Science.gov

Sample records for idoxifene antagonises e2-dependent

  1. Selected reaction monitoring LC-MS determination of idoxifene and its pyrrolidinone metabolite in human plasma using robotic high-throughput, sequential sample injection.

    PubMed

    Onorato, J M; Henion, J D; Lefebvre, P M; Kiplinger, J P

    2001-01-01

    The generation of large numbers of samples during early drug discovery has increased the demand for rapid and selective methods of analysis. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), because of its sensitivity, selectivity, and robustness, has emerged as a powerful tool in the pharmaceutical industry for many analytical needs. This work presents a high-throughput selected reaction monitoring LC-MS bioanalytical method for the determination of idoxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, and its pyrrolidinone metabolite in clinical human plasma samples. The described method uses short, small-bore columns, high flow rates, and elevated HPLC column temperatures to perform LC separations of idoxifene and its metabolite within 10 s/sample. Sequential injections were accomplished with a 215/889 multiple probe liquid handler (Gilson, Inc.), which aspirates eight samples simultaneously and performs its rinse cycle parallel to sample injection, resulting in minimum lag time between injections. This high-throughput method was applied to the determination of idoxifene and its metabolite in clinical human plasma samples. Sample preparation employed liquid/liquid extraction in the 96-well format. Method validation included determination of intra- and interassay accuracy and precision values, recovery studies, autosampler stability, and freeze-thaw stability. The LOQ obtained was 10 ng/mL for idoxifene and 30 ng/mL for the metabolite. Using idoxifene-d5 as an internal standard, idoxifene showed acceptable accuracy and precision values at QC level 1 (QC1, 15 ng/mL), level 2 (QC2, 100 ng/mL), and level 3 (QC3, 180 ng/mL) (85.0% accuracy +/- 12.0% precision, 95.1 +/- 4.9%, and 90.3 +/- 4.7%, respectively). The pyrrolidinone metabolite also showed acceptable accuracy and precision values (using no internal standard for quantitation) at QC1 (60 ng/mL), QC2 (100 ng/mL), and QC3 (180 ng/mL) (104.9 +/- 14.4%, 91.1 +/- 13.0%, and 90.8 +/- 12.2%, respectively). The

  2. The vav oncogene antagonises EGFR signalling and regulates adherens junction dynamics during Drosophila eye development.

    PubMed

    Martín-Bermudo, Maria-Dolores; Bardet, Pierre-Luc; Bellaïche, Yohanns; Malartre, Marianne

    2015-04-15

    Organ shaping and patterning depends on the coordinated regulation of multiple processes. The Drosophila compound eye provides an excellent model to study the coordination of cell fate and cell positioning during morphogenesis. Here, we find that loss of vav oncogene function during eye development is associated with a disorganised retina characterised by the presence of additional cells of all types. We demonstrate that these defects result from two distinct roles of Vav. First, and in contrast to its well-established role as a positive effector of the EGF receptor (EGFR), we show that readouts of the EGFR pathway are upregulated in vav mutant larval eye disc and pupal retina, indicating that Vav antagonises EGFR signalling during eye development. Accordingly, decreasing EGFR signalling in vav mutant eyes restores retinal organisation and rescues most vav mutant phenotypes. Second, using live imaging in the pupal retina, we observe that vav mutant cells do not form stable adherens junctions, causing various defects, such as recruitment of extra primary pigment cells. In agreement with this role in junction dynamics, we observe that these phenotypes can be exacerbated by lowering DE-Cadherin or Cindr levels. Taken together, our findings establish that Vav acts at multiple times during eye development to prevent excessive cell recruitment by limiting EGFR signalling and by regulating junction dynamics to ensure the correct patterning and morphogenesis of the Drosophila eye.

  3. A type III effector antagonises death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Ong, Sze Ying; Kennedy, Catherine L; Kelly, Michelle; Robinson, Keith S; Wong, Tania; Mansell, Ashley; Riedmaier, Patrice; Oates, Clare VL; Zaid, Ali; Mühlen, Sabrina; Crepin, Valerie F; Marches, Olivier; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A; O’Reilly, Lorraine A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Nachbur, Ueli; Infusini, Giuseppe; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonise the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC), utilise a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonisation and interfere with antimicrobial host responses 1-3. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death domain containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1 as binding partners of NleB1. NleB1 expressed ectopically or injected by the bacterial T3SS prevented Fas ligand or TNF-induced formation of the canonical death inducing signalling complex (DISC) and proteolytic activation of caspase-8, an essential step in death receptor induced apoptosis. This inhibition depended on the N-GlcNAc transferase activity of NleB1, which specifically modified Arg117 in the death domain of FADD. The importance of the death receptor apoptotic pathway to host defence was demonstrated using mice deficient in the FAS signalling pathway, which showed delayed clearance of the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium and reversion to virulence of an nleB mutant. The activity of NleB suggests that EPEC and other attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens antagonise death receptor induced apoptosis of infected cells, thereby blocking a major antimicrobial host response. PMID:24025841

  4. FKBP12 activates the cardiac ryanodine receptor Ca2+-release channel and is antagonised by FKBP12.6.

    PubMed

    Galfré, Elena; Pitt, Samantha J; Venturi, Elisa; Sitsapesan, Mano; Zaccai, Nathan R; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; O'Neill, Stephen; Sitsapesan, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Changes in FKBP12.6 binding to cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2) are implicated in mediating disturbances in Ca(2+)-homeostasis in heart failure but there is controversy over the functional effects of FKBP12.6 on RyR2 channel gating. We have therefore investigated the effects of FKBP12.6 and another structurally similar molecule, FKBP12, which is far more abundant in heart, on the gating of single sheep RyR2 channels incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers and on spontaneous waves of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release in rat isolated permeabilised cardiac cells. We demonstrate that FKBP12 is a high affinity activator of RyR2, sensitising the channel to cytosolic Ca(2+), whereas FKBP12.6 has very low efficacy, but can antagonise the effects of FKBP12. Mathematical modelling of the data shows the importance of the relative concentrations of FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 in determining RyR2 activity. Consistent with the single-channel results, physiological concentrations of FKBP12 (3 µM) increased Ca(2+)-wave frequency and decreased the SR Ca(2+)-content in cardiac cells. FKBP12.6, itself, had no effect on wave frequency but antagonised the effects of FKBP12.We provide a biophysical analysis of the mechanisms by which FK-binding proteins can regulate RyR2 single-channel gating. Our data indicate that FKBP12, in addition to FKBP12.6, may be important in regulating RyR2 function in the heart. In heart failure, it is possible that an alteration in the dual regulation of RyR2 by FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 may occur. This could contribute towards a higher RyR2 open probability, 'leaky' RyR2 channels and Ca(2+)-dependent arrhythmias. PMID:22363773

  5. alpha2-Adrenergic agonists antagonise the anxiolytic-like effect of antidepressants in the four-plate test in mice.

    PubMed

    Massé, Fabienne; Hascoët, Martine; Bourin, Michel

    2005-10-14

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) has been reported to be efficient in anxiety disorders. Some animal models have demonstrated an anxiolytic-like effect following acute administration, however, it is not yet known how noradrenergic receptors are implicated in the therapeutic effects of antidepressants (ADs) in anxiety. The effects of two alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists (clonidine, guanabenz) on anxiolytic-like effect of two SSRIs (paroxetine and citalopram) and two SNRIs (venlafaxine and milnacipran) were evaluated in the four-plate test (FPT) in mice. Paroxetine (4 mg/kg), citalopram (8 mg/kg), venlafaxine (8 mg/kg), and milnacipran (8 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) increased the number of punishments accepted by mice in the FPT. Clonidine (0.0039-0.5 mg/kg) and guanabenz (0.03-0.5mg/kg) had no effect on the number of punishments accepted by mice. Clonidine (0.03 and 0.06 mg/kg) and guanabenz (0.125 and 0.5 mg/kg) (i.p. -45 min) reversed the anti-punishment effect of paroxetine, citalopram, venlafaxine and milnacipran (i.p. -30 min). But if the antidepressants are administered 45 min before the test and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists 30 min before the test, alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists failed to alter the anti-punishment effect of antidepressants. The results of this present study indicate that alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists antagonise the anxiolytic-like effect of antidepressants in mice when they are administered 15 min before the administration of antidepressant suggesting a close inter-regulation between noradrenergic and serotoninergic system in the mechanism of SSRIs and SNRIs in anxiety-like behaviour.

  6. Prostaglandin E2-dependent IL-23 production in aged murine dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Rebecca G.; Mezayen, Rabab El; High, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    CD4+ T cells of the Th17 subtype are over-represented in the aged immune system. Dendritic cells (DC) play a critical role in naive CD4+ T cell differentiation. However, expression of cytokines by aged DC that promote differentiation or survival of Th17 cells has not been extensively investigated. Using bone marrow-derived DC from C57BL/6 mice of different ages we compared cytokine production after DC activation by Toll-like receptor agonists for TLR4 and/or TLR7/8. DC-derived TNF-α and IL-12p70 production and expression of DC co-stimulatory molecules did not vary significantly by age indicating TLR expression, function and signal transduction were intact in aged DC. There were relatively minor age-related changes in TGF-β and IL-6 which promote Th17 differentiation, but IL-23, a Th17-suvival cytokine, increased more than 40-fold across the lifespan. DC-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) also increased with age and the up-regulation of IL-23 expression by aged DC was blocked by indomethacin that prevents PGE2 production, and by antagonists of PGE2 receptors. Exogenous PGE2 added to DC cultures further enhanced IL-23 production from aged but not young DCs. These data indicate that age-related changes in DC PGE2 production are necessary, but not sufficient to induce DC IL-23 production. Such changes may play a role in the expansion of Th17 cells in the aged immune system. PMID:20600778

  7. (+)-sulpiride antagonises the renal effects of gamma-L-glutamyl-L-dopa in man.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, T M; Jeffrey, R F; Freestone, S; Lee, M R

    1988-01-01

    1. gamma-L-glutamyl-L-dopa (gludopa) was given by intravenous infusion to six healthy salt-replete men on two occasions, with and without pretreatment with (+)-sulpiride. 2. Gludopa increased sodium excretion, glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow whilst decreasing plasma renin activity. 3. (+)-sulpiride had no significant effect on baseline natriuresis, renal haemodynamics or plasma renin activity, but significantly attenuated the rise in sodium excretion, glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow produced by gludopa. 4. (+)-sulpiride abolished the acute fall in plasma renin activity seen with gludopa. 5. (+)-sulpiride raised serum prolactin concentration but did not affect the ris in urine dopamine excretion rate caused by gludopa. 6. Gludopa exerts its renal effects by stimulating specific dopamine receptors which are principally of the DA1 subtype. PMID:3129007

  8. Vitamin D Antagonises the Suppressive Effect of Inflammatory Cytokines on CTLA-4 Expression and Regulatory Function

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Louisa E.; Qureshi, Omar S.; Gardner, David; Hou, Tie Z.; Briggs, Zoe; Soskic, Blagoje; Baker, Jennifer; Raza, Karim; Sansom, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The immune suppressive protein CTLA-4 is constitutively expressed by Tregs and induced in effector T cells upon activation. Its crucial role in adaptive immunity is apparent from the fatal autoimmune pathology seen in CTLA-4 knockout mice. However, little is known regarding factors that regulate CTLA-4 expression and their effect upon its function to remove CD80 and CD86 from antigen presenting cells by transendocytosis. Th17 cells are emerging as significant players in autoimmunity as well as other diseases. Therefore, in this study we have examined the effects of Th17 polarising conditions on CTLA-4 expression and function in human T cells and show that Th17 conditions can suppress the expression of CTLA-4 and its transendocytic function. In contrast to Th17 cells, vitamin D is inversely associated with autoimmune disease. We have previously shown a striking ability of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) to enhance CTLA-4, however, its effects upon B7 transendocytosis and its activity in the context of inflammation remained unknown. Here we show that induction of CTLA-4 by 1,25(OH)2D3 can actually be enhanced in the presence of Th17 polarising cytokines. Furthermore, its transendocytic function was maintained such that T cells generated in the presence of Th17 conditions and 1,25(OH)2D3 were highly effective at capturing CTLA-4 ligands from antigen presenting cells and suppressing T cell division. Taken together, these data reveal an inhibitory effect of Th17 polarising conditions upon CTLA-4-mediated regulation and show that 1,25(OH)2D3 counteracts this effect. Given the importance of CTLA-4-mediated suppression in the control of autoimmune diseases, our novel data highlight the importance of vitamin D in inflammatory settings. PMID:26134669

  9. Van-Gogh-like 2 antagonises the canonical WNT pathway and is methylated in colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, G; Selgrad, M; Garcia, M; Ceccarelli, C; Fini, L; Bianchi, P; Laghi, L; D'Angelo, L; Paterini, P; Malfertheiner, P; Chieco, P; Boland, C R; Bazzoli, F; Ricciardiello, L

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aberrant activation of the canonical WNT signaling is a feature of colorectal cancer (CRC). Van-Gogh-like 2 (VANGL2) belongs to the non-canonical WNT pathway whose activation inhibits canonical WNT signaling. In this study, we investigated the role of VANGL2 and its epigenetic regulation in CRC. Methods: Van-Gogh-like 2 expression and promoter methylation after 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza) treatment were evaluated in CRC cells. DNA samples from 418 sporadic CRCs were tested for VANGL2 promoter methylation and microsatellite instability (MSI). Proliferation, colony formation and activation of the WNT pathway were tested in cells after VANGL2 overexpression. Results: Van-Gogh-like 2 mRNA was significantly higher in 5-aza-treated RKO, LOVO and SW48, whereas no differences were found in SW480. Van-Gogh-like 2 was fully methylated in RKO, SW48, HCT116, DLD1 and Caco2; partially methylated in LOVO, LS174T and SW837; and unmethylated in SW480, SW620 and HT29. Higher expression of VANGL2 mRNA was found in the unmethylated cell lines. In CRC specimens (8.93% MSI), methylated VANGL2 was associated with MSI, higher grade, proximal colon location and BRAF mutation. Van-Gogh-like 2 overexpression in SW480 significantly decreased proliferation, colony formation and β-catenin levels. Conclusion: Van-Gogh-like 2 is frequently methylated in MSI-CRCs with BRAF mutation and may act as a tumour suppressor gene, counteracting WNT/β-catenin signaling. PMID:23579212

  10. Small Molecules Antagonise the MIA-Fibronectin Interaction in Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Yip, King Tuo; Zhong, Xue Yin; Seibel, Nadia; Pütz, Stefanie; Autzen, Jasmin; Gasper, Raphael; Hofmann, Eckhard; Scherkenbeck, Jürgen; Stoll, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA), an extracellular protein highly expressed by malignant melanoma cells, plays an important functional role in melanoma development, progression, and metastasis. After its secretion, MIA directly interacts with extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin (FN). By this mechanism, MIA actively facilitates focal cell detachment from surrounding structures and strongly promotes tumour cell invasion and migration. Hence, the molecular understanding of MIA’s function provides a promising target for the development of new strategies in malignant melanoma therapy. Here, we describe for the first time the discovery of small molecules that are able to disrupt the MIA-FN complex by selectively binding to a new druggable pocket, which we could identify on MIA by structural analysis and fragment-based screening. Our findings may inspire novel drug discovery efforts aiming at a therapeutically effective treatment of melanoma by targeting MIA. PMID:27151361

  11. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 protein antagonises an Imiquimod-induced inflammatory pathway in primary human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kathryn H.; Wasson, Christopher W.; Watherston, Oliver; Doble, Rosella; Eric Blair, G.; Wittmann, Miriam; Macdonald, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological pathogen of cervical and a number of ano-genital cancers. How HPVs overcome the significant barriers of the skin immune system has been the topic of intensive research. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins have emerged as key players in the deregulation of host innate immune pathways that are required for the recruitment of effector cells of the immune response. Here we demonstrate that E7, and to a lesser extend E6, strongly reduce NFκB activation in response to the inflammatory mediator imiquimod. Moreover, we establish that undifferentiated keratinocytes do not express the putative receptor for imiquimod, TLR7, and as such are stimulated by imiquimod through a novel pathway. Inhibition of imiquimod induced cytokine production required residues in the CR1 and CR3 regions of E7 and resulted in reduced nuclear translocation and acetylation of the p65 sub-unit of NFκB. The results provide further evidence for a TLR7-independent role of imiquimod in the epithelial immune response and reinforce the ability of the HPV oncoproteins to disrupt the innate immune response, which may have important consequences for establishment of a chronic infection. PMID:26268216

  12. Women with high BMI: should they be managed differently due to antagonising action of leptin in labour?

    PubMed

    Wuntakal, Rekha; Kaler, Mandeep; Hollingworth, Tony

    2013-06-01

    Leptin - a protein hormone is synthesised in the adipose tissue in humans. Its level therefore should be directly proportional to the amount of adipose tissue in the body. There is evidence that leptin may be responsible for various complications in obese and morbidly obese women in labour by its effect on the myometrium causing uterine smooth muscle relaxation (causes less Ca(2+) flux in myometrium). By doing this, we believe it opposes oxytocin effect on the myometrium which in fact promotes uterine smooth muscle contractions (causes more Ca(2+) flux in myometrium). The opposing action of these two hormone may contribute to the dysfunctional labour process, prolonged first stage of labour, increase in operative vaginal delivery in second stage of labour and increase in caesarean section rate both in first and second stage of labour in obese women. Also, there is increased incidence of postdated pregnancy, induction of labour and atonic postpartum haemorrhage in obese and morbidly obese women. Does this mean labour should be managed differently in women with high BMI?

  13. The GABAA antagonist DPP-4-PIOL selectively antagonises tonic over phasic GABAergic currents in dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    Boddum, Kim; Frølund, Bente; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2014-11-01

    GABAA receptors mediate two different types of inhibitory currents: phasic inhibitory currents when rapid and brief presynaptic GABA release activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors and tonic inhibitory currents generated by low extrasynaptic GABA levels, persistently activating extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. The two inhibitory current types are mediated by different subpopulations of GABAA receptors with diverse pharmacological profiles. Selective antagonism of tonic currents is of special interest as excessive tonic inhibition post-stroke has severe pathological consequences. Here we demonstrate that phasic and tonic GABAA receptor currents can be selectively inhibited by the antagonists SR 95531 and the 4-PIOL derivative, 4-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol hydrobromide (DPP-4-PIOL), respectively. In dentate gyrus granule cells, SR 95531 was found approximately 4 times as potent inhibiting phasic currents compared to tonic currents (IC50 values: 101 vs. 427 nM). Conversely, DPP-4-PIOL was estimated to be more than 20 times as potent inhibiting tonic current compared to phasic current (IC50 values: 0.87 vs. 21.3 nM). Consequently, we were able to impose a pronounced reduction in tonic GABA mediated current (>70 %) by concentrations of DPP-4-PIOL, at which no significant effect on the phasic current was seen. Our findings demonstrate that selective inhibition of GABA mediated tonic current is possible, when targeting a subpopulation of GABAA receptors located extrasynaptically using the antagonist, DPP-4-PIOL. PMID:25103229

  14. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 protein antagonises an Imiquimod-induced inflammatory pathway in primary human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Richards, Kathryn H; Wasson, Christopher W; Watherston, Oliver; Doble, Rosella; Blair, G Eric; Wittmann, Miriam; Macdonald, Andrew

    2015-08-13

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological pathogen of cervical and a number of ano-genital cancers. How HPVs overcome the significant barriers of the skin immune system has been the topic of intensive research. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins have emerged as key players in the deregulation of host innate immune pathways that are required for the recruitment of effector cells of the immune response. Here we demonstrate that E7, and to a lesser extend E6, strongly reduce NFκB activation in response to the inflammatory mediator imiquimod. Moreover, we establish that undifferentiated keratinocytes do not express the putative receptor for imiquimod, TLR7, and as such are stimulated by imiquimod through a novel pathway. Inhibition of imiquimod induced cytokine production required residues in the CR1 and CR3 regions of E7 and resulted in reduced nuclear translocation and acetylation of the p65 sub-unit of NFκB. The results provide further evidence for a TLR7-independent role of imiquimod in the epithelial immune response and reinforce the ability of the HPV oncoproteins to disrupt the innate immune response, which may have important consequences for establishment of a chronic infection.

  15. Methyl succinate antagonises biguanide-induced AMPK-activation and death of pancreatic β-cells through restoration of mitochondrial electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hinke, S A; Martens, G A; Cai, Y; Finsi, J; Heimberg, H; Pipeleers, D; Van de Casteele, M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the insulin-sensitising properties of metformin in peripheral tissues: (a) inhibition of electron transport chain complex I, and (b) activation of the AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). However the relationship between these mechanisms and their contribution to β-cell death and dysfunction in vitro, are currently unclear. Experimental approach: The effects of biguanides (metformin and phenformin) were tested on MIN6 β-cells and primary FACS-purified rat β-cells. Cell metabolism was assessed biochemically and by FACS analysis, and correlated with AMPK phosphorylation state and cell viability, with or without fuel substrates. Key results: In MIN6 cells, metformin reduced mitochondrial complex I activity by up to 44% and a 25% net reduction in mitochondrial reducing potential. In rat β-cells, metformin caused NAD(P)H accumulation above maximal glucose-inducible levels, mimicking the effect of rotenone. Drug exposure caused phosphorylation of AMPK on Thr172 in MIN6 cell extracts, indicative of kinase activation. Methyl succinate, a complex II substrate, appeared to bypass metformin blockade of complex I. This resulted in reduced phosphorylation of AMPK, establishing a link between biguanide-induced mitochondrial inhibition and AMPK activation. Corresponding assessment of cell death indicated that methyl succinate decreased biguanide toxicity to β-cells in vitro. Conclusions and implications: AMPK activation can partly be attributed to metformin's inhibitory action on mitochondrial complex I. Anaplerotic fuel metabolism via complex II rescued β-cells from metformin-associated toxicity. We propose that utilisation of anaplerotic nutrients may reconcile in vitro and in vivo effects of metformin on the pancreatic β-cell. PMID:17339833

  16. Kicking against the PRCs – A Domesticated Transposase Antagonises Silencing Mediated by Polycomb Group Proteins and Is an Accessory Component of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Pumi; Mora-García, Santiago; de Leau, Erica; Thornton, Harry; de Alves, Flavia Lima; Rapsilber, Juri; Yang, Suxin; James, Geo Velikkakam; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Finnegan, E. Jean; Turck, Franziska; Goodrich, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) genes play crucial roles in development by regulating expression of homeotic and other genes controlling cell fate. Both groups catalyse modifications of chromatin, particularly histone methylation, leading to epigenetic changes that affect gene activity. The trxG antagonizes the function of PcG genes by activating PcG target genes, and consequently trxG mutants suppress PcG mutant phenotypes. We previously identified the ANTAGONIST OF LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (ALP1) gene as a genetic suppressor of mutants in the Arabidopsis PcG gene LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). Here, we show that ALP1 interacts genetically with several other PcG and trxG components and that it antagonizes PcG silencing. Transcriptional profiling reveals that when PcG activity is compromised numerous target genes are hyper-activated in seedlings and that in most cases this requires ALP1. Furthermore, when PcG activity is present ALP1 is needed for full activation of several floral homeotic genes that are repressed by the PcG. Strikingly, ALP1 does not encode a known chromatin protein but rather a protein related to PIF/Harbinger class transposases. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ALP1 is broadly conserved in land plants and likely lost transposase activity and acquired a novel function during angiosperm evolution. Consistent with this, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry (IP-MS) show that ALP1 associates, in vivo, with core components of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX 2 (PRC2), a widely conserved PcG protein complex which functions as a H3K27me3 histone methyltransferase. Furthermore, in reciprocal pulldowns using the histone methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF), we identify not only ALP1 and the core PRC2 components but also plant-specific accessory components including EMBRYONIC FLOWER 1 (EMF1), a transcriptional repressor previously associated with PRC1-like complexes. Taken together our data suggest that ALP1 inhibits PcG silencing by blocking the interaction of the core PRC2 with accessory components that promote its HMTase activity or its role in inhibiting transcription. ALP1 is the first example of a domesticated transposase acquiring a novel function as a PcG component. The antagonistic interaction of a modified transposase with the PcG machinery is novel and may have arisen as a means for the cognate transposon to evade host surveillance or for the host to exploit features of the transposition machinery beneficial for epigenetic regulation of gene activity. PMID:26642436

  17. A tarantula-venom peptide that antagonises the TRPA1 nociceptor ion channel by binding to the S1-S4 gating domain

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Junhong; Liu, Boyi; Cao, Guan; Lipchik, Andrew M.; Perez, Minervo; Dekan, Zoltan; Mobli, Mehdi; Daly, Norelle L.; Alewood, Paul F.; Parker, Laurie L.; King, Glenn F.; Zhou, Yufeng; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Background The venoms of predators such as spiders, scorpions, cone snails, sea anemones, and snakes, have been an excellent source of pharmacological diversity for drug discovery and as pharmacological tools for elucidating the structure, function, and physiological properties of ion channels. Here we describe the first known peptide antagonist of the nociceptor ion channel transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1). Results We constructed a recombinant cDNA library encoding ∼100 diverse GPI-anchored peptide toxins (t-toxins) derived from spider venoms and screened this library by co-expression in Xenopus oocytes with TRPA1. This screen resulted in identification of protoxin-I (ProTx-I), a 35-residue peptide from the venom of the Peruvian green-velvet tarantula, Thrixopelma pruriens, as the first known high-affinity peptide TRPA1 antagonist. Interestingly, ProTx-I was previously identified as an antagonist of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels. To identify the surfaces of ProTx-I by which it binds to these distinct ion channel types, we constructed a t-toxin library of ProTx-I alanine-scanning mutants and screened this library against NaV1.2 and TRPA1. This revealed distinct partially overlapping surfaces of ProTx-I by which it binds to these two ion channels, and whose specific chemical features explain its higher affinity for NaV1.2 than for TRPA1. Importantly, this mutagenesis yielded two novel ProTx-I variants that are only active against either TRPA1or NaV1.2, but not both. By testing its activity against chimeric channels, we identified the extracellular loops of the TRPA1 S1-S4 gating domain as the ProTx-I binding site. Conclusions These studies establish screening of t-toxin libraries of native and mutated toxins, which we term “toxineering”, as a generally applicable method for isolation of novel ion channel modifiers and for design of ion channel modifiers with altered target selectivity. They also suggest that ProTx-I will be a valuable pharmacological reagent for addressing the biophysical mechanisms of TRPA1 gating, the physiology and pathophysiology of TRPA1 function in nociceptors, and for potential clinical application in the context of pain and inflammation. PMID:24530065

  18. Bioanalytical high-throughput selected reaction monitoring-LC/MS determination of selected estrogen receptor modulators in human plasma: 2000 samples/day.

    PubMed

    Zweigenbaum, J; Henion, J

    2000-06-01

    The high-throughput determination of small molecules in biological matrixes has become an important part of drug discovery. This work shows that increased throughput LC/MS/MS techniques can be used for the analysis of selected estrogen receptor modulators in human plasma where more than 2000 samples may be analyzed in a 24-h period. The compounds used to demonstrate the high-throughput methodology include tamoxifen, raloxifene, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, nafoxidine, and idoxifene. Tamoxifen and raloxifene are used in both breast cancer therapy and osteoporosis and have shown prophylactic potential for the reduction of the risk of breast cancer. The described strategy provides LC/MS/MS separation and quantitation for each of the five test articles in control human plasma. The method includes sample preparation employing liquid-liquid extraction in the 96-well format, an LC separation of the five compounds in less than 30 s, and selected reaction monitoring detection from low nano- to microgram per milliter levels. Precision and accuracy are determined where each 96-well plate is considered a typical "tray" having calibration standards and quality control (QC) samples dispersed through each plate. A concept is introduced where 24 96-well plates analyzed in 1 day is considered a "grand tray", and the method is cross-validated with standards placed only at the beginning of the first plate and the end of the last plate. Using idoxifene-d5 as an internal standard, the results obtained for idoxifene and tamoxifen satisfy current bioanalytical method validation criteria on two separate days where 2112 and 2304 samples were run, respectively. Method validation included 24-h autosampler stability and one freeze-thaw cycle stability for the extracts. Idoxifene showed acceptable results with accuracy ranging from 0.3% for the high quality control (QC) to 15.4% for the low QC and precision of 3.6%-13.9% relative standard deviation. Tamoxifen showed accuracy ranging from 1.6% to 13

  19. Pharmacological characterisation of cardiovascular histamine receptors in man in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boyce, M J

    1982-09-01

    Data from pharmacological studies carried out in healthy subjects using systemic histamine or impromidine and their antagonists are reviewed. Exogenous histamine by rapid injection appears to stimulate only H1-receptors. Chlorpheniramine alone antagonised the responses to histamine. The effects of cardiovascular H2-receptor stimulation are demonstrated best by a sustained and large dose of histamine given by infusion. If it be considered desirable to antagonise all the cardiovascular responses to endogenous histamine, the available pharmacological data in man suggest this would be achieved best by a combination of an H1-and H2-receptor antagonist.

  20. Growth control: re-examining Zyxin's role in the hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Kieran F

    2015-03-16

    The Hippo pathway is a conserved regulator of organ growth that computes information from the cellular microenvironment. A new study examines the role of the Hippo pathway protein Zyxin and finds that it antagonises Expanded to modulate F-actin and organ size.

  1. Effects in cats of atipamezole, flumazenil and 4-aminopyridine on stress-related neurohormonal and metabolic responses induced by medetomidine, midazolam and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Ueoka, Naotami; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antagonistic effects of a fixed dose of atipamezole (ATI), flumazenil (FLU) and 4-aminopyridine (4AP), both alone and in various combinations, on key stress-related neurohormonal and metabolic changes induced by medetomidine (MED), midazolam (MID) and ketamine (KET) in healthy cats. Seven cats were used consistently in eight investigation groups. Cats were administered a mixture of 0.05 mg/kg MED and 0.5 mg/kg MID followed 10 mins later by 10 mg/kg KET intramuscularly. Twenty minutes after KET injection, the cats were intravenously injected with either a physiological saline solution at 0.1 ml/kg (control) or one of the seven variations of experimental drugs, alone or in combination: ATI, FLU, 4AP, ATI + FLU, FLU + 4AP, ATI + 4AP and ATI + FLU + 4AP. Blood samples were collected 10 times during the 24 h test period. Plasma glucose, insulin, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine and non-esterified fatty acid levels were measured. The administration of MED + MID + KET resulted in hyperglycaemia and decreases in epinephrine, norepinephrine, cortisol and non-esterified fatty acid levels. FLU or 4AP alone or FLU + 4AP did not effectively antagonise the effects induced by MED + MID + KET but enhanced the hyperglycaemia. ATI alone was effective in antagonising these effects. Compared with non-ATI regimens, combinations with ATI were more effective in antagonising the effects induced by MED + MID + KET; however, ATI + FLU + 4AP caused large increases in cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations. ATI, both alone and in combination, is effective in antagonising the neurohormonal and metabolic effects of MED + MID + KET in cats. However, ATI + FLU + 4AP is not suitable because of large stress-related hormonal responses.

  2. Influence of enkephalin on K+-evoked efflux of putative neurotransmitters in rat brain. Selective inhibition of acetylcholine and dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, N; Mitznegg, P; Sprügel, W; Domschke, W; Domschke, S; Wünsch, E; Demling, L

    1977-09-01

    In rat brain slices preincubated with various radiolabelled putative neurotransmitters, methionine-enkephalin diminished the potassium-evoked release of dopamine and acetylcholine. The effect was antagonised by naloxone. The potassium-induced effux of three other neurotransmitters, histamine, 5-hydroxy-tryptamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid, were unaffected by methionine-enkephalin. A probable physiological function for the endogenous ligands in specifically affecting the catecholaminergic and cholinergic transmission is suggested.

  3. Effects in cats of atipamezole, flumazenil and 4-aminopyridine on stress-related neurohormonal and metabolic responses induced by medetomidine, midazolam and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Ueoka, Naotami; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antagonistic effects of a fixed dose of atipamezole (ATI), flumazenil (FLU) and 4-aminopyridine (4AP), both alone and in various combinations, on key stress-related neurohormonal and metabolic changes induced by medetomidine (MED), midazolam (MID) and ketamine (KET) in healthy cats. Seven cats were used consistently in eight investigation groups. Cats were administered a mixture of 0.05 mg/kg MED and 0.5 mg/kg MID followed 10 mins later by 10 mg/kg KET intramuscularly. Twenty minutes after KET injection, the cats were intravenously injected with either a physiological saline solution at 0.1 ml/kg (control) or one of the seven variations of experimental drugs, alone or in combination: ATI, FLU, 4AP, ATI + FLU, FLU + 4AP, ATI + 4AP and ATI + FLU + 4AP. Blood samples were collected 10 times during the 24 h test period. Plasma glucose, insulin, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine and non-esterified fatty acid levels were measured. The administration of MED + MID + KET resulted in hyperglycaemia and decreases in epinephrine, norepinephrine, cortisol and non-esterified fatty acid levels. FLU or 4AP alone or FLU + 4AP did not effectively antagonise the effects induced by MED + MID + KET but enhanced the hyperglycaemia. ATI alone was effective in antagonising these effects. Compared with non-ATI regimens, combinations with ATI were more effective in antagonising the effects induced by MED + MID + KET; however, ATI + FLU + 4AP caused large increases in cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations. ATI, both alone and in combination, is effective in antagonising the neurohormonal and metabolic effects of MED + MID + KET in cats. However, ATI + FLU + 4AP is not suitable because of large stress-related hormonal responses. PMID:25366173

  4. Chlordiazepoxide enhances the anxiogenic action of CGS 8216 in the social interaction test: evidence for benzodiazepine withdrawal?

    PubMed

    File, S E; Pellow, S

    1985-07-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor 'inverse agonist' CGS 8216 has a specific anxiogenic action in the social interaction test that cannot be reversed by other compounds acting at the benzodiazepine site: Ro 15-1788, FG 7142 or beta-CCE. We tried to reverse the anxiogenic effect with chlordiazepoxide, which is able to antagonise the anxiogenic effects of several other compounds acting at benzodiazepine or related sites. Chlordiazepoxide given acutely (10-20 mg/kg) was unable to antagonise the anxiogenic action of CGS 8216 (5-10 mg/kg); instead there was a tendency to enhance its effects. The effects of chlordiazepoxide after 5 days pretreatment were then assessed, since chronic treatment is necessary to reverse the anxiogenic actions of Ro 15-1788 and Ro 5-4864. At 5 mg/kg chronically, chlordiazepoxide was unable to antagonise the anxiogenic effect of CGS 8216, and at 20 mg/kg there was a significant enhancement of the effects of CGS 8216 on social interaction without an effect on locomotor activity. These results are discussed in terms of withdrawal from benzodiazepine treatment.

  5. 2-(4-Amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole is a ligand and shows species-specific partial agonism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzi, Rana; Bradshaw, Tracey D.; Rowlands, J. Craig; Stevens, Malcolm F.G.; Bell, David R.

    2009-05-15

    2-(4-Amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203) and related compounds are a series of anti-cancer candidate pharmaceuticals, that have been shown to activate the AhR. We show that these compounds are high-affinity ligands for the rat AhR, but a quantitative assay for their ability to induce CYP1A1 RNA in H4IIEC3 cells, a measure of activation of the AhR, showed a poor relationship between affinity for the AhR and ability to induce CYP1A1 RNA. 5F 203, an agonist with low potency, was able to antagonise the induction of CYP1A1 RNA by TCDD, while IH 445, a potent agonist, did not antagonise the induction of CYP1A1 RNA by TCDD, and Schild analysis confirmed 5F 203 to be a potent antagonist of the induction of CYP1A1 RNA by TCDD in H4IIEC3 cells. In contrast, several benzothiazoles show potent induction of CYP1A1 RNA in human MCF-7 cells, and 5F 203 is unable to detectably antagonise the induction of CYP1A1 RNA in MCF-7 cells, showing a species difference in antagonism. Evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity of benzothiazoles showed that the ability to agonise the AhR correlated with growth inhibition both in H4IIEC3 cells for a variety of benzothiazoles, and between H4IIEC3 and MCF-7 cells for 5F 203, suggesting an important role of agonism of the AhR in the anti-proliferative activity of benzothiazoles.

  6. Co-transfection of decorin and interleukin-10 modulates pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix gene expression in human tenocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    Abbah, Sunny A.; Thomas, Dilip; Browne, Shane; O’Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix synthesis and remodelling are driven by increased activity of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). In tendon tissue repair, increased activity of TGF-β1 leads to progressive fibrosis. Decorin (DCN) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) antagonise pathological collagen synthesis by exerting a neutralising effect via downregulation of TGF-β1. Herein, we report that the delivery of DCN and IL-10 transgenes from a collagen hydrogel system supresses the constitutive expression of TGF-β1 and a range of pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix genes. PMID:26860065

  7. Electroencephalographic studies with i.v. methaqualone in man.

    PubMed

    Saxena, R C; Thacore, V R; Suri, M L; Agarwal, T N; Bhargava, K P

    1977-12-01

    Methaqualone injected i.v. has been reported to be a safe short-acting anaesthetic agent and a muscle relaxant in man. It has been employed in a variety of operative procedures and to modify convulsions in the management of tetanus and in electroconvulsive therapy. Safety, usefulness and the marked central effects of the drug led us to study its central effects by EEG in man. Discrepancies between clinical and EEG signs were thus seen. EEG patterns resembled those after barbiturates and the effect was dose dependent. Differences between methaqualone and barbiturates are discussed. The EEG patterns were potentiated by thioridazine and antagonised by imipramine.

  8. Co-transfection of decorin and interleukin-10 modulates pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix gene expression in human tenocyte culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbah, Sunny A.; Thomas, Dilip; Browne, Shane; O’Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix synthesis and remodelling are driven by increased activity of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). In tendon tissue repair, increased activity of TGF-β1 leads to progressive fibrosis. Decorin (DCN) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) antagonise pathological collagen synthesis by exerting a neutralising effect via downregulation of TGF-β1. Herein, we report that the delivery of DCN and IL-10 transgenes from a collagen hydrogel system supresses the constitutive expression of TGF-β1 and a range of pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix genes.

  9. The role of mouse Akt2 in insulin-dependent suppression of adipocyte lipolysis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Shlomit; DiPilato, Lisa M.; Emmett, Matthew J.; Shearin, Abigail L.; Chu, Qingwei; Monks, Bob; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim/hypothesis The release of fatty acids from adipocytes, i.e. lipolysis, is maintained under tight control, primarily by the opposing actions of catecholamines and insulin. A widely accepted model is that insulin antagonises catecholamine-dependent lipolysis through phosphorylation and activation of cAMP phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B) by the serine-threonine protein kinase Akt (protein kinase B). Recently, this hypothesis has been challenged, as in cultured adipocytes insulin appears, under some conditions, to suppress lipolysis independently of Akt. Methods To address the requirement for Akt2, the predominant isoform expressed in classic insulin target tissues, in the suppression of fatty acid release in vivo, we assessed lipolysis in mice lacking Akt2. Results In the fed state and following an oral glucose challenge, Akt2 null mice were glucose intolerant and hyperinsulinaemic, but nonetheless exhibited normal serum NEFA and glycerol levels, suggestive of normal suppression of lipolysis. Furthermore, insulin partially inhibited lipolysis in Akt2 null mice during an insulin tolerance test (ITT) and hyperinsulinaemic–euglycaemic clamp, respectively. In support of these in vivo observations, insulin antagonised catecholamine-induced lipolysis in primary brown fat adipocytes from Akt2-deficient nice. Conclusion These data suggest that suppression of lipolysis by insulin in hyperinsulinaemic states can take place in the absence of Akt2. PMID:25740694

  10. [Drug or plant substances which antagonize venoms or potentiate antivenins].

    PubMed

    Chippaux, J P; Rakotonirina, V S; Rakotonirina, A; Dzikouk, G

    1997-01-01

    Dendroaspis jamesoni (Elapidae) and Echis oceliatus (Viperidae) are responsible for most of severe evenomation in Cameroon. Toxicity of venoms of these two species has been measured using mice according to the method of Spearman & Kàrber. The effect on experimental envenomation of various drugs (atropine, promethazine, neostigmine, hydrocortisone, pentosane sulfuric polyester, heparin, tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid) and plant extracts (Schumanniophyton magnificum, Bidens pilosa, Securidaca longepedunculata and Garcinia lucida) has been observed associated or not with the antivenom lpser Afrique (SAV). The venom of D. jamesoni contains neurotoxins agonizing and antagonising acetylcholine. The toxicity of the venom did not depend on the route of injection. Atropine, promethazine, neostigmine and hydrocortisone protected animals against a venom dose up to 2 LD50. Moreover, atropine and promethazine potentiated the SAV. Similar results have been obtained with extracts from S. magnificum and B. pilosa. The venom of E. ocellatus induces haemorrhage and necrosis. The toxicity increased by 3-fold when the venom was injected through intravenous or intraperitoneal route, compared to intramuscular route. Pentosane sulfuric polyester and tranexamic acid protected mice against doses up to 3 LD50. Pentosane sulfuric polyester, hydrocortisone, heparin and aminocaproic acid increased the SAV protective titre by 50%. However, tried plant extracts weakly antagonised the venom and did not potentiate the SAV.

  11. [Drug or plant substances which antagonize venoms or potentiate antivenins].

    PubMed

    Chippaux, J P; Rakotonirina, V S; Rakotonirina, A; Dzikouk, G

    1997-01-01

    Dendroaspis jamesoni (Elapidae) and Echis oceliatus (Viperidae) are responsible for most of severe evenomation in Cameroon. Toxicity of venoms of these two species has been measured using mice according to the method of Spearman & Kàrber. The effect on experimental envenomation of various drugs (atropine, promethazine, neostigmine, hydrocortisone, pentosane sulfuric polyester, heparin, tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid) and plant extracts (Schumanniophyton magnificum, Bidens pilosa, Securidaca longepedunculata and Garcinia lucida) has been observed associated or not with the antivenom lpser Afrique (SAV). The venom of D. jamesoni contains neurotoxins agonizing and antagonising acetylcholine. The toxicity of the venom did not depend on the route of injection. Atropine, promethazine, neostigmine and hydrocortisone protected animals against a venom dose up to 2 LD50. Moreover, atropine and promethazine potentiated the SAV. Similar results have been obtained with extracts from S. magnificum and B. pilosa. The venom of E. ocellatus induces haemorrhage and necrosis. The toxicity increased by 3-fold when the venom was injected through intravenous or intraperitoneal route, compared to intramuscular route. Pentosane sulfuric polyester and tranexamic acid protected mice against doses up to 3 LD50. Pentosane sulfuric polyester, hydrocortisone, heparin and aminocaproic acid increased the SAV protective titre by 50%. However, tried plant extracts weakly antagonised the venom and did not potentiate the SAV. PMID:9479470

  12. The acid metabolite of ZD7114 is a partial agonist of lipolysis mediated by the rat beta 3-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Mayers, R M; Quayle, S P; Thompson, A J; Grant, T L; Holloway, B R

    1996-01-11

    Experiments were performed to characterise the lipolytic effects of the acid metabolite, ZM215001, ((S)-4-[2-hydroxy-3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy] phenoxyacetic acid) of the putative beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist, ZD7114 ((S)-4-[2-hydroxy-3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyethyl) phenoxyacetamide) on isolated rat white adipocytes. ZM215001 was used for these studies since it is the predominant moiety after in vivo administration of ZD7114. The agonist properties of ZM215001 were assessed in comparison to the standard nonselective beta-adrenoceptor agonist (+/-)-isoprenaline and the beta 3-adrenoceptor-selective agonist BRL 37344. Isoprenaline, BRL 37344 and ZM215001 all stimulated the rate of free fatty acid release from isolated adipocytes with the order of potency being BRL > isoprenaline > ZM215001. The maximum effect of BRL 37344 was equivalent to that of isoprenaline, but ZM215001 achieved only 30% of the maximum isoprenaline response. ZM215001 competitively antagonised the lipolytic response to BRL 37344 (pA2 = 7.26), whereas the agonist effects of BRL 37344 were not antagonised competitively by the selective antagonists ICI 118551 and CGP 20712A, at concentrations which would be expected to block beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors respectively. These results indicate that ZM215001 has low intrinsic activity at the rat adipocyte beta 3-adrenoceptor, and is a partial agonist of lipolysis in rat white adipocytes. PMID:8720584

  13. The anxiogenic action of RO 5-4864 in the social interaction test: effect of chlordiazepoxide, RO 15-1788 and CGS 8216.

    PubMed

    File, S E; Pellow, S

    1985-01-01

    RO 5-4864 (20 mg/kg), a benzodiazepine with high affinity for peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites in rat kidney and brain, but not for the "classical" CNS sites, reduced the time spent by pairs of rats in active social interaction, without reducing locomotor activity, possibly reflecting an anxiogenic action. This anxiogenic effect was not reversed by chlordiazepoxide (5 or 10 mg/kg) given acutely, but was reversed by chlordiazepoxide (5 mg/kg) given for 5 days prior to testing. RO 15-1788 (10 mg/kg), a drug that antagonises several effects of benzodiazepines but has little affinity for peripheral-type sites, had no action on the reduction in social interaction induced by RO 5-4864. However, CGS 8216 (10 mg/kg) which also antagonises the effects of benzodiazepines and has little affinity for RO 5-4864 recognition sites, significantly enhanced the reduction in social interaction caused by RO 5-4864, and the combination produced a significant decrease in locomotor activity. These results are discussed in terms of possible sites of action of RO 5-4864 on the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex.

  14. Molecular basis of oocyte-paracrine signalling that promotes granulosa cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Robert B; Ritter, Lesley J; Myllymaa, Samu; Kaivo-Oja, Noora; Dragovic, Rebecca A; Hickey, Theresa E; Ritvos, Olli; Mottershead, David G

    2006-09-15

    Oocytes regulate follicle growth by secreting paracrine growth factors that act on neighbouring granulosa cells (GCs). Those factors identified to date are mainly members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily, but little is known about which specific receptor/signalling system(s) they employ. This study was conducted to determine the requisite pathways utilised by oocytes to promote GC proliferation. We used an established oocyte-secreted mitogen bioassay, where denuded mouse oocytes are co-cultured with mural GCs. Oocytes, growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF9), TGFbeta1 and activin-A all promoted GC DNA synthesis, but bone-morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) did not. Subsequently, we tested the capacity of various TGFbeta superfamily receptor ectodomains (ECD) to neutralise oocyte- or specific growth factor-stimulated GC proliferation. The BMP type-II receptor (BMPR-II) ECD antagonised oocyte and GDF9 bioactivity dose-dependently, but had no or minimal effect on TGFbeta1 and activin-A bioactivity, demonstrating its specificity. The TGFbetaR-II, activinR-IIA and activinR-IIB ECDs all failed to neutralise oocyte- or GDF9-stimulated GC DNA synthesis, whereas they did antagonise the activity of their respective native ligands. An activin receptor-like kinase (ALK) 4/5/7 inhibitor, SB431542, also antagonised both oocyte and GDF9 bioactivity in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these findings, oocytes, GDF9 and TGFbeta1 all activated SMAD2/3 reporter constructs in transfected GC, and led to phosphorylation of SMAD2 proteins in treated cells. Surprisingly, oocytes did not activate the SMAD1/5/8 pathway in transfected GCs although exogenous BMP6 did. This study indicates that oocyte paracrine factors primarily utilise a similar signalling pathway first identified for GDF9 that employs an unusual combination of TGFbeta superfamily receptors, the BMPR-II and a SMAD2/3 stimulatory ALK (4, 5 or 7), for transmitting their mitogenic actions in GC. This

  15. Inhibition of native 5-HT3 receptor-evoked contractions in guinea pig and mouse ileum by antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Stephen P; Walsh, Jacqueline; Kelly, Mark C; Muhdar, Simerjyot; Adel-Aziz, Mohammed; Barrett, Iain D; Wildman, Scott S

    2014-09-01

    Quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine are commonly used to treat malaria, however, with associated gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects. These drugs act as antagonists at recombinant 5-HT3 receptors and modulate gut peristalsis. These gastrointestinal side effects may be the result of antagonism at intestinal 5-HT3 receptors. Ileum from male C57BL/6 mice and guinea pigs was mounted longitudinally in organ baths. The concentration-response curves for 5-HT and the selective 5-HT3 agonist 2-Me-5-HT were obtained with 5-HT (pEC50 = 7.57 ± 0.33, 12) more potent (P = 0.004) than 2-Me-5-HT (pEC50 = 5.45 ± 0.58, n = 5) in mouse ileum. There was no difference in potency of 5-HT (pEC50 = 5.42 ± 0.15, n = 8) and 2-Me-5-HT (pIC50 = 5.01 ± 0.55, n = 11) in guinea pig ileum (P > 0.05). Quinine, chloroquine or mefloquine was applied for 10 min and inhibitions prior to submaximal agonist application. In mouse ileum, quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine antagonised 5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 4.9 ± 0.17, n = 7; 4.76 ± 0.14, n = 5; 6.21 ± 0.2, n = 4, correspondingly) with mefloquine most potent (P < 0.05). Quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine antagonised 2-me-5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 6.35 ± 0.11, n = 8; 4.64 ± 0.2, n = 7; 5.11 ± 0.22, n = 6, correspondingly) with quinine most potent (P < 0.05). In guinea-pig ileum, quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine antagonised 5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 5.02 ± 0.15, n = 6; 4.54 ± 0.1, n = 7; 5.32 ± 0.13, n = 5) and 2-me-5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 4.62 ± 0.25, n = 5; 4.56 ± 0.14, n = 6; 5.67 ± 0.12, n = 4) with chloroquine least potent against 5-HT and mefloquine most potent against 2-me-5-HT (P < 0.05). These results support previous studies identifying anti-malarial drugs as antagonists at recombinant 5-HT3 receptors and may also demonstrate the ability of these drugs to influence native 5-HT3 receptor-evoked contractile responses which may account for their associated GI side-effects. PMID:24886883

  16. Resolution Pharmacology: Opportunities for Therapeutic Innovation in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Perretti, Mauro; Leroy, Xavier; Bland, Elliot J; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad

    2015-11-01

    Current medicines for the clinical management of inflammatory diseases act by inhibiting specific enzymes or antagonising specific receptors or blocking their ligands. In the past decade, a new paradigm in our understanding of the inflammatory process has emerged with the appreciation of genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms that are engaged to actively resolve inflammation. The 'resolution of acute inflammation' is enabled by counter-regulatory checkpoints to terminate the inflammatory reaction, promoting healing and repair. It may be possible to harness this knowledge for innovative approaches to the treatment of inflammatory pathologies. Here we discuss current translational attempts to develop agonists at proresolving targets as a strategy to rectify chronic inflammatory status. We reason this new approach will lead to the identification of better drugs that will establish a new branch of pharmacology, 'resolution pharmacology'.

  17. Modulation of motor functions involving central dopaminergic system by L-histidine.

    PubMed

    Paul, V N; Chopra, K; Kulkarni, S K

    2000-10-01

    There exists a possibility of interactions of histaminergic system with other neurotransmitters and their receptors in the central nervous system. Experimental evidences suggest a possible inhibitory influence of histaminergic system on the dopaminergic system. To elucidate the possible interaction between the histaminergic and dopaminergic pathways, we devised a strategy to study their effects on locomotor function and stereotypy behaviour. We investigated the effect of L-histidine, the precursor of histamine, on apomorphine-induced stereotypy and perphenazine-induced catalepsy. Histidine antagonised apomorphine-induced stereotypy. This inhibitory effect of histidine was abolished by both H1- and H2-receptor antagonists, chlorpheniramine and cimetidine, respectively. Perphenazine-induced catalepsy was potentiated by histidine and this effect was inhibited by chlorpheniramine alone but not by cimetidine. These results confirm a possible histamine-dopamine interaction in the modulation of motor functions by the central nervous system.

  18. CGP 36216 is a selective antagonist at GABA(B) presynaptic receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ong, J; Bexis, S; Marino, V; Parker, D A; Kerr, D I; Froestl, W

    2001-03-01

    In rat neocortical preparations maintained in Mg(2+)-free Krebs medium, baclofen depressed the frequency of spontaneous discharges in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50) = 6 microM), sensitive to (3-aminopropyl)ethylphosphinic acid (CGP 36216) (100, 300 and 500 microM) (pA(2) = 3.9 +/- 0.1). By contrast, CGP 36216, up to 1 mM, was ineffective in antagonising baclofen-induced hyperpolarisations, mediated through gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) (GABA(B)) postsynaptic receptors. In electrically stimulated brain slices preloaded with [3H]GABA, CGP 36216 increased [3H]GABA release (IC(50) = 43 microM), which was reversed by baclofen (20 microM). While CGP 36216 is ineffective at GABA(B) postsynaptic receptors, it is appreciably more active at presynaptic receptors.

  19. Alarm pheromone induces stress analgesia via an opioid system in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Núñez, J; Almeida, L; Balderrama, N; Giurfa, M

    1997-12-31

    Changes of the stinging response threshold of Apis mellifera scutellata were measured on foragers fixed on a holder and stimulated with an electric shock as a noxious stimulus. The threshold of responsiveness to the noxious stimulus increased when bees were previously stimulated with isopentyl acetate, which is a main component of the alarm pheromone of the sting chamber. This effect is antagonised by previous injection of naloxone-hydrochloride (Endo Laboratories Inc.). Results suggest that in the honeybee an endogenous opioid system activated by isopentyl acetate is responsible for modulation of perception for nociceptive stimuli. The resulting stress-induced analgesia in the defender bee would reduce its probability of withdrawal thus increasing its efficiency against enemies. PMID:9402618

  20. Antisnake venom activity of ethanolic seed extract of Strychnos nux vomica Linn.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ipshita; Chakravarty, A K; Gomes, A

    2004-05-01

    The whole seed extract of S. nux vomica (in low doses) effectively neutralized Daboia russelii venom induced lethal, haemorrhage, defibrinogenating, PLA2 enzyme activity and Naja kaouthia venom induced lethal, cardiotoxic, neurotoxic, PLA2 enzyme activity. The seed extract potentiated polyvalent snake venom antiserum action in experimental animals. An active compound (SNVNF) was isolated and purified by thin layer chromatography and silica gel column chromatography, which effectively antagonised D. russelii venom induced lethal, haemorrhagic, defibrinogenating, oedema, PLA2 enzyme activity and N. kaouthia induced lethal, cardiotoxic, neurotoxic, PLA, enzyme activity. Polyvalent snake venom antiserum action was significantly potentiated by the active compound. Spectral studies revealed it to be a small, straight chain compound containing methyl and amide radicals. Detailed structure elucidation of the compound (SNVNF) is warranted before its clinical trials as a snake venom antagonist.

  1. Bimodal antagonism of PKA signalling by ARHGAP36

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Rebecca L.; Czajkowski, Maciej T.; Barth, Carolin; Müller, Paul Markus; McShane, Erik; Grunwald, Stephan; Beaudette, Patrick; Mecklenburg, Nora; Volkmer, Rudolf; Zühlke, Kerstin; Dittmar, Gunnar; Selbach, Matthias; Hammes, Annette; Daumke, Oliver; Klussmann, Enno; Urbé, Sylvie; Rocks, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase A is a key mediator of cAMP signalling downstream of G-protein-coupled receptors, a signalling pathway conserved in all eukaryotes. cAMP binding to the regulatory subunits (PKAR) relieves their inhibition of the catalytic subunits (PKAC). Here we report that ARHGAP36 combines two distinct inhibitory mechanisms to antagonise PKA signalling. First, it blocks PKAC activity via a pseudosubstrate motif, akin to the mechanism employed by the protein kinase inhibitor proteins. Second, it targets PKAC for rapid ubiquitin-mediated lysosomal degradation, a pathway usually reserved for transmembrane receptors. ARHGAP36 thus dampens the sensitivity of cells to cAMP. We show that PKA inhibition by ARHGAP36 promotes derepression of the Hedgehog signalling pathway, thereby providing a simple rationale for the upregulation of ARHGAP36 in medulloblastoma. Our work reveals a new layer of PKA regulation that may play an important role in development and disease. PMID:27713425

  2. Structural organisation and chromosomal mapping of the human Id-3 gene.

    PubMed

    Deed, R W; Hirose, T; Mitchell, E L; Santibanez-Koref, M F; Norton, J D

    1994-12-30

    The helix-loop-helix (HLH) family of transcription factors plays a central role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and tumourigenesis. Members of the Id (inhibitor of DNA binding) class of these nuclear proteins are able to heterodimerise with and thereby antagonise the functions of other transcription factors of this family. We report here on the genomic organisation of the human Id3 (HLH 1R21/heir1) gene. Comparison with the two other mammalian Id genes, Id1 and Id2, reveals a highly conserved protein coding gene organisation consistent with evolution from a common, ancestral Id-like gene. In addition, by using a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clone of Id3, we have fine-scale mapped the gene to chromosome band 1p36.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and, using the same FISH technique, we have detected heterogeneity in tumour-associated 1p36 chromosome translocations.

  3. The effects of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, on cognition in rodents and primates.

    PubMed

    Barnes, J M; Costall, B; Coughlan, J; Domeney, A M; Gerrard, P A; Kelly, M E; Naylor, R J; Onaivi, E S; Tomkins, D M; Tyers, M B

    1990-04-01

    The selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, onansetron, has been assessed in three tests of cognition in the mouse, rat and marmoset. In a habituation test in the mouse, ondansetron facilitated performance in young adult and aged animals, and inhibited an impairment in habituation induced by scopolamine, electrolesions or ibotenic acid lesions of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis. Arecoline failed to improve basal performance in young adult mice but inhibited the impairment caused by scopolamine and lesions of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis. In the T-maze reinforced alternation task in rats, ondansetron and arecoline antagonised a scopolamine-induced impairment. In an object discrimination and reversal learning task in the marmoset, assessed using a Wisconsin General Test Apparatus, ondansetron improved performance in a reversal learning task. We conclude that ondansetron potently improves basal performance in rodent and primate tests of cognition and inhibits the impairments in performance caused by cholinergic deficits.

  4. Alkylation of Staurosporine to Derive a Kinase Probe for Fluorescence Applications

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Alexander J. M.; Kellam, Barrie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The natural product staurosporine is a high‐affinity inhibitor of nearly all mammalian protein kinases. The labelling of staurosporine has proven effective as a means of generating protein kinase research tools. Most tools have been generated by acylation of the 4′‐methylamine of the sugar moiety of staurosporine. Herein we describe the alkylation of this group as a first step to generate a fluorescently labelled staurosporine. Following alkylation, a polyethylene glycol linker was installed, allowing subsequent attachment of fluorescein. We report that this fluorescein–staurosporine conjugate binds to cAMP‐dependent protein kinase in the nanomolar range. Furthermore, its binding can be antagonised with unmodified staurosporine as well as ATP, indicating it targets the ATP binding site in a similar fashion to native staurosporine. This reagent has potential application as a screening tool for protein kinases of interest. PMID:27008372

  5. GPR55 and the vascular receptors for cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Hiley, C R; Kaup, S S

    2007-11-01

    CB1 and CB2 receptors mediate most responses to cannabinoids but not some of the cardiovascular actions of endocannabinoids such as anandamide and virodhamine, or those of some synthetic agents, like abnormal cannabidiol (abn-cbd). These agents induce vasorelaxation which is antagonised by rimonabant but only at high concentrations relative to those required to block CB1 receptors. Vasorelaxation to anandamide is sensitive to Pertussis toxin (though that to abn-cbd is not), and so is thought to be mediated by a G protein-coupled receptor through Gi/o. An orphan receptor, GPR55, apparently a cannabinoid receptor, is activated by abn-cbd, but is not the receptor mediating vasorelaxation to this agent, as the response persists in vessels from GPR55 knockout mice. However, the activity of anandamide in GPR55 knockout mice is not yet reported and so the role of GPR55 as a cannabinoid receptor mediating vascular responses has yet to be finalised.

  6. A barbital derivative as an atypical antidepressant drug in mice.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Menez, J F; Colombel, M C; Larousse, C

    1987-05-01

    An isopropyl derivative of barbital (5,5-diethyl-2-(isopropyloxy)pyrimidine-4,6-dione, O2IB) was administered intraperitoneally 30 min before tests in mice. Former experimental investigations have shown that O2IB has an antidepressant psychopharmacological spectrum. It increases toxicity of yohimbine in mice at 175 mg/kg, antagonises from 50 mg/kg on hypothermia induced by a high dose of apomorphine and is active on the behavioural despair test at 125 mg/kg. These effects are those observed with classical antidepressants. Since phenytoin has an antidepressant profile in mice, carbamazepine is active on manic-depressive illness and beta-mimetic drugs are antidepressants, the question presents itself whether isopropylation or anticonvulsive activity is more important for the antidepressant psychopharmacological spectrum, or whether both are of equal importance.

  7. Ban the sunset? Nonpropositional content and regulation of pharmaceutical advertising.

    PubMed

    Biegler, Paul; Vargas, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The risk that direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription pharmaceuticals (DTCA) may increase inappropriate medicine use is well recognized. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration addresses this concern by subjecting DTCA content to strict scrutiny. Its strictures are, however, heavily focused on the explicit claims made in commercials, what we term their "propositional content." Yet research in social psychology suggests advertising employs techniques to influence viewers via nonpropositional content, for example, images and music. We argue that one such technique, evaluative conditioning, is operative in DTCA. We further argue that evaluative conditioning fosters unjustified beliefs about drug safety and efficacy, antagonising the autonomy of viewers' choices about advertised medicines. We conclude that current guidelines are deficient in failing to account for evaluative conditioning, and that more research and debate are needed to determine the permissibility of this and other forms of nonpropositional persuasion. PMID:23557035

  8. Buprenorphine in combination with naloxone at a ratio of 15:1 does not enhance antinociception from buprenorphine in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Slingsby, L S; Murrell, J C; Taylor, P M

    2012-06-01

    Naloxone can enhance the antinociceptive/analgesic effects of buprenorphine in humans and rats. The antinociceptive effects of a patented 15:1 buprenorphine:naloxone combination was investigated in cats using a thermal and mechanical nociceptive model. Twelve cats received buprenorphine 10 μg/kg, naloxone 0.67 μg/kg or a buprenorphine-naloxone combination intramuscularly in a randomised cross over study. Using thermal and mechanical analgesiometry validated in the cat, pre-treatment baselines were measured. Following test drug administration, thresholds were studied for the next 24h. Naloxone did not enhance the thermal antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine. The results from this study are in agreement with previously published work showing that naloxone antagonises the effects of clinically analgesic doses of buprenorphine. Mechanical nociceptive thresholds were not affected by buprenorphine. PMID:22030474

  9. Amelioration by glucose-6-phosphate and NADP of potato glycoalkaloid inhibition in cell, enzyme and liposome assays.

    PubMed

    Roddick, J G; Leonard, A L

    1999-05-01

    Lysis of human erythrocytes by 20 microM chaconine was reduced by 0.5 mM glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and NADP. Both compounds caused approximately 50% inhibition of haemolysis at 1 mM. Glucose, glucose-1-phosphate, rhamnose, galactose and galactose-6-phosphate were ineffective; NAD was effective, although not to the extent of NADP. Of the tested sugars, only G6P reduced solanine-induced haemolysis. G6P also reduced the synergistic haemolytic action of solanine and chaconine in combination. G6P and NADP at or above 5 mM antagonised chaconine-induced betanin loss from excised red beet root discs; NADP was more effective than G6P. Disruption of PC/cholesterol liposomes by chaconine and inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by chaconine or solanine, were unaffected by up to 10 mM NADP or 50 mM G6P.

  10. LRIG1 is a triple threat: ERBB negative regulator, intestinal stem cell marker and tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Poulin, E J; Coffey, R J

    2013-05-14

    In baseball parlance, a triple threat is a person who can run, hit and throw with aplomb. Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1 (LRIG1) is a cell surface protein that antagonises ERBB receptor signalling by downregulating receptor levels. Over 10 years ago, Hedman et al postulated that LRIG1 might be a tumour suppressor. Recently, Powell et al provided in vivo evidence substantiating that claim by demonstrating that Lrig1 loss in mice leads to spontaneously arising, highly penetrant intestinal adenomas. Interestingly, Lrig1 also marks stem cells in the gut, suggesting a potential role for Lrig1 in maintaining intestinal epithelial homeostasis. In this review, we will discuss the ability of LRIG1 to act as a triple threat: pan-ERBB negative regulator, intestinal stem cell marker and tumour suppressor. We will summarise studies of LRIG1 expression in human cancers and discuss possible related roles for LRIG2 and LRIG3.

  11. Noggin4 is a long-range inhibitor of Wnt8 signalling that regulates head development in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Eroshkin, Fedor M.; Nesterenko, Alexey M.; Borodulin, Alexander V.; Martynova, Natalia Yu.; Ermakova, Galina V.; Gyoeva, Fatima K.; Orlov, Eugeny E.; Belogurov, Alexey A.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Bayramov, Andrey V.; Zaraisky, Andrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Noggin4 is a Noggin family secreted protein whose molecular and physiological functions remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that in contrast to other Noggins, Xenopus laevis Noggin4 cannot antagonise BMP signalling; instead, it specifically binds to Wnt8 and inhibits the Wnt/β -catenin pathway. Live imaging demonstrated that Noggin4 diffusivity in embryonic tissues significantly exceeded that of other Noggins. Using the Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) assay and mathematical modelling, we directly estimated the affinity of Noggin4 for Wnt8 in living embryos and determined that Noggin4 fine-tune the Wnt8 posterior-to-anterior gradient. Our results suggest a role for Noggin4 as a unique, freely diffusing, long-range inhibitor of canonical Wnt signalling, thus explaining its ability to promote head development. PMID:26973133

  12. The importance of oxygen in the killing of bacteria by ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, I; Smith, J T

    1994-01-01

    There is an inoculum size effect associated with the bactericidal potency of 4-quinolones. This phenomenon has previously been attributed to anaerobic conditions at high initial inoculum sizes. The level of anaerobicity present with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus at varying initial inoculum size was analysed by measuring dissolved oxygen concentrations and redox potentials. Such measurements confirmed that conditions at high initial inoculum sizes are more anaerobic than conditions at low initial inoculum sizes. The precise concentration of oxygen at which 4-quinolones are no longer able to kill bacteria could not be deduced by either method. The results suggest that extremely low oxygen levels are needed to antagonise 4-quinolone kill. This explains why very stringent conditions are required to render media anaerobic enough to prevent the bactericidal activity of 4-quinolones against bacteria at low initial inoculum sizes.

  13. The tolls and dangers of atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptor-2 and -4 are so far the strongest candidates for initiating innate immune signalling in atherosclerosis. Their signalling has implications for lesion development, foam cell formation, inflammation, matrix degradation and ischemia-reperfusion. The repertoire of TLR agonists is expanding. They collectively represent a conglomerate of structurally diverse molecular patterns requiring a high level of versatility in their sensing. Such versatility is achieved through cooperation of TLR heterodimers, co-receptors, and binding proteins. Several endogenous and exogenous molecular patterns engaging TLRs are associated with atherosclerosis development and complications. In this review, I describe how such molecular patterns are sensed, how they signal and what the consequences in the atherosclerotic plaque might be. The effect of TLR antagonising compounds in human and murine atherosclerosis is also addressed.

  14. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: will etanercept be an improvement over current therapies?

    PubMed

    De Benedetti, F; Ravelli, A

    2000-08-01

    Overexpression of cytokines in inflamed joints plays an important role in joint inflammation and in damage to articular tissue. Biological agents aimed at specifically antagonising tumour necrosis factor (TNF) are effective in the treatment of adult rheumatoid arthritis. A recent trial of etanercept, a genetically engineered fusion protein consisting of the Fc domain of human IgG1 and the TNF receptor p75, has demonstrated that this agent is also well tolerated and effective in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Etanercept offers a promising new alternative for patients with JIA who have persistently active arthritis despite treatment with methotrexate. Further studies are needed to clarify whether etanercept is equally effective in the various onset types of JIA (oligoarthritis, polyarthritis and systemic arthritis), whether it can modify disease progression and whether it can be administered safely for long periods of time to children. PMID:18034561

  15. Rnd proteins: multifunctional regulators of the cytoskeleton and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Riou, Philippe; Villalonga, Priam; Ridley, Anne J

    2010-11-01

    Rnd3/RhoE has two distinct functions, regulating the actin cytoskeleton and cell proliferation. This might explain why its expression is often altered in cancer and by multiple stimuli during development and disease. Rnd3 together with its relatives Rnd1 and Rnd2 are atypical members of the Rho GTPase family in that they do not hydrolyse GTP. Rnd3 and Rnd1 both antagonise RhoA/ROCK-mediated actomyosin contractility, thereby regulating cell migration, smooth muscle contractility and neurite extension. In addition, Rnd3 has been shown to have a separate role in inhibiting cell cycle progression by reducing translation of cell cycle regulators, including cyclin D1 and Myc. We propose that Rnd3 could act as a tumour suppressor to limit proliferation, but when mutations bypass this activity of Rnd3, it can promote cancer invasion through its effects in the actin cytoskeleton.

  16. Involvement of α1B-adrenoceptors in the anti-immobility effect of imipramine in the tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carlos Alberto S; Pupo, André S

    2015-03-01

    Imipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant inhibitor of norepinephrine and serotonin neuronal reuptake. The roles of specific α1-adrenoceptor subtypes that might be targeted by the increased synaptic levels of noradrenaline induced by imipramine are not well understood. This study investigates the α1-adrenoceptor subtypes involved in the anti-immobility effect of imipramine in the mouse tail suspension test. The anti-immobility effect of imipramine (32mg/kg, i.p.) was significantly antagonised by the non-subtype-selective α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (0.5 and 1.0mg/kg, i.p.). Neither the selective α1A-adrenoceptor antagonist 5-methyl-3-[3-[3-[4-[2-(2,2,2,-trifluroethoxy)phenyl]-1-piperazinyl]propyl]-2,4-(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione (RS-100329, 0.5 and 1.0mg/kg) nor the selective α1D-adrenoceptor antagonist 8-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-8-azaspiro[4.5]decane-7,9-dione dihydrochloride, (BMY-7378, up to 1.0mg/kg, i.p.) affected the anti-immobility effect of imipramine. However, the anti-immobility effect of imipramine was significantly antagonised by the selective α1B-adrenoceptor antagonist (2S)-4-(4-amino-6,7-dimethoxy-2-quinazolinyl)-2-[[(1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]carbonyl]-1-piperazinecarboxylate (L-765,314). In addition, mice treated only with RS-100329 or BMY-7378, but not with L-765,314, showed reduced immobility times in comparison to mice treated with vehicle. These results indicate that the selective antagonism of α1A- and α1D-adrenoceptors results in antidepressant-like effects and that the α1B-subtype is the main target for the increased levels of noradrenaline caused by imipramine. PMID:25617795

  17. Comparative activities of the enantiomeric GABA(B) receptor agonists CGP 44532 and 44533 in central and peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Ong, J; Bexis, S; Marino, V; Parker, D A; Kerr, D I; Froestl, W

    2001-01-19

    In neocortical slices maintained in Mg(2+)-free Krebs medium, the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(B)) receptor agonists baclofen, (3-amino-2(S)-hydroxypropyl)methylphosphinic acid (CGP 44532), and its (R)-enantiomer CGP 44533 depressed the frequency of spontaneous discharges in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50)=10, 6.5, and 50 microM, respectively). These effects were reversibly antagonised by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist (+)-(S)-5,5 dimethylmorpholinyl-2-acetic acid (Sch 50911) (3, 10, and 30 microM) (average pA(2) value=6.0+/-0.2). In neocortical wedges, baclofen, CGP 44532 and CGP 44533 elicited concentration-dependent hyperpolarisations (the EC(50)s were 14, 7.5 and 16 microM, respectively) sensitive to Sch 50911 (1, 5, 10 microM) (average pA(2) value=6.0+/-0.1), whilst they also depressed ileal electrically elicited cholinergic twitch contractions (EC(50)=11, 7, and 50 microM) that were antagonised by Sch 50911 (average pA(2) value=6.0+/-0.1). In electrically stimulated brain slices preloaded with [3H]GABA, baclofen, CGP 44532 and CGP 44533 decreased [3H]GABA release (IC(50)=5, 0.45, and 10 microM); this effect was reversed by Sch 50911 (50 microM). It is concluded that CGP 44532 is a far more potent agonist at GABA(B) autoreceptors than at central or peripheral heteroreceptors.

  18. Compound C inhibits in vitro angiogenesis and ameliorates thrombin-induced endothelial barrier failure.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Dursun; Klewer, Matthias; Bauer, Pascal; Tanislav, Christian; Sedding, Daniel; Rohrbach, Susanne; Schulz, Rainer; Aslam, Muhammad

    2015-12-01

    Compound C (comp. C) is a cell-permeable pyrrazolopyrimidine derivative and widely used as adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor to characterise the role of AMPK in various physiological processes. However, its AMPK-independent effects have also been reported. In the present study we investigated the effects of moderate dose (1-10μM) comp. C on endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, in vitro angiogenesis, and endothelial barrier function. Comp. C was unable to inhibit AMPK phosphorylation (activation) induced by metformin and A-769662 in ECs even at concentration of 10μM. At lower concentration (1μM), comp. C inhibited and potentiated the inhibitory effects of metformin and A-769662 on EC proliferation, migration, tube formation, and sprouting without inducing apoptosis. However, at higher concentration (10μM), it strongly induced apoptosis as measured by enhanced caspase 3/7 activity. Moreover, comp. C antagonised thrombin-induced EC hyperpermeability accompanied by activation of Rac1 and strengthening of adherens junctions (AJs). This EC barrier protective effect was not affected by the presence of AMPK activators. The data of the present study demonstrate that long-term treatment of ECs with low concentration comp. C inhibits EC proliferation and angiogenesis without induction of apoptosis. While short-term incubation antagonises thrombin-induced EC hyperpermeability presumably via Rac1-dependent strengthening of AJs. Furthermore, higher concentration of comp. C (10μM or above) is toxic for ECs and warns that this agent should be used with caution to demonstrate the AMPK-mediated effects. PMID:26522925

  19. Role of GABA-ergic and serotonergic systems in the anxiolytic-like mechanism of action of a 5-HT-moduline antagonist in the mouse elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Clénet, Florence; Hascoët, Martine; Fillion, Gilles; Galons, Hervé; Bourin, Michel

    2005-03-30

    5-HT-moduline is an endogenous tetrapeptide, which acts specifically as an antagonist of 5-HT1B auto- and heteroreceptors. HG1 is an ethyl arylmethyloxypiperidine acetate and an antagonist of 5-HT-moduline, which has no 5-HT-moduline agonist effect. In a pilot study, HG1 has demonstrated an anxiolytic-like profile in three mouse models of anxiety (elevated plus maze, light/dark, four plates). The aim of our study was to examine the mechanism of the anxiolytic-like effects of HG1 in the mouse elevated plus maze. Male Swiss mice were acutely administered HG1 at active doses in association with GABA antagonists such as flumazenil, bicuculline and picrotoxine, then, with 5-HT1A (NAN 190, WAY 100635) and 5-HT1B receptor antagonist (methiothepine). Finally, we tried to potentiate non-active doses of HG1 with 5-HT1A (8-OHDPAT) and 5-HT1B receptor agonists (anpirtoline) in the mouse elevated plus maze. Regarding GABA antagonists, only flumazenil antagonised active doses of HG1 in an incomplete manner. Moreover, non-active doses of HG1 were potentiated by low doses of WAY 100635 and by anpirtoline but not by 8-OHDPAT. Finally, the anxiolytic-like effects of HG1 at active doses were antagonised by all serotonergic antagonists (WAY 100635 at higher dose, NAN 190 and methiothepin). HG1 mechanism of action in the mouse elevated plus maze seems to associate a GABA-ergic component exerting a limited regulation of 5-HT neuronal activity and a major serotonergic component, which seems to implicate presynaptic 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors.

  20. Dose-dependent noradrenergic and serotonergic properties of venlafaxine in animal models indicative of antidepressant activity.

    PubMed

    Redrobe, J P; Bourin, M; Colombel, M C; Baker, G B

    1998-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate thoroughly the preclinical psychopharmacological profile of venlafaxine, testing a wide range of doses in animal models indicative of antidepressant-like effects. Venlafaxine was found to be active in mouse forced swimming test (at 8, 16, 32 and 64 mg/kg) and to increase spontaneous locomotor activity (at 16, 32 and 64 mg/kg). Venlafaxine antagonised apomorphine-induced (16 mg/kg) hypothermia (at 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 mg/kg). Pretreatment with PCPA significantly attenuated the anti-immobility effects of venlafaxine (8 and 16mg/kg; P< 0.01) in the mouse forced swimming test. Venlafaxine at a dose of 32 mg/kg remained active, despite PCPA pretreatment. DSP-4 significantly attenuated the anti-immobility effects of venlafaxine (16 mg/kg; P < 0.05), whereas venlafaxine at 32 mg/kg remained active, despite DSP-4 pretreatment. Venlafaxine was active in the forced swimming test when administered at sub-effective doses in combination with (+/-) pindolol (venlafaxine: 1 and 2 mg/kg), RU 24969 (venlafaxine: 1, 2 and 4 mg/kg), 8-OH-DPAT (venlafaxine: 4 mg/kg), clonidine (venlafaxine: 1, 2 and 4 mg/kg), lithium (venlafaxine: 1, 2, and 4 mg/kg) and quinine (venlafaxine: 1 and 2 mg/kg). Prior administration with NAN-190 antagonised the anti-immobility effects of venlafaxine (8, 16 and 32 mg/kg). Interaction studies did not induce changes in locomotor activity. The results of the present study indicated that, at low doses, venlafaxine inhibited serotonin reuptake, while at higher doses it inhibited both serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake.

  1. The vasodilator papaverine stimulates L-type Ca(2+) current in rat tail artery myocytes via a PKA-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Fabio; Manetti, Fabrizio; Durante, Miriam; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Saponara, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Papaverine is an opium alkaloid, primarily used as an antispasmodic drug and as a cerebral and coronary vasodilator. Its phosphodiesterase inhibitory activity promotes increase of cAMP levels mainly in the cytosol. As cAMP is known to modulate L-type Ca(2+) channel activity, here we tested the proposition that papaverine could affect vascular channel function. An in-depth analysis of the effect of papaverine on Ba(2+) or Ca(2+) current through L-type Ca(2+) channel [IBa(L) or ICa(L)], performed in rat tail artery myocytes using either the whole-cell or the perforated patch-clamp method, was accompanied by a functional study on rat aorta rings. Papaverine increased current amplitude under both the perforated or whole-cell configuration. Stimulation of the current by papaverine was concentration-, Vh-, frequency-, and charge carrier-dependent, and fully reverted by drug washout. The PKA inhibitor H89, but not the PKG inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cGMPS, antagonised papaverine- as well as IBMX- (another phosphodiesterase inhibitor) induced IBa(L) stimulation. In cells pre-treated with IBMX, application of papaverine failed to increase current amplitude. Papaverine sped up the inactivation kinetics of IBa(L), though only at concentrations ≥ 30 μM, and shifted the voltage dependence of the inactivation curve to more negative potentials. In rings, the vasorelaxing activity of papaverine was enhanced by previous treatment with nifedipine. In conclusion, papaverine stimulates vascular L-type Ca(2+) channel via a PKA-dependent mechanism, thus antagonising its main vasodilating activity. PMID:26586313

  2. HOXC6 is transcriptionally regulated via coordination of MLL histone methylase and estrogen receptor under estrogen environment

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Hussain, Imran; Shrestha, Bishakha; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2011-01-01

    Homeobox containing gene HOXC6 is a critical player in mammary gland development, milk production and is overexpressed in breast and prostate cancer. We demonstrated that HOXC6 is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen (E2). HOXC6 promoter contains two putative estrogen-response elements (EREs), termed as ERE11/2 and ERE21/2. Promoter analysis using luciferase based reporter assay demonstrated that both EREs are responsive to E2, ERE11/2 being more responsive than ERE21/2. Estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, bind to these EREs in an E2-dependent manner and antisense-mediated knockdown of ERs suppressed the E2-dependent activation of HOXC6 expression. Similarly, knockdown of histone methylases, MLL2 and MLL3, decreased E2-mediated activation of HOXC6. However, depletion of MLL1 or MLL4 showed no significant effect. MLL2 and MLL3 were bound to the HOXC6 EREs in an E2-dependent manner. In contrast, MLL1 and MLL4 that were bound to the HOXC6 promoter in the absence of E2, decreased upon exposure to E2. MLL2 and MLL3 play key roles in histone H3K4-trimethylation and recruitment of general transcription factors and RNAP II in the HOXC6 promoter during E2-dependent transactivation. Nuclear receptor corepressors N-CoR and SAFB1 were bound in the HOXC6 promoter in absence of E2 and that binding were decreased upon E2-treatment indicating their critical roles in suppressing HOXC6 gene expression under non-activated condition. Knockdown of either ERα or ERβ abolished E2-dependent recruitment of MLL2 and MLL3 into the HOXC6 promoter demonstrating key roles of ERs in recruitment of these MLLs into HOXC6 promoter. Overall, our studies demonstrated that HOXC6 is an estrogen-responsive gene and histone methylases MLL2 and MLL3, in coordination with ERα and ERβ, transcriptionally regulate HOXC6 in an E2-dependent manner. PMID:21683083

  3. Astrocytic estrogen receptors and impaired neurotrophic responses in a rat model of perimenopause

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Todd E.; Finch, Caleb E.

    2015-01-01

    In a perimenopausal model of middle-aged rats, the astrocyte estrogen receptor-alpha (ERa): ER-beta (ERb) ratio increased with the onset of acyclicity (constant estrus, CE) in association with impaired neurotrophic responses to estradiol (E2). We report additional data on irregular cycling (IR) from this study of 9 month old perimenopausal subgroups. In particular, irregular cyclers (IR) also show increased ERa:ERb ratio in cerebral cortex astrocytes comparable to acyclic individuals in CE. In mixed glial cultures from these same cycling subgroups, the E2-dependent neurotrophic activity and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) repression by E2 were impaired in IR to the same degree as in CE-derived glia. The greater importance of cycling status than age during the perimenopause to astrocyte ERs are attributable to individual variations of the residual ovarian follicle pool, which determine the onset of acyclicity. The corresponding loss of E2-dependent GFAP repression and E2-dependent neurotrophic activity add further to the inverse relationship of GFAP expression and astrocyte neurotrophic activity across aging in both sexes. These findings are relevant to impairments of spatial learning and of hippocampal long-term potentiation during the onset of IR in middle-aged rats, and to perimenopausal factors mediating the higher risk of women for Alzheimer disease. PMID:26483679

  4. Identification of an estrogen receptor α non covalent ubiquitin-binding surface: role in 17β-estradiol-induced transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Pesiri, Valeria; La Rosa, Piergiorgio; Stano, Pasquale; Acconcia, Filippo

    2013-06-15

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-binding domains (UBDs) located in Ub receptors decode the ubiquitination signal by non-covalently engaging the Ub modification on their binding partners and transduce the Ub signalling through Ub-based molecular interactions. In this way, inducible protein ubiquitination regulates diverse biological processes. The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the pleiotropic effects of the sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2). Fine regulation of E2 pleiotropic actions depends on E2-dependent ERα association with a plethora of binding partners and/or on the E2 modulation of receptor ubiquitination. Indeed, E2-induced ERα polyubiquitination triggers receptor degradation and transcriptional activity, and E2-dependent reduction in ERα monoubiquitination is crucial for E2 signalling. Monoubiquitinated proteins often contain UBDs, but whether non-covalent Ub-ERα binding could occur and play a role in E2-ERα signalling is unknown. Here, we report an Ub-binding surface within the ERα ligand binding domain that directs in vitro the receptor interaction with both ubiquitinated proteins and recombinant Ub chains. Mutational analysis reveals that ERα residues leucine 429 and alanine 430 are involved in Ub binding. Moreover, impairment of ERα association to ubiquitinated species strongly affects E2-induced ERα transcriptional activity. Considering the importance of UBDs in the Ub-based signalling network and the central role of different ERα binding partners in the modulation of E2-dependent effects, our discoveries provide novel insights into ERα activity that could also be relevant for ERα-dependent diseases.

  5. Protective Role of Rheum Tanguticum Polysaccharide 1 in Radiation- induced Intestinal Mucosal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin-Na; Shi, Lei; Li, Shi-Cao; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Pei

    2015-01-01

    The protective effects of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide 1 (RTP1), which is extracted from the Chinese traditional medicine Rheum tanguticum, on radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury was investigated. Rat intestinal crypt epithelial cells (IEC-6 cells) and Sprague-Dawley rats were each divided into control, irradiated and RTP1-pretreated irradiated groups. After irradiation, cell survival was determined by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide). assay, and the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected by fluorescent probe method. Apoptosis was observed by acridine orange staining, and cell cycle was analysed by flow cytometry. Histological analysis of the rat intestinal mucosa was conducted by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Irradiation at 8 Gy(Gray) decreased cell survival rate to only 54%, significantly increased intracellular ROS levels and induced apoptosis. RTP1 pretreatment significantly inhibited cell death, reduced the formation of intracellular ROS and partially inhibited apoptosis. Irradiation markedly reduced the height and quantity of rat intestinal villi, but it could be antagonised by RTP1 pretreatment. RTP1 can promote the recovery of intestinal mucosa damage, possibly by inhibiting radiation-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis and intracellular ROS production. PMID:26330871

  6. A subcellular tug of war involving three MYB-like proteins underlies a molecular antagonism in Antirrhinum flower asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Raimundo, João; Sobral, Rómulo; Bailey, Paul; Azevedo, Herlânder; Galego, Lisete; Almeida, Jorge; Coen, Enrico; Costa, Maria Manuela R

    2013-08-01

    The establishment of meristematic domains with different transcriptional activity is essential for many developmental processes. The asymmetry of the Antirrhinum majus flower is established by transcription factors with an asymmetric pattern of activity. To understand how this asymmetrical pattern is established, we studied the molecular mechanism through which the dorsal MYB protein RADIALIS (RAD) restricts the activity of the MYB transcription factor DIVARICATA (DIV) to the ventral region of the flower meristem. We show that RAD competes with DIV for binding with other MYB-like proteins, termed DRIF1 and DRIF2 (DIV- and-RAD-interacting-factors). DRIF1 and DIV interact to form a protein complex that binds to the DIV-DNA consensus region, suggesting that the DRIFs act as co-regulators of DIV transcriptional activity. In the presence of RAD, the interaction between DRIF1 and DIV bound to DNA is disrupted. Moreover, the DRIFs are sequestered in the cytoplasm by RAD, thus, preventing or reducing the formation of DRIF-DIV heterodimers in the nuclei. Our results suggest that in the dorsal region of the Antirrhinum flower meristem the dorsal protein RAD antagonises the activity of the ventral identity protein DIV in a subcellular competition for a DRIF protein promoting the establishment of the asymmetric pattern of gene activity in the Antirrhinum flower.

  7. Neuropharmacology of 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Richard Green, A

    2006-01-01

    This review outlines the history of our knowledge of the neuropharmacology of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin), focusing primarily on the work of U.K. scientists. The existence of a vasoconstrictive substance in the blood has been known for over 135 years. The substance was named serotonin and finally identified as 5-HT in 1949. The presence of 5-HT in the brain was reported by Gaddum in 1954 and it was Gaddum who also demonstrated that the action of 5-HT (in the gut) was antagonised by the potent hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide. This provoked the notion that 5-HT played a pivotal role in the control of mood and subsequent investigations have generally confirmed this hypothesis. Over the last 50 years a good understanding has been gained of the mechanisms involved in control of the storage, synthesis and degradation of 5-HT in the brain. Knowledge has also been gained on control of the functional activity of this monoamine, often by the use of behavioural models. A considerable literature also now exists on the mechanisms by which many of the drugs used to treat psychiatric illness alter the functional activity of 5-HT, particularly the drugs used to treat depression. Over the last 20 years the number of identified 5-HT receptor subtypes has increased from 2 to 14, or possibly more. A major challenge now is to utilise this knowledge to develop receptor-specific drugs and use the information gained to better treat central nervous system disorders. PMID:16402098

  8. Isolation of a haemorrhagic protein toxin (SA-HT) from the Indian venomous butterfish (Scatophagus argus, Linn) sting extract.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, S; Muhuri, D C; Dasgupta, S C; Nagchaudhuri, A K; Gomes, A

    2004-05-01

    A haemorrhagic protein toxin (SA-HT) was isolated and purified from the spine extract of the Indian venomous butterfish, S. argus Linn, by two step ion exchange chromatography. The toxin was homogeneous in native and SDS-PAGE gel. SDS-molecular weight of the toxin was found to be 18.1 +/- 0.09 kDa. SA-HT produced severe haemorrhage on stomach wall but devoid of cutaneous haemorrhage. UV, EDTA, trypsin, protease, cyproheptadine, indomethacin, acetylsalicylic acid and BW755C treatment significantly antagonized the haemorrhagic activity of SA-HT. The toxin produced dose and time dependent oedema on mice hind paw, which was significantly encountered by cyproheptadine, indomethacin and BW755C. SA-HT increased capillary permeability on guinea pig dorsal flank. On isolated guineapig ileum, rat fundus and uterus, SA-HT produced slow contraction which was completely antagonised by prostaglandin blocker SC19220. On isolated rat duodenum, SA-HT produced slow relaxation. SA-HT significantly increased plasma plasmin, serum MDA level and decreased serum SOD level indicating the possible involvement of cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway.

  9. Potential Role of Caffeine in the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roshan, Mohsin H.K.; Tambo, Amos; Pace, Nikolai P.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease [PD] is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease, affecting 1% of the population over the age of 55. The underlying neuropathology seen in PD is characterised by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta with the presence of Lewy bodies. The Lewy bodies are composed of aggregates of α-synuclein. The motor manifestations of PD include a resting tremor, bradykinesia, and muscle rigidity. Currently there is no cure for PD and motor symptoms are treated with a number of drugs including levodopa [L-dopa]. These drugs do not delay progression of the disease and often provide only temporary relief. Their use is often accompanied by severe adverse effects. Emerging evidence from both in vivo and in vitro studies suggests that caffeine may reduce parkinsonian motor symptoms by antagonising the adenosine A2A receptor, which is predominately expressed in the basal ganglia. It is hypothesised that caffeine may increase the excitatory activity in local areas by inhibiting the astrocytic inflammatory processes but evidence remains inconclusive. In addition, the co-administration of caffeine with currently available PD drugs helps to reduce drug tolerance, suggesting that caffeine may be used as an adjuvant in treating PD. In conclusion, caffeine may have a wide range of therapeutic effects which are yet to be explored, and therefore warrants further investigation in randomized clinical trials. PMID:27563362

  10. Asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Calverley, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is now recognised to be a major cause of morbidity and even mortality in people of all ages. Two important ideas have changed our approach to asthma management. The first is understanding that asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder which needs regular treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs such as inhaled corticosteroids to prevent further attacks. The second development is the availability of prescribable peak flow meters, which allows both confident diagnosis and early prediction of relapse. Asthma management guidelines provide a logical treatment framework for most patients, but a few difficult cases still consume large amounts of medical time. The commonest problem is one of compliance with treatment which may respond to patient education, although this is not universally so. Other problems include misdiagnosis, acid reflux and, rarely, true corticosteroid-resistant asthma. Several potentially important new treatments have been developed. These include longer acting anticholinergic drugs, drugs with bronchodilator and some anti-inflammatory properties which antagonise or inhibit the production of leukotrienes, sub-types of phosphodiesterase inhibitor with anti-inflammatory properties and immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin. Ultimately these new treatments must be rigorously tested and integrated into a care plan that remains centred on patient education. PMID:8746278

  11. PP2ACdc55’s role in reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis in budding yeast is independent of its FEAR function

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Gary W.; Wong, Jin Huei; Arumugam, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    PP2ACdc55 is a highly conserved serine-threonine protein phosphatase that is involved in diverse cellular processes. In budding yeast, meiotic cells lacking PP2ACdc55 activity undergo a premature exit from meiosis I which results in a failure to form bipolar spindles and divide nuclei. This defect is largely due to its role in negatively regulating the Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR) pathway. PP2ACdc55 prevents nucleolar release of the Cdk (Cyclin-dependent kinase)-antagonising phosphatase Cdc14 by counteracting phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein Net1 by Cdk. CDC55 was identified in a genetic screen for monopolins performed by isolating suppressors of spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality suggesting that Cdc55 might have a role in meiotic chromosome segregation. We investigated this possibility by isolating cdc55 alleles that suppress spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality and show that this suppression is independent of PP2ACdc55’s FEAR function. Although the suppressor mutations in cdc55 affect reductional chromosome segregation in the absence of recombination, they have no effect on chromosome segregation during wild type meiosis. We suggest that Cdc55 is required for reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis and this is independent of its FEAR function. PMID:27455870

  12. PP2A(Cdc55)'s role in reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis in budding yeast is independent of its FEAR function.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Gary W; Wong, Jin Huei; Arumugam, Prakash

    2016-07-26

    PP2A(Cdc55) is a highly conserved serine-threonine protein phosphatase that is involved in diverse cellular processes. In budding yeast, meiotic cells lacking PP2A(Cdc55) activity undergo a premature exit from meiosis I which results in a failure to form bipolar spindles and divide nuclei. This defect is largely due to its role in negatively regulating the Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR) pathway. PP2A(Cdc55) prevents nucleolar release of the Cdk (Cyclin-dependent kinase)-antagonising phosphatase Cdc14 by counteracting phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein Net1 by Cdk. CDC55 was identified in a genetic screen for monopolins performed by isolating suppressors of spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality suggesting that Cdc55 might have a role in meiotic chromosome segregation. We investigated this possibility by isolating cdc55 alleles that suppress spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality and show that this suppression is independent of PP2A(Cdc55)'s FEAR function. Although the suppressor mutations in cdc55 affect reductional chromosome segregation in the absence of recombination, they have no effect on chromosome segregation during wild type meiosis. We suggest that Cdc55 is required for reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis and this is independent of its FEAR function.

  13. Reversal of Dabigatran Using Idarucizumab in a Septic Patient with Impaired Kidney Function in Real-Life Practice.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Thomas C; Blum, Sina; Nagler, Michael; Schlittler, Fabian L; Ricklin, Meret E; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2016-01-01

    Background. Immediate reversal of anticoagulation is essential when facing severe bleeding or emergency surgery. Although idarucizumab is approved for the reversal of dabigatran in many countries, clinical experiences are lacking, particularly in special patient-populations such as sepsis and impaired renal function. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 67-year-old male septic patient with a multilocular facial abscess and chronic kidney disease (GFR 36.5 mL/min). Thrombin time (TT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) 15 hours after the last intake of 150 mg dabigatran were both prolonged (>120 sec, resp., 61 sec), as well as unbound dabigatran concentration (119.05 ng/mL). Before immediate emergency surgery dabigatran was antagonised using idarucizumab 2 × 2.5 g. Dabigatran concentration was not detectable 10 min after idarucizumab administration (<30 ng/mL). TT and aPTT time were normalised (16.2 sec, resp., 30.2 sec). Sepsis was controlled after surgery and kidney function remained stable. In the absence of postoperative bleeding, dabigatran was restarted 36 hours after admission. Conclusion. Idarucizumab successfully reversed the effect of dabigatran in real-life practice in a patient with sepsis and renal impairment and allowed emergency surgery with normal haemostasis. Efficacy and safety in real-life practice will nevertheless require prospective registries monitoring.

  14. Reversal of Dabigatran Using Idarucizumab in a Septic Patient with Impaired Kidney Function in Real-Life Practice

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Sina; Nagler, Michael; Schlittler, Fabian L.; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Immediate reversal of anticoagulation is essential when facing severe bleeding or emergency surgery. Although idarucizumab is approved for the reversal of dabigatran in many countries, clinical experiences are lacking, particularly in special patient-populations such as sepsis and impaired renal function. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 67-year-old male septic patient with a multilocular facial abscess and chronic kidney disease (GFR 36.5 mL/min). Thrombin time (TT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) 15 hours after the last intake of 150 mg dabigatran were both prolonged (>120 sec, resp., 61 sec), as well as unbound dabigatran concentration (119.05 ng/mL). Before immediate emergency surgery dabigatran was antagonised using idarucizumab 2 × 2.5 g. Dabigatran concentration was not detectable 10 min after idarucizumab administration (<30 ng/mL). TT and aPTT time were normalised (16.2 sec, resp., 30.2 sec). Sepsis was controlled after surgery and kidney function remained stable. In the absence of postoperative bleeding, dabigatran was restarted 36 hours after admission. Conclusion. Idarucizumab successfully reversed the effect of dabigatran in real-life practice in a patient with sepsis and renal impairment and allowed emergency surgery with normal haemostasis. Efficacy and safety in real-life practice will nevertheless require prospective registries monitoring. PMID:27547476

  15. Phaeobacter inhibens as biocontrol agent against Vibrio vulnificus in oyster models.

    PubMed

    Porsby, Cisse Hedegaard; Gram, Lone

    2016-08-01

    Molluscan shellfish can cause food borne diseases and here we investigated if addition of Vibrio-antagonising bacteria could reduce Vibrio vulnificus in model oyster systems and prevent its establishment in live animals. Phaeobacter inhibens, which produces an antibacterial compound, tropodithietic acid (TDA), inhibited V. vulnificus as did pure TDA (MIC of 1-3.9 μM). P. inhibens DSM 17395 (at 10(6) cfu/ml) eradicated 10(5) cfu/ml V. vulnificus CMCP6 (a rifampicin resistant variant) from a co-culture oyster model system (oyster juice) whereas the pathogen grew to 10(7) cfu/ml when co-cultured with a TDA negative Phaeobacter mutant. P. inhibens grew well in oyster juice to 10(8) CFU/ml and sterile filtered samples from these cultures were inhibitory to Vibrio spp. P. inhibens established itself in live European flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) and remained at 10(5) cfu/g for five days. However, the presence of P. inhibens could not prevent subsequently added V. vulnificus from entering the live animals, likely because of too low levels of the biocontrol strain. Whilst the oyster model studies provided indication that P. inhibens DSM 17395 could be a good candidate as biocontrol agent against V. vulnificus further optimization is need in the actual animal rearing situation. PMID:27052703

  16. Induction of metamorphosis from the larval to the polyp stage is similar in Hydrozoa and a subgroup of Scyphozoa (Cnidaria, Semaeostomeae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefker, Barbara; Kroiher, Michael; Berking, Stefan

    2000-12-01

    Larvae of cnidarians need an external cue for metamorphosis to start. The larvae of various hydrozoa, in particular of Hydractinia echinata, respond to Cs+, Li+, NH4 + and seawater in which the concentration of Mg2+ ions is reduced. They further respond to the phorbolester, tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and the diacylglycerol (DAG) diC8, which both are argued to stimulate a protein kinase C. The only well-studied scyphozoa, Cassiopea spp., respond differently, i.e. to TPA and diC8 only. We found that larvae of the scyphozoa Aurelia aurita, Chrysaora hysoscella and Cyanea lamarckii respond to all the compounds mentioned. Trigonelline ( N-methylnicotinic acid), a metamorphosis inhibitor found in Hydractinia larvae, is assumed to act by delivering a methyl group for transmethylation processes antagonising metamorphosis induction in Chrysaora hysoscella and Cyanea lamarckii. The three species tested are scyphozoa belonging to the subgroup of semaeostomeae, while Cassiopea spp. belong to the rhizostomeae. The results obtained may contribute to the discussion concerning the evolution of cnidarians and may help to clarify whether the way metamorphosis can be induced in rhizostomeae as a whole is different from that in hydrozoa and those scyphozoa belonging to the subgroup semaeostomeae.

  17. 3-Chloro,4-methoxyfendiline is a potent GABA(B) receptor potentiator in rat neocortical slices.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jennifer; Parker, David A S; Marino, Victor; Kerr, David I B; Puspawati, Ni Made; Prager, Rolf H

    2005-01-10

    Using grease-gap recording from rat neocortical slices, the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen elicited reversible and concentration-dependent hyperpolarizing responses (EC50=18+/-2.3 microM). The hyperpolarizations were antagonised by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist Sch 50911 [(+)-(S)-5,5-dimethylmorpholinyl-2-acetic acid). (+)-N-1-(3-chloro-4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl-3,3-diphenylpropylamine (3-chloro,4-methoxyfendiline; 3-Cl,4-MeO-fendiline) reversibly potentiated baclofen-induced hyperpolarizing responses, which were reduced by Sch 50911, producing leftward shifts of the baclofen concentration-response curves, with a marked increase in the maximal hyperpolarization (EC50=2+/-0.5 microM). In slices preincubated with either [3H]GABA or [3H]glutamic acid, 3-Cl,4-MeO-fendiline (1 microM) potentiated the inhibitory effect of baclofen (2 microM) on the electrically evoked release of [3H]GABA and had a similar effect on the release of [3H]glutamic acid at a concentration of 0.5 microM, without affecting the basal release. These effects were blocked by Sch 50911 (10 microM). Our findings suggest that 3-Cl,4-MeO-fendiline is a potent potentiator of pre- and postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor-mediated functions.

  18. Development of Novel Activin-Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Justin L; Walton, Kelly L; Al-Musawi, Sara L; Kelly, Emily K; Qian, Hongwei; La, Mylinh; Lu, Louis; Lovrecz, George; Ziemann, Mark; Lazarus, Ross; El-Osta, Assam; Gregorevic, Paul; Harrison, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Soluble activin type II receptors (ActRIIA/ActRIIB), via binding to diverse TGF-β proteins, can increase muscle and bone mass, correct anemia or protect against diet-induced obesity. While exciting, these multiple actions of soluble ActRIIA/IIB limit their therapeutic potential and highlight the need for new reagents that target specific ActRIIA/IIB ligands. Here, we modified the activin A and activin B prodomains, regions required for mature growth factor synthesis, to generate specific activin antagonists. Initially, the prodomains were fused to the Fc region of mouse IgG2A antibody and, subsequently, “fastener” residues (Lys45, Tyr96, His97, and Ala98; activin A numbering) that confer latency to other TGF-β proteins were incorporated. For the activin A prodomain, these modifications generated a reagent that potently (IC50 5 nmol/l) and specifically inhibited activin A signaling in vitro, and activin A-induced muscle wasting in vivo. Interestingly, the modified activin B prodomain inhibited both activin A and B signaling in vitro (IC50 ~2 nmol/l) and in vivo, suggesting it could serve as a general activin antagonist. Importantly, unlike soluble ActRIIA/IIB, the modified prodomains did not inhibit myostatin or GDF-11 activity. To underscore the therapeutic utility of specifically antagonising activin signaling, we demonstrate that the modified activin prodomains promote significant increases in muscle mass. PMID:25399825

  19. C-Peptide and its intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2009-01-01

    Although long believed to be inert, C-peptide has now been shown to have definite biological effects both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic animals and in patients with type 1 diabetes. These effects point to a protective action of C-peptide against the development of diabetic microvascular complications. Underpinning these observations is undisputed evidence of C-peptide binding to a variety of cell types at physiologically relevant concentrations, and the downstream stimulation of multiple cell signaling pathways and gene transcription via the activation of numerous transcription factors. These pathways affect such fundamental cellular processes as re-absorptive and/or secretory phenotype, migration, growth, and survival. Whilst the receptor remains to be identified, experimental data points strongly to the existence of a specific G-protein-coupled receptor for C-peptide. Of the cell types studied so far, kidney tubular cells express the highest number of C-peptide binding sites. Accordingly, C-peptide exerts major effects on the function of these cells, and in the context of diabetic nephropathy appears to antagonise the pathophysiological effects of major disease mediators such as TGFbeta1 and TNFalpha. Therefore, based on its cellular activity profile C-peptide appears well positioned for development as a therapeutic tool to treat microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes. PMID:20039003

  20. Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 counteracts morphine-induced analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Boban Blagaic, A; Turcic, P; Blagaic, V; Dubovecak, M; Jelovac, N; Zemba, M; Radic, B; Becejac, T; Stancic Rokotov, D; Sikiric, P

    2009-12-01

    Previously, the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, (PL 14736, Pliva) has been shown to have several beneficial effects, it exert gastroprotective, anti-inflammatory actions, stimulates would healing and has therapeutic value in inflammatory bowel disease. The present study aimed to study the effect of naloxone and BPC 157 on morphine-induced antinociceptive action in hot plate test in the mouse. It was found that naloxone and BPC 157 counteracted the morphine (16 mg/kg s.c.) - analgesia. Naloxone (10 mg/kg s.c.) immediately antagonised the analgesic action and the reaction time returned to the basic values, the development of BPC 157-induced action (10 pg/kg, 10 ng/kg, 10 microg/kg i.p.) required 30 minutes. When haloperidol, a central dopamine-antagonist (1 mg/kg i.p.), enhanced morphine-analgesia, BPC 157 counteracted this enhancement and naloxone reestablished the basic values of pain reaction. BPC 157, naloxone, and haloperidol per se failed to exert analgesic action. In summary, interaction between dopamine-opioid systems was demonstrated in analgesia, BPC 157 counteracted the haloperidol-induced enhancement of the antinociceptive action of morphine, indicating that BPC acts mainly through the central dopaminergic system. PMID:20388962

  1. Interaction between μ-opioid and 5-HT1A receptors in the regulation of panic-related defensive responses in the rat dorsal periaqueductal grey.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Marcel P; Zangrossi, Hélio; Roncon, Camila M; Graeff, Frederico G; Audi, Elisabeth A

    2014-12-01

    A wealth of evidence indicates that the activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal grey matter (dPAG) inhibits escape, a panic-related defensive behaviour. Results that were previously obtained with the elevated T-maze test of anxiety/panic suggest that 5-HT1A and μ-opioid receptors in this midbrain area work together to regulate this response. To investigate the generality of this finding, we assessed whether the same cooperative mechanism is engaged when escape is evoked by a different aversive stimulus electrical stimulation of the dPAG. Administration of the μ-receptor blocker CTOP into the dPAG did not change the escape threshold, but microinjection of the μ-receptor agonist DAMGO (0.3 and 0.5 nmol) or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OHDPAT (1.6 nmol) increased this index, indicating a panicolytic-like effect. Pretreatment with CTOP antagonised the anti-escape effect of 8-OHDPAT. Additionally, combined administration of subeffective doses of DAMGO and 8-OHDPAT increased the escape threshold, indicating drug synergism. Therefore, regardless of the aversive nature of the stimulus, μ-opioid and 5-HT1A receptors cooperatively act to regulate escape behaviour. A better comprehension of this mechanism might allow for new therapeutic strategies for panic disorder.

  2. The Quintiles Prize Lecture 2004. The identification of the adenosine A2B receptor as a novel therapeutic target in asthma.

    PubMed

    Holgate, Stephen T

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine is a powerful bronchoconstrictor of asthmatic, but not normal, airways. In vitro studies on isolated human mast cells and basophils revealed that adenosine and selective analogues augmented inflammatory mediator release from mast cells by stimulating A(2) receptors. Pharmacological blockade of mast cell mediator release in vivo also attenuated adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, as did theophylline, by adenosine A(2) receptor antagonism. Further in vitro studies revealed that the asthmatic response to adenosine is likely to be mediated via the A(2B) subtype which is selectively antagonised by enprofylline. Studies in animal models, especially mice, have shown a close synergistic interaction between adenosine, Th2 and airway remodelling responses. The recent description of A(2B) receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells that mediate cytokine and chemokine release and induce differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts strengthens the view that adenosine maybe more than an inflammatory mediator in asthma but also participates in airway wall remodelling in this disease. These data have provided a firm basis for developing adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonists as a new therapeutic approach to this disease.

  3. The Quintiles Prize Lecture 2004: The identification of the adenosine A2B receptor as a novel therapeutic target in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Holgate, Stephen T

    2005-01-01

    Adenosine is a powerful bronchoconstrictor of asthmatic, but not normal, airways. In vitro studies on isolated human mast cells and basophils revealed that adenosine and selective analogues augmented inflammatory mediator release from mast cells by stimulating A2 receptors. Pharmacological blockade of mast cell mediator release in vivo also attenuated adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, as did theophylline, by adenosine A2 receptor antagonism. Further in vitro studies revealed that the asthmatic response to adenosine is likely to be mediated via the A2B subtype which is selectively antagonised by enprofylline. Studies in animal models, especially mice, have shown a close synergistic interaction between adenosine, Th2 and airway remodelling responses. The recent description of A2B receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells that mediate cytokine and chemokine release and induce differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts strengthens the view that adenosine maybe more than an inflammatory mediator in asthma but also participates in airway wall remodelling in this disease. These data have provided a firm basis for developing adenosine A2B receptor antagonists as a new therapeutic approach to this disease. PMID:15980878

  4. Integrated β-catenin, BMP, PTEN, and Notch signalling patterns the nephron

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Nils O; Lawrence, Melanie L; Burn, Sally F; Johansson, Jeanette A; Bakker, Elvira RM; Ridgway, Rachel A; Chang, C-Hong; Karolak, Michele J; Oxburgh, Leif; Headon, Denis J; Sansom, Owen J; Smits, Ron; Davies, Jamie A; Hohenstein, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The different segments of the nephron and glomerulus in the kidney balance the processes of water homeostasis, solute recovery, blood filtration, and metabolite excretion. When segment function is disrupted, a range of pathological features are presented. Little is known about nephron patterning during embryogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate that the early nephron is patterned by a gradient in β-catenin activity along the axis of the nephron tubule. By modifying β-catenin activity, we force cells within nephrons to differentiate according to the imposed β-catenin activity level, thereby causing spatial shifts in nephron segments. The β-catenin signalling gradient interacts with the BMP pathway which, through PTEN/PI3K/AKT signalling, antagonises β-catenin activity and promotes segment identities associated with low β-catenin activity. β-catenin activity and PI3K signalling also integrate with Notch signalling to control segmentation: modulating β-catenin activity or PI3K rescues segment identities normally lost by inhibition of Notch. Our data therefore identifies a molecular network for nephron patterning. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04000.001 PMID:25647637

  5. The secretagogue effect of the poison from Centruroides limpidus limpidus on the pancreas of mice and the antagonistic action of the Bouvardia ternifolia extract.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ferrer, E; Reynosa-Zapata, I; Pérez-Torres, Y; Tortoriello, J

    2005-01-01

    In Mexican traditional medicine the plant species Bouvardia ternifolia is used as remedy to treat patients who have been stung by scorpions. In the preceding study, the methanol extract from the roots of this plant was capable of reducing the poisonous effect of Centruroides limpidus limpidus on mice. The poisoning from scorpion C. limpidus limpidus includes manifestations associated with the pancreatitis. This study evaluated the effect produced by the hexane and methanol extract from the root of B. ternifolia upon the acutely inflamed pancreas induced by the venom of C. limpidus limpidus on rats, and the release of amylase in the isolated pancreas of mice. The intravenous administration of venom induced the extravasation of labelled albumin, in a dose dependant manner. The pre-administration of both extracts of Bouvardia ternifolia reduced significantly (p < 0.05) the extravasation by 60%. Upon measuring the secretagogue effect of the venom in the isolated pancreas of mice, the EC50 of the venom was 3.76 x 10(-3) mg ml(-1), whilst in the presence of the methanol and hexane extracts, this EC50 was 9.13 x 10(-3) mg ml(-1) and 0.01629 mg ml(-1). In conclusion, the C. limpidus limpidus venom possesses a secretagogue effect of amylase on the pancreas of mice and produces an inflamed pancreas which is effectively antagonised by the hexane and methanol extracts from the roots of B. ternifolia.

  6. Identification and evaluation of agents isolated from traditionally used herbs against Ophiophagus hannah venom.

    PubMed

    Salama, R; Sattayasai, J; Gande, A K; Sattayasai, N; Davis, M; Lattmann, E

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was firstly to identify active molecules in herbs, that are traditionally used for the treatment of snake bite, such as Curcuma antinaia, Curcuma contravenenum, Andrographis paniculata, and Tanacetum parthenium; secondly to test similar structurally related molecules and finally to prepare and evaluate an efficient formulation against Ophiophagus hannah venom intoxification. Three labdane based compounds, including labdane dialdehyde, labdane lactone, and labdane trialdehyde and two lactones including 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide and parthenolide were isolated by column chromatography and characterised. Using the isolated rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparation, the antagonistic effect of crude extracts, isolated compounds and prepared formulations were measured in vitro on the inhibition of the neuromuscular transmission. Inhibition on muscle contraction, produced by the 5 μg/mL venom, was reversed by test agents in organ bath preparations. A labdane trialdehyde, isolated from C. contravenenum, was identified as the best antagonising agent in the low micromolar range. Tests on formulations of the most potent C. contravenenum extract showed, that the suppository with witepsol H15 was an effective medicine against O. hannah venom. This study elucidated the active compounds, accounting for the antivenin activity of traditionally used herbs and suggested the most suitable formulation, which may help to develop potent medicines for the treatment of snake bite in the future.

  7. ATP is not involved in α1-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2015-12-15

    Recent publications suggest that α1-adrenoceptor stimulation by exogenous agonists such as phenylephrine in resistance arteries cause contraction through the release of ATP from within the vascular smooth muscle cells. This ATP exits the cell through pannexin-1 channels to act back "autocrine-like" on P2 receptors on the smooth muscle that cause the contraction. In this work we directly test this hypothesis by using a selective P2X1 purinoceptor antagonist NF449 (1-10µM) against phenylephrine and ATP concentration-response curves in small mesenteric arteries of the rat and thoracodorsal arteries of the mouse. We show that NF449 is a simple competitive antagonist of ATP with a pKB of 6.43 and 6.41 in rat and mouse arteries, respectively, but did not antagonise phenylephrine concentration-response curves. This work cautions against the growing overstated role of the reputed pannexin-1/ATP release axis following α1-adrenoceptor activation in small resistance arteries.

  8. Dual PI-3 kinase/mTOR inhibition impairs autophagy flux and induces cell death independent of apoptosis and necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Button, Robert W; Vincent, Joseph H; Strang, Conor J; Luo, Shouqing

    2016-02-01

    The PI-3 kinase (PI-3K)/mTOR pathway is critical for cell growth and proliferation. Strategies of antagonising this signaling have proven to be detrimental to cell survival. This observation, coupled with the fact many tumours show enhanced growth signaling, has caused dual inhibitors of PI-3K and mTOR to be implicated in cancer treatment, and have thus been studied across various tumour models. Since PI-3K (class-I)/mTOR pathway negatively regulates autophagy, dual inhibitors of PI-3K/mTOR are currently believed to be autophagy activators. However, our present data show that the dual PI-3K/mTOR inhibition (DKI) potently suppresses autophagic flux. We further confirm that inhibition of Vps34/PI3KC3, the class-III PI-3K, causes the blockade to autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Our data suggest that DKI induces cell death independently of apoptosis and necroptosis, whereas autophagy perturbation by DKI may contribute to cell death. Given that autophagy is critical in cellular homeostasis, our study not only clarifies the role of a dual PI-3K/mTOR inhibitor in autophagy, but also suggests that its autophagy inhibition needs to be considered if such an agent is used in cancer chemotherapy.

  9. The kappa-opioid receptor is involved in the stimulating effect of nicotine on adrenocortical activity but not in nicotine induced anxiety.

    PubMed

    Marco, Eva Maria; Llorente, Ricardo; Pérez-Alvarez, Laura; Moreno, Enrique; Guaza, Carmen; Viveros, Maria Paz

    2005-09-01

    The kappa (kappa) opioid system appears to interact with nicotine in the modulation of locomotion and addiction related processes. In this study we have investigated the possible implication of the kappa-opioid system in the effects of nicotine on anxiety and adrenocortical activity. In two different experiments, we analysed the possible interaction between nicotine (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) and either the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (5 mg/kg i.p.) or the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U50,488H (1 mg/kg s.c.). Behavioural and endocrine experiments were performed in different groups of animals. Animals were exposed to the holeboard immediately followed by the plus-maze. Serum corticosterone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Nicotine induced an anxiogenic-like effect in the plus-maze and a significant decrease of holeboard activity. The anxiogenic-like effect in the plus-maze was not modified by any of the kappa-opioid receptor ligands. Nicotine also induced a significant increase in the corticosterone levels, and the kappa antagonist, which did not exert any effect per se, antagonised this effect. The kappa-agonist U50,488H induced a significant increase in corticosterone concentration when administered alone. We provide the first evidence for the involvement of the kappa-opioid receptor in the stimulatory effect of nicotine on adrenocortical activity.

  10. Antinociceptive properties and nitric oxide synthase inhibitory action of new ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Beirith, A; Creczynski-Pasa, T B; Bonetti, V R; Konzen, M; Seifriz, I; Paula, M S; Franco, C V; Calixto, J B

    1999-03-26

    This study evaluates the actions of the new ruthenium complexes trans-[RuCl2(nic)4] (Complex I) and trans-[RuCl2(i-nic)4] (Complex II) as antinociceptives, and their interaction with nitric oxide isoenzymes and with acetylcholine-induced relaxation of rat and rabbit aorta. Complex II inhibited, in a graded manner, neuronal and inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase, and was about two fold more effective in inhibiting the neuronal NO synthase than the inducible form of the enzyme. Complex I was inactive. Both complexes failed to interfere with constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase because they did not change the mean arterial blood pressure of rats. The vasorelaxant effect of acetylcholine was markedly antagonised by the Complexes I and II in rings of both rat and rabbit aorta. Complexes I and II, given intraperitoneally, like N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), inhibited, in a graded manner, both phases of the pain response induced by formalin. The actions of L-NAME, L-NOARG and Complex II, but not that of Complex I, were largely reversed by L-arginine. Both complexes failed to affect the motor response of animals in the rota-rod test and had no effect in the hot-plate assay. Together, these findings provide indications that the new ruthenium complexes, especially Complex II and its derivatives, might be of potential therapeutic benefit in the management of pain disorders.

  11. 'Smashed by the National Health'? A Closer Look at the Demise of the Pioneer Health Centre, Peckham.

    PubMed

    Conford, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Pioneer Health Centre, based in South London before and after the Second World War, remains a source of interest for advocates of a positive approach to health promotion in contrast with the treatment of those already ill. Its closure in 1950 for lack of funds has been blamed on the then recently established National Health Service, but this article argues that such an explanation is over-simplified and ignores a number of other factors. The Centre had struggled financially during the 1930s and tried to gain support from the Medical Research Council. The Council appeared interested in the Centre before the war, but was less sympathetic in the 1940s. Around the time of its closure and afterwards, the Centre was also involved in negotiations with London County Council; these failed because the Centre's directors would not accept the changes which the Council would have needed to make. Unpublished documents reveal that the Centre's directors were uncompromising and that their approach to the situation antagonised their colleagues. Changes in medical science also worked against the Centre. The success of sulphonamide drugs appeared to render preventive medicine less significant, while the development of statistical techniques cast doubt on the Centre's experimental methods. The Centre was at the heart of the nascent organic farming movement, which opposed the rapid growth of chemical cultivation. But what might be termed 'chemical triumphalism' was on the march in both medicine and agriculture, and the Centre was out of tune with the mood of the times. PMID:26971599

  12. Inhibition of Bcl-2 or IAP proteins does not provoke mutations in surviving cells.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Tanmay M; Green, Maja M; Rayner, David M; Miles, Mark A; Cutts, Suzanne M; Hawkins, Christine J

    2015-07-01

    Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cause permanent damage to the genomes of surviving cells, provoking severe side effects such as second malignancies in some cancer survivors. Drugs that mimic the activity of death ligands, or antagonise pro-survival proteins of the Bcl-2 or IAP families have yielded encouraging results in animal experiments and early phase clinical trials. Because these agents directly engage apoptosis pathways, rather than damaging DNA to indirectly provoke tumour cell death, we reasoned that they may offer another important advantage over conventional therapies: minimisation or elimination of side effects such as second cancers that result from mutation of surviving normal cells. Disappointingly, however, we previously found that concentrations of death receptor agonists like TRAIL that would be present in vivo in clinical settings provoked DNA damage in surviving cells. In this study, we used cell line model systems to investigate the mutagenic capacity of drugs from two other classes of direct apoptosis-inducing agents: the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 and the IAP antagonists LCL161 and AT-406. Encouragingly, our data suggest that IAP antagonists possess negligible genotoxic activity. Doses of ABT-737 that were required to damage DNA stimulated Bax/Bak-independent signalling and exceeded concentrations detected in the plasma of animals treated with this drug. These findings provide hope that cancer patients treated by BH3-mimetics or IAP antagonists may avoid mutation-related illnesses that afflict some cancer survivors treated with conventional DNA-damaging anti-cancer therapies.

  13. First isolation and antinociceptive activity of a lipid transfer protein from noni (Morinda citrifolia) seeds.

    PubMed

    Campos, Dyély C O; Costa, Andrea S; Lima, Amanda D R; Silva, Fredy D A; Lobo, Marina D P; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O; Moreira, Renato A; Leal, Luzia K A M; Miron, Diogo; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, Hermógenes D

    2016-05-01

    In this study a novel heat-stable lipid transfer protein, designated McLTP1, was purified from noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) seeds, using four purification steps which resulted in a high-purified protein yield (72 mg McLTP1 from 100g of noni seeds). McLTP1 exhibited molecular masses of 9.450 and 9.466 kDa, determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The N-terminal sequence of McLTP1 (AVPCGQVSSALSPCMSYLTGGGDDPEARCCAGV), as analysed by NCBI-BLAST database, revealed a high degree of identity with other reported plant lipid transfer proteins. In addition, this protein proved to be resistant to pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin digestion. McLTP1 given intraperitoneally (1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) and orally (8 mg/kg) caused an inhibition of the writhing response induced by acetic acid in mice. This protein displayed thermostability, retaining 100% of its antinociceptive activity after 30 min incubation at 80 °C. Pretreatment of mice with McLTP1 (8 mg/kg, i.p. and p.o.) also decreased neurogenic and inflammatory phases of nociception in the formalin test. Naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonised the antinociceptive effect of McLTP1 suggesting that the opioid mechanisms mediate the analgesic properties of this protein.

  14. Novel interactions between the HTLV antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 and the NFAR protein family: Implications for the HTLV lifecycles

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jane; Hall, William W.; Ratner, Lee; Sheehy, Noreen

    2016-01-01

    The human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1/HTLV-2) antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 play key roles in the HTLV lifecycles and persistence in the host. Nuclear Factors Associated with double-stranded RNA (NFAR) proteins NF90/110 function in the lifecycles of several viruses and participate in host innate immunity against infection and oncogenesis. Using GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate specific novel interactions between HBZ/APH-2 and NF90/110 and characterised the protein domains involved. Moreover we show that NF90/110 significantly enhance Tax mediated LTR activation, an effect that was abolished by HBZ but enhanced by APH-2. Additionally we found that HBZ and APH-2 modulate the promoter activity of survivin and are capable of antagonising NF110-mediated survivin activation. Thus interactions between HTLV antisense proteins and the NFAR protein family have an overall positive impact on HTLV infection. Hence NFARs may represent potential therapeutic targets in HTLV infected cells. PMID:27110706

  15. Effects of curing sodium nitrite additive and natural meat fat on growth control of Listeria monocytogenes by the bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus curvatus strain CWBI-B28.

    PubMed

    Kouakou, P; Ghalfi, H; Destain, J; Dubois-Dauphin, R; Evrard, P; Thonart, P

    2009-09-01

    In realistic model meat systems, the separate and combined effects of fat content and sodium nitrite on the antilisterial activity of the bacteriocin of Lactobacillus curvatus CWBI-B28 were studied. In laboratory fermentations where Listeria monocytogenes was co-cultured at 4 degrees C with bacteriocin-producing CWBI-B28 in lean pork meat (fat content: 13%) without added nitrite, a strong antilisterial effect was observed after one week. The effect was maintained for an additional week, after which a slight and very gradual rebound was observed. Both added nitrite (20 ppm) and a high-fat content (43%) were found to antagonise this antilisterial effect, the Listeria cfu count reached after six weeks being 200 times as high in high-fat meat with added nitrite than in lean meat without nitrite. This antagonism could not be attributed to slower growth of the bacteriocin-producing strain, since CWBI-B28 grew optimally in fat-rich meat with 20 ppm sodium nitrite. Bacteriocin activity was also measured in the samples. The observed activity levels are discussed in relation to the degree of antilisterial protection conferred.

  16. The efficacy of novel B cell biologics as the future of SLE treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ameer; Khamashta, Munther

    2014-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with wide ranging multi-systemic effects. Current understanding centralises B cells in SLE pathogenesis with clinical features resulting from autoantibody formation, immune complex deposition, antigen presentation and cytokine activation. Existing standard of care therapies generates adverse side effects; secondary to corticosteroid use and untargeted immunosuppression. The inability to uphold remission and abolish the disease process, in addition to the increasing numbers of patients seen with refractory disease with these therapies, has provoked the development of novel B cell biologics targeting specific pathogenic pathways fundamental to the SLE disease process. Current evidence highlighting the efficacy of Rituximab, Ocrelizumab and Epratuzumab in inducing B cell depletion and achieving disease amelioration through specific B cell surface receptor antagonism is discussed. We review the efficacy of Atacicept, Briobacept and Belimumab in antagonising B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL), two stimulatory cytokines crucial to B cell survival, growth and function. Two large multicentre randomised controlled trials, BLISS-52 and BLISS-76, have led to FDA approval of Belimumab. Following this breakthrough, other anti-BLyS therapies, Blisibimod and Tabalumab, are currently under Phase III evaluation. Similarly, murine models and Phase I/II trials have demonstrated significant efficacy of Rituximab, Epratuzumab, Briobacept and Atacicept as potential future therapies and we now eagerly await results from Phase III trials. Future research must compare the efficacy of different biologics amongst different patient subpopulations and SLE manifestations, in order to develop clinically and cost effective therapies.

  17. A sleep inducing factor from common Indian toad (Bufo melanostictus, Schneider) skin extract.

    PubMed

    Das, M; Mallick, B N; Dasgupta, S C; Gomes, A

    2000-09-01

    Bufo melanostictus (common Indian toad) acquire different bioactive substances in their skin during their life-time in wide ecological habitat. Earlier investigation from this laboratory revealed that toad (B. melanostictus) skin extract (TSE) posses different bioactive compounds of different diversity (Das, M., Auddy, B. and Gomes, A., 1996. Pharmacological study of the toad skin extract on experimental animals. Indian J. Pharmacol. 28, 72-76). Among these sleep induction and sleep potentiation indicated the possibility of sleep inducing factor(s) in TSE. One such sleep inducing factor (SIF) was isolated and purified by neutral alumina column chromatography followed by HPLC. Spectroscopy (UV, IR, FAB-MASS) study indicated that the sleep inducing factor was a 880 Dalton conjugated aromatic compound with a hydroxyl and carbonyl functional group. Biological study showed that SIF produced no lethality in male albino mice upto the dose of 8 mg/kg, i.v. Cyproheptadine antagonised SIF induced contraction of isolated smooth muscle indicating histamine/serotonin receptor mediated action of SIF. EEG studies showed that SIF increased sleep and decreased awakening condition of freely moving rats. Biochemical studies showed that SIF produced significant alteration of brain biogenic amine levels, monoamine oxidase (MAO) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TH) activity. This may be the reason of SIF induced sleep, although the SIF induced sleep mechanism needs further detail investigation. PMID:10736480

  18. How do general anaesthetics work?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antkowiak, Bernd

    2001-05-01

    Almost a century ago, Meyer and Overton discovered a linear relationship between the potency of anaesthetic agents to induce general anaesthesia and their ability to accumulate in olive oil. Similar correlations between anaesthetic potency and lipid solubility were later reported from investigations on various experimental model systems. However, exceptions to the Meyer-Overton correlation exist in all these systems, indicating that lipid solubility is an important, but not the sole determinant of anaesthetic action. In the mammalian central nervous system, most general anaesthetics act at multiple molecular sites. It seems likely that not all of these effects are involved in anaesthesia. GABAA- and NMDA-receptor/ion channels have already been identified as relevant targets. However, further mechanisms, such as a blockade of Na+ channels and an activation of K+ channels, also come into play. A comparison of different anaesthetics seems to show that each compound has its own spectrum of molecular actions and thus shows specific, fingerprint-like effects on different levels of neuronal activity. This may explain why there is no known compound that specifically antagonises general anaesthesia. General anaesthesia is a multidimensional phenomenon. Unconsciousness, amnesia, analgesia, loss of sensory processing and the depression of spinal motor reflexes are important components. It was not realised until very recently that different molecular mechanisms might underlie these different components. These findings challenge traditional views, such as the assumption that one anaesthetic can be freely replaced by another.

  19. Actin dynamics tune the integrated stress response by regulating eukaryotic initiation factor 2α dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Joseph E; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Malzer, Elke; Dominicus, Caia S; Patel, Vruti; Moorhead, Greg; Ron, David; Marciniak, Stefan J

    2015-01-01

    Four stress-sensing kinases phosphorylate the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) to activate the integrated stress response (ISR). In animals, the ISR is antagonised by selective eIF2α phosphatases comprising a catalytic protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) subunit in complex with a PPP1R15-type regulatory subunit. An unbiased search for additional conserved components of the PPP1R15-PP1 phosphatase identified monomeric G-actin. Like PP1, G-actin associated with the functional core of PPP1R15 family members and G-actin depletion, by the marine toxin jasplakinolide, destabilised the endogenous PPP1R15A-PP1 complex. The abundance of the ternary PPP1R15-PP1-G-actin complex was responsive to global changes in the polymeric status of actin, as was its eIF2α-directed phosphatase activity, while localised G-actin depletion at sites enriched for PPP1R15 enhanced eIF2α phosphorylation and the downstream ISR. G-actin's role as a stabilizer of the PPP1R15-containing holophosphatase provides a mechanism for integrating signals regulating actin dynamics with stresses that trigger the ISR. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04872.001 PMID:25774599

  20. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation.

  1. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1-mediated calcium responses are inhibited by the alkylamine antihistamines dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Campi, Barbara; Trevisani, Marcello; Compton, Steven J; Morice, Alyn H

    2008-12-01

    American guidelines, unlike European guidelines, support the use of antihistamines as a first line of treatment for some causes of chronic cough. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel activated by the tussive agents capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and protons. It is predominantly expressed by C-fiber and some Adelta -fiber sensory neurons and is thought to be a cough receptor. By measuring increases in intracellular calcium as an indicator of TRPV1 activation, the authors sought to determine whether antihistamines could antagonise TRPV1 permanently expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells and TRPV1 endogenously expressed in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons. In human TRPV1-expressing HEK cells (hTRPV1-HEK), diphenhydramine and fexofenadine failed to inhibit capsaicin-triggered calcium responses. However, both dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine significantly inhibited capsaicin-evoked responses in hTRPV1-HEK. Dexbrompheniramine also inhibited activation of rat TRPV1 expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells, without interfering with TRPA1 and proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) activation. Finally, in rat dorsal root ganglia neuron preparations, dexbrompheniramine dose-dependently inhibited capsaicin-evoked calcium responses. Thus, the inhibition of TRPV1 activation by dexbrompheniramine may provide one potential mechanism whereby this antihistamine exerts its therapeutic effect in chronic cough.

  2. The influence of L-NG-nitro-arginine on field stimulation induced contractions and acetylcholine release in guinea pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Brave, S R; Hobbs, A J; Gibson, A; Tucker, J F

    1991-09-16

    The interaction between parasympathetic and inhibitory non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic nerves in tracheal smooth muscle was investigated by determining the effects of the NO-synthase inhibitor L-NG-nitro-arginine (L-NOARG) on contractions and the associated acetylcholine release elicited by field stimulation of the muscle. At frequencies above 2Hz contractile responses to field stimulation were potentiated by L-NOARG (50 microM). alpha-chymotrypsin pre-treatment potentiated contractile responses at all frequencies, but the effects of L-NOARG were unaltered. The effect of L-NOARG on responses to 5Hz electrical stimulation was not mimicked by D-NOARG, was reversed by L-, but not D-arginine and was unaffected by epithelium removal. L-NOARG did not affect responses to exogenous acetylcholine nor the overflow of 3H from tissues previously loaded with [3H]-choline. It is therefore concluded that field stimulation of tracheal smooth muscle induces the release of an endogenous nitrate, which, by an inhibitory action on smooth muscle, functionally antagonises the concomitantly released parasympathetic neurotransmitter.

  3. Behavioral interactions between ethanol and imidazodiazepines with high affinities for benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The intrinsic effect of two imidazodiazepines RO 15-3505 and RO 17-1812 on the behavior of mice in a holeboard test were investigated. The interactions of these two drugs with ethanol were also studied. RO 15-3505 failed to significantly alter either exploratory head-dipping or locomotor activity when administered alone but doses of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg reversed the reduction in the number of head-dips caused by ethanol and partially reversed ethanol's locomotor stimulant action. In contrast, RO 17-1812 increased locomotor activity when administered alone, and enhanced the reduction in exploration caused by ethanol. Neither RO 15-3505 nor RO 17-1812 altered blood alcohol concentrations suggesting a pharmacodynamic basis for these interactions. The results suggest that in the holeboard test the interactions of imidazodiazepines with ethanol are related to the nature of their interaction with benzodiazepine receptors, inverse agonists antagonising and agonists enhancing ethanol's effects on exploration.

  4. Increased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of soluble Fas (CD95/Apo-1) in hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Felderhoff-Mueser, U; Herold, R; Hochhaus, F; Koehne, P; Ring-Mrozik, E; Obladen, M; Buhrer, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—The ventricular enlargement observed in children with chronically raised intracranial pressure (ICP) causes a secondary loss of brain tissue. In animal studies of hydrocephalus, programmed cell death (apoptosis) has been found as a major mechanism of neuronal injury. One of the regulators of the apoptotic cell death programme is the receptor mediated Fas/Fas ligand interaction.
METHODS—The apoptosis regulating cytokines soluble Fas (sFas) and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) were studied in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 31 hydrocephalic children undergoing shunt surgery for symptomatic hydrocephalus and 18controls.
RESULTS—High concentrations of sFas were observed in children with hydrocephalus (median 252 ng/ml); in controls sFas was below the detection limit (0.5 ng/ml). sFasL was undetectable in all but one sample.
CONCLUSION—High concentrations of sFas in the CSF of children with hydrocephalus suggest intrinsic sFas production, potentially antagonising pressure mediated Fas activation.

 PMID:11259245

  5. Physiological impact of abnormal lipoxin A₄ production on cystic fibrosis airway epithelium and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Gerard; Ringholz, Fiona; Buchanan, Paul; McNally, Paul; Urbach, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 has been described as a major signal for the resolution of inflammation and is abnormally produced in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In CF, the loss of chloride transport caused by the mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel gene results in dehydration, mucus plugging, and reduction of the airway surface liquid layer (ASL) height which favour chronic lung infection and neutrophil based inflammation leading to progressive lung destruction and early death of people with CF. This review highlights the unique ability of LXA4 to restore airway surface hydration, to stimulate airway epithelial repair, and to antagonise the proinflammatory program of the CF airway, circumventing some of the most difficult aspects of CF pathophysiology. The report points out novel aspects of the cellular mechanism involved in the physiological response to LXA4, including release of ATP from airway epithelial cell via pannexin channel and subsequent activation of and P2Y11 purinoreceptor. Therefore, inadequate endogenous LXA4 biosynthesis reported in CF exacerbates the ion transport abnormality and defective mucociliary clearance, in addition to impairing the resolution of inflammation, thus amplifying the vicious circle of airway dehydration, chronic infection, and inflammation.

  6. Potential Role of Caffeine in the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Mohsin H K; Tambo, Amos; Pace, Nikolai P

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease [PD] is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease, affecting 1% of the population over the age of 55. The underlying neuropathology seen in PD is characterised by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta with the presence of Lewy bodies. The Lewy bodies are composed of aggregates of α-synuclein. The motor manifestations of PD include a resting tremor, bradykinesia, and muscle rigidity. Currently there is no cure for PD and motor symptoms are treated with a number of drugs including levodopa [L-dopa]. These drugs do not delay progression of the disease and often provide only temporary relief. Their use is often accompanied by severe adverse effects. Emerging evidence from both in vivo and in vitro studies suggests that caffeine may reduce parkinsonian motor symptoms by antagonising the adenosine A2A receptor, which is predominately expressed in the basal ganglia. It is hypothesised that caffeine may increase the excitatory activity in local areas by inhibiting the astrocytic inflammatory processes but evidence remains inconclusive. In addition, the co-administration of caffeine with currently available PD drugs helps to reduce drug tolerance, suggesting that caffeine may be used as an adjuvant in treating PD. In conclusion, caffeine may have a wide range of therapeutic effects which are yet to be explored, and therefore warrants further investigation in randomized clinical trials. PMID:27563362

  7. Physiological Impact of Abnormal Lipoxin A4 Production on Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelium and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; Urbach, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 has been described as a major signal for the resolution of inflammation and is abnormally produced in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In CF, the loss of chloride transport caused by the mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel gene results in dehydration, mucus plugging, and reduction of the airway surface liquid layer (ASL) height which favour chronic lung infection and neutrophil based inflammation leading to progressive lung destruction and early death of people with CF. This review highlights the unique ability of LXA4 to restore airway surface hydration, to stimulate airway epithelial repair, and to antagonise the proinflammatory program of the CF airway, circumventing some of the most difficult aspects of CF pathophysiology. The report points out novel aspects of the cellular mechanism involved in the physiological response to LXA4, including release of ATP from airway epithelial cell via pannexin channel and subsequent activation of and P2Y11 purinoreceptor. Therefore, inadequate endogenous LXA4 biosynthesis reported in CF exacerbates the ion transport abnormality and defective mucociliary clearance, in addition to impairing the resolution of inflammation, thus amplifying the vicious circle of airway dehydration, chronic infection, and inflammation. PMID:25866809

  8. Over-expression of DMRT1 induces the male pathway in embryonic chicken gonads

    PubMed Central

    Lambeth, Luke; Raymond, Christopher S.; Roeszler, Kelly N.; Kuroiwa, Asato; Nakata, Tomohiro; Zarkower, David; Smith, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    DMRT1 encodes a conserved transcription factor with an essential role in gonadal function. In the chicken, DMRT1 is located on the Z sex chromosome and is currently the best candidate master regulator of avian gonadal sex differentiation. We previously showed that knockdown of DMRT1 expression during the period of sexual differentiation induces feminisation of male embryonic chicken gonads. This gene is therefore necessary for proper testis development in the chicken. However, whether it is sufficient to induce testicular differentiation has remained unresolved. We show here that over-expression of DMRT1 induces male pathway genes and antagonises the female pathway in embryonic chicken gonads. Ectopic DMRT1 expression in female gonads induces localised SOX9 and AMH expression. It also induces expression of the recently identified Z-linked male factor, Hemogen (HEMGN). Masculinised gonads show evidence of cord-like structures and retarded female-type cortical development. Furthermore, expression of the critical feminizing enzyme, aromatase, is reduced in the presence of over-expressed DMRT1. These data indicate that DMRT1 is an essential sex-linked regulator of gonadal differentiation in avians, and that it likely acts via a dosage mechanism established through the lack of global Z dosage compensation in birds. PMID:24576538

  9. A review of olopatadine for the treatment of ocular allergy.

    PubMed

    Abelson, Mark B

    2004-09-01

    Ocular allergy affects > 20% of the general population and many therapeutic preparations are available to individuals experiencing the most common forms--seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis. 0.1% Olopatadine topical ophthalmic solution is currently approved for the treatment of allergic signs and symptoms in patients > or = 3 years of age. Olopatadine is available in Europe as Opatanol) and in > 30 other countries as Patanol. It inhibits mast cell degranulation and antagonises histamine receptors to manage the itching, redness, chemosis, tearing and lid swelling of the ocular allergic reaction, and its mast cell stabilising ability has been demonstrated both in vitro (using human conjunctival mast cells) and in vivo (human clinical experience). This article reviews both the laboratory and clinical information available on olopatadine, prefaced by a discussion of the current understanding of the ocular allergic reaction and followed by the future implications for this compound. Both laboratory and clinical studies have established the efficacy, safety and comfort of olopatadine in several study design models and comparisons to other antiallergy medications. The application of olopatadine, specifically in the management of lid swelling, an allergic sign recalcitrant to therapy and nasal allergic symptoms has also been established. In the future, a new formulation containing 0.2% olopatadine exhibits a duration of action up to 24 h, supporting once-daily dosing.

  10. Effects of zinc sulphate on ethanol- and indomethacin-induced ulceration and changes in prostaglandin E2 and histamine levels in the rat gastric glandular mucosa.

    PubMed

    Cho, C H; Ogle, C W; Wong, S H; Koo, M W

    1985-01-01

    The effect of zinc sulphate on stomach ulceration produced by ethanol and indomethacin was examined in rats. Oral or intraperitoneal pretreatment with zinc sulphate (20 mg/kg, expressed as zinc ion) strongly prevented ethanol-, but not indomethacin-induced gastric glandular ulceration. Indomethacin given beforehand did not influence the protective action of zinc sulphate against ethanol-evoked lesions. Ethanol decreased histamine levels, whereas indomethacin reduced the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) content in the gastric glandular mucosa. The alcohol also elevated the histamine content in gastric secretion. Zinc sulphate reversed the ethanol-induced changes in histamine levels in both mucosa and secretion, but did not modify PGE2 reduction by indomethacin. Zinc sulphate also antagonised protein leakage from the stomach following ethanol administration. It is concluded that gastric ulceration by the currently employed doses of ethanol and indomethacin is caused by different mechanisms. Zinc sulphate prevents histamine-mediated lesions produced by the alcohol, but not ulceration due to PGE2 depletion by indomethacin.

  11. Inhibitory effects of H2-receptor antagonists on cytochrome P450 in male ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Kim, E J; Han, S S; Roh, J K; Jeong, T C; Park, J H

    1995-08-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of H2-receptor antagonists including newly developed mifentidine derivatives, IY-80843 and IY-80845, on cytochrome P450(P450) in vitro and in vivo. 2. Initially, 3-methylcholanthrene-, phenobarbital-, ethanol- and dexamethasone-induced liver microsomes were prepared from male ICR mice to study in vitro effects of above chemicals on ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase(EROD), pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase(PROD), p-nitrophenol hydroxylase and erythromycin N-demethylase(ERDM) activities, respectively. It was found that histamine, cimetidine and famotidine were not inhibitory to four enzyme activities. Meanwhile, mifentidine slightly inhibited EROD and PROD activities and its derivatives IY-80843 and IY-80845 strongly inhibited PROD, EROD and ERDM activities. 3. Prolongation of hexobarbital-induced sleeping time was determined in male ICR mice to confirm in vitro inhibitory effects of mifentidine and its derivatives in vivo. It was observed that cimetidine, mifentidine, IY-80843 and IY-80845 caused dose-dependent increases in the sleeping time, indicating the inhibition of P450 responsible for hexobarbital metabolism. 4. It was concluded that mifentidine and its derivatives are P450 inhibitors and that our newly synthesized IY-80843 is most inhibitory. 5. The present results indicate that mifentidine and its derivatives not only antagonise the H2-receptor but also inhibit P450 enzymes. PMID:7576828

  12. Latest Progress in CNT-Based Composites for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebor, Maximilian; Heep, Felicitas; Pfeiffer, Ernst K.; Linke, Stefan; Roddecke, Susanne; Lodereau, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Composite materials used in S/C platforms and pay- loads can benefit from the latest developments in carbon fibres and nano-technologies. One of the most relevant novelties is the gradual incorporation of nano-species in the resin systems. This paper addresses the results of several technology studies lead and or performed by HPS. They deal with the incorporation of CNT and other nano-species into CFRP to improve the physical properties and to antagonise specific CFRP drawbacks like e.g. the anisotropic properties based on the respective carbon fibre setup. The most interesting and promising applications for these novel composites were assessed and selected for composite development. Entities from several European countries worked together to establish composite and structure processing methods. Promising results concerning electrical and thermal properties were obtained but also many challenges had and still have to be faced. During the projects it has been found that different ingredient combinations and manufacturing processes are favourable for different applications/improvements. It seems that the CNTs and the processes have to be tailored for one specific target property, e.g. electrical conductivity enhancement. The achieved material improvements were and are still further investigated.

  13. The influence of microglia activation on the efficacy of amitriptyline, doxepin, milnacipran, venlafaxine and fluoxetine in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zychowska, Magdalena; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2015-02-15

    The analgesic properties of antidepressants are often used in the treatment of neuropathy; however their influence on glial cells in maintaining neuropathic pain is unknown. Our studies examined the neuropathic pain-relieving properties after intraperitoneal injection of amitriptyline, doxepin, milnacipran, venlafaxine and fluoxetine 7 days after sciatic nerve injury (CCI) in rats and its influence on microglia/macrophages (IBA-1) and astroglia (GFAP) activation in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) using Western blot. All tested antidepressants significantly reduced CCI-induced allodynia but hyperalgesia was only antagonised by fluoxetine, doxepine and venlafaxine. The strongest analgesia was observed after fluoxetine administration. Western blot analysis showed the upregulation of the IBA-1 in the lumbar spinal cord and DRG after amitriptyline or milnacipran administration in CCI-exposed rats, whereas after fluoxetine the downregulation was observed. The administration of doxepin did not change the IBA-1 protein level in both studied structures; however venlafaxine decreased the IBA-1 only in the DRG. No changes in the GFAP level in both structures were observed after any of listed above antidepressants administration. Chronic minocycline treatment enhanced amitriptyline and milnacipran, but did not fluoxetine analgesia under neuropathic pain in rats. Our results suggest that nerve injury-induced pain is related with the activation of microglia, which is diminished by fluoxetine treatment in the neuropathic pain model. PMID:25460025

  14. In vitro characterisation of the duration of action of the histamine-1 receptor antagonist azelastine.

    PubMed

    Slack, Robert J; Hart, Adam D; Luttmann, Mark A; Clark, Kenneth L; Begg, Malcolm

    2011-11-30

    Azelastine is a selective antagonist at the human histamine-1 receptor and is used clinically in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. In this study we have investigated its duration of action in vitro in an effort to characterise the receptor and tissue components involved. Chinese hamster ovary cell membrane fragments were used to determine the kinetics of azelastine at the H₁ receptor in a radioligand binding assay. Further duration of action studies were completed in tissue preparations using guinea-pig trachea and human bronchus. In radioligand binding studies, azelastine reached steady state at the H₁ receptor after approximately 41 min and exhibited a significantly slower dissociation rate constant from the receptor than the first generation antihistamine, diphenhydramine. In washout studies completed in guinea-pig and human airway in vitro tissue preparations, azelastine continued to antagonise the effects of histamine at the H₁ receptor for at least 18 h post-washout of the antagonist. This outcome was reversed following removal of the epithelium from guinea-pig isolated tracheal strips. These studies indicate there is a tissue component contributing to azelastine's duration of action, in addition to its direct H₁ receptor binding, with evidence suggesting a role for the epithelial layer. PMID:21946109

  15. Safety profile of anakinra in the management of rheumatologic, metabolic and autoinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Rigante, Donato; Giannini, Margherita; Galeazzi, Mauro; Lapadula, Giovanni; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Anakinra is a biologic response modifier that competitively antagonises the biologic effects of interleukin-1, the ancestor pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine produced by numerous cell types, found in excess in the serum, synovial fluid and any involved tissues of patients with many inflammatory diseases. The magnitude of the risk of different infections, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, associated with the large use of anakinra in many rheumatologic, metabolic or autoinflammatory disorders is still unknown. In addition, it is unclear whether this effect is modified by the concomitant use of antirheumatic drugs and corticosteroids. The rates of development of Mtb disease in patients treated with anakinra due to rheumatoid arthritis, systemic autoinflammatory diseases, Schnitzler's syndrome, Behçet's disease, adult-onset Still disease, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, gout and diabetes mellitus have been usually very low. However, clinicians must carefully weigh the benefits of biological drugs against their risks, particularly in patients prone to infections. Additional data are needed to understand whether this risk of Mtb infection and reactivation are representative of a class effect related to biologics or whether anakinra bears specifically an intrinsic lower risk in comparison with other biologic drugs. PMID:26940286

  16. Actin dynamics tune the integrated stress response by regulating eukaryotic initiation factor 2α dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Joseph E; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Malzer, Elke; Dominicus, Caia S; Patel, Vruti; Moorhead, Greg; Ron, David; Marciniak, Stefan J

    2015-01-01

    Four stress-sensing kinases phosphorylate the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) to activate the integrated stress response (ISR). In animals, the ISR is antagonised by selective eIF2α phosphatases comprising a catalytic protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) subunit in complex with a PPP1R15-type regulatory subunit. An unbiased search for additional conserved components of the PPP1R15-PP1 phosphatase identified monomeric G-actin. Like PP1, G-actin associated with the functional core of PPP1R15 family members and G-actin depletion, by the marine toxin jasplakinolide, destabilised the endogenous PPP1R15A-PP1 complex. The abundance of the ternary PPP1R15-PP1-G-actin complex was responsive to global changes in the polymeric status of actin, as was its eIF2α-directed phosphatase activity, while localised G-actin depletion at sites enriched for PPP1R15 enhanced eIF2α phosphorylation and the downstream ISR. G-actin's role as a stabilizer of the PPP1R15-containing holophosphatase provides a mechanism for integrating signals regulating actin dynamics with stresses that trigger the ISR.

  17. Oestrogen receptors β1 and βcx have divergent roles in breast cancer survival and lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, G; de Boniface, J; Karthik, G M; Frisell, J; Bergh, J; Hartman, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: The expression of oestrogen receptor (ER) α characterises a subset of breast cancers associated with good response to endocrine therapy. However, the clinical significance of the second ER, ERβ1, and its splice variant ERβcx is still unclear. Methods: We here report an assessment of ERα, ERβ1 and ERβcx by immunohistochemistry using quantitative digital image analysis of 340 primary tumours and corresponding sentinel lymph nodes. Results: No differences were seen in ER levels in primary tumours vs lymph node metastases. ERβ1 and ERβcx were equally distributed among age groups and tumour histological grades. Loss of ERβ1 in the primary tumour was strongly associated with poor survival. Its prognostic impact was particularly evident in young patients and in high-grade tumours. The worst outcome was seen in the tumours lacking both ERα and ERβ1. ERβcx expression in the primary tumour correlated with a higher risk of lymph node metastasis, and with poor survival when expressed in sentinel node lymphocytes. Conclusions: Our study reveals highly significant although antagonising roles of ERβ1 and ERβcx in breast cancer. Consequently, we suggest that the histopathological assessment of ERβ1 is of value as a prognostic and potentially predictive biomarker. PMID:25025959

  18. Dual PI-3 kinase/mTOR inhibition impairs autophagy flux and induces cell death independent of apoptosis and necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Button, Robert W.; Vincent, Joseph H.; Strang, Conor J.; Luo, Shouqing

    2016-01-01

    The PI-3 kinase (PI-3K)/mTOR pathway is critical for cell growth and proliferation. Strategies of antagonising this signaling have proven to be detrimental to cell survival. This observation, coupled with the fact many tumours show enhanced growth signaling, has caused dual inhibitors of PI-3K and mTOR to be implicated in cancer treatment, and have thus been studied across various tumour models. Since PI-3K (class-I)/mTOR pathway negatively regulates autophagy, dual inhibitors of PI-3K/mTOR are currently believed to be autophagy activators. However, our present data show that the dual PI-3K/mTOR inhibition (DKI) potently suppresses autophagic flux. We further confirm that inhibition of Vps34/PI3KC3, the class-III PI-3K, causes the blockade to autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Our data suggest that DKI induces cell death independently of apoptosis and necroptosis, whereas autophagy perturbation by DKI may contribute to cell death. Given that autophagy is critical in cellular homeostasis, our study not only clarifies the role of a dual PI-3K/mTOR inhibitor in autophagy, but also suggests that its autophagy inhibition needs to be considered if such an agent is used in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26814436

  19. Antagonistic sensory cues generate gustatory plasticity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hukema, Renate K; Rademakers, Suzanne; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Burghoorn, Jan; Jansen, Gert

    2006-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans shows chemoattraction to 0.1–200 mM NaCl, avoidance of higher NaCl concentrations, and avoidance of otherwise attractive NaCl concentrations after prolonged exposure to NaCl (gustatory plasticity). Previous studies have shown that the ASE and ASH sensory neurons primarily mediate attraction and avoidance of NaCl, respectively. Here we show that balances between at least four sensory cell types, ASE, ASI, ASH, ADF and perhaps ADL, modulate the response to NaCl. Our results suggest that two NaCl-attraction signalling pathways exist, one of which uses Ca2+/cGMP signalling. In addition, we provide evidence that attraction to NaCl is antagonised by G-protein signalling in the ASH neurons, which is desensitised by the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase GRK-2. Finally, the response to NaCl is modulated by G-protein signalling in the ASI and ADF neurons, a second G-protein pathway in ASH and cGMP signalling in neurons exposed to the body fluid. PMID:16407969

  20. Target Acquired: Progress and Promise of Targeted Therapeutics in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stuchbery, Ryan; Kurganovs, Natalie J; McCoy, Patrick J; Nelson, Colleen C; Hayes, Vanessa M; Corcoran, Niall M; Hovens, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is fundamentally a genomic disease caused by mutations or rearrangements in the DNA or epigenetic machinery of a patient. An emerging field in cancer treatment targets key aberrations arising from the mutational landscape of an individual patient's disease rather than employing a cancer-wide cytotoxic therapy approach. In prostate cancer in particular, where there is an observed variation in response to standard treatments between patients with disease of a similar pathological stage and grade, mutationdirected treatment may grow to be a viable tool for clinicians to tailor more effective treatments. This review will describe a number of mutations across multiple forms of cancer that have been successfully antagonised by targeted therapeutics including their identification, the development of targeted compounds to combat them and the development of resistance to these therapies. This review will continue to examine these same mutations in the treatment and management of prostate cancer; the prevalence of targetable mutations in prostate cancer, recent clinical trials of targeted-agents and the potential or limitations for their use.

  1. The Quintiles Prize Lecture 2004. The identification of the adenosine A2B receptor as a novel therapeutic target in asthma.

    PubMed

    Holgate, Stephen T

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine is a powerful bronchoconstrictor of asthmatic, but not normal, airways. In vitro studies on isolated human mast cells and basophils revealed that adenosine and selective analogues augmented inflammatory mediator release from mast cells by stimulating A(2) receptors. Pharmacological blockade of mast cell mediator release in vivo also attenuated adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, as did theophylline, by adenosine A(2) receptor antagonism. Further in vitro studies revealed that the asthmatic response to adenosine is likely to be mediated via the A(2B) subtype which is selectively antagonised by enprofylline. Studies in animal models, especially mice, have shown a close synergistic interaction between adenosine, Th2 and airway remodelling responses. The recent description of A(2B) receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells that mediate cytokine and chemokine release and induce differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts strengthens the view that adenosine maybe more than an inflammatory mediator in asthma but also participates in airway wall remodelling in this disease. These data have provided a firm basis for developing adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonists as a new therapeutic approach to this disease. PMID:15980878

  2. Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1654): London's first general practitioner?

    PubMed

    Farthing, Michael J G

    2015-08-01

    Nicholas Culpeper is often regarded as an ill-disciplined, maverick, mid-17th century herbalist and the father of contemporary alternative medicine. There are elements of this statement that have some truth but to dismiss his contribution to the development of health provision in London at the time would be a great injustice. Culpeper did not complete his apprenticeship as an apothecary and was not a formally trained physician, but he developed a clinical practice for the poor of London, indistinguishable from the role of the present day general practitioner. Observers at the time recognised his concern and compassion and his commitment to treat the whole patient and not just the disease. His enduring contribution was his translation from Latin of the physicians' Pharmacopoeia Londinensis which could be regarded as the first major step towards the demystification of medicine. Culpeper's London Dispensatory and the many other medical treatises that followed were affordable and widely available to the common man. Culpeper antagonised both apothecaries and physicians because he breached the regulations of the day by accepting patients directly. So perhaps Culpeper was, de facto, London's first general practitioner, at least 150 years before the role was formally recognised in the Apothecaries Act 1815. PMID:24585603

  3. Motor learning of cue-dependent pull-force changes during an isometric precision grip task.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Barbara C; Meindl, Tobias; Timmann, Dagmar; Kolb, Florian P; Kutz, Dieter F

    2015-02-01

    The "raspberry task" represents a precision grip task that requires continuous adjustment of grip and pull forces. During this task subjects grip a specialized grip rod and have to increase the pull force linearly while the rod is locked. The aim of this study was to determine whether an associated, initially neutral cue is able to evoke pull-force changes in the raspberry task. A standard delay paradigm was used to study cued pull-force changes during an ongoing movement resulting in unloading. Pull force and EMG activity of hand and arm muscles were recorded from 13 healthy, young subjects. The cue was associated with a complex change in motor behavior. In this task, cued force changes take place more rapidly than in protective reflex systems (in median after the second presentation of the cueing stimulus). A cued force change was detectable in two-thirds of paired trials. Although the force change is produced by a decrease of the EMG activity in several grip- and pull-force-producing muscles, the most significant effect in the majority of the subjects was an increase of the activity of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle which antagonises corresponding pull-force-producing muscles. Cued force changes require adequately and precisely controlled activation of the muscle groups involved in the movement.

  4. Integrated β-catenin, BMP, PTEN, and Notch signalling patterns the nephron.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Nils O; Lawrence, Melanie L; Burn, Sally F; Johansson, Jeanette A; Bakker, Elvira R M; Ridgway, Rachel A; Chang, C-Hong; Karolak, Michele J; Oxburgh, Leif; Headon, Denis J; Sansom, Owen J; Smits, Ron; Davies, Jamie A; Hohenstein, Peter

    2015-02-03

    The different segments of the nephron and glomerulus in the kidney balance the processes of water homeostasis, solute recovery, blood filtration, and metabolite excretion. When segment function is disrupted, a range of pathological features are presented. Little is known about nephron patterning during embryogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate that the early nephron is patterned by a gradient in β-catenin activity along the axis of the nephron tubule. By modifying β-catenin activity, we force cells within nephrons to differentiate according to the imposed β-catenin activity level, thereby causing spatial shifts in nephron segments. The β-catenin signalling gradient interacts with the BMP pathway which, through PTEN/PI3K/AKT signalling, antagonises β-catenin activity and promotes segment identities associated with low β-catenin activity. β-catenin activity and PI3K signalling also integrate with Notch signalling to control segmentation: modulating β-catenin activity or PI3K rescues segment identities normally lost by inhibition of Notch. Our data therefore identifies a molecular network for nephron patterning.

  5. Shedding (far-red) light on phytochrome mechanisms and responses in land plants.

    PubMed

    Possart, Anja; Fleck, Christian; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    In order to monitor ambient light conditions, plants rely on functionally diversified photoreceptors. Among these, phytochromes perceive red (R) and far-red (FR) light. FR light does not constitute a photosynthetic energy source; it however influences adaptive and developmental processes. In seed plants, phytochrome A (phyA) acts as FR receptor and mediates FR high irradiance responses (FR-HIRs). It exerts a dual role by promoting e.g. germination and seedling de-etiolation in canopy shade and by antagonising shade avoidance growth. Even though cryptogam plants such as mosses and ferns do not have phyA, they show FR-induced responses. In the present review we discuss the mechanistic basis of phyA-dependent FR-HIRs as well as their dual role in seed plants. We compare FR responses in seed plants and cryptogam plants and conclude on different potential concepts for the detection of canopy shade. Scenarios for the evolution of FR perception and responses are discussed.

  6. The antimicrobial effect of colistin methanesulfonate on Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    van Breda, Shane Vontelin; Buys, Antoinette; Apostolides, Zeno; Nardell, Edward Anthony; Stoltz, Anton Carel

    2015-07-01

    Polymyxins have previously been described to have activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), but further research was abandoned due to systemic toxicity concerns to achieve the required MIC. Colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), a polymyxin, is well tolerated when inhaled directly into the lungs, resulting in high local concentrations. We report here for the first time, MIC and MBC data for CMS determined by the microtiter Alamar Blue assay (MABA). We also determined how the MIC would be affected by the presence of pulmonary surfactant (PS) and if any synergy with isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) exists. The effect of CMS on the ultrastructure of MTB was also determined. The MIC for CMS was 16 mg/L, while the MBC was 256 mg/L. MIC for CMS in PS was antagonised by eight fold. For synergy, indifference was determined while time-kill assays revealed a greater killing effect when CMS was used together with INH. Ultrastructure analysis suggests that the disruption of the outer polysaccharide layer of MTB by CMS may lead to enhanced uptake of INH. Our findings may provide insight for further investigations of CMS against MTB.

  7. Impaired JNK signaling cooperates with KrasG12D expression to accelerate pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Clare C.; Harvey, Emma; McMahon, Raymond F.T.; Finegan, Katherine G.; Connor, Frances; Davis, Roger J.; Tuveson, David A.; Tournier, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and its two direct activators, namely the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase 4 (MKK4) and MKK7, constitute a signaling node frequently mutated in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here we demonstrate the cooperative interaction of endogenous expression of KrasG12D with loss-of-function mutations in mkk4 or both, mkk4 and mkk7 genes in the pancreas. More specifically, impaired JNK signaling in a subpopulation of Pdx1-expressing cells dramatically accelerated the appearance of KrasG12D-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, which rapidly progressed to invasive PDAC within 10 weeks of age. Furthermore, inactivation of mkk4/mkk7 compromised acinar regeneration following acute inflammatory stress by locking damaged exocrine cells in a permanently de-differentiated state. Therefore, we propose that JNK signaling exerts its tumor suppressive function in the pancreas by antagonising the metaplastic conversion of acinar cells towards a ductal fate capable of responding to oncogenic stimulation. PMID:24713432

  8. Analgesia after feline ovariohysterectomy under midazolam-medetomidine-ketamine anaesthesia with buprenorphine or butorphanol, and carprofen or meloxicam: a prospective, randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Polson, Sally; Taylor, Polly M; Yates, David

    2012-08-01

    One hundred female cats undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy under midazolam-medetomidine-ketamine anaesthesia were included in a blinded, randomised, prospective clinical study to compare postoperative analgesia produced by four analgesic drug combinations given preoperatively (n = 25 per group). A secondary aim was to assess the effects in kittens and pregnant animals. Buprenorphine 180 µg/m(2) or butorphanol 6 mg/m(2) were given with either carprofen 4 mg/kg (groups BUPC and BUTC, respectively) or meloxicam 0.3 mg/kg (groups BUPM or BUTM, respectively). Medetomidine was not antagonised. A simple, descriptive scale (SDS; 0-4), a dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale (DIVAS; 0-100 mm) and mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MT; 2.5-mm diameter probe) were used to evaluate postoperative pain. All pain scores were low (DIVAS <10 mm, SDS <2 and MT >10 N) and there were no significant differences between the groups. It was concluded that all protocols provided adequate analgesia and when used with midazolam-medetomidine-ketamine are effective for routine feline ovariohysterectomy. PMID:22505603

  9. The chick embryo as a model for the effects of prenatal exposure to alcohol on craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Kiecker, Clemens

    2016-07-15

    Prenatal exposure to ethanol results in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), a syndrome characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations including craniofacial dysmorphologies and neurological defects. The characterisation of the mechanisms by which ethanol exerts its teratogenic effects is difficult due to the pleiotropic nature of its actions. Different experimental model systems have been employed to investigate the aetiology of FASD. Here, I will review studies using these different model organisms that have helped to elucidate how ethanol causes the craniofacial abnormalities characteristic of FASD. In these studies, ethanol was found to impair the prechordal plate-an important embryonic signalling centre-during gastrulation and to negatively affect the induction, migration and survival of the neural crest, a cell population that generates the cartilage and most of the bones of the skull. At the cellular level, ethanol appears to inhibit Sonic hedgehog signalling, alter levels of retionoic acid activity, trigger a Ca(2+)-CamKII-dependent pathway that antagonises WNT signalling, affect cytoskeletal dynamics and increase oxidative stress. Embryos of the domestic chick Gallus gallus domesticus have played a central role in developing a working model for the effects of ethanol on craniofacial development because they are easily accessible and because key steps in craniofacial development are particularly well established in the avian embryo. I will finish this review by highlighting some potential future avenues of fetal alcohol research. PMID:26777098

  10. Naturally-Occurring Glucosinolates, Glucoraphanin and Glucoerucin, are Antagonists to Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor as Their Chemopreventive Potency.

    PubMed

    Abdull Razis, Ahmad Faizal; Noor, Noramaliza Mohd

    2015-01-01

    As a cytosolic transcription factor, the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor is involved in several patho- physiological events leading to immunosuppression and cancer; hence antagonists of the Ah receptor may possess chemoprevention properties. It is known to modulate carcinogen-metabolising enzymes, for instance the CYP1 family of cytochromes P450 and quinone reductase, both important in the biotransformation of many chemical carcinogens via regulating phase I and phase II enzyme systems. Utilising chemically-activated luciferase expression (CALUX) assay it was revealed that intact glucosinolates, glucoraphanin and glucoerucin, isolated from Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala sabellica and Eruca sativa ripe seeds, respectively, are such antagonists. Both glucosinolates were poor ligands for the Ah receptor; however, they effectively antagonised activation of the receptor by the avid ligand benzo[a]pyrene. Indeed, intact glucosinolate glucoraphanin was a more potent antagonist to the receptor than glucoerucin. It can be concluded that both glucosinolates effectively act as antagonists for the Ah receptor, and this may contribute to their established chemoprevention potency. PMID:26320454

  11. Wave pinning and spatial patterning in a mathematical model of Antivin/Lefty-Nodal signalling.

    PubMed

    Middleton, A M; King, J R; Loose, M

    2013-12-01

    Nodal signals are key regulators of mesoderm and endoderm development in vertebrate embryos. It has been observed experimentally that in Xenopus embryos the spatial range of Nodal signals is restricted by the signal Antivin (also known as Lefty). Nodal signals can activate both Nodal and Antivin, whereas Antivin is thought to antagonise Nodal by binding either directly to it or to its receptor. In this paper we develop a mathematical model of this signalling network in a line of cells. We consider the heterodimer and receptor-mediated inhibition mechanisms separately and find that, in both cases, the restriction by Antivin to the range of Nodal signals corresponds to wave pinning in the model. Our analysis indicates that, provided Antivin diffuses faster than Nodal, either mechanism can robustly account for the experimental data. We argue that, in the case of Xenopus development, it is wave pinning, rather than Turing-type patterning, that is underlying Nodal-Antivin dynamics. This leads to several experimentally testable predictions, which are discussed. Furthermore, for heterodimer-mediated inhibition to prevent waves of Nodal expression from propagating, the Nodal-Antivin complex must be turned over, and diffusivity of the complex must be negligible. In the absence of molecular mechanisms regulating these, we suggest that Antivin restricts Nodal signals via receptor-mediated, and not heterodimer-mediated, inhibition. PMID:23070212

  12. Anticonvulsive activity of Albizzia lebbeck, Hibiscus rosa sinesis and Butea monosperma in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Kasture, V S; Chopde, C T; Deshmukh, V K

    2000-07-01

    The ethanolic extracts of leaves of Albizzia lebbeck and flowers of Hibiscus rosa sinesis and the petroleum ether extract of flowers of Butea monosperma exhibited anticonvulsant activity. The bioassay guided fractionation indicated that the anticonvulsant activity lies in the methanolic fraction of chloroform soluble part of ethanolic extract of the leaves of A. lebbeck, acetone soluble part of ethanolic extract of H. rosa sinesis flowers and acetone soluble part of petroleum ether extract of B. monosperma flowers. The fractions protected animals from maximum electro shock, electrical kindling and pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in mice. The fractions also inhibited convulsions induced by lithium-pilocarpine and electrical kindling. However, they failed to protect animals from strychnine-induced convulsions. The fractions antagonised the behavioral effects of D-amphetamine and potentiated the pentobarbitone-induced sleep. The fractions raised brain contents of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin. These fractions were found to be anxiogenic and general depressant of central nervous system. PMID:10904147

  13. Effects of epinephrine and cortisol on the analgesic activity of metyrosine in rats.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Yavuz; Saglam, Mustafa Bahadir; Yildirim, Kadir; Karatay, Saliha; Polat, Beyzagul; Uslu, Turan; Suleyman, Halis; Akcay, Fatih

    2011-09-01

    Some endogenous hormones (epinephrine and cortisol) can change an individual's pain threshold. Propranolol is a non-selective β adrenergic receptor blocker which antagonises the anti-inflammatory effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs via the β1 and β2 adrenergic receptors. The roles of epinephrine and cortisol were investigated in the analgesic activity of metyrosine in rats with reduced epinephrine levels induced by metyrosine. Pain threshold measurement was performed using an analgesimeter with different doses and the single or combined usage of metyrosine, prednisolone, metyrapone and propranolol in rats. Epinephrine and corticosterone levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in metyrosineadministered rats. Metyrosine reduces the epinephrine levels without affecting the corticosterone levels, thereby creating an analgesic effect. It was determined that prednisolone did not have an analgesic effect in rats with normal epinephrine levels, but its analgesic activity increased with a parallel decrease in the epinephrine levels. Similarly, the combined use of prednisolone and metyrosine provided a stronger analgesic effect than that rendered by metyrosine alone. The strongest analgesic effect, however, was observed in the group of rats with the lowest epinephrine level in whom the metyrosine + prednisolone combination was administered. The findings of this study may be useful in severe pain cases in which the available analgesics are unable to relieve the individual's pain.

  14. MLL Histone Methylases Regulate Expression of HDLR-SR-B1 in Presence of Estrogen and Control Plasma Cholesterol in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Kasiri, Sahba; Hussain, Imran; Bobzean, Samara A. Morris; Perrotti, Linda I.

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein receptors scavenger receptor class B type I [HDLR-SR-B1 (SR-B1)] is a key player in reverse cholesterol transport and maintaining blood cholesterol. We demonstrated that human SR-B1 is transcriptionally activated by 17β-estradiol (E2) in HEPG2 and JAR cells. SR-B1 promoter contains multiple estrogen response elements (ERE half-sites) along with some Sp1 binding sites. Knockdown of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ down-regulated E2-induced SR-B1 expression. ERs were bound to SR-B1 promoter EREs in an E2-dependent manner. Along with ERs, mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) histone methylases, especially MLL1 and MLL2, play key roles in E2-mediated SR-B1 activation. MLL1 and MLL2 bind to SR-B1 promoter in an E2-dependent manner and control the assembly of transcription pre-initiation complex and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment. ERs and MLLs play critical roles in determining the cholesterol uptake by steroidogenic tissues/cells, and their knockdown suppressed the E2-induced cholesterol uptake efficiencies of the cells. Intriguingly, MLL2 knockdown in mice resulted in a 33% increase in plasma cholesterol level and also reduced SR-B1 expression in mice liver, demonstrating its crucial functions in controlling plasma cholesterol in vivo. PMID:23192982

  15. Acetylation of Conserved Lysines in Bovine Papillomavirus E2 by p300

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Edward J.; Culleton, Sara P.; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The p300, CBP, and pCAF lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) proteins have been reported to physically interact with bovine (BPV) and human (HPV) papillomavirus E2 proteins. While overexpression of these KAT proteins enhances E2-dependent transcription, the mechanism has not been determined. Using RNA interference (RNAi) to deplete these factors, we demonstrated that E2 transcriptional activity requires physiological levels of p300, CBP, and pCAF. Each protein appears to have a unique function in E2-dependent transcription, since overexpression of one KAT failed to compensate for RNAi knockdown of another KAT. Using an in vitro acetylation assay, we identified highly conserved lysines that are targeted by p300 for acetylation. The conservative changes of lysines at positions 111 and 112 to arginine were of particular interest. The K111R and the K111R/K112R mutants showed reduced transcriptional activity that was not responsive to p300 overexpression, while the K112R mutant retained activity. p300 and CBP were detected at the viral promoter; however, pCAF was not. We propose a model by which E2 transcriptional activity is controlled by p300-mediated acetylation of lysine 111. This model represents a novel mechanism regulating papillomavirus gene expression. PMID:23152516

  16. Oestrogen receptors interact with the α-catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lipovka, Yulia; Chen, Hao; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen; Konhilas, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Normal and pathological stressors engage the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling axis to protect the cell from energetic pressures. Sex steroid hormones also play a critical role in energy metabolism and significantly modify pathological progression of cardiac disease, diabetes/obesity and cancer. AMPK is targeted by 17β-oestradiol (E2), the main circulating oestrogen, but the mechanism by which E2 activates AMPK is currently unknown. Using an oestrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β) positive (T47D) breast cancer cell line, we validated E2-dependent activation of AMPK that was mediated through ERα (not ERβ) by using three experimental strategies. A series of co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that both ERs associated with AMPK in cancer and striated (skeletal and cardiac) muscle cells. We further demonstrated direct binding of ERs to the α-catalytic subunit of AMPK within the βγ-subunit-binding domain. Finally, both ERs interacted with the upstream liver kinase B 1 (LKB1) kinase complex, which is required for E2-dependent activation of AMPK. We conclude that E2 activates AMPK through ERα by direct interaction with the βγ-binding domain of AMPKα. PMID:26374855

  17. Continuous dopaminergic stimulation by pramipexole is effective to treat early morning akinesia in animal models of Parkinson's disease: A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study using in vivo microdialysis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferger, Boris; Buck, Kerstin; Shimasaki, Makoto; Koros, Eliza; Voehringer, Patrizia; Buerger, Erich

    2010-07-01

    Short-acting dopamine (DA) agonists are usually administered several times a day resulting in fluctuating plasma and brain levels. DA agonists providing continuous dopaminergic stimulation may achieve higher therapeutic benefit for example by alleviating nocturnal disturbances as well as early morning akinesia. In the present study continuous release (CR) of pramipexole (PPX) was maintained by subcutaneous implantation of Alzet minipumps, whereas subcutaneous PPX injections were used to mimic PPX immediate release (IR) in male Wistar rats. In the catalepsy bar test, PPX-CR (1 mg/kg/day) reversed the haloperidol-induced motor impairment in the morning and over the whole observation period of 12h. In contrast, PPX-IR (tid 1 mg/kg, pre-treatment the day before) was not effective in the morning but catalepsy was reduced for 6 h after PPX-IR (1 mg/kg) injection. In the reserpine model, early morning akinesia indicated by the first motor activity measurement in the morning was significantly reversed by PPX-CR (2 mg/kg/day). Again, PPX-IR (tid 0.3 mg/kg, pre-treatment the day before) was not able to antagonise early morning akinesia. These results are in agreement with in vivo microdialysis measurements showing a continuous decrease of extracellular DA levels and a continuous PPX exposure in the PPX-CR (1 mg/kg/day) group. In contrast, PPX-IR (0.3 mg/kg) produced a transient decrease of extracellular DA levels over 6 h and showed maximum PPX levels 2 h after dosing which decreased over the following 6-8 h. The present study demonstrates that PPX-CR may offer a higher therapeutic benefit than PPX-IR on early morning akinesia and confirms earlier reports that PPX-IR reverses motor impairment for several hours. PMID:20196139

  18. Interleukin-27 exhibited anti-inflammatory activity during Plasmodium berghei infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Fazalul Rahiman, S S; Basir, R; Talib, H; Tie, T H; Chuah, Y K; Jabbarzare, M; Chong, W C; Mohd Yusoff, M A; Nordin, N; Yam, M F; Abdullah, W O; Abdul Majid, R

    2013-12-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) has a pleiotropic role either as a pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory cytokine in inflammatory related diseases. The role and involvement of IL-27 during malaria was investigated and the effects of modulating its release on the production of major inflammatory cytokines and the histopathological consequences in major affected organs during the infection were evaluated. Results showed that IL-27 concentration was significantly elevated throughout the infection but no positive correlation with the parasitaemia development observed. Augmentation of IL-27 significantly elevated the release of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10 whereas antagonising and neutralising IL-27 produced the opposite. A significant elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-6) was also observed, both during augmentation and inhibition of IL-27. Thus, it is suggested that IL-27 exerts an anti-inflammatory activity in the Th1 type response by signalling the production of IL-10 during malaria. Histopathological examination showed sequestration of PRBC in the microvasculature of major organs in malarial mice. Other significant histopathological changes include hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the Kupffer cells in the liver, hyaline membrane formation in lung tissue, enlargement of the white and red pulp followed by the disappearance of germinal centre of the spleen, and tubular vacuolation of the kidney tissues. In conclusion, it is suggested that IL-27 may possibly acts as an anti-inflammatory cytokine during the infection. Modulation of its release produced a positive impact on inflammatory cytokine production during the infection, suggesting its potential in malaria immunotherapy, in which the host may benefit from its inhibition.

  19. Synergy and antagonism between iron chelators and antifungal drugs in Cryptococcus.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Wen; Campbell, Leona T; Wilkins, Marc R; Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Chen, Sharon; Carter, Dee A

    2016-10-01

    Fungal infections remain very difficult to treat, and developing new antifungal drugs is difficult and expensive. Recent approaches therefore seek to augment existing antifungals with synergistic agents that can lower the therapeutic dose, increase efficacy and prevent resistance from developing. Iron limitation can inhibit microbial growth, and iron chelators have been employed to treat fungal infections. In this study, chequerboard testing was used to explore combinations of iron chelators with antifungal agents against pathogenic Cryptococcus spp. with the aim of determining how disruption to iron homeostasis affects antifungal susceptibility. The iron chelators ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), deferoxamine (DFO), deferiprone (DFP), deferasirox (DSX), ciclopirox olamine and lactoferrin (LF) were paired with the antifungal agents amphotericin B (AmB), fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin. All chelators except for DFO increased the efficacy of AmB, and significant synergy was seen between AmB and LF for all Cryptococcus strains. Addition of exogenous iron rescued cells from the antifungal effect of LF alone but could not prevent inhibition by AmB + LF, indicating that synergy was not due primarily to iron chelation but to other properties of LF that were potentiated in the presence of AmB. Significant synergy was not seen consistently for other antifungal-chelator combinations, and EDTA, DSX and DFP antagonised the activity of azole drugs in strains of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii. This study highlights the range of interactions that can be induced by chelators and indicates that most antifungal drugs are not enhanced by iron limitation in Cryptococcus. PMID:27474467

  20. Fumaric acid esters prevent the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated and ATP-triggered pyroptosis of differentiated THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Miglio, Gianluca; Veglia, Eleonora; Fantozzi, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Fumaric acid esters (FAEs) exert therapeutic effects in patients with psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, however their mode of action remains elusive. Pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent pro-inflammatory form of programmed cell death, mediated by the activation of inflammasomes. To understand the pharmacological basis of the therapeutic effects of FAEs, the anti-pyroptotic activity of dimethyl fumarate (DMF) and its hydrolysis metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF) was studied in a model of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated pyroptosis of human macrophages. Phorbol myristate acetate-differentiated THP-1 cells were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (5 μg/ml; 4h), then pulsed with ATP (5mM; 1h). MMF, DMF, or parthenolide (positive control) were added 1h before the ATP pulse. The pyroptotic cell death was evaluated by morphological examination and quantified by measuring the lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The ATP-triggered death of THP-1 cells (60.4 ± 4.0%) was significantly (P<0.01) prevented by DMF, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner (pIC50 and maximal effect were 6.6 and 67.6 ± 1.2%, respectively). MMF was less efficacious than DMF. These effects were accompanied by a decreased intracellular activation of caspase-1 and interleukin-1β release from ATP-treated cells, thus suggesting that FAEs antagonise the effects of ATP by preventing the activation of the pyroptotic molecular cascade leading to cell death. These results indicate that FAEs are endowed with anti-pyroptotic activity, which may contribute to their therapeutic effects. PMID:26096886

  1. Prostanoid receptors mediating contraction in rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Root, James A; Davey, Dorren A; Af Forselles, Kerry J

    2015-12-15

    Selective prostaglandin EP1 antagonists have been suggested for the treatment of bladder dysfunction. This study assessed the contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes in human and non-human bladder in vitro. Classical tissue bath studies were conducted using bladder strips exposed to prostanoid agonists and antagonists. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contracted rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle strips (pEC50 7.91±0.06 (n=7), 6.40±0.13 (n=7), and 6.07±0.11 (n=5), respectively). The EP1 receptor antagonist, PF2907617 (300nM), caused a rightward shift of the PGE2 concentration-response curve in the rat bladder only (pKB 8.40±0.15, n=3). PGE2 responses in rat and macaque bladders, but not human, were antagonised by the EP3 antagonist CJ24979 (1µM). Sulprostone, a mixed EP1/EP3/FP receptor agonist, induced potent contractions of rat bladder muscle (pEC50 7.94±0.31, n=6). The FP receptor agonist, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), induced bladder contraction in all species tested, but with a lower potency in rat. The selective FP receptor agonist latanoprost caused potent contractions of macaque and human bladder strips only. SQ29548, a selective TP antagonist, and GW848687X, a mixed EP1/TP antagonist caused rightward shifts of the concentration-response curves to the selective TP agonist, U46619 (pKB estimates 8.53±0.07 and 7.56±0.06, n=3, respectively). Responses to U46619 were absent in rat preparations. These data suggest significant species differences exist in bladder contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes. We conclude that the EP1 subtype does not represent the best approach to the clinical treatment of bladder disorders targeting inhibition of smooth muscle contraction.

  2. The neuroprotective action of the mood stabilizing drugs lithium chloride and sodium valproate is mediated through the up-regulation of the homeodomain protein Six1.

    PubMed

    Plant, Kathryn E; Anderson, Elizabeth; Simecek, Nicole; Brown, Richard; Forster, Sam; Spinks, Jenny; Toms, Nick; Gibson, G Gordon; Lyon, Jon; Plant, Nick

    2009-02-15

    The mood stabilizing agents lithium chloride (LiCl) and sodium valproate (VPA) have recently gained interest as potential neuroprotective therapeutics. However, exploitation of these therapeutic applications is hindered by both a lack of molecular understanding of the mode of action, and a number of sub-optimal properties, including a relatively small therapeutic window and variable patient response. Human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) were exposed to 1 mM lithium chloride or 1 mM sodium valproate for 6 h or 72 h, and transcriptomes measured by Affymetrix U133A/B microarray. Statistically significant gene expression changes were identified using SAM software, with selected changes confirmed at transcript (TaqMan) and protein (Western blotting) levels. Finally, anti-apoptotic action was measured by an in vitro fluorescent assay. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to therapeutically relevant concentrations of either lithium chloride or sodium valproate elicited 936 statistically significant changes in gene expression. Amongst these changes we observed a large (maximal 31.3-fold) increase in the expression of the homeodomain protein Six1, and have characterized the time- and dose-dependent up-regulation of this gene in response to both drugs. In addition, we demonstrate that, like LiCl or VPA treatment, Six1 over-expression protects SH-SY5Y cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis via the blockade of caspsase-3 activation, whereas removal of Six1 protein via siRNA antagonises the ability of LiCl and VPA to protect SH-SY5Y cells from STS-induced apoptosis. These results provide a novel mechanistic rationale underlying the neuroprotective mechanism of LiCl and VPA, suggesting exciting possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic agents against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinsonism.

  3. Iron depletion suppresses mTORC1-directed signalling in intestinal Caco-2 cells via induction of REDD1

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Ailsa; Lipina, Christopher; McArdle, Harry J.; Taylor, Peter M.; Hundal, Harinder S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an indispensable micronutrient that regulates many aspects of cell function, including growth and proliferation. These processes are critically dependent upon signalling via the mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Herein, we test whether iron depletion induced by cell incubation with the iron chelator, deferoxamine (DFO), mediates its effects on cell growth through mTORC1-directed signalling and protein synthesis. We have used Caco-2 cells, a well-established in vitro model of human intestinal epithelia. Iron depletion increased expression of iron-regulated proteins (TfR, transferrin receptor and DMT1, divalent metal transporter, as predicted, but it also promoted a marked reduction in growth and proliferation of Caco-2 cells. This was strongly associated with suppressed mTORC1 signalling, as judged by reduced phosphorylation of mTOR substrates, S6K1 and 4E-BP1, and diminished protein synthesis. The reduction in mTORC1 signalling was tightly coupled with increased expression and accumulation of REDD1 (regulated in DNA damage and development 1) and reduced phosphorylation of Akt and TSC2. The increase in REDD1 abundance was rapidly reversed upon iron repletion of cells but was also attenuated by inhibitors of gene transcription, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and by REDD1 siRNA — strategies that also antagonised the loss in mTORC1 signalling associated with iron depletion. Our findings implicate REDD1 and PP2A as crucial regulators of mTORC1 activity in iron-depleted cells and indicate that their modulation may help mitigate atrophy of the intestinal mucosa that may occur in response to iron deficiency. PMID:26827808

  4. Activation of RXR/PPARγ underlies neuroprotection by bexarotene in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Certo, Michelangelo; Endo, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Kiminori; Sakurada, Shinobu; Bagetta, Giacinto; Amantea, Diana

    2015-12-01

    The identification of novel drug targets for the treatment of ischemic stroke is currently an urgent challenge. Recent experimental findings have highlighted the neuroprotective potential of immunomodulatory strategies, based on polarization of myeloid cells toward non-inflammatory, beneficial phenotypes. Given the role of retinoid X receptors (RXR) in myeloid cells differentiation and polarization, here we have explored the neuroprotective potential of the RXR agonist bexarotene in mice subjected to focal cerebral ischemia. Acute administration of bexarotene significantly reduced blood brain barrier leakage, brain infarct damage and neurological deficit produced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice, without affecting cerebral blood flow. The rexinoid exerted neuroprotection with a wide time-window, being effective when administered up to 4.5h after the insult. The amelioration of histological outcome, as well as the ability of bexarotene to revert middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo)-induced spleen atrophy, was antagonised by BR1211, a pan-RXR antagonist, or by the selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ antagonist bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE), highlighting the involvement of the RXR/PPARγ heterodimer in the beneficial effects exerted by the drug. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that bexarotene elevates Ym1-immunopositive N2 neutrophils both in the ipsilateral hemisphere and in the spleen of mice subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, pointing to a major role for peripheral neutrophil polarization in neuroprotection. Thus, our findings suggest that the RXR agonist bexarotene exerts peripheral immunomodulatory effects under ischemic conditions to be effectively repurposed for the acute therapy of ischemic stroke. PMID:26546745

  5. Capsaicin may have important potential for promoting vascular and metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J; O'Keefe, James H

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, the phytochemical responsible for the spiciness of peppers, has the potential to modulate metabolism via activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors, which are found not only on nociceptive sensory neurons, but also in a range of other tissues. TRPV1 activation induces calcium influx, and in certain tissues this is associated with increased activation or expression of key proteins such as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), KLF2, PPARdelta, PPARgamma, and LXRα. The calcium influx triggered by TRPV1 activation in endothelial cells mimics the impact of shear stress in this regard, activating and increasing the expression of eNOS—but also increasing expression of cox-2, thrombomodulin, and nrf2-responsive antioxidant enzymes, while decreasing expression of proinflammatory proteins. Hence, dietary capsaicin has favourably impacted endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rodents. TRPV1-mediated induction of LXRα in foam cells promotes cholesterol export, antagonising plaque formation. Capsaicin-mediated activation of TRPV1-expressing neurons in the gastrointestinal tract promotes sympathetically mediated stimulation of brown fat, raising metabolic rate. The increased expression of UCP2 induced by TRPV1 activation exerts a protective antioxidant effect on the liver in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and on vascular endothelium in the context of hyperglycaemia. In rodent studies, capsaicin-rich diets have shown favourable effects on atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver, cardiac hypertrophy, hypertension and stroke risk. Clinically, ingestion of capsaicin—or its less stable non-pungent analogue capsiate—has been shown to boost metabolic rate modestly. Topical application of capsaicin via patch was found to increase exercise time to ischaemic threshold in patients with angina. Further clinical studies with capsaicin administered in food, capsules

  6. Do thyroid hormones function in insects?

    PubMed

    Davey, K G

    2000-01-01

    Earlier work demonstrated that phenoxy-phenyl compounds such as fenoxycarb and thyroxine mimicked the effects of JH III in causing a reduction in volume of the follicle cells of Locusta migratoria. While these compounds were only moderately effective, a derivative of thyroxine, 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) was as effective as JH III, and T3 has been shown to bind to the same membrane receptor and activate the same pathway as JH III. The current paper shows that other thyroxine derivatives vary in activity. 3,3', 5'-Triiodothyronine (reverse T3) is inactive. 3,5-Diiodothyronine (T2) is more active than JH III, while its relatives (iodines at 3', 5' or at 3,3') are inactive. When follicles are exposed in vitro to rhodamine conjugated T3, the fluorescent compound can be seen to enter the cells and accumulate there: this process is inhibited by cycloheximide or by a temperature of 0 degrees C. The accumulation is antagonised by JH III but not JH I (which does not bind to the JH III membrane receptor) and by an antiserum raised against the putative membrane receptor protein. The action of T3, but not T2, is inhibited by 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil or by aurothioglucose, both known to inhibit deiodinases. The activity of T3, but not of T2, increases with time of exposure to the follicle cells. These facts suggest that T3 enters the cells by receptor mediated endocytosis and is converted to a more active compound. Immunoreactivity to T3, but not thyroxine, can be detected in the haemolymph of locusts, and the titre varies slightly with the gonotrophic cycle. The food shows immunoreactivity for both thyroxine and T3. These findings suggest that thyroid hormones are ingested by locusts and have the potential to be used as hormonal signals in the control of egg production.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Couples Localised Calcium Influx to Activation of Akt in Central Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Nicholson-Fish, Jessica C; Cousin, Michael A; Smillie, Karen J

    2016-03-01

    The efficient retrieval of synaptic vesicle membrane and cargo in central nerve terminals is dependent on the efficient recruitment of a series of endocytosis modes by different patterns of neuronal activity. During intense neuronal activity the dominant endocytosis mode is activity-dependent endocytosis (ADBE). Triggering of ADBE is linked to calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation since the same stimulation intensities trigger both. Dynamin I dephosphorylation is maximised by a simultaneous inhibition of its kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) by the protein kinase Akt, however it is unknown how increased neuronal activity is transduced into Akt activation. To address this question we determined how the activity-dependent increases in intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) control activation of Akt. This was achieved using either trains of high frequency action potentials to evoke localised [Ca(2+)]i increases at active zones, or a calcium ionophore to raise [Ca(2+)]i uniformly across the nerve terminal. Through the use of either non-specific calcium channel antagonists or intracellular calcium chelators we found that Akt phosphorylation (and subsequent GSK3 phosphorylation) was dependent on localised [Ca(2+)]i increases at the active zone. In an attempt to determine mechanism, we antagonised either phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or calmodulin. Activity-dependent phosphorylation of both Akt and GSK3 was arrested on inhibition of PI3K, but not calmodulin. Thus localised calcium influx in central nerve terminals activates PI3K via an unknown calcium sensor to trigger the activity-dependent phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3.

  8. Identification and functional analysis of a novel tryptophyllin peptide from the skin of the red-eye leaf frog, Agalychnis callidryas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Tianbao; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Lei; Shaw, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian skin has proved repeatedly to be a largely untapped source of bioactive peptides and this is especially true of members of the Phyllomedusinae subfamily of frogs native to South and Central America. Tryptophyllins are a group of peptides mainly found in the skin of members of this genus. In this study, a novel tryptophyllin (TPH) type 3 peptide, named AcT-3, has been isolated and structurally-characterised from the skin secretion and lyophilised skin extract of the red-eye leaf frog, Agalychnis callidryas. The peptide was identified in and purified from the skin secretion by reverse-phase HPLC. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and MS/MS fragmentation sequencing established its primary structure as: pGlu-Gly-Lys-Pro-Tyr-Trp-Pro-Pro-Pro-Phe-Leu-Pro-Glu, with a non-protonated molecular mass of 1538.19Da. The mature peptide possessed the canonical N-terminal pGlu residue that arises from post-translational modification of a Gln residue. The deduced open-reading frame consisted of 63 amino acid residues encoding a highly-conserved signal peptide of approximately 22 amino acid residues, an intervening acidic spacer peptide domain, a single AcT-3 encoding domain and a C terminal processing site. A synthetic replicate of AcT-3 was found to antagonise the effect of BK on rat tail artery smooth muscle and to contract the intestinal smooth muscle preparations. It was also found that AcT-3 could dose-dependently inhibit the proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines after 72h incubation.

  9. Treatment of depression with the CRH-1-receptor antagonist R121919: endocrine changes and side effects.

    PubMed

    Künzel, Heike E; Zobel, Astrid W; Nickel, Thomas; Ackl, Nibal; Uhr, Manfred; Sonntag, Annette; Ising, Marcus; Holsboer, Florian

    2003-01-01

    A dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system has been hypothesized to account for a myriad of cardinal symptoms of affective disorders. Specifically, increased CRH signalling via CRH type 1 receptors is thought to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of major depression and anxiety disorders. Consequently, a number of drugs have been developed in order to target the postulated increase in CRH/CRH 1 receptor signalling. One of these compounds, R121919, binds with high affinity to CRH1 receptors antagonising the action of CRH. R121919 was recently tested in an open-label study conceptualized as a safety and tolerability study. As part of this study, a thorough endocrine evaluation and detailed clinical laboratory analysis were assessed several times during 30 days of treatment with two different dose regimens of R121919 (5-40 mg vs. 40-80 mg) in 24 patients with a major depressive episode. During treatment with the experimental drug no serious side effects were noted. In particular, there were no adverse effects or impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, the renin-angiotensin system, prolactin or vasopressin secretion. Furthermore, no changes in the serum corticotropin and cortisol concentrations and in the responsivity of corticotropin and cortisol following a CRH stimulation test were noted. No effects of R121919 on clinical laboratory parameters including liver enzymes, EEG and ECG were observed. These results encourage the development of other CRH-1-R antagonists as a novel class of antidepressive drugs.

  10. Sex differences in opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartate mediated non-opioid biting fly exposure induced analgesia in deer mice.

    PubMed

    Kavaliers, M; Colwell, D D; Choleris, E

    1998-08-01

    There is evidence for sex differences in responses to noxious stimuli and in the expression and mediation of analgesia. In particular, results of investigations with swim stress and the more ethologically appropriate stress of predator odor exposure have suggested sex differences in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system involvement in the mediation of analgesia. Whether or not this sex difference generalizes to other environmental stressors is, however, not clear. Biting flies are a natural aversive stimuli commonly encountered by wild and domestic animals and humans. The present study examined the opioid and non-opioid mediated nociceptive (50 degrees C hot plate) responses of reproductive male and female deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus, exposed to biting fly attack. A 30 min exposure to biting flies (stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)) elicited a naloxone sensitive, opioid-mediated analgesia that was of a greater magnitude in males than in female deer mice. In contrast, a 5 min exposure to biting flies elicited a 'on-opioid' analgesia that was of similar magnitude in both sexes and insensitive to both naloxone and the specific kappa opiate antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine. In male mice this non-opioid analgesia was antagonised by the competitive NMDA antagonist, NPC 1262, while in reproductive females the biting fly-induced analgesia was insensitive to NPC 12626. These results show that there are sex differences in NMDA involvement in the mediation of the non-opioid analgesia arising from brief exposure to the stress of biting fly attack. These data from a common, natural environmental challenge support the presence of basic sex difference in NMDA involvement in the mediation of stress-induced analgesia. PMID:9766834

  11. Inhibition of histidine decarboxylase ablates the autocrine tumorigenic effects of histamine in human cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Heather; DeMorrow, Sharon; Venter, Julie; Onori, Paolo; White, Mellanie; Gaudio, Eugenio; Francis, Taylor; Greene, John F; Tran, Steve; Meininger, Cynthia J; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2011-01-01

    Background In several tumours the endogenous activity of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the enzyme stimulating histamine synthesis, sustains the autocrine trophic effect of histamine on cancer progression. Cholangiocarcinoma is a biliary cancer with limited treatment options. Histamine interacts with four G-protein coupled receptors, H1–H4 histamine receptors (HRs). Objective To determine the effects of histamine stimulation and inhibition of histamine synthesis (by modulation of HDC) on cholangiocarcinoma growth. Methods In vitro studies were performed using multiple human cholangiocarcinoma lines. The expression levels of the histamine synthetic machinery and HRs were evaluated along with the effects of histamine stimulation and inhibition on cholangiocarcinoma proliferation. A xenograft tumour model was used to measure tumour volume after treatment with histamine or inhibition of histamine synthesis by manipulation of HDC. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was measured in cholangiocarcinoma cells concomitant with the evaluation of the expression of CD31 in endothelial cells in the tumour microenvironment. Results Cholangiocarcinoma cells display (1) enhanced HDC and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression resulting in increased histamine secretion; and (2) increased expression of H1–H4 HRs. Inhibition of HDC and antagonising H1HR decreased histamine secretion in Mz-ChA-1 cells. Long-term treatment with histamine increased proliferation and VEGF expression in cholangiocarcinoma that was blocked by HDC inhibitor and the H1HR antagonist. In nude mice, histamine increased tumour growth (up to 25%) and VEGF expression whereas inhibition of histamine synthesis (by reduction of HDC) ablated the autocrine stimulation of histamine on tumour growth (~80%) and VEGF expression. No changes in angiogenesis (evaluated by changes in CD31 immunoreactivity) were detected in the in vivo treatment groups. Conclusion The novel concept that an autocrine loop

  12. Corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptors mediate the motivation for voluntary wheel running in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ebada, Mohamed Elsaed; Kendall, David A; Pardon, Marie-Christine

    2016-09-15

    Physical exercise can improve cognition but whether this is related to motivation levels is unknown. Voluntary wheel running is a rewarding activity proposed as a model of motivation to exercise. To question the potential effects of exercise motivation on subsequent behaviour, we used a pharmacological approach targeting some reward mechanisms. The stress hormone corticosterone has rewarding effects mediated by activation of low affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GR). To investigate whether corticosterone synthesis motivates exercise via activation of GRs and subsequently, impacts on behaviour, we treated C57BL/6J mice acutely with the inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis metyrapone (35mg/kg) or repeatedly with the GR antagonist mifepristone (30mg/kg) prior to 1-h running wheel sessions. To investigate whether reducing motivation to exercise impacts on behaviour, we antagonised running-induced dopamine D2/D3 receptors activation with sulpiride (25 or 50mg/kg) and assessed locomotor, anxiety-related and memory performance after 20 running sessions over 4 weeks. We found that corticosterone synthesis contributes to running levels, but the maintenance of running behaviour was not mediated by activation of GRs. Intermittent exercise was not associated with changes in behavioural or cognitive performance. The persistent reduction in exercise levels triggered by sulpiride also had limited impact on behavioural performance, although the level of performance for some behaviours was related to the level of exercise. Altogether, these findings indicate that corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptor activation contribute to the motivation for wheel running, but suggest that motivation for exercise is not a sufficient factor to alter behaviour in healthy mice. PMID:27233827

  13. Occurrence of a unique protein toxin from the Indian King Cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A; De, P; Dasgupta, S C

    2001-01-01

    A unique (lethal-cardiotoxic-hemorrhagic) protein toxin (Toxin CM55) was isolated and purified from Indian King Cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom by CM-sephadex ion exchange chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The purified toxin had an SDS-molecular weight of 22 +/- 0.5 kD. UV absorption spectra of Toxin CM55 showed a peak at 280 nm, whereas when excited at 280 nm fluorescence, Toxin CM55 showed an E(max) at 333.4 nm. Toxin CM55 had an LD(50) of 28.28 microg/20 g (i. v.) in albino mice. The cardiotoxic action of the toxin was established on isolated guinea pig/rabbit heart and guinea pig auricle. In rats, Toxin CM55 caused ECG abnormalities including widened QRS complex and monomorphic ventricular tachycardia suggesting that the possible site of action of Toxin CM55 was the ventricle. Toxin CM55 produced significant vasoconstriction on peripheral blood vessels. It produced significant contraction of isolated guinea pig ileum, rat fundus and rat uterus, which was completely antagonised by methysergide. The toxin was found to release a significant amount of serotonin from rabbit platelets. Toxin CM55 produced cutaneous hemorrhage in albino mice, which was also produced in reserpine and p-chloro phenylalanine pretreated animals. Rabbit antiserum was raised against Toxin CM55, which gave prominent bands in immunogel diffusion and immunoelectrophoresis. The antiserum provided 2 LD(50) protection against Toxin CM55-induced lethality in mice and also neutralised 3 MHD hemorrhagic dose of the toxin.

  14. Regulation of the expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and their endogenous ligands during rat sciatic nerve degeneration and regeneration: a role for PBR in neurosteroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lacor, P; Gandolfo, P; Tonon, M C; Brault, E; Dalibert, I; Schumacher, M; Benavides, J; Ferzaz, B

    1999-01-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) and their endogenous ligands, the diazepam-binding inhibitor derived-peptides, are present in Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of reversible (freeze-injury) and permanent (transection and ligature) nerve lesion on PBR density and on the levels of their endogenous ligands, by autoradiography (using [3H]PK11195) and radioimmunoassay (using antisera directed against the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN), a diazepam-binding inhibitor fragment). The potential role of PBR on peripheral nerve steroidogenesis, was studied by investigating the effect of specific PBR agonists and antagonists on pregnenolone levels in the sciatic nerve. Sixteen to 30 days after nerve lesion, PBR density and ODN-LI level were highly increased. Their expression returned to normal level when regeneration was completed 60 days after freeze-injury, but remained elevated when regeneration did not occur in transected distal stumps. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis of ODN-LI showed that in control nerve extracts, the major immunoreactive peak co-elutes with triakontatetraneuropeptide (TTN). After freeze-injury, intermediate molecular forms eluting between ODN and TTN were predominant and remained elevated at day 60. The greater accumulation of intermediate forms when regeneration is allowed to occur may indicate a particular role of these forms in axonal elongation and myelination. Ro5-4864, a high affinity PBR agonist increased pregnenolone concentration in the sciatic nerve. This effect was antagonised by PK11195, a high affinity PBR antagonist, which had no effect on pregnenolone basal level, indicating a specific action of PBR in neurosteroid production. These results suggest a role for PBR and their endogenous ligands in peripheral nerve regeneration. A trophic effect could be exerted via stimulation of steroid synthesis.

  15. Sex differences in opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartate mediated non-opioid biting fly exposure induced analgesia in deer mice.

    PubMed

    Kavaliers, M; Colwell, D D; Choleris, E

    1998-08-01

    There is evidence for sex differences in responses to noxious stimuli and in the expression and mediation of analgesia. In particular, results of investigations with swim stress and the more ethologically appropriate stress of predator odor exposure have suggested sex differences in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system involvement in the mediation of analgesia. Whether or not this sex difference generalizes to other environmental stressors is, however, not clear. Biting flies are a natural aversive stimuli commonly encountered by wild and domestic animals and humans. The present study examined the opioid and non-opioid mediated nociceptive (50 degrees C hot plate) responses of reproductive male and female deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus, exposed to biting fly attack. A 30 min exposure to biting flies (stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)) elicited a naloxone sensitive, opioid-mediated analgesia that was of a greater magnitude in males than in female deer mice. In contrast, a 5 min exposure to biting flies elicited a 'on-opioid' analgesia that was of similar magnitude in both sexes and insensitive to both naloxone and the specific kappa opiate antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine. In male mice this non-opioid analgesia was antagonised by the competitive NMDA antagonist, NPC 1262, while in reproductive females the biting fly-induced analgesia was insensitive to NPC 12626. These results show that there are sex differences in NMDA involvement in the mediation of the non-opioid analgesia arising from brief exposure to the stress of biting fly attack. These data from a common, natural environmental challenge support the presence of basic sex difference in NMDA involvement in the mediation of stress-induced analgesia.

  16. Anti-Plasmodial Polyvalent Interactions in Artemisia annua L. Aqueous Extract – Possible Synergistic and Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Suberu, John O.; Gorka, Alexander P.; Jacobs, Lauren; Roepe, Paul D.; Sullivan, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Artemisia annua hot water infusion (tea) has been used in in vitro experiments against P. falciparum malaria parasites to test potency relative to equivalent pure artemisinin. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometric analyses were employed to determine the metabolite profile of tea including the concentrations of artemisinin (47.5±0.8 mg L-1), dihydroartemisinic acid (70.0±0.3 mg L-1), arteannuin B (1.3±0.0 mg L-1), isovitexin (105.0±7.2 mg L-1) and a range of polyphenolic acids. The tea extract, purified compounds from the extract, and the combination of artemisinin with the purified compounds were tested against chloroquine sensitive and chloroquine resistant strains of P. falciparum using the DNA-intercalative SYBR Green I assay. The results of these in vitro tests and of isobologram analyses of combination effects showed mild to strong antagonistic interactions between artemisinin and the compounds (9-epi-artemisinin and artemisitene) extracted from A. annua with significant (IC50 <1 μM) anti-plasmodial activities for the combination range evaluated. Mono-caffeoylquinic acids, tri-caffeoylquinic acid, artemisinic acid and arteannuin B showed additive interaction while rosmarinic acid showed synergistic interaction with artemisinin in the chloroquine sensitive strain at a combination ratio of 1:3 (artemisinin to purified compound). In the chloroquine resistant parasite, using the same ratio, these compounds strongly antagonised artemisinin anti-plasmodial activity with the exception of arteannuin B, which was synergistic. This result would suggest a mechanism targeting parasite resistance defenses for arteannuin B’s potentiation of artemisinin. PMID:24244716

  17. Drought tolerance established by enhanced expression of the CC-NBS-LRR gene, ADR1, requires salicylic acid, EDS1 and ABI1.

    PubMed

    Chini, Andrea; Grant, John J; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Loake, Gary J

    2004-06-01

    An activation-tagged allele of activated disease resistance 1 (ADR1) has previously been shown to convey broad spectrum disease resistance. ADR1 was found to encode a coiled-coil (CC)-nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein, which possessed domains of homology with serine/threonine protein kinases. Here, we show that either constitutive or conditional enhanced expression of ADR1 conferred significant drought tolerance. This was not a general feature of defence-related mutants because cir (constitutive induced resistance)1, cir2 and cpr (constitutive expressor of PR genes)1, which constitutively express systemic acquired resistance (SAR), failed to exhibit this phenotype. Cross-tolerance was not a characteristic of adr1 plants, rather they showed increased sensitivity to thermal and salinity stress. Hence, adr1-activated signalling may antagonise some stress responses. Northern analysis of abiotic marker genes revealed that dehydration-responsive element (DRE)B2A but not DREB1A, RD (response to dehydration)29A or RD22 was expressed in adr1 plant lines. Furthermore, DREB2A expression was salicylic acid (SA) dependent but NPR (non-expressor of PR genes)1 independent. In adr1/ADR1 nahG (naphthalene hydroxylase G), adr1/ADR1 eds (enhanced disease susceptibility)1 and adr1/ADR1 abi1 double mutants, drought tolerance was significantly reduced. Microarray analyses of plants containing a conditional adr1 allele demonstrated that a significant number of the upregulated genes had been previously implicated in responses to dehydration. Therefore, biotic and abiotic signalling pathways may share multiple nodes and their outputs may have significant functional overlap.

  18. The paratransgenic potential of Lactobacillus kunkeei in the honey bee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Rangberg, A; Mathiesen, G; Amdam, G V; Diep, D B

    2015-01-01

    The honey bee (Apis mellifera) is a domestic insect of high value to human societies, as a crop pollinator in agriculture and a model animal in scientific research. The honey bee, however, has experienced massive mortality worldwide due to the phenomenon Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), resulting in alarming prospects for crop failure in Europe and the USA. The reasons for CCD are complex and much debated, but several honey bee pathogens are believed to be involved. Paratransgenesis is a Trojan horse strategy, where endogenous microorganisms are used to express effector molecules that antagonise pathogen development. For use in honey bees, paratransgenesis must rely on a set of criteria that the candidate paratransgenic microorganism must fulfil in order to obtain a successful outcome: (1) the candidate must be genetically modifiable to express effector molecules; (2) the modified organism should have no adverse effects on honey bee health upon reintroduction; and (3) it must survive together with other non-pathogenic bee-associated microorganisms. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are common gut bacteria in vertebrates and invertebrates, and some have naturally beneficial properties in their host. In the present work we aimed to find a potential paratransgenic candidate within this bacterial group for use in honey bees. Among isolated LAB associated with bee gut microbiota, we found the fructophilic Lactobacillus kunkeei to be the most predominant species during foraging seasons. Four genetically different strains of L. kunkeei were selected for further assessment. We demonstrated (1) that L. kunkeei is transformable; (2) that the transformed cells had no obvious adverse effect on honey bee survival; and (3) that transformed cells survived well in the gut environment of bees upon reintroduction. Our study demonstrates that L. kunkeei fulfils the three criteria for paratransgenesis and can be a suitable candidate for further research on this strategy in honey bees.

  19. Trypanosoma brucei DHFR-TS Revisited: Characterisation of a Bifunctional and Highly Unstable Recombinant Dihydrofolate Reductase-Thymidylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Marc W.; Dewar, Simon; Ong, Han B.; Sienkiewicz, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase–thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) is a chemically and genetically validated target in African trypanosomes, causative agents of sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in cattle. Here we report the kinetic properties and sensitivity of recombinant enzyme to a range of lipophilic and classical antifolate drugs. The purified recombinant enzyme, expressed as a fusion protein with elongation factor Ts (Tsf) in ThyA- Escherichia coli, retains DHFR activity, but lacks any TS activity. TS activity was found to be extremely unstable (half-life of 28 s) following desalting of clarified bacterial lysates to remove small molecules. Stability could be improved 700-fold by inclusion of dUMP, but not by other pyrimidine or purine (deoxy)-nucleosides or nucleotides. Inclusion of dUMP during purification proved insufficient to prevent inactivation during the purification procedure. Methotrexate and trimetrexate were the most potent inhibitors of DHFR (Ki 0.1 and 0.6 nM, respectively) and FdUMP and nolatrexed of TS (Ki 14 and 39 nM, respectively). All inhibitors showed a marked drop-off in potency of 100- to 1,000-fold against trypanosomes grown in low folate medium lacking thymidine. The most potent inhibitors possessed a terminal glutamate moiety suggesting that transport or subsequent retention by polyglutamylation was important for biological activity. Supplementation of culture medium with folate markedly antagonised the potency of these folate-like inhibitors, as did thymidine in the case of the TS inhibitors raltitrexed and pemetrexed. PMID:27175479

  20. Anxiolytic activity evaluation of four medicinal plants from Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Bum, E Ngo; Soudi, S; Ayissi, E R; Dong, C; Lakoulo, N H; Maidawa, F; Seke, P F E; Nanga, L D; Taiwe, G S; Dimo, T; Njikam, Njifutie; Rakotonirina, A; Rakotonirina, S V; Kamanyi, A

    2011-01-01

    Afrormosia laxiflora (A. laxiflora), Chenopodium ambrosioides (C. ambrosioides), Microglossa pyrifolia (M. pyrifolia) and Mimosa pudica (M. pudica) are plants used in traditional medicine in Cameroon to treat insomnia, epilepsy, anxiety, and agitation. They were evaluated for their anxiolytic like activity in mice. Animal models (elevated plus maze and stress-induced hyperthermia tests) were used. The four plants showed anxiolytic activity. In stress-induced hyperthermia test, A. laxiflora, C. ambrosioides, M. pyrifolia and M. pudica significantly antagonised the increase of temperature. ΔT° decreased from 0.75°C in the control group to 0.36°C at the dose of 110 mg/kg for A. laxiflora; from 1°C in the control group to -1.1°C at the dose of 120 mg/kg for C. ambrosioides; from 1.7°C in the control group to 0.2°C at the dose of 128 mg/kg for M. pyrifolia and from 1.3°C in the control group to 0.5°C at the dose of 180 mg/kg for M. pudica. In the elevated plus maze test, the four plants increased the number of entries into, percentage of entries into, and percentage of time in open arms. A. laxiflora, C. ambrosioides and M. pudica also reduced the percentage of entries and time in closed arms. In addition, C. ambrosioides, M. pyrifolia and M. pudica showed antipyretic activity by reducing the body temperature. The results suggested that C. ambrosioides, M. pyrifolia and M. pudica posses anxiolytic-like and antipyretic activities while A. laxiflora possesses only anxiolytic-like properties. These plants could be helpful in the treatment of anxiety and fever in traditional medicine in Cameroon.

  1. Corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor mediates the activity of the reward system evoked by morphine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Lasheras, M Carmen; Laorden, M Luisa; Milanés, M Victoria; Núñez, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Different neurotransmitter systems are involved in behavioural and molecular responses to morphine. The brain stress system is activated by acute administration of drugs of abuse, being CRF the main neuropeptide of this circuitry. In this study we have studied the role of CRF1R in the rewarding effects of morphine using the CPP paradigm. For that, animals were treated with a CRF1R antagonist (CP-154,526) or vehicle during 6 days. Thirty min after receiving the antagonist, mice were injected with morphine on the same days that CP-154,526 was administered; another group received saline on the same days that vehicle was administered, and both groups were immediately conditioned. Control animals received vehicle and saline every day. On day 7, animals were tested for morphine-induced CPP. c-Fos, TH and OXA immunohistochemistry, NA turnover (HPLC), and corticosterone plasma concentration (RIA) were evaluated. Administration of a CRF1R antagonist CP-154,526 blocked the morphine-induced CPP and the increased NA turnover in the NAc in morphine-paired mice. CP-154-526 antagonised the enhancement in c-Fos expression evoked by morphine-induced CPP in the VTA and NAc, and the activation of the orexinergic neurons in the LLH. Present work demonstrates that morphine-induced CPP activates different brain areas involved in reward, and points out a critical role of CRF1R in molecular changes involved in morphine-conducted behaviours. Thus, our study supports a therapeutic potential of CRF1R antagonists in addictive disorders. PMID:25556110

  2. Silicon central pattern generators for cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Nogaret, Alain; O'Callaghan, Erin L; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Meliza, C Daniel; Duncan, Edward; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-02-15

    Cardiac rhythm management devices provide therapies for both arrhythmias and resynchronisation but not heart failure, which affects millions of patients worldwide. This paper reviews recent advances in biophysics and mathematical engineering that provide a novel technological platform for addressing heart disease and enabling beat-to-beat adaptation of cardiac pacing in response to physiological feedback. The technology consists of silicon hardware central pattern generators (hCPGs) that may be trained to emulate accurately the dynamical response of biological central pattern generators (bCPGs). We discuss the limitations of present CPGs and appraise the advantages of analog over digital circuits for application in bioelectronic medicine. To test the system, we have focused on the cardio-respiratory oscillators in the medulla oblongata that modulate heart rate in phase with respiration to induce respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We describe here a novel, scalable hCPG comprising physiologically realistic (Hodgkin-Huxley type) neurones and synapses. Our hCPG comprises two neurones that antagonise each other to provide rhythmic motor drive to the vagus nerve to slow the heart. We show how recent advances in modelling allow the motor output to adapt to physiological feedback such as respiration. In rats, we report on the restoration of RSA using an hCPG that receives diaphragmatic electromyography input and use it to stimulate the vagus nerve at specific time points of the respiratory cycle to slow the heart rate. We have validated the adaptation of stimulation to alterations in respiratory rate. We demonstrate that the hCPG is tuneable in terms of the depth and timing of the RSA relative to respiratory phase. These pioneering studies will now permit an analysis of the physiological role of RSA as well as its any potential therapeutic use in cardiac disease. PMID:25433077

  3. Pharmacological studies on the venomous spotted butterfish (Scatophagus argus Linn) sting extract on experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Muhuri, D; Karmakar, S; Dasgupta, S C; Nagchaudhuri, A K; Gomes, A

    2004-05-01

    A sting of the fish S. argus, a venomous edible spotted butterfish, produces tremendous local pain, severe swelling, rise of body temperature, throbbing sensation etc. To establish the pharmacological activities of S. argus sting extract, the present investigation, was carried out on experimental animals. The LD50 of extract was found to be 9.3 mg/kg (iv) in male albino mice. The extract showed loss of sensation, urination and salivation in mice. It potentiated pentobarbitone induced sleeping time in male albino mice and produced hypothermia. Extract produced a fall of cat and guinea pig blood pressure, which was completely abolished by mepyramine. It produced a transient reduction of respiratory rate in rat, but decreased respiratory amplitude in cat, which was abolished after vagotomy. On isolated toad heart, the extract increased both the amplitude and rate of contraction. On isolated guinea pig heart, the sting extract decreased both the rate and amplitude of contraction leading to cardiac arrest, but it had no effect on isolated guinea pig auricle. The extract produced a reversible blockade of electrically induced twitch response of isolated chick biventer cervices preparation, but it had no effect on the isolated rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation. It produced a slow contractile response on isolated guinea pig ileum, rat uterus and rat fundal strip preparations but produced slow relaxation on isolated rat duodenum preparation. The contractile response on isolated guinea pig ileum and rat fundal strip was antagonised by SC19220. It did not produce any significant cutaneous haemorrhage in mice and did not produce any haemolysis on saline washed erythrocytes. The sting extract significantly increased capillary permeability of guinea pig dorsal flank and produced oedema in mice hind paw. PMID:15233469

  4. Transcription and activity of 5-fluorouracil converting enzymes in fluoropyrimidine resistance in colon cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mader, R M; Sieder, A E; Braun, J; Rizovski, B; Kalipciyan, M; Mueller, M W; Jakesz, R; Rainer, H; Steger, G G

    1997-12-01

    Cellular resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is not completely understood. Since 5-FU shares the pyrimidine pathway with the physiological pyrimidines, we investigated the relationship between fluoropyrimidine metabolism, nucleic acid uptake and cytotoxicity of 5-FU in eight colon tumour cell lines including 5-FU-resistant subclones. The cytotoxicity of 5-FU was increased up to 423-fold when the anabolites 5-fluorouridine (FUrd), 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate (FdUMP) were compared with the parent drug in vitro. The enzymes uridine phosphorylase and thymidine phosphorylase were predictive for the cytotoxicity of 5-FU in 5/7 cell lines. Inhibition of uridine phosphorylase and thymidine phosphorylase by antisense strategies effectively antagonised 5-FU, abolishing 84% and 79% of its toxicity. The importance of thymidine phosphorylase was supported by a highly restricted enzyme activity in 5-FU-resistant cells. In 5-FU naive cells, a stimulating effect of 5-FU on thymidylate synthase mRNA and ribonucleotide reductase mRNA expression was observed. In these cells, antisense oligonucleotides to ribonucleotide reductase significantly reduced cell growth. Downregulation of ribonucleotide reductase mRNA in 5-FU-resistant subclones suggests different mechanisms in primary and secondary resistance to 5-FU. Most of the intracellular 5-FU was selectively incorporated into RNA (range: 45-91%) and generally spared DNA (range: 0.2-11%). In synthesising our data, we conclude that drug resistance could be overwhelmed through bypassing limiting steps in the activation of 5-FU. In the majority of colonic tumours, the activity of uridine phosphorylase and thymidine phosphorylase may have prognostic relevance for the cytotoxicity of 5-FU in vitro.

  5. ProNodal acts via FGFR3 to govern duration of Shh expression in the prechordal mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Pamela S; Burbridge, Sarah; Soubes, Sandrine; Ohyama, Kyoji; Ben-Haim, Nadav; Chen, Canhe; Dale, Kim; Shen, Michael M; Constam, Daniel; Placzek, Marysia

    2015-11-15

    The secreted glycoprotein sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the prechordal mesoderm, where it plays a crucial role in induction and patterning of the ventral forebrain. Currently little is known about how Shh is regulated in prechordal tissue. Here we show that in the embryonic chick, Shh is expressed transiently in prechordal mesoderm, and is governed by unprocessed Nodal. Exposure of prechordal mesoderm microcultures to Nodal-conditioned medium, the Nodal inhibitor CerS, or to an ALK4/5/7 inhibitor reveals that Nodal is required to maintain both Shh and Gsc expression, but whereas Gsc is largely maintained through canonical signalling, Nodal signals through a non-canonical route to maintain Shh. Further, Shh expression can be maintained by a recombinant Nodal cleavage mutant, proNodal, but not by purified mature Nodal. A number of lines of evidence suggest that proNodal acts via FGFR3. ProNodal and FGFR3 co-immunoprecipitate and proNodal increases FGFR3 tyrosine phosphorylation. In microcultures, soluble FGFR3 abolishes Shh without affecting Gsc expression. Further, prechordal mesoderm cells in which Fgfr3 expression is reduced by Fgfr3 siRNA fail to bind to proNodal. Finally, targeted electroporation of Fgfr3 siRNA to prechordal mesoderm in vivo results in premature Shh downregulation without affecting Gsc. We report an inverse correlation between proNodal-FGFR3 signalling and pSmad1/5/8, and show that proNodal-FGFR3 signalling antagonises BMP-mediated pSmad1/5/8 signalling, which is poised to downregulate Shh. Our studies suggest that proNodal/FGFR3 signalling governs Shh duration by repressing canonical BMP signalling, and that local BMPs rapidly silence Shh once endogenous Nodal-FGFR3 signalling is downregulated.

  6. Antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects of selective neuronal NOS inhibitor 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-imidazole in mice.

    PubMed

    Volke, Vallo; Wegener, Gregers; Bourin, Michel; Vasar, Eero

    2003-03-18

    Various inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) have been shown to possess antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like properties in animal models. The aim of this study was to compare the behavioural effects of NOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) with the more selective neuronal NOS inhibitor 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)imidazole (TRIM) in animal models predictive of antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activity in order to clarify the role of distinct isoforms of NOS in the regulation of depression and anxiety. Both TRIM (50 mg/kg) and 7-NI (50 mg/kg) decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test. The magnitude of the effect was comparable to that of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (15 mg/kg). The antidepressant-like effect of TRIM was counteracted by pretreatment with L-arginine (250 mg/kg). The systemic administration of TRIM (50 mg/kg), but not 7-NI (up to 50 mg/kg) increased the time spent in the light side of the apparatus in the light-dark compartment test. The anxiolytic-like effect of TRIM was antagonised by pretreatment with L-arginine. Both TRIM and 7-NI decreased the locomotion of animals in the open field and caused motor incoordination on rotarod. These motor side effects were more pronounced in the case of 7-NI and were not diminished by pretreatment with L-arginine. We conclude that neuronal NOS seems to play the key role in the antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects of NOS inhibitors.

  7. Evidence for a 5-HT2A receptor mode of action in the anxiolytic-like properties of DOI in mice.

    PubMed

    Nic Dhonnchadha, Bríd Aine; Hascoët, Martine; Jolliet, Pascale; Bourin, Michel

    2003-12-17

    DOI [(+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane] displays a high affinity for the rat 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptors (pKi 7.3, 7.4 and 7.8, respectively) and acts as an agonist. DOI (0.5-4 mg/kg, i.p. 30 min pre-test) increased the number of punished passages in the mouse four plates test (FPT). The anti-punishment action of DOI (1 mg/kg, i.p. 30 min pre-test) was abolished by prior treatment with the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist SR 46949B (0.1 and 1 mg/kg, i.p. 45 min pre-test) but not by the selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist RS 10-2221 (0.1 and 1 mg/kg, i.p. 45 min pre-test) nor the selective 5-HT2C/2B receptor antagonist SB 206553 (0.1 and 1 mg/kg, i.p. 45 min pre-test). An anxiolytic-like action was also observed for DOI (1 mg/kg) in the elevated plus maze (EPM). The anxiolytic-like action of DOI (1 mg/kg, i.p. 30 min pre-test) was antagonised by pre-treatment with SR 46949B (0.125 and 0.5 mg/kg, i.p. 45 min pre-test) but not by RS 10-2221 (0.1 and 1 mg/kg, i.p. 45 min pre-test) nor SB 206553 (0.1 and 1 mg/kg, i.p. 45 min pre-test). In conclusion, DOI produced an anxiolytic-like profile in the mouse FPT and EPM. These effects are likely to be 5-HT2A receptor mediated.

  8. Breast Cancer Cells Induce Osteolytic Bone Lesions In vivo through a Reduction in Osteoblast Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Laura S.; Choi, Wilson; Burke, Leslie; Clements, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases are severely debilitating and have a significant impact on the quality of life of women with metastatic breast cancer. Treatment options are limited and in order to develop more targeted therapies, improved understanding of the complex mechanisms that lead to bone lesion development are warranted. Interestingly, whilst prostate-derived bone metastases are characterised by mixed or osteoblastic lesions, breast-derived bone metastases are characterised by osteolytic lesions, suggesting unique regulatory patterns. This study aimed to measure the changes in bone formation and bone resorption activity at two time-points (18 and 36 days) during development of the bone lesion following intratibial injection of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells into the left tibiae of Severely Combined Immuno-Deficient (SCID) mice. The contralateral tibia was used as a control. Tibiae were extracted and processed for undecalcified histomorphometric analysis. We provide evidence that the early bone loss observed following exposure to MDA-MB-231 cells was due to a significant reduction in mineral apposition rate, rather than increased levels of bone resorption. This suggests that osteoblast activity was impaired in the presence of breast cancer cells, contrary to previous reports of osteoclast-dependent bone loss. Furthermore mRNA expression of Dickkopf Homolog 1 (DKK-1) and Noggin were confirmed in the MDA-MB-231 cell line, both of which antagonise osteoblast regulatory pathways. The observed bone loss following injection of cancer cells was due to an overall thinning of the trabecular bone struts rather than perforation of the bone tissue matrix (as measured by trabecular width and trabecular separation, respectively), suggesting an opportunity to reverse the cancer-induced bone changes. These novel insights into the mechanisms through which osteolytic bone lesions develop may be important in the development of new treatment strategies for metastatic breast cancer

  9. The role of TRPM8 in the Guinea-pig bladder-cooling reflex investigated using a novel TRPM8 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Jennifer C; Kirkup, Anthony J; Curry, John; Humphreys, Sian; O'Regan, Paul; Postlethwaite, Michael; Young, Kimberley C; Kitching, Linda; Ethell, Brian T; Winpenny, David; McMurray, Gordon

    2014-10-01

    Patients with overactive bladder often exhibit abnormal bladder contractions in response to intravesical cold saline (positive ice-water test). The molecular entity involved in cold sensation within the urinary bladder is unknown, but a potential candidate is the ion channel, transient receptor potential (melastatin)-8 (TRPM8). The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of TRPM8 in a bladder-cooling reflex evoked in anaesthetised guinea-pigs that is comparable to the positive ice-water test seen in patients. Guinea-pig TRPM8 was cloned from L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and expressed in HEK293 cells. Functional agonist- and cold-induced Ca2+ influx and electrophysiology assays were performed in these cells, and for comparison in HEK293 cells expressing human TRPM8, using a novel TRPM8 antagonist, the S-enantiomer of 1-phenylethyl 4-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzyl (2-aminoethyl) carbamate hydrochloride (PBMC). Potency data from these assays was used to calculate intravenous infusion protocols for targeted plasma concentrations of PBMC in studies on micturition reflexes evoked by intravesical infusion of menthol or cold saline in anaesthetised guinea-pigs. Tissue expression of TRPM8 in guinea-pig bladder, urethra and in dorsal root ganglia neurones traced from the bladder was also investigated. TRPM8 mRNA and protein were detected in L6 dorsal root ganglia, bladder urothelium and smooth muscle. PBMC antagonised in vitro activation of human and guinea-pig TRPM8 and reversed menthol and cold-induced facilitation of the micturition reflex at plasma concentrations consistent with in vitro potencies. The present data suggest that the bladder-cooling reflex in the guinea-pig involves TRPM8. The potential significance of TRPM8 in bladder disease states deserves future investigation. PMID:25058909

  10. Corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor mediates the activity of the reward system evoked by morphine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Lasheras, M Carmen; Laorden, M Luisa; Milanés, M Victoria; Núñez, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Different neurotransmitter systems are involved in behavioural and molecular responses to morphine. The brain stress system is activated by acute administration of drugs of abuse, being CRF the main neuropeptide of this circuitry. In this study we have studied the role of CRF1R in the rewarding effects of morphine using the CPP paradigm. For that, animals were treated with a CRF1R antagonist (CP-154,526) or vehicle during 6 days. Thirty min after receiving the antagonist, mice were injected with morphine on the same days that CP-154,526 was administered; another group received saline on the same days that vehicle was administered, and both groups were immediately conditioned. Control animals received vehicle and saline every day. On day 7, animals were tested for morphine-induced CPP. c-Fos, TH and OXA immunohistochemistry, NA turnover (HPLC), and corticosterone plasma concentration (RIA) were evaluated. Administration of a CRF1R antagonist CP-154,526 blocked the morphine-induced CPP and the increased NA turnover in the NAc in morphine-paired mice. CP-154-526 antagonised the enhancement in c-Fos expression evoked by morphine-induced CPP in the VTA and NAc, and the activation of the orexinergic neurons in the LLH. Present work demonstrates that morphine-induced CPP activates different brain areas involved in reward, and points out a critical role of CRF1R in molecular changes involved in morphine-conducted behaviours. Thus, our study supports a therapeutic potential of CRF1R antagonists in addictive disorders.

  11. Single Cycle Structure-Based Humanization of an Anti-Nerve Growth Factor Therapeutic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Marinelli, Sara; Krastanova, Ivet; Ugolini, Gabriele; Pavone, Flaminia; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Most forms of chronic pain are inadequately treated by present therapeutic options. Compelling evidence has accumulated, demonstrating that Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is a key modulator of inflammatory and nociceptive responses, and is a promising target for the treatment of human pathologies linked to chronic and inflammatory pain. There is therefore a growing interest in the development of therapeutic molecules antagonising the NGF pathway and its nociceptor sensitization actions, among which function-blocking anti-NGF antibodies are particularly relevant candidates. In this respect, the rat anti-NGF αD11 monoclonal antibody (mAb) is a potent antagonist, able to effectively antagonize rodent and human NGF in a variety of in vitro and in vivo systems. Here we show that mAb αD11 displays a significant analgesic effect in two different models of persistent pain in mice, with a remarkable long-lasting activity. In order to advance αD11 mAb towards its clinical application in man, anti-NGF αD11 mAb was humanized by applying a novel single cycle strategy based on the a priori experimental determination of the crystal and molecular structure of the parental Fragment antigen-binding (Fab). The humanized antibody (hum-αD11) was tested in vitro and in vivo, showing that the binding mode and the NGF neutralizing biological activities of the parental antibody are fully preserved, with even a significant affinity improvement. The results firmly establish hum-αD11 as a lead candidate for clinical applications in a therapeutic area with a severe unmet medical need. More generally, the single-cycle structure-based humanization method represents a considerable improvement over the standard humanization methods, which are intrinsically empirical and require several refinement cycles. PMID:22403636

  12. Corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptors mediate the motivation for voluntary wheel running in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ebada, Mohamed Elsaed; Kendall, David A; Pardon, Marie-Christine

    2016-09-15

    Physical exercise can improve cognition but whether this is related to motivation levels is unknown. Voluntary wheel running is a rewarding activity proposed as a model of motivation to exercise. To question the potential effects of exercise motivation on subsequent behaviour, we used a pharmacological approach targeting some reward mechanisms. The stress hormone corticosterone has rewarding effects mediated by activation of low affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GR). To investigate whether corticosterone synthesis motivates exercise via activation of GRs and subsequently, impacts on behaviour, we treated C57BL/6J mice acutely with the inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis metyrapone (35mg/kg) or repeatedly with the GR antagonist mifepristone (30mg/kg) prior to 1-h running wheel sessions. To investigate whether reducing motivation to exercise impacts on behaviour, we antagonised running-induced dopamine D2/D3 receptors activation with sulpiride (25 or 50mg/kg) and assessed locomotor, anxiety-related and memory performance after 20 running sessions over 4 weeks. We found that corticosterone synthesis contributes to running levels, but the maintenance of running behaviour was not mediated by activation of GRs. Intermittent exercise was not associated with changes in behavioural or cognitive performance. The persistent reduction in exercise levels triggered by sulpiride also had limited impact on behavioural performance, although the level of performance for some behaviours was related to the level of exercise. Altogether, these findings indicate that corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptor activation contribute to the motivation for wheel running, but suggest that motivation for exercise is not a sufficient factor to alter behaviour in healthy mice.

  13. Cyamemazine as an anxiolytic drug on the elevated plus maze and light/dark paradigm in mice.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Nic Dhonnchadha BA; Claude Colombel, M; Dib, M; Hascoët, M

    2001-09-28

    Several studies have demonstrated that cyamemazine, a classic antipsychotic compound, possesses anxiolytic properties in humans as well as a potent antagonistic effect on 5-HT(2C) and 5-HT(3) receptors. In this study the level of anxiety of mice was assessed in the light/dark exploration test and the elevated plus maze (EPM) following both acute and chronic administration. Spontaneous locomotor activity was measured using a photoelectric actimeter. Acute or chronic administration of cyamemazine dramatically decreases the spontaneous locomotor activity of mice at the dose of 1 mg/kg in comparison with the control group. In the light/dark exploration test, cyamemazine (0.375 mg/kg) only demonstrated anxiolytic-like activity following acute administration. In the elevated plus maze (EPM), cyamemazine did not induce any anxiolytic like effects after acute administration. However, after chronic administration, cyamemazine at doses of 0.25, 0.375, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg significantly increased the time spent in the open arms. The number of open arm entries was also increased at 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg. Various serotonergic ligands were then used to examine the role of the various receptors in mediating the effects of cyamemazine in the EPM. Concerning the 5-HT(2) ligands DOI and mCPP antagonised the effects of cyamemazine and N-desmethyl clozapine potentiated the effects. For 2-methyl-5-HT and ondansetron, the 5-HT(3) receptor ligands did not seem to have any effect. It appears that the 5-HT(2C) receptors are more implicated in the function of mediating the anxiolytic effect of cyamemazine in the EPM. The discrepancy of results obtained in the tests, following acute or chronic administration could be the result of the combined activity of dopamine D(2) receptor antagonism with antagonism of 5-HT(2C) and 5-HT(3) receptors.

  14. Taspase1 processing alters TFIIA cofactor properties in the regulation of TFIID

    PubMed Central

    Malecová, Barbora; Caputo, Valentina S; Lee, Diane F; Hsieh, James J; Oelgeschläger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    TFIIA is an important positive regulator of TFIID, the primary promoter recognition factor of the basal RNA polymerase II transcription machinery. TFIIA antagonises negative TFIID regulators such as negative cofactor 2 (NC2), promotes specific binding of the TBP subunit of TFIID to TATA core promoter sequence elements and stimulates the interaction of TBP-associated factors (TAFs) in the TFIID complex with core promoter elements located downstream of TATA, such as the initiator element (INR). Metazoan TFIIA consists of 3 subunits, TFIIAα (35 kDa), β (19 kDa) and γ (12 kDa). TFIIAα and β subunits are encoded by a single gene and result from site-specific cleavage of a 55 kDa TFIIA(α/β) precursor protein by the protease Taspase1. Metazoan cells have been shown to contain variable amounts of TFIIA (55/12 kDa) and Taspase1-processed TFIIA (35/19/12 kDa) depending on cell type, suggesting distinct gene-specific roles of unprocessed and Taspase1-processed TFIIA. How precisely Taspase1 processing affects TFIIA functions is not understood. Here we report that Taspase1 processing alters TFIIA interactions with TFIID and the conformation of TFIID/TFIIA promoter complexes. We further show that Taspase1 processing induces increased sensitivity of TFIID/TFIIA complexes to the repressor NC2, which is counteracted by the presence of an INR core promoter element. Our results provide first evidence that Taspase1 processing affects TFIIA regulation of TFIID and suggest that Taspase1 processing of TFIIA is required to establish INR-selective core promoter activity in the presence of NC2. PMID:25996597

  15. Characterization of MDL 73005EF as a 5-HT1A selective ligand and its effects in animal models of anxiety: comparison with buspirone, 8-OH-DPAT and diazepam.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, P. C.; Tricklebank, M. D.; Middlemiss, D. N.; Mir, A. K.; Hibert, M. F.; Fozard, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    1. With radioligand binding techniques, MDL 73005 EF (8-[2-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-yl-methylamino)ethyl]-8-az aspiro[4, 5]decane-7,9-dione methyl sulphonate) shows high affinity (pIC50 8.6) and selectivity (greater than 100 fold compared to other monoamine and benzodiazepine receptor sites) for the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A recognition site; it was both more potent and more selective than buspirone in this respect. 2. In rats pretreated with reserpine, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propyl-amino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) induced forepaw treading and flat body posture; in the same model, MDL 73005EF and buspirone showed minimal agonist activity and at high doses MDL 73005EF inhibited responses to 8-OH-DPAT. 3. In rats trained to discriminate 8-OH-DPAT from saline in a drug discrimination paradigm, both MDL 73005EF and buspirone generalized dose-dependently and completely to the 8-OH-DPAT cue. 4. To define the anxiolytic potential of MDL 73005EF, it was examined in the elevated plus-maze test and in the water-lick conflict test in comparison with diazepam and buspirone. In both tests MDL 73005EF induced effects similar to those seen following diazepam. Buspirone had similar effects to both MDL 73005EF and diazepam in the water-lick conflict test but opposite effects in the elevated plus-maze. 8-OH-DPAT also had opposite effects in the elevated plus-maze test to MDL 73005EF and diazepam. 5. The anti-conflict effects of MDL 73005EF were reversed by low doses of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT; those of buspirone were neither antagonised nor mimicked by 8-OH-DPAT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1970269

  16. Selenium interactions and toxicity: a review. Selenium interactions and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Iwona; Zaporowska, Halina

    2012-02-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element for mammals. Through selenoproteins, this mineral participates in various biological processes such as antioxidant defence, thyroid hormone production, and immune responses. Some reports indicate that a human organism deficient in selenium may be prone to certain diseases. Adverse health effects following selenium overexposure, although very rare, have been found in animals and people. Contrary to selenium, arsenic and cadmium are regarded as toxic elements. Both are environmental and industrial pollutants, and exposure to excessive amounts of arsenic or cadmium can pose a threat to many people's health, especially those living in polluted regions. Two other elements, vanadium and chromium(III) in trace amounts are believed to play essential physiological functions in mammals. This review summarizes recent studies on selenium interactions with arsenic and cadmium and selenium interactions with vanadium and chromium in mammals. Human studies have demonstrated that selenium may reduce arsenic accumulation in the organism and protect against arsenic-related skin lesions. Selenium was found to antagonise the prooxidant and genotoxic effects of arsenic in rodents and cell cultures. Also, studies on selenium effects against oxidative stress induced by cadmium in various animal tissues produced promising results. Reports suggest that selenium protection against toxicity of arsenic and cadmium is mediated via sequestration of these elements into biologically inert conjugates. Selenium-dependent antioxidant enzymes probably play a secondary role in arsenic and cadmium detoxification. So far, few studies have evaluated selenium effects on chromium(III) and vanadium actions in mammals. Still, they show that selenium may interact with these minerals. Taken together, the recent findings regarding selenium interaction with other elements extend our understanding of selenium biological functions and highlight selenium as a potential

  17. Inhibitory effects of imidazoline receptor ligands on basal and kainic acid-induced neurotoxic signalling in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2016-09-01

    This in vivo study assessed the potential of the imidazoline receptor (IR) ligands moxonidine (selective I1-IR), BU224 (selective I2-IR) and LSL61122 (mixed I1/I2-IR) to dampen excitotoxic signalling induced by kainic acid (KA; 45 mg/kg) in the mouse brain (hippocampus and cerebral cortex). KA triggered a strong behavioural syndrome (seizures; maximal at 60-90 minutes) and sustained stimulation (at 72 hours with otherwise normal mouse behaviour) of pro-apoptotic c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) and calpain with increased cleavage of p35 into neurotoxic p25 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5 [Cdk5] activators) in mouse hippocampus. Pretreatment (five days) with LSL61122 (10 mg/kg), but not moxonidine (1 mg/kg) or BU224 (20 mg/kg), attenuated the KA-induced behavioural syndrome, and all three IR ligands inhibited JNK and calpain activation, as well as p35/p25 cleavage after KA in the hippocampus (effects also observed after acute IR drug treatments). Efaroxan (I1-IR, 10 mg/kg) and idazoxan (I2-IR, 10 mg/kg), postulated IR antagonists, did not antagonise the effects of moxonidine and LSL61122 on KA targets (these IR ligands showed agonistic properties inhibiting pro-apoptotic JNK). Brain subcellular preparations revealed reduced synaptosomal postsynaptic density-95 protein contents (a mediator of JNK activation) and indicated increased p35/Cdk5 complexes (with pro-survival functions) after treatment with moxonidine, BU224 and LSL61122. These results showed that I1- and I2-IR ligands (moxonidine and BU224), and especially the mixed I1/I2-IR ligand LSL61122, are partly neuroprotective against KA-induced excitotoxic signalling. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of IR drugs in disorders associated with glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:27302941

  18. Mechanism of cytotoxicity of 5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolic acid in human ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro and modulation of the drug activity by folic or folinic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Erba, E.; Sen, S.; Sessa, C.; Vikhanskaya, F. L.; D'Incalci, M.

    1994-01-01

    Inhibition of clonogenic potential by the glycinamideribonucleosyl transformylase inhibitor 5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolic acid (DDATHF, Lometrexol) was evaluated in vitro in a human ovarian carcinoma cell line, SW626. Drug-induced inhibition of clonogenic potential is a function of the dose and time of exposure and is independent of the formation of DNA single-strand breaks or de novo synthesis of protein. Simultaneous treatment with 100 microM hypoxanthine completely prevented the inhibition of clonogenic potential caused by 0.5 microM DDATHF. DDATHF blocked cells in the early-middle S-phases of the cell cycle, and there was a corresponding marked reduction in the rate of DNA synthesis after drug withdrawal. The cytotoxic potential of DDATHF was modulated by the folic acid concentration present in the medium. In a medium containing 0.22 microM folic acid, DDATHF cytotoxicity was at least 100 times that in a regular medium containing 2.22 microM folic acid, levels which, however, are about 100 times those found in human plasma. DDATHF cytotoxicity differed moderately when folic acid concentrations varied between 0.22 and 0 microM, suggesting that folic acid does not necessarily antagonise DDATHF anti-tumour activity. Folinic acid at a concentration as low as 0.1 microM can completely rescue cells when given simultaneously with 0.5 microM DDATHF. When folinic acid was given 24 h after DDATHF, a reversal of cytotoxicity was observed at 0.5 and 1 microM, but to a much lesser extent than simultaneous treatment. When folinic acid was added after 48 or 72 h of DDATHF washout, even at a high concentration and for a long time, no reduction in DDATHF cytotoxicity was found. In conclusion, the study highlights the modulation of DDATHF cytotoxicity by folic acid or by folinic acid and provides further rationale for in vivo clinical investigation with these combinations. PMID:8297715

  19. WAY-855 (3-amino-tricyclo[2.2.1.02.6]heptane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid): a novel, EAAT2-preferring, nonsubstrate inhibitor of high-affinity glutamate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, John; Eliasof, Scott; Stack, Gary; McIlvain, H Beal; Greenfield, Alexander; Kowal, Dianne; Petroski, Robert; Carrick, Tikva

    2003-01-01

    The pharmacological profile of a novel glutamate transport inhibitor, WAY-855 (3-amino-tricyclo[2.2.1.02.6]heptane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid), on the activity of the human forebrain glutamate transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 expressed in stable mammalian cell lines and in Xenopus laevis oocytes is presented. WAY-855 inhibited glutamate uptake mediated by all three subtypes in a concentration-dependent manner, with preferential inhibition of the CNS-predominant EAAT2 subtype in both cells and oocytes. IC50 values for EAAT2 and EAAT3 inhibition in cells were 2.2 and 24.5 μM, respectively, while EAAT1 activity was inhibited by 50% at 100 μM (IC50 values determined in oocytes were 1.3 μM (EAAT2), 52.5 μM (EAAT3) and 125.9 μM (EAAT1)). Application of WAY-855 to EAAT-expressing oocytes failed to induce a transporter current, and the compound failed to exchange with accumulated [3H]D-aspartate in synaptosomes consistent with a nonsubstrate inhibitor. WAY-855 inhibited D-aspartate uptake into cortical synaptosomes by a competitive mechanism, and with similar potency to that observed for the cloned EAAT2. WAY-855 failed to agonise or antagonise ionotropic glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurones, or the human metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 expressed in a stable cell line. WAY-855 represents a novel structure in glutamate transporter pharmacology, and exploration of this structure might provide insights into the discrimination between EAAT2 and other EAAT subtypes. PMID:14517179

  20. Inhibitory effects of imidazoline receptor ligands on basal and kainic acid-induced neurotoxic signalling in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2016-09-01

    This in vivo study assessed the potential of the imidazoline receptor (IR) ligands moxonidine (selective I1-IR), BU224 (selective I2-IR) and LSL61122 (mixed I1/I2-IR) to dampen excitotoxic signalling induced by kainic acid (KA; 45 mg/kg) in the mouse brain (hippocampus and cerebral cortex). KA triggered a strong behavioural syndrome (seizures; maximal at 60-90 minutes) and sustained stimulation (at 72 hours with otherwise normal mouse behaviour) of pro-apoptotic c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) and calpain with increased cleavage of p35 into neurotoxic p25 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5 [Cdk5] activators) in mouse hippocampus. Pretreatment (five days) with LSL61122 (10 mg/kg), but not moxonidine (1 mg/kg) or BU224 (20 mg/kg), attenuated the KA-induced behavioural syndrome, and all three IR ligands inhibited JNK and calpain activation, as well as p35/p25 cleavage after KA in the hippocampus (effects also observed after acute IR drug treatments). Efaroxan (I1-IR, 10 mg/kg) and idazoxan (I2-IR, 10 mg/kg), postulated IR antagonists, did not antagonise the effects of moxonidine and LSL61122 on KA targets (these IR ligands showed agonistic properties inhibiting pro-apoptotic JNK). Brain subcellular preparations revealed reduced synaptosomal postsynaptic density-95 protein contents (a mediator of JNK activation) and indicated increased p35/Cdk5 complexes (with pro-survival functions) after treatment with moxonidine, BU224 and LSL61122. These results showed that I1- and I2-IR ligands (moxonidine and BU224), and especially the mixed I1/I2-IR ligand LSL61122, are partly neuroprotective against KA-induced excitotoxic signalling. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of IR drugs in disorders associated with glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration.

  1. ProNodal acts via FGFR3 to govern duration of Shh expression in the prechordal mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Pamela S.; Burbridge, Sarah; Soubes, Sandrine; Ohyama, Kyoji; Ben-Haim, Nadav; Chen, Canhe; Dale, Kim; Shen, Michael M.; Constam, Daniel; Placzek, Marysia

    2015-01-01

    The secreted glycoprotein sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the prechordal mesoderm, where it plays a crucial role in induction and patterning of the ventral forebrain. Currently little is known about how Shh is regulated in prechordal tissue. Here we show that in the embryonic chick, Shh is expressed transiently in prechordal mesoderm, and is governed by unprocessed Nodal. Exposure of prechordal mesoderm microcultures to Nodal-conditioned medium, the Nodal inhibitor CerS, or to an ALK4/5/7 inhibitor reveals that Nodal is required to maintain both Shh and Gsc expression, but whereas Gsc is largely maintained through canonical signalling, Nodal signals through a non-canonical route to maintain Shh. Further, Shh expression can be maintained by a recombinant Nodal cleavage mutant, proNodal, but not by purified mature Nodal. A number of lines of evidence suggest that proNodal acts via FGFR3. ProNodal and FGFR3 co-immunoprecipitate and proNodal increases FGFR3 tyrosine phosphorylation. In microcultures, soluble FGFR3 abolishes Shh without affecting Gsc expression. Further, prechordal mesoderm cells in which Fgfr3 expression is reduced by Fgfr3 siRNA fail to bind to proNodal. Finally, targeted electroporation of Fgfr3 siRNA to prechordal mesoderm in vivo results in premature Shh downregulation without affecting Gsc. We report an inverse correlation between proNodal-FGFR3 signalling and pSmad1/5/8, and show that proNodal-FGFR3 signalling antagonises BMP-mediated pSmad1/5/8 signalling, which is poised to downregulate Shh. Our studies suggest that proNodal/FGFR3 signalling governs Shh duration by repressing canonical BMP signalling, and that local BMPs rapidly silence Shh once endogenous Nodal-FGFR3 signalling is downregulated. PMID:26417042

  2. Identification and Functional Analysis of a Novel Tryptophyllin Peptide from the Skin of the Red-eye Leaf Frog, Agalychnis callidryas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ran; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Tianbao; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Lei; Shaw, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian skin has proved repeatedly to be a largely untapped source of bioactive peptides and this is especially true of members of the Phyllomedusinae subfamily of frogs native to South and Central America. Tryptophyllins are a group of peptides mainly found in the skin of members of this genus. In this study, a novel tryptophyllin (TPH) type 3 peptide, named AcT-3, has been isolated and structurally-characterised from the skin secretion and lyophilised skin extract of the red-eye leaf frog, Agalychnis callidryas. The peptide was identified in and purified from the skin secretion by reverse-phase HPLC. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and MS/MS fragmentation sequencing established its primary structure as: pGlu-Gly-Lys-Pro-Tyr-Trp-Pro-Pro-Pro-Phe-Leu-Pro-Glu, with a non-protonated molecular mass of 1538.19Da. The mature peptide possessed the canonical N-terminal pGlu residue that arises from post-translational modification of a Gln residue. The deduced open-reading frame consisted of 63 amino acid residues encoding a highly-conserved signal peptide of approximately 22 amino acid residues, an intervening acidic spacer peptide domain, a single AcT-3 encoding domain and a C terminal processing site. A synthetic replicate of AcT-3 was found to antagonise the effect of BK on rat tail artery smooth muscle and to contract the intestinal smooth muscle preparations. It was also found that AcT-3 could dose-dependently inhibit the proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines after 72h incubation. PMID:25561903

  3. Molecular characterisation of Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) isolates from different outbreaks in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Romero, S; Rivera-Benítez, J F; Blomström, A-L; Ramliden, M; Hernández-Baumgarten, E; Hernández-Jáuregui, P; Ramírez-Mendoza, H; Berg, M

    2016-02-01

    Since the report of the initial outbreak of Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) infection in pigs, only one full-length genome from 1984 (PorPV-LPMV/1984) has been characterised. To investigate the overall genetic variation, full-length gene nucleotide sequences of current PorPV isolates were obtained from different clinical cases of infected swine. Genome organisation and sequence analysis of the encoded proteins (NP, P, F, M, HN and L) revealed high sequence conservation of the NP protein and the expression of the P and V proteins in all PorPV isolates. The V protein of one isolate displayed a mutation that has been implicated to antagonise the antiviral immune responses of the host. The M protein indicated a variation in a short region that could affect the electrostatic charge and the interaction with the membrane. One PorPV isolate recovered from the lungs showed a mutation at the cleavage site (HRKKR) of the F protein that could represent an important factor to determine the tissue tropism and pathogenicity of this virus. The HN protein showed high sequence identity through the years (up to 2013). Additionally, a number of sequence motifs of very high amino acid conservation among the PorPV isolates important for polymerase activity of the L protein have been identified. In summary, genetic comparisons and phylogenetic analyses indicated that three different genetic variants of PorPV are currently spreading within the swine population, and a new generation of circulating virus with different characteristics has begun to emerge.

  4. The effect of obestatin on anxiety-like behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Szakács, Júlia; Csabafi, Krisztina; Lipták, Nándor; Szabó, Gyula

    2015-10-15

    Obestatin is a 23 amino acid-peptide, derived from the same preproghrelin-gene as ghrelin. Obestatin was originally reported as a ghrelin antagonist with anorexigenic activity, but later it was proven to be involved in multiple processes including sleep, memory retention, anxiety, morphine-induced analgesia and withdrawal. In the present study, in male CFLP mice, by using computerised open field (OF) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests we have investigated the behavioural effects of the acute intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of obestatin alone, and following ghrelin receptor blockage with [d-Lys3]-Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-6 ([d-Lys3]- GHRP6) or corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptor 1 antagonism with antalarmin. Plasma corticosterone levels were measured for each treatment group by using chemofluorescent assay. Our results in the EPM test showed that obestatin reduced the percent of time spent in the open arms. The basal locomotor activity (ambulation distance and time, rearing and jumping) was not influenced significantly neither in the obestatin-treated groups, nor in those receiving pre-treatment with antalarmin or [d-Lys3]-GHRP6. The percentage of central ambulation distance however was decreased by obestatin, while the percentage of time spent in the central zone showed a decreasing tendency. The administration of antalarmin or [d-Lys3]-GHRP6 have both reversed the effect of obestatin on central ambulation. Plasma corticosterone levels were elevated by obestatin, which effect was antagonised by the injection of antalarmin. These are the first results to indicate that obestatin exerts anxiogenic-like effect in mice, which might be mediated through ghrelin receptor and CRH activation.

  5. The neuroprotective action of the mood stabilizing drugs lithium chloride and sodium valproate is mediated through the up-regulation of the homeodomain protein Six1

    SciTech Connect

    Plant, Kathryn E.; Anderson, Elizabeth; Simecek, Nicole; Brown, Richard; Forster, Sam; Spinks, Jenny; Toms, Nick; Gibson, G. Gordon; Lyon, Jon; Plant, Nick

    2009-02-15

    The mood stabilizing agents lithium chloride (LiCl) and sodium valproate (VPA) have recently gained interest as potential neuroprotective therapeutics. However, exploitation of these therapeutic applications is hindered by both a lack of molecular understanding of the mode of action, and a number of sub-optimal properties, including a relatively small therapeutic window and variable patient response. Human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) were exposed to 1 mM lithium chloride or 1 mM sodium valproate for 6 h or 72 h, and transcriptomes measured by Affymetrix U133A/B microarray. Statistically significant gene expression changes were identified using SAM software, with selected changes confirmed at transcript (TaqMan) and protein (Western blotting) levels. Finally, anti-apoptotic action was measured by an in vitro fluorescent assay. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to therapeutically relevant concentrations of either lithium chloride or sodium valproate elicited 936 statistically significant changes in gene expression. Amongst these changes we observed a large (maximal 31.3-fold) increase in the expression of the homeodomain protein Six1, and have characterized the time- and dose-dependent up-regulation of this gene in response to both drugs. In addition, we demonstrate that, like LiCl or VPA treatment, Six1 over-expression protects SH-SY5Y cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis via the blockade of caspsase-3 activation, whereas removal of Six1 protein via siRNA antagonises the ability of LiCl and VPA to protect SH-SY5Y cells from STS-induced apoptosis. These results provide a novel mechanistic rationale underlying the neuroprotective mechanism of LiCl and VPA, suggesting exciting possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic agents against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinsonism.

  6. ‘Smashed by the National Health’? A Closer Look at the Demise of the Pioneer Health Centre, Peckham

    PubMed Central

    Conford, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The Pioneer Health Centre, based in South London before and after the Second World War, remains a source of interest for advocates of a positive approach to health promotion in contrast with the treatment of those already ill. Its closure in 1950 for lack of funds has been blamed on the then recently established National Health Service, but this article argues that such an explanation is over-simplified and ignores a number of other factors. The Centre had struggled financially during the 1930s and tried to gain support from the Medical Research Council. The Council appeared interested in the Centre before the war, but was less sympathetic in the 1940s. Around the time of its closure and afterwards, the Centre was also involved in negotiations with London County Council; these failed because the Centre’s directors would not accept the changes which the Council would have needed to make. Unpublished documents reveal that the Centre’s directors were uncompromising and that their approach to the situation antagonised their colleagues. Changes in medical science also worked against the Centre. The success of sulphonamide drugs appeared to render preventive medicine less significant, while the development of statistical techniques cast doubt on the Centre’s experimental methods. The Centre was at the heart of the nascent organic farming movement, which opposed the rapid growth of chemical cultivation. But what might be termed ‘chemical triumphalism’ was on the march in both medicine and agriculture, and the Centre was out of tune with the mood of the times. PMID:26971599

  7. The ghrelin/obestatin balance in the physiological and pathological control of growth hormone secretion, body composition and food intake.

    PubMed

    Hassouna, R; Zizzari, P; Tolle, V

    2010-07-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are two gastrointestinal peptides obtained by post-translational processing of a common precursor, preproghrelin. Ghrelin is an orexigenic and adipogenic peptide and a potent growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) modified by the enzyme ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase to bind and activate its receptor, the GHS-R. The ghrelin/GHS-R pathway is complex and the effects of ghrelin on GH secretion, adiposity and food intake appear to be relayed by distinct mechanisms involving different transduction signals and constitutive activity for the GH-R, different cofactors as modulators of endogenous ghrelin signalling and/or alternative ghrelin receptors. The discovery of obestatin in 2005 brought an additional level of complexity to this fascinating system. Obestatin was initially identified as an anorexigenic peptide and as the cognate ligand for GPR39, but its effect on food intake and its ability to activate GPR39 are still controversial. Although several teams failed to reproduce the anorexigenic actions of obestatin, this peptide has been shown to antagonise GH secretion and food intake induced by ghrelin and could be an interesting pharmacological tool to counteract the actions of ghrelin. Ghrelin and obestatin immunoreactivities are recovered in the blood with an ultradian pulsatility and their concentrations in plasma vary with the nutritional status of the body. It is still a matter of debate whether both hormones are regulated by independent mechanisms and whether obestatin is a physiologically relevant peptide. Nevertheless, a significant number of studies show that the ghrelin/obestatin ratio is modified in anorexia nervosa and obesity. This suggests that the ghrelin/obestatin balance could be essential to adapt the body's response to nutritional challenges. Although measuring ghrelin and obestatin in plasma is challenging because many forms of the peptides circulate, more sensitive and selective assays to detect the different preproghrelin

  8. Silicon central pattern generators for cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nogaret, Alain; O'Callaghan, Erin L; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Meliza, C Daniel; Duncan, Edward; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm management devices provide therapies for both arrhythmias and resynchronisation but not heart failure, which affects millions of patients worldwide. This paper reviews recent advances in biophysics and mathematical engineering that provide a novel technological platform for addressing heart disease and enabling beat-to-beat adaptation of cardiac pacing in response to physiological feedback. The technology consists of silicon hardware central pattern generators (hCPGs) that may be trained to emulate accurately the dynamical response of biological central pattern generators (bCPGs). We discuss the limitations of present CPGs and appraise the advantages of analog over digital circuits for application in bioelectronic medicine. To test the system, we have focused on the cardio-respiratory oscillators in the medulla oblongata that modulate heart rate in phase with respiration to induce respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We describe here a novel, scalable hCPG comprising physiologically realistic (Hodgkin–Huxley type) neurones and synapses. Our hCPG comprises two neurones that antagonise each other to provide rhythmic motor drive to the vagus nerve to slow the heart. We show how recent advances in modelling allow the motor output to adapt to physiological feedback such as respiration. In rats, we report on the restoration of RSA using an hCPG that receives diaphragmatic electromyography input and use it to stimulate the vagus nerve at specific time points of the respiratory cycle to slow the heart rate. We have validated the adaptation of stimulation to alterations in respiratory rate. We demonstrate that the hCPG is tuneable in terms of the depth and timing of the RSA relative to respiratory phase. These pioneering studies will now permit an analysis of the physiological role of RSA as well as its any potential therapeutic use in cardiac disease. PMID:25433077

  9. Protective Effect of Glycyrrhizin, a Direct HMGB1 Inhibitor, on Focal Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Libang; Hu, Ling; Wu, Wei; Cai, Lin; Yin, Liang; Dong, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    Aim Glycyrrhizin (GL) has been reported to protect against ischemia and reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury by inhibiting the cytokine activity of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In the present study, the protective effects of GL against I/R injury, as well as the related molecular mechanisms, were investigated in rat brains. Methods Focal cerebral I/R injury was induced by intraluminal filamentous occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in Male Sprague-Dawley rats. GL alone or GL and rHMGB1 were administered intravenously at the time of reperfusion. Serum levels of HMGB1 and inflammatory mediators were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Histopathological examination, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and western blotting analyses were performed to investigate the protective and anti-apoptotic effects and related molecular mechanisms of GL against I/R injury in rat brains. Results Pre-treatment with GL significantly reduced infarct volume and improved the accompanying neurological deficits in locomotor function. The release of HMGB1 from the cerebral cortex into the serum was inhibited by GL administration. Moreover, pre-treatment with GL alleviated apoptotic injury resulting from cerebral I/R through the inhibition of cytochrome C release and caspase 3 activity. The expression levels of inflammation- and oxidative stress-related molecules including TNF-α, iNOS, IL-1β, and IL-6, which were over-expressed in I/R, were decreased by GL. P38 and P-JNK signalling were involved in this process. All of the protective effects of GL could be reversed by rHMGB1 administration. Conclusions GL has a protective effect on ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat brains through the inhibition of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptotic injury by antagonising the cytokine activity of HMGB1. PMID:24594628

  10. The role of TRPM8 in the Guinea-pig bladder-cooling reflex investigated using a novel TRPM8 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Jennifer C; Kirkup, Anthony J; Curry, John; Humphreys, Sian; O'Regan, Paul; Postlethwaite, Michael; Young, Kimberley C; Kitching, Linda; Ethell, Brian T; Winpenny, David; McMurray, Gordon

    2014-10-01

    Patients with overactive bladder often exhibit abnormal bladder contractions in response to intravesical cold saline (positive ice-water test). The molecular entity involved in cold sensation within the urinary bladder is unknown, but a potential candidate is the ion channel, transient receptor potential (melastatin)-8 (TRPM8). The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of TRPM8 in a bladder-cooling reflex evoked in anaesthetised guinea-pigs that is comparable to the positive ice-water test seen in patients. Guinea-pig TRPM8 was cloned from L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and expressed in HEK293 cells. Functional agonist- and cold-induced Ca2+ influx and electrophysiology assays were performed in these cells, and for comparison in HEK293 cells expressing human TRPM8, using a novel TRPM8 antagonist, the S-enantiomer of 1-phenylethyl 4-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzyl (2-aminoethyl) carbamate hydrochloride (PBMC). Potency data from these assays was used to calculate intravenous infusion protocols for targeted plasma concentrations of PBMC in studies on micturition reflexes evoked by intravesical infusion of menthol or cold saline in anaesthetised guinea-pigs. Tissue expression of TRPM8 in guinea-pig bladder, urethra and in dorsal root ganglia neurones traced from the bladder was also investigated. TRPM8 mRNA and protein were detected in L6 dorsal root ganglia, bladder urothelium and smooth muscle. PBMC antagonised in vitro activation of human and guinea-pig TRPM8 and reversed menthol and cold-induced facilitation of the micturition reflex at plasma concentrations consistent with in vitro potencies. The present data suggest that the bladder-cooling reflex in the guinea-pig involves TRPM8. The potential significance of TRPM8 in bladder disease states deserves future investigation.

  11. Neutron scattering study of the vibrational density of states in icosahedral and crystalline Al0.80Mn0.20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, P. F.; Youngquist, S. E.; Neumann, D. A.; Zabel, H.; Rush, J. J.; Rowe, J. M.

    1986-12-01

    We present an inelastic neutron scattering study of the vibrational density of states, g¯(E), for the icosahedral and crystalline phases of Al0.80Mn0.20. At low energy transfers we find nearly identical g¯(E)~E2 dependences indicating that the two materials are elastically similar. In the intermediate energy range, 20-35 meV, the crystalline g¯(E) shows weak structure while that of the icosahedral phase remains smooth. Above 40 meV there is an excess of the icosahedral g¯(E) compared to that of the crystalline material. These results provide a direct test for models of the interatomic forces and dynamics of the icosahedral phase.

  12. Induction of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) oncogenic domains (PODs) by papillomavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Tomomi; Lambert, Paul F.

    2007-09-30

    Promyelocytic leukemia oncogenic domains (PODs), also called nuclear domain 10 (ND10), are subnuclear structures that have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes as well as the life cycle of DNA viruses including papillomaviruses. In order to investigate the interplay between papillomaviruses and PODs, we analyzed the status of PODs in organotypic raft cultures of human keratinocytes harboring HPV genome that support the differentiation-dependent HPV life cycle. The number of PODs per nucleus was increased in the presence of HPV genomes selectively within the poorly differentiated layers but was absent in the terminally differentiated layers of the stratified epithelium. This increase in PODs was correlated with an increase in abundance of post-translationally modified PML protein. Neither the E2-dependent transcription nor viral DNA replication was reliant upon the presence of PML. Implications of these findings in terms of HPV's interaction with its host are discussed.

  13. Estrogen mediated epithelial proliferation in the uterus is directed by stromal Fgf10 and Bmp8a.

    PubMed

    Chung, Daesuk; Gao, Fei; Jegga, Anil G; Das, Sanjoy K

    2015-01-15

    To define endometrial stromal-derived paracrine mediators that participate in estradiol-17β (E2)-induced epithelial proliferation, microarray analysis of gene expression was carried out in mouse uterine epithelial-stromal co-culture systems under the condition of E2 or vehicle (control). Our results demonstrated gene alteration by E2: in epithelial cells, we found up-regulation of 119 genes and down-regulation of 28 genes, while in stroma cells we found up-regulation of 144 genes and down-regulation of 184 genes. A functional enrichment analysis of the upregulated epithelial genes implicated them for proliferation, while upregulated stromal genes were associated with extracellular functions. Quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization results confirmed differential gene expression in both cell cultures and ovariectomized uteri after the above treatments. Based on our identification of stromal secretory factors, we found evidence that suppression by siRNA specifically for Bmp8a and/or Fgf10 in the stromal layer caused significant inhibition of proliferation by E2 in the co-culture system, suggesting Bmp8a and Fgf10 act as paracrine mediators during E2-dependent control of uterine proliferation. The localization of receptors and receptor activation signaling in epithelial cells in both the co-culture system and uteri was consistent with their involvement in ligand-receptor signaling. Interestingly, loss of Bmp8a or Fgf10 also caused abrogation of E2-regulated epithelial receptor signaling in co-culture systems, suggesting that stroma-derived Fgf10 and Bmp8a are responsible for epithelial communication. Overall, stromal Fgf10 and Bmp8a serve as potential paracrine factors for E2-dependent regulation of epithelial proliferation in the uterus.

  14. Estrogen receptor α L429 and A430 regulate 17β-estradiol-induced cell proliferation via CREB1.

    PubMed

    Pesiri, Valeria; Totta, Pierangela; Segatto, Marco; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Pallottini, Valentina; Marino, Maria; Acconcia, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2)-dependent cell proliferation requires both estrogen receptor α (ERα)-based integrated control of gene transcription and kinase pathways activation. Such coordination of intracellular E2:ERα-dependent signaling mechanisms is finely tuned by receptor association with specific partner proteins. Recently, we identified the leucine (L) 429 and alanine (A) 430 within the ERα ligand binding domain as important residues for receptor non-covalent interaction to ubiquitinated species [i.e., ERα ubiquitin-binding surface (ERα UBS)] and for E2-induced ERα activation. To date, if these two ERα amino acids are involved in the control of E2-dependent pathways required for cell proliferation is unknown. Here, by using stably expressing ERα mutated in L429 and A430 (i.e., L429A,A430G-LAAG) cell lines, we show that L429 and A430 are critical for E2-induced cell proliferation, PI3K/AKT pathway activation, and ERα-mediated transcriptional changes. Moreover, we demonstrate that these two receptor structural determinants direct the E2-induced PI3K/AKT/CREB1 pathway activation and CREB1-mediated transcriptional activity that in turn control the hormone-induced cell proliferation. As a whole, our data demonstrate for the first time that the ERα UBS contributes to the modulation of E2-induced ERα-mediated cell proliferation and provide a novel connection between the receptor structure and the functional molecular mechanisms by which E2:ERα complex can regulate cell processes. PMID:26348925

  15. Mixed lineage leukaemia histone methylases 1 collaborate with ERα to regulate HOXA10 expression in AML

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jie; Fang, Li-Chao; Yang, Zai-Lin; Huang, Hui; Li, Yan; Deng, Jun; Zheng, Junsong

    2014-01-01

    HOXA10, a homeobox-containing gene involved in definitive haematopoiesis, which implicated in the pathogenesis of AML (acute myeloid leukaemia), has been studied extensively. But the regulatory mechanism that drives HOXA10 expression is still unclear. In the present paper, HOXA10 regulated by MLL1 (mixed lineage leukaemia histone methylase 1) with an epigenetic way has been demonstrated. The HOXA10 promoter contains several EREs (oestrogen response elements), including ERE1 and ERE2, which are close to the transcription start site, and are associated with E2-mediated activation of HOXA10. It has been shown that knockdown of the ERα (oestrogen receptor α) suppresses E2-mediated activation of HOXA10. Similarly, knockdown of MLL1 suppresses activation of HOXA10 and is bound to the ERE of HOXA10 promoter in an E2-dependent manner by forming complex with ERα. Knockdown of ERα affects the E2-dependent binding of MLL1 into HOXA10 EREs, suggesting critical roles of ERα in recruiting MLL on the HOXA10 promoter. More interestingly, the methylation status of histone protein H3K4 (H3 at lysine 4) with E2 is much higher than without E2 treatment in leukaemia cell. On the contrary, the methylation status of HOXA10 promoter with E2 treatment is much lower, which elevate the HOXA10 expression. Moreover, with ERα knockdown, the H3K4 methylation level is also decrease in myeloid cell. Overall, it has been clearly demonstrated that HOXA10 is transcriptionally regulated by MLL1, which, in coordination with ERα, plays a critical role in this process with epigenetic way and suggests a potential anti-E2 treatment of AML. PMID:25307539

  16. Rapid estrogen signaling negatively regulates PTEN activity through phosphorylation in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Melanie M.; Palacios-Helgeson, Leslie K.; Wah, Lah S.; Jackson, Twila A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperestrogenicity is a risk factor for endometrial cancer. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to stimulate both genomic and nongenomic estrogen receptor-α (ERα) actions in a number of reproductive tissues. However, the contributions of transcription-independent ERα signaling on normal and malignant endometrium are not fully understood. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor that decreases cellular mitosis primarily through negative regulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT signaling axis. PTEN levels are elevated during the E2 dominated, mitotically active, proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle, indicating possible hormonal regulation of PTEN in the uterus. In order to determine if rapid E2 signaling regulates PTEN, we used ERα positive, PTEN positive, endometrial cells. We show that cytosolic E2/ERα signaling leads to increased phosphorylation of PTEN at key regulatory residues. Importantly, E2 stimulation decreased PTEN lipid phosphatase activity and caused consequent increases in phospho-AKT. We further demonstrate that cytosolic ERα forms a complex with PTEN in an E2-dependent manner, and that ERα constitutively complexes with protein kinase2-α (CK2α), a kinase previously shown to phosphorylate the C-terminal tail of PTEN. These results provide mechanistic support for an E2-dependent, ERα cytosolic signaling complex that negatively regulates PTEN activity through carboxy terminus phosphorylation. Using an animal model, we show that sustained E2 signaling results in increased phospho-PTEN (S380, T382, T383), total PTEN and phospho-AKT (S473). Taken together, we provide a novel mechanism in which transcription-independent E2/ERα signaling may promote a pro-tumorigenic environment in the endometrium. PMID:24844349

  17. A transcriptional repressive role for epithelial-specific ETS factor ELF3 on oestrogen receptor alpha in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gajulapalli, Vijaya Narasihma Reddy; Samanthapudi, Venkata Subramanyam Kumar; Pulaganti, Madhusudana; Khumukcham, Saratchandra Singh; Malisetty, Vijaya Lakhsmi; Guruprasad, Lalitha; Chitta, Suresh Kumar; Manavathi, Bramanandam

    2016-04-15

    Oestrogen receptor-α (ERα) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that primarily mediates oestrogen (E2)-dependent gene transcription required for mammary gland development. Coregulators critically regulate ERα transcription functions by directly interacting with it. In the present study, we report that ELF3, an epithelial-specific ETS transcription factor, acts as a transcriptional repressor of ERα. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) analysis demonstrated that ELF3 strongly binds to ERα in the absence of E2, but ELF3 dissociation occurs upon E2 treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner suggesting that E2 negatively influences such interaction. Domain mapping studies further revealed that the ETS (E-twenty six) domain of ELF3 interacts with the DNA binding domain of ERα. Accordingly, ELF3 inhibited ERα's DNA binding activity by preventing receptor dimerization, partly explaining the mechanism by which ELF3 represses ERα transcriptional activity. Ectopic expression of ELF3 decreases ERα transcriptional activity as demonstrated by oestrogen response elements (ERE)-luciferase reporter assay or by endogenous ERα target genes. Conversely ELF3 knockdown increases ERα transcriptional activity. Consistent with these results, ELF3 ectopic expression decreases E2-dependent MCF7 cell proliferation whereas ELF3 knockdown increases it. We also found that E2 induces ELF3 expression in MCF7 cells suggesting a negative feedback regulation of ERα signalling in breast cancer cells. A small peptide sequence of ELF3 derived through functional interaction between ERα and ELF3 could inhibit DNA binding activity of ERα and breast cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate that ELF3 is a novel transcriptional repressor of ERα in breast cancer cells. Peptide interaction studies further represent a novel therapeutic option in breast cancer therapy.

  18. Central neural mechanisms of progesterone action: application to the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E

    1992-08-01

    Around the turn of the century, it was recognized that women hyperventilate during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and during pregnancy. Although a causative role for the steroid hormone progesterone in this hyperventilation was suggested as early as the 1940s, there has been no clear indication as to the mechanism by which it produces its respiratory effects. In contrast, much mechanistic information has been obtained over the same period about a different effect of progesterone, i.e., the facilitation of reproductive behaviors. In this case, the bulk of the evidence supports the hypothesis that progesterone acts via a genomic mechanism with characteristics not unlike those predicted by classic models for steroid hormone action. We recently, therefore, undertook a series of experiments to test predictions of those same models with reference to the respiratory effects of progesterone. Here we highlight the results of those studies; as background to and precedent for our experiments, we briefly review previous work in which effects of progesterone on respiration and reproductive behaviors have been studied. Our results indicate that the respiratory response to progesterone is mediated at hypothalamic sites through an estrogen- (E2) dependent progesterone receptor- (PR) mediated mechanism requiring RNA and protein synthesis, i.e., gene expression. The E2 dependence of the respiratory response to progesterone is likely a consequence of the demonstrated induction of PR mRNA and PR in hypothalamic neurons by E2. In short, we found that neural mechanisms underlying the stimulation of respiration by progesterone were similar to those mediating its reproductive effects. PMID:1399957

  19. Estrogen mediated epithelial proliferation in the uterus is directed by stromal Fgf10 and Bmp8a

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Daesuk; Gao, Fei; Jegga, Anil G.; Das, Sanjoy K.

    2014-01-01

    To define endometrial stromal-derived paracrine mediators that participate in estradiol-17β (E2)-induced epithelial proliferation, microarray analysis of gene expression was carried out in mouse uterine epithelial–stromal co-culture systems under the condition of E2 or vehicle (control). Our results demonstrated gene alteration by E2: in epithelial cells, we found up-regulation of 119 genes and down-regulation of 28 genes, while in stroma cells we found up-regulation of 144 genes and down-regulation of 184 genes. A functional enrichment analysis of the upregulated epithelial genes implicated them for proliferation, while upregulated stromal genes were associated with extracellular functions. Quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization results confirmed differential gene expression in both cell cultures and ovariectomized uteri after the above treatments. Based on our identification of stromal secretory factors, we found evidence that suppression by siRNA specifically for Bmp8a and/or Fgf10 in the stromal layer caused significant inhibition of proliferation by E2 in the co-culture system, suggesting Bmp8a and Fgf10 act as paracrine mediators during E2-dependent control of uterine proliferation. The localization of receptors and receptor activation signaling in epithelial cells in both the co-culture system and uteri was consistent with their involvement in ligand–receptor signaling. Interestingly, loss of Bmp8a or Fgf10 also caused abrogation of E2-regulated epithelial receptor signaling in co-culture systems, suggesting that stroma-derived Fgf10 and Bmp8a are responsible for epithelial communication. Overall, stromal Fgf10 and Bmp8a serve as potential paracrine factors for E2-dependent regulation of epithelial proliferation in the uterus. PMID:25451979

  20. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  1. An in vitro study of histamine on the pulmonary artery of the Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wing Hung; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Au, Alice Lai Shan; Cheung, Wui Hang

    2003-05-30

    The vascular response to most neurotransmitters of different vascular beds is altered under hypertensive condition. The modulatory effect of genetic pulmonary arterial hypertension on histamine responses is not known. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the modulatory effect of enzymatic degradation (via histamine N-methyl-transferase and diamine oxidase) on the vascular response of histamine, and the subtype(s) of histamine receptor present in the pulmonary artery (first branch, O.D. approximately 800 microm) of the normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) (male, 22-26 weeks old). In phenylephrine (1 microM) pre-contracted preparations, histamine and 6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]-N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl) heptanecarboxamide (HTMT, a histamine H(1) receptor agonist) elicited a concentration-dependent relaxation, with a smaller magnitude recorded in SHR. Application of 10 microM S-[4-(N,N-dimethylamino)-butyl]isothiourea (SKF 91488, a selective histamine N-methyl-transferase inhibitor), but not aminoguanidine (100 microM, a diamine oxidase inhibitor), significantly attenuated histamine-induced relaxation. Clobenpropit (1 nM, a potent histamine H(3) receptor antagonist) "antagonised" the suppressive effect of SKF 91488 and histamine-evoked relaxation was restored. Endothelial denudation reduced histamine- and abolished HTMT-elicited relaxation. Dimaprit (a histamine H(2) receptor agonist) caused an endothelium-independent, cis-N-(2-phenylcyclopentyl)azacyclotridec-1-en-2-amine (MDL 12330A, 10 microM, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor)-sensitive, concentration-dependent relaxation, with a similar magnitude in both strains of rat. Histamine-evoked relaxation was reversed into a further contraction (clobenpropit (10 nM)-sensitive) (with a greater magnitude occurred in the WKY rat) after blocking the histamine H(1) and H(2) receptors with diphenhydramine plus cimetidine (30 microM each). A similar further contraction

  2. Effects of a serotonin 5-HT4 receptor antagonist SB-207266 on gastrointestinal motor and sensory function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, A; Camilleri, M; Haydock, S; Ferber, I; Burton, D; Cooper, S; Tompson, D; Fitzpatrick, K; Higgins, R; Zinsmeister, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors are located on enteric cholinergic neurones and may regulate peristalsis. 5-HT4 receptors on primary afferent neurones have been postulated to modulate visceral sensation. While 5-HT4 agonists are used as prokinetic agents, the physiological role of 5-HT4 receptors in the human gut is unknown.
AIMS—Our aim was to characterise the role of 5-HT4 receptors in regulating gastrointestinal motor and sensory function in healthy subjects under baseline and stimulated conditions with a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist.
METHODS—Part A compared the effects of placebo to four doses of a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist (SB-207266) on the cisapride mediated increase in plasma aldosterone (a 5-HT4 mediated response) and orocaecal transit in 18 subjects. In part B, 52 healthy subjects received placebo, or 0.05, 0.5, or 5 mg of SB-207266 for 10-12 days; gastric, small bowel, and colonic transit were measured by scintigraphy on days 7-9, and fasting and postprandial colonic motor function, compliance, and sensation during distensions were assessed on day 12.
RESULTS—Part A: 0.5, 5, and 20 mg doses of SB-207266 had significant and quantitatively similar effects, antagonising the cisapride mediated increase in plasma aldosterone and acceleration of orocaecal transit. Part B: SB-207266 tended to delay colonic transit (geometric centre of isotope at 24 (p=0.06) and 48 hours (p=0.08)), but did not have dose related effects on transit, fasting or postprandial colonic motor activity, compliance, or sensation.
CONCLUSION—5-HT4 receptors are involved in the regulation of cisapride stimulated orocaecal transit; SB 207266 tends to modulate colonic transit but not sensory functions or compliance in healthy human subjects.


Keywords: 5-HT4 receptors; colon transit; gastrointestinal motor function; gastrointestinal sensory function PMID:11034583

  3. Siltuximab (Sylvant). Castleman's disease: good symptomatic efficacy in some patients.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by disseminated lymphadenopathy. Symptoms and outcomes differ widely from one patient to another. The median survival time is about 2.5 years. There is no consensus on treatment. Siltuximab, a monoclonal antibody that antagonises interleukin-6, has been authorised in the European Union for patients with multicentric Castleman's disease who are not infected with HIV or HHV-8. In a randomised, double-blind trial in 79 patients, most of whom had mild or moderate symptoms, the estimated one-year survival rate was 100% in the siltuximab group versus 92% in the placebo group after a median follow-up of 60 weeks. However, half of the patients in the placebo group received siltuximab after disease progression. Symptoms disappeared for at least 18 weeks in one-quarter of patients in the siltuximab group versus none of those in the placebo group; the median symptom-free period in the siltuximab group was about 16 months. The known adverse effects of siltuximab are related to its immunosuppressive effect. They include frequent infections, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Reactions can occur during the infusion, and mouth sores have been reported. Other adverse events that appear to be more frequent with siltuximab include cutaneous disorders, oedema, renal and cardiac disorders, and peripheral neuropathy. Cases of gastrointestinal perforation have been reported in trials in other clinical settings. Siltuximab can mask the signs and symptoms of acute inflammation, in particular by suppressing fever and acute-phase markers such as C-reactive protein. Interleukin-6 is a cytochrome P450 inhibitor. Siltuximab activates its isoenzymes and can thus reduce the effectiveness of the numerous drugs that are substrates of this enzyme system. This risk of interactions is likely to persist up to several weeks after siltuximab withdrawal, because of its long plasma elimination half-life (about 16 days

  4. The role of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors in antidepressant drug actions in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Redrobe, J P; MacSweeney, C P; Bourin, M

    1996-12-30

    The forced swimming test is a behavioural model developed to predict the efficacy of antidepressant drugs. Few studies have been aimed at evaluating the mechanism of action of antidepressants in the forced swimming test. The present study was designed in order to further evaluate the mode of action of antidepressants in the forced swimming test, by using selective agonists and antagonists at 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor sites. Agonists/antagonists and antidepressants were administered 45 min and 30 min, respectively, prior to testing. Prior administration of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) (1 mg/kg, i.p.) induced anti-immobility effects with the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) and noradrenaline uptake inhibitors maprotiline (8 mg/kg, i.p.) and desipramine (16 mg/kg, i.p.), but not with fluoxetine (16 mg/kg, i.p.), citalopram (16 mg/kg, i.p.) or fluvoxamine (8 mg/kg, i.p.). These effects were antagonised by prior administration of 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[-(2-phthalimido)butyl]piperazine) (NAN 190) (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.). On the other hand, pretreatment with (+/-)-pindolol (32 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and was devoid of any activity with imipramine (8 mg/kg, i.p.), maprotiline (8 mg/kg, i.p.) or desipramine (16 mg/kg, i.p.). Prior administration of 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridyl)-1H-indole (RU 24969) enhanced the antidepressant-like effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and imipramine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) in the forced swimming test. The anti-immobility effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the forced swimming test seem to be mediated by presynaptic 5-HT1A receptors as well as postsynaptic 5-HT1B receptors. Antidepressant-like effects of the noradrenaline uptake inhibitors seem, on the other hand, to be mediated by postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors. Considering the variety of 5-HT receptors, it is possible that other subtypes may participate

  5. Evaluation of the effects of a specific alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, atipamezole, on alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype binding, brain neurochemistry and behaviour in comparison with yohimbine.

    PubMed

    Haapalinna, A; Viitamaa, T; MacDonald, E; Savola, J M; Tuomisto, L; Virtanen, R; Heinonen, E

    1997-11-01

    In the present study we evaluated the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype binding, central alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist potency, as well as effects on brain neurochemistry and behavioural pharmacology of two alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists, atipamezole and yohimbine. Atipamezole had higher selectivity for alpha 2- vs. alpha 1-adrenoceptors than yohimbine regardless of the subtypes studied. Both compounds had comparable affinity for the alpha 2A-, alpha 2C- and alpha 2B-adrenoceptors, but yohimbine had significantly lower affinity for the alpha 2D-subtype. This may account for the fact that significantly higher doses of yohimbine than atipamezole were needed for reversal of alpha 2-agonist (medetomidine)-induced effects in rats (mydriasis) and mice (sedation and hypothermia). The effect on central monoaminergic activity was estimated by measuring the concentrations of transmitters and their main metabolites in whole brain homogenate. At equally effective alpha 2-antagonising doses in the rat mydriasis model, both drugs stimulated central noradrenaline turnover (as reflected by increase in metabolite levels) to the same extent. Atipamezole increased dopaminergic activity only slightly, whereas yohimbine elevated central dopamine but decreased central 5-hydroxytryptamine turnover rates. In behavioural tests, atipamezole (0.1-10 mg/kg) did not affect motor activity but stimulated food rewarded operant (FR-10) responding (0.03-3 mg/kg) whereas yohimbine both stimulated (1 mg/kg) and decreased (> or = 3 mg/kg) behaviour in a narrow dose range in these tests. In the staircase test, both antagonists increased neophobia, but in the two compartment test only yohimbine (> or = 3 mg/kg) decreased exploratory behaviour. The dissimilar effects of the antagonists on neurochemistry and behaviour are thought to be caused by non alpha 2-adrenoceptor properties of yohimbine. In conclusion, the alpha 2-antagonist atipamezole blocked all alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtypes at low

  6. Kinetics of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-10, and virus neutralising antibodies during acute ephemeral fever virus infections in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Barigye, R; Melville, L F; Davis, S; Walsh, S; Hunt, N; Hunt, R; Elliot, N

    2015-12-15

    While fever and inflammation are hallmark features of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF), the cytokine networks that underlie the acute phase of the disease have not been empirically defined in cattle. This study characterised the plasma kinetics of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α) and IL-10 during acute BEF and elucidated on the relationship between the onset of the virus neutralizing antibody response and resolution of viraemia in natural BEF virus (BEFV) infections in cattle. Plasma from three BEFV-infected and three uninfected cattle was tested for the study cytokines by a cELISA, viraemia monitored by qRT-PCR, and virus neutralizing antibody titres determined using a standard protocol. Unlike the negative controls, plasma concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 were consistently increased in the three virus-infected animals. Two of the infected heifers were recumbent and pyrexic on the first day of monitoring and increased cytokine production was already in progress by the time viraemia was detected in all the three infected animals. In all the virus-infected heifers, IL-1β was the most strongly expressed cytokine, IL-6 and IL-10 manifested intermediate plasma concentrations while TNF-α was the least expressed and demonstrated bi-phasic peaks three and five days after the onset of pyrexia. In two of the BEFV-infected heifers, viraemia resolved on the day of seroconversion while in the other infected animal, viral RNA was detectable up to three days after seroconversion. The present data document variable increase in plasma IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 during natural BEFV infections and the fact that upregulation of all but TNF-α precedes seroconversion. In addition to virus neutralising antibodies, it is likely that cytokine-mediated cellular mechanisms may be required for resolution of viraemia in BEF. Considering the anti-inflammatory properties of IL-10, its upregulation may potentially antagonise the fever response in BEFV

  7. Benefit-risk assessment of antileukotrienes in the management of asthma.

    PubMed

    García-Marcos, Luis; Schuster, Antje; Pérez-Yarza, Eduardo G

    2003-01-01

    Antileukotrienes are a relatively new class of anti-asthma drugs that either block leukotriene synthesis (5-lipoxygenase inhibitors) like zileuton, or antagonise the most relevant of their receptors (the cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor [CysLT1]) like montelukast, zafirlukast or pranlukast. Hence, their major effect is an anti-inflammatory one. With the exception of pranlukast, the other antileukotrienes have been studied and marketed in the US and Europe for long enough to establish that they are useful drugs in the management of asthma. Their effects, significantly better than placebo, seem more pronounced in subjective measurements (i.e. symptoms scores or quality-of-life tests) than in objective parameters (i.e. forced expiratory volume in 1 second or peak expiratory flow rate). Also, there is some evidence that these drugs work better in some subsets of patients with certain genetic polymorphisms - probably related to their leukotriene metabolism - or patients with certain asthma characteristics. There are a small number of comparative studies only, and with regard to long-term asthma control differences between the agents have not been evaluated. Nevertheless, their overall effect appears comparable with sodium cromoglycate (cromolyn sodium) or theophylline, but significantly less than low-dose inhaled corticosteroids. Antileukotrienes have been shown to have a degree of corticosteroid-sparing effect, but salmeterol appears to perform better as an add-on drug. Montelukast is probably the most useful antileukotriene for continuous treatment of exercise-induced asthma, performing as well as salmeterol without inducing any tolerance. All antileukotrienes are taken orally; their frequency of administration is quite different ranging from four times daily (zileuton) to once daily (montelukast). Antileukotrienes are well tolerated drugs, even though zileuton intake has been related to transitional liver enzyme elevations in some cases. Also Churg-Strauss syndrome

  8. Potential Link between the Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) System and Defective Alveolar Macrophage Phagocytic Function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Barnawi, Jameel; Tran, Hai; Jersmann, Hubertus; Pitson, Stuart; Roscioli, Eugene; Hodge, Greg; Meech, Robyn; Haberberger, Rainer; Hodge, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    patient-derived macrophages. Antagonising SIPR5 significantly improved phagocytosis. Conclusion Our results suggest a potential link between the S1P signalling system and defective macrophage phagocytic function in COPD and advise therapeutic targets. PMID:26485657

  9. Tianeptine. A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic efficacy in depression and coexisting anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Wilde, M I; Benfield, P

    1995-03-01

    Tianeptine is a novel antidepressant agent, both structurally (modified tricyclic) and in terms of its pharmacodynamic profile. Unlike other antidepressant agents, tianeptine stimulates the uptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) in rat brain synaptosomes and rat and human platelets, increases 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in cerebral tissue and plasma, and reduces serotonergic-induced behaviour. Tianeptine reduces the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress, antagonises stress-induced behavioural deficits and prevents changes in cerebral morphology. The antidepressant efficacy of tianeptine, as shown in 2 trials of patients with major depression or depressed bipolar disorder with or without melancholia, is greater than that of placebo. In patients with major depression without melancholia or psychotic features, depressed bipolar disorder or dysthymic disorder, the antidepressant efficacy of short term (4 weeks to 3 months) tianeptine therapy appears to be similar to that of amitriptyline, imipramine and fluoxetine and may be superior to that of maprotiline in patients with coexisting depression and anxiety. However, submaximal dosages of amitriptyline and maprotiline were used in these studies. Preliminary evidence suggests that tianeptine may also be effective in patients with endogenous depression. Progressive therapeutic improvements have been observed with up to 1 year of tianeptine treatment, and long term therapy may reduce the rate of relapse or recurrence. Tianeptine is effective in the treatment of depression in elderly and post-alcohol-withdrawal patient subgroups. Tianeptine was more effective in reducing psychic anxiety than placebo in patients with major depression or depressed bipolar disorder with or without melancholia. The overall anxiolytic properties of tianeptine in patients with coexisting depression and anxiety appear to be similar to those of amitriptyline, imipramine and fluoxetine and may be superior to those

  10. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 provokes interleukin-18-induced human intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ye, S.; Ju, B.; Wang, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Interleukin 18 (IL-18) is a regulatory cytokine that degrades the disc matrix. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) stimulates synthesis of the disc extracellular matrix. However, the combined effects of BMP-2 and IL-18 on human intervertebral disc degeneration have not previously been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the anabolic cytokine BMP-2 and the catabolic cytokine IL-18 on human nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells and, therefore, to identify potential therapeutic and clinical benefits of recombinant human (rh)BMP-2 in intervertebral disc degeneration. Methods Levels of IL-18 were measured in the blood of patients with intervertebral disc degenerative disease and in control patients. Human NP and AF cells were cultured in a NP cell medium and treated with IL-18 or IL-18 plus BMP-2. mRNA levels of target genes were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and protein levels of aggrecan, type II collagen, SOX6, and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) were assessed by western blot analysis. Results The serum level of patients (IL-18) increased significantly with the grade of IVD degeneration. There was a dramatic alteration in IL-18 level between the advanced degeneration (Grade III to V) group and the normal group (p = 0.008) Furthermore, IL-18 induced upregulation of the catabolic regulator MMP13 and downregulation of the anabolic regulators aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX6 at 24 hours, contributing to degradation of disc matrix enzymes. However, BMP-2 antagonised the IL-18 induced upregulation of aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX6, resulting in reversal of IL-18 mediated disc degeneration. Conclusions BMP-2 is anti-catabolic in human NP and AF cells, and its effects are partially mediated through provocation of the catabolic effect of IL-18. These findings indicate that BMP-2 may be a unique therapeutic option for prevention and reversal of disc degeneration. Cite this article: S. Ye

  12. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essential for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.

  13. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essentialmore » for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.« less

  14. Estrogen promotes Leydig cell engulfment by macrophages in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wanpeng; Zheng, Han; Lin, Wei; Tajima, Astushi; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongwen; Wu, Jihua; Han, Daishu; Rahman, Nafis A; Korach, Kenneth S; Gao, George Fu; Inoue, Ituro; Li, Xiangdong

    2014-06-01

    Male infertility accounts for almost half of infertility cases worldwide. A subset of infertile men exhibit reduced testosterone and enhanced levels of estradiol (E2), though it is unclear how increased E2 promotes deterioration of male fertility. Here, we utilized a transgenic mouse strain that overexpresses human CYP19, which encodes aromatase (AROM+ mice), and mice with knockout of Esr1, encoding estrogen receptor α (ERαKO mice), to analyze interactions between viable Leydig cells (LCs) and testicular macrophages that may lead to male infertility. In AROM+ males, enhanced E2 promoted LC hyperplasia and macrophage activation via ERα signaling. E2 stimulated LCs to produce growth arrest-specific 6 (GAS6), which mediates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by bridging cells with surface exposed phosphatidylserine (PS) to macrophage receptors, including the tyrosine kinases TYRO3, AXL, and MER. Overproduction of E2 increased apoptosis-independent extrusion of PS on LCs, which in turn promoted engulfment by E2/ERα-activated macrophages that was mediated by AXL-GAS6-PS interaction. We further confirmed E2-dependant engulfment of LCs by real-time 3D imaging. Furthermore, evaluation of molecular markers in the testes of patients with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) revealed enhanced expression of CYP19, GAS6, and AXL, which suggests that the AROM+ mouse model reflects human infertility. Together, these results suggest that GAS6 has a potential as a clinical biomarker and therapeutic target for male infertility.

  15. Time course of the estradiol-dependent induction of oxytocin receptor binding in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.E.; Ball, G.F.; Coirini, H.; Harbaugh, C.R.; McEwen, B.S.; Insel, T.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Oxytocin (OT) transmission is involved in the steroid-dependent display of sexual receptivity in rats. One of the biochemical processes stimulated by the ovarian steroid 17 beta-estradiol (E2) that is relevant to reproduction is the induction of OT receptor binding in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN). The purpose of these experiments was to determine if E2-induced changes in OT receptor binding in the VMN occur within a time frame relevant to cyclic changes in ovarian steroid secretion. OT receptor binding was measured in the VMN of ovariectomized rats implanted for 0-96 h with E2-containing Silastic capsules. The rate of decay of OT receptor binding was measured in another group of animals 6-48 h after capsule removal. Receptors were labeled with the specific OT receptor antagonist ({sup 125}I)d(CH2)5(Tyr(Me)2,Thr4,Tyr-NH2(9))OVT, and binding was measured with quantitative autoradiographic methods. In addition, plasma E2 levels and uterine weights were assessed in animals from each treatment condition. Significant increases in E2-dependent OT receptor binding and uterine weight occurred within 24 h of steroid treatment. After E2 withdrawal, OT receptor binding and uterine weight decreased significantly within 24 h. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that steroid modulation of OT receptor binding is necessary for the induction of sexual receptivity.

  16. AMF-1/Gps2 binds p300 and enhances its interaction with papillomavirus E2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Y C; Breiding, D E; Sverdrup, F; Richard, J; Androphy, E J

    2000-07-01

    The cellular protein AMF-1 (Gps2) positively modulates gene expression by the papillomavirus E2 protein (D. E. Breiding et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 17:7208-7219, 1997). We show here that AMF-1 also binds the transcriptional coactivator p300 in vitro and in vivo. E2 interacted weakly with p300. These observations led to a model in which AMF-1 recruits p300 into a complex with E2. Cotransfection of AMF-1 or p300 stimulated levels of E2-dependent transcription, while cotransfection of both AMF-1 and p300 showed an additive effect. The functional significance of p300 recruitment for E2 transactivation was evidenced by repression of E2-activated transcription by adenovirus E1A, which inhibits both coactivator and acetylase activities of p300. Antibodies to AMF-1 or E2 immunoprecipitated histone acetylase activity from cell lysates. Western blotting using antibody against acetyl-lysine failed to detect acetylation of AMF-1 or E2 in complex with p300. These results suggest that AMF-1 facilitates the recruitment of p300 and its histone acetylase activity into complexes with E2 and represents a novel mechanism of transcriptional activation.

  17. Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis l-Isoleucine Dioxygenase for Production of Useful Amino Acids▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Makoto; Kawashima, Takashi; Kodera, Tomohiro; Smirnov, Sergey V.; Sokolov, Pavel M.; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Shimizu, Sakayu; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Ogawa, Jun

    2011-01-01

    We determined the enzymatic characteristics of an industrially important biocatalyst, α-ketoglutarate-dependent l-isoleucine dioxygenase (IDO), which was found to be the enzyme responsible for the generation of (2S,3R,4S)-4-hydroxyisoleucine in Bacillus thuringiensis 2e2. Depending on the amino acid used as the substrate, IDO catalyzed three different types of oxidation reactions: hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and sulfoxidation. IDO stereoselectively hydroxylated several hydrophobic aliphatic l-amino acids, as well as l-isoleucine, and produced (S)-3-hydroxy-l-allo-isoleucine, 4-hydroxy-l-leucine, (S)-4-hydroxy-l-norvaline, 4-hydroxy-l-norleucine, and 5-hydroxy-l-norleucine. The IDO reaction product of l-isoleucine, (2S,3R,4S)-4-hydroxyisoleucine, was again reacted with IDO and dehydrogenated into (2S,3R)-2-amino-3-methyl-4-ketopentanoate, which is also a metabolite found in B. thuringiensis 2e2. Interestingly, IDO catalyzed the sulfoxidation of some sulfur-containing l-amino acids and generated l-methionine sulfoxide and l-ethionine sulfoxide. Consequently, the effective production of various modified amino acids would be possible using IDO as the biocatalyst. PMID:21821743

  18. Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis L-isoleucine dioxygenase for production of useful amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Makoto; Kawashima, Takashi; Kodera, Tomohiro; Smirnov, Sergey V; Sokolov, Pavel M; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Shimizu, Sakayu; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Ogawa, Jun

    2011-10-01

    We determined the enzymatic characteristics of an industrially important biocatalyst, α-ketoglutarate-dependent l-isoleucine dioxygenase (IDO), which was found to be the enzyme responsible for the generation of (2S,3R,4S)-4-hydroxyisoleucine in Bacillus thuringiensis 2e2. Depending on the amino acid used as the substrate, IDO catalyzed three different types of oxidation reactions: hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and sulfoxidation. IDO stereoselectively hydroxylated several hydrophobic aliphatic l-amino acids, as well as l-isoleucine, and produced (S)-3-hydroxy-l-allo-isoleucine, 4-hydroxy-l-leucine, (S)-4-hydroxy-l-norvaline, 4-hydroxy-l-norleucine, and 5-hydroxy-l-norleucine. The IDO reaction product of l-isoleucine, (2S,3R,4S)-4-hydroxyisoleucine, was again reacted with IDO and dehydrogenated into (2S,3R)-2-amino-3-methyl-4-ketopentanoate, which is also a metabolite found in B. thuringiensis 2e2. Interestingly, IDO catalyzed the sulfoxidation of some sulfur-containing l-amino acids and generated l-methionine sulfoxide and l-ethionine sulfoxide. Consequently, the effective production of various modified amino acids would be possible using IDO as the biocatalyst. PMID:21821743

  19. Tissue-specific regulation of erythropoietin production in the murine kidney, brain, and uterus.

    PubMed

    Chikuma, M; Masuda, S; Kobayashi, T; Nagao, M; Sasaki, R

    2000-12-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) produced by the kidney regulates erythropoiesis. Recent evidence suggests that Epo in the cerebrum prevents neuron death and Epo in the uterus induces estrogen (E(2))-dependent uterine angiogenesis. To elucidate how Epo expression is regulated in these tissues, ovariectomized mice were given E(2) and/or exposed to hypoxia, and the temporal patterns of Epo mRNA levels were examined. Epo mRNA levels in the kidney and cerebrum were elevated markedly within 4 h after exposure to hypoxia. Although the elevated level of Epo mRNA in the kidney decreased markedly within 8 h despite continuous hypoxia, the high level in the cerebrum was sustained for > or = 24 h, indicating that downregulation operates in the kidney but not in the brain. E(2) transiently induced Epo mRNA in the uterus but not in the kidney and cerebrum. Interestingly, the uterine Epo mRNA was hypoxia inducible only in the presence of E(2). Thus Epo expression appears to be regulated in a tissue-specific manner, endorsing the tissue-specific functions of Epo.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of selective estrogen receptor modulator activity in human breast cancer cells: identification of novel nuclear cofactors of antiestrogen-ERα complexes by interaction proteomics.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Francesca; Nassa, Giovanni; Tarallo, Roberta; Stellato, Claudia; De Filippo, Maria Rosaria; Ambrosino, Concetta; Baumann, Marc; Nyman, Tuula A; Weisz, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that controls key cellular pathways via protein-protein interactions involving multiple components of transcriptional coregulator and signal transduction complexes. Natural and synthetic ERα ligands are classified as agonists (17β-estradiol/E(2)), selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs: Tamoxifen/Tam and Raloxifene/Ral), and pure antagonists (ICI 182,780-Fulvestrant/ICI), according to the response they elicit in hormone-responsive cells. Crystallographic analyses reveal ligand-dependent ERα conformations, characterized by specific surface docking sites for functional protein-protein interactions, whose identification is needed to understand antiestrogen effects on estrogen target tissues, in particular breast cancer (BC). Tandem affinity purification (TAP) coupled to mass spectrometry was applied here to map nuclear ERα interactomes dependent upon different classes of ligands in hormone-responsive BC cells. Comparative analyses of agonist (E(2))- vs antagonist (Tam, Ral or ICI)-bound ERα interacting proteins reveal significant differences among ER ligands that relate with their biological activity, identifying novel functional partners of antiestrogen-ERα complexes in human BC cell nuclei. In particular, the E(2)-dependent nuclear ERα interactome is different and more complex than those elicited by Tam, Ral, or ICI, which, in turn, are significantly divergent from each other, a result that provides clues to explain the pharmacological specificities of these compounds. PMID:23170835

  1. Dynamin II is required for 17β-estradiol signaling and autophagy-based ERα degradation.

    PubMed

    Totta, Pierangela; Busonero, Claudia; Leone, Stefano; Marino, Maria; Acconcia, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) regulates diverse physiological effects, including cell proliferation, by binding to estrogen receptor α (ERα). ERα is both a transcription factor that drives E2-sensitive gene expression and an extra-nuclear localized receptor that triggers the activation of diverse kinase cascades. While E2 triggers cell proliferation, it also induces ERα degradation in a typical hormone-dependent feedback loop. Although ERα breakdown proceeds through the 26S proteasome, a role for lysosomes and for some endocytic proteins in controlling ERα degradation has been reported. Here, we studied the role of the endocytic protein dynamin II in E2-dependent ERα signaling and degradation. The results indicate that dynamin II siRNA-mediated knock-down partially prevents E2-induced ERα degradation through the inhibition of an autophagy-based pathway and impairs E2-induced cell proliferation signaling. Altogether, these data demonstrate that dynamin II is required for the E2:ERα signaling of physiological functions and uncovers a role for autophagy in the control of ERα turnover. PMID:27009360

  2. Dynamin II is required for 17β-estradiol signaling and autophagy-based ERα degradation

    PubMed Central

    Totta, Pierangela; Busonero, Claudia; Leone, Stefano; Marino, Maria; Acconcia, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) regulates diverse physiological effects, including cell proliferation, by binding to estrogen receptor α (ERα). ERα is both a transcription factor that drives E2-sensitive gene expression and an extra-nuclear localized receptor that triggers the activation of diverse kinase cascades. While E2 triggers cell proliferation, it also induces ERα degradation in a typical hormone-dependent feedback loop. Although ERα breakdown proceeds through the 26S proteasome, a role for lysosomes and for some endocytic proteins in controlling ERα degradation has been reported. Here, we studied the role of the endocytic protein dynamin II in E2-dependent ERα signaling and degradation. The results indicate that dynamin II siRNA-mediated knock-down partially prevents E2-induced ERα degradation through the inhibition of an autophagy-based pathway and impairs E2-induced cell proliferation signaling. Altogether, these data demonstrate that dynamin II is required for the E2:ERα signaling of physiological functions and uncovers a role for autophagy in the control of ERα turnover. PMID:27009360

  3. Neuroglobin upregulation induced by 17β-estradiol sequesters cytocrome c in the mitochondria preventing H2O2-induced apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    De Marinis, E; Fiocchetti, M; Acconcia, F; Ascenzi, P; Marino, M

    2013-01-01

    The sex steroid hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) upregulates the levels of neuroglobin (NGB), a new neuroprotectant globin, to elicit its neuroprotective effect against H2O2-induced apoptosis. Several mechanisms could be proposed to justify the NGB involvement in E2 prevention of stress-induced apoptotic cell death. Here, we evaluate the ability of E2 to modulate the intracellular NGB localization and the NGB interaction with mitochondrial cytochrome c following the H2O2-induced toxicity. Present results demonstrate that NGB is expressed in the nuclei, mitochondria, and cytosol of human neuroblastoma SK-N-BE cells. E2, but not H2O2 treatment of SK-N-BE cells, reallocates NGB mainly at the mitochondria and contemporarily reduces the number of apoptotic nuclei and the levels of cleaved caspase-3. Remarkably, the E2 treatment strongly increases NGB–cytochrome c association into mitochondria and reduces the levels of cytochrome c into the cytosol of SK-N-BE cells. Although both estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are expressed in the nucleus, mitochondria, and cytosol of SK-N-BE cells, this E2 effect specifically requires the mitochondrial ERβ activity. As a whole, these data demonstrate that the interception of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway into mitochondria (i.e., the prevention of cytochrome c release) is one of the pivotal mechanisms underlying E2-dependent NGB neuroprotection against H2O2 toxicity. PMID:23429294

  4. NF-E2, FLI1 and RUNX1 collaborate at areas of dynamic chromatin to activate transcription in mature mouse megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Chongzhi; Luyten, Annouck; Chen, Justina; Liu, X. Shirley; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in mouse and human Nfe2, Fli1 and Runx1 cause thrombocytopenia. We applied genome-wide chromatin dynamics and ChIP-seq to determine these transcription factors’ (TFs) activities in terminal megakaryocyte (MK) maturation. Enhancers with H3K4me2-marked nucleosome pairs were most enriched for NF-E2, FLI and RUNX sequence motifs, suggesting that this TF triad controls much of the late MK program. ChIP-seq revealed NF-E2 occupancy near previously implicated target genes, whose expression is compromised in Nfe2-null cells, and many other genes that become active late in MK differentiation. FLI and RUNX were also the motifs most enriched near NF-E2 binding sites and ChIP-seq implicated FLI1 and RUNX1 in activation of late MK, including NF-E2-dependent, genes. Histones showed limited activation in regions of single TF binding, while enhancers that bind NF-E2 and either RUNX1, FLI1 or both TFs gave the highest signals for TF occupancy and H3K4me2; these enhancers associated best with genes activated late in MK maturation. Thus, three essential TFs co-occupy late-acting cis-elements and show evidence for additive activity at genes responsible for platelet assembly and release. These findings provide a rich dataset of TF and chromatin dynamics in primary MK and explain why individual TF losses cause thrombopocytopenia. PMID:27457419

  5. Induction of the Bovine Papillomavirus Origin “Onion Skin”-Type DNA Replication at High E1 Protein Concentrations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Andres; Rünkorg, Kertu; Jaanson, Nele; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Ene

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the replication of plasmids composed of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) origin of replication and expression cartridges for viral proteins E1 and E2 in hamster and mouse cells. We found that the replication mode changed dramatically at different expression levels of the E1 protein. At high levels of the E1 protein, overreplication of the origin region of the plasmid was observed. Analysis of the replication products by one-dimensional and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis suggested that initially “onion skin”-type replication intermediates were generated, presumably resulting from initiation of the new replication forks before the leading fork completed the synthesis of the DNA on the episomal plasmid. These replication intermediates served as templates for generation of a heterogeneous set of origin region-containing linear fragments by displacement synthesis at the partially replicated plasmid. Additionally, the linear fragments may have been generated by DNA break-up of the onion skin-type intermediates. Analysis of replication products indicated that generated linear fragments recombined and formed concatemers or circular molecules, which presumably were able to replicate in an E1- and E2-dependent fashion. At moderate and low levels of E1, generated by transcription of the E1 open reading frame using weaker promoters, DNA replication was initiated at much lower levels, which allowed elongation of the replication fork starting from the origin to be more balanced and resulted in the generation of full-sized replication products. PMID:11992014

  6. The anti-estrogen tamoxifen blocks the stimulatory effects of interleukin-6 on 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Speirs, V; Adams, E F; White, M C

    1993-11-01

    Previous studies have revealed that human breast fibroblasts secrete the cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6) which stimulates the ability of MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells to convert estrone (E1) to the biologically more active 17 beta-estradiol (E2). This is mediated by an increase in reductive 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17-HSD) activity. In the studies described here, we have extended our observations using the anti-estrogen, tamoxifen, to demonstrate that in a steady state, endogenous intracellular concentrations of E2 have no effects on reductive 17-HSD activity (E1-->E2), but are already maximally inhibitory for the oxidative reaction (E2-->E1). Increasing intracellular concentrations of E2, however, stimulated the reductive 17-HSD in a dose-dependent manner. IL-6 stimulated the reductive pathway and was synergistic with E2. IL-6 is most likely acting through an E2-dependent mechanism, since tamoxifen completely reversed the effects of E2 and IL-6 separately and in combination. These observations suggest that tamoxifen may reduce intratissular levels of E2 by directly increasing oxidative 17-HSD activity and by blocking the actions of paracrine factors such as IL-6 which increase reductive 17-HSD activity.

  7. Tristetraprolin Represses Estrogen Receptor α Transactivation in Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Tecalco-Cruz, Angeles; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Meneses-Morales, Iván; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) mediates the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) in normal mammary gland, and it is a key participant in breast cancer tumor development. ERα transactivation activity is mediated by the synergistic interaction of two domains designated AF1 and AF2. The function of AF2 is to recruit coactivator and corepressor proteins that allow ERα to oscillate between the roles of transcriptional activator and repressor. In contrast, the mechanism responsible for AF-1 transcriptional activity is not completely understood. In this study, we identified tristetraproline (TTP) as a novel ERα-associated protein. TTP expression in MCF7 cells repressed ERα transactivation and reduced MCF7 cell proliferation and the ability of the cells to form tumors in a mouse model. We show that TTP transcriptional activity is mediated through its recruitment to the promoter region of ERα target genes and its interaction with histone deacetylases, in particular with HDAC1. TTP expression attenuates the coactivating activity of SRC-1, suggesting that exchange between TTP and other coactivators may play an important role in fine-tuning ERα transactivation. These results indicate that TTP acts as a bona fide ERα corepressor and suggest that this protein may be a contributing factor in the development of E2-dependent tumors in breast cancer. PMID:24737323

  8. Tristetraprolin represses estrogen receptor α transactivation in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Tecalco-Cruz, Angeles; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Meneses-Morales, Iván; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2014-05-30

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) mediates the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) in normal mammary gland, and it is a key participant in breast cancer tumor development. ERα transactivation activity is mediated by the synergistic interaction of two domains designated AF1 and AF2. The function of AF2 is to recruit coactivator and corepressor proteins that allow ERα to oscillate between the roles of transcriptional activator and repressor. In contrast, the mechanism responsible for AF-1 transcriptional activity is not completely understood. In this study, we identified tristetraproline (TTP) as a novel ERα-associated protein. TTP expression in MCF7 cells repressed ERα transactivation and reduced MCF7 cell proliferation and the ability of the cells to form tumors in a mouse model. We show that TTP transcriptional activity is mediated through its recruitment to the promoter region of ERα target genes and its interaction with histone deacetylases, in particular with HDAC1. TTP expression attenuates the coactivating activity of SRC-1, suggesting that exchange between TTP and other coactivators may play an important role in fine-tuning ERα transactivation. These results indicate that TTP acts as a bona fide ERα corepressor and suggest that this protein may be a contributing factor in the development of E2-dependent tumors in breast cancer.

  9. Co-transcriptional R-loops are the main cause of estrogen-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Caroline Townsend; Bocek, Michael; Crossley, Madzia P; Sollier, Julie; Sanz, Lionel A; Chédin, Frédéric; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2016-01-01

    The hormone estrogen (E2) binds the estrogen receptor to promote transcription of E2-responsive genes in the breast and other tissues. E2 also has links to genomic instability, and elevated E2 levels are tied to breast cancer. Here, we show that E2 stimulation causes a rapid, global increase in the formation of R-loops, co-transcriptional RNA-DNA products, which in some instances have been linked to DNA damage. We show that E2-dependent R-loop formation and breast cancer rearrangements are highly enriched at E2-responsive genomic loci and that E2 induces DNA replication-dependent double-strand breaks (DSBs). Strikingly, many DSBs that accumulate in response to E2 are R-loop dependent. Thus, R-loops resulting from the E2 transcriptional response are a significant source of DNA damage. This work reveals a novel mechanism by which E2 stimulation leads to genomic instability and highlights how transcriptional programs play an important role in shaping the genomic landscape of DNA damage susceptibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17548.001 PMID:27552054

  10. Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps (UBAITs) identify E3 ligase binding partners.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Hazel F; Lyon, Nancy; Leung, Justin W; Agarwal, Poonam; Swaim, Caleb D; Miller, Kyle M; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new class of reagents for identifying substrates, adaptors, and regulators of HECT and RING E3s. UBAITs (Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps) are E3-ubiquitin fusion proteins and, in an E1- and E2-dependent manner, the C-terminal ubiquitin moiety forms an amide linkage to proteins that interact with the E3, enabling covalent co-purification of the E3 with partner proteins. We designed UBAITs for both HECT (Rsp5, Itch) and RING (Psh1, RNF126, RNF168) E3s. For HECT E3s, trapping of interacting proteins occurred in vitro either through an E3 thioester-linked lariat intermediate or through an E2 thioester intermediate, and both WT and active-site mutant UBAITs trapped known interacting proteins in yeast and human cells. Yeast Psh1 and human RNF126 and RNF168 UBAITs also trapped known interacting proteins when expressed in cells. Human RNF168 is a key mediator of ubiquitin signaling that promotes DNA double-strand break repair. Using the RNF168 UBAIT, we identify H2AZ--a histone protein involved in DNA repair--as a new target of this E3 ligase. These results demonstrate that UBAITs represent powerful tools for profiling a wide range of ubiquitin ligases.

  11. ERG oncogene modulates prostaglandin signaling in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ahmed A; Tan, Shyh-Han; Sun, Chen; Shaheduzzaman, Syed; Hu, Ying; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Chen, Yongmei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Li, Hua; Sreenath, Taduru; McLeod, David G; Dobi, Albert; Srivastava, Shiv

    2011-02-15

    Androgen dependent induction of the ETS related gene (ERG) expression in more than half of all prostate cancers results from gene fusions involving regulatory sequence of androgen regulated genes (i.e. TMPRSS2, SLC45A3 and NDRG1) and protein coding sequence of the ERG. Emerging studies in experimental models underscore the functions of ERG in prostate tumorigenesis. However, biological and biochemical functions of ERG in prostate cancer (CaP) remain to be elucidated. This study suggests that ERG activation plays a role in prostaglandin signaling because knockdown of ERG expression in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion containing CaP cells leads to altered levels of the 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD), a tumor suppressor and prostaglandin catabolizing enzyme, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) . We demonstrate that HPGD expression is regulated by the binding of the ERG protein to the core promoter of this gene. Moreover, prostaglandin E2 dependent cell growth and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression are also affected by ERG knockdown. Together, these data imply that the ERG oncoprotein in CaP cells positively influence prostaglandin mediated signaling, which may contribute to tumor progression. PMID:21178489

  12. Tristetraprolin represses estrogen receptor α transactivation in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barrios-García, Tonatiuh; Tecalco-Cruz, Angeles; Gómez-Romero, Vania; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Meneses-Morales, Iván; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2014-05-30

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) mediates the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) in normal mammary gland, and it is a key participant in breast cancer tumor development. ERα transactivation activity is mediated by the synergistic interaction of two domains designated AF1 and AF2. The function of AF2 is to recruit coactivator and corepressor proteins that allow ERα to oscillate between the roles of transcriptional activator and repressor. In contrast, the mechanism responsible for AF-1 transcriptional activity is not completely understood. In this study, we identified tristetraproline (TTP) as a novel ERα-associated protein. TTP expression in MCF7 cells repressed ERα transactivation and reduced MCF7 cell proliferation and the ability of the cells to form tumors in a mouse model. We show that TTP transcriptional activity is mediated through its recruitment to the promoter region of ERα target genes and its interaction with histone deacetylases, in particular with HDAC1. TTP expression attenuates the coactivating activity of SRC-1, suggesting that exchange between TTP and other coactivators may play an important role in fine-tuning ERα transactivation. These results indicate that TTP acts as a bona fide ERα corepressor and suggest that this protein may be a contributing factor in the development of E2-dependent tumors in breast cancer. PMID:24737323

  13. Interleukin-1 stimulates the expression of type I and type II interleukin-1 receptors in the rat insulinoma cell line Rinm5F; sequencing a rat type II interleukin-1 receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Bristulf, J; Gatti, S; Malinowsky, D; Bjork, L; Sundgren, A K; Bartfai, T

    1994-01-01

    The insulin secreting rat Rinm5F cells are often used to study the cytotoxic actions of interleukin-1 (IL-1) on pancreatic beta-cells. We demonstrate here that Rinm5F insulinoma cells express both type I and type II interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) mRNAs and gene products. IL-1R agonists, recombinant murine IL-1 alpha (rmIL-1 alpha, 10 ng/ml) and recombinant rat IL-1 beta (rrIL-1 beta, 100 pg/ml or 10 ng/ml) induce the upregulation of mRNA expression for both types of IL-1 receptors (IL-1Rs). This effect of rrIL-1 beta is antagonised by preincubation with recombinant human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist protein (rhIL-1ra, 5 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, this rrIL-1 beta induced upregulation of IL-1R mRNAs is blocked by actinomycin D (7.5 micrograms/ml), whereas cycloheximide (20 micrograms/ml) has no effect. The phorbol ester PMA (20 nM) upregulates the expression of mRNAs both IL-1 receptors, whereas glucose (50 mM) upregulates the expression of the type I IL-1R mRNA only. Pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) partially blocks the rrIL-1 beta induced expression of mRNA for the type I and, to a lesser extent, the type II IL-1R. Incubation of the cells with rrIL-1 beta also induces a time-dependent expression of c-fos, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNAs. Binding studies with 125I-recombinant human IL-1 beta (125I-rhIL-1 beta) indicate that IL-1R gene products, with the ligand binding characteristics of the type I IL-1R, are constitutively present on Rinm5F cells. Treatment with rrIL-1 beta (6h) increases the number of 125I-rhIL-1 beta binding sites on Rinm5F cells. We have also demonstrated that the number of type II IL-1R binding sites increases after induction with rrIL-1 beta (6h), by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal antibody (ALVA 42) raised against the human type II IL-1R. Furthermore, we have sequenced the type II IL-1R cDNA in the rat insulinoma Rinm5F cells. The comparison of the amino acid

  14. BMP signalling in human fetal ovary somatic cells is modulated in a gene-specific fashion by GREM1 and GREM2

    PubMed Central

    Bayne, Rosemary A.; Donnachie, Douglas J.; Kinnell, Hazel L.; Childs, Andrew J.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do changes in the expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) 2 and 4, and their antagonists Gremlin1 (GREM1) and Gremlin2 (GREM2) during human fetal ovarian development impact on BMP pathway activity and lead to changes in gene expression that may influence the fate and/or function of ovarian somatic cells? STUDY FINDING BMPs 2 and 4 differentially regulate gene expression in cultured human fetal ovarian somatic cells. Expression of some, but not all BMP target genes is antagonised by GREM1 and GREM2, indicating the existence of a mechanism to fine-tune BMP signal intensity in the ovary. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), a marker of immature ovarian somatic cells, is identified as a novel transcriptional target of BMP4. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Extensive re-organisation of the germ and somatic cell populations in the feto-neonatal ovary culminates in the formation of primordial follicles, which provide the basis for a female's future fertility. BMP growth factors play important roles at many stages of ovarian development and function. GREM1, an extracellular antagonist of BMP signalling, regulates the timing of primordial follicle formation in the mouse ovary, and mRNA levels of BMP4 decrease while those of BMP2 increase prior to follicle formation in the human fetal ovary. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS Expression of genes encoding BMP pathway components, BMP antagonists and markers of ovarian somatic cells were determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR in human fetal ovaries (from 8 to 21 weeks gestation) and fetal ovary-derived somatic cell cultures. Ovarian expression of GREM1 protein was confirmed by immunoblotting. Primary human fetal ovarian somatic cell cultures were derived from disaggregated ovaries by differential adhesion and cultured in the presence of recombinant human BMP2 or BMP4, with or without the addition of GREM1 or GREM2. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE We demonstrate that the

  15. P2X purinoceptor-mediated excitation of trigeminal lingual nerve terminals in an in vitro intra-arterially perfused rat tongue preparation.

    PubMed

    Rong, W; Burnstock, G; Spyer, K M

    2000-05-01

    A novel in vitro intra-arterially perfused adult rat tongue-nerve preparation was used to explore the possible actions of P2X purinoceptor agonists (ATP and alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha, beta-meATP)) on sensory nerve terminals innervating the rat tongue. We made whole-nerve recordings of the trigeminal branch of the lingual nerve (LN), which conducts general sensory information (pain, temperature, touch, etc.), and the chorda tympani (CT), which conducts taste information. Changes in LN and CT activity following intra-arterial application of P2X agonists were compared. In seven preparations, bolus close-arterial injection of ATP (30-3000 microM, 0.1 ml) or alpha,beta-meATP (10-300 microM, 0.1 ml) induced a rapid (< 1 s after injection), dose-related increase in LN activity that decayed within a few seconds. The minimal concentration of ATP (100 microM) required to elicit a response was about 10-fold higher than that of alpha,beta-meATP (10 microM). Bolus injection of ATP or alpha,beta-meATP induced a moderate decrease in firing frequency in three of seven CT preparations. LN responses to P2X agonists showed signs of rapid desensitisation with the peak frequency of discharge being smaller when the agonists were applied at short intervals. Suramin (200 microM) or PPADS (200 microM) applied by intra-arterial perfusion each antagonised the rapid increase in LN activity following application of alpha,beta-meATP (100 microM). Capsaicin (10 microM, 0.1 ml, n = 5 preparations) was injected intra-arterially to desensitise nociceptive fibres. This was found to block (n = 2) or greatly reduce (n = 3) the excitatory effects of alpha,beta-meATP (100 microM, 0.1 ml) on LN activity, implying that only capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive fibres in LN were responsive to P2X agonists. In contrast to the consistent excitatory responses in LN activity following fast application of P2X agonists as bolus, a variable and moderate change in discharge rate of LN and no change in CT activity

  16. Estradiol-dependent catecholaminergic innervation of auditory areas in a seasonally breeding songbird.

    PubMed

    Matragrano, Lisa L; Sanford, Sara E; Salvante, Katrina G; Sockman, Keith W; Maney, Donna L

    2011-08-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that gonadal steroids such as estradiol (E2) alter neural responses not only in brain regions associated with reproductive behavior but also in sensory areas. Because catecholamine systems are involved in sensory processing and selective attention, and because they are sensitive to E2 in many species, they may mediate the neural effects of E2 in sensory areas. Here, we tested the effects of E2 on catecholaminergic innervation, synthesis and activity in the auditory system of white-throated sparrows, a seasonally breeding songbird in which E2 promotes selective auditory responses to song. Non-breeding females with regressed ovaries were held on a winter-like photoperiod and implanted with silastic capsules containing either no hormone or E2. In one hemisphere of the brain, we used immunohistochemistry to quantify fibers immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase or dopamine beta-hydroxylase in the auditory forebrain, thalamus and midbrain. E2 treatment increased catecholaminergic innervation in the same areas of the auditory system in which E2 promotes selectivity for song. In the contralateral hemisphere we quantified dopamine, norepinephrine and their metabolites in tissue punches using HPLC. Norepinephrine increased in the auditory forebrain, but not the midbrain, after E2 treatment. We found that evidence of interhemispheric differences, both in immunoreactivity and catecholamine content that did not depend on E2 treatment. Overall, our results show that increases in plasma E2 typical of the breeding season enhanced catecholaminergic innervation and synthesis in some parts of the auditory system, raising the possibility that catecholamines play a role in E2-dependent auditory plasticity in songbirds.

  17. Long-term estrogen exposure promotes carcinogen bioactivation, induces persistent changes in gene expression, and enhances the tumorigenicity of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Spink, Barbara C.; Bennett, James A.; Pentecost, Brian T.; Lostritto, Nicole; Englert, Neal A.; Benn, Geoffrey K.; Goodenough, Angela K.; Turesky, Robert J.; Spink, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The cumulative exposure to estrogens is an important determinant in the risk of breast cancer, yet the full range of mechanisms involving estrogens in the genesis and progression of breast cancer remains a subject of debate. Interactions of estrogens and environmental toxicants have received attention as putative factors contributing to carcinogenesis. Mechanistic studies have demonstrated interactions between estrogen receptor α (ERα) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), with consequences on the genes that they regulate. Many studies of ERα and AhR-mediated effects and crosstalk between them have focused on the initial molecular events. In this study, we investigated ERα- and AhR-mediated effects in long-term estrogen exposed (LTEE) MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, which were obtained by continuous culturing for at least 12 weeks in medium supplemented with 1 nM of 17β-estradiol (E2). With these LTEE cells and with parallel control cells cultured without E2 supplementation, we performed an extensive study of cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction, carcinogen bioactivation, global gene expression, and tumorigenicity in immunocompromised mice. We found that LTEE cells, in comparison with control cells, had higher levels of AhR mRNA and protein, greater responsiveness for AhR-regulated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 induction, a 6-fold higher initial level of benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adducts as determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, marked differences in the expression of numerous genes, and a higher rate of E2-dependent tumor growth as xenografts. These studies indicate that LTEE causes adaptive responses in MCF-7 cells, which may reflect processes that contribute to the overall carcinogenic effect of E2. PMID:19619570

  18. Modulation of 17β-Estradiol Signaling on Cellular Proliferation by Caveolin-2.

    PubMed

    Totta, Pierangela; Gionfra, Fabio; Busonero, Claudia; Acconcia, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    The sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) exerts pleiotropic effects by binding to the ligand-activated transcription factor estrogen receptor α (ERα). The E2:ERα complex regulates several physiological processes, including cell survival and proliferation, through transcriptional effects (i.e., estrogen responsive element [ERE]-based gene transcription) and non-transcriptional membrane-initiated effects (i.e., the activation of extra-nuclear signaling cascades), which derive from the activation of the pool of ERα that is localized to plasma membrane caveolae. Caveolae are ω-shaped membrane sub-domains that are composed of scaffold proteins named caveolins (i.e., caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and caveolin-3). Although caveolin-3 is exclusively expressed in muscles, caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 are co-expressed in all human tissues. From a functional point of view, caveolin-2 can operate both dependently on and independently of caveolin-1, which is the main coat component of caveolae. Interestingly, while a functional interplay between caveolin-1 and ERα has been reported in the control of E2-induced physiological effects, the role of caveolin-2 in E2:ERα signaling within the cell remains poorly understood. This study shows that siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion in breast ductal carcinoma cells (MCF-7) reduces E2-induced ERα phosphorylation at serine residue 118 (S118), controls intracellular receptor levels, precludes ERα-mediated extra-nuclear activation of signaling pathways, reduces ERα transcriptional activity, and prevents cellular proliferation. Meanwhile, the impact of caveolin-1 depletion on ERα signaling in MCF-7 cells is shown to be similar to that elicited by siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion. Altogether, these data demonstrate that caveolin-2 expression is necessary for the control of E2-dependent cellular proliferation. PMID:26480297

  19. Mutation of the palmitoylation site of estrogen receptor α in vivo reveals tissue-specific roles for membrane versus nuclear actions

    PubMed Central

    Adlanmerini, Marine; Solinhac, Romain; Abot, Anne; Fabre, Aurélie; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Guihot, Anne-Laure; Boudou, Frédéric; Sautier, Lucile; Vessières, Emilie; Kim, Sung Hoon; Lière, Philippe; Fontaine, Coralie; Krust, Andrée; Chambon, Pierre; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Gourdy, Pierre; Shaul, Philip W.; Henrion, Daniel; Arnal, Jean-François; Lenfant, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) activation functions AF-1 and AF-2 classically mediate gene transcription in response to estradiol (E2). A fraction of ERα is targeted to plasma membrane and elicits membrane-initiated steroid signaling (MISS), but the physiological roles of MISS in vivo are poorly understood. We therefore generated a mouse with a point mutation of the palmitoylation site of ERα (C451A-ERα) to obtain membrane-specific loss of function of ERα. The abrogation of membrane localization of ERα in vivo was confirmed in primary hepatocytes, and it resulted in female infertility with abnormal ovaries lacking corpora lutea and increase in luteinizing hormone levels. In contrast, E2 action in the uterus was preserved in C451A-ERα mice and endometrial epithelial proliferation was similar to wild type. However, E2 vascular actions such as rapid dilatation, acceleration of endothelial repair, and endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation were abrogated in C451A-ERα mice. A complementary mutant mouse lacking the transactivation function AF-2 of ERα (ERα-AF20) provided selective loss of function of nuclear ERα actions. In ERα-AF20, the acceleration of endothelial repair in response to estrogen–dendrimer conjugate, which is a membrane-selective ER ligand, was unaltered, demonstrating integrity of MISS actions. In genome-wide analysis of uterine gene expression, the vast majority of E2-dependent gene regulation was abrogated in ERα-AF20, whereas in C451A-ERα it was nearly fully preserved, indicating that membrane-to-nuclear receptor cross-talk in vivo is modest in the uterus. Thus, this work genetically segregated membrane versus nuclear actions of a steroid hormone receptor and demonstrated their in vivo tissue-specific roles. PMID:24371309

  20. Neuroglobin, a pro-survival player in estrogen receptor α-positive cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiocchetti, M; Nuzzo, M T; Totta, P; Acconcia, F; Ascenzi, P; Marino, M

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we reported that human neuroglobin (NGB) is a new player in the signal transduction pathways that lead to 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced neuron survival. Indeed, E2 induces in neuron mitochondria the enhancement of NGB level, which in turn impairs the activation of a pro-apoptotic cascade. Nowadays, the existence of a similar pathway activated by E2 in non-neuronal cells is completely unknown. Here, the role of E2-induced NGB upregulation in tumor cells is reported. E2 induced the upregulation of NGB in a dose- and time-dependent manner in MCF-7, HepG2, SK-N-BE, and HeLa cells transfected with estrogen receptor α (ERα), whereas E2 was unable to modulate the NGB expression in the ERα-devoid HeLa cells. Both transcriptional and extranuclear ERα signals were required for the E2-dependent upregulation of NGB in MCF-7 and HepG2 cell lines. E2 stimulation modified NGB intracellular localization, inducing a significant reduction of NGB in the nucleus with a parallel increase of NGB in the mitochondria in both HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. Remarkably, E2 pretreatment did not counteract the H2O2-induced caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) cleavage, as well as Bcl-2 overexpression in MCF-7 and HepG2 cells in which NGB was stably silenced by using shRNA lentiviral particles, highlighting the pivotal role of NGB in E2-induced antiapoptotic pathways in cancer cells. Present results indicate that the E2-induced NGB upregulation in cancer cells could represent a defense mechanism of E2-related cancers rendering them insensitive to oxidative stress. As a whole, these data open new avenues to develop therapeutic strategies against E2-related cancers. PMID:25299774

  1. Modeling the Cellular Mechanisms and Olfactory Input Underlying the Triphasic Response of Moth Pheromone-Sensitive Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuqiao

    2015-01-01

    In the antennal lobe of the noctuid moth Agrotis ipsilon, most pheromone-sensitive projection neurons (PNs) exhibit a triphasic firing pattern of excitation (E1)-inhibition (I)-excitation (E2) in response to a pulse of the sex pheromone. To understand the mechanisms underlying this stereotypical discharge, we developed a biophysical model of a PN receiving inputs from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) via nicotinic cholinergic synapses. The ORN is modeled as an inhomogeneous Poisson process whose firing rate is a function of time and is fitted to extracellular data recorded in response to pheromone stimulations at various concentrations and durations. The PN model is based on the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism with realistic ionic currents whose parameters were derived from previous studies. Simulations revealed that the inhibitory phase I can be produced by a SK current (Ca2+-gated small conductance K+ current) and that the excitatory phase E2 can result from the long-lasting response of the ORNs. Parameter analysis further revealed that the ending time of E1 depends on some parameters of SK, Ca2+, nACh and Na+ currents; I duration mainly depends on the time constant of intracellular Ca2+ dynamics, conductance of Ca2+ currents and some parameters of nACh currents; The mean firing frequency of E1 and E2 depends differentially on the interaction of various currents. Thus it is likely that the interplay between PN intrinsic currents and feedforward synaptic currents are sufficient to generate the triphasic firing patterns observed in the noctuid moth A. ipsilon. PMID:25962173

  2. Activation of GPER-1 Estradiol Receptor Downregulates Production of Testosterone in Isolated Rat Leydig Cells and Adult Human Testis

    PubMed Central

    Vaucher, Laurent; Funaro, Michael G.; Mehta, Akanksha; Mielnik, Anna; Bolyakov, Alexander; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Schlegel, Peter N.; Paduch, Darius A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Estradiol (E2) modulates testicular functions including steroidogenesis, but the mechanisms of E2 signaling in human testis are poorly understood. GPER-1 (GPR30), a G protein-coupled membrane receptor, mediates rapid genomic and non-genomic response to estrogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate GPER-1 expression in the testis, and its role in estradiol dependent regulation of steroidogenesis in isolated rat Leydig cells and human testis. Materials and Methods Isolated Leydig cells (LC) from adult rats and human testicular tissue were used in this study. Expression and localization studies of GPER-1 were performed with qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. Luteinizing Hormone (LH) -stimulated, isolated LC were incubated with estradiol, G-1 (GPER-1-selective agonist), and estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Testosterone production was measured with radioimmunoassay. LC viability after incubation with G-1 was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) assay. Results GPER-1 mRNA is abundantly expressed in rat LC and human testis. Co-localization experiments showed high expression levels of GPER-1 protein in LC. E2-dependent activation of GPER-1 lowers testosterone production in isolated rats LCs and in human testis, with statistically and clinically significant drops in testosterone production by 20–30% as compared to estradiol-naïve LC. The exposure to G-1 does not affect viability of isolated LCs. Conclusions Our results indicate that activation of GPER-1 lowers testosterone levels in the rat and human testis. The expression of GPER-1 in human testis, which lack ERα, makes it an exciting target for developing new agents affecting testosterone production in men. PMID:24736568

  3. Structural explanation of the rheology of a colloidal suspension under high dc electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espín, Manuel J.; Delgado, Ángel V.; González-Caballero, Fernando

    2006-04-01

    In this work we describe the electrorheology of suspensions consisting of hematite (α-Fe2O3) particles dispersed in silicone oil in the presence of large dc electric fields. If an electric field pulse is applied to the systems, it is possible to estimate the time that the electrorheological (ER) fluid takes to reach its final microstructure in the presence of the field. Our results indicate that response times of several seconds are typical, and that this time decreases with the field strength. Conventional shear-rate sweeps indicate the existence of a well-defined dynamic yield stress and a shear-thinning behavior. Interestingly, both the yield stress and the shear-thinning slope a [relating the viscosity, η , and the shear rate, γ˙ , as η=aγ˙-b+η(∞) ] show a linear dependence on the field strength, E , in disagreement with the E2 dependence often reported. This deviation is associated with changes in the conductivity of the dispersion medium with the field strength. A simple calculation of the interactions present in our ER fluid demonstrates that the ER behavior is entirely controlled by hydrodynamic (∝γ˙) and electrical forces (∝E) . This is confirmed by the collapse of all experimental results in a single master curve when the relative viscosity is plotted against the ratio γ˙/E . Careful attention has been paid in this work to the microstructure of the suspensions in the presence of both shear and electric fields simultaneously: the particles gather themselves on the walls of the electrorheological measurement cell, forming aggregates with cylindrical symmetry, shaped as rings or lamellas of solids. The electric field induced increase in viscosity is the consequence of the balance between two actions: that of the electric field, tending to keep particles together, and that of the shear field, forcing the flow of the liquid phase in the regions between rings or between rings and walls.

  4. The membrane estrogen receptor ligand STX rapidly enhances GABAergic signaling in NPY/AgRP neurons: role in mediating the anorexigenic effects of 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Smith, A W; Bosch, M A; Wagner, E J; Rønnekleiv, O K; Kelly, M J

    2013-09-01

    Besides its quintessential role in reproduction, 17β-estradiol (E2) is a potent anorexigenic hormone. E2 and the selective Gq-coupled membrane estrogen receptor (Gq-mER) ligand STX rapidly increase membrane excitability in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons by desensitizing the coupling of GABAB receptors to G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRKs), which upon activation elicit a hyperpolarizing outward current. However, it is unknown whether E2 and STX can modulate GABAB signaling in neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons. We used single-cell RT-PCR and whole cell patch clamping with selective pharmacological reagents to show that NPY/AgRP cells of mice express the GABAB-R1 and -R2 receptors and are hyperpolarized by the GABAB agonist baclofen in an E2-dependent manner. In males, E2 rapidly attenuated the coupling of GABAB receptors to GIRKs, which was blocked by the general PI3K inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002 or the selective p110β subunit inhibitor TGX-221. The ERα-selective agonist propyl pyrazole triol mimicked the effects of E2. STX, in contrast, enhanced the GABAB response in males, which was abrogated by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780. In gonadectomized mice of both sexes, E2 enhanced or attenuated the GABAB response in different NPY/AgRP cells. Coperfusing wortmannin with E2 or simply applying STX always enhanced the GABAB response. Thus, in NPY/AgRP neurons, activation of the Gq-mER by E2 or STX enhances the GABAergic postsynaptic response, whereas activation of ERα by E2 attenuates it. These findings demonstrate a clear functional dichotomy of rapid E2 membrane-initiated signaling via ERα vs. Gq-mER in a CNS neuron vital for regulating energy homeostasis.

  5. Novel selective estrogen mimics for the treatment of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Mary Ellen; White, Bethany E Perez; Gherezghiher, Teshome; Michalsen, Bradley T; Xiong, Rui; Patel, Hitisha; Zhao, Huiping; Maximov, Philipp Y; Jordan, V Craig; Thatcher, Gregory R J; Tonetti, Debra A

    2014-11-01

    Endocrine-resistant breast cancer is a major clinical obstacle. The use of 17β-estradiol (E2) has reemerged as a potential treatment option following exhaustive use of tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, although side effects have hindered its clinical usage. Protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) expression was shown to be a predictor of disease outcome for patients receiving endocrine therapy and may predict a positive response to an estrogenic treatment. Here, we have investigated the use of novel benzothiophene selective estrogen mimics (SEM) as an alternative to E2 for the treatment of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. Following in vitro characterization of SEMs, a panel of clinically relevant PKCα-expressing, tamoxifen-resistant models were used to investigate the antitumor effects of these compounds. SEM treatment resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis of tamoxifen-resistant cell lines in vitro. In vivo SEM treatment induced tumor regression of tamoxifen-resistant T47D:A18/PKCα and T47D:A18-TAM1 tumor models. T47D:A18/PKCα tumor regression was accompanied by translocation of estrogen receptor (ER) α to extranuclear sites, possibly defining a mechanism through which these SEMs initiate tumor regression. SEM treatment did not stimulate growth of E2-dependent T47D:A18/neo tumors. In addition, unlike E2 or tamoxifen, treatment with SEMs did not stimulate uterine weight gain. These findings suggest the further development of SEMs as a feasible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of endocrine-resistant breast cancer without the side effects associated with E2.

  6. Inhibition of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication by an E1-Derived p80/UAF1-Binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G.

    2012-01-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target. PMID:22278251

  7. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by an E1-derived p80/UAF1-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Archambault, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target. PMID:22278251

  8. Cyr61 promotes breast tumorigenesis and cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Bogart, Daphne F.; Castaneda, Jessica M.; Li, Patricia; Lupu, Ruth

    2002-01-16

    Cyr61, a member of the CCN family of genes, is an angiogenic factor. We have shown that it is overexpressed in invasive and metastatic human breast cancer cells and tissues. Here, we investigated whether Cyr61 is necessary and/or sufficient to bypass the ''normal'' estrogen (E2) requirements for breast cancer cell growth. Our results demonstrate that under E2-depleted condition, Cyr61 is sufficient to induce MCF-7 cells grow in the absence of E2. MCF-7 cells transfected with Cyr61 (MCF-7/Cyr61) became E2-independent but still E2-responsive. On the other hand, MCF-7/vector cells remain E2-dependent. MCF-7/Cyr61 cells acquire an antiestrogen-resistant phenotype, one of the most common clinical occurrences during breast cancer progression. MCF-7/Cyr61 cells are anchorage-independent and capable of forming Matrigel outgrowth patterns in the absence of E2. ERa expression in MCF-7/Cyr61 cells is decreased although still functional. Additionally, MCF-7/Cyr61 cells are tumorigenic in ovariectomized athymic nude mice. The tumors resemble human invasive carcinomas with increased vascularization and overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our results demonstrate that Cyr61 is a tumor-promoting factor and a key regulator of breast cancer progression. This study provides evidence that Cyr61 is sufficient to induce E2-independence and anti-E2 resistance, and to promote invasiveness in vitro, and to induce tumorigenesis in vivo, all of which are characteristics of an aggressive breast cancer phenotype.

  9. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by an E1-derived p80/UAF1-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Archambault, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target.

  10. Activation of protein synthesis in mouse uterine epithelial cells by estradiol-17β is mediated by a PKC-ERK1/2-mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Zhu, Liyin; Kuokkanen, Satu; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-17

    The uterine epithelium of mice and humans undergoes cyclical waves of cell proliferation and differentiation under the regulation of estradiol-17β (E2) and progesterone (P4). These epithelial cells respond to E2 with increased protein and DNA synthesis, whereas P4 inhibits only the E2-induced DNA synthetic response. Here we show that E2 regulates protein synthesis in these epithelial cells through activating PKC that in turn stimulates ERK1/2 to phosphorylate and thereby activate the central regulator of protein synthesis mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). This mTOR pathway is not inhibited by P4. Inhibitor studies with an estrogen receptor (ESR1) antagonist showed the dependence of this mTOR pathway on ESR1 but that once activated, a phosphorylation cascade independent of ESR1 propagates the pathway. E2 also stimulates an IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) to PI3 kinase to AKT to GSK-3β pathway required for activation of the canonical cell cycle machinery that is inhibited by P4. PKC activation did not stimulate this pathway nor does inhibition of PKC or ERK1/2 affect it. These studies therefore indicate a mechanism whereby DNA and protein synthesis are regulated by two ESR1-activated pathways that run in parallel with only the one responsible for the initiation of DNA synthesis blocked by P4. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin in vivo resulted in inhibition of E2-induced protein and DNA synthesis. Proliferative diseases of the endometrium such as endometriosis and cancer are common and E2 dependent. Thus, defining this mTOR pathway suggests that local (intrauterine or peritoneal) rapamycin administration might be a therapeutic option for these diseases.

  11. Non-invasive administration of 17β-estradiol rapidly increases aggressive behavior in non-breeding, but not breeding, male song sparrows.

    PubMed

    Heimovics, Sarah A; Ferris, Jennifer K; Soma, Kiran K

    2015-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) acts in the brain via genomic and non-genomic mechanisms to influence physiology and behavior. There is seasonal plasticity in the mechanisms by which E2 activates aggression, and non-genomic mechanisms appear to predominate during the non-breeding season. Male song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) display E2-dependent territorial aggression throughout the year. Field studies show that song sparrow aggression during a territorial intrusion is similar in the non-breeding and breeding seasons, but aggression after an intrusion ends differs seasonally. Non-breeding males stop behaving aggressively within minutes whereas breeding males remain aggressive for hours. We hypothesize that this seasonal plasticity in the persistence of aggression relates to seasonal plasticity in E2 signaling. We used a non-invasive route of E2 administration to compare the non-genomic (within 20min) effects of E2 on aggressive behavior in captive non-breeding and breeding season males. E2 rapidly increased barrier contacts (attacks) during an intrusion by 173% in non-breeding season males only. Given that these effects were observed within 20min of E2 administration, they likely occurred via a non-genomic mechanism of action. The present data, taken together with past work, suggest that environmental cues associated with the non-breeding season influence the molecular mechanisms through which E2 influences behavior. In song sparrows, transient expression of aggressive behavior during the non-breeding season is highly adaptive: it minimizes energy expenditure and maximizes the amount of time available for foraging. In all, these data suggest the intriguing possibility that aggression in the non-breeding season may be activated by a non-genomic E2 mechanism due to the fitness benefits associated with rapid and transient expression of aggression.

  12. Gender difference in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to alcohol in the rat: activational role of gonadal steroids.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, K M; Rivier, C

    1997-08-22

    administered 3 h before brains were collected. In intact males, alcohol treatment elevated levels of both CRF and AVP mRNAs in the PVN, as previously reported. In contrast, this treatment decreased CRF mRNA in castrated males implanted with E2. In addition, steroid pretreatment alone elevated CRF mRNA levels in castrated males. Although we did not observe E2-dependent increases in CRF or AVP mRNAs, our data do support a complex effect of gonadal steroids on expression of these mRNAs in the PVN.

  13. Sex Differences in Molecular Signaling at Inhibitory Synapses in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Tabatadze, Nino; Huang, Guangzhe; May, Renee M.; Jain, Anant

    2015-01-01

    The possibility that mechanisms of synaptic modulation differ between males and females has far-reaching implications for understanding brain disorders that vary between the sexes. We found recently that 17β-estradiol (E2) acutely suppresses GABAergic inhibition in the hippocampus of female rats through a sex-specific estrogen receptor α (ERα), mGluR, and endocannabinoid-dependent mechanism. Here, we define the intracellular signaling that links ERα, mGluRs, and endocannabinoids in females and identify where in this pathway males and females differ. Using a combination of whole-cell patch-clamp recording and biochemical analyses in hippocampal slices from young adult rats, we show that E2 acutely suppresses inhibition in females through mGluR1 stimulation of phospholipase C, leading to inositol triphosphate (IP3) generation, activation of the IP3 receptor (IP3R), and postsynaptic endocannabinoid release, likely of anandamide. Analysis of sex differences in this pathway showed that E2 stimulates a much greater increase in IP3 levels in females than males, whereas the group I mGluR agonist DHPG increases IP3 levels equivalently in each sex. Coimmunoprecipitation showed that ERα–mGluR1 and mGluR1–IP3R complexes exist in both sexes but are regulated by E2 only in females. Independently of E2, a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, which blocks breakdown of anandamide, suppressed >50% of inhibitory synapses in females with no effect in males, indicating tonic endocannabinoid release in females that is absent in males. Together, these studies demonstrate sex differences in both E2-dependent and E2-independent regulation of the endocannabinoid system and suggest that manipulation of endocannabinoids in vivo could affect physiological and behavioral responses differently in each sex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many brain disorders vary between the sexes, yet the degree to which this variation arises from differential experience versus intrinsic biological sex

  14. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and estrogen receptor alpha differentially modulate nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 transactivation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Raymond; Matthews, Jason

    2013-07-15

    Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2; NFE2L2) plays an important role in mediating cellular protection against reactive oxygen species. NRF2 signaling is positively modulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) but inhibited by estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). In this study we investigated the crosstalk among NRF2, AHR and ERα in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with the NRF2 activator sulforaphane (SFN), a dual AHR and ERα activator, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or 17β-estradiol (E2). SFN-dependent increases in NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase I (HMOX1) mRNA levels were significantly reduced after co-treatment with E2. E2-dependent repression of NQO1 and HMOX1 was associated with increased ERα but reduced p300 recruitment and reduced histone H3 acetylation at both genes. In contrast, DIM + SFN or TCDD + SFN induced NQO1 and HMOX1 mRNA expression to levels higher than SFN alone, which was prevented by RNAi-mediated knockdown of AHR. DIM + SFN but not TCDD + SFN also induced recruitment of ERα to NQO1 and HMOX1. However, the presence of AHR at NQO1 and HMOX1 restored p300 recruitment and histone H3 acetylation, thereby reversing the ERα-dependent repression of NRF2. Taken together, our study provides further evidence of functional interplay among NRF2, AHR and ERα signaling pathways through altered p300 recruitment to NRF2-regulated target genes. - Highlights: • We examined crosstalk among ERα, AHR, and NRF2 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. • AHR enhanced the mRNA expression levels of two NRF2 target genes – HMOX1 and NQO1. • ERα repressed HMOX1 and NQO1 expression via decreased histone acetylation. • AHR prevented ERα-dependent repression of HMOX1 and NQO1.

  15. Mechanism of genomic instability in cells infected with the high-risk human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Kadaja, Meelis; Isok-Paas, Helen; Laos, Triin; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2009-04-01

    In HPV-related cancers, the "high-risk" human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are frequently found integrated into the cellular genome. The integrated subgenomic HPV fragments express viral oncoproteins and carry an origin of DNA replication that is capable of initiating bidirectional DNA re-replication in the presence of HPV replication proteins E1 and E2, which ultimately leads to rearrangements within the locus of the integrated viral DNA. The current study indicates that the E1- and E2-dependent DNA replication from the integrated HPV origin follows the "onion skin"-type replication mode and generates a heterogeneous population of replication intermediates. These include linear, branched, open circular, and supercoiled plasmids, as identified by two-dimensional neutral-neutral gel-electrophoresis. We used immunofluorescence analysis to show that the DNA repair/recombination centers are assembled at the sites of the integrated HPV replication. These centers recruit viral and cellular replication proteins, the MRE complex, Ku70/80, ATM, Chk2, and, to some extent, ATRIP and Chk1 (S317). In addition, the synthesis of histone gammaH2AX, which is a hallmark of DNA double strand breaks, is induced, and Chk2 is activated by phosphorylation in the HPV-replicating cells. These changes suggest that the integrated HPV replication intermediates are processed by the activated cellular DNA repair/recombination machinery, which results in cross-chromosomal translocations as detected by metaphase FISH. We also confirmed that the replicating HPV episomes that expressed the physiological levels of viral replication proteins could induce genomic instability in the cells with integrated HPV. We conclude that the HPV replication origin within the host chromosome is one of the key factors that triggers the development of HPV-associated cancers. It could be used as a starting point for the "onion skin"-type of DNA replication whenever the HPV plasmid exists in the same cell, which endangers

  16. Molecular mechanisms that drive estradiol-dependent burst firing of Kiss1 neurons in the rostral periventricular preoptic area.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunguang; Tonsfeldt, Karen J; Qiu, Jian; Bosch, Martha A; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Steiner, Robert A; Kelly, Martin J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K

    2013-12-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons in the rostral periventricular area of the third ventricle (RP3V) provide excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to control fertility. Using whole cell patch clamp recording and single-cell (sc)RT-PCR techniques targeting Kiss1-CreGFP or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-EGFP neurons, we characterized the biophysical properties of these neurons and identified the critical intrinsic properties required for burst firing in 17β-estradiol (E2)-treated, ovariectomized female mice. One-fourth of the RP3V Kiss1 neurons exhibited spontaneous burst firing. RP3V Kiss1 neurons expressed a hyperpolarization-activated h-current (Ih) and a T-type calcium current (IT), which supported hyperpolarization-induced rebound burst firing. Under voltage clamp conditions, all Kiss1 neurons expressed a kinetically fast Ih that was augmented 3.4-fold by high (LH surge-producing)-E2 treatment. scPCR analysis of Kiss1 neurons revealed abundant expression of the HCN1 channel transcripts. Kiss1 neurons also expressed a Ni(2+)- and TTA-P2-sensitive IT that was augmented sixfold with high-E2 treatment. CaV3.1 mRNA was also highly expressed in these cells. Current clamp analysis revealed that rebound burst firing was induced in RP3V Kiss1 neurons in high-E2-treated animals, and the majority of Kiss1 neurons had a hyperpolarization threshold of -84.7 mV, which corresponded to the V½ for IT de-inactivation. Finally, Kiss1 neurons in the RP3V were hyperpolarized by μ- and κ-opioid and GABAB receptor agonists, suggesting that these pathways also contribute to rebound burst firing. Therefore, Kiss1 neurons in the RP3V express the critical channels and receptors that permit E2-dependent rebound burst firing and provide the biophysical substrate that drives the preovulatory surge of GnRH.

  17. Mechanism of Genomic Instability in Cells Infected with the High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kadaja, Meelis; Isok-Paas, Helen; Laos, Triin; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2009-01-01

    In HPV–related cancers, the “high-risk” human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are frequently found integrated into the cellular genome. The integrated subgenomic HPV fragments express viral oncoproteins and carry an origin of DNA replication that is capable of initiating bidirectional DNA re-replication in the presence of HPV replication proteins E1 and E2, which ultimately leads to rearrangements within the locus of the integrated viral DNA. The current study indicates that the E1- and E2-dependent DNA replication from the integrated HPV origin follows the “onion skin”–type replication mode and generates a heterogeneous population of replication intermediates. These include linear, branched, open circular, and supercoiled plasmids, as identified by two-dimensional neutral-neutral gel-electrophoresis. We used immunofluorescence analysis to show that the DNA repair/recombination centers are assembled at the sites of the integrated HPV replication. These centers recruit viral and cellular replication proteins, the MRE complex, Ku70/80, ATM, Chk2, and, to some extent, ATRIP and Chk1 (S317). In addition, the synthesis of histone γH2AX, which is a hallmark of DNA double strand breaks, is induced, and Chk2 is activated by phosphorylation in the HPV–replicating cells. These changes suggest that the integrated HPV replication intermediates are processed by the activated cellular DNA repair/recombination machinery, which results in cross-chromosomal translocations as detected by metaphase FISH. We also confirmed that the replicating HPV episomes that expressed the physiological levels of viral replication proteins could induce genomic instability in the cells with integrated HPV. We conclude that the HPV replication origin within the host chromosome is one of the key factors that triggers the development of HPV–associated cancers. It could be used as a starting point for the “onion skin”–type of DNA replication whenever the HPV plasmid exists in the same cell

  18. 17 beta-estradiol-BSA conjugates and 17 beta-estradiol regulate growth plate chondrocytes by common membrane associated mechanisms involving PKC dependent and independent signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Sylvia, V L; Walton, J; Lopez, D; Dean, D D; Boyan, B D; Schwartz, Z

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear receptors for 17 beta-estradiol (E(2)) are present in growth plate chondrocytes from both male and female rats and regulation of chondrocytes through these receptors has been studied for many years; however, recent studies indicate that an alternative pathway involving a membrane receptor may also be involved in the cell response. E(2) was found to directly affect the fluidity of chondrocyte membranes derived from female, but not male, rats. In addition, E(2) activates protein kinase C (PKC) in a nongenomic manner in female cells, and chelerythrine, a specific inhibitor of PKC, inhibits E(2)-dependent alkaline phosphatase activity and proteoglycan sulfation in these cells, indicating PKC is involved in the signal transduction mechanism. The aims of the present study were: (1) to examine the effect of a cell membrane-impermeable 17 beta-estradiol-bovine serum albumin conjugate (E(2)-BSA) on chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and matrix synthesis; (2) to determine the pathway that mediates the membrane effect of E(2)-BSA on PKC; and (3) to compare the action of E(2)-BSA to that of E(2). Confluent, fourth passage resting zone (RC) and growth zone (GC) chondrocytes from female rat costochondral cartilage were treated with 10(-9) to 10(-7) M E(2) or E(2)-BSA and changes in alkaline phosphatase specific activity, proteoglycan sulfation, and [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation measured. To examine the pathway of PKC activation, chondrocyte cultures were treated with E(2)-BSA in the presence or absence of GDP beta S (inhibitor of G-proteins), GTP gamma S (activator of G-proteins), U73122 or D609 (inhibitors of phospholipase C [PLC]), wortmannin (inhibitor of phospholipase D [PLD]) or LY294002 (inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase). E(2)-BSA mimicked the effects of E(2) on alkaline phosphatase specific activity and proteoglycan sulfation, causing dose-dependent increases in both RC and GC cell cultures. Both forms of estradiol inhibited [(3)H