M; Weller, Claudia M; Crimmins, Denis; O'Brien, Terence J; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Mulley, John C; Dubeau, Francois; Licchetta, Laura; Bisulli, Francesca; Cossette, Patrick; Thomas, Paul Q; Gecz, Jozef; Serratosa, Jose; Brouwer, Oebele F; Andermann, Frederick; Andermann, Eva; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Pandolfo, Massimo; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2013-05-01

    The majority of epilepsies are focal in origin, with seizures emanating from one brain region. Although focal epilepsies often arise from structural brain lesions, many affected individuals have normal brain imaging. The etiology is unknown in the majority of individuals, although genetic factors are increasingly recognized. Autosomal dominant familial focal epilepsy with variable foci (FFEVF) is notable because family members have seizures originating from different cortical regions. Using exome sequencing, we detected DEPDC5 mutations in two affected families. We subsequently identified mutations in five of six additional published large families with FFEVF. Study of families with focal epilepsy that were too small for conventional clinical diagnosis with FFEVF identified DEPDC5 mutations in approximately 12% of families (10/82). This high frequency establishes DEPDC5 mutations as a common cause of familial focal epilepsies. Shared homology with G protein signaling molecules and localization in human neurons suggest a role of DEPDC5 in neuronal signal transduction.

  17. [Epilepsy as a cause of removal from the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Cossío Díaz, José Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the First Chamber of the Supreme Court of Justice decided two important cases where the Ministers were urged to evaluate whether a provision of the Social Security Institute for the Mexican Armed Forces Statute making“epilepsy and other forms of seizures or equivalents” a cause of removal from the Army on the basis of “uselessness in the service” violates the equality and non-discrimination principle laid down in article 1 of the Federal Constitution. Four Supreme Court Ministers declared that the provision was constitutional. Justice Minister Cossío Díaz disagreed and wrote a separate opinion where he holds that the aforementioned provision is unconstitutional, since its excessively wide and undetermined language opens the door to declarations of “uselessness for the service” without ensuring this rests in every case in a genuine incapacity to develop a job in the Army.Before reaching this conclusion Justice Minister Cossío asked for information to the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery. It was on these basis that he sustained that the aforementioned legal provision does not satisfy an adequate means-end correlation, since it allows the Army to withdraw from service –on the basis of “uselessness”–persons whose medical condition is sometimes episodic; others curable; others, if not curable, pharmaceutically controlled; and, in cases where it does limit the kinds of activity, that the person can develop, it does so in a way that can only be determined by an intensely individualized basis.

  18. DEPDC5 mutations are not a frequent cause of familial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Striano, Pasquale; Serioli, Elena; Santulli, Lia; Manna, Ida; Labate, Angelo; Dazzo, Emanuela; Pasini, Elena; Gambardella, Antonio; Michelucci, Roberto; Striano, Salvatore; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the DEPDC5 (DEP domain-containing protein 5) gene are a major cause of familial focal epilepsy with variable foci (FFEVF) and are predicted to account for 12-37% of families with inherited focal epilepsies. To assess the clinical impact of DEPDC5 mutations in familial temporal lobe epilepsy, we screened a collection of Italian families with either autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) or familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (FMTLE). The probands of 28 families classified as ADLTE and 17 families as FMTLE were screened for DEPDC5 mutations by whole exome or targeted massive parallel sequencing. Putative mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing. We identified a DEPDC5 nonsense mutation (c.918C>G; p.Tyr306*) in a family with two affected members, clinically classified as FMTLE. The proband had temporal lobe seizures with prominent psychic symptoms (déjà vu, derealization, and forced thoughts); her mother had temporal lobe seizures, mainly featuring visceral epigastric auras and anxiety. In total, we found a single DEPDC5 mutation in one of (2.2%) 45 families with genetic temporal lobe epilepsy, a proportion much lower than that reported in other inherited focal epilepsies. © 2015 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Caused by Inactivating Mutations in SRA1

    PubMed Central

    Kotan, Leman Damla; Cooper, Charlton; Darcan, Şükran; Carr, Ian M.; Özen, Samim; Yan, Yi; Hamedani, Mohammad K.; Gürbüz, Fatih; Mengen, Eda; Turan, İhsan; Ulubay, Ayça; Akkuş, Gamze; Yüksel, Bilgin; Topaloğlu, A. Kemal; Leygue, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: What initiates the pubertal process in humans and other mammals is still unknown. We hypothesized that gene(s) taking roles in triggering human puberty may be identified by studying a cohort of idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). Methods: A cohort of IHH cases was studied based on autozygosity mapping coupled with whole exome sequencing. Results: Our studies revealed three independent families in which IHH/delayed puberty is associated with inactivating SRA1 variants. SRA1 was the first gene to be identified to function through its protein as well as noncoding functional ribonucleic acid products. These products act as co-regulators of nuclear receptors including sex steroid receptors as well as SF-1 and LRH-1, the master regulators of steroidogenesis. Functional studies with a mutant SRA1 construct showed a reduced co-activation of ligand-dependent activity of the estrogen receptor alpha, as assessed by luciferase reporter assay in HeLa cells. Conclusion: Our findings strongly suggest that SRA1 gene function is required for initiation of puberty in humans. Furthermore, SRA1 with its alternative products and functionality may provide a potential explanation for the versatility and complexity of the pubertal process. PMID:27086651

  20. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... look at the brain and nervous system. An EEG (electroencephalogram) will be done to check the electrical ... epilepsy surgery, you may need to: Wear an EEG recorder for days or weeks as you go ...

  1. Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain tumor, childhood febrile seizures, or infection. These studies are identifying changes in brain circuits and signaling pathways that may be targeted to prevent escalation into chronic epilepsy. Strategies will be available to treat and prevent comorbid ...

  2. Diagnosing and Solving School Learning Disabilities in Epilepsy: Part 2--A List of Causes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The possible causes of learning difficulties in children with epilepsy are long and complex. In order to see that a child is given an adequate evaluation, an understanding of what these many causes are and how those causes may be interrelated is necessary. This article discusses the first three of the six categories of the causes: (1) Organic; (2)…

  3. Cerebellum abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghui; Du, Hanjian; Xie, Bing; Wu, Nan; Wang, Jian; Wu, Guocai; Feng, Hua; Jiang, Tianzi

    2010-12-21

    Although there is increasing evidence suggesting that there may be subtle abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) patients using modern neuroimaging techniques, most of these previous studies focused on the brain grey matter, leaving the underlying white matter abnormalities in IGE largely unknown, which baffles the treatment as well as the understanding of IGE. In this work, we adopted multiple methods from different levels based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to analyze the white matter abnormalities in 14 young male IGE patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) only, comparing with 29 age-matched male healthy controls. First, we performed a voxel-based analysis (VBA) of the fractional anisotropy (FA) images derived from DTI. Second, we used a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method to explore the alterations within the white matter skeleton of the patients. Third, we adopted region-of-interest (ROI) analyses based on the findings of VBA and TBSS to further confirm abnormal brain regions in the patients. At last, considering the convergent evidences we found by VBA, TBSS and ROI analyses, a subsequent probabilistic fiber tractography study was performed to investigate the abnormal white matter connectivity in the patients. Significantly decreased FA values were consistently observed in the cerebellum of patients, providing fresh evidence and new clues for the important role of cerebellum in IGE with GTCS.

  4. Cerebellum Abnormalities in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy with Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bing; Wu, Nan; Wang, Jian; Wu, Guocai; Feng, Hua; Jiang, Tianzi

    2010-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence suggesting that there may be subtle abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) patients using modern neuroimaging techniques, most of these previous studies focused on the brain grey matter, leaving the underlying white matter abnormalities in IGE largely unknown, which baffles the treatment as well as the understanding of IGE. In this work, we adopted multiple methods from different levels based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to analyze the white matter abnormalities in 14 young male IGE patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) only, comparing with 29 age-matched male healthy controls. First, we performed a voxel-based analysis (VBA) of the fractional anisotropy (FA) images derived from DTI. Second, we used a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method to explore the alterations within the white matter skeleton of the patients. Third, we adopted region-of-interest (ROI) analyses based on the findings of VBA and TBSS to further confirm abnormal brain regions in the patients. At last, considering the convergent evidences we found by VBA, TBSS and ROI analyses, a subsequent probabilistic fiber tractography study was performed to investigate the abnormal white matter connectivity in the patients. Significantly decreased FA values were consistently observed in the cerebellum of patients, providing fresh evidence and new clues for the important role of cerebellum in IGE with GTCS. PMID:21203575

  5. Thalamic hypoperfusion and disrupted cerebral blood flow networks in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Arterial spin labeling and graph theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Sone, Daichi; Watanabe, Masako; Ota, Miho; Kimura, Yukio; Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Maekawa, Tomoko; Okura, Mariko; Enokizono, Mikako; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Sato, Noriko; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interictal cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions and graph theoretical networks in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) using arterial spin labeling (ASL) imaging and anatomical covariance methods of graph theoretical analysis. We recruited 19 patients with IGE and 19 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. Their CBF images were obtained by pseudo-continuous ASL imaging and compared using statistical parametric mapping 8 software (SPM8) and Graph Analysis Toolbox (GAT). The ASL imaging could detect interictal hypoperfusion in the thalamus, upper midbrain, and left cerebellum in IGE. Additionally, the graph theoretical analyses revealed characteristic findings of the CBF network of IGE, including significantly reduced resilience to attacks and changes of regional clustering especially in the bilateral temporo-occipital areas and lateral frontal lobes. There was no significance in the comparisons of network metrics. These findings could contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of IGE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Learning disorders in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Beghi, Massimiliano; Cornaggia, Cesare Maria; Frigeni, Barbara; Beghi, Ettore

    2006-01-01

    Learning disorders (LD) are disorders interfering with academic performance or with daily living activities requiring reading, writing, or mathematical abilities in subjects with a normal intelligence quotient. The prevalence of LD in the general population has been found to be 2-10% and reading disorders are the most frequent subtype. Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurological disorders in childhood with an estimated prevalence in 4-5/1,000. Epilepsy is considered to be idiopathic or cryptogenic in approximately two-thirds of cases. LD are more common in people with epilepsy than in the general population: about 25% of patients with epilepsy are said to have LD. Various psychosocial, medication-related, and epilepsy-related factors may be associated with LD in epilepsy. LD can be either permanent or state-dependent. Permanent LD are caused by a brain lesion and/or a stable brain dysfunction. In contrast, state-dependent LD are potentially reversible and treatable; they are caused by epilepsy-related factors. If allowed to persist for a long period, a state-dependent LD may become permanent.

  7. Anti-β-adrenoceptors autoimmunity causing 'idiopathic' arrhythmias and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, Donatella; Sorbo, Anna Rita; Venuti, Angela; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Manna, Raffaele; Fenici, Peter; Wallukat, Gerd; Hoebeke, Johan; Frustaci, Andrea; Fenici, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of anti-β-adrenoceptors autoantibodies (aβAA) in patients with idiopathic arrhythmias (IA) and to assess whether aβAA are predictive markers for concealed cardiomyopathy in such patients. Sixty-seven patients (group 1) with IA [25 supraventricular (SVA) and 42 ventricular (VA)]; 14 patients (group 2) with suspected cardiomyopathy, 12 patients with definite cardiomyopathy (group 3); and 19 healthy controls (group 4) were tested with an enzyme immunoassay, using synthetic peptides corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the human β1-and β2-adrenoceptors. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed in 29 patients. As compared with group 4 [3/19 (15.7%)], anti-β1-adrenoceptor autoantibodies (aβ1AA) were more frequent in group-1 patients [38/67 (56.7%; P<0.01): 27/42 (64.2%; P<0.001) with VA and 11/25 (44%; P<0.05) with SVA]. 3 of the group 1 patients also had anti-β2-adrenoceptor autoantibodies (aβ2AA). 4 were positive for aβ2AA only. Biopsy performed in 11/67 group 1 patients was abnormal in all. Of them, 7/8 (87.5%) with VA and 3/3 (100%) with SVA were positive for aβ1AA. PCR analysis from paraffin blocks of the 11 group 1 biopsied patients was negative for EV, EBV, HCV, AV, PVB19, INF A/B,HSV1/2, HHV6 and HHV8 viral genomes. The second extracellular loop of the β-adrenoceptor is the molecular target of specific autoantibodies. Positivity for aβ1AA predicts abnormal histological findings in 90% of IA patients and suggests that autoimmunity might play an arrhythmogenic role.

  8. Giant subcortical high-frequency SEPs in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: a protective mechanism against seizures?

    PubMed

    Restuccia, Domenico; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2007-01-01

    Recently, we found that high-frequency somatosensory evoked potentials (HF-SEPs), which are modulated by arousal-related structures, were abnormally enhanced during N-REM sleep in two seizure-free IGE patients [Restuccia D, Rubino M, Valeriani M, Della Marca G. Increase of brainstem high-frequency SEP subcomponents during light sleep in seizure-free epileptic patients. Clin Neurophysiol 2005; 116: 1774-1778]. Here, we aimed at verifying whether similar HF-SEP abnormalities were significantly correlated to the clinical outcome in a larger population of untreated IGE patients. Patients were classified as Juvenile Myoclonic epilepsy (JME; six patients) and Childhood or Juvenile Absence epilepsy (CAE and JAE, six patients). They were untreated because newly diagnosed, or because seizure-free. HF-SEPs from patients were compared with those obtained from 21 healthy volunteers. HF-SEPs were abnormally enhanced in all seizure-free CAE-JAE patients, whereas they were normal in all JME patients and in CAE-JAE patients with frequent seizures. Not only scalp distribution, but also dipolar source analysis suggested a subcortical origin for these enhanced subcomponents, possibly in the brainstem. The enhancement of HF-SEPs might reflect the hyperactivity of arousal-related brainstem structures; such an enhancement was found in all seizure-free CAE-JAE patients, while it was never observed in JME patients. We speculate that the hyperactivity of arousal-related brainstem structures might account for the different clinical outcome among IGE subsyndromes.

  9. Epilepsy, excess deaths and years of life lost from external causes.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, Olli; Simola, Mikko; Ansakorpi, Hanna; Raitanen, Jani; Artama, Miia; Isojärvi, Jouko; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-05-01

    We systematically quantified excess mortality in epilepsy patients by cause of death using the population-attributable fraction and epilepsy-attributable years of potential life lost (YPLL) by age 75 years at ages 15 and over. We updated and undertook a re-review of mortality studies from our previous systematic review following PRISMA guidelines to identify cohort studies of general epilepsy populations reporting a relative risk (RR) of death by cause relative to the background rates in the population. Studies on epilepsy prevalence were identified through published reviews. Country-specific mortality figures were obtained from the WHO World Mortality Database. We performed a pooled analysis with the DerSimonian-Laird random effects method. In countries with very high Human Development Indices, epilepsy contributed to 0.5-1.1 % of all deaths in the total population. Among external causes, suicides (RR 2.9, 95 % confidence interval 2.2-3.8; I(2) 52 %) were the major contributor to YPLL, corresponding to 6.7 % and 4.2 % of excess YPLL due to epilepsy in the United States (US) and in the United Kingdom (UK) in 2010, with 541 (346-792) and 44 (28-65) excess suicide cases, respectively. Fatal accidental falls were more common, with 813 (610-1064) and 95 (71-125) excess deaths in the US and in the UK, but these caused only 2.0 % of excess YPLL as they occurred in older age groups. Suicides were the most important external cause of death in epilepsy patients in terms of excess YPLL, whereas other external causes were either more common in older ages or caused less excess deaths.

  10. Herniated gyrus rectus causing idiopathic compression of the optic chiasm.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacob; Jack, Megan M; Peterson, Jeremy C; Chamoun, Roukoz B

    2017-02-01

    Anomalies in the frontal lobe can interfere with visual function by compression of the optic chiasm and nerve. The gyrus rectus is located at the anterior cranial fossa floor superior to the intracranial optic nerves and chiasm. Compression of these structures by the gyrus rectus is often caused by neoplastic or dysplastic growth in the area. We report a rare case of a herniated gyrus rectus impinged on the optic chiasm and nerve without a clear pathological cause for the herniation.

  11. [Myoclonus and epilepsies in children].

    PubMed

    Fejerman, N

    1991-01-01

    The possible associations of myoclonic phenomena, progressive or non progressive encephalopathies and epileptic phenomena are reviewed with special emphasis on childhood. This leads to the following five groups of conditions: (1) myoclonus without encephalopathy and without epilepsy; (2) encephalopathies with non-epileptic myoclonus; (3) progressive encephalopathies with myoclonic seizures or epileptic syndromes (Progressive myoclonus epilepsies); (4) epileptic encephalopathies with myoclonic seizures; (5) myoclonic epilepsies. In the first group, which also includes physiological myoclonus, a more thorough description of "benign sleep myoclonus of newborn" and "benign myoclonus of early infancy" is given. Characteristic of group 2 are "Kinsbourne syndrome" and certain types of "Hyperekplexia" which pose interesting differential diagnosis problems with stimulus-sensitive epilepsies. In group 3, the concept of progressive encephalopathies is stressed, meaning that "Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsies" are always in fact progressive encephalopathies presenting with myoclonic types of seizures or epileptic syndromes among other neurologic and psychologic signs and symptoms. Major and rare causes are reviewed. The term major is applied to typical features or to frequency, whereas rare causes include not only those what are rarely seen, but also some myoclonic variants of diseases which usually have different symptoms. The fourth group refers to severe epilepsies, mainly in infancy and childhood, which lead to mental retardation irrespective of their cause. The assumption is that diffuse and persistent epileptic activity may interfere with normal development of the higher cerebral functions. "West syndrome" and "Lennox-Gastaut syndrome" are the more representative examples and may present with myoclonic type of seizures, but they are not dealt with in detail here. Group 5 comprises true myoclonic epilepsies, differentiating syndromes recognized as idiopathic, such as

  12. Polymorphisms of the SCN1A gene in children and adolescents with primary headache and idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy: is there a linkage?

    PubMed

    Toldo, Irene; Bruson, Alice; Casarin, Alberto; Salviati, Leonardo; Boniver, Clementina; Sartori, Stefano; Montagna, Pasquale; Battistella, Pier Antonio; Clementi, Maurizio

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of the polymorphisms of the SCN1A gene in a series of children and adolescents with primary headache and idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy compared to controls. Five non-synonymous exonic polymorphisms (1748A > T, 2656T > C, 3199A > G, 5771G > A, 5864T > C) of the SCN1A gene were selected and their genotyping was performed, by high resolution melting (HRM), in 49 cases and 100 controls. We found that among the five polymorphisms, only 3199A > G was a true polymorphism. We did not find a statistically significant difference between distribution of 3199A > G genotypes between cases and controls. We excluded the role of the SCN1A gene in the pathogenesis of comorbidity between headache (especially migraine) and epilepsy. The SCN1A gene is a major gene in different epilepsies and epilepsy syndromes; the HRM could be the new methodology, more rapid and efficacious, for molecular analysis of the SCN1A gene.

  13. Common subtypes of idiopathic generalized epilepsies: Lack of linkage to D20S19 close to candidate loci (EBN1, EEGV1) on chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, T.; Schmitz, B.; Janz, D.

    1996-02-16

    Hereditary factors play a major role in the etiology of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). A trait locus (EBN1) for a rare subtype of IGEs, the benign neonatal familial convulsions, and a susceptibility gene (EEGV1) for the common human low-voltage electroencephalogram have been mapped close together with D20S19 to the chromosomal region 20q13.2. Both loci are potential candidates for the susceptibility to IGE spectra with age-related onset beyond the neonatal period. The present study tested the hypothesis that a putative susceptibility locus linked to D20S19 predisposes to spectra of IGEs with age-related onset from childhood to adolescence. Linkage analyses were conducted in 60 families ascertained through IGE patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy or childhood absence epilepsy. Our results provide evidence against linkage of a putative susceptibility gene for four hierarchically broadened IGE spectra with D20S19 assuming tentative single-locus genetic models. The extent of an {open_quotes}exclusion region{close_quotes} (lod scores below -2) varied from 0.5 cM up to 22 cM on either side of D2OSl9 depending on the trait assumed. These results are contrary to the expectation that a susceptibility gene in vicinity to D20S19 confers a common major gene effect to the expression of IGE spectra with age-related onset from childhood to adolescence. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Disruption of LGI1–linked synaptic complex causes abnormal synaptic transmission and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fukata, Yuko; Lovero, Kathryn L.; Iwanaga, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Yokoi, Norihiko; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Nicoll, Roger A.; Fukata, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a devastating and poorly understood disease. Mutations in a secreted neuronal protein, leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1), were reported in patients with an inherited form of human epilepsy, autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF). Here, we report an essential role of LGI1 as an antiepileptogenic ligand. We find that loss of LGI1 in mice (LGI1−/−) causes lethal epilepsy, which is specifically rescued by the neuronal expression of LGI1 transgene, but not LGI3. Moreover, heterozygous mice for the LGI1 mutation (LGI1+/−) show lowered seizure thresholds. Extracellularly secreted LGI1 links two epilepsy-related receptors, ADAM22 and ADAM23, in the brain and organizes a transsynaptic protein complex that includes presynaptic potassium channels and postsynaptic AMPA receptor scaffolds. A lack of LGI1 disrupts this synaptic protein connection and selectively reduces AMPA receptor–mediated synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Thus, LGI1 may serve as a major determinant of brain excitation, and the LGI1 gene-targeted mouse provides a good model for human epilepsy. PMID:20133599

  15. Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Kaarkuzhali B

    2016-02-02

    This issue provides a clinical overview of epilepsy, focusing on diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and further considerations. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  16. Epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J. )

    1991-04-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18(F)FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18(F)FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references.

  17. Hypocalcemic seizure mistaken for idiopathic epilepsy in two cases of DiGeorge syndrome (chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome).

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Lin; Lian, Li-Ming; Chen, Wei-Hung

    2009-12-01

    The chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome, which is synonymous with DiGeorge syndrome, is a congenital anomaly characterized by abnormal facies, congenital heart defects, hypoparathyroidism with hypocalcemia, and immunodeficiency. Neurological manifestations of the chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome are variable, and include mental deficiency, speech disturbances, learning difficulties, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and epilepsy. Hypoparathyroidism and hypocalcemia cause recurrent seizures if patients are not properly treated. We present two patients with poorly controlled epileptic seizures that turned out to be caused by DiGeorge syndrome with hypocalcemia. For such patients, the definitive treatment of seizures depends on recognition of this syndrome and correction of the hypocalcemic state, rather than the use of anticonvulsants.

  18. The Human Epilepsy Mutation GABRG2(Q390X) Causes Chronic Subunit Accumulation and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jing-Qiong; Shen, Wangzhen; Zhou, Chengwen; Xu, Dong; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases are two common neurological disorders conventionally viewed as being unrelated. A subset of patients with severe genetic epilepsies with impaired development and often death respond poorly to anticonvulsant drug therapy, suggesting a need for new therapeutic targets. Previously, we reported that multiple GABAA receptor epilepsy mutations caused protein misfolding and abnormal receptor trafficking. Here we establish in a novel model of a severe human genetic epileptic encephalopathy, the Gabrg2+/Q390X knock-in mouse, that in addition to impairing inhibitory neurotransmission, mutant GABAA receptor γ2(Q390X) subunits accumulated and aggregated intracellularly, activated caspase 3 and caused widespread, age-dependent neurodegeneration. These novel findings suggest that the fundamental protein metabolism and cellular consequences of the epilepsy-associated mutant γ2(Q390X) ion channel subunit are not fundamentally different from those associated with neurodegeneration. The study has far-reaching significance for identification of conserved pathological cascades and mechanism-based therapies that overlap genetic epilepsies and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26005849

  19. Localized idiopathic fibrosing mediastinitis as a cause of superior vena cava syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Baslaim, Ghassan; deVarennes, Benoit

    1998-01-01

    An unusual case of superior vena cava syndrome, caused by localized fibrosing mediastinitis is presented. A 41-year-old woman had swelling of the face and upper extremities, associated with headache and fatigue. Radiologic investigations, which included venography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the chest, documented the presence of superior vena caval (SVC) obstruction secondary to what appeared to be an intraluminal tumour. The patient underwent SVC resection and reconstruction with a spiral saphenous vein graft under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. On histopathological examination localized idiopathic fibrosing mediastinitis causing SVC obstruction was diagnosed. PMID:9492750

  20. Epidemiology, causes, and treatment of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Ba-Diop, Awa; Marin, Benoît; Druet-Cabanac, Michel; Ngoungou, Edgard B; Newton, Charles R; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disease in tropical countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Previous work on epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa has shown that many cases are severe, partly a result of some specific causes, that it carries a stigma, and that it is not adequately treated in many cases. Many studies on the epidemiology, aetiology, and management of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa have been reported in the past 10 years. The prevalence estimated from door-to-door studies is almost double that in Asia, Europe, and North America. The most commonly implicated risk factors are birth trauma, CNS infections, and traumatic brain injury. About 60% of patients with epilepsy receive no antiepileptic treatment, largely for economic and social reasons. Further epidemiological studies should be a priority to improve understanding of possible risk factors and thereby the prevention of epilepsy in Africa, and action should be taken to improve access to treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    PubMed

    Marcián, Václav; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease.

  2. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    PubMed Central

    Marcián, Václav; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease. PMID:27375960

  3. De novo mutations of KIAA2022 in females cause intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Iris M; Helbig, Katherine L; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Møller, Rikke S; Velinov, Milen; Dolzhanskaya, Natalia; Marsh, Eric; Helbig, Ingo; Devinsky, Orrin; Tang, Sha; Mefford, Heather C; Myers, Candace T; van Paesschen, Wim; Striano, Pasquale; van Gassen, Koen; van Kempen, Marjan; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Piard, Juliette; Minassian, Berge A; Nezarati, Marjan M; Pessoa, André; Jacquette, Aurelia; Maher, Bridget; Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Warde, Marie Therese Abi; De St Martin, Anne; Chelly, Jamel; van ‘t Slot, Ruben; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Brilstra, Eva H; Koeleman, Bobby P C

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in the KIAA2022 gene have been reported in male patients with X-linked intellectual disability, and related female carriers were unaffected. Here, we report 14 female patients who carry a heterozygous de novo KIAA2022 mutation and share a phenotype characterised by intellectual disability and epilepsy. Methods Reported females were selected for genetic testing because of substantial developmental problems and/or epilepsy. X-inactivation and expression studies were performed when possible. Results All mutations were predicted to result in a frameshift or premature stop. 12 out of 14 patients had intractable epilepsy with myoclonic and/or absence seizures, and generalised in 11. Thirteen patients had mild to severe intellectual disability. This female phenotype partially overlaps with the reported male phenotype which consists of more severe intellectual disability, microcephaly, growth retardation, facial dysmorphisms and, less frequently, epilepsy. One female patient showed completely skewed X-inactivation, complete absence of RNA expression in blood and a phenotype similar to male patients. In the six other tested patients, X-inactivation was random, confirmed by a non-significant twofold to threefold decrease of RNA expression in blood, consistent with the expected mosaicism between cells expressing mutant or normal KIAA2022 alleles. Conclusions Heterozygous loss of KIAA2022 expression is a cause of intellectual disability in females. Compared with its hemizygous male counterpart, the heterozygous female disease has less severe intellectual disability, but is more often associated with a severe and intractable myoclonic epilepsy. PMID:27358180

  4. Clinical features, proximate causes, and consequences of active convulsive epilepsy in Africa.

    PubMed

    Kariuki, Symon M; Matuja, William; Akpalu, Albert; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Chabi, Martin; Wagner, Ryan G; Connor, Myles; Chengo, Eddie; Ngugi, Anthony K; Odhiambo, Rachael; Bottomley, Christian; White, Steven; Sander, Josemir W; Neville, Brian G R; Newton, Charles R J C; Twine, Rhian; Gómez Olivé, F Xavier; Collinson, Mark; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen; Masanja, Honratio; Mathew, Alexander; Pariyo, George; Peterson, Stefan; Ndyomughenyi, Donald; Bauni, Evasius; Kamuyu, Gathoni; Odera, Victor Mung'ala; Mageto, James O; Ae-Ngibise, Ken; Akpalu, Bright; Agbokey, Francis; Adjei, Patrick; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Doku, Victor C K; Odermatt, Peter; Nutman, Thomas; Wilkins, Patricia; Noh, John

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the clinical features and consequences are poorly characterized. Most studies are hospital-based, and few studies have compared different ecological sites in SSA. We described active convulsive epilepsy (ACE) identified in cross-sectional community-based surveys in SSA, to understand the proximate causes, features, and consequences. We performed a detailed clinical and neurophysiologic description of ACE cases identified from a community survey of 584,586 people using medical history, neurologic examination, and electroencephalography (EEG) data from five sites in Africa: South Africa; Tanzania; Uganda; Kenya; and Ghana. The cases were examined by clinicians to discover risk factors, clinical features, and consequences of epilepsy. We used logistic regression to determine the epilepsy factors associated with medical comorbidities. Half (51%) of the 2,170 people with ACE were children and 69% of seizures began in childhood. Focal features (EEG, seizure types, and neurologic deficits) were present in 58% of ACE cases, and these varied significantly with site. Status epilepticus occurred in 25% of people with ACE. Only 36% received antiepileptic drugs (phenobarbital was the most common drug [95%]), and the proportion varied significantly with the site. Proximate causes of ACE were adverse perinatal events (11%) for onset of seizures before 18 years; and acute encephalopathy (10%) and head injury prior to seizure onset (3%). Important comorbidities were malnutrition (15%), cognitive impairment (23%), and neurologic deficits (15%). The consequences of ACE were burns (16%), head injuries (postseizure) (1%), lack of education (43%), and being unmarried (67%) or unemployed (57%) in adults, all significantly more common than in those without epilepsy. There were significant differences in the comorbidities across sites. Focal features are common in ACE, suggesting identifiable and preventable causes. Malnutrition and

  5. Abdominal epilepsy as an unusual cause of abdominal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Yilmaz; Sefer, Ustebay; Dondu, Ulker Ustebay; Ismail, Ozanli; Yusuf, Ehi

    2016-09-01

    Abdominal pain, in etiology sometimes difficult to be defined, is a frequent complaint in childhood. Abdominal epilepsy is a rare cause of abdominal pain. In this article, we report on 5 year old girl patient with abdominal epilepsy. Some investigations (stool investigation, routine blood tests, ultrasonography (USG), electrocardiogram (ECHO) and electrocardiograpy (ECG), holter for 24hr.) were done to understand the origin of these complaints; but no abnormalities were found. Finally an EEG was done during an episode of abdominal pain and it was shown that there were generalized spikes especially precipitated by hyperventilation. The patient did well on valproic acid therapy and EEG was normal 1 month after beginning of the treatment. The cause of chronic recurrent paroxymal abdominal pain is difficult for the clinicians to diagnose in childhood. A lot of disease may lead to paroxysmal gastrointestinal symptoms like familial mediterranean fever and porfiria. Abdominal epilepsy is one of the rare but easily treatable cause of abdominal pain. In conclusion, abdominal epilepsy should be suspected in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

  6. Hypohaptoglobinemia associated with familial epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    In select kindreds afflicted with familial idiopathic epilepsy, most individuals suffering seizures also have low levels of the plasma hemoglobin-binding protein, haptoglobin. This hypohaptoglobinemia may be causally associated with a tendency to develop epilepsy. Our experimental results indicate that artificially-induced hypohaptoglobinemia in mice causes retarded clearance of free hemoglobin from the central nervous system, and that such free hemoglobin may engender the peroxidation of brain lipids. We hypothesize that hypohaptoglobinemia, either inherited, or acquired via traumatic processes, may prevent efficient clearance of interstitial hemoglobin from the central nervous system, thereby predisposing these people to encephalic inflammation and the appearance of seizure disorders. PMID:3981086

  7. Causes of death among people with convulsive epilepsy in rural West China: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Mu, J; Liu, L; Zhang, Q; Si, Y; Hu, J; Fang, J; Gao, Y; He, J; Li, S; Wang, W; Wu, J; Sander, J W; Zhou, D

    2011-07-12

    Epilepsy is a serious health problem associated with an increased risk of premature mortality. Few studies have investigated risk factors for this. Understanding these risks may enable the implementation of preventative measures to reduce premature mortality. A management program for convulsive forms of epilepsy has been in place at the primary health care level in rural West China since May 2005. Demographic data and putative causes of death of attendees of the program since inception to the end of December 2009 have been recorded. Case fatality (CF), the proportional mortality ratios (PMRs) for each cause, and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for each age and cause were estimated based on the 2007 Chinese rural population. There were 106 reported deaths (70 male) among 3,568 people. CF was 2.97% during a median of 28 months' follow-up. The highest PMRs were for accidental death (59%) including drowning (45.1%); probable sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) (14.7%); status epilepticus (6.9%), and neoplasm (6.9%). The overall SMR was 4.92 (95% confidence interval 4.0-6.1); the risks were high in young people. The risk of drowning was 82-fold higher in the cohort than the general population. In rural West China, the risk of premature death is nearly 5 times higher in people with convulsive epilepsy than in the general Chinese population and especially high among young people. Accidental death, including drowning, and probable SUDEP are the leading putative causes of death in people with convulsive epilepsy in rural West China.

  8. Evaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva M; Dejanovic, Borislav; May, Patrick; Thiele, Holger; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Schwarz, Günter; Riesch, Erik; Ikram, M Arfan; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Steinböck, Hannelore; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Neophytou, Birgit; Zara, Federico; Hahn, Andreas; Gormley, Padhraig; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne G; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Kunz, Wolfram S; Krause, Roland; Zimprich, Fritz; Lemke, Johannes R; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Lerche, Holger; Neubauer, Bernd A

    2016-01-01

    The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic. We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients. We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%). Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1) are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10-4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test), previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions.

  9. Assessment of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability and Interictal Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities in Drug-naïve Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Ozden; Cincin, Altug; Pehlivan, Aslihan; Midi, Ipek; Kepez, Alper; Agan, Kadriye

    2016-06-01

    Epilepsy is a disease known to occur with autonomous phenomenons. Earlier studies indicate decreased heart rate variability (HRV) during ictal and interictal periods among epilepsy patients. In this study, we aim to investigate cardiac rhythm abnormalities and HRV during interictal period between drug-naïve patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and healthy control group. Twenty-six patients with IGE and 26 healthy individuals included in the study. In order to eliminate any structural cardiac pathology, transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all subjects and time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were evaluated after 24-hour rhythm holter monitoring. Between two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of mean heart rate and maximum duration between the start of the Q waves and the end of the T waves (QT intervals). In the time domain analysis of HRV, no statically significant difference was detected for standard deviation of all R - R intervals and root-mean-square of successive differences between patient and control group (p = 0,070 and p = 0,104 respectively). In the frequency domain analysis of HRV, patients tended to display lower total power and very low frequency power than did healthy subjects, but the differences were not statistically significant. Our results suggest that there is no major effect of the epilepsy on HRV in patients with IGE. It should be emphasized that, in this study, HRV was evaluated only in patients with IGE and that the results are not proper to be generalized for patients with partial seizures.

  10. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    PubMed

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P<0.001), older age (P<0.001), and uncontrolled seizures (P=0.045). The intraclass coefficient (test-retest reliability) for LAEP overall score was 0.848 (95% CI=0.782-0.895), with a range from 0.370 (unsteadiness) to 0.750 (memory problems). Cronbach's α coefficient (internal consistency) was 0.903. The LAEP was highly correlated with Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 inventory (r=-0.804, P>0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups.

  11. Clinical features, proximate causes, and consequences of active convulsive epilepsy in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Symon M; Matuja, William; Akpalu, Albert; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Chabi, Martin; Wagner, Ryan G; Connor, Myles; Chengo, Eddie; Ngugi, Anthony K; Odhiambo, Rachael; Bottomley, Christian; White, Steven; Sander, Josemir W; Neville, Brian G R; Newton, Charles R J C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Epilepsy is common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the clinical features and consequences are poorly characterized. Most studies are hospital-based, and few studies have compared different ecological sites in SSA. We described active convulsive epilepsy (ACE) identified in cross-sectional community-based surveys in SSA, to understand the proximate causes, features, and consequences. Methods We performed a detailed clinical and neurophysiologic description of ACE cases identified from a community survey of 584,586 people using medical history, neurologic examination, and electroencephalography (EEG) data from five sites in Africa: South Africa; Tanzania; Uganda; Kenya; and Ghana. The cases were examined by clinicians to discover risk factors, clinical features, and consequences of epilepsy. We used logistic regression to determine the epilepsy factors associated with medical comorbidities. Key Findings Half (51%) of the 2,170 people with ACE were children and 69% of seizures began in childhood. Focal features (EEG, seizure types, and neurologic deficits) were present in 58% of ACE cases, and these varied significantly with site. Status epilepticus occurred in 25% of people with ACE. Only 36% received antiepileptic drugs (phenobarbital was the most common drug [95%]), and the proportion varied significantly with the site. Proximate causes of ACE were adverse perinatal events (11%) for onset of seizures before 18 years; and acute encephalopathy (10%) and head injury prior to seizure onset (3%). Important comorbidities were malnutrition (15%), cognitive impairment (23%), and neurologic deficits (15%). The consequences of ACE were burns (16%), head injuries (postseizure) (1%), lack of education (43%), and being unmarried (67%) or unemployed (57%) in adults, all significantly more common than in those without epilepsy. Significance There were significant differences in the comorbidities across sites. Focal features are common in ACE, suggesting identifiable and

  12. Phenobarbital or potassium bromide as an add-on antiepileptic drug for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy refractory to imepitoin.

    PubMed

    Royaux, E; Van Ham, L; Broeckx, B J G; Van Soens, I; Gielen, I; Deforce, D; Bhatti, S F M

    2017-02-01

    Imepitoin has recently been approved in Europe for the management of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Currently, there is no evidence-based information available on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs used as additions to the therapeutic regimen in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that are not well controlled with imepitoin. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of phenobarbital or potassium bromide (KBr) as add-on antiepileptic drugs for controlling dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin (30 mg/kg twice daily). The study was performed as a prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial. The efficacy of phenobarbital and KBr was evaluated by comparing monthly seizure frequency (MSF), monthly seizure day frequency (MSDF), the presence of cluster seizures during a retrospective 2-month period with a prospective follow-up of 6 months, and the overall responder rate. Twenty-seven dogs were included in the study, 14 dogs in the phenobarbital group and 13 dogs in the KBr group. Both median MSF and MSDF decreased in the phenobarbital group (both P = 0.001) and in the KBr group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003, respectively). Overall, the number of dogs with cluster seizures decreased (P = 0.0005). The responder rate was 79% vs. 69% in the phenobarbital and KBr groups, respectively. We conclude that phenobarbital or KBr add-on treatment decreases median MSF and MSDF in epileptic dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin. Combination therapy was generally well tolerated and resulted in an improvement in seizure management in the majority of the dogs.

  13. Idiopathic anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Fenny, Nana; Grammer, Leslie C

    2015-05-01

    Idiopathic anaphylaxis is a diagnosis of exclusion after other causes have been thoroughly evaluated and excluded. The pathogenesis of idiopathic anaphylaxis remains uncertain, although increased numbers of activated lymphocytes and circulating histamine-releasing factors have been implicated. Signs and symptoms of patients diagnosed with idiopathic anaphylaxis are indistinguishable from the manifestations of other forms of anaphylaxis. Treatment regimens are implemented based on the frequency and severity of patient symptoms and generally include the use of epinephrine autoinjectors, antihistamines, and steroids. The prognosis of idiopathic anaphylaxis is generally favorable with well-established treatment regimens and effective patient education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cause-specific mortality in adult epilepsy patients from Tyrol, Austria: hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Granbichler, Claudia A; Oberaigner, Willi; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Bauer, Gerhard; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Seppi, Klaus; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a devastating condition with a considerable increase in mortality compared to the general population. Few studies have focused on cause-specific mortality which we analyse in detail in over 4,000 well-characterized epilepsy patients. The cohort comprised of epilepsy patients ≥ 18, treated between 1970 and 2009 at the epilepsy clinic of Innsbruck Medical University, Austria, and living in the province of Tyrol, Austria. Epilepsy diagnosis was based on ILAE guidelines (1989); patients with brain tumor were excluded. Deceased patients and causes of death (ICD-codes) were obtained via record linkage to the national death registry. We computed age-, sex-, and period-adjusted standardized mortality rates (SMR) for 36 diagnoses subgroups in four major groups. Additional analyses were performed for an incidence cohort. Overall cohort: 4,295 patients, 60,649.1 person-years, 822 deaths, overall SMR 1.7 (95 % CI 1.6-1.9), highest elevated cause-specific SMR: congenital anomalies [7.1 (95 % CI 2.3-16.6)], suicide [4.2 (95 % CI 2.0-8.1)], alcohol dependence syndrome [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], malignant neoplasm of esophagus [3.1 (95 % CI 1.2-6.4)], pneumonia [2.7 (95 % CI 1.6-4.2)]. Incidence cohort: 1,299 patients, 14,215.4 person-years, 267 deaths, overall SMR 1.8 (95 % CI 1.6-2.1), highest elevated cause-specific SMR congenital anomalies [10.8 (95 % CI 1.3-39.3)], suicide [6.8 (95 % CI 1.4-19.8)], alcohol dependence syndrome (6.4 [95 % CI 1.8-16.5)], pneumonia [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], cerebrovascular disease at 3.5 (95 % CI 2.6-4.6). Mortality due to mental health problems, such as suicide or alcohol dependence syndrome, malignant neoplasms, and cerebrovascular diseases was highly increased in our study. In addition to aim for seizure freedom, we suggest improving general health promotion, including cessation of smoking, lowering of alcohol intake, and reduction of weight as well as early identification of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with epilepsy.

  15. Indriven sphenoid wing as a cause of post-traumatic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sumer, M M; Atasoy, H T; Unal, A; Kalayci, M; Mahmutyazicioglu, K; Erdem, O

    2003-11-01

    Post-traumatic epilepsy is more frequent after severe head injuries, however the severity of the trauma is not always correlated with the injured brain tissue. We report a patient whose seizures developed 4 years after a face trauma. Upward displacement of the sphenoid wing caused a contusion at the orbital surface of the frontal lobe. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalographic findings are presented. The patient responded well to commonly used antiepileptic drugs.

  16. Abnormal Hypermethylation of the VDAC2 Promoter is a Potential Cause of Idiopathic Asthenospermia in Men

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Aiming; Hua, Yibo; Zhang, Jianzhong; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Kai; Xi, Wei; Wang, Hainan; Fang, Jianzheng; Su, Shifeng; Tang, Min; Liu, Bianjiang; Wang, Zengjun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the association between the methylation status of the VDAC2 gene promoter region and idiopathic asthenospermia (IAS). Twenty-five IAS patients and 27 fertile normozoospermia (NZ) were involved. GC-2spd cells were treated with different concentrations of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) for 24 h and 48 h. qRT-PCR was conducted to reveal whether or not VDAC2 expression was regulated by methylated modification. A dual-luciferase activity detection was used to verify VDAC2 promoter activity in GC-2spd cells. Bisulphite genomic sequence was used to analyse DNA methylation of the VDAC2 promoter. The results showed that VDAC2 expression was significantly increased after treated with 5-Aza-CdR. A strong activity of the promoter (−2000 bp to +1000 bp) was detected by dual-luciferase activity detection (P < 0.05). The bisulphite genomic sequencing and correlation analysis showed that sperm motility was positively associated with the methylation pattern of uncomplete methylation and mild hypermethylation, and negatively related to the percentage of moderate methylation. In conclusion, high methylation of the VDAC2 promoter CpGs could be positively correlated with low sperm motility. Abnormal methylation of VDAC2 promoter may be a potential cause to idiopathic asthenospermia. PMID:27892527

  17. Peri-ictal and inter-ictal headache in children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy: a multicenter cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; Coppola, Giangennaro; Spalice, Alberto; Di Fonzo, Alessia; Bruschi, Raffaella; Tozzi, Elisabetta; Iannetti, Paola; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2011-09-01

    Headache in epileptic population ranges from 8% to 15%. The aim of this paper was to study the clinical and temporal characteristics of primary headache comorbidity in idiopathic epileptic children. From June 2006 to June 2009, a cross-sectional multi-center study involving five Italian Child Neurology University Centers (two in Rome, one in Chieti, one in Naples, and one in L'Aquila) was conducted. Among 1,264 consecutively newly diagnosed, idiopathic, partial, or generalized, epileptic children, according to ILAE diagnostic criteria (aged between 5 and 15 years of age), we selected 142 children (11.2%) (130 of whom completed the study) who showed an associated peri-ictal and/or inter-ictal headache diagnosed according to the International Headache Society Criteria. Rare cases of "ictal epileptic headache", in which headache represents the sole ictal epileptic manifestation, were excluded from this study. Post-ictal headaches were most frequent (62%). Pre-ictal headaches were less common (30%). Inter-ictal headaches were described in 57.6%. Clear migrainous features were present in 93% of pre-ictal and 81.4% of post-ictal headaches. Inter-ictal headaches meet criteria for migraines in 87%. The association between partial epilepsy and migraine without aura is most common and reported in 82% of our patients with peri-ictal headache and in 76.5% of patients with post-ictal headache.

  18. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction due to Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy as a cause of visual loss during assessment for epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Niehusmann, Pitt; Surges, Rainer; von Wrede, Randi D; Elger, Christian E; Wellmer, Jörg; Reimann, Jens; Urbach, Horst; Vielhaber, Stefan; Bien, Christian G; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2011-01-01

    Assessment for epilepsy surgery may require invasive measures such as implantation of intracranial electrodes or the Wada test. These investigations are commonly well tolerated. However, complications, including visual disturbances of various etiologies, have been reported. Here we describe two patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who displayed loss of vision in the context of presurgical assessment and in whom mutations associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) were detected. Genetic analysis revealed in one patient the frequent mitochondrial G11778A LHON mutation in ND4. In the second patient, the mitochondrial C4640A mutation in ND2 was detected. This rare LHON mutation enhanced the sensitivity of the patient's muscle and brain tissue to amobarbital, a known blocker of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported in epilepsy. Thus, the presence of LHON mutations can be a rare cause of visual disturbances in patients with epilepsy and may have predisposed to development of epilepsy.

  20. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Julian; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Langlois, Mélanie; May, Patrick; Huneau, Clément; Becker, Felicitas; Muhle, Hiltrud; Suls, Arvid; Lemke, Johannes R; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Thiele, Holger; Konrad, Kathryn; Kawalia, Amit; Toliat, Mohammad R; Sander, Thomas; Rüschendorf, Franz; Caliebe, Almuth; Nagel, Inga; Kohl, Bernard; Kecskés, Angela; Jacmin, Maxime; Hardies, Katia; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Riesch, Erik; Dorn, Thomas; Brilstra, Eva H; Baulac, Stephanie; Møller, Rikke S; Hjalgrim, Helle; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehman-Horn, Frank; Roach, Jared C; Glusman, Gustavo; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David J; Martin, Benoit; de Witte, Peter A M; Biskup, Saskia; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Balling, Rudi; Nürnberg, Peter; Crawford, Alexander D; Esguerra, Camila V; Weber, Yvonne G; Lerche, Holger

    2014-12-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children and have a strong genetic component. Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding syntaxin-1B, that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations and a de novo microdeletion encompassing STX1B were then identified in 449 familial or sporadic cases. Video and local field potential analyses of zebrafish larvae with antisense knockdown of stx1b showed seizure-like behavior and epileptiform discharges that were highly sensitive to increased temperature. Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes.

  1. Gonadal mosaicism of a novel IQSEC2 variant causing female limited intellectual disability and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ewans, Lisa J; Field, Michael; Zhu, Ying; Turner, Gillian; Leffler, Melanie; Dinger, Marcel E; Cowley, Mark J; Buckley, Michael F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Jackson, Matilda R; Roscioli, Tony; Shoubridge, Cheryl

    2017-06-01

    We report a family with four girls with moderate to severe intellectual disability and epilepsy. Two girls showed regression in adolescence and died of presumed sudden unexpected death in epilepsy at 16 and 22 years. Whole exome sequencing identified a truncating pathogenic variant in IQSEC2 at NM_001111125.2: c.2679_2680insA, p.(D894fs*10), a recently identified cause of epileptic encephalopathy in females (MIM 300522). The IQSEC2 variant was identified in both surviving affected sisters but in neither parent. We describe the phenotypic spectrum associated with IQSEC2 variants, highlighting how IQSEC2 is adding to a growing list of X-linked genes that have a female-specific phenotype typically associated with de novo mutations. This report illustrates the need for careful review of all whole exome data, incorporating all possible modes of inheritance including that suggested by the family history.

  2. A case of subarachnoid hemorrhage with pituitary apoplexy caused by idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shoko M; Aoki, Makoto; Nakane, Makoto; Nakayama, Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    Steroid therapy is considered to improve clinical symptoms in hypertrophic pachymeningitis. We present a 70-year-old man with idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis, whose clinical signs progressively worsened despite steroid therapy. He died of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with pituitary apoplexy 2 months after the admission regardless of improvement of laboratory data and magnetic resonance imaging appearance by one-and-half-month steroid therapy. Autopsy revealed thickened dura mater supporting the diagnosis of hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Brain parenchyma is generally not affected by the disease; however, histological investigation suggested that inflammation of the dura caused damage to superior hypophyseal artery resulting in SAH and apoplexy in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland. The higher dose and the longer duration of steroid therapy should have achieved in our case although most laboratory data recovered within the normal range. The aggressiveness of hypertrophic pachymeningitis must be evaluated by clinical signs rather than by laboratory data or imaging examinations.

  3. Idiopathic Infantile Arterial Calcification: A Rare Cause of Sudden Unexpected Death in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Susana; Lopes, José Manuel; Oliveira, José Bessa; Santos, Agostinho

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected child death investigation is a difficult area of forensic practice in view of the wide range of possible genetic, congenital, and acquired natural and nonnatural causes. Idiopathic infantile arterial calcification (IIAC) is a rare autosomic recessive disease usually diagnosed postmortem. Inactivating mutations of the ENPP1 gene were described in 80% of the cases with IIAC. We report a case of a 5-year-old girl submitted to a forensic autopsy due to sudden death and possible medical negligence/parents child abuse. Major alterations found (intimal proliferation and deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite around the internal elastic lamina and media of arteries; acute myocardial infarct, stenotic and calcified coronary artery; perivascular and interstitial myocardial fibrosis; and subendocardial fibroelastosis) were diagnostic of IIAC. We reviewed IIAC cases published in the English literature and highlight the importance of adequate autopsy evaluation in cases of sudden child death. PMID:21151691

  4. Epilepsy - children

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure disorder - children; Convulsion - childhood epilepsy; Medically refractory childhood epilepsy; Anticonvulsant - childhood epilepsy; Antiepileptic drug - childhood epilepsy; AED - childhood epilepsy

  5. Evaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    May, Patrick; Thiele, Holger; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Schwarz, Günter; Riesch, Erik; Ikram, M. Arfan; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Steinböck, Hannelore; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Neophytou, Birgit; Zara, Federico; Hahn, Andreas; Gormley, Padhraig; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne G.; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Krause, Roland; Zimprich, Fritz; Lemke, Johannes R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Lerche, Holger; Neubauer, Bernd A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic. Methods We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients. Results and Interpretation We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%). Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1) are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10−4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test), previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions. PMID:26990884

  6. Small temporal pole encephalocele: A hidden cause of "normal" MRI temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Rafael; Jiménez-Huete, Adolfo; Campo, Pablo; Poch, Claudia; García-Morales, Irene; Gómez Angulo, Juan Carlos; Coras, Roland; Blümcke, Ingmar; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Small temporal pole encephalocele (STPE) can be the pathologic substrate of epilepsy in a subgroup of patients with noninformative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Herein, we analyzed the clinical, neurophysiologic, and radiologic features of the epilepsy found in 22 patients with STPE, and the frequency of STPE in patients with refractory focal epilepsy (RFE). We performed an observational study of all patients with STPE identified at our epilepsy unit from January 2007 to December 2014. Cases were detected through a systematic search of our database of RFE patients evaluated for surgery, and a prospective collection of patients identified at the outpatient clinic. The RFE database was also employed to analyze the frequency of STPE among the different clinical subgroups. We identified 22 patients with STPE (11 women), including 12 (4.0%) of 303 patients from the RFE database, and 10 from the outpatient clinic. The median age was 51.5 years (range 29-75) and the median age at seizure onset was 38.5 years (range 15-73). Typically, 12 (80%) of 15 patients with left STPE reported seizures with impairment of language. Among the RFE cases, STPE were found in 9.6% of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and in 0.5% of those with extra-TLE (p = 0.0001). STPEs were more frequent in TLE patients with an initial MRI study reported as normal (23.3%) than in those with MRI-visible lesions (1.4%; p = 0.0002). Stereo-electroencephalography was performed in four patients, confirming the localization of the epileptogenic zone at the temporal pole with late participation of the hippocampus. Long-term seizure control was achieved in four of five operated patients. STPE can be a hidden cause of TLE in a subgroup of patients with an initial report of "normal" MRI. Early identification of this lesion may help to select patients for presurgical evaluation and tailored resection. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Enigma (partially) resolved: phospholipase A2 receptor is the cause of "idiopathic" membranous glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Truong, Luan D; Seshan, Surya V

    2015-12-15

    Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) is a very significant kidney disease. It is one of the frequent causes of heavy protein excretion in urine. MGN is thought to be an immune-mediated disease caused by glomerular deposition of antigen-antibody complexes. The pathogenic antigen, however, has been an enigma until recently. It was discovered in 2009 that phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R), a normal transmembrane protein in podocyte plasma membrane, is the antigen causing MGN. Within 5 yr of its discovery, this seminal finding has leaded to novel insights into the treatment of this disease including diagnosis, therapy, and prediction of outcome. This finding also paves the way for fundamental studies on how and why autoimmunity against PLA2R develops. The discovery of PLA2A as the cause of "idiopathic" MGN after a half century of speculation, followed by further fundamental insights with such an expedient and successful application in patient care, embodies the elegance of science at its junction with society. This perspective traces the story of this remarkable discovery.

  8. Excessive activation of mTOR in postnatally generated granule cells is sufficient to cause epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pun, Raymund Y K; Rolle, Isaiah J; Lasarge, Candi L; Hosford, Bethany E; Rosen, Jules M; Uhl, Juli D; Schmeltzer, Sarah N; Faulkner, Christian; Bronson, Stefanie L; Murphy, Brian L; Richards, David A; Holland, Katherine D; Danzer, Steve C

    2012-09-20

    The dentate gyrus is hypothesized to function as a "gate," limiting the flow of excitation through the hippocampus. During epileptogenesis, adult-generated granule cells (DGCs) form aberrant neuronal connections with neighboring DGCs, disrupting the dentate gate. Hyperactivation of the mTOR signaling pathway is implicated in driving this aberrant circuit formation. While the presence of abnormal DGCs in epilepsy has been known for decades, direct evidence linking abnormal DGCs to seizures has been lacking. Here, we isolate the effects of abnormal DGCs using a transgenic mouse model to selectively delete PTEN from postnatally generated DGCs. PTEN deletion led to hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway, producing abnormal DGCs morphologically similar to those in epilepsy. Strikingly, animals in which PTEN was deleted from ≥ 9% of the DGC population developed spontaneous seizures in about 4 weeks, confirming that abnormal DGCs, which are present in both animals and humans with epilepsy, are capable of causing the disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Idiopathic anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2007-05-01

    Idiopathic anaphylaxis is a prednisone-responsive condition without external cause, but it can coexist with food-, medication-, or exercise-induced anaphylaxis. Mast cell activation may occur at night or after foods that have been eaten with impunity many times previously. Idiopathic anaphylaxis can be classified into frequent (if there are six or more episodes per year or two episodes in the last 2 months) or infrequent (if episodes occur less often). Idiopathic anaphylaxis-generalized consists of urticaria or angioedema associated with severe respiratory distress, syncope or hypotension, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Idiopathic anaphylaxis-angioedema consists of massive tongue enlargement or severe pharyngeal or laryngeal swelling with urticaria or peripheral angioedema. The differential diagnosis of idiopathic anaphylaxis is reviewed, and treatment approaches are presented.

  10. [Dysphagia caused by neurogenic deglutition disorders and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH)].

    PubMed

    Bremke, M; Wagner, H-J; Folz, B J

    2006-09-01

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) may lead to dysphagia caused by osteophytes of the cervical spine. Osteophytes can be resected transorally or transcervically, but operative ablation should not be indicated generously because of the threat of severe complications. A fifty-year-old man with dysphagia and loss of weight of 15 kg in the last three months is presented. He also suffered from a brain damage during infancy which caused grand-mal-seizures. One seizure lead to cardiac arrest which required cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and subsequent tracheostomy. A spheric tumor of the posterior pharyngeal wall could be seen endoscopically, it appeared radiologically as an osteophytic formation of the segments C (3) - C (5). Ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament was also seen. Diagnosis of DISH was made on the basis of these results. Contrast imaging of the esophagus and videofluoroscopy showed aspiration in terms of neurogenic disorders. The patient received a percutaneous gastrostomy after his case was discussed with neurologic and orthopaedic colleagues, because a causal therapy of the combined disease seemed to be impossible. Dysphagia in the presented case was caused by a combination of neurogenic deglutition disorders and oropharyngeal obstruction through osteophytes. Surgical removal of the osteophytes was not indicated because it would have put the patient at a certain risk, but only a part of the underlying problem would have been removed. Symptomatic therapy with a gastrostomy secures normocaloric diet. The patient's weight remained stable and he can follow his habitual daily routine.

  11. Brain maturation and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dulac, Olivier; Milh, Mathieu; Holmes, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    At full term, both glutamate and gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) are excitatory; cortical synapses are beginning to appear, there is little myelin in the cerebral hemispheres, and long tracts hardly start to develop. Neonatal myoclonic encephalopathy can result from premature activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) transmission. Benign neonatal seizures and migrating partial seizures in infancy could involve excessive or premature excitability of deep cortical layers. Benign rolandic epilepsy and continuous spike waves in slow sleep are consistent with an excess of both excitatory and inhibitory cortical synapses. West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes express age-related diffuse cortical hyperexcitability, the pattern depending on the age of occurrence; synchronization of spikes is becoming possible with maturation of the myelin. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy is itself modulated by maturation that causes frontal hyperexcitability generating myoclonic-astatic seizures, between the ages of infantile and juvenile myoclonic epilepsies. Physiological delay of hippocampo-neocortical pathways maturation could account for the delayed occurrence of mesial temporal epilepsy following infantile damage, whereas premature maturation could contribute to fronto-temporal damage characteristic of fever-induced epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children, a dramatic school-age epileptic encephalopathy.

  12. Mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 cause both Kallmann syndrome and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Pitteloud, Nelly; Acierno, James S; Meysing, Astrid; Eliseenkova, Anna V; Ma, Jinghong; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Metzger, Daniel L; Hayes, Frances J; Dwyer, Andrew A; Hughes, Virginia A; Yialamas, Maria; Hall, Janet E; Grant, Ellen; Mohammadi, Moosa; Crowley, William F

    2006-04-18

    Mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 cause Kallmann syndrome (KS), whereas mutations in the GNRHR and GPR54 genes cause idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with normal olfaction (nIHH). Mixed pedigrees containing both KS and nIHH have also been described; however, the genetic cause of these rare cases is unknown. We examined the FGFR1 gene in seven nIHH subjects who either belonged to a mixed pedigree (n = 5) or who had associated midline defects (n = 2). Heterozygous FGFR1 mutations were found in three of seven unrelated nIHH probands with normal MRI of the olfactory system: (i) G237S in an nIHH female and a KS brother; (ii) (P722H and N724K) in an nIHH male missing two teeth and his mother with isolated hyposmia; and (iii) Q680X in a nIHH male with cleft lip/palate and missing teeth, his brother with nIHH, and his father with delayed puberty. We show that these mutations lead to receptor loss-of-function. The Q680X leads to an inactive FGFR1, which lacks a major portion of the tyrosine kinase domain (TKD). The G237S mutation inhibits proper folding of D2 of the FGFR1 and likely leads to the loss of cell-surface expression of FGFR1. In contrast, the (P722H and N724K) double mutation causes structural perturbations in TKD, reducing the catalytic activity of TKD. We conclude that loss-of-function mutations in FGFR1 cause nIHH with normal MRI of the olfactory system. These mutations also account for some of the mixed pedigrees, thus challenging the current idea that KS and nIHH are distinct entities.

  13. Mutations in SLC20A2 are a major cause of familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Sandy Chan; Sears, Renee L.; Lemos, Roberta R.; Quintáns, Beatriz; Huang, Alden; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Nevarez, Lisette; Mamah, Catherine; Zatz, Mayana; Pierce, Kerrie D.; Fullerton, Janice M.; Adair, John C.; Berner, Jon E.; Bower, Matthew; Brodaty, Henry; Carmona, Olga; Dobricić, Valerija; Fogel, Brent L.; García-Estevez, Daniel; Goldman, Jill; Goudreau, John L.; Hopfer, Suellen; Janković, Milena; Jaumà, Serge; Jen, Joanna C.; Kirdlarp, Suppachok; Klepper, Joerg; Kostić, Vladimir; Lang, Anthony E.; Linglart, Agnès; Maisenbacher, Melissa K.; Manyam, Bala V.; Mazzoni, Pietro; Miedzybrodzka, Zofia; Mitarnun, Witoon; Mitchell, Philip B.; Mueller, Jennifer; Novaković, Ivana; Paucar, Martin; Paulson, Henry; Simpson, Sheila A.; Svenningsson, Per; Tuite, Paul; Vitek, Jerrold; Wetchaphanphesat, Suppachok; Williams, Charles; Yang, Michele; Schofield, Peter R.; de Oliveira, João R. M.; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC) or Fahr’s disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain regions, which is associated with neuropsychiatric and motor symptoms. Familial IBGC is genetically heterogeneous and typically transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. We performed a mutational analysis of SLC20A2, the first gene found to cause IBGC, to assess its genetic contribution to familial IBGC. We recruited 218 subjects from 29 IBGC-affected families of varied ancestry and collected medical history, neurological exam, and head CT scans to characterize each patient’s disease status. We screened our patient cohort for mutations in SLC20A2. Twelve novel (nonsense, deletions, missense, and splice site) potentially pathogenic variants, one synonymous variant, and one previously reported mutation were identified in 13 families. Variants predicted to be deleterious cosegregated with disease in five families. Three families showed nonsegregation with clinical disease of such variants, but retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging data strongly suggested previous misclassification. Overall, mutations in SLC20A2 account for as many as 41 % of our familial IBGC cases. Our screen in a large series expands the catalog of SLC20A2 mutations identified to date and demonstrates that mutations in SLC20A2 are a major cause of familial IBGC. Non-perfect segregation patterns of predicted deleterious variants highlight the challenges of phenotypic assessment in this condition with highly variable clinical presentation. PMID:23334463

  14. Recognition of facial emotions and identity in patients with mesial temporal lobe and idiopathic generalized epilepsy: an eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ibañez, Asier; Urrestarazu, Elena; Viteri, Cesar

    2014-11-01

    To describe visual scanning pattern for facial identity recognition (FIR) and emotion recognition (FER) in patients with idiopathic generalized (IGE) and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Secondary endpoint was to correlate the results with cognitive function. Benton Facial Recognition Test (BFRT) and Ekman&Friesen series were performed for FIR and FER respectively in 23 controls, 20 IGE and 19 MTLE patients. Eye movements were recorded by a Hi-Speed eye-tracker system. Neuropsychological tools explored cognitive function. Correct FIR rate was 78% in controls, 70.7% in IGE and 67.4% (p=0.009) in MTLE patients. FER hits reached 82.7% in controls, 74.3% in IGE (p=0.006) and 73.4% in MTLE (p=0.002) groups. IGE patients failed in disgust (p=0.005) and MTLE ones in fear (p=0.009) and disgust (p=0.03). FER correlated with neuropsychological scores, particularly verbal fluency (r=0.542, p<0.001). Eye-tracking revealed that controls scanned faces more diffusely than IGE and MTLE patients for FIR, who tended to top facial areas. A longer scanning of the top facial area was found in the three groups for FER. Gap between top and bottom facial region fixation time decreased in MTLE patients, with more but shorter fixations in bottom facial region. However, none of these findings were statistically significant. FIR was impaired in MTLE patients, and FER in both IGE and MTLE, particularly for fear and disgust. Although not statistically significant, those with impaired FER tended to perform more diffuse eye-tracking over the faces and have cognitive dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A rare cause of scintigraphic ventilation-perfusion mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Pochis, W.T.; Krasnow, A.Z.; Collier, B.D.; Mewissen, M.W.; Almagro, U.A.; Hellman, R.S.; Isitman, A.T. )

    1990-05-01

    A case of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with multiple areas of mismatch on ventilation-perfusion lung imaging in the absence of pulmonary embolism is presented. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is one of the few nonembolic diseases producing a pulmonary ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In this condition, chest radiographs may not detect the full extent of disease, and xenon-133 ventilation imaging may be relatively insensitive to morbid changes in small airways. Thus, when examining patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, one should be aware that abnormal perfusion imaging patterns without matching ventilation abnormalities are not always due to embolism. In this setting, contrast pulmonary angiography is often needed for accurate differential diagnosis.

  16. Association of GABRA6 1519 T>C (rs3219151) and Synapsin II (rs37733634) gene polymorphisms with the development of idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Prasad, D K V; Shaheen, Uzma; Satyanarayana, U; Prabha, T Surya; Jyothy, A; Munshi, Anjana

    2014-10-01

    The idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is a neurological disorder which accounts for approximately 30% of all epilepsy cases. Patients identified with IGE syndromes have pharmacoresponsive epilepsies without abnormal neurological symptoms, structural brain lesions and are of unknown origin. A genetic etiology to IGEs has been proposed. Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter acts by binding to transmembrane GABAA and GABAB receptors of both pre- and postsynaptic neurons. Synapsin II (SynII), a neuron specific phosphoprotein plays a major role in synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter release. The present study was carried out with an aim to evaluate the association of GABRA6 (rs3219151) T>C and Syn II (rs37733634) A>G gene polymorphisms with IGE. Molecular analysis revealed that the frequency of 'CC' genotype and 'C'allele of GABRA6 (rs3219151) T>C gene polymorphism was significantly higher in IGE patients compared to healthy controls [CC vs. TT, χ2=26; p<0.001; Odds ratio=3.6 (95% CI; 2.1-5.9); C vs T, χ2=24.7; p<0.001; Odds ratio=1.78 (95% CI; 1.4-2.2)]. The frequency of 'GG' genotype and 'G' allele of the intronic polymorphism A>G in Syn II gene was also found to be significantly associated with the disease when compared to controls [GG vs AA, χ2=64.52; p<0.001; Odds ratio=7.37 (95% CI; 4.4-12.3); G vs. A, χ2=65.78; p<0.001; Odds ratio=2.57 (95% CI; 2.0-3.2)]. The generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction method was employed to detect gene-gene interactions. The gene-gene interaction at two loci involving GABRA6 and Syn II revealed a significant association [χ2=36.6, p<0.001, Odds ratio=3.17 (95% CI; 2.2-4.6)] with IGE. Therefore, the present study clearly indicates that both GABRA6 (rs3219151) T>C and Syn II (rs37733634) A>G polymorphisms are important risk factors for the development of IGE in the South Indian population from Andhra Pradesh. The gene-gene interaction studies demonstrated significant interactive effects

  17. Circadian phase typing in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Dim light melatonin onset and patterns of melatonin secretion-Semicurve findings in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Manni, Raffaele; De Icco, Roberto; Cremascoli, Riccardo; Ferrera, Giulia; Furia, Francesca; Zambrelli, Elena; Canevini, Maria Paola; Terzaghi, Michele

    2016-08-01

    It has been debated in the literature whether patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) have a distinctive, evening-oriented chronotype. The few questionnaire-based studies that are available in the literature have conflicting results. The aim of our study was to define chronotype in patients with IGE by determining dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). Twenty adults diagnosed with IGE (grand mal on awakening [GM] in 7 cases and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in 13 cases) were investigated by means of a face-to-face semistructured sleep interview, Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire, and a melatonin salivary test with DLMO determination. Eighteen healthy subjects (HC) and 28 patients affected with cryptogenic focal epilepsy (FE) served as controls. The mean MEQ score was significantly lower in patients with IGE than that in patients with FE (49.1±5.9 versus 56.1±8.7 P<0.01) but not significantly lower than that in HC (49.1±5.9 versus 49.3±8.6). Midsleep on free days corrected for sleep duration did not differ significantly between the three subject groups (04:59±01:21h, 04:37±01:17h, 04:29±00:52h). The mean DLMO time in patients with IGE (22:13±01:34h) occurred 49min later than that in HC (21.24±1h), and the melatonin surge within the 30-minute time interval after DLMO in patients with IGE was significantly lower than that in HC (1.51±2.7 versus 3.8±3.6pg/mL P=0.045). Subjective measures of chronotype do not indicate a definite evening-oriented chronotype in patients with IGE. However, the data concerning endogenous melatonin secretion indicate that patients with IGE tend to have a late circadian phase. Further studies are warranted in order to better define the late pattern of endogenous melatonin secretion in patients with IGE and to ascertain the role of this pattern in influencing behavioral chronotype in these subjects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. A prospective observational longitudinal study of new-onset seizures and newly diagnosed epilepsy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fredsø, N; Toft, N; Sabers, A; Berendt, M

    2017-02-16

    Seizures are common in dogs and can be caused by non-epileptic conditions or epilepsy. The clinical course of newly diagnosed epilepsy is sparsely documented. The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate causes for seizures (epileptic and non-epileptic) in a cohort of dogs with new-onset untreated seizures, and for those dogs with newly diagnosed epilepsy to investigate epilepsy type, seizure type and the course of disease over time, including the risk of seizure recurrence. Untreated client-owned dogs experiencing new-onset seizures were prospectively enrolled in a longitudinal observational study including clinical investigations and long-term monitoring at the Copenhagen University Hospital for Companion Animals. A baseline clinical assessment was followed by investigator/owner contact every eight weeks from inclusion to death or end of study. Inclusion of dogs was conducted from November 2010 to September 2012, and the study terminated in June 2014. One hundred and six dogs were included in the study. Seventy-nine dogs (74.5%) were diagnosed with epilepsy: 61 dogs (77.2%) with idiopathic epilepsy, 13 dogs (16.5%) with structural epilepsy and five dogs (6.3%) with suspected structural epilepsy. A non-epileptic cause for seizures was identified in 13 dogs and suspected in 10 dogs. Four dogs in which no cause for seizures was identified experienced only one seizure during the study. In dogs with idiopathic epilepsy 60% had their second epileptic seizure within three months of seizure onset. Twenty-six dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (43%) completed the study without receiving antiepileptic treatment. The natural course of idiopathic epilepsy (uninfluenced by drugs) was illustrated by highly individual and fluctuating seizure patterns, including long periods of remission. Cluster seizures motivated early treatment. In a few dogs with a high seizure frequency owners declined treatment against the investigators advice. Epilepsy is the most likely

  19. Autoimmune encephalitis: A potentially reversible cause of status epilepticus, epilepsy, and cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Awadh Kishor; Ihtisham, Kavish; Garg, Ajay; Gulati, Sheffali; Padma, Madakasira Vasantha; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To review clinical characteristics and response to immunomodulation therapy in autoimmune encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus (SE), epilepsy, and cognitive decline. Design: Observational, prospective case series. Setting: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: Prospective analysis of 15 patients, who presented with SE, epilepsy, cognitive decline, and other neurological symptoms with positive autoantibodies. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal-fluid analysis (CSF), and tumor screening were done periodically. Treatment received and responses (categorized as per patients and treating doctor's information) were noted. Results: There were 15 (males = 10) patients of autoimmune encephalitis. The mean age of presentation was 24 years (range: 2-64 years). The most common onset was subacute (64%) and four (29%) patients presented as SE. Predominant clinical presentations were seizures (100%) almost of every semiology. CSF was done in 10 patients; it was normal in 60%. Brain MRI was done in all patients, in six (40%) it was normal, six (40%) showed T2W and FLAIR hyperintensities in bilateral limbic areas. Antibodies found were the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody in seven (50%), voltage-gated potassium channel antibody in five (36%), two of antiglutamic acid decarboxylase, and one patient with double stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibodies. None showed evidence of malignancy. Patients received immunotherapy, either steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, or both. Follow-up showed significant improvement in majority of cases, neither further seizures nor relapse in nine (67%) cases. One death occurred, due to delayed presentation. Conclusions: Uncommon but potentially reversible causes of SE, epilepsy, and cognitive decline may be immune-related and high index of suspicion will prevent missing the diagnosis. PMID:24339583

  20. Curative effect and costs of surgical and gamma knife treatments on intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Z T; Chen, Q X

    2015-07-31

    This study aimed to investigate the curative effect and costs of surgical and gamma knife treatments on intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis. The subjects comprised patients who suffered from intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis and received treatment in the Department of Neurosurgery of our hospital between 2010 and 2011. After obtaining their consent, patients were evaluated and selected to receive surgical or gamma knife treatments. In the surgical group, the short-term curative rate was 92.60% and the average cost was US$ 1311.50 while in the gamma knife group, the short-term curative rate was 53.79%, and the average cost was US$ 2786.90. Both surgical and gamma knife treatments of intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis are safe and effective, but the short-term curative effect of surgical treatment is better than that of gamma knife, and its cost is lower.

  1. New ideas in epilepsy genetics: novel epilepsy genes, copy number alterations, and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, Christina A; Hedera, Peter

    2007-03-01

    The majority of genes associated with epilepsy syndromes to date are ion channel genes. Selection bias may have allowed us to establish their role in epilepsy based on a priori knowledge of the significance of these proteins in regulating neuronal excitability. There are, however, more than 3000 genes expressed at the synapse, as well as many other genes expressed nearby in supporting cells and glia that can likewise regulate excitability. Identification of new genes involved in epilepsy may arise from studying the targets of anticonvulsant medications, ascertainment of an epileptic phenotype in mice, or as a result of positional cloning efforts. There are several loci for idiopathic focal and generalized epilepsies that lie in chromosomal regions that are devoid of known ion channels; therefore, the number of novel genes involved in epilepsy is likely to increase. Establishing the role of these novel genes in the pathogenesis of epilepsy has not been an easy task compared with the relative ease with which ion channel mutations can be studied. This review will describe several novel epilepsy genes and will then discuss other genetic causes of epilepsy, including alterations of chromosomal copy number and gene regulatory elements.

  2. Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly and symptomatic epilepsy caused by a homozygous 7-kilobase deletion in LYK5.

    PubMed

    Puffenberger, Erik G; Strauss, Kevin A; Ramsey, Keri E; Craig, David W; Stephan, Dietrich A; Robinson, Donna L; Hendrickson, Christine L; Gottlieb, Steven; Ramsay, David A; Siu, Victoria M; Heuer, Gregory G; Crino, Peter B; Morton, D Holmes

    2007-07-01

    We used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to investigate the cause of a symptomatic epilepsy syndrome in a group of seven distantly related Old Order Mennonite children. Autozygosity mapping was inconclusive, but closer inspection of the data followed by formal SNP copy number analyses showed that all affected patients had homozygous deletions of a single SNP (rs721575) and their parents were hemizygous for this marker. The deleted SNP marked a larger deletion encompassing exons 9-13 of LYK5, which encodes STE20-related adaptor protein, a pseudokinase necessary for proper localization and function of serine/threonine kinase 11 (a.k.a. LKB1). Homozygous LYK5 deletions were associated with polyhydramnios, preterm labour and distinctive craniofacial features. Affected children had large heads, infantile-onset intractable multifocal seizures and severe psychomotor retardation. We designated this condition PMSE syndrome (polyhydramnios, megalencephaly and symptomatic epilepsy). Thirty-eight percent (N = 16) of affected children died during childhood (ages 7 months to 6 years) from medical complications of the disorder, which included status epilepticus, congestive heart failure due to atrial septal defect and hypernatremic dehydration due to diabetes insipidus. A single post-mortem neuropathological study revealed megalencephaly, ventriculomegaly, cytomegaly and extensive vacuolization and astrocytosis of white matter. There was abundant anti-phospho-ribosomal S6 labelling of large cells within the frontal cortex, basal ganglia, hippocampus and spinal cord, consistent with constitutive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway in brain.

  3. Postsurgical recurrence of osteophytes causing dysphagia in patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kei; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Hosoe, Hideo; Iinuma, Nobuki; Suzuki, Yasushi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2009-11-01

    Although cervical anterior osteophytes accompanying diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) are generally asymptomatic, large osteophytes sometimes cause swallowing disorders. Surgical resection of the osteophyte has been reported to be an effective treatment; however, little study has been given to the recurrences of osteophytes. A prospective study was performed for seven patients who underwent surgical resection of cervical anterior osteophytes for the treatment of recalcitrant dysphagia caused by osteophytes that accompanied DISH. The seven patients were six men and one woman ranging in age from 55 to 78 years (mean age = 65 years). After a mean postoperative follow-up period of 9 years (range: 6-13 years), surgical outcomes were evaluated by symptom severity and plain radiographs of the cervical spine. On all operated intervertebral segments, the effect of postoperative intervertebral mobility (range of movement > 1 degree) on the incidence of recurrent osteophytic formation (width > 2 mm) was analyzed by Fisher's exact test. Complete relief of the dysphagia was obtained within one month postoperatively in five patients, while it was delayed for 3 months in two patients. All of the patients developed recurrent cervical osteophytic formation, with an average increase rate of approximately 1 mm/year following surgical resection. Of the 20 operated intervertebral segments, the incidence of recurrent osteophytes was significantly higher (P = 0.0013) in the 16 segments with mobility than in the four segments without mobility. Five of the seven patients remained asymptomatic, although radiological recurrence of osteophytes was seen at the final follow-up. The two remaining patients complained of moderate dysphagia 10 and 11 years after surgery, respectively; one of these two required re-operation due to progressive dysphagia 11 years postoperatively. In patients with cervical DISH and dysphagia, surgical resection of osteophytes resulted in a high likelihood

  4. Vertebral derotation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis causes hypokyphosis of the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kota; Nakamura, Takayuki; Iwanami, Akio; Hosogane, Naobumi; Tsuji, Takashi; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Morio

    2012-06-12

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that direct vertebral derotation by pedicle screws (PS) causes hypokyphosis of the thoracic spine in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients, using computer simulation. Twenty AIS patients with Lenke type 1 or 2 who underwent posterior correction surgeries using PS were included in this study. Simulated corrections of each patient's scoliosis, as determined by the preoperative CT scan data, were performed on segmented 3D models of the whole spine. Two types of simulated extreme correction were performed: 1) complete coronal correction only (C method) and 2) complete coronal correction with complete derotation of vertebral bodies (C + D method). The kyphosis angle (T5-T12) and vertebral rotation angle at the apex were measured before and after the simulated corrections. The mean kyphosis angle after the C + D method was significantly smaller than that after the C method (2.7 ± 10.0° vs. 15.0 ± 7.1°, p < 0.01). The mean preoperative apical rotation angle of 15.2 ± 5.5° was completely corrected after the C + D method (0°) and was unchanged after the C method (17.6 ± 4.2°). In the 3D simulation study, kyphosis was reduced after complete correction of the coronal and rotational deformity, but it was maintained after the coronal-only correction. These results proved the hypothesis that the vertebral derotation obtained by PS causes hypokyphosis of the thoracic spine.

  5. Seizure and Psychosocial Outcomes of Childhood and Juvenile Onset Generalized Epilepsies: Wolf in Sheep's Clothing, or Well-Dressed Wolf?

    PubMed

    Nickels, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Studies of generalized electroclinical syndromes can provide guidance regarding long-term seizure, cognitive, and psychosocial outcomes. Childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures alone are electroclinical syndromes typically associated with normal intellect and good response to antiseizure medications. However, studies have demonstrated significantly poorer psychosocial outcomes than expected for these syndromes, regardless of seizure control. Potential causes for this include underlying abnormalities in social skills, social stigma, and underlying abnormalities in brain development and maturation.

  6. Increased sensitivity of the neuronal nicotinic receptor alpha 2 subunit causes familial epilepsy with nocturnal wandering and ictal fear.

    PubMed

    Aridon, Paolo; Marini, Carla; Di Resta, Chiara; Brilli, Elisa; De Fusco, Maurizio; Politi, Fausta; Parrini, Elena; Manfredi, Irene; Pisano, Tiziana; Pruna, Dario; Curia, Giulia; Cianchetti, Carlo; Pasqualetti, Massimo; Becchetti, Andrea; Guerrini, Renzo; Casari, Giorgio

    2006-08-01

    Sleep has traditionally been recognized as a precipitating factor for some forms of epilepsy, although differential diagnosis between some seizure types and parasomnias may be difficult. Autosomal dominant frontal lobe epilepsy is characterized by nocturnal seizures with hyperkinetic automatisms and poorly organized stereotyped movements and has been associated with mutations of the alpha 4 and beta 2 subunits of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. We performed a clinical and molecular genetic study of a large pedigree segregating sleep-related epilepsy in which seizures are associated with fear sensation, tongue movements, and nocturnal wandering, closely resembling nightmares and sleep walking. We identified a new genetic locus for familial sleep-related focal epilepsy on chromosome 8p12.3-8q12.3. By sequencing the positional candidate neuronal cholinergic receptor alpha 2 subunit gene (CHRNA2), we detected a heterozygous missense mutation, I279N, in the first transmembrane domain that is crucial for receptor function. Whole-cell recordings of transiently transfected HEK293 cells expressing either the mutant or the wild-type receptor showed that the new CHRNA2 mutation markedly increases the receptor sensitivity to acetylcholine, therefore indicating that the nicotinic alpha 2 subunit alteration is the underlying cause. CHRNA2 is the third neuronal cholinergic receptor gene to be associated with familial sleep-related epilepsies. Compared with the CHRNA4 and CHRNB2 mutations reported elsewhere, CHRNA2 mutations cause a more complex and finalized ictal behavior.

  7. Aluminum-containing antacids as a cause of idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, E

    1999-07-01

    The mechanism of pathogenesis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is unknown. In a study of 200 PD patients and 200 age- and sex-matched controls, Strang noted a marked and statistically significant higher incidence of ulcers (diagnosed by X-ray or surgery) in the PD patients compared to the controls (14% to 4%). These results have been discussed but never explained. Studies have shown increased concentrations of aluminum in the substantia nigra of PD patients compared to controls. Aluminum is thought to be a cellular toxin. Here I suggest that aluminum, and in particular aluminum-containing antacids may contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic PD.

  8. Novel homozygous missense mutation in ALDH7A1 causes neonatal pyridoxine dependent epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Coci, Emanuele G; Codutti, Luca; Fink, Christian; Bartsch, Sophie; Grüning, Gunnar; Lücke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Riedel, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (PDE) (OMIM#266100) is a neonatal form of epilepsy, caused by dysfunction of the enzyme α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH7A1 or Antiquitin). This enzyme converts α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (α-AASA) into α-aminoadipate (AAA), a critical step in the lysine metabolism of the brain. ALDH7A1 dysfunction causes an accumulation of α-AASA and δ(1)-piperideine-6-carboxylic acid (P6C), which are in equilibrium with each other. P6C binds and inactivates pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the active form of pyridoxine. Individuals affected by ALDH7A1 deficiency show pre-natal and post-natal seizures, which respond to oral pyridoxine but not to other pediatric anti-epileptic drugs. We discovered a novel missense mutation (c.566G > A, p.Gly189Glu) in homozygous state residing in the NAD+ binding domain coding region of exon 6 and affecting an highly conserved amino acid residue. The seizures stopped under post-natal pyridoxine therapy, nevertheless a longer follow-up is needed to evaluate the intellectual development of the child, who is additionally treated with oral l-arginine since the 13th month of life. Developmental delay with or without structural cortex abnormalities were reported in several patients. A brain MRI scan revealed hyperintense white matter in the right cerebellum compatible with cerebellar gliosis. Taken together, our studies enlarge the group of missense pathogenic mutations of ALDH7A1 gene and reveal a novel cerebellar finding within the PDE patients cohort.

  9. Epilepsy caused by an abnormal alternative splicing with dosage effect of the SV2A gene in a chicken model.

    PubMed

    Douaud, Marine; Feve, Katia; Pituello, Fabienne; Gourichon, David; Boitard, Simon; Leguern, Eric; Coquerelle, Gérard; Vieaud, Agathe; Batini, Cesira; Naquet, Robert; Vignal, Alain; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle; Pitel, Frédérique

    2011-01-01

    Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is caused by the combination of an individual's enhanced sensitivity with relevant light stimuli, such as stroboscopic lights or video games. This is the most common reflex epilepsy in humans; it is characterized by the photoparoxysmal response, which is an abnormal electroencephalographic reaction, and seizures triggered by intermittent light stimulation. Here, by using genetic mapping, sequencing and functional analyses, we report that a mutation in the acceptor site of the second intron of SV2A (the gene encoding synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A) is causing photosensitive reflex epilepsy in a unique vertebrate model, the Fepi chicken strain, a spontaneous model where the neurological disorder is inherited as an autosomal recessive mutation. This mutation causes an aberrant splicing event and significantly reduces the level of SV2A mRNA in homozygous carriers. Levetiracetam, a second generation antiepileptic drug, is known to bind SV2A, and SV2A knock-out mice develop seizures soon after birth and usually die within three weeks. The Fepi chicken survives to adulthood and responds to levetiracetam, suggesting that the low-level expression of SV2A in these animals is sufficient to allow survival, but does not protect against seizures. Thus, the Fepi chicken model shows that the role of the SV2A pathway in the brain is conserved between birds and mammals, in spite of a large phylogenetic distance. The Fepi model appears particularly useful for further studies of physiopathology of reflex epilepsy, in comparison with induced models of epilepsy in rodents. Consequently, SV2A is a very attractive candidate gene for analysis in the context of both mono- and polygenic generalized epilepsies in humans.

  10. Epilepsy Caused by an Abnormal Alternative Splicing with Dosage Effect of the SV2A Gene in a Chicken Model

    PubMed Central

    Douaud, Marine; Feve, Katia; Pituello, Fabienne; Gourichon, David; Boitard, Simon; Leguern, Eric; Coquerelle, Gérard; Vieaud, Agathe; Batini, Cesira; Vignal, Alain; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle; Pitel, Frédérique

    2011-01-01

    Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is caused by the combination of an individual's enhanced sensitivity with relevant light stimuli, such as stroboscopic lights or video games. This is the most common reflex epilepsy in humans; it is characterized by the photoparoxysmal response, which is an abnormal electroencephalographic reaction, and seizures triggered by intermittent light stimulation. Here, by using genetic mapping, sequencing and functional analyses, we report that a mutation in the acceptor site of the second intron of SV2A (the gene encoding synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A) is causing photosensitive reflex epilepsy in a unique vertebrate model, the Fepi chicken strain, a spontaneous model where the neurological disorder is inherited as an autosomal recessive mutation. This mutation causes an aberrant splicing event and significantly reduces the level of SV2A mRNA in homozygous carriers. Levetiracetam, a second generation antiepileptic drug, is known to bind SV2A, and SV2A knock-out mice develop seizures soon after birth and usually die within three weeks. The Fepi chicken survives to adulthood and responds to levetiracetam, suggesting that the low-level expression of SV2A in these animals is sufficient to allow survival, but does not protect against seizures. Thus, the Fepi chicken model shows that the role of the SV2A pathway in the brain is conserved between birds and mammals, in spite of a large phylogenetic distance. The Fepi model appears particularly useful for further studies of physiopathology of reflex epilepsy, in comparison with induced models of epilepsy in rodents. Consequently, SV2A is a very attractive candidate gene for analysis in the context of both mono- and polygenic generalized epilepsies in humans. PMID:22046416

  11. Management of multifactorial idiopathic epilepsy in EL mice with caloric restriction and the ketogenic diet: role of glucose and ketone bodies

    PubMed Central

    Mantis, John G; Centeno, Nicole A; Todorova, Mariana T; McGowan, Richard; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2004-01-01

    Background The high fat, low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) was developed as an alternative to fasting for seizure management. While the mechanisms by which fasting and the KD inhibit seizures remain speculative, alterations in brain energy metabolism are likely involved. We previously showed that caloric restriction (CR) inhibits seizure susceptibility by reducing blood glucose in the epileptic EL mouse, a natural model for human multifactorial idiopathic epilepsy. In this study, we compared the antiepileptic and anticonvulsant efficacy of the KD with that of CR in adult EL mice with active epilepsy. EL mice that experienced at least 15 recurrent complex partial seizures were fed either a standard diet unrestricted (SD-UR) or restricted (SD-R), and either a KD unrestricted (KD-UR) or restricted (KD-R). All mice were fasted for 14 hrs prior to diet initiation. A new experimental design was used where each mouse in the diet-restricted groups served as its own control to achieve a 20–23% body weight reduction. Seizure susceptibility, body weights, and the levels of plasma glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate were measured once/week over a nine-week treatment period. Results Body weights and blood glucose levels remained high over the testing period in the SD-UR and the KD-UR groups, but were significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in the SD-R and KD-R groups. Plasma β-hydroxybutyrate levels were significantly (p < 0.001) increased in the SD-R and KD-R groups compared to their respective UR groups. Seizure susceptibility remained high in both UR-fed groups throughout the study, but was significantly reduced after three weeks in both R-fed groups. Conclusions The results indicate that seizure susceptibility in EL mice is dependent on plasma glucose levels and that seizure control is more associated with the amount than with the origin of dietary calories. Also, CR underlies the antiepileptic and anticonvulsant action of the KD in EL mice. A transition from glucose to ketone

  12. Investigating the potential of the anti-epileptic drug imepitoin as a treatment for co-morbid anxiety in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Packer, Rowena M A; De Risio, Luisa; Volk, Holger A

    2017-04-07

    Behavioural changes associated with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) have been identified in dogs, with fear and anxiety-related problems seen in both drug-naïve dogs and dogs treated with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Treating anxiety-related behaviour in dogs with IE may be challenging, as seizures are a contraindication for many conventional anxiolytic drugs. In addition, many dogs with IE are already treated with AEDs to reduce their seizure frequency, which may have negative effects if used in polytherapy. Imepitoin is low-affinity partial agonist at the benzodiazepine (BDZ) site of the GABAA receptor, and has been demonstrated to have both anticonvulsant and anxiolytic effects in laboratory rodents. Imepitoin has been developed for the treatment of IE in dogs, with demonstrated anticonvulsant effects and high tolerability and safety. To date, imepitoin's potential to reduce anxiety in dogs with IE has not been investigated. An online survey was conducted to investigate the effect of imepitoin on fear and anxiety-related behaviours in dogs with IE. Eighty-five valid responses were received from owners of dogs with IE currently treated with imepitoin. Anxiety-related behaviour was quantified before and during imepitoin treatment using a validated questionnaire tool (C-BARQ). No differences were observed in the five fear/anxiety-related measures between the two time periods (before vs. during treatment) for dog directed fear, stranger directed fear, non-social fear, pain sensitivity and separation related behaviour. A median 45% reduction in seizure frequency/month was observed following imepitoin treatment; however, imepitoin did not appear effective in reducing seizure frequency in a minority of cases. Polyphagia was the most common chronic side effect, and more side effects were reported in polytherapy cases. Imepitoin does not appear to improve anxiety-related behaviour in dogs with IE treated with this medication for its anti-epileptic effects. Investigating the

  13. Cause-specific mortality among children and young adults with epilepsy: Results from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System ☆

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Niu; Shaw, Esther C.; Zack, Matthew; Kobau, Rosemarie; Dykstra, Heather; Covington, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated causes of death in children and young adults with epilepsy by using data from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System (NCDR-CRS), a passive surveillance system composed of comprehensive information related to deaths reviewed by local child death review teams. Information on a total of 48,697 deaths in children and young adults 28 days to 24 years of age, including 551 deaths with epilepsy and 48,146 deaths without epilepsy, was collected from 2004 through 2012 in 32 states. In a proportionate mortality analysis by official manner of death, decedents with epilepsy had a significantly higher percentage of natural deaths but significantly lower percentages of deaths due to accidents, homicide, and undetermined causes compared with persons without epilepsy. With respect to underlying causes of death, decedents with epilepsy had significantly higher percentages of deaths due to drowning and most medical conditions including pneumonia and congenital anomalies but lower percentages of deaths due to asphyxia, weapon use, and unknown causes compared with decedents without epilepsy. The increased percentages of deaths due to pneumonia and drowning in children and young adults with epilepsy suggest preventive interventions including immunization and better instruction and monitoring before or during swimming. State-specific and national population-based mortality studies of children and young adults with epilepsy are recommended. PMID:25794682

  14. Cause-specific mortality among children and young adults with epilepsy: Results from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Tian, Niu; Shaw, Esther C; Zack, Matthew; Kobau, Rosemarie; Dykstra, Heather; Covington, Theresa M

    2015-04-01

    We investigated causes of death in children and young adults with epilepsy by using data from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System (NCDR-CRS), a passive surveillance system composed of comprehensive information related to deaths reviewed by local child death review teams. Information on a total of 48,697 deaths in children and young adults 28days to 24years of age, including 551 deaths with epilepsy and 48,146 deaths without epilepsy, was collected from 2004 through 2012 in 32 states. In a proportionate mortality analysis by official manner of death, decedents with epilepsy had a significantly higher percentage of natural deaths but significantly lower percentages of deaths due to accidents, homicide, and undetermined causes compared with persons without epilepsy. With respect to underlying causes of death, decedents with epilepsy had significantly higher percentages of deaths due to drowning and most medical conditions including pneumonia and congenital anomalies but lower percentages of deaths due to asphyxia, weapon use, and unknown causes compared with decedents without epilepsy. The increased percentages of deaths due to pneumonia and drowning in children and young adults with epilepsy suggest preventive interventions including immunization and better instruction and monitoring before or during swimming. State-specific and national population-based mortality studies of children and young adults with epilepsy are recommended.

  15. Idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Onur; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Scoliosis refers to curves exceeding 10 degrees observed through posterioanterior direct radiography. In fact, the diagnosis for idiopathic scoliosis is accepted to exclude already available causes. The aim of this paper was to review the etiopathogenesis, classification systems and the treatment management of idiopathic scoliosis. A search in the National Library of Medicine (Pubmed) database using the key words 'idiopathic' and 'scoliosis' was performed. For the literature review, papers concerning the etiopathogenesis, classification and treatment were selected among these articles. A search in the National Library of Medicine (Pubmed) database using the key words 'idiopathic' and 'scoliosis' yielded 4518 articles published between 1947 and 2013. The main hypothesis put forward included genetic factors, hormonal factors, bone and connective tissue anomalies. King, Lenke, Coonrad and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) classifications were the main classification systems for idiopathic scoliosis. Exercise, bracing and anterior, posterior or combined surgery when indicated are the choices for the treatment. Every idiopathic scoliosis case has to be managed to its own characteristics. It is the post-operative appearance that the surgeons are perhaps the least interested but the adolescent patients the most interested in. The aim of scoliosis surgery is to restore the spine without neurological deficit.

  16. Idiopathic oedema and diuretics.

    PubMed Central

    Dunnigan, M. G.; Denning, D. W.; Henry, J. A.; de Wolff, F. A.

    1987-01-01

    Diuretic abuse has been invoked as the cause of idiopathic oedema. In this study, eight patients with idiopathic oedema were studied. Symptoms and weight variation continued despite the proven absence of diuretics in seven of them as determined by urinary chromatograms. Idiopathic oedema cannot therefore be attributed to diuretic use alone. PMID:3671223

  17. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a cause of epilepsy and periventricular heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; Monacelli, Debora; Castagnino, Miriam; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a variety of inherited connective tissue disorders that have been described in association with various neurological features. Until now the neurological symptoms have not been studied in detail; therefore, the aim of this review is to analyze the possible association between EDS, epilepsy and periventricular heterotopia (PH). We have carried out a critical review of all cases of epilepsy in EDS patients with and without PH. Epilepsy is a frequent neurological manifestation of EDS; generally, it is characterized by focal seizures with temporo-parieto-occipital auras and the most common EEG findings epileptiform discharges and slow intermittent rhythm with delta-theta waves. Epilepsy in EDS patients is usually responsive to common antiepileptic therapy; very few cases of drug resistant focal epilepsy requested surgical treatment, with favorable results in terms of outcome. Epilepsy is the most common presenting neurological manifestation associated with PH in EDS patients. Abnormal anatomic circuitries (including heterotopic nodules) could generate epilepsy in patients with PH. Among the principal neurological manifestations, epilepsy and PH have a considerable importance and can influence the long-term evolution of these patients. We hypothesize that PH may determine the epileptic manifestations in patients with EDS; much remains to be learnt about the relationships between nodules and the epileptic manifestations in EDS syndrome. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inappropriate phosphate excretion in idiopathic hypercalciuria: the key to a common cause and future treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C P; Child, D F; Hudson, P R; Soysa, L D; Davies, G K; Davies, M G; De Bolla, A R

    1996-01-01

    to serum calcium concentrations within the patient and control groups. CONCLUSIONS: It is proposed that patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria have an "inappropriately' high phosphate excretion for any given serum calcium concentration. Loss of phosphate may induce increased activation of 1,25-(OH)2-vitamin D. Some of the commonly described causes of stone formation may be manifestations of a single mechanism. PMID:8944605

  19. Disruption of Fgf13 causes synaptic excitatory-inhibitory imbalance and genetic epilepsy and febrile seizures plus.

    PubMed

    Puranam, Ram S; He, Xiao Ping; Yao, Lijun; Le, Tri; Jang, Wonjo; Rehder, Catherine W; Lewis, Darrell V; McNamara, James O

    2015-06-10

    We identified a family in which a translocation between chromosomes X and 14 was associated with cognitive impairment and a complex genetic disorder termed "Genetic Epilepsy and Febrile Seizures Plus" (GEFS(+)). We demonstrate that the breakpoint on the X chromosome disrupted a gene that encodes an auxiliary protein of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, fibroblast growth factor 13 (Fgf13). Female mice in which one Fgf13 allele was deleted exhibited hyperthermia-induced seizures and epilepsy. Anatomic studies revealed expression of Fgf13 mRNA in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons of hippocampus. Electrophysiological recordings revealed decreased inhibitory and increased excitatory synaptic inputs in hippocampal neurons of Fgf13 mutants. We speculate that reduced expression of Fgf13 impairs excitability of inhibitory interneurons, resulting in enhanced excitability within local circuits of hippocampus and the clinical phenotype of epilepsy. These findings reveal a novel cause of this syndrome and underscore the powerful role of FGF13 in control of neuronal excitability.

  20. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol.

    PubMed

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena; Milne, Marjorie; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Farqhuar, Robyn G; Fischer, Andrea; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Pakozdy, Akos; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials for seizures, the parameters for MRI examination should allow the detection of subtle lesions which may not be obvious with existing techniques. In addition, there are several differentials for idiopathic epilepsy in humans, for example some focal cortical dysplasias, which may only apparent with special sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification of underlying causes of seizures not yet apparent in the veterinary literature.There is a need for a standardized veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol which will facilitate more detailed examination of areas susceptible to generating and perpetuating seizures, is cost efficient, simple to perform and can be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging is reviewed.

  1. Exacerbation of idiopathic paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia in remission state caused by secondary hypoparathyroidism with hypocalcemia after thyroidectomy: evidence for ion channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dongkwan; Yoon, Won Tae; Suh, Bum Chun; Moon, Heui-Soo; Chung, Pil-Wook; Kim, Yong Bum

    2012-11-01

    Most reported cases of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) are idiopathic or familial; however, hypoparathyroidism is another unusual cause of secondary PKD. The pathomechanism of PKD remains poorly understood, and the association between idiopathic and secondary PKD remains an enigma, and has yet to be clearly elucidated. We recently encountered a patient with idiopathic PKD whose symptoms were aggravated by secondary hypoparathyroidism with hypocalcemia after having undergone a thyroidectomy. The patient's paroxysms were ameliorated by the normalization of serum calcium levels. The results discussed herein may provide support for the hypothesis that PKD is associated with neuronal ion regulation.

  2. Neurocysticercosis as a Cause of Epilepsy and Seizures in Two Community-Based Studies in a Cysticercosis-Endemic Region in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Moyano, Luz M.; Saito, Mayuko; Montano, Silvia M.; Gonzalvez, Guillermo; Olaya, Sandra; Ayvar, Viterbo; González, Isidro; Larrauri, Luis; Tsang, Victor C. W.; Llanos, Fernando; Rodríguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Garcia, Hector H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of epilepsy added to inadequate treatment results in chronic morbidity and considerable mortality in poor populations. Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a helminthic disease of the central nervous system, is a leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in most of the world. Methods Taking advantage of a cysticercosis elimination program, we performed two community-based cross-sectional studies between 2006 and 2007 in 58 rural communities (population 20,610) to assess the prevalence and characteristics of epilepsy and epileptic seizures in this endemic region. Serological and computed tomography (CT) data in individuals with epilepsy were compared to previous surveys in general population from the same region. Principal findings In two surveys, 17,450 individuals were evaluated. Lifetime prevalence of epilepsy was 17.25/1000, and prevalence of active epilepsy was 10.8/1000 inhabitants. The prevalence of epilepsy increased after age 25 years and dropped after age 45. Only 24% (45/188) of patients with active epilepsy were taking antiepileptic drugs, all at sub-therapeutic doses. Antibodies to cysticercosis were found in approximately 40% of individuals with epilepsy in both studies. In one survey only individuals presenting strong antibody reactions were significantly associated with having epilepsy (OR 5.74; p<0.001). In the second, the seroprevalence as well as the proportion presenting strong antibody reactions were both significantly higher in individuals with epilepsy (OR 2.2 and 4.33, respectively). Brain CT showed NCC-compatible images in 109/282 individuals with epilepsy (39%). All individuals with viable parasites on CT were seropositive. Conclusion The prevalence of epilepsy in this cysticercosis endemic region is high and NCC is an important contributor to it. PMID:24551255

  3. Mutations affecting GABAergic signaling in seizures and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2010-01-01

    The causes of epilepsies and epileptic seizures are multifactorial. Genetic predisposition may contribute in certain types of epilepsies and seizures, whether idiopathic or symptomatic of genetic origin. Although these are not very common, they have offered a unique opportunity to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. Among the implicated gene mutations, a number of GABAA receptor subunit mutations have been recently identified that contribute to several idiopathic epilepsies, febrile seizures, and rarely to certain types of symptomatic epilepsies, like the severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy. Deletion of GABAA receptor genes has also been linked to Angelman syndrome. Furthermore, mutations of proteins controlling chloride homeostasis, which indirectly defines the functional consequences of GABAA signaling, have been identified. These include the chloride channel 2 (CLCN2) and the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC3. The pathogenic role of CLCN2 mutations has not been clearly demonstrated and may represent either susceptibility genes or, in certain cases, innocuous polymorphisms. KCC3 mutations have been associated with hereditary motor and sensory polyneuropathy with corpus callosum agenesis (Andermann syndrome) that often manifests with epileptic seizures. This review summarizes the recent progress in the genetic linkages of epilepsies and seizures to the above genes and discusses potential pathogenic mechanisms that contribute to the age, sex, and conditional expression of these seizures in carriers of these mutations. PMID:20352446

  4. A recurrent de novo mutation in KCNC1 causes progressive myoclonus epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Muona, Mikko; Berkovic, Samuel F; Dibbens, Leanne M; Oliver, Karen L; Maljevic, Snezana; Bayly, Marta A; Joensuu, Tarja; Canafoglia, Laura; Franceschetti, Silvana; Michelucci, Roberto; Markkinen, Salla; Heron, Sarah E; Hildebrand, Michael S; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Gambardella, Antonio; Tinuper, Paolo; Licchetta, Laura; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Criscuolo, Chiara; Filla, Alessandro; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Ahmad, Jamil; Ahmad, Adeel; Baykan, Betul; Said, Edith; Topcu, Meral; Riguzzi, Patrizia; King, Mary D; Ozkara, Cigdem; Andrade, Danielle M; Engelsen, Bernt A; Crespel, Arielle; Lindenau, Matthias; Lohmann, Ebba; Saletti, Veronica; Massano, João; Privitera, Michael; Espay, Alberto J; Kauffmann, Birgit; Duchowny, Michael; Møller, Rikke S; Straussberg, Rachel; Afawi, Zaid; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Daly, Mark J; Petrou, Steven; Lerche, Holger; Palotie, Aarno; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina

    2014-01-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of rare, inherited disorders manifesting with action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, and ataxia. We exome-sequenced 84 unrelated PME patients of unknown cause and molecularly solved 26 cases (31%). Remarkably, a recurrent de novo mutation c.959G>A (p.Arg320His) in KCNC1 was identified as a novel major cause for PME. Eleven unrelated exome-sequenced (13%) and two patients in a secondary cohort (7%) had this mutation. KCNC1 encodes KV3.1, a subunit of the KV3 voltage-gated K+ channels, major determinants of high-frequency neuronal firing. Functional analysis of the p.Arg320His mutant channel revealed a dominant-negative loss-of-function effect. Ten patients had pathogenic mutations in known PME-associated genes (NEU1, NHLRC1, AFG3L2, EPM2A, CLN6, SERPINI1). Identification of mutations in PRNP, SACS, and TBC1D24 expand their phenotypic spectrum to PME. These findings provide important insights into the molecular genetic basis of PME and reveal the role of de novo mutations in this disease entity. PMID:25401298

  5. Superficial brachial artery: A possible cause for idiopathic median nerve entrapment neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nkomozepi, Pilani; Xhakaza, Nkosi; Swanepoel, Elaine

    2017-02-15

    Nerve entrapment syndromes occur because of anatomic constraints at specific locations in both upper and lower limbs. Anatomical locations prone to nerve entrapment syndromes include sites where a nerve courses through fibro-osseous or fibromuscular tunnels or penetrates a muscle. The median nerve (MN) can be entrapped by the ligament of Struthers; thickened biceps aponeurosis; between the superficial and deep heads of the pronator teres muscle and by a thickened proximal edge of flexor digitorum superficialis muscle. A few cases of MN neuropathies encountered are reported to be idiopathic. The superficial branchial artery (SBA) is defined as the artery running superficial to MN or its roots. This divergence from normal anatomy may be the possible explanation for idiopathic median nerve entrapment neuropathy. This study presents three cases with unilateral presence of the SBA encountered during routine undergraduate dissection at the University of Johannesburg. Case 1: SBA divided into radial and ulnar arteries. Brachial artery (BA) terminated as deep brachial artery. Case 2: SBA continued as radial artery (RA). BA terminated as ulnar artery (UA), anterior and posterior interosseous arteries. Case 3: SBA continued as UA. BA divided into radial and common interosseous arteries. Arteries that take an unusual course are more vulnerable to iatrogenic injury during surgical procedures and may disturb the evaluation of angiographic images during diagnosis. In particular, the presence of SBA may be a course of idiopathic neuropathies.

  6. Audiometric comparison of Lassa fever hearing loss and idiopathic sudden hearing loss: evidence for viral cause.

    PubMed

    Liao, B S; Byl, F M; Adour, K K

    1992-03-01

    A recently published prospective study on acute sensorineural deafness in Lassa fever among a West African population showed the audiometric pattern of a known virally induced hearing loss. Using the audiometric data from the patients with Lassa fever in that study, we analyzed and classified the initial hearing loss and final recovery into three groups by pure-tone average values and then did the same for 222 patients with idiopathic sudden hearing loss (SHL) in our study. Statistical analyses of the severity of initial hearing loss and the hearing recovery pattern indicate that the clinical course of our 222 patients with idiopathic SHL showed no statistically significant differences from the clinical course of the patients with Lassa fever. We found a marked difference in age, however, and a clinically significant difference in the incidence of bilateral hearing loss. In reviewing the literature on sudden sensorineural hearing loss, we found no apparent relation between severity of viral illness and initial hearing loss or subsequent recovery. Cummins et al. suggest that virally induced hearing loss in Lassa fever is linked to the host's immune response and not to the viremia. We thus propose a virally induced immune response mechanism for idiopathic sensorineural SHL. Further prospective studies are needed for verification.

  7. Historical documents on epilepsy: From antiquity through the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Panteliadis, Christos P; Vassilyadi, Photios; Fehlert, Julia; Hagel, Christian

    2017-02-26

    Historical documents dating back almost 4500years have alluded to the condition of epilepsy, describing signs and symptoms that are well-known today. Epilepsy was thought to be a mystical disorder by almost all Ancient cultures, including the Babylonians, Egyptians, Greeks, Indians, Iranians and Chinese. Hippocrates was the first to de-mystify the condition of epilepsy, providing a more scientific approach to the condition. As the signs and symptoms of epilepsy occurred without an obvious cause, the idea stood that it was a mystical phenomenon of divine punishment. This portrayal persisted through the early centuries of the common era, including the Middle Ages. It was not until the 16th and 17th century that Paracelsus, le Pois and Sylvius started to investigate internal causes for epilepsy. By the beginning of the 18th century, the general opinion on epilepsy was that it was an idiopathic disease residing in the brain and other inner organs. This resulted in Tissot writing the first modern book on epilepsy. Research continued in the 19th century with Jackson describing different types of seizures and many researchers showing interest in electroencephalography (EEG). The 20th century saw more detailed research being done on epilepsy and EEG, in addition to the establishment of many epilepsy-associated medical societies. The goal of this historical documentation is to provide an overview of the most important milestones in the history of epilepsy.

  8. Catamenial epilepsy: A missed cause of refractory seizure in young women.

    PubMed

    Kandeepan, J; Shaaban, J

    2016-01-01

    Catamenial epilepsy refers to changes in the frequency of seizures over the course of the menstrual cycle. A thorough history and detailed review of the patient's seizure diary are imperative to classify the seizures accurately and select the most appropriate antiepileptic treatment. As catamenial epilepsy rarely responds to antiepileptic medications, the physician should regularly revise the treatment plan of the women with epilepsy that is refractory to the current treatment. We describe the case of a 34-year-old single woman who presented with refractory seizures.

  9. Myoclonus and epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Fejerman, N

    1997-01-01

    The possible associations of myoclonic phenomenae, progressive or non-progressive encephalopathies and epileptic features are reviewed, with special emphasis on pediatric age. This leads to recognize the following five groups of conditions: (1) Myoclonus without encephalopathy and without epilepsy; (2) Encephalopathies with non-epileptic myoclonus; (3) Progressive encephalopathies presenting myoclonus seizures of epileptic syndromes (Progressive myoclonus epilepsies); (4) Epileptic encephalopathies with myoclonic seizures; (5) Myoclonic epilepsies. Within the first group, which also includes physiologic myoclonus, a more thorough description of "Benign sleep myoclonus of newborn" and "Benign myoclonus of early infancy" is given. Characteristics of group 2 are "Kinsbourne Syndrome" and certain types of "Hyperekplexia" which pose interesting differential diagnosis with stimulus-sensitive epilepsies. In group 3, the concept of progressive encephalopathies is stressed. The fourth group refers to severe epilepsies, mainly on infancy and childhood, which lead to mental retardation irrespective of their aetiology. Group 5 comprises the true myoclonic epilepsies, differentiating syndromes recognized as idiopathic--such as "Benign myoclonic epilepsy of infancy" and "Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy"--from those which are cryptogenic and carry a more cautious prognosis--as "Cryptogenic myoclonic and myoclonoastatic epilepsies" and "Severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy". Other epileptic syndromes not usually considered as myoclonic epilepsies, but presenting sometimes as myoclonic seizures, are finally referred.

  10. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome of unknown cause: phenotypic characteristics of patients in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project.

    PubMed

    Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Dlugos, Dennis; Fahlstrom, Robyn; Joshi, Sucheta; Shellhaas, Renée; Boro, Alex; Sullivan, Joseph; Geller, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a devastating childhood-onset epilepsy syndrome. The cause is unknown in 25% of cases. Little has been described about the specific clinical or electroencephalography (EEG) features of LGS of unknown or genetic cause (LGS(u)). The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) aims to characterize LGS(u) by phenotypic analysis of patients with LGS(u) and their parents. One hundred thirty-five patients with LGS with no known etiology and their parents were enrolled from 19 EPGP centers in the United States and Australia. Clinical data from medical records, standardized questionnaires, imaging, and EEG were collected with use of online informatics systems developed for EPGP. LGS(u) in the EPGP cohort had a broad range of onset of epilepsy from 1 to 13 years, was male predominant (p < 0.0002), and was associated with normal development prior to seizure onset in 59.2% of patients. Despite the diagnosis, almost half of the adult patients with LGS(u) completed secondary school. Parents were cognitively normal. All subjects had EEG recordings with generalized epileptiform abnormalities with a spike wave frequency range of 1-5 Hz (median 2 Hz), whereas 8.1% of subjects had EEG studies with a normal posterior dominant rhythm. Almost 12% of patients evolved from West syndrome. LGS(u) has distinctive characteristics including a broad age range of onset, male predominance, and often normal development prior to the onset of seizures. Cognitive achievements such as completion of secondary school were possible in half of adult patients. Our phenotypic description of LGS(u) coupled with future genetic studies will advance our understanding of this epilepsy syndrome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Biallelic SZT2 Mutations Cause Infantile Encephalopathy with Epilepsy and Dysmorphic Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Hershkovitz, Tova; Heyman, Eli; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Kakar, Naseebullah; Smirin-Yosef, Pola; Vila-Pueyo, Marta; Kornreich, Liora; Thiele, Holger; Bode, Harald; Lagovsky, Irina; Dahary, Dvir; Haviv, Ami; Hubshman, Monika Weisz; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Nürnberg, Peter; Gothelf, Doron; Kubisch, Christian; Shohat, Mordechai; Macaya, Alfons; Borck, Guntram

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are genetically heterogeneous severe disorders in which epileptic activity contributes to neurological deterioration. We studied two unrelated children presenting with a distinctive early-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by refractory epilepsy and absent developmental milestones, as well as thick and short corpus callosum and persistent cavum septum pellucidum on brain MRI. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified biallelic mutations in seizure threshold 2 (SZT2) in both affected children. The causative mutations include a homozygous nonsense mutation and a nonsense mutation together with an exonic splice-site mutation in a compound-heterozygous state. The latter mutation leads to exon skipping and premature termination of translation, as shown by RT-PCR in blood RNA of the affected boy. Thus, all three mutations are predicted to result in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and/or premature protein truncation and thereby loss of SZT2 function. Although the molecular role of the peroxisomal protein SZT2 in neuronal excitability and brain development remains to be defined, Szt2 has been shown to influence seizure threshold and epileptogenesis in mice, consistent with our findings in humans. We conclude that mutations in SZT2 cause a severe type of autosomal-recessive infantile encephalopathy with intractable seizures and distinct neuroradiological anomalies. PMID:23932106

  12. PRIMA1 mutation: a new cause of nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Tankard, Rick; Gazina, Elena V; Damiano, John A; Lawrence, Kate M; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M; Regan, Brigid M; Shearer, Aiden Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Tinuper, Paolo; Lichetta, Laura; Baldassari, Sara; Bisulli, Francesca; Pippucci, Tommaso; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Reid, Christopher A; Petrou, Steven; Bahlo, Melanie; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) can be sporadic or autosomal dominant; some families have nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit mutations. We report a novel autosomal recessive phenotype in a single family and identify the causative gene. Methods Whole exome sequencing data was used to map the family, thereby narrowing exome search space, and then to identify the mutation. Results Linkage analysis using exome sequence data from two affected and two unaffected subjects showed homozygous linkage peaks on chromosomes 7, 8, 13, and 14 with maximum LOD scores between 1.5 and 1.93. Exome variant filtering under these peaks revealed that the affected siblings were homozygous for a novel splice site mutation (c.93+2T>C) in the PRIMA1 gene on chromosome 14. No additional PRIMA1 mutations were found in 300 other NFLE cases. The c.93+2T>C mutation was shown to lead to skipping of the first coding exon of the PRIMA1 mRNA using a minigene system. Interpretation PRIMA1 is a transmembrane protein that anchors acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme hydrolyzing acetycholine, to membrane rafts of neurons. PRiMA knockout mice have reduction of AChE and accumulation of acetylcholine at the synapse; our minigene analysis suggests that the c.93+2T>C mutation leads to knockout of PRIMA1. Mutations with gain of function effects in acetylcholine receptor subunits cause autosomal dominant NFLE. Thus, enhanced cholinergic responses are the likely cause of the severe NFLE and intellectual disability segregating in this family, representing the first recessive case to be reported and the first PRIMA1 mutation implicated in disease. PMID:26339676

  13. Epilepsy-causing sequence variations in SIK1 disrupt synaptic activity response gene expression and affect neuronal morphology.

    PubMed

    Pröschel, Christoph; Hansen, Jeanne N; Ali, Adil; Tuttle, Emily; Lacagnina, Michelle; Buscaglia, Georgia; Halterman, Marc W; Paciorkowski, Alex R

    2017-02-01

    SIK1 syndrome is a newly described developmental epilepsy disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the salt-inducible kinase SIK1. To better understand the pathophysiology of SIK1 syndrome, we studied the effects of SIK1 pathogenic sequence variations in human neurons. Primary human fetal cortical neurons were transfected with a lentiviral vector to overexpress wild-type and mutant SIK1 protein. We evaluated the transcriptional activity of known downstream gene targets in neurons expressing mutant SIK1 compared with wild type. We then assayed neuronal morphology by measuring neurite length, number and branching. Truncating SIK1 sequence variations were associated with abnormal MEF2C transcriptional activity and decreased MEF2C protein levels. Epilepsy-causing SIK1 sequence variations were associated with significantly decreased expression of ARC (activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated) and other synaptic activity response element genes. Assay of mRNA levels for other MEF2C target genes NR4A1 (Nur77) and NRG1, found significantly, decreased the expression of these genes as well. The missense p.(Pro287Thr) SIK1 sequence variation was associated with abnormal neuronal morphology, with significant decreases in mean neurite length, mean number of neurites and a significant increase in proximal branches compared with wild type. Epilepsy-causing SIK1 sequence variations resulted in abnormalities in the MEF2C-ARC pathway of neuronal development and synapse activity response. This work provides the first insights into the mechanisms of pathogenesis in SIK1 syndrome, and extends the ARX-MEF2C pathway in the pathogenesis of developmental epilepsy.

  14. X-Linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a frequent cause of idiopathic Addison`s disease in young adult male patients

    SciTech Connect

    Laureti, S.; Casucci, G.; Santeusanio, F.

    1996-02-01

    X-Linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a genetic disease associated with demyelination of the central nervous system, adrenal insufficiency, and accumulation of very long chain fatty acids in tissue and body fluids. ALD is due to mutation of a gene located in Xq28 that encodes a peroxisomal transporter protein of unknown function. The most common phenotype of ALD is the cerebral form (45%) that develops in boys between 5-12 yr. Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) involves the spinal cord and peripheral nerves in young adults (35%). Adrenal insufficiency (Addison`s disease) is frequently associated with AMN or cerebral ALD and may remain the only clinical expression of ALD (8% of cases). The prevalence of ALD among adults with Addison`s disease remains unknown. To evaluate this prevalence, we performed biochemical analysis of very long chain fatty acids in 14 male patients (age ranging from 12-45 yr at diagnosis) previously diagnosed as having primary idiopathic adrenocortical insufficiency. In 5 of 14 patients (35%), elevated plasma concentrations of very long chain fatty acids were detected. None of these patients had adrenocortical antibodies. By electrophysiological tests and magnetic resonance imaging it was determined that two patients had cerebral ALD, one had adrenomyeloneuropathy with cerebral involvement, and two had preclinical AMN. Our data support the hypothesis that ALD is a frequent cause of idiopathic Addison`s disease in children and adults. 30 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Familial risk of epilepsy: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Peljto, Anna L.; Barker-Cummings, Christie; Vasoli, Vincent M.; Leibson, Cynthia L.; Hauser, W. Allen; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Almost all previous studies of familial risk of epilepsy have had potentially serious methodological limitations. Our goal was to address these limitations and provide more rigorous estimates of familial risk in a population-based study. We used the unique resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify all 660 Rochester, Minnesota residents born in 1920 or later with incidence of epilepsy from 1935–94 (probands) and their 2439 first-degree relatives who resided in Olmsted County. We assessed incidence of epilepsy in relatives by comprehensive review of the relatives’ medical records, and estimated age-specific cumulative incidence and standardized incidence ratios for epilepsy in relatives compared with the general population, according to proband and relative characteristics. Among relatives of all probands, cumulative incidence of epilepsy to age 40 was 4.7%, and risk was increased 3.3-fold (95% confidence interval 2.75–5.99) compared with population incidence. Risk was increased to the greatest extent in relatives of probands with idiopathic generalized epilepsies (standardized incidence ratio 6.0) and epilepsies associated with intellectual or motor disability presumed present from birth, which we denoted ‘prenatal/developmental cause’ (standardized incidence ratio 4.3). Among relatives of probands with epilepsy without identified cause (including epilepsies classified as ‘idiopathic’ or ‘unknown cause’), risk was significantly increased for epilepsy of prenatal/developmental cause (standardized incidence ratio 4.1). Similarly, among relatives of probands with prenatal/developmental cause, risk was significantly increased for epilepsies without identified cause (standardized incidence ratio 3.8). In relatives of probands with generalized epilepsy, standardized incidence ratios were 8.3 (95% confidence interval 2.93–15.31) for generalized epilepsy and 2.5 (95% confidence interval 0.92–4.00) for focal epilepsy. In relatives of

  16. Mutations in SLC35A3 cause autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy and arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Edvardson, Simon; Ashikov, Angel; Jalas, Chaim; Sturiale, Luisa; Shaag, Avraham; Fedick, Anastasia; Treff, Nathan R; Garozzo, Domenico; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Elpeleg, Orly

    2013-11-01

    The heritability of autism spectrum disorder is currently estimated at 55%. Identification of the molecular basis of patients with syndromic autism extends our understanding of the pathogenesis of autism in general. The objective of this study was to find the gene mutated in eight patients from a large kindred, who suffered from autism spectrum disorder, arthrogryposis and epilepsy. By linkage analysis and exome sequencing, we identified deleterious mutations in SLC35A3 in these patients. SLC35A3 encodes the major Golgi uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) transporter. In Golgi vesicles isolated from patient fibroblasts the transport of the respective nucleotide sugar was significantly reduced causing a massive decrease in the content of cell surface expressed highly branched N-glycans and a concomitant sharp increase of lower branched glycoforms. Spontaneous mutation in SLC35A3 has been discovered in cattle worldwide, recapitulating the human phenotype with arthrogryposis and additional skeletal defects known as Complex Vertebral Malformation syndrome. The skeletal anomalies in the mutant cattle and in our patients, and perhaps even the neurological symptoms are likely the consequence of the lack of high-branched N-glycans and the concomitant abundance of lower-branched glycoforms at the cell surface. This pattern has previously been associated with growth arrest and induction of differentiation. With this study, we add SLC35A3 to the gene list of autism spectrum disorders, and underscore the crucial importance of UDP-GlcNAc in the regulation of the N-glycan branching pathway in the Golgi apparatus.

  17. GRIN1 mutations cause encephalopathy with infantile-onset epilepsy, and hyperkinetic and stereotyped movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Chihiro; Shiina, Masaaki; Tohyama, Jun; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Blumkin, Lubov; Lev, Dorit; Mukaida, Souichi; Nozaki, Fumihito; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Onuma, Akira; Kodera, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-06-01

    Recently, de novo mutations in GRIN1 have been identified in patients with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and epileptic encephalopathy. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis of patients with genetically unsolved epileptic encephalopathies identified four patients with GRIN1 mutations, allowing us to investigate the phenotypic spectrum of GRIN1 mutations. Eighty-eight patients with unclassified early onset epileptic encephalopathies (EOEEs) with an age of onset <1 year were analyzed by WES. The effect of mutations on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors was examined by mapping altered amino acids onto three-dimensional models. We identified four de novo missense GRIN1 mutations in 4 of 88 patients with unclassified EOEEs. In these four patients, initial symptoms appeared within 3 months of birth, including hyperkinetic movements in two patients (2/4, 50%), and seizures in two patients (2/4, 50%). Involuntary movements, severe developmental delay, and intellectual disability were recognized in all four patients. In addition, abnormal eye movements resembling oculogyric crises and stereotypic hand movements were observed in two and three patients, respectively. All the four patients exhibited only nonspecific focal and diffuse epileptiform abnormality, and never showed suppression-burst or hypsarrhythmia during infancy. A de novo mosaic mutation (c.1923G>A) with a mutant allele frequency of 16% (in DNA of blood leukocytes) was detected in one patient. Three mutations were located in the transmembrane domain (3/4, 75%), and one in the extracellular loop near transmembrane helix 1. All the mutations were predicted to impair the function of the NMDA receptor. Clinical features of de novo GRIN1 mutations include infantile involuntary movements, seizures, and hand stereotypies, suggesting that GRIN1 mutations cause encephalopathy resulting in seizures and movement disorders. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Secondary neurotransmitter deficiencies in epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channelopathies: A potential treatment target?

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Demos, Michelle; Shyr, Casper; Matthews, Allison; Zhang, Linhua; Race, Simone; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Van Allen, Margot I; Mancarci, Ogan; Toker, Lilah; Pavlidis, Paul; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Trump, Natalie; Heales, Simon; Pope, Simon; Cross, J Helen; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2016-01-01

    We describe neurotransmitter abnormalities in two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy resulting from deleterious de novo mutations in sodium channel genes. Whole exome sequencing identified a de novo SCN2A splice-site mutation (c.2379+1G>A, p.Glu717Gly.fs*30) resulting in deletion of exon 14, in a 10-year old male with early onset global developmental delay, intermittent ataxia, autism, hypotonia, epileptic encephalopathy and cerebral/cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebrospinal fluid both homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were significantly decreased; extensive biochemical and genetic investigations ruled out primary neurotransmitter deficiencies and other known inborn errors of metabolism. In an 8-year old female with an early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy, developmental regression, and progressive cerebellar atrophy, a previously unreported de novo missense mutation was identified in SCN8A (c.5615G>A; p.Arg1872Gln), affecting a highly conserved residue located in the C-terminal of the Nav1.6 protein. Aside from decreased homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate was also found to be low. We hypothesize that these channelopathies cause abnormal synaptic mono-amine metabolite secretion/uptake via impaired vesicular release and imbalance in electrochemical ion gradients, which in turn aggravate the seizures. Treatment with oral 5-hydroxytryptophan, l-Dopa/Carbidopa, and a dopa agonist resulted in mild improvement of seizure control in the male case, most likely via dopamine and serotonin receptor activated signal transduction and modulation of glutamatergic, GABA-ergic and glycinergic neurotransmission. Neurotransmitter analysis in other sodium channelopathy patients will help validate our findings, potentially yielding novel treatment opportunities.

  19. Evaluating the Efficacy of Teaching Methods Regarding Prevention of Human Epilepsy Caused by Taenia solium Neurocysticercosis in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wohlgemut, Jared; Dewey, Cate; Levy, Mike; Mutua, Florence

    2010-01-01

    Taenia solium neurocysticercosis is a major cause of adult-onset epilepsy in developing countries. A questionnaire was administered to 282 Kenyan farmers, followed by a workshop, a second questionnaire, one-on-one training, and a third questionnaire. People who attended workshops were more likely to know how T. solium causes epilepsy in humans in the third visit than the second (P = 0.001). The likelihood that farmers would tether their pigs 100% of the time, limiting exposure to tapeworm eggs, increased after the first (P < 0.001) and second visits (P < 0.001). Farmers were more likely to have heard of Cysticercus cellulosae in the second (P = 0.001) and third visits (P = 0.007), and to know how pigs acquire infection in the second (P = 0.03) and third visits (P = 0.003). Farmers with at least a grade 8 education were more likely to know how T. solium is transmitted to humans in the second (P = 0.001) and third visits (P = 0.009), and were more likely to understand the relationship between epilepsy and T. solium in the second (P = 0.03) and third visits (P = 0.03). Grade 8 education may enhance learning from written material. Workshops followed by individual on-farm training enhanced knowledge acquisition and behavior changes. Training local government extension workers contributed to the sustainability of this project. PMID:20348512

  20. Evaluating the efficacy of teaching methods regarding prevention of human epilepsy caused by Taenia solium neurocysticercosis in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Wohlgemut, Jared; Dewey, Cate; Levy, Mike; Mutua, Florence

    2010-04-01

    Taenia solium neurocysticercosis is a major cause of adult-onset epilepsy in developing countries. A questionnaire was administered to 282 Kenyan farmers, followed by a workshop, a second questionnaire, one-on-one training, and a third questionnaire. People who attended workshops were more likely to know how T. solium causes epilepsy in humans in the third visit than the second (P = 0.001). The likelihood that farmers would tether their pigs 100% of the time, limiting exposure to tapeworm eggs, increased after the first (P < 0.001) and second visits (P < 0.001). Farmers were more likely to have heard of Cysticercus cellulosae in the second (P = 0.001) and third visits (P = 0.007), and to know how pigs acquire infection in the second (P = 0.03) and third visits (P = 0.003). Farmers with at least a grade 8 education were more likely to know how T. solium is transmitted to humans in the second (P = 0.001) and third visits (P = 0.009), and were more likely to understand the relationship between epilepsy and T. solium in the second (P = 0.03) and third visits (P = 0.03). Grade 8 education may enhance learning from written material. Workshops followed by individual on-farm training enhanced knowledge acquisition and behavior changes. Training local government extension workers contributed to the sustainability of this project.

  1. SLC9A6 mutations cause X-linked mental retardation, microcephaly, epilepsy, and ataxia, a phenotype mimicking Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, Gregor D; Selmer, Kaja K; Roxrud, Ingrid; Smith, Raffaella; Kyllerman, Mårten; Eiklid, Kristin; Kroken, Mette; Mattingsdal, Morten; Egeland, Thore; Stenmark, Harald; Sjøholm, Hans; Server, Andres; Samuelsson, Lena; Christianson, Arnold; Tarpey, Patrick; Whibley, Annabel; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew; Teague, Jon; Edkins, Sarah; Gecz, Jozef; Turner, Gillian; Raymond, F Lucy; Schwartz, Charles; Stevenson, Roger E; Undlien, Dag E; Strømme, Petter

    2008-04-01

    Linkage analysis and DNA sequencing in a family exhibiting an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) syndrome, characterized by microcephaly, epilepsy, ataxia, and absent speech and resembling Angelman syndrome, identified a deletion in the SLC9A6 gene encoding the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE6. Subsequently, other mutations were found in a male with mental retardation (MR) who had been investigated for Angelman syndrome and in two XLMR families with epilepsy and ataxia, including the family designated as having Christianson syndrome. Therefore, mutations in SLC9A6 cause X-linked mental retardation. Additionally, males with findings suggestive of unexplained Angelman syndrome should be considered as potential candidates for SLC9A6 mutations.

  2. SLC9A6 Mutations Cause X-Linked Mental Retardation, Microcephaly, Epilepsy, and Ataxia, a Phenotype Mimicking Angelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gilfillan, Gregor D.; Selmer, Kaja K.; Roxrud, Ingrid; Smith, Raffaella; Kyllerman, Mårten; Eiklid, Kristin; Kroken, Mette; Mattingsdal, Morten; Egeland, Thore; Stenmark, Harald; Sjøholm, Hans; Server, Andres; Samuelsson, Lena; Christianson, Arnold; Tarpey, Patrick; Whibley, Annabel; Stratton, Michael R.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Teague, Jon; Edkins, Sarah; Gecz, Jozef; Turner, Gillian; Raymond, F. Lucy; Schwartz, Charles; Stevenson, Roger E.; Undlien, Dag E.; Strømme, Petter

    2008-01-01

    Linkage analysis and DNA sequencing in a family exhibiting an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) syndrome, characterized by microcephaly, epilepsy, ataxia, and absent speech and resembling Angelman syndrome, identified a deletion in the SLC9A6 gene encoding the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE6. Subsequently, other mutations were found in a male with mental retardation (MR) who had been investigated for Angelman syndrome and in two XLMR families with epilepsy and ataxia, including the family designated as having Christianson syndrome. Therefore, mutations in SLC9A6 cause X-linked mental retardation. Additionally, males with findings suggestive of unexplained Angelman syndrome should be considered as potential candidates for SLC9A6 mutations. PMID:18342287

  3. Prognostic factors for outcome in pediatric probable lesional frontal lobe epilepsy with an unknown cause (cryptogenic).

    PubMed

    Lee, Inn-Chi; Chen, Yung-Jung; Lee, Hong-Shen; Li, Shuan-Yow

    2014-12-01

    The outcomes of children with cryptogenic seizures most probably arising from the frontal lobe are difficult to predict. We retrospectively collected data on 865 pediatric patients with epilepsy. In 78 patients with cryptogenic frontal lobe epilepsy, the age at first seizure was inversely correlated with the outcome, including the degree of intellectual disability/developmental delay (P = .002) and seizure frequency (P = .02) after adequate treatment. Intellectual disability was more prevalent in children with a first seizure at 0 to 3 years old (P = .002), and seizures were more frequent in those with a first seizure at 0 to 6 years old than at 7 to 16 years old (P = .026). For pediatric cryptogenic frontal lobe epilepsy, the age at first seizure is important and inversely correlated with outcome, including seizure frequency and intellectual disability. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. Generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity in juvenile dogs caused by a defective DIRAS family GTPase 1

    PubMed Central

    Wielaender, Franziska; Sarviaho, Riika; James, Fiona; Hytönen, Marjo K.; Cortez, Miguel A.; Kluger, Gerhard; Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Arumilli, Meharji; Kornberg, Marion; Bathen-Noethen, Andrea; Tipold, Andrea; Rentmeister, Kai; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.; Hülsmeyer, Velia; Boettcher, Irene C.; Tästensen, Carina; Flegel, Thomas; Leeb, Tosso; Matiasek, Kaspar; Fischer, Andrea; Lohi, Hannes

    2017-01-01

    The clinical and electroencephalographic features of a canine generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity and onset in young Rhodesian Ridgeback dogs (6 wk to 18 mo) are described. A fully penetrant recessive 4-bp deletion was identified in the DIRAS family GTPase 1 (DIRAS1) gene with an altered expression pattern of DIRAS1 protein in the affected brain. This neuronal DIRAS1 gene with a proposed role in cholinergic transmission provides not only a candidate for human myoclonic epilepsy but also insights into the disease etiology, while establishing a spontaneous model for future intervention studies and functional characterization. PMID:28223533

  5. Epilepsy-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Lin, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Liu; Xu, Hai-Qing; Shi, Yi-Wu; Yi, Yong-Hong; He, Na; Liao, Wei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Development in genetic technology has led to the identification of an increasing number of genes associated with epilepsy. These discoveries will both provide the basis for including genetic tests in clinical practice and improve diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. By searching through several databases (OMIM, HGMD, and EpilepsyGene) and recent publications on PubMed, we found 977 genes that are associated with epilepsy. We classified these genes into 4 categories according to the manifestation of epilepsy in phenotypes. We found 84 genes that are considered as epilepsy genes: genes that cause epilepsies or syndromes with epilepsy as the core symptom. 73 genes were listed as neurodevelopment-associated genes: genes associated with both brain-development malformations and epilepsy. Several genes (536) were epilepsy-related: genes associated with both physical or other systemic abnormalities and epilepsy or seizures. We found 284 additional genes putatively associated with epilepsy; this requires further verification. These integrated data will provide new insights useful for both including genetic tests in the clinical practice and evaluating the results of genetic tests. We also summarized the epilepsy-associated genes according to their function, with the goal to better characterize the association between genes and epilepsies and to further understand the mechanisms underlying epilepsy.

  6. Genetics of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vadlamudi, Lata; Milne, Roger L.; Lawrence, Kate; Heron, Sarah E.; Eckhaus, Jazmin; Keay, Deborah; Connellan, Mary; Torn-Broers, Yvonne; Howell, R. Anne; Mulley, John C.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Hopper, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Analysis of twins with epilepsy to explore the genetic architecture of specific epilepsies, to evaluate the applicability of the 2010 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) organization of epilepsy syndromes, and to integrate molecular genetics with phenotypic analyses. Methods: A total of 558 twin pairs suspected to have epilepsy were ascertained from twin registries (69%) or referral (31%). Casewise concordance estimates were calculated for epilepsy syndromes. Epilepsies were then grouped according to the 2010 ILAE organizational scheme. Molecular genetic information was utilized where applicable. Results: Of 558 twin pairs, 418 had confirmed seizures. A total of 534 twin individuals were affected. There were higher twin concordance estimates for monozygotic (MZ) than for dizygotic (DZ) twins for idiopathic generalized epilepsies (MZ = 0.77; DZ = 0.35), genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (MZ = 0.85; DZ = 0.25), and focal epilepsies (MZ = 0.40; DZ = 0.03). Utilizing the 2010 ILAE scheme, the twin data clearly demonstrated genetic influences in the syndromes designated as genetic. Of the 384 tested twin individuals, 10.9% had mutations of large effect in known epilepsy genes or carried validated susceptibility alleles. Conclusions: Twin studies confirm clear genetic influences for specific epilepsies. Analysis of the twin sample using the 2010 ILAE scheme strongly supported the validity of grouping the “genetic” syndromes together and shows this organizational scheme to be a more flexible and biologically meaningful system than previous classifications. Successful selected molecular testing applied to this cohort is the prelude to future large-scale next-generation sequencing of epilepsy research cohorts. Insights into genetic architecture provided by twin studies provide essential data for optimizing such approaches. PMID:25107880

  7. Disruption of Fgf13 Causes Synaptic Excitatory–Inhibitory Imbalance and Genetic Epilepsy and Febrile Seizures Plus

    PubMed Central

    Puranam, Ram S.; He, Xiao Ping; Yao, Lijun; Le, Tri; Jang, Wonjo; Rehder, Catherine W.; Lewis, Darrell V.

    2015-01-01

    We identified a family in which a translocation between chromosomes X and 14 was associated with cognitive impairment and a complex genetic disorder termed “Genetic Epilepsy and Febrile Seizures Plus” (GEFS+). We demonstrate that the breakpoint on the X chromosome disrupted a gene that encodes an auxiliary protein of voltage-gated Na+ channels, fibroblast growth factor 13 (Fgf13). Female mice in which one Fgf13 allele was deleted exhibited hyperthermia-induced seizures and epilepsy. Anatomic studies revealed expression of Fgf13 mRNA in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons of hippocampus. Electrophysiological recordings revealed decreased inhibitory and increased excitatory synaptic inputs in hippocampal neurons of Fgf13 mutants. We speculate that reduced expression of Fgf13 impairs excitability of inhibitory interneurons, resulting in enhanced excitability within local circuits of hippocampus and the clinical phenotype of epilepsy. These findings reveal a novel cause of this syndrome and underscore the powerful role of FGF13 in control of neuronal excitability. PMID:26063919

  8. Frameless stereotactic functional neuronavigation combined with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging as a strategy in highly eloquent located tumors causing epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Bjoern; Grummich, Peter; Hamer, Hajo; Bluemcke, Ingmar; Coras, Roland; Buchfelder, Michael; Roessler, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Intractable epilepsy due to tumors located in highly eloquent brain regions is often considered surgically inaccessible because of a high risk of postoperative neurological deterioration. Intraoperative MRI and functional navigation contribute to overcome this problem. To retrospectively investigate the long-term results and impact of functional neuronavigation and 1.5-tesla intraoperative MRI on patients who underwent surgery of tumors associated with epilepsy located close to or within eloquent brain areas. Nineteen patients (9 female, 10 male, mean age 41.4 ± 13.4 years, 11 low-grade and 8 high-grade glial tumors) were evaluated preoperatively using BOLD imaging, diffusion-tensor imaging tractography and magnetoencephalography. Functional data were implemented into neuronavigation in this multimodal approach. In 14 of 19 patients (74%), complete resection was achieved, and in 5 patients significant tumor volume reduction was accomplished. Eight of 14 (57%) complete resections were achieved only by performing an intraoperative image update. Neurological deterioration was found permanently in 2 patients. After a mean follow-up of 43.8 ± 23.8 months, 15 patients (79%) became seizure free (Engel class Ia). Despite the highly eloquent location of tumors causing intractable epilepsy, our multimodal approach led to complete resection in more than two-thirds of patients with an acceptable neurological morbidity and excellent long-term seizure control.

  9. Excessive activation of mTOR in postnatally-generated granule cells is sufficient to cause epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Raymund Y.K.; Rolle, Isaiah J.; LaSarge, Candi L.; Hosford, Bethany E.; Rosen, Jules M.; Uhl, Juli D.; Schmeltzer, Sarah N.; Faulkner, Christian; Bronson, Stefanie L.; Murphy, Brian L.; Richards, David A.; Holland, Katherine D.; Danzer, Steve C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The dentate gyrus is hypothesized to function as a “gate”, limiting the flow of excitation through the hippocampus. During epileptogenesis, adult-generated granule cells (DGC) form aberrant neuronal connections with neighboring DGC, disrupting the dentate gate. Hyperactivation of the mTOR signaling pathway is implicated in driving this aberrant circuit formation. While the presence of abnormal DGC in epilepsy has been known for decades, direct evidence linking abnormal DGC to seizures has been lacking. Here, we isolate the effects of abnormal DGC using a transgenic mouse model to selectively delete PTEN from postnatally-generated DGC. PTEN deletion led to hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway, producing abnormal DGC morphologically similar to those in epilepsy. Strikingly, animals in which PTEN was deleted from ≥9% of the DGC population developed spontaneous seizures in about four weeks, confirming that abnormal DGC – which are present in both animals and humans with epilepsy – are capable of causing the disease. PMID:22998871

  10. Mutations in FRMD7, a newly identified member of the FERM family, cause X-linked idiopathic congenital nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, Patrick; Thomas, Shery; Sarvananthan, Nagini; Mallya, Uma; Lisgo, Steven; Talbot, Chris J; Roberts, Eryl O; Awan, Musarat; Surendran, Mylvaganam; McLean, Rebecca J; Reinecke, Robert D; Langmann, Andrea; Lindner, Susanne; Koch, Martina; Jain, Sunila; Woodruff, Geoffrey; Gale, Richard P; Bastawrous, Andrew; Degg, Chris; Droutsas, Konstantinos; Asproudis, Ioannis; Zubcov, Alina A; Pieh, Christina; Veal, Colin D; Machado, Rajiv D; Backhouse, Oliver C; Baumber, Laura; Constantinescu, Cris S; Brodsky, Michael C; Hunter, David G; Hertle, Richard W; Read, Randy J; Edkins, Sarah; O'Meara, Sarah; Parker, Adrian; Stevens, Claire; Teague, Jon; Wooster, Richard; Futreal, P Andrew; Trembath, Richard C; Stratton, Michael R; Raymond, F Lucy; Gottlob, Irene

    2006-11-01

    Idiopathic congenital nystagmus is characterized by involuntary, periodic, predominantly horizontal oscillations of both eyes. We identified 22 mutations in FRMD7 in 26 families with X-linked idiopathic congenital nystagmus. Screening of 42 singleton cases of idiopathic congenital nystagmus (28 male, 14 females) yielded three mutations (7%). We found restricted expression of FRMD7 in human embryonic brain and developing neural retina, suggesting a specific role in the control of eye movement and gaze stability.

  11. Understanding the burden of idiopathic generalized epilepsy in the United States, Europe, and Brazil: An analysis from the National Health and Wellness Survey.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shaloo; Kwan, Patrick; Faught, Edward; Tsong, Wan; Forsythe, Anna; Ryvlin, Phillipe

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the current burden of primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (PGTCS) associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) as a function of seizure frequency. We analyzed data for (IGE) as a proxy measure of PGTCS. Little is known about the quality of life (QoL), health utility, productivity, healthcare resource utilization (HRU), and cost burden of PGTCS or IGE. Patients were identified from the US (2011, 2012, & 2013), 5EU (2011 & 2013), and Brazil (2011 & 2012) National Health and Wellness Survey, a nationally representative, internet-based survey of adults (18+ years). Patients that self-reported a diagnosis of IGE were categorized into seizure frequencies of: ≥1 seizure per week, 1-3 seizures per month, 1-4 seizures per year, or <1 seizure per year. QoL was measured using the SF-36v2 Mental (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS) scores, health utilities with the SF-6D, productivity with the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) questionnaire, and HRU as reported in the past six months. Unit costs were estimated from the literature and multiplied against HRU values to calculate direct costs and WPAI values to calculate indirect costs. Generalized linear regression was utilized to examine the relationship between seizure frequency and each measure of burden with adjustment for covariates. Out of the general population surveyed, IGE was self-reported in 782 of 176,093 (US), 172 of 30,000 (UK), 106 of 30,001 (Germany), 87 of 30,000 (France), 31 of 12,011 (Spain), 22 of 17,500 (Italy), and 34 of 24,000 (Brazil). Persistent seizures (≥1 per year) were reported in over 40% of patients with IGE (10-15% with ≥1 seizure per week, 10-15% with 1-3 seizures per month, 20-25% with 1-4 seizures per year). Over 75% were treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Compared with those having <1 seizure per year (reference group), patients in the two most frequent seizure categories reported worse MCS and PCS scores

  12. Beta-blockade with bucindolol in heart failure caused by ischemic versus idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Woodley, S L; Gilbert, E M; Anderson, J L; O'Connell, J B; Deitchman, D; Yanowitz, F G; Mealey, P C; Volkman, K; Renlund, D G; Menlove, R

    1991-12-01

    We investigated the effects of bucindolol, a nonselective, non-ISA beta-blocker with mild-vasodilatory properties, in patients with congestive heart failure from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (ISCDC, n = 27) and compared the results with those in subjects with heart failure from idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC, n = 22). Patients were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive 12 weeks' treatment with either bucindolol or placebo, with randomization stratified for IDC or ISCDC: Invasive (right heart catheterization) and noninvasive (echo, MUGA, central venous norepinephrine, exercise treadmill studies, and symptom scores) tests of heart failure severity were determined at baseline and end of the study. For all subjects (ISCDC plus IDC), relative to placebo treatment, bucindolol-treated patients had significant improvement in ejection fraction, left ventricular size and filling pressure, stroke work index, symptom score, and central venous norepinephrine. However, most of these differences could be attributed to improvement in the IDC subgroup, as the only parameter with a statistically significant degree of improvement in the bucindolol-treated ISCDC subgroup was left ventricular size. We conclude that beta-blockade may produce quantitatively different degrees of response in different kinds of heart muscle disease.

  13. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. All-cause mortality rate in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Implications for the design and execution of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    King, Talmadge E; Albera, Carlo; Bradford, Williamson Z; Costabel, Ulrich; du Bois, Roland M; Leff, Jonathan A; Nathan, Steven D; Sahn, Steven A; Valeyre, Dominique; Noble, Paul W

    2014-04-01

    FVC has emerged as a standard primary endpoint in clinical trials evaluating novel therapies for patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, it has recently been proposed that all-cause mortality or a composite comprised of all-cause mortality and all-cause nonelective hospitalization be adopted as the standard primary endpoint for IPF clinical trials. To conduct a comprehensive evaluation of mortality in three phase 3 clinical trials and evaluate the feasibility of mortality trials in patients with IPF. The study population included 622 patients randomized to placebo in the CAPACITY studies evaluating pirfenidone (n = 347) or the INSPIRE study evaluating interferon-γ1b (n = 275). The Kaplan-Meier estimate of 2-year survival was fit to the exponential distribution and used to calculate sample size requirements for a mortality study with 90% power to detect a 25% reduction in all-cause mortality with a two-sided α of 0.05. Modeling analyses were used to assess the effects of selected variables on sample size and study design. A total of 73 deaths occurred during the period of observation (mean duration of follow-up, 80.1 wk). The all-cause mortality rate was 6.6% at 1 year and 13.7% at 2 years. Based on the observed 2-year mortality rate, a total of 508 events would be required to detect a significant treatment benefit in a two-arm trial with 90% power to detect a 25% reduction in all-cause mortality. The estimated sample size for a trial enrolled over 3 years with a maximum follow-up period of 5 years is 2,582 patients. The all-cause mortality rate is relatively low in patients with IPF with mild to moderate impairment in lung function. Accordingly, the necessary size, duration, and cost of all-cause mortality trials in this population are substantial and likely prohibitive.

  15. Mutations in TBC1D24, a gene associated with epilepsy, also cause nonsyndromic deafness DFNB86.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Atteeq U; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Morell, Robert J; Drummond, Meghan C; Ito, Taku; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Khan, Asma A; Basra, Muhammad Asim R; Wasif, Naveed; Ayub, Muhammad; Ali, Rana A; Raza, Syed I; Nickerson, Deborah A; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael; Riazuddin, Saima; Billington, Neil; Khan, Shaheen N; Friedman, Penelope L; Griffith, Andrew J; Ahmad, Wasim; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Leal, Suzanne M; Friedman, Thomas B

    2014-01-02

    Inherited deafness is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. We recently mapped DFNB86, a locus associated with nonsyndromic deafness, to chromosome 16p. In this study, whole-exome sequencing was performed with genomic DNA from affected individuals from three large consanguineous families in which markers linked to DFNB86 segregate with profound deafness. Analyses of these data revealed homozygous mutation c.208G>T (p.Asp70Tyr) or c.878G>C (p.Arg293Pro) in TBC1D24 as the underlying cause of deafness in the three families. Sanger sequence analysis of TBC1D24 in an additional large family in which deafness segregates with DFNB86 identified the c.208G>T (p.Asp70Tyr) substitution. These mutations affect TBC1D24 amino acid residues that are conserved in orthologs ranging from fruit fly to human. Neither variant was observed in databases of single-nucleotide variants or in 634 chromosomes from ethnically matched control subjects. TBC1D24 in the mouse inner ear was immunolocalized predominantly to spiral ganglion neurons, indicating that DFNB86 deafness might be an auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. Previously, six recessive mutations in TBC1D24 were reported to cause seizures (hearing loss was not reported) ranging in severity from epilepsy with otherwise normal development to epileptic encephalopathy resulting in childhood death. Two of our four families in which deafness segregates with mutant alleles of TBC1D24 were available for neurological examination. Cosegregation of epilepsy and deafness was not observed in these two families. Although the causal relationship between genotype and phenotype is not presently understood, our findings, combined with published data, indicate that recessive alleles of TBC1D24 can cause either epilepsy or nonsyndromic deafness.

  16. Mutations in TBC1D24, a Gene Associated With Epilepsy, Also Cause Nonsyndromic Deafness DFNB86

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Atteeq U.; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Morell, Robert J.; Drummond, Meghan C.; Ito, Taku; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Khan, Asma A.; Basra, Muhammad Asim R.; Wasif, Naveed; Ayub, Muhammad; Ali, Rana A.; Raza, Syed I.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael; Riazuddin, Saima; Billington, Neil; Khan, Shaheen N.; Friedman, Penelope L.; Griffith, Andrew J.; Ahmad, Wasim; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Leal, Suzanne M.; Friedman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited deafness is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. We recently mapped DFNB86, a locus associated with nonsyndromic deafness, to chromosome 16p. In this study, whole-exome sequencing was performed with genomic DNA from affected individuals from three large consanguineous families in which markers linked to DFNB86 segregate with profound deafness. Analyses of these data revealed homozygous mutation c.208G>T (p.Asp70Tyr) or c.878G>C (p.Arg293Pro) in TBC1D24 as the underlying cause of deafness in the three families. Sanger sequence analysis of TBC1D24 in an additional large family in which deafness segregates with DFNB86 identified the c.208G>T (p.Asp70Tyr) substitution. These mutations affect TBC1D24 amino acid residues that are conserved in orthologs ranging from fruit fly to human. Neither variant was observed in databases of single-nucleotide variants or in 634 chromosomes from ethnically matched control subjects. TBC1D24 in the mouse inner ear was immunolocalized predominantly to spiral ganglion neurons, indicating that DFNB86 deafness might be an auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. Previously, six recessive mutations in TBC1D24 were reported to cause seizures (hearing loss was not reported) ranging in severity from epilepsy with otherwise normal development to epileptic encephalopathy resulting in childhood death. Two of our four families in which deafness segregates with mutant alleles of TBC1D24 were available for neurological examination. Cosegregation of epilepsy and deafness was not observed in these two families. Although the causal relationship between genotype and phenotype is not presently understood, our findings, combined with published data, indicate that recessive alleles of TBC1D24 can cause either epilepsy or nonsyndromic deafness. PMID:24387994

  17. Quantification of changes in foveal capillary architecture caused by idiopathic epiretinal membrane using OCT angiography.

    PubMed

    Nelis, P; Alten, F; Clemens, C R; Heiduschka, P; Eter, N

    2017-07-01

    To quantify the extent and depth of distortion of the foveal capillary architecture due to traction of an idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A). Multimodal imaging including OCT-A (Angiovue, Optovue) was performed in 42 eyes with idiopathic ERM (72.4 years ±6.8). Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), OCT-A vessel density of the foveal (VDfo) and parafoveal (VDp) region were assessed. Based on 6 × 6-mm(2) OCT-A images, a macular vessel density ratio (MVR = VDfo/VDp) was calculated for the superficial (s), deep (d) and full-thickness (f) slabs to assess a depth-resolved, non-invasive evaluation of foveal distortion. The acquired data were subdivided in a patient group with mild and significant BCVA reduction due to ERM. Data was compared to age-matched healthy controls. In all three slabs, MVR was significantly smaller in the control group in comparison with the ERM group: MVRs: 0.63 ± 0.1 vs 0.83 ± 0.1 (p > 0.001); MVRd: 0.60 ± 0.1 vs 0.73 ± 0.1 (p < 0.001); MVRf: 0.68 ± 0.1 vs 0.82 ± 0.1 (p < 0.001). Group 1 (BCVA <0.4 LogMar) showed a significantly higher MVR in comparison with the control group in the superficial plexus only: MVRs: 0.64 ± 0.1 vs 0.78 ± 0.1 (p < 0.001); MVRd: 0.60 ± 0.1 vs 0.65 ± 0.2 (p = 0.3); MVRf: 0.68 ± 0.1 vs 0.77 ± 0.1 (p = 0.01). However, group 2 (BCVA > = 0.4 LogMar) showed a significantly higher MVR in all three slabs: MVRs: 0.64 ± 0.1 vs 0.86 ± 0.1 (p < 0.001); MVRd: 0.60 ± 0.1 vs 0.77 ± 0.2 (p < 0.001); MVRf: 0.68 ± 0.1 vs 0.85 ± 0.1 (p < 0.001). Assessing MVR using OCT-A may serve as a tool to quantify the extent and depth of distortion of the foveal capillary architecture due to traction of ERM. BCVA reduction appears to be associated with extent and depth of distortion.

  18. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome- a rare cause of refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Malik, Prerna; Garg, Rajinder; Gulia, Anil Kumar D; Kario, Joginder

    2014-03-01

    Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome (DDMS) is a syndrome associated with refractory epilepsy. DDMS is a rare syndrome characterized by seizures, facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiplegia and mental retardation. The characteristic radiologic features are cerebral hemiatrophy with homolateral hypertrophy of the skull and sinuses. The case was an 18 years old female with seizures, hemiparesis of the right side and mental retardation who was diagnosed with DDMS based on computed tomography.

  19. [Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Morentin, B; Alcaraz, R

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is an important cause of death in young epileptic patients. However, it is relatively unknown to neurologists. To analyze the frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of SUDEP as a cause of sudden death (SD) in young persons. An observational study of all SD due to SUDEP in persons aged 1 35 years occurring between 1991 and 1998 in Bizkaia, in whom medico legal autopsy was done. In all cases a full autopsy was done and the previous clinical history was investigated. Eight of the 107 cases of SD (7.5%) were due to SUDEP. Five were aged between 25 and 29 years and in this age group it was the commonest cause of death (22%). Six had been diagnosed as having idiopathic epilepsy and two as having posttraumatic epilepsy. Generalized convulsions occurred in 75%. Four patients died when they were alone. Two patients had epileptic seizures hours before their death. At necropsy no structural changes were seen in the brain except in the two patients with posttraumatic epilepsy. Pulmonary oedema was a frequent finding. In 50% of the dead patients, chemico toxicological study showed there to be no trace of the drugs they had been prescribed. Although SD is rare, SUDEP is an important cause of mortality in young epileptics. Violent death in relation to epilepsy causes problems in forensic medicine. Although the mechanisms of SUDEP are not clear, it would seem necessary to increase medical control of this disorder, especially in young people.

  20. Causes and Prognosis of Visual Acuity Loss at the Time of Initial Presentation in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, John J.; Thurtell, Matthew J.; Longmuir, Reid A.; Garvin, Mona K.; Wang, Jui-Kai; Wall, Michael; Kardon, Randy H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the etiology and prognosis of visual acuity loss in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) at presentation and to provide objective measures to predict visual outcome. Methods. A retrospective review of 660 patients with IIH (2009–2013) identified 31 patients (4.7%) with 48 eyes having best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/25 or worse on initial presentation. Fundus photography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the optic disc and macula, and perimetry were used to determine the causes and prognosis of vision loss. Segmentation of the macula OCT was performed using the Iowa Reference Algorithm to determine the retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer complex (GCL-IPL) thickness. Results. Outer retinal changes alone caused decreased BCVA at initial presentation in 22 eyes (46%): subretinal fluid in 16, chorioretinal folds in 5, and peripapillary choroidal neovascularization in 1. The vision loss was reversible except for some eyes with chorioretinal folds. Optic neuropathy alone caused decreased BCVA in 10 eyes (21%) and coexisting outer retinal changes and optic neuropathy caused decreased BCVA in 16 eyes (33%). A GCL-IPL thickness less than or equal to 70 μm at initial presentation or progressive thinning of greater than or equal to 10 μm within 2 to 3 weeks compared with baseline correlated with poor visual outcome. Conclusions. Visual acuity loss in IIH can be caused by both outer retinal changes and optic neuropathy. Vision loss from outer retinal changes is mostly reversible. The outcome of patients with coexisting outer retinal changes and optic neuropathy or optic neuropathy alone depends on the degree of optic neuropathy, which can be predicted by the GCL-IPL thickness. PMID:26070058

  1. ASAH1 variant causing a mild SMA phenotype with no myoclonic epilepsy: a clinical, biochemical and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Filosto, Massimiliano; Aureli, Massimo; Castellotti, Barbara; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Schiumarini, Domitilla; Valsecchi, Manuela; Lualdi, Susanna; Mazzotti, Raffaella; Pensato, Viviana; Rota, Silvia; Gellera, Cinzia; Filocamo, Mirella; Padovani, Alessandro

    2016-11-01

    ASAH1 gene encodes for acid ceramidase that is involved in the degradation of ceramide into sphingosine and free fatty acids within lysosomes. ASAH1 variants cause both the severe and early-onset Farber disease and rare cases of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME), phenotypically characterized by childhood onset of proximal muscle weakness and atrophy due to spinal motor neuron degeneration followed by occurrence of severe and intractable myoclonic seizures and death in the teenage years. We studied two subjects, a 30-year-old pregnant woman and her 17-year-old sister, affected with a very slowly progressive non-5q SMA since childhood. No history of seizures or myoclonus has been reported and EEG was unremarkable. The molecular study of ASAH1 gene showed the presence of the homozygote nucleotide variation c.124A>G (r.124a>g) that causes the amino acid substitution p.Thr42Ala. Biochemical evaluation of cultured fibroblasts showed both reduction in ceramidase activity and accumulation of ceramide compared with the normal control. This study describes for the first time the association between ASAH1 variants and an adult SMA phenotype with no myoclonic epilepsy nor death in early age, thus expanding the phenotypic spectrum of ASAH1-related SMA. ASAH1 molecular analysis should be considered in the diagnostic testing of non-5q adult SMA patients.

  2. Cellular mechanisms underlying acquired epilepsy: The calcium hypothesis of the induction and maintainance of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Robert J.; Sun, David A.; Deshpande, Laxmikant S.

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Although epilepsy can be idiopathic, it is estimated that up to 50% of all epilepsy cases are initiated by neurological insults and are called acquired epilepsy (AE). AE develops in 3 phases: (1) the injury (central nervous system [CNS] insult), (2) epileptogenesis (latency), and (3) the chronic epileptic (spontaneous recurrent seizure) phases. Status epilepticus (SE), stroke, and traumatic brain injury (TBI) are 3 major examples of common brain injuries that can lead to the development of AE. It is especially important to understand the molecular mechanisms that cause AE because it may lead to innovative strategies to prevent or cure this common condition. Recent studies have offered new insights into the cause of AE and indicate that injury-induced alterations in intracellular calcium concentration levels [Ca2+]i and calcium homeostatic mechanisms play a role in the development and maintenance of AE. The injuries that cause AE are different, but they share a common molecular mechanism for producing brain damage—an increase in extracellular glutamate concentration that causes increased intracellular neuronal calcium, leading to neuronal injury and/or death. Neurons that survive the injury induced by glutamate and are exposed to increased [Ca2+]i are the cellular substrates to develop epilepsy because dead cells do not seize. The neurons that survive injury sustain permanent long-term plasticity changes in [Ca2+]i and calcium homeostatic mechanisms that are permanent and are a prominent feature of the epileptic phenotype. In the last several years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the prolonged alteration in neuronal calcium dynamics plays an important role in the induction and maintenance of the prolonged neuroplasticity changes underlying the epileptic phenotype. Understanding the role of calcium as a second messenger in the induction and maintenance of epilepsy may provide novel insights into

  3. The investigation of inborn errors of metabolism as an underlying cause of idiopathic intellectual disability in adults in Norway.

    PubMed

    Hope, S; Johannessen, C H; Aanonsen, N O; Strømme, P

    2016-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) may be an unrecognized cause of intellectual disability (ID) in adults. Knowledge and techniques for investigating IEMs have evolved rapidly; therefore adult patients with idiopathic ID may benefit from an up-to-date aetiological work-up. This review aims at establishing recommendations for investigating IEMs as a cause of ID in adults. PubMed was searched for articles published between 2000 and 2015 regarding clinical work-up, IEMs, ID and adults. Information compiled from 61 articles is used to give practical suggestions from a clinical point of view. Many IEMs that cause ID are characterized by increased risk of specific somatic, neurological and psychiatric signs. Neurometabolic investigations of ID should start with a thorough medical history, clinical examination and general screening in blood. Brain imaging with magnetic resonance imaging and if possible magnetic resonance spectroscopy should also be part of the initial work-up. The aim is to detect abnormalities that give clues to a specific IEM. After the initial screening, a first tier of neurometabolic screening tests in blood and urine should be performed. If this fails to give diagnostic clues, a second tier of neurometabolic tests should be considered in order to secure that the treatable IEMs are detected. Whole exome sequencing techniques, when they become available in clinical settings, will offer new opportunities for detection of IEMs. Based on a broad review of the current literature a systematic diagnostic work-up to detect IEMs as a cause of ID in adults is suggested. © 2015 EAN.

  4. Functional Loss of Bmsei Causes Thermosensitive Epilepsy in Contractile Mutant Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Hongyi; Cheng, Tingcai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Dai, Fangyin; Mita, Kazuei; Xia, Qingyou; Liu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    The thermoprotective mechanisms of insects remain largely unknown. We reported the Bombyx mori contractile (cot) behavioral mutant with thermo-sensitive seizures phenotype. At elevated temperatures, the cot mutant exhibit seizures associated with strong contractions, rolling, vomiting, and a temporary lack of movement. We narrowed a region containing cot to ~268 kb by positional cloning and identified the mutant gene as Bmsei which encoded a potassium channel protein. Bmsei was present in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm in wild-type ganglia but faint in cot. Furthermore, Bmsei was markedly decreased upon high temperature treatment in cot mutant. With the RNAi method and injecting potassium channel blockers, the wild type silkworm was induced the cot phenotype. These results demonstrated that Bmsei was responsible for the cot mutant phenotype and played an important role in thermoprotection in silkworm. Meanwhile, comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the proteomic differences. The results showed that the protein of Hsp-1 and Tn1 were significantly decreased and increased on protein level in cot mutant after thermo-stimulus, respectively. Our data provide insights into the mechanism of thermoprotection in insect. As cot phenotype closely resembles human epilepsy, cot might be a potential model for the mechanism of epilepsy in future. PMID:26198671

  5. Functional Loss of Bmsei Causes Thermosensitive Epilepsy in Contractile Mutant Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Hongyi; Cheng, Tingcai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Dai, Fangyin; Mita, Kazuei; Xia, Qingyou; Liu, Chun

    2015-07-01

    The thermoprotective mechanisms of insects remain largely unknown. We reported the Bombyx mori contractile (cot) behavioral mutant with thermo-sensitive seizures phenotype. At elevated temperatures, the cot mutant exhibit seizures associated with strong contractions, rolling, vomiting, and a temporary lack of movement. We narrowed a region containing cot to ~268 kb by positional cloning and identified the mutant gene as Bmsei which encoded a potassium channel protein. Bmsei was present in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm in wild-type ganglia but faint in cot. Furthermore, Bmsei was markedly decreased upon high temperature treatment in cot mutant. With the RNAi method and injecting potassium channel blockers, the wild type silkworm was induced the cot phenotype. These results demonstrated that Bmsei was responsible for the cot mutant phenotype and played an important role in thermoprotection in silkworm. Meanwhile, comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the proteomic differences. The results showed that the protein of Hsp-1 and Tn1 were significantly decreased and increased on protein level in cot mutant after thermo-stimulus, respectively. Our data provide insights into the mechanism of thermoprotection in insect. As cot phenotype closely resembles human epilepsy, cot might be a potential model for the mechanism of epilepsy in future.

  6. Dysplastic changes in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and the effect of corticosteroids to increase dysplasia and cause hyperdiploid macropolycytes.

    PubMed

    Olcay, L; Yetgin, S; Okur, H; Erekul, S; Tuncer, M

    2000-10-01

    This study evaluates the dysplastic hematological changes in nine patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in 11 attacks, before and after corticosteroid treatment. The pretreatment blood smears of patients with ITP, displayed more neutrophils with bizarre nuclei (P < 0.001), Döhle or Döhle-like inclusions (P < 0. 01), irregular distribution of granules (P < 0.05), hypo-agranulation (P < 0.05), pseudo-Pelger-Huet-like cells (P < 0. 01), and nuclei with chromatine clumping (P < 0.01) than the normal children. The eosinophils of ITP patients were also dysplastic, before treatment. The pretreatment diameter of the neutrophils and the percentage of macropolycytes were greater than those of the patients with viral infections and normal group (P < 0.05 for all). The percentage of neutrophils with bizarre nuclei and nuclei with chromatine clumping and the diameter of neutrophils and macropolycyte percentage increased with corticosteroid therapy (P < 0.01, < 0.01, < 0.01, and < 0.05, respectively). The neutrophil diameter, percentage of macropolycytes, and number of neutrophils with bizarre nuclei decreased within 1-4 weeks after the therapy was stopped. In the neutrophils of two patients, diploidy and hyperdiploidy were established before and on the last day of therapy, respectively, and diploidy reversed after therapy was stopped. In conclusion, ITP patients display dysplastic findings in both neutrophils and eosinophils before treatment and corticosteroids cause transient significant increase in some of the dysplastic changes in neutrophils.

  7. Clinical Risk Factors Associated with Anti-Epileptic Drug Responsiveness in Canine Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Rowena M. A.; Shihab, Nadia K.; Torres, Bruno B. J.; Volk, Holger A.

    2014-01-01

    The nature and occurrence of remission, and conversely, pharmacoresistance following epilepsy treatment is still not fully understood in human or veterinary medicine. As such, predicting which patients will have good or poor treatment outcomes is imprecise, impeding patient management. In the present study, we use a naturally occurring animal model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy to investigate clinical risk factors associated with treatment outcome. Dogs with idiopathic epilepsy, for which no underlying cause was identified, were treated at a canine epilepsy clinic and monitored following discharge from a small animal referral hospital. Clinical data was gained via standardised owner questionnaires and longitudinal follow up data was gained via telephone interview with the dogs’ owners. At follow up, 14% of treated dogs were in seizure-free remission. Dogs that did not achieve remission were more likely to be male, and to have previously experienced cluster seizures. Seizure frequency or the total number of seizures prior to treatment were not significant predictors of pharmacoresistance, demonstrating that seizure density, that is, the temporal pattern of seizure activity, is a more influential predictor of pharmacoresistance. These results are in line with clinical studies of human epilepsy, and experimental rodent models of epilepsy, that patients experiencing episodes of high seizure density (cluster seizures), not just a high seizure frequency pre-treatment, are at an increased risk of drug-refractoriness. These data provide further evidence that the dog could be a useful naturally occurring epilepsy model in the study of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. PMID:25153799

  8. An appraisal of the new operational definition of epilepsy--then and now.

    PubMed

    Malkan, Ashish; Beran, Roy G

    2014-12-01

    The focus to define epilepsy in the newly proposed classification has shifted from the conceptual perspective to practical application thought to better reflect that which is happening to the patient. Within the new definition, a single unprovoked or reflex seizure can be considered as epilepsy if the recurrence risk is similar to that following two unprovoked seizures. Epilepsy is considered to be resolved if the individual had an age-dependent epilepsy syndrome and has passed the applicable age or if the person has remained seizure-free for the last ten years without seizure medications for the last five years. This new operational definition of epilepsy may change the epileptologist's approach regarding when and how long to treat patients with seizures. The new definition also has significant psychosocial and employment-related implications for the patients. With regard to etiology, the terms idiopathic, symptomatic, and cryptogenic have been replaced by genetic, structural/metabolic, and unknown. This reflects a better understanding of the underlying cause of epilepsy based on genetic tests and better neuroimaging. The terms 'simple partial' and 'complex partial' seizures have been replaced by 'focal motor/sensory' and 'focal dyscognitive' seizures, thereby ending the ambiguity associated with the former terms and the difficulty encountered with definitions of altered states of consciousness. These changes, reflective of a better insight into the pathogenesis of seizures and epilepsy, are expected to be more pragmatic and assist when managing patients with epilepsy. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Coding and noncoding variation of the human calcium-channel beta4-subunit gene CACNB4 in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy and episodic ataxia.

    PubMed Central

    Escayg, A; De Waard, M; Lee, D D; Bichet, D; Wolf, P; Mayer, T; Johnston, J; Baloh, R; Sander, T; Meisler, M H

    2000-01-01

    Inactivation of the beta4 subunit of the calcium channel in the mouse neurological mutant lethargic results in a complex neurological disorder that includes absence epilepsy and ataxia. To determine the role of the calcium-channel beta4-subunit gene CACNB4 on chromosome 2q22-23 in related human disorders, we screened for mutations in small pedigrees with familial epilepsy and ataxia. The premature-termination mutation R482X was identified in a patient with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. The R482X protein lacks the 38 C-terminal amino acids containing part of an interaction domain for the alpha1 subunit. The missense mutation C104F was identified both in a German family with generalized epilepsy and praxis-induced seizures and in a French Canadian family with episodic ataxia. These coding mutations were not detected in 255 unaffected control individuals (510 chromosomes), and they may be considered candidate disease mutations. The results of functional tests of the truncated protein R482X in Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated a small decrease in the fast time constant for inactivation of the cotransfected alpha1 subunit. Further studies will be required to evaluate the in vivo consequences of these mutations. We also describe eight noncoding single-nucleotide substitutions, two of which are present at polymorphic frequency, and a previously unrecognized first intron of CACNB4 that interrupts exon 1 at codon 21. PMID:10762541

  10. Long-term ascorbic acid administration causes anticonvulsant activity during moderate and long-duration swimming exercise in experimental epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tutkun, Erkut; Arslan, Gokhan; Soslu, Recep; Ayyildiz, Mustafa; Agar, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise on brain health are undeniable. Long-term exercise increases the production of reactive oxygen species in brain. Therefore, athletes often consume antioxidant supplements to remedy exercise-related damage and fatigue during exercise. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of ascorbic acid in the effects of different intensities of swimming exercise on the brain susceptibility to experimental epilepsy in rats. Ascorbic acid was administered intraperitoneally (ip) during three different swimming exercise programme for 90 days (15 min, 30 min, 90 min/day). The anticonvulsant activity regarding the frequency of epileptiform activity appeared in the 80 min after 500 units intracortical penicillin injection in 30 min and 90 min/day exercise groups. The administration of ascorbic acid (100 mg/kg, ip) did not alter the anticonvulsant properties seen in the in short-duration (15 min/day) swimming exercise group. The amplitude of epileptiform activity also became significant in the 110 and 120 min after penicillin injection in the moderate (30 min/day) and long duration (60 min/day) groups, respectively. The results of the present study provide electrophysiologic evidence that long-term administration of ascorbic acid causes anticonvulsant activities in the moderate and long-duration swimming exercise. Antioxidant supplementation such as ascorbic acid might be suggested for moderate and long-duration swimming exercise in epilepsy.

  11. Myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation (MEAK) is caused by heterozygous KCNC1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Fábio A; Andrade, Danielle M

    2016-09-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) is a distinct group of seizure disorders characterized by gradual neurological decline with ataxia, myoclonus and recurring seizures. There are several forms of PME, among which the most recently described is MEAK - myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation. This particular subtype is caused by a recurrent de novo heterozygous mutation (c.959G>A, p.Arg320His) in the KCNC1 gene, which maps to chromosome 11 and encodes for the Kv3.1 protein (a subunit of the Kv3 subfamily of voltage-gated potassium channels). Loss of Kv3 function disrupts the firing properties of fast-spiking neurons, affects neurotransmitter release and induces cell death. Specifically regarding Kv3.1 malfunctioning, the most affected neurons include inhibitory GABAergic interneurons and cerebellar neurons. Impairment of the former cells is believed to contribute to myoclonus and seizures, whereas dysfunction of the latter to ataxia and tremor. Phenotypically, MEAK patients generally have a normal early development. At the age of 6 to 14 years, they present with myoclonus, which tends to progressively worsen with time. Tonic-clonic seizures may or may not be present, and some patients develop mild cognitive impairment following seizure onset. Typical electroencephalographic features comprise generalized epileptiform discharges and, in some cases, photosensitivity. Brain imaging is either normal or shows cerebellar atrophy. The identification of MEAK has both expanded the phenotypic and genotypic spectra of PME and established an emerging role for de novo mutations in PME.

  12. Genetics of pediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hani, Abeer J; Mikati, Husam M; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2015-06-01

    As the genetic etiologies of an expanding number of epilepsy syndromes are revealed, the complexity of the phenotype genotype correlation increases. As our review will show, multiple gene mutations cause different epilepsy syndromes, making identification of the specific mutation increasingly more important for prognostication and often more directed treatment. Examples of that include the need to avoid specific drugs in Dravet syndrome and the ongoing investigations of the potential use of new directed therapies such as retigabine in KCNQ2-related epilepsies, quinidine in KCNT1-related epilepsies, and memantine in GRIN2A-related epilepsies.

  13. Epilepsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - epilepsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on epilepsy : Epilepsy Foundation -- www.epilepsy.com National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/ ...

  14. Kids' perception about epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Paula T; Cabral, Paula; Araújo, Ulisses; Noronha, Ana Lúcia A; Li, Li M

    2005-06-01

    Epilepsy remains a stigmatized condition. Lack of information has been pointed to as a cause of the perpetuation of stigma. Our goal was to survey children's perception of epilepsy. We used a questionnaire to determine if the children knew what epilepsy is and, if they did not know, what did they think epilepsy is. Twenty-nine children (15 girls; mean age 10 years, range 9-11 years) from a fourth-grade class of an elementary school in Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, completed the questionnaires individually at the same time in the classroom. This took about 20 minutes. Only four children said they knew what epilepsy is: a disease of swallowing the tongue (3) and a disease that can kill (1). The perceptions of children who said they did not know what epilepsy is were: a disease that can kill, a disease of swallowing the tongue, a contagious disease, a serious illness, a head injury. Three children knew someone with epilepsy, and only two of them had said they knew what epilepsy is. The perceptions elicited from the children had a negative connotation; only one child mentioned a relationship between epilepsy and the brain. The spontaneous thoughts of children in this age group, without the contamination of political correctness, may reflect society's collective unconsciousness of the prejudice toward epilepsy and people with epilepsy and needs to be further investigated. Continuous, repetitive educational efforts are necessary in elementary school to change these negative perceptions of epilepsy in our society.

  15. Lipoic Acid Synthetase Deficiency Causes Neonatal-Onset Epilepsy, Defective Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism, and Glycine Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Johannes A.; Zimmermann, Franz A.; Fauth, Christine; Bergheim, Christa; Meierhofer, David; Radmayr, Doris; Zschocke, Johannes; Koch, Johannes; Sperl, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Lipoic acid is an essential prosthetic group of four mitochondrial enzymes involved in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, and branched chain amino acids and in the glycine cleavage. Lipoic acid is synthesized stepwise within mitochondria through a process that includes lipoic acid synthetase. We identified the homozygous mutation c.746G>A (p.Arg249His) in LIAS in an individual with neonatal-onset epilepsy, muscular hypotonia, lactic acidosis, and elevated glycine concentration in plasma and urine. Investigation of the mitochondrial energy metabolism showed reduced oxidation of pyruvate and decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. A pronounced reduction of the prosthetic group lipoamide was found in lipoylated proteins. PMID:22152680

  16. Mutations in the GABA Transporter SLC6A1 Cause Epilepsy with Myoclonic-Atonic Seizures.

    PubMed

    Carvill, Gemma L; McMahon, Jacinta M; Schneider, Amy; Zemel, Matthew; Myers, Candace T; Saykally, Julia; Nguyen, John; Robbiano, Angela; Zara, Federico; Specchio, Nicola; Mecarelli, Oriano; Smith, Robert L; Leventer, Richard J; Møller, Rikke S; Nikanorova, Marina; Dimova, Petia; Jordanova, Albena; Petrou, Steven; Helbig, Ingo; Striano, Pasquale; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Mefford, Heather C

    2015-05-07

    GAT-1, encoded by SLC6A1, is one of the major gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters in the brain and is responsible for re-uptake of GABA from the synapse. In this study, targeted resequencing of 644 individuals with epileptic encephalopathies led to the identification of six SLC6A1 mutations in seven individuals, all of whom have epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (MAE). We describe two truncations and four missense alterations, all of which most likely lead to loss of function of GAT-1 and thus reduced GABA re-uptake from the synapse. These individuals share many of the electrophysiological properties of Gat1-deficient mice, including spontaneous spike-wave discharges. Overall, pathogenic mutations occurred in 6/160 individuals with MAE, accounting for ~4% of unsolved MAE cases.

  17. Epilepsy: A Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sirven, Joseph I.

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy, a disorder of unprovoked seizures is a multifaceted disease affecting individuals of all ages with a particular predilection for the very young and old. In addition to seizures, many patients often report cognitive and psychiatric problems associated with both the seizures themselves and its therapy. Epilepsy has numerous etiologies both idiopathic and acquired with a wide range of therapeutic responses. Despite numerous treatments available to control repetitive seizures including medications, diets, immunotherapy, surgery, and neuromodulatory devices, a large percentage of patients continue to suffer the consequences of uncontrolled seizures, which include psychosocial stigma and death. PMID:26328931

  18. Bilateral idiopathic calf muscle hypertrophy: an exceptional cause of unsightly leg curvature.

    PubMed

    Herlin, C; Chaput, B; Rivier, F; Doucet, J C; Bigorre, M; Captier, G

    2015-04-01

    The authors present the management of a young female patient who presented with longstanding bilateral calf muscle hypertrophy, with no known cause. Taking into account the patient's wishes and the fact that the hypertrophy was mainly located in the posteromedial compartment, we chose to carry out a subtotal bilateral resection of medial gastrocnemius muscles. This procedure was performed with an harmonic scalpel, permitting a excellent cosmetic result while avoiding complications or functional impairment. After a reviewing of the commonly used techniques, the authors discuss the chosen surgical approach taking into account its clinical particularity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rule out other conditions or infections, such as Lyme disease , that may cause similar symptoms or occur along ... ESR) Bones, Muscles, and Joints Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Word! Arthritis Arthritis Lupus Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis ( ...

  20. Idiopathic transient osteoporosis of the talus: a cause for unexplained foot and ankle pain.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Rajiv; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Pathare, Sanjay; Saeed, Kamran

    2012-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman was investigated for several neoplastic, inflammatory, and infective conditions for her left foot, and ankle pain associated with swelling, which she developed unexpectedly without history of trauma or infection. Gross osteopenia in the talus raised the possibilities of several differential diagnoses, but a magnetic resonance imaging scan showed diffuse bone marrow edema in the talus. With negative infective and inflammatory markers, the condition was ultimately labeled as "transient osteoporosis." She was reassured and followed up regularly. At the end of 12 months, she was completely asymptomatic, and her radiograph and magnetic resonance images showed significant improvement, with a normal-appearing talus and ankle joint, and there was complete resolution of bone marrow edema. Although "transient osteoporosis" of the foot is an uncommon condition, clinicians should be aware of this. Unexplained foot pain, with osteopenic bone and diffuse bone marrow edema on magnetic resonance imaging scan, is a feature of this condition. However, the diagnosis is established once other causes are excluded. The condition is self-limiting, and watchful expectancy of a normal recovery is the mainstay of treatment. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Potential years lost and life expectancy in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Granbichler, Claudia A; Zimmermann, Georg; Oberaigner, Willi; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Taylor, Alexandra; Luef, Gerhard; Bathke, Arne C; Trinka, Eugen

    2017-09-28

    Studies using relative measures, such as standardized mortality ratios, have shown that patients with epilepsy have an increased mortality. Reports on more direct and absolute measure such as life expectancy are sparse. We report potential years lost and how life expectancy has changed over 40 years in a cohort of patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. We analyzed life expectancy in a cohort of adult patients diagnosed with definite epilepsy between 1970 and 2010. Those with brain tumor as cause of epilepsy were excluded. By retrospective probabilistic record linkage, living or death status was derived from the national death registry. We estimated life expectancy by a Weibull regression model using gender, age at diagnosis, epilepsy etiology, and year of diagnosis as covariates at time of epilepsy diagnosis, and 5, 10, 15, and 20 years after diagnosis. Results were compared to the general population, and 95% confidence intervals are given. There were 249 deaths (105 women, age at death 19.0-104.0 years) in 1,112 patients (11,978.4 person-years, 474 women, 638 men). A substantial decrease in life expectancy was observed for only a few subgroups, strongly depending on epilepsy etiology and time of diagnosis: time of life lost was highest in patients with symptomatic epilepsy diagnosed between 1970 and 1980; the impact declined with increasing time from diagnosis. Over half of the analyzed subgroups did not differ significantly from the general population. This effect was reversed in the later decades, and life expectancy was prolonged in some subgroups, reaching a maximum in those with newly diagnosed idiopathic and cryptogenic epilepsy between 2001 and 2010. Life expectancy is reduced in symptomatic epilepsies. However, in other subgroups, a prolonged life expectancy was found, which has not been reported previously. Reasons may be manifold and call for further study. © 2017 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International

  2. Idiopathic hypersomnia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000803.htm Idiopathic hypersomnia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Idiopathic hypersomnia is a sleep disorder in which a person ...

  3. Epilepsy and limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A: double trouble, serendipitous finding or new phenotype?

    PubMed

    Pizzanelli, C; Mancuso, M; Galli, R; Choub, A; Fanin, M; Nascimbeni, A C; Siciliano, G; Murri, L

    2006-06-01

    Autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) type 2A are a group of disorders characterised by progressive involvement of proximal limb girdle muscles and caused by changes in the CAPN3 gene. Involvement of tissues other than the skeletal muscle has not been reported so far. Here we describe the unusual association of LGMD2A and idiopathic generalised epilepsy in a 14-year-old girl.

  4. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  5. A nonsense mutation in TMEM95 encoding a nondescript transmembrane protein causes idiopathic male subfertility in cattle.

    PubMed

    Pausch, Hubert; Kölle, Sabine; Wurmser, Christine; Schwarzenbacher, Hermann; Emmerling, Reiner; Jansen, Sandra; Trottmann, Matthias; Fuerst, Christian; Götz, Kay-Uwe; Fries, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants underlying reduced male reproductive performance have been identified in humans and model organisms, most of them compromising semen quality. Occasionally, male fertility is severely compromised although semen analysis remains without any apparent pathological findings (i.e., idiopathic subfertility). Artificial insemination (AI) in most cattle populations requires close examination of all ejaculates before insemination. Although anomalous ejaculates are rejected, insemination success varies considerably among AI bulls. In an attempt to identify genetic causes of such variation, we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Imputed genotypes of 652,856 SNPs were available for 7962 AI bulls of the Fleckvieh (FV) population. Male reproductive ability (MRA) was assessed based on 15.3 million artificial inseminations. The GWAS uncovered a strong association signal on bovine chromosome 19 (P = 4.08 × 10(-59)). Subsequent autozygosity mapping revealed a common 1386 kb segment of extended homozygosity in 40 bulls with exceptionally poor reproductive performance. Only 1.7% of 35,671 inseminations with semen samples of those bulls were successful. None of the bulls with normal reproductive performance was homozygous, indicating recessive inheritance. Exploiting whole-genome re-sequencing data of 43 animals revealed a candidate causal nonsense mutation (rs378652941, c.483C>A, p.Cys161X) in the transmembrane protein 95 encoding gene TMEM95 which was subsequently validated in 1990 AI bulls. Immunohistochemical investigations evidenced that TMEM95 is located at the surface of spermatozoa of fertile animals whereas it is absent in spermatozoa of subfertile animals. These findings imply that integrity of TMEM95 is required for an undisturbed fertilisation. Our results demonstrate that deficiency of TMEM95 severely compromises male reproductive performance in cattle and reveal for the first time a phenotypic effect associated with genomic variation in TMEM

  6. A Nonsense Mutation in TMEM95 Encoding a Nondescript Transmembrane Protein Causes Idiopathic Male Subfertility in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pausch, Hubert; Kölle, Sabine; Wurmser, Christine; Schwarzenbacher, Hermann; Emmerling, Reiner; Jansen, Sandra; Trottmann, Matthias; Fuerst, Christian; Götz, Kay-Uwe; Fries, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants underlying reduced male reproductive performance have been identified in humans and model organisms, most of them compromising semen quality. Occasionally, male fertility is severely compromised although semen analysis remains without any apparent pathological findings (i.e., idiopathic subfertility). Artificial insemination (AI) in most cattle populations requires close examination of all ejaculates before insemination. Although anomalous ejaculates are rejected, insemination success varies considerably among AI bulls. In an attempt to identify genetic causes of such variation, we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Imputed genotypes of 652,856 SNPs were available for 7962 AI bulls of the Fleckvieh (FV) population. Male reproductive ability (MRA) was assessed based on 15.3 million artificial inseminations. The GWAS uncovered a strong association signal on bovine chromosome 19 (P = 4.08×10−59). Subsequent autozygosity mapping revealed a common 1386 kb segment of extended homozygosity in 40 bulls with exceptionally poor reproductive performance. Only 1.7% of 35,671 inseminations with semen samples of those bulls were successful. None of the bulls with normal reproductive performance was homozygous, indicating recessive inheritance. Exploiting whole-genome re-sequencing data of 43 animals revealed a candidate causal nonsense mutation (rs378652941, c.483C>A, p.Cys161X) in the transmembrane protein 95 encoding gene TMEM95 which was subsequently validated in 1990 AI bulls. Immunohistochemical investigations evidenced that TMEM95 is located at the surface of spermatozoa of fertile animals whereas it is absent in spermatozoa of subfertile animals. These findings imply that integrity of TMEM95 is required for an undisturbed fertilisation. Our results demonstrate that deficiency of TMEM95 severely compromises male reproductive performance in cattle and reveal for the first time a phenotypic effect associated with genomic variation in

  7. The social causes of inequality in epilepsy and developing a rehabilitation strategy: a U.K.-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Ridsdale, Leone

    2009-10-01

    A rehabilitation approach has been adopted for many long-term neurologic conditions, but not for epilepsy. The disabilities associated with epilepsy are cognitive, psychological, and social, which are not as readily identified by medical doctors as are physical disabilities. A rehabilitation approach moves the emphasis from a medically driven process to a focus on the personal, social, and physical context of long-term illness. It is suggested that a missed opportunity for education and support for self-management occurs after diagnosis. This results in disadvantage to those whose educational level and knowledge of epilepsy are low. People who do not achieve epilepsy control may then experience higher levels of psychological distress, and a negative cycle of loss of self-efficacy, poor epilepsy control, social disadvantage, and disability. Rehabilitation services have benefited communities surrounding centers of excellence. Not so in epilepsy. Despite centers of excellence, areas with deprivation have higher than national average levels of patients reporting a seizure in the prior year, and higher emergency hospital admissions. Specialists working in partnership with general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses can do more to increase participation and reduce distress for people with epilepsy. When available, GPs and nurses with special interest in epilepsy promote integrated services. Primary-secondary networks are likely to be more effective in preventing downward drift. This requires evaluation.

  8. Uncovering genomic causes of co-morbidity in epilepsy: gene-driven phenotypic characterization of rare microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Catarino, Claudia B; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Clayton, Lisa M S; Thom, Maria; Martinian, Lillian; Cohen, Hannah; Adalat, Shazia; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Pope, Simon A; Lench, Nicholas; Koltzenburg, Martin; Duncan, John S; Hammond, Peter; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Land, John M; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy often suffer from other important conditions. The existence of such co-morbidities is frequently not recognized and their relationship with epilepsy usually remains unexplained. We describe three patients with common, sporadic, non-syndromic epilepsies in whom large genomic microdeletions were found during a study of genetic susceptibility to epilepsy. We performed detailed gene-driven clinical investigations in each patient. Disruption of the function of genes in the deleted regions can explain co-morbidities in these patients. Co-morbidities in patients with epilepsy can be part of a genomic abnormality even in the absence of (known) congenital malformations or intellectual disabilities. Gene-driven phenotype examination can also reveal clinically significant unsuspected condition.

  9. Uncovering Genomic Causes of Co-Morbidity in Epilepsy: Gene-Driven Phenotypic Characterization of Rare Microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Catarino, Claudia B.; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Clayton, Lisa M. S.; Thom, Maria; Martinian, Lillian; Cohen, Hannah; Adalat, Shazia; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Pope, Simon A.; Lench, Nicholas; Koltzenburg, Martin; Duncan, John S.; Hammond, Peter; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Land, John M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with epilepsy often suffer from other important conditions. The existence of such co-morbidities is frequently not recognized and their relationship with epilepsy usually remains unexplained. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe three patients with common, sporadic, non-syndromic epilepsies in whom large genomic microdeletions were found during a study of genetic susceptibility to epilepsy. We performed detailed gene-driven clinical investigations in each patient. Disruption of the function of genes in the deleted regions can explain co-morbidities in these patients. Conclusions/Significance Co-morbidities in patients with epilepsy can be part of a genomic abnormality even in the absence of (known) congenital malformations or intellectual disabilities. Gene-driven phenotype examination can also reveal clinically significant unsuspected condition. PMID:21858020

  10. Loss of the smallest subunit of cytochrome c oxidase, COX8A, causes Leigh-like syndrome and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Kerstin; Kudin, Alexei P; Zsurka, Gábor; Kornblum, Cornelia; Reimann, Jens; Stüve, Burkhard; Waltz, Stephan; Hattingen, Elke; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Rüb, Cornelia; Voos, Wolfgang; Kopatz, Jens; Neumann, Harald; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2016-02-01

    Isolated cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) deficiency is one of the most frequent respiratory chain defects in humans and is usually caused by mutations in proteins required for assembly of the complex. Mutations in nuclear-encoded structural subunits are very rare. In a patient with Leigh-like syndrome presenting with leukodystrophy and severe epilepsy, we identified a homozygous splice site mutation in COX8A, which codes for the ubiquitously expressed isoform of subunit VIII, the smallest nuclear-encoded subunit of complex IV. The mutation, affecting the last nucleotide of intron 1, leads to aberrant splicing, a frame-shift in the highly conserved exon 2, and decreased amount of the COX8A transcript. The loss of the wild-type COX8A protein severely impairs the stability of the entire cytochrome c oxidase enzyme complex and manifests in isolated complex IV deficiency in skeletal muscle and fibroblasts, similar to the frequent c.845_846delCT mutation in the assembly factor SURF1 gene. Stability and activity of complex IV could be rescued in the patient's fibroblasts by lentiviral expression of wild-type COX8A. Our findings demonstrate that COX8A is indispensable for function of human complex IV and its mutation causes human disease.

  11. [Myoclonus and myoclonic epilepsies in childhood].

    PubMed

    Nieto-Barrera, M

    Myoclonic jerks occur in a number of different syndromes. There is many classifications of myoclonus. It is preferred the Fejerman classification, slightly modified that present the following five groups: 1. Myoclonus without encephalopathy and without epilepsy, which includes physiological myoclonus; 2. Encephalopathies with non epileptic myoclonus, which includes Kinsbourne syndrome and certain types of hyperekplexia which pose differential diagnosis problems with reflex myoclonic epilepsy; 3. Progressive encephalopathies with myoclonic seizures which includes typical and atypical progressive myoclonus epilepsies; 4. Epilepsies and epileptic encephalopathies with myoclonic seizures, which includes severe epilepsies which leads to mental retardation, as Otahara syndrome, West syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and other epilepsies which present sometimes myoclonic seizures, as Landau-Kleffner syndrome, 5. Comprises true myoclonic epilepsies, differentiating syndromes recognized as idiopathic, -benign myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, reflex form of benign myoclonic epilepsy in infancy, eyelid myoclonic with absences, perioral myoclonic with absences and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy-, cryptogenic-severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, myoclonic-astatic epilepsy and epilepsy with myoclonic absences-, and symptomatic as the generalized myoclonus in children with static encephalopathies. The epileptic syndromes of the last group are described. Despite this classification, apparently clear, there is still a great deal of confusion and in clinical practice, many cases are difficult to classify.

  12. Clinical characteristics of patients with treated epilepsy in Korea: a nationwide epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Seo-Young; Chung, Soo-Eun; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Jung, Ki-Young

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of epidemiologic studies have been conducted on the prevalence and incidence of epilepsy around the world, only a few studies have investigated the clinical characteristics of patients with epilepsy in a population-based sample. The purpose of the present study was to describe the clinical characteristics of treated patients with epilepsy in Korea via a nationwide medical records survey. The study population was obtained through a nationwide database registered to the Health Insurance Review and Assessment service. Patients were recruited from clinics and hospitals in each cluster according to region and referral level by random selection from a preallocated sample of patients. All patients were being treated with antiepileptic drug medication with or without a diagnosis code for epilepsy or seizure between January 2009 and December 2009. Among the 6,436 selected patients, 2,150 met the diagnostic criteria for epilepsy and were included in our survey on the clinical characteristics of patients who were with treated epilepsy. The proportion of male patients with epilepsy in this study was higher (1,226; 57.0%) than that of female patients. In addition, 10.6% of patients were first diagnosed with epilepsy in 2009, and 53.6% of patients experienced at least one seizure over the course of 2009; 78.1% were classified as having localization-related epilepsy, whereas 7.3% were considered to have generalized epilepsy. Thirty-five percent of patients were thus classified as idiopathic or cryptogenic cases. The most common cause of symptomatic epilepsy was trauma (10.0%), followed by stroke (9.6%), central nervous system (CNS) infection (5.7%), and hippocampal sclerosis (4.9%). This is the first nationwide study of the clinical characteristics of treated epilepsy in Korea using a national database validated by medical records survey. The etiologies of epilepsy and epilepsy syndrome classifications were comparable to those previously reported in other

  13. Venlafaxine-associated serotonin syndrome causing severe rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in a patient with idiopathic Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Abeynaike, Lakshan; Wickramarathne, Thanushi

    2010-10-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with idiopathic Parkinson disease, on dopaminergic therapy, was admitted with confusion and agitation, diaphoresis, and hyperkinesia after the commencement of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine 2 weeks prior for depression. He was found to have severe rhabdomyolysis and developed acute renal failure. The most likely diagnosis was serotonin syndrome induced by venlafaxine, although neuroleptic malignant syndrome was also considered. The differential diagnosis, atypical features in this presentation, and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Managing Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Managing Epilepsy Language: English Spanish Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... support strategies to use to empower PLWMCC. Managing Epilepsy Well Network The Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network ...

  15. Epilepsy Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Epilepsy surgery By Mayo Clinic Staff Epilepsy surgery is a procedure that removes an area of your brain where your seizures originate. Epilepsy surgery works best for people who have seizures ...

  16. [Benign reflex myoclonic epilepsy in infants].

    PubMed

    Cuvellier, J C; Lamblin, M D; Cuisset, J M; Vallée, L; Nuyts, J P

    1997-08-01

    Myoclonic epilepsy of infancy are seldom benign. A 25-month old girl developed myoclonic jerks either spontaneously either as reflex responses to auditory and tactile stimuli, such as sudden touching of the face or trunk from the age of 4 months. The jerks disappeared after valproate therapy. Neurological examination was normal with a follow-up of 9 months. This condition resembles that described in 1995 by Ricci et al. In must be differentiated from other myoclonic epilepsies of infancy, reflex epilepsies and hyperekplexia. It could be the earliest from of idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

  17. Heterozygous truncation mutations of the SMC1A gene cause a severe early onset epilepsy with cluster seizures in females: Detailed phenotyping of 10 new cases.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Joseph D; Joss, Shelagh; Metcalfe, Kay A; Somarathi, Suresh; Cruden, Jamie; Devlin, Anita M; Donaldson, Alan; DiDonato, Nataliya; Fitzpatrick, David; Kaiser, Frank J; Lampe, Anne K; Lees, Melissa M; McLellan, Ailsa; Montgomery, Tara; Mundada, Vivek; Nairn, Lesley; Sarkar, Ajoy; Schallner, Jens; Pozojevic, Jelena; Parenti, Ilaria; Tan, Jeen; Turnpenny, Peter; Whitehouse, William P; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2017-04-01

    The phenotype of seizure clustering with febrile illnesses in infancy/early childhood is well recognized. To date the only genetic epilepsy consistently associated with this phenotype is PCDH19, an X-linked disorder restricted to females, and males with mosaicism. The SMC1A gene, which encodes a structural component of the cohesin complex is also located on the X chromosome. Missense variants and small in-frame deletions of SMC1A cause approximately 5% of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS). Recently, protein truncating mutations in SMC1A have been reported in five females, all of whom have been affected by a drug-resistant epilepsy, and severe developmental impairment. Our objective was to further delineate the phenotype of SMC1A truncation. Female cases with de novo truncation mutations in SMC1A were identified from the Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) study (n = 8), from postmortem testing of an affected twin (n = 1), and from clinical testing with an epilepsy gene panel (n = 1). Detailed information on the phenotype in each case was obtained. Ten cases with heterozygous de novo mutations in the SMC1A gene are presented. All 10 mutations identified are predicted to result in premature truncation of the SMC1A protein. All cases are female, and none had a clinical diagnosis of CdLS. They presented with onset of epileptic seizures between <4 weeks and 28 months of age. In the majority of cases, a marked preponderance for seizures to occur in clusters was noted. Seizure clusters were associated with developmental regression. Moderate or severe developmental impairment was apparent in all cases. Truncation mutations in SMC1A cause a severe epilepsy phenotype with cluster seizures in females. These mutations are likely to be nonviable in males. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Epilepsy and the Sensory Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The relations of epilepsy and the sensory systems are bidirectional. Epilepsy may act on sensory systems by producing sensory seizure symptoms, by altering sensory performance, and by epilepsy treatment causing sensory side effects. Sensory system activity may have an important role in both generation and inhibition of seizures. PMID:27857611

  19. Mutations in the sodium channel gene SCN2A cause neonatal epilepsy with late-onset episodic ataxia.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, N; Hahn, A; Bast, T; Müller, S; Löffler, H; Maljevic, S; Gaily, E; Prehl, I; Biskup, S; Joensuu, T; Lehesjoki, A-E; Neubauer, B A; Lerche, H; Hedrich, U B S

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in SCN2A cause epilepsy syndromes of variable severity including neonatal-infantile seizures. In one case, we previously described additional childhood-onset episodic ataxia. Here, we corroborate and detail the latter phenotype in three further cases. We describe the clinical characteristics, identify the causative SCN2A mutations and determine their functional consequences using whole-cell patch-clamping in mammalian cells. In total, four probands presented with neonatal-onset seizures remitting after five to 13 months. In early childhood, they started to experience repeated episodes of ataxia, accompanied in part by headache or back pain lasting minutes to several hours. In two of the new cases, we detected the novel mutation p.Arg1882Gly. While this mutation occurred de novo in both patients, one of them carries an additional known variant on the same SCN2A allele, inherited from the unaffected father (p.Gly1522Ala). Whereas p.Arg1882Gly alone shifted the activation curve by -4 mV, the combination of both variants did not affect activation, but caused a depolarizing shift of voltage-dependent inactivation, and a significant increase in Na(+) current density and protein production. p.Gly1522Ala alone did not change channel gating. The third new proband carries the same de novo SCN2A gain-of-function mutation as our first published case (p.Ala263Val). Our findings broaden the clinical spectrum observed with SCN2A gain-of-function mutations, showing that fairly different biophysical mechanisms can cause a convergent clinical phenotype of neonatal seizures and later onset episodic ataxia.

  20. Mutation of the human mitochondrial phenylalanine-tRNA synthetase causes infantile-onset epilepsy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency☆

    PubMed Central

    Almalki, Abdulraheem; Alston, Charlotte L.; Parker, Alasdair; Simonic, Ingrid; Mehta, Sarju G.; He, Langping; Reza, Mojgan; Oliveira, Jorge M.A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W.; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are essential enzymes in protein synthesis since they charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. Mutations in the genes encoding mitochondrial aaRSs have been associated with a wide spectrum of human mitochondrial diseases. Here we report the identification of pathogenic mutations (a partial genomic deletion and a highly conserved p. Asp325Tyr missense variant) in FARS2, the gene encoding mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, in a patient with early-onset epilepsy and isolated complex IV deficiency in muscle. The biochemical defect was expressed in myoblasts but not in fibroblasts and associated with decreased steady state levels of COXI and COXII protein and reduced steady state levels of the mt-tRNAPhe transcript. Functional analysis of the recombinant mutant p. Asp325Tyr FARS2 protein showed an inability to bind ATP and consequently undetectable aminoacylation activity using either bacterial tRNA or human mt-tRNAPhe as substrates. Lentiviral transduction of cells with wildtype FARS2 restored complex IV protein levels, confirming that the p.Asp325Tyr mutation is pathogenic, causing respiratory chain deficiency and neurological deficits on account of defective aminoacylation of mt-tRNAPhe. PMID:24161539

  1. A novel mutation in PGAP2 gene causes developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy and microcephaly in consanguineous Saudi family.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Rasool, Mahmood; Jan, Mohammed M; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad H

    2016-12-15

    PGAP2 (Post-GPI Attachment to Proteins 2) gene is involved in lipid remodeling steps of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor maturation. At the surface of the cell this gene is required for proper expression of GPI-anchored proteins. Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive disorder usually characterized by severe mental retardation. Mutations in the PGAP2 gene cause hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome-3. We have identified a large consanguineous family from Saudi origin segregating developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy and microcephaly. Whole exome sequencing with 100× coverage was performed on two affected siblings of the family. Data analysis in the patient revealed a novel missense mutation c.191C>T in PGAP2 gene resulting in Alanine to Valine substitution (Ala64Val). The mutation was reconfirmed and validated by subsequent Sanger sequencing method. The mutation was ruled out in 100 unrelated healthy controls. We suggest that this pathogenic mutation disrupts the proper function of the gene proteins resulting in the disease state.

  2. Novel KCNQ3 Mutation in a Large Family with Benign Familial Neonatal Epilepsy: A Rare Cause of Neonatal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Maljevic, Snezana; Vejzovic, Sabina; Bernhard, Matthias K.; Bertsche, Astrid; Weise, Sebastian; Döcker, Miriam; Lerche, Holger; Lemke, Johannes R.; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Syrbe, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Benign familial neonatal seizures (BFNS) present a rare familial epilepsy syndrome caused by genetic alterations in the voltage-gated potassium channels Kv7.2 and Kv7.3, encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3. While most BFNS families carry alterations in KCNQ2, mutations in KCNQ3 appear to be less common. Here, we describe a family with 6 individuals presenting with neonatal focal and generalized seizures. Genetic testing revealed a novel KCNQ3 variant, c.835G>T, cosegregating with seizures in 4 tested individuals. This variant results in a substitution of the highly conserved amino acid valine localized within the pore-forming transmembrane segment S5 (p.V279F). Functional investigations in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed a loss of function, which supports p.V279F as a pathogenic mutation. When p.V279F was coexpressed with the wild-type (WT) Kv7.2 subunits, the resulting potassium currents were about 10-fold reduced compared to the WT Kv7.3 and Kv7.2 coexpression. Genotype-phenotype correlation shows an incomplete penetrance of p.V279F. Response to antiepileptic treatment was variable, but evaluation of treatment response remained challenging due to the self-limiting character of the disease. The identification of the pathogenic variant helped to avoid unnecessary investigations in affected family members and allowed guided therapy. PMID:27781029

  3. Novel KCNQ3 Mutation in a Large Family with Benign Familial Neonatal Epilepsy: A Rare Cause of Neonatal Seizures.

    PubMed

    Maljevic, Snezana; Vejzovic, Sabina; Bernhard, Matthias K; Bertsche, Astrid; Weise, Sebastian; Döcker, Miriam; Lerche, Holger; Lemke, Johannes R; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Syrbe, Steffen

    2016-09-01

    Benign familial neonatal seizures (BFNS) present a rare familial epilepsy syndrome caused by genetic alterations in the voltage-gated potassium channels Kv7.2 and Kv7.3, encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3. While most BFNS families carry alterations in KCNQ2, mutations in KCNQ3 appear to be less common. Here, we describe a family with 6 individuals presenting with neonatal focal and generalized seizures. Genetic testing revealed a novel KCNQ3 variant, c.835G>T, cosegregating with seizures in 4 tested individuals. This variant results in a substitution of the highly conserved amino acid valine localized within the pore-forming transmembrane segment S5 (p.V279F). Functional investigations in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed a loss of function, which supports p.V279F as a pathogenic mutation. When p.V279F was coexpressed with the wild-type (WT) Kv7.2 subunits, the resulting potassium currents were about 10-fold reduced compared to the WT Kv7.3 and Kv7.2 coexpression. Genotype-phenotype correlation shows an incomplete penetrance of p.V279F. Response to antiepileptic treatment was variable, but evaluation of treatment response remained challenging due to the self-limiting character of the disease. The identification of the pathogenic variant helped to avoid unnecessary investigations in affected family members and allowed guided therapy.

  4. Mutation of the human mitochondrial phenylalanine-tRNA synthetase causes infantile-onset epilepsy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Almalki, Abdulraheem; Alston, Charlotte L; Parker, Alasdair; Simonic, Ingrid; Mehta, Sarju G; He, Langping; Reza, Mojgan; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are essential enzymes in protein synthesis since they charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. Mutations in the genes encoding mitochondrial aaRSs have been associated with a wide spectrum of human mitochondrial diseases. Here we report the identification of pathogenic mutations (a partial genomic deletion and a highly conserved p. Asp325Tyr missense variant) in FARS2, the gene encoding mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, in a patient with early-onset epilepsy and isolated complex IV deficiency in muscle. The biochemical defect was expressed in myoblasts but not in fibroblasts and associated with decreased steady state levels of COXI and COXII protein and reduced steady state levels of the mt-tRNA(Phe) transcript. Functional analysis of the recombinant mutant p. Asp325Tyr FARS2 protein showed an inability to bind ATP and consequently undetectable aminoacylation activity using either bacterial tRNA or human mt-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. Lentiviral transduction of cells with wildtype FARS2 restored complex IV protein levels, confirming that the p.Asp325Tyr mutation is pathogenic, causing respiratory chain deficiency and neurological deficits on account of defective aminoacylation of mt-tRNA(Phe).

  5. Standard dose valproic acid does not cause additional cognitive impact in a rodent model of intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jellett, Adam P; Jenks, Kyle; Lucas, Marcella; Scott, Rod C

    2015-02-01

    Children with epilepsy face significant cognitive and behavioral impairments. These impairments are due to a poorly characterized interaction between the underlying etiology, the effect of seizures and the effect of medication. The large variation in these factors make understanding the main drivers of cognitive impairment in humans extremely difficult. Therefore, we investigated the cognitive effect of seizures and the antiepileptic drug valproic acid in a rodent model of cortical dysplasia. Rats were divided into seizure-receiving and non-receiving groups. Rats experienced frequent early life seizures using the flurothyl inhalation method: 50 seizures between postnatal day 5 and 15 and then one seizure a day following that. Rats were further divided into drug-treated and vehicle treated groups. Valproic acid treated animals were treated from 5 days preceding behavioral testing in the Morris water maze at a clinically relevant concentration. We show here that the main driver of cognitive impairments are the brain malformations, and that persistent seizures in animals with brain malformations and valproic acid caused no additional impact. These findings suggest that neither an appropriate dose of a standard antiepileptic drug or intractable seizures worsen cognition associated with a malformation of cortical development and that alternative treatment strategies to improve cognition are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding relationships between autism, intelligence, and epilepsy: a cross-disorder approach

    PubMed Central

    VAN EEGHEN, AGNIES M; PULSIFER, MARGARET B; MERKER, VANESSA L; NEUMEYER, ANN M; VAN EEGHEN, ELMER E; THIBERT, RONALD L; COLE, ANDREW J; LEIGH, FAWN A; PLOTKIN, SCOTT R; THIELE, ELIZABETH A

    2014-01-01

    Aim As relationships between autistic traits, epilepsy, and cognitive functioning remain poorly understood, these associations were explored in the biologically related disorders tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), and epilepsy. Method The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), a quantitative measure of autistic traits, was distributed to caregivers or companions of patients with TSC, NF1, and childhood-onset epilepsy of unknown cause (EUC), and these results were compared with SRS data from individuals with idiopathic autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and their unaffected siblings. Scores and trait profiles of autistic features were compared with cognitive outcomes, epilepsy variables, and genotype. Results A total of 180 SRS questionnaires were filled out in the TSC, NF1, and EUC outpatient clinics at the Massachusetts General Hospital (90 females, 90 males; mean age 21y, range 4–63y), and SRS data from 210 patients with ASD recruited from an autism research collaboration (167 males, 43 females; mean age 9y range 4–22y) and 130 unaffected siblings were available. Regression models showed a significant association between SRS scores and intelligence outcomes (p<0.001) and various seizure variables (p<0.02), but not with a specific underlying disorder or genotype. The level of autistic features was strongly associated with intelligence outcomes in patients with TSC and epilepsy (p<0.01); in patients with NF1 these relationships were weaker (p=0.25). For all study groups, autistic trait subdomains covaried with neurocognitive comorbidity, with endophenotypes similar to that of idiopathic autism. Interpretation Our data show that in TSC and childhood-onset epilepsy, the severity and phenotype of autistic features are inextricably linked with intelligence and epilepsy outcomes. Such relationships were weaker for individuals with NF1. Findings suggest that ASDs are not specific for these conditions. PMID:23205844

  7. Comorbidity between headache and epilepsy in a pediatric headache center.

    PubMed

    Toldo, Irene; Perissinotto, Egle; Menegazzo, Francesca; Boniver, Clementina; Sartori, Stefano; Salviati, Leonardo; Clementi, Maurizio; Montagna, Pasquale; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the comorbidity between headache and epilepsy in a large series of children with headache (1,795). Fifty-six cases (3.1%) suffered from idiopathic headache and idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy or unprovoked seizures. There was a strong association between migraine and epilepsy: in migraineurs (46/56) the risk of epilepsy was 3.2 times higher when compared with tension-type headache, without significant difference between migraine with and without aura (P = 0.89); children with epilepsy had a 4.5-fold increased risk of developing migraine than tension-type headache. In cases with comorbidity, focal epilepsies prevailed (43/56, 76.8%). Migraineurs affected by focal epilepsies (36/56) had a three times higher risk of having a cryptogenic epilepsy (27/36, 75%) than an idiopathic epilepsy (9/36, 25%) (P = 0.003). In migraine with aura, epilepsy preceded migraine in 71% of cases. Photosensitivity (7/56, 12.5%) and positive family history for epilepsy (22/56, 39%) were frequent in cases with comorbidity.

  8. [A study of epilepsy according to the age at onset and monitored for 3 years in a regional reference paediatric neurology unit].

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Gómez, Laura; López-Pisón, Javier; Lapresta Moros, Carlos; Fuertes Rodrigo, Cristina; Fernando Martínez, Ruth; Samper-Villagrasa, Pilar; Monge-Galindo, Lorena; Peña-Segura, José Luis; García-Jiménez, María Concepción

    2017-01-01

    A study of epilepsy, according to the age at onset of the crisis and its causes, monitored by a Paediatric Neurology Unit over a period of three years. Historical cohorts study was conducted by reviewing the Paediatric Neurology medical records data base of epileptic children followed-up from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010. A total of 4,595 children were attended during the study period. The diagnosis of epilepsy was established in 605 (13.17%): 277 (45.79%) symptomatic, 156 (25.79%) idiopathic, and 172 (28.43%) with cryptogenic epilepsy. Absence epilepsy and benign childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes are the idiopathic epileptic syndromes most prevalent, and the most prevalent symptomatic epilepsies are prenatal encephalopathies. More than one-quarter (26.12%) of epilepsies began in the first year of life, and 67.72% were symptomatic. Refractory epilepsy was observed in 25.29%, 42.46% with cognitive impairment, 26.45% with motor involvement, and 9.92% with an autism spectrum disorder, being more frequent at an earlier age of onset. The absence of a universally accepted classification of epileptic syndromes makes tasks like this difficult, starting with the terminology. A useful classification would be aetiological, with two groups: a large group with established aetiology, or very likely genetic syndromes, and another with no established cause. The age of onset of epilepsy in each aetiological group helps in the prognosis, which is worsened by refractoriness and associated neurodevelopmental disorders, and are generally worse at an earlier onset and in certain aetiologies. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutations in SYNGAP1 cause intellectual disability, autism, and a specific form of epilepsy by inducing haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berryer, Martin H; Hamdan, Fadi F; Klitten, Laura L; Møller, Rikke S; Carmant, Lionel; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Patry, Lysanne; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Rochefort, Daniel; Neugnot-Cerioli, Mathilde; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Niu, Zhiyv; Eng, Christine M; Yang, Yaping; Palardy, Sylvain; Belhumeur, Céline; Rouleau, Guy A; Tommerup, Niels; Immken, Ladonna; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Patel, Gayle Simpson; Majewski, Jacek; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Scheffzek, Klaus; Hjalgrim, Helle; Michaud, Jacques L; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2013-02-01

    De novo mutations in SYNGAP1, which codes for a RAS/RAP GTP-activating protein, cause nonsyndromic intellectual disability (NSID). All disease-causing point mutations identified until now in SYNGAP1 are truncating, raising the possibility of an association between this type of mutations and NSID. Here, we report the identification of the first pathogenic missense mutations (c.1084T>C [p.W362R], c.1685C>T [p.P562L]) and three novel truncating mutations (c.283dupC [p.H95PfsX5], c.2212_2213del [p.S738X], and (c.2184del [p.N729TfsX31]) in SYNGAP1 in patients with NSID. A subset of these patients also showed ataxia, autism, and a specific form of generalized epilepsy that can be refractory to treatment. All of these mutations occurred de novo, except c.283dupC, which was inherited from a father who is a mosaic. Biolistic transfection of wild-type SYNGAP1 in pyramidal cells from cortical organotypic cultures significantly reduced activity-dependent phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) levels. In contrast, constructs expressing p.W362R, p.P562L, or the previously described p.R579X had no significant effect on pERK levels. These experiments suggest that the de novo missense mutations, p.R579X, and possibly all the other truncating mutations in SYNGAP1 result in a loss of its function. Moreover, our study confirms the involvement of SYNGAP1 in autism while providing novel insight into the epileptic manifestations associated with its disruption.

  10. Idiopathic Cam Morphology Is Not Caused by Subclinical Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: An MRI and CT Study.

    PubMed

    Monazzam, Shafagh; Bomar, James D; Pennock, Andrew T

    2013-12-01

    Cam impingement as a known sequelae of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) has led to speculation that subclinical SCFEs may be the causative factor in idiopathic cam morphology; alternatively, others have implicated an abnormal extension of the growth plate as a causative factor. To investigate the growth plate tilt angle in 4 patient cohorts: normal patients, patients with idiopathic cam morphology (CamIP), patients with cam morphology secondary to known SCFE (CamSCFE), and patients with incidental findings of an asymptomatic cam (Camasymp). Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A database of 192 computed tomography scans of abdomens/pelvises of patients (ages, 5-19 years) with no known orthopaedic issues, reformatted to neutral tilt, inclination, and rotation, were utilized for the normal cohort, the Camasymp cohort, and to create an age- and sex-matched control cohort. In addition, a retrospective review of all patients treated for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) with preoperative advance imaging was conducted, and patients were separated to CamIP and CamSCFE cohorts. The alpha angle and tilt angle were measured on each hip. Statistical analysis was performed. The mean tilt angle among the normal patients was 12.1°, with 1.9% of the variation in tilt angle being explained by age; each additional year of age decreased the tilt angle by 0.27° (P = .008). The tilt angle for the CamSCFE cohort (mean, 44.5°) was found to be significantly greater than both the CamIP cohort (mean, 5.9°; P < .001) and the control cohort (mean, 12.8°; P < .001). The tilt angle for the CamIP cohort was found to be significantly less than the control cohort (P = .003). The alpha angle and tilt angle were positively correlated in the CamIP cohort, but no correlation was found in the other cohorts. The mean tilt angle of the 18 hips in the Camasymp cohort was 13.9° ± 11.5° (range, -12° to 37°), with 12 hips (67%) in the tilt angle range of CamIP cohort and 6 in the

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury Causes a Tacrolimus-Sensitive Increase in Non-Convulsive Seizures in a Rat Model of Post-Traumatic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, John N.; Gandhi, Anandh; Singh, Baljinderjit; Churn, Severn B.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a significant but potentially preventable complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previous research in animal models of acquired epilepsy has implicated the calcium-sensitive phosphatase, calcineurin. In addition, our lab recently found that calcineurin activity in the rat hippocampus increases acutely after lateral TBI. Here we use a calcineurin inhibitor test whether an acute increase in calcineurin activity is necessary for the development of late post-traumatic seizures. Adult rats were administered the calcineurin inhibitor Tacrolimus (5mg/kg; i.p.) 1 hour after lateral fluid percussion TBI and then monitored by video-electrocorticography (video-ECoG) for spontaneous seizure activity 5 weeks or 33 weeks later. At 5 weeks post-TBI, we observed epileptiform activity on the video-ECoG of brain injured rats but no seizures. By 33 weeks post-TBI though, nearly all injured rats exhibited spontaneous seizures, including convulsive seizures which were infrequent but lasted minutes (18% of injured rats), and non-convulsive seizures which were frequent but lasted tens of seconds (94% of injured rats). We also identified non-convulsive seizures in a smaller subset of control and sham TBI rats (56%), reminiscent of idiopathic seizures described in other rats strains. Non-convulsive seizures in the brain injured rats, however, were four-times more frequent and two-times longer lasting than in their uninjured littermates. Interestingly, rats administered Tacrolimus acutely after TBI showed significantly fewer non-convulsive seizures than untreated rats, but a similar degree of cortical atrophy. The data thus indicate that administration of Tacrolimus acutely after TBI suppressed non-convulsive seizures months later. PMID:25580467

  12. Epilepsy: Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Nandanavana Subbareddy; Sinha, Sanjib; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy

    2014-01-01

    There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India. PMID:24791085

  13. Epilepsy: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Nandanavana Subbareddy; Sinha, Sanjib; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy

    2014-03-01

    There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India.

  14. An Xp; Yq translocation causing a novel contiguous gene syndrome in brothers with generalized epilepsy, ichthyosis, and attention deficits.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Michael J; Glass, Ian A; Bennett, Craig L; Cotter, Phil D; Watson, Nate F; Mitchell, Anna L; Bird, Tom D; Farrell, Don F

    2003-12-01

    We describe two brothers with generalized epilepsy, attention deficits, congenital ichthyosis, and Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis who harbor an unusual Xp; Yq translocation chromosome, resulting in a novel contiguous gene syndrome because of deletion of genes from the distal short arm of the X chromosome. Physical examination, neuropsychologic testing, EEG, and neuroimaging studies were performed. Because of their unusual phenotype, karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and further molecular analyses were carried out to refine the break points of the underlying unbalanced sex chromosome rearrangement. The subjects had generalized epilepsy, X-linked ichthyosis, Madelung deformities, mesomelia, normal intelligence, and attention deficits. The brothers' karyotype was unbalanced; they inherited a maternal derivative X chromosome. Deleted distal Xp genes included short-stature homeobox on the X chromosome (SHOX), aryl sulfatase E (ARSE), variably charged X-chromosome mRNA gene A (VCX-A), and steroid sulfatase (STS). The final karyotype was 46,Y,der(X)t(X; Y)(p22.3; q11.2).ish der(X) (DXZ1+, KAL+, STS-, SHOX-) mat. Loss of distal contiguous Xp genes resulted in a syndrome comprising bony deformities, ichthyosis, attention problems, and generalized epilepsy. Candidate epilepsy genes within the deleted segment, such as ASMT, a gene involved in the final synthesis of melatonin, are discussed. Cytogenetic analyses should be included in the clinical evaluation of patients with generalized epilepsy and complex phenotypes.

  15. Depression and genetic causal attribution of epilepsy in multiplex epilepsy families.

    PubMed

    Sorge, Shawn T; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Phelan, Jo C; Winawer, Melodie R; Shostak, Sara; Goldsmith, Jeff; Chung, Wendy K; Ottman, Ruth

    2016-10-01

    Rapid advances in genetic research and increased use of genetic testing have increased the emphasis on genetic causes of epilepsy in patient encounters. Research in other disorders suggests that genetic causal attributions can influence patients' psychological responses and coping strategies, but little is known about how epilepsy patients and their relatives will respond to genetic attributions of epilepsy. We investigated the possibility that among members of families containing multiple individuals with epilepsy, depression, the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in the epilepsies, might be related to the perception that epilepsy has a genetic cause. A self-administered survey was completed by 417 individuals in 104 families averaging 4 individuals with epilepsy per family. Current depression was measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire. Genetic causal attribution was assessed by three questions addressing the following: perceived likelihood of having an epilepsy-related mutation, perceived role of genetics in causing epilepsy in the family, and (in individuals with epilepsy) perceived influence of genetics in causing the individual's epilepsy. Relatives without epilepsy were asked about their perceived chance of developing epilepsy in the future, compared with the average person. Prevalence of current depression was 14.8% in 182 individuals with epilepsy, 6.5% in 184 biologic relatives without epilepsy, and 3.9% in 51 individuals married into the families. Among individuals with epilepsy, depression was unrelated to genetic attribution. Among biologic relatives without epilepsy, however, prevalence of depression increased with increasing perceived chance of having an epilepsy-related mutation (p = 0.02). This association was not mediated by perceived future epilepsy risk among relatives without epilepsy. Depression is associated with perceived likelihood of carrying an epilepsy-related mutation among individuals without epilepsy in families containing

  16. A New Locus for Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus Maps to Chromosome 2

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Cendes, I.; Scheffer, I. E.; Berkovic, S. F.; Rousseau, M.; Andermann, E.; Rouleau, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a recently recognized but relatively common form of inherited childhood-onset epilepsy with heterogeneous epilepsy phenotypes. We genotyped 41 family members, including 21 affected individuals, to localize the gene causing epilepsy in a large family segregating an autosomal dominant form of GEFS+. A genomewide search examining 197 markers identified linkage of GEFS+ to chromosome 2, on the basis of an initial positive LOD score for marker D2S294 (Z=4.4, recombination fraction [θ] = 0). A total of 24 markers were tested on chromosome 2q, to define the smallest candidate region for GEFS+. The highest two-point LOD score (Zmax=5.29; θ=0) was obtained with marker D2S324. Critical recombination events mapped the GEFS+ gene to a 29-cM region flanked by markers D2S156 and D2S311, with the idiopathic generalized epilepsy locus thereby assigned to chromosome 2q23-q31. The existence of the heterogeneous epilepsy phenotypes in this kindred suggests that seizure predisposition determined by the GEFS+ gene on chromosome 2q could be modified by other genes and/or by environmental factors, to produce the different seizure types observed. PMID:10677328

  17. A Homozygous Mutation in Human PRICKLE1 Causes an Autosomal-Recessive Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy-Ataxia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, Alexander G.; Wallace, Robyn H.; Buhr, Aimee; Buller, Andrew R.; Afawi, Zaid; Shimojo, Masahito; Miyata, Shingo; Chen, Shan; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Griesbach, Hilary L.; Wu, Shu; Nashelsky, Marcus; Vladar, Eszter K.; Antic, Dragana; Ferguson, Polly J.; Cirak, Sebahattin; Voit, Thomas; Scott, Matthew P.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Gurnett, Christina; Daoud, Azhar S.; Kivity, Sara; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Mazarib, Aziz; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Korczyn, Amos D.; Slusarski, Diane C.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; El-Shanti, Hatem I.

    2008-01-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) is a syndrome characterized by myoclonic seizures (lightning-like jerks), generalized convulsive seizures, and varying degrees of neurological decline, especially ataxia and dementia. Previously, we characterized three pedigrees of individuals with PME and ataxia, where either clinical features or linkage mapping excluded known PME loci. This report identifies a mutation in PRICKLE1 (also known as RILP for REST/NRSF interacting LIM domain protein) in all three of these pedigrees. The identified PRICKLE1 mutation blocks the PRICKLE1 and REST interaction in vitro and disrupts the normal function of PRICKLE1 in an in vivo zebrafish overexpression system. PRICKLE1 is expressed in brain regions implicated in epilepsy and ataxia in mice and humans, and, to our knowledge, is the first molecule in the noncanonical WNT signaling pathway to be directly implicated in human epilepsy. PMID:18976727

  18. Revised terminology and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies: report of the ILAE Commission on Classification and Terminology, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Berg, Anne T; Berkovic, Samuel F; Brodie, Martin J; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Cross, J Helen; van Emde Boas, Walter; Engel, Jerome; French, Jacqueline; Glauser, Tracy A; Mathern, Gary W; Moshé, Solomon L; Nordli, Douglas; Plouin, Perrine; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2010-04-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Commission on Classification and Terminology has revised concepts, terminology, and approaches for classifying seizures and forms of epilepsy. Generalized and focal are redefined for seizures as occurring in and rapidly engaging bilaterally distributed networks (generalized) and within networks limited to one hemisphere and either discretely localized or more widely distributed (focal). Classification of generalized seizures is simplified. No natural classification for focal seizures exists; focal seizures should be described according to their manifestations (e.g., dyscognitive, focal motor). The concepts of generalized and focal do not apply to electroclinical syndromes. Genetic, structural-metabolic, and unknown represent modified concepts to replace idiopathic, symptomatic, and cryptogenic. Not all epilepsies are recognized as electroclinical syndromes. Organization of forms of epilepsy is first by specificity: electroclinical syndromes, nonsyndromic epilepsies with structural-metabolic causes, and epilepsies of unknown cause. Further organization within these divisions can be accomplished in a flexible manner depending on purpose. Natural classes (e.g., specific underlying cause, age at onset, associated seizure type), or pragmatic groupings (e.g., epileptic encephalopathies, self-limited electroclinical syndromes) may serve as the basis for organizing knowledge about recognized forms of epilepsy and facilitate identification of new forms.

  19. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Choudhury, Mayukh; Stoica, Ana; Di Cristo, Graziella; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X) that were found in a cohort of French Canadian families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1−/− GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D) induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  20. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Choudhury, Mayukh; Stoica, Ana; Di Cristo, Graziella; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X) that were found in a cohort of French Canadian families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1 (flox/flox) mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1 (-/-) GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D) induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  1. Missense mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel gene KCNT1 cause severe autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Heron, Sarah E; Smith, Katherine R; Bahlo, Melanie; Nobili, Lino; Kahana, Esther; Licchetta, Laura; Oliver, Karen L; Mazarib, Aziz; Afawi, Zaid; Korczyn, Amos; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Petrou, Steven; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Dibbens, Leanne M

    2012-11-01

    We performed genomic mapping of a family with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) and intellectual and psychiatric problems, identifying a disease-associated region on chromosome 9q34.3. Whole-exome sequencing identified a mutation in KCNT1, encoding a sodium-gated potassium channel subunit. KCNT1 mutations were identified in two additional families and a sporadic case with severe ADNFLE and psychiatric features. These findings implicate the sodium-gated potassium channel complex in ADNFLE and, more broadly, in the pathogenesis of focal epilepsies.

  2. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal: medical treatment of canine epilepsy in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farquhar, Robyn G; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Löscher, Wolfgang; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Edward E; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    In Europe, the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) licensed for dogs has grown considerably over the last years. Nevertheless, the same questions remain, which include, 1) when to start treatment, 2) which drug is best used initially, 3) which adjunctive AED can be advised if treatment with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug treatment protocols, 1) is based on current published evidence-based literature, 2) considers the current legal framework of the cascade regulation for the prescription of veterinary drugs in Europe, and 3) reflects the authors' experience. With this paper it is aimed to provide a consensus for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy. Furthermore, for the management of structural epilepsy AEDs are inevitable in addition to treating the underlying cause, if possible.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... myoclonic epilepsy spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  4. Idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Billiard, M; Merle, C; Carlander, B; Ondze, B; Alvarez, D; Besset, A

    1998-04-01

    Identification of idiopathic hypersomnia dates back 20 years only. It typically consists of prolonged nocturnal sleep, great difficulty waking up in the morning or at the end of a nap, and constant or recurrent excessive daytime sleepiness. Complete and incomplete forms are encountered. Twenty-three subjects fulfilling ICSD criteria are reported with clinical, polysomnographic and immunogenetic data. Considering differential diagnosis is an important step in the diagnosis of idiopathic hypersomnia. Idiopathic hypersomnia is much less frequent than narcolepsy. A strong genetic component is suggested by the high proportion of familial cases. No association with HLA has been evidenced to date.

  5. [Unusual cause of right heart failure decompensation in 21-years old patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension -- a case report].

    PubMed

    Florczyk, Michał; Stawecka-Pawełczyk, Anna; Kurzyna, Marcin; Fijałkowska, Anna; Burakowska, Janusz; Zyłkowska, Joanna; Szturmowicz, Monika; Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Tomkowski, Witold; Torbicki, Adam

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe a case of 21-years old woman with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension with atypical clinical consequences of massive internal bleeding. Despite significant hypovolemia clinical and laboratory presentation was one of RV failure with dilatation of right heart ventricle and increased plasma level of markers of myocardial stretch and injury (NT-proBNP and troponin, respectively). This is attributed to impaired right ventricular coronary perfusion and hypoxia. Intensive treatment restored baseline RV conditions and at 15 months follow-up no persistent right heart impairment was observed. This case demonstrates that bleeding should be also considered in differential diagnosis of exacerbation of right ventricular failure in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  6. Comorbidity headache and epilepsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Yamane, L E; Montenegro, M A; Guerreiro, M M

    2004-04-01

    Epilepsy and headache are both frequent in childhood. Because seizures are frequently a frightening event, other medical conditions--including headache--are often neglected not only by the patient, but also by the physician. The objective of this study was to verify the comorbidity between headache and epilepsy in childhood. This was a prospective study conducted at the pediatric epilepsy clinic of our university hospital. Fifty children with epilepsy and ability to describe their symptoms, between 5 and 18 years old, were interviewed according to a semi-structured questionnaire. The headache was classified according to the International Headache Society. The frequency of headache was compared with the findings of a control group composed by children without epilepsy, siblings of children with epilepsy. Fifty children were evaluated, 29 boys, mean age 11 years. Twenty-three (46 %) patients presented with headache, as opposed to only 1 (2.5 %) in the control group ( p < 0.01). Ten (43.5 %) had migraine, 4 (17.4 %) had tension type headache and in 9 (39.1 %) the type of headache could not be established. In 9/23 (39 %) a temporal relationship between headache and epilepsy was present, 6 postictal and 3 preictal. There was no difference in gender, age, type of seizure and family history of headache in the groups of patients with or without headache. However, most patients with headache were older than 10 years (54.5 %) and had idiopathic epilepsy (65.2 %; p < 0.01). The headache usually started in the same year or after the diagnosis of epilepsy (95 %; p < 0.01). Headache and epilepsy are a common comorbidity in childhood, and occur mostly in children older than 10 years with idiopathic epilepsy. The headache usually starts in the same year or after the diagnosis of epilepsy.

  7. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Children with New Onset Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jana E.; Watson, Ryann; Sheth, Raj; Caplan, Rochelle; Koehn, Monica; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution, timing, and risk factors for psychiatric comorbidity in children with recent onset epilepsy. Children aged 8 to 18 years with recent onset epilepsy (less than 1 year in duration) of idiopathic etiology (n=53) and a healthy comparison group (n=50) underwent a structured psychiatric…

  8. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Children with New Onset Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jana E.; Watson, Ryann; Sheth, Raj; Caplan, Rochelle; Koehn, Monica; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution, timing, and risk factors for psychiatric comorbidity in children with recent onset epilepsy. Children aged 8 to 18 years with recent onset epilepsy (less than 1 year in duration) of idiopathic etiology (n=53) and a healthy comparison group (n=50) underwent a structured psychiatric…

  9. GEM THERAPY AND EPILEPSY

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S.R.N.; Shenoy, Raghuram

    1990-01-01

    The authors present in this paper the status of treatment and cause of epilepsy. They propose further research to be undertaken to document the data and a study of human magnetic aura followed by blood spectral studies. They have suggested that based upon these studies it should be possible to determine the cause of epilepsy and its treatment by the physical application of suitable precious and semi-previous stones followed by administration of Ayurvedic formulation. PMID:22557696

  10. Functional characterization of a novel C-terminal ATP1A2 mutation causing hemiplegic migraine and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Tiziana; Spiller, Susan; Mei, Davide; Guerrini, Renzo; Cianchetti, Carlo; Friedrich, Thomas; Pruna, Dario

    2013-12-01

    We describe a four-generation Italian family with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) and epilepsy due to a novel ATP1A2 missense mutation (R1007W). Mutational analysis revealed a heterozygous nucleotide substitution c.3019C>T resulting in the missense substitution p.Arg1007Trp (p.R1007W) in seven subjects: Three individuals had hemiplegic migraine, two exhibited a clinical overlap between migraine and epilepsy, one had migraine and one was unaffected. The identified ATP1A2 mutation was not found in an ethnically matched control population of 190 individuals and was not reported in a polymorphisms database. In two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments on XENOPUS oocytes, the ATP1A2 R1007W mutant showed (i) reduced ion pumping activity due to a more profound voltage dependence and (ii) decreased apparent affinity for extracellular K⁺ at voltages around the cellular resting potential. This distinct type of loss of function has not been reported for other FHM2 mutations and can lead to impaired K⁺ clearance and elevated K⁺ levels in the CNS. The functional data and clinical evidence suggest that in FHM2 migraine and epilepsy may originate from the same pathogenic mechanisms associated with genetically determined alterations of ion channels and pumps. Our data also support the hypothesis that the new mutation R1007W in our family may be a susceptibility factor for epilepsy.

  11. Infections, inflammation and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Fujinami, Robert S.; White, H. Steve; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Blümcke, Ingmar; Sander, Josemir W.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is the tendency to have unprovoked epileptic seizures. Anything causing structural or functional derangement of brain physiology may lead to seizures, and different conditions may express themselves solely by recurrent seizures and thus be labelled “epilepsy.” Worldwide, epilepsy is the most common serious neurological condition. The range of risk factors for the development of epilepsy varies with age and geographic location. Congenital, developmental and genetic conditions are mostly associated with the development of epilepsy in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Head trauma, infections of the central nervous system (CNS) and tumours may occur at any age and may lead to the development of epilepsy. Infections of the CNS are a major risk factor for epilepsy. The reported risk of unprovoked seizures in population-based cohorts of survivors of CNS infections from developed countries is between 6.8 and 8.3 %, and is much higher in resource-poor countries. In this review, the various viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infectious diseases of the CNS which result in seizures and epilepsy are discussed. The pathogenesis of epilepsy due to brain infections, as well as the role of experimental models to study mechanisms of epileptogenesis induced by infectious agents, is reviewed. The sterile (non-infectious) inflammatory response that occurs following brain insults is also discussed, as well as its overlap with inflammation due to infections, and the potential role in epileptogenesis. Furthermore, autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of seizures is reviewed. Potential strategies to prevent epilepsy resulting from brain infections and non-infectious inflammation are also considered. PMID:26423537

  12. Infections, inflammation and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Fujinami, Robert S; White, H Steve; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Blümcke, Ingmar; Sander, Josemir W; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Epilepsy is the tendency to have unprovoked epileptic seizures. Anything causing structural or functional derangement of brain physiology may lead to seizures, and different conditions may express themselves solely by recurrent seizures and thus be labelled "epilepsy." Worldwide, epilepsy is the most common serious neurological condition. The range of risk factors for the development of epilepsy varies with age and geographic location. Congenital, developmental and genetic conditions are mostly associated with the development of epilepsy in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Head trauma, infections of the central nervous system (CNS) and tumours may occur at any age and may lead to the development of epilepsy. Infections of the CNS are a major risk factor for epilepsy. The reported risk of unprovoked seizures in population-based cohorts of survivors of CNS infections from developed countries is between 6.8 and 8.3 %, and is much higher in resource-poor countries. In this review, the various viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infectious diseases of the CNS which result in seizures and epilepsy are discussed. The pathogenesis of epilepsy due to brain infections, as well as the role of experimental models to study mechanisms of epileptogenesis induced by infectious agents, is reviewed. The sterile (non-infectious) inflammatory response that occurs following brain insults is also discussed, as well as its overlap with inflammation due to infections, and the potential role in epileptogenesis. Furthermore, autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of seizures is reviewed. Potential strategies to prevent epilepsy resulting from brain infections and non-infectious inflammation are also considered.

  13. Idiopathic Neonatal Colonic Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Melek, Mehmet; Kaba, Sultan; Bulan, Keziban; Peker, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Though the perforation of the colon in neonates is rare, it is associated with more than 50% mortality in high-risk patients. We report a case of idiopathic neonatal perforation of the sigmoid colon in an 8-day-old, healthy, male neonate without any demonstrable cause. PMID:26023477

  14. Idiopathic central diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Grace, Mary; Balachandran, Venu; Menon, Sooraj

    2011-10-01

    Idiopathic central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a rare disorder characterized clinically by polyuria and polydipsia, and an abnormal urinary concentration without any identified etiology. We report a case of central diabetes insipidus in a 60-year-old lady in the absence of secondary causes like trauma, infection, and infiltrative disorders of brain.

  15. Idiopathic scrotal elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Brad J; Elmore, James M; Roehrborn, Claus G

    2005-02-01

    Scrotal lymphedema (scrotal elephantiasis) is a condition that has historically been described in areas endemic to filariasis. We present a unique case of a 22-year-old man with idiopathic lymphedema isolated to the scrotum. After acquired causes of lymphedema were ruled out, the patient was treated with scrotectomy and scrotal reconstruction.

  16. Idiopathic pigmentosis tubae.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, I I; Meehan, F P

    1994-01-01

    Case Report--A 33-year-old woman was examined because of primary infertility. Hysterosalpingography plus laparoscopy led to a diagnosis of the extremely rare condition of pigmentosis of the fallopian tube, with complete tubal occlusion as the cause of the infertility. The condition appeared to be idiopathic.

  17. No evidence of a role for cystatin B gene in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mumoli, Laura; Tarantino, Patrizia; Michelucci, Roberto; Bianchi, Amedeo; Labate, Angelo; Franceschetti, Silvana; Marini, Carla; Striano, Pasquale; Gagliardi, Monica; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Sofia, Vito; Pennese, Loredana; Annesi, Grazia; Aguglia, Umberto; Guerrini, Renzo; Zara, Federico; Gambardella, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Genetic factors play a major role in the etiology of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), a common form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy, but so far, genes related to JME remain largely unknown. JME shares electroclinical features with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1; EPM1), a form of progressive myoclonus epilepsy characterized by myoclonus, epilepsy, and gradual neurologic deterioration. EPM1 is caused by mutations in the gene that codes for cystatin B (CSTB), an inhibitor of cysteine protease. In the present study, we wished to investigate the role of the CSTB gene in patients with JME. Fifty-seven unrelated patients (35 women; mean age ± standard deviation [SD], 24.1 ± 7.7; mean age ± SD at onset, 15.3 ± 2.4) with JME were enrolled. Twenty-three of 57 patients were the probands of families with JME. The molecular diagnosis was carried out to identify the common dodecamer repeat expansion mutation or other disease-causing mutations in the CSTB gene. The molecular analysis did not depict mutations in any of the 57 patients with JME. Our study did not support a role for the CSTB gene in patients with familial or sporadic JME.

  18. Recognizing and preventing epilepsy-related mortality

    PubMed Central

    Spruill, Tanya; Thurman, David; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is associated with a high rate of premature mortality from direct and indirect effects of seizures, epilepsy, and antiseizure therapies. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the second leading neurologic cause of total lost potential life-years after stroke, yet SUDEP may account for less than half of all epilepsy-related deaths. Some epilepsy groups are especially vulnerable: individuals from low socioeconomic status groups and those with comorbid psychiatric illness die more often than controls. Despite clear evidence of an important public health problem, efforts to assess and prevent epilepsy-related deaths remain inadequate. We discuss factors contributing to the underestimation of SUDEP and other epilepsy-related causes of death. We suggest the need for a systematic classification of deaths directly due to epilepsy (e.g., SUDEP, drowning), due to acute symptomatic seizures, and indirectly due to epilepsy (e.g., suicide, chronic effects of antiseizure medications). Accurately estimating the frequency of epilepsy-related mortality is essential to support the development and assessment of preventive interventions. We propose that educational interventions and public health campaigns targeting medication adherence, psychiatric comorbidity, and other modifiable risk factors may reduce epilepsy-related mortality. Educational campaigns regarding sudden infant death syndrome and fires, which kill far fewer Americans than epilepsy, have been widely implemented. We have done too little to prevent epilepsy-related deaths. Everyone with epilepsy and everyone who treats people with epilepsy need to know that controlling seizures will save lives. PMID:26674330

  19. [A Case of Postoperative Paraplegia Caused by Idiopathic Spinal Cord Infarction following Hepatectomy under Both General and Epidural Anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Koga, Yukari; Hiraki, Teruyuki; Ushijima, Kazuo

    2015-04-01

    A 73-year-old woman (height : 155 cm, weight : 55 kg) was scheduled to undergo a laparotomic hepatectomy and radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Her medical history did not include any relevant conditions such as cardiovascular or neurological disorders. A thoracic epidural catheter was introduced at T8-9 before the induction of anesthesia with intravenous propofol. General anesthesia was maintained with the inhalation of oxygen, air, and desflurane, and the continuous infusion of remifentanil. Several intraoperative episodes of mild hypotension occurred, each of which was successfully treated with intravenous ephedrine, but otherwise her anesthetic course was uneventful, and she recovered from the anesthesia smoothly. Her postoperative pain was well controlled with continuous epidural infusion of levobupivacaine and fentanyl, and she could walk by herself on postoperative day (POD) 1. However, she suffered weakness in her lower extremities on POD2 and subsequently fell into complete paraplegia with sensory loss below the T4 level on POD3. A magnetic resonance imaging scan taken on POD4 showed an idiopathic spinal cord infarction (SCI) involving levels T1 through T4, although no epidural abnormalities, e.g., hematomas, were detected. Immediate treatment with methylprednisolone, ozagrel, and edaravone failed to resolve her symptoms. We suggest that it is of great importance to consider SCI as a differential diagnosis as soon as possible in cases of unanticipated postoperative paraplegia.

  20. Epilepsy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 - Session VIII Epilepsy Pipeline 2014 - Session IX, Shark Tank Competition and Closing Remarks Joint Content Partnership ... Seizures Crossing the Finish Line: SmartWatch Our 2013 Shark Tank Winner The Research Roundtable in Epilepsy New ...

  1. Clinical characteristics and epilepsy outcomes following surgery caused by focal cortical dysplasia (type IIa) in 110 adult epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuqiang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Che, Ningwei; Qin, Huamin; Liu, Shuping; Wu, Xinling; Wei, Minghai; Cheng, Huakun; Yin, Jian

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of surgical intervention of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) IIa on the outcome of epilepsy, and to evaluate the prognostic factors of seizure freedom. Patient data from epilepsy surgeries were retrospectively reviewed at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University between 2007 and 2015. A total of 110 patients with a definite pathological diagnosis of FCD IIa were included. Moreover, the clinical characteristics, seizure outcome and quality of life in adults with FCD IIa were evaluated. The Engel seizure outcome achievements were class I in 72, class II in 20, class III in 11 and class IV in 7 patients. In addition, the Engel seizure outcome was relevant with the resection range of the lesions (P=0.028). The assessments of electrocorticography (ECoG) patterns and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are relevant to determining the extent of the resection, which may influence the surgery outcome (P=0.001 and P=0.023). Using multivariate regression analyses, the extent of resection, seizure frequency, preoperative ECoG and location of resection were the most important risk factors for seizure recurrence. The results of quality of life in epilepsy-10 scoring revealed that the quality of life improved significantly following surgery (P<0.01). Moreover, surgical intervention, EcoG, MRI positioning and complete resection helped to have improved seizure control, relief of anxiety and quality of life. All these observations strongly recommend an early consideration of epilepsy surgery in FCD IIa patients.

  2. Sociological histories on epilepsy as "causes for disqualification" stipulated in the Japanese Road Traffic Act of 1960 and Revised Road Traffic Act of 2001.

    PubMed

    Imataka, G; Yoshihara, S

    2017-07-01

    In the wake of successive cases of fatal accidents caused by patients behind the wheel whose driving was likely to be hindered due to paroxysmal diseases, including epilepsy, there has been an outcry from victims demanding stricter criminal penalties against the perpetrators due to negligence. As a result of this action, a revised Road Traffic Act was put into effect in Japan on June 14, 2013. This act established new penal provisions against any person who provides false statements on his/her medical condition(s) when acquiring or renewing a driver's license. In this paper, the social circumstances will be introduced regarding road traffic in Japan when the Road Traffic Act, the origin of today's revised Road Traffic Act, was enacted in 1960. An overview of the reasons behind the enactment of the original act will be provided. Additionally, the handling of patients with "provisions for disqualification," whose driving is likely to be hindered due to paroxysmal diseases, including "epilepsy," will be reviewed. This handling attracted repeated controversy during the enactment of the original act and will also be reviewed. One significant change in wording from "absolute causes for disqualification" in the Road Traffic Act of 1960 to "relative causes for disqualification" in the Revised Road Traffic Act of 2001 also will be discussed from a medical sociology perspective. Finally, the social status and socio-economic position of drivers with paroxysmal diseases, as it pertains to influences on lawmakers, will be discussed.

  3. Do ATP-binding cassette transporters cause pharmacoresistance in epilepsy? Problems and approaches in determining which antiepileptic drugs are affected.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Römermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common problem in epilepsy, affecting at least 30% of patients. One prominent hypothesis to explain this resistance suggests an inadequate penetration or excess efflux of AEDs across the blood - brain barrier (BBB) as a result of overexpressed efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the encoded product of the multidrug resistance- 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) gene. Pgp and MDR1 are markedly increased in epileptogenic brain tissue of patients with AED-resistant partial epilepsy and following seizures in rodent models of partial epilepsy. In rodent models, AED-resistant rats exhibit higher Pgp levels than responsive animals; increased Pgp expression is associated with lower brain levels of AEDs; and, most importantly, co-administration of Pgp inhibitors reverses AED resistance. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that Pgp plays a significant role in mediating resistance to AEDs in rodent models of epilepsy - however, whether this phenomenon extends to at least some human refractory epilepsy remains unclear, particularly because it is still a matter of debate which AEDs, if any, are transported by human Pgp. The difficulty in determining which AEDs are substrates of human Pgp is mainly a consequence of the fact that AEDs are highly permeable compounds, which are not easily identified as Pgp substrates in in vitro models of the BBB, such as monolayer (Transwell(®)) efflux assays. By using a modified assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA), which minimizes the influence of high transcellular permeability, two groups have recently demonstrated that several major AEDs are transported by human Pgp. Importantly, it was demonstrated in these studies that Pgp-mediated transport highly depends on the AED concentration and may not be identified if concentrations below or above the therapeutic range are used. In addition to the efflux transporters, seizure-induced alterations in BBB integrity and activity of

  4. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Jinyu; Zhou, Haohan; Dong, Rongpeng; Kang, Mingyang; Zhao, Jianwu

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily), experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily), and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily). The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG (p < 0.05), respectively. COS reduces the side effects caused by antibiotics (p < 0.05). COS improved biochemical indexes and reduced the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. COS reduced the antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies. PMID:28335413

  5. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Jinyu; Zhou, Haohan; Dong, Rongpeng; Kang, Mingyang; Zhao, Jianwu

    2017-03-14

    Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily), experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily), and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily). The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG (p < 0.05), respectively. COS reduces the side effects caused by antibiotics (p < 0.05). COS improved biochemical indexes and reduced the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. COS reduced the antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies.

  6. Idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Billiard, M

    1996-08-01

    Idiopathic hypersomnia is not as well delineated as narcolepsy and its history is much more recent. There are at least two forms of the disorder: (1) a polysymptomatic form, characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal sleep of abnormally long duration, and signs of sleep drunkenness on awakening, and (2) a monosymptomatic form that manifests only by excessive daytime sleepiness. The most widely used laboratory procedures are nocturnal polysomnographic recording following by an MSLT demonstrating a mean sleep latency of less than 10 minutes. At least in the polysymptomatic form, however, continuous polysomnography on an ad lib protocol deserves to be performed to catch the abnormally long major sleep episode and the long unrefreshing naps. Idiopathic hypersomnia is probably one of the most overdiagnosed sleep disorders. Several other disorders must be excluded before the diagnosis can be considered conclusive. Treatment of idiopathic hypersomnia relies on stimulants, which are frequently less effective and less well tolerated than in narcolepsy.

  7. Psychosocial aspects of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pravina

    2002-05-01

    Social attitudes towards epilepsy cause more distress to the patient and his/her near and dear ones, than the disease itself. The major psychosocial issues related to epilepsy are: Quality of medical management, overprotection, education, employment, marriage and pregnancy. Inadequate treatment is the major reason involved in psychosocial issues. Constant overprotection and pampering leads to behavioural pattern which makes epileptic patient dependent for ever. Education is hampered in epileptic persons. Teachers and students should have proper information regarding seizures. If seizures are well controlled, job opportunities increase. Employers and employees need to be educated about epilepsy. Self-employment is the best in epileptic patients. Regarding marriage, each patient is to be judged on individual merits and type of epilepsy. Society needs to be educated about the facts and consequences of epilepsy. Risk of anti-epileptic drug's usage is very insignificant compared to risk of seizures in pregnancy. So girls are advised to seek medical advice before pregnancy and during follow-up. With more and more support from the society, persons with epilepsy will have the courage and confidence to speak about themselves and their illness. It is only then that we will realise that persons with epilepsy are 'normal' or 'near-normal' and this will break the vicious cycle of stigma.

  8. De novo loss-of-function mutations in X-linked SMC1A cause severe ID and therapy-resistant epilepsy in females: expanding the phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Jansen, S; Kleefstra, T; Willemsen, M H; de Vries, P; Pfundt, R; Hehir-Kwa, J Y; Gilissen, C; Veltman, J A; de Vries, B B A; Vissers, L E L M

    2016-11-01

    De novo missense mutations and in-frame coding deletions in the X-linked gene SMC1A (structural maintenance of chromosomes 1A), encoding part of the cohesin complex, are known to cause Cornelia de Lange syndrome in both males and females. For a long time, loss-of-function (LoF) mutations in SMC1A were considered incompatible with life, as such mutations had not been reported in neither male nor female patients. However, recently, the authors and others reported LoF mutations in females with intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy. Here we present the detailed phenotype of two females with de novo LoF mutations in SMC1A, including a de novo mutation of single base deletion [c.2364del, p.(Asn788Lysfs*10)], predicted to result in a frameshift, and a de novo deletion of exon 16, resulting in an out-of-frame mRNA splice product [p.(Leu808Argfs*6)]. By combining our patients with the other recently reported females carrying SMC1A LoF mutations, we ascertained a phenotypic spectrum of (severe) ID, therapy-resistant epilepsy, absence/delay of speech, hypotonia and small hands and feet. Our data show the existence of a novel phenotypic entity - distinct from CdLS - and caused by de novo SMC1A LoF mutations.

  9. A gene defect causing a novel progressive epilepsy with mental retardation, EPMR, maps to chromosome 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Ranta, S.; Tahvanainen, E.; Karila, E.

    1994-09-01

    EPMR (progressive epilepsy with mental retardation) is a newly discovered autosomal recessively inherited disorder which occurs with high frequency in an isolated rural population in Finland. So far 25 patients have been identified, 21 of whom are alive. Twenty-three patients share a common ancestor from the 18th century. The main features of EPMR are: normal early development, tonic-clonic seizures with onset between ages 5 and 10, and mental retardation which begins approximately 2 years after the onset of epilepsy and soon leads to deepening mental retardation. Adult patients do not manage their daily life without help. The EEG is normal at the onset of epilepsy but later progressive slowing of the background activity occurs. The etiology and pathogenesis of EPMR remain known. As this is a novel disease entity without any definitive diagnostic marker we wished to begin its elucidation by first defining its gene locus. A random search for linkage in four multiplex families (only 20 individuals tested) resulted in the finding of linkage to marker D8S264 with a lod score of 4.45 at zero recombination. The EPMR gene resides in a 7 centimorgan interval between marker loci AFM185xb2 and D8S262 with a maximum multipoint lod score of 7.03 at 1.8 centimorgans proximal to D8S264. Physically this region is very distal on 8p. Of the sixteen EPMR chromosomes haplotyped 15 were identical or almost identical. One chromosome, however, had a distinctly different haplotype raising the possibility of there being two different mutations or one very old mutation. These findings are a starting point toward isolating and characterizing the gene and its protein product. Physical mapping has been initiated by isolating nine YACs from the region.

  10. Brain Slump Caused by Jugular Venous Stenoses Treated by Stenting: A Hypothesis to Link Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Nicholas; Trivedi, Rikin; Greenwood, Richard; Pickard, John

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension, of which brain slump is an extreme expression, is caused by a cerebrospinal fluid leak. The reason the leak develops in the first place, however, is unknown, and some cases can be very difficult to manage. We describe a patient with severe symptoms of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and brain slump documented by magnetic resonance imaging whose clinical syndrome and structural brain anomaly resolved completely after treatment directed exclusively at improving cranial venous outflow. Diagnostics included computed tomography (CT) venography, catheter venography, and jugular venoplasty. CT venography showed narrowing of both internal jugular veins below the skull base. Catheter venography confirmed that these were associated with pressure gradients. Jugular venoplasty performed on two separate occasions as a clinical test gave temporary respite. Lasting remission (2 years of follow-up) was achieved by stenting the dominant internal jugular vein. These findings and this outcome suggest a mechanism for the development of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that would link it to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and have cranial venous outflow obstruction as the underlying cause.

  11. Molecular Pathology of Genetic Epilepsies Associated with GABAA Receptor Subunit Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Robert L; Kang, Jing-Qiong

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in ligand-gated ion channel genes associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsies have been reported in excitatory acetylcholine receptor α4 and β2 subunit genes linked to autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy and in inhibitory GABAA receptor α1, β3, γ2, and δ subunit genes associated with childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, pure febrile seizures, generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, and generalized epilepsy with tonic–clonic seizures. Recent studies suggest that these mutations alter receptor function or biogenesis, including impaired receptor subunit messenger RNA stability, receptor subunit protein folding and stability, receptor assembly, and receptor trafficking. PMID:19396344

  12. Genetics and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Steinlein, Ortrud K.

    2008-01-01

    The term “epilepsy” describes a heterogeneous group of disorders, most of them caused by interactions between several or even many genes and environmental factors. Much rarer are the genetic epilepsies that are due to single-gene mutations or defined structural chromosomal aberrations, such as microdeletions. The discovery of several of the genes underlying these rare genetic epilepsies has already considerably contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms epileptogenesis. The progress made in the last 15 years in the genetics of epilepsy is providing new possibilities for diagnosis and therapy. Here, different genetic epilepsies are reviewed as examples, to demonstrate the various pathways that can lead from genes to seizures. PMID:18472482

  13. Surgical Treatment of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John W.; Hakimian, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article outlines indications for neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy, describes the presurgical workup, summarizes surgical approaches, and details expected risks and benefits. Recent Findings: There is class I evidence for the efficacy of temporal lobectomy in treating intractable seizures, and accumulating documentation that successful surgical treatment reverses much of the disability, morbidity, and excess mortality of chronic epilepsy. Summary: Chronic, uncontrolled focal epilepsy causes progressive disability and increased mortality, but these can be reversed with seizure control. Vigorous efforts to stop seizures are warranted. If two well-chosen and tolerated medication trials do not achieve seizure control, an early workup for epilepsy surgery should be arranged. If this workup definitively identifies the brain region from which the seizures arise, and this region can be removed with a low risk of disabling neurologic deficits, neurosurgery will have a much better chance of stopping seizures than further medication trials. PMID:23739107

  14. Talking about epilepsy: Challenges parents face when communicating with their child about epilepsy and epilepsy-related issues.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Stephanie; Lambert, Veronica; Gallagher, Pamela; Shahwan, Amre; Austin, Joan K

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the challenges that parents of children with epilepsy experienced when engaging in dialog with their child about epilepsy and epilepsy-related issues. Using a qualitative exploratory approach, interviews were conducted with 34 parents of children with epilepsy (aged 6-16 years), consisting of 27 mothers and 7 fathers. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Findings revealed five main themes: normalizing epilepsy, the invisibility of epilepsy, information concealment, fear of misinforming the child, and difficulty in discussing particular epilepsy-related issues. Many of the communicative challenges experienced by parents impacted on their ability to engage openly in parent-child dialog about epilepsy in the home. Parents face specific challenges when choosing to communicate with their child about epilepsy, relating to creating a sense of normality, reducing fear of causing their child worry, and having a lack of epilepsy-related knowledge. Healthcare professionals who work closely with families living with epilepsy should remain mindful of the importance of discussing family communication surrounding epilepsy and the challenges parents of children with epilepsy face when talking about epilepsy within the home.

  15. [The clinical utility of genetic testing in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Anna; Gál, Anikó

    2011-09-30

    We summarize those epilepsies, in which genetic testing has clinical significance. Different types of genetic tests are presented. Na-channel epilepsies include different clinical entities, the exact genetic diagnosis is relevant in the prognosis, genetic counseling, as well in the therapeutic decision--as Na-channel blockers may worsen them. Molecular genetic tests are available for most of the malformations of cortical development, important for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. Molecular genetic testing of progressive myoclonic epilepsies, which may be difficult to differentiate clinically is almost complete. For some neonatal/infantile epileptic encephalopathies, for most of the neurometabolic disorders, molecular genetic tests are available, so are cytogenetic tests for chromosomal abnormalities accompanied with epilepsy. The clinical significance of the genetic diagnostic of rare, focal inherited epilepsies is limited, their importance is mostly in epilepsy pathophysiology research. The genetic background of the common idiopathic generalized epilepsies is unrevealed so far.

  16. Late-onset, praxis-induced myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Melanie; Carrazana, Enrique J; Lopez, Maria Raquel; Wallace, Douglas M

    2012-06-01

    Praxis-induction of seizures is an interesting subset of reflex epilepsy in which seizures are induced by higher mental activities associated with the use of part of the body. Reflex traits have often been described in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. We report a patient presenting with praxis-induced myoclonic epilepsy at a late age. Ictal myoclonus was triggered by building a bird house and captured by video-polygraphic EEG recording. At 39 years old, the patient's age at onset of epilepsy was consistent with the syndrome of adult myoclonic epilepsy. Our case supports the notion of adult myoclonic epilepsy with possible occurrence of praxis-activation of seizures, as has been noted with the other idiopathic generalised epilepsies. [Published with videosequences].

  17. Long-term outcome of medically treated epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, M; Schmidt, D

    2017-01-01

    To review the long-term outcome of epilepsy in population-based studies. Analysis of population-based studies. About two of three patients with new-onset epilepsy will, in the long run, enter five-year terminal remission. Chances for remission are best for those with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy. It is unclear whether the seizure outcome has improved over the last several decades. Social outcome, however, may have become better because of the improved level of knowledge on and public attitudes toward people with epilepsy, and possibly fewer prejudices at home, daycare, school, military and labor market. While we still do not have a cure for epilepsy for all patients, relief of the medical and social consequences is available for many and hope is on the horizon for people with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal: diagnostic approach to epilepsy in dogs.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farqhuar, Robyn; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Packer, Rowena M A; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Ned; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Batlle, Martí Pumarola; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient presenting with a history of suspected epileptic seizures incorporates two fundamental steps: to establish if the events the animal is demonstrating truly represent epileptic seizures and if so, to identify their underlying cause. Differentiation of epileptic seizures from other non-epileptic episodic paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more unprovoked epileptic seizures occurring at least 24 h apart, age at epileptic seizure onset of between six months and six years, unremarkable inter-ictal physical and neurological examination, and no significant abnormalities on minimum data base blood tests and urinalysis. Tier II confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and II and identification of electroencephalographic abnormalities characteristic for seizure disorders. The authors recommend performing MRI of the brain and routine CSF analysis, after exclusion of reactive seizures, in dogs with age at epileptic seizure onset <6 months or >6 years, inter-ictal neurological abnormalities consistent with intracranial neurolocalisation, status epilepticus or cluster seizure at epileptic seizure onset

  19. Array-Based Gene Discovery with Three Unrelated Subjects Shows SCARB2/LIMP-2 Deficiency Causes Myoclonus Epilepsy and Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Berkovic, Samuel F.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Oshlack, Alicia; Silver, Jeremy D.; Katerelos, Marina; Vears, Danya F.; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Zhang, Ke Wei; Stankovich, Jim; Kalnins, Renate M.; Dowling, John P.; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Faldini, Enrico; D'Hooge, Rudi; Vadlamudi, Lata; Macdonell, Richard A.; Hodgson, Bree L.; Bayly, Marta A.; Savige, Judy; Mulley, John C.; Smyth, Gordon K.; Power, David A.; Saftig, Paul; Bahlo, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    Action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome (AMRF) is an autosomal-recessive disorder with the remarkable combination of focal glomerulosclerosis, frequently with glomerular collapse, and progressive myoclonus epilepsy associated with storage material in the brain. Here, we employed a novel combination of molecular strategies to find the responsible gene and show its effects in an animal model. Utilizing only three unrelated affected individuals and their relatives, we used homozygosity mapping with single-nucleotide polymorphism chips to localize AMRF. We then used microarray-expression analysis to prioritize candidates prior to sequencing. The disorder was mapped to 4q13-21, and microarray-expression analysis identified SCARB2/Limp2, which encodes a lysosomal-membrane protein, as the likely candidate. Mutations in SCARB2/Limp2 were found in all three families used for mapping and subsequently confirmed in two other unrelated AMRF families. The mutations were associated with lack of SCARB2 protein. Reanalysis of an existing Limp2 knockout mouse showed intracellular inclusions in cerebral and cerebellar cortex, and the kidneys showed subtle glomerular changes. This study highlights that recessive genes can be identified with a very small number of subjects. The ancestral lysosomal-membrane protein SCARB2/LIMP-2 is responsible for AMRF. The heterogeneous pathology in the kidney and brain suggests that SCARB2/Limp2 has pleiotropic effects that may be relevant to understanding the pathogenesis of other forms of glomerulosclerosis or collapse and myoclonic epilepsies. PMID:18308289

  20. [Neuropsychological disorders and childhood epilepsies].

    PubMed

    Vallée, Louis

    2012-12-01

    Neuropsychological consequences of epilepsy will be function of the specific anamnesis of the child, characteristics of epilepsy syndromes, and treatment. The effects of recurrent seizures, iatrogenic effects of medications, and school adaptation are reviewed. The neurodevelopmental origins of comorbidities are detailed, how they develop over time. Despite the good prognosis and the remission of seizures before adulthood with normal neurological and intellectual development, some subtle cognitive and behavioural deficits in children with benign epilepsy seem to occur. Cognition can be impaired leading to long-term intellectual disabilities. One factor that could potentially cause cognitive deficits is the frequent seizures that characterize intractable epilepsy.

  1. Idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Billiard, Michel; Sonka, Karel

    2016-10-01

    Idiopathic hypersomnia continues to evolve from the concept of "sleep drunkenness" introduced by Bedrich Roth in Prague in 1956 and the description of idiopathic hypersomnia with two forms, polysymptomatic and monosymptomatic, by the same Bedrich Roth in 1976. The diagnostic criteria of idiopathic hypersomnia have varied with the successive revisions of the International classifications of sleep disorders, including the recent 3rd edition. No epidemiological studies have been conducted so far. Disease onset occurs most often during adolescence or young adulthood. A familial background is often present but rigorous studies are still lacking. The key manifestation is hypersomnolence. It is often accompanied by sleep of long duration and debilitating sleep inertia. Polysomnography (PSG) followed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) is mandatory, as well as a 24 h PSG or a 2-wk actigraphy in association with a sleep log to ensure a total 24-h sleep time longer than or equal to 66O minutes, when the mean sleep latency on the MSLT is longer than 8 min. Yet, MSLT is neither sensitive nor specific and the polysomnographic diagnostic criteria require continuous readjustment and biologic markers are still lacking. Idiopathic hypersomnia is most often a chronic condition though spontaneous remission may occur. The condition is disabling, sometimes even more so than narcolepsy type 1 or 2. Based on neurochemical, genetic and immunological analyses as well as on exploration of the homeostatic and circadian processes of sleep, various pathophysiological hypotheses have been proposed. Differential diagnosis involves a number of diseases and it is not yet clear whether idiopathic hypersomnia and narcolepsy type 2 are not the same condition. Until now, the treatment of idiopathic hypersomnia has mirrored that of the sleepiness of narcolepsy type 1 or 2. The first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of modafinil have just been published, as well as a double

  2. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For Teens > Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) ... people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people as much ...

  3. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For Teens > Juvenile Idiopathic ... can affect people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people ...

  4. Idiopathic Focal Eosinophilic Enteritis (IFEE), an Emerging Cause of Abdominal Pain in Horses: The Effect of Age, Time and Geographical Location on Risk

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Debra C.; Costain, Deborah A.; Sherlock, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background Idiopathic focal eosinophilic enteritis (IFEE) is an emerging cause of abdominal pain (colic) in horses that frequently requires surgical intervention to prevent death. The epidemiology of IFEE is poorly understood and it is difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. The aetiology of this condition and methods of possible prevention are currently unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate temporal and spatial heterogeneity in IFEE risk and to ascertain the effect of horse age on risk. Methodology/Principal Findings A retrospective, nested case-control study was undertaken using data from 85 IFEE cases and 848 randomly selected controls admitted to a UK equine hospital for exploratory laparotomy to investigate the cause of colic over a 10-year period. Generalised additive models (GAMs) were used to quantify temporal and age effects on the odds of IFEE and to provide mapped estimates of ‘residual’ risk over the study region. The relative risk of IFEE increased over the study period (p = 0.001) and a seasonal pattern was evident (p<0.01) with greatest risk of IFEE being identified between the months of July and November. IFEE risk decreased with increasing age (p<0.001) with younger (0–5 years old) horses being at greatest risk. The mapped surface estimate exhibited significantly atypical sub-regions (p<0.001) with increased IFEE risk in horses residing in the North-West of the study region. Conclusions/Significance IFEE was found to exhibit both spatial and temporal variation in risk and is more likely to occur in younger horses. This information may help to identify horses at increased risk of IFEE, provide clues about the aetiology of this condition and to identify areas that require further research. PMID:25463382

  5. Familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: a benign epilepsy syndrome showing complex inheritance.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Douglas E; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Taylor, Isabella; Cook, Mark J; McKelvie, Penelope A; Vears, Danya F; Lawrence, Kate M; McMahon, Jacinta M; Grinton, Bronwyn E; McIntosh, Anne M; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2010-11-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is the commonest partial epilepsy of adulthood. Although generally perceived as an acquired disorder, several forms of familial temporal lobe epilepsy, with mesial or lateral seizure semiology, have been described. Descriptions of familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy have varied widely from a benign epilepsy syndrome with prominent déjà vu and without antecedent febrile seizures or magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, to heterogeneous, but generally more refractory epilepsies, often with a history of febrile seizures and with frequent hippocampal atrophy and high T₂ signal on magnetic resonance imaging. Compelling evidence of a genetic aetiology (rather than chance aggregation) in familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy has come from twin studies. Dominant inheritance has been reported in two large families, though the usual mode of inheritance is not known. Here, we describe clinical and neurophysiological features of 20 new mesial temporal lobe epilepsy families including 51 affected individuals. The epilepsies in these families were generally benign, and febrile seizure history was infrequent (9.8%). No evidence of hippocampal sclerosis or dysplasia was present on brain imaging. A single individual underwent anterior temporal lobectomy, with subsequent seizure freedom and histopathological evidence of hippocampal sclerosis was not found. Inheritance patterns in probands' relatives were analysed in these families, together with 19 other temporal lobe epilepsy families previously reported by us. Observed frequencies of epilepsies in relatives were lower than predicted by dominant Mendelian models, while only a minority (8/39) of families could be compatible with recessive inheritance. These findings strongly suggest that complex inheritance, similar to that widely accepted in the idiopathic generalized epilepsies, is the usual mode of inheritance in familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. This disorder, which appears to be

  6. The validity of a separate classification of cryptogenic localization related epilepsy amongst childhood epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Reijs, Rianne P; van Mil, Saskia G M; van Hall, Mariette H J A; Arends, Johan B A M; Weber, Jacobiene W; Renier, Willy O; Aldenkamp, Albert P

    2007-07-01

    One-third of children with epilepsy are classified as having a cryptogenic localization related epilepsy (CLRE). In cohort studies CLRE is often grouped together with either symptomatic localization related epilepsy (SLRE) or idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Therefore, this categorization is not specific enough and will not lead to prognostic or treatment information. We objectified the classification differences between these categories. A total of 114 children admitted to our epilepsy centre underwent a standardized clinical analysis, which yielded age at onset, duration of the epilepsy, seizure frequency, seizure type, percentage of interictal epileptiform activity on EEG (IEA), type of treatment, and full scale IQ. These variables are regarded the characteristics of the epilepsy, and used in a discriminant function analysis. IEA was found to be the only variable to distinguish between groups of epilepsy. SLRE could easily be distinguished significantly from IGE and CLRE, while the latter two did not differ significantly. Discriminant function analysis combined the variables into two functions, applicable to classify the children. By applying this statistical analysis method, the groups clinically classified as SLRE and IGE were mostly classified as SLRE (71.4%) and IGE (57.9%). However, CLRE appeared difficult to classify (49.2%), and most children were classified as either SLRE (19%) or IGE (31.7%). The current opinion that CLRE is 'probably symptomatic' cannot be confirmed in all cases in this study. It is most likely that the current CLRE population consists of both children with eventually SLRE, as well as yet to be described syndromes to be classified as idiopathic epilepsies. We emphasize the need for separate studies regarding children with 'probably symptomatic' (cryptogenic) localization related epilepsy, as this will maximally help children, caretakers and treating physicians to achieve the best possible outcome.

  7. A role of SCN9A in human epilepsies, as a cause of febrile seizures and as a potential modifier of Dravet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nanda A; Pappas, Chris; Dahle, E Jill; Claes, Lieve R F; Pruess, Timothy H; De Jonghe, Peter; Thompson, Joel; Dixon, Missy; Gurnett, Christina; Peiffer, Andy; White, H Steve; Filloux, Francis; Leppert, Mark F

    2009-09-01

    A follow-up study of a large Utah family with significant linkage to chromosome 2q24 led us to identify a new febrile seizure (FS) gene, SCN9A encoding Na(v)1.7. In 21 affected members, we uncovered a potential mutation in a highly conserved amino acid, p.N641Y, in the large cytoplasmic loop between transmembrane domains I and II that was absent from 586 ethnically matched population control chromosomes. To establish a functional role for this mutation in seizure susceptibility, we introduced the orthologous mutation into the murine Scn9a ortholog using targeted homologous recombination. Compared to wild-type mice, homozygous Scn9a(N641Y/N641Y) knockin mice exhibit significantly reduced thresholds to electrically induced clonic and tonic-clonic seizures, and increased corneal kindling acquisition rates. Together, these data strongly support the SCN9A p.N641Y mutation as disease-causing in this family. To confirm the role of SCN9A in FS, we analyzed a collection of 92 unrelated FS patients and identified additional highly conserved Na(v)1.7 missense variants in 5% of the patients. After one of these children with FS later developed Dravet syndrome (severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy), we sequenced the SCN1A gene, a gene known to be associated with Dravet syndrome, and identified a heterozygous frameshift mutation. Subsequent analysis of 109 Dravet syndrome patients yielded nine Na(v)1.7 missense variants (8% of the patients), all in highly conserved amino acids. Six of these Dravet syndrome patients with SCN9A missense variants also harbored either missense or splice site SCN1A mutations and three had no SCN1A mutations. This study provides evidence for a role of SCN9A in human epilepsies, both as a cause of FS and as a partner with SCN1A mutations.

  8. The interictal language profile in adult epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bartha-Doering, Lisa; Trinka, Eugen

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature on the interictal language profile in adult patients with epilepsy. An extensive literature search was performed using MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PASCAL, and PSYNDEXplus databases. Key aspects of inclusion criteria were adult patients with epilepsy, patient number >10, and in-depth qualitative investigations of a specific language modality or administration of tests of at least two different language modalities, including comprehension, naming, repetition, reading, writing, and spontaneous speech. Our search strategy yielded 933 articles on epilepsy and language. Of these, 31 met final eligibility criteria. Most included articles focused on temporal lobe epilepsy; only three studies were interested in the language profile of patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsies, and one study on frontal lobe epilepsy met inclusion criteria. Study results showed a pronounced heterogeneity of language abilities in patients with epilepsy, varying from intact language profiles to impairment in several language functions. However, at least 17% of patients displayed deficits in more than one language function, with naming, reading comprehension, spontaneous speech, and discourse production being most often affected. This review underscores the need to evaluate different language functions-including spontaneous speech, discourse abilities, naming, auditory and reading comprehension, reading, writing, and repetition-individually in order to obtain a reliable profile of language functioning in patients with epilepsy. Moreover, our findings show that in contrast to the huge scientific interest of memory functions in epilepsy, the examination of language functions so far played a minor role in epilepsy research, emphasizing the need for future research activities in this field. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. Can emotional stress trigger the onset of epilepsy?

    PubMed

    Gélisse, Philippe; Genton, Pierre; Coubes, Philippe; Tang, Ngoc Phuong Loc; Crespel, Arielle

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of an acute adverse stress as "trigger" for the onset of epilepsy. Among 4618 consecutive patients, twenty-two reported a major life event within three months before the onset of epilepsy. All patients had focal epilepsy except one with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. The temporal lobe was involved in 90% of patients with focal epilepsy. More precisely, 13 patients (62% of patients with focal epilepsy) had medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), two had lateral temporal lobe epilepsy, four had temporoparietooccipital junction epilepsy, and two patients had central lobe epilepsy. The mean age and the median age at onset of epilepsy for patients with MTLE were both 38 years (range: 9.5-65 years). Ten patients had right and three had left MTLE. Among patients with focal epilepsy, MRI was abnormal in 7 (33%) with hippocampal sclerosis in four, periventricular nodular heterotopia in two, and complex cortical dysgenesis in one. The mean age at onset of epilepsy for patients with brain lesions was 26 years (range: 9.5-49). Twelve patients (54%) reported a death as a triggering factor for the onset of their epilepsy. Seven patients (32%) reported that a relationship of trust had been broken. Three patients (14%) had been subjects of violence. No patient reported sexual abuse as a triggering factor. This study provides evidence that some patients (5/1000 patients) began their seizures in the wake of significant life events. The average age at onset of epilepsy is quite late, around age 30, even in the presence of brain lesions. These patients are emotionally and affectively more prone to have consequences of a stressful life event. The recognition and management of such situations may bring significant relief with improvement of the control of epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Recurrent De Novo Variant in NACC1 Causes a Syndrome Characterized by Infantile Epilepsy, Cataracts, and Profound Developmental Delay.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Kelly; Meng, Linyan; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Bearden, David R; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjorg; Busk, Oyvind L; Stong, Nicholas; Liston, Eriskay; Cohn, Ronald D; Scaglia, Fernando; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Tarpinian, Jennifer; Skraban, Cara M; Deardorff, Matthew A; Friedman, Jeremy N; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Walley, Nicole; Mikati, Mohamad A; Kranz, Peter G; Jasien, Joan; McConkie-Rosell, Allyn; McDonald, Marie; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns; Freemark, Michael; Kansagra, Sujay; Freedman, Sharon; Bali, Deeksha; Millan, Francisca; Bale, Sherri; Nelson, Stanley F; Lee, Hane; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Goldstein, David B; Xiao, Rui; Yang, Yaping; Posey, Jennifer E; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Lupski, James R; Wangler, Michael F; Shashi, Vandana

    2017-02-02

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has increasingly enabled new pathogenic gene variant identification for undiagnosed neurodevelopmental disorders and provided insights into both gene function and disease biology. Here, we describe seven children with a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by microcephaly, profound developmental delays and/or intellectual disability, cataracts, severe epilepsy including infantile spasms, irritability, failure to thrive, and stereotypic hand movements. Brain imaging in these individuals reveals delay in myelination and cerebral atrophy. We observe an identical recurrent de novo heterozygous c.892C>T (p.Arg298Trp) variant in the nucleus accumbens associated 1 (NACC1) gene in seven affected individuals. One of the seven individuals is mosaic for this variant. NACC1 encodes a transcriptional repressor implicated in gene expression and has not previously been associated with germline disorders. The probability of finding the same missense NACC1 variant by chance in 7 out of 17,228 individuals who underwent WES for diagnoses of neurodevelopmental phenotypes is extremely small and achieves genome-wide significance (p = 1.25 × 10(-14)). Selective constraint against missense variants in NACC1 makes this excess of an identical missense variant in all seven individuals more remarkable. Our findings are consistent with a germline recurrent mutational hotspot associated with an allele-specific neurodevelopmental phenotype in NACC1.

  11. Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy: normal outcome in a patient with late diagnosis after prolonged status epilepticus causing cortical blindness.

    PubMed

    Kluger, G; Blank, R; Paul, K; Paschke, E; Jansen, E; Jakobs, C; Wörle, H; Plecko, B

    2008-10-01

    We report on a male proband with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) and neonatal seizure onset. At the age of 31 months, a prolonged status epilepticus led to severe neurological regression with cortical blindness, loss of speech and muscular hypotonia with slow recovery over the following 3 months. At 33 months of age pyridoxine therapy was initiated with excellent response and the boy remained seizure-free on pyridoxine monotherapy, except for two occasions with seizure recurrence 10 days after accidental pyridoxine withdrawal. alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (antiquitin) deficiency was indicated by elevated pipecolic acid concentrations in plasma and alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde excretion in urine. Molecular analysis of the antiquitin gene revealed a novel missense mutation c.57insA, while the mutation of the other allele remained unidentified so far. Despite the delay in diagnosis and prolonged status epilepticus, neuropsychological evaluations at the ages of 11 and 18 years demonstrated full-scale IQ of 93 and 92, respectively, with better verbal IQ (103 and 101) than performance IQ (85 and 82).

  12. Direct evidence for a β1-adrenergic receptor–directed autoimmune attack as a cause of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jahns, Roland; Boivin, Valérie; Hein, Lutz; Triebel, Sven; Angermann, Christiane E.; Ertl, Georg; Lohse, Martin J.

    2004-01-01

    Today, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) represents the main cause of severe heart failure and disability in younger adults and thus is a challenge for public health. About 30% of DCM cases are genetic in origin; however, the large majority of cases are sporadic, and a viral or immune pathogenesis is suspected. Following the established postulates for pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, here we provide direct evidence that an autoimmune attack directed against the cardiac β1-adrenergic receptor may play a causal role in DCM. First, we immunized inbred rats against the second extracellular β1-receptor loop (β1-ECII; 100% sequence identity between human and rat) every month. All these rats developed first, receptor-stimulating anti–β1-ECII Ab’s and then, after 9 months, progressive severe left ventricular dilatation and dysfunction. Second, we transferred sera from anti–β1-ECII–positive and Ab-negative animals every month to healthy rats of the same strain. Strikingly, all anti–β1-ECII–transferred rats also developed a similar cardiomyopathic phenotype within a similar time frame, underlining the pathogenic potential of these receptor Ab’s. As a consequence, β1-adrenergic receptor–targeted autoimmune DCM should now be categorized with other known receptor Ab-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as Graves disease or myasthenia gravis. Although carried out in an experimental animal model, our findings should further encourage the development of therapeutic strategies that combat harmful anti–β1-ECII in receptor Ab–positive DCM patients. PMID:15146239

  13. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination.

  14. Musicogenic epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Brien, S E; Murray, T J

    1984-01-01

    A case of musicogenic epilepsy is reported in which the seizures were precipitated by singing voices. It was found that some singers' voices were particularly epileptogenic and that some of their songs, but not others, would precipitate a seizure. A study of the "offending" songs and singers did not reveal a common key, chord, harmonic interval, pitch or rhythm, and the emotional feeling or intensity of the music did not seem to be relevant. However, the voices that caused the seizures had a throaty, "metallic" quality. Such a singing voice results from incorrect positioning of the larynx such that it is not allowed to descend fully during singing; consequently, the vowel sounds produced must be manipulated by the lips or jaw to be distinguished. This trait is most common in singers with a low voice range who sing softly and use a microphone. It is not seen in trained operatic or musical theatre singers. The results of repeated testing showed that the seizures in this patient were caused by listening to singers who positioned the larynx incorrectly. PMID:6498678

  15. Characterisation and reduction of the EEG artefact caused by the helium cooling pump in the MR environment: validation in epilepsy patient data.

    PubMed

    Rothlübbers, Sven; Relvas, Vânia; Leal, Alberto; Murta, Teresa; Lemieux, Louis; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2015-03-01

    The EEG acquired simultaneously with fMRI is distorted by a number of artefacts related to the presence of strong magnetic fields, which must be reduced in order to allow for a useful interpretation and quantification of the EEG data. For the two most prominent artefacts, associated with magnetic field gradient switching and the heart beat, reduction methods have been developed and applied successfully. However, a number of artefacts related to the MR-environment can be found to distort the EEG data acquired even without ongoing fMRI acquisition. In this paper, we investigate the most prominent of those artefacts, caused by the Helium cooling pump, and propose a method for its reduction and respective validation in data collected from epilepsy patients. Since the Helium cooling pump artefact was found to be repetitive, an average template subtraction method was developed for its reduction with appropriate adjustments for minimizing the degradation of the physiological part of the signal. The new methodology was validated in a group of 15 EEG-fMRI datasets collected from six consecutive epilepsy patients, where it successfully reduced the amplitude of the artefact spectral peaks by 95 ± 2 % while the background spectral amplitude within those peaks was reduced by only -5 ± 4 %. Although the Helium cooling pump should ideally be switched off during simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions, we have shown here that in cases where this is not possible the associated artefact can be effectively reduced in post processing.

  16. Homozygous EEF1A2 mutation causes dilated cardiomyopathy, failure to thrive, global developmental delay, epilepsy and early death.

    PubMed

    Cao, Siqi; Smith, Laura L; Padilla-Lopez, Sergio R; Guida, Brandon S; Blume, Elizabeth; Shi, Jiahai; Morton, Sarah U; Brownstein, Catherine A; Beggs, Alan H; Kruer, Michael C; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2017-09-15

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (EEF1A), is encoded by two distinct isoforms, EEF1A1 and EEF1A2; whereas EEF1A1 is expressed almost ubiquitously, EEF1A2 expression is limited such that it is only detectable in skeletal muscle, heart, brain and spinal cord. Currently, the role of EEF1A2 in normal cardiac development and function is unclear. There have been several reports linking de novo dominant EEF1A2 mutations to neurological issues in humans. We report a pair of siblings carrying a homozygous missense mutation p.P333L in EEF1A2 who exhibited global developmental delay, failure to thrive, dilated cardiomyopathy and epilepsy, ultimately leading to death in early childhood. A third sibling also died of a similar presentation, but DNA was unavailable to confirm the mutation. Functional genomic analysis was performed in S. cerevisiae and zebrafish. In S. cerevisiae, there was no evidence for a dominant-negative effect. Previously identified putative de novo mutations failed to complement yeast strains lacking the EEF1A ortholog showing a major growth defect. In contrast, the introduction of the mutation seen in our family led to a milder growth defect. To evaluate its function in zebrafish, we knocked down eef1a2 expression using translation blocking and splice-site interfering morpholinos. EEF1A2-deficient zebrafish had skeletal muscle weakness, cardiac failure and small heads. Human EEF1A2 wild-type mRNA successfully rescued the morphant phenotype, but mutant RNA did not. Overall, EEF1A2 appears to be critical for normal heart function in humans, and its deficiency results in clinical abnormalities in neurologic function as well as in skeletal and cardiac muscle defects. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Up-to-date Critical Review of the Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    AKTEKİN, Berrin

    2015-01-01

    The classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsies is a subject of interest in various medical disciplines (such as neurology, pediatric neurology, molecular biology and genetics, neurosurgery, pharmacology, radiology, histopathology), and each of them requires a different approach in their practice. In last 15 years, enormous amount of debate in which irrelevant to actual level of knowledge, were ongoing in the literature. Epilepsy classification is a fundamental tool that impacts not only daily clinical practice but also research era and education. The current lack of consensus in this field causes a serious obstacle in patient management, student and resident education, and information sharing among different scientific interest groups. The comparison of different classification proposals by means of positive and negative aspects is beyond the scope of discussion in this article; therefore, I will try to give a brief summary of our current level of understanding. Main issues regarding the classifications proposal are as follows: Concepts of epileptic seizure/epilepsy/syndromeFocal & generalized epilepsy conceptIdiopathic, genetic, cryptogenic, and symptomatic (structural/metabolic) concepts

  18. Cingulate Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Alkawadri, Rafeed; So, Norman K.; Van Ness, Paul C.; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The literature on cingulate gyrus epilepsy in the magnetic resonance imaging era is limited to case reports and small case series. To our knowledge, this is the largest study of surgically confirmed epilepsy arising from the anterior or posterior cingulate region. OBJECTIVE To characterize the clinical and electrophysiological findings of epilepsies arising from the anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied consecutive cingulate gyrus epilepsy cases identified retrospectively from the Cleveland Clinic and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center epilepsy databases from 1992 to 2009. Participants included 14 consecutive cases of cingulate gyrus epilepsies confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcome measure was improvement in seizure frequency following surgery. The clinical, video electroencephalography, neuroimaging, pathology, and surgical outcome data were reviewed. RESULTS All 14 patients had cingulate epilepsy confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. They were divided into 3 groups based on anatomical location of the lesion and corresponding seizure semiology. In the posterior cingulate group, all 4 patients had electroclinical findings suggestive of temporal origin of the epilepsy. The anterior cingulate cases were divided into a typical (Bancaud) group (6 cases with hypermotor seizures and infrequent generalization with the presence of fear, laughter, or severe interictal personality changes) and an atypical group (4 cases presenting with simple motor seizures and a tendency for more frequent generalization and less-favorable long-term surgical outcome). All atypical cases were associated with an underlying infiltrative astrocytoma. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Posterior cingulate gyrus epilepsy may

  19. Gelastic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gumpert, John; Hansotia, Phiroze; Upton, Adrian

    1970-01-01

    A case of retinitis pigmentosa with laughing epilepsy is described. Stereotyped repetitive episodes of limb movement, rigidity, and cackling laughter responding to diazepam are recorded. One episode is presented as gelastic status epilepticus and the clinical and EEG features are reported. Features of gelastic epilepsy are discussed and briefly compared with other laughing disorders. A short history of the condition is accompanied by a relevant review of the literature. The possible importance of hypothalamic lesions in laughing epilepsy is discussed and the absence of consistent EEG findings is noted. Images PMID:5505675

  20. Employees with Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Epilepsy By Melanie Whetzel, M. A. Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Epilepsy What is Epilepsy? Epilepsy is a chronic, neurological ...

  1. Loss-of-function KCNH2 mutation in a family with long QT syndrome, epilepsy, and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Partemi, Sara; Cestèle, Sandrine; Pezzella, Marianna; Campuzano, Oscar; Paravidino, Roberta; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Zara, Federico; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Striano, Salvatore; Oliva, Antonio; Brugada, Ramon; Mantegazza, Massimo; Striano, Pasquale

    2013-08-01

    There has been increased interest in a possible association between epilepsy channelopathies and cardiac arrhythmias, such as long QT syndrome (LQTS). We report a kindred that features LQTS, idiopathic epilepsy, and increased risk of sudden death. Genetic study showed a previously unreported heterozygous point mutation (c.246T>C) in the KCNH2 gene. Functional studies showed that the mutation induces severe loss of function. This observation provides further evidence for a possible link between idiopathic epilepsy and LQTS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Genetic models of focal epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Boillot, Morgane; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2016-02-15

    Focal epilepsies were for a long time thought to be acquired disorders secondary to cerebral lesions. However, the important role of genetic factors in focal epilepsies is now well established. Several focal epilepsy syndromes are now proven to be monogenic disorders. While earlier genetic studies suggested a strong contribution of ion channel and neurotransmitter receptor genes, later work has revealed alternative pathways, among which the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal transduction pathway with DEPDC5. In this article, we provide an update on the mutational spectrum of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor genes (CHRNA4, CHRNB2, CHRNA2) and KCNT1 causing autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE), and of LGI1 in autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF). We also emphasize, through a review of the current literature, the contribution of in vitro and in vivo models developed to unveil the pathogenic mechanisms underlying these two epileptic syndromes.

  3. [Definition and classification of epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Jibiki, Itsuki

    2014-05-01

    The concept or definition of epilepsy was mentioned as a chronic disease of the brain consisting of repetitions of EEG paroxysm and clinical seizures caused by excessive discharges of the cerebral neurons, in reference with Gastaut's opinion and the other statements. Further, we referred to diseases to be excluded from epilepsy such as isolated, occasional and subclinical seizures and so on. Next, new classifications of seizures and epilepsies were explained on the basis of revised terminology and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies in Report of the ILAE Communication in Classification and Terminology, 2005-09, in comparison with the Classification of Epileptic Seizures in 1981 and the Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndromes in 1989.

  4. Correlation of EEG with neuropsychological status in children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, David A; Rayer, Katherine; Jackson, Daren C; Stafstrom, Carl E; Hsu, Murielle; Ferrazzano, Peter A; Dabbs, Kevin; Worrell, Gregory A; Jones, Jana E; Hermann, Bruce P

    2016-02-01

    To determine correlations of the EEG frequency spectrum with neuropsychological status in children with idiopathic epilepsy. Forty-six children ages 8-18 years old with idiopathic epilepsy were retrospectively identified and analyzed for correlations between EEG spectra and neuropsychological status using multivariate linear regression. In addition, the theta/beta ratio, which has been suggested as a clinically useful EEG marker of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and an EEG spike count were calculated for each subject. Neuropsychological status was highly correlated with posterior alpha (8-15 Hz) EEG activity in a complex way, with both positive and negative correlations at lower and higher alpha frequency sub-bands for each cognitive task in a pattern that depends on the specific cognitive task. In addition, the theta/beta ratio was a specific but insensitive indicator of ADHD status in children with epilepsy; most children both with and without epilepsy have normal theta/beta ratios. The spike count showed no correlations with neuropsychological status. (1) The alpha rhythm may have at least two sub-bands which serve different purposes. (2) The theta/beta ratio is not a sensitive indicator of ADHD status in children with epilepsy. (3) The EEG frequency spectrum correlates more robustly with neuropsychological status than spike count analysis in children with idiopathic epilepsy. (1) The role of posterior alpha rhythms in cognition is complex and can be overlooked if EEG spectral resolution is too coarse or if neuropsychological status is assessed too narrowly. (2) ADHD in children with idiopathic epilepsy may involve different mechanisms from those in children without epilepsy. (3) Reliable correlations with neuropsychological status require longer EEG samples when using spike count analysis than when using frequency spectra. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  5. Epidemiology of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Abramovici, S; Bagić, A

    2016-01-01

    Modern epidemiology of epilepsy maximizes the benefits of advanced diagnostic methods and sophisticated techniques for case ascertainment in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy and representativeness of the cases and cohorts studied, resulting in better comparability of similarly performed studies. Overall, these advanced epidemiologic methods are expected to yield a better understanding of diverse risk factors, high-risk populations, seizure triggers, multiple and poorly understood causes of epilepsy, including the increasing and complex role of genetics, and establish the natural course of treated and untreated epilepsy and syndromes - all of which form the foundation of an attempt to prevent epileptogenesis as the primary prophylaxis of epilepsy. Although data collection continues to improve, epidemiologists still need to overcome definition and coding variability, insufficient documentation, as well as the interplay of socioeconomic factors and stigma. As most of the 65-70 million people with epilepsy live outside of resource-rich countries, extensive underdiagnosis, misdiagnosis, and undertreatment are likely. Epidemiology will continue to provide the necessary information to the medical community, public, and regulators as the foundation for improved health policies, targeted education, and advanced measures of prevention and prognostication of the most common severe brain disorder.

  6. Levetiracetam in the treatment of childhood epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wheless, James W

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common pediatric neurologic disorder that is difficult to manage in a substantial portion of children. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a novel antiepileptic drug (AED) that has recently been approved as add-on treatment for various seizure types in epilepsy populations that include children: for refractory partial seizures in epilepsy patients ≥4 years old, for myoclonic seizures in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy patients ≥12 years old, and for primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients (≥6 years old with FDA approval; ≥12 years old with EMEA approval). A review of published pediatric studies indicates that the efficacy of LEV is best established for partial seizures; however, results from recent double-blind and open-label trials indicate that adjunctive LEV also controls generalized seizures – particularly myoclonic and generalized tonic-clonic – in children and adolescents with primary generalized epilepsy. LEV was well-tolerated in pediatric studies. The most common adverse events (AEs) reported were sedation related. Behavioral AEs were among the most commonly reported events in some trials; conversely, improvements in behavior and cognition were also frequently reported. LEV appears to be a safe and effective AED with unique characteristics that benefit the treatment of children with epilepsy. PMID:19300570

  7. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  8. About Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... EEG Telemetry? What is Magnetoencephalography (MEG)? What is Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)? About Pre-surgical Evaluation for Epilepsy. What ... In most cases, an EEG (electroencephalogram) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) test will be performed as well. You will ...

  9. First de novo KCND3 mutation causes severe Kv4.3 channel dysfunction leading to early onset cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, oral apraxia and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Smets, Katrien; Duarri, Anna; Deconinck, Tine; Ceulemans, Berten; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Züchner, Stephan; Gonzalez, Michael Anthony; Schüle, Rebecca; Synofzik, Matthis; Van der Aa, Nathalie; De Jonghe, Peter; Verbeek, Dineke S; Baets, Jonathan

    2015-07-21

    Identification of the first de novo mutation in potassium voltage-gated channel, shal-related subfamily, member 3 (KCND3) in a patient with complex early onset cerebellar ataxia in order to expand the genetic and phenotypic spectrum. Whole exome sequencing in a cerebellar ataxia patient and subsequent immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting and patch clamp assays of the channel were performed. A de novo KCND3 mutation (c.877_885dupCGCGTCTTC; p.Arg293_Phe295dup) was found duplicating the RVF motif and thereby adding an extra positive charge to voltage-gated potassium 4.3 (Kv4.3) in the voltage-sensor domain causing a severe shift of the voltage-dependence gating to more depolarized voltages. The patient displayed a severe phenotype with early onset cerebellar ataxia complicated by intellectual disability, epilepsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, strabismus, oral apraxia and joint hyperlaxity. We identified a de novo KCND3 mutation causing the most marked change in Kv4.3's channel properties reported so far, which correlated with a severe and unique spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 19/22 disease phenotype.

  10. Epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Prevett, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Over 10 million people in Africa have epilepsy of which most have no access to appropriate treatment. Epilepsy in Africa is different- the incidence is higher, and the causes and cultural attitudes towards it differ. This article examines the epidemiology, causes and treatment of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa and looks at the challenges to improve access to treatment and potential solutions and the implications for neurologists in more developed countries.

  11. Functional Investigation of a Non-coding Variant Associated with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Zebrafish: Elevated Expression of the Ladybird Homeobox Gene Causes Body Axis Deformation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kou, Ikuyo; Takimoto, Aki; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-ichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Miura, Shigenori; Adachi, Taiji; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ikegawa, Shiro; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we identified an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis susceptibility locus near human ladybird homeobox 1 (LBX1) and FLJ41350 by a genome-wide association study. Here, we characterized the associated non-coding variant and investigated the function of these genes. A chromosome conformation capture assay revealed that the genome region with the most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (rs11190870) physically interacted with the promoter region of LBX1-FLJ41350. The promoter in the direction of LBX1, combined with a 590-bp region including rs11190870, had higher transcriptional activity with the risk allele than that with the non-risk allele in HEK 293T cells. The ubiquitous overexpression of human LBX1 or either of the zebrafish lbx genes (lbx1a, lbx1b, and lbx2), but not FLJ41350, in zebrafish embryos caused body curvature followed by death prior to vertebral column formation. Such body axis deformation was not observed in transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated knockout zebrafish of lbx1b or lbx2. Mosaic expression of lbx1b driven by the GATA2 minimal promoter and the lbx1b enhancer in zebrafish significantly alleviated the embryonic lethal phenotype to allow observation of the later onset of the spinal curvature with or without vertebral malformation. Deformation of the embryonic body axis by lbx1b overexpression was associated with defects in convergent extension, which is a component of the main axis-elongation machinery in gastrulating embryos. In embryos overexpressing lbx1b, wnt5b, a ligand of the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, was significantly downregulated. Injection of mRNA for wnt5b or RhoA, a key downstream effector of Wnt/PCP signaling, rescued the defective convergent extension phenotype and attenuated the lbx1b-induced curvature of the body axis. Thus, our study presents a novel pathological feature of LBX1 and its zebrafish homologs in body axis deformation at various stages of

  12. Functional Investigation of a Non-coding Variant Associated with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Zebrafish: Elevated Expression of the Ladybird Homeobox Gene Causes Body Axis Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Long; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kou, Ikuyo; Takimoto, Aki; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-ichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Miura, Shigenori; Adachi, Taiji; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ikegawa, Shiro; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we identified an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis susceptibility locus near human ladybird homeobox 1 (LBX1) and FLJ41350 by a genome-wide association study. Here, we characterized the associated non-coding variant and investigated the function of these genes. A chromosome conformation capture assay revealed that the genome region with the most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (rs11190870) physically interacted with the promoter region of LBX1-FLJ41350. The promoter in the direction of LBX1, combined with a 590-bp region including rs11190870, had higher transcriptional activity with the risk allele than that with the non-risk allele in HEK 293T cells. The ubiquitous overexpression of human LBX1 or either of the zebrafish lbx genes (lbx1a, lbx1b, and lbx2), but not FLJ41350, in zebrafish embryos caused body curvature followed by death prior to vertebral column formation. Such body axis deformation was not observed in transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated knockout zebrafish of lbx1b or lbx2. Mosaic expression of lbx1b driven by the GATA2 minimal promoter and the lbx1b enhancer in zebrafish significantly alleviated the embryonic lethal phenotype to allow observation of the later onset of the spinal curvature with or without vertebral malformation. Deformation of the embryonic body axis by lbx1b overexpression was associated with defects in convergent extension, which is a component of the main axis-elongation machinery in gastrulating embryos. In embryos overexpressing lbx1b, wnt5b, a ligand of the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, was significantly downregulated. Injection of mRNA for wnt5b or RhoA, a key downstream effector of Wnt/PCP signaling, rescued the defective convergent extension phenotype and attenuated the lbx1b-induced curvature of the body axis. Thus, our study presents a novel pathological feature of LBX1 and its zebrafish homologs in body axis deformation at various stages of

  13. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Nitin Hemchandra; Khanna, Dinkar Parveen; Bhatt, Vaibhavi Hitesh; Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective tissue elements, mostly associated with some syndrome. This case report describes a case of nonsyndromic generalized IGF in an 18-year-old male patient who presented with generalized gingival enlargement. The enlarged tissue was surgically removed by internal bevel gingivectomy and ledge and wedge procedure. The patient was regularly monitored clinically for improvement in his periodontal condition as well as for any recurrence of gingival overgrowth. PMID:26941525

  14. Idiopathic Gingival Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ullal Anand; Khandelwal, Vishal; Ninave, Nupur

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis is a rare heriditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective tissue elements. This case report gives an overview of gingival fibromatosis in a 11-year-old female patient who presented with generalized gingival enlargement. Based on the history and clinical examination, the diagnosis was made and the enlarged tissue was surgically removed. The patient was being regularly monitored clinically for improvement in her periodontal condition as well as for any recurrence of gingival overgrowth. PMID:27616864

  15. Epilepsy: Novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Anovadiya, Ashish P.; Sanmukhani, Jayesh J.; Tripathi, C. B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite of established and effective therapy for epilepsy, 20–25% patients develop therapeutic failure; this encourages finding newer drugs. Novel approaches target receptors which remain unaffected by conventional therapy or inhibit epileptogenesis. AMPA receptor antagonists have shown faster and complete protection compared to diazepam. Protein kinase (PK) plays an important role in the development of epilepsy. PK inhibitors such as K252a, VID-82925, and Herbimycin A have been found effective in inhibition of spread of epileptiform activity and epileptogenesis. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein-coupled receptors classified into three groups. Group 1 mGluRs antagonist and Groups 2 and 3 mGluRs agonists inhibited pentylenetetrazole-induced kindled seizures. Combined use of these agents has also shown favorable results. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a central role in multiple mechanisms of epileptogenesis. mTOR causes transcription, induction of proapoptotic proteins, and autophagy inhibition. Rapamycin was effective in suppression of recurrent seizures as well as in tuberous sclerosis and acute brain injury model. 5% CO2 showed potent effects on cortical epileptiform activity and convulsions in animal epilepsy models and in humans with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. It is found to be rapidly acting, safe and cheap, thus it can be a good option in emergency for suppression of seizure. Neurosteroids are considered as fourth generation neuromessengers, they act as positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors. Clinical trial of ganaxolone, an allopregnanolone analogue, has shown a beneficial role in pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, most of these drugs are tested in early phases of development and the possible use and safety in epilepsy has to be proven in clinical trials. PMID:22629084

  16. Metabolic epilepsies: approaches to a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Stöckler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Plecko, Barbara

    2009-08-01

    Although inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are a relatively rare cause of epilepsy in children, their diagnosis is important with respect to treatment, prognosis and genetic counselling. In addition to seizures and epilepsy, IEM may produce a complex clinical picture in which epilepsy is only one of the various neurologic manifestations including developmental delay/regression, mental retardation, movement disorders, micro-/macrocephaly, as well as cerebral grey and white matter changes. Dysmorphic features and cerebral dysgenesis may also be part of a metabolic epilepsy syndrome (e.g. disorders of peroxisomal biogenesis, glutaric aciduria type 2, pyruvate dehydrogenease complex deficiency). Metabolic epilepsies may dominate the clinical presentation (e.g. pyridoxine dependent epilepsy) or may precede further neurologic deterioration (e.g. neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) and additional organ involvement (e.g. liver failure in Alpers (POLG1) disease). Metabolic epilepsies often present with myoclonic seizures (e.g. Gaucher Disease type 3, mitochondrial syndromes) and, as a rule, patients presenting with predominantly myoclonic seizures should be carefully investigated for these types of metabolic epilepsies. Patients with very early onset of epilepsy are considered at high risk for an underlying IEM as well. In this review we present an overview of metabolic epilepsies based on various criteria such as treatability, age of onset, seizure type, and pathogenetic background. Exemplary disorders will be described in more detail including cerebral glucose transporter (GLUT1) deficiency, pyridoxine dependent epilepsy, neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, cathepsin D deficiency, Alpers syndrome (POLG deficiency), and guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency.

  17. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal < 100 pM). Intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was reinitiated. Two months later, her hippocampal abnormalities had improved and 3 months later her VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  18. Prevalence of epilepsy in rural Kansas.

    PubMed

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Liu, Yi; Paschal, Angelia M; Hawley, Suzanne; Thurman, David; Hauser, W Allen

    2014-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of active epilepsy in two southeastern rural Kansas counties. Medical records were abstracted from the emergency rooms, out- and inpatient services and clinics of 9 hospitals, from 10 doctors' offices, and 1 nursing home in and surrounding the two counties. Letters were mailed from hospitals and doctors' offices to invite their potentially eligible patients to participate in an interview. Medical record information and the interview, when available, were used for the final determination of active epilepsy, seizure type, etiology, syndrome, age, and gender in consensus conferences. Prevalence of epilepsy was calculated, and capture-recapture methodology, which estimates prevalence based on what is known about the population, was employed to assess active epilepsy in the two counties. This study identified 404 individuals with active prevalent epilepsy who visited at least one of the 20 facilities during the observation period. The overall prevalence of active epilepsy was 7.2 per 1000. The seizure type for 71.3% of prevalent cases was unknown; among the 76 cases with known and classifiable seizure type, 55.3% had focal with secondary generalized seizures. Among the 222 cases with classifiable etiology, 53.1% were idiopathic/cryptogenic. About 75% (n=301) were captured at only one center, 72% (n=75) of the remaining 103 patients were captured at two centers, and 28 patients were identified at three or more centers. The capture-recapture assessment yielded an estimation of 982 prevalent patients. The overall estimated prevalence of epilepsy in the two Kansas counties using capture-recapture was 17 per 1000. The crude prevalence of epilepsy, using medical record survey methods, was similar to, but on the high end, of other total population prevalence studies in the United States. The capture-recapture assessment suggested that epilepsy prevalence might be considerably higher than the crude prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  19. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Laura O; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H; Kesmodel, Ulrik S; Bay, Bjørn; Matthiesen, Niels B; Henriksen, Tine B

    2016-09-01

    A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment was obtained from pregnancy questionnaires in early pregnancy. Children developing epilepsy were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Prescription Registry until 2013. Data were analysed using Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for potential confounders. A total of 60 440 pregnancies were included, and 0.8% of the children developed epilepsy.The primary analyses showed no association between parental infertility or fertility treatment, and the overall risk of childhood epilepsy (hazard rate ratios (HRs); 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.08 (0.73, 1.60) and 1.04 (0.71, 1.52)). In secondary analyses, both parental infertility and fertility treatment were associated with an increased risk of idiopathic generalised epilepsy (HRs and 95% CIs: 2.25 (1.10, 4.58) and 2.45 (1.26, 4.75)). No association was seen for focal epilepsy. Parental infertility or fertility treatment was not associated with an overall risk of childhood epilepsy. Parental infertility may be associated with an increased risk of idiopathic generalised epilepsy; a subtype of epilepsy believed to be of genetic origin. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Investigation of GRIN2A in common epilepsy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lal, Dennis; Steinbrücker, Sandra; Schubert, Julian; Sander, Thomas; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne; Lerche, Holger; Thiele, Holger; Krause, Roland; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Nürnberg, Peter; Palotie, Aarno; Neubauer, Bernd A; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Helbig, Ingo; Becker, Albert J; Schoch, Susanne; Hansen, Jörg; Dorn, Thomas; Hohl, Christin; Lüscher, Nicole; von Spiczak, Sarah; Lemke, Johannes R

    2015-09-01

    Recently, mutations and deletions in the GRIN2A gene have been identified to predispose to benign and severe idiopathic focal epilepsies (IFE), revealing a higher incidence of GRIN2A alterations among the more severe phenotypes. This study aimed to explore the phenotypic boundaries of GRIN2A mutations by investigating patients with the two most common epilepsy syndromes: (i) idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and (ii) temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Whole exome sequencing data of 238 patients with IGE as well as Sanger sequencing of 84 patients with TLE were evaluated for GRIN2A sequence alterations. Two additional independent cohorts comprising 1469 IGE and 330 TLE patients were screened for structural deletions (>40kb) involving GRIN2A. Apart from a presumably benign, non-segregating variant in a patient with juvenile absence epilepsy, neither mutations nor deletions were detected in either cohort. These findings suggest that mutations in GRIN2A preferentially are involved in genetic variance of pediatric IFE and do not contribute significantly to either adult focal epilepsies as TLE or generalized epilepsies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  2. Targeting BK (big potassium) Channels in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    N'Gouemo, Prosper

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Epilepsies are disorders of neuronal excitability characterized by spontaneous and recurrent seizures. Ion channels are critical for regulating neuronal excitability and, therefore, can contribute significantly to epilepsy pathophysiology. In particular, large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels play an important role in seizure etiology. These channels are activated by both membrane depolarization and increased intracellular Ca2+. This unique coupling of Ca2+ signaling to membrane depolarization is important in controlling neuronal hyperexcitability, as outward K+ current through BKCa channels hyperpolarizes neurons. Areas covered This review focuses on BKCa channel structure-function and discusses the role of these channels in epilepsy pathophysiology. Expert opinion Loss-of-function BKCa channels contribute neuronal hyperexcitability that can lead to temporal lobe epilepsy, tonic-clonic seizures and alcohol withdrawal seizures. Similarly, BKCa channel blockade can trigger seizures and status epilepticus. Paradoxically, some mutations in BKCa channel subunit can give rise to the channel gain-of-function that leads to development of idiopathic epilepsy (primarily absence epilepsy). Seizures themselves also enhance BKCa channel currents associated with neuronal hyperexcitability, and blocking BKCa channels suppresses generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Thus, both loss-of-function and gain-of-function BKCa channels might serve as molecular targets for drugs to suppress certain seizure phenotypes including temporal lobe seizures and absence seizures, respectively. PMID:21923633

  3. History of epilepsy: nosological concepts and classification.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight into the development of the nosological views of the epilepsies, from prehistoric times to the present, and highlight how these views are reflected by terminology and classification. Even the earliest written documents reveal awareness that there are multiple forms of epilepsy, and it is surprising that they should be included under the same disease concept, perhaps because the generalised tonic-clonic seizure served as a common denominator. The Hippocratic doctrine that the seat of epilepsy is in the brain may be rooted in earlier knowledge of traumatic seizures. Galenus differentiated cases where the brain was the primary site of origin from others where epilepsy was concomitant with illness in other parts of the body. This laid the fundament for the distinction between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies, the definition of which changed considerably over time. The description of the multiple seizure types as they are known at present started in the late 18th century. Attempts to classify seizure types began in the late 19th century, when Jackson formulated a comprehensive pathophysiological definition of epilepsy. Electroencephalography supported a second dichotomy, between seizures with localised onset and others with immediate involvement of both hemispheres which became known as "generalised". In recent years, advanced methods of studying brain function in vivo, including the generation of both spontaneous and reflex epileptic seizures, have revolutionised our understanding of focal and "generalised" human ictogenesis. Both involve complex neuronal networks which are currently being investigated.

  4. Idiopathic cardiomegaly*

    PubMed Central

    1968-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are certain heart diseases of unknown etiology and pathogenesis, occurring mostly in tropical and subtropical areas, where they constitute a major clinical problem and sometimes a public health problem. The need for international co-operation in the study of such forms of heart disease has long been recognized and WHO convened informal meetings of investigators on various aspects of the subject in 1964, 1965 and 1966. Out of these have arisen co-operative studies co-ordinated by WHO. In November 1967 a fourth informal meeting was held in Kingston, Jamaica, to review the following topics: the progress reports from all co-operating laboratories; the different types of cardiomyopathies; past experience with cardiac registries, and the diagnostic importance of coronary angiography. Steps were taken towards the formulation of a standard terminology, since too many confusing names are currently employed to mean “cardiomegaly of unknown origin”. A common name, “idiopathic cardiomegaly”, was therefore suggested for future use. The account presented here was prepared by Dr Z. Fejfar, Chief Medical Officer, Cardiovascular Diseases, World Health Organization, Geneva, on behalf of the other participants and is a précis of some of the information that was exchanged, some of the views that were expressed and of the suggestions that were made. PMID:4235740

  5. Recessive mutations in SLC13A5 result in a loss of citrate transport and cause neonatal epilepsy, developmental delay and teeth hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hardies, Katia; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Asselbergh, Bob; Geuens, Thomas; Deconinck, Tine; Azmi, Abdelkrim; May, Patrick; Brilstra, Eva; Becker, Felicitas; Barisic, Nina; Craiu, Dana; Braun, Kees P J; Lal, Dennis; Thiele, Holger; Schubert, Julian; Weber, Yvonne; van 't Slot, Ruben; Nürnberg, Peter; Balling, Rudi; Timmerman, Vincent; Lerche, Holger; Maudsley, Stuart; Helbig, Ingo; Suls, Arvid; Koeleman, Bobby P C; De Jonghe, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The epileptic encephalopathies are a clinically and aetiologically heterogeneous subgroup of epilepsy syndromes. Most epileptic encephalopathies have a genetic cause and patients are often found to carry a heterozygous de novo mutation in one of the genes associated with the disease entity. Occasionally recessive mutations are identified: a recent publication described a distinct neonatal epileptic encephalopathy (MIM 615905) caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC13A5 gene. Here, we report eight additional patients belonging to four different families with autosomal recessive mutations in SLC13A5. SLC13A5 encodes a high affinity sodium-dependent citrate transporter, which is expressed in the brain. Neurons are considered incapable of de novo synthesis of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates; therefore they rely on the uptake of intermediates, such as citrate, to maintain their energy status and neurotransmitter production. The effect of all seven identified mutations (two premature stops and five amino acid substitutions) was studied in vitro, using immunocytochemistry, selective western blot and mass spectrometry. We hereby demonstrate that cells expressing mutant sodium-dependent citrate transporter have a complete loss of citrate uptake due to various cellular loss-of-function mechanisms. In addition, we provide independent proof of the involvement of autosomal recessive SLC13A5 mutations in the development of neonatal epileptic encephalopathies, and highlight teeth hypoplasia as a possible indicator for SLC13A5 screening. All three patients who tried the ketogenic diet responded well to this treatment, and future studies will allow us to ascertain whether this is a recurrent feature in this severe disorder.

  6. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  7. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication. PMID:26664952

  8. Association of Family History of Epilepsy with Earlier Age Onset of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Mohammad Amin; Safaei, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is supposedly the most frequent subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of JME and comparison of patients' demographics as well as timeline of the disease between positive family history epileptic patients (PFHE) and negative family history epileptic patients (NFHE) among sample of Iranian epileptic patients. From Feb. 2006 to Oct. 2009, 1915 definite epileptic patients (873 females) referred to epilepsy clinics in Isfahan, central Iran, were surveyed and among them, 194 JME patients were diagnosed. JME was diagnosed by its specific clinical and EEG criteria. Patients were divided into two groups as PFHE and NFHE and data were compared between them. JME was responsible for 10% (194 patients) of all types of epilepsies. Of JME patients, 53% were female. In terms of family history of epilepsy, 40% were positive. No significant differences was found between PFHE and NFHE groups as for gender (P>0.05). Age of epilepsy onset was significantly earlier in PFHE patients (15 vs. 22 yr, P<0.001). Occurrence of JME before 18 yr old among PFHE patients was significantly higher (OR=2.356, P=0.007). A family history of epilepsy might be associated with an earlier age of onset in patients with JME.

  9. Association of Family History of Epilepsy with Earlier Age Onset of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    NAJAFI, Mohammad Reza; NAJAFI, Mohammad Amin; SAFAEI, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is supposedly the most frequent subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of JME and comparison of patients’ demographics as well as timeline of the disease between positive family history epileptic patients (PFHE) and negative family history epileptic patients (NFHE) among sample of Iranian epileptic patients. Materials & Methods From Feb. 2006 to Oct. 2009, 1915 definite epileptic patients (873 females) referred to epilepsy clinics in Isfahan, central Iran, were surveyed and among them, 194 JME patients were diagnosed. JME was diagnosed by its specific clinical and EEG criteria. Patients were divided into two groups as PFHE and NFHE and data were compared between them. Results JME was responsible for 10% (194 patients) of all types of epilepsies. Of JME patients, 53% were female. In terms of family history of epilepsy, 40% were positive. No significant differences was found between PFHE and NFHE groups as for gender (P>0.05). Age of epilepsy onset was significantly earlier in PFHE patients (15 vs. 22 yr, P<0.001). Occurrence of JME before 18 yr old among PFHE patients was significantly higher (OR=2.356, P=0.007). Conclusion A family history of epilepsy might be associated with an earlier age of onset in patients with JME. PMID:27247579

  10. Behavioral and Movement Disorders due to Long-Lasting Myoclonic Status Epilepticus Misdiagnosed as ADHD in a Patient With Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy: Electroclinical Findings and Related Hemodynamic Changes.

    PubMed

    Fanella, Martina; Carnì, Marco; Morano, Alessandra; Albini, Mariarita; Lapenta, Leonardo; Casciato, Sara; Fattouch, Jinane; Di Castro, Elisabetta; Colonnese, Claudio; Vaudano, Anna Elisabetta; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) likely share common underlying neural mechanisms, as often suggested by both the evidence of electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities in ADHD patients without epilepsy and the coexistence of these 2 conditions. The differential diagnosis between epilepsy and ADHD may consequently be challenging. In this report, we describe a patient presenting with a clinical association of "tics" and behavioral disorders that appeared 6 months before our first observation and had previously been interpreted as ADHD. A video-EEG evaluation documented an electroclinical pattern of myoclonic status epilepticus. On the basis of the revised clinical data, the EEG findings, the good response to valproate, the long-lasting myoclonic status epilepticus, and the enduring epileptic abnormalities likely causing behavioral disturbances, the patient's symptoms were interpreted as being the expression of untreated juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. The EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging study revealed, during clinical generalized spike-and-wave and polyspike-and-wave discharges, positive blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes bilaterally in the thalamus, the prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 6, supplementary motor area) and the cerebellum, and negative BOLD signal changes in the regions of the default mode network. Such findings, which are typical of BOLD changes observed in idiopathic generalized epilepsy, may also shed light on the anatomofunctional network underlying ADHD. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2015.

  11. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management.

    PubMed

    Welty, Timothy E

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a common epilepsy syndrome that begins most frequently in the early teenage years. It is officially classified as a type of idiopathic generalized epilepsy and is often under-recognized or misdiagnosed. This syndrome has a strong genetic component with multiple gene mutations being associated with the clinical presentation. Based upon genetic associations, there may be multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms for the disorder; the pathophysiology has not been clearly defined. A diagnosis of JME is made using the clinical history and EEG findings. Valproic acid is the primary antiepileptic drug (AED) used for JME, but some newer AEDs may be effective alternatives. Selection of an appropriate AED is essential to the proper management of JME, because of the possibility of exacerbation of seizures by some AEDs and the adverse effect profiles of effective drugs. It is important for clinicians to understand JME to correctly diagnose and manage patients with this syndrome.

  12. Epilepsy diagnostic and treatment needs identified with a collaborative database involving tertiary centers in France.

    PubMed

    Chipaux, Mathilde; Szurhaj, William; Vercueil, Laurent; Milh, Mathieu; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Cances, Claude; Auvin, Stéphane; Chassagnon, Serge; Napuri, Sylvia; Allaire, Catherine; Derambure, Philippe; Marchal, Cécile; Caubel, Isabelle; Ricard-Mousnier, Brigitte; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Pinard, Jean-Marc; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; de Baracé, Claire; Kahane, Philippe; Gautier, Agnès; Hamelin, Sophie; Coste-Zeitoun, Delphine; Rosenberg, Sarah-Dominique; Clerson, Pierre; Nabbout, Rima; Kuchenbuch, Mathieu; Picot, Marie-Christine; Kaminska, Anna

    2016-05-01

    To obtain perspective on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers in France, and describe etiology, epilepsy syndromes, and identify factors of drug resistance and comorbidities. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the characteristics of 5,794 pediatric and adult patients with epilepsy included in a collaborative database in France between 2007 and 2013. Comparisons between groups used Student's t-test or Fisher's exact test for binary or categorical variables. Factors associated with drug resistance and intellectual disability were evaluated in multi-adjusted logistic regression models. Mean age at inclusion was 17.9 years; children accounted for 67%. Epilepsy was unclassified in 20% of patients, and etiology was unknown in 65%, including those with idiopathic epilepsies. Etiologies differed significantly in adult- when compared to pediatric-onset epilepsy; however, among focal structural epilepsies, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis began as often in the pediatric as in adult age range. Drug resistance concerned 53% of 4,210 patients evaluable for seizure control and was highest in progressive myoclonic epilepsy (89%), metabolic diseases (84%), focal cortical dysplasia (70%), other cortical malformations (69%), and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (67%). Fifty-nine percent of patients with focal structural epilepsy and 69% with epileptic encephalopathies were drug resistant; however, 40-50% of patients with West syndrome and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep were seizure-free. Ages at onset in infancy and in young adults shared the highest risk of drug resistance. Epilepsy onset in infancy comprised the highest risk of intellectual disability, whereas specific cognitive impairment affected 36% of children with idiopathic focal epilepsy. Our study provides a snapshot on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers and discloses needs for diagnosis and treatment

  13. Epilepsy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Werhahn, Konrad J

    2009-02-01

    Epilepsy is the third most common disease affecting the brain in the elderly. Current demographic trends will lead to an increased prevalence of epilepsy in the general population. A selective literature search revealed 102 relevant publications as of September 2008, 50 of which were original articles. The level of evidence was found to be very low. No guidelines, systematic reviews or meta-analyses are available, and there have been only three randomized, double-blind trials of treatment for epilepsy in the elderly. The seizures often escape clinical attention, because premonitory symptoms (aura) and secondary generalization into tonic-clonic seizures are both rarer in older patients. On the other hand, sudden loss of consciousness from various causes becomes more common with increasing age, presenting a challenge in differential diagnosis. Treatment is often more complex because of comorbidities and multiple other drugs, and requires a cautious approach. Drug interactions, in particular, require special attention. On the positive side, epileptic seizures in the elderly seem to be more easily controlled by medications than they are in young adults. Epilepsy is often more difficult to recognize in old age. The treatment is hampered by side effects and drug interactions. Thus, certainty about the diagnosis is indispensable, and the treatment often requires the use of newer-generation antiepileptic drugs.

  14. Ictal consciousness in epilepsy and nonepileptic attack disorder.

    PubMed

    Ali, Fizzah; Rickards, Hugh; Bagary, Manny; Greenhill, Lyn; McCorry, Doug; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

    2010-11-01

    Exploration of subjective experiences during seizures may enhance knowledge of the differing natures of epilepsy and nonepileptic attack disorder (NEAD). We performed a quantitative evaluation of both the general level of awareness and the specific contents of consciousness during seizures using the Ictal Consciousness Inventory (ICI). Ninety-five adult outpatients attending general neuropsychiatry and epilepsy clinics with established diagnoses of either epilepsy (n = 66) or NEAD (n = 29) completed one ICI for each witnessed seizure recalled. Patients with a dubious/dual diagnosis were excluded. ICI Level (ICI-L) and ICI Content (ICI-L) scores were calculated for the 167 questionnaires generated by patients with epilepsy (n = 119, of which 58 from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 14 frontal lobe epilepsy, and 47 idiopathic 30 generalized epilepsy) and patients with NEAD (n = 48). Mann-Whitney U tests revealed statistically significant higher ICI-L and ICI-C scores for patients with NEAD (both P = 0.01). Subjective reports of consciousness experiences varied between epilepsy and NEAD, with patients with NEAD reporting significantly greater levels of general awareness/responsiveness and more vivid subjective experiences during attacks. The ICI is proposed as a potentially useful self-report instrument to supplement clinical and instrumental tests for the differential diagnosis of epilepsy and NEAD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Possible relationship between phenylthiocarbamide taste sensitivity and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pal, S K; Sharma, K; Pathak, A; Sawhney, I M S; Prabhakar, S

    2004-06-01

    The study was based on the data of a sample of 400 epileptic patients (200 idiopathic and 200 symptomatic) and 100 normal healthy individuals serving as controls. The PTC threshold distribution was bimodal. The number of non-tasters among idiopathic epileptics (35.5%) and symptomatic epileptics (32.5%) was significantly higher than controls (20%). The relative incidence of non-tasters in idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies was 2.20 and 1.93 respectively. There is evidence that non-tasters tend to ingest a greater quantity of bitter tasting goitrogenic substances present naturally in edible plants which in turn exert greater thyroid stress in non-tasters or less sensitive tasters. Such a stress during intrauterine or early childhood growth and development might have affected neurological maturation which in turn made them more susceptible to epilepsy than tasters, who faced lesser stress.

  16. Targeting Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... WebEase (Epilepsy Awareness, Support, and Education), a free online program that has been shown to improve self-management behaviors. Other programs include Project UPLIFT (Using Practice and Learning to Increase Favorable Thoughts) and PEARLS (Program to Encourage Active, ...

  17. Paraneoplastic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Anna; Lukas, Rimas V; VanHaerents, Stephen; Warnke, Peter; Tao, James X; Rose, Sandra; Wu, Shasha

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy can be a manifestation of paraneoplastic syndromes which are the consequence of an immune reaction to neuronal elements driven by an underlying malignancy affecting other organs and tissues. The antibodies commonly found in paraneoplastic encephalitis can be divided into two main groups depending on the target antigen: 1) antibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens, such as against neurotransmitter (N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)) receptors, ion channels (voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)), and channel-complex proteins (leucine rich, glioma inactivated-1 glycoprotein (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein-2 (CASPR2)) and 2) antibodies against intracellular neuronal antigens (Hu/antineuronal nuclear antibody-1 (ANNA-1), Ma2/Ta, glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), less frequently to CV2/collapsin response mediator protein 5 (CRMP5)). In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of the current literature on paraneoplastic epilepsy indexed by the associated onconeuronal antibodies. While a range of seizure types can be seen with paraneoplastic syndromes, temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common because of the association with limbic encephalitis. Early treatment of the paraneoplastic syndrome with immune modulation/suppression may prevent the more serious potential consequences of paraneoplastic epilepsy.

  18. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Krupa H; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Patil, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential.

  19. Familial periventricular nodular heterotopia, epilepsy and Melnick-Needles Syndrome caused by a single FLNA mutation with combined gain-of-function and loss-of-function effects.

    PubMed

    Parrini, Elena; Mei, Davide; Pisanti, Maria Antonietta; Catarzi, Serena; Pucatti, Daniela; Bianchini, Claudia; Mascalchi, Mario; Bertini, Enrico; Morrone, Amelia; Cavaliere, Maria Luigia; Guerrini, Renzo

    2015-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the FLNA gene cause a neuronal migration disorder defined as X-linked periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH); gain-of-function mutations are associated with a group of X-linked skeletal dysplasias designed as otopalatodigital (OPD) spectrum. We describe a family in which a woman and her three daughters exhibited a complex phenotype combining PNH, epilepsy and Melnick-Needles syndrome (MNS), a skeletal disorder assigned to the OPD spectrum. All four individuals harboured a novel non-conservative missense mutation in FLNA exon 3. In all affected family members, we performed mutation analysis of the FLNA gene, RT-PCR, ultradeep sequencing analysis in FLNA cDNAs and western blot in lymphocyte cells to further characterise the mutation. We also assessed the effects on RT-PCR products of treatment of patients' lymphocytes with cycloheximide, a nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) inhibitor. We identified a novel c.622G>C change in FLNA exon 3, leading to the substitution of a highly conserved aminoacid (p.Gly208Arg). Gel electrophoresis and ultradeep sequencing revealed the missense mutation as well as retention of intron 3. Cycloheximide treatment demonstrated that the aberrant mRNA transcript-retaining intron 3 is subjected to NMD. Western blot analysis confirmed reduced FLNA levels in lymphocyte cells. The novel c.622G>C substitution leads to two aberrant FLNA transcripts, one of which carries the missense mutation, plus a longer transcript resulting from intron 3 retention. We propose that the exceptional co-occurrence of PNH and MNS, two otherwise mutually exclusive allelic phenotypes, is the consequence of a single mutational event resulting in co-occurring gain-of-function and loss-of-function effects. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Progressive myoclonic epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Michelucci, Roberto; Canafoglia, Laura; Striano, Pasquale; Gambardella, Antonio; Magaudda, Adriana; Tinuper, Paolo; La Neve, Angela; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Visani, Elisa; Panzica, Ferruccio; Avanzini, Giuliano; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Bianchi, Amedeo; Zara, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To define the clinical spectrum and etiology of progressive myoclonic epilepsies (PMEs) in Italy using a database developed by the Genetics Commission of the Italian League against Epilepsy. Methods: We collected clinical and laboratory data from patients referred to 25 Italian epilepsy centers regardless of whether a positive causative factor was identified. PMEs of undetermined origins were grouped using 2-step cluster analysis. Results: We collected clinical data from 204 patients, including 77 with a diagnosis of Unverricht-Lundborg disease and 37 with a diagnosis of Lafora body disease; 31 patients had PMEs due to rarer genetic causes, mainly neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Two more patients had celiac disease. Despite extensive investigation, we found no definitive etiology for 57 patients. Cluster analysis indicated that these patients could be grouped into 2 clusters defined by age at disease onset, age at myoclonus onset, previous psychomotor delay, seizure characteristics, photosensitivity, associated signs other than those included in the cardinal definition of PME, and pathologic MRI findings. Conclusions: Information concerning the distribution of different genetic causes of PMEs may provide a framework for an updated diagnostic workup. Phenotypes of the patients with PME of undetermined cause varied widely. The presence of separate clusters suggests that novel forms of PME are yet to be clinically and genetically characterized. PMID:24384641

  1. Cacna1g is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by mutation of voltage-gated sodium channel Scn2a.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Jeffrey D; Hawkins, Nicole A; Zachwieja, Nicole J; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-06-01

    More than 1,200 mutations in neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) genes have been identified in patients with several epilepsy syndromes. A common feature of genetic epilepsies is variable expressivity among individuals with the same mutation. The Scn2a(Q54) transgenic mouse model has a mutation in Scn2a that results in spontaneous epilepsy. Scn2a(Q54) phenotype severity varies depending on the genetic strain background, making it a useful model for identifying and characterizing epilepsy modifier genes. Scn2a(Q54) mice on the [C57BL/6JxSJL/J]F1 background exhibit earlier seizure onset, elevated spontaneous seizure frequency, and decreased survival compared to Scn2a(Q54) mice congenic on the C57BL/6J strain. Genetic mapping and RNA-Seq analysis identified Cacna1g as a candidate modifier gene at the Moe1 locus, which influences Scn2a(Q54) phenotype severity. In this study, we evaluated the modifier potential of Cacna1g, encoding the Cav3.1 voltage-gated calcium channel, by testing whether transgenic alteration of Cacna1g expression modifies severity of the Scn2a(Q54) seizure phenotype. Scn2a(Q54) mice exhibited increased spontaneous seizure frequency with elevated Cacna1g expression and decreased seizure frequency with decreased Cacna1g expression. These results provide support for Cacna1g as an epilepsy modifier gene and suggest that modulation of Cav3.1 may be an effective therapeutic strategy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. American Epilepsy Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epilepsy Society CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA SUDEP SURGERY DEVICES GENETICS TREATMENTS Drug Alerts and ... RESOURCES Navigation CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA SUDEP SURGERY DEVICES GENETICS TREATMENTS Drug Alerts and ...

  3. Epilepsy - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000127.htm Epilepsy in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has epilepsy . People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  4. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000128.htm Epilepsy or seizures - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have epilepsy . People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  5. Epilepsy Genetics—Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Annapurna; Lowenstein, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Human epilepsy is a common and heterogeneous condition in which genetics play an important etiological role. We begin by reviewing the past history of epilepsy genetics, a field that has traditionally included studies of pedigrees with epilepsy caused by defects in ion channels and neurotransmitters. We highlight important recent discoveries that have expanded the field beyond the realm of channels and neurotransmitters and that have challenged the notion that single genes produce single disorders. Finally, we project toward an exciting future for epilepsy genetics as large-scale collaborative phenotyping studies come face to face with new technologies in genomic medicine. PMID:21277190

  6. Managing epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Elizabeth Anne

    2004-09-01

    Epilepsy is very common in tuberous sclerosis complex and occurs in 80 to 90% of affected individuals during their lifetime. Onset usually occurs during childhood, and up to one third of children with tuberous sclerosis complex will develop infantile spasms. Although not completely understood, the incidence of epilepsy is thought to relate to the neuropathologic features of the disorder, including cortical tubers and other dysgenetic features. Individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have epileptiform features to their electroencephalograms. Treatment of epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex is similar to epilepsy resulting from other causes and includes anticonvulsant medications, the vagus nerve stimulator, and the ketogenic diet. Vigabatrin has been shown to be particularly effective in treating infantile spasms in the setting of tuberous sclerosis complex. Epilepsy surgery has a very important role in the management of children and adults with pharmacoresistant epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex.

  7. Shared mechanisms of epilepsy, migraine and affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Zarcone, Davide; Corbetta, Simona

    2017-05-01

    Since the nineteenth century several clinical features have been observed in common between migraine and epilepsy (such as episodic attacks, triggering factors, presence of aura, frequent familiarity), but only in recent years researchers have really engaged in finding a common pathogenic mechanism. From studies of disease incidence, we understand how either migraine among patients with epilepsy or epilepsy among migraine patients are more frequent than in the general population. This association may result from a direct causality, by the same environmental risk factors and/or by a common genetic susceptibility. Ischemic events are the most frequent direct causes, especially among women and elderly people: migraine can lead to silent or clinically considerable strokes, and these ones could explain the increased risk of developing epilepsy in people with a history of migraine. Head injuries can lead headache, often with migraine characteristics, and seizures. But there are also many idiopathic cases. The comorbidity migraine-epilepsy might be explained in these cases by a neuronal hyperexcitability, which increases the risk of both diseases: a higher concentration of extracellular glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter, leads in fact as a result a Cortical Spreading Depression (the pathophysiological mechanism at the base of aura) and convulsions; antiepileptic drugs such as topiramate are, therefore, used also in migraine prophylaxis. A genetic link between these two diseases is particularly evident in familial hemiplegic migraine: mutations of ATP1A2, SCN1A and CACNA1A genes, identified in this disease, have also been involved in different types of epilepsy and febrile seizures. The channelopathies, especially engaging sodium and potassium ions, can be the common pathogenic mechanism of migraine and epilepsy. Both migraine and epilepsy also have, compared to the general population, a higher prevalence and incidence of affective disorders such as anxiety

  8. A Population-Based Study of Long-term Outcomes of Cryptogenic Focal Epilepsy in Childhood: Cryptogenic Epilepsy is NOT Probably Symptomatic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wirrell, Elaine C; Grossardt, Brandon R; So, Elson L; Nickels, Katherine C

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare long-term outcome in a population-based group of children with cryptogenic vs symptomatic focal epilepsy diagnosed from 1980–2004 and to define the course of epilepsy in the cryptogenic group. Methods We identified all children residing in Olmsted County, MN, 1 month through 17 years with newly diagnosed, non-idiopathic focal epilepsy from 1980–2004. Children with idiopathic partial epilepsy syndromes were excluded. Medical records were reviewed to determine etiology, results of imaging and EEG studies, treatments used, and long-term outcome. Children were defined as having symptomatic epilepsy if they had a known genetic or structural/metabolic etiology, and as cryptogenic if they did not. Key Findings Of 359 children with newly-diagnosed epilepsy, 215 (60%) had non-idiopathic focal epilepsy. Of these, 206 (96%) were followed for more than 12 months. Ninety five children (46%) were classified as symptomatic. Median follow-up from diagnosis was similar in both groups, being 157 months (25%ile, 75%ile 89, 233) in the cryptogenic group vs 134 months (25%ile, 75%ile 78, 220) in the symptomatic group (p=0.26). Of 111 cryptogenic cases, 66% had normal cognition. Long-term outcome was significantly better in those with cryptogenic vs symptomatic etiology (intractable epilepsy at last follow-up, 7% vs 40%, p<0.001; seizure-freedom at last follow-up, 81% vs 55%, p<0.001). Of those who achieved seizure-freedom at final follow-up, 68% of the cryptogenic group versus only 46% of the symptomatic group were off antiepileptic medications (p=0.01). One third of the cryptogenic group had a remarkably benign disorder, with no seizures seen after initiation of medication, or in those who were untreated, after the second afebrile seizure. A further 5% had seizures within the first year but remained seizure-free thereafter. With the exception of perinatal complications, which predicted against seizure remission, no other factors were found to significantly

  9. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, N

    1995-08-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a relatively common, though under diagnosed, form of epilepsy that commences in adolescence. The distinguishing symptoms, diagnosis and medical management are discussed.

  10. Epilepsy and Persian culture: an overview.

    PubMed

    Vanzan, A; Paladin, F

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews the manner in which Persian culture viewed the problem of epilepsy. Beginning with the Avesta, the earliest Persian text on health and sickness, the medical literature on treatments of epilepsy common in Iran are reviewed. The article also explores popular Persian concepts that try to explain the causes of the morbus sacer.

  11. Genetic Causal Attribution of Epilepsy and its Implications for Felt Stigma

    PubMed Central

    Sabatello, Maya; Phelan, Jo C.; Hesdorffer, Dale C.; Shostak, Sara; Goldsmith, Jeff; Sorge, Shawn T.; Winawer, Melodie R.; Chung, Wendy K.; Ottman, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Research in other disorders suggests that genetic causal attribution of epilepsy might be associated with increased stigma. We investigated this hypothesis in a unique sample of families containing multiple individuals with epilepsy. Methods 181 people with epilepsy and 178 biological relatives without epilepsy completed a self-administered survey. In people with epilepsy, felt stigma was assessed through the Epilepsy Stigma Scale (ESS), scored 1 to 7 with higher scores indicating more stigma and >4 indicating some felt stigma. Felt stigma related to having epilepsy in the family was assessed through the Family Epilepsy Stigma Scale (FESS), created by replacing “epilepsy” with “epilepsy in my family” in each ESS item. Genetic attribution was assessed through participants’ perceptions of the (1) role of genetics in causing epilepsy in the family, (2) chance they had an epilepsy-related mutation, and (3) (in people with epilepsy) influence of genetics in causing their epilepsy. Results Among people with epilepsy, 22% met criteria for felt stigma (ESS score >4). Scores were increased among individuals who were aged ≥60 years, were unemployed, reported epilepsy-related discrimination, or had seizures within the last year or >100 seizures in their lifetime. Adjusting for other variables, ESS scores in people with epilepsy were significantly higher among those who perceived genetics played a “medium” or “big” role in causing epilepsy in the family than in others (3.4 vs. 2.7, p=0.025). Only 4% of relatives without epilepsy had felt stigma. Scores in relatives were unrelated to genetic attribution. Significance In these unusual families, predictors of felt stigma in individuals with epilepsy are similar to those in other studies, and stigma levels are low in relatives without epilepsy. Felt stigma may be increased in people with epilepsy who believe epilepsy in the family has a genetic cause, emphasizing the need for sensitive

  12. EPILEPSY BIOMARKERS

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jerome; Pitkänen, Asla; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Dudek, F. Edward; Bertram, Edward H.; Cole, Andrew J.; Moshé, Solomon L.; Wiebe, Samuel; Fureman, Brandy E.; Jensen, Frances E.; Mody, Istvan; Nehlig, Astrid; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2013-01-01

    Summary A biomarker is defined as an objectively measured characteristic of a normal or pathological biological process. Identification and proper validation of biomarkers of epileptogenesis, the development of epilepsy, and ictogenesis, the propensity to generate spontaneous seizures, might predict the development of an epilepsy condition; identify the presence and severity of tissue capable of generating spontaneous seizures; measure progression after the condition is established; and determine pharmacoresistance. Such biomarkers could be used to create animal models for more cost-effective screening of potential antiepileptogenic and antiseizure drugs and devices, and to reduce the cost of clinical trials by enriching the trial population, and acting as surrogate markers to shorten trial duration. The objectives of the biomarker subgroup for the London Workshop were to define approaches for identifying possible biomarkers for these purposes. Research to identify reliable biomarkers may also reveal underlying mechanisms that could serve as therapeutic targets for the development of new antiepileptogenic and antiseizure compounds. PMID:23909854

  13. Burden of epilepsy in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Ayala, Alejandro; Nariño, Daniel; Rosselli, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy lays an important burden on healthcare systems and society in general. Disability adjusted life years (DALYs) have been developed to compare the burden of this disease both between conditions and between geographical boundaries. With improving data on disease incidence and prevalence in Colombia, we can refine our DALYs-based estimates. Using different strategies, including the official healthcare provision database and death certificates, as well as extrapolation from published neuroepidemiologic studies, we estimated the incidence and prevalence by age groups, disease duration and attributable mortality. With this information we calculated DALYs for the year 2012. Overall, it was found that epilepsy was responsible for 0.88% of all deaths in Colombia. A total of 5.25 DALYs per 1,000 person-years are lost due to epilepsy in Colombia, 75% of which (3.91 DALYs) are due to premature mortality, with a higher burden in men (6.12 DALYs) than in women (4.41 DALYs). We reported new estimations on epilepsy incidence and prevalence by age groups in Colombia and conclude that DALYs lost due to epilepsy in Colombia are almost double the previous figure, mostly because of the underestimation of attributable mortality. With this figure, epilepsy ranks 12th instead of 19th in the list of the most important causes of DALYs lost. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. [Modern aspects of epilepsy treatment].

    PubMed

    Alajbegović, Azra; Kantardzić, Dzelaludin; Suljić, Enra; Alajbegović, Salem

    2003-01-01

    It is a general rule today, after a relevant diagnostics of an epilepsy, to start a monotherapy treatment, depending on a kind of a seizure, a life age and a general health condition. First line of monotherapy epilepsy drugs remain carbamazapine and sodium valproat. New drugs that are being introduced are: felbamat, gabapentin, lamotrigin, oxcarbazepin, tiagabin, topiramat, vigabatin and zanisamid. These are commonly used as add-on therapy, or as an addition for previously used antiepileptic. Their indicated areas are complex resistant partial seizures with or without generalization. Attention should be paid on proper dosage, interactions and toxicity. Regardless on the new epileptic era, according to reports of International League against epilepsy, most of the patients do not receive the drug that is the most appropriate for them concerning the price (cost-benefit). Neurosurgical methods in epilepsy treatment are: selective amygdalo-hyppocampotomy, temporal lobotomy, subpial resection, hemispherectomy, corpus callosotomy, removal of lesions like tumors or cysts provide encouraging results in reduction of epileptic seizures that can be followed by reduction of drug therapy. N. vagus stimulation is being wider introduced in resident epileptics. Treatment of epilepsy in women requires an approach to sexuality, conception, pregnancy, introduction of medicaments, antiepileptic terratogenity, contraception, motherhood and menopause. A special significance of modern approach to epilepsy is in treatment of elderly who have cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disease as a cause of seizures. A complex treatment of epilepsy using pharmacological and neurosurgical approach requires supportive psychotherapy, socio-therapy, the work with a family, education about epilepsy and living a life with more quality having one.

  15. Cacna1g is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by mutation of voltage-gated sodium channel Scn2a

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Jeffrey D.; Hawkins, Nicole A.; Zachwieja, Nicole J.; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary More than 1200 mutations in neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel genes have been identified in patients with several epilepsy syndromes. A common feature of genetic epilepsies is variable expressivity among individuals with the same mutation. The Scn2aQ54 transgenic mouse model has a mutation in Scn2a that results in spontaneous epilepsy. Scn2aQ54 phenotype severity varies depending on the genetic strain background, making it a useful model for identifying and characterizing epilepsy modifier genes. Scn2aQ54 mice on the [C57BL/6JxSJL/J]F1 background exhibit earlier seizure onset, elevated spontaneous seizure frequency, and decreased survival compared to Scn2aQ54 mice congenic on the C57BL/6J strain. Genetic mapping and RNA-Seq analysis identified Cacna1g as a candidate modifier gene at the Moe1 locus, which influences Scn2aQ54 phenotype severity. In this study, we evaluated the modifier potential of Cacna1g, encoding the Cav3.1 voltage-gated calcium channel, by testing whether transgenic alteration of Cacna1g expression modifies severity of the Scn2aQ54 seizure phenotype. Scn2aQ54 mice exhibited increased spontaneous seizure frequency with elevated Cacna1g expression and decreased seizure frequency with decreased Cacna1g expression. These results provide support for Cacna1g as an epilepsy modifier gene and suggest that modulation of Cav3.1 may be an effective therapeutic strategy. PMID:27112236

  16. [Clinical guidelines for epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-05-01

    Many international guidelines for epilepsy from the countries in Europe, USA and Asia have been published since the introduction of evidence-based medicine. In Japan, the clinical guidelines for epilepsy management were published by the Japanese Society of Neurology (JSN) in 2002 and 2010. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 primarily targets general practitioners treating epilepsy patients. The Japan Epilepsy Society has been publishing 16 guidelines for several topics since 2005. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 recommends that carbamazepine can be regarded for new onset partial epilepsy and sodium valproate is for new onset generalized epilepsy as anti-epileptic drug (AED) monotherapy. The new AEDs received approval by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, mainly in the add-on treatment of adults with partial epilepsy. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 will contribute to improvement in the management of epilepsy in Japan.

  17. Evaluating the initial impact of the Riyadh Epilepsy Awareness Campaign.

    PubMed

    Alaqeel, Ahmed; Kamalmaz, Hisham; Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; AlZahrani, Ibrahim; Alaqeel, Alaa; Aljetaily, Samiha; Aldrees, Amjad; Alsolaihim, Alanood; Badghesh, Rana; Al Hamzah, Al-Bandari; AlGethami, Hanan; Al-Khalaf, AlBatool; Alqunaieer, Feras; AbouAl-Shaar, Iyad; AlMufleh, Aws; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman J

    2015-11-01

    We determine the impact of an educational awareness campaign on the level of knowledge and the attitude of the Saudi population in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in an attempt to improve the awareness and reduce the social stigma associated with epilepsy. The Saudi Epilepsy Society organized a citywide awareness campaign in 2013. A survey consisting of 11 questions pertaining to epilepsy awareness was distributed to Saudi citizens living in Riyadh, aged 15 years and above, in malls, health clubs, mosques, universities, and schools during that campaign. The same questionnaire was administered before and after the awareness campaign to the same individuals on the same day to assess the impact of the campaign (n=2118). The epilepsy awareness campaign significantly raised the general knowledge about epilepsy: 1519 before vs. 1944 after (P<0.001) would allow their children to interact with an individual who had epilepsy; 1567 before vs. 688 after (P<0.001) would not want their children to marry an individual with epilepsy. Eight hundred twenty six before vs. 47 after (P<0.001) thought that epilepsy is untreatable. Regarding the causes of epilepsy, 1663 before vs. 896 after (P<0.001) believed that epilepsy is caused by supernatural powers, and 1224 before vs. 1874 after (P<0.001) chose brain disease as a cause of epilepsy. These findings suggest that epilepsy awareness campaigns can close knowledge gaps. A long-term reevaluation may be needed to assess awareness sustainability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding Death in Children With Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Donner, Elizabeth J; Camfield, Peter; Brooks, Linda; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Camfield, Carol; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Wirrell, Elaine

    2017-01-31

    Death in children with epilepsy is profoundly disturbing, with lasting effects on the family, community, and health care providers. The overall risk of death for children with epilepsy is about ten times that of the general population. However, the risk of premature death for children without associated neurological comorbidities is similar to that of the general population, and most deaths are related to the cause of the epilepsy or associated neurologic disability, not seizures. The most common cause of seizure-related death in children with epilepsy is sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). SUDEP is relatively uncommon in childhood, but the risk increases if epilepsy persists into adulthood. Although the direct cause of SUDEP remains unknown, most often death follows a generalized convulsive seizure and the risk of SUDEP is strongly related to drug-resistant epilepsy and frequent generalized tonic-clonic seizures. The most effective SUDEP prevention strategy is to reduce the frequency of seizures, although a number of seizure detection devices are under development and in the future may prove to be useful for seizure detection for those at particularly high risk. There are distinct benefits for health care professionals to discuss mortality with the family soon after the diagnosis of epilepsy. An individual approach is appropriate. When a child with epilepsy dies, particularly if the death was unexpected, family grief may be profound. Physicians and other health care professionals have a critical role in supporting families that lose a child to epilepsy. This review will provide health care providers with information needed to discuss the risk of death in children with epilepsy and support families following a loss.

  19. Idiopathic isolated orbicularis weakness

    PubMed Central

    MacVie, O P; Majid, M A; Husssin, H M; Ung, T; Manners, R M; Ormerod, I; Pawade, J; Harrad, R A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Orbicularis weakness is commonly associated with seventh nerve palsy or neuromuscular and myopathic conditions such as myotonic dystrophy and myasethenia gravis. We report four cases of idiopathic isolated orbicularis weakness. Methods All four cases were female and the presenting symptoms of ocular irritation and epiphora had been present for over 7 years in three patients. All patients had lagophthalmos and three had ectropion. Three patients underwent full investigations which excluded known causes of orbicularis weakness. Two patients underwent oribularis oculi muscle biopsy and histological confirmation of orbicularis atrophy. Results All patients underwent surgery to specifically address the orbicularis weakness with satisfactory outcomes and alleviation of symptoms in all cases. Isolated orbicularis weakness may be a relatively common entity that is frequently overlooked. Conclusion Early recognition of this condition may lead to better management and prevent patients undergoing unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:22322997

  20. How do we define the term idiopathic?

    PubMed

    Tirlapur, Seema A; Priest, Lee; Daniels, Jane P; Khan, Khalid S

    2013-12-01

    The term idiopathic is often used to describe a disease with no identifiable cause. It may be a diagnosis of exclusion; however, what specific minimum investigations need to be performed to define idiopathic is not always clear. This commentary describes the problems inherent in reaching a definition for the term idiopathic. There is limited literature describing methodology to define a condition with no clear diagnostic criteria. This article offers chronic pelvic pain (CPP) syndrome as an example, in which structured qualitative interviews, literature searches and group consensus discussions were undertaken to produce a working definition for idiopathic CPP. It is important to correctly develop these standardized definitions for use as outcome measures in research and as clinical indicators in healthcare.

  1. A pediatric case of idiopathic Harlequin syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Moon Souk; Kim, Seung Yeon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Soo Jin; You, Chur Woo; Kim, Jon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome, which is a rare disorder caused by dysfunction of the autonomic system, manifests as asymmetric facial flushing and sweating in response to heat, exercise, or emotional factors. The syndrome may be primary (idiopathic) with a benign course, or can occur secondary to structural abnormalities or iatrogenic factors. The precise mechanism underlying idiopathic harlequin syndrome remains unclear. Here, we describe a case of a 6-year-old boy who reported left hemifacial flushing and sweating after exercise. He had an unremarkable birth history and no significant medical history. Complete ophthalmological and neurological examinations were performed, and no other abnormalities were identified. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to exclude lesions of the cerebrum and cervicothoracic spinal cord, and no abnormalities were noted. His final diagnosis was classic idiopathic harlequin syndrome. Herein, we report the first pediatric case of idiopathic harlequin syndrome in Korea. PMID:28018464

  2. Cognitive impairment in epilepsy: the role of network abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Gregory L

    2015-06-01

    The challenges to individuals with epilepsy extend far beyond the seizures. Co-morbidities in epilepsy are very common and are often more problematic to individuals than the seizures themselves. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms of cognitive impairment are discussed. While aetiology of the epilepsy has a significant influence on cognition, there is increasing evidence that prolonged or recurrent seizures can cause or exacerbate cognitive impairment. Alterations in signalling pathways and neuronal network function play a major role in both the pathophysiology of epilepsy and the epilepsy comorbidities. However, the biological underpinnings of cognitive impairment can be distinct from the pathophysiological processes that cause seizures.

  3. The electroclinical-semiology of generalized tonic-clonic seizures among different epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Pan, S P; Wang, F; Zhang, Y; Wang, J

    2015-11-01

    The study reported here discusses the duration of the generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) among frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). The study was done by analyzing the data from patients who had undergone video-EEG in 2009 and had GTCS during the monitoring. The patients were selected for the frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Once they met the criteria, the durations of all the phases were measured, then discussed if there were any difference in duration for different epilepsies. On comparison of the total duration of various types of seizures it was found that the duration of FLE (177 ± 212.6 sec.) was significantly different from the duration of MTLE (104.6 ± 51.8 sec.) and IGE (63.9 ± 28.2 sec.). It can be found in the comparison of GTCS that the duration of phase 6,7 of FLE (63.5 ± 30.9 sec.) was statistically significant compared with MTLE (37.3 ± 13.8 sec.) and IGE (46.4 ± 30.1 sec.). The duration of various types of epilepsy in the generalized tonic-clonic period was not statistically significant. Through this study, we found the differences of the duration of different types of epilepsies that provide the clinical basis for further studies of seizure mechanism and neural network conduction.

  4. Importance of genetic factors in the occurrence of epilepsy syndrome type: A twin study

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Linda A.; Pellock, John M.; Kjeldsen, Marianne J.; Nakken, Karl Otto

    2011-01-01

    Summary Although there is strong evidence that genetic factors contribute to risk for epilepsy, their role in the determination of syndrome type is less clear. This study was undertaken to address this question. Information related to epilepsy was obtained from twins included in 455 monozygotic and 868 dizygotic pairs ascertained from population-based twin registries in Denmark, Norway and the United States. Syndrome type was determined based on medical record information and detailed clinical interviews and classified using the International Classification Systems for the Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndromes. Concordance rates were significantly increased in monozygotic versus dizygotic pairs for all major syndrome groups except localization-related cryptogenic epilepsy. Among generalized epilepsies, genetic factors were found to play an important role in the determination of childhood absence, juvenile absence, juvenile myoclonic, and idiopathic generalized epilepsy; and to a lesser degree for epilepsies with grand mal seizures on awakening. Among localization-related epilepsies, genetic factors contributed to risk for localization-related idiopathic and symptomatic syndromes overall, but did not appear to play an important role in determining risk for frontal, occipital or temporal lobe epilepsy. These results suggest that, while genetic factors contribute to risk for major syndrome types, determined when possible, their contribution to risk for localization-related syndrome sub-types, as defined by specific focality, may be modest. PMID:21885256

  5. [Idiopathic facial paralysis in children].

    PubMed

    Achour, I; Chakroun, A; Ayedi, S; Ben Rhaiem, Z; Mnejja, M; Charfeddine, I; Hammami, B; Ghorbel, A

    2015-05-01

    Idiopathic facial palsy is the most common cause of facial nerve palsy in children. Controversy exists regarding treatment options. The objectives of this study were to review the epidemiological and clinical characteristics as well as the outcome of idiopathic facial palsy in children to suggest appropriate treatment. A retrospective study was conducted on children with a diagnosis of idiopathic facial palsy from 2007 to 2012. A total of 37 cases (13 males, 24 females) with a mean age of 13.9 years were included in this analysis. The mean duration between onset of Bell's palsy and consultation was 3 days. Of these patients, 78.3% had moderately severe (grade IV) or severe paralysis (grade V on the House and Brackmann grading). Twenty-seven patients were treated in an outpatient context, three patients were hospitalized, and seven patients were treated as outpatients and subsequently hospitalized. All patients received corticosteroids. Eight of them also received antiviral treatment. The complete recovery rate was 94.6% (35/37). The duration of complete recovery was 7.4 weeks. Children with idiopathic facial palsy have a very good prognosis. The complete recovery rate exceeds 90%. However, controversy exists regarding treatment options. High-quality studies have been conducted on adult populations. Medical treatment based on corticosteroids alone or combined with antiviral treatment is certainly effective in improving facial function outcomes in adults. In children, the recommendation for prescription of steroids and antiviral drugs based on adult treatment appears to be justified. Randomized controlled trials in the pediatric population are recommended to define a strategy for management of idiopathic facial paralysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Microsensors and wireless system for monitoring epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Ashok, B. H.; Kumaar, Raman V.; Sarukesi, K.; Jose, K. A.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2003-07-01

    Epilepsy is a form of brain disorder caused by abnormal discharges of neurons. The most common manifestations of epilepsy are seizures which could affect visual, aural and motor abilities of a person. Absence epilepsy is a form of epilepsy common mostly in children. The most common manifestations of absence epilepsy are staring and transient loss of responsiveness. Also, subtle motor activities may occur. Due to the subtle nature of these symptoms, episodes of absence epilepsy may often go unrecognized for long periods of time or be mistakenly attributed to attention deficit disorder or daydreaming. Spells of absence epilepsy may last about 10 seconds and occur hundreds of times each day. Patients have no recollections of the events occurred during those seizures and will resume normal activity without any postictal symptoms. The EEG during such episodes of Absence epilepsy shows intermittent activity of 3 Hz generalized spike and wave complexes. As EEG is the only way of detecting such symptoms, it is required to monitor the EEG of the patient for a long time, usually the whole day. This requires that the patient be connected to the EEG recorder all the time and thus remain only in the bed. So, effectively the EEG is being monitored only when the patient is stationary. The wireless monitoring system described in this paper aims at eliminating this constraint and enables the physician to monitor the EEG when the patient resumes his normal activities. This approach could even help the doctor identify possible triggers of absence epilepsy.

  7. Public awareness, understanding & attitudes toward epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gambhir, S K; Kumar, V; Singhi, P D; Goel, R C

    1995-07-01

    The public awareness, understanding and attitudes towards epilepsy were evaluated in a north Indian population in 1992 by personal interview method. The study revealed that 92 per cent of the respondents had read or heard about epilepsy. More than 55 per cent knew someone and had seen a case of seizure. Eighty five per cent of the respondents were not aware of the cause of epilepsy or had wrong beliefs. Eighteen and 15 per cent thought epilepsy to be a hereditary disorder and a form of insanity respectively. About 40 per cent of the respondents felt that children with epilepsy should not be sent to school and also objected to their children's contact with epileptics at school or at play. Two-thirds of the respondents objected to their children marrying a person who had ever had epilepsy. Twenty per cent were ignorant about the manifestation of epilepsy and an equal number were unable to recommend any therapy in case their relatives or friends had epilepsy. Fifty seven per cent did not know what kind of first aid should be given during the epileptic attack. Although the awareness of epilepsy among Indian people was comparable to that of individuals in Western countries, the attitudes of the Indians were much more negative. Better educated people belonging to higher occupational groups were less prejudiced against social contact and schooling of their children with epileptic children compared to low educational and occupational groups.

  8. The treatment of women with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Weil, Sabine; Deppe, Charlotte; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2010-11-01

    Women with epilepsy and their doctors are often unsure of the implications of the disease and the limitations it causes. There is a major need for counseling. Selective review of the literature as of November 2009. Recommendations on pregnancy and childbearing for women with epilepsy can be found in the guidelines issued by the German Societies of Neurology and Epileptology and by the American Epilepsy Society. Only low-level evidence is available on other relevant questions, including contraception, the influence of hormones on epilepsy, and the influence of antiepileptic drugs on endocrine and bone metabolism, because of a lack of controlled studies. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is more commonly seen in women with epilepsy who take valproate. Antiepileptic drugs that induce CYP3a can diminish the efficacy of oral contraceptives; conversely, oral contraceptives can markedly lower the blood levels of antiepileptic drugs. According to the most recent studies, the risk of congenital malformations and spontaneous abortions is 1% to 2% in the normal population and 3% to 9% in the offspring of women with epilepsy who are taking antiepileptic drugs. Women with epilepsy who want to have children are currently advised to take folic acid prophylactically starting before conception and until the end of the first trimester. New mothers with epilepsy are advised to breastfeed their children. Proper treatment and counseling of women with epilepsy, with due attention to aspects that are specific to women patients, can reduce the limitations to which they are subject in everyday life.

  9. Spotlight on levetiracetam in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2011-10-01

    Levetiracetam (Keppra®, E Keppra®) is an established second-generation antiepileptic drug (AED). Worldwide, levetiracetam is most commonly approved as adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization; other approved indications include monotherapy treatment of partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization, and adjunctive treatment of myoclonic seizures associated with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and primary generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Levetiracetam has a novel structure and unique mechanisms of action. Unlike other AEDs, the mechanisms of action of levetiracetam appear to involve neuronal binding to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, inhibiting calcium release from intraneuronal stores, opposing the activity of negative modulators of GABA- and glycin-gated currents and inhibiting excessive synchronized activity between neurons. In addition, levetiracetam inhibits N-type calcium channels. Levetiracetam is associated with rapid and complete absorption, high oral bioavailability, minimal metabolism that consists of hydrolysis of the acetamide group and primarily renal elimination. It lacks cytochrome P450 isoenzyme-inducing potential and is not associated with clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs, including other AEDs. The efficacy of oral immediate-release levetiracetam in controlling seizures has been established in numerous randomized, double-blind, controlled, multicentre trials in patients with epilepsy. Adjunctive levetiracetam reduced the frequency of seizures in paediatric and adult patients with refractory partial-onset seizures to a significantly greater extent than placebo. Monotherapy with levetiracetam was noninferior to that with carbamazepine controlled release in controlling seizures in patients with newly diagnosed partial-onset seizures. Levetiracetam also provided seizure control relative to placebo as

  10. Attention deficits in children with epilepsy: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Gascoigne, Michael B; Smith, Mary Lou; Barton, Belinda; Webster, Richard; Gill, Deepak; Lah, Suncica

    2017-02-01

    Attention difficulties are a common clinical complaint among children with epilepsy. We aimed to compare a range of attentional abilities between groups of children with two common epilepsy syndromes, Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) and Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy (IGE), and to healthy controls. We also investigated whether epilepsy factors (laterality of seizure focus, epilepsy onset, duration, and severity) were related to attentional abilities. Multiple dimensions of attention (selective, sustained, and divided attention and attentional control) were assessed directly with standardized neuropsychological measures in 101 children aged 6-16years (23 children with TLE, 20 with IGE and 58 healthy controls). Attention was also assessed indirectly, via a parent-report measure. Children with TLE performed worse than children with IGE (p=0.013) and healthy controls (p<0.001) on a test of attentional control, but no between-group differences were apparent on tests of other attentional abilities. Compared to healthy controls, greater attention problems were reported by parents of children with TLE (p=0.006) and IGE (p=0.012). Left-hemisphere seizure focus and greater epilepsy severity were associated with poorer attentional control and sustained-divided attention, respectively, but no other epilepsy factors were associated with attentional abilities. These findings suggest that children with localization-related epilepsy, but not generalized epilepsy, may be at risk of deficits in attentional control. Interventions aimed at improving attentional control may be targeted at children with localization-related epilepsy, particularly those with a left-hemisphere seizure focus, who appear to be particularly susceptible to this type of attentional deficit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Seizure-related injuries in children and adolescents with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lagunju, IkeOluwa A; Oyinlade, Alexander O; Babatunde, Olubusayo D

    2016-01-01

    Children with epilepsy are reported to be at a greater risk of injuries compared with their peers who do not have epilepsy. We set out to determine the frequency and pattern of seizure-related injuries in children with epilepsy seen at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Consecutive cases of epilepsy seen at the pediatric neurology clinic of the UCH, Ibadan over a period of 6months were evaluated for injuries in the preceding 12months using a structured questionnaire. These were compared with age- and sex-matched controls. A total of 125 children with epilepsy and 125 age- and sex-matched controls were studied. Injuries occurred more frequently in children with epilepsy than in their peers (p=0.01, OR 1.935, 95% CI 1.142-3.280). Epilepsy was generalized in 80 (64.0%), and localization-related in 45 (36.0%). Idiopathic epilepsy accounted for 74 (59.2%), and the remaining 51 (40.8%) had remote symptomatic epilepsy. Fifty-seven (45.6%) children had suffered seizure-related injuries with multiple injuries in 31 (24.8%). The most frequent were skin/soft tissue lacerations (26.4%), injuries to the tongue and soft tissues of the mouth (19.2%), minor head injuries (15.2%), and dental injuries with tooth loss (8.0%). There was a statistically significant association between seizure frequency and seizure-related injuries (p=0.002). Children on polytherapy had a significantly higher frequency of seizure-related injuries (p<0.001). Epilepsy is a major risk factor for injuries in childhood. High seizure frequency increases the risk of multiple injuries in children with epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Environmental risk factors for temporal lobe epilepsy--is prenatal exposure to the marine algal neurotoxin domoic acid a potentially preventable cause?

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ian

    2010-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS) is one of the more common forms of chronic epilepsy. Its aetiology is unknown, though an early developmental insult is thought by some to be an important trigger. There is not a strong genetic predisposition; gene-environment interactions are more significant considerations. Environmental risk factors for TLE-HS are under-researched. Domoic acid (DA) is an environmental neurotoxin of algal origin that can contaminate marine food webs. DA can cross the placenta, is significantly more toxic to the developing brain compared to the adult brain, and has affected humans and marine wildlife through mass poisonings. DA coincidentally has a decades-long history of use as a chemical model of temporal lobe epilepsy, along with its close structural analogue kainic acid (also of algal origin). The principal hypothesis presented here is that dietary exposure to doses of DA that are sub-clinical in pregnant women may be sufficient to damage the foetal hippocampus and initiate epileptogenesis. The hypothesis could be tested both experimentally by in vivo proof-of-concept animal studies that expand on current knowledge of prenatal susceptibility to DA neurotoxicity, and by epidemiological investigations directed towards dietary exposure to marine food products. If only a small proportion of the attributable risk for TLE-HS is found to be due to gestational exposure to DA, the public health implications would still be of great significance, as this would represent a potentially preventable exposure. Other potent neurotoxins are produced by marine microalgae and freshwater cyanobacteria. These structurally and mechanistically diverse toxins can also contaminate water supplies, seafood and shellfish. Several operate by modulating ion channels, so may also be of interest to epilepsy researchers. DA is also the subject of preliminary scrutiny in strandings involving odontocete cetaceans. The implications of such work are

  13. Hyperactive mTOR signals in the proopiomelanocortin-expressing hippocampal neurons cause age-dependent epilepsy and premature death in mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Yuki; Sakai, Yasunari; Shimmura, Mitsunori; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Nishio, Miki; Akamine, Satoshi; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Torisu, Hiroyuki; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Suzuki, Akira; Takada, Hidetoshi; Hara, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a frequent comorbidity in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Recent studies utilizing massive sequencing data identified subsets of genes that are associated with epilepsy and FCD. AKT and mTOR-related signals have been recently implicated in the pathogenic processes of epilepsy and FCD. To clarify the functional roles of the AKT-mTOR pathway in the hippocampal neurons, we generated conditional knockout mice harboring the deletion of Pten (Pten-cKO) in Proopiomelanocortin-expressing neurons. The Pten-cKO mice developed normally until 8 weeks of age, then presented generalized seizures at 8–10 weeks of age. Video-monitored electroencephalograms detected paroxysmal discharges emerging from the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. These mice showed progressive hypertrophy of the dentate gyrus (DG) with increased expressions of excitatory synaptic markers (Psd95, Shank3 and Homer). In contrast, the expression of inhibitory neurons (Gad67) was decreased at 6–8 weeks of age. Immunofluorescence studies revealed the abnormal sprouting of mossy fibers in the DG of the Pten-cKO mice prior to the onset of seizures. The treatment of these mice with an mTOR inhibitor rapamycin successfully prevented the development of seizures and reversed these molecular phenotypes. These data indicate that the mTOR pathway regulates hippocampal excitability in the postnatal brain. PMID:26961412

  14. Uniparental disomy as a cause of spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy: phenotypic homogeneity due to the homozygous c.125C>T mutation in ASAH1.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, Beatriz G; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Ortega-Moreno, Laura; Verdú, Alfonso; Carrascosa-Romero, M Carmen; García-Campos, Óscar; García-Muñozguren, Susana; Pardal-Fernández, José Manuel; Serratosa, José M

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMAPME, OMIM#159950) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the combination of progressive myoclonic epilepsy and muscular weakness due to lower motor neuron disease. Mutations in ASAH1, previously associated only to Farber disease, have been recently described in seven patients with SMAPME. A homozygous c.125C>T mutation was initially found in six patients with a clinical homogeneous phenotype. A heterozygous compound mutation found in an additional patient has broadened the clinical and genetic spectrum of clinical SMAPME. We report a new case of a 13-year-old girl with SMAPME with the homozygous ASAH1 c.125C>T mutation, unique in that it is due to paternal uniparental disomy. She experienced muscle weakness from the age of three due to lower motor neuron involvement that lead to severe handicap and onset in late childhood of a progressive myoclonic epilepsy. This clinical picture fully overlaps with that of previously reported patients with this mutation and supports our view that the clinical phenotype associated with the homozygous c.125C>T mutation constitutes a clinically homogenous and recognizable disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Recent advances in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Manford, Mark

    2017-08-01

    This paper reviews advances in epilepsy in recent years with an emphasis on therapeutics and underlying mechanisms, including status epilepticus, drug and surgical treatments. Lessons from rarer epilepsies regarding the relationship between epilepsy type, mechanisms and choice of antiepileptic drugs (AED) are explored and data regarding AED use in pregnancy are reviewed. Concepts evolving towards a move from treating seizures to treating epilepsy are discussed, both in terms of the mechanisms of epileptogenesis, and in terms of epilepsy's broader comorbidity, especially depression.

  16. [Idiopathic facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Wolf, S R

    1998-09-01

    Although acute idiopathic facial paresis is often labelled "Bell's palsy", historical studies show that Nicolaus Anton Friedreich (1761-1836) from Würzburg was the first physician to describe the typical symptoms of the disorder in 1797, approximately 24 years prior to the paper published by Sir Charles Bell. Diagnostics has now improved to the extent that acute idiopathic facial palsy can more frequently be assigned to etiologies caused by inflammatory disorders. Herpes simplex virus type I and Borrelia burgdorferi are particularly relevant. Underestimation of the degree of paresis is, particularly in children, a drawback of the clinical examination. "Incomplete eyelid closure" is not a reliable indicator of remaining nerve function. For this reason complete electromyography (EMG) is recommended in all cases of severe facial paresis. Since electroneurography does not reliably reflect the degree of denervation present, needle EMG is preferred. The therapy of the facial palsy of unclear etiology is still not well defined. Nevertheless, we recommend that a combined treatment should be used early, at least in patients with disfiguring pareses. Combinations may consist of cortisone, virostatic agents and hemorrheologic substances and possibly antibiotics. Surgical decompression of the facial nerve remains controversial, since positive surgical results lack statistical support. Individual instructions for facial exercises, massage and muscle relaxation can support rehabilitation and possibly reduce the production of pathological synkinesia. Electrical stimulation should not be used. There are a number of possibilities available to reduce the effects of misdirected reinnervation, especially the use of botulinum-A-toxin. However, intensive diagnosis and therapy in the early phase of paresis are decisive in obtaining a favorable outcome. Further refinements in rehabilitation and comparative multicenter controlled studies are still required for future improvements in

  17. Community-based epidemiological study of epilepsy in the Qena governorate in Upper Egypt, a door-to-door survey.

    PubMed

    Fawi, Gharib; Khedr, Eman M; El-Fetoh, Noha Abo; Thabit, Mohamed N; Abbass, Mohamed A; Zaki, Ahmad F

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the epidemiological features of epilepsy in a representative governorate of Upper Egypt. A door-to-door community-based survey study was performed using a sample of 10 areas among various districts of the Qena governorate in Upper Egypt. Six were classified as rural areas, and the remaining four were classified as urban areas, with a total population of 8027 inhabitants. The population was screened using an epilepsy-screening questionnaire. Positive cases with suspected epilepsy were referred to Qena University Hospital to be further evaluated by a qualified neurologist and for further investigations, such as neuroimaging and electroencephalography. One hundred patients had a confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy, with a lifetime prevalence of 12.46/1000. The active prevalence rate of epilepsy was 2.12/1000, while the incidence rate was 123/100000. Seventy-six percent of the patients had idiopathic epilepsies, while 24% had symptomatic epilepsy. Generalized epilepsies were more common (70.1%) than partial epilepsy (26.3%), meanwhile epilepsies with mixed seizure types were 2.6%. The most common seizure type was generalized tonic clonic seizures (51.8%). The age-specific prevalence rate of epilepsy was much higher in infancy and early childhood (62.5 and 37.04/1000, respectively), which regressed steadily with age. Idiopathic epilepsies were significantly more common in urban areas than in rural areas (P=0.01), while symptomatic epilepsies were more common in rural areas than in urban areas (P<0.005). Upper Egypt is characterized by a relatively high incidence and prevalence of epilepsy and epilepsy-related medical service, and more cultural education should be directed to those areas in Egypt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonsurgical management of idiopathic clubfoot.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Kenneth J; Richards, B Stephens

    2003-01-01

    Because nonsurgical management was thought not to yield adequate correction and a durable result, most children with idiopathic clubfoot have undergone surgery with extensive posteromedial and lateral release. However, surgical management caused residual deformity, stiffness, and pain in some children; thus, the favorable long-term results with the Ponseti and French methods of nonsurgical management have garnered interest. The Ponseti method consists of manipulation and casting of idiopathic clubfeet; the French method consists of physiotherapy, taping, and continuous passive motion. Careful evaluation of the techniques and results of these two approaches may increase their use and decrease or minimize the use of surgical management and thus the associated morbidity resulting from extensile releases.

  19. Acquired Idiopathic Generalized Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Geethu; Criton, Sebastian; Surendran, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is a rare condition, where the exact pathomechanism is unknown. We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis in a patient who later developed lichen planus. Here an autoimmune-mediated destruction of sweat glands may be the probable pathomechanism.

  20. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  1. MicroRNAs dysregulation in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Meng; Li, Xue-Mei; Zheng, Xue-Ping; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2014-10-10

    Epilepsy is a syndrome characterized by recurrent spontaneous seizures due to neuronal hyperactivity in the brain. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate post-transcriptional expression of protein-coding mRNAs, which may have key roles in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. Evidence indicates that miRNAs are emerging as a critical new layer of gene expression regulation with implications for the cause and treatment of epilepsy. Accumulating studies in epilepsy suggest that numerous specific miRNAs are dysregulated. Recent studies have explored several target genes and pathways of miRNAs in order to find out therapeutic approaches to epilepsy. Here, we review current findings regarding miRNA research in humans and animal models to provide a solid foundation for further research aiming at understanding the potential contribution of miRNAs to epilepsy pathophysiology. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Obtaining genetic testing in pediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ream, Margie A; Patel, Anup D

    2015-10-01

    The steps from patient evaluation to genetic diagnosis remain complicated. We discuss some of the genetic testing methods available along with their general advantages and disadvantages. We briefly review common pediatric epilepsy syndromes with strong genetic association and provide a potentially useful algorithm for genetic testing in drug-resistant epilepsy. We performed an extensive literature review of available information as it pertains to genetic testing and genetics in pediatric epilepsy. If a genetic disorder is suspected as the cause of epilepsy, based on drug resistance, family history, or clinical phenotype, timely diagnosis may reduce overall cost, limit the diagnostic odyssey that can bring much anxiety to families, improve prognostic accuracy, and lead to targeted therapy. Interpretation of complicated results should be performed only in collaboration with geneticists and genetic counselors, unless the ordering neurologist has a strong background in and understanding of genetics. Genetic testing can play an important role in the care provided to patients with epilepsy.

  3. Pulmonary lesion of idiopathic plasmacytic lymphadenopathy with polyclonal hyperimmunoglobulinemia appears to be a cause of lymphoplasmacytic proliferation of the lung: a report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masaru; Nakamura, Naoya; Otuski, Yoshiro; Itoh, Hideaki; Ogawa, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    We report on pulmonary lesions seen in five cases of idiopathic plasmacytic lymphadenopathy with polyclonal hyperimmunoglobulinemia (IPL). This group of five patients consisted of two Japanese men (age: 33 and 45 years), and three Japanese women (age: 25, 43, and 48 years). All five cases were detected incidentally on routine chest X-rays, and had multiple small nodular lesions in the bilateral lungs. These pulmonary lesions were the initial clinical presentation of IPL in three cases in which, at the onset of disease, no lymphadenopathy was detected. At the disease onset, all five cases showed prominent IPL. In three cases examined, serum interleukin-6 was elevated, and anti-human immunodeficiency type-1 antibody was negative in three cases. Clinically, autoimmune disease was suspected for all five cases, and the various autoantibodies were investigated. Although anti-Scl 70 antibody was positive in one case, this patient had no symptoms of systemic sclerosis. Pathologically, all five lesions were characterized by well-demarcated masses that consisted of abundant reactive germinal centers and a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate in the interfollicular area with a variable degree of interfollicular fibrosis. The immunohistochemical study and polymerase chain reaction demonstrated the polytypic nature of the plasma cells and B-cells. IPL is rare in lymphoproliferative disorders. However, pulmonary involvement may frequently occur in IPL patients. Moreover, pulmonary involvement seems to represent the initial clinical manifestation of IPL. Therapeutically, it is important to discriminate between pulmonary involvement of IPL and pulmonary benign or malignant pulmonary lymphoplasmacytic proliferation, particularly marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type.

  4. Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Auboire, Laurent; Boutemy, Jonathan; Constans, Jean Marc; Le Gallou, Thomas; Busson, Philippe; Bienvenu, Boris

    2015-03-01

    Although occipital neuralgia is usually caused by degenerative arthropathy, nearly 20 other aetiologies may lead to this condition. We present the first case report of hypertrophic pachymeningitis revealed by isolated occipital neuralgia. Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis is a plausible cause of occipital neuralgia and may present without cranial-nerve palsy. There is no consensus on the treatment for idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis, but the usual approach is to start corticotherapy and then to add immunosuppressants. When occipital neuralgia is not clinically isolated or when a first-line treatment fails, another disease diagnosis should be considered. However, the cost effectiveness of extended investigations needs to be considered.

  5. HCN channelopathies: pathophysiology in genetic epilepsy and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Reid, Christopher A; Phillips, A Marie; Petrou, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) can act as pacemakers in the brain making them strong candidates for driving aberrant hypersynchronous network activity seen in epilepsy. Transcriptional changes in HCN channels occur in several animal models of epilepsy. However, only recently have genetic studies demonstrated sequence variation in HCN1 and HCN2 genes associated with human epilepsy. These include a triple proline deletion in HCN2 that increases channel function and occurs more often in patients with febrile seizure syndromes. Other HCNx gene variants have been described in idiopathic generalized epilepsy although the functional consequence of these remains unclear. In this review we explore potential cellular and network mechanisms involving HCN channels in the genetic epilepsies. We suggest how new genetic sequencing technology, medium-throughput functional assays and the ability to develop syndrome-specific animal models will provide a more comprehensive understanding of how I(h) contributes to pathogenic mechanisms underlying human genetic epilepsy. We also discuss what is known about the pharmacological manipulation of HCN channels in the context of epilepsy and how this may help future efforts in developing HCN-channel-based therapy. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Epilepsy and music: practical notes.

    PubMed

    Maguire, M

    2017-04-01

    Music processing occurs via a complex network of activity far beyond the auditory cortices. This network may become sensitised to music or may be recruited as part of a temporal lobe seizure, manifesting as either musicogenic epilepsy or ictal musical phenomena. The idea that sound waves may directly affect brain waves has led researchers to explore music as therapy for epilepsy. There is limited and low quality evidence of an antiepileptic effect with the Mozart Sonata K.448. We do not have a pathophysiological explanation for the apparent dichotomous effect of music on seizures. However, clinicians should consider musicality when treating patients with antiepileptic medication or preparing patients for epilepsy surgery. Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine each may cause a reversible altered appreciation of pitch. Surgical cohort studies suggest that musical memory and perception may be affected, particularly following right temporal lobe surgery, and discussion of this risk should form part of presurgical counselling.

  7. Stem cell therapy for treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Parisa; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Soleimani, Masoud; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Mohamadi-Jahani, Fereshteh; Jahangiri, Sharareh; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hasan; Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy as one of the most common neurological disorders affects more than 50 million people worldwide with a higher prevalence rate in low-income countries. Excessive electrical discharges in neurons following neural cell damage or loss cause recurrent seizures. One of the most common and difficult to treat types of epilepsy is temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) which results from hippocampal sclerosis. Nowadays, similar to other diseases, epilepsy also is a candidate for treatment with different types of stem cells. Various stem cell types were used for treatment of epilepsy in basic and experimental researches. Two major roles of stem cell therapy in epilepsy are prophylaxis against chronic epilepsy and amelioration cognitive function after the occurrence of TLE. Several animal studies have supported the use of these cells for treating drug-resistant TLE. Although stem cell therapy seems like a promising approach for treatment of epilepsy in the future however, there are some serious safety and ethical concerns that are needed to be eliminated before clinical application.

  8. Focal status epilepticus as a manifestation of idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Navalpotro-Gómez, Irene; Vivanco-Hidalgo, Rosa María; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Medrano-Martorell, Santiago; Alameda-Quitllet, Francisco; Villalba-Martínez, Gloria; Roquer, Jaume

    2016-08-15

    Idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (IHCP) is an uncommon disease of unknown etiology characterized by thickening of the cerebral dura mater with possible associated inflammation. The most frequently described clinical symptoms include headache, cranial nerve palsy, and cerebellar dysfunction. Epilepsy and/or status epilepticus as main presentation is very uncommon. Two consecutive cases are presented of patients manifesting focal status epilepticus secondary to IHCP, with clinical, laboratory [blood test and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis], neuroradiologic [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 Tesla and digital subtraction angiography (DSA)], and therapeutic data. One patient underwent meningeal biopsy; pathology findings are also included. Corticosteroid therapy resulted in clinical improvement in both cases, and neuroimaging showed decreased abnormal morphology, compared to initial findings. In the diagnostic approach to focal status epilepticus or epilepsy, IHCP must be considered a potential, although extremely infrequent, cause. Anti-inflammatory treatment is an effective addition to antiepileptic drug therapy in patients with IHCP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analytic information processing style in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Buonfiglio, Marzia; Di Sabato, Francesco; Mandillo, Silvia; Albini, Mariarita; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Giallonardo, Annateresa; Avanzini, Giuliano

    2017-08-01

    Relevant to the study of epileptogenesis is learning processing, given the pivotal role that neuroplasticity assumes in both mechanisms. Recently, evoked potential analyses showed a link between analytic cognitive style and altered neural excitability in both migraine and healthy subjects, regardless of cognitive impairment or psychological disorders. In this study we evaluated analytic/global and visual/auditory perceptual dimensions of cognitive style in patients with epilepsy. Twenty-five cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients matched with 25 idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) sufferers and 25 healthy volunteers were recruited and participated in three cognitive style tests: "Sternberg-Wagner Self-Assessment Inventory", the C. Cornoldi test series called AMOS, and the Mariani Learning style Questionnaire. Our results demonstrate a significant association between analytic cognitive style and both IGE and TLE and respectively a predominant auditory and visual analytic style (ANOVA: p values <0,0001). These findings should encourage further research to investigate information processing style and its neurophysiological correlates in epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Autoimmune Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Amy M. L.; Britton, Jeffrey W.; McKeon, Andrew; So, Elson; Lennon, Vanda A.; Shin, Cheolsu; Klein, Christopher J.; Watson, Robert E.; Kotsenas, Amy L.; Lagerlund, Terrence D.; Cascino, Gregory D.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Wirrell, Elaine C.; Nickels, Katherine C.; Aksamit, Allen J.; Noe, Katherine H.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe clinical characteristics and immunotherapy responses in patients with autoimmune epilepsy. Design Observational, retrospective case series. Setting Mayo Clinic Health System. Patients Thirty-two patients with an exclusive (n=11) or predominant (n = 21) seizure presentation in whom an autoimmune etiology was suspected (on the basis of neural autoantibody [91%], inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid [31%], or magnetic resonance imaging suggesting inflammation [63%]) were studied. All had partial seizures: 81% had failed treatment with 2 or more anti-epileptic drugs and had daily seizures and 38% had seizure semiologies that were multifocal or changed with time. Head magnetic resonance imaging was normal in 15 (47%) at onset. Electroencephalogram abnormalities included interictal epileptiform discharges in 20; electrographic seizures in 15; and focal slowing in 13. Neural autoantibodies included voltage-gated potassium channel complex in 56% (leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 specific, 14; contactin-associated proteinlike 2 specific, 1); glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 in 22%; collapsin response-mediator protein 5 in 6%; and Ma2, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, and ganglionic acetylcholine receptor in 1 patient each. Intervention Immunotherapy with intravenous methylprednisolone; intravenous immune globulin; and combinations of intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immune globulin, plasmapheresis, or cyclo-phosphamide. Main Outcome Measure Seizure frequency. Results After a median interval of 17 months (range, 3–72 months), 22 of 27 (81%) reported improvement postimmunotherapy; 18 were seizure free. The median time from seizure onset to initiating immunotherapy was 4 months for responders and 22 months for nonresponders (P<.05). All voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody–positive patients reported initial or lasting benefit (P<.05). One voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody–positive patient was seizure free after

  11. Video game epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Bhalla, A; Lehl, S S; Sachdev, A

    2001-12-01

    Reflex epilepsy is the commonest form of epilepsy in which seizures are provoked by specific external stimulus. Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is provoked by environmental flicker stimuli. Video game epilepsy is considered to be its variant or a pattern sensitive epilepsy. The mean age of onset is around puberty and boys suffer more commonly as they are more inclined to play video games. Television set or computer screen is the commonest precipitants. The treatment remains the removal of the offending stimulus along with drug therapy. Long term prognosis in these patients is better as photosensitivity gradually declines with increasing age. We present two such case of epilepsy induced by video game.

  12. Childhood epilepsy and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementation of epileptic patients with some of these sleep-related hormones may have a beneficial role in controlling epilepsy. PMID:25254184

  13. Update on the management of idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Jo; Blanco, John S; Widmann, Roger F

    2009-02-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a lateral curvature of the spine greater than 10 degrees for which there is no known cause. This paper reviews the current literature on the appropriate evaluation and treatment of patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Improved technology and surgical techniques are allowing improved curve correction and improved quality of life for these patients. Specifically, the pedicle screw construct can provide excellent curve correction and stabilization for spinal deformities. Idiopathic scoliosis is a diagnosis of exclusion and the approach to a patient with scoliosis should aim toward ruling out other possible causes. In those patients with scoliosis necessitating treatment, bracing should be the first line of treatment and these patients should be followed up closely to track curve progression. Patients who fail conservative management may undergo spinal fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation. Vigilant monitoring and thorough evaluation of scoliosis patients can steer patients toward appropriate management in a judicious manner preventing the significant medical morbidity and deformity that scoliosis can insidiously inflict.

  14. Myoclonic occipital photosensitive epilepsy with dystonia (MOPED): A familial epilepsy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sadleir, Lynette G; Paterson, Sarah; Smith, Katherine R; Redshaw, Natalie; Ranta, Annemarei; Kalnins, Renate; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bahlo, Melanie; Hildebrand, Michael S; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2015-08-01

    To describe clinical and EEG phenotypes of a family with an unusual familial epilepsy syndrome characterized by myoclonus and dystonia. Family members underwent electroclinical phenotyping including review of EEGs and MRI. DNA from family members was genotyped using Illumina OmniExpress genotyping arrays. Parametric and nonparametric linkage analyses were performed using MERLIN. The disorder followed autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance and affected seven individuals over two generations. Seizures began at a mean of 14.5 years. Six individuals had spontaneous myoclonic seizures, of which five also had photic-induced myoclonus and four had photic-induced occipital seizures. Six individuals had convulsive seizures; generalized in two and focal in four. Photosensitivity was prominent with generalized spike wave and polyspike wave in four individuals of which two also had occipital spikes. MRI scans were normal in the four individuals tested. Extensive metabolic investigation was normal. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) occurred in two; and JME overlapping with idiopathic photosensitive epilepsy (IPOE) in four individuals. All three affected males had a more severe disorder than the four affected females. Two males had a progressive neurological disorder with progressive myoclonus epilepsy and deterioration in their early 30s. They developed episodes of paroxysmal cervical dystonia with cognitive decline during periods of poor seizure control. One plateaued after years of poor seizure control but remained intractable with periods of deterioration. The other deteriorated with episodes of status dystonicus and status epilepticus, ataxia and a progressive ophthalmoplegia before succumbing at 38 years. Parametric linkage analysis identified three peaks achieving a maximum LOD score of 1.21. Nonparametric analysis identified eight peaks achieving LOD scores above 0.80. These were not statistically significant. This is a novel autosomal dominant familial epilepsy syndrome

  15. [Eponyms and epilepsy (history of Eastern civilizations)].

    PubMed

    Janković, S M; Sokić, D V; Lević, Z M; Susić, V; Drulović, J; Stojsavljević, N; Veskov, R; Ivanus, J

    1996-01-01

    considered as life threatening events. Persian history of epilepsy, except from the 6th century Zoroastrian "Avesta" document, lacks the written or spoken medical heritage untill the 7th century A.D. and the Arabic conquest of the entire Moslem world. On the other hand, Islamic medicine should be freed from the simple prejudice that the Moslem authors were only the translators of Greek medicine; contrary to such a view, their work contains a high degree of individuality. Although Mohammed introduced a lot of novelty into medicine, Khoran and the Sayings do not explicitly refer to epilepsy. Of importance is to notice that Moslem medicine did not have demons in the "repertoire" of direct causes of epilepsy. The causes and the cures of epilepsy were more magic-mystical and occult in nature, which is reminiscent of the European, as well as Serbian Middle age attitudes. Avicenna recognized difference between children and adult epilepsy. He considered insomnia and afternoon siesta as well as intensive sounds and light to be a provocative factors, whereby we see that at least empirically he knew of sleep (deprivation), startle and reflex epilepsy. The XIII century invasion of Mongols brought about the recession in Moslem Medicine; it recovered only in the XVIII century under the strong influence of European medicine handed over to us through Jewish doctors of various nationalities. The story of the China history of epilepsy has its debut approximately in the 8th century B. C. Medical texts from this period name epilepsy "Dian" and "Xian" which meant "the falling sickness" and "convulsions", respectively. Chinese medical terminology often interchangeably used the words "mania", "madness" and "psychosis" for "epilepsy" which, aside from a prominent language barrier, brings additional confusion. Although Chinese documents gave the first description of the grand mal epileptic attack already in the 8th century B. C. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  16. Recognizing and preventing epilepsy-related mortality: A call for action.

    PubMed

    Devinsky, Orrin; Spruill, Tanya; Thurman, David; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-02-23

    Epilepsy is associated with a high rate of premature mortality from direct and indirect effects of seizures, epilepsy, and antiseizure therapies. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the second leading neurologic cause of total lost potential life-years after stroke, yet SUDEP may account for less than half of all epilepsy-related deaths. Some epilepsy groups are especially vulnerable: individuals from low socioeconomic status groups and those with comorbid psychiatric illness die more often than controls. Despite clear evidence of an important public health problem, efforts to assess and prevent epilepsy-related deaths remain inadequate. We discuss factors contributing to the underestimation of SUDEP and other epilepsy-related causes of death. We suggest the need for a systematic classification of deaths directly due to epilepsy (e.g., SUDEP, drowning), due to acute symptomatic seizures, and indirectly due to epilepsy (e.g., suicide, chronic effects of antiseizure medications). Accurately estimating the frequency of epilepsy-related mortality is essential to support the development and assessment of preventive interventions. We propose that educational interventions and public health campaigns targeting medication adherence, psychiatric comorbidity, and other modifiable risk factors may reduce epilepsy-related mortality. Educational campaigns regarding sudden infant death syndrome and fires, which kill far fewer Americans than epilepsy, have been widely implemented. We have done too little to prevent epilepsy-related deaths. Everyone with epilepsy and everyone who treats people with epilepsy need to know that controlling seizures will save lives. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Intellectual Disability and Epilepsy in Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    BARCA, Diana; TARTA-ARSENE, Oana; DICA, Alice; ILIESCU, Catrinel; BUDISTEANU, Magdalena; MOTOESCU, Cristina; BUTOIANU, Niculina; CRAIU, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation, with a reported frequency of epilepsy between 1.4-17% (1). There is a paucity of data in the literature regarding epilepsy in Down syndrome and its relation to intellectual disability. Objectives: The purpose of this article is to analyze the association of epilepsy in children with DS - frequency and type of seizures, treatment, outcome and to compare cognitive impairment of children with DS and epilepsy and DS without epilepsy from our cohort. Methods: A four years systematic retrospective analysis of the database of the Pediatric Neurology Clinic (January 2010 - December 2013) identified a cohort of 39 pediatric cases with DS and neurological symptoms, 9 of them (23%) associating epileptic seizures. Following data were analysed: clinical and neurological examination, type/s of seizures, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), psychological examination, psychiatric evaluation in selected cases, electrocardiography (ECG), cardiac ultrasonography, ophthalmologic examination. Results: 23% (9 patients) of the children with DS of our cohort presented epilepsy. Five patients had epileptic spasms (56%), one of these further developed astatic seizures. Focal seizures were observed in three patients (33%) and absence with eyelid myoclonias in one patient (11%). Two of the nine patients with DS and epilepsy had generalized seizures, both with very good response to levetiracetam (LEV). EEG was abnormal at seizure onset, and was improved after treatment. Of the nine children with DS and epilepsy, two (22%) presented mild mental retardation and seven (78%) had moderate to severe cognitive delay. Of the 30 children with DS and without epilepsy, 21 (70%) had mild mental retardation and 9 (30%) had moderate to severe cognitive impairment. Conclusions: The most frequent epileptic syndrome associated with DS is West syndrome, with good response to specific antiepileptics

  18. Epilepsy and neuropsychological comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Rudzinski, Leslie A; Meador, Kimford J

    2013-06-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disorder with several associated comorbidities requiring timely recognition and treatment. This article discusses aspects of cognitive impairment; psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety, and psychosis; and health-related quality-of-life issues pertaining to patients with epilepsy. Cognitive problems in epilepsy may be present early in the disease course. Advances in imaging techniques are allowing correlation of structure and function as they relate to cognitive impairment in epilepsy. The relationship between epilepsy, depression, and anxiety is increasingly recognized, and these psychiatric comorbidities may affect suicide risk, patient-reported adverse antiepileptic drug effects, and quality of life. Psychiatric disorders are underrecognized and undertreated in patients with epilepsy. Physicians who treat patients with epilepsy should be aware of the major impact that cognitive impairment and psychiatric comorbidities have on these patients. Identifying and treating these comorbidities in epilepsy patients is just as important as seizure treatment.

  19. Listening to Epilepsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunquell, Phillip J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses what epilepsy is and what it is not, defines types of epileptic seizures, identifies epilepsy syndromes, discusses antiepileptic drugs, describes seizure surgery, and examines issues of quality of life. (JDD)

  20. Knowledge of, perceptions of, attitudes and practices regarding epilepsy among medical students in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Ayşe

    2016-05-01

    Medical practitioners' attitudes have a significant impact on the quality of care for patients with epilepsy. This study was conducted to assess the current level of knowledge about epilepsy and treatment together with attitudes and perception toward patients with epilepsy among medical students in Turkey. The study was conducted using a structured questionnaire to assess knowledge, awareness, and practices about epilepsy among medical students at Selçuk U