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Sample records for idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis

  1. Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis: experience of twenty-one patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, R

    1995-01-01

    The features and outcome of 21 children (12 boys, nine girls) with idopathic juvenile osteoporosis (IJO) followed for up to 23 yr are described. The mean age of onset was 7 yr (range 1-13 yr) with no sex difference; the main presenting symptoms were long bone fractures, pain in the back and difficulty in walking. Typically, radiographs demonstrated compression of the vertebrae and metaphyses of the long bones; bone histology sometimes showed an excess of osteocytes associated with woven bone; routine biochemistry was normal for age; and with three exceptions no abnormalities of extracted dermal collagen or collagen synthesized by fibroblasts were detected. Where circulating vitamin D metabolites were measured they were within the normal range; and hip and spine bone mineral density (measured by DXA) was strikingly low. Five patients are still growing and two are currently untraceable. Of the remaining 14 who are now adults, 11 have substantially or completely recovered and three are disabled. Since spontaneous recovery occurs it remains impossible to assess the many forms of treatment given.

  2. Evidence of Altered Matrix Composition in Iliac Crest Biopsies from Patients with Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, IJ; Chiodo, V; Ma, Y; Boskey, AL

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis (IJO) is a rare condition in children, characterized by bone pain, long bone and vertebral fractures. Previously, IJO bone was solely characterized by histomorphometry and quantitative computed tomography. The goal of this study is to describe IJO bone composition. Materials and Methods Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI), a vibrational spectroscopic technique providing spatially resolved images of chemical composition, was used to determine whether iliac crest biopsies from children with IJO differed in composition from and age- and sex-matched controls, and, as a secondary analysis, whether IJO-bone showed the same disease dependent change in composition as do iliac crest bone biopsies from women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). Wilcoxon rank-tests and linear regressions were used to analyze FTIRI variables (mineral-to-matrix ratio, carbonate-to-phosphate ratio, crystallinity, acid-phosphate substitution, collagen maturity) and their individual pixel distributions (Heterogeneity). Results Mineral-to-matrix ratio was comparable in IJO and age-matched controls. Contrastingly, collagen maturity (also known as collagen cross-link ratio) was higher in cortical and cancellous IJO bone compared to juvenile controls. Acid-phosphate substitution was greater in IJO cancellous bone than in age-matched controls, suggesting IJO bone mineral is formed more recently, reflecting a slower mineralization process. This agrees with findings of increased heterogeneity for mineral-to-matrix and collagen maturity ratios in IJO cancellous bone. There were negative correlations between cancellous collagen maturity and previously reported histomorphometric bone formation markers. There were no correlations with indices of remodeling. Conclusions IJO bone, similar to PMO bone, had elevated collagen maturity relative to its age-matched controls. This emphasizes the importance of the collagen matrix for bone health. IJO bone differed

  3. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For Teens > Juvenile Idiopathic ... can affect people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people ...

  4. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  5. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rule out other conditions or infections, such as Lyme disease , that may cause similar symptoms or occur along ... ESR) Bones, Muscles, and Joints Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Word! Arthritis Arthritis Lupus Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis ( ...

  6. Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis: a cross-sectional single-centre experience with bone histomorphometry and quantitative computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis (IJO) is a rare condition of poorly understood etiology and pathophysiology that affects otherwise healthy children. This condition is characterized clinically by bone pain and vertebral fractures; spontaneous recovery is observed after puberty in the majority of cases. Although decreased trabecular bone turnover has been noted previously, cortical and trabecular bone characteristics as determined by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and their relationship to bone histomorphometry are unknown. Methods All children with a clinical diagnosis of IJO who were followed in our center since 1995 and who had undergone at least one diagnostic bone biopsy were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Results Fifteen patients (11 males/4 females) with median ages of 5.8 and 10.2 years at first symptoms and at referral, respectively, were included in the analysis. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated decreased trabecular bone turnover (BFR/BS) in the majority of patients with heterogeneous parameters of trabecular mineralization and volume. QCTresults demonstrated that bone mineral density (BMD) was reduced in both trabecular/lumbar and cortical/femoral bone: Z score: -2.1 (−3.6;–1.0) and −0.9 (−8.2;1.4)in the two compartments, respectively. In the eight patients who underwent both bone biopsy and QCT, cortical BMD was associated with trabecular separation and with trabecular bone formation rate (r = 0.898 and −0.881, respectively, both p < 0.05). Conclusions This series confirms that IJO is characterized by impaired trabecular architecture that can be detected by both bone biopsy and QCT. The association between bone biopsy and QCT results may have implications for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of these children. PMID:23418950

  7. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile primary osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile primary osteoporosis juvenile primary osteoporosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Juvenile primary osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by thinning of ...

  8. Pamidronate treatment stimulates the onset of recovery phase reducing fracture rate and skeletal deformities in patients with idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis: comparison with untreated patients.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, Giampiero I; Vierucci, Francesco; Bertelloni, Silvano; Erba, Paola; Zampollo, Elisa; Giuca, Maria Rita

    2013-09-01

    Although spontaneous remission occurs in patients with idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis (IJO), permanent bone deformities may occur. The effects of long-term pamidronate treatment on clinical findings, bone mineral status, and fracture rate were evaluated. Nine patients (age 9.8 ± 1.1 years, 7 males) with IJO were randomized to intravenous pamidronate (0.8 ± 0.1 mg/kg per day for 3 days; cycles per year 2.0 ± 0.1; duration 7.3 ± 1.1 years; n = 5) or no treatment (n = 4). Fracture rate, phalangeal quantitative ultrasound, and lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at entry and during follow-up (range 6.3-9.4 years) were assessed. Bone pain improved in treated patients. Difficulty walking continued for 3-5 years in untreated patients, and vertebral collapses occurred in three of them. During follow-up, phalangeal amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS), bone transmission time (BTT), and lumbar BMDarea and BMDvolume progressively increased in treated patients (P < 0.05-P < 0.0001). In untreated patients AD-SoS and BTT decreased during the first 2-4 years of follow-up (P < 0.05-P < 0.01); lumbar BMDarea increased after 6 years (P < 0.001) whereas BTT and lumbar BMDvolume increased after 7 years of follow-up (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). At the end of follow-up, AD-SoS, BTT, lumbar BMDarea, and BMDvolume Z-scores were lower in untreated patients than in treated patients (-2.2 ± 0.3 and -0.5 ± 0.2; -1.9 ± 0.2 and -0.6 ± 0.2; -2.3 ± 0.3 and -0.7 ± 0.3; -2.4 ± 0.2 and -0.7 ± 0.3, P < 0.0001, respectively). Fracture rate was higher in untreated patients than in treated patients during the first 3 years of follow-up (P < 0.02). Our study showed that spontaneous recovery of bone mineral status is unsatisfactory in patients with IJO. Pamidronate treatment stimulated the onset of recovery phase reducing fracture rate and permanent disabilities without evidence of

  9. [Physiotherapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Spamer, M; Georgi, M; Häfner, R; Händel, H; König, M; Haas, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Control of disease activity and recovery of function are major issues in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Functional therapies including physiotherapy are important components in the multidisciplinary teamwork and each phase of the disease requires different strategies. While in the active phase of the disease pain alleviation is the main focus, the inactive phase requires strategies for improving motility and function. During remission the aim is to regain general fitness by sports activities. These phase adapted strategies must be individually designed and usually require a combination of different measures including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, massage as well as other physical procedures and sport therapy. There are only few controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of physical therapies in JIA and many strategies are derived from long-standing experience. New results from physiology and sport sciences have contributed to the development in recent years. This report summarizes the basics and main strategies of physical therapy in JIA.

  10. Kienbock's disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Desy, Nicholas M; Bernstein, Mitchell; Harvey, Edward J; Hazel, Hazel

    2011-06-01

    Kienbock's disease or osteonecrosis of the lunate is an uncommon cause of wrist pain. . Though there have been several reports of cases in patients with various rheumatologic diseases, the precise etiology has currently not been established. We report a case of Kienbock's disease that occurred in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. To our knowledge, this is the first case report with an association between these two conditions.

  11. Remission in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current facts.

    PubMed

    Shenoi, Susan; Wallace, Carol A

    2010-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic inflammatory arthritic disease affecting children. Despite the availability of potent disease-modifying antirheumatic medications, most children still experience a chronic course with long periods of active disease. Goals of treatment should include achievement of disease remission with optimal physical functioning that allows children to lead normal lives with no structural joint damage. The term remission implies a complete lack of disease activity. This article focuses on recently developed preliminary criteria for inactive disease and remission in JIA. Recent studies using these new definitions demonstrate only modest rates of achievement of remission favoring children with persistent oligoarticular JIA. Children with rheumatoid factor-positive polyarticular JIA are least likely to achieve remission. Therapeutic strategies to achieve remission are also discussed.

  12. Idiopathic osteoporosis: an evolutionary dys-adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, C

    2001-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterised by simultaneous net bone growth and net resorption on different surfaces, suggesting that systemic factors are not the sole explanation for the findings. The main clinical consequence is fracturing in the largely trabecular bones of the spine, hip, and radius, and the key problem in these areas is finding an explanation for the preferential loss of transverse trabeculae. In normal bone, local maintenance depends on a negative feedback response to intermittent compression strain, and it is concluded, from biomechanical analysis of the response required to achieve negative feedback, that a preferential loss of transverse trabeculae is indicative of a selective deficiency of radial compression loading. The only significant source of radial compression in humans is the induced strain produced by axial tension. This is a necessary component of the lifestyles of quadrupeds and arboreal primates, but in humans occurs only on the convex side when the bone is offset loaded. The resulting strain is a function of the range of movement. It is suggested that the asymmetrical pattern of bone loss in cortical and trabecular osteoporosis reflects chronic underuse of movement range, resulting from the adoption of a bipedal lifestyle. Exercise regimens based on using the whole of the available movement range should better prepare the skeleton to adjust to other factors hostile to bone maintenance.

 PMID:11350841

  13. Pulmonary haemosiderosis with juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a Malaysian child.

    PubMed

    Wong, A R; Noor, A S Siti; Rasool, A H G; Quah, B S; Roberton, D

    2007-10-01

    A rare case of childhood pulmonary haemosiderosis with juvenile idiopathic arthritis is discussed, with particular reference to treatment with hydroxychloroquine and sildenafil for pulmonary hypertension which occurs secondary to this disease.

  14. Clinical outcome measures in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alessandro; Giancane, Gabriella; Schiappapietra, Benedetta; Davì, Sergio; Calandra, Serena; Lanni, Stefano; Ravelli, Angelo

    2016-04-18

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), as a chronic condition, is associated with significant disease- and treatment-related morbidity, thus impacting children's quality of life. In order to optimize JIA management, the paediatric rheumatologist has begun to regularly use measurements of disease activity developed, validated and endorsed by international paediatric rheumatology professional societies in an effort to monitor the disease course over time and assess the efficacy of therapeutic interventions in JIA patients.A literature review was performed to describe the main outcome measures currently used in JIA patients to determine disease activity status.The Juvenile Disease Activity Score (JADAS), in its different versions (classic JADAS, JADAS-CRP and cJADAS) and the validated definitions of disease activity and response to treatment represent an important tool for the assessment of clinically relevant changes in disease activity, leading more and more to a treat-to-target strategy, based on a tight and thorough control of the patient condition. Moreover, in recent years, increasing attention on the incorporation of patient-reported or parent-reported outcomes (PRCOs), when measuring the health state of patients with paediatric rheumatic diseases has emerged.We think that the care of JIA patients cannot be possible without taking into account clinical outcome measures and, in this regard, further work is required.

  15. [Unusual presentation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Moreno Prieto, M; Carbonero Celis, M J; Cuadrado Caballero, M C

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis is very rare. This is the case of an 18 month old female patient whose first sign of disease was torticollis due to an underlying atlanto-axial subluxation. Three months later, bilateral knee arthritis developed and she was diagnosed with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Throughout the disease a persistent elevation of liver enzymes was noted, combined with positive antinuclear antibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia, reaching the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune hepatitis.

  16. Osteoporosis in men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.S.; Klibanski, A.; Neer, R.M.; Greenspan, S.L.; Rosenthal, D.I.; Crowley, W.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    To assess the effect of testosterone deficiency on skeletal integrity in men, we determined bone density in 23 hypogonadal men with isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and compared those values with ones from controls. Cortical bone density, as assessed by single-photon absorptiometry of the nondominant radius, ranged from 0.57 to 0.86 g/cm2 (mean +/- SE, 0.71 +/- 0.02) in patients with fused epiphyses and from 0.57 to 0.67 g/cm2 (mean, 0.61 +/- 0.01) in patients with open epiphyses, both of which were significantly (p less than 0.001) lower than normal. Spinal trabecular bone density, as assessed by computed tomography, was similarly decreased (p less than 0.0001) and ranged from 42 to 177 mg K2HPO4/cm3 (mean, 112 +/- 7). Cortical bone density was at least 2 SD below normal in 16 of 23 men, and 8 men had spinal bone densities below the fracture threshold of 80 to 100 mg K2HPO4/cm3. Osteopenia was equally severe in men with immature and mature bone ages, suggesting that abnormal bone development plays an important role in the osteopenia of men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

  17. The human microbiome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verwoerd, Anouk; Ter Haar, Nienke M; de Roock, Sytze; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-09-20

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. The pathogenesis of JIA is thought to be the result of a combination of host genetic and environmental triggers. However, the precise factors that determine one's susceptibility to JIA remain to be unravelled. The microbiome has received increasing attention as a potential contributing factor to the development of a wide array of immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. Also in JIA, there is accumulating evidence that the composition of the microbiome is different from healthy individuals. A growing body of evidence indeed suggests that, among others, the microbiome may influence the development of the immune system, the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier, and the differentiation of T cell subsets. In turn, this might lead to dysregulation of the immune system, thereby possibly playing a role in the development of JIA. The potential to manipulate the microbiome, for example by faecal microbial transplantation, might then offer perspectives for future therapeutic interventions. Before we can think of such interventions, we need to first obtain a deeper understanding of the cause and effect relationship between JIA and the microbiome. In this review, we discuss the existing evidence for the involvement of the microbiome in JIA pathogenesis and explore the potential mechanisms through which the microbiome may influence the development of autoimmunity in general and JIA specifically.

  18. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sarah L N; Sen, Ethan S; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2016-04-27

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood, with JIA-associated uveitis its most common extra-articular manifestation. JIA-associated uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening condition and thus carries a considerable risk of morbidity. The aetiology of the condition is autoimmune in nature with the predominant involvement of CD4(+) T cells. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, particularly regarding interplay between genetic and environmental factors. JIA-associated uveitis comes in several forms, but the most common presentation is of the chronic anterior uveitis type. This condition is usually asymptomatic and thus screening for JIA-associated uveitis in at-risk patients is paramount. Early detection and treatment aims to stop inflammation and prevent the development of complications leading to visual loss, which can occur due to both active disease and burden of disease treatment. Visually disabling complications of JIA-associated uveitis include cataracts, glaucoma, band keratopathy and macular oedema. There is a growing body of evidence for the early introduction of systemic immunosuppressive therapies in order to reduce topical and systemic glucocorticoid use. This includes more traditional treatments, such as methotrexate, as well as newer biological therapies. This review highlights the epidemiology of JIA-associated uveitis, the underlying pathogenesis and how affected patients may present. The current guidelines and criteria for screening, diagnosis and monitoring are discussed along with approaches to management.

  19. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health].

    PubMed

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Sielicka, Danuta; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2016-05-04

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child's health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity. The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health.

  20. [Optic neuritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patient].

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Daniela M R; Buscatti, Izabel M; Lourenço, Benito; Monti, Fernanda C; Paz, José Albino; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) was rarely reported in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, particularly in those under anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha blockage. However, to our knowledge, the prevalence of ON in JIA population has not been studied. Therefore, 5,793 patients were followed up at our University Hospital and 630 (11%) had JIA. One patient (0.15%) had ON and was reported herein. A 6-year-old male was diagnosed with extended oligoarticular JIA, and received naproxen and methotrexate subsequently replaced by leflunomide. At 11 years old, he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis, followed by a partial motor seizure with secondary generalization. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram showed diffuse disorganization of the brain electric activity and leflunomide was suspended. Seven days later, the patient presented acute ocular pain, loss of acuity for color, blurred vision, photophobia, redness and short progressive visual loss in the right eye. A fundoscopic exam detected unilateral papilledema without retinal exudates. Orbital MRI suggested right ON. The anti-aquaporin 4 (anti-AQP4) antibody was negative. Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone was administered for five days, and subsequently with prednisone, he had clinical and laboratory improvement. In conclusion, a low prevalence of ON was observed in our JIA population. The absence of anti-AQP4 antibody and the normal brain MRI do not exclude the possibility of demyelinating disease associated with chronic arthritis. Therefore, rigorous follow up is required.

  1. Immune Complexes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Terry L.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) reflects a group of clinically heterogeneous, autoimmune disorders in children characterized by chronic arthritis and hallmarked by elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) and associated complement activation by-products in their sera. Immune complexes (ICs) have been detected in patients’ sera with JIA utilizing a variety of methods, including the anti-human IgM affinity column, C1q solid-phase assay, polyethylene glycol precipitation, Staphylococcal Protein A separation method, anti-C1q/C3 affinity columns, and FcγRIII affinity method. As many as 75% of JIA patients have had IC detected in their sera. The CIC proteome in JIA patients has been examined to elucidate disease-associated proteins that are expressed in active disease. Evaluation of these ICs has shown the presence of multiple peptide fragments by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Subsequently, all isotypes of rheumatoid factor (RF), isotypes of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, IgG, C1q, C4, C3, and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were detected in these IC. Complement activation and levels of IC correlate with disease activity in JIA, indicating their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This review will summarize the existing literature and discuss the role of possible protein modification that participates in the generation of the immune response. We will address the possible role of these events in the development of ectopic germinal centers that become the secondary site of plasma cell development in JIA. We will further address possible therapeutic modalities that could be instituted as a result of the information gathered by the presence of ICs in JIA. PMID:27242784

  2. AA amyloidosis associated with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Saha, Abhijeet; Chopra, Yogiraj; Theis, Jason D; Vrana, Julie A; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2013-10-01

    We report a 12-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome due to renal AA amyloidosis. The AA amyloidosis was associated with a 3-year history of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The presence of serum amyloid A protein was confirmed by laser microdissection of Congo Red-positive glomeruli and vessels followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; this analysis excluded hereditary and familial amyloidosis. Aggressive management of the systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis resulted in improvement in clinical and laboratory parameters. The case represents an unusual cause of nephrotic syndrome in children. Early diagnosis of renal amyloidosis and management of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis is paramount to preventing progression of kidney disease.

  3. [Current therapy of polyarticular forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hospach, A; Rühlmann, J M; Weller-Heinemann, F

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in infancy and childhood. Approximately 20 % of patients with JIA suffer from the polyarticular form of the disease, which causes a substantial disease burden and long-term sequelae. Therapeutic approaches have used steroids and conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) but over the last decade new drugs have become available for the treatment of JIA, in particular biologic DMARD. This article summarizes the current therapy options for polyarticular JIA.

  4. Bone Density After Teriparatide Discontinuation in Premenopausal Idiopathic Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Kamanda-Kosseh, Mafo; Recker, Robert. R.; Lappe, Joan M.; Dempster, David W.; Zhou, Hua; Cremers, Serge; Bucovsky, Mariana; Stubby, Julie; Shane, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Context: Without antiresorptive therapy, postmenopausal women lose bone mass after teriparatide (TPTD) discontinuation; estrogen treatment prevents bone loss in this setting. It is not known whether premenopausal women with regular menses lose bone mass after teriparatide discontinuation. Objective: This study aimed to test the hypothesis that normally menstruating premenopausal women with idiopathic osteoporosis (IOP) will maintain teriparatide-associated bone mineral density (BMD) gains after medication cessation. Design: Twenty-one premenopausal IOP women previously enrolled in an open-label pilot study of teriparatide (20 mcg for 18–24 mo), had substantial BMD increases at the lumbar spine (LS; 10.8 ± 8.3%), total hip (TH; 6.2 ± 5.6%), and femoral neck (7.6 ± 3.4%). For this study, BMD was remeasured 2.0 ± 0.6 years after teriparatide cessation. Participants: Fifteen women, who had gained 11.1 ± 7.2% at LS and 6.1 ± 6.5% at TH and were premenopausal at teriparatide completion, were followed without antiresorptive treatment. Results: Two years after completing teriparatide, BMD declined by 4.8 ± 4.3% (P = .0007) at the LS. In contrast, BMD remained stable at the femoral neck (−1.5 ± 4.2%) and TH (−1.1 ± 3.7%). Those who sustained LS bone loss >3% (−7.3 ± 2.9%; n = 10), did not differ from those with stable LS BMD (0.1 ± 1.1%; n=5) with regard to baseline body mass index, BMD at any site, or duration of followup, but were significantly older at re-evaluation (46 ± 3 vs 38 ± 7; P = .046), had larger increases in LS BMD during teriparatide treatment and higher cancellous bone remodeling on transiliac biopsy at baseline and completion of teriparatide treatment. Serum bone turnover markers did not differ at baseline or teriparatide completion, but tended to be higher at the re-evaluation timepoint in those with post-teriparatide bone loss. Conclusions: These findings lead us to conclude that premenopausal women with IOP, particularly those over

  5. [Pain and coping strategies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Herlin, Troels; Thastum, Mikael

    2008-02-18

    Pain is one of the primary symptoms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). JIA patients have reduced pain tolerance and pain threshold compared to healthy controls. In children with JIA the greater use of coping strategies such as problem-solving, positive self-statements and distraction consistently have predicted less arthritis-related pain, even after controlling for relevant medical and demographic variables. Interventions specifically designed to modify maladaptive pain coping strategies and pain-related health beliefs may be effective in reducing pain in children with JIA.

  6. Physiotherapy in pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Case study.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Beata; Kaczor, Zofia; Zuk-Drążyk, Berenika; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthropathy of childhood and adolescence. This term encompasses a group of chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of the connective tissue which cause arthritis in patients under 16 years of age lasting at least 6 weeks. The authors presented the characteristic features of physiotherapy based on functional examination results on the basis of two cases of girls with pauciarticular JIA treated according to an established pharmacological regimen. Physiotherapy should be introduced at an early stage of the disease. Kinesiotherapy preceded by history-taking and a functional examination of the patient, has to focus on both primary and secondary joint lesions.

  7. The Myositis Autoantibody Phenotypes of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M.; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, “shawl-sign” rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and “mechanic’s hands,” and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was

  8. The myositis autoantibody phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rider, Lisa G; Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N; Miller, Frederick W

    2013-07-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, "shawl-sign" rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and "mechanic's hands," and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was characterized by high

  9. Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis in a Child with Recurrent Macrophage Activation Syndrome Secondary to Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Kenan; Sahin, Sezgin; Adrovic, Amra

    2017-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome, a severe complication of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other inflammatory diseases, represents one of the most important rheumatological emergencies. Delayed diagnosis could lead to life-threatening complications. Pulmonary hemosiderosis has been classically characterized by a triad of anemia, hemoptysis, and lung infiltrates on chest radiogram. Although the majority of patients of pulmonary hemosiderosis are considered idiopathic, secondary hemosiderosis associated with known diseases could be seen. In this case report, we aimed to present gradually increased pulmonary manifestations due to pulmonary hemosiderosis with recurrent macrophage activation syndrome attacks in a child with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:28251009

  10. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  11. The clinical phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Targoff, Ira N; Huber, Adam M; Malley, James D; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Miller, Frederick W; Rider, Lisa G

    2013-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. Although juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), the most common form of JIIM, has been well studied, the other major clinical subgroups of JIIM, including juvenile polymyositis (JPM) and juvenile myositis overlapping with another autoimmune or connective tissue disease (JCTM), have not been well characterized, and their similarity to the adult clinical subgroups is unknown. We enrolled 436 patients with JIIM, including 354 classified as JDM, 33 as JPM, and 49 as JCTM, in a nationwide registry study. The aim of the study was to compare demographics; clinical features; laboratory measures, including myositis autoantibodies; and outcomes among these clinical subgroups, as well as with published data on adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) enrolled in a separate natural history study. We used random forest classification and logistic regression modeling to compare clinical subgroups, following univariate analysis. JDM was characterized by typical rashes, including Gottron papules, heliotrope rash, malar rash, periungual capillary changes, and other photosensitive and vasculopathic skin rashes. JPM was characterized by more severe weakness, higher creatine kinase levels, falling episodes, and more frequent cardiac disease. JCTM had more frequent interstitial lung disease, Raynaud phenomenon, arthralgia, and malar rash. Differences in autoantibody frequency were also evident, with anti-p155/140, anti-MJ, and anti-Mi-2 seen more frequently in patients with JDM, anti-signal recognition particle and anti-Jo-1 in JPM, and anti-U1-RNP, PM-Scl, and other myositis-associated autoantibodies more commonly present in JCTM. Mortality was highest in patients with JCTM, whereas hospitalizations and wheelchair use were highest in JPM patients. Several demographic and clinical features

  12. Clinical patterns of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of disorders with different disease manifestations among various populations. There are few reports of JIA among indigenous Africans especially sub-Saharan Africa. We present herein the clinical patterns of JIA encountered at a tertiary hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. Method Hospital records of patients with a diagnosis of chronic arthritis with onset at the age of 16 years or less presenting to University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia for the periods 1994–98 and 2006–2010 were retrospectively reviewed and reclassified as Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) based on the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILA R) JIA diagnostic criteria. Results In total, 126 patients with chronic arthritis of onset at age 16 years or less were evaluated over these periods at the hospital. Of these, 85 could further be analyzed by ILAR JIA criteria but 7 (8.24%) were HIV seropositive and were assessed separately. The average age at disease onset among the 78 JIA patients was 8.70 years (range: 1–15 years) with average age at first visit to hospital being 11.3 years (range: 2 to 25 years) and with a female to male ratio of 1.2:1. Polyarticular rheumatoid factor negative JIA, at 34.62%, was the most frequent type of chronic arthritis encountered. Oligoarthritis was found in 32.05% while 11.54% and 14.10% were polyarticular rheumatoid factor positive and systemic JIA, respectively. Enthesitis-related arthritis was found in 6.41% and only 1.28% were determined to have psoriatic arthritis among this population. Conclusion JIA is predominantly a polyarticular rheumatoid factor negative disease in Zambia. Late presentation is an issue with major implications for educational input and resource acquisition. There is need to elucidate the genetics and environmental factors of JIA in this region. PMID:24034206

  13. The Clinical Phenotypes of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Targoff, Ira N.; Huber, Adam M.; Malley, James D.; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2015-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes and other systemic features. Although juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), the most common form of JIIM, has been well-studied, the other major clinical subgroups of JIIM, including juvenile polymyositis (JPM) and juvenile myositis overlapping with another autoimmune or connective tissue disease (JCTM), have not been well characterized, and their similarity to the adult clinical subgroups is also unknown. We enrolled 436 patients with JIIM, including 354 classified as JDM, 33 as JPM and 49 as JCTM, in a nationwide registry study. The aim of this study was to compare demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, including myositis autoantibodies, and outcomes, among these clinical subgroups, as well as with published data on adult IIM patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. Random forest classification and logistic regression modeling were used to compare clinical subgroups, following univariate analysis. JDM was characterized by typical rashes, including Gottron’s papules, heliotrope rash, malar rash, periungual capillary changes and other photosensitive and vasculopathic skin rashes. JPM was characterized by more severe weakness, higher creatine kinase levels, falling episodes and more frequent cardiac disease. JCTM had more frequent interstitial lung disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon, arthralgia and malar rash. Differences in autoantibody frequency were also evident, with anti-p155, anti-MJ and anti-Mi2 seen more frequently in patients with JDM, anti-signal recognition particle and anti-Jo1 in JPM, and anti-U1RNP, PM-Scl and other myositis-associated autoantibodies more commonly present in JCTM. Mortality was highest in JCTM, whereas hospitalizations and wheelchair usage were highest in JPM patients. Several demographic and clinical features were shared between juvenile and adult IIM subgroups

  14. Optimisation of disease assessments in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, A; Schiappapietra, B; Dalprà, S; Calandra, S; Martini, A; Ravelli, A

    2014-01-01

    A variety of clinical measures are available for assessment of disease status of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in clinical trials, clinical care and long-term outcome surveys. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Pediatric 30 remains the preferred primary outcome measure for registrative trials, although in most therapeutic studies performed in the 2000s patients were also evaluated for more stringent levels of improvement, that is, applying the ACR Pediatric 50, 70, 90, and 100 response criteria. Because the recent therapeutic advances have made inactive disease an achievable goal in most patients, it has been suggested that endpoints for future clinical trials incorporate the evaluation of disease activity state, namely the assessment of inactive disease and low disease activity. The introduction of the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS) and the establishment of its cut-offs for various disease activity states may foster the implementation of the treat-to-target strategy in both clinical trials and routine practice. In recent years, there has been an increased focus on the inclusion of patient and child perspectives in health outcome measures through the use of parent/child-reported outcomes. Integration of these measures in the clinical evaluation is considered important as they reflect the parent's and child's perception of the disease course and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Future studies will show whether the newer imaging modalities, namely magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can replace conventional radiography for the assessment of structural joint damage and its progression.

  15. Cardiac involvement in adult and juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Thomas; Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Sanner, Helga

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) include the main subgroups polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), inclusion body myositis (IBM) and juvenile DM (JDM). The mentioned subgroups are characterised by inflammation of skeletal muscles leading to muscle weakness and other organs can also be affected as well. Even though clinically significant heart involvement is uncommon, heart disease is one of the major causes of death in IIM. Recent studies show an increased prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in JDM and DM/PM, which need attention. The risk of developing atherosclerotic coronary artery disease is increased twofold to fourfold in DM/PM. New and improved diagnostic methods have in recent studies in PM/DM and JDM demonstrated a high prevalence of subclinical cardiac involvement, especially diastolic dysfunction. Interactions between proinflammatory cytokines and traditional risk factors might contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction. Heart involvement could also be related to myocarditis and/or myocardial fibrosis, leading to arrhythmias and congestive heart failure, demonstrated both in adult and juvenile IIM. Also, reduced heart rate variability (a known risk factor for cardiac morbidity and mortality) has been shown in long-standing JDM. Until more information is available, patients with IIM should follow the same recommendations for cardiovascular risk stratification and prevention as for the corresponding general population, but be aware that statins might worsen muscle symptoms mimicking myositis relapse. On the basis of recent studies, we recommend a low threshold for cardiac workup and follow-up in patients with IIM. PMID:27752355

  16. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis overview and involvement of the temporomandibular joint: prevalence, systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Ruy

    2015-02-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the many joints involved in the inflammatory arthritides. As imaging of joints has developed, so have the data regarding extent and prevalence of TMJ involvement in these diseases. TMJ disease is especially prevalent in juvenile arthritis. The adult and pediatric inflammatory arthritides share common pathophysiology but are still markedly different. The preponderance of TMJ arthritis research exists in juvenile arthritis. This article discusses classification, treatment, and TMJ involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  17. IL-1 Inhibition in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Giancane, Gabriella; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Bracciolini, Giulia; Consolaro, Alessandro; Ravelli, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is the form of childhood arthritis whose treatment is most challenging. The demonstration of the prominent involvement of interleukin (IL)-1 in disease pathogenesis has provided the rationale for the treatment with biologic medications that antagonize this cytokine. The three IL-1 blockers that have been tested so far (anakinra, canakinumab, and rilonacept) have all been proven effective and safe, although only canakinumab is currently approved for use in sJIA. The studies on IL-1 inhibition in sJIA published in the past few years suggest that children with fewer affected joints, higher neutrophil count, younger age at disease onset, shorter disease duration, or, possibly, higher ferritin level may respond better to anti-IL-1 treatment. In addition, it has been postulated that use of IL-1 blockade as first-line therapy may take advantage of a “window of opportunity,” in which disease pathophysiology can be altered to prevent the occurrence of chronic arthritis. In this review, we analyze the published literature on IL-1 inhibitors in sJIA and discuss the rationale underlying the use of these medications, the results of therapeutic studies, and the controversial issues. PMID:27999545

  18. Laboratory Indicators of Aggrecan Turnover in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna; Kuźnik-Trocha, Kornelia; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Jura-Półtorak, Agnieszka; Olczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Evaluation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), as an early marker of aggrecan degradation, and chondroitin sulfate 846 epitope (CS846), as a biomarker of CS synthesis, is an attempt at answering the question whether the therapy used in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients contributes to the normalization of biochemical changes in aggrecan. Methods and Results. Serum levels of CS and CS846 as well as catalase (CT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in erythrocyte were assessed in patients before and after treatment. In the course of JIA, aggrecan metabolism is disturbed, which is reflected by a decrease (p < 0.001) in CS serum level and an increase (p < 0.05) in CS846 concentration. Furthermore, increased (p < 0.001) activities of CT, SOD, and GPx in untreated JIA patients were recorded. The anti-inflammatory treatment resulted in the normalization of CS846 level and SOD and GPx activities. In untreated patients, we have revealed a significant correlation between serum CS and CS846, CT, CRP, ESR, MMP-3, and ADAMTS-4, respectively, as well as between CS846 and CT, GPx, CRP, ESR, and TGF-β1, respectively. Conclusion. The observed changes of CS and CS846 in JIA patients indicate a further need of the therapy continuation aimed at protecting a patient from a possible disability. PMID:26924871

  19. Autoimmune response to transthyretin in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Cristina C.; Lele, Aditi; Janow, Ginger; Becerra, Aniuska; Bauli, Francesco; Saad, Fawzy A.; Perino, Giorgio; Montagna, Cristina; Cobelli, Neil; Hardin, John; Stern, Lawrence J.; Ilowite, Norman; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common pediatric rheumatological condition. Although it has been proposed that JIA has an autoimmune component, the autoantigens are still unknown. Using biochemical and proteomic approaches, we identified the molecular chaperone transthyretin (TTR) as an antigenic target for B and T cell immune responses. TTR was eluted from IgG complexes and affinity purified from 3 JIA patients, and a statistically significant increase in TTR autoantibodies was observed in a group of 43 JIA patients. Three cryptic, HLA-DR1–restricted TTR peptides, which induced CD4+ T cell expansion and IFN-γ and TNF-α production in 3 out of 17 analyzed patients, were also identified. Misfolding, aggregation and oxidation of TTR, as observed in the synovial fluid of all JIA patients, enhanced its immunogenicity in HLA-DR1 transgenic mice. Our data point to TTR as an autoantigen potentially involved in the pathogenesis of JIA and to oxidation and aggregation as a mechanism facilitating TTR autoimmunity. PMID:26973882

  20. Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Oray, Merih; Tuğal-Tutkun, İlknur

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric uveitis may be a serious health problem because of the lifetime burden of vision loss due to severe complications if the problem is not adequately treated. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis is characterized by insidious onset and potentially blinding chronic anterior uveitis. Periodic ophthalmologic screening is of utmost importance for early diagnosis of uveitis. Early diagnosis and proper immunomodulatory treatment are essential for good visual prognosis. The goal of treatment is to achieve enduring drug-free remission. The choice of therapeutic regimen needs to be tailored to each individual case. One must keep in mind that patients under immunomodulatory treatment should be monitored closely due to possible side effects. Local and systemic corticosteroids have long been the mainstay of therapy; however, long-term corticosteroid therapy should be avoided due to serious side effects. Steroid-sparing agents in the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis include antimetabolites and biologic agents in refractory cases. Among the various immunomodulatory agents, methotrexate is generally the first choice, as it has a well-established safety and efficacy profile in pediatric cases and does not appear to increase the risk of cancer. Other classic immunomodulators that may also be used in combination with methotrexate include azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporin A. Biologic agents, primarily tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors including infliximab or adalimumab, should be considered in cases of treatment failure with classic immunomodulatory agents. PMID:27800265

  1. Altered signaling in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Macaubas, Claudia; Wong, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yujuan; Nguyen, Khoa D.; Lee, Justin; Milojevic, Diana; Shenoi, Susan; Stevens, Anne M.; Ilowite, Norman; Saper, Vivian; Lee, Tzielan; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is characterized by systemic inflammation and arthritis. Monocytes are implicated in sJIA pathogenesis, but their role in disease is unclear. The response of sJIA monocytes to IFN may be dysregulated. We examined intracellular signaling in response to IFN type I (IFNα) and type II (IFNγ) in monocytes during sJIA activity and quiescence, in 2 patient groups. Independent of disease activity, monocytes from Group 1 (collected between 2002-2009) showed defective STAT1 phosphorylation downstream of IFNs, and expressed higher transcript levels of SOCS1, an inhibitor of IFN signaling. In the Group 2 (collected between 2011-2014), monocytes of patients with recent disease onset were IFNγ hyporesponsive, but in treated, quiescent subjects, monocytes were hyperresponsive to IFNγ. Recent changes in medication in sJIA may alter the IFN hyporesponsiveness. Impaired IFN/pSTAT1 signaling is consistent with skewing of sJIA monocytes away from an M1 phenotype and may contribute to disease pathology. PMID:26747737

  2. Report - Recurrent hip arthritis diagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tung-Ming; Yang, Kuender D; Yong, Su-Boon

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. It is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with arthritis of unknown etiology that begins before the age of 16 and persists for longer than 6 weeks. In this report, the case of a child who suffered recurrent alternative hip arthritis with bilateral hip arthritis is examined, in which he was finally diagnosed as suffering from Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A 14-year-old boy of Taiwanese origin presented with a normal birth and developmental history. At the age of 10, right-side hip joint pain was experienced, which later migrated to the left side. On further inspection, synovium hypertrophy, cartilage erosion and hip turbid fluid accumulation were found and aseptic arthritis was presumed to be the primary cause. However, after re-examining both his clinical history and presentation, Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was the final diagnosis. Any child presenting with repeat joint swelling are at risk of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is still to be the case if symptoms recede or heal and no initial diagnosis is made. Therefore, a better understanding of the risk of recurrent arthritis is needed. It cannot be emphasized strongly enough that Juvenile idiopathic arthritis should be suspected at all times when a child suffers from recurrent aseptic arthritis of the hip joint.

  3. Treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a revolution in care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A generation ago, children with arthritis faced a lifetime of pain and disability. Today, there are a multitude of treatment options, including a variety of biologics targeting key cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. While non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids were once the mainstay of therapy, they are now largely used as bridge or adjunctive therapies. Among the conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, methotrexate remains first-line therapy for most children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) due to its long track record of safety and effectiveness in the management of peripheral arthritis. Sulfasalazine and leflunomide may also have a secondary role. The tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) have shown tremendous benefit in children with polyarticular JIA and likely in enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic JIA as well. There may be additional benefit in combining TNFi with methotrexate. Abatacept and tocilizumab also appear to benefit polyarticular JIA; the role of rituximab remains unclear. For the treatment of systemic JIA, while the TNFi are of less benefit, blockade of interleukin-1 or interleukin-6 is highly effective. Additionally, interleukin-1 blockade appears to be effective treatment of macrophage activation syndrome, one of the most dangerous complications of JIA; specifically, anakinra in combination with cyclosporine and corticosteroids may obviate the need for cytotoxic approaches. In contrast, methotrexate along with the TNFi and abatacept are effective agents for the management of uveitis, another complication of JIA. Overall, the biologics have demonstrated an impressive safety record in children with JIA, although children do need to be monitored for rare but potentially dangerous adverse events, such as tuberculosis and other infections; paradoxical development of additional autoimmune diseases; and possibly an increased risk of malignancy. Finally, there may be a window of opportunity

  4. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in the Era of International Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Uziel, Yosef

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Improved understanding of its pathogenesis has led to international cooperation in clinical studies. Multicenter, international collaborations and research facilitate rapid enrollment of enough patients to enable a variety of studies, including those of epidemiology, diagnostic and classification criteria, genetic disease predisposition, pathogenesis, outcomes, and treatment protocols. In the last 20 years, the vision of the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trial Organization (PRINTO) has become a reality of worldwide collaboration in pediatric rheumatology research, including North American and European research groups. Major advances have been made in treating systemic JIA and its main complication, macrophage-activating syndrome (MAS). Single Hub and Access Point to Pediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) is a project of the European Society of Pediatric Rheumatology with the goal of improving clinical care. Based on evidence in the scientific literature, position papers regarding optimal clinical approaches and care have been published. Formal, validated assessment tools to evaluate response to treatment have been developed. Recommendations have been established to encourage international research collaborations, especially in light of major advances achieved in the genetics of pediatric rheumatologic diseases and the need to share biological samples among different countries and continents. Every participating country has disease information available for patients and families. Additionally, educational programs and updated syllabi for pediatric rheumatology have been written to promote similar, high-level academic training in different countries. These efforts have resulted in significant improvements in treatment and in patient prognosis. However, improved cooperation is needed to enhance research with biological and genetic samples. The Israeli Research Group for

  5. Trial of Early Aggressive Therapy in Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Carol A.; Giannini, Edward H.; Spalding, Steven J.; Hashkes, Philip J.; O’Neil, Kathleen M.; Zeft, Andrew S.; Szer, Ilona S.; Ringold, Sarah; Brunner, Hermine I.; Schanberg, Laura E.; Sundel, Robert P.; Milojevic, Diana; Punaro, Marilynn G.; Chira, Peter; Gottlieb, Beth S.; Higgins, Gloria C.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Kimura, Yukiko; Hamilton, Stephanie; Johnson, Anne; Huang, Bin; Lovell, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine if aggressive treatment initiated early in the course of rheumatoid factor positive or negative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (poly-JIA) can induce clinical inactive disease (CID) within 6 months. METHODS Between May 2007 and October 2010 a multi-center, prospective, double blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial of two aggressive treatments was conducted in 85 children aged 2 to 16 years with polyarticular JIA of less than 12 months duration. Patients received either methotrexate 0.5 mg/kg/wk SQ (40 mg max), etanercept 0.8 mg/kg/wk (50 mg max), prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/d (60 mg max) tapered to 0 by 17 weeks (Arm 1), or methotrexate (same dose as Arm 1), etanercept placebo, and prednisolone placebo (Arm 2). The primary outcome was CID at 6 months. An exploratory phase determined the rate of clinical remission on medication (6 months of continuous CID) at 12 months. RESULTS By 6 months, 17 of 42 (40%) of patients in Arm 1 and 10 of 43 (23%) in Arm 2 had achieved CID (X2 = 2.91; p = 0.088). After 12 months, 9 patients in Arm 1 and 3 in Arm 2 achieved clinical remission on medication (p = 0.0534). There were no significant inter-arm differences in adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Although this study did not meet its primary endpoint, early aggressive therapy in this cohort of children with recent onset polyarticular JIA resulted in substantial proportions of patients in both arms achieving CID by 6 months and clinical remission on medication within 12 months of treatment. PMID:22183975

  6. Incidence of herpes zoster infections in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Nimmrich, S; Horneff, G

    2015-03-01

    The risk of herpes zoster among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) exposed to biologics has not been evaluated. We determined incidence rates of herpes zoster among children with JIA in correlation with medication at time of occurrence and total drug exposure. The German biologics register database was used to identify patients with herpes zoster. Crude infection rates and incidence ratios (IRR) were compared to published rates. Demographics and overall exposure and particular exposure time to corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and biologics were analyzed. The JIA cohort included 3,042 patients with 5,557.9 person-years of follow-up; 1,628 have used corticosteroids, 2,930 methotrexate and 1,685 etanercept. In total, 17 herpes zoster events have been documented [6/1,000 patients (3.5-9.0); 3.1/1,000 patient-years (1.9-4.9)]. Thus, the incidence rate in JIA patients was higher than expected [IRR 2.9 (1.8-4.5), p < 0.001]. In all patients, the event resolved completely. There were two complications, one patient developed intercostal neuralgia, and one had a recurrent herpes zoster. Compared to the healthy population, a significant higher IRR is observed in JIA patients who received a monotherapy with etanercept or in combination with steroids and methotrexate, but not in JIA patients exposed to methotrexate without biologics. In comparison with our control group of patients treated with methotrexate, the IRR was higher for exposure to etanercept monotherapy and combination of etanercept and corticosteroids irrespective of methotrexate use. A generally higher incidence rate in JIA patients treated with etanercept was observed. No serious or refractory manifestations occurred.

  7. Mechanism of osteoporosis in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: experimental scoliosis in pinealectomized chickens.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hitoshi; Machida, Masafumi; Saito, Masashi; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hosogane, Naobumi; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Morio; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2011-11-01

    To clarify the mechanism of osteoporosis in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), we investigated radiological and histological changes in the cervical vertebrae of a chicken thoracic scoliosis model. Forty newly hatched broiler chicks were randomly divided into four equal groups: sham-operated chickens serving as control (CON), pinealectomized chickens (PNX), sham-operated (CON + MLT) and pinealectomized chickens (PNX + MLT) that received intraperitoneal administration of melatonin. Pinealectomy was performed at the age of 3 days, and the chickens were killed at 2 months of age. Postmortem X-rays were examined for the presence of scoliosis, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images were taken to evaluate the microstructure of the cervical vertebrae. Histological specimens of the scanned cervical vertebra were prepared, and a midsagittal section was stained with hematoxylin and eosin and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase to evaluate the numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, respectively. Scoliosis developed at the thoracic spine in all chickens of the PNX and in two of the PNX + MLT group. Micro-CT data revealed that chickens in the PNX group had a greater degree of generalized osteoporosis compared with the other birds. The number of osteoblasts was significantly decreased in the PNX group, while no significant difference was observed among chickens in the numbers of osteoclasts. Our results suggest that melatonin deficiency reduces osteoblast proliferation and leads to the development of scoliosis and osteoporosis. The restoration of melatonin prevented the development of scoliosis and osteoporosis, indicating that melatonin levels may be crucial to the development of deformity and osteoporosis in AIS.

  8. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Osteoporosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Osteoporosis A A A What's ... you're in your mid-20s. What Is Osteoporosis? If someone has osteoporosis (say: oss-tee-oh- ...

  9. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Osteoporosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Osteoporosis Print A A A ... you're in your mid-20s. What Is Osteoporosis? If someone has osteoporosis (say: oss-tee-oh- ...

  10. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; v. d. Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as ‘JIA-uveitis’) has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze uveitis activity, complications and visual prognosis in adulthood. Methods In this multicenter study, 67 adult patients (129 affected eyes) with JIA-uveitis were retrospectively studied for best corrected visual acuity, visual fields, uveitis activity, topical/systemic treatments, ocular complications, and ocular surgeries during their 18th, 22nd and 30th year of life. Because treatment strategies changed after the year 1990, outcomes were stratified for onset of uveitis before and after 1990. Results Sixty-two of all 67 included patients (93%) had bilateral uveitis. During their 18th life year, 4/52 patients (8%) had complete remission, 28/52 (54%) had uveitis activity and 37/51 patients (73%) were on systemic immunomodulatory treatment. Bilateral visual impairment or legal blindness occurred in 2/51 patients (4%); unilateral visual impairment or legal blindness occurred in 17/51 patients (33%) aged 18 years. The visual prognosis appeared to be slightly better for patients with uveitis onset after the year 1990 (for uveitis onset before 1990 (n = 7) four patients (58%) and for uveitis onset after 1990 (n = 44) 13 patients (30%) were either visual impaired or blind). At least one ocular surgery was performed in 10/24 patients (42%) between their 18th and 22nd year of life. Conclusions Bilateral visual outcome in early adulthood in patients with JIA-uveitis appears to be fairly good, although one third of the patients developed one visually impaired or blind eye. However, a fair amount of the patients suffered from ongoing uveitis activity and needed ongoing treatment as well as surgical interventions. Awareness of these findings is important for ophthalmologists and

  11. Effects of physical training on bone mineral density in fertile women with idiopathic osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Ingrid; Brinck, Jonas; Sääf, Maria

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether moderate physical training can improve the bone mineral density (BMD) in women with idiopathic osteoporosis. Ten pre-menopausal women aged 24-44 years diagnosed with idiopathic osteoporosis were included in the study. The physical training program consisted of three fast 30-min walks plus one or two sessions of 1-h training per week during 1 year at a training centre separate from the hospital. All patients were given supplements of vitamin D and calcium. Bone mineral density was measured in the femoral neck area and the lumbar spine by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The measurements were performed at baseline and after 12 months of training and compared with the measurements at the time of diagnosis, 1-3 years before the study. Eight women fulfilled the 12-month training period, and their mean (SD) BMD at start was 0.88 (0.08) g/cm(2) in the spine and 0.76 (0.13) g/cm(2) in the femoral neck. The mean spine BMD increase was 0.031 g/cm(2) (3.5%) after 1 year of training, which was significant (Wilcoxon's non-parametric test, p = 0.018). The mean increment in BMD in the femoral neck was insignificant, 0.007 g/cm(2) (0.9%) after the intervention (p = 0.74). However, the bone loss during the 1- to 3-year period from diagnosis to study start was, on average, 0.045 g/cm(2) or 5.0% in the femoral neck (p = 0.042), thus indicating a positive indirect effect of the intervention. There is no evidence-based therapy for women with idiopathic osteoporosis. It is therefore of importance to elucidate the impact of moderate physical activity in this group of patients. A 1-year training program was sufficient to induce a small but significant change in the spine BMD.

  12. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part I: Clinical classifications and radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Matuszewska, Genowefa; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals at the developmental age. Radiography is the primary modality employed in the diagnostic imaging in order to identify changes typical of this disease entity and rule out other bone-related pathologies, such as neoplasms, posttraumatic changes, developmental defects and other forms of arthritis. The standard procedure involves the performance of comparative joint radiographs in two planes. Radiographic changes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis are detected in later stages of the disease. Bone structures are assessed in the first place. Radiographs can also indirectly indicate the presence of soft tissue inflammation (i.e. in joint cavities, sheaths and bursae) based on swelling and increased density of the soft tissue as well as dislocation of fat folds. Signs of articular cartilage defects are also seen in radiographs indirectly – based on joint space width changes. The first part of the publication presents the classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and discusses its radiographic images. The authors list the affected joints as well as explain the spectrum and specificity of radiographic signs resulting from inflammatory changes overlapping with those caused by the maturation of the skeletal system. Moreover, certain dilemmas associated with the monitoring of the disease are reviewed. The second part of the publication will explain issues associated with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, which are more and more commonly applied in juvenile idiopathic arthritis for early detection of pathological features as well as the disease complications. PMID:27679726

  13. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and juvenile idiopathic arthritis: is there an association with disease activity?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine the association between serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), to determine the prevalence of vitamin D (VD) deficiency [25(OH)D=19 ng/ml] and insufficiency [25(OH)D 20-29 ng/ml], and to determine factors associated with ...

  14. IL-6 blockers in systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barone, Patrizia; Pignataro, Rossana; Garozzo, Maria Teresa; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    IL-6 has a key role in the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and activity of Systemic Onset Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA). Tocilizumab (TCZ), the first humanized antihuman IL-6 receptor antibody, inhibits the activity of IL-6. In this review, we summarize the main studies performed, to date, about the use of TCZ in children affected by sJIA refractory to conventional treatment. Nowadays TCZ can be used, alone or in association with Metotrexate, in children older than 2 years. Its use in children younger than 2 years is being investigated. Further study about its use in sJIA and other type of idiopathic arthritis should be done.

  15. Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic onset of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Aggarwal, Hari K; Rao, Avinash; Mittal, Anshul; Jain, Promil

    2016-01-01

    Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is defined as arthritis affecting one or more joint usually in the juvenile age group (< 16 years of age) with or preceded by fever of at least 2 weeks duration that is documented to be daily ("quotidian") for at least 3 days which may be associated with evanescent (non-fixed) erythematous rash or generalized lymph node enlargement or hepatomegaly/splenomegaly/both or serositis. Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a life-threatening complication of sJIA marked by sudden onset of non-remitting high fever, profound depression in all three blood cell lines (i.e. leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia), hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and elevated serum liver enzyme levels. In children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the clinical picture may mimic sepsis or an exacerbation of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 16-year-old female patient presenting with high grade fever with joint pains and generalized weakness which proved to be systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis with macrophage activation syndrome after ruling out all other differential diagnoses and responded well to intravenous steroids.

  16. Osteoporosis in juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus: morphometric and comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Soejima, K; Landing, B H

    1986-01-01

    Ribs and vertebrae of 8 children and young adults aged from 17 months to 24 years with juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, 4 with diabetes secondary to cystic fibrosis and 2 with diabetes secondary to thalassemia major, were analyzed for osteoporosis by a point-count morphometric method. The mean ratio of bone spicule to marrow space in cancellous bone of ribs of patients with juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus or with diabetes mellitus secondary to cystic fibrosis or thalassemia was 55% that of 10 control patients. The lengths of the zones of proliferating and mature cartilage cells in costal epiphyses of patients with juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus were also below normal. The ratio of bone spicule to marrow space of vertebrae of the diabetic patients was not significantly different from control values. The data confirm clinical reports that osteoporosis is a regular feature of juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and suggest that the degree of bone matrix and mineral deficiency in such patients is greater than is usually considered.

  17. Growth retardation and delayed puberty in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Umławska, Wioleta; Prusek-Dudkiewicz, Anna

    2010-03-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common joint disorder in developing children. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is difficult to diagnose and treat. In some patients, signs and symptoms can be frustratingly inconsistent, contradictory or idiosyncratic. Short stature in patients with JIA is usually due to reduced growth in the lower extremities, and only rarely due to reduced growth in the spinal column. In some studies, children with JIA were found to have infantile body proportions. Puberty is delayed in children with JIA. In children with chronic arthritic disorders, there is a strong correlation between the activity of the disease and the age of puberty. The main goals in reducing growth retardation in children with JIA are promoting timely remission and reducing the duration and dosage of corticosteroid treatment. It is important to regularly monitor physical development. Further improvements to the treatment protocol depend on continued interdisciplinary research involving paediatricians, rheumatologists and clinical anthropologists.

  18. Osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, B.L. Melton III, L.J. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 20 chapters. Some of the titles are: Radiology of asteoporosis; Quantitative computed tomography in assessment of osteoporosis; Nuclear medicine and densitometry; Assessment of bone turnover by histormorphometry in osteoporosis; and The biochemistry of bone.

  19. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis is a condition that leads to loss of bone mass. From the outside, osteoporotic bone is ... disease. Prevention is the best measure for treating osteoporosis by eating a recommended balanced diet including foods ...

  20. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis is a disease that thins and weakens the bones. Your bones become fragile and break easily, ... United States, millions of people either already have osteoporosis or are at high risk due to low ...

  1. Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W; Mosner, Michelle; Silverstein, Shari

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes a person to increased risk of fracture. Fractures have severe consequences, so fracture prevention is imperative. Risk factor assessment and bone density testing are important tools in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Actions to promote strong bones include adequate intakes of calcium and vitamin D; being physically active; not smoking; and avoiding excessive alcohol use. There are several FDA-approved medications for the treatment of osteoporosis. The recent attention to osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) and the association between dental and skeletal health speak to the importance of osteoporosis awareness for dental professionals.

  2. Trabecular bone microstructure and local gene expression in iliac crest biopsies of men with idiopathic osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Patsch, Janina M; Kohler, Thomas; Berzlanovich, Andrea; Muschitz, Christian; Bieglmayr, Christian; Roschger, Paul; Resch, Heinrich; Pietschmann, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Male idiopathic osteoporosis (MIO) is a metabolic bone disease that is characterized by low bone mass, microstructural alterations, and increased fracture risk in otherwise healthy men. Although the detailed pathophysiology of MIO has yet to be clarified, evidence increasingly suggests an osteoblastic defect as the underlying cause. In this study we tested the hypothesis that the expression profile of certain osteoblastic or osteoblast-related genes (ie, WNT10B, RUNX2, Osterix, Osteocalcin, SOST, RANKL, and OPG) is different in iliac crest biopsies of MIO patients when compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, we investigated the relation of local gene expression characteristics with histomorphometric, microstructural, and clinical features. Following written informed consent and diligent clinical patient characterization, iliac crest biopsies were performed in nine men. While RNA extraction, reverse-transcription, and real-time polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were performed on one biopsy, a second biopsy of each patient was submitted for histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography (µCT). Age-matched bone samples from forensic autopsies served as controls. MIO patients displayed significantly reduced WNT10B, RUNX2, RANKL, and SOST expression. Performing µCT for the first time in MIO biopsies, we found significant decreases in trabecular number and connectivity density. Trabecular separation was increased significantly, but trabecular thickness was similar in both groups. Histomorphometry revealed decreased BV/TV and osteoid volume and fewer osteoclasts in MIO. By providing evidence for reduced local WNT10B, RUNX2, and RANKL gene expression and histomorphometric low turnover, our data support the osteoblast dysfunction model discussed for MIO. Further, MIO seems to lead to a different microstructural pathology than age-related bone loss.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Arthur B; Laor, Tal

    2013-12-01

    For more than a century, it has been known that juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can affect the temporomandibular joint. With advances in medical imaging in more recent decades, there has been an increase in awareness of the spectrum of pathology that can affect the temporomandibular joint in children with JIA. This pathology can lead to symptoms ranging from decreased chewing ability, jaw and facial pain, headaches and malocclusion to craniofacial morphological changes such as a retrognathic mandible. The purpose of this review is to suggest an MR imaging protocol for the temporomandibular joint and to illustrate normal and abnormal appearances of the joint in children with JIA.

  4. An intra-articular ganglion cyst in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Donna Y; Yee, Keolamau; Burkhalter, William; Okimoto, Kelley Chinen; Kon, Kevin; Kurahara, David K

    2014-01-01

    We report an intra-articular ganglion cyst (IAGC) presenting as knee pain and a mass in a patient with longstanding Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). We could not find a similar case of an IAGC occurring in the knee of JIA patients in the literature. IAGC may need to be included as a possibility in patients with inflammatory arthritis with new-onset knee pain, especially in those with a palpable mass. MRI was useful in distinguishing IAGC from more worrisome causes of a knee mass. Orthopedic input was helpful in diagnosis and treatment. In addition, methotrexate therapy was effective in bringing about a long-lasting remission.

  5. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is at its highest level. After bone mass peaks, all adults start to lose some bone mass.Osteoporosis occurs if you lose too much bone or don't make enough bone to begin with.What are the risk factors for osteoporosis?The following things put you at ...

  6. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  7. Developments in the Classification and Treatment of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Lisa G.; Katz, James D.; Jones, Olcay Y.

    2013-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are rare, heterogeneous autoimmune diseases that share chronic muscle inflammation and weakness. JIIM broadly includes three major clinicopathologic groups: juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile polymyositis, and overlap myositis. A growing spectrum of clinicopathologic groups and serologic phenotypes defined by the presence of myositis-specific or myositis-associated autoantibodies are now recognized, each with differing demographics, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and prognoses. With the first multi-center collaborative studies and controlled trials using standardized preliminarily validated outcome measures, the therapy of juvenile myositis has advanced. Although daily oral corticosteroids remain the backbone of treatment, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are almost always used as adjunctive therapy. Methotrexate is the conventional DMARD for the initial therapy, either alone or combined with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone, and/or intravenous immunoglobulin for patients with moderate to severe disease. Cyclosporine may be added to these or serve as an alternative to methotrexate. Other drugs and biologic therapies, including mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and infliximab, might benefit selected patients with recalcitrant disease, unacceptable steroid toxicity, or patients with risk factors for poor prognosis. The treatment of cutaneous disease, calcinosis, and the role for rehabilitation are also discussed. PMID:24182859

  8. [Change in condylar and mandibular morphology in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: cone beam volumetric imaging].

    PubMed

    Garagiola, Umberto; Mercatali, Lorenzo; Bellintani, Claudio; Fodor, Attila; Farronato, Giampietro; Lőrincz, Adám

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to show the importance of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography to volumetrically quantify TMJ damage in patients with JIA, measuring condylar and mandibular real volumes. 34 children with temporomandibular involvement by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis were observed by Cone Beam Computerized Tomography. 4 were excluded because of several imaging noises. The mandible was isolated from others craniofacial structures; the whole mandibular volume and its components' volumes (condyle, ramus, hemibody, hemisymphysis on right side and on left side) has been calculated by a 3D volume rendering technique. The results show a highly significant statistical difference between affected side volumetric values versus normal side volumetric values above all on condyle region (P < 0.01), while they don't show any statistical differences between right side versus left side. The Cone Beam Computerized Tomography represents a huge improvement in understanding of the condyle and mandibular morphological changes, even in the early stages of the Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. The JIA can lead in children to temporomandibular joint damage with facial development and growth alterations.

  9. The role of heme oxygenase-1 in systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akitaka; Mori, Masaaki; Naruto, Takuya; Nakajima, Shoko; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    We have determined the serum levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in 56 patients with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) and compared these with serum HO-1 levels in healthy controls and patients with other pediatric rheumatic diseases. Serum HO-1 levels were measured by the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean serum HO-1 level in s-JIA patients during the active phase was 123.6 +/- 13.83 ng/ml, which was significantly higher than that in patients with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (p-JIA), Kawasaki disease, systemic lupus erythematosus or mixed connective tissue disease (P < 0.0005). The serum levels of HO-1, cytokines and cytokine receptors in patients with s-JIA were also assessed at both the active and inactive phases. The serum HO-1 level in patients with s-JIA in the active phase was found to be significantly greater than that in patients with the disease in the inactive phase (P < 0.0001). An assessment of the relationships between serum HO-1 levels and other laboratory parameters or cytokines in patients with s-JIA did not reveal any strong correlations. These results suggest that the serum level of HO-1 may be a useful marker for the differential diagnosis of s-JIA. Further study will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism of HO-1 production and to clarify the role of HO-1 in the disease process.

  10. [Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Tavares, Anna Carolina Faria Moreira Gomes; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Guimarães, Luciano Junqueira; Guimarães, Raquel Rosa; Santos, Flávia Patrícia Sena Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Machrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially fatal disease, commonly associated with chronic rheumatic diseases, mainly juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is included in the group of secondary forms of haemophagocytic syndrome, and other causes are lymphoproliferative diseases and infections. Its most important clinical and laboratorial manifestations are non-remitting fever, splenomegaly, bleeding, impairment of liver function, cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypofibrinogenemia and hyperferritinemia. The treatment needs to be started quickly, and the majority of cases have a good response with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. The Epstein-Barr virus is described as a possible trigger for many cases of MAS, especially in these patients in treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. In these refractory cases, etoposide (VP16) should be administered, associated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Our objective is to describe a rare case of MAS probably due to EBV infection in a subject with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which achieved complete remission of the disease after therapy guided by 2004-HLH protocol.

  11. Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nanes, Mark S; Kallen, Caleb B

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are common and result in extensive morbidity and mortality. It is possible to decrease the risk of fracture in postmenopausal, male, and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis with appropriate screening and treatment. The assessment of fracture risk, for which bone densitometry is only 1 component, should be the main focus of patient evaluation. Epidemiologically derived risk-assessment tools such as World Health Organization Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) provide physicians with a way to determine the 10-year risk of osteoporotic fracture and effectively choose candidates for therapy. A number of potent skeletal antiresorptive and anabolic drugs have become available to treat osteoporosis and prevent up to 70% of fractures. Here, we provide a detailed update on clinical osteoporosis, the contribution of bone densitometry, and the approach to patients using risk assessment in the consideration of treatments. Progress in osteoporosis is an example of successful bench-to-bedside research benefitting populations worldwide.

  12. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention and Treatment The good news is that osteoporosis can often be prevented and treated. Healthy lifestyle choices such as proper diet, exercise, and treatment medications can help prevent further bone ...

  13. [The spa and health resort- based treatment of back pain syndrome in the adolescents presenting with juvenile idiopathic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Kravtsova, E Yu; Murav'ev, S V; Kravtsov, Yu I

    2017-01-01

    The relevance of the problem arises from the lack of substantiation for the inclusion of transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tSDCS) in the comprehensive spa and health resort-based treatment of back pain syndrome in the adolescents presenting with juvenile idiopathic scoliosis.

  14. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies: an Update on Classification and Treatment with Special Focus on Juvenile Forms.

    PubMed

    Pagnini, Ilaria; Vitale, Antonio; Selmi, Carlo; Cimaz, Rolando; Cantarini, Luca

    2017-02-01

    Juvenile inflammatory myopathies represent a heterogeneous group of rare and potentially fatal disorders of unknown aetiology, characterised by inflammation and proximal and symmetric muscle weakness. Beyond many similarities, specific clinical, laboratoristic and histopathologic features underlie different subsets with distinguishing demographic, prognostic and therapeutic peculiarities. Over time, several forms of inflammatory idiopathic myopathies have been described, including macrophagic myofascitis, immune-mediated necrozing myopathy and the spectrum of amyopathic dermatomyositis that include hypomyopathic dermatomyositis, inclusion body myositis and cancer-associated myositis occurring almost exclusively in adults. However, juvenile dermatomyositis is the most frequent in childhood, whereas polymyositis is relatively more frequent in adults. The aetiology is nowadays widely unclear; however, current theories contemplate a combination of environmental triggers, immune dysfunction and specific tissue responses involving muscle, skin and small vessels endothelium in genetically susceptible individuals. Myositis-specific autoantibodies, found almost exclusively in patients with myositis and myositis-associated autoantibodies, detectable both among patients with myositis and in subjects suffering from other autoimmune diseases, have an important clinical role because of their relation to specific clinical features, response to therapy and prognosis. The gold standard treatment for juvenile dermatomyositis is represented by corticosteroids, along with adjunctive steroid-sparing immunosuppressive therapies, which are used to counteract disease activity, prevent mortality, and reduce long-term disability. Further treatment approach such as biologic agents and autologous stem cell transplantation are emerging during the last years, in particular in patients difficult to treat and with poor prognosis. Therefore, a highly medical specialised approach is required for

  15. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... if your provider thinks the cause of your osteoporosis is a medical condition, rather than the slow bone loss that occurs with aging. DEXA scan results compare your bone mineral density with both a young adult who has no bone loss and with people ...

  16. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis complicated by amyloidosis with secondary nephrotic syndrome - effective treatment with tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Małgorzata; Jednacz, Ewa; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    A case report of a boy with juvenile idiopathic arthritis since the age of 2 years, generalized onset, complicated by nephrotic syndrome due to secondary type A amyloidosis is presented. In the patient the disease had an especially severe course, complicated by frequent infections, making routine treatment difficult. Amyloidosis was diagnosed in the 5(th) year of the disease based on a rectal biopsy. Since the disease onset the boy has been taking prednisolone and sequentially cyclosporine A, methotrexate, chlorambucil, etanercept, and cyclophosphamide. Clinical and laboratory remission was observed after treatment with tocilizumab. After 42 months of treatment with tocilizumab the boy's condition is good. There is no pain or joint edema, and no signs of nephrotic syndrome.

  17. The importance of an ophthalmologic examination in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Uveitis occurs within the first year of arthritis onset in 73% of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) considered at risk. The intraocular inflammation is characterized by an insidious onset and a silent and chronic clinical course capable of producing significant visual loss due to complications such as: cataract formation, secondary glaucoma, maculopathy and optic neuropathy. The absence of initial signs and symptoms, along with a deficient ophthalmic monitoring produce a delay in diagnosis with serious consequences. It has been estimated that 47% of JIA patients at risk for developing uveitis are legally blind (20/200 or worse) at least in one eye at the time of their first visit to the ophthalmologist. To reduce ocular complications and improve their visual outcome, it is necessary that rheumatologists refer all patients recently diagnosed (within the first month) with JIA for an ophthalmic evaluation, and maintain periodical follow-up visits based on classification and risk category of the disease.

  18. [Magnetic resonance imaging in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: peculiarities of imaging children].

    PubMed

    Navallas, M; Rebollo Polo, M; Riaza, L; Muchart López, J; Maristany, T

    2013-09-01

    The term juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) encompasses a heterogeneous group of arthritides with no known cause that begin before the age of 16 years and persist for at least 6 weeks. In recent decades, imaging techniques have acquired a fundamental role in the diagnosis and follow-up of JIA, owing to the unification of the different criteria for classification, which has strengthened the research in this field, and to the development of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. In this article, we briefly explain what JIA is. Moreover, we describe the role and limitations of plain-film radiography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Finally, we review the MRI protocol and findings, and we comment on the differential diagnosis.

  19. Imaging in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA): an update with particular emphasis on MRI.

    PubMed

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; de Horatio, L Tanturri; Boavida, P; Lambot-Juhan, K; Rosendahl, K; Tomà, P; Muller, Ls Ording

    2013-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous condition encompassing all forms of chronic arthritis of unknown origin and with onset before 16 years of age. During the last decade new, potent therapeutic agents have become available, underscoring the need for accurate monitoring of therapeutic response on both disease activity and structural damage to the joint. However, so far, treatment efficacy is based on clinical ground only, although clinical parameters are poor markers for disease activity and progression of structural damage. Not so for rheumatoid arthritis patients where the inclusion of radiographic assessment has been required by FDA to test the disease-modifying potential of new anti-rheumatic drugs. In imaging of children with JIA there has been a shift from traditional radiography towards newer techniques such as ultrasound and MRI, however without proper evaluation of their accuracy and validity. We here summarize present knowledge and discuss future challenges in imaging children with JIA.

  20. Prevention and Management of Cataracts in Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis–Associated Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis can be associated with vision-compromising complications such as cataracts, glaucoma, synechiae, and band keratopathy. Of these, cataracts are one of the most common sequelae of JIA-associated uveitis and can result in significant visual disability. Risk factors for cataracts include posterior synechiae and longstanding ocular inflammation. Prevention of cataract development is crucial through appropriate control of uveitis. However, not all preventive measures are successful, and further management consisting of medical and surgical techniques is often necessary. Various factors should be taken into consideration when deciding on cataract management, including timing of surgery and placement of an intraocular lens. Continued partnership between pediatric rheumatologists and pediatric ophthalmologists can help ensure favorable visual outcomes. PMID:22201032

  1. Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lane, J M; Russell, L; Khan, S N

    2000-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a disorder of decreased bone mass, microarchitectural deterioration, and fragility fractures. Osteoporosis is widespread and can affect people of all ethnic backgrounds and many older women and men. An essential element in preventing osteoporosis is the achievement of normal peak bone mass. Adequate nutrition, appropriate calcium and vitamin D intake, regular menstrual cycles and a well balanced exercise program of exercise are essential elements in achieving peak bone mass. At menopause women undergo accelerated bone loss. Thereafter, women and men gradually lose bone mass. A loss of one standard deviation give rise to an enhanced twofold risk of spine fractures or a 2.5 risk of hip fracture. Bone mass is determined by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, quantitative computed tomography scan, and a peripheral ultrasound. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry has outstanding precision (within 1% to 2%), and has the ability to show the efficacy of drug intervention. Peripheral measurements may identify osteoporosis but only have a 70% correlation with hip and spine bone mass. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry determines bone mass in a patient but the bone collagen breakdown products (N-telopeptide crosslinks) establish the current rate of bone loss. Major risk factors leading to fragility fracture include low body weight, history of fracture, family history of osteoporosis, and smoking. All individuals should ingest adequate calcium and vitamin D, exercise, and prevent falls. Women with low bone mass, high urinary bone collagen breakdown products, and/or major risk factors should consider hormone replacement therapy or a selective estrogen receptor modulator (Evista), calcitonin and bisphosphonates (alendronate). These agents successfully increase bone mass and limit fracture risk. Men at risk for fragility fractures respond similarly as women to alendronate and calcitonin. Although vertebral compression fractures can occur spontaneously, hip fractures are

  2. Correlation between compliance and brace treatment in juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: SOSORT 2014 award winner

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the last years, evidence has accumulated in support of bracing as an effective treatment option in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Yet, little information is available on the impact of compliance on the outcome of conservative treatment in scoliotic subjects. The aim of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the association between compliance to brace treatment and the progression of scoliotic curve in patients with idiopathic adolescent (AIS) or juvenile scoliosis (JIS). Methods Among 1.424 patients treated for idiopathic scoliosis, 645 were eligible for inclusion criteria. Three outcomes were distinguished in agreement with the SRS criteria: curve correction, curve stabilization and curve progression. Brace wearing was assessed by one orthopaedic surgeon (LA) and scored on a standardized form. Compliance to treatment was categorized as complete (brace worn as prescribed), incomplete A (brace removed for 1 month), incomplete B (brace removed for 2 months), incomplete C (brace removed during school hours), and incomplete D (brace worn overnight only). Chi square test, T test or ANOVA and ANOVA for repeated measures tests were used as statistical tests. Results The results from our study showed that at follow-up the compliance was: Complete 61.1%; Incomplete A 5.2%; Incomplete B 10.7%; Incomplete C 14.2%; Incomplete D 8.8%. Curve correction was accomplished in 301/319 of Complete, 19/27 Incomplete A, 25/56 Incomplete B, 52/74 Incomplete C, 27/46 Incomplete D. Cobb mean value was 29.8 ± 7.5 SD at beginning and 17.1 ± 10.9 SD at follow-up. Both Cobb and Perdriolle degree amelioration was significantly higher in patients with complete compliance over all other groups, both in juvenile, both in adolescent scoliosis. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the rate of surgical treatment was 2.1% among patients with definite outcome and 12.1% among those with drop-out. Treatment compliance showed significant interactions with time

  3. Serum calreticulin as a novel biomarker of juvenile idiopathic arthritis disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Hashaad, Nashwa Ismail; Fawzy, Rasha Mohamed; Elazem, Abeer Ahmed Abo; Youssef, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the relations between calreticulin (CRT) serum level and both disease activity and severity parameters in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Material and Methods In this study, 60 children with JIA and 50 age-and-sex-matched healthy subjects were enrolled. The assessment of the disease activity was done using juvenile arthritis disease activity score 27 (JADAS-27). The assessment of disease severity was done via gray-scale ultrasonography (US) and power Doppler US (PDUS). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assay the serum level of human CRT. Results The mean serum CRT levels in JIA patients was 8.6±1.2 ng/mL and showed a highly significant increase (p=0.001) as compared to the mean serum levels in the controls (5.02±0.77 ng/mL). There were statistically significant positive correlations between the serum CRT levels and disease duration, tender joint count, swollen joint count, visual analog scale, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, JADAS-27, C-reactive protein, rheumatoid factor titer, and ultrasonographic grading for synovitis and neovascularization. Conclusion Elevated serum CRT levels in JIA patients and its correlations with JIA disease activity and severity parameters signified that CRT might be used as a novel biomarker for disease activity and severity in JIA. PMID:28293448

  4. Toward a treat-to-target approach in the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alessandro; Negro, Giorgia; Lanni, Stefano; Solari, Nicoletta; Martini, Alberto; Ravelli, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) render disease remission an attainable goal in many, if not most, patients. This has led to suggestions that future treatment guidelines include an overriding goal to achieve clinical remission or, at least, minimal disease activity. Furthermore, implementation of treatment strategies aimed at achieving and maintaining tight disease control in standard paediatric rheumatology practice has been proposed. A compelling argument is available at this time to suggest that the incorporation of treat-to-target approach in the management of children with JIA may improve disease outcome. Recently, descriptions of disease states that represent suitable therapeutic targets, such as inactive disease, minimal disease activity, or parent- or child-acceptable symptom states, have been developed. In addition, criteria for these states based on the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS) have been identified. Future studies will clarify whether the addition of an imaging assessment to the management of children with JIA will improve the prediction of clinical outcomes.

  5. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Hintze, Gerhard; Graf, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is among the main causes for bone fractures. In this overview we report on the prevalence of the disease, the diagnostic procedures, and the therapeutic options. The prevalence increases with age and women are more often affected than men. The diagnosis usually is made on the basis of dual X-ray absorptiometry. Prophylactic measures include a sufficient intake of calcium and vitamin D. Bisphosphonates play a central role in the pharmacotherapy of this disease.

  6. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, R

    1994-09-20

    Liver cirrhosis may be accompanied by osteoporosis and, rarely, osteomalacia. Normal liver function is required for normal digestion and absorption of calcium-containing nutrients. The liver plays an important role for the metabolisation of vitamin D: the 25-hydroxylation takes place in the liver. However, the respective enzymatic capacity is not limited by liver diseases except for almost complete liver insufficiency. Therefore, true hypovitaminosis D only rarely plays a role in hepatic osteopenia, but direct toxic effects on bone forming cells (osteoblasts) are discussed: e.g. by bile salts. Coexisting hypogonadism leads to further bone loss. Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis in part present with osteoporosis and fractures. Bone histology reveals normal resorption, but decreased formation. Calcitropic hormones are generally normal. Chronic alcoholism induces the same histologic picture in bone, i.e. normal resorption and diminished formation. These changes are reversible after abstinence and as long as of cirrhosis has not yet developed. Patients undergoing liver transplantation due to end stage liver insufficiency including cirrhosis present with diminished bone mass before receiving a new liver, and they show further bone loss after the transplantation due to immunosuppressive treatment including glucocorticoids. There is no specific treatment of bone loss or osteoporosis due to liver cirrhosis. Preventive efforts should be devoted to the avoidance of suboptimal calcium and vitamin D supply, immobilization, and hypogonadism. Fluorides may increase bone mass after liver transplantation--perhaps they are also useful in liver cirrhosis. Antiresorption agents like calcitonins or bisphosphonates may be cautiously tried.

  7. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings.

  8. Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Philip; Cooper, Cyrus

    2006-06-17

    Osteoporosis is a serious public health issue. The past 10 years have seen great advances in our understanding of its epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment, and further advances are rapidly being made. Clinical assessment will probably evolve from decisions mainly being made on the basis of bone densitometry, to use of algorithms of absolute fracture risk. Biochemical markers of bone turnover are also likely to become more widely used. Bisphosphonates will probably remain the mainstay of therapy, but improved understanding of the optimum amount of remodelling suppression and duration of therapy will be important. At the same time, other diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, including biological agents, are likely to become more widespread.

  9. Role of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes in juvenile idiopathic epilepsy in Arabian foals.

    PubMed

    Lichter-Peled, Anat; Polani, Sagi; Stanyon, Roscoe; Rocchi, Mariano; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila

    2013-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic epilepsy (JIE) in Arabian foals resembles benign-familial neonatal convulsion (BFNC) syndrome, a rare idiopathic epilepsy of new-born humans. BFNC syndrome exhibits genetic heterogeneity, as has been hypothesised to occur in Arabian foals, and is known to be caused by mutations in the voltage-gated potassium channel subunit KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes. The close phenotypic characteristics of both Arabian foals and children suggest these epileptic syndromes are caused by the same genetic disorder. In horses, the KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes are located on the terminal region of chromosomes 22 and 9, respectively, essentially homologous to their location on chromosomes 20q13.3 and 8q24 in humans. Gene trees for the KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes between horses and other mammals, particularly humans and mice, were constructed and compared to widely accepted mammalian phylogenetic trees. The KCNQ2 gene tree exhibited close clustering between horses and humans, relative to horses and mice, in contrast to the evolutionary trees of other mammals. Distance values between the horse and human groups were lower as opposed to those found between the horse and mouse groups. The similarity between the horse and the human, especially for the KCNQ2 gene, where the majority of mutations causing BFNC have been found, supports the hypothesis of similar heritable and genetic patterns of the disease in both species and suggests that contrary to the classic mouse-model concept, humans may be a more suitable model for the study of JIE in Arabian foals.

  10. Sustained-release dexamethasone intravitreal implant in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Nucci, Paolo; Baynes, Kimberly; Lowder, Careen Y; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the results of treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis with the use of intravitreal dexamethasone implant. Sixteen eyes with Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis received intravitreal dexamethasone implant to treat recalcitrant anterior segment inflammation (43.7 %), chronic macular edema (6.2 %), or a combination of both (50 %). One month after injection, mean visual acuity had improvement to 39.6 ± 11 ETDRS letters (p < 0.001). Mean AC cells measure at 1 month was 0.79 and 0.75 at 3 months. One month after injection, there was a significant reduction of central retinal thickness (CRT) to 342.4 ± 79.3 µm (p < 0.01). One month after the second implant, 11 eyes (91.6 %) achieved improved activity of the anterior uveitis, and mean best-corrected visual acuity improved to 44.6 ± 8.1 ETDRS letters (p < 0.01). At 1 month after the second injection, 4/5 eyes had resolution of macular edema with CRT of 250.4 ± 13.7 µm (p < 0.01). Of the 16 eyes, 12 eyes received a second injection at mean of 7.5 ± 3.1 months after the first treatment, and 5 eyes received a third Ozurdex injection on average 7 ± 4.6 months after the second injection. Of the 16 eyes, five eyes were pseudophakic prior to injection. Of the remaining 11 eyes, 8 (73 %) developed worsening posterior subcapsular cataract at a mean of 7.3 ± 1.2 months after the first injection. After the first injection, only one eye required topical antiglaucoma therapy with maximum pressure of 25 mmHg. In patients with recalcitrant JIA-associated active uveitis, injection of sustained-release dexamethasone can achieve control of anterior inflammation and resolution of macular edema.

  11. National registry of patients with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies in Hungary--clinical characteristics and disease course of 44 patients with juvenile dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Constantin, T; Ponyi, A; Orbán, I; Molnár, K; Dérfalvi, B; Dicso, F; Kálovics, T; Müller, J; Garami, M; Sallai, A; Balogh, Z; Szalai, Z; Fekete, G; Dankó, K

    2006-05-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive weakness and frequent involvement of internal organs, mainly the pulmonary, gastrointestinal and cardiac systems which considerably contribute to the morbidity and mortality of the IIMs. Aim of this study was to present clinical characteristics, disease course, frequency of relapses and survival in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). A national registry of patients with juvenile IIMs was elaborated by the authors in Hungary. We have summarized data of the register according to signs and symptoms, disease course, frequency of relapses and survival of patients with juvenile IIM. Analysis was performed using data of 44 patients with juvenile DM diagnosed between 1976 and 2004 according to Bohan and Peter's criteria. Survival probability was calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. Data of patients with juvenile DM were compared with data of 66 patients with adult DM. The most frequent cutaneous features were facial erythema and heliotrope rash. Extramuscular and extraskeletal manifestations of the disease were more frequent in adult patients. The most common extramuscular feature was arthralgia in both groups of patients with juvenile or adult DM. Cardiac manifestation of the disease was not observed in juvenile patients. Respiratory muscle involvement and interstitial lung disease (ILD) were more frequent among adult DM patients than cardiac manifestation of the myositis. In view of the disease course, the authors found that frequency of polycyclic and monophasic subtypes of the disease were mainly similar. The hazard of relapse was found higher during the first year after the remission. None of the juvenile patients died. Among adult patients four disease-specific deaths occurred. There was no correlation between relapse free survival and initial therapeutic regimen. Many of our patients had polycyclic or chronic disease

  12. Evaluation of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis in southeastern Turkey: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Şen, V; Ece, A; Uluca, Ü; Güneş, A; Yel, S; Tan, İ; Karabel, D; Yıldırım, B; Haspolat, K

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the disease characteristics of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in southeast Turkey. Methods: The International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) criteria were used to diagnose JIA. Hospital records of the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit, of the Dicle University Hospital, were reviewed retrospectively and demographic, clinical and laboratory data were recorded. Results: Totally 213 children (103 boys, 110 girls), with an age range of 1.6-18 years were enrolled. The mean age of the disease onset was 8.1 years. Polyarticular type was the most common (42.3%) presentation. The frequencies of other JIA subtypes were as follows: oligoarticular 37.1%, systemic 8.9%, enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) 10.8% and psoriatic arthritis 0.9%. The knees (74.2%) and ankles (54.0%) were the most commonly affected joints. Uveitis was found in 4.2% of patients. Anti-nuclear antibodies were positive in 11.7% and HLA-B27 in 2.8% of patients. Active disease was seen in 57 (26.7%) patients at the last visit. Conclusion: In the present study, polyarticular JIA was the predominant subtype and there were fewer patients with positive ANA or uveitis compared to previous studies. Hippokratia 2015, 19 (1): 63-68. PMID:26435650

  13. Optimizing the Wingate Anaerobic Cycling Test for youth with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Joyce; Larché, Maggie J; Timmons, Brian W

    2011-08-01

    The Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) can assess muscle function in youth with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Our objective was to compare peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) when the WAnT is performed with a standard vs. an optimized braking force. Eight patients with JIA between the ages of 8 and 18 participated in two sessions. Optimal braking force was determined with a series of 15-s force-velocity tests performed against braking forces ranging from 3.5 to 8.5% of body weight. Participants then performed two randomized WAnTs against the standard (4.5%) and optimal braking forces. PP tended to be greater in the optimized vs. standard WAnT (12.5 ± 2.6 vs. 10.8 ± 1.0 W/kg, respectively; p = .07). No differences were observed for MP (standard: 6.2 ± 0.9 vs. optimized: 6.2 ± 1.1 W/kg; p = .9). Optimization of the WAnT tended to increase PP by 10-28% in youth with JIA.

  14. Methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: process to approval for JIA indication in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masaaki; Naruto, Takuya; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Murata, Takuji; Takei, Syuji; Tomiita, Minako; Itoh, Yasuhiko; Fujikawa, Satoshi; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), the primary treatment for the articular-type juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), is effective and brings about radiological improvement. Patient compliance is good, and it is recognized that its known side effects, namely, disruption of liver function and induction of pulmonary lesions, are unlikely to be severe at the low MTX doses that are administered. In Japan, MTX was granted approval in 1999 by the then Ministry of Health and Welfare specifically for treating rheumatoid arthritis in adult patients, allowing it be generally used in medical institutions for patients having National Health Insurance. However, in the pediatric field, its use outside the indications has so far been unavoidable, and has been left to the discretion of the physician. Finally, at the present conference, expansion of the indications of MTX for JIA was approved in Japan. It is noteworthy that this expansion of indications was achieved without requiring clinical trials on children sponsored by the pharmaceutical company: it was achieved rather by collecting necessary information through ongoing efforts (including collection and analysis of information about approval status in foreign countries, adequate evidence from the literature, implementation of a clinical use survey in Japan, etc.). It also merits attention that the maximum dose (10 mg/m2) was set on the basis of pharmacokinetic data from children, rather than relying on the dosing method and dose for adults.

  15. Gene Expression Deconvolution for Uncovering Molecular Signatures in Response to Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Alan M.; Yeung, Rae S. M.; Morris, Quaid

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression-based signatures help identify pathways relevant to diseases and treatments, but are challenging to construct when there is a diversity of disease mechanisms and treatments in patients with complex diseases. To overcome this challenge, we present a new application of an in silico gene expression deconvolution method, ISOpure-S1, and apply it to identify a common gene expression signature corresponding to response to treatment in 33 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Using pre- and post-treatment gene expression profiles only, we found a gene expression signature that significantly correlated with a reduction in the number of joints with active arthritis, a measure of clinical outcome (Spearman rho = 0.44, p = 0.040, Bonferroni correction). This signature may be associated with a decrease in T-cells, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets. The products of most differentially expressed genes include known biomarkers for JIA such as major histocompatibility complexes and interleukins, as well as novel biomarkers including α-defensins. This method is readily applicable to expression datasets of other complex diseases to uncover shared mechanistic patterns in heterogeneous samples. PMID:27244050

  16. Use of adalimumab in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis refractory to etanercept and/or infliximab.

    PubMed

    Katsicas, María M; Russo, Ricardo A G

    2009-08-01

    To analyse the effectiveness and safety of adalimumab in a group of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who had failed treatment with etanercept and/or infliximab in a single paediatric rheumatology clinic. Patients with JIA with active polyarthritis refractory to metotrexate (MTX) (> or =20 mg/m2/week) for at least 3 months and to etanercept (up to 1 mg/kg twice weekly) and/or infliximab (up to 10 mg/kg every 4 weeks) for at least 6 months were included. All patients received adalimumab 24 mg/m2/week concomitantly with MTX 7.5-10 mg/week. Evaluation of efficacy included improvement as defined by the ACR paediatric 30 criteria, 50% and 70% improvement and remission. Six patients were included. Three patients met improvement criteria; 50% and 70% improvement occurred in two children. Improvement was sustained for 12, 24 and 36 months, respectively. Remission occurred in one patient. Adalimumab was discontinued due to lack of efficacy in three patients. No side effects were observed. Adalimumab appears to be effective and safe in patients with JIA refractory to other anti-TNF agents. Further controlled studies are needed in order to assess efficacy of adalimumab in children with refractory JIA.

  17. Apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Smolewska, E; Brozik, H; Smolewski, P; Biernacka-Zielins..., M; Darzynkiewicz, Z; Stanczyk, J

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate different aspects of apoptosis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: The frequency of TUNEL positive peripheral blood (PB) lymphocytes (apoptotic index (AI)), as well as serum CD95 (APO1/Fas) antigen expression and serum levels of sFas and interleukin 15 (IL15), were examined in 44 cases of JIA. Results were correlated with type of onset, activity of JIA, and acute phase indicators. Results: The AI of lymphocytes was significantly higher in patients with JIA than in controls (p=0.020). The mean AI of lymphocytes was increased in JIA with systemic type of onset and high activity (p=0.001). Moreover, IL15 levels in systemic disease were higher than in controls (p=0.012). An increased AI correlated with raised IL15 (p=0.046), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.005) and C reactive protein (CRP; p=0.017). Additionally, correlation was found between IL15 and CRP levels (p=0.039). CD95 and sFas levels were unchanged compared with controls. Conclusion: PB lymphocytes of children with JIA have an increased tendency to undergo apoptosis. The degree of apoptosis depends on the type of onset and activity of JIA and correlates with serum levels of IL15. Further studies are needed to explain whether this is an epiphenomenon of the disease activity or is related to the pathogenesis of JIA. PMID:12860732

  18. Infrapatellar bursitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Alqanatish, Jubran T; Petty, Ross E; Houghton, Kristin M; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori B; Cabral, David A; Cairns, Robyn A

    2011-02-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may infrequently present with localized anterior knee pain or swelling, in addition to generalize knee pain induced by JIA. We report five cases of deep infrapatellar bursitis in children with JIA. The clinical features, radiological findings, management, and outcome of five children with JIA and deep infrapatellar bursitis are reviewed. Three boys and two girls with a mean age of 9.8 years (range 6-14 years) were reviewed. Four children had persistent oligoarticular JIA, and one child had extended oligoarticular JIA. The presentation of deep infrapatellar bursitis was variable. In only one patient was the bursal swelling painful. Knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in four patients and demonstrated coexistent knee joint synovitis in three. Treatment included targeted corticosteroid injections into the deep infrapatellar bursa in two cases with complete resolution. One case was treated with corticosteroid injection by an outside health care provider with poor clinical response. Two cases are being treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and methotrexate. Deep infrapatellar bursitis can occur as an isolated finding or concurrently with knee joint synovitis in patients with JIA. Awareness of this entity is important because direct injection of the bursa may be needed for treatment, as the bursa does not communicate with the knee joint. Furthermore, when bursitis is suspected in JIA, MRI can be helpful to confirm the diagnosis, detect concurrent knee joint synovitis, and exclude other pathologies.

  19. A Novel Method for Pathway Identification Based on Attractor and Crosstalk in Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanji; Lin, Shunhua; Li, Changhui; Li, Yizhao; Chen, Lei; Wang, Yingzhen

    2016-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is one of the most common inflammatory disorders of unknown etiology. We introduced a novel method to identify dysregulated pathways associated with polyarticular JIA (pJIA). Material/Methods Gene expression profiling of 61 children with pJIA and 59 healthy controls were collected from E-GEOD-13849; 300 pathways were obtained from Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database and 787,896 protein-protein interaction sets were gathered from the Retrieval of Interacting Genes. Attractor and crosstalk were designed to complement each other to increase the integrity of pathways assessment. Then, impact factor was used to assess the interactions inter-pathways, and RP-value was used to evaluate the comprehensive influential ability of attractors. Results There were seven attractors with p<0.01 and 14 pathways with RP<0.01. Finally, two significantly dysfunctional pathways were found, which were related to pJIA progression: p53 signaling pathway (KEGG ID: 04115) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (KEGG ID: 04932). Conclusions A novel approach that identified the dysregulated pathways in pJIA was constructed based on attractor and crosstalk. The new process is expected to be efficient in the upcoming era of medicine. PMID:27804927

  20. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and athletic participation: are we adequately preparing for sports integration?

    PubMed

    Taxter, Alysha; Foss, Kim Barber; Melson, Paula; Ford, Kevin R; Shaffer, Michael; Myer, Gregory D

    2012-09-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) now have well-controlled disease due to improved therapies and management strategies. Children with JIA are more active than in the past and often participate in dynamic, high-loading sports. Standard measures of disease control include examination findings, laboratory values, and patient-directed surveys. However, these standards do not address the subtle deficits in biomechanics and neuromuscular control, which could place affected joints at higher risk for injury. Currently, there are limited evidence-based guidelines to structure conditioning recommendations as to the fitness and mechanics needed to provide safe integration into sports in this population; therefore, tools that objectively measure function with high accuracy and precision may be warranted. Previous work using 3-dimensional motion analysis demonstrated usefulness in guiding physical therapy treatment to correct these deficits. The use of a multidisciplinary team, including physical therapy, rheumatology, and sports medicine, is crucial for preparing these children to return to play. We suggest that the child transition into a sport preparatory-conditioning program to address any underlying deficits. A pediatric exercise specialist who is sensitive to the needs of this population can work with a physical therapist to then appropriately integrate the child safely into sport. Encouraging an active lifestyle is vital to the management of JIA and does not worsen the symptoms associated with childhood arthritis.

  1. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment.

  2. Condylar asymmetry in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis assessed by cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Huntjens, Elisabeth; Kiss, Gabriel; Wouters, Carine; Carels, Carine

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of condylar asymmetry in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and analysis software. For 20 patients (14 girls and six boys; mean age 11.21 +/- 3.54 years), resultant cross-sectional images of the left and right temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were semi-automatically segmented, and exact registration of the right, with respect to the flipped left grey-level condyle, was obtained. Visual inspection of the volume images in 360 degree rotation showed a wide variety of condylar destruction patterns, ranging from small erosions within the cortex to almost complete deformation of the condylar head. Because segmentation was restricted to the delineation of the cortical region, possible changes in the deeper zones were not reproduced. Descriptive statistics [median and interquartile range (IQR)] and diagrams (frequency distribution) were used to assess the results. Initial analysis of condylar volume (including both flipped left and right) showed a median value for volume of 0.844 cm(3) (IQR 0.323), while the median value for volume difference between both condyles was 0.051 cm(3) (IQR 0.098). Analysis of the degree of asymmetry showed a median value of 26.18 per cent (IQR 14.46). Using the CBCT-based method, it was shown that condylar asymmetry was a common feature in children with JIA. The degree of asymmetry was variable, but significant in the majority of the subjects.

  3. Remission rate is not dependent on the presence of antinuclear antibodies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Glerup, M; Herlin, T; Twilt, M

    2017-03-01

    Recently, it has been hypothesized that the subcategories of the ILAR classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are not homogeneous, and that the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) should lead to a separate entity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate ANA positivity as a predictor of achieving remission. A retrospective single-center cohort study including all JIA patients diagnosed between January 2000 and May 2014. A minimum follow-up of 1 year was required plus the ANA status. ANA positivity was defined as at least two positive results with a titer ≥1:160. Demographic and clinical features were collected. Remission at last follow-up was defined by the Wallace criteria. A total of 625 patients met the inclusion criteria and 230 (37%) were found ANA positive. Analysis showed no difference in remission rate between ANA-positive and ANA-negative patients. Additionally, joint count at diagnosis and at last follow-up were comparable in both groups. ANA positivity was correlated to a female predominance and young age at diagnosis (p < 0.001). Remission rates are not different in ANA-positive patients than in ANA-negative patients. This does not support the hypothesis to possibly divide JIA patients based on their ANA status.

  4. Atypical Cutaneous Blastomycosis in a Child With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis on Infliximab.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert J; Boos, Markus D; Burnham, Jon M; McKay, Eileen M; Kim, Jason; Jen, Melinda

    2015-11-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is a dimorphic fungus endemic to much of North America, particularly the soils of the midwestern and southeastern United States. Human infection typically occurs through inhalation of airborne conidia, which can be followed occasionally by dissemination to the skin, bone, genitourinary system, and central nervous system. A hallmark of the pathogen is that it can cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed populations. Blastomycosis is rare in pediatric patients, with cutaneous manifestations occurring even less frequently. Here, we report the case of a 9-year-old boy on iatrogenic immunosuppression with infliximab and methotrexate for juvenile idiopathic arthritis who presented with a nonhealing, indurated plaque of his right ear with significant superficial yellow crusting in the absence of constitutional symptoms. After failing a prolonged course of topical and oral antibiotic therapy, biopsy and tissue culture revealed Blastomyces dermatitidis infection. The area cleared after treatment with oral fluconazole and withdrawal of infliximab. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a pediatric patient developing an infection with B dermatitidis after initiation of therapy with a tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor. This case also highlights an unusual morphology of cutaneous blastomycosis in an iatrogenically immunosuppressed child.

  5. Gout in a 15-year-old boy with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Hallie; Grant, Kristen; Khanna, Geetika; White, Andrew J

    2014-01-06

    Joint pain is a common complaint in pediatrics and is most often attributed to overuse or injury. In the face of persistent, severe, or recurrent symptoms, the differential typically expands to include bony or structural causes versus rheumatologic conditions. Rarely, a child has two distinct causes for joint pain. In this case, an obese 15-year-old male was diagnosed with gout, a disease common in adults but virtually ignored in the field of pediatrics. The presence of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) complicated and delayed the consideration of this second diagnosis. Indeed, the absence of gout from this patient's differential diagnosis resulted in a greater than two-year delay in receiving treatment. The patients' BMI was 47.4, and he was also mis-diagnosed with osteochondritis dissecans and underwent medical treatment for JIA, assorted imaging studies, and multiple surgical procedures before the key history of increased pain with red meat ingestion, noticed by the patient, and a subsequent elevated uric acid confirmed his ultimate diagnosis. With the increased prevalence of obesity in the adolescent population, the diagnosis of gout should be an important consideration in the differential diagnosis for an arthritic joint in an overweight patient, regardless of age.

  6. Infection-Related Death among Persons with Refractory Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jonathan P.; Wood, Mark; Friswell, Mark; Flood, Terence J.; Foster, Helen E.

    2016-01-01

    Severe infections are emerging as major risk factors for death among children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In particular, children with refractory JIA treated with long-term, multiple, and often combined immunosuppressive and antiinflammatory agents, including the new biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), are at increased risk for severe infections and death. We investigated 4 persons with JIA who died during 1994–2013, three of overwhelming central venous catheter–related bacterial sepsis caused by coagulase-negative Staphylococus or α-hemolytic Streptococcus infection and 1 of disseminated adenovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection). All 4 had active JIA refractory to long-term therapy with multiple and combined conventional and biological DMARDs. Two died while receiving high-dose systemic corticosteroids, methotrexate, and after recent exposure to anti–tumor necrosis factor-α biological DMARDs, and 2 during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedure. Reporting all cases of severe infections and especially deaths in these children is of paramount importance for accurate surveillance. PMID:27648582

  7. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging signs.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulou, Maria I; Margariti, Persefoni N; Karali, Aikaterini; Astrakas, Loukas; Alfandaki, Sapfo; Kosta, Paraskevi; Siamopoulou, Antigoni

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to define clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Forty-six patients, aged 2.08-36.7 years, with JIA (oligoartitular 18, polyarticular 17, systemic type 11) were examined with standard plain and contrast-enhanced sequences. Of 88 TMJs examined, an abnormal condyle was observed in 32%, flattened articular eminence in 27%, flattened articular disk in 17%, intra-articular fluid in 10%, enhancing pannus in 45% and restricted condylar motion in 9%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that for abnormal condyle and flattened articular eminence, independent predictors were type of JIA (P < 0.015), age at onset (P < 0.038), and duration of disease activity (P < 0.001). Plots of the logistic regression models showed that TMJ involvement approached certainty for systemic sooner than for the other JIA types. Pannus was present with probability >0.5 when the disease started before 4 years of age. In conclusion, the systemic type of JIA, young age at onset and long duration of activity are risk factors for TMJ damage. MRI of the TMJ should be performed in patients who are less than 4 years of age at the onset of JIA, and in those with the systemic type, whatever the age of onset.

  8. Infection-Related Death among Persons with Refractory Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Abinun, Mario; Lane, Jonathan P; Wood, Mark; Friswell, Mark; Flood, Terence J; Foster, Helen E

    2016-10-01

    Severe infections are emerging as major risk factors for death among children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In particular, children with refractory JIA treated with long-term, multiple, and often combined immunosuppressive and antiinflammatory agents, including the new biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), are at increased risk for severe infections and death. We investigated 4 persons with JIA who died during 1994-2013, three of overwhelming central venous catheter-related bacterial sepsis caused by coagulase-negative Staphylococus or α-hemolytic Streptococcus infection and 1 of disseminated adenovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection). All 4 had active JIA refractory to long-term therapy with multiple and combined conventional and biological DMARDs. Two died while receiving high-dose systemic corticosteroids, methotrexate, and after recent exposure to anti-tumor necrosis factor-α biological DMARDs, and 2 during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedure. Reporting all cases of severe infections and especially deaths in these children is of paramount importance for accurate surveillance.

  9. Ultrasonography and color Doppler of proximal gluteal enthesitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The presence of enthesitis (insertional inflammation) in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is difficult to establish clinically and may influence classification and treatment of the disease. We used ultrasonography (US) and color Doppler (CD) imaging to detect enthesitis at the small and deep-seated proximal insertion of the gluteus medius fascia on the posterior iliac crest where clinical diagnosis is difficult. The findings in JIA patients were compared with those obtained in healthy controls and with the patients' MRI results. Methods Seventy-six proximal gluteus medius insertions were studied clinically (tenderness to palpation of the posterior iliac crest) and by US and CD (echogenicity, thickness, hyperemia) in 38 patients with JIA and in 38 healthy controls, respectively (median age 13 years, range 7-18 years). In addition, an additional MRI examination of the sacroiliac joints and iliac crests was performed in all patients. Results In patients with focal, palpable tenderness, US detected decreased echogenicity of the entheses in 53% of the iliac crests (bilateral in 37% and unilateral in 32%). US also revealed significantly thicker entheses in JIA patients compared to healthy controls (p < 0.003 left side, p < 0.001 right side). There was no significant difference in thickness between the left and right sides in individual subjects. Hyperemia was detected by CD in 37% (28/76) of the iliac crests and by contrast-enhanced MRI in 12% (6/50). Conclusions According to US, the gluteus medius insertion was thicker in JIA patients than in controls, and it was hypoechoic (enthesitis) in about half of the patients. These findings may represent chronic, inactive disease in some of the patients, because there was only limited Doppler flow and MRI contrast enhancement. The present study indicates that US can be useful as an adjunct to clinical examination for improved assessment of enthesitis in JIA. This may influence disease classification

  10. Characteristics and relationship of periodontal disease with juvenile idiopathic and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vahabi, Surena; Rostamian, Abdolrahman; Baniebrahimi, Ghazaleh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most prevalent chronic inflammatory disease of the joints. It is correlated with periodontal disease due to similar factors that exist in both diseases. The present study assessed the relationship of periodontal disease with RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 30 RA and 30 JIA patients along with similar number of matched controls were selected among patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Periodontal parameters including pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), O’Leary and Bay plaque index (PI) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were determined in cases and controls. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, number of painful and inflamed joints and severity of disease were evaluated in RA and JIA patients. Mann-Whitney U-test nonparametric, Spearman and Pearson's correlation coefficients, and Chi-square tests were used as statistical analysis (α = 0.05). Results: PD (4.17 vs. 3.6 mm; P < 0.0001), CAL (4.89 vs. 4.18 mm; P < 0.002), percentage of sites with PD >4 mm (58.83% vs. 44.33%; P < 0.002), percentage of sites with CAL >3 mm (74.13% vs. 64.4%; P < 0.001), percentage of sites with BOP (9.67% vs. 6.87%; P < 0.0001) and PI index (85.73% vs. 80.63%; P < 0.0001) were significantly higher in RA patients than controls. In this group, direct and significant correlations were found between serologic findings, disease severity and number of painful and inflamed joints with periodontal factors. In JIA patients, no significant relationships were found between JIA findings and periodontal parameters. Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, there was a relationship between RA and periodontal disease. Severity of periodontal disease increases in patients with RA, while no increased risk of periodontal disease or its severity was observed among JIA patients. PMID:26759590

  11. Blueberry Improves the Therapeutic Effect of Etanercept on Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Phase III Study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yingjie; Wang, Ye; Guo, Jun; Chu, Haifeng; Gao, Yong; Pang, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthritis in the adolescents under the age of 16. Etanercept, an inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor, is often used to treat JIA despite its significant side effects. Homeopathic remedies, such as blueberries, have anti-inflammatory properties with fewer unwanted effects and should be considered as a primary treatment. We aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of blueberry and etanercept for JIA. Two hundred and one JIA patients were selected, and randomly and evenly assigned to three groups: ETA (50 mg of etanercept twice weekly), ETABJ (matched etanercept and 50 ml blueberry juice daily) and ETAPJ (matched etanercept and placebo juice). The severity of JIA was measured using American College of Rheumatology scales (ACR) 20, 50 and 70. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL1) alpha and IL1 beta, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RA) were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA. After a 6-month follow-up, the ACR20, ACR50 and ACR70 in an ETABJ group were higher than those in other two groups (P < 0.05), suggesting clinically meaningful improvement in JIA. Meanwhile, the symptoms and side effects were reduced significantly or absent in an ETABJ group, including mental diseases, retrobulbar optic neuritis, gaining weight, infection, cutaneous vasculitis, diarrhea, uveitis and pancytopenia. Blueberries reduced the levels of IL1 alpha and beta, and increased the level of IL1RA. Thus, a combination therapy of blueberry and etanercept can reduce the severity of JIA and should be developed as a new method for JIA therapy.

  12. Self-Reported Pain and Disease Symptoms Persist in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Despite Treatment Advances

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Maggie H.; Connelly, Mark; Anthony, Kelly K.; Gil, Karen M.; Schanberg, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To use electronic diaries (e-diaries) to determine whether pain, stiffness, and fatigue continue to be common, disabling symptoms in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) despite the use of aggressive treatments in contemporary medical management. Methods Fifty-nine children with JIA (ages 8–18 years) provided ratings of pain, stiffness, and fatigue intensity and functional limitations using a smartphone e-diary 3 times each day for 1 month. Medication information was collected via parent report and checked for accuracy by chart review. Descriptive analyses were conducted to determine typical symptom intensity, frequency, and variability. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze associations between symptoms and functional outcomes and between medication use and symptom intensity. Results Children reported moments of pain in 66% of e-diary entries. No children were entirely pain-free across the reporting period. In 31% of all e-diary entries the visual analog scale score for pain was >40 (high pain intensity), with 86% of children reporting a high level of pain at least once during the study period. The mean ratings of pain, stiffness, and fatigue intensity were in the mild-to-moderate range. Medication class was not a reliable predictor of differences in symptom intensity, even though 79% of children were prescribed a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug and 47% were prescribed a biologic agent. Moments of higher pain intensity and higher stiffness intensity were each uniquely predictive of higher concurrent functional limitations. Conclusion Self-reported pain, stiffness, and fatigue continue to be common in children with JIA, despite contemporary advances in treatment strategies, including use of biologic agents. These findings are surprisingly consistent with previous results from research using daily paper diaries in the pre-biologics era. There remains a pressing and ongoing need to optimize pain and symptom management in JIA. PMID

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is potentially prevalent among paediatric patients with chronic diseases but with variable rates among different age groups, diseases and countries. There are no recent reports on CAM use among paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Europe. We hypothesized that CAM use associates with a more severe disease in paediatric IBD and JIA. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire study among adolescent outpatients with IBD and JIA addressing the frequency and type of CAM use during the past year. The patients were recruited at the Children’s Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland. Results Of the 147 respondents, 97 had IBD (Crohn’s disease: n = 46; median age 15.5, disease duration 3.4 years) and 50 had JIA (median age 13.8, disease duration 6.9 years). During the past 12 months, 48% regularly used CAM while 81% reported occasional CAM use. Compared to patients with JIA, the use of CAM in IBD patients tended to be more frequent. The most commonly used CAM included probiotics, multivitamins, and mineral and trace element supplements. Self-imposed dietary restrictions were common, involving 27.6% of the non-CAM users but 64.8% of all CAM users. Disease activity was associated with CAM use in JIA but not in IBD. Conclusions CAM use is frequent among adolescents with IBD and JIA and associates with self-imposed dietary restrictions. Reassuringly, adherence to disease modifying drugs is good in young CAM users. In JIA, patients with active disease used more frequently CAM than patients with inactive disease. As CAM use is frequent, physicians should familiarise themselves with the basic concepts of CAM. The potential pharmacological interaction or the toxicity of certain CAM products warrants awareness and hence physicians should actively ask their patients about CAM use. PMID:24708564

  14. PADI4 and the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hisa, Kaori; Yanagimachi, Masakatsu D.; Naruto, Takuya; Miyamae, Takako; Kikuchi, Masako; Hara, Rhoki; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shumpei; Mori, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    Objective Both genetic and environmental factors are associated with susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Many studies have reported that both a ‘shared epitope’ (SE) encoded by several HLA-DRB1 alleles and the peptidyl arginine deiminase type 4 (PADI4) gene polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is uncertain whether JIA and RA share the latter genetic risk factor. Therefore, here we investigated relationships between HLA-SE and PADI4 polymorphisms with clinical subtypes of JIA. Methods JIA patients (39 oligoarthritis, 48 RF-positive polyarthritis, 19 RF-negative polyarthritis and 82 systemic) and 188 healthy controls were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 by PCR-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe methodology. Three PADI4 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs2240340, rs2240337 and rs1748033, were genotyped using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. Results Frequencies of the HLA-SE were higher in RF-positive polyarticular JIA than in healthy controls. RF-positive polyarticular JIA was associated with HLA-SE (OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 2.5–11.9, pc < 0.001). No associations were found between clinical subtypes of JIA and PADI4 allele frequency. Nonetheless, rs2240337 in the PADI4 gene was significantly associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA)-positivity in JIA. The A allele at rs2240337 was a significant risk factor for ACPA positivity in JIA (OR = 5.6, 95% CI = 1.71–23.7 pc = 0.03). Conclusion PADI4 gene polymorphism is associated with ACPA-positivity in JIA. The association of HLA-SE with RF-positive polyarticular JIA as well as RA is confirmed in Japanese. Thus, HLA-SE and PADI4 status both influence JIA clinical manifestations. PMID:28182665

  15. Effectiveness and safety of TNF inhibitors in adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    McErlane, Flora; Foster, Helen E; Lunt, Mark; Watson, Kath D; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) continue to have active disease into adulthood. Adults with JIA are a heterogeneous group, and the effects of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapies are not well described. This analysis aims to describe treatment outcomes among patients with JIA starting TNFi for the first time in adulthood. Methods Patients with arthritis onset <16 years starting their first TNFi therapy were identified from the British Society of Rheumatology Biologics Register. Disease activity outcomes (using 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)) are presented at 1 year after start of therapy according to disease pattern. Incidence rates (IR) of adverse events per 1000 person-years (pyrs) were calculated. Outcomes in patients with polyarticular JIA were compared with a cohort (weighted for age and gender) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results In 443 adults with JIA starting a first TNFi, disease activity over 1 year improved across all measures. There were 58 first serious infections (IR 22.3/1000 pyrs); 4 cardiovascular events (IR 1.4/1000 pyrs); 11 uveitis events (IR 4.0/1000 pyrs) and 16 malignancies (IR 3.9/1000 pyrs). Compared with the weighted RA cohort, disease activity improvement was similar; malignancy rates were lower and uveitis rates much higher. While crude IR were similar, JIA patients had a lower risk of serious infection (HR 0.5 (95% CI 0.3 to 0.9)). Conclusions This is the largest study to describe disease activity and safety outcomes in adults with JIA receiving TNFi. Disease activity improved after 1 year in all disease patterns, suggesting TNFi is an effective therapy in this population. PMID:27843575

  16. Transitional care in clinical networks for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current situation and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cruikshank, Mary; Foster, Helen E; Stewart, Jane; Davidson, Joyce E; Rapley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Clinical networks for paediatric and adolescent rheumatology are evolving, and their effect and role in the transition process between paediatric and adult services are unknown. We therefore explored the experiences of those involved to try and understand this further. Health professionals, young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their families were recruited via five national health service paediatric and adolescent rheumatology specialist centres and networks across the UK. Seventy participants took part in focus groups and one-to-one interviews. Data was analysed using coding, memoing and mapping techniques to identify features of transitional services across the sector. Variation and inequities in transitional care exist. Although transition services in networks are evolving, development has lagged behind other areas with network establishment focusing more on access to paediatric rheumatology multidisciplinary teams. Challenges include workforce shortfalls, differences in service priorities, standards and healthcare infrastructures, and managing the legacy of historic encounters. Providing equitable high-quality clinically effective services for transition across the UK has a long way to go. There is a call from within the sector for more protected time, staff and resources to develop transition roles and services, as well as streamlining of local referral pathways between paediatric and adult healthcare services. In addition, there is a need to support professionals in developing their understanding of transitional care in clinical networks, particularly around service design, organisational change and the interpersonal skills required for collaborative working. Key messages • Transitional care in clinical networks requires collaborative working and an effective interface with paediatric and adult rheumatology.• Professional centrism and historic encounters may affect collaborative relationships within clinical networks.• Education

  17. Incidence of Selected Opportunistic Infections Among Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Beukelman, Timothy; Xie, Fenglong; Baddley, John W; Chen, Lang; Delzell, Elizabeth; Grijalva, Carlos G; Mannion, Melissa L; Patkar, Nivedita M; Saag, Kenneth G; Winthrop, Kevin L; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare incidence rates of selected opportunistic infections (OI) among children with and without juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Using United States national Medicaid administrative claims data from 2000 through 2005, we identified a cohort of children with JIA based on physician diagnosis codes and dispensed medications. We defined a non-JIA comparator cohort of children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We defined 15 types of OI using physician diagnosis or hospital discharge codes, and 7 of these types also required evidence of treatment with specific antimicrobials. We calculated infection incidence rates (IR). The rates in the ADHD comparator cohort were standardized to the age, sex, and race distribution of the JIA cohort. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRR) to compare infection rates. Results The JIA cohort included 8,503 children with 13,990 person-years (p-y) of follow-up. The ADHD comparator cohort included 360,362 children with 477,050 p-y of follow-up. When all OI were considered together as a single outcome, there were 42 infections in the JIA cohort (IR 300 per 100,000 p-y; IRR 2.4 [1.7–3.3] versus ADHD). The most common OI among children with JIA were 3 Coccidioides (IR 21 per 100,000 p-y; IRR 101 [8.1–5319] versus ADHD); 5 Salmonella (IR 35 per 100,000 p-y; IRR 3.8 [1.2–9.5]); and 32 herpes zoster (IR 225 per 100,000 p-y; IRR 2.1 [1.4–3.0]). Conclusions OI are rare among children with JIA. Nevertheless, children with JIA had a higher rate of OI, including Coccidioides, Salmonella, and herpes zoster, than children with ADHD. PMID:23460423

  18. The RAndomized Placebo Phase Study Of Rilonacept in the Treatment of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (RAPPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Ilowite, Norman T.; Prather, Kristi; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Schanberg, Laura E.; Elder, Melissa; Milojevic, Diana; Verbsky, James W.; Spalding, Steven J.; Kimura, Yukiko; Imundo, Lisa F.; Punaro, Marilynn G.; Sherry, David D.; Tarvin, Stacey E.; Zemel, Lawrence S.; Birmingham, James D.; Gottlieb, Beth S.; Miller, Michael L.; O'Neil, Kathleen; Ruth, Natasha M.; Wallace, Carol A.; Singer, Nora G.; Sandborg, Christy I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin-1 plays a pivotal role in in the pathogenesis of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). We assessed the efficacy and safety of rilonacept (IL-1 trap), an IL-1 inhibitor, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Methods An initial 4-week double-blind placebo phase was incorporated into a 24-week randomized multi-center design, followed by an open label phase. We randomized 71 children with at least 2 active joints 1:1 to 2 arms of the study. Patients in the rilonacept arm received rilonacept (4.4mg/kg loading dose followed by 2.2mg/kg weekly, subcutaneously) from day 0; patients in the placebo arm received placebo for 4 weeks followed by a loading dose of rilonacept at week 4 followed by weekly maintenance doses. The primary endpoint was time to response, using adapted JIA ACR30 response criteria coupled with absence of fever and taper of systemic corticosteroids using pre-specified criteria. Results Time to response was shorter in the rilonacept arm than in the placebo arm (Chi-square 7.235, P=.007). Secondary analysis showed 20/35 (57%) of patients in the rilonacept arm responded at week 4 compared to 9/33 (27%) in the placebo arm (P=.016) using the same response criteria. Exacerbation of sJIA (4) was the most common SAE. More patients in the rilonacept arm had elevated liver transaminases, including more than three times the upper limits of normal, as compared to those in the placebo arm. Adverse events were similar in the two arms of the study. Conclusions Rilonacept was generally well tolerated and demonstrated efficacy in active sJIA. PMID:24839206

  19. Do patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis in remission exhibit active synovitis on joint ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Bugni Miotto e Silva, Vanessa; de Freitas Tavares da Silva, Carolina; de Aguiar Vilela Mitraud, Sônia; Nely Vilar Furtado, Rita; Esteves Hilário, Maria Odete; Natour, Jamil; Terreri, Maria Teresa

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the presence and characteristics of subclinical synovitis using power Doppler (PD) ultrasonography on patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in clinical remission and compare the findings with those of healthy children. A cross-sectional study was carried out involving the clinical (physical exam, functional capacity and laboratory tests) and ultrasonography evaluation of 34 joints (synovial fluid/hypertrophy, PD signal and bone erosion). Subclinical synovitis was defined as the presence of synovial hypertrophy/joint effusion with or without any PD signal. Thirty-six patients (11.5 ± 3.74 years) and 36 controls (sex and age matched) were evaluated (2,448 joints). Twenty-seven patients were in remission on medication (mean duration: 1.8 ± 2.2 years). Subclinical synovitis was detected in 41.7% patients and 11.1% controls (p = 0.003). Erosion was detected in three patients (8.3%). Subclinical synovitis was found in 38/1,224 (3.1%) joints in the patients (most affected: radiocarpal wrist, anterior elbow and tibiotalar ankle) and 8/1,224 (0.6%) joints in the controls (most affected: radiocarpal wrist). Differences in subclinical synovitis between patients and controls were found in the elbows (p = 0.033) and ankles (p = 0.006). A greater frequency of subclinical synovitis was found in patients with the extended oligoarticular or polyarticular subtypes (p = 0.013), those at an older age at disease onset (p = 0.007) and using methotrexate (p = 0.049). Patients with JIA in remission exhibit subclinical synovitis more frequently than controls. Subclinical synovitis was more frequent in patients with the polyarticular involvement and those at an older age at disease onset.

  20. Polymorphisms of genes encoding interleukin-4 and its receptor in Iranian patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ziaee, Vahid; Rezaei, Arezou; Harsini, Sara; Maddah, Marzieh; Zoghi, Samaneh; Sadr, Maryam; Moradinejad, Mohammad Hassan; Rezaei, Nima

    As cytokines, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), seem to have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), this study is aimed at investigating of association of polymorphisms in IL-4 and IL-4 receptor α (IL-4RA) genes with susceptibility to JIA. A case-control study was conducted on 53 patients with JIA and 139 healthy unrelated controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of IL-4 gene at positions -1098, -590, and -33, as well as IL-4RA gene at position +1902 were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers method and compared between patients and healthy individuals. At the allelic level, C allele at IL-4 -33 was found to be more frequent in patients compared to control (P value <0.01). At the genotypic level, CC genotype at IL-4 -590 (P value <0.01), together with CC and TT genotypes at IL-4 -33 (P value <0.01), were significantly higher in patients with JIA, while TC genotypes at IL-4 -590 and -33 positions were found to be lower in case group (P value <0.01). At the haplotypic level, IL-4 (positions -1098, -509, -33) TTC, GCC, and TTT haplotypes were significantly lower than controls (P value <0.01, P value = 0.03, and P value = 0.04, respectively). Although, TCC haplotype at the same positions was found to be higher in patients (P value <0.01). Polymorphic site of +1902 IL-4RA gene did not differ between cases and controls. Polymorphisms in promoter region of IL-4 but not IL-4RA genes confer susceptibility to JIA and may predispose individuals to adaptive immune responses.

  1. The novel use of combined IL-1 and IL-6 inhibition in a patient with severe, aggressive, erosive, systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Martin; Isaacs, John

    2017-01-01

    Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) is a form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) that typically presents with prominent systemic features and accounts for approximately 10–15% of children with JIA. Pro-inflammatory cytokine pathways are thought to be involved in its pathogenesis, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and laboratory tests demonstrate a prominent inflammatory response with high CRP and ferritin levels. We present a case of severe, aggressive, erosive SoJIA in a 17-year-old male resistant to multiple biologic therapies treated with a novel combination of IL-1 and IL-6 blockade along with subcutaneous methotrexate. PMID:28293458

  2. The novel use of combined IL-1 and IL-6 inhibition in a patient with severe, aggressive, erosive, systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Martin; Isaacs, John

    2017-03-01

    Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) is a form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) that typically presents with prominent systemic features and accounts for approximately 10-15% of children with JIA. Pro-inflammatory cytokine pathways are thought to be involved in its pathogenesis, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and laboratory tests demonstrate a prominent inflammatory response with high CRP and ferritin levels. We present a case of severe, aggressive, erosive SoJIA in a 17-year-old male resistant to multiple biologic therapies treated with a novel combination of IL-1 and IL-6 blockade along with subcutaneous methotrexate.

  3. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in two tertiary centres in the Western Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a disease that shows wide variations between differing populations. Since the recent international consensus on classification criteria, JIA has been widely described in many countries and population groups. There has been almost no data that describes JIA in an African, specifically Sub-Saharan African, setting. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe disease characteristics, disease course, and functional disability in two tertiary centres in the Western Cape, South Africa and compare the findings to other JIA populations. Methods Eighty-six children were recruited during random clinic visits to rheumatology clinics at Tygerberg and Groote Schuur Hospital between April 2010 and April 2011. Children were diagnosed using International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) 2001 classification criteria. Consent was obtained and medical records examined. The Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaires (CHAQ) and visual analogue scales (VAS) for pain and general well-being were completed and all children were examined by a researcher in conjunction with a paediatric rheumatologist. HIV status as well as tuberculosis disease and treatment were investigated. Results A total of 86 children were enrolled. Eight children were excluded (2 HIV arthropathy, 1 TB arthritis, 1 SLE, 4 with insufficient data), leaving a total of 78 patients. There was an equal female to male ratio-39 males and 39 females. There were 6 systemic JIA patients (7.69%), 17 persistent oligoarthritis (21.79%), 4 extended oligoarthritis (5.12%), 11 polyarthritis rheumatoid factor (RF) positive (14.10%), 21 polyarthritis RF negative (26.9%), 1 psoriatic arthritis (1.28%), and 18 enthesitis-related arthritis (23%). The median CHAQ for the group was 0.5 (IQR 0.1-1.25), the median VAS for pain was 18 mm (IQR 4–42) and median VAS for general well-being was 25 mm (IQR 3–49). Enthesitis-related arthritis and polyarthritis disease subtypes in

  4. HLA B27 allele types in homogeneous groups of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients in Latvia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous condition and therapeutic strategies vary in different JIA types. The routinely accepted practice to start with Sulphasalazine (SS) as the first line treatment in patients with HLA B27 positive JIA proves to be ineffective in a large proportion of children. Objective to investigate HLA B27 positive JIA patients clinical characteristics, determined HLA B27 allele types and their connection with antirheumatic treatment in homogenous patient groups. Materials and methods 56 patients diagnosed with JIA and observed over the period 2006 to 2009 included in the study. HLAB27 allele types were determined using PCR method. Results In HLA B27 positive JIA patients mean disease onset was 12.34 ± 3.3 years. Most common (44%) JIA type was enthesitis related arthritis. Positive response to the treatment with SS was found in 32% of patients, Methotrexate (MTX) - in 43%, combined treatment - SS with MTX was effective in 12.5%. 12.5% of patients required combination MTX with Enbrel. Eight HLA B27 allele types were found in JIA patients in Latvia: *2702, *2703, *2704, *2705, *2710, *2715, *2717, *2728. The most common was *2705 - in 55% of cases. Among all the patients enthesitis related arthritis most commonly occurred in patients with HLAB*2705 allele (OR = 2.01, p < 0.02), oligoarthritis in patients with *2710 allele (OR = 3.0, p < 0.04) and polyarthritis with *2717 allele (OR = 3.0, p < 0.05). In patients with *2705 allele effective treatment was MTX (OR = 1.13, p < 0.03) and MTX with SS (OR = 2.02, p < 0.05), but in patients having *2703 allele - MTX with Enbrel (OR = 2.94, p < 0.02). Conclusions There are 8 different HLA B27 alleles in JIA patients in Latvia and the most common is *2705, but in order to assert them to be disease associated alleles, more extensive studies are needed, including control group of HLA B27 positive healthy individuals. Standard treatment approach with SS proves to be unsatisfactory in the

  5. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis activity and function ability: deleterious effects in periodontal disease?

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Camila; van der Vinne, Roberta T A; Campos, Lucia M A; Guardieiro, Priscila R; Saviolli, Cynthia; Bonfá, Eloisa; Pereira, Rosa M R; Viana, Vilma S; Borba, Eduardo F; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    The impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in periodontal diseases is controversial probably due to gender and age heterogeneity. We therefore evaluated a homogeneous female post-pubertal JIA population for these conditions. Thirty-five JIA patients and 35 gender/age comparable healthy controls were evaluated according to demographic data, complete periodontal evaluation, fasting lipoproteins, and anti-lipoprotein lipase antibodies. JIA scores, laboratorial tests, X-rays, and treatment were also assessed. Current age was similar in JIA patients and controls (11.90 ± 2.0 vs. 12.50 ± 3.0 years, p = 0.289). Complete periodontal assessments revealed that gingival index, dental plaque, gingival bleeding, and clinical dental attachment indices were alike in JIA patients and controls (p > 0.05), except for gingival enlargement in former group (p < 0.0001). Further analysis of patients with and without gingivitis revealed that cyclosporine use was more often observed in JIA patients with gingivitis (37 vs. 0%, p = 0.01), whereas no differences were evidenced in demographic, JIA scores, inflammatory markers, and lipid profile in both groups. Of note, two parameters of periodontal assessment were correlated with JIA scores [gingival index (GI) and Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) (r s  = +0.402, p = 0.020)] and plaque index (PI) and visual analog scale (VAS) physician (r s  = +0.430, p = 0.013). In addition, evaluation of dental assessment demonstrated that JIA activity scores had positive correlation with decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMF-T) and junvenile athritis disease activity score (JADAS) (r s  = +0.364,p = 0.037), VAS physician (r s  = +0.401,p = 0.021) and VAS patient (r s  = +0.364,p = 0.037). We demonstrated, using rigorous criteria, that periodontal and dental condition in JIA is similar to controls. In spite of that, the finding of a correlation with disease parameters

  6. Measurement of blood calprotectin (MRP-8/MRP-14) levels in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the investigation was to compare blood calprotectin (MRP8/14, S100A 8/9) levels in patients with systemic-onset, polyarticular, RF-negative and oligoarticular subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and to explore links between blood calprotectin levels and clinical and laboratory markers of JIA activity. Material and methods Measurement of calprotectin in blood serum was performed in 160 patients with JIA followed up at Lviv Regional Council Public Institution “Western-Ukrainian Specialised Children’s Medical Centre”. Seventeen patients with systemic-onset JIA (sJIA) and 49 patients with other JIA subtypes (RF-negative polyarthritis and oligoarthritis) in the active phase of the disease were included in this study. Determination of calprotectin levels in blood serum was performed using EK-MRP8/14 Buhlmann Calprotectin reagents (Buhlmann, Switzerland) by the ELISA method. Results The results of the investigations showed that blood calprotectin levels were higher in patients with systemic-onset subtype of the disease (median 13,800 ng/ml), and differed significantly from levels in healthy children (median 1,800 ng/ml, p = 0.00002), levels in patients with articular subtypes of JIA (median 2,700 ng/ml, p = 0.000008), and patients with RF-negative polyarthritis (median 3,800 ng/ml, p = 0.003226) and oligoarthritis (median 2,500 ng/ml, p = 0.000009). The highest blood calprotectin levels were found in patients with newly diagnosed sJIA, the median being 32,500 ng/ml (range: 13,800–177,000 ng/ml). Direct correlations were found between blood calprotectin and JADAS 27 activity score (p = 0.000009), ESR (p = 0.000079) and CRP (p = 0.000058). Conclusions Blood calprotectin level is one of the measures that can be used to confirm the diagnosis of sJIA and to monitor the disease activity and therapy effectiveness. PMID:28386137

  7. Severe idiopathic hypocalcemia in a juvenile western lowland gorilla, Gorilla gorilla gorilla.

    PubMed

    Chatfield, Jenifer; Stones, Greeley; Jalil, Tania

    2012-03-01

    A 6-mo-old, male western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) was evaluated because of tetany of both hands. The gorilla had alternating periods of constipation, diarrhea, and bloating since birth. A diagnosis of idiopathic hypocalcemia was based on severe hypocalcemia, a normal vitamin D level, response to oral calcium and vitamin D therapy, and eventual resolution. Idiopathic hypocalcemia, an uncommon disease in neonatal humans, should be considered in young gorillas with persistent gastrointestinal problems or acute tetany.

  8. VibroCV: a computer vision-based vibroarthrography platform with possible application to Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Andrew D; Prahalad, Sampath; Inan, Omer T

    2016-08-01

    Vibroarthrography, a method for interpreting the sounds emitted by a knee during movement, has been studied for several joint disorders since 1902. However, to our knowledge, the usefulness of this method for management of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) has not been investigated. To study joint sounds as a possible new biomarker for pediatric cases of JIA we designed and built VibroCV, a platform to capture vibroarthrograms from four accelerometers; electromyograms (EMG) and inertial measurements from four wireless EMG modules; and joint angles from two Sony Eye cameras and six light-emitting diodes with commercially-available off-the-shelf parts and computer vision via OpenCV. This article explains the design of this turn-key platform in detail, and provides a sample recording captured from a pediatric subject.

  9. Extremely elevated IL-18 levels may help distinguish systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis from other febrile diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Y.; Cui, P.; Li, Q.; Liang, F.; Li, C.; Yang, J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore whether IL-18 can be a serological marker for the diagnosis of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). A total of 23 sJIA patients (13 males, median age 8.2), 20 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, 18 patients with severe infections (SIF), 26 Kawasaki disease (KD) patients, 18 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, and 25 healthy control patients were selected for this study. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to determine the serum concentrations of the S100A8, S100A9, and IL-6 proteins. The serum IL-18 levels were detected by a cytometric bead array (CBA). The serum IL-6 concentrations in various disease groups were significantly higher than that in the healthy control group. The IL-6 concentrations exhibited no significant difference between disease groups. The S100A8 level in the sJIA group was significantly higher than those of the ALL, JIA, and healthy control groups but showed no significant difference compared to the SIF and KD groups. The S100A9 serum concentration in the sJIA group was significantly higher than those in the ALL and healthy control groups and exhibited no significant difference from the SIF, KD, and JIA groups. The IL-18 level of the sJIA group was significantly higher than that of the other febrile disease groups. The IL-18 serum concentration may be used as a biological serum marker to distinguish sJIA from other febrile diseases. PMID:28225869

  10. Behavioral Problems in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Controlled Study to Examine the Risk of Psychopathology in a Chronic Pediatric Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chamanara, Elham; Raeeskarami, Seyed-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are prone to the problems that can delay their psychosocial development; however, the existing literature has not reached a consensus on the psychological problems related to JIA. A total of 51 children and adolescents with JIA and 75 healthy controls aged 6 to 18 years were examined using the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL). Our results represented that 70 percent of JIA group reached “borderline clinical” range or “clinical” range in internalizing problems, while this percentage in the control group was 18 percent. In addition, our results indicated that JIA group has gotten significantly higher scores (more than twofold) in externalizing behaviors compared to control group. Furthermore, children with JIA showed higher rate of anxiety/depression, withdrawal/depression, somatic complaints, rule breaking behaviors, and aggressive behaviors as well as thought and social problems compared to control group (p < 0.001). As a conclusion, children and adolescents with JIA compared to healthy controls may show higher rate of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Furthermore, our novel findings on externalizing, social, and thought problems in JIA warrant further investigation on affected children who may be at greater risk of future psychopathologies. PMID:27656678

  11. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: bacterial diversity in temporomandibular joint synovial fluid in comparison with immunological and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Olsen-Bergem, H; Kristoffersen, A K; Bjørnland, T; Reseland, J E; Aas, J A

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in up to 80% of affected children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid, and to compare this with clinical and immunological findings in children with JIA, adults with persistent JIA, and adults with rheumatoid arthritis, in order to detect whether bacteria contribute to inflammation in TMJ arthritis. Synovial fluid and skin swab samples were collected from 30 patients (54 TMJs). Bacterial detection was performed using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial DNA was detected in 31 TMJs (57%) in 19 patients (63%). A positive statistically significant correlation was registered between bacterial DNA detected in TMJ synovial fluid and the following factors: total protein concentration in synovial fluid, interleukin 1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and adiponectin, as well as the duration of the general medical disease. Fourteen different bacterial species were detected in synovial fluid. Bacterial DNA in TMJ synovial fluid without contamination was detected in more than 50% of the patients. Studies are needed to evaluate the consequences of this bacterial DNA in synovial fluid with regard to TMJ arthritis.

  12. Network analysis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA): a new horizon for the understanding of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic target identification.

    PubMed

    Donn, Rachelle; De Leonibus, Chiara; Meyer, Stefan; Stevens, Adam

    2016-07-02

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a clinically diverse and genetically complex autoimmune disease. Currently, there is very limited understanding of the potential underlying mechanisms that result in the range of phenotypes which constitute JIA.The elucidation of the functional relevance of genetic associations with phenotypic traits is a fundamental problem that hampers the translation of genetic observations to plausible medical interventions. Genome wide association studies, and subsequent fine-mapping studies in JIA patients, have identified many genetic variants associated with disease. Such approaches rely on 'tag' single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The associated SNPs are rarely functional variants, so the extrapolation of genetic association data to the identification of biologically meaningful findings can be a protracted undertaking. Integrative genomics aims to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype.Systems biology, principally through network analysis, is emerging as a valuable way to identify biological pathways of relevance to complex genetic diseases. This review aims to highlight recent findings in systems biology related to JIA in an attempt to assist in the understanding of JIA pathogenesis and therapeutic target identification.

  13. Genetic Screening of Mutations Associated with Fabry Disease in a Nationwide Cohort of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Maria J.; Mourão, Ana F.; Martinho, António; Simões, Olívia; Melo-Gomes, José; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Célia; Brito, Iva; Fonseca, João E.; Canhão, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Fabry’s disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with an alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The prevalence of FD among juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with established diagnosis is unknown, but as musculoskeletal pain may be an important complaint at presentation, misdiagnosed cases are anticipated. With this study, we aim to calculate the frequency of FD-associated mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. Children with JIA from a national cohort were selected. Clinical and laboratorial information was recorded in the Portuguese rheumatic diseases register (http://Reuma.pt). Molecular genetic testing to detect GLA gene mutations was performed. After the multiplex polymerase chain reactions technique for DNA amplification, direct sequencing of the complete sequence of GLA gene was completed. From a cohort of 292 patients with JIA (188 females, 104 males), mutations were identified in 5 patients (all female). Four patients had the mutation D313Y, a rare GLA variant, which is associated with low enzymatic levels in plasma, but normal lysosomal levels. One patient presented the missense mutation R118C, which was previously described in Mediterranean patients with FD. This is the first screening of FD mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. No “classic” pathogenic FD mutations were reported. The late-onset FD-associated mutation, R118C, was found in a frequency of 0.34% (1/292). PMID:28299312

  14. Oral health and orthodontic considerations in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: review of the literature and report of a case.

    PubMed

    Synodinos, Philippos N; Polyzois, Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a severe disease of childhood, which comprises a diverse group of distinct clinical entities of unclear aetiology. Some abnormality of the immune system is present in all JIA cases. In its most severe clinical form, JIA may show localised and/or systemic complications, including functional impairment of the affected sites. This may result in variable growth and developmental anomalies. In many JIA cases, where the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is affected, mandibular growth may be restricted, thus leading to the development of mandibular hypoplasia and/or retrognathism. As a result, it is not uncommon for JIA patients to present with skeletal Class II and open bite malocclusions. Furthermore, in JIA cases with unilateral TMJ involvement, craniofacial asymmetry may occur. In such cases, early orthodontic intervention facilitates both the skeletal and the occlusal rehabilitation. Increased prevalence of dental caries and periodontal disease in JIA cases may be attributed to a combination of aetiological factors, including difficulties in executing good oral hygiene, unfavourable dietary practices and side effects from the long-term administration of medication. In addition, an association between periodontal disease and JIA has been reported based on their similar pattern of clinical disregulation of the inflammatory process. This paper presents a brief description of JIA, with special reference to dental health and orthodontic treatment considerations. In addition, a case is presented where the appropriate orthodontic intervention led to the establishment of a normally functioning, as well as an aesthetically pleasing, occlusion.

  15. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling Predicts Therapeutic Response at Six Months in Patients With Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kaiyu; Sawle, Ashley D; Frank, M Barton; Chen, Yanmin; Wallace, Carol A; Jarvis, James N

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether gene expression profiles identified in peripheral whole blood samples could be used to determine therapeutic outcome in a cohort of children with newly diagnosed polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Whole blood samples from the Trial of Early Aggressive Therapy (TREAT) in JIA patients were analyzed on Illumina microarrays, and differential gene expression was compared to expression in healthy controls. Microarray results were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in an independent cohort of samples. Pathway analysis software was used to characterize gene expression profiles. Support vector machines were used to develop predictive models for different patient classes. Results Differential gene expression profiles for rheumatoid factor (RF)–positive and RF-negative patients were remarkably similar. Pathway analysis revealed a broad range of affected pathways, consistent with current mechanistic theories. Modeling showed that the prognosis at 6 months was strongly linked to gene expression at presentation, irrespective of treatment. Conclusion Gene expression is linked to therapeutic outcome, and gene expression in the peripheral blood may be a suitable target for a prognostic test. PMID:24782192

  16. Genome-wide data reveal novel genes for methotrexate response in a large cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis cases.

    PubMed

    Cobb, J; Cule, E; Moncrieffe, H; Hinks, A; Ursu, S; Patrick, F; Kassoumeri, L; Flynn, E; Bulatović, M; Wulffraat, N; van Zelst, B; de Jonge, R; Bohm, M; Dolezalova, P; Hirani, S; Newman, S; Whitworth, P; Southwood, T R; De Iorio, M; Wedderburn, L R; Thomson, W

    2014-08-01

    Clinical response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) displays considerable heterogeneity. Currently, there are no reliable predictors to identify non-responders: earlier identification could lead to a targeted treatment. We genotyped 759 JIA cases from the UK, the Netherlands and Czech Republic. Clinical variables were measured at baseline and 6 months after start of the treatment. In Phase I analysis, samples were analysed for the association with MTX response using ordinal regression of ACR-pedi categories and linear regression of change in clinical variables, and identified 31 genetic regions (P<0.001). Phase II analysis increased SNP density in the most strongly associated regions, identifying 14 regions (P<1 × 10(-5)): three contain genes of particular biological interest (ZMIZ1, TGIF1 and CFTR). These data suggest a role for novel pathways in MTX response and further investigations within associated regions will help to reach our goal of predicting response to MTX in JIA.

  17. Intravenous Laser Blood Irradiation Increases Efficacy of Etanercept in Selected Subtypes of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: An Innovative Clinical Research Approach

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Michael; Ailioaie, Laura Marinela; Ailioaie, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    This single-blind, placebo-controlled study assesses the efficacy of synergic administration of intravenous laser blood irradiation (ILBI) and etanercept in selected subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Etanercept is a tumor necrosis factor alpha blocking agent with recognized importance in JIA. Laser radiation has immunomodulatory effects in animal and human studies. Fourteen patients (Group I) received ILBI and 9 patients (Group II) received placebo laser. ILBI was performed in addition to ongoing JIA medication, including etanercept. ILBI was administrated in 3 sets of 5 consecutive daily sessions, with a 7-week interval between every set of sessions. Evaluation was performed using ACR (American College of Rheumatology) Pediatric Criteria (ACR Pedi) at study enrollment and at 10 and 20 weeks, respectively. After 10 weeks, 85.7% of the patients in Group I fulfilled Pedi 30 criteria, compared to only 55.6% of the patients in Group II. After 20 weeks, all patients in both groups had a Pedi 30 response. In Group I, 92.8% of the subjects met the Pedi 50 response, compared to only 55.6% in the placebo group. One patient in Group I responded best, fulfilling Pedi 70 criteria. If applied synergistically, ILBI and etanercept would have an increased efficacy in promoting JIA remission. PMID:23990845

  18. Genetic Screening of Mutations Associated with Fabry Disease in a Nationwide Cohort of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Maria J; Mourão, Ana F; Martinho, António; Simões, Olívia; Melo-Gomes, José; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Célia; Brito, Iva; Fonseca, João E; Canhão, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Fabry's disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with an alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The prevalence of FD among juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with established diagnosis is unknown, but as musculoskeletal pain may be an important complaint at presentation, misdiagnosed cases are anticipated. With this study, we aim to calculate the frequency of FD-associated mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. Children with JIA from a national cohort were selected. Clinical and laboratorial information was recorded in the Portuguese rheumatic diseases register (http://Reuma.pt). Molecular genetic testing to detect GLA gene mutations was performed. After the multiplex polymerase chain reactions technique for DNA amplification, direct sequencing of the complete sequence of GLA gene was completed. From a cohort of 292 patients with JIA (188 females, 104 males), mutations were identified in 5 patients (all female). Four patients had the mutation D313Y, a rare GLA variant, which is associated with low enzymatic levels in plasma, but normal lysosomal levels. One patient presented the missense mutation R118C, which was previously described in Mediterranean patients with FD. This is the first screening of FD mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. No "classic" pathogenic FD mutations were reported. The late-onset FD-associated mutation, R118C, was found in a frequency of 0.34% (1/292).

  19. Blood gene expression profiling in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Blood gene expression profiling has led to major advances in the field of rheumatology over the last few decades. Specifically, DNA microarray technology has been integral in increasing our knowledge of key players in the pathogenesis of some rare pediatric rheumatic diseases. Our group, using microarray analysis, identified the interferon (IFN) gene signature in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has published data that suggest high doses of intravenous corticosteroid treatment may have benefit over strictly oral regimens. Additionally, DNA microarray technology led to our discovery that the interleukin (IL)-1 gene signature is associated with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) and to the use of IL-1 blockade with anakinra in this disease. We also reported the biologic rationale for use of anakinra early in the disease course. Anakinra is now being used as first-line treatment in sJIA in multiple centers. Herein, we review how information obtained from blood gene expression profiling has changed our clinical practice. PMID:24839407

  20. Alteration of Fecal Microbiota Profiles in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 Allele and Disease Status.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Monica; Cavalieri, Duccio; Albanese, Davide; Sordo, Maddalena; Pindo, Massimo; Donati, Claudio; Pagnini, Ilaria; Giani, Teresa; Simonini, Gabriele; Paladini, Alessia; Lionetti, Paolo; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial "pro-arthritogenic" profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS), evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA), in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA). Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively, compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter, and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly to other

  1. An exploration of parents’ preferences for foot care in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a possible role for the discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An increased awareness of patients’ and parents’ care preferences regarding foot care is desirable from a clinical perspective as such information may be utilised to optimise care delivery. The aim of this study was to examine parents’ preferences for, and valuations of foot care and foot-related outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods A discrete choice experiment (DCE) incorporating willingness-to-pay (WTP) questions was conducted by surveying 42 parents of children with JIA who were enrolled in a randomised-controlled trial of multidisciplinary foot care at a single UK paediatric rheumatology outpatients department. Attributes explored were: levels of pain; mobility; ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL); waiting time; referral route; and footwear. The DCE was administered at trial baseline. DCE data were analysed using a multinomial-logit-regression model to estimate preferences and relative importance of attributes of foot care. A stated-preference WTP question was presented to estimate parents’ monetary valuation of health and service improvements. Results Every attribute in the DCE was statistically significant (p < 0.01) except that of cost (p = 0.118), suggesting that all attributes, except cost, have an impact on parents’ preferences for foot care for their child. The magnitudes of the coefficients indicate that the strength of preference for each attribute was (in descending order): improved ability to perform ADL, reductions in foot pain, improved mobility, improved ability to wear desired footwear, multidisciplinary foot care route, and reduced waiting time. Parents’ estimated mean annual WTP for a multidisciplinary foot care service was £1,119.05. Conclusions In terms of foot care service provision for children with JIA, parents appear to prefer improvements in health outcomes over non-health outcomes and service process attributes. Cost was relatively less important than other attributes

  2. The Effect of Positive Family History of Autoimmunity in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Characteristics; a Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Khani, Mehdi; Ziaee, Vahid; Moradinejad, Mohamad-Hassan; Parvaneh, Nima

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) patients with and without family history of autoimmune disease with respect to clinical features and laboratory data. Methods Sixteen JIA patients with family history of autoimmune disease were identified during study, 32 patients were chosen for comparative group from referred patients to the rheumatology clinic according to the date of referral. Two groups were compared with respect to age of onset, sex, subtype, disease activity, duration of active disease and laboratory variables. Findings The age of onset was significantly lower in JIA patients with family history of autoimmunity (4.7 years vs. 7.0 years; P=0.02), polyarthicular subtype was more frequent in patients with positive family history (50% vs.25%; P=0.04) most of JIA patients with positive family history were in the active phase at the time of study (64% vs 25%; P=0.02) and had a longer duration of active disease (21.0 months vs 12.3 months; P=0.04). Patients with positive family history had more positive ANA (43.5%% vs 12.5%; P=0.01) and also more positive ADA (75% vs 20.8%; P=0.002). Two groups were similar according to sex, and other laboratory variables. Conclusion JIA patients with family history of autoimmune disease seem to have a more severe disease than patients without such family history, they are younger at the onset, and have mostly poyarthicular subtype. They also have more ANA and ADA positivity. These findings are different from familial JIA case-control studies according to active disease duration, subtype, and ANA positivity. PMID:24800019

  3. Early onset pauciarticular arthritis is the major risk factor for naproxen-induced pseudoporphyria in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schäd, Susanne G; Kraus, Andrea; Haubitz, Imme; Trcka, Jiri; Hamm, Henning; Girschick, Hermann J

    2007-01-01

    Pseudoporphyria (PP) is characterized by skin fragility, blistering and scarring in sun-exposed skin areas without abnormalities in porphyrin metabolism. The phenylpropionic acid derivative group of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially naproxen, is known to cause PP. Naproxen is currently one of the most prescribed drugs in the therapy of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The prevalence of PP was determined in a 9-year retrospective study of children with JIA and associated diseases. In addition, we prospectively studied the incidence of PP in 196 patients (127 girls and 69 boys) with JIA and associated diseases treated with naproxen from July 2001 to March 2002. We compared these data with those from a matched control group with JIA and associated diseases not treated with naproxen in order to identify risk factors for development of PP. The incidence of PP in the group of children taking naproxen was 11.4%. PP was particularly frequent in children with the early-onset pauciarticular subtype of JIA (mean age 4.5 years). PP was associated with signs of disease activity, such as reduced haemoglobin (<11.75 g/dl), and increased leucocyte counts (>10,400/μl) and erythocyte sedimentation rate (>26 mm/hour). Comedications, especially chloroquine intake, appeared to be additional risk factors. The mean duration of naproxen therapy before the onset of PP was 18.1 months, and most children with PP developed their lesions within the first 2 years of naproxen treatment. JIA disease activity seems to be a confounding factor for PP. In particular, patients with early-onset pauciarticular JIA patients who have significant inflammation appear to be prone to developing PP upon treatment with naproxen. PMID:17266758

  4. Anti-type II collagen antibodies detection and avidity in patients with oligoarticular and polyarticular forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Galber R; Fonseca, João E; Fujimura, Patricia T; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Silva, Carlos H M; Mourão, Ana F; Canhão, Helena; Goulart, Luiz R; Gonçalves, João; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) refers to a heterogeneous group of illnesses that have in common the occurrence of chronic joint inflammation in children younger than 16 years of age. The diagnosis is made only on clinical assessment. The identification of antibody markers could improve the early diagnosis, optimizing the clinical management of patients. Type II collagen is one potential autoantigen that has been implicated in the process of arthritis development. The aims of our study were to investigate the occurrence of anti-type II collagen antibodies and also to determine the avidity of the antibody-antigen binding. Ninety-six patients with oligoarticular or polyarticular JIA, 13 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 61 healthy controls (HC) were tested for anti-type II collagen antibodies by ELISA and avidity ELISA. Sensitivity and specificity were determined by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Forty-two JIA patients (44%) were positive for antibodies against type II collagen. Its detection was significantly higher in JIA patients than in AS patients (p=0.006) and HCs (p<0.0001). Furthermore, anti-type II collagen antibody detection was significantly more frequent in patients with JIA of ≤6 months duration (p=0.0007). Antibodies displaying high avidity to type II collagen were associated with disease activity (p=0.004). This study demonstrates that antibodies against type II collagen are present in the serum of patients with oligoarticular and polyarticular JIA, being its presence more prevalent in patients with early disease. It also demonstrates that JIA patients with active disease present antibodies with high avidity against type II collagen.

  5. Altered expression of intestinal human leucocyte antigen D-related and immune signalling molecules in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arvonen, M; Vähäsalo, P; Turunen, S; Salo, H M; Mäki, M; Laurila, K; Vaarala, O; Karttunen, T J

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to study intestinal immune activation status in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) by assessing intestinal human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression and the mRNA expression levels of the pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators and pattern recognition receptors. HLA-D-related (HLA-DR) expression was assessed using immunohistochemical staining of frozen sections in 11 children with JIA and 17 controls. The gene expression levels of the anti- and proinflammatory cytokines, lymphocyte recognition receptors and pattern recognition receptors were studied with reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) in 14 children with JIA and 12 controls. All subjects had various gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms indicating endoscopic examinations, but eventually were not diagnosed with GI disease. In JIA patients, the expression of HLA-DR was increased in the crypt epithelial cells and in the epithelial basement membrane of the ileum when compared with the controls. Positive HLA-DR staining in the ileal mucosa was associated with the presence of high clinical disease activity of JIA and low mRNA expression of anti-inflammatory mediators, such as forkhead box protein P3 (FoxP3), glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. Low ileal expression of interleukin (IL)-10, TGF-β, FoxP3, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and TLR-4 transcripts correlated significantly with a high clinical disease activity in the JIA patients. The increased HLA-DR expression suggests enhanced intestinal antigen presentation in JIA. A correlation between clinical disease activity and low gene expression of tolerogenic mediators in the ileum supports the hypothesis that a link exists between the gut immune system and JIA. PMID:23121667

  6. Are temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients? A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zwir, Liete M L Figueiredo; Terreri, Maria Teresa R A; Sousa, Soraia Ale; Fernandes, Artur Rocha Corrêa; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Hilário, Maria Odete E

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to perform a comprehensive clinical evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to investigate the association between the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the TMJs of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Seventy-five patients with JIA participated in this study. All patients underwent a rheumatological examination performed by a paediatric rheumatologist, a TMJ examination performed by a single dentist and an MRI with contrast of the TMJs. These examinations were scheduled on the same date. The patients were examined again 1 year later. Twenty-eight (37.3 %) patients reported symptoms at the first evaluation and 11 (14.7 %) patients at the second evaluation. In relation to signs, 35 (46.7 %) of the patients presented at least one sign at the first evaluation and 29 (38.7 %) at the second. Intense contrast enhancement of TMJ was significantly associated with disease activity (p < 0.001) at the first evaluation and a trend to significance was observed at the second (p = 0.056), with poly/systemic subtypes (p = 0.028 and p = 0.049, respectively), with restricted mouth opening capacity (p = 0.013 and p = 0.001, respectively), with the presence of erosions at both evaluations (p = 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively) and with altered condylar shape at the second evaluation (p = 0.0005). TMJ involvement is highly prevalent in JIA patients, with asymptomatic children presenting severe structural alterations of the TMJ. The TMJ should always be evaluated in JIA patients, even in the absence of signs and symptoms.

  7. Transfer from paediatric rheumatology to the adult rheumatology setting: experiences and expectations of young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hilderson, Deborah; Eyckmans, Leen; Van der Elst, Kristien; Westhovens, Rene; Wouters, Carine; Moons, Philip

    2013-05-01

    Adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are transferred from paediatrics to adult-oriented healthcare when they reach early adulthood. Research on the extent to which patients' expectations about the adult healthcare setting match their actual experience after transfer, may promote successful transfer from paediatrics to adult care. As part of the 'Don't Retard' project ( http://www.kuleuven.be/switch2/rheuma.html ), experiences and expectations of young adults regarding their transfer from paediatric rheumatology to adult rheumatology were explored. A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured, in-depth interviews of 11 patients with JIA, aged 18 to 30. Data were analysed using procedures inherent to the content analysis approach. For both concepts, experiences and expectations, three main themes emerged: 'preparation', 'parental involvement' and an 'adapted setting for the late-adolescent or early adult'. The need for a gradual process covered the themes 'preparation' and 'parental involvement'. Young people with JIA prefer to have a say in the moment of transfer and in the reduction of parental involvement. The majority of the participants like their parents' presence at the first consultation at the adult rheumatology department. They expect a healthcare setting adapted to their needs and the possibility to meet peers in this setting. Sudden confrontation with older patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis at adult rheumatology was an unsettling experience for some of the young patients and they declared that better preparation is needed. This study enabled us to define three main themes important in transfer. These themes can facilitate healthcare professionals in developing specific interventions to prepare the young people to transfer, to regulate parental involvement and to arrange an adapted setting for them. Since we included patients who were in follow-up at one tertiary care centre, in which both paediatric and adult

  8. Alteration of Fecal Microbiota Profiles in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 Allele and Disease Status

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Monica; Cavalieri, Duccio; Albanese, Davide; Sordo, Maddalena; Pindo, Massimo; Donati, Claudio; Pagnini, Ilaria; Giani, Teresa; Simonini, Gabriele; Paladini, Alessia; Lionetti, Paolo; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial “pro-arthritogenic” profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS), evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA), in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA). Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively, compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter, and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly to

  9. Safety of celecoxib and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results of the phase 4 registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess long-term safety and developmental data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients treated in routine clinical practice with celecoxib or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs). Methods Children aged ≥2 to <18 years with rheumatoid-factor–positive or –negative polyarthritis, persistent or extended oligoarthritis, or systemic arthritis were enrolled into this prospective, observational, multicenter standard-of-care registry. Eligible patients were newly or recently prescribed (≤6 months) an nsNSAID or celecoxib. Enrolled patients were followed to the end of the study, whether they remained on the original NSAID, switched, or discontinued therapy altogether. All adverse events (AEs) regardless of severity were captured in the database. Results A total of 274 patients (nsNSAID, n = 219; celecoxib, n = 55) were observed for 410 patient-years of observation. Naproxen, meloxicam, and nabumetone were the most frequently used nsNSAIDs. At baseline, the celecoxib group was older, had a numerically longer median time since diagnosis, and a numerically higher proportion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal-related NSAID intolerance. AEs reported were those frequently observed with NSAID treatment and were similar across groups (nsNSAIDs: 52.0%; celecoxib: 52.9%). Twelve unique patients experienced a total of 18 serious AEs; the most frequent were infections, and none was attributed to NSAID use. Conclusions The safety profile of celecoxib and nsNSAIDs appears similar overall. The results from this registry, ongoing pharmacovigilance, and the phase 3 trial that led to the approval of celecoxib for children with JIA provide evidence that the benefit-risk for celecoxib treatment in JIA remains positive. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00688545. PMID:25057265

  10. Th1-Induced CD106 Expression Mediates Leukocytes Adhesion on Synovial Fibroblasts from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Cristina; Capone, Manuela; Rossi, Maria Caterina; Chillà, Anastasia; Santarlasci, Veronica; Mazzoni, Alessio; Cimaz, Rolando; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Del Rosso, Mario; Annunziato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that subsets of human T helper cells can orchestrate leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts (SFbs), thus regulating the retention of leukocytes in the joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Several cell types, such as monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes, T and B lymphocytes, SFbs and osteoclasts participate in joint tissue damage JIA. Among T cells, an enrichment of classic and non-classic Th1 subsets, has been found in JIA synovial fluid (SF), compared to peripheral blood (PB). Moreover, it has been shown that IL-12 in the SF of inflamed joints mediates the shift of Th17 lymphocytes towards the non-classic Th1 subset. Culture supernatants of Th17, classic and non-classic Th1 clones, have been tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation, and to induce expression of adhesion molecules on SFbs, obtained from healthy donors. Culture supernatants of both classic and non-classic Th1, but not of Th17, clones, were able to induce CD106 (VCAM-1) up-regulation on SFbs. This effect, mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, was crucial for the adhesion of circulating leukocytes on SFbs. Finally, we found that SFbs derived from SF of JIA patients expressed higher levels of CD106 than those from healthy donors, resembling the phenotype of SFbs activated in vitro with Th1-clones supernatants. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that classic and non-classic Th1 cells induce CD106 expression on SFbs through TNF-α, an effect that could play a role in leukocytes retention in inflamed joints. PMID:27123929

  11. Operative stabilization of the remaining mobile segment in ankylosed cervical spine in systemic onset - juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Suhodolčan, Lovro; Mihelak, Marko; Brecelj, Janez; Vengust, Rok

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 19-year-old young man with oligoarthritis type of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, who presented with several month duration of lower neck pain and progressive muscular weakness of all four limbs. X-rays of the cervical spine demonstrated spontaneous apophyseal joint fusion from the occipital condyle to C6 and from C7 to Th2 with marked instability between C6 and C7. Surgical intervention began with anterolateral approach to the cervical spine performing decompression, insertion of cage and anterior vertebral plate and screws, followed by posterior approach and fixation. Care was taken to restore sagittal balance. The condition was successfully operatively managed with multisegmental, both column fixation and fusion, resulting in pain cessation and resolution of myelopathy. Postoperatively, minor swallowing difficulties were noted, which ceased after three days. Patient was able to move around in a wheelchair on the sixth postoperative day. Stiff neck collar was advised for three months postoperatively with neck pain slowly decreasing in the course of first postoperative month. On the follow-up visit six months after the surgery patient exhibited no signs of spastic tetraparesis, X-rays of the cervical spine revealed solid bony fusion at single mobile segment C6-C7. He was able to gaze horizontally while sitting in a wheelchair. Signs of myelopathy with stiff neck and single movable segment raised concerns about intubation, but were successfully managed using awake fiber-optic intubation. Avoidance of tracheostomy enabled us to perform an anterolateral approach without increasing the risk of wound infection. Regarding surgical procedure, the same principles are obeyed as in management of fracture in ankylosing spondylitis or Mb. Forestrier. PMID:27458558

  12. Expert consensus on dynamics of laboratory tests for diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Alexandra; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify which laboratory tests that change over time are most valuable for the timely diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). Methods A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of experts was first asked to evaluate 115 profiles of patients with MAS, which included the values of laboratory tests at the pre-MAS visit and at MAS onset, and the change in values between the two time points. The experts were asked to choose the 5 laboratory tests in which change was most important for the diagnosis of MAS and to rank the 5 selected tests in order of importance. The relevance of change in laboratory parameters was further discussed and ranked by the same experts at a consensus conference. Results Platelet count was the most frequently selected test, followed by ferritin level, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), white cell count, neutrophil count, and fibrinogen and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Ferritin was most frequently assigned the highest score. At the end of the process, platelet count, ferritin level and AST were the laboratory tests in which the experts found change over time to be most important. Conclusions We identified the laboratory tests in which change over time is most valuable for the early diagnosis of MAS in sJIA. The dynamics of laboratory values during the course of MAS should be further scrutinised in a prospective study in order to establish the optimal cut-off values for their variation. PMID:26848401

  13. SECONDARY OSTEOPOROSIS: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Faryal; Canalis, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by decreased bone mineral density and compromised bone strength predisposing to an increased risk of fractures. Although idiopathic osteoporosis is the most common form of osteoporosis, secondary factors may contribute to the bone loss and increased fracture risk in patients presenting with fragility fractures or osteoporosis. Several medical conditions and medications significantly increase the risk for bone loss and skeletal fragility. This review focuses on some of the common causes of osteoporosis, addressing the underlying mechanisms, diagnostic approach and treatment of low bone mass in the presence of these conditions. PMID:25971649

  14. The comparisons between thermography and ultrasonography with physical examination for wrist joint assessment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lerkvaleekul, Butsabong; Jaovisidha, Suphaneewan; Sungkarat, Witaya; Chitrapazt, Niyata; Fuangfa, Praman; Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to assess infrared thermography (IRT) and ultrasonography (US) for detecting wrist arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Although IRT could help us detecting joint inflammation, IRT studies in JIA patients with wrist arthritis are still limited. Currently, no validated US criteria exist for detecting arthritis, and the most useful parameters between Gray-scale ultrasound (GSUS) or Power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) remain unclear. Therefore, this study focused on detecting wrist arthritis in varying degrees using IRT and US compared with physical examination. Of 46 JIA patients, 16 had previous wrist arthritis but currently inactive, 30 still had wrist arthritis, and the median ages (IQR) were 7.7 (4.3) and 10.2 (4.8) years respectively. Fifteen healthy participants were included, with a median age (IQR) of 9.2 (2.0) years. Using IRT, mean temperature (Tmean) and maximum temperature (Tmax) at skin surface in the region of interest (ROI) in the arthritis group were higher than in the inactive group and the healthy controls with p < 0.05. When patients with arthritis were subgroup analyzed by disease severity based on physical examination, the moderate to severe arthritis had Tmean and Tmax higher than the mild arthritis group with statistical significance. The Heat Distribution Index (HDI), two standard deviations of all pixel temperature values in the ROI, in the moderate to severe arthritis group was higher than in the healthy controls (p = 0.027). The receiver operating characteristic analysis in arthritis detection revealed diagnostic sensitivity of 85.7% and 71.4% and specificity of 80.0% and 93.3% at a cut-off points of Tmean ≥ 31.0 C and Tmax ≥ 32.3 C respectively. For US, GSUS and PDUS are useful in detecting arthritis, providing high sensitivity (83.3%) and specificity (81.3%). Our study demonstrated that both IRT and US were applicable tools for detecting wrist arthritis.

  15. Rare causes of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Gemma; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by loss of bone mass and strength, resulting in increased risk of fractures. It is classically divided into primary (post-menopausal or senile), secondary and idiopathic forms. There are many rare diseases, that cause directly or indirectly osteoporosis. The identification and classification of most of these rare causes of osteoporosis is crucial for the specialists in endocrinology and not, in order to prevent this bone complication and to provide for an early therapy. Several pathogenic mechanisms are involved, including various aspects of bone metabolism such as: decreased bone formation, increased bone resorption, altered calcium, phosphorus and/or vitamin D homeostasis, and abnormal collagen synthesis. In this review, less common forms of primary and secondary osteoporosis are described, specifying, if applicable: genetic causes, epidemiology, clinical features, and pathogenic mechanisms causing osteoporosis. A greater awareness of all rare causes of osteoporosis could reduce the number of cases classified as idiopathic osteoporosis and allow the introduction of appropriate and timely treatments. PMID:26604941

  16. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development ( ... therapist, will work together to develop the best method of treatment. The goals of treatment are to ...

  17. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage. Psoriatic arthritis is when a person has psoriasis and arthritis together. Enthesitis-related arthritis usually affects ... person's symptoms, find out if others in the family have had arthritis, and do a complete physical ...

  18. In favour of the definition "adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis": juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis braced after ten years of age, do not show different end results. SOSORT award winner 2014

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The most important factor discriminating juvenile (JIS) from adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the risk of deformity progression. Brace treatment can change natural history, even when risk of progression is high. The aim of this study was to compare the end of growth results of JIS subjects, treated after 10 years of age, with final results of AIS. Methods Design: prospective observational controlled cohort study nested in a prospective database. Setting: outpatient tertiary referral clinic specialized in conservative treatment of spinal deformities. Inclusion criteria: idiopathic scoliosis; European Risser 0–2; 25 degrees to 45 degrees Cobb; start treatment age: 10 years or more, never treated before. Exclusion criteria: secondary scoliosis, neurological etiology, prior treatment for scoliosis (brace or surgery). Groups: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria for the AJIS, (Juvenile Idiopathic Scoliosis treated in adolescence), demonstrated by an x-ray before 10 year of age, and treatment start after 10 years of age. AIS group included 45 adolescents with a diagnostic x-ray made after the threshold of age 10 years. Results at the end of growth were analysed; the threshold of 5 Cobb degree to define worsened, improved and stabilized curves was considered. Statistics: Mean and SD were used for descriptive statistics of clinical and radiographic changes. Relative Risk of failure (RR), Chi-square and T-test of all data was calculated to find differences among the two groups. 95% Confidence Interval (CI) , and of radiographic changes have been calculated. Results We did not find any Cobb angle significant differences among groups at baseline and at the end of treatment. The only difference was in the number of patients progressed above 45 degrees, found in the JIS group. The RR of progression of AJIS was, 1.35 (IC95% 0.57-3.17) versus AIS, and it wasn't statistically significant in the AJIS group, in respect to AIS group (p = 0.5338). Conclusion

  19. Functional changes following distraction osteogenesis treatment of asymmetric mandibular growth deviation in unilateral juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a prospective study with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nørholt, S E; Pedersen, T K; Herlin, T

    2013-03-01

    In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), temporomandibular joint involvement is a frequent complication leading to deficient mandibular growth. Occurring unilaterally this will give rise to mandibular and maxillary asymmetry that will affect the soft tissue and the muscles and result in complex dentofacial anomaly. In the case of severe dentofacial malformation, orthognathic surgery is the only treatment option. Vertical osseodistraction of the mandibular ramus has been suggested as a means of rectifying the mandibular growth deviation and soft-tissue problems. Whether such treatment introduces dysfunctional side effects of the temporomandibular joint and muscles has been debated and concern has been raised that treatment impairs the patient's mouth opening capacity and mandibular movement. The present study prospectively evaluated 23 patients with JIA and mandibular asymmetry caused by unilateral temporomandibular joint arthritis. The authors found a clinical effect on the asymmetry with only minor subjective complaints and limited objective changes in functional parameters.

  20. Selecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) clinical trials: first report of the MRI in JIA special interest group.

    PubMed

    Hemke, Robert; Doria, Andrea S; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Maas, Mario; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M; van Rossum, Marion A J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have substantially improved the evaluation of joint pathologies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Because of the current availability of highly effective antirheumatic therapies and the unique and useful features of MRI, there is a growing need for an accurate and reproducible MRI assessment scoring system for JIA, such as the rheumatoid arthritis MRI Scoring (RAMRIS) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To effectively evaluate the efficacy of treatment in clinical research trials, we need to develop and validate scoring methods to accurately measure joint outcomes, standardize imaging protocols for data acquisition and interpretation, and create imaging atlases to differentiate physiologic and pathologic joint findings in childhood and adolescence. Such a standardized, validated, JIA-MRI scoring method could be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  1. DRESS-syndrome on sulfasalazine and naproxen treatment for juvenile idiopathic arthritis and reactivation of human herpevirus 6 in an 11-year-old Caucasian boy.

    PubMed

    Piñana, E; Lei, S H; Merino, R; Melgosa, M; De La Vega, R; Gonzales-Obeso, E; Ramírez, E; Borobia, A; Carcas, A

    2010-06-01

    DRESS-syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is a severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome characterized by diffuse maculopapular rash, lymphadenopathy, multivisceral involvement, eosinophilia and atypical lymphocytes with a mortality rate of 10-40% (Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, 1, 250). It is described in adults treated with aromatic antiepileptics and less frequently with sulphonamides, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (Clinics in Dermatology, 23, 171; Pediatrics, 108, 485). We report on an 11-year-old Caucasian boy hospitalized with a skin eruption, lymphadenopathy, acute hepatitis, renal tubular involvement, haematological abnormalities and human-herpevirus-6 reactivation, treated with sulfasalazine and naproxen for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). This is the first report in children with rheumatic disease and highlights the possibility of sulfasalazine and naproxen-induced-DRESS-syndrome in children with JIA.

  2. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in adulthood: fulfilment of classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, long-term outcomes and predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Eusébio, Mónica; M Martins, Fernando; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Furtado, Carolina; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Cordeiro, Inês; Ferreira, Joana; Cerqueira, Marcos; Figueira, Ricardo; Brito, Iva; Santos, Maria José; Melo-Gomes, José A; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine how adult juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients fulfil classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, evaluate their outcomes and determine clinical predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage. Methods Patients with JIA registered on the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register (Reuma.pt) older than 18 years and with more than 5 years of disease duration were included. Data regarding sociodemographic features, fulfilment of adult classification criteria, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index—articular (JADI-A) and Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index—extra-articular (JADI-E) damage index and disease activity were analysed. Results 426 patients were included. Most of patients with systemic JIA fulfilled criteria for Adult Still's disease. 95.6% of the patients with rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive polyarthritis and 57.1% of the patients with RF-negative polyarthritis matched criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 38.9% of the patients with extended oligoarthritis were classified as RA while 34.8% of the patients with persistent oligoarthritis were classified as spondyloarthritis. Patients with enthesitis-related arthritis fulfilled criteria for spondyloarthritis in 94.7%. Patients with psoriatic arthritis maintained this classification. Patients with inactive disease had lower disease duration, lower diagnosis delay and corticosteroids exposure. Longer disease duration was associated with higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E. Higher JADI-A was also associated with biological treatment and retirement due to JIA disability and higher JADI-E with corticosteroids exposure. Younger age at disease onset was predictive of higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E and decreased the chance of inactive disease. Conclusions Most of the included patients fulfilled classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, maintain active disease and have functional impairment. Younger age at disease onset was predictive

  3. Pain in School: Patterns of Pain-Related School Impairment among Adolescents with Primary Pain Conditions, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Pain, and Pain-Free Peers.

    PubMed

    Agoston, Anna Monica; Gray, Laura S; Logan, Deirdre E

    2016-11-30

    Children with chronic pain frequently experience impairment in the school setting, but we do not yet understand how unique these struggles are to children with primary pain conditions compared to peers with disease-related pain or those without chronic pain symptoms. The objective of this study is to examine school functioning, defined as school attendance rates, overall quality of life in the school setting, and school nurse visits among adolescents with primary pain conditions, those with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-related pain, and healthy peers. Two hundred and sixty adolescents participated in the study, including 129 with primary pain conditions, 61 with JIA, and 70 healthy comparison adolescents. They completed self- and parent-reported measures of school function. Findings show that as a group, youth with primary pain conditions reported more school absences, lower quality of life in the school setting, and more frequent school nurse visits compared to both adolescents with JIA-related pain and healthy peers. We conclude that compared to those who experience pain specific to a disease process, adolescents with primary pain conditions may face unique challenges in the school setting and may require more support to help them succeed in school in spite of pain.

  4. Association of HLA-A*02:06 and HLA-DRB1*04:05 with clinical subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Miyamae, Takako; Naruto, Takuya; Hara, Takuma; Kikuchi, Masako; Hara, Ryoki; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Goto, Hiroaki; Morita, Satoshi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Kimura, Akinori; Yokota, Shumpei

    2011-03-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is one of the most common forms of pediatric chronic arthritis. JIA is a clinically heterogeneous disease. Therefore, the genetic background of JIA may also be heterogeneous. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and susceptibility to JIA and/or uveitis, which is one of the most devastating complications of JIA. A total of 106 Japanese articular JIA patients (67 with polyarthritis and 39 with oligoarthritis) and 678 healthy controls were genotyped for HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 by PCR-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe methodology. HLA-A(*)02:06 was the risk factor for JIA accompanied by uveitis after adjustment for clinical factors (corrected P-value < 0.001, odds ratio (OR) 11.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.2-43.0). On the other hand, HLA-DRB1(*)04:05 was associated with polyarticular JIA (corrected P-value < 0.001, OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7-4.8). We found an association of HLA-A(*)02:06 with susceptibility to JIA accompanied by uveitis, which might be considered a separate clinical JIA entity. We also found an association between HLA-DRB1(*)04:05 and polyarticular JIA. Thus, clinical subtypes of JIA can be classified by the presence of the specific HLA alleles, HLA-A(*)02:06 and DRB1(*)04:05.

  5. Improvement of reduced serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients treated with the anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shoko; Naruto, Takuya; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Nishimaki, Shigeru; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we determined serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) patients during both the active and the remission phases to investigate how the growth cartilage turnover changed under tocilizumab treatment. Specimens were collected from 201 healthy children under 16 years of age with no growth impairment, and paired sera were collected from 11 sJIA patients treated with tocilizumab. Disease activity was assessed from white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and ferritin, and the COMP concentration was determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum COMP concentrations were found independent of age, and the mean value in healthy children was 17.74+/-5.6 U/L. The mean serum COMP in sJIA patients during the active phase was 10.75+/-3.9 U/L, lower than that of healthy children. The mean serum COMP in the remission phase (14.89+/-3.9 U/L) was significantly higher than that in the active period (P<0.05). These results suggested that in sJIA patients, a reduced serum COMP concentration is a useful marker of active disease and growth impairment, and that the growth cartilage turnover suppressed during the active phase is improved in the remission phase under tocilizumab treatment.

  6. Changes in fecal microbiota and metabolomics in a child with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) responding to two treatment periods with exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN).

    PubMed

    Berntson, Lillemor; Agback, Peter; Dicksved, Johan

    2016-06-01

    The microbiome and immune system of the digestive tract are highly important in both health and disease. Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is a common anti-inflammatory treatment in children with Crohn's disease in the European countries, and the mechanism is most likely linked to changes in the intestinal microbiome. In the present study, EEN was given in two treatment periods several months apart to a patient with very severe, disabling juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), with a remarkable clinical response as the result. The aim of the present study was to study how the EEN treatment influenced the microbiome and metabolome of this patient. Fecal samples from before, during, and between treatments with EEN were studied. The microbiome was analyzed by sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons using Illumina MiSeq, and the metabolome was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance. The microbiome changed markedly from treatment with EEN, with a strong reduction of the Bacteroidetes phylum. Metabolic profiles showed clear differences before, during, and between treatment with EEN, where butyrate, propionate, and acetate followed a cyclic pattern with the lowest levels at the end of each treatment period. This patient with JIA showed remarkable clinical improvement after EEN treatment, and we found corresponding changes in both the fecal microbiome and the metabolome. Further studies are needed to explore the pathophysiological role of the intestinal canal in children with JIA.

  7. Disruption of vascular endothelial homeostasis in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated macrophage activation syndrome: The dynamic roles of angiopoietin-1 and -2.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Yuko; Shimizu, Masaki; Inoue, Natsumi; Mizuta, Mao; Nakagishi, Yasuo; Wada, Taizo; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-04-01

    To assess the role of angiopoietin (Ang)-1 and Ang-2 and to investigate the clinical significance of serum levels of them in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA)-associated macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), we determined these levels in 51 patients with s-JIA, 11 patients with polyarticular JIA (poly-JIA), 12 patients with virus associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS), 12 patients with Kawasaki disease (KD), and 15 age-matched healthy controls (HC). The results were compared with clinical features of MAS. During the MAS phase, serum Ang-1 levels were significantly decreased compared with those during the active and inactive phases. Serum Ang-2/1 ratio were significantly elevated during the MAS phase, compared with those during the active and inactive phases. There was a rapid increase in the Ang-2/1 ratio at the onset of MAS. Serum Ang-1 and the Ang-2/1 ratio significantly correlated with measures of disease activity, including AST and LDH. Ang-2/1 dysregulation was also observed in patients with VAHS, whereas not observed in most cases of KD. The homeostasis of vascular endothelial function by Ang-1 and Ang-2 is disrupted in MAS. Serum Ang-1 levels and the Ang-2/1 ratio might represent promising indicators of disease activity for MAS.

  8. A novel reactive epitope-based antigen targeted by serum autoantibodies in oligoarticular and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis and development of an electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Galber R; Fujimura, Patricia T; Vaz, Emília R; Silva, Tamiris A; Rodovalho, Vinícius R; Britto-Madurro, Ana Graci; Madurro, João M; Fonseca, João E; Silva, Carlos H M; Santos, Paula S; Mourão, Ana F; Canhão, Helena; Goulart, Luiz R; Gonçalves, João; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Currently, there are no specific markers for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) diagnosis, which is based on clinical symptoms and some blood tests for diseases' exclusion. Aiming to select new epitope-based antigens (mimotopes) that could recognize circulating autoantibodies in most JIA forms, we screened a phage displayed random peptide library against IgG antibodies purified from serum of JIA patients. ELISA assay was carried out to confirm immunoreactivity of selected peptides against sera IgG antibodies from JIA patients, healthy children and patients with other autoimmune diseases. The mimotope PRF+1 fused to phage particles was able to efficiently discriminate JIA patients from controls, and for this reason was chosen to be chemically synthesized for validation in a larger sample size. The synthetic peptide was immobilized onto bioelectrodes' surface for antibody detection by electrochemical analyses through differential pulse voltammetry. The PRF+1 synthetic peptide has efficiently discriminated JIA patients from control groups (p<0.0001) with a very good accuracy (AUC>0.84; sensitivity=61%; specificity=91%). The electrochemical platform proved to be fast, low cost and effective in detecting anti-PRF+1 antibodies from JIA patients compared to healthy controls (p=0.0049). Our study describes a novel and promising epitope-based biomarker for JIA diagnosis that can become a useful tool for screening tests, which was successfully incorporated onto an electrochemical biosensor and could be promptly used in field diagnostics.

  9. Pain in School: Patterns of Pain-Related School Impairment among Adolescents with Primary Pain Conditions, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Pain, and Pain-Free Peers

    PubMed Central

    Agoston, Anna Monica; Gray, Laura S.; Logan, Deirdre E.

    2016-01-01

    Children with chronic pain frequently experience impairment in the school setting, but we do not yet understand how unique these struggles are to children with primary pain conditions compared to peers with disease-related pain or those without chronic pain symptoms. The objective of this study is to examine school functioning, defined as school attendance rates, overall quality of life in the school setting, and school nurse visits among adolescents with primary pain conditions, those with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-related pain, and healthy peers. Two hundred and sixty adolescents participated in the study, including 129 with primary pain conditions, 61 with JIA, and 70 healthy comparison adolescents. They completed self- and parent-reported measures of school function. Findings show that as a group, youth with primary pain conditions reported more school absences, lower quality of life in the school setting, and more frequent school nurse visits compared to both adolescents with JIA-related pain and healthy peers. We conclude that compared to those who experience pain specific to a disease process, adolescents with primary pain conditions may face unique challenges in the school setting and may require more support to help them succeed in school in spite of pain. PMID:27916882

  10. Low rate of surgery in juvenile idiopathic scoliosis treated with a complete and tailored conservative approach: end-growth results from a retrospective cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background context The main distinctive aspect of Juvenile Idiopathic Scoliosis (JIS) with respect to Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) is the high risk of severe deformity and surgery. Approximately 70% of curves in patients with JIS progress and ultimately require surgery. There are presently very few studies with long-term follow-up of JIS and even fewer looking specifically at bracing Purpose To verify the effectiveness of a complete conservative treatment, including bracing and exercises, for JIS. Study design/setting Retrospective cohort observational study nested in a clinical prospective database of consecutive outpatients. Patient Sample Inclusion criteria: JIS, no previous treatment, all consecutive radiographies available from treatment start to end of growth (Risser sign 3). We found 30 patients, 27 females, 10 JIS type 1; mean age at first diagnosis was 7.8 +/-1.5 and mean treatment lasted 5.8 years. Cobb degrees 24.4+/-10 degrees, with 7 cases >30 degrees, and 2 > 45degrees. Outcome Measures Physiological measures. Radiographic and clinical data. Methods Treatment (exercises alone, or elastic-rigid-highly rigid braces plus exercises) was tailored and continuously changed according to Cobb degrees, individual preferences, anthropometric characteristics, pubertal spurt, remaining growth, rotation, hump, lumbar curve take-off, and imbalance. The SOSORT Guidelines for patients’ management have been followed. Funding and Conflict of Interest: no. Results 33.3% (95% Confidence Interval 16.4-50.2%) of patients worsened over the years. At the end of growth, 6.6% (0–15.5%) had surgical deformities (>45degrees). We observed a good correction in the first years of treatment until pubertal growth spurt, when progression was usually noted and treatment changed increasing corrective forces (hours or rigidity of bracing). 23 cases were followed up until they had two consecutive radiographies showing Risser sign 5 and showed stability. Conclusions

  11. Long‐Term Safety, Efficacy, and Quality of Life in Patients With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Treated With Intravenous Abatacept for Up to Seven Years

    PubMed Central

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Mouy, Richard; Paz, Eliana; Rubio‐Pérez, Nadina; Silva, Clovis A.; Abud‐Mendoza, Carlos; Burgos‐Vargas, Ruben; Gerloni, Valeria; Melo‐Gomes, Jose A.; Saad‐Magalhaes, Claudia; Chavez‐Corrales, J.; Huemer, Christian; Kivitz, Alan; Blanco, Francisco J.; Foeldvari, Ivan; Hofer, Michael; Huppertz, Hans‐Iko; Job Deslandre, Chantal; Minden, Kirsten; Punaro, Marilynn; Block, Alan J.; Giannini, Edward H.; Martini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective The efficacy and safety of abatacept in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who experienced an inadequate response to disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs were previously established in a phase III study that included a 4‐month open‐label lead‐in period, a 6‐month double‐blind withdrawal period, and a long‐term extension (LTE) phase. The aim of this study was to present the safety, efficacy, and patient‐reported outcomes of abatacept treatment (10 mg/kg every 4 weeks) during the LTE phase, for up to 7 years of followup. Methods Patients enrolled in the phase III trial could enter the open‐label LTE phase if they had not achieved a response to treatment at month 4 or if they had received abatacept or placebo during the double‐blind period. Results One hundred fifty‐three (80.5%) of 190 patients entered the LTE phase, and 69 patients (36.3%) completed it. The overall incidence rate (events per 100 patient‐years) of adverse events decreased during the LTE phase (433.61 events during the short‐term phase [combined lead‐in and double‐blind periods] versus 132.39 events during the LTE phase). Similar results were observed for serious adverse events (6.82 versus 5.60), serious infections (1.13 versus 1.72), malignancies (1.12 versus 0), and autoimmune events (2.26 versus 1.18). American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Pediatric 30 (Pedi 30) responses, Pedi 70 responses, and clinically inactive disease status were maintained throughout the LTE phase in patients who continued to receive therapy. Improvements in the Child Health Questionnaire physical and psychosocial summary scores were maintained over time. Conclusion Long‐term abatacept treatment for up to 7 years was associated with consistent safety, sustained efficacy, and quality‐of‐life benefits in patients with JIA. PMID:26097215

  12. Adalimumab: long-term safety in 23 458 patients from global clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis and Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Burmester, Gerd R; Panaccione, Remo; Gordon, Kenneth B; McIlraith, Melissa J; Lacerda, Ana P M

    2013-01-01

    Background As long-term treatment with antitumour necrosis factor (TNF) drugs becomes accepted practice, the risk assessment requires an understanding of anti-TNF long-term safety. Registry safety data in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are available, but these patients may not be monitored as closely as patients in a clinical trial. Cross-indication safety reviews of available anti-TNF agents are limited. Objective To analyse the long-term safety of adalimumab treatment. Methods This analysis included 23 458 patients exposed to adalimumab in 71 global clinical trials in RA, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis (Ps) and Crohn's disease (CD). Events per 100 patient-years were calculated using events reported after the first dose through 70 days after the last dose. Standardised incidence rates for malignancies were calculated using a National Cancer Institute database. Standardised death rates were calculated using WHO data. Results The most frequently reported serious adverse events across indications were infections with greatest incidence in RA and CD trials. Overall malignancy rates for adalimumab-treated patients were as expected for the general population; the incidence of lymphoma was increased in patients with RA, but within the range expected in RA without anti-TNF therapy; non-melanoma skin cancer incidence was raised in RA, Ps and CD. In all indications, death rates were lower than, or equivalent to, those expected in the general population. Conclusions Analysis of adverse events of interest through nearly 12 years of adalimumab exposure in clinical trials across indications demonstrated individual differences in rates by disease populations, no new safety signals and a safety profile consistent with known information about the anti-TNF class. PMID:22562972

  13. Abnormal kappa:lambda light chain ratio in circulating immune complexes as a marker for B cell activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Low, J M; Chauhan, A K; Moore, T L

    2007-01-01

    Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have been shown to have elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) which correlated with disease activity. Our aim was to assess B cell activity by measuring the amount of and the kappa:lambda chain immunoglobulin light (L) chain ratio in CICs from JIA patients and to determine potential evidence for either an antigen-driven response or B-cell receptor editing. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure kappa and lambda chains present in the CICs from the sera of patients with JIA. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's correlation, one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc analysis. Sera from 44 JIA patients were examined for the concentration of L chains in CICs. Healthy controls had a kappa:lambda chain ratio of 1.2:1, whereas this ratio was reversed among JIA subgroups with RF-positive polyarthritis (1:1.2), RF-negative polyarthritis (1:1.3), oligoarthritis (1:2.3) and systemic-onset arthritis (1:2.5). In addition, overall lambda chain selection was not significantly associated with a particular immunoglobulin heavy (H) chain and occurred with all immunoglobulin isotypes. We showed preferential selection of lambda chains contributing to the formation of potentially pathogenic CICs from JIA patients, of all onset types compared to healthy controls, in an H chain-independent manner. The reversal of kappa:lambda chain ratio within the JIA CICs and association with all immunoglobulin isotypes demonstrated the potential for L chain editing. Furthermore, we conclude that a reversal of the normal kappa:lambda chain ratio in JIA CICs may be used as a marker for increased B-cell activity.

  14. Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life in German Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Comparison to German General Population

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Swaantje; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Schlichtiger, Jenny; Molz, Johannes; Bisdorff, Betty; Michels, Hartmut; Hügle, Boris; Radon, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Objective Aims of the study were to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adult patients with former diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), to compare their HRQOL with the general population and to identify factors related to a poor outcome. Methods In 2012, a cross-sectional survey was performed by mailing a questionnaire to a large cohort of former and current patients of the German Centre for Rheumatology in Children and Adolescents. Only adult patients (≥18 years) with a diagnosis compatible with JIA were included (n = 2592; response 66%). The questionnaire included information about HRQOL (EQ5D), disease-related questions and socio-demographics. Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of problems with mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain and anxiety/depression were standardized to the German general population. Factors associated with low HRQOL in JIA patients were identified using logistic regression models. Results Sixty-two percent of the study population was female; age range was 18–73 years. In all dimensions, JIA patients reported statistically significantly more problems than the general population with largest differences in the pain dimension (JIA patients 56%; 95%CI 55–58%; general population 28%; 26–29%) and the anxiety/depression dimension (28%; 27–29% vs. 4%; 4–5%). Lower HRQOL in JIA patients was associated with female sex, older age, lower level of education, still being under rheumatic treatment and disability. Conclusions HRQOL in adult JIA patients is considerably lower than in the general population. As this cohort includes historic patients the new therapeutic schemes available today are expected to improve HRQOL in future. PMID:27115139

  15. Prospective surveillance study of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness and seasonal influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients. PMID:23510667

  16. Mental health and adjustment to juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Level of agreement between parent and adolescent reports according to Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and Adolescent Outcomes Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Katarzyna A.; Niedziela, Marek; Głowacki, Maciej; Głowacki, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were threefold. Firstly, to analyze the psychometric properties of the Polish-language Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) questionnaire in the self-report Adolescent Outcomes Questionnaire (adolescents, 11–18 years of age) and in the parent-report Adolescent Outcomes Questionnaire (completed by a parent or guardian of an adolescent aged 11–18 years). Secondly, to determine the level of agreement between parents and adolescents in rating dysfunction in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and thirdly, to examine associations between psychological adjustments of patients to JIA and disease as well as their socio-demographic characteristics. The study sample consisted of 52 participants. 26 adolescents between the ages of 11 and 18 years with a diagnosis of JIA and 26 parents were considered for inclusion. Disease course was classified as pauciarticular (n = 12, 46.2%) and polyarticular (n = 14, 53.8%). Participants completed the PODCI (self- and parent- report) twice and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire-25 (SDQ-25). Considering the distribution of results regarding PODCI normative scores, 73.1% of parents and 69.2% of patients scored below 50 on the Global Functioning Scale; that is lower than the average for the general healthy population. Regarding the parent report, the total score of the SDQ-25 equaled 11.86 (SD 2.66), whereas the patient report equaled 11.23 (SD 2.78). The study groups do not differ significantly in regards to either the PODCI or the SDQ-25 results. Parents and adolescents with JIA appear to hold very similar perceptions of patients' health. Greater differences emerge as disease severity and age of patients increase. Excellent internal consistency, intrarater and test-retest reliability of the Global Functioning Scale have been confirmed in the Polish version of the PODCI, the questionnaire may therefore aid identification of patients reporting significant problems in this group. PMID

  17. Serum levels of osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor -κB ligand in children with early juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a 2-year prospective controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The clinical relevance of observations of serum levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor -κB ligand (RANKL) in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not clear. To elucidate the potential role of OPG and RANKL in JIA we determined serum levels of OPG and RANKL in patients with early JIA compared to healthy children, and prospectively explored changes in relation to radiographic score, bone and lean mass, severity of the disease, and treatment. Methods Ninety children with early oligoarticular or polyarticular JIA (ages 6-18 years; mean disease duration 19.4 months) and 90 healthy children individually matched for age, sex, race, and county of residence, were examined at baseline and 2-year follow-up. OPG and RANKL were quantified by enzyme-immunoassay. Data were analyzed with the use of t-tests, ANOVA, and multiple regression analyses. Results Serum OPG was significantly lower in patients than controls at baseline, and there was a trend towards higher RANKL and a lower OPG/RANKL ratio. Patients with polyarthritis had significantly higher increments in RANKL from baseline to follow-up, compared to patients with oligoarthritis. RANKL was a significant negative predictor for increments in total body lean mass. Patients who were receiving corticosteroids (CS) or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) at follow-up had higher OPG/RANKL ratio compared with patients who did not receive this medication. Conclusions The data supports that levels of OPG are lower in patients with JIA compared to healthy children, and higher levels of RANKL is associated with more serious disease. RANKL was a significant negative predictor of lean mass in patients with JIA. The OPG/RANKL ratio was higher in patients on DMARDs or CS treatment. PMID:21134287

  18. Validation of the Brazilian version of the pediatric outcomes data collection instrument: a cross-sectional evaluation in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a lack of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) questionnaires to evaluate pediatric musculoskeletal diseases in Brazil. The Pediatric Outcome Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) is widely used elsewhere for pediatric patients with musculoskeletal disorders, but it has not been fully validated in Brazil. Validation of the PODCI in the Brazilian Portuguese language is important to improve the assessment of pediatric patients with musculoskeletal diseases and to compare Brazilian study results with results from the international literature. This study aimed to analyze the test–re-test reliability and the convergent validity indicators for the quality of life scores obtained by application of the PODCI to children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods The PODCI underwent translation, transcultural adaptation, and field testing. Fifty-seven children and adolescents with JIA were administered the PODCI questionnaire. The Child Health Questionnaire - Parent Form 28 (CHQ PF-28) was used as the gold standard. Pain scales were employed, clinical examinations were performed, and laboratory inflammatory activity tests were conducted. Results The three versions of the PODCI exhibited good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient >0.70), good reproducibility (p < 0.05), and good correlation compared with the gold standard (CHQ), as shown by a Spearman coefficient (Rho) >0.40 (p < 0.05). Conclusions The PODCI was validated in patients with JIA in Brazil. This questionnaire was found to be valid, precise, and reliable. It can be successfully applied in research conducted by healthcare professionals who work with children and adolescents with musculoskeletal system disorders. PMID:24171906

  19. Linear growth in children suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis requiring steroid therapy: natural history and effects of growth hormone treatment on linear growth.

    PubMed

    Simon, D; Lucidarme, N; Prieur, A M; Ruiz, J C; Czernichow, P

    2001-01-01

    We assessed linear growth and final height retrospectively in a group of 24 patients suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) during childhood who had received steroid therapy. In these patients, there was a significant loss of height of more than 2 standard deviations during the first years of the disease, which correlated positively with the duration of prednisone therapy. After remission of the disease and discontinuation of prednisone treatment, 70% of the patients achieved catch-up growth, although 30% showed a persistent loss of height. Their mean final height was strongly correlated with their mean height at the end of steroid therapy and was significantly different between the group of patients with catch-up growth and the group without catch-up growth. This pattern of growth observed in patients with JIA should help us to define strategies of growth hormone (GH) treatment in these patients in order to improve their final height. We have previously reported the beneficial effects on growth and body composition of 1 year of GH treatment in a group of 14 growth-retarded patients suffering from JIA who received glucocorticoid therapy. These patients (n = 13) were treated again with GH at the same dosage (0.46 mg/kg/week [0.07 mg/kg/day]) for another 3-year period. GH treatment markedly increased growth velocity in these patients, but had a minor effect on height SDS, suggesting that these children will remain short when adults. Starting GH therapy in these patients earlier after the onset of the disease may prevent growth deterioration and metabolic complications induced by chronic inflammation and long-term steroid therapy.

  20. Growing up and moving on. A multicentre UK audit of the transfer of adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis from paediatric to adult centred care

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, L P; McDonagh, J E; Southwood, T R; Shaw, K L

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the provisions made for the transfer of adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis to adult rheumatology clinics in the UK and the impact of a transitional care programme. Methods An audit of the documentation of the provisions made for transfer in 10 centres participating in a controlled trial of transitional care. Each centre conducted a retrospective case note audit of the recent patients transferred to adult care before and 12–24 months after the start of the trial. Demographic details, age when transition was first discussed, age at transfer, transitional issues, multidisciplinary team involvement, adolescent self advocacy, and readiness were documented. Results There were improvements at follow up in documentation of transitional issues, disease specific educational needs, adolescent readiness, and parental needs with the exception of dental care, dietary calcium, and home exercise programmes. The age at which the concept of an independent clinic visit was introduced was lower (mean (SD): 16.8 (1.06) v 15.8 (1.46) years, p = 0.01) but there were no other changes in age related transitional milestones. Significantly more participants had preparatory visits to the adult clinic, had a transition plan, and had joint injections while awake at follow up. Conclusions The improvement in documentation suggests that involvement in the research project increased awareness of transitional issues. The difficulty of changing policy into practice was highlighted, with room for improvement, particularly at the paediatric/adult interface. The reasons for this are likely to be multiple, including resources and lack of specific training. PMID:15994281

  1. Frequency of joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis during a 5-year follow-up of newly diagnosed patients: implications for MR imaging as outcome measure.

    PubMed

    Hemke, Robert; Nusman, Charlotte M; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M; Doria, Andrea S; Kuijpers, Taco W; Maas, Mario; van Rossum, Marion A J

    2015-02-01

    To assess the sequence and type of active joints in a cohort of newly diagnosed juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with full access to current treatment at first visit and during a follow-up period of 5-years, in order to identify an index joint/group of joints for magnetic resonance imaging in JIA. Patient charts of all consecutive newly diagnosed JIA patients with a follow-up duration of at least 5 years were analyzed. Patients were derived from two tertiary pediatric rheumatology centers. Patient characteristics and data concerning the presence of joints with arthritis and the use of medication were recorded. Findings from 95 JIA patients [39 (41 %) oligoarticular and 56 (59 %) polyarticular] were analyzed. At first visit, distribution of active joints among patients was as follows: knee (n = 70, 74 %), ankle (n = 55, 58 %), elbow (n = 23, 24 %), wrist (n = 23, 24 %), metacarpophalangeal (MCP) (n = 20, 21 %), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) (n = 13, 14 %), hip (n = 6, 6 %), shoulder (n = 5, 5 %), and distal interphalangeal (DIP) (n = 4, 4 %) joints. After a follow-up period of 5 years, the cumulative percentage of patients with specific joint involvement changed into: knee (n = 88, 93 %), ankle (n = 79, 83 %), elbow (n = 43, 45 %), wrist (n = 38, 40 %), MCP (n = 36, 38 %), PIP (n = 29, 31 %), shoulder (n = 20, 21 %), hip (n = 17, 19 %), and DIP (n = 9, 10 %) joints. Despite changes in treatment strategies over the years, the knee remains the most commonly involved joint at onset and during follow-up in JIA, followed by the ankle, elbow, and wrist. For the evaluation of outcome with MRI, the knee appears the most appropriate joint in JIA.

  2. Development of a Vision Related Quality of Life Instrument for Children 8–18 Years of Age for use in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-associated Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Angeles-Han, Sheila T; Griffin, Kenneth W; Harrison, Melanie J; Lehman, Thomas JA; Leong, Traci; Robb, Rachel Reeves; Shainberg, Marla; Ponder, Lori; Lenhart, Phoebe; Hutchinson, Amy; Srivastava, Sunil K; Prahalad, Sampath; Lambert, Scott R; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the validity and reliability of a novel questionnaire to measure vision related quality of life (VRQOL) in children 8–18 years old for use in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis (JIA-U) –Effects of Youngsters’ Eyesight on Quality of Life (EYE-Q). Methods Several steps validated the EYE-Q. We interviewed experts and children on how vision affects a child’s activities. We developed new items and selected relevant items from existing instruments. We administered initial versions of the EYE-Q to normal-sighted children and those with JIA-U. For this study, children with various (or no) ocular conditions were recruited from a clinical population. Visual acuity (VA) and contrast sensitivity were performed, and the EYE-Q and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) were administered. The EYE-Q was repeated 10 days later. Patients, parents and physicians rated vision severity. Results Of 120 patients, 48% were female, 46.7% had no visual impairment (VI), and 52% had bilateral eye involvement. Mean age was 11.3 years. There were significant differences in the measures based on VA (p<0.001). Children with more severe VA and bilateral eye involvement had worse EYE-Q scores (p<0.001). There were significant associations between the EYE-Q and PedsQL (r = 0.375), repeat EYE-Q (r = 0.864), and clinical measures of ocular disease (r = −0.620). Conclusions Our study provides evidence of the validity and reliability of the EYE-Q in the measurement of VRQOL. The EYE-Q may complement clinical measures of VI and overall QOL and become an important tool in the assessment of QOL in JIA-U. PMID:21678564

  3. Osteoporosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by progressive loss of bone density, thinning of bone tissue and increased vulnerability to fractures. Osteoporosis may result from disease, dietary or hormonal deficiency ...

  4. Feasibility of a Website and a Hospital-Based Online Portal for Young Adults With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Views and Experiences of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scholtus, Lieske W; Drossaert, Constance HC; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Prakken, Berent; Kruize, Aike A; Bijlsma, Johannes JW

    2015-01-01

    Background To improve knowledge and to encourage active involvement of young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), an informative website with written and video information and an online portal with access to the personal medical record, self-monitoring, and e-consult functionalities were developed. Before implementing these applications in daily practice, it is important to gain insight into their feasibility in terms of ease of use, perceived usefulness and intention to use. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate and to examine the feasibility of the website and the online portal for young adults with JIA. Methods A qualitative, feasibility study was conducted among the first users: 13 young adults with JIA. After provided access to the website and online portal, patients were interviewed on perceived usefulness, ease of use, and intention to (re)use the applications. Results Participants in the study considered the website and online portal as useful and easy-to-use. New medical information and feedback would motivate them to revisit the applications again. On the website, videos showing other young adults, telling how they handle their condition, were found as the most useful. On the portal, access to their medical records was most appreciated: it made the young JIA patients feel in control and it helped them monitor symptoms and disease activity. e-consults were thought to facilitate communication with physicians. Conclusions The young adults considered both the website and the online portal as feasible, but they also had valuable suggestions to improve accessibility and use. Based on these findings, a news and event section was added on the website and a direct link was made to a discussion board and social media. To provide and support health information, the website is actively used in daily care. Considering the online portal, the use of self-monitoring tools and e-consult can be stimulated if there is direct linkage to treatment and

  5. HLA-DRB1*11 and variants of the MHC class II locus are strong risk factors for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ombrello, Michael J; Remmers, Elaine F; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Grom, Alexei; Foell, Dirk; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Özen, Seza; Prahalad, Sampath; Zeft, Andrew S; Bohnsack, John F; Mellins, Elizabeth D; Ilowite, Norman T; Russo, Ricardo; Len, Claudio; Hilario, Maria Odete E; Oliveira, Sheila; Yeung, Rae S M; Rosenberg, Alan; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Anton, Jordi; Schwarz, Tobias; Hinks, Anne; Bilginer, Yelda; Park, Jane; Cobb, Joanna; Satorius, Colleen L; Han, Buhm; Baskin, Elizabeth; Signa, Sara; Duerr, Richard H; Achkar, J P; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kottyan, Leah C; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen W; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Docampo, Elisa; Estivill, Xavier; Gül, Ahmet; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Langefeld, Carl D; Thompson, Susan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Thomson, Wendy; Kastner, Daniel L; Woo, Patricia

    2015-12-29

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an often severe, potentially life-threatening childhood inflammatory disease, the pathophysiology of which is poorly understood. To determine whether genetic variation within the MHC locus on chromosome 6 influences sJIA susceptibility, we performed an association study of 982 children with sJIA and 8,010 healthy control subjects from nine countries. Using meta-analysis of directly observed and imputed SNP genotypes and imputed classic HLA types, we identified the MHC locus as a bona fide susceptibility locus with effects on sJIA risk that transcended geographically defined strata. The strongest sJIA-associated SNP, rs151043342 [P = 2.8 × 10(-17), odds ratio (OR) 2.6 (2.1, 3.3)], was part of a cluster of 482 sJIA-associated SNPs that spanned a 400-kb region and included the class II HLA region. Conditional analysis controlling for the effect of rs151043342 found that rs12722051 independently influenced sJIA risk [P = 1.0 × 10(-5), OR 0.7 (0.6, 0.8)]. Meta-analysis of imputed classic HLA-type associations in six study populations of Western European ancestry revealed that HLA-DRB1*11 and its defining amino acid residue, glutamate 58, were strongly associated with sJIA [P = 2.7 × 10(-16), OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.8)], as was the HLA-DRB1*11-HLA-DQA1*05-HLA-DQB1*03 haplotype [6.4 × 10(-17), OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.9)]. By examining the MHC locus in the largest collection of sJIA patients assembled to date, this study solidifies the relationship between the class II HLA region and sJIA, implicating adaptive immune molecules in the pathogenesis of sJIA.

  6. A Systematic Critical Appraisal of Clinical Practice Guidelines in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christine A. M.; Toupin-April, Karine; Jutai, Jeffrey W.; Duffy, Ciarán M.; Rahman, Prinon; Cavallo, Sabrina; Brosseau, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this review are to: 1) appraise the methodological quality of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) providing pharmacological and/or non-pharmacological intervention recommendations, and 2) summarize the recommendations provided by the included CPGs and compare them where possible. Methods A systematic search was performed. Three trained appraisers independently evaluated the methodological quality of the CPGs using a validated and reliable instrument, the Appraisal of Guidelines in Research and Evaluation II. Six domains were considered: 1) score and purpose; 2) stakeholder involvement; 3) rigor of development; 4) clarity of presentation; 5) applicability; and 6) editorial independence. The domains consist of a total of 23 items each scored on a 7-point scale. High quality CPGs were identified if they had a domain score above 60% in rigor of development, and two other domains. Results Of the three included CPGs, the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and American College of Rheumatology (ACR) CPGs were considered to be of high quality, but the German Society for Pediatric Rheumatology was of lower quality. Domains one to four had high domain scores across the guidelines (mean (standard deviation)): 72.76 (13.80); 66.67 (9.81); 64.67 (7.77); and 87.00 (9.64), respectively. Lower scores were obtained for applicability (14.00 (5.57)) and editorial independence (43.44 (7.02)). Recommendations varied across CPGs due to differences in context, target audience (general practitioners, rheumatologists, and other multidisciplinary healthcare professionals) and patients’ disease presentations. Despite this variability, progression of pharmacological treatment did not conflict between CPGs. Recommendations for non-pharmacological interventions were vague and the interventions considered varied between CPGs. Conclusions Overall, recommendations were based on a paucity of evidence and

  7. Can Seeding in the Clinic Reach a Wide Audience? A Proof of Concept Study on Spreading a Health Message About Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Using a Shareable Online Video

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Michaela; Rapley, Tim; Foster, Helen; Pain, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Background Shareable online video offers the potential for spreading a health message across online and real world social networks. Seeding a message in a clinical setting may be advantageous. Objective To investigate the potential of an online video to spread a health message about juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) when delivered or seeded in a clinical setting and investigate factors that influence sharing behavior. Methods Multimethod proof of concept study. Concepts for two different styles of video were developed using focus groups and interviews and reviewed by an online market research panel. We compared dissemination of the two videos from two specialist pediatric rheumatology clinics in NHS Hospitals. Participants were 15 patients, family members, and clinical staff with knowledge of JIA at concept stage; 300 market research panel members in development stage; and 38 patients and their parents or guardians in the seeding stage. Newly diagnosed patients with JIA and/or parents or guardians were invited to view and share an online video with a health message about JIA across real-life and electronic social networks. Main outcome measures were viewing statistics, sharing behavior and patterns, and participant feedback. Results Of 38 patients and/or their parents or guardians given links, 26 visited the video webpage and shared the link, 2 visited and did not share, and 10 did not visit. Most links were viewed and shared within a few days. A total of 3314 pageviews were recorded with a mean of 89.6 pageviews per link (range 0-1245). Links were accessed from 26 countries, with most viewers in the United Kingdom (82.5%). Mothers were the most active group of sharers. Conclusions Distribution of a video link in a clinical setting may be an effective way to spread a health message. Parents or guardians of children with JIA are more likely to share a link than young people. Dissemination depends on a small number of active sharers, the content of the video, and

  8. Health-related quality of life in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis – child’s and parent’s point of view

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Raciborski, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the quality of life (QoL) of children suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Poland, to compare QoL of children with JIA and healthy children, and to compare children’s and parents’ assessments of QoL. Material and methods The KIDSCREEN-52 questionnaire (children’s and parents’ version) was used to assess the quality of life. The QoL in JIA patients and healthy peers from European and Polish reference groups was compared by the t-test. The Bland-Altman method was used to evaluate child and parent assessment agreement. Results Eighty-nine questionnaires were obtained from children (median age: 14 years; 62% female; JIA history longer than 1 year) and 84 questionnaires from parents. The QoL of JIA patients was lower than in healthy peers from the European reference group in terms of physical well-being (p < 0.001), psychological well-being (p = 0.011), autonomy (p < 0.001) and social support and peers (p < 0.001). The QoL of JIA patients compared with the QoL of children from the Polish reference group was lower only in terms of physical well-being (p < 0.001), whereas it was higher in terms of moods and emotions (p = 0.023), parent relations and home life (p = 0.005) and financial resources (p < 0.001). In most terms the assessment performed by the parent was lower than the child’s. The most significant differences were observed for physical well-being (p < 0.001), psychological well-being (p = 0.016), and self-perception (p = 0.013). Conclusions The present study is the first assessment of QoL of JIA children in Poland. In our study the quality of life in JIA children was lower than in healthy peers. Discrepancies between the assessment of the child’s QoL performed by the child and the parent were found. Both assessments should be taken into account in clinical practice as well as in research studies. PMID:27994269

  9. Treating osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Akhil; March, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    summary Osteoporotic fractures are common resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Exercise can help prevent osteoporosis. It can also benefit patients with osteoporosis, but the exercises must be tailored to the patient. Most Australians should be able to obtain adequate calcium in their diet and vitamin D from the sun. Supplements may be needed in some patients and they are recommended for use with other drugs for osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates, and in some patients denosumab, are first-line drugs for osteoporosis. Raloxifene and strontium ranelate can be considered in patients who cannot take bisphosphonates or denosumab. Teriparatide is reserved for patients with severe osteoporosis and the use of strontium ranelate is declining because of cardiovascular safety concerns. PMID:27340321

  10. Secondary osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Secondary osteoporosis is less common than primary osteoporosis. It may be suspected in patients who present with a fragility fracture despite having no risk factors for osteoporosis. In addition, secondary osteoporosis should be considered if the bone density Z-score is –2.5 or less. Consider the fracture site and presence of other clinical clues to guide investigations for an underlying cause. The tests to use are those that are indicated for the suspected cause. Baseline investigations include tests for bone and mineral metabolism (calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone), liver and kidney function, full blood count and thyroid-stimulating hormone. More detailed testing may be required in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:27346916

  11. [Postmenopausal osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    László, Adám

    2004-01-04

    Due to its incidence and clinical consequences osteoporosis followed by vertebral, hip, and forearm fractures represents an outstanding problem of nowadays' health care. Because of its high mortality rate hip fractures are of special interest. The number of fractures caused by postmenopausal osteoporosis increases with age. Costs of examinations and treatment of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis and fractures are also increasing and represent a significant amount all over the world. Organization of Osteoporosis Centres in Hungary was founded in 1995 and has been since functioning, however, only the one-sixth of osteoporotic patients are treated. Several risk factors are known in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, first of all the lack of sufficient calcium and vitamin D intake, age, genetic factors, and circumstances known to predispose falling. Estrogen deficiency is the most likely cause of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Osteodensitometry by DEXA is the most important method to evaluate osteoporosis, since decrease in bone mineral density strongly correlates with fracture incidence. Physical, radiologic, and laboratory examination are also required at the first visit and during follow-up. The quantity of bone can hardly be influenced after the 35th year of age, thus prevention of osteoporosis has special significance: appropriate calcium and vitamin D supplementation, weight-bearing sports and physical activity can prevent fractures. According to the results from studies fulfilling the criteria of evidence-based medicine, first choice treatment of osteoporosis involves hormone replacement therapy, bisphosphonates, the tissue specific tibolone, raloxifen and calcitonin. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation are always necessary to be added to any antiporotic treatment. Other combinations of different antiporotic drugs are useless and make the treatment more expensive. Other treatments like massage, physiotherapy, hip-protecting pants, etc. as well as

  12. Osteoporosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bone tissue and increased vulnerability to fractures. Osteoporosis may result from disease, dietary or hormonal deficiency or advanced age. Regular exercise and vitamin and mineral supplements can reduce and ...

  13. MALE OSTEOPOROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Lindomar Guimarães; Guimarães, Mara Lucia Rassi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Population aging is a reality that is being faced worldwide, and Brazil is no different. Osteoporosis was considered to be a postmenopausal women's disease for many years. Men have many development and hormonal factors that differentiate their skeletal maturation, which affects the incidence of osteoporosis and fractures. An up-to-date review of the specific literature within the Medline system is presented. PMID:27022584

  14. Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... not supported by your browser. Home Osteoporosis Women Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women Publication available in: PDF (54 ... Are Available? Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  15. Osteoporosis guidelines.

    PubMed

    Barlow, D H

    2007-10-01

    The Position Statement from the International Menopause Society (IMS) in 2004 recommends the use of hormone therapy for the 'avoidance of bone-wasting and fractures'. It also states that 'prevention, not treatment, is the most feasible goal'. In updating the Statement, this paper considers the relevance of Osteoporosis Guidelines. Relevant documents will be of two broad types. These may be consensus statements/position statements that summarize the 'state of the art' for practitioners, based on the work of expert groups, or they may be formal Guidelines generated through formal 'evidence-based' methodology. The former approach is generally used by Societies and can be generated through relatively efficient consensus processes. The latter approach will normally involve extensive work and cost, necessarily becomes very detailed, involving systematic review and technology appraisal and can lead to highly specific recommendations on intervention thresholds. For the revision of the general IMS Position Statement, the specific IMS Paper on Postmenopausal Osteoporosis (2005) must be a key reference document. This provides a description of the international consensus on the management of osteoporosis up to late 2004 and which remains relevant today. Additionally, other consensus statements and systematic guidelines need to be considered. Across these documents providing guidance, the substantial influence of the International Osteoporosis Foundation/National Osteoporosis Foundation Position Paper, defining a 'New approach to the development of assessment guidelines for osteoporosis', can be seen. This flagged the importance of a shift from guidance, tying the diagnostic threshold to the intervention threshold, and instead advised linking the intervention threshold to estimated fracture risk probability. This moves the intervention decision away from a simple bone density threshold to a more complex, but more realistic, threshold estimate, taking into account a range of

  16. Postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Eastell, Richard; O'Neill, Terence W; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Langdahl, Bente; Reid, Ian R; Gold, Deborah T; Cummings, Steven R

    2016-09-29

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disorder that is characterized by low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue. Fractures of the proximal femur, the vertebrae and the distal radius are the most frequent osteoporotic fractures, although most fractures in the elderly are probably at least partly related to bone fragility. The incidence of fractures varies greatly by country, but on average up to 50% of women >50 years of age are at risk of fractures. Fractures severely affect the quality of life of an individual and are becoming a major public health problem owing to the ageing population. Postmenopausal osteoporosis, resulting from oestrogen deficiency, is the most common type of osteoporosis. Oestrogen deficiency results in an increase in bone turnover owing to effects on all types of bone cells. The imbalance in bone formation and resorption has effects on trabecular bone (loss of connectivity) and cortical bone (cortical thinning and porosity). Osteoporosis is diagnosed using bone density measurements of the lumbar spine and proximal femur. Preventive strategies to improve bone health include diet, exercise and abstaining from smoking. Fractures may be prevented by reducing falls in high-risk populations. Several drugs are licensed to reduce fracture risk by slowing down bone resorption (such as bisphosphonates and denosumab) or by stimulating bone formation (such as teriparatide). Improved understanding of the cellular basis for osteoporosis has resulted in new drugs targeted to key pathways, which are under development.

  17. [Osteoporosis treatment].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, B; Rizzoli, R

    2006-01-04

    As for any chronic disease, adherence to osteoporosis treatment is low. Folates and vitamin B12 decrease hip fracture risk in elderly Japanese with stroke. Raloxifene (Evista) decreases the incidence of positive estrogen receptor breast cancer and could prevent cardiovascular events in patients at high risk. Strontium ranelate (Protélos) prevents hip fracture in elderly women. The action of alendronate (Fosamax) on bone mineral density and markers of bone remodelling is of higher amplitude than that of risedronate (Actonel). Once monthly ibandronate (Bonviva) increases bone mineral density in post menopausal women with osteoporosis. Excessive suppression of bone remodelling and osteonecrosis of the yaws could be related to bisphosphonate intake.

  18. Premenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Adi

    2017-03-01

    Most premenopausal women with low trauma fracture(s) or low bone mineral density have a secondary cause of osteoporosis or bone loss. Where possible, treatment of the underlying cause should be the focus of management. Premenopausal women with an ongoing cause of bone loss and those who have had, or continue to have, low trauma fractures may require pharmacologic intervention. Clinical trials provide evidence of benefits of bisphosphonates and teriparatide for bone mineral density in several types of premenopausal osteoporosis, but studies are small and do not provide evidence regarding fracture risk reduction.

  19. Linkage analysis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and marker loci on chromosome 6p in families of patients with juvenile myocloni epilepsy: No evidence for an epilepsy locus in the HLA region

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, W.P.; Rees, M.; Curtis, D.; Sundqvist, A.; Parker, K.; Chung, E.; Baralle, D.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    Evidence for a locus (EJM1) in the HLA region of chromosome 6p predisposing to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) in the families of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has been obtained in two previous studies of separately ascertained groups of kindreds. Linkage analysis has been undertaken in a third set of 25 families including a patient with JME and at least one first-degree relative with IGE. Family members were typed for eight polymorphic loci on chromosome 6p: F13A, D6889, D6S109, D6S105, D6S10, C4B, DQA1/A2, and TCTE1. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance and age-dependent high or low penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage was obtained at any locus. Multipoint linkage analysis generated significant exclusion data (lod score < -2.0) at HLA and for a region 10-30 cM telomeric to HLA, the extent of which varied with the level of penetrance assumed. These observations indicate that genetic heterogeneity exists within this epilepsy phenotype. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Osteoporosis Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... known risk factors. Some risk factors cannot be changed, but you can change others. Risk factors you cannot change: Gender . Your chances of developing osteoporosis are greater if ... Vitamin D plays an important role in calcium absorption and bone health. Food sources ...

  1. Idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Billiard, M; Merle, C; Carlander, B; Ondze, B; Alvarez, D; Besset, A

    1998-04-01

    Identification of idiopathic hypersomnia dates back 20 years only. It typically consists of prolonged nocturnal sleep, great difficulty waking up in the morning or at the end of a nap, and constant or recurrent excessive daytime sleepiness. Complete and incomplete forms are encountered. Twenty-three subjects fulfilling ICSD criteria are reported with clinical, polysomnographic and immunogenetic data. Considering differential diagnosis is an important step in the diagnosis of idiopathic hypersomnia. Idiopathic hypersomnia is much less frequent than narcolepsy. A strong genetic component is suggested by the high proportion of familial cases. No association with HLA has been evidenced to date.

  2. Idiopathic hypersomnia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Idiopathic hypersomnia is a sleep disorder in which a person is excessively sleepy ( hypersomnia ) ... other potential causes of excessive daytime sleepiness. Other sleep disorders that may cause daytime sleepiness include: Narcolepsy Obstructive ...

  3. Corticosteroid osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, P; Lane, N E

    2001-07-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used and effective agents for the control of many inflammatory diseases, but corticosteroid osteoporosis is a common problem associated with their long term high dose use. Prevention of corticosteroid osteoporosis is preferable to treatment of established corticosteroid bone loss. Several large double-blind controlled clinical trials in patients with corticosteroid osteoporosis have recently been published that provide new insights into its treatment. Based upon available evidence, the rank order of choice for prophylaxis would be a bisphosphonate followed by a vitamin D metabolite or an oestrogen type medication. Calcium alone appears to be unable to prevent rapid bone loss in patients starting corticosteroids, especially with prednisolone doses at 10 mg a day or greater. If an active vitamin D metabolite is used, calcium supplementation should be avoided unless dietary calcium intake is low. Hormone replacement therapy should be considered if hypogonadism is present. Since vertebral fracture is a common and important complication of high dose corticosteroid therapy, these findings suggest that rapid bone loss and hence fractures, can be prevented by prophylactic treatment. Although the follow-up data is limited, it is likely that such therapy needs to be continued beyond 12 months whilst patients continue significant doses of corticosteroid therapy.

  4. Osteoporosis in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... not supported by your browser. Home Osteoporosis Men Osteoporosis in Men Publication available in: PDF (71 KB) ... as life expectancy continues to rise. What Causes Osteoporosis? Bone is constantly changing—that is, old bone ...

  5. Juvenile angiofibroma

    MedlinePlus

    Nasal tumor; Angiofibroma - juvenile; Benign nasal tumor; Juvenile nasal angiofibroma; JNA ... Juvenile angiofibroma is not very common. It is most often found in adolescent boys. The tumor contains ...

  6. 2016 Classification Criteria for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Complicating Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Lisa; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-03-01

    To develop criteria for the classification of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of 28 experts was first asked to classify 428 patient profiles as having or not having MAS, based on clinical and laboratory features at the time of disease onset. The 428 profiles comprised 161 patients with systemic JIA-associated MAS and 267 patients with a condition that could potentially be confused with MAS (active systemic JIA without evidence of MAS, or systemic infection). Next, the ability of candidate criteria to classify individual patients as having MAS or not having MAS was assessed by evaluating the agreement between the classification yielded using the criteria and the consensus classification of the experts. The final criteria were selected in a consensus conference. Experts achieved consensus on the classification of 391 of the 428 patient profiles (91.4%). A total of 982 candidate criteria were tested statistically. The 37 best-performing criteria and 8 criteria obtained from the literature were evaluated at the consensus conference. During the conference, 82% consensus among experts was reached on the final MAS classification criteria. In validation analyses, these criteria had a sensitivity of 0.73 and a specificity of 0.99. Agreement between the classification (MAS or not MAS) obtained using the criteria and the original diagnosis made by the treating physician was high (κ=0.76). We have developed a set of classification criteria for MAS complicating systemic JIA and provided preliminary evidence of its validity. Use of these criteria will potentially improve understanding of MAS in systemic JIA and enhance efforts to discover effective therapies, by ensuring appropriate patient enrollment in studies.

  7. APL-2, an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein 60, induces interleukin-10 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell derived from juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients and downregulates the inflammatory response in collagen-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Norailys; Cantera, Dolores; Barberá, Ariana; Alonso, Amaris; Chall, Elsy; Franco, Lourdes; Ancizar, Julio; Nuñez, Yanetsy; Altruda, Fiorella; Silengo, Lorenzo; Padrón, Gabriel; Del Carmen Dominguez, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by autoimmune arthritis of unknown cause with onset before age of 16 years. Methotrexate provides clinical benefits in JIA. For children who do not respond to methotrexate, treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is an option. However, some patients do not respond or are intolerant to anti-TNF therapy. Induction of peripheral tolerance has long been considered a promising approach to the treatment of chronic autoimmune diseases. We aimed to evaluate the potentialities of two altered peptide ligands (APLs) derived from human heat-shock protein 60, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis, in JIA patients. Interferon (IFN)-γ, TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-10 levels were determined in ex vivo assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from these patients. Wild-type peptide and one of these APLs increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. Unlike, the other APLs (called APL2) increased the IL-10 level without affecting IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. On the other hand, APL2 induces a marked activation of T cells since it transforms cell cycle phase's distribution of CD4+ T cells from these patients. In addition, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of APL2 in collagen-induced arthritis model. Therapy with APL2 reduced arthritis scores and histological lesions in mice. This effect was associated to a decrease in TNF-α and IL-17 levels. These results indicate a therapeutic potentiality of APL2 for JIA.

  8. The most important needs and preferences of patients for support from health care professionals: A reflective practice on (transitional) care for young adults with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ammerlaan, Judy W; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; de Boer-Nijhof, Nienke C; Prakken, Berent; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Kruize, Aike A

    2017-03-12

    In this manuscript, presented as a Reflective Practice, the learning experiences and reflections of a healthcare team on redeveloping the transitional care for young adults with a juvenile rheumatic disease are described. In this process of redeveloping care, the healthcare team experienced that small step, driven by patient stories and involvement of patients in all phases from development to evaluation, led to meaningful results. The eHealth interventions, developed to support the transition and to increase self-management were found to be feasible and evaluated positively by the young adult group. But the healthcare team also experienced that the focus on the patient alone, is not enough to implement self-management interventions and sustain patient centered care in daily practice. How healthcare professionals personally think and feel about patient centered care is essential and needs to be discussed in daily care.It determines the way of being present with attention and commitment in daily health care. It affects the hands, head and heart. A daily reflection on shared answers of the patient and the health care professional to the question 'what is the most important to you?'may help to implement patient centered care in health practice.

  9. Idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Billiard, M

    1996-08-01

    Idiopathic hypersomnia is not as well delineated as narcolepsy and its history is much more recent. There are at least two forms of the disorder: (1) a polysymptomatic form, characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal sleep of abnormally long duration, and signs of sleep drunkenness on awakening, and (2) a monosymptomatic form that manifests only by excessive daytime sleepiness. The most widely used laboratory procedures are nocturnal polysomnographic recording following by an MSLT demonstrating a mean sleep latency of less than 10 minutes. At least in the polysymptomatic form, however, continuous polysomnography on an ad lib protocol deserves to be performed to catch the abnormally long major sleep episode and the long unrefreshing naps. Idiopathic hypersomnia is probably one of the most overdiagnosed sleep disorders. Several other disorders must be excluded before the diagnosis can be considered conclusive. Treatment of idiopathic hypersomnia relies on stimulants, which are frequently less effective and less well tolerated than in narcolepsy.

  10. Gender Disparities in Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Alswat, Khaled A.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a growing health concern worldwide and its complications are as prevalent as other common chronic disease complications such as hypertension and diabetes. In this review, we will discuss the role of gender in osteoporosis, especially related to peak bone mass and maturation, rate of annual bone loss, screening, prevalence of osteoporosis and its related fractures, mortality after osteoporosis-related fracture, fracture risk predication using different technologies and the impact of gender on osteoporosis management. PMID:28392857

  11. Glucocorticoid osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Philip N

    2002-01-01

    Postmenopausal women are at greatest risk of rapid bone loss and fracture with glucocorticoids and should be actively considered for prophylactic measures. In men and premenopausal women receiving glucocorticoids, the decision to use anti-osteoporosis prophylaxis is less clear and depends upon baseline bone mineral density [BMD], anticipated dose and duration of glucocorticoids. Based upon evidence the order of choice for prophylaxis would be a bisphosphonate followed by a vitamin D metabolite or hormone replacement therapy [HRT]. Calcium alone appears unable to prevent rapid bone loss in patients starting glucocorticoids. HRT should clearly be considered if hypogonadism is present. In patients receiving chronic low dose glucocorticoids, treatment with calcium and vitamin D may be sufficient to prevent further bone loss. However since fracture risk is a function of multiple factors including the degree of reduction in BMD as well as the duration of exposure, treatment with therapy to increase BMD will reduce fracture risk even in patients receiving chronic low dose glucocorticoids.

  12. Understanding osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R.

    1991-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved recently in our understanding of the normal process by which bone mass is regulated. Age-related trabecular bone loss is characterized not simply by a global loss of bone but also by cortical porosity and loss of trabecular connections. Because bone strength depends on architectural as well as material properties, bone quantity alone cannot define fracture risk with precision. Traditional therapies for osteoporosis increase bone mass, and estrogen therapy, in particular, profoundly decreases fracture risk. The pharmacologic restoration of bone quantity and quality, however, remains elusive. Modern biotechnology offers the hope that progress may come about through the development of growth factors and other osteotropic compounds for clinical use. Images PMID:1877231

  13. Idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Billiard, Michel; Sonka, Karel

    2016-10-01

    Idiopathic hypersomnia continues to evolve from the concept of "sleep drunkenness" introduced by Bedrich Roth in Prague in 1956 and the description of idiopathic hypersomnia with two forms, polysymptomatic and monosymptomatic, by the same Bedrich Roth in 1976. The diagnostic criteria of idiopathic hypersomnia have varied with the successive revisions of the International classifications of sleep disorders, including the recent 3rd edition. No epidemiological studies have been conducted so far. Disease onset occurs most often during adolescence or young adulthood. A familial background is often present but rigorous studies are still lacking. The key manifestation is hypersomnolence. It is often accompanied by sleep of long duration and debilitating sleep inertia. Polysomnography (PSG) followed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) is mandatory, as well as a 24 h PSG or a 2-wk actigraphy in association with a sleep log to ensure a total 24-h sleep time longer than or equal to 66O minutes, when the mean sleep latency on the MSLT is longer than 8 min. Yet, MSLT is neither sensitive nor specific and the polysomnographic diagnostic criteria require continuous readjustment and biologic markers are still lacking. Idiopathic hypersomnia is most often a chronic condition though spontaneous remission may occur. The condition is disabling, sometimes even more so than narcolepsy type 1 or 2. Based on neurochemical, genetic and immunological analyses as well as on exploration of the homeostatic and circadian processes of sleep, various pathophysiological hypotheses have been proposed. Differential diagnosis involves a number of diseases and it is not yet clear whether idiopathic hypersomnia and narcolepsy type 2 are not the same condition. Until now, the treatment of idiopathic hypersomnia has mirrored that of the sleepiness of narcolepsy type 1 or 2. The first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of modafinil have just been published, as well as a double

  14. Four dermatomyositis-specific autoantibodies-anti-TIF1γ, anti-NXP2, anti-SAE and anti-MDA5-in adult and juvenile patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies in a Hungarian cohort.

    PubMed

    Bodoki, Levente; Nagy-Vincze, Melinda; Griger, Zoltán; Betteridge, Zoe; Szöllősi, Lászlóné; Dankó, Katalin

    2014-12-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are chronic systemic autoimmune diseases characterised by symmetrical, proximal muscle weakness. Dermatomyositis represents one subset of IIMs, in which skin rashes are present in addition to muscle weakness. Myositis-specific antibodies can only be detected in myositis, and they are directed against specific proteins found in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus of cells. With this case-based article, we introduce the recently detected anti-TIF1γ, anti-NXP2, anti-SAE and anti-MDA5 antibodies that form various clinical groups. These antibodies could be detected in patients with dermatomyositis. The myositis-specific autoantibodies of three hundred and thirty-seven Hungarian patients with IIM were detected. Retrospective analysis of the clinical findings has also been introduced by revision of the medical history. We had twelve patients with anti-TIF1γ positivity, four patients with anti-NXP2 positivity and four patients with anti-SAE positivity. We did not have any positive anti-MDA5 patients. The most relevant clinical findings were similar to those seen in previously published reports. Eleven of the twelve patients with anti-TIF1γ positivity had classical dermatomyositis. Three of the twelve anti-TIF1γ patients had cancer during the disease progression. This was two out of four for the anti-NXP2 subgroup and one in four for the anti-SAE subgroup. In two juvenile dermatomyositis cases, typical ulceration was seen in patients with anti-TIF1γ positivity. The frequency of pulmonary fibrosis during the disease progression was 2/12, 1/4 and 1/4 in anti-TIF1γ, anti-NXP2 and anti-SAE, respectively. Other extra-muscular manifestations, such as arthralgia, dysphagia, dysphonia and dyspnoea, were also detectable. The myositis subgroups determined by these myositis-specific autoantibodies differ from each other in their symptoms, prognosis and therapy responsiveness. Their detection is helpful for the preparation of an adequate

  15. Efficacy and safety of open-label etanercept on extended oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis: part 1 (week 12) of the CLIPPER study

    PubMed Central

    Horneff, Gerd; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Constantin, Tamas; Foeldvari, Ivan; Vojinovic, Jelena; Chasnyk, Vyacheslav G; Dehoorne, Joke; Panaviene, Violeta; Susic, Gordana; Stanevica, Valda; Kobusinska, Katarzyna; Zuber, Zbigniew; Mouy, Richard; Rumba-Rozenfelde, Ingrida; Breda, Luciana; Dolezalova, Pavla; Job-Deslandre, Chantal; Wulffraat, Nico; Alvarez, Daniel; Zang, Chuanbo; Wajdula, Joseph; Woodworth, Deborah; Vlahos, Bonnie; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of etanercept (ETN) in paediatric subjects with extended oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (eoJIA), enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA), or psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods CLIPPER is an ongoing, Phase 3b, open-label, multicentre study; the 12-week (Part 1) data are reported here. Subjects with eoJIA (2–17 years), ERA (12–17 years), or PsA (12–17 years) received ETN 0.8 mg/kg once weekly (maximum 50 mg). Primary endpoint was the percentage of subjects achieving JIA American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 30 criteria at week 12; secondary outcomes included JIA ACR 50/70/90 and inactive disease. Results 122/127 (96.1%) subjects completed the study (mean age 11.7 years). JIA ACR 30 (95% CI) was achieved by 88.6% (81.6% to 93.6%) of subjects overall; 89.7% (78.8% to 96.1%) with eoJIA, 83.3% (67.2% to 93.6%) with ERA and 93.1% (77.2% to 99.2%) with PsA. For eoJIA, ERA, or PsA categories, the ORs of ETN vs the historical placebo data were 26.2, 15.1 and 40.7, respectively. Overall JIA ACR 50, 70, 90 and inactive disease were achieved by 81.1, 61.5, 29.8 and 12.1%, respectively. Treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs), infections, and serious AEs, were reported in 45 (35.4%), 58 (45.7%), and 4 (3.1%), subjects, respectively. Serious AEs were one case each of abdominal pain, bronchopneumonia, gastroenteritis and pyelocystitis. One subject reported herpes zoster and another varicella. No differences in safety were observed across the JIA categories. Conclusions ETN treatment for 12 weeks was effective and well tolerated in paediatric subjects with eoJIA, ERA and PsA, with no unexpected safety findings. PMID:23696632

  16. Rationale, design and baseline data of a mixed methods study examining the clinical impact of a brief transition programme for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the DON'T RETARD project

    PubMed Central

    Hilderson, Deborah; Westhovens, Rene; Wouters, Carine; Van der Elst, Kristien; Goossens, Eva; Moons, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe (1) the content of a transition programme for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) designed as a brief intervention, (2) the rationale and design of a mixed-methods study evaluating the clinical impact of this transition programme and (3) to provide baseline data of the intervention group. Design An ‘embedded experimental’ design is used for the evaluation of the transition programme. A ‘one-group pretest-posttest, with a non-equivalent posttest-only comparison group design’ is used to quantitatively evaluate the impact of the transition programme, applying both longitudinal and comparative analyses. Subsequently, experiences of adolescents and their parents who participated in the experimental group will be analysed qualitatively using content analysis. Setting Participants in the intervention are recruited at a tertiary care centre in Belgium. The comparison group participants are recruited from one tertiary and three secondary care centres in Belgium. Participants The intervention group consists of 33 young people (25 females; 8 males) with a median age of 16 years. Main diagnoses are persistent or extended oligoarticular JIA (33%), polyarticular JIA (30%), enthesitis-related JIA (21%) or systemic arthritis (15%). Intervention The transition programme comprises eight key components: (1) transition coordinator; (2) providing information and education; (3) availability by telephone; (4) information about and contact with an adult care programme; (5) guidance of parents; (6) meeting with peers; (7) transfer plan; and (8) actual transfer to adult care. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome is health status, as perceived by the adolescents. Secondary outcomes are health status, as perceived by the parents; medication adherence; illness-related knowledge; quality of life; fatigue; promotion of independence; support of autonomy; behavioural control and psychological control. Results At baseline, the median

  17. Osteoporosis and Asian American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... not supported by your browser. Home Osteoporosis Women Osteoporosis and Asian American Women Publication available in: PDF ( ... Are Available? Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  18. Osteoarthritis, osteoarthrosis, and idiopathic condylar resorption.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, Louis G

    2008-05-01

    The term "osteoarthritis" has classically been defined as a low-inflammatory arthritic condition. The term "osteoarthrosis," a synonym for osteoarthritis in the medical orthopedic literature, has recently come to be identified in the dental/temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders literature with any noninflammatory arthritic condition that results in similar degenerative changes as in osteoarthritis. The term "idiopathic condylar resorption," also known as "progressive condylar resorption," is described as a dysfunctional remodeling of the TMJ manifested by morphologic change, decreased ramal height, progressive mandibular retrusion in the adult, or decreased mandibular growth in the juvenile. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of osteoarthritic TMJ disorders and idiopathic condylar resorption.

  19. Osteoporosis and Your Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Movement › Osteoporosis and Your Spine Osteoporosis and Your Spine Your spine is made up of small bones ... called kyphosis. Kyphosis and Bone Breaks in the Spine The bones in the spine are called vertebrae. ...

  20. Osteoporosis: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, C. Conrad; Slemenda, Charles

    1987-01-01

    An overview of osteoporosis, its types, causes, diagnosis, and treatment is presented. Risk factors and bone mass measurement are also discussed. This article serves as an introduction to a symposium on osteoporosis containing five other articles in this issue. (MT)

  1. FastStats: Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Osteoporosis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... men 50 years of age and over with osteoporosis of the femur neck or lumbar spine: 4% ...

  2. Osteoporosis in unstable adult scoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Velis, K.P.; Healey, J.H.; Schneider, R.

    1988-12-01

    New noninvasive techniques as well as conventional methods were used to evaluate skeletal mass in the following three populations of adult white women as follows: (1) 79 subjects with preexisting idiopathic scoliosis designated as unstable (US) because of the associated presence in the lumbar spine of lateral spondylolisthesis with segmental instability; (2) 67 subjects with preexisting idiopathic scoliosis without lateral spondylolisthesis designated as stable (SS); and (3) 248 age-matched nonscoliotic controls. Ages in all three groups were categorized into premenopausal (25-44 years), perimenopausal (45-54 years), and postmenopausal (55-84 years). The results showed higher scoliosis morbidity in the US compared to the SS populations. The prevalence and severity of osteoporosis were markedly increased in US versus SS populations. Femoral neck density determined by dual-photon absorptiometry techniques averaged 26% to 48% lower in all age categories of US patients compared to controls. These changes were found in the youngest age groups, indicating reductions in bone mineral content earlier in the adult life of white women with a specific type of high-morbidity US characterized by the marker of lateral spondylolisthesis.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... making a group of related proteins called the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex . The HLA complex helps the immune system distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins made by foreign invaders ( ...

  4. [QOL evaluation for osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Endo, Naoto

    2012-06-01

    It is important to evaluate the Health Related QOL (HRQOL) in the treatment of the patients with osteoporosis. In 1999, the Japanese Society for Bone and Mineral Research made Japanese Osteoporosis Quality of Life Questionnaire (JOQOL) to evaluate the osteoporosis specific HRQOL of the Japanese patients. This JOQOL 1999-version was revised in 2000. JOQOL 2001 version consists of six domain 38 items, using five-point scale ranging from 0 to 4, scored from 0 to 152. Osteoporosis is a bone disorder with decreased bone strength, resulting in bone fragility and consequently fractures. The vertebral fractures cause a change in the spinal column (kyphosis) and the decline of the physical function due to the back pain. This is the decrease in QOL of the patients with osteoporosis compared to cases without osteoporosis. Therefore, assessment of QOL are recommended in the prevention and treatment for osteoporosis.

  5. Osteoporosis and Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is often overlooked or simply forgotten as a cause of osteoporosis. Yet, the consequences of osteoporotic fractures can be devastating. Although the bulk of the published experience regarding osteoporosis is derived from the postmenopausal population, this review will focus on gastrointestinal disorders implicated in osteoporosis, with an emphasis on inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease. The unique aspects of gastrointestinal diseases associated with osteoporosis include early onset of disease (and, therefore, prolonged exposure to risk factors for developing osteoporosis, particularly with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease), malabsorption, and maldigestion of nutrients necessary for bone health and maintenance (eg, calcium, vitamin D), as well as the impact of glucocorticoids. These factors, when added to smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, hypogonadism, and a family history of osteoporosis, accumulate into an imposing package of predictors for osteoporotic fracture. This paper will review the identification and treatment strategies for patients with gastrointestinal disorders and osteoporosis. PMID:20978554

  6. Osteoporosis: Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Stefka; Vasileva, Liliya; Ivanova, Stanislava; Peikova, Lily; Obreshkova, Danka

    2015-01-01

    The definition of osteoporosis was originally formulated at a conference of the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1993 as 'a systemic skeletal disease characterized by decreased bone mass and altered micro-architecture of bone tissue, leading to enhanced bone fragility and risk of fractures'. Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and loss of the structural and bio-mechanical properties that are required to maintain bone homeostasis. This review aims to address the currently available options in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Management of osteoporosis includes non-pharmacological treatment - diet rich of calcium and vitamin D, healthy lifestyle, proper exercise plan, and pharmacological therapy. Combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options have to be considered for prevention of osteoporosis and minimization of the risk of fractures. Given the heterogeneity of osteoporosis syndrome and lack of significant number of comparative studies, the choice of a pharmacological agents should be individualized.

  7. Comparing Osteoporosis Drugs: The Bisphosphonates

    MedlinePlus

    Drugs to Treat Low Bone Density Comparing Osteoporosis Drugs: The Bisphosphonates What is osteoporosis (low bone density)? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the body does not build enough new bone. ...

  8. Idiopathic cardiomegaly*

    PubMed Central

    1968-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are certain heart diseases of unknown etiology and pathogenesis, occurring mostly in tropical and subtropical areas, where they constitute a major clinical problem and sometimes a public health problem. The need for international co-operation in the study of such forms of heart disease has long been recognized and WHO convened informal meetings of investigators on various aspects of the subject in 1964, 1965 and 1966. Out of these have arisen co-operative studies co-ordinated by WHO. In November 1967 a fourth informal meeting was held in Kingston, Jamaica, to review the following topics: the progress reports from all co-operating laboratories; the different types of cardiomyopathies; past experience with cardiac registries, and the diagnostic importance of coronary angiography. Steps were taken towards the formulation of a standard terminology, since too many confusing names are currently employed to mean “cardiomegaly of unknown origin”. A common name, “idiopathic cardiomegaly”, was therefore suggested for future use. The account presented here was prepared by Dr Z. Fejfar, Chief Medical Officer, Cardiovascular Diseases, World Health Organization, Geneva, on behalf of the other participants and is a précis of some of the information that was exchanged, some of the views that were expressed and of the suggestions that were made. PMID:4235740

  9. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  10. Pituitary Disorders and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Various hormonal disorders can influence bone metabolism and cause secondary osteoporosis. The consequence of this is a significant increase of fracture risk. Among pituitary disorders such effects are observed in patients with Cushing's disease, hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, and hypopituitarism. Severe osteoporosis is the result of the coexistence of some of these disorders and hypogonadism at the same time, which is quite often. PMID:25873948

  11. [Pathophysiology of immobilization osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    Enhancement of bone resorption and suppression of bone formation in response to reduced mechanical stress cause rapid bone loss. pharmacotherapy for immobilization osteoporosis in motor paralysis and long-term bedrest is effective therapy. Early intervention for rapid bone loss is important for immobilization osteoporosis.

  12. [Osteoporosis: a clinical perspective].

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Niina

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is defined by decreased bone density and microarchitectural deterioration that predispose to fragility fractures. The WHO diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis require bone densitometry but treatment is possible on the basis of high clinical fracture risk and can be assessed by the FRAX risk algorithm. All those subject to fracture risk should be advised about proper basic treatment of osteoporosis, including exercise, prevention of falls, smoking cessation, avoidance of alcohol intake, and dietary or supplemental abundance of calcium and vitamin D. Underlying diseases must be studied after diagnosis of osteoporosis even if treatment is initiated without densitometry. When indicated, specific osteoporosis therapy includes bisphosphonates, denosumab, teriparatide, strontium ranelate or SERMs. In hypogonadism, gonadal steroids may be indicated alone or in addition to a specific treatment. Treatment effect and continuation are assessed after 2 to 5 years.

  13. [Osteoporosis in collagen diseases].

    PubMed

    Momohara, S; Aritomi, H

    1994-09-01

    The pathogenesis of osteoporosis in patients with rheumatic diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is poorly understood. The duration of the disease, the severity of the inflammatory process, gender, age, steroid therapy and menopause have been suggested as risk factors for osteoporosis in patients with RA. Although these factors may contribute to the development of osteoporosis, the influence of one specific factor is difficult to evaluate. It is said that the treatment with steroids has a deleterious effect on bone turnover, but this effect has been controversial. The dose margin of prednisone that will lead to osteoporosis is not known but has been estimated to be 10 mg per day. Fractures and stress fractures in patients with RA are probably much more common. Further study concerning osteoporosis in rheumatic diseases is necessary.

  14. Animal models for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Komori, Toshihisa

    2015-07-15

    The major types of osteoporosis in humans are postmenopausal osteoporosis, disuse osteoporosis, and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Animal models for postmenopausal osteoporosis are generated by ovariectomy. Bone loss occurs in estrogen deficiency due to enhanced bone resorption and impaired osteoblast function. Estrogen receptor α induces osteoclast apoptosis, but the mechanism for impaired osteoblast function remains to be clarified. Animal models for unloading are generated by tail suspension or hind limb immobilization by sciatic neurectomy, tenotomy, or using plaster cast. Unloading inhibits bone formation and enhances bone resorption, and the involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in it needs to be further investigated. The osteocyte network regulates bone mass by responding to mechanical stress. Osteoblast-specific BCL2 transgenic mice, in which the osteocyte network is completely disrupted, can be a mouse model for the evaluation of osteocyte functions. Glucocorticoid treatment inhibits bone formation and enhances bone resorption, and markedly reduces cancellous bone in humans and large animals, but not consistently in rodents.

  15. [Genetics of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Solal, M; de Vernejoul, M C

    2004-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a multifactorial disease involving genetic component and several environmental factors. Some rare diseases that are associated with osteoporosis such as Lobstein disease or the "pseudoglial osteoporosis" syndrom are monogenetic. Nevertheless common osteoporosis is a polygenic affection resulting from the interaction between the polymorphism of different genes and the environmental factors. The genetic component of osteoporosis encompasses roughly 60 to 70% of bone mineral density, whereas the effect on fracture risk seems lower because of the importance of other environmental factors as falls. Many polymorphisms of candidate genes involved in the regulation of bone mass have been correlated to bone density. It is likely that many genes participate to the regulation of bone density although the existence of a major gene is highly suspected. Moreover linkage analysis after genome-wide search in populations with severe osteoporosis has focused on some regions of interest (QTL) on the chromosomes. This will allow to localize one or more specific genes. The current genetic studies on different populations affected by osteoporosis or not will be useful in order to better predict the fracture risk in association with bone density and biochemical markers of bone turnover. Moreover, this will lead to the development of new treatments of osfeoporosis and will help to adapt the therapy for individual patients.

  16. OSTEOPOROSIS DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Márcio Passini Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    Articles that update the state of knowledge regarding osteoporosis run the risk of quickly becoming obsolete because research and studies on osteoporosis today are arousing great interest among researchers, the pharmaceutical and medical equipment industries, governments and even WHO. All orthopedists know about osteoporosis because of its most deleterious effect: osteoporotic fracture. Osteoporosis without fractures does not arouse suspicion because this is a pathological condition with a nonspecific clinical profile. Osteoporotic fractures have an economic cost (from treatment), a social cost (from its sequelae) and a medical cost (from deaths). Many fractures could be avoided through diagnosing osteoporosis prior to the first fracture and thus many temporary and permanent disabilities could be avoided and many lives saved. Awareness of the risk factors for osteoporosis raises suspicions and bone densitometry aids in diagnosis. Treatment should be based on the physiopathology of the disease. Hence, for prevention or treatment of osteoporosis, the activity of osteoclasts should be diminished or the activity of osteoblasts should be increased, or both. Treatment that reduces the incidence of fractures by improving the bone geometry and microarchitecture would be ideal. Newly formed bone tissue needs to have good cell and matrix quality, normal mineralization, a good ratio between mineralized (mechanically resistant) and non-mineralized (flexible) bone, and no accumulated damage. The ideal treatment should have a positive remodeling rate and fast and long-lasting therapeutic effects. Such effects need to be easily detectable. They need to be safe.

  17. OSTEOPOROSIS DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Márcio Passini Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Articles that update the state of knowledge regarding osteoporosis run the risk of quickly becoming obsolete because research and studies on osteoporosis today are arousing great interest among researchers, the pharmaceutical and medical equipment industries, governments and even WHO. All orthopedists know about osteoporosis because of its most deleterious effect: osteoporotic fracture. Osteoporosis without fractures does not arouse suspicion because this is a pathological condition with a nonspecific clinical profile. Osteoporotic fractures have an economic cost (from treatment), a social cost (from its sequelae) and a medical cost (from deaths). Many fractures could be avoided through diagnosing osteoporosis prior to the first fracture and thus many temporary and permanent disabilities could be avoided and many lives saved. Awareness of the risk factors for osteoporosis raises suspicions and bone densitometry aids in diagnosis. Treatment should be based on the physiopathology of the disease. Hence, for prevention or treatment of osteoporosis, the activity of osteoclasts should be diminished or the activity of osteoblasts should be increased, or both. Treatment that reduces the incidence of fractures by improving the bone geometry and microarchitecture would be ideal. Newly formed bone tissue needs to have good cell and matrix quality, normal mineralization, a good ratio between mineralized (mechanically resistant) and non-mineralized (flexible) bone, and no accumulated damage. The ideal treatment should have a positive remodeling rate and fast and long-lasting therapeutic effects. Such effects need to be easily detectable. They need to be safe. PMID:27022545

  18. Periodontitis and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Straka, Michal; Straka-Trapezanlidis, Michaela; Deglovic, Juraj; Varga, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Today's knowledge and studies show a firm correlation between osteoporosis and periodontitis, particularly in postmenopausal women. This review study deals with epidemiological and etiopathogenetic association between chronic periodontitis and an osteoporosis. A special emphasis is put on explanation of possible relations between a premature tooth loss and decrease of length and density of jaw bones, particularly their alveolar prolongations. The second part of the paper deals with principles of treatment in patients suffering of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis reduces density of jaw bones and decreases a number of teeth in jaws, but it does not affect other clinical signs and markers of periodontitis such as inflammation, bleeding and the depth of periodontal pockets and microbial plaque.

  19. [Hypertension and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    The number of patients with high blood pressure and osteoporosis are increased year by year in our society. In hypertension patients, excess urinary calcium secretion induces secondary parathyroidism to increase serum calcium level by calcium release from bone, which may accelerate osteoporosis. In this aspect, there are several reports that anti-hypertensive drugs, especially thiazides, increase bone mineral density and decrease the incidence of bone fracture. In addition, we demonstrated that renin-angiotensin system can be involved in the process of osteoporosis. Angiotensin II significantly induced the expression of RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) in osteoblasts, leading to the activation of osteoclasts, while these effects were completely blocked by an Ang II type 1 receptor blockade. Recently, it has been reported that angiotensin receptor blockade clinically decreased the incidence of bone fracture. Renin-angiotensin system might be common molecule to regulate both hypertension and osteoporosis.

  20. Management of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Frederick T; Kivitz, Alan J; Sands, Earl E

    2003-10-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, reduction in quality of life, and increasing health care costs. It is estimated that 1.5 million women in the United States have one or more osteoporosis-related fractures annually. Fractures may occur at any site, but vertebral fractures are the most common. Longitudinal studies have demonstrated a decreased life expectancy associated with both vertebral and nonvertebral fractures. Once an initial fracture occurs, there is a fivefold increased risk of a second fracture within 1 year. The management of osteoporosis today incorporates multiple modalities of therapy. In addition to early detection, patient education, exercise, and nutritional supplementation, multiple therapeutic agents should be implemented early in an attempt to prevent initial and subsequent fractures. This article reviews currently approved modalities of therapy for the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  1. Medicines for osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Evista); Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... Your doctor may prescribe certain medicines to help lower your ... make the bones in your hips, spine, and other areas less likely ...

  2. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  3. Diagnosis of Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahner, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Early recognition of osteoporosis is difficult because symptoms are lacking and there are no distinct, readily accessible diagnostic features. This article reviews the standard approach, radiographic and laboratory diagnosis, bone mass measurement techniques, and interpretation of bone mineral data. (MT)

  4. [Osteoporosis and Colles' fracture].

    PubMed

    Hindsø, K; Lauritzen, J B

    2001-10-01

    We describe the connection between osteoporosis and Colles' fractures of the distal radius from an epidemiological and aetiological point of view. In addition, the value of these fractures as markers of osteoporosis and future risk of fracture is assessed. Several studies have clearly shown an epidemiological association between osteoporosis and fractures of the distal radius, with the association strongest for women up to 65 years of age and for osteoporosis located in the forearm. The association weakens for other locations and for older women. Osteoporosis may have some aetiologic significance for the development of Colles' fractures, but several extraskeletal factors are of equal or further importance. The occurrence of a Colles' fracture in the first 10-15 years after the postmenopause indicates an increased relative risk of sustaining another fracture in the future. However the relative risk approaches one after a few years and, because of the comparatively low absolute risk in this age-group, Colles' fracture as a risk factor contributes little to an assessment of the lifetime fracture risk. In a few longitudinal studies, Colles' fractures could not predict the long-term risk of osteoporosis. The presence of a Colles' fracture should lead to considerations concerning the skeletal and extraskeletal causes of the fracture for the purpose of initiating preventive and therapeutic measures.

  5. Bisphosphonates for Osteoporosis: Benefits and Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... o es sis : Benefits and Risks What is osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which your bones become ... through menopause are especially at risk of developing osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is more common in women than in ...

  6. Acquired Idiopathic Generalized Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Geethu; Criton, Sebastian; Surendran, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is a rare condition, where the exact pathomechanism is unknown. We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis in a patient who later developed lichen planus. Here an autoimmune-mediated destruction of sweat glands may be the probable pathomechanism.

  7. [Clinical characteristics of male osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Mika; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2016-07-01

    As men are less likely than women to develop osteoporosis, male osteoporosis remains poorly understood. However, elderly men have a clearly reduced bone mineral density and increased risk for fractures. In Japan, one in four patients with osteoporosis is male. Male osteoporosis is associated with not only reduction in androgen, but also estrogen, and differs from postmenopausal osteoporosis in that decreased bone formation is involved and that age-related changes in cortical bone structure and perforation of the trabeculae of cancellous bone are unlikely to occur. The proportion of secondary osteoporosis is higher for men than women;therefore, differential diagnosis is important in the diagnosis of male osteoporosis. In addition, it is recommended that bone mineral density be measured at the femoral neck or total hip in men. Men have a worse prognosis following fractures than women, and management of male osteoporosis is highly important for extending healthy life expectancy.

  8. Juvenile dermatomyositis in a Nigerian girl.

    PubMed

    Adelowo, Olufemi; Nwankwo, Madu; Olaosebikan, Hakeem

    2014-04-04

    Juvenile dermatomyositis is an autoimmune connective tissue disease occurring in children less than 16 years old. It is part of a heterogeneous group of muscle diseases called idiopathic Iiflammatory myopathies. It had previously been reported in black Africans resident in UK. However, there is no documented case reported from Africa. The index sign of heliotrope rashes is often difficult to visualise in the black skin. An 11-year-old Nigerian girl presenting with clinical, laboratory and histopathological features of juvenile dermatomyositis is presented here. It is hoped that this case will heighten the index of suspicion of this condition among medical practitioners in Africa.

  9. Juvenile Firesetting.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brittany; Freeman, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile firesetting is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Male gender, substance use, history of maltreatment, interest in fire, and psychiatric illness are commonly reported risk factors. Interventions that have been shown to be effective in juveniles who set fires include cognitive behavior therapy and educational interventions, whereas satiation has not been shown to be an effective intervention. Forensic assessments can assist the legal community in adjudicating youth with effective interventions. Future studies should focus on consistent assessment and outcome measures to create more evidence for directing evaluation and treatment of juvenile firesetters.

  10. Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... your browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions Publication ... between these conditions. Osteoporosis Arthritis For Your Information Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  11. [Steroid-induced osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Perrot, Serge; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Bone-related steroid involvement is one of the most frequent complications of steroid treatment. Epidemiological data demonstrate that osteoporosis starts early during the treatment, predominantly involves trabecular bone and is correlated to dosage and treatment duration. Mechanisms and consequences of steroid bone involvement are related to osseous and extra-osseous mechanisms. In clinical practice, steroid-induced osteoporosis remains underdiagnosed and undertreated both in preventive and curative approaches. Recently, new molecules as teriparatide and zoledronic acid got indication for the treatment of steroid-induced osteoporosis. To guide treatment strategies, several recommendations are available: French, not updated recommendations since 2003 (Afssaps, 2003), European elaborated by the EULAR in 2007 and those of the ACR updated in 2010.

  12. Genetics of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huilin; Ralston, Stuart H

    2005-03-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in regulating bone mineral density and other phenotypes relevant to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis such as ultrasound properties of bone, skeletal geometry, and bone turnover. Progress has been made in identifying quantitative traits for regulation of bone mineral density by linkage studies in man and mouse, but relatively few causal genes have been identified. Dramatic progress has been made in identifying the genes responsible for monogenic bone diseases and it appears that polymorphisms in many of these genes also play a role in regulating bone mineral density in the general population. Advances in knowledge about the genetic basis of osteoporosis and other bone diseases offer the prospect of developing new markers for assessment of fracture risk and the identification of novel molecular targets for the design of new drug treatments for osteoporosis.

  13. [Therapy of postmenopausal osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Keck, E

    2003-12-01

    The therapy of postmenopausal osteoporosis is based on a few comprehensible assumptions. High bone resorption should be reduced by treatment with bisphosphonates, raloxifene or seldom with calcitonins. After reduction of high bone turnover and in low bone turnover situations, an osteoinductive combination therapy should be started, inducing collagen type I with parathyroid hormone or fluorides. This collagen can then be mineralized by calcium, vitamin D, and vitamin D metabolites. In addition, bone resorption should be reduced during menopause with estrogens and gestagens, in the case of a receptor-positive breast cancer with tamoxifen, and after menopause with raloxifene or a bisphosphonate. In elderly patients a depletion of vitamin D often induces an osteoporomalacia instead of an osteoporosis. In this situation, mineralization of the osteoid by calcium and vitamin D is sufficient for therapy. A daily osteoporosis gymnastic program is required and physical activity should be enhanced to increase muscle mass because bone adapts to the individual situation.

  14. Pathophysiology of immobilization osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S. B.; DiCarlo, E. F.

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of gravity-related forces on the skeleton creates a type of osteoporosis that is unique because its severity is dependent on the mechanical stress bearing function of the skeleton as well as the length of time that the forces are absent or reduced. Bones that bear weight under normal conditions are more affected than bones that normally do not bear weight. The cytokine environment and the cells in the affected bones are altered in time so that stem cells produce fewer new cells and the differentiated cells tend to be less active. These alterations in the local environment of the affected parts appear to resemble those of age- and disease-associated systemic forms of osteoporosis. The osteoporosis produced as a result of the loss of normal activity however, appears to be at least partially reversible through remobilization, strenuous exercise, and--possibly in the future--cytokine therapy.

  15. [Treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Chapurlat, Roland; Delmas, Pierre D

    2004-12-15

    The treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis relies on management of some risk factors for fracture, e.g., risk factors for falls, improvement of calcium and vitamin D intake, and on various medications. All elderly women with calcium and vitamin D deficiency should receive calcium and vitamin D supplements. Estrogen replacement therapy should not longer be used to prevent or treat postmenopausal osteoporosis, owing to its poor long-term risk/benefit ratio. Raloxifene, biphosphonates (alendronate, risedronate) are well tolerated compounds with proven anti-fracture efficacy. Teriparatide is a new bone forming agent to treat severe osteoporosis. Strontium ranelate is a new drug also reducing the risk of fractures that should be available soon.

  16. Juvenile Prostitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1986-01-01

    Recent research and Canadian government committee reports concerning juvenile prostitution are reviewed. Proposals are made in the realms of law and social policy; and existing programs are described. (DB)

  17. [Radiological diagnosis of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Issever, A S; Link, T M

    2011-02-01

    Having at their disposal a wide range of imaging techniques, radiologists play a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with osteoporosis. The radiological tests range from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which is the only reference method accepted by the WHO, to conventional radiographs for fracture characterization, to more recent techniques for analyzing trabecular structure, and the findings are decisive in initiating correct management of osteoporosis patients. This review provides an overview of established radiological techniques and an outline of new diagnostic approaches.

  18. Bone Health and Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lupsa, Beatrice C; Insogna, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue leading to decreased bone strength and an increased risk of low-energy fractures. Central dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements are the gold standard for determining bone mineral density. Bone loss is an inevitable consequence of the decrease in estrogen levels during and following menopause, but additional risk factors for bone loss can also contribute to osteoporosis in older women. A well-balanced diet, exercise, and smoking cessation are key to maintaining bone health as women age. Pharmacologic agents should be recommended in patients at high risk for fracture.

  19. Osteoporosis in young adults: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, S; Bianchi, M L; Eisman, J A; Foldes, A J; Adami, S; Wahl, D A; Stepan, J J; de Vernejoul, M-C; Kaufman, J-M

    2012-12-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is mainly caused by increased bone remodeling resulting from estrogen deficiency. Indications for treatment are based on low areal bone mineral density (aBMD, T-score  ≤ -2.5), typical fragility fractures (spine or hip), and more recently, an elevated 10-year fracture probability (by FRAX®). In contrast, there is no clear definition of osteoporosis nor intervention thresholds in younger individuals. Low aBMD in a young adult may reflect a physiologically low peak bone mass, such as in lean but otherwise healthy persons, whereas fractures commonly occur with high-impact trauma, i.e., without bone fragility. Furthermore, low aBMD associated with vitamin D deficiency may be highly prevalent in some regions of the world. Nevertheless, true osteoporosis in the young can occur, which we define as a T-score below -2.5 at spine or hip in association with a chronic disease known to affect bone metabolism. In the absence of secondary causes, the presence of fragility fractures, such as in vertebrae, may point towards genetic or idiopathic osteoporosis. In turn, treatment of the underlying condition may improve bone mass as well. In rare cases, a bone-specific treatment may be indicated, although evidence is scarce for a true benefit on fracture risk. The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) convened a working group to review pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis in the young, excluding children and adolescents, and provide a screening strategy including laboratory exams for a systematic approach of this condition.

  20. Osteoporosis in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... unaware that they are at risk for this Osteoporosis Risk Factors Personal and family history • White race • Age 70 and older • Thinness • Prior fracture as an adult, mainly after age 50 • History of delayed puberty • ...

  1. Genetics of osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Tomohiko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-09-19

    Highlights: • Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with osteoporosis were identified. • SNPs mapped close to or within VDR and ESR1 are associated with bone mineral density. • WNT signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in regulating bone mineral density. • Genetic studies will be useful for identification of new therapeutic targets. - Abstract: Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, which increases susceptibility to fractures. BMD is a complex quantitative trait with normal distribution and seems to be genetically controlled (in 50–90% of the cases), according to studies on twins and families. Over the last 20 years, candidate gene approach and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with low BMD, osteoporosis, and osteoporotic fractures. These SNPs have been mapped close to or within genes including those encoding nuclear receptors and WNT-β-catenin signaling proteins. Understanding the genetics of osteoporosis will help identify novel candidates for diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  2. Clinical Practice. Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Black, Dennis M; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-01-21

    Key Clinical Points Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Fractures and osteoporosis are common, particularly among older women, and hip fractures can be devastating. Treatment is generally recommended in postmenopausal women who have a bone mineral density T score of -2.5 or less, a history of spine or hip fracture, or a Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) score indicating increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates (generic) and denosumab reduce the risk of hip, nonvertebral, and vertebral fractures; bisphosphonates are commonly used as first-line treatment in women who do not have contraindications. Teriparatide reduces the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures. Osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been reported with treatment but are rare. The benefit-to-risk ratio for osteoporosis treatment is strongly positive for most women with osteoporosis. Because benefits are retained after discontinuation of alendronate or zoledronic acid, drug holidays after 5 years of alendronate therapy or 3 years of zoledronic acid therapy may be considered for patients at lower risk for fracture.

  3. Animal models for osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Maran, A.; Lotinun, S.; Hefferan, T.; Evans, G. L.; Zhang, M.; Sibonga, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Animal models will continue to be important tools in the quest to understand the contribution of specific genes to establishment of peak bone mass and optimal bone architecture, as well as the genetic basis for a predisposition toward accelerated bone loss in the presence of co-morbidity factors such as estrogen deficiency. Existing animal models will continue to be useful for modeling changes in bone metabolism and architecture induced by well-defined local and systemic factors. However, there is a critical unfulfilled need to develop and validate better animal models to allow fruitful investigation of the interaction of the multitude of factors which precipitate senile osteoporosis. Well characterized and validated animal models that can be recommended for investigation of the etiology, prevention and treatment of several forms of osteoporosis have been listed in Table 1. Also listed are models which are provisionally recommended. These latter models have potential but are inadequately characterized, deviate significantly from the human response, require careful choice of strain or age, or are not practical for most investigators to adopt. It cannot be stressed strongly enough that the enormous potential of laboratory animals as models for osteoporosis can only be realized if great care is taken in the choice of an appropriate species, age, experimental design, and measurements. Poor choices will results in misinterpretation of results which ultimately can bring harm to patients who suffer from osteoporosis by delaying advancement of knowledge.

  4. Osteoporosis: an update.

    PubMed

    el-Hajj Fuleihan, G

    1998-01-01

    Prevention is the therapy of choice for optimizing skeletal health and preventing osteoporosis. Attempts directed at increasing peak bone mass (e.g., good calcium intake during preadolescence, adolescence, and adulthood), reducing risk factors for bone loss such as menstrual abnormalities, thin body habitus, decreased physical activity or excessive alcohol intake, and slowing down bone loss and reversing any causes of secondary bone loss should be pursued vigorously. In practice, all patients should be encouraged to get regular exercise, as well as adequate vitamin D and calcium intake. In the absence of contraindications, estrogen is the mainstay therapy for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Other antiresorptive agents are available as alternative therapies to estrogen. Of equal importance to elderly women with established osteoporosis is counseling on how to prevent falls. Therapies that increase bone formation (aside from fluoride), including growth factors, are not currently available. However, such interventions used in conjunction with an antiresorptive therapy, offer the potential to greatly enhance and therefore normalize bone mass and may hold a promise for the treatment of osteoporosis in the future.

  5. [Bilateral idiopathic granulomatous orchitis].

    PubMed

    Peyrí Rey, E; Riverola Manzanilla, A; Cañas Tello, M A

    2008-04-01

    A rare case of asymtomatic synchronous bilateral granulomatous orchitis idiopathic is decribed. In the scrotal ultrasonography are multiple hypoecoic areas, differential diagnosis between testicular tumor and granulomatous orchitis is very difficult in any examination by histological findings.

  6. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  7. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  8. Trends in paediatric rheumatology referral times and disease activity indices over a ten-year period among children and young people with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: results from the childhood arthritis prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    McErlane, Flora; Foster, Helen E.; Carrasco, Roberto; Baildam, Eileen M.; Chieng, S. E. Alice; Davidson, Joyce E.; Ioannou, Yiannis; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Thomson, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The medical management of JIA has advanced significantly over the past 10 years. It is not known whether these changes have impacted on outcomes. The aim of this analysis was to identify and describe trends in referral times, treatment times and 1-year outcomes over a 10-year period among children with JIA enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study. Methods. The Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study is a prospective inception cohort of children with new-onset inflammatory arthritis. Analysis included all children recruited in 2001–11 with at least 1 year of follow-up, divided into four groups by year of diagnosis. Median referral time, baseline disease pattern (oligoarticular, polyarticular or systemic onset) and time to first definitive treatment were compared between groups. Where possible, clinical juvenile arthritis disease activity score (cJADAS) cut-offs were applied at 1 year. Results. One thousand and sixty-six children were included in the analysis. The median time from symptom onset and referral to first paediatric rheumatology appointment (22.7–24.7 and 3.4–4.7 weeks, respectively) did not vary significantly (∼20% seen within 10 weeks of onset and ∼50% within 4 weeks of referral). For oligoarticular and polyarticular disease, 33.8–47 and 25.4–34.9%, respectively, achieved inactive disease by 1 year, with ∼30% in high disease activity at 1 year. A positive trend towards earlier definitive treatment reached significance in oligoarticular and polyarticular pattern disease. Conclusion. Children with new-onset JIA have a persistent delay in access to paediatric rheumatology care, with one-third in high disease activity at 1 year and no significant improvement over the past 10 years. Contributing factors may include service pressures and poor awareness. Further research is necessary to gain a better understanding and improve important clinical outcomes. PMID:27016664

  9. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed. PMID:26078691

  10. Management of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Andreopoulou, Panagiota; Bockman, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of menopause, which follows the decline in the ovarian production of estrogen, is the aggressive and persistent loss of bone mineral and structural elements leading to loss of bone strength and increased fracture risk. This review focuses on newer methods of diagnosing osteoporosis and assessing fracture risk, as well as on novel management strategies for prevention and treatment. Fracture-risk prediction has been significantly enhanced by the development of methods such as the trabecular bone score, which helps assess bone microarchitecture and adds value to standard bone densitometry, and the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) algorithm techniques. The treatment of osteoporosis, which has the goals of fracture prevention and risk reduction, is moving beyond traditional monotherapies with antiresorptives and anabolic agents into new combination regimens.

  11. Juvenile Spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gmuca, Sabrina; Weiss, Pamela F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide a comprehensive update of the pathogenesis, diagnostic imaging, treatments, and disease activity measurements of juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). Recent findings Genetic and microbiome studies have provided new information regarding possible pathogenesis of JSpA. Recent work suggests that children with JSpA have decreased thresholds for pain in comparison to healthy children. Additionally, pain on physical examination and abnormalities on ultrasound of the entheses are not well correlated. Treatment guidelines for juvenile arthritis, including JSpA, were published by the American College of Rheumatology and are based on active joint count and presence of sacroiliitis. Recent studies have established the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in the symptomatic treatment of axial disease, though their efficacy for halting progression of structural damage is less clear. Newly developed disease activity measures for JSpA include the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score and the JSpA Disease Activity index. In comparison to other categories of juvenile arthritis, children with JSpA are less likely to attain and sustain inactive disease. Summary Further microbiome and genetic research may help elucidate JSpA pathogenesis. More randomized therapeutic trials are needed and the advent of new composite disease activity measurement tools will hopefully allow for the design of these greatly needed trials. PMID:26002028

  12. [Osteoporosis in phlebology].

    PubMed

    van der Molen, H R; Overvelde, S

    1993-01-01

    Patient often think that the pains of their extremities (especially during the night) are caused by a plebo or an angiopathy whereas they are in fact due to a vertebral or lumbar discal affection. 84 patients with osteoporosis were treated by an intramuscular injection of deca-durabolin (25 mg/month) and calcium phosphate (tertiare). Results were satisfactory: six months later, 62 patients no longer suffered, 13 had felt improvement and 2 remained unchanged.

  13. Osteoporosis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Parisi, Anna; Atteno, Mariangela; Montalbano, Simona; Vitiello, Maria; Esposito, Carmela; Bertolini, Nicoletta; Foglia, Francesca; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2012-07-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to an increased risk of fracture. The prevalence of OP in the general population is very high as established in several studies, and OP represents one of the possible aspects of bone involvement in arthritis. In psoriatic arthritis this involvement is particularly complex because it affects not only mechanisms of bone loss but also of bone formation. We will discuss these aspects and the available epidemiological data.

  14. Osteoporosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, Marco; Carda, Stefano; Viscontini, Giovanni Sguazzini; Cisari, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    Patients affected by Parkinson's disease are at a high risk for fractures, mainly of the hip. These fractures are caused by falls due to postural imbalance, neurological impairment and reduced bone mass. The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate the correlations and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bone loss in Parkinson's disease and appraise bone loss or fracture risk reduction interventions; (2) to develop a research agenda that informs the design and development of risk reduction strategies. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are very common findings in patients with Parkinson's disease, affecting up to 91% of women and 61% of men. Reduced bone mass in Parkinsonian patients seems to be caused mainly by reduced mobility through a mechanism similar to that observed in other neurological diseases. Endocrine (such as vitamin D deficiency), nutritional and iatrogenic factors also play an important role in bone mass depletion. Female gender, disease duration and severity (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV), old age and low body mass index are related to more severe osteoporosis. Vitamin D supplementation and bisphosphonates seem to be effective in reducing the risk of nonvertebral fractures in patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Prevention and evaluation of osteoporosis through bone mass density assessment should be considered in all patients with Parkinson's disease.

  15. Osteoporosis in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anitha; Carey, Elizabeth J

    2013-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal complication seen in patients with chronic liver disease. Osteoporosis is usually asymptomatic and, if untreated, can result in fractures and impaired quality of life. For this review, we performed a systematic search of the PubMed database, and all recent peer-reviewed articles regarding the prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis in chronic liver disease were included. The prevalence of osteoporosis varies between 11% and 58% in patients with chronic liver disease and in transplant recipients. The etiology of osteoporosis is multifactorial and only partially understood. Various factors linked to the pathogenesis of bone loss are vitamin D, calcium, insulin growth factor-1, receptor activation of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), bilirubin, fibronectin, leptin, proinflammatory cytokines, and genetic polymorphisms. Management of osteoporosis involves early diagnosis, identifying and minimizing risk factors, general supportive care, nutrition therapy, and pharmacotherapy. Osteoporosis is diagnosed based on the bone mineral density (BMD) assessment using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Measurement of BMD should be considered in all patients with advanced liver disease and in transplant recipients. Vitamin D and calcium supplementation is recommended for all patients with osteoporosis. Specific agents used for treatment of osteoporosis include bisphosphonates, calcitonin, hormonal therapy, and raloxifene. Bisphosphonates have become the mainstay of therapy for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Prolonged suppression of bone remodeling resulting in atypical fractures has emerged as a significant complication with long-term use of bisphosphonates. Newer treatment agents and better fracture prevention strategies are necessary to prevent and treat osteoporosis.

  16. Idiopathic Multifocal Choroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Tavallali, Ali; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic multifocal choroiditis (MFC) and/or punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) describe a chronic progressive bilateral inflammatory chorioretinopathy that predominantly affect healthy myopic white women with no known associated systemic or ocular diseases. The principal sites of involvement are the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and outer retinal spaces; the choroid is not affected during the active phase of the disease. Idiopathic MFC with atrophy is a recently described variant. Although there is no generally accepted standard treatment, anti-inflammatory and anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents are necessary in the acute stage to control the inflammation and choroidal neovascularization (CNV). PMID:27994812

  17. Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotwica, Tomasz; Szumarska, Joanna; Staniszewska-Marszalek, Edyta; Mazurek, Walentyna; Kosmala, Wojciech

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) is an uncommon lesion, which may be associated with different etiologies including congenital cardiovascular diseases, systemic vasculitis, connective tissue diseases, infections, and trauma. Idiopathic PAA is sporadically diagnosed by exclusion of concomitant major pathology. We report a case of a 56-year-old female with an idiopathic pulmonary artery dilatation identified fortuitously by echocardiography and confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Neither significant pulmonary valve dysfunction nor pulmonary hypertension and other cardiac abnormalities which might contribute to the PAA development were found. Here, we describe echocardiographic and computed tomography findings and review the literature on PAA management.

  18. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, J; Egger, K; Harloff, A

    2017-02-01

    This review describes the clinical findings as well as thes diagnostic and therapeutic options for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri). Furthermore, the pathophysiological concepts are discussed. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is characterized by signs and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure with no established pathogenesis. Common symptoms include headaches, visual loss and pulsatile tinnitus. Treatment has two major goals: the alleviation of headaches and the preservation of vision. Weight loss and acetazolamide are the cornerstones in the treatment of the disorder. Drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, optic nerve sheath fenestration and stent angioplasty of a sinus stenosis can be employed in severe cases.

  19. Juvenile Justice in Milwaukee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gary L.; Greer, Lanetta

    2010-01-01

    Historically, there have been several attempts made to address issues surrounding juvenile delinquency. The Wisconsin Legislature outlines the objectives of the juvenile justice system in the Juvenile Justice Code in s. 939.01, ?to promote a juvenile justice system capable of dealing with the problem of juvenile delinquency, a system which will…

  20. Novel Therapies for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Leonardo; Bilezikian, John P

    2017-03-01

    Recently discovered mechanisms have assisted in developing new therapies for osteoporosis. New classes of drugs have been developed for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Although there have been numerous advances over the past 2 decades, the search for newer therapies continues.

  1. The Developmental Origins of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Claire L; Stenson, Charlotte; Embleton, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most prevalent skeletal disorders and has enormous public health consequences due to the morbidity and mortality of the resulting fractures. This article discusses the developmental origins of osteoporosis and outlines some of the modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors in both intrauterine and postnatal life that contribute to the later onset of osteoporosis. Evidence for the effects of birth size and early growth in both preterm and term born infants are discussed and the role of epigenetics within the programming hypothesis is highlighted. This review provides compelling evidence for the developmental origins of osteoporosis and highlights the importance of osteoporosis prevention at all stages of the life course. PMID:27018386

  2. Idiopathic Neonatal Colonic Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Melek, Mehmet; Kaba, Sultan; Bulan, Keziban; Peker, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Though the perforation of the colon in neonates is rare, it is associated with more than 50% mortality in high-risk patients. We report a case of idiopathic neonatal perforation of the sigmoid colon in an 8-day-old, healthy, male neonate without any demonstrable cause. PMID:26023477

  3. Sclerosing idiopathic orbital inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Paul A; Kersten, Robert C; Kulwin, Dwight R

    2006-01-01

    A 5-year-old girl referred for orbital cellulitis was found to have a right orbital mass. Computed tomography revealed a mass occupying the inferotemporal orbit, extending into the maxillary sinus. Biopsy yielded a diagnosis of sclerosing idiopathic orbital inflammation. She was successfully treated with prednisone.

  4. Idiopathic scrotal elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Brad J; Elmore, James M; Roehrborn, Claus G

    2005-02-01

    Scrotal lymphedema (scrotal elephantiasis) is a condition that has historically been described in areas endemic to filariasis. We present a unique case of a 22-year-old man with idiopathic lymphedema isolated to the scrotum. After acquired causes of lymphedema were ruled out, the patient was treated with scrotectomy and scrotal reconstruction.

  5. Idiopathic pigmentosis tubae.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, I I; Meehan, F P

    1994-01-01

    Case Report--A 33-year-old woman was examined because of primary infertility. Hysterosalpingography plus laparoscopy led to a diagnosis of the extremely rare condition of pigmentosis of the fallopian tube, with complete tubal occlusion as the cause of the infertility. The condition appeared to be idiopathic.

  6. [Idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Bennani, S; Ait Bolbarod, A; el Mrini, M; Kadiri, R; Benjelloun, S

    1996-06-01

    The authors report a case of idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula. The diagnosis was established angiographically in a 24 year old man presenting gross hematuria. Embolization of the fistula was performed. Efficiency of this treatment was appreciated clinically and by duplex renal ultrasonography. The characteristics of renal arteriovenous fistulas are reviewed.

  7. Idiopathic central diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Grace, Mary; Balachandran, Venu; Menon, Sooraj

    2011-10-01

    Idiopathic central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a rare disorder characterized clinically by polyuria and polydipsia, and an abnormal urinary concentration without any identified etiology. We report a case of central diabetes insipidus in a 60-year-old lady in the absence of secondary causes like trauma, infection, and infiltrative disorders of brain.

  8. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  9. Osteoporosis and Lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Ishimi, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal tissue is formed during the first two decades of life; then a constant bone mass is maintained until 40 y of age. In the case of women, the bone mass is rapidly reduced at menopause at around 50 y of age. After that, bone mass slowly decreases in both men and women who have passed the 70-y-old mark. The National Institute of Health Consensus Conference adopted the definition of osteoporosis as a skeletal disorder that is characterized by compromised bone strength leading to a predisposition for and an increased risk of fracture. Since osteoporotic fractures are the third-highest cause for becoming bedridden, the maintenance of healthy bones is an important factor in extending a person's healthy lifespan. Bone mass is influenced by many factors, such as nutrition, physical activity, smoking and alcohol intake, as well as by genetic factors. Thus, a healthy diet providing balanced nutrients including calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K and protein, regular physical activity, and not smoking help maintain bone health and delay or prevent osteoporosis. Some functional foods containing soy isoflavones, milk basic protein and n-3 fatty acid may help promote bone health.

  10. Spine mineral change during osteoporosis therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Kolb, F.O.; Meier, K.A.; Schafer, S.A.

    1985-05-01

    Osteoporosis therapy has been handicapped by lack of means to quantitate the process. Dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) offers accurate (4%) and precise (2%) estimation of lumbar spine mineral. The authors followed 42 osteoporotics to determine response to therapy. There were 17 patients with normal menopause (NM), 4 with surgical menopause (SM), 3 with premature menopause (PM), and 18 with idiopathic osteoporoses (10). Intervals between DPA spine mineral estimation were 16.5 +- 5.2 mo. for NM, 14.3 +- 8.4 mo. for SM, 14.0 +- 7.5 mo. for PM and 16.7 +- 5.8 mo. for 10. Observed average percent change of spine mineral under therapy for those intervals was 5.2 +- 7.9% for NM, +7.3 +- 1.7% for SM, -2.4 +- 6.3% for PM and +1.8 +- 12.3% for 10. Therapy invariably was with Ca, low dose Premarin in NM and PM, often with phosphates in IO, sometimes with thiazides, often with Vitamin D and with occasional other modalities, including NaF. The authors find DPA is a cost-effective way to measure osteopenia in the osteoporeses, document response to therapy, identify need for therapy change when there is continued bone loss under therapy, and to encourage the patient's compliance with long-term, complex therapies.

  11. Recognizing and treating secondary osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Walker-Bone, Karen

    2012-08-01

    Osteoporosis, through its association with fragility fracture, is a major public health problem, costing an estimated $34.8 billion worldwide per annum. With projected demographic changes, the burden looks set to grow. Therefore, the prevention of osteoporosis, as well as its identification and treatment once established, are becoming increasingly important. Osteoporosis is secondary when a drug, disease or deficiency is the underlying cause. Glucocorticoids, hypogonadism, alcohol abuse and malnutrition are among the most frequently recognized causes of secondary osteoporosis but the list of implicated diseases and drugs is growing and some of the more recently recognized associations, such as those with haematological conditions and acid-suppressing medications, are less well publicized. In some cases, advancement in treatment of the primary disease has led to people living long enough to develop secondary osteoporosis; for example, successful treatment for breast and prostate malignancies by hormonal manipulation, improved survival in HIV with the advent of anti-retroviral therapies, and improved treatment for cystic fibrosis. This Review emphasizes the importance of secondary osteoporosis, discusses familiar and less well-known causes and what is known of their mechanisms, provides guidance as to the pragmatic identification of secondary osteoporosis and summarizes treatment options, where available.

  12. Fighting Juvenile Gun Violence. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, David; Grant, Heath; Rowe, Wendy; Jacobs, Nancy

    This bulletin describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's efforts to fight juvenile gun violence. The Office awarded four community demonstration grants to implement "Partnerships To Reduce Juvenile Gun Violence." Partnership goals include increasing the effectiveness of existing strategies by enhancing and…

  13. Genetics Home Reference: adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adolescent idiopathic scoliosis adolescent idiopathic scoliosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is an abnormal curvature of the ...

  14. [Phosphorus intake and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Omi, N; Ezawa, I

    2001-10-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the most important nutrients for bone metabolism, such as calcium. In general, P intake is usually adequate in our daily diet, and there is a risk of over-consumption from processed food. On the other hand, Ca intake is not always adequate from the Japanese daily diet. When Ca/P is taken from the daily diet at a level of 0.5 - 2.0, the P intake level dose not affect intestinal Ca absorption. Therefore, it is important not only to pay attention to preventing the over-consumption of P, but also to obtain a sufficient intake of Ca. For the prevention of osteoporosis, it is important to consume sufficient Ca and to maintain and appropriate Ca/P balance from diet.

  15. Splenectomy in idiopathic hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Wani, Nazir A; Parray, Fazl Q

    2006-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of splenectomy in 15 patients with idiopathic hypersplenism were studied. The mean age was 43 years (range, 5-72 years). The male to female ratio was 1:1.14. The response to splenectomy was: in thrombocytopenia, complete response (CR) in 71%, partial response (PR) and no response (NR) in 14% each of patients; in anemia, CR in 83%, PR in 0%, and NR in 16% of patients; and in leukopenia, CR in 78% and PR and NR in 11% each of patients. However, the morbidity (27%) and mortality (20%) observed was quite high. Thus, we conclude that splenectomy is an excellent treatment to improve the hematological parameters in patients with idiopathic hypersplenism, but elderly patients and patients with multisystem disease should not have this surgery.

  16. [Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    2016-12-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is a 3D spinal deformity in frontal, sagittal and axial planes, with high relevance in the pediatric population especially in adolescents and females between 10 years of age and the end of growth spurt and skeletal maturity. The radiographic manifestation is a curve greater than 10° measured by Cobb method associated with vertebral rotation. "Idiopathic" diagnosis has to be done after neuroanatomical anomalies of the posterior cerebral fosa and spinal canal have been ruled out. The physical finding of a thoracic or lumbar hump is the clinical manifestation of vertebral rotation seen in a forward bending test (Adam's Test). It is recommended that all curves with a magnitude greater than 20° have to be controlled and treated by a spinal surgeon being observation, bracing and surgery the different treatment options based on the extent, progression of deformity and basically the clinical condition of the patient.

  17. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xaubet, Antoni; Ancochea, Julio; Molina-Molina, María

    2017-02-23

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia associated with the radiological and/or histological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Its aetiology is unknown, but probably comprises the action of endogenous and exogenous micro-environmental factors in subjects with genetic predisposition. Its diagnosis is based on the presence of characteristic findings of high-resolution computed tomography scans and pulmonary biopsies in absence of interstitial lung diseases of other aetiologies. Its clinical evolution is variable, although the mean survival rate is 2-5 years as of its clinical presentation. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may present complications and comorbidities which modify the disease's clinical course and prognosis. In the mild-moderate disease, the treatment consists of the administration of anti-fibrotic drugs. In severe disease, the best therapeutic option is pulmonary transplantation. In this paper we review the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease.

  18. Idiopathic pain and depression.

    PubMed

    von Knorring, L; Ekselius, L

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes research on the hypothesis that idiopathic chronic pain syndromes and depressive disorders share certain common pathogenetic mechanisms. There is increasing evidence that this may be partly true. Not only do chronic pain syndromes respond to treatment with antidepressants, but there are also striking clinical similarities between these syndromes and depressive syndromes. However, important differences do exist (e.g., the courses of these disorders are usually dissimilar). Family studies show that affective disorders are common in first-degree relatives of patients with idiopathic pain syndromes, but it is impossible to conclude from this that clear-cut genetic factors are of importance. Factors common to both syndromes include common personality traits, shortened rapid eye movements in sleep EEG, hypercortisolaemia and pathological dexamethasone suppression tests, low levels of melatonin in serum and urine and high levels of endorphins and Fraction I in cerebro-spinal fluid. One important common pathogenetic mechanism seems to be disturbances in the serotoninergic system.

  19. An idiopathic gigantomastia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Jeng; Choi, Hyeon-Gon; Kim, Wan Seop; Yu, Yeong-Beom; Park, Kyoung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Gigantomastia is a rare condition characterized by excessive breast growth. It has been reported that the majority of gigantomastia cases occur during either pregnancy or puberty. We were presented with a rare case of gigantomastia associated with neither pregnancy nor puberty, and successfully treated it with reduction mammaplasty and free nipple graft. This idiopathic gigantomastia is the very first case in Korea, and adds to the worldwide total of 9 reported cases. PMID:25741497

  20. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Sometimes doctors can find out what is causing pulmonary fibrosis (lung scarring). For example, exposure to environmental pollutants ...

  1. Juvenile Justice & Youth Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, James C.

    Youth violence and the juvenile justice system in the United States are explored. Part 1 takes stock of the situation. The first chapter discusses the origins and evaluation of the juvenile justice system, and the second considers the contributions of the Federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act to the existing juvenile justice…

  2. [Osteoporosis and intake of vitamins].

    PubMed

    Hirota, Takako; Hirota, Kenji

    2005-05-01

    Subclinical vitamins deficiency is common in the elderly, especially in osteoporotic patients. However, most physicians in this area are just focused on drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis. It is already established that several vitamins influence bone turnover, bone mineral density, or even the risk of hip fractures. Improving these vitamins status may help to treat and prevent osteoporosis in elderly people. Recently higher vitamin D intake is recognized to be needed to keep not only bone health but also muscle strength. More sun exposure might be needed for improved bone health in the elderly. Deficiency of Vitamin K, C, or B(12) may be also important modifiable risk factors for osteoporosis and bone fracture. Excessive retinal supplementation may become associated with higher bone loss. Thus such diet rich in fruit and vegetables together with fish and meat could fulfill a balance among these vitamins and should be recommended for prevention or treatment of osteoporosis.

  3. For People with Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis Basics For People With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor Publication available in: ... and your special needs. Medical Specialists Who Treat Osteoporosis After an initial assessment, it may be necessary ...

  4. Sonographic evaluation of the temporomandibular joints in juvenile idiopathic arthritis().

    PubMed

    Melchiorre, D; Falcini, F; Kaloudi, O; Bandinelli, F; Nacci, F; Matucci Cerinic, M

    2010-03-01

    Sommario INTRODUZIONE: L'artrite Idiopatica giovanile (AIG) determina alterazioni a carico della testa condilare dell'articolazione temporomandibolare (ATM). Nell'esordio oligo-articolare (OA) l'interessamento dell'ATM viene spesso trascurato perchè può essere asintomatico. Lo scopo di questo studio è quello di valutare la presenza di versamento intrarticolare (V) dell'ATM, mediante esame ecografico (US), nelle fasi precoci di malattia. MATERIALE E METODI: Sono stati studiati 68 bambini (57 bambine e 11 bambini, di età compresa tra 9,1 e 16, anni, età media: 11,02 ± 4,2 mesi) con AIG ad esordio OA. I pazienti (pz) erano sintomatici quando uno dei quattro sintomi seguenti era presente: 1) dolore ricorrente (a riposo o durante il movimento di apertura della bocca); 2) presenza di scrosci articolari; 3) presenza di limitazione nell'apertura della bocca; 4) locking intermittente. US è stato eseguito su entrambe le ATM sia in fase statica che dinamica, mediante ecografo General Electric (LOGIQ7) con sonda lineare (8,5 MHz) posizionata lungo l'asse maggiore del ramo condilare. Il V era presente quando lo spessore della capsula articolare era ≥1,5 mm. RISULTATI: 46/68 (68%) hanno presentato V a carico delle ATM; in 16 (35%) il V era bilaterale. 2/46 con V erano sintomatici, mentre in 44 non erano presenti sintomi. CONCLUSIONI: Questi dati suggeriscono che un'alta percentuale di bambini e giovani adulti con AIG ad esordio OA, nella fase iniziale della malattia, presenta un interessamento flogistico delle ATM anche in assenza di sintomi. L'US, non invasivo e facilmente ripetibile, ci offre importanti informazioni sul coinvolgimento articolare delle ATM ed è risultato utile nella diagnosi all'esordio.

  5. Prevalence and characteristics of visual aura in idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gungor-Tuncer, Ozlem; Baykan, Betul; Altindag, Ebru; Bebek, Nerses; Gurses, Candan; Gokyigit, Aysen

    2012-12-01

    Some patients with idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE) experience visual aura, which can confuse the diagnosis. We sought to determine the frequency and characteristics of visual auras in IGE patients. Among the 176 IGE patients, 4 men and 7 women reported visual auras (mean age - 24 years). Syndromic diagnoses were juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in four, eyelid myoclonia with absences (EMA) in three, juvenile absence epilepsy in three, and other in one. Visual auras consisted of flashing lights, macropsia, illusional movements, and blindness. Eyelid myoclonia with absences was significantly more common in the group with visual aura (3 of 11 patients vs. 8 of 165 IGE patients; P=0.02). Furthermore, photosensitivity was found significantly more common in IGE patients with visual aura (90% vs 46% of the total IGE patients) (P=0.004). In conclusion, the visual auras do not exclude a diagnosis of IGE. The presence of visual aura in the EMA syndrome is also remarkable.

  6. Nutrition and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lau, E M; Woo, J

    1998-07-01

    Nutritional factors have a significant influence on the cause of osteoporosis. Calcium supplementation may be particularly effective in populations with a low calcium diet. Supplementations of 500 mg/d may produce about 4% gain in skeletal calcium in adolescents. Supplementations of 800 mg/d may prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women. The results of clinical trials also suggested that such supplementation may prevent hip and vertebral fractures in the elderly. The largest effect of calcium supplementation occurs in the first year of treatment, whereas sustained effects are not proven. Vitamin D supplementation may be particularly useful in vitamin D-deficient elderly. In this group, hip fractures may be prevented by vitamin D administration. Urinary sodium excretion is correlated with urinary calcium excretion in humans, and a direct effect of high sodium intake on loss at the hip has been demonstrated. Observational epidemiologic studies suggested a negative effect of a high protein intake on bone density, although there are no results from clinical trials to support this view. Dietary fiber, phytate, oxalate, and caffeine intake may have a small negative effect on calcium absorption.

  7. Idiopathic granulomatous orchitis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somak; Hooda, Shveta; Parwani, Anil V

    2011-05-15

    Idiopathic granulomatous orchitis is a rare inflammatory process of the testis of unknown etiology. It is characterized by presence of non-specific granulomatous inflammation and admixed multinucleated giant cells. It usually presents as a testicular mass which is highly suspicious of malignancy. Histologically, there is extensive destruction of seminiferous tubules with tubular or interstitial pattern of granulomatous inflammation and prominent collagen fibrosis. Trauma and possible auto-antibodies against sperms have been postulated to be the underlying mechanism. Differential diagnoses include intratubular germ-cell neoplasia, malignant lymphomas, and malakoplakia. Orchiectomy is currently the most appropriate therapy for this condition.

  8. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Nitin Hemchandra; Khanna, Dinkar Parveen; Bhatt, Vaibhavi Hitesh; Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective tissue elements, mostly associated with some syndrome. This case report describes a case of nonsyndromic generalized IGF in an 18-year-old male patient who presented with generalized gingival enlargement. The enlarged tissue was surgically removed by internal bevel gingivectomy and ledge and wedge procedure. The patient was regularly monitored clinically for improvement in his periodontal condition as well as for any recurrence of gingival overgrowth. PMID:26941525

  9. [Pharmacologic treatment of osteoporosis--2011].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Péter

    2011-08-14

    Osteoporosis affects approximately 9% of the population in Hungary resulting in about 100 000 osteoporotic fractures annually. Thirty-five percent of patients with hip fractures due to osteoporosis will die within 1 year. Direct costs of osteoporosis exceed 25 billion forints per year. Apparently, cost-effective reduction of bone loss and consequent fracture risk will add up to not only financial savings but improvement in quality of life, as well. A number of pharmacological modalities are available for this purpose. The mainstay of the treatment of osteoporosis is the bisphosphonate group that includes effective anti-resorptive compounds mitigating bone loss and fragility. The recently registered denosumab exhibits similar efficacy by neutralizing RANK ligand, however, marked differences can be observed between the two drug classes. Strontium has a unique mechanism of action by rebalancing bone turnover, and thus, providing an efficient treatment option for the not fast bone losers who are at high fracture risk. The purely anabolic teriparatide is available for the extremely severe osteoporotic patients and for those who do not respond to other types of therapy. Older treatment options such as hormone replacement therapy, raloxifene, tibolone or calcitonin may also have a restricted place in the management of osteoporosis.

  10. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Muhammad Naghman; Ahmad, Zafar; Verma, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scoliosis refers to deviation of spine greater than 10 degrees in the coronal plane. Idiopathic Scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity that develops in otherwise healthy children. The sub types of scoliosis are based on the age of the child at presentation. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) by definition occurs in children over the age of 10 years until skeletal maturity. Objective: The objective of this review is to outline the features of AIS to allow the physician to recognise this condition and commence early treatment, thereby optimizing patient outcome. Method: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases, including Pubmed and Embase, to cover important research published covering AIS. Conclusion: AIS results in higher incidence of back pain and discontent with body image. Curves greater than 50 degrees in thoracic region and greater than 30 degrees in lumbar region progress at a rate of 0.5 to 1 degree per year into adulthood. Curves greater than 60 degrees can lead to pulmonary functional deficit. Therefore once the disease is recognized, effective treatment should be instituted to address the deformity and prevention of its long-term sequelae. PMID:27347243

  11. [On "2015 Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis". CKD and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinsuke; Inaba, Masaaki

    2015-09-01

    Many patients with osteoporosis have complicated with CKD. It was reported that the risk of hip and vertebral fracture is higher in osteoporosis patients with CKD than without CKD. Because the drugs for osteoporosis are excreted by kidney, there are no drugs that the efficacy and safety were established for the CKD patient. I give an outline about the relationship between CKD and osteoporosis, and the note on the medical care of osteoporosis patients with CKD.

  12. Fish as osteoporosis research models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerlich, Roland; Renn, Jörg; Aleström, Peter; Muller, Marc; Schartl, Manfred; Winkler, Christoph; Midtlyng, Paul; Eberius, Matthias; Slenzka, Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Osteoporosis, characterised by a progressive loss of bone density, is one of the most important bone diseases of humans worldwide. During spaceflight, astronauts also suffer bone loss that strongly resembles osteoporosis in patients on Earth. In addition to these human disorders, skeletal malformations often cause problems in industrial animal production. Although the alterations of bone homeostasis that lead to osteoporosis are well-documented at the cellular level, the molecular events underlying this disease are still poorly understood. Moreover, most of our knowledge is derived from in vitro studies using cell culture systems. Recent findings indicate a remarkable conservation of key regulators of bone development and bone homeostasis between fish and mammals, both at the sequence and expression levels.

  13. Prevention and rehabilitation of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kerschan-Schindl, Katharina

    2016-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a frequent disease in postmenopausal women. Despite the fact that fragility fractures cause many problems, osteoporosis is still underdiagnosed and undertreated. This manuscript outlines the topics diagnosis of osteoporosis, fracture risk prevention, and therapy after fracture. Regular physical activities, a sufficient intake of calcium, and a normal vitamin D level are important for bone health. Depending on the personal fracture risk, the patient may also be prescribed bone-specific medication to prevent fragility fractures. In case of a prevalent osteoporotic fracture, the initiation or adaptation of bone-specific therapy is indispensable. Since most osteoporotic fractures occur during a fall, fall risk reduction is an important measure to inhibit a new fracture. Rehabilitation of patients with fragility fractures varies with different localizations of the fracture and should be performed by a multidisciplinary team.

  14. Older Men's Explanatory Model for Osteoporosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solimeo, Samantha L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Gold, Deborah T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the nature of men's experiences of osteoporosis by developing an understanding of men's explanatory models. Design and Methods: This descriptive study invited community-residing male osteoporosis patients aged 50+ to participate in interviews about osteoporosis. Participants were recruited from a hospital-affiliated bone…

  15. Health technology assessment in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Hiligsmann, Mickael; Kanis, John A; Compston, Juliet; Cooper, Cyrus; Flamion, Bruno; Bergmann, Pierre; Body, Jean-Jacques; Boonen, Steven; Bruyere, Olivier; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Goemaere, Stefan; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Rozenberg, Serge; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2013-07-01

    We review the various aspects of health technology assessment in osteoporosis, including epidemiology and burden of disease, and assessment of the cost-effectiveness of recent advances in the treatment of osteoporosis and the prevention of fracture, in the context of the allocation of health-care resources by decision makers in osteoporosis. This article was prepared on the basis of a symposium held by the Belgian Bone Club and the discussions surrounding that meeting and is based on a review and critical appraisal of the literature. Epidemiological studies confirm the immense burden of osteoporotic fractures for patients and society, with lifetime risks of any fracture of the hip, spine, and forearm of around 40 % for women and 13 % for men. The economic impact is also large; for example, Europe's six largest countries spent €31 billion on osteoporotic fractures in 2010. Moreover, the burden is expected to increase in the future with demographic changes and increasing life expectancy. Recent advances in the management of osteoporosis include novel treatments, better fracture-risk assessment notably via fracture risk algorithms, and improved adherence to medication. Economic evaluation can inform decision makers in health care on the cost-effectiveness of the various interventions. Cost-effectiveness analyses suggest that the recent advances in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis may constitute an efficient basis for the allocation of scarce health-care resources. In summary, health technology assessment is increasingly used in the field of osteoporosis and could be very useful to help decision makers efficiently allocate health-care resources.

  16. Diagnosis and management of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Stuart H; Fraser, Jamie

    2015-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a common condition characterised by low bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fragility fractures. It affects up to 30% of women and 12% of men at some point in their lives. Two of the most important risk factors are increasing age and female gender, although other common and potentially modifiable risk factors include long-term corticosteroid therapy, chronic inflammatory disease, malabsorption and untreated premature menopause. The diagnosis of osteoporosis can be confirmed by DEXA but this should only be performed in patients who have an increased risk of fracture on the basis of clinical risk factors. DEXA should be considered if the 10-year risk of major osteoporotic fracture is > 10%. If the BMD T-score values by DEXA at the lumbar spine, femoral neck or total hip are at or below -2.5 then the diagnosis of osteoporosis is confirmed. Vertebral fractures are generally taken as diagnostic of osteoporosis, even if spine BMD values are not in the osteoporotic range. Oral bisphosphonates are the first-line treatment. If they are contraindicated or not tolerated then parenteral therapy should be considered. There is evidence that fractures occur in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis at higher levels of BMD than in postmenopausal osteoporosis so therapy should be considered in patients with a BMD T-score of <-1.5. Although it is useful to have a DEXA scan before starting treatment to provide a baseline value to assess response, this investigation is not absolutely necessary to initiate bone protective therapy, especially in those aged above 65 since the vast majority of these patients will have a T-score of -1.5 or below. In younger individuals where BMD is likely to be higher DEXA is useful in determining if bone protective treatment is needed immediately or if it could be delayed until the T score falls below -1.5.

  17. Juvenile Delinquency: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile Delinquency is a term which is often inaccurately used. This article clarifies definitions, looks at prevalence, and explores the relationship between juvenile delinquency and mental health. Throughout, differences between males and females are explored. (Contains 1 table.)

  18. Evaluation and Treatment of Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Kim M

    2016-07-01

    As the population ages, the rates of osteoporotic fractures will increase, with postmenopausal women incurring most of these fractures. Diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis are extremely important. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan screening is recommended in all women more than 65 years of age or in women aged 50 to 64 years with certain risk factors. Treatment should be considered if osteoporosis is present, there is a history of fragility fracture, or in the setting of osteopenia plus high risk for fracture.

  19. Juvenile Arrests, 2007. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puzzanchera, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This Bulletin summarizes 2007 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report, "Crime in the United States 2007." The Bulletin describes the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. It serves as a baseline for comparison for…

  20. Juvenile Arrests, 2000. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin examines the national and state juvenile arrest rate in 2000 using data reported annually by local law enforcement agencies nationwide to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program. Results indicate that the murder rate in 2000 was the lowest since 1965; juvenile arrests for violence in 2000 were the lowest since 1988; few juveniles…

  1. Juvenile Arrests, 1999. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin presents a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data for 1999. Data come from the FBI's annual "Crime in the United States" report, which offers the estimated number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies. The 1999 murder rate was the lowest since 1966. Of the nearly 1,800 juveniles murdered in…

  2. Juvenile Arrests 1996. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    In 1996, law enforcement agencies in the United States made an estimated 2.9 million arrests of persons under the age of 18. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) figures, juveniles accounted for 19% of all arrests and 19% of all violent crime in 1996. The substantial growth in juvenile crime that began in the late 1980s peaked in…

  3. Juvenile Arrests, 1998. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This report provides a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data in the United States. In 1998, law enforcement agencies made an estimated 2.6 million arrests of persons under age 18. Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics indicate that juveniles account for 18% of all arrests, and 17% of all violent crime arrests in…

  4. Juvenile Justice Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Provides a list of terms pertaining to the juvenile justice system, such as appeal and due process, that are used throughout this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education," in particular, with the teaching strategies "The Case of Gerry Gault" (SO 532 196) "Today's Juvenile Court" (SO 532 197), and "Using the Juvenile Justice Poster" (SO 532…

  5. Concepts Shaping Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Rob White's paper explores ways in which community building can be integrated into the practices of juvenile justice work. He provides a model of what can be called "restorative social justice", one that builds upon the juvenile conferencing model by attempting to fuse social justice concerns with progressive juvenile justice practices.

  6. Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Basant R.; Lippa, Carol F.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a potentially reversible neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by a triad of dementia, gait, and urinary disturbance. Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have aided in properly identifying and improving symptoms in patients. However, a large proportion of iNPH patients remain either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Using PubMed search engine of keywords “normal pressure hydrocephalus,” “diagnosis,” “shunt treatment,” “biomarkers,” “gait disturbances,” “cognitive function,” “neuropsychology,” “imaging,” and “pathogenesis,” articles were obtained for this review. The majority of the articles were retrieved from the past 10 years. The purpose of this review article is to aid general practitioners in further understanding current findings on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of iNPH. PMID:28138494

  7. Idiopathic endogenous lipoid pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Ohri, Shivani; Bambery, Pradeep; Singh, Surjit

    2006-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is a rare pulmonary disorder having no classical radiological appearance. We report a 33-year-old male, ex-smoker who was referred to us with history of cough, mild mucoid expectoration and progressively increasing dyspnoea since one year. He was investigated at local hospital and was treated with 30 mg prednisolone per day for 6 months for sarcoidosis without any response. On examination, he was normal except for fine basal crepitations in chest. Pulmonary function test (PFT) revealed mild airway obstruction. High resolution computerised tomographic scan (HRCT scan) revealed bilateral reticulonodular shadows and bronchiectasis in lower zones. Open lung biopsy revealed lipoid pneumonia. As there was no history of nasal distillation of oils, it was diagnosed to be idiopathic. The relevant literature is reviewed.

  8. The idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Alfaham, M A; Ferguson, S D; Sihra, B; Davies, J

    1987-01-01

    A 14 year old girl with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome is described. In addition to weight loss, anaemia, amenorrhoea, general lethargy, anorexia, mouth ulcers, blisters of hands and feet, and petechial skin rash, she had features of involvement of the cardiovascular system as the major complication. She responded well to treatment. After a comprehensive search of the published reports 18 cases of this syndrome were identified in children under 16 years. Fifteen of these children had involvement of the cardiovascular system as the major source of their morbidity and mortality. Summary of the clinical details and laboratory, biopsy, and necropsy findings of the involvement of the various organ systems of the 18 children is presented. PMID:3619478

  9. [Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-François

    2008-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic disorder characterized histopathologically by a pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia, with heterogeneous and mutilating interstitial fibrosis with foci of proliferating fibroblasts, honeycomb lung, and little if any inflammation. The diagnosis is based on a pluridisciplinary analysis of the clinical symptoms, the chest high-resolution computerized tomography features, and pathology on video-thoracoscopic lung biopsy when indicated. In half of the cases, the typical tomodensitometric pattern allows to make a confident diagnosis without a lung biopsy. The median survival is only about 3 years and is presently not improved by any treatment. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine (antioxydant) in association with corticosteroids and azathioprine may slightly reduce the rate of functional worsening. Clinical trials are in progress to improve the treatment of this still incurable disease.

  10. Ablation of idiopathic ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Doreen; Kottkamp, Hans

    2010-09-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias occur in patients without structural heart disease. They can arise from a variety of specific areas within both ventricles and in the supravalvular regions of the great arteries. Two main groups need to be differentiated: arrhythmias from the outflow tract (OT) region and idiopathic left ventricular, so-called fascicular, tachycardias (ILVTs). OT tachycardia typically originates in the right ventricular OT, but may also occur in the left ventricular OT, particularly in the sinuses of Valsalva or the anterior epicardium or the great cardiac vein. Activation mapping or pace mapping for the OT regions and mapping of diastolic potentials in ILVTs are the mapping techniques that are typically used. The ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias is highly successful, associated with only rare complications. Newly recognized entities of idiopathic ventricular tachycardias are those originating in the papillary muscles and in the atrioventricular annular regions.

  11. [Idiopathic facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Wolf, S R

    1998-09-01

    Although acute idiopathic facial paresis is often labelled "Bell's palsy", historical studies show that Nicolaus Anton Friedreich (1761-1836) from Würzburg was the first physician to describe the typical symptoms of the disorder in 1797, approximately 24 years prior to the paper published by Sir Charles Bell. Diagnostics has now improved to the extent that acute idiopathic facial palsy can more frequently be assigned to etiologies caused by inflammatory disorders. Herpes simplex virus type I and Borrelia burgdorferi are particularly relevant. Underestimation of the degree of paresis is, particularly in children, a drawback of the clinical examination. "Incomplete eyelid closure" is not a reliable indicator of remaining nerve function. For this reason complete electromyography (EMG) is recommended in all cases of severe facial paresis. Since electroneurography does not reliably reflect the degree of denervation present, needle EMG is preferred. The therapy of the facial palsy of unclear etiology is still not well defined. Nevertheless, we recommend that a combined treatment should be used early, at least in patients with disfiguring pareses. Combinations may consist of cortisone, virostatic agents and hemorrheologic substances and possibly antibiotics. Surgical decompression of the facial nerve remains controversial, since positive surgical results lack statistical support. Individual instructions for facial exercises, massage and muscle relaxation can support rehabilitation and possibly reduce the production of pathological synkinesia. Electrical stimulation should not be used. There are a number of possibilities available to reduce the effects of misdirected reinnervation, especially the use of botulinum-A-toxin. However, intensive diagnosis and therapy in the early phase of paresis are decisive in obtaining a favorable outcome. Further refinements in rehabilitation and comparative multicenter controlled studies are still required for future improvements in

  12. Idiopathic Flushing with Dysesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Fogelman, Joshua P.; Ashinoff, Robin; Soter, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the efficacy and safety of the 585nm pulsed dye laser for the treatment of idiopathic flushing with dysesthesia. Design: This was a retrospective study of patients treated with a 585nm pulsed dye laser with fluences ranging from 3.5 to 7.5J/cm2 (purpura threshold fluences), a pulse duration of 450μsec, and a spot size of 5 or 10mm. Setting: The Ronald 0. Perelman Department of Dermatology at New York University Medical Center. Participants: Ten adult subjects who presented with flushing with dysesthesia. Measurements: Participants subjectively evaluated the decrease in dysesthesia and the number of flushing episodes. The objective response to treatment was evaluated by a single physician using pre- and postoperative photographs. The severity of postoperative erythema was compared with baseline using an ordinal scale ranging from zero (resolution of erythema) to four (76-100% of baseline erythema). Results: The mean number of treatments received by the subjects was seven. The mean fluence was 6.66J/cm2. Subjectively, 100 percent of subjects reported a decrease in dysethesia and the number of flushing episodes. Objectively, subjects demonstrated at least a 62.5-percent reduction in erythema. Conclusion: Laser surgery provided subjective relief of dysesthesia and decreased the number of flushing episodes with a greater than 62-percent objective reduction in the severity of erythema. The 585nm pulsed dye laser is a safe, efficacious treatment for the signs and symptoms of idiopathic flushing with dysesthesia. PMID:26345489

  13. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  14. The Pharmacological Management of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Riek, Amy E.; Towler, Dwight A.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy is effective in decreasing the incidence of osteoporotic fracture, morbidity, and mortality. This benefit is pronounced in patients at highest risk for fracture: those with prior osteoporotic fracture, very low bone mineral density, or receiving chronic corticosteroid treatment. We review the best pharmacotherapeutic options currently available for treating osteoporosis. PMID:21568234

  15. Research Advances: Onions Battle Osteoporosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Bern in Switzerland have identified a compound in the popular vegetable that appears to decrease bone loss in laboratory studies using rat bone cells. It is suggested that eating onions might help prevent bone loss and osteoporosis, a disease, which predominantly affects older women.

  16. Quantitative imaging methods in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Oei, Ling; Koromani, Fjorda; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Zillikens, M. Carola

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by a decreased bone mass and quality resulting in an increased fracture risk. Quantitative imaging methods are critical in the diagnosis and follow-up of treatment effects in osteoporosis. Prior radiographic vertebral fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) as a quantitative parameter derived from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are among the strongest known predictors of future osteoporotic fractures. Therefore, current clinical decision making relies heavily on accurate assessment of these imaging features. Further, novel quantitative techniques are being developed to appraise additional characteristics of osteoporosis including three-dimensional bone architecture with quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Dedicated high-resolution (HR) CT equipment is available to enhance image quality. At the other end of the spectrum, by utilizing post-processing techniques such as the trabecular bone score (TBS) information on three-dimensional architecture can be derived from DXA images. Further developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seem promising to not only capture bone micro-architecture but also characterize processes at the molecular level. This review provides an overview of various quantitative imaging techniques based on different radiological modalities utilized in clinical osteoporosis care and research. PMID:28090446

  17. Osteoporosis and ischemic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Laroche, Michel; Pécourneau, Virginie; Blain, Hubert; Breuil, Véronique; Chapurlat, Roland; Cortet, Bernard; Sutter, Bruno; Degboe, Yannick

    2016-11-09

    Osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease were long viewed as independent of each other. However, numerous epidemiological studies, which are discussed in the first part of this review, have provided incontrovertible evidence of a link. Thus, the risk of coronary artery disease and stroke is higher in patients with a history of osteoporotic fracture or low bone mineral density than in non-osteoporotic patients. In the other direction, patients with cardiovascular disease are at higher risk for bone loss and osteoporotic fracture. The link between osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease is due in part to shared conventional risk factors such as estrogen deprivation in women, smoking, low physical activity, and diabetes. In addition, atheroma plaque calcification involves cytokines and growth factors that also play a role in bone turnover, including proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNFα), osteoprotegerin, sclerostin, matrix GLA protein, and FGF-23. Several recent studies have provided support for these pathophysiological hypotheses. Thus, elevation of osteoprotegerin, sclerostin, or FGF-23 levels may explain and predict the occurrence of both osteoporotic fractures and cardiovascular events. The association between osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease found in most epidemiological and pathophysiological studies suggests a need for evaluating potential benefits from routine bone absorptiometry and osteoporotic fracture detection in patients with cardiovascular disease and from exercise testing and arterial Doppler imaging in patients with osteoporosis.

  18. Quantitative imaging methods in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Oei, Ling; Koromani, Fjorda; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Zillikens, M Carola; Oei, Edwin H G

    2016-12-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by a decreased bone mass and quality resulting in an increased fracture risk. Quantitative imaging methods are critical in the diagnosis and follow-up of treatment effects in osteoporosis. Prior radiographic vertebral fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) as a quantitative parameter derived from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are among the strongest known predictors of future osteoporotic fractures. Therefore, current clinical decision making relies heavily on accurate assessment of these imaging features. Further, novel quantitative techniques are being developed to appraise additional characteristics of osteoporosis including three-dimensional bone architecture with quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Dedicated high-resolution (HR) CT equipment is available to enhance image quality. At the other end of the spectrum, by utilizing post-processing techniques such as the trabecular bone score (TBS) information on three-dimensional architecture can be derived from DXA images. Further developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seem promising to not only capture bone micro-architecture but also characterize processes at the molecular level. This review provides an overview of various quantitative imaging techniques based on different radiological modalities utilized in clinical osteoporosis care and research.

  19. [Idiopathic lung fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, L; Geldszus, R; Molitor, S J

    1990-02-01

    In a 39-year-old patient with chronic progressive idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, the genetic aspects, course and therapeutic possibilities of the disease are discussed. In February, 1987, the English-born patient, Anthony V., attended for initial examination on account of progressive dyspnoea, on which occasion radiology and pulmonary function analysis revealed advanced pulmonary fibrosis. The patient's family history revealed a familial genesis, since both his father (?) and his sister had died of this disease. A comparative of the patient's chest films with original chest films of his sister revealed almost identical findings. Within the previous twelve months, follow-up examinations done on A.V. revealed an increase in the restrictive component (reduction of vital capacity from 2,400 ml to 1,500 ml), development of partial respiratory failure at rest, and global respiratory failure in response to mild ergometric exercise despite intermittent high-dose steroid administrations superimposed on long-term, low-dose steroid therapy. The unfavourable evolution observed over the past 12 months is underscored by an increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure from 18 mmHg initially to a present 34 mmHg at rest, and 46 mmHg under submaximal ergometric loading. The only option still left to the patient is the possibility of a lung transplantation, which - probably initially unilateral - is scheduled to be carried out in the near future at the Chest Surgery Department of the Medical University at Hannover.

  20. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Rinsky, Lawrence A.; Gamble, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is the single most common form of spinal deformity seen in orthopedic practice. Our knowledge about the epidemiology, etiology, natural history, and treatment has recently increased dramatically. The incidence of small curves is rather high (2% of the population), whereas severe curves are much less common (<0.1%), but we cannot always predict which curve will progress. Abnormalities of the neuromuscular system and of calcium metabolism, and certain growth, genetic, and mechanical factors may all play roles in the pathogenesis of the disorder. The physiologic secondary effects of severe scoliosis relate to restrictive lung disease, but most patients do not have a deformity great enough to affect their cardiorespiratory function. The psychological and social effects of scoliosis are significant for patients but difficult to quantitate. For most patients with moderate scoliosis—that is, more than 25 to 30 degrees—treatment with an underarm brace or electrical stimulation is adequate to “control” progression of the curve. Surgical fusion allows actual correction of the curve but is indicated in only a small percentage of patients—usually those with more than 50 degrees of deformity. Images PMID:3279708

  1. Idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Johnson; Venugopal, K; Khadar, S A; Sudhayakumar, N; Gupta, Anoop K

    2004-07-01

    Idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia is an important cardiac arrhythmia with specific electrocardiographic features and therapeutic options. It is characterized by relatively narrow QRS complex and right bundle branch block pattern. The QRS axis depends on which fascicle is involved in the re-entry. Left axis deviation is noted with left posterior fascicular tachycardia and right axis deviation with left anterior fascicular tachycardia. A left septal fascicular tachycardia with normal axis has also been described. Fascicular tachycardia is usually seen in individuals without structural heart disease. Response to verapamil is an important feature of fascicular tachycardia. Rare instances of termination with intravenous adenosine have also been noted. A presystolic or diastolic potential preceding the QRS, presumed to originate from the Purkinje fibers can be recorded during sinus rhythm and ventricular tachycardia in many patients with fascicular tachycardia. This potential (P potential) has been used as a guide to catheter ablation. Prompt recognition of fascicular tachycardia especially in the emergency department is very important. It is one of the eminently ablatable ventricular tachycardias. Primary ablation has been reported to have a higher success, lesser procedure time and fluoroscopy time.

  2. Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A.; Korach, K.S. ); Epstein, S. ); Bhattacharyya, M. ); Pounds, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis were reviewed at a conference held at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences 8-9 November 1993. The conference was co-sponsored by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and the NIH Office of Research in Women's Health. The objective of the conference was to review what is known about risk factors for osteoporosis and to identify gaps in the present state of knowledge that might be addressed by future research. The conference was divided into two broad themes. The first session focused on current knowledge regarding etiology, risk factors, and approaches to clinical and laboratory diagnosis. This was followed by three sessions in which various environmental pollutants were discussed. Topics selected for review included environmental agents that interfere with bone and calcium metabolism, such as the toxic metals lead, cadmium, aluminum, and fluoride, natural and antiestrogens, calcium, and vitamin D.

  3. Review of postmenopausal osteoporosis pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Stacey L

    2007-06-01

    The degradation of bone tissue leading to osteoporosis is often silent and unrecognized until a postmenopausal woman develops a bone fracture. The costs of medical treatment and subsequent changes in the quality of life of a patient are significant, and avoidance via proper nutrition, exercise, and pharmacologic therapy may be the key to decreasing healthcare costs associated with this disease state. A periodic review of current literature is necessary to update the reader of current therapeutic options for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. A number of medications exist, and new options are ongoing. Clinicians now have access to antiresorptive and anabolic therapy in addition to lifestyle modification as options for patients. This article consists of a review of established guidelines for screening, diagnosis, and pharmacologic modalities and will provide a comprehensive assessment of therapeutic options.

  4. [Epidemiology of Osteoporosis in Men].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2016-07-01

    Estimated number of those with osteoporosis was about 12,800,000, and about 23%, 3,000,000 were male osteoporosis in Japan. Incidence of hip, vertebral, distal radius, and proximal humeral fracture in men was half of that in women. Lifetime risk of hip fracture was 5.6% in men. Risk factors for osteoporotic fracture in men were low bone mineral density(BMD), previous fracture, low body mass index, smoking, family history of fracture, glucocorticoid use and others. For osteoporotic fractures, the fracture risk in smokers was significantly higher in men than in women. There was no differences in fracture risks by BMD, previous fracture, glucocorticoid use, and family fracture history between men and women.

  5. Osteoporosis: a disease management opportunity.

    PubMed

    Taft, L B; Looker, P A; Cella, D

    2000-01-01

    Advances in the ability to detect and effectively treat osteoporosis lead to questions about when testing and treatment should be initiated. Disease management provides answers with the promise of both cost-effective use of resources and improved health outcomes. Applying the characteristics and principles of disease management to osteoporosis provides a powerful rationale for a population-based approach to this disease. Disease management makes it possible to systematically identify persons at risk, intervene with prevention and treatment programs, and measure clinical, quality of life, and economic outcomes. Clinical guidelines are a critical element in disease management. This article presents clinical guidelines developed recently by national medical and public health experts based on a review of available research and clinical evidence.

  6. Osteoporosis: primary prevention in the community.

    PubMed

    Loh, K Y; Shong, H K

    2007-10-01

    The incidence of osteoporosis is increasing worldwide. It has great impact on the life of the elderly population. The most significant medical consequence of osteoporosis is fragility fracture which without proper treatment will cause severe medical and psychosocial complications. The overall cost in managing osteoporosis and its related fractures is escalating. Using bone densitometry to measure bone mineral density is useful in the diagnosis of osteoporosis but it is costly and not feasible in the community. Drugs such as estrogen replacement, raloxifene and calcitonin are effective in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis but they are also expensive. Identifying modifiable risk factors such as smoking, lack of exercise, low dietary calcium and vitamin D intake and healthy life style remain strategy in the primary prevention of osteoporosis in the community.

  7. [Nutritional factors in preventing osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Martín Jiménez, Juan Antonio; Consuegra Moya, Belkis; Martín Jiménez, María Teresa

    2015-07-18

    Osteoporosis, main risk factor for suffering fragility fractures, is an important public health problem which has undoubted social, health and economic impact; but mainly causes pain, functional limitation and severe alterations in the patient's quality of life. Its current prevalence is very high and a further increase is expected due to a higher life expectancy and the progressive ageing of the population. In the prevention of osteoporosis, the main goal is to prevent fragility fractures; for this reason, it is necessary to: 1) promote bone formation in youth, to get sufficient bone mass peak, 2) reduce bone loss in adulthood, especially after menopause, 3) maintain bone health throughout life, and 4) prevent falls. There is enough evidence that multifactorial strategies (assessment of risk factors, healthy lifestyle habits, smoking cessation, moderation in alcohol consumption, physical exercise, outdoor activity with prudent exposure to sunlight, and a varied and balanced diet), are effective in the population at risk. Regarding factors for the prevention of osteoporosis, current recommendations are: increased consumption of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and fluoride; provide adequate vitamin D (even with fortified food if necessary); consumption of foods rich in omega-3 acids; reduction of salt and prepared ready meals; sufficient but moderate intake of protein and, in the absence of intolerance, promote the consumption of milk and dairy products, especially yogurt and fermented milk products.

  8. Bone tissue engineering in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Ignatius, Anita; Matsushita, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshinobu; Groll, Juergen; Walles, Heike

    2013-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a polygenetic, environmentally modifiable disease, which precipitates into fragility fractures of vertebrae, hip and radius and also confers a high risk of fractures in accidents and trauma. Aging and the genetic molecular background of osteoporosis cause delayed healing and impair regeneration. The worldwide burden of disease is huge and steadily increasing while the average life expectancy is also on the rise. The clinical need for bone regeneration applications, systemic or in situ guided bone regeneration and bone tissue engineering, will increase and become a challenge for health care systems. Apart from in situ guided tissue regeneration classical ex vivo tissue engineering of bone has not yet reached the level of routine clinical application although a wealth of scaffolds and growth factors has been developed. Engineering of complex bone constructs in vitro requires scaffolds, growth and differentiation factors, precursor cells for angiogenesis and osteogenesis and suitable bioreactors in various combinations. The development of applications for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone faces technical challenges concerning rapid vascularization for the survival of constructs in vivo. Recent new ideas and developments in the fields of bone biology, materials science and bioreactor technology will enable us to develop standard operating procedures for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone in the near future. Once prototyped such applications will rapidly be tailored for compromised conditions like vitamin D and sex hormone deficiencies, cellular deficits and high production of regeneration inhibitors, as they are prevalent in osteoporosis and in higher age.

  9. [Osteoporosis associated with spinal cord lesion].

    PubMed

    Miladinović, Ksenija; Vavra-Hadziahmetović, Narcisa; Muftić, Mirsad; Sakota, Slavica

    2007-01-01

    One of the complications caused by spinal lesion is osteoporosis which development is induced by lesion itself, and its mechanism is not explained enough. Risk factor of this kind of osteoporosis is fracture which management is difficult and is cause of further complications which aggravate already damaged quality of life of patients with spinal cord injury, and demand additional health insurance expenses. Importance of prevention and treatment of spinal cord injury induced osteoporosis is enlightened by case report.

  10. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What People With Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page April 2016 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, a disorder ...

  11. What People with Diabetes Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What People With Diabetes Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page April 2016 What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism, a term ...

  12. What People with Anorexia Nervosa Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... People With Anorexia Nervosa Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: PDF (86 KB) Related Resources ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  13. What People with Celiac Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... People With Celiac Disease Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: PDF (98 KB) Related Resources ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  14. Health Beliefs about Osteoporosis and Osteoporosis Screening in Older Women and Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayak, Smita; Roberts, Mark S.; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Greenspan, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine older adults' beliefs about osteoporosis and osteoporosis screening to identify barriers to screening. Design: Cross-sectional mailed survey. Setting: Western Pennsylvania. Methods: Surveys were mailed to 1,830 women and men aged 60 years and older. The survey assessed socio-demographic characteristics, osteoporosis and…

  15. Denosumab for the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Andrea; Grauer, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    View the National Osteoporosis Foundation Clinician's Guide Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a major concern to public health. Fractures are the major clinical consequence of osteoporosis and are associated with substantial morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Despite the availability of screening and treatment guidelines, osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment remain low. Health care providers may consult guidelines in the clinical management of their patients with osteoporosis, including those from the National Osteoporosis Foundation, and the new fracture risk assessment tool from the World Health Organization. Bisphosphonates are the most commonly used treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Although these agents are effective in preventing fractures and bone loss, the benefits of treatment may be limited by suboptimal adherence and compliance. Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody that targets and inhibits RANK ligand, an essential mediator of bone resorption. In clinical trials in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, denosumab 60 mg given subcutaneously every 6 months was well tolerated and statistically significantly reduced the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fractures. The introduction of denosumab into clinical practice provides physicians with another option for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, and the twice-yearly dosing regimen has the potential to improve adherence.

  16. The teriparatide in the treatment of severe senile osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Manuele, S; Sorbello, L; Puglisi, N; Grasso, S; La Malfa, L; D'Urbino, G; Rizzotto, M; Strano, S; Maugeri, D

    2007-01-01

    The osteoporosis is a systemic disease of multicausal etiopathogenesis. A progressive bone loss and qualitative alterations in the macro- and micro-architecture of the remaining bones, resulting in a loss of strength of bones to such an extent that even very modest traumas will cause fractures characterize it. Three forms are defined (i) postmenopausal appearing after the menopause, (ii) senile appearing with advancing age, and (iii) the idiopathic forms. Severe osteoporosis is declared when the patients suffer vertebral or femoral fractures without any trauma during a treatment with anti-reabsorptive medicines of at least 1-year. The treatment of osteoporosis is based on various categories of pharmaca, such as bisphosphonates, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), diaminobutyric acid (DABA), parathyroid hormone (PTH), estrogens and non-hormonal drugs. The teriparatide, the recombinant human (rh)PTH(1-34), is identical in amino acid sequence until the 34th (N-terminal) amino acid of the endogenous, human PTH. It is produced in E. coli using the recombinant DNA technology. It is a pharmacon having a strong trophic-anabolic action on the bone tissue, assuring both the inhibition of the bone loss, and the formation of new bones of good quality. It acts as a stimulant of the osteoblast functions, and at the same time, increases the absorption of calcium from the intestine, and also the renal reabsorption of calcium, and decreases the excretion of phosphates in the kidney. This study summarizes our own experience with the use of rhPTH(1-34) in the treatment of senile patients with severe osteoporosis. Our sample consisted of 40 elderly women of the mean age of 78+/-5 years, having severe osteoporosis. They displayed a columnar T-score>-3.5 and femoral T-score>-2.5, had been under antireabsorptive treatment since at least 12 months. In particular, 15 patients were treated with Alendronate (70 mg/week), 10 of them with Risedronate (35 mg/week), and 15 of them

  17. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management.

    PubMed

    Welty, Timothy E

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a common epilepsy syndrome that begins most frequently in the early teenage years. It is officially classified as a type of idiopathic generalized epilepsy and is often under-recognized or misdiagnosed. This syndrome has a strong genetic component with multiple gene mutations being associated with the clinical presentation. Based upon genetic associations, there may be multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms for the disorder; the pathophysiology has not been clearly defined. A diagnosis of JME is made using the clinical history and EEG findings. Valproic acid is the primary antiepileptic drug (AED) used for JME, but some newer AEDs may be effective alternatives. Selection of an appropriate AED is essential to the proper management of JME, because of the possibility of exacerbation of seizures by some AEDs and the adverse effect profiles of effective drugs. It is important for clinicians to understand JME to correctly diagnose and manage patients with this syndrome.

  18. Male idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Giorgio

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (iOAT) affects approximately 30% of all infertile men. This mini-review discussed recent data in this field. Age, non-inflammatory functional alterations in post-testicular organs, infective agents (Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes virus and adeno-associated viruses), alterations in gamete genome, mitochondrial alterations, environmental pollutants and "subtle" hormonal alterations are all considered possible causes of iOAT. Increase of reactive oxygen species in tubules and in seminal plasma and of apoptosis are reputed to affect sperm concentration, motility and morphology. iOAT is commonly diagnosed by exclusion, nevertheless spectral traces of the main testicular artery may be used as a diagnostic tool for iOAT. The following can be considered therapies for iOAT: 1) tamoxifen citrate (20 mg/d) + testosterone undecanoate (120 mg/d) (pregnancy rate per couple/month [prcm]: 3.8%); 2) folic acid (66 mg/d) + zinc sulfate (5 mg/d); 3) L-carnitine (2 g/d) alone or in combination with acetyl-L-carnitine (1 g/d) (prcm: 2.3%); and 4) both carnitines = one 30 mg cinnoxicam suppository every 4 days (prcm: 8.5%). Alpha-blocking drugs improved sperm concentration but not morphology, motility or pregnancy rate. Tranilast (300 mg/d) increased sperm parameters and pregnancy rates in an initial uncontrolled study. Its efficacy on sperm concentration (but not on sperm motility, morphology or prcm) was confirmed in subsequent published reports. The efficacy of tamoxifen + testosterone undecanoate, tamoxifen alone, and recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone is still a matter for discussion.

  19. Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Kevin R.; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; King, Talmadge E.; Raghu, Ganesh; Colby, Thomas V.; Wells, Athol; Bassily, Nadir; Brown, Kevin; du Bois, Roland; Flint, Andrew; Gay, Steven E.; Gross, Barry H.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Knapp, Robert; Louvar, Edmund; Lynch, David; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Quick, John; Thannickal, Victor J.; Travis, William D.; Vyskocil, James; Wadenstorer, Frazer A.; Wilt, Jeffrey; Toews, Galen B.; Murray, Susan; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Treatment and prognoses of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs) varies by diagnosis. Obtaining a uniform diagnosis among observers is difficult. Objectives: Evaluate diagnostic agreement between academic and community-based physicians for patients with DPLDs, and determine if an interactive approach between clinicians, radiologists, and pathologists improved diagnostic agreement in community and academic centers. Methods: Retrospective review of 39 patients with DPLD. A total of 19 participants reviewed cases at 2 community locations and 1 academic location. Information from the history, physical examination, pulmonary function testing, high-resolution computed tomography, and surgical lung biopsy was collected. Data were presented in the same sequential fashion to three groups of physicians on separate days. Measurements and Main Results: Each observer's diagnosis was coded into one of eight categories. A κ statistic allowing for multiple raters was used to assess agreement in diagnosis. Interactions between clinicians, radiologists, and pathologists improved interobserver agreement at both community and academic sites; however, final agreement was better within academic centers (κ = 0.55–0.71) than within community centers (κ = 0.32–0.44). Clinically significant disagreement was present between academic and community-based physicians (κ = 0.11–0.56). Community physicians were more likely to assign a final diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis compared with academic physicians. Conclusions: Significant disagreement exists in the diagnosis of DPLD between physicians based in communities compared with those in academic centers. Wherever possible, patients should be referred to centers with expertise in diffuse parenchymal lung disorders to help clarify the diagnosis and provide suggestions regarding treatment options. PMID:17255566

  20. Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome: description of 9 new cases and beneficial response to bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Streeten, Elizabeth A; McBride, Daniel; Puffenberger, Eric; Hoffman, Marc E; Pollin, Toni I; Donnelly, Patrick; Sack, Paul; Morton, Holmes

    2008-09-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of severe juvenile osteoporosis and congenital blindness, due to mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Approximately fifty cases of OPPG have been reported. We report 9 new cases of OPPG, in three related nuclear families of Conservative Mennonites in Pennsylvania. All 9 children with OPPG were blind and had osteoporosis. Four of six parents had low bone mineral density (BMD) or osteoporosis; 2 were normal. Sequence analysis from genomic DNA revealed homozygosity for a nonsense mutation of exon 6 of LRP5 (W425X) in four OPPG cases tested in families A and C. In family B, OPPG cases were compound heterozygotes for the exon 6 W425X LRP5 mutation and a second exon 6 mutation (T409A); bone phenotype was milder than in family A. Neither of these mutations was present in an unrelated normal. The four treated OPPG patients all responded to bisphosphonates (duration 1.5-6.5 years) with improvement in Z-scores. One patient had a negligible response to teriparatide. In summary, we report 9 new cases of OPPG due to two novel LRP5 mutations, note a milder bone phenotype but similar ocular phenotype in LRP5 W425X/T409A compound heterozygotes than in W425X homozygotes and describe positive response to bisphosphonate treatment in four cases.

  1. Idiopathic Sporadic Onychomadesis of Toenails

    PubMed Central

    Nitayavardhana, Sunatra

    2016-01-01

    Onychomadesis is a clinical sign of nail plate separation due to transient or permanent arrest of nail matrix activities. Onychomadesis can be considered as a severe form of Beau's line. This condition usually occurs after trauma, causal diseases, or medications, yet it rarely occurs as an idiopathic condition. We report a case of a 38-year-old Thai female who developed recurrence onychomadesis in several toenails in the absence of predisposing factors or associated conditions. To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the first reported case of idiopathic onychomadesis limited to toenails. PMID:27437152

  2. Osteoporosis in menopause.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aliya; Fortier, Michel; Fortier, Michel; Reid, Robert; Abramson, Beth L; Blake, Jennifer; Desindes, Sophie; Dodin, Sylvie; Graves, Lisa; Guthrie, Bing; Johnston, Shawna; Khan, Aliya; Rowe, Timothy; Sodhi, Namrita; Wilks, Penny; Wolfman, Wendy

    2014-09-01

    Objectif : Offrir aux fournisseurs de soins de santé des lignes directrices quant à la prévention, au diagnostic et à la prise en charge clinique de l’ostéoporose postménopausique. Issues : Stratégies visant à identifier et à évaluer les femmes exposées à des risques élevés; utilisation de la densité minérale osseuse et des marqueurs du renouvellement des cellules osseuses pour l’évaluation du diagnostic et de la réaction à la prise en charge; et recommandations quant à la nutrition, à l’activité physique et au choix du traitement pharmacologique en vue de prévenir l’ostéoporose et d’en assurer la prise en charge. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans MEDLINE et The Cochrane Library le 30 août et le 18 septembre 2012, respectivement, au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. « osteoporosis », « bone density », « menopause ») et de mots clés (p. ex. « bone health », « bone loss », « BMD ») appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles publiés en anglais ou en français. Les résultats ont été restreints aux documents publiés à partir de 2009. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en mars 2013. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques, auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales, et dans des collections de directives cliniques Valeurs : La qualité des résultats est évaluée au moyen des critères d

  3. Renewing Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macallair, Daniel; Males, Mike; Enty, Dinky Manek; Vinakor, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    The Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) was commissioned by Sierra Health Foundation to critically examine California's juvenile justice system and consider the potential role of foundations in promoting systemic reform. The information gathered by CJCJ researchers for this report suggests that foundations can perform a key leadership…

  4. Juvenile Delinquency Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsey, Mark W.

    1988-01-01

    Three meta-analyses by C. J. Garrett (1984, 1985), P. Kaufman (1985), and W. S. Davidson and others (1984) of juvenile delinquency interventions are summarized. This systematic literature review indicates that interventions to reduce juvenile delinquency may have small, but meaningful, impacts. Promising avenues for future research are suggested.…

  5. Juvenile Confinement in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    For more than a century, the predominant strategy for the treatment and punishment of serious and sometimes not-so-serious juvenile offenders in the United States has been placement into large juvenile corrections institutions, alternatively known as training schools, reformatories, or youth corrections centers. America's heavy reliance on…

  6. Distinguishing juvenile homicide from violent juvenile offending.

    PubMed

    DiCataldo, Frank; Everett, Meghan

    2008-04-01

    Juvenile homicide is a social problem that has remained a central focus within juvenile justice research in recent years. The term juvenile murderer describes a legal category, but it is purported to have significant scientific meaning. Research has attempted to conceptualize adolescent murderers as a clinical category that can be reliably distinguished from their nonhomicidal counterparts. This study examined 33 adolescents adjudicated delinquent or awaiting trial for murder and 38 adolescents who committed violent, nonhomicidal offenses to determine whether the two groups differed significantly on family history, early development, delinquency history, mental health, and weapon possession variables. The nonhomicide group proved more problematic on many of these measures. Two key factors did distinguish the homicide group: These adolescents endorsed the greater availability of guns and substance abuse at the time of their commitment offenses. The significance of this finding is discussed, and the implications for risk management and policy are reviewed.

  7. Idiopathic CD4 Lymphocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Régent, Alexis; Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Cheynier, Rémi; Terrier, Benjamin; Charmeteau-De Muylder, Bénédicte; Krivitzky, Alain; Oksenhendler, Eric; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Hubert, Pascale; Lortholary, Olivier; Dupin, Nicolas; Debré, Patrice; Guillevin, Loïc; Mouthon, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic CD4 T lymphocytopenia (ICL) is a rare and severe condition with limited available data. We conducted a French multicenter study to analyze the clinical and immunologic characteristics of a cohort of patients with ICL according to the Centers for Disease Control criteria. We recruited 40 patients (24 female) of mean age 44.2 ± 12.2 (19–70) years. Patients underwent T-lymphocyte phenotyping and lymphoproliferation assay at diagnosis, and experiments related to thymic function and interferon (IFN)-γ release by natural killer (NK) cell were performed. Mean follow-up was 6.9 ± 6.7 (0.14–24.3) years. Infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic events were recorded, as were outcomes of interleukin 2 therapy. In all, 25 patients had opportunistic infections (12 with human papillomavirus infection), 14 had autoimmune symptoms, 5 had malignancies, and 8 had mild or no symptoms. At the time of diagnosis, the mean cell counts were as follows: mean CD4 cell count: 127/mm3 (range, 4–294); mean CD8: 236/mm3 (range, 1–1293); mean CD19: 113/mm3 (range, 3–547); and mean NK cell count: 122/mm3 (range, 5–416). Most patients had deficiency in CD8, CD19, and/or NK cells. Cytotoxic function of NK cells was normal, and patients with infections had a significantly lower NK cell count than those without (p = 0.01). Patients with autoimmune manifestations had increased CD8 T-cell count. Proliferation of thymic precursors, as assessed by T-cell rearrangement excision circles, was increased. Six patients died (15%). CD4 T-cell count <150/mm3 and NK cell count <100/mm3 were predictors of death. In conclusion, ICL is a heterogeneous disorder often associated with deficiencies in CD8, CD19, and/or NK cells. Long-term prognosis may be related to initial CD4 and NK cell deficiency. PMID:24646462

  8. Idiopathic atrophie blanche.

    PubMed

    Amato, Lauretta; Chiarini, Caterina; Berti, Samantha; Massi, Daniela; Fabbri, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    clinical, serologic, histopathologic, and immunopathologic findings, a diagnosis of idiopathic atrophie blanche was made. The patient was treated with dapsone (50 mg p.o. q.d.) and pentoxifylline (400 mg p.o. t.i.d.) with pain relief and complete resolution of the ulcerations after 6 weeks of therapy.

  9. The natural approach to osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Bartolozzi, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is normally the result of a wrong life-style (diet, physical inactivity, smoke, dental hygiene, intestinal dysbiosis,…) and environmental toxicity which stimulate the chronic expression of inflammatory genes and alter the immuno-endocrine balance. A natural approch should face all the factors involved, leading the patients to become aware of their own responsability, and helping them with natural therapies, healthy food and life-style which support their body in the process of self-healing. PMID:26604935

  10. Balance control in elderly people with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Chen, Chao-Yin; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Yang, Rong-Sen

    2014-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a prevalent health concern among older adults and is associated with an increased risk of falls that incur fracture, injury, or mortality. Identifying the risk factors of falls within this population is essential for the development of effective regimes for fall prevention. Studies have shown that muscle quality and good posture alignments are critical for balance control in elderly individuals. People with osteoporosis often have muscle weakness and increased spine kyphosis leading to vertebral fractures and poor balance control, or even falls. Therefore, improving muscle quality, strengthening weak muscles, and correcting postural alignment are essential elements for the prevention of falls and fractures in older adults with osteoporosis. This review reports the necessary information regarding the critical factors of balance control in older adults with osteoporosis, as well as testing the clinical innovations of exercise training to improve the long-term prognosis of osteoporosis in this vulnerable population.

  11. Denosumab: recent update in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Inês; Branco, Jaime C

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a major concern to public health. Fractures are the major clinical consequence of osteoporosis and are associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and health care costs. Bone strength determinants such as bone mineral density and bone quality parameters are determined by life-long remodeling of skeletal tissue. Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL) is a cytokine essential for osteoclast differentiation, activation and survival. Denosumab (Prolia®) is a fully human monoclonal antibody for RANKL, which selectively inhibits osteoclastogenesis, being recently approved for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis in women at a high or increased risk of fracture by the FDA in the United States and by the European Medicines Agency in Europe since June 2010. FREEDOM, DECIDE and STAND are the phase 3 trials comparing denosumab with placebo and alendronate in postmenopausal osteoporosis. The authors aim to update denosumab role in postmenopausal osteoporosis with a physiopathological review.

  12. [Lung is also involved in juvenile dermatomyositis].

    PubMed

    Pouessel, G; Thumerelle, C; Nève, V; Santangelo, T; Flammarion, S; Pruvot, I; Tillie-Leblond, I; Deschildre, A

    2014-07-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis is the leading cause of chronic idiopathic inflammatory myopathy of auto-immune origin in children. Lung involvement in inflammatory myopathies is well described in adults, involving mostly interstitial lung disease, aspiration pneumonia and alveolar hypoventilation. We propose to describe its specificities in children. Pulmonary involvement may be asymptomatic and therefore must be systematically screened for. In case of clinical or functional respiratory abnormality, a chest computed tomographic (CT) scan is necessary. In children, a decrease of respiratory muscle strength seems common and should be systematically and specifically searched for by non-invasive and reproducible tests (sniff test). Interstitial lung disease usually associates restrictive functional defect, impairment of carbon monoxide diffusion and interstitial lung disease on CT scan. As in adults, the first-line treatment of juvenile dermatomyositis is based on corticosteroids. Corticosteroid resistant forms require corticosteroid bolus or adjuvant immunosuppressive drugs (methotrexate or cyclosporine). There is no consensus in pediatrics for the treatment of diffuse interstitial lung disease. Complications of treatment, including prolonged steroid therapy, are frequent and therefore a careful assessment of the treatments risk-benefit ratio is necessary, especially in growing children.

  13. Juvenile arthritis: current concepts in terminology, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Abramowicz, S; Kim, S; Prahalad, S; Chouinard, A F; Kaban, L B

    2016-07-01

    The latest change in terminology from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) to juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), established by the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR), has resulted in some confusion for OMFS and other treating clinicians. JIA comprises a group of systemic inflammatory diseases that result in the destruction of hard and soft tissues in a single or multiple joints. In a significant number of patients, one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJ) are also involved. TMJ disease may be accompanied by pain, swelling, and limitation of motion, as well as mandibular retrognathism, open bite, and asymmetry. The purpose of this article is to provide a review, for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon, of the terminology, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of children with JIA.

  14. Osteoporosis: the role of micronutrients.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W

    2005-05-01

    Osteoporosis and low bone mass are currently estimated to be a major public health threat. Adequate nutrition plays a major role in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis; the micronutrients of greatest importance are calcium and vitamin D. Calcium has been shown to have beneficial effects on bone mass at all ages, although the results are not always consistent. Higher doses than the current US recommendation (600 IU) of vitamin D in the elderly (age > or = 65 y) may actually be required for optimal bone health (800-1000 IU/d). The elderly can clearly benefit from increased vitamin D intakes; however, the potential importance of vitamin D in peak bone mass is just being investigated. Vitamin D has been related to falls, with supplementation reducing the number of falls. There are clear fracture benefits demonstrated in randomized clinical trials of calcium and vitamin D supplementation. The other micronutrient needs for optimizing bone health can be easily met by a healthy diet that is high in fruits and vegetables to ensure adequate intakes for magnesium, potassium, vitamin C, vitamin K, and other potentially important nutrients. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of the importance of adequate calcium and vitamin D intakes (easily monitored by serum 25(OH)D) for optimal bone health, as well as the prevention of falls and fractures. In addition, a healthy diet that includes 5 servings a day of fruits and vegetables should optimize the intake of micronutrients required for bone health.

  15. Transient osteoporosis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Vernon, L F; Dooley, J C; Neidorf, D L

    1997-06-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip is an uncommon but probably underdiagnosed condition. There appears to be a predisposition for the condition in middle-aged males and in women in their third trimester of pregnancy. The etiology remains unclear, with theories that include vascular and neurologic disturbances. Clinical signs are usually pain in the hip area with functional disability of the affected limb. Plane film radiographs may be completely normal or show only minimal osteopenia. This report describes a 40-year-old male in whom transient osteoporosis of the hip was diagnosed. The patient's symptoms were initially interpreted as being due to sciatica; however, careful evaluation, further diagnostic work-up in the form of magnetic resonance imaging, and the clinical course of the disease ultimately led to the correct diagnosis. Resolution occurred gradually with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and rest. This case demonstrates the need for further evaluation of patients with hip-area pain who may have negative x-rays of the hip joint but continue to be symptomatic.

  16. Evaluation of osteoporosis using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Joaquim M.; Costa, Eduardo T.; Nantes Button, Vera L. d. S.; Dantas, Ricardo G.

    2000-04-01

    We have developed an equipment using ultrasound transducers to help in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The equipment consists of an X-Y axes displacement system controlled by a microcomputer and uses two ultrasound transducers in opposite sides to inspect the calcaneus region of the patient. We have used two pairs of transducers with 500 kHz and 1 MHz central frequencies. Each pair of transducers was fixed in the X-Y displacement system submerged in a small water tank with a support for the foot of the patient. The transmitter was excited with pulses of 400 - 600 kHz or 800 - 1200 kHz and the ultrasound waves propagating through the bone in the calcaneus region are received by the opposite transducer, amplified and acquired in a digital oscilloscope. The data are transferred to the microcomputer and the ultrasound attenuation and the ultrasound transmission velocity are determined. The system was tested in patients, selected from a group that had already been diagnosed using a DEXA equipment. The results showed that there is a decrease in the ultrasound transmission velocity and the ultrasound attenuation in osteoporotic patients when compared to healthy patients of the same sex and age group. The conclusion is that ultrasound attenuation and the transmission velocity in the calcaneus region may be used as parameters in the evaluation of osteoporosis using our new system.

  17. An overview and management of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Sözen, Tümay; Özışık, Lale; Başaran, Nursel Çalık

    2017-03-01

    Osteoporosis -related to various factors including menopause and aging- is the most common chronic metabolic bone disease, which is characterized by increased bone fragility. Although it is seen in all age groups, gender, and races, it is more common in Caucasians (white race), older people, and women. With an aging population and longer life span, osteoporosis is increasingly becoming a global epidemic. Currently, it has been estimated that more than 200 million people are suffering from osteoporosis. According to recent statistics from the International Osteoporosis Foundation, worldwide, 1 in 3 women over the age of 50 years and 1 in 5 men will experience osteoporotic fractures in their lifetime. Every fracture is a sign of another impending one. Osteoporosis has no clinical manifestations until there is a fracture. Fractures cause important morbidity; in men, in particular, they can cause mortality. Moreover, osteoporosis results in a decreased quality of life, increased disability-adjusted life span, and big financial burden to health insurance systems of countries that are responsible for the care of such patients. With an early diagnosis of this disease before fractures occur and by assessing the bone mineral density and with early treatment, osteoporosis can be prevented. Therefore, increasing awareness among doctors, which, in turn, facilitates increase awareness of the normal populace, will be effective in preventing this epidemic.

  18. Causes, mechanisms and management of paediatric osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mäkitie, Outi

    2013-08-01

    Osteoporosis, a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength and an increased risk of fractures, is an important paediatric disorder that involves almost all paediatric subspecialties. Osteogenesis imperfecta is the most common form of childhood-onset primary osteoporosis, but several other forms are also known. Secondary osteoporosis is caused by an underlying chronic illness or its treatment. The most common causes of secondary osteoporosis include chronic systemic inflammation, glucocorticoid use and neuromuscular disabilities. The skeletal sequelae can present in childhood as low-energy peripheral and vertebral fractures, or become evident in adulthood as low bone mass and an increased propensity to develop osteoporosis. Management should aim at prevention, as interventions to treat symptomatic osteoporosis in the paediatric age group are scarce. Bisphosphonates are the principal pharmacological agents that can be used in this setting, but data on their efficacy and safety in paediatric populations remain inadequate, especially in patients with secondary osteoporosis. Consequently, it is important to understand the potential skeletal effects of paediatric illnesses and their therapies in order to institute effective and timely prevention of skeletal complications.

  19. An overview and management of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sözen, Tümay; Özışık, Lale; Başaran, Nursel Çalık

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis -related to various factors including menopause and aging- is the most common chronic metabolic bone disease, which is characterized by increased bone fragility. Although it is seen in all age groups, gender, and races, it is more common in Caucasians (white race), older people, and women. With an aging population and longer life span, osteoporosis is increasingly becoming a global epidemic. Currently, it has been estimated that more than 200 million people are suffering from osteoporosis. According to recent statistics from the International Osteoporosis Foundation, worldwide, 1 in 3 women over the age of 50 years and 1 in 5 men will experience osteoporotic fractures in their lifetime. Every fracture is a sign of another impending one. Osteoporosis has no clinical manifestations until there is a fracture. Fractures cause important morbidity; in men, in particular, they can cause mortality. Moreover, osteoporosis results in a decreased quality of life, increased disability-adjusted life span, and big financial burden to health insurance systems of countries that are responsible for the care of such patients. With an early diagnosis of this disease before fractures occur and by assessing the bone mineral density and with early treatment, osteoporosis can be prevented. Therefore, increasing awareness among doctors, which, in turn, facilitates increase awareness of the normal populace, will be effective in preventing this epidemic. PMID:28293453

  20. Juvenile Sex Offenders.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Eileen P; Otonichar, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Sexual offending by juveniles accounts for a sizable percentage of sexual offenses, especially against young children. In this article, recent research on female juvenile sex offenders (JSOs), risk factors for offending in juveniles, treatment, and the ways in which these youth may differ from general delinquents will be reviewed. Most JSOs do not go on to develop paraphilic disorders or to commit sex offenses during adulthood, and as a group, they are more similar to nonsexual offending juvenile delinquents than to adult sex offenders. Recent research has elucidated some differences between youth who commit sex offenses and general delinquents in the areas of atypical sexual interests, the use of pornography, and early sexual victimization during childhood.

  1. [Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias in 2016].

    PubMed

    Debray, M-P; Borie, R; Danel, C; Khalil, A; Majlath, M; Crestani, B

    2017-02-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias comprise 8 clinicopathological entities, most of them with a chronic course and various prognosis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most frequent and most severe of these. Computed tomography has an important role for its diagnosis. It can identify the corresponding pathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia in about 50 percent of cases. It can suggest differential diagnosis in other cases, most frequently fibrosing nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Imaging features should be integrated to clinical and available pathologic data during multidisciplinary team meetings involving physicians with a good knowledge of interstitial diseases. Some cases may be unclassifiable, but these could later be reclassified as new data may occur or imaging features may change. Surgical lung biopsy is being less frequently performed and an emerging less invasive technique, lung cryobiopsy, is under evaluation. Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis is a distinct entity only recently described, with uncertain prevalence and prognosis that seems being quite often associated to another pattern of interstitial pneumonia.

  2. Nonsurgical management of idiopathic clubfoot.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Kenneth J; Richards, B Stephens

    2003-01-01

    Because nonsurgical management was thought not to yield adequate correction and a durable result, most children with idiopathic clubfoot have undergone surgery with extensive posteromedial and lateral release. However, surgical management caused residual deformity, stiffness, and pain in some children; thus, the favorable long-term results with the Ponseti and French methods of nonsurgical management have garnered interest. The Ponseti method consists of manipulation and casting of idiopathic clubfeet; the French method consists of physiotherapy, taping, and continuous passive motion. Careful evaluation of the techniques and results of these two approaches may increase their use and decrease or minimize the use of surgical management and thus the associated morbidity resulting from extensile releases.

  3. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your skin when it is exposed to sunlight. You need 10 to 15 minutes of sunlight to the hands, arms, and face, two to ... your doctor or nurse about the risks and benefits of medicines for bone loss. Return to top ...

  4. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo Adolfo

    2016-09-01

    Calcium intake has a role on the development of peak bone mass, and has a mild impact on the maintenance of bone mass during adulthood and the reduction of bone loss rate in postmenopausal women and the elderly in both genders. Calcium dietary intake should be privileged over supplementation. Dairy products are the main calcium dietary sources. Prospective studies have not clearly demonstrated an effect on the prevention of fractures, because of the practical difficulties of a long follow-up in order to get to solid conclusions; however the physiological rationale is that an adequate calcium intake and 25(OH) vitamin D levels exceeding 20 ng/ml is beneficial for bone health and may decrease to certain extent the risk of fractures.

  5. Treatment of Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Howard A.

    2012-01-01

    Exciting progress recently has been made in our understanding of idiopathic membranous nephropathy, as well as treatment of this disease. Here, we review important advances regarding the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. We will also review the current approach to treatment and its limitations and will highlight new therapies that are currently being explored for this disease including Rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil, and adrenocorticotropic hormone, with an emphasis on results of the most recent clinical trials. PMID:22859855

  6. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: evolving concepts.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jay H; Moua, Teng; Daniels, Craig E; Hartman, Thomas E; Yi, Eunhee S; Utz, James P; Limper, Andrew H

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) occurs predominantly in middle-aged and older adults and accounts for 20% to 30% of interstitial lung diseases. It is usually progressive, resulting in respiratory failure and death. Diagnostic criteria for IPF have evolved over the years, and IPF is currently defined as a disease characterized by the histopathologic pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia occurring in the absence of an identifiable cause of lung injury. Understanding of the pathogenesis of IPF has shifted away from chronic inflammation and toward dysregulated fibroproliferative repair in response to alveolar epithelial injury. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is likely a heterogeneous disorder caused by various interactions between genetic components and environmental exposures. High-resolution computed tomography can be diagnostic in the presence of typical findings such as bilateral reticular opacities associated with traction bronchiectasis/bronchiolectasis in a predominantly basal and subpleural distribution, along with subpleural honeycombing. In other circumstances, a surgical lung biopsy may be needed. The clinical course of IPF can be unpredictable and may be punctuated by acute deteriorations (acute exacerbation). Although progress continues in unraveling the mechanisms of IPF, effective therapy has remained elusive. Thus, clinicians and patients need to reach informed decisions regarding management options including lung transplant. The findings in this review were based on a literature search of PubMed using the search terms idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and usual interstitial pneumonia, limited to human studies in the English language published from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2013, and supplemented by key references published before the year 2000.

  7. Estrogen therapy for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Lorraine A

    2006-08-01

    Osteoporosis is a worldwide problem that results in fractures that lead to disability and high costs to society. Estrogen therapy is frequently utilized for postmenopausal symptoms, but also has proven protective effects on the skeleton. The main action of estrogen at the cellular level is to inhibit the osteoclast by increasing levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG). OPG binds to the receptor activator of NFkB and prevents osteoclast differentiation, activity and survival. Numerous trials have demonstrated the positive effect estrogen has on the improvement of bone mineral density, and lower doses have also proven efficacious with fewer side effects. Both observational and randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the ability of estrogen treatment to prevent fractures. Topics that remain controversial include the appropriate length of estrogen treatment for postmenopausal women and the appropriate follow-up after treatment discontinuation.

  8. Validation of the male osteoporosis knowledge quiz.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Jean M; Marx, Katherine A; Narrett, Matthew; Caudill, JoAnn; Landsman, Jeffrey; Parrish, John M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the six-item Men's Osteoporosis Knowledge Quiz (MOKQ). The MOKQ asks questions about risk factors that are pertinent to men, such as the risk for developing low bone mass related to hormone treatment for prostate cancer and the importance of testosterone for bone mass. A survey was sent to 242 men with a mean age of 83.2 years. The mean number of questions answered correctly in response to the six-item MOKQ was 2.37. Convergent validity was examined by correlating the score achieved on the MOKQ with the score achieved on the total Facts on Osteoporosis Quiz. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the MOKQ and the Facts on Osteoporosis Quiz was r = .76. Reliability was demonstrated by computing a Cronbach's alpha for the MOKQ (r = .72). The MOKQ was found to have adequate reliability and validity in assessing older men's knowledge about osteoporosis.

  9. The burden of osteoporosis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Bruna Coelho Galvão; Guerra, Luiza Paulino; Drummond, Juliana Beaudette; Silva, Barbara C; Soares, Maria Marta Sarquis

    2014-07-01

    Osteoporotic fractures impose severe physical, psychosocial, and financial burden both to the patient and the society. Studies on the prevalence of osteoporosis and fragility fractures in Brazil show a wide variation, due to differences in sample size, the population studied, and methodologies. Few studies have been conducted in Brazil about the cost-effectiveness analyses of different intervention options aimed at the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Investigation and treatment strategies based on cost-effectiveness and scientific evidence are essential in the preparation of public health policies with the ultimate goal of reducing the incidence of fractures and, consequently, the direct and indirect costs associated with them. This article reviews the Brazilian burden of osteoporosis in terms of the prevalence and fractures attributable to the disease, the costs related to the investigation and management, as well as the impact of osteoporosis on the population as a whole and on affected individuals.

  10. Prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael

    2008-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disease characterized by reduced bone strength and increased risk for fractures. Fragility fractures are associated with serious clinical consequences, including chronic pain, skeletal deformities, loss of independence, and increased mortality. Although osteoporosis is underdiagnosed and undertreated, many who are treated take medication incorrectly or do not continue it long enough to benefit. Measures to prevent osteoporosis include a healthy lifestyle, with regular physical activity, adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D, and avoidance of cigarette smoking and excess alcohol. Patients at risk for osteoporosis can be diagnosed with a simple bone density test before the first fracture occurs. Pharmacologic agents for patients at high risk for fracture can reduce the burden of osteoporotic fractures.

  11. Treatment of primary osteoporosis in men.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Andrea; Bianchi, Gerolamo

    2015-01-01

    With the aging of the population worldwide, osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are becoming a serious health care issue in the Western world. Although less frequent than in women, osteoporosis in men is a relatively common problem. Hip and vertebral fractures are particularly relevant, being associated with significant mortality and disability. Since bone loss and fragility fractures in men have been recognized as serious medical conditions, several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been undertaken in males with osteoporosis to investigate the anti-fracture efficacy of the pharmacological agents commonly used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis. Overall, treatments for osteoporosis in men are less defined than in women, mainly due to the fact that there are fewer RCTs performed in male populations, to the relatively smaller sample sizes, and to the lack of long-term extension studies. However, the key question is whether men are expected to respond differently to osteoporosis therapies than women. The pharmacological properties of bisphosphonates, teriparatide, denosumab, and strontium ranelate make such differentiation unlikely, and available clinical data support their efficacy in men with primary osteoporosis as well as in women. In a series of well-designed RCTs, alendronate, risedronate, zoledronic acid, and teriparatide were demonstrated to reduce the risk of new vertebral fractures in men presenting with primary osteoporosis (including osteoporosis associated with low testosterone levels) and to improve the bone mineral density (BMD). In preliminary studies, ibandronate, denosumab, and strontium ranelate also showed their beneficial effects on surrogate outcomes (BMD and markers of bone turnover) in men with osteoporosis. Although direct evidence about their non-vertebral anti-fracture efficacy are lacking, the effects of bisphosphonates, denosumab, teriparatide, and strontium ranelate on surrogate outcomes (BMD and markers of bone turnover

  12. [Osteoporosis--current diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Pfeilschifter, Johannes

    2009-08-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are a frequent cause of disability and a loss of quality of life in old age. Maintenance of muscle function and balance, a daily calcium intake of 1,000 mg, sufficient vitamin D, and a prudent use of fall- and osteoporosis-associated drugs are key components of fracture prevention. The German guideline recommends to initiate a specific long-term osteoporosis medication in individuals with a 30% 10-year risk for hip fractures and vertebral fractures.

  13. Vocational Teachers' Role in Serving Juvenile Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meers, Gary D.

    1983-01-01

    Educators need to understand the juvenile justice system to understand what juvenile offenders go through while completing their sentences. This article reviews cases and juvenile charge classifications, and presents a model for alternative sentencing options for juveniles. (JOW)

  14. Decreased serum vitamin D in idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Hae; Kim, Ji-Soo; Shin, Jong Wook; Kim, Sungbo; Lee, Hajeong; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon; Jo, Hyunjin; Song, Junghan; Ghim, Yuna

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association of osteopenia/osteoporosis with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Since vitamin D takes part in the regulation of calcium and phosphorus found in the body and plays an important role in maintaining proper bone structure, decreased bone mineral density in patients with BPPV may be related to decreased serum vitamin D. We measured the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 100 patients (63 women and 37 men, mean age ± SD = 61.8 ± 11.6) with idiopathic BPPV and compared the data with those of 192 controls (101 women and 91 men, mean age ± SD = 60.3 ± 11.3) who had lived in the same community without dizziness or imbalance during the preceding year. The selection of the controls and acquisition of clinical information were done using the data from the Fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008. The serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was lower in the patients with BPPV than in the controls (mean ± SD = 14.4 ± 8.4 versus 19.1 ± 6.8 ng/ml, p = 0.001). Furthermore, patients with BPPV showed a higher prevalence of decreased serum vitamin D (<20 ng/ml, 80.0 vs. 60.1 %, p < 0.001) than the controls. Multiple logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, proteinuria, regular exercise and the existence of decreased bone mineral density demonstrated that vitamin D insufficiency (10-20 ng/ml) and deficiency (<10 ng/ml) were associated with BPPV with the odds ratios of 3.8 (95 % confidence interval = 1.51-9.38, p = 0.004) and 23.0 (95 % confidence interval = 6.88-77.05, p < 0.001). Our study demonstrated an association between idiopathic BPPV and decreased serum vitamin D. Decreased serum vitamin D may be a risk factor of BPPV.

  15. Osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Compston, J E; Judd, D; Crawley, E O; Evans, W D; Evans, C; Church, H A; Reid, E M; Rhodes, J

    1987-01-01

    Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular and peripheral cortical bone was measured in 75 unselected patients with small and/or large intestinal inflammatory bowel disease. Osteoporosis, defined as a bone mineral content greater than 2 SD below the age and sex matched normal mean value was present in 23 patients (30.6%). Three amenorrhoeic females aged 34, 38, and 42 years had severe clinical osteoporosis and a further three patients had one or more vertebral crush fractures. Eighteen of the 23 patients with osteoporosis had small intestinal disease with one or more resections and the mean lifetime steroid dose in those with osteoporosis was significantly higher than in those with normal bone mineral content. Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular bone showed significant negative correlations with lifetime steroid dose and serum alkaline phosphatase and a significant positive correlation with serum albumin. Peripheral cortical bone mineral content was positively correlated with body weight, height and body mass index. We conclude that the prevalence of osteoporosis is increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, severe clinical osteoporosis developing in some relatively young patients. The pathogenesis of this bone loss is probably multifactorial; steroid therapy is likely to be an important contributory factor. PMID:3583068

  16. Non-response to osteoporosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Francis, Roger M

    2004-06-01

    There are now a number of effective treatments for osteoporosis, which increase bone mineral density (BMD) and decrease the risk of fractures. There is no clear consensus on the optimal method for assessing response to treatment in the individual patient. The goal of osteoporosis treatment is to prevent fractures after minimal trauma, but these are relatively uncommon events and cannot be totally avoided by the use of currently available therapies. Alternative methods of assessing response to treatment include serial measurement of BMD or the biochemical markers of bone turnover, but the observed changes may be misleading if they do not exceed the least significant change. The proportion of patients who fail to respond to osteoporosis treatments is difficult to quantify. Clinical trials show continuing bone loss in up to 15% of participants on hormone replacement therapy or bisphosphonates. Non-response to treatment is probably more common in clinical practice, but may be due to poor adherence to treatment recommendations. Other potential causes of an apparent failure to respond to treatment include the use of a weak antiresorptive agent, differences in bioavailability, low dietary calcium intake, vitamin D insufficiency and underlying causes of secondary osteoporosis. The management of patients who fail to respond to treatment includes confirmation that they are adhering to treatment and have an adequate dietary calcium intake and vitamin D status and excluding causes of secondary osteoporosis. Consideration should also be given to the addition of calcium and vitamin D supplementation and the use of alternative treatments for osteoporosis.

  17. Managing elderly people's osteoporosis. Why? Who? How?

    PubMed Central

    Juby, A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To guide family physicians through assessment of why treating elderly people's osteoporosis is necessary, who to treat, and how to treat in a practical way. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Evidence of the efficacy of treatment for osteoporosis is shown by a reduced probability of fracture. This can be ascertained by direct evaluation for bisphosphonates, calcium, and calcitonin, or indirectly by ascertaining benefit to bone mineral density for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and exercise. MAIN MESSAGE: Unless medically contraindicated, all elderly people should take supplementary vitamin D (800 IU/d) and calcium (1500 mg/d). Those with risk factors for osteoporosis (e.g., smoking, thinness, previous fracture when older than 50 years, fracture in first-degree relatives older than 50 years, and steroid use) should have a bone density measurement. Those meeting World Health Organization criteria for osteoporosis should also be treated with HRT or bisphosphonates or possibly with selective estrogen receptor modulators. CONCLUSIONS: Good evidence indicates that adequate treatment of osteoporosis can prevent fractures and thus reduce associated morbidity and mortality among vulnerable elderly people. Because of the prevalence of osteoporosis, the onus falls on family physicians to be the front-line managers. PMID:10386218

  18. Juvenile Incarceration and Health.

    PubMed

    Barnert, Elizabeth S; Perry, Raymond; Morris, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Addressing the health status and needs of incarcerated youth represents an issue at the nexus of juvenile justice reform and health care reform. Incarcerated youth face disproportionately higher morbidity and higher mortality compared to the general adolescent population. Dental health, reproductive health, and mental health needs are particularly high, likely as a result of lower access to care, engagement in high-risk behaviors, and underlying health disparities. Violence exposure and injury also contribute to the health disparities seen in this population. Further, juvenile incarceration itself is an important determinant of health. Juvenile incarceration likely correlates with worse health and social functioning across the life course. Correctional health care facilities allow time for providers to address the unmet physical and mental health needs seen in this population. Yet substantial challenges to care delivery in detention facilities exist and quality of care in detention facilities varies widely. Community-based pediatricians can serve a vital role in ensuring continuity of care in the postdetention period and linking youth to services that can potentially prevent juvenile offending. Pediatricians who succeed in understanding and addressing the underlying social contexts of their patients' lives can have tremendous impact in improving the life trajectories of these vulnerable youth. Opportunities exist in clinical care, research, medical education, policy, and advocacy for pediatricians to lead change and improve the health status of youth involved in the juvenile justice system.

  19. Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Elise I; Mutasim, Diya F; Heaton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis (AIGA) in a 56-year-old white woman. Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is an exceedingly rare group of heterogeneous disorders that has been almost exclusively reported in young Japanese males. Our case is unique in that AlGA may be underrecognized in this patient population.

  20. Juvenile familial endocrinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Drury, M. I.; Keelan, Deborah M.; Timoney, F. J.; Irvine, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    A case of primary hypothyroidism, idiopathic Addison's disease, idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (with preceding moniliasis), Addisonian pernicious anaemia and primary ovarian failure is described. She died at the age of 24 years following an illness compatible with adrenal crisis. At post-mortem there was no recognizable adrenal or ovarian tissue; there was only a minute portion of probable parathyroid tissue and the uterus was infantile. Her serum contained antibodies reactive with adrenal cortex, steroid-producing cells in the gonads, placental trophoblasts and thyroid epithelial cytoplasm and intrinsic factor. Her brother, who was known to have gluten enteropathy, died aged 11 years following an illness compatible with adrenal crisis. His adrenal glands were grossly atrophic at autopsy. The parents were consanguinous and both showed either clinical or serological evidence of organ specific autoimmune disease. PMID:5202743

  1. Extending juvenility in grasses

    DOEpatents

    Kaeppler, Shawn; de Leon Gatti, Natalia; Foerster, Jillian

    2017-04-11

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for modulating the juvenile to adult developmental growth transition in plants, such as grasses (e.g. maize). In particular, the invention provides methods for enhancing agronomic properties in plants by modulating expression of GRMZM2G362718, GRMZM2G096016, or homologs thereof. Modulation of expression of one or more additional genes which affect juvenile to adult developmental growth transition such as Glossy15 or Cg1, in conjunction with such modulation of expression is also contemplated. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of GRMZM2G362718 and/or GRMZM2G096016 are also contemplated, as are transgenic plants and products produced there from, that demonstrate altered, such as extended juvenile growth, and display associated phenotypes such as enhanced yield, improved digestibility, and increased disease resistance. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved forage or feed crops or in biofuel production.

  2. Impaired bone formation in male idiopathic osteoporosis: further reduction in the presence of concomitant hypercalciuria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, J. E.; Sakhaee, K.; Breslau, N. A.; Gottschalk, F.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    We present iliac bone histomorphometric data and related biochemical data from 16 nonalcoholic men (50 +/- 11 (SD) years) referred for evaluation of spontaneous skeletal and/or appendicular fractures and reduced spinal bone density. All men were eugonadal and had no known underlying disorder associated with osteopenia. For the group, mean serum chemistry values were within normal limits including immunoreactive parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin and serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]. Nine men demonstrated hypercalciuria (greater than or equal to 0.1 mmol/kg per day) while on a constant metabolic diet of 20 mmol/day Ca. Their 24-hour urinary calcium was significantly greater than that for the remaining 7 men (7.4 +/- 1.6 vs. 5.0 +/- 0.8 mmol/day, p = 0.003), as was their calciuric response to a 1 g oral calcium load (0.23 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.15 +/- 0.05 Ca/creatinine, p = 0.042). Serum parameters (including parathyroid hormone and 1,25(OH)2D) of hypercalciuric and normocalciuric men were not significantly different. Histomorphometric indices for cancellous bone demonstrated significant differences between the entire group of osteoporotic men and age-adjusted normal values for bone volume (11.4 +/- 4.0% vs. 23.2 +/- 4.4%), osteoid surface (5.6 +/- 3.9% vs. 12.1 +/- 4.6%), osteoblastic surface (2.0 +/- 2.3% vs. 3.9 +/- 1.9%), and mineralizing surface (1.9 +/- 2.4% vs. 5.1 +/- 2.7%); there were also significant differences in bone formation rate (total surface referent) (0.004 +/- 0.001 vs. 0.011 +/- 0.006 mm3/mm2 per year). Compared with the normocalciuric group the 9 hypercalciuric men had significantly lower osteoblastic surfaces (1.6 +/- 1.9% vs. 2.5 +/- 2.6%) and mineralizing surfaces (1.4 +/- 1.5% vs. 2.7 +/- 3.2%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. Treating the Juvenile Offender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoge, Robert D., Ed.; Guerra, Nancy G., Ed.; Boxer, Paul, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This authoritative, highly readable reference and text is grounded in the latest knowledge on how antisocial and criminal behavior develops in youth and how it can effectively be treated. Contributors describe proven ways to reduce juvenile delinquency by targeting specific risk factors and strengthening young people's personal, family, and…

  4. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the possible causes of juvenile arthritis. They are studying genetic and environmental factors that they think are involved. They are also trying to improve current treatments and find new medicines that will work better with fewer side effects. Research supported by ...

  5. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Masoud; Tavakol, Marzieh; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Tavakol, Zahra; Momenzadeh, Kaveh; Nabavi, Mohammad; Dabbaghzade, Abbas; Mosallanejad, Asieh; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-04-01

    Chronic urticaria is the most common skin diseases, characterized by chronic cutaneous lesions which severely debilitates patients in several aspects of their everyday life. Vitamin D is known to exert several actions in the immune system and to influence function and differentiation of mast cells, central role players in the pathogenesis of chronic idiopathic urticaria. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D levels and susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria. One hundred and fourteen patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria were recruited in this study along with one hundred and eighty seven sex-matched and age-matched healthy volunteers as the control group. For each patient, urticaria activity score was calculated and autologous serum skin test was done. Vitamin D metabolic statue was measured in serum as 25 hydroxyvitamin D using enzyme immunoassay method. Patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria significantly showed lower levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria. There was a significant positive correlation between vitamin D levels and urticaria activity score. This study showed that patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria had reduced levels of vitamin D, while vitamin D deficiency could increase susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria.

  6. Management of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, R; Adachi, J D; Cooper, C; Dere, W; Devogelaer, J P; Diez-Perez, A; Kanis, J A; Laslop, A; Mitlak, B; Papapoulos, S; Ralston, S; Reiter, S; Werhya, G; Reginster, J Y

    2012-10-01

    This review summarizes the available evidence-based data that form the basis for therapeutic intervention and covers the current status of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) management, regulatory requirements, and risk-assessment options. Glucocorticoids are known to cause bone loss and fractures, yet many patients receiving or initiating glucocorticoid therapy are not appropriately evaluated and treated. An European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis workshop was convened to discuss GIOP management and to provide a report by a panel of experts. An expert panel reviewed the available studies that discussed approved therapeutic agents, focusing on randomized and controlled clinical trials reporting on bone mineral density and/or fracture risk of at least 48 weeks' duration. There is no evidence that GIOP and postmenopausal osteoporosis respond differently to treatments. The FRAX algorithm can be adjusted according to glucocorticoid dose. Available antiosteoporotic therapies such as bisphosphonates and teriparatide are efficacious in GIOP management. Several other agents approved for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis may become available for GIOP. It is advised to stop antiosteoporotic treatment after glucocorticoid cessation, unless the patient remains at increased risk of fracture. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation as an osteoporosis-prevention measure is less effective than specific antiosteoporotic treatment. Fracture end-point studies and additional studies investigating specific subpopulations (pediatric, premenopausal, or elderly patients) would strengthen the evidence base and facilitate the development of intervention thresholds and treatment guidelines.

  7. Osteoporosis Prevention, Screening, and Treatment: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Juliana M.; Clarke, Bart L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Osteoporosis, defined as low bone mass leading to increased fracture risk, is a major health problem that affects approximately 10 million Americans. The aging U.S. population is predicted to contribute to as much as a 50% increase in prevalence by 2025. Although common, osteoporosis can be clinically silent, and without prevention and screening, the costs of osteoporotic fracture–related morbidity and mortality will burden the U.S. healthcare system. This is a particularly relevant concern in the context of diminishing health care resources. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is the most widely used, validated technique for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) and diagnosing osteoporosis. Cost-effectiveness analyses support early detection and treatment of high-risk patients with antiresorptive medications such as bisphosphonates. Moreover, optimization of bone health throughout life can help prevent osteoporosis. Current guidelines recommend screening women by age 65 years, but because no guidelines for screening intervals exist, decisions are made on the basis of clinical judgment alone. Although the recent literature provides some guidance, this review further explores current recommendations in light of newer evidence to provide more clarity on prevention, screening, and management strategies for patients with osteoporosis in the primary care setting. PMID:24766381

  8. Dilemmas in the management of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Fragility fracture is the clinically apparent and relevant outcome in osteoporosis. Osteoporotic fragility fractures occur most commonly in the vertebrae, hip and wrist, and are associated with substantial disability, pain and reduced quality of life. It is estimated that more than 2 million women have osteoporosis in England and Wales. In the UK, there are over 300,000 fractures each year, causing severe pain and disability to individuals at an estimated annual cost to the NHS of over £1.73 billion. As a result of increased bone loss after the menopause in women, and age-related bone loss in both women and men, the prevalence of osteoporosis increases markedly with age, from 2% at 50 years to more than 25% at 80 years in women. Despite the development of a number of guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis, management of the condition is not straightforward. Here we provide a reminder of some specific dilemmas facing generalists in regards to the management of osteoporosis, including diagnosis and investigation for reversible secondary causes; the effectiveness and duration of pharmacological management with oral bisphosphonates; and the role of calcium and vitamin D.

  9. The pathology of transient regional osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, E F

    1998-01-01

    Biopsy specimens from 19 patients with transient regional osteoporosis were studied. All patients presented with pain. There were nine patients with transient osteoporosis of the hip. Six of these specimens were therapeutic core biopsies, and three were femoral heads removed during total hip replacement. The other patients with osteoporosis in different locations had biopsies to rule out infection or neoplasm. Five of these patients had transient osteoporosis of the knee. Three had ankle involvement and two had involvement of the tibial shaft. Plain radiographs were available for study in all cases, and either a bone scan or an MRI was studied in each case. Except for one patient who was lost to follow-up, all had resolution of symptoms and radiographic changes. The histologic changes in the biopsies were distinctive, although they were present in varying degrees. There was edema and reactive bone formation in the marrow spaces. In addition, osteoclastic bone resorption was active in 14 of the 19 cases. Although lipid cysts were sometimes found in the marrow spaces, there was no evidence of fat necrosis or bone necrosis. The high bone turnover and absence of fat necrosis suggests that this disorder is a vasomotor response rather than an early stage of osteonecrosis. Awareness of these characteristic histologic changes should enable the pathologist to make a specific diagnosis of transient regional osteoporosis when a biopsy is required.

  10. Osteoporosis in paediatric patients with spina bifida

    PubMed Central

    Marreiros, Humberto Filipe; Loff, Clara; Calado, Eulalia

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and morbidity associated with osteoporosis and fractures in patients with spina bifida (SB) highlight the importance of osteoporosis prevention and treatment in early childhood; however, the issue has received little attention. The method for the selection of appropriate patients for drug treatment has not been clarified. Objective To review the literature concerning fracture risks and low bone density in paediatric patients with SB. We looked for studies describing state-of-the-art treatments and for prevention of secondary osteoporosis. Methods Articles were identified through a search in the electronic database (PUBMED) supplemented with reviews of the reference lists of selected papers. The main outcome measures were incidence of fractures and risk factors for fracture, an association between bone mineral density (BMD) and occurrence of fracture, risk factors of low BMD, and effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments on BMD and on the incidence of fractures. We considered as a secondary outcome the occurrence of fractures in relation to the mechanism of injury. Results Results indicated that patients with SB are at increased risk for fractures and low BMD. Risk factors that may predispose patients to fractures include higher levels of neurological involvement, non-ambulatory status, physical inactivity, hypercalciuria, higher body fat levels, contractures, and a previous spontaneous fracture. Limitations were observed in the number and quality of studies concerning osteoporosis prevention and treatment in paediatric patients with SB. The safety and efficiency of drugs to treat osteoporosis in adults have not been evaluated satisfactorily in children with SB. PMID:22330186

  11. Vitamin K₂ therapy for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jun

    2014-05-16

    Vitamin K may play an important role in the prevention of fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Menatetrenone is the brand name of a synthetic vitamin K2 that is chemically identical to menaquinone-4. The present review study aimed to clarify the effect of menatetrenone on the skeleton in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, by reviewing the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the literature. RCTs that investigated the effect of menatetrenone on bone mineral density (BMD), measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and fracture incidence in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, were identified by a PubMed search for literature published in English. Eight studies met the criteria for RCTs. Small RCTs showed that menatetrenone monotherapy decreased serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) concentrations, modestly increased lumbar spine BMD, and reduced the incidence of fractures (mainly vertebral fracture), and that combined alendronate and menatetrenone therapy enhanced the decrease in serum ucOC concentrations and further increased femoral neck BMD. This review of the literature revealed positive evidence for the effects of menatetrenone monotherapy on fracture incidence in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Further studies are required to clarify the efficacy of menatetrenone in combination with bisphosphonates against fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

  12. Modern Rehabilitation in Osteoporosis, Falls, and Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dionyssiotis, Yannis; Skarantavos, Grigorios; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    In prevention and management of osteoporosis, modern rehabilitation should focus on how to increase muscular and bone strength. Resistance exercises are beneficial for muscle and bone strength, and weight-bearing exercises help maintain fitness and bone mass. In subjects at higher risk for osteoporotic fractures, particular attention should be paid to improving balance – the most important element in falls prevention. Given the close interaction between osteoporosis and falls, prevention of fractures should be based on factors related to bone strength and risk factors for falls. Fractures are the most serious complication of osteoporosis and may be prevented. The use of modern spinal orthosis helps to reduce pain and improve posture. Vibration platforms are used in rehabilitation of osteoporosis, based on the concept that noninvasive, short-duration, mechanical stimulation could have an impact on osteoporosis risk. Pharmacologic therapy should be added for those at high risk of fracture, and vitamin D/calcium supplementation is essential in all prevention strategies. Success of rehabilitation in osteoporotic and fractured subjects through an individualized educational approach optimizes function to the highest level of independence while improving the overall quality of life. PMID:24963273

  13. How Long Should You Take Certain Osteoporosis Drugs?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Updates How Long Should You Take Certain Osteoporosis Drugs? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... put both men and women at risk for osteoporosis, including age, race, family history, and a sedentary ...

  14. What Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis and How Are They Different?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. How Do People With Osteoporosis and Arthritis Cope? If you have osteoporosis or arthritis, exercise can ... People with arthritis need to learn ways to cope with joints that don't move well and ...

  15. Modern Therapies for Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies (IIMs): Role of Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Oddis, Chester V.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the lack of placebo-controlled trials, glucocorticoids are considered the mainstay of initial treatment for idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIMs) and myositis-associated ILD (MA-ILD). Glucocorticoid-sparing agents are often given concomitantly with other immunosuppressive agents, particularly in patients with moderate or severe disease. As treatment of refractory cases of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies has been challenging, there is growing interest in evaluating newer therapies including biologics that target various pathways involved in the pathogenesis of IIMs. In a large clinical trial of rituximab in adult and juvenile myositis, the primary outcome was not met, but the definition of improvement was met by most of this refractory group of myositis patients. Rituximab use was also associated with a significant glucocorticoid-sparing effect. Intravenous immune globulin (IVIg) can be used for refractory IIMs or those with severe dysphagia or concomitant infections. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) utility in IIMs is generally limited by previous negative studies along with recent reports suggesting their potential for inducing myositis. Further research is required to assess the role of new therapies such as tocilizumab (anti-IL6), ACTH gel, sifalimumab (anti-IFNα), and abatacept (inhibition of T cell co-stimulation) given their biological plausibility and encouraging small case series results. Other potential novel therapies include alemtuzumab (a humanized monoclonal antibody which binds CD52 on B and T lymphocytes), fingolimod (a sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator that traps T lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs), eculizumab, and basiliximab. The future investigations in IIMs will depend on well-designed controlled clinical trials using validated consensus core set measures and improvements in myositis classification schemes based on serologic and histopathologic features. PMID:26767526

  16. Modern Therapies for Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies (IIMs): Role of Biologics.

    PubMed

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Oddis, Chester V; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2017-02-01

    Despite the lack of placebo-controlled trials, glucocorticoids are considered the mainstay of initial treatment for idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIMs) and myositis-associated ILD (MA-ILD). Glucocorticoid-sparing agents are often given concomitantly with other immunosuppressive agents, particularly in patients with moderate or severe disease. As treatment of refractory cases of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies has been challenging, there is growing interest in evaluating newer therapies including biologics that target various pathways involved in the pathogenesis of IIMs. In a large clinical trial of rituximab in adult and juvenile myositis, the primary outcome was not met, but the definition of improvement was met by most of this refractory group of myositis patients. Rituximab use was also associated with a significant glucocorticoid-sparing effect. Intravenous immune globulin (IVIg) can be used for refractory IIMs or those with severe dysphagia or concomitant infections. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) utility in IIMs is generally limited by previous negative studies along with recent reports suggesting their potential for inducing myositis. Further research is required to assess the role of new therapies such as tocilizumab (anti-IL6), ACTH gel, sifalimumab (anti-IFNα), and abatacept (inhibition of T cell co-stimulation) given their biological plausibility and encouraging small case series results. Other potential novel therapies include alemtuzumab (a humanized monoclonal antibody which binds CD52 on B and T lymphocytes), fingolimod (a sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator that traps T lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs), eculizumab, and basiliximab. The future investigations in IIMs will depend on well-designed controlled clinical trials using validated consensus core set measures and improvements in myositis classification schemes based on serologic and histopathologic features.

  17. Emerging anabolic treatments in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mosekilde, Leif; Tørring, Ove; Rejnmark, Lars

    2011-04-01

    Anabolic treatment that remodels bone tissue and restores bone biomechanical competence is essential in the treatment of osteoporosis. In addition, long term antiresorptive therapy may have limitations because of the reduced renewal of bone tissue. The only pure anabolic drugs available at present are intact PTH (1-84) (Preotact®) and the truncated PTH (1-34) (Teriparatide, Forteo®) while strontium ranelate may possess antiresorptive as well as anabolic properties. The marketed antiresorptive and anabolic antiosteoporotic drugs have limitations in their use due to adverse effects or to the occurrence of rare but severe late complications. Furthermore, indications may be restricted by co-existing diseases or treatment duration may be limited. However, new anabolic drugs are being developed mimicking the effect of PTH, or targeting the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) or the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway. The PTH mimetics are truncated or altered PTH fragments, parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTHrP) and calcilytics stimulating endogenous PTH secretion. Calcimimetics (e.g. strontium) and calcilytics (e.g. lithium) may also affect bone cells directly through the CaSR. The Wnt pathway that stimulates osteoblastic proliferation, differentiation and function may be activated by neutralizing antibodies to secreted inhibitors of Wnt signalling (e.g. Sclerostin or Dickkopf) or by small molecules (e.g. lithium) that inhibits the glycogen synthase kinase 3β mediated degradation of β-catenin. Finally, blocking of activin A by soluble receptor fusion proteins has been shown to increase bone mass by a dual anabolic-antiresorptive action. The present paper summarises the physiological background and the present evidence for these effects.

  18. Canadian Quality Circle pilot project in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, George; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Thabane, Lehana; Gafni, Amiram; Hodsman, Anthony; Kvern, Brent; Johnstone, Dan; Plumley, Nathalie; Baldwin, Alanna; Doupe, M.; Katz, Alan; Salach, Lena; Adachi, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    PROBLEM ADDRESSED Family physicians are not adequately following the 2002 Osteoporosis Canada guidelines for providing optimal care to patients with osteoporosis. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM The Canadian Quality Circle (CQC) pilot project was developed to assess the feasibility of the CQC project design and to gather informationfor implementing a national study of quality circles (QCs). The national study would assess whether use ofQCs could improve family physicians’ adherence to the osteoporosis guidelines. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The pilot project enrolled 52 family physicians and involved 7 QCs. The project had 3 phases: training and baseline data collection, educational intervention and follow-up data collection, and sessions on implementing strategies for care. CONCLUSION Findings from the pilot study showed that the CQC project was well designed and well received. Use of QCs appeared to be feasible for transferring knowledge and giving physicians an opportunity to analyze work-related problems and develop solutions to them. PMID:17934033

  19. Refractory Rheumatic Disorder: Atypical Postpregnancy Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Mourgues, Cindy; Malochet-Guinamand, Sandrine; Soubrier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report on a young patient with severe osteoporosis that was initially revealed when she presented with polyarthralgia during her second pregnancy. Postpartum, the pain increased and her X-ray did not show any abnormalities. A bone scintigraphy was performed. It indicated an inflammatory rheumatic disorder. Six months after partum, an investigation of right coxalgia revealed a spontaneous basicervical fracture. Given the persistent polyarthralgia, the patient underwent a new scintigraphy, which revealed areas of what looked to be old rib and L1 fractures. A subsequent full body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed signal abnormalities that could indicate multiple lower limb bone fractures. Despite exhaustive biological, radiological, and histological testing, no secondary cause for the osteoporosis was found. The patient was started on teriparatide. We finally concluded that, despite the atypical presentation, the patient was suffering from postpregnancy osteoporosis. It is possible that the frequency of occurrence of this still poorly understood disease is underestimated. PMID:25785219

  20. Pregnancy-related osteoporosis and spinal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ka Yeong; Han, Si Eun; Kim, Seung Chul; Lee, Kyu Sup

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy-related osteoporosis is a very rare condition characterized by the occurrence of fracture during pregnancy or the puerperium. Despite its relative rarity, it can be a dangerous condition that causes severe back pain, height loss and disability. Normal physiologic changes during pregnancy, genetic or racial difference, obstetrical history and obstetrical disease, such as preterm labor or pregnancy-induced hypertension, are presumed risk factors of pregnancy-related osteooporosis. However, exact etiology and pathogenesis are uncertain. The management and natural history are still poorly defined. Traditional medications for osteoporosis are calcium/vitamin D and bisphosphonate. Concerns with bisphosphonate include accumulation in bone and fetal exposure in subsequent pregnancies. The newly developed medication, teriparatide, has shown good results. We report six cases of pregnancy-related osteoporosis and spinal fracture with literature review. PMID:28217686

  1. Osteoporosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  2. Osteoporosis Health Beliefs among Younger and Older Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, C. Shanthi; McLeod, William; Kennedy, Laura; McLeod, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare osteoporosis health beliefs among different age and gender groups. This study used a cross-sectional design, involved 300 participants that represent both genders and three age groups (18 to 25, 30 to 50, and 50-plus), and assessed osteoporosis health beliefs using the Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale…

  3. Osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Vosse, D; de Vlam, K

    2009-01-01

    Bone is a target in many inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The generalized effect of inflammation on bone may result in a decreased quality of bone and is associated with an increased risk of fractures and deformities, both in RA and AS. RA is characterized by periarticular osteopenia, systemic osteoporosis and bone erosions. Periarticular osteopenia and bone erosions are mainly correlated with disease activity. Unlike postmenopausal osteoporosis, osteoporosis in RA is more characterised by marked loss of bone in the hip and the radius, while the axial bone is relatively preserved. In general, several cross-sectional studies documented a lower bone mineral density in patients with RA, with a two-fold increase in osteoporosis compared to age- and sex-matched controls and relates to an increased fracture risk. Several factors contribute to the increased risk: older age, little exercise, long-term use of corticosteroids, and high disability index. AS is characterized by an increase in bone fragility due to reduced bone mineral density. The reported prevalence of osteoporosis in AS patients varies largely. The large variation reflects the difficulties in assessing BMD in AS due to new bone formation. Bone fragility is also due to changes in structural properties resulting from inflammation-induced bone failure in the spine in combination with reduced capacity of shock absorption leading to vertebral fractures. Different types of spinal fractures in patients with AS are described, including wedging. Wedging vertebral fractures contribute to hyperkyphosis and impaired physical function. In contrast to RA , bone loss in AS is accompanied by new bone formation. The pathophysiology of osteoporosis in RA and AS probably is fundamentally similar, but with different clinical phenotypes. The implications for therapeutically intervening in its occurrence and progression might be fundamentally different.

  4. Preventing osteoporosis-related fractures: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gass, Margery; Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2006-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength, which predisposes a person to increased risk of fracture. In the United States, 26% of women aged > or =65 years and >50% of women aged > or =85 years have osteoporosis. Over 1.5 million fractures per year are attributable to osteoporosis; these fractures result in 500,000 hospitalizations, 800,000 emergency room visits, 2.6 million physician visits, 180,000 nursing home placements, and 12 billion dollars to 18 billion dollars in direct healthcare costs each year. Fracture also results in loss of function and has a negative impact on psychological status. In recognition of the importance of bone health, the US Surgeon General has, for the first time, issued a comprehensive report on bone health and treatment. The report recommends a pyramidal approach to osteoporosis treatment that includes calcium and vitamin D supplementation, physical activity, and fall prevention as the first line in fracture prevention. The second level consists of treating secondary causes of osteoporosis; the third and top level consists of pharmacotherapy. Pharmacotherapeutic interventions (e.g., bisphosphonates, selective estrogen receptor modulators, calcitonin, and teriparatide) in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis provide substantial reduction in fracture risk over and above risk reduction with calcium and vitamin D supplementation alone. Despite the effectiveness of therapy, most patients who receive treatment do not remain on treatment for >1 year. An important approach to reducing the rate of fractures is first to target our treatments to patients at high risk for fracture and then to develop strategies to improve treatment continuation rates.

  5. DEPRESSION AS A RISK FACTOR FOR OSTEOPOROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Cizza, Giovanni; Primma, Svetlana; Csako, Gyorgy

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health threat. Multiple studies have reported an association between depression and low bone mineral density, but a causal link between these two conditions is disputed. Here we review the endocrine and immune alterations secondary to depression that might affect bone mass. We also discuss the possible role of poor lifestyle in the etiology of osteoporosis in subjects with depression and the potential effect of antidepressants on bone loss. We propose that depression induces bone loss and osteoporotic fractures, primarily via specific immune and endocrine mechanisms, with poor lifestyle habits and use of specific antidepressants also potential contributory factors. PMID:19747841

  6. [Management of osteoporosis: room for improvment].

    PubMed

    Roux, Christian

    2010-11-01

    The objective of anti-osteoporotic treatments is the prevention of the first or recurrent fractures. Screening of at risk patients is the basis of improvement of osteoporosis management. Prevalent fractures are strong determinants of incident fractures. In patients without fractures screening of risk factors, and quantification of risk using FRAX tool, allows detection of patients who should receive highest priority for treatment. Several drugs have shown that they are able to decrease the risk of fracture, providing persistence and compliance. Non pharmacological approach (including nutrition and physical activity) is part of optimal management of osteoporosis.

  7. Study design in osteoporosis: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Kanis, J A; Alexandre, J M; Bone, H G; Abadie, E; Brasseur, D; Chassany, O; Durrleman, S; Lekkerkerker, J F F; Caulin, F

    2003-06-01

    The advent of effective agents for the treatment of osteoporosis has led to the view that placebo-controlled trials to test new agents for efficacy are no longer appropriate. Rather, studies of superiority, equivalence, or non-inferiority have been recommended. Such studies require very large sample sizes, and the burden of osteoporotic fracture in a trial setting is substantially increased. Studies of equivalence cannot be unambiguously interpreted because the variance in effect of active comparator agents is too large in osteoporosis. If fracture studies are required by regulatory agencies, there is still a requirement for placebo-controlled studies, although perhaps of shorter duration than demanded at present.

  8. Epidemiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Brett; Collard, Harold R

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic fibrotic lung disease of unknown cause that occurs in adults and has a poor prognosis. Its epidemiology has been difficult to study because of its rarity and evolution in diagnostic and coding practices. Though uncommon, it is likely underappreciated both in terms of its occurrence (ie, incidence, prevalence) and public health impact (ie, health care costs and resource utilization). Incidence and mortality appear to be on the rise, and prevalence is expected to increase with the aging population. Potential risk factors include occupational and environmental exposures, tobacco smoking, gastroesophageal reflux, and genetic factors. An accurate understanding of its epidemiology is important, especially as novel therapies are emerging. PMID:24348069

  9. Epigenomics of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ivana V

    2012-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex lung disease of unknown etiology. Development of IPF is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Gene-expression profiling studies have taught us quite a bit about the biology of this fatal disease, but epigenetic marks may be the missing link that connects the environmental exposure in genetically predisposed individuals to transcriptome changes associated with the development of IPF. This review will begin with an introduction to the disease, followed by brief summaries of studies of gene expression in IPF and epigenetic marks associated with exposures relevant to IPF. The majority of the discussion will focus on epigenetic studies conducted so far in IPF, the limitations, challenges nd future directions in this field.

  10. Smoking and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chad K.; Murray, Lynne A.; Molfino, Nestor A.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a disease of unknown etiology with considerable morbidity and mortality. Cigarette smoking is one of the most recognized risk factors for development of IPF. Furthermore, recent work suggests that smoking may have a detrimental effect on survival of patients with IPF. The mechanism by which smoking may contribute to the pathogenesis of IPF is largely unknown. However, accumulating evidence suggests that increased oxidative stress might promote disease progression in IPF patients who are current and former smokers. In this review, potential mechanisms by which cigarette smoking affects IPF, the effects of cigarette smoking on accelerated loss of lung function in patients with IPF, key genetic studies evaluating the potential candidate genes and gene-environment (smoking) interaction, diagnosis, and treatment with emphasis on recently closed and ongoing clinical trials are presented. PMID:22448328

  11. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  12. Molecular etiology of idiopathic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, T; Hayashi, T; Kimura, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is a primary cardiac disorder associated with abnormalities of ventricular wall thickness, size of ventricular cavity, contraction, relaxation, conduction and rhythm. Over the past two decades, molecular genetic analyses have revealed that mutations in the various genes cause ICM and such information concerning the genetic basis of ICM enables us to speculate the pathogenesis of this heterogeous cardiac disease. This review focuses on the molecular pathogenesis, i.e., genetic abnormalities and functional alterations due to the mutations especially in sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in three characteristic features of ICM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Understanding the functional abnormalities of the sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in ICM, has unraveled the function of these components not only as a contractile unit but also as a pivot for transduction of biochemical signals. PMID:18646564

  13. Idiopathic Renal Infarction Mimicking Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Francesco; Scarano, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Renal infarction is a rare cause of referral to the emergency department, with very low estimated incidence (0.004%–0.007%). Usually, it manifests in patients aged 60–70 with risk factors for thromboembolism, mostly related to heart disease, atrial fibrillation in particular. We report a case of idiopathic segmental renal infarction in a 38-year-old patient, presenting with acute abdominal pain with no previous known history or risk factors for thromboembolic diseases. Because of its aspecific clinical presentation, this condition can mimic more frequent pathologies including pyelonephritis, nephrolithiasis, or as in our case appendicitis. Here we highlight the extremely ambiguous presentation of renal infarct and the importance for clinicians to be aware of this condition, particularly in patients without clear risk factors, as it usually has a good prognosis after appropriate anticoagulant therapy. PMID:28203466

  14. Economic evaluation of osteoporosis liaison service for secondary fracture prevention in postmenopausal osteoporosis patients with previous hip fracture in Japan.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, K; Noto, S

    2017-02-01

    A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of secondary fracture prevention by osteoporosis liaison service (OLS) relative to no therapy in patients with osteoporosis and a history of hip fracture. Secondary fracture prevention by OLS is cost-effective in Japanese women with osteoporosis who have suffered a hip fracture.

  15. A pediatric case of idiopathic Harlequin syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Moon Souk; Kim, Seung Yeon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Soo Jin; You, Chur Woo; Kim, Jon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome, which is a rare disorder caused by dysfunction of the autonomic system, manifests as asymmetric facial flushing and sweating in response to heat, exercise, or emotional factors. The syndrome may be primary (idiopathic) with a benign course, or can occur secondary to structural abnormalities or iatrogenic factors. The precise mechanism underlying idiopathic harlequin syndrome remains unclear. Here, we describe a case of a 6-year-old boy who reported left hemifacial flushing and sweating after exercise. He had an unremarkable birth history and no significant medical history. Complete ophthalmological and neurological examinations were performed, and no other abnormalities were identified. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to exclude lesions of the cerebrum and cervicothoracic spinal cord, and no abnormalities were noted. His final diagnosis was classic idiopathic harlequin syndrome. Herein, we report the first pediatric case of idiopathic harlequin syndrome in Korea. PMID:28018464

  16. Hodgkin's disease presenting as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, W. G.; Allan, N. C.; Perry, D. J.; Stockdill, G.

    1984-01-01

    A case of Hodgkin's disease presenting as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in a 23-year-old male is reported. This is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's disease having been previously described in only two cases. PMID:6541338

  17. Ultrastructural differences between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Grover, Madhusudan; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Bernard, Cheryl E; Lurken, Matthew S; Smyrk, Thomas C; Parkman, Henry P; Abell, Thomas L; Snape, William J; Hasler, William L; Ünalp-Arida, Aynur; Nguyen, Linda; Koch, Kenneth L; Calles, Jorges; Lee, Linda; Tonascia, James; Hamilton, Frank A; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The ultrastructural changes in diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis are not well studied and it is not known whether there are different defects in the two disorders. As part of the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium, full thickness gastric body biopsies from 20 diabetic and 20 idiopathic gastroparetics were studied by light microscopy. Abnormalities were found in many (83%) but not all patients. Among the common defects were loss of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and neural abnormalities. No distinguishing features were seen between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis. Our aim was to provide a detailed description of the ultrastructural abnormalities, compare findings between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis and determine if patients with apparently normal immunohistological features have ultrastructural abnormalities. Tissues from 40 gastroparetic patients and 24 age- and sex-matched controls were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Interstitial cells of Cajal showing changes suggestive of injury, large and empty nerve endings, presence of lipofuscin and lamellar bodies in the smooth muscle cells were found in all patients. However, the ultrastructural changes in ICC and nerves differed between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis and were more severe in idiopathic gastroparesis. A thickened basal lamina around smooth muscle cells and nerves was characteristic of diabetic gastroparesis whereas idiopathic gastroparetics had fibrosis, especially around the nerves. In conclusion, in all the patients TEM showed abnormalities in ICC, nerves and smooth muscle consistent with the delay in gastric emptying. The significant differences found between diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis offers insight into pathophysiology as well as into potential targeted therapies. PMID:21914127

  18. Unilateral Idiopathic Calcinosis Cutis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alsaif, Fahad; Abduljabbar, Amr M.

    2017-01-01

    Calcinosis cutis is a rare disorder characterized by the deposition of calcium in the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Unilateral idiopathic calcinosis cutis has only rarely been reported in the literature. Here, we report the case of a 7-year-old healthy girl who presented with multiple asymptomatic hard nodules on the right side of her body. Histopathological, radiological, and extensive blood investigations confirmed the diagnosis of unilateral idiopathic calcinosis cutis. PMID:28203159

  19. Drug-Related Adverse Events of Osteoporosis Therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Moin; Cheung, Angela M; Khan, Aliya A

    2017-03-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is associated with microarchitectural deterioration and increased risk of fracture. Osteoporosis therapy effectively reduces the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fracture and has been associated with increased survival. Currently approved treatments for osteoporosis include bisphosphonates, denosumab, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and teriparatide. This article reviews the adverse events of therapy associated with these medical interventions. Hormone replacement therapy is not included, because it is no longer indicated for the treatment of osteoporosis in all countries. Calcitonin and strontium ranelate are also not included, because their indication for osteoporosis has recently been limited or withdrawn.

  20. Osteoporosis: incidence, prevention, and treatment of the silent killer.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Lynn C

    2005-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a nationwide health care concern affecting millions of Americans. Health care dollars to prevent and treat osteoporosis are needed. Osteoporosis-related injuries and resulting disabilities, and consequent admissions to hospitals, nursing homes, and long-term care facilities is costing billions of dollars for care and treatment. Healthy lifestyle choices including vitamin and mineral therapy; safe home environments; a diet replete with calcium, vitamin D, and protein; weight-bearing and resistance exercises; and fall prevention programs for home-bound and hospitalized elders are needed to prevent osteoporosis-related fractures and injuries. Nurses must educate the public on osteoporosis and osteoporosis-prevention activities. Research in nursing, pharmacy, and allied health fields such as physical therapy and nutrition must expand to improve understanding of the risks associated with osteoporosis and to evaluate health-promotion and disease- prevention activities. Interdisciplinary partnerships should be established to study the issues, prevention, and treatment modalities of this "silent killer."

  1. Management of beta-thalassemia-associated osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Andrea; Pinto, Valeria; Forni, Gian Luca; Pilotto, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Beta-Thalassemia-associated osteoporosis is a multifactorial and complex condition. Different acquired and genetic factors are involved in its pathogenesis. These factors produce an imbalance in bone remodeling by inhibiting osteoblast activity and increasing osteoclast function, leading to bone loss and increased fracture risk. The management of patients presenting with thalassemia-associated osteoporosis should consist of the implementation of general measures and the prescription of a specific pharmacological agent, with the aim of reducing fracture risk and preventing disability and deterioration of quality of life. General measures include control of anemia, adequate chelation therapy, healthy nutrition and lifestyle, regular exercise, adequate management of comorbid conditions, hormone replacement therapy in patients with hypogonadism, and vitamin D supplementation/therapy. Among the pharmacological agents currently available for the management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and men, bisphosphonates have been shown to improve bone mineral density, to reduce bone turnover, and to decrease bone/back pain in patients with thalassemia-associated osteoporosis, with a good profile of safety and tolerability. On the other hand, there are limited experiences with other pharmacological agents (e.g., denosumab or teriparatide). The complexity of this condition presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges and underscores the importance of a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach.

  2. [New strategies for exercise training in osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, A; Schilling, S; Neuerburg, C; Mutschler, W; Böcker, W; Felsenberg, D; Stumpf, U

    2015-11-01

    In the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, movement with muscle strengthening and proprioceptive training plays a major role. This was taken into consideration in the guidelines by the governing body on osteoporosis (Dachverband Osteoporose, DVO) from 2014 on prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and in the DVO guidelines from 2008 on physiotherapy and exercise therapy for osteoporosis. Increases in lumbar bone density of between 0.5 % and 2.5 % can be achieved in women by strengthening exercises with high resistance. With this combination and strengthening of the quadriceps muscle a reduction of falls and hence the fracture risk could also be achieved. In traumatology, training for muscle strengthening is not always possible, especially for elderly patients. Practically relevant alternatives are regular walking and aquatraining, which may also lead to a significant increase in bone mineral density. Furthermore, large effects can be achieved with alternating side whole-body vibration (WBV) training with whole body vibration plates with only 3 days of training per week and with short training periods (15-20 min). Rates of increase in leg strength between 20 % and almost 40 % and in bone density between 0.5 % and 4 % in 6 months have been described. Whether and with what intensity whole body vibration therapy could be used for e.g. more rapid healing of fractures, is currently unclear. Initial positive results have been described in animal models.

  3. Efficacy of Osteoporosis Therapies in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes is characterized by increased fracture risk and by reduced bone strength for a given density. Contributing factors may include lower bone turnover and accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts. There are concerns that the pharmacological therapies for osteoporosis, particularly anti-resorptive therapies that suppress bone turnover, may not be as effective in the setting of diabetes. This review considers clinical trials and observational studies that have assessed the efficacy of anti-resorptive and anabolic therapies in diabetic patients. Post hoc analyses of randomized trials indicate that raloxifene has similar efficacy for prevention of vertebral fractures in diabetic compared with non-diabetic patients. Evidence from randomized clinical trials is lacking for anti-fracture efficacy of other osteoporosis therapies in diabetes. However, observational studies suggest that bisphosphonates are effective in preventing fractures in diabetic patients. The great majority of diabetic patients in studies to date have been type 2, and efficacy of osteoporosis therapies in type 1 diabetic patients remains to be addressed. Further evaluation of the efficacy of osteoporosis therapies in the setting of diabetes is needed to provide optimal fracture prevention for this population.

  4. Bone mineral density: testing for osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primary osteoporosis is related to bone loss from ageing. Secondary osteoporosis results from specific conditions that may be reversible. A thoracolumbar X-ray is useful in identifying vertebral fractures, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry is the preferred method of calculating bone mineral density. The density of the total hip is the best predictor for a hip fracture, while the lumbar spine is the best site for monitoring the effect of treatment. The T-score is a comparison of the patient’s bone density with healthy, young individuals of the same sex. A negative T-score of –2.5 or less at the femoral neck defines osteoporosis. The Z-score is a comparison with the bone density of people of the same age and sex as the patient. A negative Z-score of –2.5 or less should raise suspicion of a secondary cause of osteoporosis. Clinical risk calculators can be used to predict the 10-year probability of a hip or major osteoporotic fracture. A probability of more than 5% for the hip or more than 20% for any fracture is abnormal and treatment may be warranted. PMID:27340320

  5. [Osteoporosis in Super-aged society.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis could contribute to increase other chronic diseases such as cardiovascular events, resulting in higher mortality in these patients. Antiresorptive agents such as bisphosphonates has been reported to reduce not only the number of fragile fracture but also all causes mortality. These agents are also expected to improve quality of life and activity of daily life with longer life expectancy.

  6. The Effect of Fluoride in Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlund, L. R.; Gallagher, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of fluoride on bone tissue and the possible role of fluoride in the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, fluoride treatment should be restricted to clinical trials until its risks and benefits have been further evaluated. (Author/MT)

  7. Better Bones Buddies: An Osteoporosis Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Susan L.; Blue, Rebecca; Horner, Arlene

    2005-01-01

    Although osteoporosis typically surfaces in later life, peak bone mass attained before age 20 is a key factor in its prevention. However, most American children's diets lack sufficient calcium during the critical growth periods of preadolescence and adolescence to achieve peak bone mass. "Better Bones (BB) Buddies" is an educational…

  8. Osteoporosis: What is the Role of Exercise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnings, Frances

    1992-01-01

    Research has not yet identified the best combination of estrogen replacement, calcium, and exercise for fighting osteoporosis, but clinical experience indicates all are needed to prevent the rapid bone loss that occurs in postmenopausal women. Physicians must encourage women to reduce their risk using all available options. (SM)

  9. Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors…

  10. Telepsychiatry in juvenile justice settings.

    PubMed

    Kaliebe, Kristopher E; Heneghan, James; Kim, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Telepsychiatry is emerging as a valuable means of providing mental health care in juvenile justice settings. Youth in the juvenile justice system have high levels of psychiatric morbidity. State and local juvenile justice systems frequently struggle to provide specialized psychiatric care, as these systems have limited resources and often operate in remote locations. Case studies in the use of telepsychiatry to provide improved care in juvenile corrections in 4 states are described, along with a review of advantages and disadvantages of telepsychiatry in these settings.

  11. Immunoglobulin Gene Polymorphisms are Susceptibility Factors for Clinical and Autoantibody Subgroups of the Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Schiffenbauer, Adam; Targoff, Ira N.; Malley, Karen; Pandey, Janardan P.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate possible associations of GM and KM markers in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA) with adult and juvenile forms of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). Methods We performed serologic analyses of polymorphic determinants associated with immunoglobulin gamma heavy (GM) and kappa light chains (KM) in large populations of EA (n=514: 297 adults and 217 juveniles) and AA IIM patients (n=109: 73 adults and 50 juveniles) representing the major clinicopathologic and autoantibody groups. Results For EA dermatomyositis (DM) patients, the GM 3 23 5,13 phenotype was a risk factor for both adults (OR=2.2; Pc=0.020) and juveniles (OR=2.2; Pc=0.0013). Of interest, the GM 13 allotype was a risk factor for juvenile DM (JDM) for both EA (OR=3.9; Pc<0.0001) and AA (OR=4.8; Pc=0.033). However, the GM 1,3,17 5,13,21 phenotype was a risk factor for JDM in EA but not in AA. Among the IIM autoantibody groups, GM 3 23 5,13 was a risk factor for EA adults with anti-Jo-1 autoantibodies (OR=3.4; Pc=0.0031), while the GM 3 allotype was protective for adults with anti-threonyl tRNA synthetase or anti-RNP autoantibodies (OR=0.1; Pc=0.047 and OR=0.2; Pc=0.034, respectively). In contrast, GM 6 was a risk factor for AA adults with anti-SRP autoantibodies (OR=7.5; Pc=0.041). Conclusions These data suggest that polymorphic alleles of GM and KM loci are differentially associated with IIM subgroups defined by age, ethnicity, clinical features and autoantibodies, and expand the list of immune response genes possibly important in the pathogenesis of myositis. PMID:18821675

  12. Juvenile kyphosis: effects of different variables on conservative treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Platero, D; Luna, J D; Pedraza, V

    1997-09-01

    We reviewed the records of 212 patients with idiopathic or Scheuermann-type juvenile kyphosis (Scheuermann's disease). The 200 patients available for follow-up were divided into three groups depending on the degree of angular deformity, and the influence of different variables on treatment outcome in each group was investigated. A very influential positive variable was combined treatment with a body cast plus brace; exercise treatment also produced acceptable results. Other variables that positively influenced the outcome of treatment were compliance with treatment, and (unexpectedly) elevated initial Risser sign (skeletal maturity). An initial Risser sign of 0 or 1 was, in contrast with other studies, associated with smaller improvement. However, initial maximal wedging, etiology and initial assessment of curve flexibility did not influence the degree of improvement in the initial angular deformity.

  13. Juvenile Mentoring Program: A Progress Review. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotney, Laurence C.; Mertinko, Elizabeth; Lange, James; Baker, Tara Kelley

    The greatest support offered by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention for youth mentoring has been through the Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP), which provides one-to-one mentoring for youth at risk of delinquency, gang involvement, educational failure, or dropping out of school. Information on JUMP has been collected through…

  14. Improving Literacy Skills of Juvenile Detainees. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Jane; And Others

    The Office of Juvenile and Delinquency Prevention funded a model designed to improve the literacy level of youth in juvenile detention and correctional facilities. The model specified training language arts teachers and relevant staff and volunteers in direct instruction methods for rapid improvement of students' comprehension, particularly for…

  15. [Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aurélie

    2012-04-01

    Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy is a rare autosomal dominant disease. It is characterized by abnormal handling of urate responsible for hyperuricaemia often complicated of gouty arthritis. Renal failure is due to tubulointerstitial nephritis. Ultrasonography sometimes finds renal cysts of variable size and number. Renal histology, although not specific, shows interstitial fibrosis, atrophic tubules, sometimes enlarged and with irregular membrane thickening. Renal failure progresses to end stage between 30 and 60 years of age. Allopurinol treatment is recommended at the early stages of the disease, its efficacy on slowing down the progression of the disease is however not proven. There is genetic heterogeneity in familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy. Uromodulin encoding Tamm-Horsfall protein is the only gene to date identified, responsible in less than half of the families. The described mutations most often concern a cystein and are clustering in exon 4. These mutations result in abnormal retention of the protein in endoplasmic reticulum of Henle loop cells and in reduction of its urinary excretion. The pathophysiology of the disease is however still dubious. Indeed, Tamm-Horsfall protein functions are not well known (anti-infectious role, cristallisation inhibition, immunomodulating role). Knock-out mice do not develop renal phenotype but are more prone to E. coli urinary infections. Uromodulin gene mutations have also been described in medullary cystic kidney disease, an autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial nephropathy, considered at first as a distinct disorder. Genetic progress allowed us to consider familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy and medullary cystic kidney disease as the two facets of a same disease, we should call uromodulin associated kidney diseases. At least two other genes have been implicated in similar clinical presentation: TCF2 and the gene encoding renin.

  16. Bone Disease and Idiopathic Hypercalciuria

    PubMed Central

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    Observational and epidemiological studies alike have demonstrated that idiopathic hypercalciuric (IH) stone-forming patients typically demonstrate bone mineral density scores significantly less than those observed for age- and gender-matched normal subjects or those for non-hypercalciuric stone-forming patients. Most of these studies have relied on changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and have not explored the mechanism(s) involved. There have been a small number of studies that have relied on dynamic bone histomorphometry to ascertain the nature of the bone defect in IH patients. When performed, these studies have clearly demonstrated increased bone resorption and high bone turnover in patients with fasting hypercalciuria while suppressed bone formation indices are the most consistent finding in patients with the absorptive variant of IH. The causes of this apparent difference in bone remodeling between the two variants of IH is still uncertain. Available evidence suggests that potential mechanisms may be dependent in large part to genetic, metabolic, and nutritional causes of hypercalciuria and bone loss in patients with IH. PMID:18359394

  17. Epigenetics of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex lung disease of unknown etiology. Development of IPF is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Recent work by our and other groups has identified strong genetic predisposition factors for the development of pulmonary fibrosis while cigarette smoke remains the most strongly associated environmental exposure risk factor. Gene expression profiling studies of IPF lung have taught us quite a bit about the biology of this fatal disease and those in peripheral blood have provided important biomarkers. However, epigenetic marks may be the missing link that connects the environmental exposure in genetically predisposed individuals to transcriptional changes associated with disease development. Moreover, epigenetic marks represent a promising therapeutic target for IPF. In this review, we will introduce the disease, summarize genetic and gene expression studies in IPF, discuss exposures relevant to IPF and known epigenetic changes associated with cigarette smoke exposure, and summarize epigenetic studies conducted so far in IPF. We will end by discussing limitations, challenges and future opportunities in this field. PMID:24746870

  18. Insulinoma presenting as idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Michelangelo; Monzani, Fabio; Bonanni, Enrica; Di Coscio, Elisa; Cignoni, Fabio; Dardano, Angela; Iudice, Alfonso; Murri, Luigi

    2010-06-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with a history of increased sleep need and difficulty waking up; the diagnosis of idiopathic hypersomnia was hypothesized. During ambulatory polysomnography (PSG), the patient presented an episode characterized by loss of consciousness and jerking of the four limbs. A video-PSG monitoring was performed and the patient showed unresponsiveness and drowsiness at 7 a.m. During the episode, EEG showed theta-delta diffuse activity, and blood glucose level was 32 mg dl(-1). The diagnosis of insulinoma was then assumed; CT scan showed a hypodense mass into the pancreatic tail, and a partial pancreasectomy was performed. The described symptoms disappeared, and 5 years later the findings of a complete clinical and neurophysiological examination were negative. The clinical picture of insulinoma presenting with paroxysmal disorders has been previously described; however, whereas hypersomnia is uncommon, in the current case it represents the main symptom. Clinicians should keep in mind that neuroglycopenia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with hypersomnia, particularly if the clinical scenario does not conform to standard criteria.

  19. Scrotal calcinosis: idiopathic or dystrophic?

    PubMed

    Dubey, Suparna; Sharma, Rajeev; Maheshwari, Veena

    2010-02-15

    Scrotal calcinosis is a rare benign local process characterized by multiple, painless, hard scrotal nodules in the absence of any systemic metabolic disorder. Histological examination reveals extensive deposition of calcium in the dermis, which may be surrounded by histiocytes and an inflammatory giant cell reaction. Numerous theories have been propounded to explain the pathogenesis of this condition, but the principal debate revolves around whether the calcium is deposited at the site of previous epithelial cysts or the calcified nodules are purely idiopathic. This is the largest study of scrotal calcinosis to date with 100 cases, on which clinical, biochemical, radiological, cytopathological, and histopathological examinations were conducted. The histological picture shows a continuous spectrum of changes ranging from intact epithelial cysts (41.0%) - both normal and inflamed; through inflamed cysts containing calcific material in the lumen but with intact cyst wall (53.0%); calcified inflamed cysts with partial epithelial lining (11.0%); to 'naked' calcium deposits lying in the dermis (100%), sometimes compressing surrounding collagen fibres to form a pseudocyst (56.0%). The presence of normal values of calcium and phosphorus along with this spectrum of changes in histology both support the theory that these form by dystrophic calcification of epithelial cysts in a progression that involves inflammation, rupture, calcification and obliteration of the cyst wall.

  20. [Treatment of osteoporosis: current data and prospects].

    PubMed

    Reginster, J Y; Deroisy, R; Franchimont, P

    1994-12-15

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is characterized not only by a reduction in bone mass but also by bone microarchitecture alterations, which result in greater bone frailty and in an increased fracture risk. Many drugs have been studied to determine whether they prevent bone loss or reduce the incidence of additional fractures in patients with established osteoporosis. Primary prevention of osteoporosis rests on regular exercising and adequate intake of dietary calcium. For secondary prevention in women undergoing menopause, replacement estrogen therapy given for at least ten years is associated with substantial reductions in fractures of the radius, hip, and spine. Other drugs capable of arresting postmenopausal bone loss include parenteral, nasal or rectal calcitonin and diphosphonates. However, the long-term safety of the latter requires further evaluation. Current studies are evaluating new molecules with potential preventive efficacy, such as ipriflavone. There is no general consensus about the efficacy of treatments for established osteoporosis with fractures. To date, no controlled studies have demonstrated a reduction in the incidence of further fractures in patients given calcium alone. Studies of hydroxylated vitamin D derivatives have been disappointing, although daily administration of vitamin D3 in combination with calcium significantly reduced the incidence of nonvertebral fractures in a population of elderly institutionalized subjects. Plausible explanations for this effect include increased vitamin D levels and reduced parathyroid levels in the bloodstream. Parenteral or nasal calcitonin stabilizes or increases bone mineral content in both cancellous and cortical bone. This effect is especially marked in high-turn-over patients. Several lines of evidence suggest that calcitonin therapy has a protective effect against vertebral and hip fractures. In patients with osteoporosis, oral or intravenous diphosphonates are associated with a significant increase in

  1. Juvenile Justice in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankovic, Joanne, Ed.; And Others

    Producing a much-needed organized body of literature about rural juvenile justice, 14 papers (largely from the 1979 National Symposium on Rural Justice) are organized to identify current issues, identify forces causing changes in current systems, review programs responding to rural juvenile justice problems, and provide planning models to aid…

  2. Iatrogenic Effect of Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatti, Uberto; Tremblay, Richard E.; Vitaro, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Background: The present study uses data from a community sample of 779 low-SES boys to investigate whether intervention by the juvenile justice system is determined, at least in part, by particular individual, familial and social conditions, and whether intervention by the juvenile courts during adolescence increases involvement in adult crime.…

  3. Juvenile Crime. Opposing Viewpoints Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, A. E., Ed.

    Books in the Opposing Viewpoints Series present debates about current issues that can be used to teach critical reading and thinking skills. The variety of opinions expressed in this collection of articles and book excerpts explores many aspects of juvenile crime. It is a commonly held view that the number of crimes committed by juveniles is…

  4. Juvenile Courts- Terms To Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Offers a crossword puzzle that focuses on terms learned in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education." Explains that the letters in the boxes spell the answer to this question: what do juvenile courts try to offer juveniles? Provides the clues and answers to the puzzle. (CMK)

  5. Mental Illness and Juvenile Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Lee A.; Washington, Aryssa

    2016-01-01

    Within the past decade, reliance on the juvenile justice system to meet the needs of juvenile offenders with mental health concerns has increased. Due to this tendency, research has been conducted on the effectiveness of various intervention and treatment programs/approaches with varied success. Recent literature suggests that because of interrelated problems involved for youth in the juvenile justice system with mental health issues, a dynamic system of care that extends beyond mere treatment within the juvenile justice system is the most promising. The authors provide a brief overview of the extent to which delinquency and mental illness co-occur; why treatment for these individuals requires a system of care; intervention models; and the juvenile justice systems role in providing mental health services to delinquent youth. Current and future advancements and implications for practitioners are provided. PMID:26901213

  6. Mental Illness and Juvenile Offenders.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Lee A; Washington, Aryssa

    2016-02-18

    Within the past decade, reliance on the juvenile justice system to meet the needs of juvenile offenders with mental health concerns has increased. Due to this tendency, research has been conducted on the effectiveness of various intervention and treatment programs/approaches with varied success. Recent literature suggests that because of interrelated problems involved for youth in the juvenile justice system with mental health issues, a dynamic system of care that extends beyond mere treatment within the juvenile justice system is the most promising. The authors provide a brief overview of the extent to which delinquency and mental illness co-occur; why treatment for these individuals requires a system of care; intervention models; and the juvenile justice systems role in providing mental health services to delinquent youth. Current and future advancements and implications for practitioners are provided.

  7. Juvenile 'Perinasal' Angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anupam; Verma, Veerendra; Mishra, Subhash Chandra

    2017-03-01

    The extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a separate clinical entity but those involving infratemporal fossa and cheek resemble juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) and hence have been labelled as juvenile perinasal angiofibroma (JPA) in this paper. This paper presents a 7th case of JPA and attempts to review the world literature on JPA, along with a proposal of staging the disease. A 16 year male presented with a painless compressible facial swelling since 7 months without any epistaxis or nasal obstruction. Initially a vascular lesion was suspected but JNA without nasal extension was strongly suspected on imaging. A deep trucut biopsy confirmed the histopathology. The vascular enhancement was significant and the tumour was excised through open approach (Weber Fergusson). JPA that can be regarded as a variant of JNA that fails to extend medially. Imaging demonstrates classical JNA findings with a clear nose/nasopharynx. A deep trucut biopsy under control in inpatient settings may sometimes help. JPA presents most commonly in Stage II where an open facial approach preferably following selective preoperative embolization is indicated. Hence with painless compressible (or non-compressible) cheek swelling suspected to be of a vascular etiology, a high degree of clinical suspicion for JPA needs to maintained in order to prevent a misdiagnosis.

  8. Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome, a disorder affecting skeletal strength and vision, is assigned to chromosome region 11q12-13

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Jin; Warman, M.L.

    1996-07-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe juvenile-onset osteoporosis and congenital or juvenile-onset blindness. The pathogenic mechanism is not known. Clinical, biochemical, and microscopic analyses suggest that OPS may be a disorder of matrix homeostasis rather than a disorder of matrix structure. Consequently, identification of the OPS gene and its protein product could provide insights regarding common osteoporotic conditions, such as postmenopausal and senile osteoporosis. As a first step toward determining the cause of OPS, we utilized a combination of traditional linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping to assign the OPS locus to chromosome region 11q12-13. Mapping was accomplished by analyzing 16 DNA samples (seven affected individuals) from three different consanguineous kindreds. Studies in 10 additional families narrowed the candidate region, supported locus homogeneity, and did not detect founder effects. The OPS locus maps to a 13-cM interval between D11S1298 and D11S971 and most likely lies in a 3-cM region between GSTP1 and D11S1296. At present, no strong candidate genes colocalize with OPS. 33 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Żuchowski, Paweł; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures.

  10. Osteoporosis: a paradox in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Carter, Shea; Lories, Rik J

    2011-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic and severe inflammatory disease of the axial skeleton and the joints. Inflammation is associated with trabecular bone loss leading to osteoporosis but also with corcal new bone formation leading to progressive ankylosis of the spine and sacroiliac joints. This results in an apparent paradox of bone formation and loss taking place at sites closesly located to each other. Osteoporosis can be explained by the impact of inflammation of the bone remodeling cycle. In contrast, new bone formation has been linked to aberrant acvaon of bone morphogenec protein and Wnt signaling. In this commentary, we review recent data on this bone paradox and highlight recent advances including the effect of current drug therapies and the idenfication of new therapeutic targets.

  11. The role of cytokines in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Brincat, S D; Borg, M; Camilleri, G; Calleja-Agius, J

    2014-08-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a silent systemic progressive disease characterised by a decrease in bone mass per unit volume. This condition compromises the physical strength of the skeleton and increases the susceptibility to fractures on minor trauma. The imbalance between bone formation and bone resorption is known to be responsible for postmenopausal bone loss. Estrogen deficiency contributes to bone loss by increasing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by bone marrow and bone cells. Clinical and molecular evidence indicates that estrogen-regulated cytokines exert regulatory effects on bone turnover implicating their role as being the primary mediators of the accelerated bone loss at menopause. The current perspective on the role and interaction of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, TNF, IFN-γ and TGF-β in bone loss linked with estrogen deficiency is reviewed. Current treatment options and emerging drug therapies in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis are also evaluated.

  12. Spaceflight osteoporosis: current state and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Cappellesso, R; Nicole, L; Guido, A; Pizzol, D

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the established major consequences of long-duration spaceflights in astronauts seriously undermining their health after their returning on Earth. Indeed, astronauts typically lose more bone mass during one month than postmenopausal women on Earth lose in one year. To date, countermeasures mainly consist in exercise and supplementation while pharmacological treatment as those used in postmenopausal women are not routine. However, it is evident that exercise and supplementation alone are not enough to maintain bone homeostasis. In this paper we describe the current countermeasures for bone loss during long-term spaceflight, review the modern treatment which are successfully employed to prevent osteoporosis on Earth and that could be quickly used also for astronauts and finally focus on the recent cellular and molecular understanding of bone homeostasis which might provide the basis for the development of future targeted therapies.

  13. Review of treatment modalities for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Ronald C; Chesnut, Charles H; Gass, Margery L; Holick, Michael F; Leib, Edward S; Lewiecki, Michael E; Maricic, Michael; Watts, Nelson B

    2005-10-01

    This review summarizes and updates data presented at recent annual Southern Medical Association conferences on postmenopausal osteoporosis. As part of any osteoporosis treatment program, it is important to maintain adequate calcium and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels either through diet or supplementation. Among the available pharmacologic therapies, the bisphosphonates alendronate and risedronate have demonstrated the most robust fracture risk reductions-approximately 40 to 50% reduction in vertebral fracture risk, 30 to 40% in nonvertebral fracture risk, and 40 to 60% in hip fracture risk. Ibandronate, a new bisphosphonate, has demonstrated efficacy in reducing vertebral fracture risk. Salmon calcitonin nasal spray and raloxifene demonstrated significant reductions in vertebral fracture risk in pivotal studies. Teriparatide significantly reduced vertebral and nonvertebral fracture risk. Drugs on the horizon include strontium ranelate, which has been shown to reduce vertebral and nonvertebral fracture risk, and zoledronic acid, an injectable bisphosphonate that increased bone density with once-yearly administration.

  14. Identification, diagnosis, and prevention of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jeffrey P

    2011-05-01

    Prevention of osteoporotic fractures is of major importance from a public health perspective. Despite the large burden the disease exacts on individuals and society, not all patients with osteoporosis receive optimal treatment. Since only 1 in 3 patients with osteoporosis is diagnosed, clinicians need to improve their ability to identify patients who are candidates for bone mineral density (BMD) screening. Although limited data exist about the direct correlation between effective screening and fracture morbidity and mortality, it has been proved that increases in fractures are associated with increases in morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identifying patients at risk, making a timely diagnosis, implementing prevention measures (ie, calcium, vitamin D, exercise, fall precautions, etc), and initiating pharmacologic therapy for appropriate patients can all help to minimize fracture risk.

  15. [Pregnancy and lactation-associated osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Gehlen, M; Lazarescu, A D; Hinz, C; Boncu, B; Schmidt, N; Pfeifer, M; Schwarz-Eywill, M; Pollähne, W; Minne, H W

    2017-01-13

    Pregnancy and lactation-associated osteoporosis (PLO) is a rare form of osteoporosis, which occurs in the last trimester or postpartum. So far 100 cases have been published. The leading symptoms are severe low back pain or less frequently hip pain. Many patients develop postpartum depression due to inability to care for the baby and vertebral fractures. The therapeutic decision has to be made individually but teriparatid and bisphosphonates seem to be the best option. We report the clinical course (16 years) of a 37-year-old patient with PLO, who suffered 6 vertebral fractures. There were severe physical limitations and mental problems caused by the disease. The patient was treated by multimodal therapy including physiotherapy and psychotherapy and bisphosphonates were given. The time between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis was 5 months. No further fractures occurred in the following 16 years. The physical and mental condition significantly improved.

  16. Syncope and Idiopathic (Paroxysmal) AV Block.

    PubMed

    Brignole, Michele; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Guieu, Regis

    2015-08-01

    Syncope due to idiopathic AV block is characterized by: 1) ECG documentation (usually by means of prolonged ECG monitoring) of paroxysmal complete AV block with one or multiple consecutive pauses, without P-P cycle lengthening or PR interval prolongation, not triggered by atrial or ventricular premature beats nor by rate variations; 2) long history of recurrent syncope without prodromes; 3) absence of cardiac and ECG abnormalities; 4) absence of progression to persistent forms of AV block; 5) efficacy of cardiac pacing therapy. The patients affected by idiopathic AV block have low baseline adenosine plasma level values and show an increased susceptibility to exogenous adenosine. The APL value of the patients with idiopathic AV block is much lower than patients affected by vasovagal syncope who have high adenosine values.

  17. Studies on the pathophysiology and therapy of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, J L; Ambrus, J L; Robin, J C; Ambrus, C M; Kahn, E A

    1984-01-01

    Etiologic and pathologic factors in clinical osteoporosis are reviewed. Techniques were developed to determine total skeletal calcium content with in vivo neutron activation analysis and to induce osteoporosis (in about three months) with low calcium diet, corticosteroid or heparin treatment in experimental animals. Genetic influence was demonstrated: C3H/St (Ha) mice were more susceptible to osteoporosis by all three modalities than C57B1/6 (J) mice. Fluoride was ineffective in preventing osteoporosis induced by either of these three modalities. Heparin induced osteoporosis was prevented by conjugated estrogens, progestins or their combinations. Progestins were shown in other studies to inhibit estrogen induced metaplasia and neoplasia. Combining estrogens with progestin may result in an increased therapeutic index for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Human and salmon calcitonin, Deca - Durabolin, an anabolic steroid, Mopidamole, a pyrimidopyrimidine derivative, Trental, a methylxanthine derivative, certain 2-thiophene carboxylic acid derivatives and imidazoquinazolines exhibited anti-osteoporotic effects.

  18. Pig calcitonin in the treatment of localised osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    De Bastiani, G; Nogarin, L; Perusi, M

    1976-08-01

    On the basis of positive results obtained in the treatment of Sudeck's atrophy with calcitonin, the authors extended their investigation to other forms of localised osteoporosis. Six patients were examined affected by osteoporosis secondary to immobilisation, three patients with osteoporosis of the lower limbs from paralysis of the sciatic nerve and six patients with migrant osteoporosis. Treatment was as follows: pig calcitonin (Calcitar) in doses of 160 u MRC/daily + calcium gluconate in doses of 3 gr/daily. The duration of treatment averaged forty five days. In osteoporosis from immobilisation and nerve lesions the calcitonin treatment did not influence the condition and there was no change in radiographic appearances nor was there any analgesic action. On the other hand, the results were clearly positive in migrant osteoporosis: in all the patients treated there was complete regression of pain, cutaneous trophic changes, and functional loss. At a later stage, normal radiographic appearances were restored.

  19. Osteoporosis in postmenopausal women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Fionnuala; Walker-Bone, Karen; Tariq, Shema

    2017-01-01

    The widespread availability of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV from a life-limiting condition to one with near-normal life expectancy. HIV is associated with an increased risk of osteopenia and osteoporosis, with people living with HIV (PLHIV) potentially experiencing these conditions at a younger age than their HIV-negative counterparts. The mechanisms driving bone disease in HIV are complex and include: an increased prevalence of traditional risk factors; other comorbid conditions; and HIV-associated factors such as viral effects, systemic inflammation, and ART-related factors. One-third of PLHIV in the United Kingdom are female, and increasing numbers of women living with HIV (WLHIV) are reaching menopausal age. Oestrogen decline in the context of an elevated background risk of poor bone health results in WLHIV being at greater risk of osteoporosis than women without HIV. European HIV guidelines therefore recommend routine screening of postmenopausal WLHIV using FRAX(©) for clinical risk factors, with or without bone mineral density scanning. Data support the use of calcium and vitamin D supplementation, and bisphosphonates in the treatment of osteoporosis in PLHIV. Additionally, some patients with confirmed osteoporosis may benefit from a switch to an ART agent with a better bone safety profile. However, there remains a notable paucity of data on HIV and menopause, including the impact of hormone replacement therapy on the bone health of WLHIV. In conclusion, it is important that clinicians are aware that postmenopausal WLHIV are a group at particular risk of bone disease, who require proactive screening and advice about preventative measures.

  20. Clodronate news of efficacy in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Alfredo; Ventura, Lorenzo; Cozzi, Luisella; Tonini, Greta

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clodronate belongs to Bisphosphonates family and it has been studied especially for osteoporosis treatment, Paget’s disease, osteolytic metastases, hypercalcemia malignancy and some childhood skeletal diseases. Besides the osteoporosis treatment, it has been successfully used for treating tumoral osteolysis and for bone localization of multiple myeloma, hypercalcemia malignancy, primary hyperparathyroidism, Paget’s disease and algodystrophy. Filipponi study showed a statistically significant reduction of the incidence of vertebral fractures after 4 years of treatment with clodronate, intravenously administered at a dose of 200 mg every three weeks. Frediani study, published in 2003 on BONE, proved the clodronate efficacy in the prevention of fractures caused by glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO). Clodronate doses of 800 mg/day per os and 100 mg i.m./week are substantially equivalent, because the oral absorption is about 1,9%. A higher efficacy on BMD was documented in various works, especially in cohorts of patients with a greater fracture risk, using higher doses (1600 mg per os). This has led to the hypothesis of using clodronate 200 mg i.m. formulation. Clodronate is an osteoporosis drug that can be assumed in different doses (100 mg i.m./week, clodronate 200 mg i.m. every 2 weeks) considering the risk band, identified by algorithms (FRAX o DeFRA), by BMD and by the presence of at least one risk factor. That means that it is possible to envisage a differentiated use of clodronate adapting the doses to the fracture risk and to the severity of pain symptoms, thus promoting a greater adherence to the therapy. To conclude clodronate is helpful in reducing fracture risk, is safe, well tolerated, and has a good rate cost/effectiveness in patients with fracture risk over 7% established with FRAX. PMID:27252741

  1. Novel Advances in the Treatment of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Christopher KY; Mason, Alice; Cooper, Cyrus; Dennison, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Osteoporosis is a significant public health issue affecting over half of women aged over 50. With an aging population its importance is set to increase further over time. Prevention of fragility fractures avoids significant mortality and morbidity as well as saving significant direct and indirect costs to the economy. In this review, we discuss existing treatments to contextualise the treatment landscape, and demonstrate how our understanding of bone pathophysiology has led to novel therapies – in the form of combinations and altered durations of existing treatments, as well as newer drug therapies. Sources of data Pubmed and Embase were searched for randomised controlled trials of new therapies for osteoporosis. These searches were supplemented with material presented in abstract form at international meetings Areas of agreement New drugs that appear promising in the treatment of osteoporosis include the cathepsin K inhibitor, monoclonal antibodies against sclerostin, and parathyroid hormone related peptide. Areas of controversy Separate to the development of novel drug therapies is the issue of how best to use agents that are currently available to us; specifically which agent to choose, alone or in combination; duration of therapy; how best to identify patients at highest risk of fracture, and to ensure the highest possible adherence to medication. Many of these issues have been addressed in other excellent review papers, and will not be considered in detail here. Growing points As with all new treatments, we await results of long term use, and experience in ‘real life’ patient populations Areas timely for developing research As alluded to above, data are urgently required regarding the optimal duration of therapy; use of combination therapy; ordering of therapies for best therapeutic effect. As stratified medicine becomes more strongly considered in all areas of therapy, its merits in osteoporosis as in other musculoskeletal conditions, is

  2. Epidemiology, etiology, and diagnosis of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lane, Nancy E

    2006-02-01

    Osteoporosis, a major public health problem, is becoming increasingly prevalent with the aging of the world population. Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength, which predisposes the individual to an increased risk of fractures of the hip, spine, and other skeletal sites. The clinical consequences and economic burden of this disease call for measures to assess individuals who are at high risk to allow for appropriate intervention. Many risk factors are associated with osteoporotic fracture, including low peak bone mass, hormonal factors, the use of certain drugs (eg, glucocorticoids), cigarette smoking, low physical activity, low intake of calcium and vitamin D, race, small body size, and a personal or a family history of fracture. All of these factors should be taken into account when assessing the risk of fracture and determining whether further treatment is required. Because osteoporotic fracture risk is higher in older women than in older men, all postmenopausal women should be evaluated for signs of osteoporosis during routine physical examinations. Radiologic laboratory assessments of bone mineral density generally should be reserved for patients at highest risk, including all women over the age of 65, younger postmenopausal women with risk factors, and all postmenopausal women with a history of fractures. The evaluation of biochemical markers of bone turnover has been useful in clinical research. However, the predictive factor of these measurements is not defined clearly, and these findings should not be used as a replacement for bone density testing. Together, clinical assessment of osteoporotic risk factors and objective measures of bone mineral density can help to identify patients who will benefit from intervention and, thus, can potentially reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with osteoporosis-associated fractures in this population.

  3. Senile osteoporosis. The effects of exercise.

    PubMed

    Yeater, R A; Martin, R B

    1984-02-01

    The available literature indicates that a high level of physical activity throughout life can result in increased skeletal mass during the fourth decade. Such a large reservoir of bone mass at midlife may delay the clinical manifestations of osteoporosis in later life. Furthermore, the published studies of animal models and humans strongly suggest that physical activity retards or prevents involutional bone loss in both recently postmenopausal and very elderly women.

  4. Osteoporosis: the emperor has no clothes

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, T L N; Michaëlsson, K; Aspenberg, P; Sievänen, H

    2015-01-01

    Current prevention strategies for low-trauma fractures amongst older persons depend on the notions that fractures are mainly caused by osteoporosis (pathophysiology), that patients at high risk can be identified (screening) and that the risk is amenable to bone-targeted pharmacotherapy (treatment). However, all these three notions can be disputed. Pathophysiology Most fracture patients have fallen, but actually do not have osteoporosis. A high likelihood of falling, in turn, is attributable to an ageing-related decline in physical functioning and general frailty. Screening Currently available fracture risk prediction strategies including bone densitometry and multifactorial prediction tools are unable to identify a large proportion of patients who will sustain a fracture, whereas many of those with a high fracture risk score will not sustain a fracture. Treatment The evidence for the viability of bone-targeted pharmacotherapy in preventing hip fracture and other clinical fragility fractures is mainly limited to women aged 65–80 years with osteoporosis, whereas the proof of hip fracture-preventing efficacy in women over 80 years of age and in men at all ages is meagre or absent. Further, the antihip fracture efficacy shown in clinical trials is absent in real-life studies. Many drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis have also been associated with increased risks of serious adverse events. There are also considerable uncertainties related to the efficacy of drug therapy in preventing clinical vertebral fractures, whereas the efficacy for preventing other fractures (relative risk reductions of 20–25%) remains moderate, particularly in terms of the low absolute risk reduction in fractures with this treatment. PMID:25809279

  5. [Hormones and osteoporosis update. Glucocorticoids and bone].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kyoji

    2009-07-01

    Glucocorticoids are a class of vital steroid hormone which exhibit permissive effects on transactivation in a variety of cells, including those in bone. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, on the other hand, predisposes to fragility fracture by compromising bone strength and can be understood as a disease primarily characterized by a deficiency in bone quality. It is a major challenge in bone biology to understand these two contrasting sides of glucocorticoid activity in bone.

  6. Idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Belloli, Elizabeth A; Beckford, Rosemarie; Hadley, Ryan; Flaherty, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is an interstitial lung disease that may be idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disease, toxins or numerous other causes. Idiopathic NSIP is a rare diagnosis and requires exclusion of these other possible causes. Patients typically present in mid-adulthood with dyspnoea, cough and often constitutional symptoms including fever and fatigue. The disease has a female predominance, and more than 50% of patients have never smoked. Physical exam features mild hypoxaemia and inspiratory rales. Pulmonary function tests demonstrate restriction and a low diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include predominantly lower lobe subpleural reticular changes, traction bronchiectasis and ground-glass opacities; honeycombing is rarely seen. An evaluation of the underlying pathology is necessary for a firm diagnosis. Histologically, alveolar and interstitial mononuclear cell inflammation and fibrosis are seen in a temporally uniform pattern with preserved underlying alveolar architecture. NSIP must be differentiated from other parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. A thorough exposure history and assessment for underlying connective tissue diseases are highly important, as positive findings in these categories would likely denote a case of secondary NSIP. A multi-disciplinary discussion that includes pulmonologist(s), radiologist(s) and pathologist(s) assists in reaching a consensus diagnosis and improves diagnostic accuracy. Treatment of idiopathic NSIP, although not well proven, is generally instituted in the form of immunosuppression. Prognosis is favourable compared with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, although the diagnosis still carries an attributable mortality. Herein we will summarize the clinical characteristics and management of idiopathic NSIP.

  7. Perceived risk of osteoporosis: Restricted physical activities?

    PubMed Central

    Dalsgaard Reventlow, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explore elderly women's physical activity in relation to their perception of the risk of osteoporosis. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Setting Informants were purposely selected from a Danish population-based, age-specific cohort study conducted in the county of Copenhagen with people born in 1936. Subjects Women in their sixties. Results Women who perceived a current risk of osteoporosis tended to reduce their physical activity in an attempt to reduce the risk of bone damage. This behaviour was related to the imagined fragility of the bones (the risk inside the body), and the actual situations (the risk outside the body), including places and activities. Knowledge of a reduced bone mass reinforced the women's uncertainty about what their bones could endure. Experiences managing physical activity without injury resulted in reinterpretations of their risk of bone fractures and increased physical activity. Conclusions Perceived risk of osteoporosis may lead to decreased physical activity and hence actually increase the risk. When informing individuals about health risk people's images and imaginations of the actual risk have to be acknowledged. When a bone scan is being considered, explicit advice encouraging physical activity – especially the weight-bearing kind – should be stressed. PMID:17846934

  8. [Lifestyle management approaches in postmenopausal osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiroaki

    2004-11-01

    Of the lifestyle management approaches to postmenopausal osteoporosis recommended, encouraging walking appears to be more relevant than ensuring appropriate nutritional intake in preventing bone loss. The focus of the current lecture is therefore on encouraging exercise, as it is not hard to imagine the physical impact of exercise on bone mineral density. As has long been pointed out, in fact, the initial management of postmenopausal osteoporosis consists in subjecting the bone to a continual physical stress, including exercise. In this regard, aerobic exercise including walking has been widely recommended;however, there is no clear evidence showing aerobic exercise to be superior to other kinds of exercise, while several studies reported on the benefit of combining aerobic exercise with pharmacological treatments in postmenopausal women, including our own series. Physical exercise programs or guidelines aimed at the prophylaxis of postmenopausal osteoporosis that draw on research evidence supporting the benefit of encouraging physical exercise need yet to be put in place as a matter of urgency.

  9. Osteoporosis: an increasing concern in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Marcio A

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of children are being affected by low bone density and osteoporosis. Bone fractures are the main reason for hospitalization between 10 and 14 years of age and, over the past 3 decades, there has been an increase in the incidence of fractures in children. Childhood factors such as lifestyle, diet, chronic illness, and medications have a vital short-term impact on bone health and a long-term effect on the achievement of peak bone mass, with the potential for morbidity in adulthood. The primary forms of osteoporosis consist of rare inherited conditions, but the secondary forms are becoming more common given that chronically ill children are surviving longer. This subject should be of interest to pediatric dentists, because low mineral density and osteoporosis, together with drugs used to treat them (eg, bisphosphonates), may cause adverse effects in the oral cavity. Furthermore, the pediatric dentist is an important health care professional to counsel patients about healthy lifestyles that can help prevent the condition from an early age.

  10. Postmenopausal osteoporosis - clinical, biological and histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Oana Roxana; Popescu, Mihaela; Novac, Liliana; Mogoantă, LaurenŢiu; Pavel, LaurenŢiu Petrişor; Vicaş, Răzvan Marius; Trăistaru, Magdalena Rodica

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common disorders in postmenopausal women, affecting the quality of life and increasing the risk for fractures in minor traumas. Changes in the bone microarchitecture causes static changes in the body and affects motility. In this study, we analyzed two groups of women, one with physiological menopause and one with surgically induced menopause. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was suspected based on the clinical symptoms and confirmed by assessing bone mineral density by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Comparing some clinical and biological aspects there was noted that a much higher percentage of women with surgically induced menopause exhibited increases in body mass index, changes in serum lipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, blood glucose, serum calcium, magnesemia and osteocalcin. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in the histopathological aspects of bone tissue examined from these two groups. In all patients, there was identified a significant reduction in the number of osteocytes and osteoblasts, the expansion of haversian channels, reducing the number of trabecular bone in the cancellous bone with wide areola cavities often full of adipose tissue, non-homogenous demineralization of both the compact bone and the cancellous bone, atrophy and even absence of the endosteal, and the presence of multiple microfractures. Our study showed that early surgically induced menopause more intensely alters the lipid, carbohydrate and mineral metabolism, thus favoring the onset of osteoporosis.

  11. Juvenile justice mental health services.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christopher R; Penn, Joseph V

    2002-10-01

    As the second century of partnership begins, child psychiatry and juvenile justice face continuing challenges in meeting the mental health needs of delinquents. The modern juvenile justice system is marked by a significantly higher volume of cases, with increasingly complicated multiproblem youths and families with comorbid medical, psychiatric, substance abuse disorders, multiple family and psychosocial adversities, and shrinking community resources and alternatives to confinement. The family court is faced with shrinking financial resources to support court-ordered placement and treatment programs in efforts to treat and rehabilitate youths. The recognition of high rates of mental disorders for incarcerated youth has prompted several recommendations for improvement and calls for reform [56,57]. In their 2000 annual report, the Coalition for Juvenile Justice advocated increased access to mental health services that provide a continuum of care tailored to the specific problems of incarcerated youth [58]. The specific recommendations of the report for mental health providers include the need for wraparound services, improved planning and coordination between agencies, and further research. The Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has set three priorities in dealing with the mental health needs of delinquents: further research on the prevalence of mental illness among juvenile offenders, development of mental health screening assessment protocols, and improved mental health services [59]. Other programs have called for earlier detection and diversion of troubled youth from juvenile justice to mental health systems [31,56]. Most recently, many juvenile and family courts have developed innovative programs to address specific problems such as truancy or substance use and diversionary or alternative sentencing programs to deal with first-time or nonviolent delinquents. All youths who come in contact with the juvenile justice system

  12. A model of health education and management for osteoporosis prevention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Xu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Yan; Hao, Hongxia; Chen, Liying; Su, Tianjiao; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Weifeng; Xie, Yuanyuan; Wang, Tiantian; Yang, Fan; He, Li; Wang, Wenjiao; Fu, Xuemei; Ma, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis, a chronic disease with no therapeutic cure, affects a growing number of people as the aging population in China rapidly increases. Therefore, developing an evidence-based model of health education and management for osteoporosis prevention is required. In the present study, an osteoporosis club was established, which is a novel model of health education and management for osteoporosis prevention. A unified management of membership was used based on a digitized database. A total of 436 patients with osteoporosis were randomly assigned to the osteoporosis club group or the self-management control group. For the osteoporosis club group, multiple activities of health education were performed, including monthly systematic health education lectures, exercise programs and communication parties once a year. For the control group, the participants took charge of their own musculoskeletal health. All data of the participants were collected and evaluated prior to and following intervention. In the pre-intervention assessment, no significant difference was identified in the health education between the two groups. Through the four-year intervention, the osteoporosis knowledge, health beliefs, living behavior, medication compliance, quality of life and bone mineral density of the osteoporosis club group were improved significantly compared with the control group (P<0.001), while the pain degree of the osteoporosis club group was relieved significantly more compared with the control group (P<0.001). The results in the present study suggest that setting up an osteoporosis club is an evidence-based model of health education and management for osteoporosis prevention in China. PMID:28105113

  13. Osteoporosis in children: pediatric and pediatric rheumatology perspective: a review

    PubMed Central

    Uziel, Yosef; Zifman, Eyal; Hashkes, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that osteoporosis affects children as well as adults both as a primary problem and as secondary to various diseases, medications, and lifestyle issues. In this review, we emphasize the correct diagnosis of osteoporosis in children as opposed to adults, etiology, and pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical treatments. We especially focus on rheumatologic conditions associated with osteoporosis and management issues. PMID:19835571

  14. Benefits, Costs, and Harms of Osteoporosis Screening in Male Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Osteoporosis Screening in Male Veterans PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cathleen S. Colón-Emeric, MD, MHS CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Institute...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 October 2012 – 30 September 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Benefits, Costs and Harms of Osteoporosis Screening in...to screen for and treat osteoporosis in men. The recommendations of clinical practice guidelines vary in how to select men to be screened, and the

  15. Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents Osteoporosis can strike at any age, although the risk ...

  16. What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: PDF (87 KB) Related Resources ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  17. Idiopathic Giant Cell Myocarditis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumari M.K., Kalpana; Mysorekar, Vijaya V.; S., Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Giant-cell myocarditis is a disease of relatively young, predominantly healthy adults. The patients usually die of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia unless a cardiac transplantation is performed. We are reporting here an autopsy case of idiopathic giant cell myocarditis with no symptoms in a 27-year old -worker who died suddenly. The purpose of this report was to emphasize that idiopathic giant cell myocarditis was a rare disease and that it could exist in the absence of any symptomatic heart disease. PMID:23205365

  18. A Case of Idiopathic Thyrotropin (TSH) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ichida, Tatsuya; Kajita, Yoshihiro

    1997-01-01

    The first case of idiopathic thyrotropin (TSH) deficiency in an old woman with thyroid functioning adenoma was reported. She got subtotal thyroidectomy before about four years of her admission to our hospital because of fatigability, puffy face and leg edema. At that time, she had low TSH and free T4 levels despite replacement therapy with desiccated thyroid. No response of only serum TSH after adminstration of combined stimulant containing TRH and repeated TRH suggested the failure of TSH secretion. CT MRI did not show any abnormality. These results indicated that her hypothyroidism was due to acquired idiopathic TSH deficiency. PMID:9159047

  19. Treatment of idiopathic oligozoospermia with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Brigante, C; Motta, G; Fusi, F; Coletta, M P; Busacca, M

    1985-01-01

    Eighteen subfertile men, with idiopathic normogonadotropic oligozoospermia were treated with an antiestrogenic compound, tamoxifen (Nolvadex), at the dose of 20 mg/day for four months. Hormonal parameters (LH, FSH, Testosterone, Prolactin) were evaluated before treatment and after 45 and 90 days of therapy. Serum LH, FSH and Testosterone increased significantly after 45 days of tamoxifen treatment. Seminal analyses, performed before and after three months of therapy showed improvements in sperm motility and in sperm density. By our clinical findings, tamoxifen can be considered a useful approach for an empiric treatment of idiopathic oligozoospermia.

  20. Paediatric idiopathic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Stephen J; Lee, Graham A

    2017-03-20

    Acquired limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) describes a condition in which the corneal limbal stem cells are altered or destroyed, typically due to ocular trauma, chronic allergy or inflammation. Idiopathic LSCD is a term used to describe limbal stem cell failure in the absence of any identifiable causative factor. While several cases of adult-onset LSCD have been identified previously, this case report describes a rare presentation of bilateral asymmetric idiopathic paediatric limbal stem cell deficiency in a sixteen-year-old male with an otherwise unremarkable ocular history.