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Sample records for idp signature processing

  1. NPOESS Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. J.; Grant, K. D.; Bergeron, C.

    2008-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The NPOESS design allows centralized mission management and delivers high quality environmental products to military, civil and scientific users. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. IDPS will process environmental data products beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and continuing through the lifetime of the NPOESS system. Within the overall NPOESS processing environment, the IDPS must process a data volume several orders of magnitude the size of current systems -- in one-quarter of the time. Further, it must support the calibration, validation, and data quality improvement initiatives of the NPOESS program to ensure the production of atmospheric and environmental products that meet strict requirements for accuracy and precision. This poster will illustrate and describe the IDPS HW architecture that is necessary to meet these challenging design requirements. In addition, it will illustrate the expandability features of the architecture in support of future data processing and data distribution needs.

  2. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) may be the best preserved remnants of primordial solar system materials, in part because they were not affected by parent body hydrothermal alteration. Their primitive characteristics include fine grained, unequilibrated, anhydrous mineralogy, enrichment in volatile elements, and abundant molecular cloud material and silicate stardust. However, while the majority of CP-IDP materials likely derived from the Solar System, their formation processes and provenance are poorly constrained. Stardust abundances provide a relative measure of the extent of processing that the Solar System starting materials has undergone in primitive materials. For example, among primitive meteorites silicate stardust abundances vary by over two orders of magnitude (less than 10-200 ppm). This range of abundances is ascribed to varying extents of aqueous processing in the meteorite parent bodies. The higher average silicate stardust abundances among CP-IDPs (greater than 375 ppm) are thus attributable to the lack of aqueous processing of these materials. Yet, silicate stardust abundances in IDPs also vary considerably. While the silicate stardust abundance in IDPs having anomalous N isotopic compositions was reported to be 375 ppm, the abundance in IDPs lacking N anomalies is less than 10 ppm. Furthermore, these values are significantly eclipsed among some IDPs with abundances ranging from 2,000 ppm to 10,000 ppm. Given that CP-IDPs have not been significantly affected by parent body processes, the difference in silicate stardust abundances among these IDPs must reflect varying extents of nebular processing. Here we present recent results of a systematic coordinated mineralogical/isotopic study of large cluster IDPs aimed at (1) characterizing the mineralogy of presolar silicates and (2) delineating the mineralogical and petrographic characteristics of IDPs with differing silicate stardust abundances. One of the goals of this study is

  3. IDP: Image and data processing (software) in C++

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S.

    1994-11-15

    IDP++(Image and Data Processing in C++) is a complied, multidimensional, multi-data type, signal processing environment written in C++. It is being developed within the Radar Ocean Imaging group and is intended as a partial replacement for View. IDP++ takes advantage of the latest object-oriented compiler technology to provide `information hiding.` Users need only know C, not C++. Signals are treated like any other variable with a defined set of operators and functions in an intuitive manner. IDP++ is being designed for real-time environment where interpreted signal processing packages are less efficient.

  4. IDP++: signal and image processing algorithms in C++ version 4.1

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S.K.

    1996-11-01

    IDP++ (Image and Data Processing in C++) is a collection of signal and image processing algorithms written in C++. It is a compiled signal processing environment which supports four data types of up to four dimensions. It is developed within Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Image and Data Processing group as a partial replacement for View. IDP ++ takes advantage of the latest, implemented and actually working, object-oriented compiler technology to provide `information hiding.` Users need only know C, not C++. Signals are treated like any other variable with a defined set of operators and functions in an intuitive manner. IDP++ is designed for real-time environment where interpreted processing packages are less efficient. IDP++ exists for both SUNs and Silicon Graphics using their most current compilers.

  5. NPOESS IDPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, J.; Ripley, M.

    2009-12-01

    NPOESS, the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System, represents the U.S., next generation, polar-orbiting, Low-Earth-Orbit [LEO] satellite constellation and end-to-end system for environmental remote sensing. The NPOESS program is comprised of the spacecraft, instruments and sensors on the spacecraft, the command, control and communications infrastructure, data processing software and hardware, and launch support capabilities. The NPOESS program also includes the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP), a risk reduction mission managed jointly by the NPOESS Integrated Program Office (IPO) and NASA. It provides an opportunity for NPOESS to demonstrate and validate new sensors, algorithms, and operational processing capabilities, and to test many components of the system prior to the first NPOESS flight. NPP also provides continuity between the current Earth Observing System (EOS) and NPOESS for select remotely sensed data that support global climate studies and research. The NPOESS Ground System will provide data to the DoD and DOC weather Centrals (the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC), the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) and the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS)) in unprecedented latency. All Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) installations consist of the hardware and software necessary to receive and process raw satellite data into Environmental Data Records (EDRs). An architecture with an IDP at each of the four Centrals, each capable of generating all the products, was derived after studying the communications cost to transmit the products from a centralized location. Additionally, the data products will be provided to NOAA’s Comprehensive Large-Array data Stewardship System (CLASS) for distribution to the broader scientific user community.

  6. TEM and NanoSIMS Study of Hydrated/Anhydrous Phase Mixed IDPs: Cometary or Asteroidal Origin?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.

    2005-01-01

    Chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are subdivided into (1) particles that form highly porous aggregates (chondritic porous "CP" IDPs), and (2) smooth particles ("CS" IDPs). Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been a valuable tool for non-destructively determining the bulk mineralogy of IDPs. Most IDPs fall within three distinct IR groups: (1) olivine-rich particles, (2) pyroxene-rich particles, and (3) phyllosilicate-rich particles. From the IR studies, IDPs dominated by anhydrous minerals tend to be fine grained (CP), while phyllosilicate-rich IDPs are mostly CS. CP IDPs have been linked to cometary sources based on their compositions, spectral properties, and atmospheric entry velocities. Since no spectral signatures of hydrated minerals have been detected in comets, CS IDPs are thought to derive from primitive asteroids. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have revealed that the mineralogical distinctions between CP and CS IDPs are not always clear. Previous investigators have reported trace amounts of hydrous minerals in dominantly anhydrous particles. A better understanding of these particles will help to elucidate whether there is a genetic relationship between anhydrous and hydrated IDPs, provide insight into the earliest stages of aqueous alteration of primitive materials, and may help to determine whether comets have experienced any aqueous processing. Here we report a combined TEM and isotopic imaging study of an unusual anhydrous IDP with hydrated phases. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  7. Continued Studies of Stardust in IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Walker, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    We recently reported the first identification of stardust in IDPs. Here we present the results of a detailed analysis of the original and subsequent O isotopic studies of anhydrous cluster IDPs. Anhydrous cluster IDPs were selected because they have preserved molecular cloud material, as evidenced by large enrichments in deuterium. Further, they have escaped aqueous and thermal processing, which could destroy or modify their mineralogy.

  8. Nonlinear image filtering within IDP++

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S.K.; Wieting, M.G.; Brase, J.M.

    1995-02-09

    IDP++, image and data processing in C++, is a set of a signal processing libraries written in C++. It is a multi-dimension (up to four dimensions), multi-data type (implemented through templates) signal processing extension to C++. IDP++ takes advantage of the object-oriented compiler technology to provide ``information hiding.`` Users need only know C, not C++. Signals or data sets are treated like any other variable with a defined set of operators and functions. We here some examples of the nonlinear filter library within IDP++. Specifically, the results of MIN, MAX median, {alpha}-trimmed mean, and edge-trimmed mean filters as applied to a real aperture radar (RR) and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data set.

  9. IDPs and Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Walker, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth s stratosphere and NASA Stardust mission samples constitute direct samples of diverse cometary bodies. These materials are among the least altered remnants of the original building blocks of the Solar System. Both cometary materials and primitive meteorites contain a broad diversity of organic compounds that appear to have formed in a range of environments, including the presolar cold molecular cloud, the solar nebula, asteroids and comet nuclei. Isotopic anomalies in H, C, and N are commonly observed in meteoritic organic matter, reflecting chemical processes at extremely low temperatures. These isotopic anomalies are also very heterogeneous on micrometer and even smaller spatial scales, suggesting that some presolar organic grains have survived the formation of the Solar System. Most recently, coordinated transmission electron microscopy and isotopic imaging studies have shown that isotopically anomalous organic globules having rounded and often hollow structures are abundant and widespread amongst the most primitive components of meteoritic materials. These studies suggest that such organic grains were among the most important primary building blocks of the Solar System.

  10. IDPs at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsh, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    The present study concerns Swedish teachers' practices with regard to individual development plans (IDPs), which are mandatory for all students in compulsory school. The conceptual points of departure are taken from Wartofsky's distinctions between primary, secondary, and tertiary artifacts and the concepts of inscription and translation. A total…

  11. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Aparicio, Samuel A.J.R.; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bignell, Graham R.; Bolli, Niccolo; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P.; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R.; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A.; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T.W.; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A.; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L.; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N.; Span, Paul N.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N.J.; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P. Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M.; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. However, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here, we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, kataegis, is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer with potential implications for understanding of cancer etiology, prevention and therapy. PMID:23945592

  12. The Abundance and Distribution of Presolar Materials in Cluster IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Ito, Motoo

    2007-01-01

    Presolar grains and remnants of interstellar organic compounds occur in a wide range of primitive solar system materials, including meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), and comet Wild-2 samples. Among the most abundant presolar phases are silicate stardust grains and molecular cloud material. However, these materials have also been susceptible to destruction and alteration during parent body and nebular processing. In addition to their importance as direct samples of remote and ancient astrophysical environments, presolar materials thus provide a measure of how well different primitive bodies have preserved the original solar system starting materials. The matrix normalized abundances of presolar silicate grains in meteorites range from 20 ppm in Semarkona and Bishunpur to 170 ppm for Acfer 094. The lower abundances of presolar silicates in Bishunpur and Semarkona has been ascribed to the destruction of presolar silicates during aqueous processes. Presolar silicates appear to be significantly more abundant in anhydrous IDPs, possibly because these materials did not experience parent body hydrothermal alteration. Among IDPs the estimated abundances of presolar silicates vary by more than an order of magnitude, from 480 to 5500 ppm. The wide disparity in the abundances of presolar silicates of IDPs may be a consequence of the relatively small total area analyzed in those studies and the fine grain sizes of the IDPs. Alternatively, there may be a wide range in presolar silicate abundances between different IDPs. This view is supported by the observation that 15N-rich IDPs have higher presolar silicate abundances than those with isotopically normal N.

  13. Changes in IDP mineralogy and composition by terrestrial factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George J.

    1994-01-01

    Major objectives in the study of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) are to constrain the physical and chemical conditions in the early solar system, to characterize the particles making up the zodiacal cloud, and to infer the physical, chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic properties of IDP parent bodies: the comets and the asteroids. However, the effects of terrestrial interactions alter the properties of some IDP's from those of the zodiacal cloud particles. The interactions can be separated into four distinct phases: near-earth gravitational segregation, atmospheric entry deceleration, stratospheric residence, and the collection/curation process.

  14. Nitrogen Isotopic Composition of Organic Matter in a Pristine Collection IDP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Nguyen, A. N.; Walker, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) are probable cometary materials that show primitive characteristics, such as unequilibrated mineralogy, fragile structure, and abundant presolar grains and organic matter [1-3]. CP IDPs are richer in aliphatic species and N-bearing aromatic hydrocarbons than meteoritic organics and commonly exhibit highly anomalous H and N isotopic compositions [4,5]. Cometary organic matter is of interest in part because it has escaped the hydrothermal processing experienced by meteorites. However, IDPs are collected using silicon oil that must be removed with strong organic solvents such as hexane. This procedure is likely to have removed some fraction of soluble organic phases in IDPs. We recently reported the first stratospheric collection of IDPs without the use of silicone oil [6]. Here we present initial studies of the carbonaceous material in an IDP from this collection.

  15. Elemental Composition of Primitive Anhydrous IDPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G.; Wirick, S.; Sutton, S. R.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2015-10-01

    We measured elemental compositions of five large anhydrous cluster interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) that show no evidence of significant thermal alteration during atmospheric entry and found their mean composition to be very similar to that of primitive CI meteorites. Our results indicate that the enrichment in moderately volatile elements and the depletion in S found in the ~10 μm anhydrous, chondritic porous (CP) IDPs, the matrix of these cluster IDPs, are not representative of the composition of their parent body. The inclusion of larger (>10 μm) volatile-poor silicates as well as sulfides in the large anhydrous cluster IDPs, which sample the CP IDP parent body at a larger size scale, suggests the large cluster IDPs are unbiased samples of the condensable material of the Solar Nebula.

  16. Extracellular Signatures as Indicators of Processing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-01-09

    As described in other chapters within this volume, many aspects of microbial cells vary with culture conditions and therefore can potentially be analyzed as forensic signatures of growth conditions. In addition to changes or variations in components of the microbes themselves, extracellular materials indicative of production processes may remain associated with the final bacterial product. It is well recognized that even with considerable effort to make pure products such as fine chemicals or pharmaceuticals, trace impurities from components or synthesis steps associated with production processes can be detected in the final product. These impurities can be used as indicators of production source or methods, such as to help connect drugs of abuse to supply chains. Extracellular residue associated with microbial cells could similarly help to characterize production processes. For successful growth of microorganisms on culture media there must be an available source of carbon, nitrogen, inorganic phosphate and sulfur, trace metals, water and vitamins. The pH, temperature, and a supply of oxygen or other gases must also be appropriate for a given organism for successful culture. The sources of these components and the range in temperature, pH and other variables has adapted over the years with currently a wide range of possible combinations of media components, recipes and parameters to choose from for a given organism. Because of this wide variability in components, mixtures of components, and other parameters, there is the potential for differentiation of cultured organisms based on changes in culture conditions. The challenge remains how to narrow the field of potential combinations and be able to attribute variations in the final bacterial product and extracellular signatures associated with the final product to information about the culture conditions or recipe used in the production of that product.

  17. The topographic signature of anthropogenic geomorphic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, P.; Sofia, G.

    2014-12-01

    Within an abiotic-dominated context, geomorphologic patterns and dynamics are single expressions of trade-offs between the physical resistance forces, and the mechanical and chemical forces related to climate and erosion. Recently, however, it has become essential for the geomorphological community to take into account also biota as a fundamental geomorphologic agent acting from local to regional scales. However, while there is a recent flourishing literature about the impacts of vegetation on geomorphic processes, the study of anthropogenic pressure on geomorphology is still at its early stages. Humans are indeed among the most prominent geomorphic agents, redistributing land surface, and causing drastic changes to the geomorphic organization of the landscape (e.g. intensive agriculture, urbanization), with direct consequences on land degradation and watershed response. The reconstruction or identification of artificial or anthropogenic topographies, therefore, provides a mechanism for quantifying anthropogenic changes to the landscape systems in the context of the Anthropocene epoch. High-resolution topographic data derived from the recent remote sensing technologies (e.g. lidar, SAR, SfM), offer now new opportunities to recognize better understand geomorphic processes from topographic signatures, especially in engineered landscapes where the direct anthropic alteration of processes is significant. It is possible indeed to better recognize human-induced geomorphic and anthropogenic features (e.g. road networks, agricultural terraces), and the connected erosion. The study presented here may allow improved understanding and targeted mitigation of the processes driving geomorphic changes during urban development and help guide future research directions for development-based watershed studies. Human society is deeply affecting the environment with consequences on the landscape. It is therefore fundamental to establish greater management control over the Earth

  18. Automated defect spatial signature analysis for semiconductor manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Gleason, Shaun S.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for performing automated defect spatial signature alysis on a data set representing defect coordinates and wafer processing information includes categorizing data from the data set into a plurality of high level categories, classifying the categorized data contained in each high level category into user-labeled signature events, and correlating the categorized, classified signature events to a present or incipient anomalous process condition.

  19. Chemical compositions of large cluster IDPs

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S.R.

    2006-12-06

    We performed X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy on two large cluster IDPs, which sample the IDP parent body at a mass scale two orders-of-magnitude larger than {approx}10 {micro}m IDPs, allowing proper incorporation of larger mineral grains into the bulk composition of the parent body. We previously determined that {approx}10 {micro}m interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere are enriched in many moderately volatile elements by a factor of {approx}3 over the CI meteorites. However, these IDP measurements provide no direct constraint on the bulk chemical composition of the parent body (or parent bodies) of the IDPs. Collisions are believed to be the major mechanism for dust production by the asteroids, producing dust by surface erosion, cratering and catastrophic disruption. Hypervelocity impact experiments at {approx}5 km/sec, which is the mean collision velocity in the main belt, performed by Flynn and Durda on ordinary chondrite meteorites and the carbonaceous chondrite meteorite Allende show that the 10 {micro}m debris is dominated by matrix material while the debris larger than {approx}25 {micro}m is dominated by chondrule fragments. Thus, if the IDP parent body is similar in structure to the chondritic meteorites, it is likely that the {approx}10 {micro}m IDPs oversample the fine-grained component of the parent body. We have examined the matrix material from the few meteorites that are sufficiently fine-grained to be samples of potential IDP parent bodies. This search has, thus far, not produced a compositional and mineralogical match to either the hydrous or anhydrous IDPs. This result, coupled with our recent mapping of the element distributions, which indicates the enrichment of moderately volatile elements is not due to contamination on their surfaces, suggests the IDPs represent a new type of extraterrestrial material. Nonetheless, the meteorite fragmentation results suggest that compositional measurements on 10 {micro

  20. Multivalent IDP assemblies: Unique properties of LC8-associated, IDP duplex scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah A; Jespersen, Nathan; Woodward, Clare; Barbar, Elisar

    2015-09-14

    A wide variety of subcellular complexes are composed of one or more intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that are multivalent, flexible, and characterized by dynamic binding of diverse partner proteins. These multivalent IDP assemblies, of broad functional diversity, are classified here into five categories distinguished by the number of IDP chains and the arrangement of partner proteins in the functional complex. Examples of each category are summarized in the context of the exceptional molecular and biological properties of IDPs. One type - IDP duplex scaffolds - is considered in detail. Its unique features include parallel alignment of two IDP chains, formation of new self-associated domains, enhanced affinity for additional bivalent ligands, and ubiquitous binding of the hub protein LC8. For two IDP duplex scaffolds, dynein intermediate chain IC and nucleoporin Nup159, these duplex features, together with the inherent flexibility of IDPs, are central to their assembly and function. A new type of IDP-LC8 interaction, distributed binding of LC8 among multiple IDP recognition sites, is described for Nup159 assembly.

  1. High-Nickel Iron-Sulfides in Anhydrous, Gems-Rich CP IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    FLynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Wirick, S.; Hu, W.; Li, L.; Yan, H.; Huang, X.; Nazaretski, E.; Lauer, K.; Chu, Y. S.

    2016-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) that were not severly heated during atmospheric deceleration are the best preserved samples of the solids that condensed from the Solar protoplanetary disk, as well as pre-Solar grains thatr survived incorporation into the disk, currently available for laboratory analysis [1]. These CP IDPs never experienced the aqueous and/or thermal processing, gravitational compaction, and shock effects that overprinted the record of Solar nebula processes in meteorites.

  2. Identification of cometary and asteroidal particles in stratospheric IDP collections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.; Love, S. G.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Bradley, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    He release temperature curves were determined for a specially processed set of 5 microns to 15 microns stratospheric IDP's whose masses, densities, and compositions were accurately measured. The He release temperature in combination with atmospheric entry calculations yields a most probable entry velocity for each particle and association with either an asteroidal (low velocity) or cometary (high velocity) origin. It was found that over half of the 5-15 microns IDP's have entry velocities consistent with asteroidal origin and that at least 20 percent have cometary origins. A few of the asteroidal particles are porous aggregates and it appears that there may be close material similarities among some primitive asteroids and comets. In the processing of individual 5 microns IDP's and determination of entry velocities, a few dozen microtome slices that can be used for a variety of detailed TEM, IR, and ion probe studies were preserved. These procedures provide laboratory samples that can be generically associated with asteroids and comets and are in a sense a limited sample return mission from these primitive bodies.

  3. The Abundance and Distribution of Presolar Materials in Cluster IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Ito, Motoo

    2007-01-01

    Presolar grains and remnants of interstellar organic compounds occur in a wide range of primitive solar system materials, including meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), and comet Wild-2 samples. Among the most abundant presolar phases are silicate stardust grains and molecular cloud material. However, these materials have also been susceptible to destruction and alteration during parent body and nebular processing. In addition to their importance as direct samples of remote and ancient astrophysical environments, presolar materials thus provide a measure of how well different primitive bodies have preserved the original solar system starting materials.

  4. Computer controlled processing of composites utilizing dielectric signature curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, L. B.; Dominski, Marty

    1992-10-01

    Three composite materials for aircraft applications are experimentally developed by using automated computer control of the autoclave fabrication process. The computer-control methodology is an expert system based on data regarding the correlation of dielectric information and physicochemical changes in polymer matrices during processing. Thermal and rheological analyses are conducted with thermocouples and dielectric sensors, and real-time data are sent to the computer to control the autoclave processing. Sample laminates including PEEK APC-2/AS-4, SC-1008 phenolic, and PMR-15 polyimide are studied for density, resin/void content, and fiber volume. Critical process events are identified which contribute to the production of high-quality composites, and the process-control technique is shown to reduce scrap and enhance uniformity in the samples. The study demonstrates the utility of dielectric signature curves as the basis for computer-controlled composite processing.

  5. Human topographic signatures and derived geomorphic processes across landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, Paolo; Sofia, Giulia

    2016-02-01

    The Earth's surface morphology, in an abiotic context, is a consequence of major forcings such as tectonic uplift, erosion, sediment transport, and climate. Recently, however, it has become essential for the geomorphological community to also take into account biota as a geomorphological agent that has a role in shaping the landscape, even if at a different scale and magnitude from that of geology. Although the modern literature is flourishing on the impacts of vegetation on geomorphic processes, the study of anthropogenic pressures on geomorphology is still in its early stages. Topography emerges as a result of natural driving forces, but some human activities (such as mining, agricultural practices and the construction of road networks) directly or indirectly move large quantities of soil, which leave clear topographic signatures embedded on the Earth's morphology. These signatures can cause drastic changes to the geomorphological organization of the landscape, with direct consequences on Earth surface processes. This review provides an overview of the recent literature on the role of humans as a geological agent in shaping the morphology of the landscape. We explore different contexts that are significantly characterized by anthropogenic topographic signatures: landscapes affected by mining activities, road networks and agricultural practices. We underline the main characteristics of those landscapes and the implications of human impacts on Earth surface processes. The final section considers future challenges wherein we explore recent novelties and trials in the concept of anthropogenic geomorphology. Herein, we focus on the role of high-resolution topographic and remote-sensing technologies. The reconstruction or identification of artificial or anthropogenic topographies provides a mechanism for quantifying anthropogenic changes to landscape systems. This study may allow an improved understanding and targeted mitigation of the processes driving geomorphic

  6. On-line infrared process signature measurements through combustion atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweibaum, F. M.; Kozlowski, A. T.; Surette, W. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A number of on-line infrared process signature measurements have been made through combustion atmospheres, including those in jet engines, piston engines, and coal gasification reactors. The difficulties involved include operation in the presence of pressure as high as 1800 psi, temperatures as high as 3200 F, and explosive, corrosive and dust-laden atmospheres. Calibration problems have resulted from the use of purge gases to clear the viewing tubes, and the obscuration of the view ports by combustion products. A review of the solutions employed to counteract the problems is presented, and areas in which better solutions are required are suggested.

  7. Calculation of kinetic data for processes leading to UV signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, P. K.; Natanson, G. A.; Garrett, B. C.; Redmon, M. J.

    1989-03-01

    Novel state-of-the-art computational techniques were developed and validated for studying collisional processes responsible for producing infrared and ultraviolet signatures in rocket plumes. The promising new methods involve computation of cross sections and rates within a semiclassical methodology. Two of the key beneficiary programs are the SPURC and the CHARM programs which require detailed microscopic dynamical information (kinetic rates and cross sections) about such collisional processes for successful modeling of the chemistry within appropriate flowfield simulation codes. Successful prediction and interpretation of ultraviolet signatures require treating collision induced transitions between different electronic states caused by the coupling between electronic and nuclear motions in molecules during collisions. Electronic transitions bring in inherently quantum mechanical effects that have no analogs in classical mechanics. The task of numerically solving the quantum mechanical equations of motion is still an unsolvable computational problem for many realistic molecular systems. The semiclassical theory is accurate enough to reproduce specific necessary quantum mechanical features, because it leads to ordinary differential equations instead of the partial differential equations of quantum mechanics. Electronic structure information required in modelling the production of candidate excited species, nitrogen, nitric oxide, and hydroxyl radical molecules in some elementary reactions was analyzed.

  8. Bromine in Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs): Evidence for Stratospheric Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1992-07-01

    Chondritic IDPs that are collected in the lower stratosphere are enriched in bromine: up to 40 x CI in an individual IDP [1]. The average enrichment is 19 x CI [2]. Volatile element enrichments in chondritic IDPs show a general increase with increased element volatility [1,2] which is consistent with solar nebula condensation models. However, the bromine enrichment is markedly up from the general volatile element enrichment trend. Stratospheric bromine derives from anthropogenic and volcanic activities and micrometeoroid ablation and evaporation [3]. It is possible that a portion or all bromine in IDPs is stratospheric surface contamination. In this case there should be an inverse correlation between bromine content and IDP size [1,4]. This correlation is not obvious because it may be complicated by the different ability of exposed IDP surfaces to adsorb volatile elements [1]. To evaluate this model it is important to know whether bromine occurs in a distinct mineral phase [5] or in a surface layer that might not survive the curatorial rinsing procedure. Another factor is the IDP stratospheric residence time. In my continued AEM analyses of ultrathin CP IDP sections, I recently observed round Br-containing grains associated with CP IDP W7029E5. These grains (11.6-744 nm in diameter) have a volatile matrix with abundant nanocrystals. Their bulk composition shows the presence of Na, K, Br, Cl, and S. Polycrystalline rings in their diffraction patterns are consistent with KBrO(sub)3, KCl, Na(sub)2SO(sub)3 and Na(sub)2S(sub)2 [Gail Fraundorf, written comm., 1991]. These round grains resemble sulfuric acid droplets associated with silica grains in other CP IDPs [6]. The sulfuric acid was washed off the silica grain surface during curatorial hexane rinsing of IDPs. The AEM data confirm a Br-bearing layer on W7029E5. This study is the first, and so far only, observation of Br-bearing material associated with chondritic IDPs in support of a stratospheric bromine surface

  9. Mineralogical Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere [1]. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels [2,3]) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. Some hydrated IDPs exhibit large deuterium enrichments [4] similar to those observed in anhydrous IDPs. Both anhydrous and hydrated IDPs contain a variety of anhydrous minerals such as silicates, sulfides, oxides, and carbonates. Controversies on hydrated IDPs still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials, because of the lack of a systematic series of analysis on individual hydrated IDPs. In this study, we combine our observations of the bulk mineralogy, mineral/ organic chemistry in order to derive a more complete picture of hydrated IDPs.

  10. Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy for depressed youth in IDP camps in Northern Uganda: adaptation and training.

    PubMed

    Verdeli, Helen; Clougherty, Kathleen; Onyango, Grace; Lewandowski, Eric; Speelman, Liesbeth; Betancourt, Teresa S; Neugebauer, Richard; Stein, Traci R; Bolton, Paul

    2008-07-01

    This article reviews the use of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) with depressed youth living in Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camps in North Uganda. This youth has been exposed to severe losses and disruptions in relationships with caregivers, family, and community members; limited access to formal education; exposure to malnutrition and infections; and pressure to prematurely assume adult family roles. The process of adaptation to the content and training of IPT for these youth is presented and illustrated with case examples.

  11. Process consistency in models: The importance of system signatures, expert knowledge, and process complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, M.; Fovet, O.; Ruiz, L.; Euser, T.; Gharari, S.; Nijzink, R.; Freer, J.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrological models frequently suffer from limited predictive power despite adequate calibration performances. This can indicate insufficient representations of the underlying processes. Thus, ways are sought to increase model consistency while satisfying the contrasting priorities of increased model complexity and limited equifinality. In this study, the value of a systematic use of hydrological signatures and expert knowledge for increasing model consistency was tested. It was found that a simple conceptual model, constrained by four calibration objective functions, was able to adequately reproduce the hydrograph in the calibration period. The model, however, could not reproduce a suite of hydrological signatures, indicating a lack of model consistency. Subsequently, testing 11 models, model complexity was increased in a stepwise way and counter-balanced by "prior constraints," inferred from expert knowledge to ensure a model which behaves well with respect to the modeler's perception of the system. We showed that, in spite of unchanged calibration performance, the most complex model setup exhibited increased performance in the independent test period and skill to better reproduce all tested signatures, indicating a better system representation. The results suggest that a model may be inadequate despite good performance with respect to multiple calibration objectives and that increasing model complexity, if counter-balanced by prior constraints, can significantly increase predictive performance of a model and its skill to reproduce hydrological signatures. The results strongly illustrate the need to balance automated model calibration with a more expert-knowledge-driven strategy of constraining models.

  12. Element Mapping in Anhydrous IDPs: Identification of the Host Phases of Major/Minor Elements as a Test of Nebula Condensation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Wirick, S.; Jacobsen, C.

    2004-01-01

    Many anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are the most pristine samples of primitive solar system dust currently available for laboratory analysis. Their primitive nature is demonstrated by: 1) the high content of moderately volatile elements, indicating they have not been heated significantly since formation, 2) the absence of hydrated material, indicating they never experienced aqueous processing, 3) the presence of unequilibrated mineral assemblages, 4) the presence of large isotopic anomalies (e.g., D and 15N enrichment), in these IDPs.

  13. Coordinated Chemical and Isotopic Studies of GEMS in IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cometary IDPs contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula [1]. Following their accretion, these materials have remained relatively unaltered because of the lack of parent body hydrothermal alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these IDPs because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars [e.g. 2]. Amorphous silicates (in the form of GEMS grains) are a major component of cometary IDPs and so a major objective of this work is to elucidate their origins. In rare cases, GEMS grains have highly anomalous O isotopic compositions that establish their origins as circumstellar condensates [3]. Here we present data on a systematic study of the silicate components within a primitive IDP.

  14. Association of Presolar Grains with Molecular Cloud Material in IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.

    2005-01-01

    Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere appear chemically, mineralogically, and texturally primitive in comparison to meteorites. Particles that escape significant atmospheric entry heating have highly unequilibrated mineralogy, are volatile element rich, and, overall, appear to have escaped significant parent body hydrothermal alteration. These IDPs are comprised of the building blocks of the solar system. The strongest evidence that anhydrous IDPs are primitive is that they contain abundant stardust and molecular cloud material. In particular, presolar silicates were first identified in IDPs and are present in abundances (450-5,500 ppm) that are well above that observed in primitive meteorites (less than 170 ppm). The most fragile (cluster) IDPs also commonly exhibit large H and N isotopic anomalies that likely originated by isotopic fractionation during extremely low temperature chemical reactions in a presolar cold molecular cloud. The D/H ratios exceed that of most primitive meteorites, and in rare cases reach values directly observed from simple gas phase molecules in cold molecular clouds. The most extreme D- and N-15-enrichments are usually observed at the finest spatial scales (0.5-2 microns) that can be measured. These observations suggest that D and N-15 hotspots are in fact preserved nuggets of molecular cloud material, and that the materials within them also have presolar origins. The advanced capabilities of the NanoSIMS ion microprobe now enable us to test this hypothesis. Here, we report two recent examples of presolar silicates found to be directly associated with molecular cloud material.

  15. Forensic handwriting examiners' opinions on the process of production of disguised and simulated signatures.

    PubMed

    Bird, Carolyne; Found, Bryan; Ballantyne, Kaye; Rogers, Doug

    2010-02-25

    Large-scale blind testing of forensic handwriting examiners (FHEs) has shown that authorship opinions on disguised and simulated signatures attract higher misleading and inconclusive rates than genuine signatures do. To test whether this is due to the failure of FHEs to detect the indicators of disguise/simulation behaviours we examined their opinions regarding the 'process of production' (which in this case was a choice between written naturally or written using a disguise/simulation strategy) of the questioned disguised and simulated signatures in blinded skill testing trials. The relationship between their process opinions and authorship opinions is then assessed. It was found that the majority of the inconclusive authorship opinions for both disguised and simulated signatures had a correct process opinion (707 of 1241, 57.0% for disguised; 3838 of 4368, 87.9% for simulated), with only 7.3% (90 of 1241) of the disguised and 0.85% (37 of 4368) of the simulated signatures exhibiting incorrect process opinions. For the total misleading authorship opinions relating to disguised signatures, the majority of the process opinions were correct (167 of 241, 69.3%) indicating that a disguise/simulation process was detected, but misinterpreted as being by another writer. These results show the usefulness of FHEs offering a first stage simulation/disguise process opinion without going on to form an opinion on authorship, as the support for the proposition that a signature is something other than genuine may be, in itself, of strong evidential value.

  16. Laser microprobe study of cosmic dust (IDPs) and potential source materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Sommer, M. S., II

    1986-01-01

    The study of cosmic dust or interplanetary dust particles (IDP) can provide vital information about primitive materials derived primarily from comets and asteroids along with a small unknown fraction from the nearby interstellar medium. The study of these particles can enhance our understanding of comets along with the decoding of the history of the early solar system. In addition the study of the cosmic dust for IDP particles can assist in the elucidation of the cosmic history of the organogenic elements which are vital to life processes. Studies to date on these particles have shown that they are complex, heterogeneous assemblages of both amorphous and crystalline components. In order to understand the nature of these particles, any analytical measurements must be able to distinguish between the possible sources of these particles. A study was undertaken using a laser microprobe interfaced to a quadrupole mass spectrometer for the analysis of the volatile components present in cosmic dust particles, terrestrial contaminants present in the upper atmosphere, and primitive carbonaceous chondrites. From the study of the volatiles released from the carbonaceous materials it is hoped that one could distinguish between components and sources in the IDP particles analyzed. The technique is briefly described and results for the CI, CM, and CV chondrites and cosmic dust particle W7027B8 are presented.

  17. N-15-Rich Organic Globules in a Cluster IDP and the Bells CM2 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2008-01-01

    Organic matter in primitive meteorites and chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) is commonly enriched in D/H and 15N/14N relative to terrestrial values [1-3]. These anomalies are ascribed to the partial preservation of presolar cold molecular cloud material [1]. Some meteorites and IDPs contain m-size inclusions with extreme H and N isotopic anomalies [2-4], possibly due to preserved pristine primordial organic grains. We recently showed that the in the Tagish Lake meteorite, the principle carriers of these anomalies are sub- m, hollow organic globules [5]. The globules likely formed by photochemical processing of organic ices in a cold molecular cloud or the outermost regions of the protosolar disk [5]. We proposed that similar materials should be common among primitive meteorites, IDPs, and comets. Similar objects have been observed in organic extracts of carbonaceous chondrites [6-8], however their N and H isotopic compositions are generally unknown. Bulk H and N isotopic compositions may indicate which meteorites best preserve interstellar organic compounds. Thus, we selected the Bells CM2 carbonaceous chondrites for study based on its large bulk 15N (+335 %) and D (+990 %) [9].

  18. Amorphous Silicates in Primitive Meteoritic Materials: Acfer 094 and IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of presolar grains is one measure of the primitive nature of meteoritic materials. Presolar silicates are abundant in meteorites whose matrices are dominated by amorphous silicates such as the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Presolar silicates are even more abundant in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Amorphous silicates in the form of GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of CP IDPs. We are studying amorphous silicates in Acfer 094 matrix in order to determine whether they are related to the GEMS grains in CPIDPs

  19. Process Consistency in Models: the Importance of System Signatures, Expert Knowledge and Process Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, Markus; Fovet, Ophelie; Ruiz, Laurent; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological models are frequently characterized by what is often considered to be adequate calibration performances. In many cases, however, these models experience a substantial uncertainty and performance decrease in validation periods, thus resulting in poor predictive power. Besides the likely presence of data errors, this observation can point towards wrong or insufficient representations of the underlying processes and their heterogeneity. In other words, right results are generated for the wrong reasons. Thus ways are sought to increase model consistency and to thereby satisfy the contrasting priorities of the need a) to increase model complexity and b) to limit model equifinality. In this study a stepwise model development approach is chosen to test the value of an exhaustive and systematic combined use of hydrological signatures, expert knowledge and readily available, yet anecdotal and rarely exploited, hydrological information for increasing model consistency towards generating the right answer for the right reasons. A simple 3-box, 7 parameter, conceptual HBV-type model, constrained by 4 calibration objective functions was able to adequately reproduce the hydrograph with comparatively high values for the 4 objective functions in the 5-year calibration period. However, closer inspection of the results showed a dramatic decrease of model performance in the 5-year validation period. In addition, assessing the model's skill to reproduce a range of 20 hydrological signatures including, amongst others, the flow duration curve, the autocorrelation function and the rising limb density, showed that it could not adequately reproduce the vast majority of these signatures, indicating a lack of model consistency. Subsequently model complexity was increased in a stepwise way to allow for more process heterogeneity. To limit model equifinality, increase in complexity was counter-balanced by a stepwise application of "realism constraints", inferred from expert

  20. Music, language and meaning: brain signatures of semantic processing.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan; Kasper, Elisabeth; Sammler, Daniela; Schulze, Katrin; Gunter, Thomas; Friederici, Angela D

    2004-03-01

    Semantics is a key feature of language, but whether or not music can activate brain mechanisms related to the processing of semantic meaning is not known. We compared processing of semantic meaning in language and music, investigating the semantic priming effect as indexed by behavioral measures and by the N400 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP) measured by electroencephalography (EEG). Human subjects were presented visually with target words after hearing either a spoken sentence or a musical excerpt. Target words that were semantically unrelated to prime sentences elicited a larger N400 than did target words that were preceded by semantically related sentences. In addition, target words that were preceded by semantically unrelated musical primes showed a similar N400 effect, as compared to target words preceded by related musical primes. The N400 priming effect did not differ between language and music with respect to time course, strength or neural generators. Our results indicate that both music and language can prime the meaning of a word, and that music can, as language, determine physiological indices of semantic processing.

  1. Refractory grain processing in circumstellar shells Diagnostic infrared signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Donn, Bertram; Nelson, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in infrared speckle interferometry reported by Ridgway, et al. (1986) have made possible the determination of the temperatures at the inner radius of certain dusty outflows. When combined with recent data on the thermal annealing and hydrous alteration rates of amorphous magnesium silicate grains, this information allows one to predict that grains heated to high temperatures around stars such as NML Cygnus will be more crystalline than will cooler grains around stars like IRC +10420. In 1985, Jura and Morris (1985) showed that water vapor can condense on previously nucleated refractory grains in some stellar outflows. Stochastic heating events might provide sufficient energy to produce hydrated silicates from orginally amorphous grains provided that the loss of water from such materials does not occur too rapidly. Observable consequences of both types of grain processing are discussed.

  2. Exploring the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, L.; Atekwana, E.; Brantley, S.; Gorby, Y.; Hubbard, S. S.; Knight, R.; Morgan, D.; Revil, A.; Rossbach, S.; Yee, N.

    2009-05-15

    AGU Chapman Conference on Biogeophysics; Portland, Maine, 13-16 October 2008; Geophysical methods have the potential to detect and characterize microbial growth and activity in subsurface environments over different spatial and temporal scales. Recognition of this potential has resulted in the development of a new subdiscipline in geophysics called 'biogeophysics,' a rapidly evolving Earth science discipline that integrates environmental microbiology, geomicrobiology, biogeochemistry, and geophysics to investigate interactions that occur between the biosphere (microorganisms and their products) and the geosphere. Biogeophysics research performed over the past decade has confirmed the potential for geophysical techniques to detect microbes, microbial growth/biofilm formation, and microbe-mineral interactions. The unique characteristics of geophysical data sets (e.g., noninvasive data acquisition, spatially continuous properties retrieved) present opportunities to explore geomicrobial processes outside of the laboratory, at unique spatial scales unachievable with microbiological techniques, and possibly in remote environments such as the deep ocean. In response to this opportunity, AGU hosted a Chapman Conference with a mission to bring together geophysicists, biophysicists, geochemists, geomicrobiologists, and environmental microbiologists conducting multidisciplinary research with potential impact on biogeophysics in order to define the current state of the science, identify the critical questions facing the community, and generate a road map for establishing biogeophysics as a critical subdiscipline of Earth science research. For more information on the conference, see http://www.agu.org/meetings/chapman/2008/fcall/.

  3. Atypical spatiotemporal signatures of working memory brain processes in autism

    PubMed Central

    Urbain, C M; Pang, E W; Taylor, M J

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) impairments may contribute to the profound behavioural manifestations in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, previous behavioural results are discrepant as are the few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results collected in adults and adolescents with ASD. Here we investigate the precise temporal dynamics of WM-related brain activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in 20 children with ASD and matched controls during an n-back WM task across different load levels (1-back vs 2-back). Although behavioural results were similar between ASD and typically developing (TD) children, the between-group comparison performed on functional brain activity showed atypical WM-related brain processes in children with ASD compared with TD children. These atypical responses were observed in the ASD group from 200 to 600 ms post stimulus in both the low- (1-back) and high- (2-back) memory load conditions. During the 1-back condition, children with ASD showed reduced WM-related activations in the right hippocampus and the cingulate gyrus compared with TD children who showed more activation in the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex and the insulae. In the 2-back condition, children with ASD showed less activity in the left insula and midcingulate gyrus and more activity in the left precuneus than TD children. In addition, reduced activity in the anterior cingulate cortex was correlated with symptom severity in children with ASD. Thus, this MEG study identified the precise timing and sources of atypical WM-related activity in frontal, temporal and parietal regions in children with ASD. The potential impacts of such atypicalities on social deficits of autism are discussed. PMID:26261885

  4. An assessment of the contamination acquired by IDPs during atmospheric deceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George J.

    1994-01-01

    The E-layer of the terrestrial mesosphere, between 80 and 110 km altitude, is derived from meteoric ablation. Concentrations of Na and Fe, contributed by meteoric vapor, have been monitored in the mesosphere, and both individual meteors and average concentration profiles have been measured. Individual interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) entering the earth's atmosphere must pass through the mesospheric layers rich in meteoric volatile elements. Limits on the extent to which individual IDP's can be contaminated by meteoric volatile elements during deceleration in the upper atmosphere can be established by considering the extreme cases: the direct passage of an IDP through a meteoric vapor trail or the passage of an IDP through the mesospheric layer rich in meteoric volatiles. It appears the interaction of IDP's with meteoric vapor during deceleration in the upper atmosphere does not produce significant contamination of IDP's as they decelerate in the upper atmosphere.

  5. Magnetic Signatures of Fine-scale Processes in the Ocean Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A.; Dean, C.; Avera, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Fine-scale processes in the upper ocean turbulent boundary layer may have a measurable electromagnetic signature. In order to study magnetic signatures of these fine-scale processes, we have applied a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model combining a 3D computational fluid dynamics model and electromagnetic block, based on ANSYS Fluent software. In addition, the hydrodynamic component of the MHD model is coupled with a radar imaging algorithm, which potentially provides a link to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite imagery. Capabilities of this model have been demonstrated using a simulation and observation of an internal wave soliton in the Straits of Florida, observed with in situ instrumentation (ADCP mooring) and COSMO Sky Med (SAR) satellite image. We have applied this model to study magnetic signatures of surface waves, freshwater lenses, spatially coherent organized motions in the near-surface layer of the ocean (Langmuir circulation and ramp-like structures), and bio-turbulence induced by diel vertical migrations of zooplankton in some areas of the ocean. Investigation of electromagnetic signatures in upper ocean processes offers a valuable new prospect in air-sea interaction.

  6. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, Jeffrey

    2012-12-12

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  7. Technology Gap Analysis for the Detection of Process Signatures Using Less Than Remote Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, John S.; Atkinson, David A.; Lind, Michael A.; Maughan, A. D.; Kelly, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Although remote sensing methods offer advantages for monitoring important illicit process activities, remote and stand-off technologies cannot successfully detect all important processes with the sensitivity and certainty that is desired. The main scope of the program is observables, with a primary focus on chemical signatures. A number of key process signatures elude remote or stand-off detection for a variety of reasons (e.g., heavy particulate emissions that do not propagate far enough for detection at stand-off distances, semi-volatile chemicals that do not tend to vaporize and remain in the environment near the source, etc.). Some of these compounds can provide persistent, process-specific information that is not available through remote techniques; however, the associated measurement technologies have their own set of advantages, disadvantages and technical challenges that may need to be overcome before additional signature data can be effectively and reliably exploited. The main objective of this report is to describe a process to identify high impact technology gaps for important less-than-remote detection applications. The subsequent analysis focuses on the technology development needed to enable exploitation of important process signatures. The evaluation process that was developed involves three interrelated and often conflicting requirements generation activities: • Identification of target signature chemicals with unique intelligence value and their associated attributes as mitigated by environmentally influenced fate and transport effects (i.e., what can you expect to actually find that has intelligence value, where do you need to look for it and what sensitivity and selectivity do you need to see it) • Identification of end-user deployment scenario possibilities and constraints with a focus on alternative detection requirements, timing issues, logistical consideration, and training requirements for a successful measurement • Identification of

  8. A Dynamic Time Warping based covariance function for Gaussian Processes signature identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silversides, Katherine L.; Melkumyan, Arman

    2016-11-01

    Modelling stratiform deposits requires a detailed knowledge of the stratigraphic boundaries. In Banded Iron Formation (BIF) hosted ores of the Hamersley Group in Western Australia these boundaries are often identified using marker shales. Both Gaussian Processes (GP) and Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) have been previously proposed as methods to automatically identify marker shales in natural gamma logs. However, each method has different advantages and disadvantages. We propose a DTW based covariance function for the GP that combines the flexibility of the DTW with the probabilistic framework of the GP. The three methods are tested and compared on their ability to identify two natural gamma signatures from a Marra Mamba type iron ore deposit. These tests show that while all three methods can identify boundaries, the GP with the DTW covariance function combines and balances the strengths and weaknesses of the individual methods. This method identifies more positive signatures than the GP with the standard covariance function, and has a higher accuracy for identified signatures than the DTW. The combined method can handle larger variations in the signature without requiring multiple libraries, has a probabilistic output and does not require manual cut-off selections.

  9. IDP Camp and Reconstruction Monitoring Experience at SERTIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clandillon, Stephen; Allenbach, Bernard; Battiston, Stephanie; Caspard, Mathilde; Fellah, Kader; Giraud, Henri; Montabord, Myldred; Tholey, Nadine; Uribe, Carlos; Yesou, Herve; de Fraipont, Paul

    2010-12-01

    SERTIT's rapid mapping activities covering disasters and damage mapping after a major catastrophic event such as those realized within the framework of International Charter "Space and major disasters" (Charter) and GMES1 programmes are relatively well known, whereas the work carried since 2004 on the exploitation of Earth Observation data for humanitarian aid is less often presented. The aim of this paper is to present this work from mapping and monitoring IDP camp related emergencies to supporting recovery and reconstruction and the context, procedures and examples of this work. A brief introduction to the world of rapid mapping will be given within the context of emergency mapping and monitoring and why this need arises. This is combined with a word on the development of this service with respect to the Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camp mapping. Then, the cases of Sudan 2004, Chad & Sudan 2008 and Yemen 2009 will be treated to show that the Emergency Mapping and Monitoring Service for Displaced Populations is operational. Afterwards, SERTIT's complementary Emergency Recovery Support Service will be demonstrated through the long- term reconstruction monitoring work carried out, post- disaster, following the 2003 Boumerdès earthquake event. Finally, the need for the availability and deployment of this kind of services is highlighted by the reconstruction planning and monitoring requirements in Haiti, amongst other places.

  10. Comparing Wild 2 Particles to Chondrites and IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Rietmeijer, Frans; Leroux, Hugues; Mikouchi, Takashi; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Simon, Steven; Grossman, Lawrence; Stephan, Thomas; Weisberg, Michael; Velbel, Michael; Zega, Thomas; Stroud, Rhonda; Tomeoka, Kazushige; Ohnishi, Ichiro; Tomioka, Naotaka; Nakamura, Tomoki; Matrajt, Graciela; Joswiak, David; Brownlee, Don; Langenhorst, Falko; Krot, Alexander; Kearsley, Anton; Ishii, Hope; Graham, Giles

    2008-01-01

    We compare the observed composition ranges of olivine, pyroxene and Fe-Ni sulfides in Wild 2 grains, comparing these with chondritic IDPs and chondrite classes to explore whether these data suggest affinities to known hydrous materials in particular. Wild 2 olivine has an extremely wide composition range, from Fo4-100 with a pronounced frequency peak at Fo99. The composition range displayed by the low-calcium pyroxene is also very extensive, from En52 to En100, with a significant frequency peak centered at En95. These ranges are as broad or broader than those reported for any other extraterrestrial material. Wild 2 Fe-Ni sulfides mainly have compositions close to that of FeS, with less than 2 atom % Ni - to date, only two pentlandite grains have been found among the Wild-grains suggesting that this mineral is not abundant. The complete lack of compositions between FeS and pentlandite (with intermediate solid solution compositions) suggests (but does not require) that FeS and pentlandite condensed as crystalline species, i.e. did not form as amorphous phases, which later became annealed. While we have not yet observed any direct evidence of water-bearing minerals, the presence of Ni-bearing sulfides, and magnesium-dominated olivine and low-Ca pyroxene does not rule out their presence at low abundance. We do conclude that modern major and minor element compositions of chondrite matrix and IDPs are needed.

  11. Regional scale analysis of the topographic signatures of landslide/debris flow dominated processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, P.; Righetto, A.

    2012-04-01

    The morphology of alpine headwater basins is strongly influenced by erosion processes. The relationship between landforms and erosion processes has been analyzed based on the relationship between slope and drainage area (Montgomery and Foufoula-Georgiou, 1993), because among parameters derived from a DTM (Digital Terrain Model), slope and drainage area are deemed to be pertinent for studying overall erosion dynamics. Thanks to LiDAR and high resolution topography now is possible to reach a better representation of hillslope morphology, and then recognize in detail the topographic signature of valley incision by landslides and debris flows (Tarolli and Dalla Fontana, 2009). In this work we present a tentative of a regional scale analysis of such signature. In the analysis we derived the slope-area relationship using high-resolution DTMs with 2.5 m cells derived from LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data. We considered 23 catchments, characterized by soil-mantled landscape, and where several debris flows occurred in the year 2009. The results showed that in 83% catchments the topographic signature of debris flow processes is clearly present, while in the remaining catchments only hillslopes, unchanneled valleys and alluvial channels regions are recognized. The slope-area relationships of few catchments where no debris flows were observed during 2009 events, nor reported in the historical database, were then analyzed. For these basins the slope-area relationship does not evidence the topographic signature of debris flow processes. According to these results the presented methodology really can help for a right preliminary analysis and classification of alpine catchments based on their dominant geomorphological processes. The methodology should be used for a first and quick interpretation, in support to field surveys and more complex physically based modeling analysis.

  12. Presolar Materials in a Giant Cluster IDP of Probable Cometary Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.; Nguyen, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) have been linked to comets by their fragile structure, primitive mineralogy, dynamics, and abundant interstellar materials. But differences have emerged between 'cometary' CP-IDPs and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust Mission samples. Particles resembling Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs), chondrules, and amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) in Wild 2 samples are rare in CP-IDPs. Unlike IDPs, presolar materials are scarce in Wild 2 samples. These differences may be due to selection effects, such as destruction of fine grained (presolar) components during the 6 km/s aerogel impact collection of Wild 2 samples. Large refractory grains observed in Wild 2 samples are also unlikely to be found in most (less than 30 micrometers) IDPs. Presolar materials provide a measure of primitive-ness of meteorites and IDPs. Organic matter in IDPs and chondrites shows H and N isotopic anomalies attributed to low-T interstellar or protosolar disk chemistry, where the largest anomalies occur in the most primitive samples. Presolar silicates are abundant in meteorites with low levels of aqueous alteration (Acfer 094 approximately 200 ppm) and scarce in altered chondrites (e.g. Semarkona approximately 20 ppm). Presolar silicates in minimally altered CP-IDPs range from approximately 400 ppm to 15,000 ppm, possibly reflecting variable levels of destruction in the solar nebula or statistical variations due to small sample sizes. Here we present preliminary isotopic and mineralogical studies of a very large CP-IDP. The goals of this study are to more accurately determine the abundances of presolar components of CP-IDP material for comparison with comet Wild 2 samples and meteorites. The large mass of this IDP presents a unique opportunity to accurately determine the abundance of pre-solar grains in a likely cometary sample.

  13. Post-analysis report on Chesapeake Bay data processing. [spectral analysis and recognition computer signature extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F.

    1972-01-01

    The additional processing performed on data collected over the Rhode River Test Site and Forestry Site in November 1970 is reported. The techniques and procedures used to obtain the processed results are described. Thermal data collected over three approximately parallel lines of the site were contoured, and the results color coded, for the purpose of delineating important scene constituents and to identify trees attacked by pine bark beetles. Contouring work and histogram preparation are reviewed and the important conclusions from the spectral analysis and recognition computer (SPARC) signature extension work are summarized. The SPARC setup and processing records are presented and recommendations are made for future data collection over the site.

  14. The Impact of Talibanization on the Education of IDP's in N. W. F. P. Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akhtar, Sajjad Hayat

    2009-01-01

    The study looked into a descriptive research to evaluate the impact of talibanization on the education of IDP's in NWFP (Pakistan). The study has defined the needs, problems and opportunities, contribution of NGO's and emerging trends of IDP's regarding maddrassa education/ general education. The main focus of the study was the needs and…

  15. Spatially Resolved Analysis of Amines Using a Fluorescence Molecular Probe: Molecular Analysis of IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Wentworth, S. J.; Robinson, G. A.; McKay, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Some Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) have large isotope anomalies in H and N. To address the nature of the carrier phase, we are developing a procedure to spatially resolve the distribution of organic species on IDP thin sections utilizing fluorescent molecular probes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Nano-Diamonds in Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs), Micrometeorites, and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Joswiak, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Genge, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    Nano-diamonds have been identified in IDPs (Interplanetary Dust Particles), micrometeorites, and meteorites. They appear to be depleted in non-cluster IDPs suggesting that some nano-diamonds are not presolar. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Hydrological signatures of Critical Zone Processes: Developing targets for Critical Zone modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. E.; Karst, N.; Dralle, D.

    2015-12-01

    Water fluxes through the Critical Zone (CZ) are ubiquitous, and their behavior has the potential to reveal information about the structure and dynamics of the CZ. Models describing these fluxes implicitly propose hypotheses about the CZ which are encoded in the structure of the models. However, the certainty with which such hypotheses can be tested with observed hydrologic data is challenged by the well-known problem of equifinality - the tendency of multiple models, with very different model structures, to produce equally good representations of observed hydrologic dynamics. The project of modeling the CZ is thus challenged by the need to identify hydrologic signatures that are closely tied to the CZ structure and which could provide a stronger basis for hypothesis testing in model frameworks. Here I present one potential signature based on streamflow recession dynamics and the structure of their variability. Firstly, I present a technique to remove a mathematical artifact that is inherent in power-law representations of streamflow recessions. Secondly, I show that having removed this artifact, intriguing relationships emerge in the recession variability in the rivers near the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory. This relationship is interpreted in terms of how water is partitioned within the CZ. The close relationship between CZ processes and this part of the hydrologic response suggests that co-variation in recession parameters could provide a process-oriented hydrologic signature that CZ models should attempt to emulate.

  18. Potential Signatures of Semi-volatile Compounds Associated With Nuclear Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Probasco, Kathleen M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Maughan, A. D.

    2002-06-01

    Semi-volatile chemicals associated with nuclear processes (e.g., the reprocessing of uranium to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons, or the separation of actinides from processing waste streams), can provide sticky residues or signatures that will attach to piping, ducting, soil, water, or other surface media. Volatile compounds, that are more suitable for electro-optical sensing, have been well studied. However, the semi-volatile compounds have not been well documented or studied. A majority of these semi-volatile chemicals are more robust than typical gaseous or liquid chemicals and can have lifetimes of several weeks, months, or years in the environment. However, large data gaps exist concerning these potential signature compounds and more research is needed to fill these data gaps so that important signature information is not overlooked or discarded. This report investigates key semi-volatile compounds associated with nuclear separations, identifies available chemical and physical properties, and discusses the degradation products that would result from hydrolysis, radiolysis and oxidation reactions on these compounds.

  19. Comprehensive Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction, IR Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Nozaki, W.; Tomeoka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere(1). Although much is known about the mineralogy, chemistry and carbon abundance of hydrated IDPs (2-4) controversies still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone some degree of aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels (3,4) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. We report the comprehensive study of individual hydrated IDPs. The strong depletion in Ca (I) has been used as a diagnostic feature of hydrated IDPs. The particles are embedded in elemental sulfur or low viscosity epoxy and ultramicrotomed thin sections are observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) followed by other measurements including: 1) FTIR microspectroscopy to understand the significant constraints on the organic functionality and the nature of the C-bearing phases and 2) powder X-ray difiaction using a synchrotron X-ray source to understand the bulk mineralogy of the particles.

  20. 78 FR 43145 - Announcing Approval of Federal Information Processing Standard 186-4, Digital Signature Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... the protection of data: The Digital Signature Algorithm (DSA), the Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) and the Rivest- Shamir Adelman Algorithm (RSA). This revision includes a clarification of..., first published on May 19, 1994 (59 FR 26208), specified a digital signature algorithm (DSA) to...

  1. Iterative techniques to estimate signature vectors for mixture processing of multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvato, P., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Two methods for obtaining the required spectral signatures for a particular mixture model are considered. For the model considered, the spectral signatures become signature vectors. The first method is based upon determination of the signature vectors in such a way that a measure of the inconsistency between the mixture model and the observed data is minimized. The second method is based upon determination of the signature vectors in such a way that the estimated mean percentage coverage of individual species matches apriori or ground truth estimates. The two methods proposed are applied to actual multispectral data in order to verify the concepts presented.

  2. The molecular signature of AML mesenchymal stromal cells reveals candidate genes related to the leukemogenic process.

    PubMed

    Binato, Renata; de Almeida Oliveira, Nathalia Correa; Du Rocher, Barbara; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by myeloid precursor proliferation in the bone marrow, apoptosis reduction and differentiation arrest. Although there are several studies in this field, events related to disease initiation and progression remain unknown. The malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is thought to generate leukemic stem cells, and this transformation could be related to changes in mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) signaling. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the gene expression profile of hMSC from AML patients (hMSC-AML) compared to healthy donors hMSCs (hMSC-HD). The results showed a common molecular signature for all hMSC-AML. Other assays were performed with a large number of patients and the results confirmed a molecular signature that is capable of distinguishing hMSC-AML from hMSC-HD. Moreover, CCL2 and BMP4 genes encode secreted proteins that could affect HSCs. To verify whether these proteins are differentially expressed in AML patients, ELISA was performed with plasma samples. CCL2 and BMP4 proteins are differentially expressed in AML patients, indicating changes in hMSC-AML signaling. Altogether, hMSCs-AML signaling alterations could be an important factor in the leukemic transformation process.

  3. Investigation of environmental physical parameters and processes complementing the search for signatures of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, L.; Horneck, G.; Kochan, H.; Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, P.; Ulamec, S.

    In general, the search for signatures of life on other planets follows different lines: one is to study life in extreme natural environments on the Earth, another one is to perform laboratory experiments under simulated natural conditions in order define the limits for formation and survival of life, and finally space missions to perform in situ measurements on planetary surfaces outside the Earth to look for indicators of extinct or extant life. For the case of the planet Mars, relevant surface conditions are roughly known from orbiter as well as lander missions. In an extrapolation of terrestrial conditions, laboratory studies are conducted on terrestrial biota from extreme environments under various simulated planetary surface conditions in order to investigate general biological survivability as a function of physical and chemical parameters (radiation, UV flux, atmosphere, temperature, humidity, soil properties including mineralogy and toxicity, etc.). This way, physical parameters and processes acting on planetary bodies and their interrelations are studied in parallel with the search for surviving biota. Several suitable test chambers for physical and for biological investigations of this type are available at DLR Cologne. Ultimately, the same physical quantities should be measured concurrently with biological measurements during future planetary landing missions searching for signatures of life. The general question, however, remains whether life on Earth shows any biochemical resemblance with hypothetical life on ancient or modern Mars.

  4. Unreported intrinsic disorder in proteins: Building connections to the literature on IDPs

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    This review opens a new series entitled “Unreported intrinsic disorder in proteins.” The goal of this series is to bring attention of researchers to an interesting phenomenon of missed (or overlooked, or ignored, or unreported) disorder. This series serves as a companion to “Digested Disorder” which provides a quarterly review of papers on intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) found by standard literature searches. The need for this alternative series results from the observation that there are numerous publications that describe IDPs (or hybrid proteins with ordered and disordered regions) yet fail to recognize many of the key discoveries and publications in the IDP field. By ignoring the body of work on IDPs, such publications often fail to relate their findings to prior discoveries or fail to explore the obvious implications of their work. Thus, the goal of this series is not only to review these very interesting and important papers, but also to point out how each paper relates to the IDP field and show how common tools in the IDP field can readily take the findings in new directions or provide a broader context for the reported findings. PMID:28232880

  5. Using Bathymodiolus tissue stable isotope signatures to infer biogeochemical process at hydrocarbon seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Kiel, S.; Qiu, J.; Yang, Q.; Zhou, H.; Peng, Y.; Chen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Here we use stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the tissue of two bathymodiolin mussel species with different chemotrophic symbionts (methanotrophs in B. platifrons and sulfide-oxidizers in B. aduloides) to gain insights into the biogeochemical processes at an active site in 1120 m depth on the Formosa Ridge, called Site F. Because mussels with methanotrophic symbionts acquire the isotope signature of the used methane, the average δ13C values of B. platifrons (-70.3‰; n=36) indicates a biogenic methane source at Site F, consistent with the measured carbon isotope signature of methane (-61.1‰ to -58.7‰) sampled 1.5 m above the mussel beds. The only small offset between the δ13C signatures of the ascending methane and the authigenic carbonate at site F (as low as -55.3‰) suggests only minor mixing of the pore water with marine bicarbonate, which in turn may be used as an indicator for advective rather than diffusive seepage at this site. B. aduloides has much higher average δ13C values of -34.4‰ (n=9), indicating inorganic carbon (DIC) dissolved in epibenthic bottom water as its main carbon source. The DIC was apparently marine bicarbonate with a small contribution of 13C-depleted carbon from locally oxidized methane. The δ34S values of the two mussel species indicate that they used two different sulfur sources. B. platifrons (average δ34S = +6.4±2.6‰; n=36) used seawater sulfate mixed with isotopically light re-oxidized sulfide from the sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), while the sulfur source of B. aduloides (δ34S = -8.0±3.1‰; n=9) was AOM-derived sulfide used by its symbionts. δ15N values differed between the mussels, with B. platifrons having a wider range of on average slightly lower values (mean = +0.5±0.7‰, n=36) than B. aduloides (mean = +1.1±0.0‰). These values are significantly lower than δ15N values of South China Sea deep-sea sediments (+5‰ to +6‰), indicating that the organic nitrogen

  6. Crustal processes cause adakitic chemical signatures in syn-collision magmatism from SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark; Kheirkhah, Monireh; Neill, Iain

    2015-04-01

    Dehaj magmatism may have developed its geochemical signature during deep fractionation as the ascent of the magmas was impeded by thick orogenic crust. The rocks may be seen as just another part of the widespread syn-collision magmatism that has affected widespread areas of Turkey, Iran, Armenia and neighbouring countries in the last ~10-15 Ma, and need not be used as markers for debateable geodynamic events such as break-off. Adakites are also present in NE Iran without any obvious association with subduction processes. We argue that magmatism across much of the plateau is linked at least in part to mantle upwelling following Miocene slab break-off, but also to small-scale convection beneath the collision zone, as predicted by numerical modelling. Particular compositions such as those at Dehaj are influenced by local sources and differentiation processes, but there is no need for independent triggers for initial melting across disparate locations.

  7. Carbon analyses of IDP's sectioned in sulfur and supported on beryllium films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Keller, L.; Thomas, K. L.; Vanderwood, T. B.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    Carbon is the only major element in interplanetary dust whose abundance, distribution and chemical state are not well understood. Information about carbon could clarify the relationship between the various classes of IDP's, conventional meteorites, and sources (e.g., comets vs. asteroids). To date, the most reliable estimates of C abundance in Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDP's) have been obtained by analyzing particles on thick-flat Be substrates using thin-window energy-dispersive spectroscopy in the SEM. These estimates of C abundance are valid only if C is homogeneously distributed, because detected C x-rays originate from the outer 0.1 micrometers of the particle. An alternative and potentially more accurate method of measuring C abundances is to analyze multiple thin sections (each less than 0.1 less than 0.1 micrometers thick) of IDP's. These efforts however, have been stymied because of a lack of a suitable non-carbonaceous embedding medium and the availability of C-free conductive substrates. We have embedded and thin-sectioned IDP's in glassy sulfur, and transferred the thin sections to Be support films approximately 25 nm thick. The sections were then analyzed in a 200 KeV analytical TEM. S sublimes rapidly under vacuum in the TEM, leaving non-embedded sections supported on Be. Apart from quantitative C (and O) analyses, S sectioning dramatically expands the range of analytical measurements that can be performed on a single IDP.

  8. Cometary interplanetary dust particles? An update on carbon in anhydrous IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Keller, L. P.; Blanford, G. E.; Mckay, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    Chondritic anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) are widely considered to be the most pristine samples available for the study of the early solar system because of their primitive mineralogy, chemistry, and isotopic characteristics. Previously, anhydrous IDP's were analyzed quantitatively for light elements and found that these particles have significantly higher bulk carbon abundances than known chondritic meteorites. A relationship between carbon abundance and silicate mineralogy was also identified which, in general, shows that particles dominated by pyroxenes have a higher carbon abundance than those dominated by olivines. Particles containing equal amounts of olivine and pyroxene show a range of carbon contents and can be grouped with either the pyroxene- or olivine-dominated particles based on their carbon abundance. It was suggested that high carbon pyroxene-rich IDP's are derived from cometary sources. Bulk compositions and mineralogy of our additional IDP's were determined; one particle has the highest carbon abundance reported in IDP's or any other chondritic material, with the possible exception of the carbon-rich Halley particles.

  9. Coordinated Chemical and Isotropic Studies of IDPS: Comparison of Circumstellar and Solar GEMS Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2007-01-01

    Silicate stardust in IDPs and meteorites include forsterite, amorphous silicates, and GEMS grains [1]. Amorphous presolar silicates are much less abundant than expected based on astronomical models [2], possibly destroyed by parent body alteration. A more accurate accounting of presolar silicate mineralogy may be preserved in anhydrous IDPs. Here we present results of coordinated TEM and isotopic analyses of an anhydrous IDP (L2005AL5) that is comprised of crystalline silicates and sulfides, GEMS grains, and equilibrated aggregates embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. Nanometer-scale quantitative compositional maps of all grains in two microtome thin sections were obtained with a JEOL 2500SE. These sections were then subjected to O and N isotopic imaging with the JSC NanoSIMS 50L. Coordinated high resolution chemical maps and O isotopic com-positions were obtained on 11 GEMS grains, 8 crystalline grains, and 6 equilibrated aggregates.

  10. Improved validation of IDP ensembles by one-bond Cα-Hα scalar couplings.

    PubMed

    Gapsys, Vytautas; Narayanan, Raghavendran L; Xiang, ShengQi; de Groot, Bert L; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are best described by ensembles of conformations and a variety of approaches have been developed to determine IDP ensembles. Because of the large number of conformations, however, cross-validation of the determined ensembles by independent experimental data is crucial. The (1)JCαHα coupling constant is particularly suited for cross-validation, because it has a large magnitude and mostly depends on the often less accessible dihedral angle ψ. Here, we reinvestigated the connection between (1)JCαHα values and protein backbone dihedral angles. We show that accurate amino-acid specific random coil values of the (1)JCαHα coupling constant, in combination with a reparameterized empirical Karplus-type equation, allow for reliable cross-validation of molecular ensembles of IDPs.

  11. Nebular and Interstellar Materials in a Giant Cluster IDP of Probable Cometary Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.; Nguyen, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Comets contain a complex mixture of materials with presolar and Solar System origins. Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) are associated with comets by their fragile nature, unequilibrated anhydrous mineralogy and high abundances of circumstellar grains and isotopically anomalous organic materials. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples returned by the Stardust spacecraft contain presolar materials as well as refractory 16O-rich Ca-Al-rich inclusion- (CAI), chondrule-, and AOA-like materials. We are conducting coordinated chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic studies of a giant cluster CP-IDP (U2-20-GCA) to determine the proportions of inner Solar System and interstellar materials. We previously found that this IDP contains abundant presolar silicates (approx. 1,800 ppm) and 15N-rich hotspots [6].

  12. From Positivity to Negativity Bias: Ambiguity Affects the Neurophysiological Signatures of Feedback Processing.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Henning; Schnuerch, Robert; Stahl, Jutta

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies on the neurophysiological underpinnings of feedback processing almost exclusively used low-ambiguity feedback, which does not fully address the diversity of situations in everyday life. We therefore used a pseudo trial-and-error learning task to investigate ERPs of low- versus high-ambiguity feedback. Twenty-eight participants tried to deduce the rule governing visual feedback to their button presses in response to visual stimuli. In the blocked condition, the same two feedback words were presented across several consecutive trials, whereas in the random condition feedback was randomly drawn on each trial from sets of five positive and five negative words. The feedback-related negativity (FRN-D), a frontocentral ERP difference between negative and positive feedback, was significantly larger in the blocked condition, whereas the centroparietal late positive complex indicating controlled attention was enhanced for negative feedback irrespective of condition. Moreover, FRN-D in the blocked condition was due to increased reward positivity (Rew-P) for positive feedback, rather than increased (raw) FRN for negative feedback. Our findings strongly support recent lines of evidence that the FRN-D, one of the most widely studied signatures of reinforcement learning in the human brain, critically depends on feedback discriminability and is primarily driven by the Rew-P. A novel finding concerned larger frontocentral P2 for negative feedback in the random but not the blocked condition. Although Rew-P points to a positivity bias in feedback processing under conditions of low feedback ambiguity, P2 suggests a specific adaptation of information processing in case of highly ambiguous feedback, involving an early negativity bias. Generalizability of the P2 findings was demonstrated in a second experiment using explicit valence categorization of highly emotional positive and negative adjectives.

  13. Organic Matter from Comet 81p/Wild 2, IDPS and Carbonaceous Meteorites; Similarities and Differences

    SciTech Connect

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G; Keller, L; Nakamura Messenger, K; Peltzer, C; Jacobsen, C; Sandford, S; Zolensky, M

    2009-01-01

    During preliminary examination of 81P/Wild 2 particles collected by the NASA Stardust spacecraft, we analyzed seven, sulfur embedded and ultramicrotomed particles extracted from five different tracks. Sections were analyzed using a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (SXTM) and carbon X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra were collected. We compared the carbon XANES spectra of these Wild 2 samples with a database of spectra on thirty-four interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and with several meteorites. Two of the particles analyzed are iron sulfides and there is evidence that an aliphatic compound associated with these particles can survive high temperatures. An iron sulfide from an IDP demonstrates the same phenomenon. Another, mostly carbon free containing particle radiation damaged, something we have not observed in any IDPs we have analyzed or any indigenous organic matter from the carbonaceous meteorites, Tagish Lake, Orgueil, Bells and Murchison. The carbonaceous material associated with this particle showed no mass loss during the initial analysis but chemically changed over a period of two months. The carbon XANES spectra of the other four particles varied more than spectra from IDPs and indigenous organic matter from meteorites. Comparison of the carbon XANES spectra from these particles with 1. the carbon XANES spectra from thirty-four IDPs (<15 micron in size) and 2. the carbon XANES spectra from carbonaceous material from the Tagish Lake, Orgueil, Bells, and Murchison meteorites show that 81P/Wild 2 carbon XANES spectra are more similar to IDP carbon XANES spectra then to the carbon XANES spectra of meteorites.

  14. Focused Ion Beam Recovery and Analysis of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) and Stardust Analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, G. A.; Bradley, J. P.; Bernas, M.; Stroud, R. M.; Dai, Z. R.; Floss, C.; Stadermann, F. J.; Snead, C. J.; Westphal, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Meteoritics research is a major beneficiary of recent developments in analytical instrumentation [1,2]. Integrated studies in which multiple analytical techniques are applied to the same specimen are providing new insight about the nature of IDPs [1]. Such studies are dependent on the ability to prepare specimens that can be analyzed in multiple instruments. Focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy has revolutionized specimen preparation in materials science [3]. Although FIB has successfully been used for a few IDP and meteorite studies [1,4-6], it has yet to be widely utilized in meteoritics. We are using FIB for integrated TEM/NanoSIMS/synchrotron infrared (IR) studies [1].

  15. C/N and other Elemental Ratios of Chondritic Porous IDPS and a Fluffy Concordia Micrometeorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Khodja, H.; Raepsaet, C.; Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Taylor, S.; Engrand, C.; Duprat, J.; Herzog, G. F.

    2013-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) may be cometary in origin [1], as may ultracarbona-ceous (UCAMMs) [2] and 'fluffy' [3] micrometeorites from the Concordia collection. They are all rich in organics, which can rim grains and may have helped glue grains together during accretion [4]. The organics also contain nitrogen the input of which to Earth has potential biological importance. We report C/N ratios, and other properties of CP-IDPs and a Concordia fluffy microme-teorite.

  16. Studying IDP stability and dynamics by fast relaxation imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Apratim; Prigozhin, Maxim; Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Fast relaxation imaging (FReI) temperature-tunes living cells and applies small temperature jumps to them, to monitor biomolecular stability and kinetics in vivo. The folding or aggregation state of a target protein is monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Intrinsically disordered proteins near the structured-unstructured boundary are particularly sensitive to their environment. We describe, using the IDP α-synuclein as an example, how FReI can be used to measure IDP stability and folding inside the cell.

  17. Collection and curation of IDPs in the stratosphere and below. Part 2: The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurette, Michel; Hammer, C.; Harvey, R.; Immel, G.; Kurat, G.; Taylor, S.

    1994-01-01

    In a companion paper, Zolensky discusses interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) collected in the stratosphere. Here, we describe the recovery of much larger unmelted to partially melted IDP's from the Greenland and Antarctica ice sheet, and discuss problems arising in their collection and curation, as well as future prospects for tackling these problems.

  18. ff14IDPs force field improving the conformation sampling of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong; Wang, Wei; Ye, Wei; Ji, Dingjue; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are proteins which lack of specific tertiary structure and unable to fold spontaneously without the partner binding. These intrinsically disordered proteins are found to associate with various diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. However, current widely used force fields, such as ff99SB, ff14SB, OPLS/AA, and Charmm27, are insufficient in sampling the conformational characters of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this study, the CMAP method was used to correct the φ/ψ distributions of disorder-promoting amino acids. The simulation results show that the force filed parameters (ff14IDPs) can improve the φ/ψ distributions of the disorder-promoting amino acids, with RMSD less than 0.10% relative to the benchmark data of intrinsically disordered proteins. Further test suggests that the calculated secondary chemical shifts under ff14IDPs are in quantitative agreement with the data of NMR experiment for five tested systems. In addition, the simulation results show that ff14IDPs can still be used to model structural proteins, such as tested lysozyme and ubiquitin, with better performance in coil regions than the original general Amber force field ff14SB. These findings confirm that the newly developed Amber ff14IDPs is a robust model for improving the conformation sampling of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  19. Nebular and Interstellar Materials in a Giant Cluster IDP of Probable Cometary Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, S.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.; Nguyen, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    We are conducting coordinated mineralogical, and isotopic studies of a giant cluster CP-IDP to determine proportions of inner solar system and interstellar materials. We have identified an 16O-rich enstatite grain that likely formed near the Sun.

  20. Assessment of Mobilization and Leadership Challenges in Azerbaijani IDP and Refugee Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affolter, Friedrich W.; Findlay, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    A study analyzed community mobilization and leadership challenges in Azerbaijan refugee and internally displaced people (IDP) camps. The research determined that there is a lack of capacity to mobilize the community to effective community action and learning. (Contains 21 references.) (Author/JOW)

  1. Signatures support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Chadwick T.

    2009-05-01

    The Signatures Support Program (SSP) leverages the full spectrum of signature-related activities (collections, processing, development, storage, maintenance, and dissemination) within the Department of Defense (DOD), the intelligence community (IC), other Federal agencies, and civil institutions. The Enterprise encompasses acoustic, seismic, radio frequency, infrared, radar, nuclear radiation, and electro-optical signatures. The SSP serves the war fighter, the IC, and civil institutions by supporting military operations, intelligence operations, homeland defense, disaster relief, acquisitions, and research and development. Data centers host and maintain signature holdings, collectively forming the national signatures pool. The geographically distributed organizations are the authoritative sources and repositories for signature data; the centers are responsible for data content and quality. The SSP proactively engages DOD, IC, other Federal entities, academia, and industry to locate signatures for inclusion in the distributed national signatures pool and provides world-wide 24/7 access via the SSP application.

  2. Signature of magmatic processes in ground deformation signals from Phlegraean Fields (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagagli, Matteo; Montagna, Chiara Paola; Longo, Antonella; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Ground deformation signals such as dilatometric and tiltmetric ones, are nowadays well studied from the vulcanological community all over the world. These signals can be used to retrieve information on volcanoes state and to study the magma dynamics in their plumbing system. We compared synthetic signals in the Very Long Period (VLP, 10-2 - 10-1 Hz) and Ultra Long Period (ULP, 10-4 - 10-2 Hz) bands obtained from the simulation of magma mixing in shallow reservoirs ([3],[4]) with real data obtained from the dilatometers and tiltmeters network situated in the Phlegraean Fields near Naples (Italy), in order to define and constrain the relationships between them. Analyses of data from the October 2006 seismic swarm in the area show that the frequency spectrum of the synthetics is remarkably similar to the transient present in the real signals. In depth studies with accurated techniques for spectral analysis (i.e wavelet transform) and application of this method to other time windows have identified in the bandwidth around 10-4Hz (between 1h30m and 2h45m) peaks that are fairly stable and independent from the processing carried out on the full-band signal. These peaks could be the signature of ongoing convection at depth. It is well known that re-injection of juvenile magmas can reactivate the eruption dynamics ([1],[2]), thus being able to define mixing markers and detect them in the ground deformation signals is a relevant topic in order to understand the dynamics of active and quiescent vulcanoes and to eventually improve early-warning methods for impending eruptions. [1] Arienzo, I. et al. (2010). "The feeding system of Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (Campi Flegrei, Italy): dragging the past into present activity and future scenarios". In: Chemical Geology 270.1, pp. 135-147. [2] Bachmann, Olivier and George Bergantz (2008). "The magma reservoirs that feed supereruptions". In: Elements 4.1, pp. 17-21. [3] Longo, Antonella et al. (2012). "Magma convection and mixing

  3. Methods of extending signatures and training without ground information. [data processing, pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, R. G.; Thomas, G. S.; Nalepka, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Methods of performing signature extension, using LANDSAT-1 data, are explored. The emphasis is on improving the performance and cost-effectiveness of large area wheat surveys. Two methods were developed: ASC, and MASC. Two methods, Ratio, and RADIFF, previously used with aircraft data were adapted to and tested on LANDSAT-1 data. An investigation into the sources and nature of between scene data variations was included. Initial investigations into the selection of training fields without in situ ground truth were undertaken.

  4. Rapid Cenozoic ingrowth of isotopic signatures simulating "HIMU" in ancient lithospheric mantle: Distinguishing source from process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy-West, Alex J.; Bennett, Vickie C.; Amelin, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Chemical and isotopic heterogeneities in the lithospheric mantle are increasingly being recognised on all scales of examination, although the mechanisms responsible for generating this variability are still poorly understood. To investigate the relative behaviour of different isotopic systems in off-cratonic mantle, and specifically the origin of the regional southwest Pacific "HIMU" (high time integrated 238U/204Pb) Pb isotopic signature, we present the first U-Th-Pb, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and Re-Os isotopic dataset for spinel peridotite xenoliths sampling the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath Zealandia. Strongly metasomatised xenoliths converge to a restricted range of Sr and Nd isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7028-0.7033; εNd ≈ +3-+6) reflecting pervasive overprinting of their original melt depletion signatures by carbonatite-rich melts. In contrast, rare, weakly metasomatised samples possess radiogenic Nd isotopic compositions (εNd > +15) and unradiogenic Sr isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr < 0.7022). This is consistent with melt extraction at ca. 2.0 Ga and in accord with widespread Paleoproterozoic Re-Os model ages from both weakly metasomatised and the more numerous, strongly metasomatised xenoliths. The coupling of chalcophile (Os), and lithophile (Sr and Nd) melt depletion ages from peridotite xenoliths on a regional scale under Zealandia argues for preservation of a significant mantle keel (⩾2 million km3) associated with a large-scale Paleoproterozoic melting event. Lead isotopic compositions are highly variable with 206Pb/204Pb = 17.3-21.3 (n = 34) and two further samples with more extreme compositions of 22.4 and 25.4, but are not correlated with other isotopic data or U/Pb and Th/Pb ratios in either strongly or weakly metasomatised xenoliths; this signature is thus a recent addition to the lithospheric mantle. Lead model ages suggest that this metasomatism occurred in the last 200 m.y., with errorchrons from individual localities

  5. Long-term effects of traumatic experience: Comparison study in the adolescent IDPs in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Chieko; Ristic, Dragana; Niregi, Mitsuki

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the long term psychological effects of war stress regarded as traumatic experience. The subjects are Serbian internally displaced people (IDP) of adolescent population from Kosovo. It is a very big concern whether the adolescents would overcome the social and psychological difficulties caused by the war stress in order to reconstruct the better society. The result came out that the long-term effects still exist in PTSD, depression and hopelessness, which affects self-esteem and the attitude in purpose in life that are important factors for personality development. This paper also examines the difference between IDPs with war stress and the adolescent sufferers of the big earthquake in Japan.

  6. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Measurements of Titanium Valence States in Refractory Nodule Pyroxenes from a Likely Cometary IDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joswiak, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Ishii, H. A.; Sutton, S. R.

    2015-07-01

    Mineralogical properties combined with Ti EELs measurements on fassaites from refractory nodules in an IDP of likely cometary origin are consistent with formation in a restricted nebular environment with variable ƒO2.

  7. Uncertainty in hydrological signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, I. K.; McMillan, H. K.

    2015-09-01

    Information about rainfall-runoff processes is essential for hydrological analyses, modelling and water-management applications. A hydrological, or diagnostic, signature quantifies such information from observed data as an index value. Signatures are widely used, e.g. for catchment classification, model calibration and change detection. Uncertainties in the observed data - including measurement inaccuracy and representativeness as well as errors relating to data management - propagate to the signature values and reduce their information content. Subjective choices in the calculation method are a further source of uncertainty. We review the uncertainties relevant to different signatures based on rainfall and flow data. We propose a generally applicable method to calculate these uncertainties based on Monte Carlo sampling and demonstrate it in two catchments for common signatures including rainfall-runoff thresholds, recession analysis and basic descriptive signatures of flow distribution and dynamics. Our intention is to contribute to awareness and knowledge of signature uncertainty, including typical sources, magnitude and methods for its assessment. We found that the uncertainties were often large (i.e. typical intervals of ±10-40 % relative uncertainty) and highly variable between signatures. There was greater uncertainty in signatures that use high-frequency responses, small data subsets, or subsets prone to measurement errors. There was lower uncertainty in signatures that use spatial or temporal averages. Some signatures were sensitive to particular uncertainty types such as rating-curve form. We found that signatures can be designed to be robust to some uncertainty sources. Signature uncertainties of the magnitudes we found have the potential to change the conclusions of hydrological and ecohydrological analyses, such as cross-catchment comparisons or inferences about dominant processes.

  8. Constraining recharge and groundwater flow processes in hard-rock aquifers in temperate maritime climate using stable isotope signatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilatova, Katarina; Ofterdinger, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Recharge estimates and in understanding flow process in hard rock aquifers pose significant challenges. These arise from structural complexities of the hardrock aquifers and are further complicated by variability of the superficial cover. A comparative study of three metamorphic catchments situated in the North of Ireland is presented in this study, each with contrasting geology, glaciation history and consequently superficial cover. The presented study focusses on two main strains. Firstly, due to lack of existing records, stable water isotopes in precipitation (δ18O and δ2H) were monitored at the research sites and their temporal and spatial variability was examined. Secondly, flow processes and dynamics of groundwater recharge based on continuous records of stable isotopes in groundwater, collected along catchment transects from various depths, and its variability in relation to the acquired precipitation signal were studied. Each precipitation station exhibited distinct isotopic signatures, where weather effect and proximity to coastline are the main controlling factors governing the isotope signatures. Moreover, in each of the stations the isotopic signature varied seasonally and thus stable isotopes proved a useful tool for assessing the dynamics of groundwater recharge. The analysis of isotope signatures in precipitation and groundwater from various depths within the hard rock aquifers allowed to evaluate the timescale of recharge, with rapid responses varying from few days up to several months. In general, the recharge appeared continuous over the hydrological year within wetter catchments with higher annual precipitation amounts purging the hardrock aquifers throughout the year. However, within comparatively dryer catchments recharge has a more seasonal character, predominantly taking place during the winter half of the year. Spatially, the recharge is highly localised within the elevated catchment areas, where superficial deposits are scarce and the

  9. NUDT16 and ITPA play a dual protective role in maintaining chromosome stability and cell growth by eliminating dIDP/IDP and dITP/ITP from nucleotide pools in mammals.

    PubMed

    Abolhassani, Nona; Iyama, Teruaki; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Ohno, Mizuki; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2010-05-01

    Mammalian inosine triphosphatase encoded by ITPA gene hydrolyzes ITP and dITP to monophosphates, avoiding their deleterious effects. Itpa(-) mice exhibited perinatal lethality, and significantly higher levels of inosine in cellular RNA and deoxyinosine in nuclear DNA were detected in Itpa(-) embryos than in wild-type embryos. Therefore, we examined the effects of ITPA deficiency on mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Itpa(-) primary MEFs lacking ITP-hydrolyzing activity exhibited a prolonged doubling time, increased chromosome abnormalities and accumulation of single-strand breaks in nuclear DNA, compared with primary MEFs prepared from wild-type embryos. However, immortalized Itpa(-) MEFs had neither of these phenotypes and had a significantly higher ITP/IDP-hydrolyzing activity than Itpa(-) embryos or primary MEFs. Mammalian NUDT16 proteins exhibit strong dIDP/IDP-hydrolyzing activity and similarly low levels of Nudt16 mRNA and protein were detected in primary MEFs derived from both wild-type and Itpa(-) embryos. However, immortalized Itpa(-) MEFs expressed significantly higher levels of Nudt16 than the wild type. Moreover, introduction of silencing RNAs against Nudt16 into immortalized Itpa(-) MEFs reproduced ITPA-deficient phenotypes. We thus conclude that NUDT16 and ITPA play a dual protective role for eliminating dIDP/IDP and dITP/ITP from nucleotide pools in mammals.

  10. Impact of jerry can disinfection in a camp environment - experiences in an IDP camp in Northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Steele, Andre; Clarke, Brian; Watkins, Owen

    2008-12-01

    In July 2007, a study by the Centre for Environmental Health Engineering, at the University of Surrey, assessed a modified method of jerry can cleaning in an internally displaced persons (IDP) camp in Kitgum, N. Uganda. The poor condition of drinking water vessels used in the camp was confirmed as a potential source for microbiological contamination both visually and by microbiological testing. Jerry cans were disinfected using high strength sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) generated using an experimental AquaChlor Solar unit. The study suggested that regular jerry can cleaning, using a high strength chlorine based disinfectant, offers an effective method of alleviating the adverse effects of contamination in water collection and storage vessels. Results indicated that the method is capable of significantly reducing thermo-tolerant coliform numbers to below 5 cfu/100 ml in most cases. Chlorine strength depletion after repetitive cleaning confirms the impact of process. The method does not substitute for good hygiene practices, which are essential for maintaining water quality in the household. It is suggested that the process can play an important role during outbreaks of water-borne diseases, such as cholera, particularly if combined with regular water disinfection.

  11. What does the fine-scale petrography of IDPs reveal about grain formation and evolution in the early solar system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, John

    1994-01-01

    The 'pyroxene' interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) may be the best samples for investigation of primordial grain-forming reactions because they appear to have experienced negligible post-accretional alteration. They are likely to continue to yield information about gas-to-solid condensation and other grain-forming reactions that may have occurred either in the solar nebular or presolar interstellar environments. An immediate challenge lies in understanding the nanometer-scale petrography of the ultrafine-grained aggregates in 'pyroxene' IDP's. Whether these aggregates contain components from diverse grain-forming environments may ultimately be answered by systematic petrographic studies using electron microscopes capable of high spatial resolution microanalysis. It may be more difficult to decipher evidence of grain formation and evolution in 'olivine' and 'layer silicate' IDP's because they appear to have experienced post-accretional alteration. Most of the studied 'olivine' IDPs have been subjected to heating and equilibration, perhaps during atmospheric entry, while the 'layer silicate' IDP's have experienced aqueous alteration.

  12. Brain signatures of artificial language processing: evidence challenging the critical period hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Friederici, Angela D; Steinhauer, Karsten; Pfeifer, Erdmut

    2002-01-08

    Adult second language learning seems to be more difficult and less efficient than first language acquisition during childhood. By using event-related brain potentials, we show that adults who learned a miniature artificial language display a similar real-time pattern of brain activation when processing this language as native speakers do when processing natural languages. Participants trained in the artificial language showed two event-related brain potential components taken to reflect early automatic and late controlled syntactic processes, whereas untrained participants did not. This result challenges the common view that late second language learners process language in a principally different way from native speakers. Our findings demonstrate that a small system of grammatical rules can be syntactically instantiated by the adult speaker in a way that strongly resembles native-speaker sentence processing.

  13. Modern Microbial Fossilization Processes as Signatures for Interpreting Ancient Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Microbial Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Penny A.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Nelman, Mayra; Byrne, Monica; Longazo, Teresa; Galindo, Charles; McKay, David S.; Sams, Clarence

    2003-01-01

    Terrestrial biotas from microbially dominated hypersaline environments will help us understand microbial fossilization processes. Hypersaline tolerant biota from Storr's Lake, San Salvador Island (Bahamas), Mono Lake (California), and the Dead Sea (Israel) represent marine and nonmarine sites for comparative studies of potential analogs for interpreting some Mars meteorites and Mars sample return rocks [1,2,3,4,5,6]. The purpose of this study is to compare microbial fossilization processes, the dominant associated minerals, and potential diagenic implications.

  14. Signature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyati, Vittal P.

    The reduction of vehicle radar signature is accomplished by means of vehicle shaping, the use of microwave frequencies-absorbent materials, and either passive or active cancellation techniques; such techniques are also useful in the reduction of propulsion system-associated IR emissions. In some anticipated scenarios, the objective is not signature-reduction but signature control, for deception, via decoy vehicles that mimic the signature characteristics of actual weapons systems. As the stealthiness of airframes and missiles increases, their propulsion systems' exhaust plumes assume a more important role in detection by an adversary.

  15. Stable isotope signatures in bulk samples from two soils with contrasting characteristics. What do they tell about ongoing pedogenic processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; dos Anjos Leal, Otávio; Knicker, Heike; Pinheiro Dick, Deborah; González-Vila, Francisco J.; González-Pérez, José A.

    2014-05-01

    Isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been proven as a promising tool for the monitoring of biogeochemical processes in soil. In this work, stable isotope signatures of light elements δ15N, δ13C, δ18O and δD were determined for two soils with contrasting characteristics in terms of climate, vegetation, land use and management. The studied soils were a Cambisol from a subtropical area (Paraná region, South Brazil) and an Arenosol from a Mediterranean climate (Andalusia, South Spain). A Flash 2000 HT (N, C, S, H and O) elemental analyzer (Thermo Scientific) coupled to a Delta V Advantage IRMS (Thermo Scientific) was used. Isotopic ratios are reported as parts per thousand (o ) deviations from appropriate standards recognized by the international atomic energy agency (IAEA). In a first approach we took advantage of the well-known different δ13C signature between plants using either the C4 or C3 carbon fixation pathway (O'Leary, 1981). The Arenosol (Spain) revealed a δ13C signature which is clearly in the range of C3 plants (-26 to -30 o ). Different plant canopies (tree, shrubs or ferns) caused only slight variations δ13C (STD= 0.98). In contrast, the Cambisol (Brazil) showed less depletion of the heavier carbon isotope corresponding to C4 predominant vegetation. In addition an increase from -19 o in the soil surface (0 - 5 cm) to -16 o in the subsoil (20 - 30 cm) was observed in line with a recent (2 years old) shift of the land use from the predominant C4 grassland to eucalypt (C3) cultivation. Crossplots of δ15N vs. δ18O may provide information about nitrate (NO3-) sources and N cycling (Kendall, 1998). In the Mediterranean Arenosol this signal (δ18O = 30o δ15N = 2o ) was found compatible with a predominant nitrate atmospheric deposition, whereas the signal in the Brazilian Cambisol pointed to the use of a mineral N fertilization with signs of denitrification processes (δ18O = 13o δ15N = 9o ). No conclusive results could be obtained from the

  16. Kabrit ki gen twòp mèt: understanding gaps in WASH services in Haiti's IDP camps.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Mark; Levey, Tania

    2014-04-01

    Despite the enormous infusion of post-quake aid to Haiti, cholera had killed more than 8,000 people by January 2013. Based on two mixed-method studies of a random sample of 108 internally displaced person (IDP) camps and 168 interviews with agency representatives and recipients, this article examines the prevalence of factors that have proven most relevant to the rapid spread of cholera, particularly the provision of water and sanitation services in IDP camps. The study reveals that 30% of IDP camps had no toilets and 40% had no access to water before the outbreak, with only minimal progress after three months. Using bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses, this article explores patterns in the gaps of services with a range of variables such as NGO camp management, municipality and land-owners. It offers several theoretical and policy explanations for low level of services, concluding with a series of recommendations for better coordination and management.

  17. The Neural Signatures of Processing Semantic End Values in Automatic Number Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Pinhas, Michal; Buchman, Chananel; Lavro, Dmitri; Mesika, David; Tzelgov, Joseph; Berger, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The brain activity associated with processing numerical end values has received limited research attention. The present study explored the neural correlates associated with processing semantic end values under conditions of automatic number processing. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants performed the numerical Stroop task, in which they were asked to compare the physical size of pairs of numbers, while ignoring their numerical values. The smallest end value in the set, which is a task irrelevant factor, was manipulated between participant groups. We focused on the processing of the lower end values of 0 and 1 because these numbers were found to be automatically tagged as the “smallest.” Behavioral results showed that the size congruity effect was modulated by the presence of the smallest end value in the pair. ERP data revealed a spatially extended centro-parieto-occipital P3 that was enhanced for congruent versus incongruent trials. Importantly, over centro-parietal sites, the P3 congruity effect (congruent minus incongruent) was larger for pairs containing the smallest end value than for pairs containing non-smallest values. These differences in the congruency effect were localized to the precuneus. The presence of an end value within the pair also modulated P3 latency. Our results provide the first neural evidence for the encoding of numerical end values. They further demonstrate that the use of end values as anchors is a primary aspect of processing symbolic numerical information. PMID:26640436

  18. Attachment Patterns Trigger Differential Neural Signature of Emotional Processing in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Decety, Jean; Huepe, David; Cardona, Juan Felipe; Canales-Johnson, Andres; Sigman, Mariano; Mikulan, Ezequiel; Helgiu, Elena; Baez, Sandra; Manes, Facundo; Lopez, Vladimir; Ibañez, Agustín

    2013-01-01

    Background Research suggests that individuals with different attachment patterns process social information differently, especially in terms of facial emotion recognition. However, few studies have explored social information processes in adolescents. This study examined the behavioral and ERP correlates of emotional processing in adolescents with different attachment orientations (insecure attachment group and secure attachment group; IAG and SAG, respectively). This study also explored the association of these correlates to individual neuropsychological profiles. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a modified version of the dual valence task (DVT), in which participants classify stimuli (faces and words) according to emotional valence (positive or negative). Results showed that the IAG performed significantly worse than SAG on tests of executive function (EF attention, processing speed, visuospatial abilities and cognitive flexibility). In the behavioral DVT, the IAG presented lower performance and accuracy. The IAG also exhibited slower RTs for stimuli with negative valence. Compared to the SAG, the IAG showed a negative bias for faces; a larger P1 and attenuated N170 component over the right hemisphere was observed. A negative bias was also observed in the IAG for word stimuli, which was demonstrated by comparing the N170 amplitude of the IAG with the valence of the SAG. Finally, the amplitude of the N170 elicited by the facial stimuli correlated with EF in both groups (and negative valence with EF in the IAG). Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that individuals with different attachment patterns process key emotional information and corresponding EF differently. This is evidenced by an early modulation of ERP components’ amplitudes, which are correlated with behavioral and neuropsychological effects. In brief, attachments patterns appear to impact multiple domains, such as emotional processing and EFs. PMID:23940552

  19. Depletions of sulfur and/or zinc in IDPs: Are they reliable indicators of atmospheric entry heating?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Bajt, S.; Kloeck, W.; Thomas, K. L.; Keller, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    The degree of heating of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) on Earth atmospheric entry is important in distinguishing cometary particles from main-belt asteroidal particles. Depletions in the volatile elements S and Zn were proposed as chemical indicators of significant entry heating. The S and Zn contents of cosmic dust particles were correlated with physical indicators of atmospheric entry heating, such as the production of magnetite and the loss of solar wind implanted He. The results indicate that the Zn content of IDP's is a useful indicator of entry heating, but the S content seems to be less useful.

  20. Gene expression signatures defining fundamental biological processes in pluripotent, early, and late differentiated embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, John Antonydas; Doss, Michael Xavier; Winkler, Johannes; Wagh, Vilas; Hescheler, Jürgen; Kolde, Raivo; Vilo, Jaak; Schulz, Herbert; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2012-09-01

    Investigating the molecular mechanisms controlling the in vivo developmental program postembryogenesis is challenging and time consuming. However, the developmental program can be partly recapitulated in vitro by the use of cultured embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Similar to the totipotent cells of the inner cell mass, gene expression and morphological changes in cultured ESCs occur hierarchically during their differentiation, with epiblast cells developing first, followed by germ layers and finally somatic cells. Combination of high throughput -omics technologies with murine ESCs offers an alternative approach for studying developmental processes toward organ-specific cell phenotypes. We have made an attempt to understand differentiation networks controlling embryogenesis in vivo using a time kinetic, by identifying molecules defining fundamental biological processes in the pluripotent state as well as in early and the late differentiation stages of ESCs. Our microarray data of the differentiation of the ESCs clearly demonstrate that the most critical early differentiation processes occur at days 2 and 3 of differentiation. Besides monitoring well-annotated markers pertinent to both self-renewal and potency (capacity to differentiate to different cell lineage), we have identified candidate molecules for relevant signaling pathways. These molecules can be further investigated in gain and loss-of-function studies to elucidate their role for pluripotency and differentiation. As an example, siRNA knockdown of MageB16, a gene highly expressed in the pluripotent state, has proven its influence in inducing differentiation when its function is repressed.

  1. New class of supersymmetric signatures in the processes gg{yields}HH', VH

    SciTech Connect

    Gounaris, G. J.; Layssac, J.; Renard, F. M.

    2009-07-01

    Within the minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM) and standard model (SM) frameworks, we analyze the 1loop electroweak predictions for the helicity amplitudes describing the 17 processes gg{yields}HH', and the 9 processes gg{yields}VH; where H, H{sup '} denote Higgs or Goldstone bosons, while V=Z, W{sup {+-}}. Concentrating on MSSM, we then investigate how the asymptotic helicity conservation (HCns) property of supersymmetry (SUSY) affects the amplitudes at the LHC energy range and what is the corresponding situation in the SM, where no HCns theorem exists. HCns is subsequently used to construct many relations among the cross sections of the above MSSM processes, depending only on the standard MSSM angles {alpha} and {beta} characterizing the two Higgs doublets. These relations should be asymptotically exact but as the energy decreases toward the LHC range, mass-depending deviations should start appearing. Provided the SUSY scale is not too high, these relations may remain roughly correct, even at the LHC energy range.

  2. Electrophysiological signatures of event words: Dissociating syntactic and semantic category effects in lexical processing.

    PubMed

    Lapinskaya, Natalia; Uzomah, Uchechukwu; Bedny, Marina; Lau, Ellen

    2016-12-01

    Numerous theories have been proposed regarding the brain's organization and retrieval of lexical information. Neurophysiological dissociations in processing different word classes, particularly nouns and verbs, have been extensively documented, supporting the contribution of grammatical class to lexical organization. However, the contribution of semantic properties to these processing differences is still unresolved. We aim to isolate this contribution by comparing ERPs to verbs (e.g. wade), object nouns (e.g. cookie), and event nouns (e.g. concert) in a paired similarity judgment task, as event nouns share grammatical category with object nouns but some semantic properties with verbs. We find that event nouns pattern with verbs in eliciting a more positive response than object nouns across left anterior electrodes 300-500ms after word presentation. This time-window has been strongly linked to lexical-semantic access by prior electrophysiological work. Thus, the similarity of the response to words referring to concepts with more complex participant structure and temporal continuity extends across grammatical class (event nouns and verbs), and contrasts with the words that refer to objects (object nouns). This contrast supports a semantic, as well as syntactic, contribution to the differential neural organization and processing of lexical items. We also observed a late (500-800ms post-stimulus) posterior positivity for object nouns relative to event nouns and verbs at the second word of each pair, which may reflect the impact of semantic properties on the similarity judgment task.

  3. Chicxulub Impact Melts: Geochemical Signatures of Target Lithology Mixing and Post-Impact Hydrothermal Fluid Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kring, David A.; Zurcher, Lukas; Horz, Freidrich; Mertzmann, Stanley A.

    2004-01-01

    Impact melts within complex impact craters are generally homogeneous, unless they differentiated, contain immiscible melt components, or were hydrothermally altered while cooling. The details of these processes, however, and their chemical consequences, are poorly understood. The best opportunity to unravel them may lie with the Chicxulub impact structure, because it is the world s most pristine (albeit buried) large impact crater. The Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project recovered approx. 100 meters of impactites in a continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 (YAX-1) borehole. This dramatically increased the amount of melt available for analyses, which was previously limited to two small samples N17 and N19) recovered from the Yucatan-6 (Y-6) borehole and one sample (N10) recovered from the Chicxulub-1 (C-1) borehole. In this study, we describe the chemical compositions of six melt samples over an approx. 40 m section of the core and compare them to previous melt samples from the Y-6 and C-1 boreholes.

  4. Signature of magmatic processes in strainmeter records at Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagagli, M.; Montagna, C. P.; Papale, P.; Longo, A.

    2017-01-01

    Volcanic unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera, Southern Italy, is characterized by episodes of ground deformation, seismicity, and enhanced fumarolic activity; whether its origin is purely hydrothermal or magmatic is highly debated. We have identified ground deformation patterns in strainmeter records from a heightened unrest period in late 2006, closely resembling synthetic signals from numerical simulations of shallow magma chamber replenishment and mixing. Together with other recent findings, our results depict a situation whereby periodic arrivals of deep magma feed a shallow intrusion at 3-4 km depth. These results suggest that the analysis of strainmeter records, coupled with advanced numerical simulations of magma dynamics, could lead to new approaches in imaging subsurface dynamic processes in volcanic areas.

  5. Assisting Groundwater Exploration for Refugee/IDP Camps by Remote Sensing and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Lorenz; Robl, Jörg; Hilberg, Sylke; Braun, Andreas; Rogenhofer, Edith; Dirnberger, Daniel; Strasser, Thomas; Füreder, Petra; Lang, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Refugee camps and camps of internally displaced people (IDP) often form spontaneously or have to be established rapidly in remote, rural areas, where little is known about the hydrogeological situation. This requires a rapid assessment of the availability of groundwater to enable humanitarian organisations like Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) to supply the camp population with sufficient potable water. Within the project EO4HumEn, hydrogeological reconnaissance maps are produced for MSF by integrating remote sensing data like SRTM, Landsat, ASTER, optical very-high resolution (VHR) imagery, and SAR data. Depending on the specific situation of the camps, these maps contain topography, permanent and temporary water bodies, hard rock outcrops and their geological variability, locations of existing boreholes and wells (if available), potential contamination sources, roads and obstacles (e.g. swampland). In areas characterized by unconsolidated sediments, specific landforms like alluvial fans, meanders, levees, deltas or beach ridges are identified. Here, the reconnaissance map can be sufficient to plan drill sites for groundwater abstraction. In hard rock areas, the lithology is determined, if the vegetation cover allows it. Fractures, faults and karst features are mapped to resolve the structural setting. Anomalous vegetation patterns are interpreted in terms of near-surface groundwater. The maps provide an overview of the camp surroundings, and allow the field hydrogeologists to focus their investigations on the most promising locations. The maps are complemented by a literature review on geological maps, articles and reports available for the area of interest. Assisting groundwater exploration by remote sensing data analysis is not a new development, but it has not been widely adopted by the humanitarian community as interfaces between humanitarian organisations and GI-scientists were missing. EO4HumEn fills this gap by a strong interdisciplinary cooperation

  6. Inplementation of an automated signal processing approach for the analysis of chemical spectral signatures collected from FT-IR mounted in an aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Kroutil, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    The automated detection of chemical spectral signatures using a passive infrared Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer mounted in an aircraft is a difficult challenge due to the small total infrared energy contribution of a particular chemical species compared to the background signature. The detection of spectral signatures is complicated by the fact that a large, widely varying infrared background is present that is coupled with the presence of a number of chemical interferents in the atmosphere. This paper describes a mathematical technique that has been demonstrated to automatically detect specific chemical species in an automated processing environment. The data analysis methodology has been demonstrated to be effective using data of low spectral resolution at low aircraft altitudes. An overview of the implementation and basic concepts of the approach are presented.

  7. The Global Geometry of River Drainage Basins and the Signature of Tectonic and Autogenic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachetta, E.; Willett, S.

    2015-12-01

    The plan-form structure of the world's river basins contains extensive information regarding tectonic, paleo-geographic and paleo-climate conditions, but interpretation of this structure is complicated by the need to disentangle these processes from the autogenic behavior of fluvial processes. One method of interpreting this structure is by utilizing the well-established scaling between drainage area and channel slope. Integration of this scaling relationship predicts a relationship between channel length and downstream integrated drainage area, referred to in recent studies as χ (Willett et al., 2014). In this paper, we apply this methodology at a continental scale by calculating χ for the world's river networks using hydrological information from the HydroSHED (Hydrological data and maps based on SHuttleElevation Derivatives at multiple Scales) suite of geo-referenced data sets (drainage directions and flow accumulations). River pixels were identified using a minimum drainage area of 5 km2. A constant value of m/n of 0.45 was assumed. We applied a new method to correct χ within closed basins where base level is different from sea level. Mapping of χ illustrates the geometric stability of a river network, thus highlighting where tectonic or climatic forcing has perturbed the shape and geometry. Each continent shows characteristic features. Continental rift margins on all continents show clear asymmetric escarpments indicating inland migration. Active orogenic belts break up older river basins, but are difficult to interpret because of spatially variable uplift rates. Regions of recent tilting are evident even in cratonic areas by lateral reorganizations of basins. Past and pending river captures are identified on all continents. Very few regions on Earth appear to be in near-equilibrium, though some are identified; for example the Urals appears to provide a stable continental divide for Eurasia. Our analysis of maps of χ at the global scale quantifies a

  8. Matched-field processing, geoacoustic inversion, and source signature recovery of blue whale vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Thode, A M; D'Spain, G L; Kuperman, W A

    2000-03-01

    Matched-field processing (MFP) and global inversion techniques have been applied to vocalizations from four whales recorded on a 48-element tilted vertical array off the Channel Islands in 1996. Global inversions from selected whale calls using as few as eight elements extracted information about the surrounding ocean bottom composition, array shape, and the animal's position. These inversion results were then used to conduct straightforward MFP on other calls. The sediment sound-speed inversion estimates are consistent with those derived from sediment samples collected in the area. In general, most animals swam from the east to west, but one animal remained within approximately 500 m of its original position over 45 min. All whales vocalized between 10 and 40 m depth. Three acoustic sequences are discussed in detail: the first illustrating a match between an acoustic track and visual sighting, the second tracking two whales to ranges out to 8 km, and the final sequence demonstrating high-resolution dive profiles from an animal that changed its course to avoid the research platform FLIP (floating instrument platform). This last whale displayed an unusual diversity of signals that include three strong frequency-modulated (FM) downsweeps which contain possible signs of an internal resonance. The arrival of this same whale coincided with a sudden change in oceanographic conditions.

  9. Signature of nonlinear damping in geometric structure of a nonequilibrium process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-jin; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the effect of nonlinear interaction on the geometric structure of a nonequilibrium process. Specifically, by considering a driven-dissipative system where a stochastic variable x is damped either linearly (∝x ) or nonlinearly (∝x3 ) while driven by a white noise, we compute the time-dependent probability density functions (PDFs) during the relaxation towards equilibrium from an initial nonequilibrium state. From these PDFs, we quantify the information change by the information length L , which is the total number of statistically distinguishable states which the system passes through from the initial state to the final state. By exploiting different initial PDFs and the strength D of the white-noise forcing, we show that for a linear system, L increases essentially linearly with an initial mean value y0 of x as L ∝y0 , demonstrating the preservation of a linear geometry. In comparison, in the case of a cubic damping, L has a power-law scaling as L ∝y0m , with the exponent m depending on D and the width of the initial PDF. The rate at which information changes also exhibits a robust power-law scaling with time for the cubic damping.

  10. Dietary Tyrosine/Phenylalanine Depletion Effects on Behavioral and Brain Signatures of Human Motivational Processing

    PubMed Central

    Bjork, James M; Grant, Steven J; Chen, Gang; Hommer, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission is critical for motivational processing. We assessed whether disruption of DA synthesis in healthy controls using an amino-acid beverage devoid of catecholamine precursors (tyrosine–phenylalanine depletion (TPD)) would blunt recruitment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) by rewards. Sixteen controls ingested each of a tyr/phe-depleting beverage (DEP) or a tyr/phe-balanced (BAL) control beverage in two laboratory visits. Five hours after consumption of each drink, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while they viewed anticipatory cues to respond to a target to either win money or avoid losing money. TPD did not exert main effects on mood or on task behavior, but affected brain activation. In right NAcc, TPD blunted activation by anticipation of high rewards. In left NAcc, recruitment anticipating high rewards was modulated by individual differences in mood change across the DEP drink day, where subjects whose mood worsened following TPD (relative to within-day mood change under BAL conditions) also showed lower activation under DEP conditions relative to BAL conditions. Exploratory analysis indicated that TPD qualitatively blunted the voxel-wise spatial extent of suprathreshold activation by reward anticipation. Finally, loss outcomes activated anterior insula under DEP conditions but not under BAL conditions. These data indicate that: (1) dietary depletion of catacholamine precursors will blunt dopaminergic mesolimbic activity, and (2) in controls, synthetic pathways of this neurocircuitry maintain sufficient buffering capacity to resist an effect on motivated behavior. Additional studies are needed to determine if clinical populations would show similar resistance to behavioral effects of TPD. PMID:23995581

  11. Relative Amino Acid Concentrations as a Signature for Parent Body Processes of Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botta, Oliver; Glavin, Daniel P.; Kminek, Gerhard; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Most meteorites are thought to have originated from objects in the asteroid belt. Carbonaceous chondrites, which contain significant amounts of organic carbon including complex organic compounds, have also been suggested to be derived from comets. The current model for the synthesis of organic compounds found in carbonaceous chondrites includes the survival of interstellar organic compounds and the processing of some of these compounds on the meteoritic parent body. The amino acid composition of five CM carbonaceous chondrites, two CIs, one CR, and one CV3 have been measured using hot water extraction-vapor hydrolysis, OPA/NAC derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Total amino acid abundances in the bulk meteorites as well as the amino acid concentrations relative to glycine = 1.0 for beta-alanine, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and D-alanine were determined. Additional data for three Antarctic CM meteorites were obtained from the literature. All CM meteorites analyzed in this study show a complex distribution of amino acids and a high variability in total concentration ranging from approx. 15,300 to approx. 5800 parts per billion (ppb), while the CIs show a total amino acid abundance of approx. 4300 ppb. The relatively (compared to glycine) high AIB content found in all the CMs is a strong indicator that Strecker-cyanohydrin synthesis is the dominant pathway for the formation of amino acids found in these meteorites. The data from the Antarctic CM carbonaceous chondrites are inconsistent with the results from the other CMs, perhaps due to influences from the Antarctic ice that were effective during their residence time. In contrast to CMs, the data from the CI carbonaceous chondrites indicate that the Strecker synthesis was not active on their parent bodies.

  12. Ion distributions in the vicinity of Mars: Signatures of heating and acceleration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, H.; Stenberg, G.; Futaana, Y.; Holmström, M.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Fedorov, A.

    2012-02-01

    More than three years of data from the ASPERA-3 instrument on-board Mars Express has been used to compile average distribution functions of ions in and around the Mars induced magnetosphere. We present samples of average distribution functions, as well as average flux patterns based on the average distribution functions, all suitable for detailed comparison with models of the near-Mars space environment. The average heavy ion distributions close to the planet form thermal populations with a temperature of 3 to 10 eV. The distribution functions in the tail consist of two populations, one cold which is an extension of the low altitude population, and one accelerated population of ionospheric origin ions. All significant fluxes of heavy ions in the tail are tailward. The heavy ions in the magnetosheath form a plume with the flow aligned with the bow shock, and a more radial flow direction than the solar wind origin flow. Summarizing the escape processes, ionospheric ions are heated close to the planet, presumably through wave-particle interaction. These heated populations are accelerated in the tailward direction in a restricted region. Another significant escape path is through the magnetosheath. A part of the ionospheric population is likely accelerated in the radial direction, out into the magnetosheath, although pick up of an oxygen exosphere may also be a viable source for this escape. Increased energy input from the solar wind during CIR events appear to mainly increase the number flux of escaping particles, the average energy of the escaping particles is not strongly affected. Heavy ions on the dayside may precipitate and cause sputtering of the atmosphere, though fluxes are likely lower than 0.4 × 1023 s-1.

  13. A Carbon-XANES Study of IDP Organic Diversity: Evidence for Multiple Sources of Early Solar System Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Wirick, S.; Keller, L. P.

    2013-09-01

    We identified >30 distinct C-XANES spectra, differing in positions, relative areas, and widths of C=O and C=C absorptions, in a single ultramicrotome section of a CP IDP, suggesting multiple sources for organic matter in the early solar system.

  14. Spatially Resolved Acid Dissolution of IDPs: The State of Carbon and the Abundance of Diamonds in the Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Gezo, J. C.; Hill, H. G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Ultramicrotome sections of IDPs have been successfully etched with HF to isolate and reveal the microdistribution of carbonaceous material. The sections are evaluated for nanodiamonds, 3.4 micron feature, GEMS and the origin of low albedo in small interplanetary particles.

  15. Advanced SEM-EDX and Isotope Mapping of a Refractory Grain in a Fine-Grained IDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Salge, T.; Brearley, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    We present high spatial resolution SEM-EDX and O isotope mapping to reveal the presence of a melilite-olivine refractory grain in a fine-grained IDP. We use this to discuss transport of material from the inner solar system and formation of comets.

  16. Stable Isotopic Signatures in the Isolated Brine Cyroecosystem of Lake Vida Reveal Evidence of both Abiotic and Biotic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. E.; Ostrom, N. E.; Glazer, B. T.; McKay, C.; Kenig, F.; Loeffler, F. E.; Fritsen, C. H.; Doran, P. T.

    2011-12-01

    Lake Vida in the Victoria Valley of East Antarctica harbors ice-entrained brine that has been isolated from surface processes for several thousand years. The brine conditions (permanently dark, temperature of -13.4 °C, lack of oxygen, and pH of 6.2) and geochemistry are highly unusual. As an example, the brine contains excessive quantities of both reduced and oxidized nitrogen in nearly all forms, which in several cases are the highest levels found among natural ecosystems on Earth. Though this cryoecosystem appears to be relatively inhospitable, we have evidence that microbial life persists in abundance (cell levels over 107 cells per mL), is capable of protein production at in situ temperatures, and harbors a unique, but not necessarily novel, assemblage of bacterial phylotypes spanning at least eight phyla. In order to assess in situ microbial activities occurring today and in the past, and test hypotheses concerning energy generation in the brine cryoecosystem, the stable isotope signatures of nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen have been characterized in liquid and dissolved gas phases of the brine. The data provide evidence for both biotic and potentially abiotic formation of different fractions. The site preference of 15N-nitrous oxide (-3.64) suggests that the primary source of this dissolved gas, which is found at levels as high as 86 μM, is biologically produced by denitrification pathways. This appears to be consistent with detection of Marinobacter and Psychrobacter-related bacterial rRNA gene sequences and isolates in the brine microbial community. On the other hand, dissolved hydrogen present in the brine harbors an δH-H2 isotope signature suggesting that abiotic (potentially via serpentinization) or biotic production is equivocal based on the significant levels of fractionation observed. We postulate however, that a serpentinization production route is more favorable in this system that lies in a basin comprised of Ferrar dolerite sills and granite

  17. Relationship of isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) isomerase activity to isoprene emission of oak leaves.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Nicolas; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2002-10-01

    Oaks emit large amounts of isoprene, a compound that plays an important role in tropospheric chemistry. Isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI, E.C. 5.3.3.2) catalyzes the isomerization of isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) to dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), and in isoprene-emitting plants, isoprene synthase (IS) converts the DMADP to isoprene. To study the role of IDI in isoprene biosynthesis of oak leaves, we compared IDI and IS activities in pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) with the isoprene emission rates of these species. We developed a non-radioactive enzyme assay to detect IDI activity in crude leaf extracts of Q. robur. The substrate dependency of IDI activity showed biphasic kinetics with Michaelis constants (K(m)(IDP)) of 0.7 +/- 0.2 micro M for a high-affinity phase and 39.5 +/- 6.9 micro M for a low-affinity phase, potentially attributable to different IDI isoforms. Under standard assay conditions, the temperature optimum for IDI activity was about 42 degrees C, but IDI activity was detectable up to 60 degrees C. A sharp pH optimum appeared around pH 7, with 20 mM Mg(2+) also required for IDI activity. Neither IDI activity nor IS activity showed diurnal variation in Q. robur leaves. The sum of IDI activities showed a significant linear correlation with IS activity in both Q. robur and Q. pubescens leaves, and both enzyme activities showed a linear relationship to isoprene emission factors in leaves of these oak species, indicating the possible involvement of IDI in isoprene biosynthesis by oak leaves.

  18. TOP-IDP-scale: a new amino acid scale measuring propensity for intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Campen, Andrew; Williams, Ryan M; Brown, Celeste J; Meng, Jingwei; Uversky, Vladimir N; Dunker, A Keith

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins carry out various biological functions while lacking ordered secondary and/or tertiary structure. In order to find general intrinsic properties of amino acid residues that are responsible for the absence of ordered structure in intrinsically disordered proteins we surveyed 517 amino acid scales. Each of these scales was taken as an independent attribute for the subsequent analysis. For a given attribute value X, which is averaged over a consecutive string of amino acids, and for a given data set having both ordered and disordered segments, the conditional probabilities P(s(o) | x) and P(s(d) | x) for order and disorder, respectively, can be determined for all possible values of X. Plots of the conditional probabilities P(s(o) | x) and P(s(o) | x) versus X give a pair of curves. The area between these two curves divided by the total area of the graph gives the area ratio value (ARV), which is proportional to the degree of separation of the two probability curves and, therefore, provides a measure of the given attribute's power to discriminate between order and disorder. As ARV falls between zero and one, larger ARV corresponds to the better discrimination between order and disorder. Starting from the scale with the highest ARV, we applied a simulated annealing procedure to search for alternative scale values and have managed to increase the ARV by more than 10%. The ranking of the amino acids in this new TOP-IDP scale is as follows (from order promoting to disorder promoting): W, F, Y, I, M, L, V, N, C, T, A, G, R, D, H, Q, K, S, E, P. A web-based server has been created to apply the TOP-IDP scale to predict intrinsically disordered proteins (http://www.disprot.org/dev/disindex.php).

  19. Model parameters conditioning on regional hydrologic signatures for process-based design flood estimation in ungauged basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Daniela; De Luca, Davide Luciano

    2015-04-01

    The use of rainfall-runoff models represents an alternative to statistical approaches (such as at-site or regional flood frequency analysis) for design flood estimation, and constitutes an answer to the increasing need for synthetic design hydrographs (SDHs) associated to a specific return period. However, the lack of streamflow observations and the consequent high uncertainty associated with parameter estimation, usually pose serious limitations to the use of process-based approaches in ungauged catchments, which in contrast represent the majority in practical applications. This work presents the application of a Bayesian procedure that, for a predefined rainfall-runoff model, allows for the assessment of posterior parameters distribution, using the limited and uncertain information available for the response of an ungauged catchment (Bulygina et al. 2009; 2011). The use of regional estimates of river flow statistics, interpreted as hydrological signatures that measure theoretically relevant system process behaviours (Gupta et al. 2008), within this framework represents a valuable option and has shown significant developments in recent literature to constrain the plausible model response and to reduce the uncertainty in ungauged basins. In this study we rely on the first three L-moments of annual streamflow maxima, for which regressions are available from previous studies (Biondi et al. 2012; Laio et al. 2011). The methodology was carried out for a catchment located in southern Italy, and used within a Monte Carlo scheme (MCs) considering both event-based and continuous simulation approaches for design flood estimation. The applied procedure offers promising perspectives to perform model calibration and uncertainty analysis in ungauged basins; moreover, in the context of design flood estimation, process-based methods coupled with MCs approach have the advantage of providing simulated floods uncertainty analysis that represents an asset in risk-based decision

  20. Quantifying nitrogen process rates in a constructed wetland using natural abundance stable isotope signatures and stable isotope amendment experiments.

    PubMed

    Erler, Dirk V; Eyre, Bradley D

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the spatial variability in nitrogen (N) transformation within a constructed wetland (CW) treating domestic effluent. Nitrogen cycling within the CW was driven by settlement and mineralization of particulate organic nitrogen and uptake of NO3-. The concentration of NO3- was found to decrease, as the delta15N-NO3- signature increased, as water flowed through the CW, allowing denitrification rates to be estimated on the basis of the degree of fractionation of delta15N-NO3-. Estimates of denitrification hinged on the determination of a net isotope effect (eta), which was influenced byprocesses that enrich or deplete 15NO3- (e.g., nitrification), as well as the rate constants associated with the different processes involved in denitrification (i.e., diffusion and enzyme activity). The influence of nitrification on eta was quantified; however, it remained unclear how eta varied due to variability in denitrification rate constants. A series of stable isotope amendment experiments was used to further constrain the value of eta and calculate rates of denitrification, and nitrification, within the wetland. The maximum calculated rate of denitrification was 956 +/- 187 micromol N m(-2) h(-1), and the maximum rate of nitrification was 182 +/- 28.9 micromol N m(-2) h(-1). Uptake of NO3- was quantitatively more important than denitrification throughoutthe wetland. Rates of N cycling varied spatially within thewetland, with denitrification dominating in the downstream deoxygenated region of the wetland. Studies that use fractionation of N to derive rate estimates must exercise caution when interpreting the net isotope effect. We suggest a sampling procedure for future natural abundance studies that may help improve the accuracy of N cycling rate estimates.

  1. Chemical Heterogeneity of a Large Cluster IDP: Clues to its Formation History Using X-ray Fluorescence Mapping and XANES Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Chondritic porous IDPs may be among the most primitive objects found in our solar system [1]. They consist of many micron to submicron minerals, glasses and carbonaceous matter [2,3,4,5,6,7] with > 10(exp 4) grains in a 10 micron cluster [8]. Speculation on the environment where these fine grained, porous IDPs formed varies with possible sources being presolar dusty plasma clouds, protostellar condensation, solar asteroids or comets [4,6,9]. Also, fine grained dust forms in our solar system today [10,11]. Isotopic anomalies in some particles in IDPs suggest an interstellar source[4,7,12]. IDPs contain relic particles left from the dusty plasma that existed before the protostellar disk formed and other grains in the IDPs formed later after the cold dense nebula cloud collapsed to form our protostar and other grains formed more recently. Fe and CR XANES spectroscopy is used here to investigate the oxygen environment in a large (>50 10 micron or larger sub-units) IDP. Conclusions: Analyzing large (>50 10 micron or larger sub-units) CP IDPs gives one a view on the environments where these fine dust grains formed which is different from that found by only analyzing the small, 10 micron IDPs. As with cluster IDP L2008#5 [3], L2009R2 cluster #13 appears to be an aggregate of grains that sample a diversity of solar and perhaps presolar environments. Sub-micron, grain by grain measurement of trace element contents and elemental oxidation states determined by XANES spectroscopy offers the possibility of understanding the environments in which these grains formed when compared to standard spectra. By comparing thermodynamic modeling of condensates with analytical data an understanding of transport mechanisms operating in the early solar system may be attained.

  2. Signatures of Förster and Dexter transfer processes in coupled nanostructures for linear and two-dimensional coherent optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specht, Judith F.; Richter, Marten

    2015-03-01

    In this manuscript, we study the impact of the two Coulomb induced resonance energy transfer processes, Förster and Dexter coupling, on the spectral signatures obtained by double quantum coherence spectroscopy. We show that the specific coupling characteristics allow us to identify the underlying excitation transfer mechanism by means of specific signatures in coherent spectroscopy. Therefore, we control the microscopic calculated coupling strength of spin preserving and spin flipping Förster transfer processes by varying the mutual orientation of the two quantum emitters. The calculated spectra reveal the optical selection rules altered by Förster and Dexter coupling between two semiconductor quantum dots. We show that Dexter coupling between bright and dark two-exciton states occurs.

  3. Search for the Higgs Boson and Rare Standard Model Processes in the ET+B-Jets Signature at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Potamianos, Karolos Jozef

    2011-12-01

    We study rare processes of the standard model of particle physics (SM) in events with missing transverse energy ET, no leptons, and two or three jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a $b$-quark (ET+b-jets signature). We present a search for the SM Higgs boson produced in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson when the Higgs decays into \\bbbar. We consider the scenario where $Z \\to \

  4. A comprehensive data processing plan for crop calendar MSS signature development from satellite imagery: Crop identification using vegetation phenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, C. A. (Principal Investigator); Carlyle, S. M.; Haralick, R. M.; Yokoyama, R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The phenological method of crop identification involves the creation of crop signatures which characterize multispectral observations as phenological growth states. The phenological signature models spectral reflectance explicitly as a function of crop maturity rather than as a function of date. A correspondence of time to growth state is established which minimizes the smallest difference between the given multispectral multitemporal vector and a category mean vector. The application of the method to the identification of winter wheat and corn shows (1) the method is capable of discriminating crop type with about the same degree of accuracy as more traditional classifiers; (2) the use of LANDSAT observations on two or more dates yields better results than the use of a single observation; and (3) some potential is demonstrated for labeling the degree of maturity of the crop, as well as the crop type.

  5. Validation of Ship Signatures in Envisat ASAR AP Mode Data using AISLive: Data Acquisition, Processing, and Analysis Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    est d’environ 10 dB inférieure à la RCS totale en copolarisation; des modèles de la RCS totale en fonction de la longueur du navire sont fournis...plusieurs fonctions de distribution de probabilités bien connues; la variabilité de la RCS est moindre pour les signatures de navires en polarisation... Matlab ®. 2 The two largest normalized total RCS values were filtered from the dataset in order for the model to pass the K-S test. 30 DRDC Ottawa

  6. Transcriptome analysis of the interferon-signature defining the autoimmune process of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peck, A B; Nguyen, C Q

    2012-09-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) of humans and SS-like (SjS-like) diseases in mouse models are characterized by chronic immune attacks against the salivary and lacrimal glands leading to exocrine dysfunction. One characteristic of SS and SjS-like diseases repeatedly observed is a strong upregulated expression of both the type I (α/β) and type II (γ) interferons (IFNs). In addition, recent global transcriptome studies have identified a variety of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) transcripts differentially expressed in tissues of SS patients and mouse models exhibiting SjS-like disease. Analyses of these transcriptome databases indicate that the sets of differentially expressed genes are highly restricted, suggesting that there is a unique specificity in ISGs activated (or suppressed) during development and onset of disease. As a result, these observations have led to both SS and SjS-like diseases being designated as 'interferon-signature' diseases. While SS and SjS-like diseases may be designated as such, very little effort has been made to determine what an interferon-signature might signify relative to autoinflammation and whether it might point directly to an underlying etiopathological mechanism. Here, we review these limited data and provide a model of how the products of these genes interact molecularly and biologically to define critical details of SS pathology.

  7. Detection of selection signatures of population-specific genomic regions selected during domestication process in Jinhua pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengcao; Chen, Jiucheng; Wang, Zhen; Pan, Yuchun; Wang, Qishan; Xu, Ningying; Wang, Zhengguang

    2016-12-01

    Chinese pigs have been undergoing both natural and artificial selection for thousands of years. Jinhua pigs are of great importance, as they can be a valuable model for exploring the genetic mechanisms linked to meat quality and other traits such as disease resistance, reproduction and production. The purpose of this study was to identify distinctive footprints of selection between Jinhua pigs and other breeds utilizing genome-wide SNP data. Genotyping by genome reducing and sequencing was implemented in order to perform cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity to reveal strong signatures of selection for those economically important traits. This work was performed at a 2% genome level, which comprised 152 006 SNPs genotyped in a total of 517 individuals. Population-specific footprints of selective sweeps were searched for in the genome of Jinhua pigs using six native breeds and three European breeds as reference groups. Several candidate genes associated with meat quality, health and reproduction, such as GH1, CRHR2, TRAF4 and CCK, were found to be overlapping with the significantly positive outliers. Additionally, the results revealed that some genomic regions associated with meat quality, immune response and reproduction in Jinhua pigs have evolved directionally under domestication and subsequent selections. The identified genes and biological pathways in Jinhua pigs showed different selection patterns in comparison with the Chinese and European breeds.

  8. Improving the automated detection of refugee/IDP dwellings using the multispectral bands of the WorldView-2 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Thomas; Gueguen, Lionel; Soille, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    The enumeration of the population remains a critical task in the management of refugee/IDP camps. Analysis of very high spatial resolution satellite data proofed to be an efficient and secure approach for the estimation of dwellings and the monitoring of the camp over time. In this paper we propose a new methodology for the automated extraction of features based on differential morphological decomposition segmentation for feature extraction and interactive training sample selection from the max-tree and min-tree structures. This feature extraction methodology is tested on a WorldView-2 scene of an IDP camp in Darfur Sudan. Special emphasis is given to the additional available bands of the WorldView-2 sensor. The results obtained show that the interactive image information tool is performing very well by tuning the feature extraction to the local conditions. The analysis of different spectral subsets shows that it is possible to obtain good results already with an RGB combination, but by increasing the number of spectral bands the detection of dwellings becomes more accurate. Best results were obtained using all eight bands of WorldView-2 satellite.

  9. IDP-ASE: haplotyping and quantifying allele-specific expression at the gene and gene isoform level by hybrid sequencing.

    PubMed

    Deonovic, Benjamin; Wang, Yunhao; Weirather, Jason; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Au, Kin Fai

    2016-11-28

    Allele-specific expression (ASE) is a fundamental problem in studying gene regulation and diploid transcriptome profiles, with two key challenges: (i) haplotyping and (ii) estimation of ASE at the gene isoform level. Existing ASE analysis methods are limited by a dependence on haplotyping from laborious experiments or extra genome/family trio data. In addition, there is a lack of methods for gene isoform level ASE analysis. We developed a tool, IDP-ASE, for full ASE analysis. By innovative integration of Third Generation Sequencing (TGS) long reads with Second Generation Sequencing (SGS) short reads, the accuracy of haplotyping and ASE quantification at the gene and gene isoform level was greatly improved as demonstrated by the gold standard data GM12878 data and semi-simulation data. In addition to methodology development, applications of IDP-ASE to human embryonic stem cells and breast cancer cells indicate that the imbalance of ASE and non-uniformity of gene isoform ASE is widespread, including tumorigenesis relevant genes and pluripotency markers. These results show that gene isoform expression and allele-specific expression cooperate to provide high diversity and complexity of gene regulation and expression, highlighting the importance of studying ASE at the gene isoform level. Our study provides a robust bioinformatics solution to understand ASE using RNA sequencing data only.

  10. Loss of solar He and Ne from IDPS in subducting sediment: Diffusion and the effect of phase changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiyagon, H.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the diffusion experiment for solar He and Ne in IDP's in a magnetic separate from Pacific Ocean sediment suggest that solar He and Ne would be easily released from IDP grains and hence lost from subducting slabs at shallow depths. However, since the diffusion experiments was conducted under high vacuum, there may be a possibility that magnetite grains, which are supposedly the main constituent of the magnetic fraction, might be partly reduced to form a metal phase due to low oxygen fugacity in the experimental condition. If this is the case, such a phase change might affect the gas release and hence the results of the diffusion coefficients. In order to examine whether or not such a phase change really occurred in the condition of the diffusion experiment, I conducted a heating experiment for a magnetic separate from Pacific Ocean sediment. In the same condition as in the diffusion experiment, and the run products were examined with an x ray diffraction method. Three samples were prepared: they were wrapped with platinum foil, put in a vacuum line, and heated in a molybdenum crucible for two hours at 500 C, 800 C,and 950 C, respectively. After cooling the furnace, the samples were taken out from the crucible and analyzed with an x ray diffraction method.

  11. Predicting individual differences in decision-making process from signature movement styles: an illustrative study of leaders

    PubMed Central

    Connors, Brenda L.; Rende, Richard; Colton, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    There has been a surge of interest in examining the utility of methods for capturing individual differences in decision-making style. We illustrate the potential offered by Movement Pattern Analysis (MPA), an observational methodology that has been used in business and by the US Department of Defense to record body movements that provide predictive insight into individual differences in decision-making motivations and actions. Twelve military officers participated in an intensive 2-h interview that permitted detailed and fine-grained observation and coding of signature movements by trained practitioners using MPA. Three months later, these subjects completed four hypothetical decision-making tasks in which the amount of information sought out before coming to a decision, as well as the time spent on the tasks, were under the partial control of the subject. A composite MPA indicator of how a person allocates decision-making actions and motivations to balance both Assertion (exertion of tangible movement effort on the environment to make something occur) and Perspective (through movements that support shaping in the body to perceive and create a suitable viewpoint for action) was highly correlated with the total number of information draws and total response time—individuals high on Assertion reached for less information and had faster response times than those high on Perspective. Discussion focuses on the utility of using movement-based observational measures to capture individual differences in decision-making style and the implications for application in applied settings geared toward investigations of experienced leaders and world statesmen where individuality rules the day. PMID:24069012

  12. Electrical signature of modern and ancient tectonic processes in the crust of the Atlas mountains of Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo; Jones, Alan G.; Siniscalchi, Agata; Campanyà, Joan; Kiyan, Duygu; Romano, Gerardo; Rouai, Mohamed; TopoMed MT Team

    2011-04-01

    The Atlas Mountains in Morocco are considered as type examples of intracontinental mountain chains, with high topography that contrasts with moderate crustal shortening and thickening. Whereas recent geological studies and geodynamic modelling suggest the existence of dynamic topography to explain this apparent contradiction, there is a lack of modern geophysical data at the crustal scale to corroborate this hypothesis. To address this deficiency, magnetotelluric data were recently acquired that image the electrical resistivity distribution of the crust from the Middle Atlas to the Anti-Atlas, crossing the tabular Moulouya plain and the High Atlas. All tectonic units show different, distinct and unique electrical signatures throughout the crust reflecting the tectonic history of development of each one. In the upper crust, electrical resistivity values and geometries can be associated to sediment sequences in the Moulouya and Anti-Atlas and to crustal scale fault systems in the High Atlas developed likely during Cenozoic times. In the lower crust, the low resistivity anomaly found below the Moulouya plain, together with other geophysical (low velocity anomaly, lack of earthquakes and minimum Bouguer anomaly) and geochemical (Neogene-Quaternary intraplate alkaline volcanic fields) evidences, infer the existence of a small degree of partial melt at the base of the crust. Resistivity values suggest a partial melt fraction of the order of 2-8%. The low resistivity anomaly found below the Anti-Atlas may be associated with a relict subduction of Precambrian oceanic sediments, or to precipitated minerals during the release of fluids from the mantle during the accretion of the Anti-Atlas to the West African Supercontinent during the Panafrican orogeny (ca. 685 Ma).

  13. Synthetic study on carbocyclic analogs of cyclic ADP-ribose, a novel second messenger: an efficient synthesis of cyclic IDP-carbocyclic-ribose.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, M; Shuto, S; Minakawa, N; Ueno, Y; Matsuda, A

    1999-01-01

    An efficient synthesis of cyclic IDP-carbocyclic-ribose, as a stable mimic for cyclic ADP-ribose, was achieved. 8-Bromo-N1-carbocyclic-ribosylinosine derivative 10, prepared from N1-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)inosine derivative 5 and an optically active carbocyclic amine 6, was converted to 8-bromo-N1-carbocyclic-ribosylinosine bisphosphate derivative 15. Treatment of 15 with I2 in the presence of molecular sieves in pyridine gave the desired cyclic product 16 quantitatively, which was deprotected and reductively debrominated to give the target cyclic IDP-carbocyclic-ribose (3).

  14. Intrusion detection using secure signatures

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Trent Darnel; Haile, Jedediah

    2014-09-30

    A method and device for intrusion detection using secure signatures comprising capturing network data. A search hash value, value employing at least one one-way function, is generated from the captured network data using a first hash function. The presence of a search hash value match in a secure signature table comprising search hash values and an encrypted rule is determined. After determining a search hash value match, a decryption key is generated from the captured network data using a second hash function, a hash function different form the first hash function. One or more of the encrypted rules of the secure signatures table having a hash value equal to the generated search hash value are then decrypted using the generated decryption key. The one or more decrypted secure signature rules are then processed for a match and one or more user notifications are deployed if a match is identified.

  15. Thermal Modification of Silicate Materials on Flash-heated Sulfide IDPs: The First Clues for Chemically Controlled, Early Silicate Mineral Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Variable Ca-compositions of flash heated ferromagnesiosilica materials on massive sulfide IDPs provide the first clues for chemically controlled nucleation of pyroxenes during the earliest stages of silicate mineral evolution in solar nebula dust. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Heat-Treatment of MgSiO Smokes of Astrophysical Interest: Possible Implications for Olivine-Pyroxene-Silica Assemblages in Chondritic Aggregate IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Nuth, J. A., III; Hallenbeck, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    Anhydrous silicates in coarse-grained ferromagnesiosilica principal components (PCs) formed during atmospheric entry flash-heating also constrain the astromineralogy of astrophysical dust. This is because of the unique closed-system behavior of these PCs in chondritic aggregate interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Li-6/Li-7, B-10/B-11, and Li-7/B-11/Si-28 individual IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Song, L.-G.; Zhang, Y.-X.; Fan, C.-Y.

    1994-01-01

    At the initial stage of the development of our solar system, the solar nebula is presumably composed of H-1, H-2, He-3, He-4, and Li-7, which were made during the Big Band, and C, N, O, . . ., which are products of nearby supernova explosions. Li-6 nuclei (together with about equal amounts of Li-7), Be-9, B-10, and B-11 were produced later by cosmic ray particles bombarding the local interstellar C, N, O, . . . nuclei before the nebula condensed to become the Sun and the planets. Thus, the ratio Li-6/Li-7 is a measure of the length of the early epoch of the solar system. In this paper we shall report the measurement of Li-7/Li-6, B-11/B-10, and Li-7/B-11/Si-28 of four IDP's obtained from Johnson Space Center and discuss the findings.

  18. Long range recognition and selection in IDPs: the interactions of the C-terminus of p53

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Lane, David P.; Verma, Chandra S.

    2016-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of p53 is an extensively studied IDP, interacting with different partners through multiple distinct conformations. To explore the interplay between preformed structural elements and intrinsic fluctuations in its folding and binding we combine extensive atomistic equilibrium and non-equilibrium simulations. We find that the free peptide segment rapidly interconverts between ordered and disordered states with significant populations of the conformations that are seen in the complexed states. The underlying global folding-binding landscape points to a synergistic mechanism in which recognition is dictated via long range electrostatic recognition which results in the formation of reactive structures as far away as 10 Å, and binding proceeds with the steering of selected conformations followed by induced folding at the target surface or within a close range. PMID:27030593

  19. IDP camp evolvement analysis in Darfur using VHSR optical satellite image time series and scientific visualization on virtual globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiede, Dirk; Lang, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we focus on the application of transferable, object-based image analysis algorithms for dwelling extraction in a camp for internally displaced people (IDP) in Darfur, Sudan along with innovative means for scientific visualisation of the results. Three very high spatial resolution satellite images (QuickBird: 2002, 2004, 2008) were used for: (1) extracting different types of dwellings and (2) calculating and visualizing added-value products such as dwelling density and camp structure. The results were visualized on virtual globes (Google Earth and ArcGIS Explorer) revealing the analysis results (analytical 3D views,) transformed into the third dimension (z-value). Data formats depend on virtual globe software including KML/KMZ (keyhole mark-up language) and ESRI 3D shapefiles streamed as ArcGIS Server-based globe service. In addition, means for improving overall performance of automated dwelling structures using grid computing techniques are discussed using examples from a similar study.

  20. IDP camp evolvement analysis in Darfur using VHSR optical satellite image time series and scientific visualization on virtual globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiede, Dirk; Lang, Stefan

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we focus on the application of transferable, object-based image analysis algorithms for dwelling extraction in a camp for internally displaced people (IDP) in Darfur, Sudan along with innovative means for scientific visualisation of the results. Three very high spatial resolution satellite images (QuickBird: 2002, 2004, 2008) were used for: (1) extracting different types of dwellings and (2) calculating and visualizing added-value products such as dwelling density and camp structure. The results were visualized on virtual globes (Google Earth and ArcGIS Explorer) revealing the analysis results (analytical 3D views,) transformed into the third dimension (z-value). Data formats depend on virtual globe software including KML/KMZ (keyhole mark-up language) and ESRI 3D shapefiles streamed as ArcGIS Server-based globe service. In addition, means for improving overall performance of automated dwelling structures using grid computing techniques are discussed using examples from a similar study.

  1. Bilingual and monolingual brains compared: a functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of syntactic processing and a possible "neural signature" of bilingualism.

    PubMed

    Kovelman, Ioulia; Baker, Stephanie A; Petitto, Laura-Ann

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Does the brain of a bilingual process language differently from that of a monolingual? We compared how bilinguals and monolinguals recruit classic language brain areas in response to a language task and asked whether there is a "neural signature" of bilingualism. Highly proficient and early-exposed adult Spanish-English bilinguals and English monolinguals participated. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants completed a syntactic "sentence judgment task" [Caplan, D., Alpert, N., & Waters, G. Effects of syntactic structure and propositional number on patterns of regional cerebral blood flow. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 10, 541-552, 1998]. The sentences exploited differences between Spanish and English linguistic properties, allowing us to explore similarities and differences in behavioral and neural responses between bilinguals and monolinguals, and between a bilingual's two languages. If bilinguals' neural processing differs across their two languages, then differential behavioral and neural patterns should be observed in Spanish and English. Results show that behaviorally, in English, bilinguals and monolinguals had the same speed and accuracy, yet, as predicted from the Spanish-English structural differences, bilinguals had a different pattern of performance in Spanish. fMRI analyses revealed that both monolinguals (in one language) and bilinguals (in each language) showed predicted increases in activation in classic language areas (e.g., left inferior frontal cortex, LIFC), with any neural differences between the bilingual's two languages being principled and predictable based on the morphosyntactic differences between Spanish and English. However, an important difference was that bilinguals had a significantly greater increase in the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal in the LIFC (BA 45) when processing English than the English monolinguals. The results provide insight into the decades-old question about the

  2. Geochemical balance of lateritization processes and climatic signatures in weathering profiles overlain by ferricretes in Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Anicet

    1999-12-01

    A simple geochemical balance of lateritization processes governing the development of several tens of meters of weathering profiles overlain by ferricretes is estimated on the basis of detailed mineralogical and geochemical data. The lateritic weathering mantle of the "Haut-Mbomou" area in Central Africa is composed of different weathering layers described from the base to the top of vertical profiles as a saprolite, a mottled clay layer, a soft nodular layer, a soft ferricrete, and a ferricrete in which kaolinite, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite occur in various quantities. Incongruent dissolution of kaolinite leads to the formation of gibbsite in the upper saprolite, whereas the hematite does not clearly replace the kaolinite according to an epigene process in the upper ferruginous layers of the profiles. Instead, that kaolinite is also transformed into gibbsite according to an incongruent dissolution under hydrated and reducing conditions induced by a relatively humid climatic pattern. The respective relations of the silica, iron, and aluminum balances and the Al substitution rate of the hematite on the one hand, and of RHG [RHG = 100 (hematite/hematite + goethite)] and the kaolinite on the other hand, to the consumption or the release of protons H + permit differentiation of aggrading ferruginization and degradation processes operating in the different lateritic weathering profiles. The Al substitution rate of the Fe-oxyhydroxides varies according to the nature of lateritization processes, e.g., saprolitic weathering and aggrading ferruginization vs. degradation. The observations and results indicate that the ferruginization process of the weathering materials of parent rocks is not a simple ongoing process as often thought. This suggests that the actual lateritic weathering mantle of the Haut-Mbomou area may result from different stages of weathering and erosion during climatic changes.

  3. Process-Based Species Pools Reveal the Hidden Signature of Biotic Interactions Amid the Influence of Temperature Filtering.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Weinstein, Ben G; Borregaard, Michael K; Marske, Katharine A; Martin, Danny R; McGuire, Jimmy A; Parra, Juan L; Rahbek, Carsten; Graham, Catherine H

    2016-01-01

    A persistent challenge in ecology is to tease apart the influence of multiple processes acting simultaneously and interacting in complex ways to shape the structure of species assemblages. We implement a heuristic approach that relies on explicitly defining species pools and permits assessment of the relative influence of the main processes thought to shape assemblage structure: environmental filtering, dispersal limitations, and biotic interactions. We illustrate our approach using data on the assemblage composition and geographic distribution of hummingbirds, a comprehensive phylogeny and morphological traits. The implementation of several process-based species pool definitions in null models suggests that temperature-but not precipitation or dispersal limitation-acts as the main regional filter of assemblage structure. Incorporating this environmental filter directly into the definition of assemblage-specific species pools revealed an otherwise hidden pattern of phylogenetic evenness, indicating that biotic interactions might further influence hummingbird assemblage structure. Such hidden patterns of assemblage structure call for a reexamination of a multitude of phylogenetic- and trait-based studies that did not explicitly consider potentially important processes in their definition of the species pool. Our heuristic approach provides a transparent way to explore patterns and refine interpretations of the underlying causes of assemblage structure.

  4. β decay of nuclei around 90Se: Search for signatures of a N=56 subshell closure relevant to the r process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, M.; Aprahamian, A.; Pereira, J.; Surman, R.; Arndt, O.; Baumann, T.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Estrade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Ginter, T.; Hausmann, M.; Hennrich, S.; Kessler, R.; Kratz, K.-L.; Lorusso, G.; Mantica, P. F.; Matos, M.; Montes, F.; Pfeiffer, B.; Portillo, M.; Schatz, H.; Schertz, F.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Walters, W. B.; Wöhr, A.

    2012-03-01

    Background: Nuclear structure plays a significant role on the rapid neutron capture process (r process) since shapes evolve with the emergence of shells and subshells. There was some indication in neighboring nuclei that we might find examples of a new N=56 subshell, which may give rise to a doubly magic 3490Se56 nucleus.Purpose: β-decay half-lives of nuclei around 90Se have been measured to determine if this nucleus has in fact a doubly magic character.Method: The fragmentation of a 136Xe beam at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University was used to create a cocktail of nuclei in the A=90 region.Results: We have measured the half-lives of 22 nuclei near the r-process path in the A=90 region. The half-lives of 88As and 90Se have been measured for the first time. The values were compared with theoretical predictions in the search for nuclear-deformation signatures of a N=56 subshell, and its possible role in the emergence of a potential doubly magic 90Se. The impact of such hypothesis on the synthesis of heavy nuclei, particularly in the production of Sr, Y, and Zr elements was investigated with a weak r-process network.Conclusions: The new half-lives agree with results obtained from a standard global QRPA model used in r-process calculations, indicating that 90Se has a quadrupole shape incompatible with a closed N=56 subshell in this region. The impact of the measured 90Se half-life in comparison with a former theoretical predication associated with a spherical half-life on the weak r process is shown to be strong.

  5. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  6. A hybrid approach identifies metabolic signatures of high-producers for chinese hamster ovary clone selection and process optimization.

    PubMed

    Popp, Oliver; Müller, Dirk; Didzus, Katharina; Paul, Wolfgang; Lipsmeier, Florian; Kirchner, Florian; Niklas, Jens; Mauch, Klaus; Beaucamp, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    In-depth characterization of high-producer cell lines and bioprocesses is vital to ensure robust and consistent production of recombinant therapeutic proteins in high quantity and quality for clinical applications. This requires applying appropriate methods during bioprocess development to enable meaningful characterization of CHO clones and processes. Here, we present a novel hybrid approach for supporting comprehensive characterization of metabolic clone performance. The approach combines metabolite profiling with multivariate data analysis and fluxomics to enable a data-driven mechanistic analysis of key metabolic traits associated with desired cell phenotypes. We applied the methodology to quantify and compare metabolic performance in a set of 10 recombinant CHO-K1 producer clones and a host cell line. The comprehensive characterization enabled us to derive an extended set of clone performance criteria that not only captured growth and product formation, but also incorporated information on intracellular clone physiology and on metabolic changes during the process. These criteria served to establish a quantitative clone ranking and allowed us to identify metabolic differences between high-producing CHO-K1 clones yielding comparably high product titers. Through multivariate data analysis of the combined metabolite and flux data we uncovered common metabolic traits characteristic of high-producer clones in the screening setup. This included high intracellular rates of glutamine synthesis, low cysteine uptake, reduced excretion of aspartate and glutamate, and low intracellular degradation rates of branched-chain amino acids and of histidine. Finally, the above approach was integrated into a workflow that enables standardized high-content selection of CHO producer clones in a high-throughput fashion. In conclusion, the combination of quantitative metabolite profiling, multivariate data analysis, and mechanistic network model simulations can identify metabolic

  7. Ballistic Signature Identification System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The first phase of a research project directed toward development of a high speed automatic process to be used to match gun barrel signatures imparted to fired bullets was documented. An optical projection technique has been devised to produce and photograph a planar image of the entire signature, and the phototransparency produced is subjected to analysis using digital Fourier transform techniques. The success of this approach appears to be limited primarily by the accuracy of the photographic step since no significant processing limitations have been encountered.

  8. Biomarker Sensors and Method for Multi-Color Imaging and Processing of Single-Molecule Life Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Lawrence A. (Inventor); Collier, Charles Patrick (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention is a device including array of active regions for use in reacting one or more species in at least two of the active regions in a sequential process, e.g., sequential reactions. The device has a transparent substrate member, which has a surface region and a silane material overlying the surface region. A first active region overlies a first portion of the silane material. The first region has a first dimension of less than 1 micron in size and has first molecules capable of binding to the first portion of the silane material. A second active region overlies a second portion of the silane material. The second region has a second dimension of less than 1 micron in size, second molecules capable of binding to the second portion of the active region, and a spatial distance separates the first active region and the second active region.

  9. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  10. Improved method of signature extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, D.; Gordon, M.; Kistler, R.; Kriegler, F. J.; Lampert, S.; Marshall, R. E.; Mclaughlin, R.; Smith, V.

    1977-01-01

    System promises capability of rapidly processing large amounts of data generated by currently available and planned multispectral sensors, such as those utilized on aircraft and spacecraft. Techniques developed for system, greatly decrease operator time required for signature extraction from multispectral data base.

  11. Signature Visualization of Software Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Panas, T

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present work on the visualization of software binaries. In particular, we utilize ROSE, an open source compiler infrastructure, to pre-process software binaries, and we apply a landscape metaphor to visualize the signature of each binary (malware). We define the signature of a binary as a metric-based layout of the functions contained in the binary. In our initial experiment, we visualize the signatures of a series of computer worms that all originate from the same line. These visualizations are useful for a number of reasons. First, the images reveal how the archetype has evolved over a series of versions of one worm. Second, one can see the distinct changes between version. This allows the viewer to form conclusions about the development cycle of a particular worm.

  12. Signature molecular descriptor : advanced applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the development of the Signature Molecular Descriptor (or Signature) for use in the solution of inverse design problems as well as in highthroughput screening applications. The ultimate goal of using Signature is to identify novel and non-intuitive chemical structures with optimal predicted properties for a given application. We demonstrate this in three studies: green solvent design, glucocorticoid receptor ligand design and the design of inhibitors for Factor XIa. In many areas of engineering, compounds are designed and/or modified in incremental ways which rely upon heuristics or institutional knowledge. Often multiple experiments are performed and the optimal compound is identified in this brute-force fashion. Perhaps a traditional chemical scaffold is identified and movement of a substituent group around a ring constitutes the whole of the design process. Also notably, a chemical being evaluated in one area might demonstrate properties very attractive in another area and serendipity was the mechanism for solution. In contrast to such approaches, computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) looks to encompass both experimental and heuristic-based knowledge into a strategy that will design a molecule on a computer to meet a given target. Depending on the algorithm employed, the molecule which is designed might be quite novel (re: no CAS registration number) and/or non-intuitive relative to what is known about the problem at hand. While CAMD is a fairly recent strategy (dating to the early 1980s), it contains a variety of bottlenecks and limitations which have prevented the technique from garnering more attention in the academic, governmental and industrial institutions. A main reason for this is how the molecules are described in the computer. This step can control how models are developed for the properties of interest on a given problem as well as how to go from an output of the algorithm to an actual chemical structure. This report

  13. UV degradation of accreted organics on Mars: IDP longevity, surface reservoir of organics, and relevance to the detection of methane in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, J.; Schuerger, A.; Barlow, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Reanalysis of the results from the Viking Landers by Navarro-Gonzales et al in 2010 suggested detection of organic carbon in the soil at both VL1 and VL2 sites at the level of a few ppm. By using a numerical radiative transfer code for the martian atmosphere, we will show how this level of carbon can be explained if the source of the organic carbon is Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) undergoing UV Photolysis. The breakdown of IDPs by UV radiation will also produce significant quantities of methane. The amount of carbon expected to be present on the surface of Mars, if converted largely to methane, would explain the background signal of ~10ppbv reported by Mars Express. Furthermore, this methane would allow emissions from surface concentrations of organics to be tracked from orbit by a TGO-like spacecraft yeilding insights on the production and destruction mechanisms of methane on Mars and acting as a tracer to observe the circulation of the martian atmosphere. However, the rate of accretion and conversion of IDP Organics at Mars cannot explain the large 45 ppbv plumes observed by Mumma et al (2009). Instead, limits will be presented that describe the limiting case of a sudden influx of organic carbon to the surface by an atmospheric airburst of a loosely consolidated organic-rich body.

  14. Landsat Signature Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. N.; Mcguire, K. G.; Bland, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    The Landsat Signature Development Program, LSDP, is designed to produce an unsupervised classification of a scene from a Landsat tape. This classification is based on the clustering tendencies of the multispectral scanner data processed from the scene. The program will generate a character map that, by identifying each of the general classes of surface features extracted from the scene data with a specific line printer symbol, indicates the approximate locations and distributions of these general classes within the scene. Also provided with the character map are a number of tables each of which describes either some aspect of the spectral properties of the resultant classes, some inter-class relationship, the incidence of picture elements assigned to the various classes in the character map classification of the scene, or some significant intermediate stage in the development of the final classes.

  15. Minority Language Development and Literacy among Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Refugees, and Wartime Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Joan Bomberger

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how minority language development and literacy activities were facilitated in a wartime context for Southern Sudanese language groups, particularly through the use of workshops. It also presents the voices of the language speakers themselves as they reflect on this process. A background discussion considers the importance of…

  16. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark [Alamo, CA; Gosnell, Tom B [Moraga, CA; Ham, Cheryl [Livermore, CA; Perkins, Dwight [Livermore, CA; Wong, James [Dublin, CA

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  17. Digital Signature Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  18. Electronic Signatures for Public Procurement across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ølnes, Jon; Andresen, Anette; Arbia, Stefano; Ernst, Markus; Hagen, Martin; Klein, Stephan; Manca, Giovanni; Rossi, Adriano; Schipplick, Frank; Tatti, Daniele; Wessolowski, Gesa; Windheuser, Jan

    The PEPPOL (Pan-European Public Procurement On-Line) project is a large scale pilot under the CIP programme of the EU, exploring electronic public procurement in a unified European market. An important element is interoperability of electronic signatures across borders, identified today as a major obstacle to cross-border procurement. PEPPOL will address use of signatures in procurement processes, in particular tendering but also post-award processes like orders and invoices. Signature policies, i.e. quality requirements and requirements on information captured in the signing process, will be developed. This as well as technical interoperability of e-signatures across Europe will finally be piloted in demonstrators starting late 2009 or early 2010.

  19. Nonlinear analysis of dynamic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, S.; Fallah, A.; Towhidkhah, F.

    2013-12-01

    Signature is a long trained motor skill resulting in well combination of segments like strokes and loops. It is a physical manifestation of complex motor processes. The problem, generally stated, is that how relative simplicity in behavior emerges from considerable complexity of perception-action system that produces behavior within an infinitely variable biomechanical and environmental context. To solve this problem, we present evidences which indicate that motor control dynamic in signing process is a chaotic process. This chaotic dynamic may explain a richer array of time series behavior in motor skill of signature. Nonlinear analysis is a powerful approach and suitable tool which seeks for characterizing dynamical systems through concepts such as fractal dimension and Lyapunov exponent. As a result, they can be analyzed in both horizontal and vertical for time series of position and velocity. We observed from the results that noninteger values for the correlation dimension indicates low dimensional deterministic dynamics. This result could be confirmed by using surrogate data tests. We have also used time series to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent and obtain a positive value. These results constitute significant evidence that signature data are outcome of chaos in a nonlinear dynamical system of motor control.

  20. UV Signature Mutations †

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  1. An archaeal genomic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  2. Twin Signature Schemes, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäge, Sven

    In this paper, we revisit the twin signature scheme by Naccache, Pointcheval and Stern from CCS 2001 that is secure under the Strong RSA (SRSA) assumption and improve its efficiency in several ways. First, we present a new twin signature scheme that is based on the Strong Diffie-Hellman (SDH) assumption in bilinear groups and allows for very short signatures and key material. A big advantage of this scheme is that, in contrast to the original scheme, it does not require a computationally expensive function for mapping messages to primes. We prove this new scheme secure under adaptive chosen message attacks. Second, we present a modification that allows to significantly increase efficiency when signing long messages. This construction uses collision-resistant hash functions as its basis. As a result, our improvements make the signature length independent of the message size. Our construction deviates from the standard hash-and-sign approach in which the hash value of the message is signed in place of the message itself. We show that in the case of twin signatures, one can exploit the properties of the hash function as an integral part of the signature scheme. This improvement can be applied to both the SRSA based and SDH based twin signature scheme.

  3. NPOESS Interface Data Processing Segment Product Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The NPOESS design allows centralized mission management and delivers high quality environmental products to military, civil and scientific users. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. The IDPS will process environmental data products beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and continuing through the lifetime of the NPOESS system. Within the overall NPOESS processing environment, the IDPS must process a data volume nearly 1000 times the size of current systems -- in one-quarter of the time. Further, it must support the calibration, validation, and data quality improvement initiatives of the NPOESS program to ensure the production of atmospheric and environmental products that meet strict requirements for accuracy and precision. This paper will describe the architecture approach that is necessary to meet these challenging, and seemingly exclusive, NPOESS IDPS design requirements, with a focus on the processing relationships required to generate the NPP products.

  4. Modeling the lexical morphology of Western handwritten signatures.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Cabrera, Moises; Ferrer, Miguel A; Morales, Aythami

    2015-01-01

    A handwritten signature is the final response to a complex cognitive and neuromuscular process which is the result of the learning process. Because of the many factors involved in signing, it is possible to study the signature from many points of view: graphologists, forensic experts, neurologists and computer vision experts have all examined them. Researchers study written signatures for psychiatric, penal, health and automatic verification purposes. As a potentially useful, multi-purpose study, this paper is focused on the lexical morphology of handwritten signatures. This we understand to mean the identification, analysis, and description of the signature structures of a given signer. In this work we analyze different public datasets involving 1533 signers from different Western geographical areas. Some relevant characteristics of signature lexical morphology have been selected, examined in terms of their probability distribution functions and modeled through a General Extreme Value distribution. This study suggests some useful models for multi-disciplinary sciences which depend on handwriting signatures.

  5. Modeling the Lexical Morphology of Western Handwritten Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Cabrera, Moises; Ferrer, Miguel A.; Morales, Aythami

    2015-01-01

    A handwritten signature is the final response to a complex cognitive and neuromuscular process which is the result of the learning process. Because of the many factors involved in signing, it is possible to study the signature from many points of view: graphologists, forensic experts, neurologists and computer vision experts have all examined them. Researchers study written signatures for psychiatric, penal, health and automatic verification purposes. As a potentially useful, multi-purpose study, this paper is focused on the lexical morphology of handwritten signatures. This we understand to mean the identification, analysis, and description of the signature structures of a given signer. In this work we analyze different public datasets involving 1533 signers from different Western geographical areas. Some relevant characteristics of signature lexical morphology have been selected, examined in terms of their probability distribution functions and modeled through a General Extreme Value distribution. This study suggests some useful models for multi-disciplinary sciences which depend on handwriting signatures. PMID:25860942

  6. Micro-analyses of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) and Micrometeorites (MMs): Implications for sample return missions to undifferentiated protoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F.

    The good news is that the original, typically non-chondritic, presolar dust had an extremely simple mineralogy of predominantly Mg-rich olivines and -pyroxenes, pyrrhotite (Fe7 S8 ), Fe-o xides and Fe,Ni-metal. This unique property is preserved in the least modified protoplanets for in situ sampling (e.g. STARDUST, MUSES-C) and in their debris in the form of stratospheric IDPs and MMs. The corollary is that mineralogical complexity in all extraterrestrial materials is an evolved secondary property. The earliest stages of solar system evolution were defined by hierarchical dust accretion whereby the accreting dust was recycled prior to the formation of the final surviving protoplanets. This recycling concentrated initially minor elements so they could form new minerals , e.g. alkali-feldspars and plagioclase. The least- modified protoplanets are comet nuclei, i.e. random mixtures of rubble piles and dirty snowballs, and the icy (ultra)carbonaceous asteroids. Second best are the dormant, extinct and rare active comet nuclei among the near-Earth asteroids that are relatively easy to access by sample return missions. Third are the anhydrous CO/CV carbonaceous chondrites and the low metamorphic grade, unequilibrated ordinary chondrites from the main asteroid belt. Lithification of the original rubble piles in these asteroids erased all structural properties but not the mineralogy and chemistry of the accreted entities, i.e. matrix, chondrules and CAIs.Consequently , returned samples of small chips, fragments or powders from the surface of undifferentiated protoplanets will amply suffice for a full mineralogical and chemical characterization of these small bodies, including modifications from interactions with the space environment, e.g. space weathering, regolith formation and the black mantle on icy-protoplanets. Major improvements in the sensitivity of available micro-analytical tools means that in situ acquired samples can be analyzed at scales of individual, n m-s i

  7. Sulfur isotope signatures in gypsiferous sediments of the Estancia and Tularosa Basins as indicators of sulfate sources, hydrological processes, and microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szynkiewicz, Anna; Moore, Craig H.; Glamoclija, Mihaela; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2009-10-01

    In order to reconstruct paleo-environmental conditions for the saline playa lakes of the Rio Grande Rift, we investigated sediment sulfate sources using sulfur isotope compositions of dissolved SO42- ions in modern surface water, groundwater, and SO42- precipitated in the form of gypsum sediments deposited during the Pleistocene and Holocene in the Tularosa and Estancia Basins. The major sulfate sources are Lower and Middle Permian marine evaporites (δ 34S of 10.9-14.4‰), but the diverse physiography of the Tularosa Basin led to a complex drainage system which contributed sulfates from various sources depending on the climate at the time of sedimentation. As inferred from sulfur isotope mass balance constraints, weathering of sulfides of magmatic/hydrothermal and sedimentary origin associated with climate oscillations during Last Glacial Maximum contributed about 35-50% of the sulfates and led to deposition of gypsum with δ 34S values of -1.2‰ to 2.2‰ which are substantially lower than Permian evaporates. In the Estancia Basin, microbial sulfate reduction appears to overprint sulfur isotopic signatures that might elucidate past groundwater flows. A Rayleigh distillation model indicates that about 3-18% of sulfates from an inorganic groundwater pool (δ 34S of 12.6-13.8‰) have been metabolized by bacteria and preserved as partially to fully reduced sulfur-bearing minerals species (elemental sulfur, monosulfides, disulfides) with distinctly negative δ 34S values (-42.3‰ to -20.3‰) compared to co-existing gypsum (-3.8‰ to 22.4‰). For the Tularosa Basin microbial sulfate reduction had negligible effect on δ 34S value of the gypsiferous sediments most likely because of higher annual temperatures (15-33 °C) and lower organic carbon content (median 0.09%) in those sediments leading to more efficient oxidation of H 2S and/or smaller rates of sulfate reduction compared to the saline playas of the Estancia Basin (5-28 °C; median 0.46% of organic carbon

  8. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  9. Are there molecular signatures?

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes molecular signatures and mutational spectrum analysis. The mutation spectrum is defined as the type and location of DNA base change. There are currently about five well documented cases. Mutations and radon-associated tumors are discussed.

  10. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; MaNGA-GMOS Team

    2017-01-01

    Feedback from actively accreting SMBHs (Active Galactic Nuclei, AGN) is now widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. Many attempts at finding a conclusive observational proof that AGN may be able to quench star formation and regulate the host galaxies' growth have shown that this problem is highly complex.I will present results from several projects that focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN. I will describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history (Wylezalek+2016a,b). Furthermore, I will show that powerful AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of the galaxy. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and outflows that are potentially very relevant for understanding the role of AGN in galaxy evolution (Wylezalek+2016c)!

  11. Meteor signature interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Meteor signatures contain information about the constituents of space debris and present potential false alarms to early warnings systems. Better models could both extract the maximum scientific information possible and reduce their danger. Accurate predictions can be produced by models of modest complexity, which can be inverted to predict the sizes, compositions, and trajectories of object from their signatures for most objects of interest and concern.

  12. Cryptanalysis of a sessional blind signature based on quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Wen-Min

    2014-09-01

    A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or document. A blind signature is a form of digital signature in which the content of a message is disguised (blinded) before it is signed to protect the privacy of the message from the signatory. For signing quantum messages, some quantum blind signature protocols have been proposed. Recently, Khodambashi et al. (Quantum Inf Process 13:121, 2014) proposed a sessional blind signature based on quantum cryptography. It was claimed that these protocol could guarantee unconditional security. However, after our analysis, we find that the signature protocol will cause the key information leakage in the view of information theory. Taking advantage of loophole, the message sender can succeed in forging the signature without the knowledge of the whole exact key between the verifier and him. To conquer this shortcoming, we construct an improved protocol based on it and the new protocol can resist the key information leakage attacks.

  13. Invisibly Sanitizable Signature without Pairings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Dae Hyun; Lee, Pil Joong

    Sanitizable signatures allow sanitizers to delete some pre-determined parts of a signed document without invalidating the signature. While ordinary sanitizable signatures allow verifiers to know how many subdocuments have been sanitized, invisibly sanitizable signatures do not leave any clue to the sanitized subdocuments; verifiers do not know whether or not sanitizing has been performed. Previous invisibly sanitizable signature scheme was constructed based on aggregate signature with pairings. In this article, we present the first invisibly sanitizable signature without using pairings. Our proposed scheme is secure under the RSA assumption.

  14. Comparison of Nickel XANES Spectra and Elemental Maps from a Ureilite, a LL3.8 Ordinary Chondrite, Two Carbonaceous Chondrites and Two Large Cluster IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Nickel in the extraterrestrial world is commonly found in both Fe-Ni sulfide and Fe-Ni met-al forms [1] and in the pure metal state in the interior of iron meteorites where it is not easily oxidized. Ni is also found in olivine, pyroxene and glasses and in some melts the partitioning of Ni between the olivines and glass is controlled by the amount of S in the melt [2]. Its most common valence state is Ni(2+) but Ni also occurs as Ni(0), Ni(+), and Ni(3+) and rarely as Ni(2-), Ni(1-) and Ni(4+) [3]. It's valence state in olivines is Ni(2+) in octa-hedral coordination on the M1 site and rarely on the M2 site.[4]. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray absorp-tion near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy is well established and can be used to determine not only va-lence states but also coordination sites [5]. We report here Ni XANES spectroscopy and elemental maps collected from 2 carbonaceous chondrites, 2 large clus-ter IDPs, 1 ureilite and 1 LL3 orginary chondrite.Using XANES it may be possible to find a common trait in the large cluster IDPs that will also be found in mete-orite samples.

  15. Assessment of the Interstellar Processes Leading to Deuterium Enrichment in Meteoritic Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The presence of isotopic anomalies is the most unequivocal demonstration that meteoritic material contains circumstellar or interstellar components. In the case of organic compounds in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), the most useful isotopic tracer has been deuterium (D). We discuss four processes that are expected to lead to D enrichment in interstellar materials and describe how their unique characteristics can be used to assess their relative importance for the organics in meteorites. These enrichment processes are low temperature gas phase ion-molecule reactions, low temperature gas-grain reactions, gas phase unimolecular photodissociation, and ultraviolet photolysis in D-enriched ice mantles. Each of these processes is expected to be associated with distinct regiochemical signatures (D placement on the product molecules, correlation with specific chemical functionalities, etc.), especially in the molecular population of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We describe these differences and discuss how they may be used to delineate the various interstellar processes that may have contributed to meteoritic D enrichments. We also briefly discuss how these processes may affect the isotopic distributions in C, 0, and N in the same compounds.

  16. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, J. Wesley; Damiano, Brian; Mehta, Chaitanya; Collins, Price; Lish, Matthew; Cady, Brian; Lollar, Victor; de Wet, Dane; Bayram, Duygu

    2015-12-15

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on

  17. Magma Differentiation Processes That Develop an "Enriched" Signature in the Izu Bonin Rear Arc: Evidence from Drilling at IODP Site U1437

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, L. J.; DeBari, S. M.; Schindlbeck, J. C.; Escobar-Burciaga, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Izu Bonin rear arc represents a unique laboratory to study the development of continental crust precursors at an intraoceanic subduction zone., Volcanic output in the Izu Bonin rear arc is compositionally distinct from the Izu Bonin main volcanic front, with med- to high-K and LREE-enrichment similar to the average composition of the continental crust. Drilling at IODP Expedition 350 Site U1437 in the Izu Bonin rear arc obtained volcaniclastic material that was deposited from at least 13.5 Ma to present. IODP Expedition 350 represents the first drilling mission in the Izu Bonin rear arc region. This study presents fresh glass and mineral compositions (obtained via EMP and LA-ICP-MS) from unaltered tephra layers in mud/mudstone (Lithostratigraphic Unit I) and lapillistone (Lithostratigraphic Unit II) <4.5 Ma to examine the geochemical signature of Izu Bonin rear arc magmas. Unit II samples are coarse-grained tephras that are mainly rhyolitic in composition (72.1-77.5 wt. % SiO2, 3.2-3.9 wt. % K2O and average Mg# 24) and LREE-enriched. These rear-arc rhyolites have an average La/Sm of 2.6 with flat HREEs, average Th/La of 0.15, and Zr/Y of 4.86. Rear-arc rhyolite trace element signature is distinct from felsic eruptive products from the Izu Bonin main volcanic front, which have lower La/Sm and Th/La as well as significantly lower incompatible element concentrations. Rear arc rhyolites have similar trace element ratios to rhyolites from the adjacent but younger backarc knolls and actively-extending rift regions, but the latter is typified by lower K2O, as well as a smaller degree of enrichment in incompatible elements. Given these unique characteristics, we explore models for felsic magma formation and intracrustal differentiation in the Izu Bonin rear arc.

  18. Practical quantum digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  19. ERS-1 SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, K.; Bicknell, T.; Vines, K.

    1986-01-01

    To take full advantage of the synthetic aperature radar (SAR) to be flown on board the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) (1989) and the Canadian Radarsat (1990), the implementation of a receiving station in Alaska is being studied to gather and process SAR data pertaining in particular to regions within the station's range of reception. The current SAR data processing requirement is estimated to be on the order of 5 minutes per day. The Interim Digital Sar Processor (IDP) which was under continual development through Seasat (1978) and SIR-B (1984) can process slightly more than 2 minutes of ERS-1 data per day. On the other hand, the Advanced Digital SAR Processore (ADSP), currently under development for the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C, 1988) and the Venus Radar Mapper, (VMR, 1988), is capable of processing ERS-1 SAR data at a real time rate. To better suit the anticipated ERS-1 SAR data processing requirement, both a modified IDP and an ADSP derivative are being examined. For the modified IDP, a pipelined architecture is proposed for the mini-computer plus array processor arrangement to improve throughout. For the ADSP derivative, a simplified version is proposed to enhance ease of implementation and maintainability while maintaing real time throughput rates. These processing systems are discussed and evaluated.

  20. Factor models for cancer signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel method for extracting cancer signatures by applying statistical risk models (http://ssrn.com/abstract=2732453) from quantitative finance to cancer genome data. Using 1389 whole genome sequenced samples from 14 cancers, we identify an "overall" mode of somatic mutational noise. We give a prescription for factoring out this noise and source code for fixing the number of signatures. We apply nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to genome data aggregated by cancer subtype and filtered using our method. The resultant signatures have substantially lower variability than those from unfiltered data. Also, the computational cost of signature extraction is cut by about a factor of 10. We find 3 novel cancer signatures, including a liver cancer dominant signature (96% contribution) and a renal cell carcinoma signature (70% contribution). Our method accelerates finding new cancer signatures and improves their overall stability. Reciprocally, the methods for extracting cancer signatures could have interesting applications in quantitative finance.

  1. Current signature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Inventor); Lucena, Angel (Inventor); Ihlefeld, Curtis (Inventor); Burns, Bradley (Inventor); Bassignani, Karin E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A solenoid health monitoring system uses a signal conditioner and controller assembly in one embodiment that includes analog circuitry and a DSP controller. The analog circuitry provides signal conditioning to the low-level raw signal coming from a signal acquisition assembly. Software running in a DSP analyzes the incoming data (recorded current signature) and determines the state of the solenoid whether it is energized, de-energized, or in a transitioning state. In one embodiment, the software identifies key features in the current signature during the transition phase and is able to determine the health of the solenoid.

  2. Current Signature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Inventor); Lucena, Angel (Inventor); Ihlefeld, Curtis (Inventor); Burns, Bradley (Inventor); Bassignani, Mario (Inventor); Bassignani, Karin E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A solenoid health monitoring system uses a signal conditioner and controller assembly in one embodiment that includes analog circuitry and a DSP controller. The analog circuitry provides signal conditioning to the low-level raw signal coming from a signal acquisition assembly. Software running in a DSP analyzes the incoming data (recorded current signature) and determines the state of the solenoid whether it is energized, de-energized, or in a transitioning state. In one embodiment, the software identifies key features in the current signature during the transition phase and is able to determine the health of the solenoid.

  3. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is often referred to as the primary source of energy release during solar flares. Directly observing reconnection occurring in the solar atmosphere, however, is not trivial considering that the scale size of the diffusion region is magnitudes smaller than the observational capabilities of current instrumentation, and coronal magnetic field measurements are not currently sufficient to capture the process. Therefore, predicting and studying observationally feasible signatures of the precursors and consequences of reconnection is necessary for guiding and verifying the simulations that dominate our understanding. I will present a set of such observations, particularly in connection with long-duration solar events, and compare them with recent simulations and theoretical predictions.

  4. A Signature Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin V.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses Dr. Amalia Amaki and her approach to art as her signature style by turning everyday items into fine art. Amaki is an assistant professor of art, art history, and Black American studies at the University of Delaware. She loves taking unexpected an object and redefining it in the context of art--like a button, a fan, a faded…

  5. Searching the Inclusive Lepton + Photon + Missing E(T) + b-quark Signature for Radiative Top Quark Decay and Non-Standard-Model Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    In a search for new phenomena in a signature suppressed in the standard model of elementary particles (SM), we compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton ({ell}), a photon ({gamma}), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E{sub T}), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find 28 {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} events versus an expectation of 31.0{sub -3.5}{sup +4.1} events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, simulations predict that the largest SM source is top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, t{bar t} + {gamma}. In the data we observe 16 t{bar t}{gamma} candidate events versus an expectation from non-top-quark SM sources of 11.2{sub -2.1}{sup +2.3}. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total is due to SM top quark production, we estimate the t{bar t} cross section to be 0.15 {+-} 0.08 pb.

  6. Terahertz signature characterization of bio-simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Alexander J.; Miller, Peter; Abreu, Rene; Grotts, Jeffrey; Globus, Tatiana; Brown, Elliott

    2005-05-01

    Collaboration with the University of Virginia (UVa) and the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) has resulted in the collection of signature data in the THz region of the spectrum for ovalbumin, Bacillus Subtilis (BG) and RNA from MS2 phage. Two independent experimental measurement systems were used to characterize the bio-simulants. Prior to our efforts, only a limited signature database existed. The goal was to evaluate a larger ensemble of biological agent simulants (BG, MS2 and ovalbumin) by measuring their THz absorption spectra. UCSB used a photomixer spectrometer and UVa a Fourier Transform spectrometer to measure absorption spectra. Each group used different sample preparation techniques and made multiple measurements to provide reliable statistics. Data processing culminated in applying proprietary algorithms to develop detection filters for each simulant. Through a covariance matrix approach, the detection filters extract signatures over regions with strong absorption and ignore regions with large signature variation (noise). The discrimination capability of these filters was also tested. The probability of detection and false alarm for each simulant was analyzed by each simulant specific filter. We analyzed a limited set of Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) data (a near neighbor to BG) and were capable of discriminating between BT and BG. The signal processing and filter construction demonstrates signature specificity and filter discrimination capabilities.

  7. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study.

  8. Wake Signature Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedding, Geoffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    An accumulated body of quantitative evidence shows that bluff-body wakes in stably stratified environments have an unusual degree of coherence and organization, so characteristic geometries such as arrays of alternating-signed vortices have very long lifetimes, as measured in units of buoyancy timescales, or in the downstream distance scaled by a body length. The combination of pattern geometry and persistence renders the detection of these wakes possible in principle. It now appears that identifiable signatures can be found from many disparate sources: Islands, fish, and plankton all have been noted to generate features that can be detected by climate modelers, hopeful navigators in open oceans, or hungry predators. The various types of wakes are reviewed with notes on why their signatures are important and to whom. A general theory of wake pattern formation is lacking and would have to span many orders of magnitude in Reynolds number.

  9. SMAWT Signature Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    were generally inversely proportional to the size assesments of the flash and smoke . Table 26 shows the percent of change in average judgments of...Average Time of Gunner’s View Obscuration by Smoke During Firings From the Wood Line .. .. ..... ..... ...... ..... .. 18 7. Average Obscuration Times...of Gunner’s View Obscuration by Smoke - Grass Line 19 8. Normalized Comparisons of the Relative Grades Assigned to Systems Signature Components

  10. Bayesian Separation of Lamb Wave Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, SW

    2001-07-19

    A persistent problem in the analysis of Lamb wave signatures in experimental data is the fact that several different modes appear simultaneously in the signal. The modes overlap in both the frequency and time domains. Attempts to separate the overlapping Lamb wave signatures by conventional signal processing methods have been unsatisfactory. This paper reports an exciting alternative to conventional methods. Severely overlapping Lamb waves are found to be readily separable by Bayesian parameter estimation. The authors have used linear-chirped Gaussian-windowed sinusoids as models of each Lamb wave mode. The separation algorithm allows each mode to be examined individually.

  11. Molecular signature in HCV-positive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    De Re, Valli; Caggiari, Laura; Garziera, Marica; De Zorzi, Mariangela; Repetto, Ombretta

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive, single-stranded RNA virus, which has been associated to different subtypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Cumulative evidence suggests an HCV-related antigen driven process in the B-NHL development. The underlying molecular signature associated to HCV-related B-NHL has to date remained obscure. In this review, we discuss the recent developments in this field with a special mention to different sets of genes whose expression is associated with BCR coupled to Blys signaling which in turn was found to be linked to B-cell maturation stages and NF-κb transcription factor. Even if recent progress on HCV-B-NHL signature has been made, the precise relationship between HCV and lymphoma development and phenotype signature remain to be clarified.

  12. Visual signatures in video visualization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Botchen, Ralf P; Hashim, Rudy R; Weiskopf, Daniel; Ertl, Thomas; Thornton, Ian M

    2006-01-01

    Video visualization is a computation process that extracts meaningful information from original video data sets and conveys the extracted information to users in appropriate visual representations. This paper presents a broad treatment of the subject, following a typical research pipeline involving concept formulation, system development, a path-finding user study, and a field trial with real application data. In particular, we have conducted a fundamental study on the visualization of motion events in videos. We have, for the first time, deployed flow visualization techniques in video visualization. We have compared the effectiveness of different abstract visual representations of videos. We have conducted a user study to examine whether users are able to learn to recognize visual signatures of motions, and to assist in the evaluation of different visualization techniques. We have applied our understanding and the developed techniques to a set of application video clips. Our study has demonstrated that video visualization is both technically feasible and cost-effective. It has provided the first set of evidence confirming that ordinary users can be accustomed to the visual features depicted in video visualizations, and can learn to recognize visual signatures of a variety of motion events.

  13. Knowledge Signatures for Information Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Judi; Cowell, Andrew J.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Mark A.

    2003-10-25

    This paper introduces the notion of a knowledge signature: a concise, ontologically-driven representation of the semantic characteristics of data. Knowledge signatures provide programmatic access to data semantics while allowing comparisons to be made across different types of data such as text, images or video, enabling efficient, automated information integration. Through observation, which determines the degree of association between data and ontological concepts, and refinement, which uses the axioms and structure of the domain ontology to place the signature more accurately within the context of the domain, knowledge signatures can be created. A comparison of such signatures for two different pieces of data results in a measure of their semantic separation. This paper discusses the definition of knowledge signatures along with the design and prototype implementation of a knowledge signature generator.

  14. U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) multimodal signatures database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kelly

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Multimodal Signatures Database (MMSDB) is a centralized collection of sensor data of various modalities that are co-located and co-registered. The signatures include ground and air vehicles, personnel, mortar, artillery, small arms gunfire from potential sniper weapons, explosives, and many other high value targets. This data is made available to Department of Defense (DoD) and DoD contractors, Intel agencies, other government agencies (OGA), and academia for use in developing target detection, tracking, and classification algorithms and systems to protect our Soldiers. A platform independent Web interface disseminates the signatures to researchers and engineers within the scientific community. Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) signature models provide an excellent solution for the sharing of complex multimodal signature data for algorithmic development and database requirements. Many open source tools for viewing and plotting HDF5 signatures are available over the Web. Seamless integration of HDF5 signatures is possible in both proprietary computational environments, such as MATLAB, and Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) computational environments, such as Octave and Python, for performing signal processing, analysis, and algorithm development. Future developments include extending the Web interface into a portal system for accessing ARL algorithms and signatures, High Performance Computing (HPC) resources, and integrating existing database and signature architectures into sensor networking environments.

  15. Signature CERN-URSS

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-24

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  16. Advanced spectral signature discrimination algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sumit; Cao, Wenjie; Samat, Alim

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to the task of hyperspectral signature analysis. Hyperspectral signature analysis has been studied a lot in literature and there has been a lot of different algorithms developed which endeavors to discriminate between hyperspectral signatures. There are many approaches for performing the task of hyperspectral signature analysis. Binary coding approaches like SPAM and SFBC use basic statistical thresholding operations to binarize a signature which are then compared using Hamming distance. This framework has been extended to techniques like SDFC wherein a set of primate structures are used to characterize local variations in a signature together with the overall statistical measures like mean. As we see such structures harness only local variations and do not exploit any covariation of spectrally distinct parts of the signature. The approach of this research is to harvest such information by the use of a technique similar to circular convolution. In the approach we consider the signature as cyclic by appending the two ends of it. We then create two copies of the spectral signature. These three signatures can be placed next to each other like the rotating discs of a combination lock. We then find local structures at different circular shifts between the three cyclic spectral signatures. Texture features like in SDFC can be used to study the local structural variation for each circular shift. We can then create different measure by creating histogram from the shifts and thereafter using different techniques for information extraction from the histograms. Depending on the technique used different variant of the proposed algorithm are obtained. Experiments using the proposed technique show the viability of the proposed methods and their performances as compared to current binary signature coding techniques.

  17. Multimodal signature modeling of humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, J. Michael; Kocher, Brian; Prussing, Keith; Lane, Sarah; Thomas, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Georgia Tech been investigating method for the detection of covert personnel in traditionally difficult environments (e.g., urban, caves). This program focuses on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. Both aspects are needed to support the development of personnel detection and tracking algorithms. The difficult nature of these personnel-related problems dictates a multimodal sensing approach. Human signature data of sufficient and accurate quality and quantity do not exist, thus the development of an accurate signature model for a human is needed. This model should also simulate various human activities to allow motion-based observables to be exploited. This paper will describe a multimodal signature modeling approach that incorporates human physiological aspects, thermoregulation, and dynamics into the signature calculation. This approach permits both passive and active signatures to be modeled. The focus of the current effort involved the computation of signatures in urban environments. This paper will discuss the development of a human motion model for use in simulating both electro-optical signatures and radar-based signatures. Video sequences of humans in a simulated urban environment will also be presented; results using these sequences for personnel tracking will be presented.

  18. EUROPIUM s-PROCESS SIGNATURE AT CLOSE-TO-SOLAR METALLICITY IN STARDUST SiC GRAINS FROM ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Janaina N.; Ireland, Trevor R.; Holden, Peter; Lugaro, Maria; Gyngard, Frank; Zinner, Ernst; Cristallo, Sergio; Rauscher, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Individual mainstream stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains and a SiC-enriched bulk sample from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite have been analyzed by the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe-Reverse Geometry for Eu isotopes. The mainstream grains are believed to have condensed in the outflows of {approx}1.5-3 M{sub Sun} carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The {sup 151}Eu fractions [fr({sup 151}Eu) = {sup 151}Eu/({sup 151}Eu+{sup 153}Eu)] derived from our measurements are compared with previous astronomical observations of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars enriched in elements made by slow neutron captures (the s-process). Despite the difference in metallicity between the parent stars of the grains and the metal-poor stars, the fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from our measurements agree well with fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from astronomical observations. We have also compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of Eu isotopic ratios in the envelope of AGB stars. Because of the low Eu abundances in the SiC grains, the fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from our measurements show large uncertainties, in most cases being larger than the difference between solar and predicted fr({sup 151}Eu) values. The SiC aggregate yields a fr({sup 151}Eu) value within the range observed in the single grains and provides a more precise result (fr({sup 151}Eu) = 0.54 {+-} 0.03, 95% conf.), but is approximately 12% higher than current s-process predictions. The AGB models can match the SiC data if we use an improved formalism to evaluate the contribution of excited nuclear states in the calculation of the {sup 151}Sm(n, {gamma}) stellar reaction rate.

  19. Irma multisensor predictive signature model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, John S.; Flynn, David S.; Wellfare, Michael R.; Richards, Mike; Prestwood, Lee

    1995-06-01

    The Irma synthetic signature model was one of the first high resolution synthetic infrared (IR) target and background signature models to be developed for tactical air-to-surface weapon scenarios. Originally developed in 1980 by the Armament Directorate of the Air Force Wright Laboratory (WL/MN), the Irma model was used exclusively to generate IR scenes for smart weapons research and development. In 1988, a number of significant upgrades to Irma were initiated including the addition of a laser channel. This two channel version, Irma 3.0, was released to the user community in 1990. In 1992, an improved scene generator was incorporated into the Irma model which supported correlated frame-to-frame imagery. This and other improvements were released in Irma 2.2. Recently, Irma 3.2, a passive IR/millimeter wave (MMW) code, was completed. Currently, upgrades are underway to include an active MMW channel. Designated Irma 4.0, this code will serve as a cornerstone of sensor fusion research in the laboratory from 6.1 concept development to 6.3 technology demonstration programs for precision guided munitions. Several significant milestones have been reached in this development process and are demonstrated. The Irma 4.0 software design has been developed and interim results are available. Irma is being developed to facilitate multi-sensor smart weapons research and development. It is currently in distribution to over 80 agencies within the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, ARPA, NASA, Department of Transportation, academia, and industry.

  20. Signature CERN-URSS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  1. Signatures of aging revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Drell, S.; Jeanloz, R.; Cornwall, J.; Dyson, F.; Eardley, D.

    1998-03-18

    This study is a follow-on to the review made by JASON during its 1997 Summer Study of what is known about the aging of critical constituents, particularly the high explosives, metals (Pu, U), and polymers in the enduring stockpile. The JASON report (JSR-97-320) that summarized the findings was based on briefings by the three weapons labs (LANL, LLNL, SNL). They presented excellent technical analyses covering a broad range of scientific and engineering problems pertaining to determining signatures of aging. But the report also noted: `Missing, however, from the briefings and the written documents made available to us by the labs and DOE, was evidence of an adequately sharp focus and high priorities on a number of essential near-term needs of maintaining weapons in the stockpile.

  2. Tagging a monotop signature in natural SUSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Dorival; Sakurai, Kazuki; Takeuchi, Michihisa

    2017-01-01

    We study the feasibility of probing a region of natural supersymmetry where the stop and Higgsino masses are compressed. Although this region is most effectively searched for in the monojet channel, this signature is present in many other nonsupersymmetric frameworks. Therefore, another channel that carries orthogonal information is required to confirm the existence of the light stop and Higgsinos. We show that a supersymmetric version of the t t ¯H process, p p →t t˜ 1χ˜1 (2 ) 0 , can have an observably large rate when both the stop and Higgsinos are significantly light, and it leads to a distinctive monotop signature in the compressed mass region. We demonstrate that the hadronic channel of the monotop signature can effectively discriminate the signal from backgrounds by tagging a hadronic top jet. We show that the hadronic channel of the monotop signature offers a significant improvement over the leptonic channel and the sensitivity reaches mt˜1≃420 GeV at the 13 TeV LHC with 3 ab-1 luminosity.

  3. Multisensors signature prediction workbench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latger, Jean; Cathala, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    Guidance of weapon systems relies on sensors to analyze targets signature. Defense weapon systems also need to detect then identify threats also using sensors. The sensors performance is very dependent on conditions e.g. time of day, atmospheric propagation, background ... Visible camera are very efficient for diurnal fine weather conditions, long wave infrared sensors for night vision, radar systems very efficient for seeing through atmosphere and/or foliage ... Besides, multi sensors systems, combining several collocated sensors with associated algorithms of fusion, provide better efficiency (typically for Enhanced Vision Systems). But these sophisticated systems are all the more difficult to conceive, assess and qualify. In that frame, multi sensors simulation is highly required. This paper focuses on multi sensors simulation tools. A first part makes a state of the Art of such simulation workbenches with a special focus on SE-Workbench. SEWorkbench is described with regards to infrared/EO sensors, millimeter waves sensors, active EO sensors and GNSS sensors. Then a general overview of simulation of targets and backgrounds signature objectives is presented, depending on the type of simulation required (parametric studies, open loop simulation, closed loop simulation, hybridization of SW simulation and HW ...). After the objective review, the paper presents some basic requirements for simulation implementation such as the deterministic behavior of simulation, mandatory to repeat it many times for parametric studies... Several technical topics are then discussed, such as the rendering technique (ray tracing vs. rasterization), the implementation (CPU vs. GP GPU) and the tradeoff between physical accuracy and performance of computation. Examples of results using SE-Workbench are showed and commented.

  4. Signatures of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltz, Edward Anthony

    It is well known that most of the mass in the universe remains unobserved save for its gravitational effect on luminous matter. The nature of this ``dark matter'' remains a mystery. From measurements of the primordial deuterium abundance, the theory of big bang nucleosynthesis predicts that there are not enough baryons to account for the amount of dark matter observed, thus the missing mass must take an exotic form. Several promising candidates have been proposed. In this work I will describe my research along two main lines of inquiry into the dark matter puzzle. The first possibility is that the dark matter is exotic massive particles, such as those predicted by supersymmetric extensions to the standard model of particle physics. Such particles are generically called WIMPs, for weakly interacting massive particles. Focusing on the so-called neutralino in supersymmetric models, I discuss the possible signatures of such particles, including their direct detection via nuclear recoil experiments and their indirect detection via annihilations in the halos of galaxies, producing high energy antiprotons, positrons and gamma rays. I also discuss signatures of the possible slow decays of such particles. The second possibility is that there is a population of black holes formed in the early universe. Any dark objects in galactic halos, black holes included, are called MACHOs, for massive compact halo objects. Such objects can be detected by their gravitational microlensing effects. Several possibilities for sources of baryonic dark matter are also interesting for gravitational microlensing. These include brown dwarf stars and old, cool white dwarf stars. I discuss the theory of gravitational microlensing, focusing on the technique of pixel microlensing. I make predictions for several planned microlensing experiments with ground based and space based telescopes. Furthermore, I discuss binary lenses in the context of pixel microlensing. Finally, I develop a new technique for

  5. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, D.; Zakamska, N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. It operates by either heating or driving the gas that would otherwise be available for star formation out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. We have assembled a large sample of 133 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1signatures are hosted in galaxies that are more `quenched' considering their stellar mass than galaxies with weaker outflow signatures. This correlation is only seen in AGN host galaxies with SFR >100 M_{⊙} yr^{-1} where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, or `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  6. Image processing and products for the Magellan mission to Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Jerry; Alexander, Doug; Andres, Paul; Lewicki, Scott; Mcauley, Myche

    1992-01-01

    The Magellan mission to Venus is providing planetary scientists with massive amounts of new data about the surface geology of Venus. Digital image processing is an integral part of the ground data system that provides data products to the investigators. The mosaicking of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image data from the spacecraft is being performed at JPL's Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL). MIPL hosts and supports the Image Data Processing Subsystem (IDPS), which was developed in a VAXcluster environment of hardware and software that includes optical disk jukeboxes and the TAE-VICAR (Transportable Applications Executive-Video Image Communication and Retrieval) system. The IDPS is being used by processing analysts of the Image Data Processing Team to produce the Magellan image data products. Various aspects of the image processing procedure are discussed.

  7. Evidence for Changes in 81PIWild 2 Organic Matter Since Collection and Comparison of 82PIWild 2 and IDP Organic Matter to Access the Thermal Effects of Aerogel Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L.; Messenger, Nakamura; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Peltzer, C.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Stardust spacecraft collected cometary material during its passage through the dust coma of comet 81P/Wild 2 on January 2nd, 2004 and delivered this material to Earth on January 15th 2006. The first fragment we analyzed during the preliminary examination was partially vaporized by the X-ray beam. The carbonaceous material that survived was re-analysis approx.2 months later and the carbon spectrum for this material had significantly changed from what we first observed.. We have observed similar changes to the carbonaceous matter in some interplanetary dust particles ( IDPs). Some of the 81P/Wild 2 organic matter volatilized upon impact with the aerogel as observed using IR spectroscopy where IR spectra were collected several mms away from sample tracks [1]. The time-temperature profile experienced by any particular 81P/Wild 2 grain during aerogel capture is not known, although Brownlee, et al. suggest that fine-grained materials, <1 micron in size, fragmented and then partially vaporized during collection, while particles much larger then 1 micron in size were captured intact [2]. Nearly all organic matter is subject to thermal alteration. To assess the heating and alteration experienced by the 81P/Wild 2 organic matter during capture we are comparing 81P/Wild2 organic matter with IDP organic matter where we have evidence of heating in the IDP [3,4].

  8. Index of Spectrum Signature Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Frederick Research Corporation. Alexandria. VA 163 AN/APG-030 Radar Receiver Heasureaents Electromagnetic Coapatibilitv Analysis Center, US Navv Marine ... Electromagnetic Compatibility Characteristics of the W 86 Gun Fire Control Svstem. Naval HEapons Lab, Dahlgren, VA 501 Partial Spectrum Signature...ECAC-I-IO-(SS) DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Center Annapolis, Maryland 21402 INDEX OF SPECTRUM SIGNATURE DATA

  9. Cell short circuit, preshort signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, C.

    1980-01-01

    Short-circuit events observed in ground test simulations of DSCS-3 battery in-orbit operations are analyzed. Voltage signatures appearing in the data preceding the short-circuit event are evaluated. The ground test simulation is briefly described along with performance during reconditioning discharges. Results suggest that a characteristic signature develops prior to a shorting event.

  10. The Effects of Differentiated Instruction on the Literacy Process of Learners with Interrupted Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niño Santisteban, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This research study analyzes the literacy and foreign langauge processes of learners in the "Procesos Básicos" Program. The participants were 15 Spanish-speaking children and young adolescents, whose highest level of education was first grade. Eight of the 15 children were Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), and the others were affected…

  11. Improving interpretation of geoelectrical signatures arising from biomineralization process in porous media: Low-frequency dielectric spectroscopy measurements on Desulfovibrio vulgaris cell suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Prodan, C.; Slater, L. D.; Bot, C.; Ntarlagiannis, D.

    2009-12-01

    dilute suspension of polarizable spheres with the polarization attributed to the surface charge on the cell walls. Our results provide insights into the likely contribution of the cells themselves to biogeophysical signals observed during biomineralization processes.

  12. Development of a model community to evaluate efficient removal of genetic signatures from spacecraft surfaces: issues pertaining to sampling, sample processing, and molecular analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Duc, Myron; Kwan, Kelly; Cooper, Moogega; Stam, Christina; Vaishampayan, Parag; Benardini, James Nick; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Andersen, Gary; Spry, James A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    Despite advances in the specificity and sensitivity of molecular biological technologies, the ef-ficient recovery of DNA from low-biomass samples remains extremely challenging. Optimal methods to extract these biomolecules should 1) achieve the greatest total yield; 2) reflect comprehensive microbial diversity of the sampled environment; and 3) assert reproducible re-sults. For an in-depth assessment of the wide spectrum of microorganisms present in the low-biomass spacecraft assembly clean room environment, technologies facilitating efficient col-lection, sample processing, and analysis are needed. To this end, a homogenous mixture of equal concentrations of 11 distinct microbial lineages having significant relevance to planetary protection (bacteria, archaea, and fungi; aerobes and anaerobes; cells and spores; rods and cocci) was prepared. Suitable aliquots of this "model" community were then characterized us-ing a parallel set of downstream molecular analyses which revealed the level of microbial DNA, extracellular DNA, dissolved organic matter, and particulate non-microbial substances present in the community. Appropriate subsamples of this model community were dried on stainless steel metal surfaces, and procedures targeting the efficient removal and recovery of community member DNAs were evaluated. The collection and release of genetic materials from cotton and flocked nylon swabs were compared. Several automated nucleic acid extraction methods were assessed for both total DNA yield and conservation of microbial community structure. Uni-versal small subunit rrn Q-PCR, species-specific Q-PCR, and DNA microarray methodologies were used in concert to estimate the recovery of both individual members, and the community as a whole. Results of this study will enable consideration of future planetary protection policy amendments based on modern molecular methods.

  13. (abstract) Topographic Signatures in Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.; Evans, Diane L.

    1996-01-01

    Topographic information is required for many Earth Science investigations. For example, topography is an important element in regional and global geomorphic studies because it reflects the interplay between the climate-driven processes of erosion and the tectonic processes of uplift. A number of techniques have been developed to analyze digital topographic data, including Fourier texture analysis. A Fourier transform of the topography of an area allows the spatial frequency content of the topography to be analyzed. Band-pass filtering of the transform produces images representing the amplitude of different spatial wavelengths. These are then used in a multi-band classification to map units based on their spatial frequency content. The results using a radar image instead of digital topography showed good correspondence to a geologic map, however brightness variations in the image unrelated to topography caused errors. An additional benefit to the use of Fourier band-pass images for the classification is that the textural signatures of the units are quantative measures of the spatial characteristics of the units that may be used to map similar units in similar environments.

  14. Extraction of small boat harmonic signatures from passive sonar.

    PubMed

    Ogden, George L; Zurk, Lisa M; Jones, Mark E; Peterson, Mary E

    2011-06-01

    This paper investigates the extraction of acoustic signatures from small boats using a passive sonar system. Noise radiated from a small boats consists of broadband noise and harmonically related tones that correspond to engine and propeller specifications. A signal processing method to automatically extract the harmonic structure of noise radiated from small boats is developed. The Harmonic Extraction and Analysis Tool (HEAT) estimates the instantaneous fundamental frequency of the harmonic tones, refines the fundamental frequency estimate using a Kalman filter, and automatically extracts the amplitudes of the harmonic tonals to generate a harmonic signature for the boat. Results are presented that show the HEAT algorithms ability to extract these signatures.

  15. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon.

  16. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  17. Time delay signature concealment of optical feedback induced chaos in an external cavity semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Gui; Xia, Guang-Qiong; Tang, Xi; Lin, Xiao-Dong; Deng, Tao; Fan, Li; Wu, Zheng-Mao

    2010-03-29

    The time delay (TD) signature concealment of optical feedback induced chaos in an external cavity semiconductor laser is experimentally demonstrated. Both the evolution curve and the distribution map of TD signature are obtained in the parameter space of external feedback strength and injection current. The optimum parameter scope of the TD signature concealment is also specified. Furthermore, the approximately periodic evolution relation between TD signature and external cavity length is observed and indicates that the intrinsic relaxation oscillation of semiconductor laser may play an important role during the process of TD signature suppression.

  18. Modulation of an IDP binding mechanism and rates by helix propensity and non-native interactions: association of HIF1α with CBP.

    PubMed

    De Sancho, David; Best, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins that acquire their three dimensional structures only upon binding to their targets are very important in cellular signal regulation. While experimental studies have been made on the structures of both bound (structured) and unbound (disordered) states, less is known about the actual folding-binding transition. Coarse grained simulations using native-centric (i.e. Gō) potentials have been particularly useful in addressing this problem, given the large search space for IDP binding, but have well-known deficiencies in reproducing the unfolded state structure and dynamics. Here, we investigate the interaction of HIF1α with CBP using a hierarchy of coarse-grained models, in each case matching the binding affinity at 300 K to the experimental value. Starting from a pure Gō-like model based on the native structure of the complex we go on to consider a more realistic model of helix propensity in the HIF1α, and finally the effect of non-native interactions between binding partners. We find structural disorder (i.e."fuzziness") in the bound state of HIF1α in all models which is supported by the results of atomistic simulations. Correcting the over-stabilized helices in the unbound state gives rise to a more cooperative folding-binding transition (destabilizing partially bound intermediates). Adding non-native contacts lowers the free energy barrier for binding to an almost barrierless scenario, leading to higher binding/unbinding rates relative to the other models, in better agreement with the near diffusion-limited binding rates measured experimentally. Transition state structures for the three models are highly disordered, supporting a fly-casting mechanism for binding.

  19. Using what you get: dynamic physiologic signatures of critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Andre L.; Clermont, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    A physiologic signature can be defined as a consistent and robust collection of physiologic measurements characterizing a disease process and its temporal evolution. If a library of physiologic signatures of impending cardiopulmonary instability were available to clinicians caring for inpatients, many episodes of clinical decompensation and their downstream effects could potentially be averted. The development and resolution of cardiopulmonary instability are processes that take time to become clinically apparent, and the treatments provided take time to have an impact. The characterization of dynamic changes in hemodynamic and metabolic variables is implicit in the concept of physiologic signatures. Changes in vital signs such as blood pressure and heart rate, as well as measures of flow such as cardiac output are some of the standard variables used by clinicians to determine cardiopulmonary instability. When these primary variables are collected with high enough frequency to derive new variables, this data hierarchy can be used to development physiologic signatures. The construction of new variables from primary variables, and therefore the creation of physiologic signatures requires no new information; additional knowledge is extracted from data that already exists. It is possible to create physiologic signatures for each stage in the process of clinical decompensation and recovery to improve patient outcomes. PMID:25435482

  20. Retail applications of signature verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Thomas G.; Russell, Gregory F.; Heilper, Andre; Smith, Barton A.; Hu, Jianying; Markman, Dmitry; Graham, Jon E.; Drews, Clemens

    2004-08-01

    The dramatic rise in identity theft, the ever pressing need to provide convenience in checkout services to attract and retain loyal customers, and the growing use of multi-function signature captures devices in the retail sector provides favorable conditions for the deployment of dynamic signature verification (DSV) in retail settings. We report on the development of a DSV system to meet the needs of the retail sector. We currently have a database of approximately 10,000 signatures collected from 600 subjects and forgers. Previous work at IBM on DSV has been merged and extended to achieve robust performance on pen position data available from commercial point of sale hardware, achieving equal error rates on skilled forgeries and authentic signatures of 1.5% to 4%.

  1. Transcriptional Signatures in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    While selective neuronal death has been an influential theme in Huntington's disease (HD), there is now a preponderance of evidence that significant neuronal dysfunction precedes frank neuronal death. The best evidence for neuronal dysfunction is the observation that gene expression is altered in HD brain, suggesting that transcriptional dysregulation is a central mechanism. Studies of altered gene expression began with careful observations of post-mortem human HD brain and subsequently were accelerated by the development of transgenic mouse models. The application of DNA microarray technology has spurred tremendous progress with respect to the altered transcriptional processes that occur in HD, through gene expression studies of both transgenic mouse models as well as cellular models of HD. Gene expression profiles are remarkably comparable across these models, bolstering the idea that transcriptional signatures reflect an essential feature of disease pathogenesis. Finally, gene expression studies have been applied to human HD, thus not only validating the approach of using model systems, but also solidifying the idea that altered transcription is a key mechanism in HD pathogenesis. In the future, gene expression profiling will be used as a readout in clinical trials aimed at correcting transcriptional dysregulation in Huntington's disease. PMID:17467140

  2. Ballastic signature identification systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, A.; Hine, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results are described of an attempt to establish a uniform procedure for documenting (recording) expended bullet signatures as effortlessly as possible and to build a comprehensive library of these signatures in a form that will permit the automated comparison of a new suspect bullet with the prestored library. The ultimate objective is to achieve a standardized format that will permit nationwide interaction between police departments, crime laboratories, and other interested law enforcement agencies.

  3. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  4. Quantum blind dual-signature scheme without arbitrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Huang, Dazu; Shi, Jinjing; Guo, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the elegant features of a bind signature, we suggest the design of a quantum blind dual-signature scheme with three phases, i.e., initial phase, signing phase and verification phase. Different from conventional schemes, legal messages are signed not only by the blind signatory but also by the sender in the signing phase. It does not rely much on an arbitrator in the verification phase as the previous quantum signature schemes usually do. The security is guaranteed by entanglement in quantum information processing. Security analysis demonstrates that the signature can be neither forged nor disavowed by illegal participants or attacker. It provides a potential application for e-commerce or e-payment systems with the current technology.

  5. Compound signature detection on LINCS L1000 big data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenglin; Su, Jing; Yang, Fei; Wei, Kun; Ma, Jinwen; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) L1000 big data provide gene expression profiles induced by over 10,000 compounds, shRNAs, and kinase inhibitors using the L1000 platform. We developed csNMF, a systematic compound signature discovery pipeline covering from raw L1000 data processing to drug screening and mechanism generation. The csNMF pipeline demonstrated better performance than the original L1000 pipeline. The discovered compound signatures of breast cancer were consistent with the LINCS KINOMEscan data and were clinically relevant. The csNMF pipeline provided a novel and complete tool to expedite signature-based drug discovery leveraging the LINCS L1000 resources. PMID:25609570

  6. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-05-04

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposedmore » for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.« less

  7. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-05-04

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposed for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.

  8. Quantum messages with signatures forgeable in arbitrated quantum signature schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewan; Choi, Jeong Woon; Jho, Nam-Su; Lee, Soojoon

    2015-02-01

    Even though a method to perfectly sign quantum messages has not been known, the arbitrated quantum signature scheme has been considered as one of the good candidates. However, its forgery problem has been an obstacle to the scheme becoming a successful method. In this paper, we consider one situation, which is slightly different from the forgery problem, that we use to check whether at least one quantum message with signature can be forged in a given scheme, although all the messages cannot be forged. If there are only a finite number of forgeable quantum messages in the scheme, then the scheme can be secured against the forgery attack by not sending forgeable quantum messages, and so our situation does not directly imply that we check whether the scheme is secure against the attack. However, if users run a given scheme without any consideration of forgeable quantum messages, then a sender might transmit such forgeable messages to a receiver and in such a case an attacker can forge the messages if the attacker knows them. Thus it is important and necessary to look into forgeable quantum messages. We show here that there always exists such a forgeable quantum message-signature pair for every known scheme with quantum encryption and rotation, and numerically show that there are no forgeable quantum message-signature pairs that exist in an arbitrated quantum signature scheme.

  9. Visual attention and expertise for forensic signature analysis.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Adrian G; Found, Bryan; Rogers, Doug

    2006-11-01

    Eye tracking was used to measure visual attention of nine forensic document examiners (FDEs) and 12 control subjects on a blind signature comparison trial. Subjects evaluated 32 questioned signatures (16 genuine, eight disguised, and eight forged) which were compared, on screen, with four known signatures of the specimen provider while their eye movements, response times, and opinions were recorded. FDEs' opinions were significantly more accurate than controls, providing further evidence of FDE expertise. Both control and FDE subjects looked at signature features in a very similar way and the difference in the accuracy of their opinions can be accounted for by different cognitive processing of the visual information that they extract from the images. In a separate experiment the FDEs re-examined a reordered set of the same 32 questioned signatures. In this phase each signature was presented for only 100 msec to test if eye movements are relevant in forming opinions; performance significantly dropped, but not to chance levels indicating that the examination process comprises a combination of both global and local feature extraction strategies.

  10. Significance Analysis of Prognostic Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Andrew H.; Knoblauch, Nicholas W.; Hefti, Marco M.; Kaplan, Jennifer; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Culhane, Aedin C.; Schroeder, Markus S.; Risch, Thomas; Quackenbush, John; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    A major goal in translational cancer research is to identify biological signatures driving cancer progression and metastasis. A common technique applied in genomics research is to cluster patients using gene expression data from a candidate prognostic gene set, and if the resulting clusters show statistically significant outcome stratification, to associate the gene set with prognosis, suggesting its biological and clinical importance. Recent work has questioned the validity of this approach by showing in several breast cancer data sets that “random” gene sets tend to cluster patients into prognostically variable subgroups. This work suggests that new rigorous statistical methods are needed to identify biologically informative prognostic gene sets. To address this problem, we developed Significance Analysis of Prognostic Signatures (SAPS) which integrates standard prognostic tests with a new prognostic significance test based on stratifying patients into prognostic subtypes with random gene sets. SAPS ensures that a significant gene set is not only able to stratify patients into prognostically variable groups, but is also enriched for genes showing strong univariate associations with patient prognosis, and performs significantly better than random gene sets. We use SAPS to perform a large meta-analysis (the largest completed to date) of prognostic pathways in breast and ovarian cancer and their molecular subtypes. Our analyses show that only a small subset of the gene sets found statistically significant using standard measures achieve significance by SAPS. We identify new prognostic signatures in breast and ovarian cancer and their corresponding molecular subtypes, and we show that prognostic signatures in ER negative breast cancer are more similar to prognostic signatures in ovarian cancer than to prognostic signatures in ER positive breast cancer. SAPS is a powerful new method for deriving robust prognostic biological signatures from clinically annotated

  11. Digital gene expression signatures for maize development.

    PubMed

    Eveland, Andrea L; Satoh-Nagasawa, Namiko; Goldshmidt, Alexander; Meyer, Sandra; Beatty, Mary; Sakai, Hajime; Ware, Doreen; Jackson, David

    2010-11-01

    Genome-wide expression signatures detect specific perturbations in developmental programs and contribute to functional resolution of key regulatory networks. In maize (Zea mays) inflorescences, mutations in the RAMOSA (RA) genes affect the determinacy of axillary meristems and thus alter branching patterns, an important agronomic trait. In this work, we developed and tested a framework for analysis of tag-based, digital gene expression profiles using Illumina's high-throughput sequencing technology and the newly assembled B73 maize reference genome. We also used a mutation in the RA3 gene to identify putative expression signatures specific to stem cell fate in axillary meristem determinacy. The RA3 gene encodes a trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and may act at the interface between developmental and metabolic processes. Deep sequencing of digital gene expression libraries, representing three biological replicate ear samples from wild-type and ra3 plants, generated 27 million 20- to 21-nucleotide reads with frequencies spanning 4 orders of magnitude. Unique sequence tags were anchored to 3'-ends of individual transcripts by DpnII and NlaIII digests, which were multiplexed during sequencing. We mapped 86% of nonredundant signature tags to the maize genome, which associated with 37,117 gene models and unannotated regions of expression. In total, 66% of genes were detected by at least nine reads in immature maize ears. We used comparative genomics to leverage existing information from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) in functional analyses of differentially expressed maize genes. Results from this study provide a basis for the analysis of short-read expression data in maize and resolved specific expression signatures that will help define mechanisms of action for the RA3 gene.

  12. Identification of pixels with stray light and cloud shadow contaminations in the satellite ocean color data processing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lide; Wang, Menghua

    2013-09-20

    A new flag/masking scheme has been developed for identifying stray light and cloud shadow pixels that significantly impact the quality of satellite-derived ocean color products. Various case studies have been carried out to evaluate the performance of the new cloud contamination flag/masking scheme on ocean color products derived from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP). These include direct visual assessments, detailed quantitative case studies, objective statistic analyses, and global image examinations and comparisons. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Multisensor Level-1 to Level-2 (NOAA-MSL12) ocean color data processing system has been used in the study. The new stray light and cloud shadow identification method has been shown to outperform the current stray light flag in both valid data coverage and data quality of satellite-derived ocean color products. In addition, some cloud-related flags from the official VIIRS-SNPP data processing software, i.e., the Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), have been assessed. Although the data quality with the IDPS flags is comparable to that of the new flag implemented in the NOAA-MSL12 ocean color data processing system, the valid data coverage from the IDPS is significantly less than that from the NOAA-MSL12 using the new stray light and cloud shadow flag method. Thus, the IDPS flag/masking algorithms need to be refined and modified to reduce the pixel loss, e.g., the proposed new cloud contamination flag/masking can be implemented in IDPS VIIRS ocean color data processing.

  13. Isotopic signatures by bulk analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.

    1997-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a series of measurement techniques for identification of nuclear signatures by analyzing bulk samples. Two specific applications for isotopic fingerprinting to identify the origin of anthropogenic radioactivity in bulk samples are presented. The first example is the analyses of environmental samples collected in the US Arctic to determine the impact of dumping of radionuclides in this polar region. Analyses of sediment and biota samples indicate that for the areas sampled the anthropogenic radionuclide content of sediments was predominantly the result of the deposition of global fallout. The anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in fish, birds and mammals were very low. It can be surmised that marine food chains are presently not significantly affected. The second example is isotopic fingerprinting of water and sediment samples from the Rocky Flats Facility (RFP). The largest source of anthropogenic radioactivity presently affecting surface-waters at RFP is the sediments that are currently residing in the holding ponds. One gram of sediment from a holding pond contains approximately 50 times more plutonium than 1 liter of water from the pond. Essentially 100% of the uranium in Ponds A-1 and A-2 originated as depleted uranium. The largest source of radioactivity in the terminal Ponds A-4, B-5 and C-2 was naturally occurring uranium and its decay product radium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.05% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public. All of the radioactivity observed in soil, sediment and water samples collected at RFP was naturally occurring, the result of processes at RFP or the result of global fallout. No extraneous anthropogenic alpha, beta or gamma activities were detected. The plutonium concentrations in Pond C-2 appear to vary seasonally.

  14. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

    2013-06-01

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

  15. Measurement of sniper infrared signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, M.; Dulski, R.; Trzaskawka, P.; Bieszczad, G.

    2009-09-01

    The paper presents some practical aspects of sniper IR signature measurements. Description of particular signatures for sniper and background in typical scenarios has been presented. We take into consideration sniper activities in open area as well as in urban environment. The measurements were made at field test ground. High precision laboratory measurements were also performed. Several infrared cameras were used during measurements to cover all measurement assumptions. Some of the cameras are measurement class devices with high accuracy and speed. The others are microbolometer cameras with FPA detector similar to those used in real commercial counter-sniper systems. The registration was made in SWIR and LWIR spectral bands simultaneously. An ultra fast visual camera was also used for visible spectra registration. Exemplary sniper IR signatures for typical situation were presented.

  16. Subduction signature in backarc mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. R.; Snow, J. E.; Brandon, A. D.; Ohara, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Abyssal peridotites exposed during seafloor extension provide a rare glimpse into the processes occurring within the oceanic mantle. Whole rock and mineral-scale major element data from abyssal peridotites record processes intimately associated with melt-depletion and melt-rock interaction occurring just prior to exposure of the mantle at the surface. Isotopic data, however, can provide insight into the long-term evolution of the oceanic mantle. A number of studies of mantle material exposed along mid-ocean ridges have demonstrated that abyssal peridotites from Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Gakkel Ridge, and Southwest Indian Ridge commonly display a range of whole rock Os isotopic ratios (187Os/188Os = 0.118- 0.130; Brandon et al., 2000; Standish et al., 2002; Alard et al., 2005; Harvey et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008). The range of isotopic values in each region demonstrates that the oceanic mantle does not melt uniformly over time. Instead, anciently depleted regions (187Os/188Os ≈ 0.118) are juxtaposed against relatively fertile regions (187Os/188Os ≈ 0.130) that are isotopically similar to established primitive mantle values (187Os/188Os = 0.1296; Meisel et al. 2001). Abyssal peridotites from the Godzilla Megamullion and Chaotic Terrain in the backarc Parece Vela Basin (Philippine Sea) display a range of Os isotopic values extending to similar unradiogenic values. However, some of the backarc basin abyssal peridotites record more radiogenic 187Os/188Os values (0.135-0.170) than mid-ocean ridge peridotites. Comparable radiogenic signatures are reported only in highly weathered abyssal peridotites (187Os/188Os ≤ 0.17, Standish et al., 2002) and subduction-related volcanic arc peridotites (187Os/188Os ≤ 0.16, Brandon et al., 1996; Widom et al., 2003). In both the weathered peridotites and arc peridotites, the 187Os/188Os value is negatively correlated with Os abundance: the most radiogenic value has the lowest Os abundance (< 1 ppb) making them highly susceptible to

  17. Textural signatures for wetland vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, R. I.; Marcellus, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation indicates that unique textural signatures do exist for specific wetland communities at certain times in the growing season. When photographs with the proper resolution are obtained, the textural features can identify the spectral features of the vegetation community seen with lower resolution mapping data. The development of a matrix of optimum textural signatures is the goal of this research. Seasonal variations of spectral and textural features are particularly important when performing a vegetations analysis of fresh water marshes. This matrix will aid in flight planning, since expected seasonal variations and resolution requirements can be established prior to a given flight mission.

  18. Maritime Electromagnetism and DRDC Signature Management Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    characteristics of naturally occurring electromagnetism i.e. ambient electromag- netic fields in the oceans are described. In particular, the sources or...physical processes generating the fields, their magnitudes and the relevant time scales are noted. The ambient fields include the Earth’s geomagnetic...Résumé On examine de façon sélective le vaste domaine de l’électromagnétisme en milieu marin du point de vue de la gestion scientifique des signatures

  19. Rare earth and trace element signatures for assessing an impact of rock mining and processing on the environment: Wiśniówka case study, south-central Poland.

    PubMed

    Migaszewski, Zdzisław M; Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Dołęgowska, Sabina

    2016-12-01

    A detailed hydrogeochemical study was performed in the Wiśniówka mining area (south-central Poland). This covered three acid pit bodies, historic tailings acid ponds, acid pools, and additionally two neighboring rivers. All these acid mine drainage (AMD) waters are characterized by the pH in the range of 1.7 (pools) to 3.5 (tailings ponds). The most interesting is the Podwiśniówka acid pit lake that shows a very low pH (2.2-2.5) and very high concentrations of SO4(2-) (2720-5460 mg/L), Fe (545-1140 mg/L), Al (86.2 mg/L), As (9603-24,883 μg/L), Co (1317-3458 μg/L), Cr (753-2047 μg/L), Cu (6307-18,879 μg/L), Ni (1168-3127 μg/L), and rare earth element (REE) (589-1341 μg/L). In addition, seeps that drain the Podwiśniówka mine tailings and partly aggregate piles form strong acid pools in the mining area. Along with these pools, in which As and REE contents reach 369,726 and 6288 μg/L, respectively, these waters are among the most distinctive As- and REE-rich AMD surface waters across the world. It is noteworthy that the Podwiśniówka acid pit lake and Wiśniówka Duża acid pit sump exhibit different element signatures and REE concentration patterns normalized to North American Composite Shale (NASC): the Podwiśniówka acid pit lake always shows a characteristic roof-shaped medium REE (MREE) profile with distinct enrichments in Gd, Eu, and Tb whereas the other one displays a step-shaped heavy REE (HREE) profile with positive Tb and Gd anomalies. The REE undergo fractionation during weathering and the subsequent leaching of dissolved and suspended fractions from rocks to acid water bodies where these and other elements are further fractionated by geochemical processes. This study shows that the individual REE have greater affinities for Mn, HREE for Fe and SO4(2-), and only La and Ce for Al. This specific water geochemistry has enabled us to (i) pinpoint the location of AMD "hot spots" originated from quartzite mining and processing operations

  20. Investigation of Electromagnetic Signatures of a FPGA Using an APREL EM-ISIGHT System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    signature. Every part emits a unique EM signature similar to that of a human fingerprint . The same types of parts will have similar signatures, but with...DNA) fingerprinting is a new way to identify embedded ICs through the collection of unintentional RF emissions (Cobb et al., 2010). This leaked...fabrication practices that create a unique fingerprint for each device. Extreme variations can be linked to a process defect, a counterfeit device, or

  1. Topological Signatures for Population Admixture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Topological Signatures for Population AdmixtureDeniz Yorukoglu1, Filippo Utro1, David Kuhn2, Saugata Basu3 and Laxmi Parida1* Abstract Background: As populations with multi-linear transmission (i.e., mixing of genetic material from two parents, say) evolve over generations, the genetic transmission...

  2. MK 66 Rocket Signature Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Indian Head, Maryland. ’The objec- tive of the study was to reduce the visible signature of the rocket motor. The rocket motor used for demonstration tests...15 6. Actual Emmiissions . . . . . . ........... . 16 7. Human Eye Adjusted Emmissions ..................... .. 16 8. Cross...altered. Additives are commonly used in gun propellants for elimination of muzzle flash. Their use in tactical rockets has been very limited, and

  3. Disaster relief through composite signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Chadwick T.; Hyde, Brian; Carpenter, Tom; Nichols, Steve

    2012-06-01

    A composite signature is a group of signatures that are related in such a way to more completely or further define a target or operational endeavor at a higher fidelity. This paper builds on previous work developing innovative composite signatures associated with civil disasters, including physical, chemical and pattern/behavioral. For the composite signature approach to be successful it requires effective data fusion and visualization. This plays a key role in both preparedness and the response and recovery which are critical to saving lives. Visualization tools enhance the overall understanding of the crisis by pulling together and analyzing the data, and providing a clear and complete analysis of the information to the organizations/agencies dependant on it for a successful operation. An example of this, Freedom Web, is an easy-to-use data visualization and collaboration solution for use in homeland security, emergency preparedness, situational awareness, and event management. The solution provides a nationwide common operating picture for all levels of government through a web based, map interface. The tool was designed to be utilized by non-geospatial experts and is easily tailored to the specific needs of the users. Consisting of standard COTS and open source databases and a web server, users can view, edit, share, and highlight information easily and quickly through a standard internet browser.

  4. Twin signal signature sensing: Application to shorted winding monitoring, detection and localization

    SciTech Connect

    Streifel, R.J.; Marks, R.J.; El-Sharkawi, A.E.; Kerszenbaum, I.

    1995-12-31

    Using twin signal sensing we propose a method to monitor, detect and localize shorts in power system devices with windings: including rotors, transformers and motors. There has, to date, been no effective way to do so. The most obvious approach, time domain reflectometry, fails due to the reactive coupling of the windings. Twin signal signature sensing of shorts results from identical signals being simultaneously injected in both sides of the windings. The reflected signals are measured and the difference amplified to produce the signature signal. The signature signal characterizes the current state of the windings. When winding shorts are present, the electrical characteristics of the device will be different and thus the signature signal will also change. The changes in the signature signal can be monitored to detect shorted windings. While a device is in operation, the signature signals can be monitored and the development of winding shorts can be diagnosed through the process of novelty detection. After a device is cleaned or otherwise known to be functioning correctly (no winding shorts), signature signals can be collected which represent the healthy device. If a sufficient number of signals can be collected, the signal space representing healthy windings can be characterized. A detection surface can be placed around the healthy signature signals to provide a partition of the signal space into two regions: healthy and faulty. Any signature signal which is not within the healthy signature partition will indicate a faulted device.

  5. Block truncation signature coding for hyperspectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sumit; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces a new signature coding which is designed based on the well-known Block Truncation Coding (BTC). It comprises of bit-maps of the signature blocks generated by different threshold criteria. Two new BTC-based algorithms are developed for signature coding, to be called Block Truncation Signature Coding (BTSC) and 2-level BTSC (2BTSC). In order to compare the developed BTC based algorithms with current binary signature coding schemes such as Spectral Program Analysis Manager (SPAM) developed by Mazer et al. and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) by Qian et al., three different thresholding functions, local block mean, local block gradient, local block correlation are derived to improve the BTSC performance where the combined bit-maps generated by these thresholds can provide better spectral signature characterization. Experimental results reveal that the new BTC-based signature coding performs more effectively in characterizing spectral variations than currently available binary signature coding methods.

  6. An efficient synthesis of cyclic IDP- and cyclic 8-bromo-IDP-carbocyclic-riboses using a modified Hata condensation method to form an intramolecular pyrophosphate linkage as a key step. An entry to a general method for the chemical synthesis of cyclic ADP-ribose analogues

    PubMed

    Fukuoka; Shuto; Minakawa; Ueno; Matsuda

    2000-08-25

    An efficient synthesis of cyclic IDP-carbocyclic-ribose (3) and its 8-bromo derivative 6, as stable mimics of cyclic ADP-ribose, was achieved, and a condensation reaction with phenylthiophosphate-type substrate 15 or 16 to form an intramolecular pyrophosphate linkage was a key step. N-1-Carbocyclic-ribosylinosine derivative 28 and the corresponding 8-bromo congener 24 were prepared via condensation between N-1-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)inosine derivative 17 and a known optically active carbocyclic amine 18. Compounds 24 and 28 were then converted to the corresponding 5"-phosphoryl-5'-phenylthiophosphate derivatives 15 and 16, respectively, which were substrates for the condensation reaction to form an intramolecular pyrophosphate linkage. Treatment of 8-bromo substrate 15 with I2 or AgNO3 in the presence of molecular sieves 3A (MS 3A) in pyridine at room temperature gave the desired cyclic product 12 quantitatively, while the yield was quite low without MS. The similar reaction of 8-unsubstituted substrate 16 gave the corresponding cyclized product 32 in 81% yield. Acidic treatment of these cyclic pyrophosphates 12 and 32 readily gave the targets 6 and 3, respectively. This result suggests that the construction of N-1-substituted hypoxanthine nucleoside structures from N-1-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)inosine derivatives and the intramolecular condensation by activation of the phenylthiophosphate group with I2 or AgNO3/MS 3A combine to provide a very efficient route for the synthesis of analogues of cyclic ADP-ribose such as 3 and 6. Thus, this may be an entry to a general method for synthesizing biologically important cyclic nucleotides of this type.

  7. Partially Blind Signatures Based on Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiao-Qiu; Niu, Hui-Fang

    2012-12-01

    In a partially blind signature scheme, the signer explicitly includes pre-agreed common information in the blind signature, which can improve the availability and performance. We present a new partially blind signature scheme based on fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In addition, we analyze the security of this scheme, and show it is not possible to forge valid partially blind signatures. Moreover, the comparisons between this scheme and those based on public-key cryptography are also discussed.

  8. 48 CFR 4.102 - Contractor's signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contractor's signature. 4... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contract Execution 4.102 Contractor's signature. (a) Individuals. A contract with an... be signed by that individual, and the signature shall be followed by the individual's typed,...

  9. Toward a Signature Pedagogy in Educational Leadership Preparation and Program Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, William R.; Murtadha, Khaula

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we work towards developing a signature pedagogy for educational leadership preparation programs. A signature pedagogy that engenders theory-building processes and leadership practices includes complex case studies, inquiry-centered internships, collaborative and interdisciplinary leadership institutes, and continuous assessments…

  10. Polarization signatures of airborne particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Prashant; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2013-07-01

    Exploratory research has been conducted with the aim of completely determining the polarization signatures of selected particulates as a function of wavelength. This may lead to a better understanding of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and such materials, perhaps leading to the point detection of bio-aerosols present in the atmosphere. To this end, a polarimeter capable of measuring the complete Mueller matrix of highly scattering samples in transmission and reflection (with good spectral resolution from 300 to 1100 nm) has been developed. The polarization properties of Bacillus subtilis (surrogate for anthrax spore) are compared to ambient particulate matter species such as pollen, dust, and soot. Differentiating features in the polarization signatures of these samples have been identified, thus demonstrating the potential applicability of this technique for the detection of bio-aerosol in the ambient atmosphere.

  11. Signatures of a shadow biosphere.

    PubMed

    Davies, Paul C W; Benner, Steven A; Cleland, Carol E; Lineweaver, Charles H; McKay, Christopher P; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa

    2009-03-01

    Astrobiologists are aware that extraterrestrial life might differ from known life, and considerable thought has been given to possible signatures associated with weird forms of life on other planets. So far, however, very little attention has been paid to the possibility that our own planet might also host communities of weird life. If life arises readily in Earth-like conditions, as many astrobiologists contend, then it may well have formed many times on Earth itself, which raises the question whether one or more shadow biospheres have existed in the past or still exist today. In this paper, we discuss possible signatures of weird life and outline some simple strategies for seeking evidence of a shadow biosphere.

  12. Electronic health records: what does your signature signify?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Electronic health records serve multiple purposes, including clinical communication, legal documentation, financial transaction capture, research and analytics. Electronic signatures attached to entries in EHRs have different logical and legal meanings for different users. Some of these are vestiges from historic paper formats that require reconsideration. Traditionally accepted functions of signatures, such as identity verification, attestation, consent, authorization and non-repudiation can become ambiguous in the context of computer-assisted workflow processes that incorporate functions like logins, auto-fill and audit trails. This article exposes the incompatibility of expectations among typical users of electronically signed information. PMID:22888846

  13. Reading the Signatures of Extrasolar Planets in Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    An extrasolar planet sculpts the famous debris dish around Fomalhaut; probably ma ny other debris disks contain planets that we could locate if only we could better recognize their signatures in the dust that surrounds them. But the interaction between planets and debris disks involves both orbital resonances and collisions among grains and rocks in the disks --- difficult processes to model simultanemus]y. I will describe new 3-D models of debris disk dynamics that incorporate both collisions and resonant trapping of dust for the first time, allowing us to decode debris disk images and read the signatures of the planets they contain.

  14. Heterogeneous access and processing of EO-Data on a Cloud based Infrastructure delivering operational Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggemann, F.; Appel, F.; Bach, H.; de la Mar, J.; Schirpke, B.; Dutting, K.; Rucker, G.; Leimbach, D.

    2015-04-01

    To address the challenges of effective data handling faced by Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) a cloud-based infrastructure for accessing and processing of Earth Observation(EO)-data has been developed within the project APPS4GMES(www.apps4gmes.de). To gain homogenous multi mission data access an Input Data Portal (IDP) been implemented on this infrastructure. The IDP consists of an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) conformant catalogue, a consolidation module for format conversion and an OGC-conformant ordering framework. Metadata of various EO-sources and with different standards is harvested and transferred to an OGC conformant Earth Observation Product standard and inserted into the catalogue by a Metadata Harvester. The IDP can be accessed for search and ordering of the harvested datasets by the services implemented on the cloud infrastructure. Different land-surface services have been realised by the project partners, using the implemented IDP and cloud infrastructure. Results of these are customer ready products, as well as pre-products (e.g. atmospheric corrected EO data), serving as a basis for other services. Within the IDP an automated access to ESA's Sentinel-1 Scientific Data Hub has been implemented. Searching and downloading of the SAR data can be performed in an automated way. With the implementation of the Sentinel-1 Toolbox and own software, for processing of the datasets for further use, for example for Vista's snow monitoring, delivering input for the flood forecast services, can also be performed in an automated way. For performance tests of the cloud environment a sophisticated model based atmospheric correction and pre-classification service has been implemented. Tests conducted an automated synchronised processing of one entire Landsat 8 (LS-8) coverage for Germany and performance comparisons to standard desktop systems. Results of these tests, showing a performance improvement by the factor of six, proved the high flexibility and

  15. Automatic classification of spatial signatures on semiconductor wafermaps

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W.; Gleason, S.S.; Karnowski, T.P.; Cohen, S.L.; Lakhani, F.

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes Spatial Signature Analysis (SSA), a cooperative research project between SEMATECH and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for automatically analyzing and reducing semiconductor wafermap defect data to useful information. Trends toward larger wafer formats and smaller critical dimensions have caused an exponential increase in the volume of visual and parametric defect data which must be analyzed and stored, therefore necessitating the development of automated tools for wafer defect analysis. Contamination particles that did not create problems with 1 micron design rules can now be categorized as killer defects. SSA is an automated wafermap analysis procedure which performs a sophisticated defect clustering and signature classification of electronic wafermaps. This procedure has been realized in a software system that contains a signature classifier that is user-trainable. Known examples of historically problematic process signatures are added to a training database for the classifier. Once a suitable training set has been established, the software can automatically segment and classify multiple signatures form a standard electronic wafermap file into user-defined categories. It is anticipated that successful integration of this technology with other wafer monitoring strategies will result in reduced time-to-discovery and ultimately improved product yield.

  16. Shape Signatures: speeding up computer aided drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Meek, Peter J; Liu, ZhiWei; Tian, LiFeng; Wang, Ching Y; Welsh, William J; Zauhar, Randy J

    2006-10-01

    Identifying potential lead molecules is becoming a more automated process. We review Shape Signatures, a tool that is effective and easy to use compared with most computer aided drug design techniques. Laboratory researchers can apply this in silico technique cost-effectively without the need for specialized computer backgrounds. Identifying a potential lead molecule requires database screening, and this becomes rate-limiting once the database becomes too large. The use of Shape Signatures eliminates this concern and offers molecule screening rates that are in advance of any currently available method. Shape Signatures provides a conduit for researchers to conduct rapid identification of potential active molecules, and studies with this tool can be initiated with only one bioactive lead or receptor site.

  17. Shell Buckling Design Criteria Based on Manufacturing Imperfection Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis-based approach .for developing shell-buckling design criteria for laminated-composite cylindrical shells that accurately accounts for the effects of initial geometric imperfections is presented. With this approach, measured initial geometric imperfection data from six graphite-epoxy shells are used to determine a manufacturing-process-specific imperfection signature for these shells. This imperfection signature is then used as input into nonlinear finite-element analyses. The imperfection signature represents a "first-approximation" mean imperfection shape that is suitable for developing preliminary-design data. Comparisons of test data and analytical results obtained by using several different imperfection shapes are presented for selected shells. Overall, the results indicate that the analysis-based approach presented for developing reliable preliminary-design criteria has the potential to provide improved, less conservative buckling-load estimates, and to reduce the weight and cost of developing buckling-resistant shell structures.

  18. Identification of selection signatures in livestock species.

    PubMed

    de Simoni Gouveia, João José; da Silva, Marcos Vinicius Gualberto Barbosa; Paiva, Samuel Rezende; de Oliveira, Sônia Maria Pinheiro

    2014-06-01

    The identification of regions that have undergone selection is one of the principal goals of theoretical and applied evolutionary genetics. Such studies can also provide information about the evolutionary processes involved in shaping genomes, as well as physical and functional information about genes/genomic regions. Domestication followed by breed formation and selection schemes has allowed the formation of very diverse livestock breeds adapted to a wide variety of environments and with special characteristics. The advances in genomics in the last five years have enabled the development of several methods to detect selection signatures and have resulted in the publication of a considerable number of studies involving livestock species. The aims of this review are to describe the principal effects of natural/artificial selection on livestock genomes, to present the main methods used to detect selection signatures and to discuss some recent results in this area. This review should be useful also to research scientists working with wild animals/non-domesticated species and plant biologists working with breeding and evolutionary biology.

  19. Identification of selection signatures in livestock species

    PubMed Central

    de Simoni Gouveia, João José; da Silva, Marcos Vinicius Gualberto Barbosa; Paiva, Samuel Rezende; de Oliveira, Sônia Maria Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    The identification of regions that have undergone selection is one of the principal goals of theoretical and applied evolutionary genetics. Such studies can also provide information about the evolutionary processes involved in shaping genomes, as well as physical and functional information about genes/genomic regions. Domestication followed by breed formation and selection schemes has allowed the formation of very diverse livestock breeds adapted to a wide variety of environments and with special characteristics. The advances in genomics in the last five years have enabled the development of several methods to detect selection signatures and have resulted in the publication of a considerable number of studies involving livestock species. The aims of this review are to describe the principal effects of natural/artificial selection on livestock genomes, to present the main methods used to detect selection signatures and to discuss some recent results in this area. This review should be useful also to research scientists working with wild animals/non-domesticated species and plant biologists working with breeding and evolutionary biology. PMID:25071397

  20. Neurofunctional Signature of Hyperfamiliarity for Unknown Faces

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Elisa; D’Agata, Federico; Caroppo, Paola; Coriasco, Mario; Ferrio, Federica; Celeghin, Alessia; Diano, Matteo; Rubino, Elisa; de Gelder, Beatrice; Rainero, Innocenzo; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Tamietto, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfamiliarity for unknown faces is a rare selective disorder that consists of the disturbing and abnormal feeling of familiarity for unknown faces, while recognition of known faces is normal. In one such patient we investigated with a multimodal neuroimaging design the hitherto undescribed neural signature associated with hyperfamiliarity feelings. Behaviorally, signal detection methods revealed that the patient’s discrimination sensitivity between familiar and unfamiliar faces was significantly lower than that of matched controls, and her response criterion for familiarity decisions was significantly more liberal. At the neural level, while morphometric analysis and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) showed the atrophy and hypofunctioning of the left temporal regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed that hyperfamiliarity feelings were selectively associated to enhanced activity in the right medial and inferior temporal cortices. We therefore characterize the neurofunctional signature of hyperfamiliarity for unknown faces as related to the loss of coordinated activity between the complementary face processing functions of the left and right temporal lobes. PMID:26154253

  1. Photonic quantum digital signatures operating over kilometer ranges in installed optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Robert J.; Fujiwara, Mikio; Amiri, Ryan; Honjo, Toshimori; Shimizu, Kaoru; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Takeoka, Masahiro; Andersson, Erika; Buller, Gerald S.; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-10-01

    The security of electronic communications is a topic that has gained noteworthy public interest in recent years. As a result, there is an increasing public recognition of the existence and importance of mathematically based approaches to digital security. Many of these implement digital signatures to ensure that a malicious party has not tampered with the message in transit, that a legitimate receiver can validate the identity of the signer and that messages are transferable. The security of most digital signature schemes relies on the assumed computational difficulty of solving certain mathematical problems. However, reports in the media have shown that certain implementations of such signature schemes are vulnerable to algorithmic breakthroughs and emerging quantum processing technologies. Indeed, even without quantum processors, the possibility remains that classical algorithmic breakthroughs will render these schemes insecure. There is ongoing research into information-theoretically secure signature schemes, where the security is guaranteed against an attacker with arbitrary computational resources. One such approach is quantum digital signatures. Quantum signature schemes can be made information-theoretically secure based on the laws of quantum mechanics while comparable classical protocols require additional resources such as anonymous broadcast and/or a trusted authority. Previously, most early demonstrations of quantum digital signatures required dedicated single-purpose hardware and operated over restricted ranges in a laboratory environment. Here, for the first time, we present a demonstration of quantum digital signatures conducted over several kilometers of installed optical fiber. The system reported here operates at a higher signature generation rate than previous fiber systems.

  2. Thermal imaging as a biometrics approach to facial signature authentication.

    PubMed

    Guzman, A M; Goryawala, M; Wang, Jin; Barreto, A; Andrian, J; Rishe, N; Adjouadi, M

    2013-01-01

    A new thermal imaging framework with unique feature extraction and similarity measurements for face recognition is presented. The research premise is to design specialized algorithms that would extract vasculature information, create a thermal facial signature and identify the individual. The proposed algorithm is fully integrated and consolidates the critical steps of feature extraction through the use of morphological operators, registration using the Linear Image Registration Tool and matching through unique similarity measures designed for this task. The novel approach at developing a thermal signature template using four images taken at various instants of time ensured that unforeseen changes in the vasculature over time did not affect the biometric matching process as the authentication process relied only on consistent thermal features. Thirteen subjects were used for testing the developed technique on an in-house thermal imaging system. The matching using the similarity measures showed an average accuracy of 88.46% for skeletonized signatures and 90.39% for anisotropically diffused signatures. The highly accurate results obtained in the matching process clearly demonstrate the ability of the thermal infrared system to extend in application to other thermal imaging based systems. Empirical results applying this approach to an existing database of thermal images proves this assertion.

  3. Discovery of Brownleeite: a New Manganese Silicide Mineral in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Clemett, Simon J.; Messenger, Scott; Jones, John H.; Palma, Russell L.; Pepin, Robert O.; Klock, Wolfgang; Zolensky, Michael E.; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    The Earth accretes approximately 40,000 tons of cosmic dust annually, originating mainly from the disintegration of comets and collisions among asteroids. This cosmic dust, also known as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), is a subject of intense interest since it is made of the original building blocks of our Solar System. Although the specific parent bodies of IDPs are unknown, the anhydrous chondritic-porous IDPs (CP-IDPs) subset has been potentially linked to a cometary source. The CP-IDPs are extremely primitive materials based on their unequilibrated mineralogy, C-rich chemistry, and anomalous isotopic signatures. In particular, some CP-IDPs escaped the thermal, aqueous and impact shock processing that has modified or destroyed the original mineralogy of meteorites. Thus, the CP-IDPs represent some of the most primitive solar system materials available for laboratory study. Most CP-IDPs are comprised of minerals that are common on Earth. However, in the course of an examination of one of the CP-IDPs, we encountered three sub-micrometer sized grains of manganese silicide (MnSi), a phase that has heretofore not been found in nature. In the seminar, we would like to focus on IDP studies and this manganese silicide phase that has been approved as the first new mineral identified from a comet by the International Mineralogical Association (IMA) in 2008. The mineral is named in honour of Donald E. Brownlee, an American astronomer and a founder of the field of cosmic dust research who is the principal investigator of the NASA Stardust Mission that collected dust samples from Comet 81P/Wild-2 and returned them to Earth. Much of our current view and understanding of the early solar system would not exist without the pioneering work of professor Don Brownlee in the study of IDPs.

  4. Forensic handwriting examiners' expertise for signature comparison.

    PubMed

    Sita, Jodi; Found, Bryan; Rogers, Douglas K

    2002-09-01

    This paper reports on the performance of forensic document examiners (FDEs) in a signature comparison task that was designed to address the issue of expertise. The opinions of FDEs regarding 150 genuine and simulated questioned signatures were compared with a control group of non-examiners' opinions. On the question of expertise, results showed that FDEs were statistically better than the control group at accurately determining the genuineness or non-genuineness of questioned signatures. The FDE group made errors (by calling a genuine signature simulated or by calling a simulated signature genuine) in 3.4% of their opinions while 19.3% of the control group's opinions were erroneous. The FDE group gave significantly more inconclusive opinions than the control group. Analysis of FDEs' responses showed that more correct opinions were expressed regarding simulated signatures and more inconclusive opinions were made on genuine signatures. Further, when the complexity of a signature was taken into account, FDEs made more correct opinions on high complexity signatures than on signatures of lower complexity. There was a wide range of skill amongst FDEs and no significant relationship was found between the number of years FDEs had been practicing and their correct, inconclusive and error rates.

  5. Infrared signatures for remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, R.S.; Sharpe, S.W.; Kelly, J.F.

    1994-04-01

    PNL`s capabilities for infrared and near-infrared spectroscopy include tunable-diode-laser (TDL) systems covering 300--3,000 cm{sup {minus}1} at <10-MHz bandwidth; a Bruker Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer for the near- to far-infrared at 50-MHz resolution; and a stable line-tunable, 12-w cw CO{sub 2} laser. PNL also has a beam expansion source with a 12-cm slit, which provides a 3-m effective path for gases at {approximately}10 K, giving a Doppler width of typically 10 MHz; and long-path static gas cells (to 100 m). In applying this equipment to signatures work, the authors emphasize the importance of high spectral resolution for detecting and identifying atmospheric interferences; for identifying the optimum analytical frequencies; for deriving, by spectroscopic analysis, the molecular parameters needed for modeling; and for obtaining data on species and/or bands that are not in existing databases. As an example of such spectroscopy, the authors have assigned and analyzed the C-Cl stretching region of CCl{sub 4} at 770--800 cm{sup {minus}1}. This is an important potential signature species whose IR absorption has remained puzzling because of the natural isotopic mix, extensive hot-band structure, and a Fermi resonance involving a nearby combination band. Instrument development projects include the IR sniffer, a small high-sensitivity, high-discrimination (Doppler-limited) device for fence-line or downwind monitoring that is effective even in regions of atmospheric absorption; preliminary work has achieved sensitivities at the low-ppb level. Other work covers trace species detection with TDLs, and FM-modulated CO{sub 2} laser LIDAR. The authors are planning a field experiment to interrogate the Hanford tank farm for signature species from Rattlesnake Mountain, a standoff of ca. 15 km, to be accompanied by simultaneous ground-truthing at the tanks.

  6. Signature of anisotropic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.

    2010-09-15

    Our universe may have formed via bubble nucleation in an eternally inflating background. Furthermore, the background may have a compact dimension--the modulus of which tunnels out of a metastable minimum during bubble nucleation--which subsequently grows to become one of our three large spatial dimensions. When in this scenario our bubble universe collides with other ones like it, the collision geometry is constrained by the reduced symmetry of the tunneling instanton. While the regions affected by such bubble collisions still appear (to leading order) as disks in an observer's sky, the centers of these disks all lie on a single great circle, providing a distinct signature of anisotropic bubble nucleation.

  7. Spectroscopic signature for ferroelectric ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Marek J.; Gług, Maciej; Boczar, Marek; Boda, Łukasz

    2014-09-01

    Various forms of ice exist within our galaxy. Particularly intriguing type of ice - ‘ferroelectric ice' was discovered experimentally and is stable in temperatures below 72 K. This form of ice can generate enormous electric fields and can play an important role in planetary formation. In this letter we present Car-Parrinello simulation of infrared spectra of ferroelectric ice and compare them with spectra of hexagonal ice. Librational region of the spectra can be treated as spectroscopic signature of ice XI and can be of help to identify ferroelectric ice in the Universe.

  8. Satellite signatures in SLR observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the evidence for the detection of satellite-dependent signatures in the laser range observations obtained by the UK single-photon Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) System models of the expected observation distributions from Ajisai and Lageos are developed from the published satellite spread functions and from the characteristics of the SLR System and compared with the observations. The effects of varying return strengths are discussed using the models and by experimental observations of Ajisai, during which a range of return levels from single to multiple photons is achieved. The implications of these results for system-dependent center for mass corrections are discussed.

  9. Gut microbiota signatures of longevity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanli; Hua, Yutong; Zeng, Bo; Ning, Ruihong; Li, Ying; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2016-09-26

    An aging global population poses substantial challenges to society [1]. Centenarians are a model for healthy aging because they have reached the extreme limit of life by escaping, surviving, or delaying chronic diseases [2]. The genetics of centenarians have been extensively examined [3], but less is known about their gut microbiotas. Recently, Biagi et al.[4] characterized the gut microbiota in Italian centenarians and semi-supercentenarians. Here, we compare the gut microbiota of Chinese long-living people with younger age groups, and with the results from the Italian population [4], to identify gut-microbial signatures of healthy aging.

  10. The electrophysiological signature of deliberate rule violations.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Roland; Wirth, Robert; Schwarz, Katharina A; Foerster, Anna; Steinhauser, Marco; Kunde, Wilfried

    2016-12-01

    Humans follow rules by default, and violating even simple rules induces cognitive conflict for the rule breaker. Previous studies revealed this conflict in various behavioral measures, including response times and movement trajectories. Based on these experiments, we investigated the electrophysiological signature of deliberately violating a simple stimulus-response mapping rule. Such rule violations were characterized by a delayed and attenuated P300 component when evaluating a rule-relevant stimulus, most likely reflecting increased response complexity. This parietal attenuation was followed by a frontal positivity for rule violations relative to correct response trials. Together, these results reinforce previous findings on the need to inhibit automatic S-R translation when committing a rule violation, and they point toward additional factors involved in rule violation. Candidate processes such as negative emotional responses and increased monitoring should be targeted by future investigations.

  11. Detection of signatures of selection using Fst.

    PubMed

    Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Hak Kyo; Gondro, Cedric

    2013-01-01

    Natural selection has molded the evolution of species across all taxa. Much more recently, on an evolutionary scale, human-oriented selection started to play an important role in shaping organisms, markedly so after the domestication of animals and plants. These selection processes have left traceable marks in the genome. Following from the recent advances in molecular genetics technologies, a number of methods have been developed to detect such signals, termed genomic signatures of selection. In this chapter we discuss a straightforward protocol based on the F ST statistic to identify genomic regions that exhibit high variation in allelic frequency between groups, which is a characteristic of genomic regions that have gone through differential selection. How to define the borders of these regions and further explore its genetic content is then discussed.

  12. Quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature with constant size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Li, Zhenli

    2016-09-01

    Using quantum homomorphic signature in quantum network, we propose a quantum broadcasting multiple blind signature scheme. Different from classical signature and current quantum signature schemes, the multi-signature proposed in our scheme is not generated by simply putting the individual signatures together, but by aggregating the individual signatures based on homomorphic property. Therefore, the size of the multi-signature is constant. Furthermore, based on a wide range of investigation for the security of existing quantum signature protocols, our protocol is designed to resist possible forgery attacks against signature and message from the various attack sources and disavowal attacks from participants.

  13. An HEVC compressed domain content-based video signature for copy detection and video retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahboub, Khalid; Gadgil, Neeraj J.; Comer, Mary L.; Delp, Edward J.

    2014-03-01

    Video sharing platforms and social networks have been growing very rapidly for the past few years. The rapid increase in the amount of video content introduces many challenges in terms of copyright violation detection and video search and retrieval. Generating and matching content-based video signatures, or fingerprints, is an effective method to detect copies or "near-duplicate" videos. Video signatures should be robust to changes in the video features used to characterize the signature caused by common signal processing operations. Recent work has focused on generating video signatures based on the uncompressed domain. However, decompression is a computationally intensive operation. In large video databases, it becomes advantageous to create robust signatures directly from the compressed domain. The High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard has been recently ratified as the latest video coding standard and wide spread adoption is anticipated. We propose a method in which a content-based video signature is generated directly from the HEVC-coded bitstream. Motion vectors from the HEVC-coded bitstream are used as the features. A robust hashing function based on projection on random matrices is used to generate the hashing bits. A sequence of these bits serves as the signature for the video. Our experimental results show that our proposed method generates a signature robust to common signal processing techniques such as resolution scaling, brightness scaling and compression.

  14. Influence of a harmonic in the response on randomdec signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Operational Modal Analysis (OMA) extracts modal parameters of a structure using their output response, during operation in general. OMA, when applied to mechanical engineering structures is often faced with the problem of harmonics present in the output response, and can cause erroneous modal extraction. The random decrement (RD) method of OMA helps extract randomdec signature data that can be further processed to obtain modal parameters of a structure. This paper for the first time analyses influence of a harmonic in the response on randomdec signature. Fundamental equations based on probability are derived for analyzing the influence of a harmonic on randomdec signature. These probabilistic equations are then used to predict the amplitude of the harmonic in randomdec signature. Randomdec signature of a pure harmonic signal is also derived and it is shown that it is of the same frequency as that of the harmonic signal, but has an amplitude equal to the trigger level used to find the randomdec. Based on the developed theory, new insights into the influence of harmonic on randomdec are presented based on an example. It is shown that the influence of the harmonic on randomdec is characterized by the conditional probability density function of the harmonic. It is found that more unsymmetrical is this PDF, more is the amplitude of the harmonic that is present in the randomdec signature. The amplitude of the harmonic in the randomdec is shown to be the conditional expected value of the harmonic. It is also shown that as the random component of the response increases then the amplitude of the harmonic in the randomdec decreases and in the limit can be completely eliminated.

  15. The genomic signature of parallel adaptation from shared genetic variation

    PubMed Central

    Roesti, Marius; Gavrilets, Sergey; Hendry, Andrew P.; Salzburger, Walter; Berner, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Parallel adaptation is common and may often occur from shared genetic variation, but the genomic consequences of this process remain poorly understood. We first use individual-based simulations to demonstrate that comparisons among populations adapted in parallel from shared variation reveal a characteristic genomic signature around a selected locus: a low divergence valley centered at the locus and flanked by twin peaks of high divergence. This signature is initiated by the hitchhiking of haplotype tracts differing among derived populations in the broader neighborhood of the selected locus (driving the high divergence twin peaks) and shared haplotype tracts in the tight neighborhood of the locus (driving the low divergence valley). This initial hitchhiking signature is reinforced over time because the selected locus acts as a barrier to gene flow from the source to the derived populations, thus promoting divergence by drift in its close neighborhood. We next empirically confirm the peak-valley-peak signature by combining targeted and RAD sequence data at three candidate adaptation genes in multiple marine (source) and freshwater (derived) populations of threespine stickleback. Finally, we use a genome-wide screen for the peak-valley-peak signature to discover additional genome regions involved in parallel marine-freshwater divergence. Our findings offer a new explanation for heterogeneous genomic divergence and thus challenge the standard view that peaks in population divergence harbor divergently selected loci, and that low-divergence regions result from balancing selection or localized introgression. We anticipate that genome scans for peak-valley-peak divergence signatures will promote the discovery of adaptation genes in other organisms. PMID:24635356

  16. Modeling scanner signatures in the context of OPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiaolin; Tyminski, Jacek K.; Lucas, Kevin

    2007-10-01

    The requirement for OPC modeling accuracy becomes increasingly stringent as the semiconductor industry enters sub- 0.1um regime. Targeting at capturing the IC pattern printing characteristics through the lithography process, an OPC model is usually in the form of the first principle optical imaging component, refined by some phenomenological components such as resist and etch. The phenomenological components can be adjusted appropriately in order to fit the OPC model to the silicon measurement data. The optical imaging component is the backbone for the OPC model, and it is the key to a stable and physics-centric OPC model. Scanner systematic signatures such as illuminator pupil-fill, illuminator polarization, lens aberration, lens apodization, flare, etc., previously ignored without significant accuracy sacrifice at previous technology nodes, but are playing non-negligible roles at 45nm node and beyond. In order to ensure that the OPC modeling tool can accurately model these important scanner systematic signatures, the core engine (i.e. the optical imaging simulator) of OPC simulator must be able to model these signatures with sufficient accuracy. In this paper, we study the impact on optical proximity effect (OPE) of the aforementioned scanner systematic signatures on several 1D (simple line space, doublet line and doublet space) and 2D (dense line end pullback, isolated line end pullback and T-bar line end pullback) OPC test patterns. We demonstrate that the scanner systematic signatures have significant OPE impact on the level of several nanometers. The predicted OPEs and impact from our OPC simulator matches well with results from an industry standard lithography simulator, and this has laid the foundation of accurate and physics-centric OPC model with the systematic scanner signatures incorporated.

  17. Autophagy-related prognostic signature for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yunyan; Li, Pengfei; Peng, Fuduan; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liang, Haihai; Zhao, Wenyuan; Qi, Lishuang; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Chenguang; Guo, Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a process that degrades intracellular constituents, such as long-lived or damaged proteins and organelles, to buffer metabolic stress under starvation conditions. Deregulation of autophagy is involved in the progression of cancer. However, the predictive value of autophagy for breast cancer prognosis remains unclear. First, based on gene expression profiling, we found that autophagy genes were implicated in breast cancer. Then, using the Cox proportional hazard regression model, we detected autophagy prognostic signature for breast cancer in a training dataset. We identified a set of eight autophagy genes (BCL2, BIRC5, EIF4EBP1, ERO1L, FOS, GAPDH, ITPR1 and VEGFA) that were significantly associated with overall survival in breast cancer. The eight autophagy genes were assigned as a autophagy-related prognostic signature for breast cancer. Based on the autophagy-related signature, the training dataset GSE21653 could be classified into high-risk and low-risk subgroups with significantly different survival times (HR = 2.72, 95% CI = (1.91, 3.87); P = 1.37 × 10(-5)). Inactivation of autophagy was associated with shortened survival of breast cancer patients. The prognostic value of the autophagy-related signature was confirmed in the testing dataset GSE3494 (HR = 2.12, 95% CI = (1.48, 3.03); P = 1.65 × 10(-3)) and GSE7390 (HR = 1.76, 95% CI = (1.22, 2.54); P = 9.95 × 10(-4)). Further analysis revealed that the prognostic value of the autophagy signature was independent of known clinical prognostic factors, including age, tumor size, grade, estrogen receptor status, progesterone receptor status, ERBB2 status, lymph node status and TP53 mutation status. Finally, we demonstrated that the autophagy signature could also predict distant metastasis-free survival for breast cancer.

  18. Epigenetic signatures of invasive status in populations of marine invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ardura, Alba; Zaiko, Anastasija; Morán, Paloma; Planes, Serge; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetics, as a DNA signature that affects gene expression and enables rapid reaction of an organism to environmental changes, is likely involved in the process of biological invasions. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism common to plants and animals for regulating gene expression. In this study we show, for the first time in any marine species, significant reduction of global methylation levels during the expansive phase of a pygmy mussel (Xenostrobus securis) recent invasion in Europe (two-year old), while in older introductions such epigenetic signature of invasion was progressively reduced. Decreased methylation was interpreted as a rapid way of increasing phenotypic plasticity that would help invasive populations to thrive. This epigenetic signature of early invasion was stronger than the expected environmental signature of environmental stress in younger populations sampled from ports, otherwise detected in a much older population (>90 year old) of the also invasive tubeworm Ficopomatus enigmaticus established in similar locations. Higher epigenetic than genetic diversity found in X. securis was confirmed from F. enigmaticus samples. As reported for introduced plants and vertebrates, epigenetic variation could compensate for relatively lower genetic variation caused by founder effects. These phenomena were compared with epigenetic mechanisms involved in metastasis, as parallel processes of community (biological invasion) and organism (cancer) invasions. PMID:28205577

  19. Epigenetic signatures of invasive status in populations of marine invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardura, Alba; Zaiko, Anastasija; Morán, Paloma; Planes, Serge; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2017-02-01

    Epigenetics, as a DNA signature that affects gene expression and enables rapid reaction of an organism to environmental changes, is likely involved in the process of biological invasions. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism common to plants and animals for regulating gene expression. In this study we show, for the first time in any marine species, significant reduction of global methylation levels during the expansive phase of a pygmy mussel (Xenostrobus securis) recent invasion in Europe (two-year old), while in older introductions such epigenetic signature of invasion was progressively reduced. Decreased methylation was interpreted as a rapid way of increasing phenotypic plasticity that would help invasive populations to thrive. This epigenetic signature of early invasion was stronger than the expected environmental signature of environmental stress in younger populations sampled from ports, otherwise detected in a much older population (>90 year old) of the also invasive tubeworm Ficopomatus enigmaticus established in similar locations. Higher epigenetic than genetic diversity found in X. securis was confirmed from F. enigmaticus samples. As reported for introduced plants and vertebrates, epigenetic variation could compensate for relatively lower genetic variation caused by founder effects. These phenomena were compared with epigenetic mechanisms involved in metastasis, as parallel processes of community (biological invasion) and organism (cancer) invasions.

  20. Secure Obfuscation for Encrypted Group Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hongfei; Liu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, group signature techniques are widely used in constructing privacy-preserving security schemes for various information systems. However, conventional techniques keep the schemes secure only in normal black-box attack contexts. In other words, these schemes suppose that (the implementation of) the group signature generation algorithm is running in a platform that is perfectly protected from various intrusions and attacks. As a complementary to existing studies, how to generate group signatures securely in a more austere security context, such as a white-box attack context, is studied in this paper. We use obfuscation as an approach to acquire a higher level of security. Concretely, we introduce a special group signature functionality-an encrypted group signature, and then provide an obfuscator for the proposed functionality. A series of new security notions for both the functionality and its obfuscator has been introduced. The most important one is the average-case secure virtual black-box property w.r.t. dependent oracles and restricted dependent oracles which captures the requirement of protecting the output of the proposed obfuscator against collision attacks from group members. The security notions fit for many other specialized obfuscators, such as obfuscators for identity-based signatures, threshold signatures and key-insulated signatures. Finally, the correctness and security of the proposed obfuscator have been proven. Thereby, the obfuscated encrypted group signature functionality can be applied to variants of privacy-preserving security schemes and enhance the security level of these schemes. PMID:26167686

  1. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOEpatents

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  2. Fractal signatures in analogs of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, Nisha; Banerjee, Varsha; Puri, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are an important constituent of the earths stratosphere, interstellar and interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, etc. Their physical and optical characteristics are significantly influenced by the morphology of silicate aggregates which form the core in IDPs. In this paper we reinterpret scattering data from laboratory analogs of cosmic silicate aggregates created by Volten et al. (2007) [1] to extract their morphological features. By evaluating the structure factor, we find that the aggregates are mass fractals with a mass fractal dimension dm≃1.75. The same fractal dimension also characterizes clusters obtained from diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). This suggests that the analogs are formed by an irreversible aggregation of stochastically transported silicate particles.

  3. Somatic ERCC2 Mutations Are Associated with a Distinct Genomic Signature in Urothelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Lior Z; Kamburov, Atanas; Kwiatkowski, David J; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Van Allen, Eliezer M; D'Andrea, Alan; Getz, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in DNA repair pathways are common in tumors and can result in characteristic mutational signatures; however, a specific mutational signature associated with somatic alterations in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway has not yet been identified. Here, we examine the mutational processes operating in urothelial cancer, a tumor type in which the core NER gene ERCC2 is significantly mutated. Analysis of three independent urothelial tumor cohorts reveals a strong association between somatic ERCC2 mutations and activity of a mutational signature characterized by a broad spectrum of base changes. In addition, we note an association between activity of this signature and smoking that is independent of ERCC2 mutation status, providing genomic evidence of tobacco-related mutagenesis in urothelial cancer. Together, these analyses identify the first NER-related mutational signature and highlight the related roles of DNA damage and subsequent DNA repair in shaping the tumor mutational landscape. PMID:27111033

  4. Signature spectrale des grains interstellaires.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léger, A.

    Notre connaissance de la nature des grains interstellaires reposait sur un nombre très restreint de signatures spectrales dans la courbe d'extinction du milieu interstellaire. Une information considérable est contenue dans les 40 bandes interstellaires diffuses dans le visible, mais reste inexploitée. L'interprétation récente des cinq bandes IR en émission, en terme de molécules d'hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques, est développée. Elle permet l'utilisation d'une information spectroscopique comparable, à elle seule, à ce sur quoi était basée jusqu'alors notre connaissance de la matière interstellaire condensée. Différentes implications de cette mise en évidence sont proposées.

  5. Frontal theta is a signature of successful working memory manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Itthipuripat, Sirawaj; Wessel, Jan R.; Aron, Adam R.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that working memory (WM) is updated/manipulated via a fronto-basal-ganglia circuit. One way that this could happen is via the synchronization of neural oscillations. A first step towards testing this hypothesis is to clearly establish a frontal scalp EEG signature of WM manipulation. Although many EEG studies have indeed revealed frontal EEG signatures for WM, especially in the theta frequency band (3–8 Hz), few of them required subjects to manipulate WM, and of those that did, none specifically tied the EEG signature to the manipulation process per se. Here we employed a WM manipulation task that has been shown with imaging to engage the prefrontal cortex and the striatum. We adapted this task to titrate the success of WM manipulation to approximately 50%. Using time-frequency analysis of EEG, we showed that theta power is increased over frontal cortex for successful versus failed WM manipulation, specifically at the time of the manipulation event. This establishes a clear-cut EEG signature of WM manipulation. Future studies could employ this to test the fronto-basal-ganglia hypothesis of WM updating/manipulation. PMID:23109082

  6. Gunshot acoustic signature specific features and false alarms reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzier, Alain; Millet, Joel

    2005-05-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of the most specific parameters of gunshot signatures through models as well as through real data. The models for the different contributions to gunshot typical signature (shock and muzzle blast) are presented and used to discuss the variation of measured signatures over the different environmental conditions and shot configurations. The analysis is followed by a description of the performance requirements for gunshot detection systems, from sniper detection that was the main concern 10 years ago, to the new and more challenging conditions faced in today operations. The work presented examines the process of how systems are deployed and used as well as how the operational environment has changed. The main sources of false alarms and new threats such as RPGs and mortars that acoustic gunshot detection systems have to face today are also defined and discussed. Finally, different strategies for reducing false alarms are proposed based on the acoustic signatures. Different strategies are presented through various examples of specific missions ranging from vehicle protection to area protection. These strategies not only include recommendation on how to handle acoustic information for the best efficiency of the acoustic detector but also recommends some add-on sensors to enhance system overall performance.

  7. Polarimetric signatures of sea ice. 1: Theoretical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.; Drinkwater, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    Physical, structral, and electromagnetic properties and interrelating processes in sea ice are used to develop a composite model for polarimetric backscattering signatures of sea ice. Physical properties of sea ice constituents such as ice, brine, air, and salt are presented in terms of their effects on electromagnetic wave interactions. Sea ice structure and geometry of scatterers are related to wave propagation, attenuation, and scattering. Temperature and salinity, which are determining factors for the thermodynamic phase distribution in sea ice, are consistently used to derive both effective permittivities and polarimetric scattering coefficients. Polarmetric signatures of sea ice depend on crystal sizes and brine volumes, which are affected by ice growth rates. Desalination by brine expulsion, drainage, or other mechanisms modifies wave penetration and scattering. Sea ice signatures are further complicated by surface conditions such as rough interfaces, hummocks, snow cover, brine skim, or slush layer. Based on the same set of geophysical parameters characterizing sea ice, a composite model is developed to calculate effective permittivities and backscattering covariance matrices at microwave frequencies to interpretation of sea ice polarimetric signatures.

  8. Polarimetric Signatures of Sea Ice. Part 1; Theoretical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.; Drinkwater, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    Physical, structural, and electromagnetic properties and interrelating processes in sea ice are used to develop a composite model for polarimetric backscattering signatures of sea ice. Physical properties of sea ice constituents such as ice, brine, air, and salt are presented in terms of their effects on electromagnetic wave interactions. Sea ice structure and geometry of scatterers are related to wave propagation, attenuation, and scattering. Temperature and salinity, which are determining factors for the thermodynamic phase distribution in sea ice, are consistently used to derive both effective permittivities and polarimetric scattering coefficients. Polarimetric signatures of sea ice depend on crystal sizes and brine volumes, which are affected by ice growth rates. Desalination by brine expulsion, drainage, or other mechanisms modifies wave penetration and scattering. Sea ice signatures are further complicated by surface conditions such as rough interfaces, hummocks, snow cover, brine skim, or slush layer. Based on the same set of geophysical parameters characterizing sea ice, a composite model is developed to calculate effective permittivities and backscattering covariance matrices at microwave frequencies for interpretation of sea ice polarimetric signatures.

  9. Metabolic Signatures of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Martin T.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G.; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. PMID:25873373

  10. The Pedagogic Signature of the Teaching Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Ewald; Lerche, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Markus; Oubaid, Viktor; Weiss, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Lee S. Shulman deplores that the field of education as a profession does not have a pedagogic signature, which he characterizes as a synthesis of cognitive, practical and moral apprenticeship. In this context, the following study has three goals: 1) In the first theoretical part, the basic problems of constructing a pedagogic signature are…

  11. 21 CFR 11.50 - Signature manifestations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ELECTRONIC RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.50 Signature manifestations. (a) Signed electronic... the same controls as for electronic records and shall be included as part of any human readable...

  12. 48 CFR 4.102 - Contractor's signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractor's signature. 4.102 Section 4.102 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contract Execution 4.102 Contractor's signature. (a) Individuals. A contract with...

  13. A Real Quantum Designated Verifier Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Min; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Yang, Yu-Guang

    2015-09-01

    The effectiveness of most quantum signature schemes reported in the literature can be verified by a designated person, however, those quantum signature schemes aren't the real traditional designated verifier signature schemes, because the designated person hasn't the capability to efficiently simulate a signature which is indistinguishable from a signer, which cannot satisfy the requirements in some special environments such as E-voting, call for tenders and software licensing. For solving this problem, a real quantum designated verifier signature scheme is proposed in this paper. According to the property of unitary transformation and quantum one-way function, only a verifier designated by a signer can verify the "validity of a signature" and the designated verifier cannot prove to a third party that the signature was produced by the signer or by himself through a transcript simulation algorithm. Moreover, the quantum key distribution and quantum encryption algorithm guarantee the unconditional security of this scheme. Analysis results show that this new scheme satisfies the main security requirements of designated verifier signature scheme and the major attack strategies.

  14. Does Social Work Have a Signature Pedagogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earls Larrison, Tara; Korr, Wynne S.

    2013-01-01

    This article contributes to discourse on signature pedagogy by reconceptualizing how our pedagogies are understood and defined for social work education. We critique the view that field education is social work's signature pedagogy and consider what pedagogies are distinct about the teaching and learning of social work. Using Shulman's…

  15. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to any provisions prescribed by the Director under § 850.104— (1) An electronic communication may be... signature of an electronic communication may be deemed to satisfy any statutory or regulatory requirement... section, an electronic signature is a method of signing an electronic communication, including...

  16. Experimentally accessible signatures of Auger scattering in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winzer, Torben; Jago, Roland; Malic, Ermin

    2016-12-01

    The gapless and linear electronic band structure of graphene opens up Auger scattering channels bridging the valence and the conduction band and changing the charge carrier density. Here, we reveal experimentally accessible signatures of Auger scattering in optically excited graphene. To be able to focus on signatures of Auger scattering, we apply a low excitation energy, weak pump fluences, and a cryostatic temperature, so that all relevant processes lie energetically below the optical phonon threshold. In this regime, carrier-phonon scattering is strongly suppressed and Coulomb processes govern the carrier dynamics. Depending on the excitation regime, we find an accumulation or depletion of the carrier occupation close to the Dirac point. This reflects well the behavior predicted from Auger-dominated carrier dynamics. Based on this observation, we propose a multicolor pump-probe experiment to uncover the extreme importance of Auger channels for the nonequilibrium dynamics in graphene.

  17. Implementing Signature Neural Networks with Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Medina, José Luis; Latorre, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Spiking Neural Networks constitute the most promising approach to develop realistic Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). Unlike traditional firing rate-based paradigms, information coding in spiking models is based on the precise timing of individual spikes. It has been demonstrated that spiking ANNs can be successfully and efficiently applied to multiple realistic problems solvable with traditional strategies (e.g., data classification or pattern recognition). In recent years, major breakthroughs in neuroscience research have discovered new relevant computational principles in different living neural systems. Could ANNs benefit from some of these recent findings providing novel elements of inspiration? This is an intriguing question for the research community and the development of spiking ANNs including novel bio-inspired information coding and processing strategies is gaining attention. From this perspective, in this work, we adapt the core concepts of the recently proposed Signature Neural Network paradigm—i.e., neural signatures to identify each unit in the network, local information contextualization during the processing, and multicoding strategies for information propagation regarding the origin and the content of the data—to be employed in a spiking neural network. To the best of our knowledge, none of these mechanisms have been used yet in the context of ANNs of spiking neurons. This paper provides a proof-of-concept for their applicability in such networks. Computer simulations show that a simple network model like the discussed here exhibits complex self-organizing properties. The combination of multiple simultaneous encoding schemes allows the network to generate coexisting spatio-temporal patterns of activity encoding information in different spatio-temporal spaces. As a function of the network and/or intra-unit parameters shaping the corresponding encoding modality, different forms of competition among the evoked patterns can emerge even in the

  18. Implementing Signature Neural Networks with Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Medina, José Luis; Latorre, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Spiking Neural Networks constitute the most promising approach to develop realistic Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). Unlike traditional firing rate-based paradigms, information coding in spiking models is based on the precise timing of individual spikes. It has been demonstrated that spiking ANNs can be successfully and efficiently applied to multiple realistic problems solvable with traditional strategies (e.g., data classification or pattern recognition). In recent years, major breakthroughs in neuroscience research have discovered new relevant computational principles in different living neural systems. Could ANNs benefit from some of these recent findings providing novel elements of inspiration? This is an intriguing question for the research community and the development of spiking ANNs including novel bio-inspired information coding and processing strategies is gaining attention. From this perspective, in this work, we adapt the core concepts of the recently proposed Signature Neural Network paradigm-i.e., neural signatures to identify each unit in the network, local information contextualization during the processing, and multicoding strategies for information propagation regarding the origin and the content of the data-to be employed in a spiking neural network. To the best of our knowledge, none of these mechanisms have been used yet in the context of ANNs of spiking neurons. This paper provides a proof-of-concept for their applicability in such networks. Computer simulations show that a simple network model like the discussed here exhibits complex self-organizing properties. The combination of multiple simultaneous encoding schemes allows the network to generate coexisting spatio-temporal patterns of activity encoding information in different spatio-temporal spaces. As a function of the network and/or intra-unit parameters shaping the corresponding encoding modality, different forms of competition among the evoked patterns can emerge even in the absence

  19. Dynamic characteristics of signatures: effects of writer style on genuine and simulated signatures.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Linton; Found, Bryan; Caligiuri, Michael; Rogers, Doug

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if computer-measured dynamic features (duration, size, velocity, jerk, and pen pressure) differ between genuine and simulated signatures. Sixty subjects (3 equal groups of 3 signature styles) each provided 10 naturally written (genuine) signatures. Each of these subjects then provided 15 simulations of each of three model signatures. The genuine (N = 600) and simulated (N = 2700) signatures were collected using a digitizing tablet. MovAlyzeR(®) software was used to estimate kinematic parameters for each pen stroke. Stroke duration, velocity, and pen pressure were found to discriminate between genuine and simulated signatures regardless of the simulator's own style of signature or the style of signature being simulated. However, there was a significant interaction between style and condition for size and jerk (a measure of smoothness). The results of this study, based on quantitative analysis and dynamic handwriting features, indicate that the style of the simulator's own signature and the style of signature being simulated can impact the characteristics of handwriting movements for simulations. Writer style characteristics might therefore need to be taken into consideration as potentially significant when evaluating signature features with a view to forming opinions regarding authenticity.

  20. NIST bullet signature measurement system for RM (Reference Material) 8240 standard bullets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Song, John; Whitenton, Eric; Zheng, Alan; Vorburger, Theodore; Zhou, Jack

    2004-07-01

    A bullet signature measurement system based on a stylus instrument was developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the signature measurements of NIST RM (Reference Material) 8240 standard bullets. The standard bullets are developed as a reference standard for bullet signature measurements and are aimed to support the recently established National Integrated Ballistics Information Network (NIBIN) by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The RM bullets are designed as both a virtual and a physical bullet signature standard. The virtual standard is a set of six digitized bullet signatures originally profiled from six master bullets fired at ATF and FBI using six different guns. By using the virtual signature standard to control the tool path on a numerically controlled diamond turning machine at NIST, 40 RM bullets were produced. In this paper, a comparison parameter and an algorithm using auto-and cross-correlation functions are described for qualifying the bullet signature differences between the RM bullets and the virtual bullet signature standard. When two compared signatures are exactly the same (point by point), their cross-correlation function (CCF) value will be equal to 100%. The measurement system setup, measurement program, and initial measurement results are discussed. Initial measurement results for the 40 standard bullets, each measured at six land impressions, show that the CCF values for the 240 signature measurements are higher than 95%, with most of them even higher than 99%. These results demonstrate the high reproducibility for both the manufacturing process and the measurement system for the NIST RM 8240 standard bullets.

  1. On "A new quantum blind signature with unlinkability"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi-Ping; Tsai, Shang-Lun; Hwang, Tzonelih; Kao, Shih-Hung

    2017-04-01

    This article points out a security loophole in Shi et al.'s quantum blind signature scheme. By using the modification attack, a message owner can cheat a signature receiver with a fake message-signature pair without being detected.

  2. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  3. 76 FR 411 - Regulatory Guidance Concerning Electronic Signatures and Documents

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Regulatory Guidance Concerning Electronic Signatures and... guidance. SUMMARY: FMCSA issues regulatory guidance concerning the use of electronic signatures and... information regarding FMCSA's acceptance of electronic signature on documents required by the Federal...

  4. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  5. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  6. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  7. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  8. What Signatures Dominantly Associate with Gene Age?

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hongyan; Wang, Guangyu; Ma, Lina; Yi, Soojin V.; Zhang, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    As genes originate at different evolutionary times, they harbor distinctive genomic signatures of evolutionary ages. Although previous studies have investigated different gene age-related signatures, what signatures dominantly associate with gene age remains unresolved. Here we address this question via a combined approach of comprehensive assignment of gene ages, gene family identification, and multivariate analyses. We first provide a comprehensive and improved gene age assignment by combining homolog clustering with phylogeny inference and categorize human genes into 26 age classes spanning the whole tree of life. We then explore the dominant age-related signatures based on a collection of 10 potential signatures (including gene composition, gene length, selection pressure, expression level, connectivity in protein–protein interaction network and DNA methylation). Our results show that GC content and connectivity in protein–protein interaction network (PPIN) associate dominantly with gene age. Furthermore, we investigate the heterogeneity of dominant signatures in duplicates and singletons. We find that GC content is a consistent primary factor of gene age in duplicates and singletons, whereas PPIN is more strongly associated with gene age in singletons than in duplicates. Taken together, GC content and PPIN are two dominant signatures in close association with gene age, exhibiting heterogeneity in duplicates and singletons and presumably reflecting complex differential interplays between natural selection and mutation. PMID:27609935

  9. Molecular signatures of major depression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Na; Chang, Simon; Li, Yihan; Li, Qibin; Hu, Jingchu; Liang, Jieqin; Song, Li; Kretzschmar, Warren; Gan, Xiangchao; Nicod, Jerome; Rivera, Margarita; Deng, Hong; Du, Bo; Li, Keqing; Sang, Wenhu; Gao, Jingfang; Gao, Shugui; Ha, Baowei; Ho, Hung-Yao; Hu, Chunmei; Hu, Jian; Hu, Zhenfei; Huang, Guoping; Jiang, Guoqing; Jiang, Tao; Jin, Wei; Li, Gongying; Li, Kan; Li, Yi; Li, Yingrui; Li, Youhui; Lin, Yu-Ting; Liu, Lanfen; Liu, Tiebang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yuan; Lu, Yao; Lv, Luxian; Meng, Huaqing; Qian, Puyi; Sang, Hong; Shen, Jianhua; Shi, Jianguo; Sun, Jing; Tao, Ming; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Jian; Wang, Linmao; Wang, Xueyi; Wang, Xumei; Yang, Huanming; Yang, Lijun; Yin, Ye; Zhang, Jinbei; Zhang, Kerang; Sun, Ning; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhong, Hui; Breen, Gerome; Wang, Jun; Marchini, Jonathan; Chen, Yiping; Xu, Qi; Xu, Xun; Mott, Richard; Huang, Guo-Jen; Kendler, Kenneth; Flint, Jonathan

    2015-05-04

    Adversity, particularly in early life, can cause illness. Clues to the responsible mechanisms may lie with the discovery of molecular signatures of stress, some of which include alterations to an individual's somatic genome. Here, using genome sequences from 11,670 women, we observed a highly significant association between a stress-related disease, major depression, and the amount of mtDNA (p = 9.00 × 10(-42), odds ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29-1.37]) and telomere length (p = 2.84 × 10(-14), odds ratio 0.85 [95% CI = 0.81-0.89]). While both telomere length and mtDNA amount were associated with adverse life events, conditional regression analyses showed the molecular changes were contingent on the depressed state. We tested this hypothesis with experiments in mice, demonstrating that stress causes both molecular changes, which are partly reversible and can be elicited by the administration of corticosterone. Together, these results demonstrate that changes in the amount of mtDNA and telomere length are consequences of stress and entering a depressed state. These findings identify increased amounts of mtDNA as a molecular marker of MD and have important implications for understanding how stress causes the disease.

  10. SIRUS spectral signature analysis code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Gary J.; Caola, Mike J.; Geatches, Rachel M.; Roberts, Nick C.

    2003-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Centre (ATC) is responsible for developing IR signature prediction capabilities for its parent body, BAE SYSTEMS. To achieve this, the SIRUS code has been developed and used on a variety of projects for well over a decade. SIRUS is capable of providing accurate IR predictions for air breathing and rocket motor propelled vehicles. SIRUS models various physical components to derive its predictions. A key component is the radiance reflected from the surface of the modeled vehicle. This is modeled by fitting parameters to the measured Bi-Directional Reflectance Function (BDRF) of the surface material(s). The ATC have successfully implemented a parameterization scheme based on the published OPTASM model, and this is described. However, inconsistencies between reflectance measurements and values calculated from the parameterized fit have led to an elliptical parameter enhancement. The implementation of this is also described. Finally, an end-to-end measurement-parameterization capability is described, based on measurements taken with SOC600 instrumentation.

  11. Molecular signatures of vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn; Lindqvist, Madelene; Harandi, Ali M

    2015-09-29

    Mass vaccination has saved millions of human lives and improved the quality of life in both developing and developed countries. The emergence of new pathogens and inadequate protection conferred by some of the existing vaccines such as vaccines for tuberculosis, influenza and pertussis especially in certain age groups have resulted in a move from empirically developed vaccines toward more pathogen tailored and rationally engineered vaccines. A deeper understanding of the interaction of innate and adaptive immunity at molecular level enables the development of vaccines that selectively target certain type of immune responses without excessive reactogenicity. Adjuvants constitute an imperative element of modern vaccines. Although a variety of candidate adjuvants have been evaluated in the past few decades, only a limited number of vaccine adjuvants are currently available for human use. A better understanding of the mode of action of adjuvants is pivotal to harness the potential of existing and new adjuvants in shaping a desired immune response. Recent advancement in systems biology powered by the emerging cutting edge omics technology has led to the identification of molecular signatures rapidly induced after vaccination in the blood that correlate and predict a later protective immune response or vaccine safety. This can pave ways to prospectively determine the potency and safety of vaccines and adjuvants. This review is intended to highlight the importance of big data analysis in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms of actions of adjuvants to inform rational development of future human vaccines.

  12. Infrared signatures from bomb detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orson, Jay A.; Bagby, William F.; Perram, Glen P.

    2003-04-01

    Remote observations of the temporal and spectral characteristics of the infrared emissions from bomb detonations have been correlated with explosion conditions. A Fourier transform interferometer was used to record spectra in the 1.6-20 μm range at spectral resolutions of 4-16 cm -1 and temporal resolutions of 0.047-0.123 s. Field observations of 56 detonation events included a set of aircraft delivered ordinance and a series of static ground detonations for a variety of bomb sizes, types and environmental conditions. The emission is well represented by a gray body with continuously decreasing temperature and characteristic decay times of 1-4 s, providing only limited variability with detonation conditions. However, the fireball size times the emissivity as a function of time can be determined from the spectra without imaging and provides a more sensitive signature. The degree of temporal overlap as a function of frequency for a pair of detonation events provides a very sensitive discriminator for explosion conditions. The temporal overlap decreases with increasing emission frequency for all the observed events, indicating more information content at higher frequencies.

  13. Molecular Signatures of Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Na; Chang, Simon; Li, Yihan; Li, Qibin; Hu, Jingchu; Liang, Jieqin; Song, Li; Kretzschmar, Warren; Gan, Xiangchao; Nicod, Jerome; Rivera, Margarita; Deng, Hong; Du, Bo; Li, Keqing; Sang, Wenhu; Gao, Jingfang; Gao, Shugui; Ha, Baowei; Ho, Hung-Yao; Hu, Chunmei; Hu, Jian; Hu, Zhenfei; Huang, Guoping; Jiang, Guoqing; Jiang, Tao; Jin, Wei; Li, Gongying; Li, Kan; Li, Yi; Li, Yingrui; Li, Youhui; Lin, Yu-Ting; Liu, Lanfen; Liu, Tiebang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yuan; Lu, Yao; Lv, Luxian; Meng, Huaqing; Qian, Puyi; Sang, Hong; Shen, Jianhua; Shi, Jianguo; Sun, Jing; Tao, Ming; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Jian; Wang, Linmao; Wang, Xueyi; Wang, Xumei; Yang, Huanming; Yang, Lijun; Yin, Ye; Zhang, Jinbei; Zhang, Kerang; Sun, Ning; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhong, Hui; Breen, Gerome; Wang, Jun; Marchini, Jonathan; Chen, Yiping; Xu, Qi; Xu, Xun; Mott, Richard; Huang, Guo-Jen; Kendler, Kenneth; Flint, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adversity, particularly in early life, can cause illness. Clues to the responsible mechanisms may lie with the discovery of molecular signatures of stress, some of which include alterations to an individual’s somatic genome. Here, using genome sequences from 11,670 women, we observed a highly significant association between a stress-related disease, major depression, and the amount of mtDNA (p = 9.00 × 10−42, odds ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29–1.37]) and telomere length (p = 2.84 × 10−14, odds ratio 0.85 [95% CI = 0.81–0.89]). While both telomere length and mtDNA amount were associated with adverse life events, conditional regression analyses showed the molecular changes were contingent on the depressed state. We tested this hypothesis with experiments in mice, demonstrating that stress causes both molecular changes, which are partly reversible and can be elicited by the administration of corticosterone. Together, these results demonstrate that changes in the amount of mtDNA and telomere length are consequences of stress and entering a depressed state. These findings identify increased amounts of mtDNA as a molecular marker of MD and have important implications for understanding how stress causes the disease. PMID:25913401

  14. Recognizing impactor signatures in the planetary record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Gault, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    Crater size reflects the target response to the combined effects of impactor size, density, and velocity. Isolating the effects of each variable in the cratering record is generally considered masked, if not lost, during late stages of crater modification (e.g., floor uplift and rim collapse). Important clues, however, come from the distinctive signatures of the impactor created by oblique impacts. In summary, oblique impacts allow for the identification of distinctive signatures of the impactor created during early penetration. Such signatures may further allow first-order testing of scaling relations for late crater excavation from the planetary surface record. Other aspects of this study are discussed.

  15. Timing signatures of large scale solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Hock-Mysliwiec, Rachel; Henry, Timothy; Kirk, Michael S.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the timing signatures of large solar eruptions resulting in flares, CMEs and Solar Energetic Particle events. We probe solar active regions from the chromosphere through the corona, using data from space and ground-based observations, including ISOON, SDO, GONG, and GOES. Our studies include a number of flares and CMEs of mostly the M- and X-strengths as categorized by GOES. We find that the chromospheric signatures of these large eruptions occur 5-30 minutes in advance of coronal high temperature signatures. These timing measurements are then used as inputs to models and reconstruct the eruptive nature of these systems, and explore their utility in forecasts.

  16. Remote Sensing of Body Signs and Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    REMOTE SENSING OF BODY SIGNS AND SIGNATURES LPrepared For Naval Medical Research and Development Command National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda...BODY SIGNS AND SIGNATURES S~By James C. Lin and Karen H. Chan Department of Bioengineering University of Illinois at Chicago Chicago, IL 60680 Abstract...Filters Di-t lb io. I AN!ý,z.biiity Codes I’ A.IDist jor p REMOTE SENSING OF BODY SIGNS AND SIGNATURES By James C. Lin and Karen H. Chan Department

  17. Waveform design for detection of weapons based on signature exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Fauzia; Amin, Moeness G.; Dogaru, Traian

    2010-04-01

    We present waveform design based on signature exploitation techniques for improved detection of weapons in urban sensing applications. A single-antenna monostatic radar system is considered. Under the assumption of exact knowledge of the target orientation and, hence, known impulse response, matched illumination approach is used for optimal target detection. For the case of unknown target orientation, we analyze the target signatures as random processes and perform signal-to-noise-ratio based waveform optimization. Numerical electromagnetic modeling is used to provide the impulse responses of an AK-47 assault rifle for various target aspect angles relative to the radar. Simulation results depict an improvement in the signal-to-noise-ratio at the output of the matched filter receiver for both matched illumination and stochastic waveforms as compared to a chirp waveform of the same duration and energy.

  18. Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Ju, Young Seok; Haase, Kerstin; Van Loo, Peter; Martincorena, Iñigo; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Totoki, Yasushi; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Campbell, Peter J; Vineis, Paolo; Phillips, David H; Stratton, Michael R

    2016-11-04

    Tobacco smoking increases the risk of at least 17 classes of human cancer. We analyzed somatic mutations and DNA methylation in 5243 cancers of types for which tobacco smoking confers an elevated risk. Smoking is associated with increased mutation burdens of multiple distinct mutational signatures, which contribute to different extents in different cancers. One of these signatures, mainly found in cancers derived from tissues directly exposed to tobacco smoke, is attributable to misreplication of DNA damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Others likely reflect indirect activation of DNA editing by APOBEC cytidine deaminases and of an endogenous clocklike mutational process. Smoking is associated with limited differences in methylation. The results are consistent with the proposition that smoking increases cancer risk by increasing the somatic mutation load, although direct evidence for this mechanism is lacking in some smoking-related cancer types.

  19. Thermal surface signatures of ship propeller wakes in stratified waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropayev, S. I.; Nath, C.; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    When a ship moves in temperature stratified water, e.g., in the ocean diurnal thermocline, the propeller(s) as well as the turbulent boundary layer of the hull mix the surface water with underlying colder fluid. As a result, when observed from above, a temperature "wake signature" of ˜1-2 °C may be detected at the water surface. To quantify this phenomenon, theoretical modeling and physical experiments were conducted. The dominant processes responsible for thermal wake generation were identified and parameterized. Most important similarity parameters were derived and estimates for wake signature contrast were made. To verify model predictions, scaled experiments were conducted, with the water surface temperature measured using a sensitive infrared camera. Comparison of laboratory measurements with model estimates has shown satisfactory agreement, both qualitative and quantitatively. Estimates for ocean ship-wake scenarios are also given, which are supported by available field observations.

  20. Physics of the inner heliosphere: Mechanisms, models and observational signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withbroe, George L.

    1987-01-01

    Selected problems concerned with the important physical processes that occur in the corona and solar wind acceleration region, particularly time dependent phenomena were studied. Both the physics of the phenomena and the resultant effects on observational signatures, particularly spectroscopic signatures were also studied. Phenomena under study include: wave motions, particularly Alfven and fast mode waves; the formation of standing shocks in the inner heliosphere as a result of momentum and/or heat addition to the wind; and coronal transient phenomena where momentum and/or heat are deposited in the corona to produce transient plasma heating and/or mass ejection. The development of theoretical models for the inner heliosphere, the theoretical investigation of spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for this region, and the analysis of existing skylab and other relevant data are also included.

  1. Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Ju, Young Seok; Haase, Kerstin; ...

    2016-11-04

    Tobacco smoking increases the risk of at least 17 classes of cancer. Here, we analyzed somatic mutations and DNA methylation in 5,243 cancers of types for which tobacco smoking confers an elevated risk. Smoking is associated with increased mutation burdens of multiple distinct mutational signatures, which contribute to different extents in different cancers. One of these signatures, mainly found in cancers derived from tissues directly exposed to tobacco smoke, is attributable to misreplication of DNA damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Others likely reflect indirect activation of DNA edi ting by APOBEC cytidine deaminases and of an endogenous clock-like mutational process.more » Smoking is associated with limited differences in methylation. The results are consistent with the proposition that smoking increases cancer risk by increasing the somatic mutation load, although direct evidence for this mechanism is lacking in some smoking-related cancer types.« less

  2. Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Ju, Young Seok; Haase, Kerstin; Van Loo, Peter; Martincorena, Inigo; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Totoki, Yasushi; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Campbell, Peter J.; Vineis, Paolo; Phillips, David H.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2016-11-04

    Tobacco smoking increases the risk of at least 17 classes of cancer. Here, we analyzed somatic mutations and DNA methylation in 5,243 cancers of types for which tobacco smoking confers an elevated risk. Smoking is associated with increased mutation burdens of multiple distinct mutational signatures, which contribute to different extents in different cancers. One of these signatures, mainly found in cancers derived from tissues directly exposed to tobacco smoke, is attributable to misreplication of DNA damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Others likely reflect indirect activation of DNA edi ting by APOBEC cytidine deaminases and of an endogenous clock-like mutational process. Smoking is associated with limited differences in methylation. The results are consistent with the proposition that smoking increases cancer risk by increasing the somatic mutation load, although direct evidence for this mechanism is lacking in some smoking-related cancer types.

  3. The Application of Spatial Signature Analysis to Electrical Test Data: Validation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, S.S.; Karnowski, T.P.; Lakhani, F.; Tobin, K.W.

    1999-03-15

    This paper presents the results of the Spatial Signature Analysis (SSA) Electrical-test (e-test) validation study that was conducted between February and June, 1998. SSA is an automated procedure developed by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address the issue of intelligent data reduction while providing feedback on current manufacturing processes. SSA was initially developed to automate the analysis of optical defect data. Optical defects can form groups, or clusters, which may have a distinct shape. These patterns can reveal information about the manufacturing process. Optical defect SSA uses image processing algorithms and a classifier system to interpret and identify these patterns, or signatures. SSA has been extended to analyze and interpret electrical test data. The algorithms used for optical defect SSA have been adapted and applied to e-test binmaps. An image of the binmap is created, and features such as geometric and invariant moments are extracted and presented to a pair-wise, fuzzy, k-NN classifier. The classifier itself was prepared by manually training, which consists of storing example signatures of interest in a library, then executing an automated process which treats the examples as prototype signatures. The training process includes a procedure for automatically determining which features are most relevant to each class. The evaluation was performed by installing the SSA software as a batch process at three SEMATECH member company sites. Feedback from member company representatives was incorporated and classifiers were built to automatically assign labels to the binmap signatures. The three sites produced memory devices (DRAM) and microprocessors in a mature process fabrication environment. For all of these products, 5,620 signatures that encompassed approximately 552 wafers were human-classified and analyzed. The performance of the SSA E-test system indicates that the approach was successful in reliably classifying binmap

  4. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  5. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  6. 15 CFR 908.16 - Signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.16 Signature. All reports filed with the National... or intending to conduct the weather modification activities referred to therein by such...

  7. Analysis of multispectral signatures of the shot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, Mariusz; Dulski, Rafał; Piątkowski, Tadeusz; Madura, Henryk; Bareła, Jarosław; Polakowski, Henryk

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents some practical aspects of sniper IR signature measurements. Description of particular signatures for sniper shot in typical scenarios has been presented. We take into consideration sniper activities in the open area as well as in urban environment. The measurements were made at field test ground. High precision laboratory measurements were also performed. Several infrared cameras were used during measurements to cover all measurement assumptions. Some of the cameras are measurement-class devices with high accuracy and frame rates. The registrations were simultaneously made in UV, NWIR, SWIR and LWIR spectral bands. The infrared cameras have possibilities to install optical filters for multispectral measurement. An ultra fast visual camera was also used for visible spectra registration. Exemplary sniper IR signatures for typical situation were presented. LWIR imaging spectroradiometer HyperCam was also used during the laboratory measurements and field experiments. The signatures collected by HyperCam were useful for the determination of spectral characteristics of shot.

  8. Secure quantum signatures using insecure quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Kent, Adrian; Andersson, Erika

    2016-03-01

    Digital signatures are widely used in modern communication to guarantee authenticity and transferability of messages. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. We present a quantum signature scheme that does not require trusted quantum channels. We prove that it is unconditionally secure against the most general coherent attacks, and show that it requires the transmission of significantly fewer quantum states than previous schemes. We also show that the quantum channel noise threshold for our scheme is less strict than for distilling a secure key using quantum key distribution. This shows that "direct" quantum signature schemes can be preferable to signature schemes relying on secret shared keys generated using quantum key distribution.

  9. ACCRETING CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS: OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2015-01-20

    I calculate the spectral energy distributions of accreting circumplanetary disks using atmospheric radiative transfer models. Circumplanetary disks only accreting at 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} around a 1 M{sub J} planet can be brighter than the planet itself. A moderately accreting circumplanetary disk ( M-dot ∼10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; enough to form a 10 M{sub J} planet within 1 Myr) around a 1 M{sub J} planet has a maximum temperature of ∼2000 K, and at near-infrared wavelengths (J, H, K bands), this disk is as bright as a late-M-type brown dwarf or a 10 M{sub J} planet with a ''hot start''. To use direct imaging to find the accretion disks around low-mass planets (e.g., 1 M{sub J} ) and distinguish them from brown dwarfs or hot high-mass planets, it is crucial to obtain photometry at mid-infrared bands (L', M, N bands) because the emission from circumplanetary disks falls off more slowly toward longer wavelengths than those of brown dwarfs or planets. If young planets have strong magnetic fields (≳100 G), fields may truncate slowly accreting circumplanetary disks ( M-dot ≲10{sup −9} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) and lead to magnetospheric accretion, which can provide additional accretion signatures, such as UV/optical excess from the accretion shock and line emission.

  10. Irma multisensor predictive signature model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, John S.; Wellfare, Michael R.; Chenault, David B.; Talele, Sunjay E.; Blume, Bradley T.; Richards, Mike; Prestwood, Lee

    1997-06-01

    Development of target acquisition and target recognition algorithms in highly cluttered backgrounds in a variety of battlefield conditions demands a flexible, high fidelity capability for synthetic image generation. Cost effective smart weapons research and testing also requires extensive scene generation capability. The Irma software package addresses this need through a first principles, phenomenology based scene generator that enhances research into new algorithms, novel sensors, and sensor fusion approaches. Irma was one of the first high resolution synthetic infrared target and background signature models developed for tactical air-to-surface weapon scenarios. Originally developed in 1980 by the Armament Directorate of the Air Force Wright Laboratory, the Irma model was used exclusively to generate IR scenes for smart weapons research and development. in 1987, Nichols Research Corporation took over the maintenance of Irma and has since added substantial capabilities. The development of Irma has culminated in a program that includes not only passive visible, IR, and millimeter wave (MMW) channels but also active MMW and ladar channels. Each of these channels is co-registered providing the capability to develop algorithms for multi-band sensor fusion concepts and associated algorithms. In this paper, the capabilities of the latest release of Irma, Irma 4.0, will be described. A brief description of the elements of the software that are common to all channels will be provided. Each channel will be described briefly including a summary of the phenomenological effects and the sensor effects modeled in the software. Examples of Irma multi- channel imagery will be presented.

  11. New signatures of flavor violating Higgs couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschmann, Malte; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-06-01

    We explore several novel LHC signatures arising from quark or lepton flavor violating couplings in the Higgs sector, and we constrain such couplings using LHC data. Since the largest signals are possible in channels involving top quarks or tau leptons, we consider in particular the following flavor violating processes: (1) pp → thh (top plus di-Higgs final state) arising from a dimension six coupling of up-type quarks to three insertions of the Higgs field. We develop a search strategy for this final state and demonstrate that detection is possible at the high luminosity LHC if flavor violating top-up-Higgs couplings are not too far below the current limit. (2) pp → tH 0, where H 0 is the heavy neutral CP-even Higgs boson in a two Higgs doublet model (2HDM). We consider the decay channels H 0 → tu, WW, ZZ, hh and use existing LHC data to constrain the first three of them. For the fourth, we adapt our search for the thh final state, and we demonstrate that in large regions of the parameter space, it is superior to other searches, including searches for flavor violating top quark decays ( t → hq). (3) H 0 → τ μ, again in the context of a 2HDM. This channel is particularly well motivated by the recent CMS excess in h → τ μ, and we use the data from this search to constrain the properties of H 0.

  12. A neural signature of the unique hues

    PubMed Central

    Forder, Lewis; Bosten, Jenny; He, Xun; Franklin, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Since at least the 17th century there has been the idea that there are four simple and perceptually pure “unique” hues: red, yellow, green, and blue, and that all other hues are perceived as mixtures of these four hues. However, sustained scientific investigation has not yet provided solid evidence for a neural representation that separates the unique hues from other colors. We measured event-related potentials elicited from unique hues and the ‘intermediate’ hues in between them. We find a neural signature of the unique hues 230 ms after stimulus onset at a post-perceptual stage of visual processing. Specifically, the posterior P2 component over the parieto-occipital lobe peaked significantly earlier for the unique than for the intermediate hues (Z = −2.9, p = 0.004). Having identified a neural marker for unique hues, fundamental questions about the contribution of neural hardwiring, language and environment to the unique hues can now be addressed. PMID:28186142

  13. Advanced techniques in current signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. F.; Castleberry, K. N.

    1992-02-01

    In general, both ac and dc motors can be characterized as weakly nonlinear systems, in which both linear and nonlinear effects occur simultaneously. Fortunately, the nonlinearities are generally well behaved and understood and can be handled via several standard mathematical techniques already well developed in the systems modeling area; examples are piecewise linear approximations and Volterra series representations. Field measurements of numerous motors and motor-driven systems confirm the rather complex nature of motor current spectra and illustrate both linear and nonlinear effects (including line harmonics and modulation components). Although previous current signature analysis (CSA) work at Oak Ridge and other sites has principally focused on the modulation mechanisms and detection methods (AM, PM, and FM), more recent studies have been conducted on linear spectral components (those appearing in the electric current at their actual frequencies and not as modulation sidebands). For example, large axial-flow compressors (approximately 3300 hp) in the US gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants exhibit running-speed (approximately 20 Hz) and high-frequency vibrational information (greater than 1 kHz) in their motor current spectra. Several signal-processing techniques developed to facilitate analysis of these components, including specialized filtering schemes, are presented. Finally, concepts for the designs of advanced digitally based CSA units are offered, which should serve to foster the development of much more computationally capable 'smart' CSA instrumentation in the next several years.

  14. Distinguishing Biotic from Abiotic Phosphate Oxygen Isotopic Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R.; Moyer, C.; Colman, A.; Liang, Y.; Dogru, D.

    2006-05-01

    On earth, phosphate has a strong biological oxygen isotope signature due to its concentration and intense cycling by living organisms as an essential nutrient. Phosphate does not undergo oxygen isotope exchange with water at low temperature without enzymatic catalysis, making the oxygen isotope ratio (18O/16O) of phosphate, δ18OP, an attractive biosignature in the search for early and extraterrestrial life. Recent laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that the δ18OP value of dissolved inorganic phosphate (PO4) records specific microbial activity and enzymatic reaction pathways in both laboratory cultures and natural waters/sediments (Blake et al., 2005; Colman et al 2005; Liang and Blake, 2005). Phosphate oxygen isotope biosignatures may be distinguished from abiotic signatures by: (1) evaluating the degree of temperature-dependent PO4-water oxygen isotope exchange in aqueous systems and deviation from equilibrium; and (2) evolution from an abiotic P reservoir signature towards a biotic P reservoir signature. Important abiotic processes potentially affecting phosphate δ18OP values include dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, recrystallization of PO4 mineral phases, diagenesis and metamorphism. For most of these processes, the recording, retention and alteration of δ18OP biosignatures have not been evaluated. Deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields are an ideal system in which to study the preservation and alteration of δ18OP biosignatures, as well as potential look-alikes produced by heat-promoted PO4 -water oxygen isotope exchange. Results from recent studies of δ18OP biosignatures in hydrothermal deposits near 9 and 21 degrees N. EPR and at Loihi seamount will be presented.

  15. The postprocessing of quantum digital signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tian-Yin; Ma, Jian-Feng; Cai, Xiao-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Many novel quantum digital signature proposals have been proposed, which can effectively guarantee the information-theoretic security of the signature for a singe bit against forging and denying. Using the current basic building blocks of signing a single bit, we give a new proposal to construct an entire protocol for signing a long message. Compared with the previous work, it can improve at least 33.33% efficiency.

  16. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  17. Research Plan for Fire Signatures and Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the prevention, suppression, and detection of fires aboard a spacecraft is presented. The topics include: 1) Fire Prevention, Detection, and Suppression Sub-Element Products; 2) FPDS Organizing Questions; 3) FPDS Organizing Questions; 4) Signatures, Sensors, and Simulations; 5) Quantification of Fire and Pre-Fire Signatures; 6) Smoke; 7) DAFT Hardware; 8) Additional Benefits of DAFT; 9) Development and Characterization of Sensors 10) Simulation of the Transport of Smoke and Fire Precursors; and 11) FPDS Organizing Questions.

  18. Kinematics of Signature Writing in Healthy Aging*

    PubMed Central

    Caligiuri, Michael P.; Kim, Chi; Landy, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    Forensic document examiners (FDE) called upon to distinguish a genuine from a forged signature of an elderly person are often required to consider the question of age-related deterioration and whether the available exemplars reliably capture the natural effects of aging of the original writer. An understanding of the statistical relationship between advanced age and handwriting movements can reduce the uncertainty that may exist in an examiner’s approach to questioned signatures formed by elderly writers. The primary purpose of this study was to systematically examine age-related changes in signature kinematics in healthy writers. Forty-two healthy subjects between the ages of 60–91 years participated in this study. Signatures were recorded using a digitizing tablet and commercial software was used to examine the temporal and spatial stroke kinematics and pen pressure. Results indicated that vertical stroke duration and dysfluency increased with age, whereas vertical stroke amplitude and velocity decreased with age. Pen pressure decreased with age. We found that a linear model characterized the best-fit relationship between advanced age and handwriting movement parameters for signature formation. Male writers exhibited stronger age effects than female writers, especially for pen pressure and stroke dysfluency. The present study contributes to an understanding of how advanced age alters signature formation in otherwise healthy adults. PMID:24673648

  19. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  20. Assessing the Quality of Bioforensic Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Gosink, Luke J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Brothers, Alan J.; Corley, Courtney D.; Tardiff, Mark F.

    2013-06-04

    We present a mathematical framework for assessing the quality of signature systems in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility—a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics (SQM). We demonstrate the SQM approach by assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system consists of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated fifteen combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We demonstrated that SQM can be used to distinguish between the various combinations in terms of attributes of interest. The approach assisted in clearly identifying assays that were least informative, largely in part because they only could discriminate between very few culture media, and in particular, culture media that are rarely used. There are limitations associated with the data that were used to train and test the signature system. Consequently, our intent is not to draw formal conclusions regarding this particular bioforensic system, but rather to illustrate an analytical approach that could be useful in comparing one signature system to another.

  1. Signature extension through the application of cluster matching algorithms to determine appropriate signature transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambeck, P. F.; Rice, D. P.

    1976-01-01

    Signature extension is intended to increase the space-time range over which a set of training statistics can be used to classify data without significant loss of recognition accuracy. A first cluster matching algorithm MASC (Multiplicative and Additive Signature Correction) was developed at the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan to test the concept of using associations between training and recognition area cluster statistics to define an average signature transformation. A more recent signature extension module CROP-A (Cluster Regression Ordered on Principal Axis) has shown evidence of making significant associations between training and recognition area cluster statistics, with the clusters to be matched being selected automatically by the algorithm.

  2. 21 CFR 11.70 - Signature/record linking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ELECTRONIC RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.70 Signature/record linking. Electronic signatures and handwritten signatures executed to electronic records shall be linked to their...

  3. Domain walls and their experimental signatures in s+is superconductors.

    PubMed

    Garaud, Julien; Babaev, Egor

    2014-01-10

    Arguments were recently advanced that hole-doped Ba(1-x)K(x)Fe2As2 exhibits the s+is state at certain doping. Spontaneous breaking of time-reversal symmetry in the s+is state dictates that it possess domain wall excitations. Here, we discuss what are the experimentally detectable signatures of domain walls in the s+is state. We find that in this state the domain walls can have a dipolelike magnetic signature (in contrast to the uniform magnetic signature of domain walls p+ip superconductors). We propose experiments where quench-induced domain walls can be stabilized by geometric barriers and observed via their magnetic signature or their influence on the magnetization process, thereby providing an experimental tool to confirm the s+is state.

  4. L1000CDS2: LINCS L1000 characteristic direction signatures search engine

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Qiaonan; Reid, St Patrick; Clark, Neil R; Wang, Zichen; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Rouillard, Andrew D; Readhead, Ben; Tritsch, Sarah R; Hodos, Rachel; Hafner, Marc; Niepel, Mario; Sorger, Peter K; Dudley, Joel T; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G; Ma’ayan, Avi

    2017-01-01

    The library of integrated network-based cellular signatures (LINCS) L1000 data set currently comprises of over a million gene expression profiles of chemically perturbed human cell lines. Through unique several intrinsic and extrinsic benchmarking schemes, we demonstrate that processing the L1000 data with the characteristic direction (CD) method significantly improves signal to noise compared with the MODZ method currently used to compute L1000 signatures. The CD processed L1000 signatures are served through a state-of-the-art web-based search engine application called L1000CDS2. The L1000CDS2 search engine provides prioritization of thousands of small-molecule signatures, and their pairwise combinations, predicted to either mimic or reverse an input gene expression signature using two methods. The L1000CDS2 search engine also predicts drug targets for all the small molecules profiled by the L1000 assay that we processed. Targets are predicted by computing the cosine similarity between the L1000 small-molecule signatures and a large collection of signatures extracted from the gene expression omnibus (GEO) for single-gene perturbations in mammalian cells. We applied L1000CDS2 to prioritize small molecules that are predicted to reverse expression in 670 disease signatures also extracted from GEO, and prioritized small molecules that can mimic expression of 22 endogenous ligand signatures profiled by the L1000 assay. As a case study, to further demonstrate the utility of L1000CDS2, we collected expression signatures from human cells infected with Ebola virus at 30, 60 and 120 min. Querying these signatures with L1000CDS2 we identified kenpaullone, a GSK3B/CDK2 inhibitor that we show, in subsequent experiments, has a dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ebola infection in vitro without causing cellular toxicity in human cell lines. In summary, the L1000CDS2 tool can be applied in many biological and biomedical settings, while improving the extraction of knowledge

  5. The research of a new test method about dynamic target infrared spectral signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiang-hui; Gao, Jiao-bo; Chen, Qing; Luo, Yan-ling; Li, Jiang-jun; Gao, Ze-dong; Wang, Nan; Gao, Meng

    2014-11-01

    The research on infrared spectral target signature shows great military importance in the domain of IR detection Recognition, IRCM, IR image guide and ir stealth etc. The measurements of infrared spectral of tactical targets have been a direct but effective technique in providing signatures for both analysis and simulation to missile seeker designers for many years. In order to deal with the problem of dynamic target infrared spectral signature, this paper presents a new method for acquiring and testing ir spectral radiation signatures of dynamic objects, which is based on an IR imager guiding the target and acquiring the scene at the same time, a FOV chopping scan infrared spectral radiometer alternatively testing the target and its background around ir spectral signature.ir imager and spectral radiometer have the same optical axis. The raw test data was processed according to a new deal with method. Principles and data processing methods were described in detail, test error also analyzed. Field test results showed that the method described in the above is right; the test error was reduced smaller, and can better satisfy the needs of acquiring dynamic target ir spectral signature.

  6. Hyperspectral imagery for observing spectral signature change in Aspergillus flavus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCrispino, Kevin; Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Brabham, Kori; Lewis, David; Beach, Jim; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2005-11-01

    Aflatoxin contaminated corn is dangerous for domestic animals when used as feed and cause liver cancer when consumed by human beings. Therefore, the ability to detect A. flavus and its toxic metabolite, aflatoxin, is important. The objective of this study is to measure A. flavus growth using hyperspectral technology and develop spectral signatures for A. flavus. Based on the research group's previous experiments using hyperspectral imaging techniques, it has been confirmed that the spectral signature of A. flavus is unique and readily identifiable against any background or surrounding surface and among other fungal strains. This study focused on observing changes in the A. flavus spectral signature over an eight-day growth period. The study used a visible-near-infrared hyperspectral image system for data acquisition. This image system uses focal plane pushbroom scanning for high spatial and high spectral resolution imaging. Procedures previously developed by the research group were used for image calibration and image processing. The results showed that while A. flavus gradually progressed along the experiment timeline, the day-to-day surface reflectance of A. flavus displayed significant difference in discreet regions of the wavelength spectrum. External disturbance due to environmental changes also altered the growth and subsequently changed the reflectance patterns of A. flavus.

  7. Efficient Unrestricted Identity-Based Aggregate Signature Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yumin; Zhan, Qian; Huang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    An aggregate signature scheme allows anyone to compress multiple individual signatures from various users into a single compact signature. The main objective of such a scheme is to reduce the costs on storage, communication and computation. However, among existing aggregate signature schemes in the identity-based setting, some of them fail to achieve constant-length aggregate signature or require a large amount of pairing operations which grows linearly with the number of signers, while others have some limitations on the aggregated signatures. The main challenge in building efficient aggregate signature scheme is to compress signatures into a compact, constant-length signature without any restriction. To address the above drawbacks, by using the bilinear pairings, we propose an efficient unrestricted identity-based aggregate signature. Our scheme achieves both full aggregation and constant pairing computation. We prove that our scheme has existential unforgeability under the computational Diffie-Hellman assumption. PMID:25329777

  8. Efficient unrestricted identity-based aggregate signature scheme.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yumin; Zhan, Qian; Huang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    An aggregate signature scheme allows anyone to compress multiple individual signatures from various users into a single compact signature. The main objective of such a scheme is to reduce the costs on storage, communication and computation. However, among existing aggregate signature schemes in the identity-based setting, some of them fail to achieve constant-length aggregate signature or require a large amount of pairing operations which grows linearly with the number of signers, while others have some limitations on the aggregated signatures. The main challenge in building efficient aggregate signature scheme is to compress signatures into a compact, constant-length signature without any restriction. To address the above drawbacks, by using the bilinear pairings, we propose an efficient unrestricted identity-based aggregate signature. Our scheme achieves both full aggregation and constant pairing computation. We prove that our scheme has existential unforgeability under the computational Diffie-Hellman assumption.

  9. Microwave-Spectral Signatures Would Reveal Concealed Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G.; Ngo, P.; Carl, J. R.; Byerly, K.; Stolarcyzk, L.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed technique for locating concealed objects (especially small antipersonnel land mines) involves the acquisition and processing of spectral signatures over broad microwave frequency bands. This technique was conceived to overcome the weaknesses of older narrow- band electromagnetic techniques like ground-probing radar and low-frequency electromagnetic induction. Ground-probing radar is susceptible to false detections and/or interference caused by rocks, roots, air pockets, soil inhomogeneities, ice, liquid water, and miscellaneous buried objects other than those sought. Moreover, if the radar frequency happens to be one for which the permittivity of a sought object matches the permittivity of the surrounding soil or there is an unfavorable complex-amplitude addition of the radar reflection at the receiver, then the object is not detected. Low-frequency electromagnetic induction works well for detecting metallic objects, but the amounts of metal in plastic mines are often too small to be detectable. The potential advantage of the proposed technique arises from the fact that wideband spectral signatures generally contain more relevant information than do narrow-band signals. Consequently, spectral signatures could be used to make better decisions regarding whether concealed objects are present and whether they are the ones sought. In some cases, spectral signatures could provide information on the depths, sizes, shapes, and compositions of objects. An apparatus to implement the proposed technique (see Figure 1) could be assembled from equipment already in common use. Typically, such an apparatus would include a radio-frequency (RF) transmitter/receiver, a broad-band microwave antenna, and a fast personal computer loaded with appropriate software. In operation, the counter would be turned on, the antenna would be aimed at the ground or other mass suspected to contain a mine or other sought object, and the operating frequency would be swept over the band of

  10. A Nucleotide Signature for the Identification of Angelicae Sinensis Radix (Danggui) and Its Products

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lili; Han, Jianping; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    It is very difficult to identify Angelicae sinensis radix (Danggui) when it is processed into Chinese patent medicines. The proposed internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) is not sufficient to resolve heavily processed materials. Therefore, a short barcode for the identification of processed materials is urgently needed. In this study, 265 samples of Angelicae sinensis radix and adulterants were collected. The ITS2 region was sequenced, and based on one single nucleotide polymorphism(SNP) site unique to Angelica sinensis, a nucleotide signature consisting of 37-bp (5′-aatccgcgtc atcttagtga gctcaaggac ccttagg-3′) was developed. It is highly conserved and specific within Angelica sinensis while divergent among other species. Then, we designed primers (DG01F/DG01R) to amplify the nucleotide signature region from processed materials. 15 samples procured online were analysed. By seeking the signature, we found that 7 of them were counterfeits. 28 batches of Chinese patent medicines containing Danggui were amplified. 19 of them were found to contain the signature, and adulterants such as Ligusticum sinense, Notopterygium incisum, Angelica decursiva and Angelica gigas were detected in other batches. Thus, this nucleotide signature, with only 37-bp, will broaden the application of DNA barcoding to identify the components in decoctions, Chinese patent medicines and other products with degraded DNA. PMID:27713564

  11. Integrative Metabolic Signatures for Hepatic Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Gang; Meng, Fan; Liu, Laibin; Mohney, Robert; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Guha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a dose-limiting factor in curative radiation therapy (RT) for liver cancers, making early detection of radiation-associated liver injury absolutely essential for medical intervention. A metabolomic approach was used to determine metabolic signatures that could serve as biomarkers for early detection of RILD in mice. Methods Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice received 0, 10 or 50 Gy Whole Liver Irradiation (WLI) and were contrasted to mice, which received 10 Gy whole body irradiation (WBI). Liver and plasma samples were collected at 24 hours after irradiation. The samples were processed using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Results Twenty four hours after WLI, 407 metabolites were detected in liver samples while 347 metabolites were detected in plasma. Plasma metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included several amino acids, purine and pyrimidine metabolites, microbial metabolites, and most prominently bradykinin and 3-indoxyl-sulfate. Liver metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included pentose phosphate, purine, and pyrimidine metabolites in liver. Plasma biomarkers in common between WLI and WBI were enriched in microbial metabolites such as 3 indoxyl sulfate, indole-3-lactic acid, phenyllactic acid, pipecolic acid, hippuric acid, and markers of DNA damage such as 2-deoxyuridine. Metabolites associated with tryptophan and indoles may reflect radiation-induced gut microbiome effects. Predominant liver biomarkers in common between WBI and WLI were amino acids, sugars, TCA metabolites (fumarate), fatty acids (lineolate, n-hexadecanoic acid) and DNA damage markers (uridine). Conclusions We identified a set of metabolomic markers that may prove useful as plasma biomarkers of RILD and WBI. Pathway analysis also suggested that the unique metabolic changes observed after liver irradiation was an integrative response of the intestine, liver and kidney. PMID:26046990

  12. Lipidome signatures in early bovine embryo development.

    PubMed

    Sudano, Mateus J; Rascado, Tatiana D S; Tata, Alessandra; Belaz, Katia R A; Santos, Vanessa G; Valente, Roniele S; Mesquita, Fernando S; Ferreira, Christina R; Araújo, João P; Eberlin, Marcos N; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda D C

    2016-07-15

    Mammalian preimplantation embryonic development is a complex, conserved, and well-orchestrated process involving dynamic molecular and structural changes. Understanding membrane lipid profile fluctuation during this crucial period is fundamental to address mechanisms governing embryogenesis. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to perform a comprehensive assessment of stage-specific lipid profiles during early bovine embryonic development and associate with the mRNA abundance of lipid metabolism-related genes (ACSL3, ELOVL5, and ELOVL6) and with the amount of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Immature oocytes were recovered from slaughterhouse-derived ovaries, two-cell embryos, and eight- to 16-cell embryos, morula, and blastocysts that were in vitro produced under different environmental conditions. Lipid droplets content and mRNA transcript levels for ACSL3, ELOVL5, and ELOVL6, monitored by lipid staining and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively, increased at morula followed by a decrease at blastocyst stage. Relative mRNA abundance changes of ACSL3 were closely related to cytoplasmic lipid droplet accumulation. Characteristic dynamic changes of phospholipid profiles were observed during early embryo development and related to unsaturation level, acyl chain length, and class composition. ELOVL5 and ELOVL6 mRNA levels were suggestive of overexpression of membrane phospholipids containing elongated fatty acids with 16, 18, and 20 carbons. In addition, putative biomarkers of key events of embryogenesis, embryo lipid accumulation, and elongation were identified. This study provides a comprehensive description of stage-specific lipidome signatures and proposes a mechanism to explain its potential relationship with the fluctuation of both cytoplasmic lipid droplets content and mRNA levels of lipid metabolism-related genes during early bovine embryo development.

  13. Microbial Signatures in Ooids from the Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, M. R.; Swart, P. K.; Devlin, Q.; Oehlert, A. M.; Saied, A.; Eberli, G. P.; Klaus, J. S.; Altabet, M.

    2013-12-01

    Microbes are abundant in sedimentary systems where their metabolic capabilities can exert a profound impact on carbonate precipitation processes by altering the alkalinity of their immediate surrounding. Using a combination of clone analysis of 16SrRNA, functional gene analysis and both inorganic and organic stable isotopic analyses, we characterized the microbial community structure of ooids and their potential functional capabilities that could lead to precipitation of carbonates. Oolitic bacterial communities were highly diverse, representing 12 different prokaryotic lineages, among which Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria/Bacteroidetes and Deltaproteobacteria were the most abundant. Based on functional gene analysis, a large number of genes were associated with redox dependent microbial communities with putative functional capability for mineral precipitation such as aerobic/anoxygenic photosynthesis, denitrification, ammonification, and sulfate reduction. In addition, a broad diversity of genes related to organic carbon degradation and nitrogen fixation were present, implying metabolic plasticity that enables survival under oligotrophic conditions. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic analyses, which were conducted on both bulk and intracrystalline organic matter as well as in leachate sediments, identified geochemical signatures of microbial activity. δ13C values for organic C in the bulk (-11.94 to -16.71) and intracrystalline organic matter (-12.37 to -17.66), were similar and within the range of fractionation patterns associated with cyanobacteria, algae and photosynthesizers that employ the C4 carbon fixation pathway. Nitrogen isotopic values for both bulk (δ15N: -0.314 to - 0.706) and intracrystalline organic matter (δ15N: -0.343 -1.70) also showed fractionation patterns consistent with nitrogen fixation. In addition, positive δ15N and δ18O values of the NO3- leached from the ooids provided evidence of denitrification. These findings

  14. Specificity in ROS Signaling and Transcript Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Vaahtera, Lauri; Brosché, Mikael; Wrzaczek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules in plants, are involved in developmental control and stress adaptation. ROS production can trigger broad transcriptional changes; however, it is not clear how specificity in transcriptional regulation is achieved. Recent Advances: A large collection of public transcriptome data from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is available for analysis. These data can be used for the analysis of biological processes that are associated with ROS signaling and for the identification of suitable transcriptional indicators. Several online tools, such as Genevestigator and Expression Angler, have simplified the task to analyze, interpret, and visualize this wealth of data. Critical Issues: The analysis of the exact transcriptional responses to ROS requires the production of specific ROS in distinct subcellular compartments with precise timing, which is experimentally difficult. Analyses are further complicated by the effect of ROS production in one subcellular location on the ROS accumulation in other compartments. In addition, even subtle differences in the method of ROS production or treatment can lead to significantly different outcomes when various stimuli are compared. Future Directions: Due to the difficulty of inducing ROS production specifically with regard to ROS type, subcellular localization, and timing, we propose that the concept of a “ROS marker gene” should be re-evaluated. We suggest guidelines for the analysis of transcriptional data in ROS signaling. The use of “ROS signatures,” which consist of a set of genes that together can show characteristic and indicative responses, should be preferred over the use of individual marker genes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1422–1441. PMID:24180661

  15. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers.

  16. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers.

  17. Biomarker Gene Signature Discovery Integrating Network Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Cun, Yupeng; Fröhlich, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of prognostic and diagnostic biomarker gene signatures for diseases, such as cancer, is seen as a major step towards a better personalized medicine. During the last decade various methods, mainly coming from the machine learning or statistical domain, have been proposed for that purpose. However, one important obstacle for making gene signatures a standard tool in clinical diagnosis is the typical low reproducibility of these signatures combined with the difficulty to achieve a clear biological interpretation. For that purpose in the last years there has been a growing interest in approaches that try to integrate information from molecular interaction networks. Here we review the current state of research in this field by giving an overview about so-far proposed approaches. PMID:24832044

  18. Explosives Detection: Exploitation of the Physical Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David

    2010-10-01

    Explosives based terrorism is an ongoing threat that is evolving with respect to implementation, configuration and materials used. There are a variety of devices designed to detect explosive devices, however, each technology has limitations and operational constraints. A full understanding of the signatures available for detection coupled with the array of detection choices can be used to develop a conceptual model of an explosives screening operation. Physics based sensors provide a robust approach to explosives detection, typically through the identification of anomalies, and are currently used for screening in airports around the world. The next generation of detectors for explosives detection will need to be more sensitive and selective, as well as integrate seamlessly with devices focused on chemical signatures. An appreciation for the details of the physical signature exploitation in cluttered environments with time, space, and privacy constraints is necessary for effective explosives screening of people, luggage, cargo, and vehicles.

  19. A Novel Quantum Proxy Blind Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Xie, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2017-02-01

    A novel quantum proxy blind signature scheme is proposed. In this scheme, a special type of non-maximally entangled three-qubit state is introduced as a quantum channel, which can realize perfect teleportation. The message sender U blinds his message by means of preparing two groups of non-orthogonal single-photon states. According to the original signer Charlie's delegation message, the proxy signer Alice generates a corresponding signature. The arbitrator Trent can help the receiver Bob verify the signature, and also prevent Bob from doing any damage. The above-mentioned advantages make this scheme different from some existing schemes. It is showed that our scheme has the properties of undeniability, unforgeability, blindness, untraceability. Moreover, it is free from intercept-resend attack.

  20. Nitrogen isotopic signatures in the Acapulco meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, G.; Marti, K.

    1991-01-01

    N isotopic abundances are reported for a bulk sample of the unique meteorite Acapulco. Although the mineral chemistry indicates a high degree of recrystallization under redox conditions between those of H and E chondrites (Palme et al., 1981), the presence of two distinct N isotopic signatures shows that the carriers of these N components were not equilibrated. In stepwise pyrolysis, the larger (65 percent) N component is released mostly below 1000 C and reveals a signature of delta(N-15) = 8.9 + or - 1.2 per mil, which is within the range observed in chondrites. A second 'light' component appears above 1000 C and has a signature of delta(N-15) less than or equal to -110.5 + or - 4.0 per mil (uncorrected for spallation N-15).

  1. Quantum mechanical stabilization of Minkowski signature wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M.

    1989-05-19

    When one attempts to construct classical wormholes in Minkowski signature Lorentzian spacetimes violations of both the weak energy hypothesis and averaged weak energy hypothesis are encountered. Since the weak energy hypothesis is experimentally known to be violated quantum mechanically, this suggests that a quantum mechanical analysis of Minkowski signature wormholes is in order. In this note I perform a minisuperspace analysis of a simple class of Minkowski signature wormholes. By solving the Wheeler-de Witt equation for pure Einstein gravity on this minisuperspace the quantum mechanical wave function of the wormhole is obtained in closed form. The wormhole is shown to be quantum mechanically stabilized with an average radius of order the Planck length. 8 refs.

  2. Ritual and signature in serial sexual homicide.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Louis B; Kassen, Martin; Mesa, V Blair; Pinizzotto, Anthony J

    2010-01-01

    Ritual and signature are fantasy-driven, repetitive crime scene behaviors that have been found to occur in serial sexual homicide. Notwithstanding numerous anecdotal case reports, ritual and signature have rarely been studied empirically. In a national sample of 38 offenders and their 162 victims, we examined behavioral and thematic consistency, as well as the evolution and uniqueness of these crime scene actions. The notion that serial sexual murderers engage in the same rituals and leave unique signatures at every scene was not supported by our data. In fact, the results suggest that the crime scene conduct of this group of offenders is fairly complex and varied. Implications of these findings for forensic assessments and criminal investigations are discussed.

  3. Orbital debris characterization with impact flash signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.

    1991-12-31

    Orbital debris is recognized as a serious and growing threat to man`s utilization and exploration of space. While some information is available on the material composition of orbital debris, most measurements of orbital debris size and velocity distributions do not distinguish material type. The analysis and understanding of impact flash signatures can lead to an in-situ detector system with the ability to determine size and impact velocity distribution for orbital debris segregated by material type. This detector concept is based on an understanding of how material shock properties govern the flash signature arising from the impact of a piece of orbital debris (impactor) against a witness plate (target). Analytical results are presented that identify the most promising witness plate materials with respect to producing impact flash signatures that characterize the orbital debris material. 7 refs.

  4. Orbital debris characterization with impact flash signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Orbital debris is recognized as a serious and growing threat to man's utilization and exploration of space. While some information is available on the material composition of orbital debris, most measurements of orbital debris size and velocity distributions do not distinguish material type. The analysis and understanding of impact flash signatures can lead to an in-situ detector system with the ability to determine size and impact velocity distribution for orbital debris segregated by material type. This detector concept is based on an understanding of how material shock properties govern the flash signature arising from the impact of a piece of orbital debris (impactor) against a witness plate (target). Analytical results are presented that identify the most promising witness plate materials with respect to producing impact flash signatures that characterize the orbital debris material. 7 refs.

  5. Selection signatures in worldwide sheep populations.

    PubMed

    Fariello, Maria-Ines; Servin, Bertrand; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Rupp, Rachel; Moreno, Carole; San Cristobal, Magali; Boitard, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of populations in domestic species offers great opportunities to study genome response to selection. The recently published Sheep HapMap dataset is a great example of characterization of the world wide genetic diversity in sheep. In this study, we re-analyzed the Sheep HapMap dataset to identify selection signatures in worldwide sheep populations. Compared to previous analyses, we made use of statistical methods that (i) take account of the hierarchical structure of sheep populations, (ii) make use of linkage disequilibrium information and (iii) focus specifically on either recent or older selection signatures. We show that this allows pinpointing several new selection signatures in the sheep genome and distinguishing those related to modern breeding objectives and to earlier post-domestication constraints. The newly identified regions, together with the ones previously identified, reveal the extensive genome response to selection on morphology, color and adaptation to new environments.

  6. A Methodology for Calculating Radiation Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Klasky, Marc Louis; Wilcox, Trevor; Bathke, Charles G.; James, Michael R.

    2015-05-01

    A rigorous formalism is presented for calculating radiation signatures from both Special Nuclear Material (SNM) as well as radiological sources. The use of MCNP6 in conjunction with CINDER/ORIGEN is described to allow for the determination of both neutron and photon leakages from objects of interest. In addition, a description of the use of MCNP6 to properly model the background neutron and photon sources is also presented. Examinations of the physics issues encountered in the modeling are investigated so as to allow for guidance in the user discerning the relevant physics to incorporate into general radiation signature calculations. Furthermore, examples are provided to assist in delineating the pertinent physics that must be accounted for. Finally, examples of detector modeling utilizing MCNP are provided along with a discussion on the generation of Receiver Operating Curves, which are the suggested means by which to determine detectability radiation signatures emanating from objects.

  7. Selection Signatures in Worldwide Sheep Populations

    PubMed Central

    Fariello, Maria-Ines; Servin, Bertrand; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Rupp, Rachel; Moreno, Carole; Cristobal, Magali San; Boitard, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of populations in domestic species offers great opportunities to study genome response to selection. The recently published Sheep HapMap dataset is a great example of characterization of the world wide genetic diversity in sheep. In this study, we re-analyzed the Sheep HapMap dataset to identify selection signatures in worldwide sheep populations. Compared to previous analyses, we made use of statistical methods that (i) take account of the hierarchical structure of sheep populations, (ii) make use of linkage disequilibrium information and (iii) focus specifically on either recent or older selection signatures. We show that this allows pinpointing several new selection signatures in the sheep genome and distinguishing those related to modern breeding objectives and to earlier post-domestication constraints. The newly identified regions, together with the ones previously identified, reveal the extensive genome response to selection on morphology, color and adaptation to new environments. PMID:25126940

  8. Neutral and adaptive genomic signatures of rapid poleward range expansion.

    PubMed

    Swaegers, J; Mergeay, J; Van Geystelen, A; Therry, L; Larmuseau, M H D; Stoks, R

    2015-12-01

    Many species are expanding their range polewards, and this has been associated with rapid phenotypic change. Yet, it is unclear to what extent this reflects rapid genetic adaptation or neutral processes associated with range expansion, or selection linked to the new thermal conditions encountered. To disentangle these alternatives, we studied the genomic signature of range expansion in the damselfly Coenagrion scitulum using 4950 newly developed genomic SNPs and linked this to the rapidly evolved phenotypic differences between core and (newly established) edge populations. Most edge populations were genetically clearly differentiated from the core populations and all were differentiated from each other indicating independent range expansion events. In addition, evidence for genetic drift in the edge populations, and strong evidence for adaptive genetic variation in association with the range expansion was detected. We identified one SNP under consistent selection in four of the five edge populations and showed that the allele increasing in frequency is associated with increased flight performance. This indicates collateral, non-neutral evolutionary changes in independent edge populations driven by the range expansion process. We also detected a genomic signature of adaptation to the newly encountered thermal regimes, reflecting a pattern of countergradient variation. The latter signature was identified at a single SNP as well as in a set of covarying SNPs using a polygenic multilocus approach to detect selection. Overall, this study highlights how a strategic geographic sampling design and the integration of genomic, phenotypic and environmental data can identify and disentangle the neutral and adaptive processes that are simultaneously operating during range expansions.

  9. A Robust Iris Identification System Based on Wavelet Packet Decomposition and Local Comparisons of the Extracted Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossant, Florence; Mikovicova, Beata; Adam, Mathieu; Trocan, Maria

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a complete iris identification system including three main stages: iris segmentation, signature extraction, and signature comparison. An accurate and robust pupil and iris segmentation process, taking into account eyelid occlusions, is first detailed and evaluated. Then, an original wavelet-packet-based signature extraction method and a novel identification approach, based on the fusion of local distance measures, are proposed. Performance measurements validating the proposed iris signature and demonstrating the benefit of our local-based signature comparison are provided. Moreover, an exhaustive evaluation of robustness, with regards to the acquisition conditions, attests the high performances and the reliability of our system. Tests have been conducted on two different databases, the well-known CASIA database (V3) and our ISEP database. Finally, a comparison of the performances of our system with the published ones is given and discussed.

  10. Development of Asset Fault Signatures for Prognostic and Health Management in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Randall Bickford; Richard Rusaw

    2014-06-01

    Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using the Electric Power Research Institute’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. The FW-PHM Suite is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The FW-PHM Suite has four main modules: Diagnostic Advisor, Asset Fault Signature (AFS) Database, Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and Remaining Useful Life Database. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures to assess the health status of generator step-up generators and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. At the most basic level, fault signatures are comprised of an asset type, a fault type, and a set of one or more fault features (symptoms) that are indicative of the specified fault. The AFS Database is populated with asset fault signatures via a content development exercise that is based on the results of intensive technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The developed fault signatures capture this knowledge and implement it in a standardized approach, thereby streamlining the diagnostic and prognostic process. This will support the automation of proactive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

  11. Combining fuzzy logic and voting methods for matching pixel spectra with signature databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Peter G.; Pilati, Martin L.

    2002-08-01

    This paper discusses a method for searching a database of known material signatures to find the closest match with an unknown signature. This database search method combines fuzzy logic and voting methods to achieve a high level of classification accuracy with the signatures and data cubes tested. This paper discusses the method in detail to include background and test results. It makes reference to public literature concerning components used by the method but developed elsewhere. This paper results from a project whose main objective is to produce an easily integrated software tool that makes an accurate best-guess as to the material(s) indicated by the signature of a pixel found to be interesting according to some analysis method, such as anomaly detection and scene characterization. Anomaly detection examines a spectral cube and determines which pixels are unusual relative to the majority background. Scene characterization finds pixels whose signatures are representative of the unique pixel groups. The current project fully automates the process of determining unknown pixels of interest, taking the signatures from the flagged pixels, searching a database of known signatures, and making a best guess as to the material(s) represented by each pixel's signature. The method ranks the possible materials by order of likelihood with the purpose of accounting for multiple materials existing in the same pixel. In this way it is possible to deliver multiple reportings when more than one material is closely matched within some threshold. This facilitates human analysis and decision-making for productions purposes. The implementation facilitates rapid response to interactive analysis need in support of strategic and tactical operational requirements in both the civil and defense sectors.

  12. An efficient and provably secure proxy signature scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhong; Liu, Xue; Gao, Shengnan

    2010-08-01

    Proxy signature is a special signature, it allows an original signer to delegate her signing capability to a proxy signer and the proxy signer can produce a signature on behalf of the original signer. At present, most of proxy signature in essence consists of two signatures. To overcome the problem, we propose a short efficient proxy signature scheme based on a certificateless signature scheme. And we show that the proposed scheme is secure in the random oracle model. The security of the scheme is related to Inverse Computational Diffie-Hellman Problem and the k-CCA problem. Comparison with Huang et.al scheme, our scheme has an advantage over Huang et.al's scheme in terms of the size of proxy signature. Since the length of proxy signature in our scheme is 160bit, it is very suitable for mobile devices.

  13. Transient thermal camouflage and heat signature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tian-Zhi; Su, Yishu; Xu, Weikai; Yang, Xiao-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Thermal metamaterials have been proposed to manipulate heat flux as a new way to cloak or camouflage objects in the infrared world. To date, however, thermal metamaterials only operate in the steady-state and exhibit detectable, transient heat signatures. In this letter, the theoretical basis for a thermal camouflaging technique with controlled transient diffusion is presented. This technique renders an object invisible in real time. More importantly, the thermal camouflaging device instantaneously generates a pre-designed heat signature and behaves as a perfect thermal illusion device. A metamaterial coating with homogeneous and isotropic thermal conductivity, density, and volumetric heat capacity was fabricated and very good camouflaging performance was achieved.

  14. KEA-71 Smart Current Signature Sensor (SCSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development and uses of the Smart Current Signature Sensor (SCSS), also known as the Valve Health Monitor (VHM) system. SCSS provides a way to not only monitor real-time the valve's operation in a non invasive manner, but also to monitor its health (Fault Detection and Isolation) and identify potential faults and/or degradation in the near future (Prediction/Prognosis). This technology approach is not only applicable for solenoid valves, and it could be extrapolated to other electrical components with repeatable electrical current signatures such as motors.

  15. Plasma Signatures of Radial Field Power Dropouts

    SciTech Connect

    Lucek, E.A.; Horbury, T.S.; Balogh, A.; McComas, D.J.

    1998-10-04

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and {beta} during these events.

  16. Plasma signatures of radial field power dropouts

    SciTech Connect

    Lucek, E.A.; Balogh, A.; Horbury, T.S.; McComas, D.J.

    1999-06-01

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and {beta} during these events. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Cryptanalysis of the Quantum Group Signature Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke-Jia; Sun, Ying; Song, Ting-Ting; Zuo, Hui-Juan

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the researches of quantum group signature (QGS) have attracted a lot of attentions and some typical protocols have been designed for e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc. In this paper, we analyze the security of the quantum group signature with the example of two novel protocols. It can be seen that both of them cannot be implemented securely since the arbitrator cannot solve the disputes fairly. In order to show that, some possible attack strategies, which can be used by the malicious participants, are proposed. Moreover, the further discussions of QGS are presented finally, including some insecurity factors and improved ideas.

  18. Characterization of marine macroalgae by fluorescence signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topinka, J. A.; Bellows, W. Korjeff; Yentsch, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of distinguishing macroalgal classes by their fluorescence signatures was investigated using narrow-waveband light to excite groups of accessory pigments in brown, red, and green macroalgae and measuring fluorescence emission at 685 nm. Results obtained on 20 marine macroalgae field-collected samples showed that fluorescence excitation signatures were relatively uniform within phylogenetic classes but were substantially different for different classes. It is suggested that it may be possible to characterize the type and the abundance of subtidal macroalgae from low-flying aircraft using existing laser-induced fluorescence methodology.

  19. Enhanced Cancelable Biometrics for Online Signature Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Daigo; Inuma, Manabu; Shikata, Junji; Otsuka, Akira

    Cancelable approaches for biometric person authentication have been studied to protect enrolled biometric data, and several algorithms have been proposed. One drawback of cancelable approaches is that the performance is inferior to that of non-cancelable approaches. In this paper, we propose a scheme to improve the performance of a cancelable approach for online signature verification. Our scheme generates two cancelable dataset from one raw dataset and uses them for verification. Preliminary experiments were performed using a distance-based online signature verification algorithm. The experimental results show that our proposed scheme is promising.

  20. Techni-Dilaton Signatures at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    We explore LHC discovery signatures of techni-dilaton (TD) arising as a composite pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson (pNGB), associated with the spontaneous breaking of the approximate scale symmetry in the walking technicolor (WTC). We explicitly evaluate the TD 7 TeV LHC production cross sections times the branching ratios in terms of the TD mass MTD as an input parameter for the region 200 GeV < MTD < 1000 GeV in the typical WTC models. It turns out that the TD signatures are quite different from those of the standard model (SM) Higgs.

  1. Security problem on arbitrated quantum signature schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong Woon; Chang, Ku-Young; Hong, Dowon

    2011-12-15

    Many arbitrated quantum signature schemes implemented with the help of a trusted third party have been developed up to now. In order to guarantee unconditional security, most of them take advantage of the optimal quantum one-time encryption based on Pauli operators. However, in this paper we point out that the previous schemes provide security only against a total break attack and show in fact that there exists an existential forgery attack that can validly modify the transmitted pair of message and signature. In addition, we also provide a simple method to recover security against the proposed attack.

  2. Covariant change of signature in classical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, G. F. R.

    1992-10-01

    This paper gives a covariant formalism enabling investigation of the possibility of change of signature in classical General Relativity, when the geometry is that of a Robertson-Walker universe. It is shown that such changes are compatible with the Einstein field equations, both in the case of a barotropic fluid and of a scalar field. A criterion is given for when such a change of signature should take place in the scalar field case. Some examples show the kind of resulting exact solutions of the field equations.

  3. Transient aspects of stream interface signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, N.U.; Shodhan, S.; Forsyth, R.J.; Burton, M.E.; Gosling, J.T.; Fitzenreiter, R.J.; Lepping, R.P.

    1999-06-01

    Although stream interfaces are steady-state, corotating boundaries between slow and fast solar wind, their signatures are sometimes associated with transient features. Here the authors illustrate two modes of association: interfaces trailing interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) at 1 AU and interfaces within ICMEs in the range 4--5 AU. The former are readily understood as boundaries between transient slow wind and steady-state fast wind, where the ICMEs add variability to the interface signatures. The latter are puzzling and may be related to evolution of interfaces.

  4. Spectral Signatures in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    Ensuring that students understand the basis behind their geography/science courses is an essential part of their education. This article looks at an inexpensive and rigorous way of teaching students how to develop the needed data for remote sensing work. The procedure shows instructors how to build a system to teach students the process of…

  5. Quantum Signature of Analog Hawking Radiation in Momentum Space.

    PubMed

    Boiron, D; Fabbri, A; Larré, P-É; Pavloff, N; Westbrook, C I; Ziń, P

    2015-07-10

    We consider a sonic analog of a black hole realized in the one-dimensional flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that one- and two-body momentum distributions accessible by present-day experimental techniques provide clear direct evidence (i) of the occurrence of a sonic horizon, (ii) of the associated acoustic Hawking radiation, and (iii) of the quantum nature of the Hawking process. The signature of the quantum behavior persists even at temperatures larger than the chemical potential.

  6. A Electronic Voting Scheme Achieved by Using Quantum Proxy Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Ding, Li-Yuan; Yu, Yao-Feng; Li, Peng-Fei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new electronic voting scheme using Bell entangled states as quantum channels. This scheme is based on quantum proxy signature. The voter Alice, vote management center Bob, teller Charlie and scrutineer Diana only perform single particle measurement to realize the electronic voting process. So the scheme reduces the technical difficulty and increases operation efficiency. It can be easily realized. We use quantum key distribution and one-time pad to guarantee its unconditional security. The scheme uses the physical characteristics of quantum mechanics to guarantee its anonymity, verifiability, unforgetability and undeniability.

  7. Instrumentation for motor-current signature analysis using synchronous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Castleberry, K.N.

    1996-07-01

    Personnel in the Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in association with the United States Enrichment Corporation, the U.S. Navy, and various Department of Energy sponsors, have been involved in the development and application of motor-current signature analysis for several years. In that time, innovation in the field has resulted in major improvements in signal processing, analysis, and system performance and capabilities. Recent work has concentrated on industrial implementation of one of the most promising new techniques. This report describes the developed method and the instrumentation package that is being used to investigate and develop potential applications.

  8. Attack and improvements of fair quantum blind signature schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiangfu; Qiu, Daowen

    2013-06-01

    Blind signature schemes allow users to obtain the signature of a message while the signer learns neither the message nor the resulting signature. Therefore, blind signatures have been used to realize cryptographic protocols providing the anonymity of some participants, such as: secure electronic payment systems and electronic voting systems. A fair blind signature is a form of blind signature which the anonymity could be removed with the help of a trusted entity, when this is required for legal reasons. Recently, a fair quantum blind signature scheme was proposed and thought to be safe. In this paper, we first point out that there exists a new attack on fair quantum blind signature schemes. The attack shows that, if any sender has intercepted any valid signature, he (she) can counterfeit a valid signature for any message and can not be traced by the counterfeited blind signature. Then, we construct a fair quantum blind signature scheme by improved the existed one. The proposed fair quantum blind signature scheme can resist the preceding attack. Furthermore, we demonstrate the security of the proposed fair quantum blind signature scheme and compare it with the other one.

  9. Sputum RNA signature in allergic asthmatics following allergen bronchoprovocation test

    PubMed Central

    Zuiker, Rob G.J.A.; Tribouley, Catherine; Diamant, Zuzana; Boot, J. Diderik; Cohen, Adam F.; Van Dyck, K.; De Lepeleire, I.; Rivas, Veronica M.; Malkov, Vladislav A.; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Ruddy, Marcella K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Inhaled allergen challenge is a validated disease model of allergic asthma offering useful pharmacodynamic assessment of pharmacotherapeutic effects in a limited number of subjects. Objectives To evaluate whether an RNA signature can be identified from induced sputum following an inhaled allergen challenge, whether a RNA signature could be modulated by limited doses of inhaled fluticasone, and whether these gene expression profiles would correlate with the clinical endpoints measured in this study. Methods Thirteen non-smoking, allergic subjects with mild-to-moderate asthma participated in a randomised, placebo-controlled, 2-period cross-over study following a single-blind placebo run-in period. Each period consisted of three consecutive days, separated by a wash-out period of at least 3 weeks. Subjects randomly received inhaled fluticasone ((FP) MDI; 500 mcg BID×5 doses in total) or placebo. On day 2, house dust mite extract was inhaled and airway response was measured by FEV1 at predefined time points until 7 h post-allergen. Sputum was induced by NaCl 4.5%, processed and analysed at 24 h pre-allergen and 7 and 24 h post-allergen. RNA was isolated from eligible sputum cell pellets (<80% squamous of 500 cells), amplified according to NuGEN technology, and profiled on Affymetrix arrays. Gene expression changes from baseline and fluticasone treatment effects were evaluated using a mixed effects ANCOVA model at 7 and at 24 h post-allergen challenge. Results Inhaled allergen-induced statistically significant gene expression changes in sputum, which were effectively blunted by fluticasone (adjusted p<0.025). Forty-seven RNA signatures were selected from these responses for correlation analyses and further validation. This included Th2 mRNA levels for cytokines, chemokines, high-affinity IgE receptor FCER1A, histamine receptor HRH4, and enzymes and receptors in the arachidonic pathway. Individual messengers from the 47 RNA signatures correlated significantly

  10. Evolutionary signatures in complex ejecta and their driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C.; Berdichevsky, D.

    2004-10-01

    We examine interplanetary signatures of ejecta-ejecta interactions. To this end, two time intervals of inner-heliospheric (≤1AU) observations separated by 2 solar cycles are chosen where ejecta/magnetic clouds are in the process of interacting to form complex ejecta. At the Sun, both intervals are characterized by many coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and flares. In each case, a complement of observations from various instruments on two spacecraft are examined in order to bring out the in-situ signatures of ejecta-ejecta interactions and their relation to solar observations. In the first interval (April 1979), data are shown from Helios-2 and ISEE-3, separated by ~0.33AU in radial distance and 28° in heliographic longitude. In the second interval (March-April 2001), data from the SOHO and Wind probes are combined, relating effects at the Sun and their manifestations at 1AU on one of Wind's distant prograde orbits. At ~0.67AU, Helios-2 observes two individual ejecta which have merged by the time they are observed at 1AU by ISEE-3. In March 2001, two distinct Halo CMEs (H-CMEs) are observed on SOHO on 28-29 March approaching each other with a relative speed of 500kms-1 within 30 solar radii. In order to isolate signatures of ejecta-ejecta interactions, the two event intervals are compared with expectations for pristine (isolated) ejecta near the last solar minimum, extensive observations on which were given by Berdichevsky et al. (2002). The observations from these two event sequences are then intercompared. In both event sequences, coalescence/merging was accompanied by the following signatures: heating of the plasma, acceleration of the leading ejecta and deceleration of the trailing ejecta, compressed field and plasma in the leading ejecta, disappearance of shocks and the strengthening of shocks driven by the accelerated ejecta. A search for reconnection signatures at the interface between the two ejecta in the March 2001 event was inconclusive because the

  11. Noise-Tolerant Hyperspectral Signature Classification in Unresolved Object Detection with Adaptive Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalz, M.; Key, G.

    Accurate spectral signature classification is a crucial step in the nonimaging detection and recognition of spaceborne objects. In classical hyperspectral recognition applications, especially where linear mixing models are employed, signature classification accuracy depends on accurate spectral endmember discrimination. In selected target recognition (ATR) applications, previous non-adaptive techniques for signature classification have yielded class separation and classifier refinement results that tend to be suboptimal. In practice, the number of signatures accurately classified often depends linearly on the number of inputs. This can lead to potentially severe classification errors in the presence of noise or densely interleaved signatures. In this paper, we present an enhancement of an emerging technology for nonimaging spectral signature classification based on a highly accurate, efficient search engine called Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding (TNE). Adaptive TNE can optimize its classifier performance to track input nonergodicities and yield measures of confidence or caution for evaluation of classification results. Unlike neural networks, TNE does not have a hidden intermediate data structure (e.g., a neural net weight matrix). Instead, TNE generates and exploits a user-accessible data structure called the agreement map (AM), which can be manipulated by Boolean logic operations to effect accurate classifier refinement through programmable algorithms. The open architecture and programmability of TNE's pattern-space (AM) processing allows a TNE developer to determine the qualitative and quantitative reasons for classification accuracy, as well as characterize in detail the signatures for which TNE does not obtain classification matches, and why such mis-matches occur. In this study AM-based classification has been modified to partially compensate for input statistical changes, in response to performance metrics such as probability of correct classification (Pd

  12. Extraction and analysis of the width, gray scale and radian in Chinese signature handwriting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohong

    2015-10-01

    Forensic handwriting examination is a relevant identification process in forensic science. This research obtained ideas from the process of features detection and analysis in forensic handwriting examination. A Chinese signature database was developed and comprised original signatures, freehand imitation forgeries, random forgeries and tracing imitation forgeries. The features of width, gray scale and radian combined with stroke orders were automatically extracted after image processing. A correlation coefficient was used to precisely characterize and express the similarities between signatures. To validate the differences between writers, a multivariate analysis of the variance was employed. The canonical discriminant analysis was performed between the original and non-original signatures; the cross-validation estimated the discriminating power of the width, gray scale and radian data. It is suggested that the extraction and analysis of these properties in Chinese signatures is reasonable. Meanwhile, forensic handwriting examination using the quantitative feature extraction and statistical analysis methods in this research could be performed with a satisfactory result in the discriminant analysis.

  13. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  14. Selection signature in domesticated animals.

    PubMed

    Zhangyuan, Pan; Xiaoyun, He; Xiangyu, Wang; Xiaofei, Guo; Xiaohan, Cao; Wenping, Hu; Ran, Di; Qiuyue, Liu; Mingxing, Chu

    2016-12-20

    Domesticated animals play an important role in the life of humanity. All these domesticated animals undergo same process, first domesticated from wild animals, then after long time natural and artificial selection, formed various breeds that adapted to the local environment and human needs. In this process, domestication, natural and artificial selection will leave the selection signal in the genome. The research on these selection signals can find functional genes directly, is one of the most important strategies in screening functional genes. The current studies of selection signal have been performed in pigs, chickens, cattle, sheep, goats, dogs and other domestic animals, and found a great deal of functional genes. This paper provided an overview of the types and the detected methods of selection signal, and outlined researches of selection signal in domestic animals, and discussed the key issues in selection signal analysis and its prospects.

  15. Signature neural networks: definition and application to multidimensional sorting problems.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Roberto; de Borja Rodriguez, Francisco; Varona, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a self-organizing neural network paradigm that is able to discriminate information locally using a strategy for information coding and processing inspired in recent findings in living neural systems. The proposed neural network uses: 1) neural signatures to identify each unit in the network; 2) local discrimination of input information during the processing; and 3) a multicoding mechanism for information propagation regarding the who and the what of the information. The local discrimination implies a distinct processing as a function of the neural signature recognition and a local transient memory. In the context of artificial neural networks none of these mechanisms has been analyzed in detail, and our goal is to demonstrate that they can be used to efficiently solve some specific problems. To illustrate the proposed paradigm, we apply it to the problem of multidimensional sorting, which can take advantage of the local information discrimination. In particular, we compare the results of this new approach with traditional methods to solve jigsaw puzzles and we analyze the situations where the new paradigm improves the performance.

  16. Joint Estimation of Time-Frequency Signature and DOA Based on STFD for Multicomponent Chirp Signals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziyue; Liu, Congfeng

    2014-01-01

    In the study of the joint estimation of time-frequency signature and direction of arrival (DOA) for multicomponent chirp signals, an estimation method based on spatial time-frequency distributions (STFDs) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, array signal model for multicomponent chirp signals is presented and then array processing is applied in time-frequency analysis to mitigate cross-terms. According to the results of the array processing, Hough transform is performed and the estimation of time-frequency signature is obtained. Subsequently, subspace method for DOA estimation based on STFD matrix is achieved. Simulation results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  17. SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURES RELATED TO A SUNQUAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, S. A.; Harra, L. K.; Green, L. M.; Zharkov, S.

    2015-10-10

    The presence of flare-related acoustic emission (sunquakes (SQs)) in some flares, and only in specific locations within the flaring environment, represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. In an attempt to contribute to understanding the origins of SQs we present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode’s EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona above an SQ, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the SQ is determined using both time–distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that unlike many previous SQ detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time–distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using EIS and IRIS spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location, at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger velocity shifts and substantially broader profiles than in the location with no SQ, and there is a good correlation between blueshifted, hot coronal, hard X-ray (HXR), and redshifted chromospheric emission, consistent with the idea of a strong downward motion driven by rapid heating by nonthermal electrons and the formation of chromospheric shocks. Exploiting the diagnostic potential of the Mg ii triplet lines, we also find evidence for a single large temperature increase deep in the atmosphere, which is consistent with this scenario. The time of the 6 mHz and time–distance peak signal coincides with a secondary peak in the energy release process, but in this case we find no evidence of HXR emission in the quake location, instead finding very broad spectral lines, strongly shifted to the red

  18. Spectroscopic Signatures Related to a Sunquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S. A.; Harra, L. K.; Zharkov, S.; Green, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    The presence of flare-related acoustic emission (sunquakes (SQs)) in some flares, and only in specific locations within the flaring environment, represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. In an attempt to contribute to understanding the origins of SQs we present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode’s EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona above an SQ, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the SQ is determined using both time-distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that unlike many previous SQ detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time-distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using EIS and IRIS spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location, at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger velocity shifts and substantially broader profiles than in the location with no SQ, and there is a good correlation between blueshifted, hot coronal, hard X-ray (HXR), and redshifted chromospheric emission, consistent with the idea of a strong downward motion driven by rapid heating by nonthermal electrons and the formation of chromospheric shocks. Exploiting the diagnostic potential of the Mg ii triplet lines, we also find evidence for a single large temperature increase deep in the atmosphere, which is consistent with this scenario. The time of the 6 mHz and time-distance peak signal coincides with a secondary peak in the energy release process, but in this case we find no evidence of HXR emission in the quake location, instead finding very broad spectral lines, strongly shifted to the red, indicating

  19. Pickup Ion Signatures in the Vicinity of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regoli, L.; Coates, A. J.; Feyerabend, M.; Roussos, E.; Jones, G. H.; Krupp, N.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Being the only moon in the solar system with a significant atmosphere, Titan possesses an ionosphere that acts as a conducting obstacle to the incoming plasma from Saturn's magnetosphere. This creates a mass-loading of the magnetic field lines with freshly picked up ions from Titan's atmosphere on a process similar to that observed in comets (e.g. Coates et al. (1993), Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 98, No. A12, 20985-20994) and other moons like Jupiter's Io (e.g. Russell et al. (2003), Planetary and Space Science, Vol. 51, 233-238). However, while at other celestial bodies ion cyclotron waves arise as one of the main signatures of this process, this is not the case at Titan, with e.g. Cowee et al. (2010) (Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 115, A10224) attributing this to the local orientation of the magnetic field and the plasma flow preventing the waves to grow to levels detectable by the instruments on-board Cassini. For the reason above, the detection of pickup ions signatures needs to be approached through other methods. For this study, we analyze data from the CAPS/IMS instrument on-board Cassini. IMS is an ion mass spectrometer capable of detecting ion fluxes with energies from 1 eV to 50 keV with an atomic resolution of M/ΔM ~ 70. During many of the dedicated Titan flybys by Cassini, IMS was able to distinguish between ions of magnetospheric origin and of ionospheric origin, the latter being freshly picked up ions from Titan's ionosphere. With the help of ion spectrograms and time of flight (TOF) information, we carried out a survey of all the flybys for which IMS has data (the CAPS instrument was switched off after the 83th. dedicated flyby, named in the project as T83) in order to obtain information about the location and frequency of occurence for the signatures.

  20. Hyperspectral signature analysis of skin parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Garza, Luis; Kang, Sewon; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The temporal analysis of changes in biological skin parameters, including melanosome concentration, collagen concentration and blood oxygenation, may serve as a valuable tool in diagnosing the progression of malignant skin cancers and in understanding the pathophysiology of cancerous tumors. Quantitative knowledge of these parameters can also be useful in applications such as wound assessment, and point-of-care diagnostics, amongst others. We propose an approach to estimate in vivo skin parameters using a forward computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel Equations. We use this model to map the skin parameters to their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We then use machine learning based regression to develop an inverse map from hyperspectral signatures to skin parameters. In particular, we employ support vector machine based regression to estimate the in vivo skin parameters given their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We build on our work from SPIE 2012, and validate our methodology on an in vivo dataset. This dataset consists of 241 signatures collected from in vivo hyperspectral imaging of patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian and African American ethnicities. In addition, we also extend our methodology past the visible region and through the short-wave infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We find promising results when comparing the estimated skin parameters to the ground truth, demonstrating good agreement with well-established physiological precepts. This methodology can have potential use in non-invasive skin anomaly detection and for developing minimally invasive pre-screening tools.

  1. 42 CFR 424.36 - Signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... personal contact between the provider, hospital, or supplier and the beneficiary (for example, a physician sent a blood sample to the provider for diagnostic tests), a representative of the provider, hospital... Part B may be signed by the entity on the beneficiary's behalf. (e) Acceptance of other signatures...

  2. The Face Signature of Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Peter; Suttie, Michael; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Allanson, Judith; Shore, Eileen M.; Kaplan, Frederick S.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP) causes extensive heterotopic bone formation due to heterozygous mutations in the glycine-serine activation domain of ACVR1 (ALK2), a bone morphogenetic protein type I receptor. Anecdotal observations of facial similarity have been made by clinicians and parents, but no objective quantitative analysis of the faces of FOP patients has ever been undertaken. We delineated the common facial characteristics of 55 individuals with molecularly confirmed FOP by analysing their face signature (face shape difference normalized against age and sex matched controls) and associated face signature graphs (with face signatures as vertices and adjacency corresponding to greatest similarity). Our analysis identified 10 affected individuals whose face signature is more homogeneous than others with FOP. This distinct subgroup showed the previously identified reduced mandible as well as newly identified features: underdevelopment of the upper orbit/supra-orbital ridge; infra-orbital prominence; and, low-set ears. These findings strongly suggest that the canonical FOP mutation variably affects the postnatal morphogenesis of the normotopic cranial skeleton in the upper midface and mandible and may have important diagnostic and functional implications. PMID:22581580

  3. Exploring Signature Pedagogies in Undergraduate Leadership Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the instructional strategies most frequently used by leadership educators who teach academic credit-bearing undergraduate leadership studies courses through a national survey and identifies signature pedagogies within the leadership discipline. Findings from this study suggest that class discussion--whether in the form of…

  4. The Pedagogic Signature of Special Needs Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiß, Sabine; Kollmannsberger, Markus; Lerche, Thomas; Oubaid, Viktor; Kiel, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the following study is to identify a pedagogic signature, according to LS Shulman, for working with students who have special educational needs. Special educational needs are defined as significant limitations in personal development and learning which require particular educational measures beyond regular education. The development of…

  5. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to any provisions prescribed by the Director under § 850.104— (1) An electronic communication may be... signature of an electronic communication may be deemed to satisfy any statutory or regulatory requirement... communication, including an application, claim, or notice, designation of beneficiary, or assignment that—...

  6. Signatures of black holes at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaglià, Marco; Godang, Romulus; Cremaldi, Lucien M.; Summers, Donald J.

    2007-06-01

    Signatures of black hole events at CERN's Large Hadron Collider are discussed. Event simulations are carried out with the Fortran Monte Carlo generator CATFISH. Inelasticity effects, exact field emissivities, color and charge conservation, corrections to semiclassical black hole evaporation, gravitational energy loss at formation and possibility of a black hole remnant are included in the analysis.

  7. Negative obstacle detection by thermal signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthies, Larry; Rankin, A.

    2003-01-01

    Detecting negative obstacles (ditches, potholes, and other depressions) is one of the most difficult problems in perception for autonomous, off-road navigation. Past work has largely relied on range imagery, because that is based on the geometry of the obstacle, is largely insensitive to illumination variables, and because there have not been other reliable alternatives. However, the visible aspect of negative obstacles shrinks rapidly with range, making them impossible to detect in time to avoid them at high speed. To relive this problem, we show that the interiors of negative obstacles generally remain warmer than the surrounding terrain throughout the night, making thermal signature a stable property for night-time negative obstacle detection. Experimental results to date have achieved detection distances 45% greater by using thermal signature than by using range data alone. Thermal signature is the first known observable with potential to reveal a deep negative obstacle without actually seeing far into it. Modeling solar illumination has potential to extend the usefulness of thermal signature through daylight hours.

  8. Digital gene expression signatures for maize development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide expression signatures detect specific perturbations in developmental programs and contribute to functional resolution of key regulatory networks. In maize (Zea mays) inflorescences, mutations in the RAMOSA (RA) genes affect determinacy of axillary meristems and thus alter branching patt...

  9. Developing a Predictive Capability for Bioluminescence Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    naval nighttime operations because the flow field associated with their motion stimulates naturally occurring plankton . In the littoral, the primary...sources of bioluminescence are dinoflagellates, common unicellular plankton that are also known to form red tides. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence is...bioluminescent signatures of some swimming fish are distinct enough to differentiate species; nocturnally foraging predators may use bioluminescent

  10. Cosmological perturbations and classical change of signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jérôme

    1995-12-01

    Cosmological perturbations on a manifold admitting signature change are studied. The background solution consists in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe filled by a constant scalar field playing the role of a cosmological constant. It is shown that no regular solution exists satisfying the junction conditions at the surface of change. The comparison with similar studies in quantum cosmology is made.

  11. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to any provisions prescribed by the Director under § 850.104— (1) An electronic communication may be... signature of an electronic communication may be deemed to satisfy any statutory or regulatory requirement... communication, including an application, claim, or notice, designation of beneficiary, or assignment that—...

  12. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to any provisions prescribed by the Director under § 850.104— (1) An electronic communication may be... signature of an electronic communication may be deemed to satisfy any statutory or regulatory requirement... communication, including an application, claim, or notice, designation of beneficiary, or assignment that—...

  13. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to any provisions prescribed by the Director under § 850.104— (1) An electronic communication may be... signature of an electronic communication may be deemed to satisfy any statutory or regulatory requirement... communication, including an application, claim, or notice, designation of beneficiary, or assignment that—...

  14. Observational signatures of self-destructive civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam; Forgan, Duncan; James, Jack O'malley

    2016-10-01

    We address the possibility that intelligent civilizations that destroy themselves could present signatures observable by humanity. Placing limits on the number of self-destroyed civilizations in the Milky Way has strong implications for the final three terms in Drake's Equation, and would allow us to identify which classes of solution to Fermi's Paradox fit with the evidence (or lack thereof). Using the Earth as an example, we consider a variety of scenarios in which humans could extinguish their own technological civilization. Each scenario presents some form of observable signature that could be probed by astronomical campaigns to detect and characterize extrasolar planetary systems. Some observables are unlikely to be detected at interstellar distances, but some scenarios are likely to produce significant changes in atmospheric composition that could be detected serendipitously with next-generation telescopes. In some cases, the timing of the observation would prove crucial to detection, as the decay of signatures is rapid compared with humanity's communication lifetime. In others, the signatures persist on far longer timescales.

  15. Dynamical Signatures of Living Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main challenges in modeling living systems is to distinguish a random walk of physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) from those of biological origin and that will constitute the starting point of the proposed approach. As conjectured, the biological random walk must be nonlinear. Indeed, any stochastic Markov process can be described by linear Fokker-Planck equation (or its discretized version), only that type of process has been observed in the inanimate world. However, all such processes always converge to a stable (ergodic or periodic) state, i.e., to the states of a lower complexity and high entropy. At the same time, the evolution of living systems directed toward a higher level of complexity if complexity is associated with a number of structural variations. The simplest way to mimic such a tendency is to incorporate a nonlinearity into the random walk; then the probability evolution will attain the features of diffusion equation: the formation and dissipation of shock waves initiated by small shallow wave disturbances. As a result, the evolution never "dies:" it produces new different configurations which are accompanied by an increase or decrease of entropy (the decrease takes place during formation of shock waves, the increase-during their dissipation). In other words, the evolution can be directed "against the second law of thermodynamics" by forming patterns outside of equilibrium in the probability space. Due to that, a specie is not locked up in a certain pattern of behavior: it still can perform a variety of motions, and only the statistics of these motions is constrained by this pattern. It should be emphasized that such a "twist" is based upon the concept of reflection, i.e., the existence of the self-image (adopted from psychology). The model consists of a generator of stochastic processes which represents the motor dynamics in the form of nonlinear random walks, and a simulator of the nonlinear version of the diffusion

  16. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Joshua E.; Peterson, Eugene J.

    2012-09-13

    As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and

  17. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  18. Observational signatures of binary supermassive black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Roedig, Constanze; Krolik, Julian H.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2014-04-20

    Observations indicate that most massive galaxies contain a supermassive black hole, and theoretical studies suggest that when such galaxies have a major merger, the central black holes will form a binary and eventually coalesce. Here we discuss two spectral signatures of such binaries that may help distinguish them from ordinary active galactic nuclei. These signatures are expected when the mass ratio between the holes is not extreme and the system is fed by a circumbinary disk. One such signature is a notch in the thermal continuum that has been predicted by other authors; we point out that it should be accompanied by a spectral revival at shorter wavelengths and also discuss its dependence on binary properties such as mass, mass ratio, and separation. In particular, we note that the wavelength λ {sub n} at which the notch occurs depends on these three parameters in such a way as to make the number of systems displaying these notches ∝λ{sub n}{sup 16/3}; longer wavelength searches are therefore strongly favored. A second signature, first discussed here, is hard X-ray emission with a Wien-like spectrum at a characteristic temperature ∼100 keV produced by Compton cooling of the shock generated when streams from the circumbinary disk hit the accretion disks around the individual black holes. We investigate the observability of both signatures. The hard X-ray signal may be particularly valuable as it can provide an indicator of black hole merger a few decades in advance of the event.

  19. Pheromones and signature mixtures: defining species-wide signals and variable cues for identity in both invertebrates and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Tristram D

    2010-10-01

    Pheromones have been found in species in almost every part of the animal kingdom, including mammals. Pheromones (a molecule or defined combination of molecules) are species-wide signals which elicit innate responses (though responses can be conditional on development as well as context, experience, and internal state). In contrast, signature mixtures, in invertebrates and vertebrates, are variable subsets of molecules of an animal's chemical profile which are learnt by other animals, allowing them to distinguish individuals or colonies. All signature mixtures, and almost all pheromones, whatever the size of molecules, are detected by olfaction (as defined by receptor families and glomerular processing), in mammals by the main olfactory system or vomeronasal system or both. There is convergence on a glomerular organization of olfaction. The processing of all signature mixtures, and most pheromones, is combinatorial across a number of glomeruli, even for some sex pheromones which appear to have 'labeled lines'. Narrowly specific pheromone receptors are found, but are not a prerequisite for a molecule to be a pheromone. A small minority of pheromones act directly on target tissues (allohormone pheromones) or are detected by non-glomerular chemoreceptors, such as taste. The proposed definitions for pheromone and signature mixture are based on the heuristic value of separating these kinds of chemical information. In contrast to a species-wide pheromone, there is no single signature mixture to find, as signature mixtures are a 'receiver-side' phenomenon and it is the differences in signature mixtures which allow animals to distinguish each other.

  20. Induced Polarization Signature of Biofilms in Porous Media: From Laboratory Experiments to Theoretical Developments and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Atekwana, Estella; Patrauchan, Marianna; Revil, Andre

    2016-10-04

    Bioremediation strategies for mitigating the transport of heavy metals and radionuclides in subsurface sediments have largely targeted the use of dissimilatory metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Growth and metabolic activities from these organisms can significantly influence biogeochemical processes, including mineral dissolution/precipitation, fluctuating pH and redox potential (Eh) values, development of biofilms, and decreasing hydraulic conductivity. The Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) technique has emerged as the technique most sensitive to the presence of microbial cells and biofilms in porous media; yet it is often difficult to unambiguously distinguish the impact of multiple and often competing processes that occur during in-situ biostimulation activities on the SIP signatures. The main goal of our project is to quantitatively characterize major components within bacterial biofilms (cells, DNA, metals, metabolites etc.) contributing to detectable SIP signatures. We specifically: (i) evaluated the contribution of biofilm components to SIP signatures, (ii) determined the contribution of biogenic minerals commonly found in biofilms to SIP signatures, (iii) determined if the SIP signatures can be used to quantify the rates of biofilm formation, (iv) developed models and a fundamental understanding of potential underlying polarization mechanisms at low frequencies (<40 kHz) resulting from the presence of microbial cells and biofilms

  1. Predicting the predictive power of IDP ensembles.

    PubMed

    Tompa, Peter; Varadi, Mihaly

    2014-02-04

    The function of intrinsically disordered proteins may be interpreted in terms of their structural ensembles. The article by Schwalbe and colleagues in this issue of Structure combines NMR and SAXS constraints to generate structural ensembles that unveil important functional and pathological features.

  2. The effects of extrinsic motivation on signature authorship opinions in forensic signature blind trials.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Tahnee N; Found, Bryan; Ballantyne, Kaye N; Rogers, Doug

    2014-03-01

    Expertise studies in forensic handwriting examination involve comparisons of Forensic Handwriting Examiners' (FHEs) opinions with lay-persons on blind tests. All published studies of this type have reported real and demonstrable skill differences between the specialist and lay groups. However, critics have proposed that any difference shown may be indicative of a lack of motivation on the part of lay participants, rather than a real difference in skill. It has been suggested that qualified FHEs would be inherently more motivated to succeed in blinded validation trials, as their professional reputations could be at risk, should they perform poorly on the task provided. Furthermore, critics suggest that lay-persons would be unlikely to be highly motivated to succeed, as they would have no fear of negative consequences should they perform badly. In an effort to investigate this concern, a blind signature trial was designed and administered to forty lay-persons. Participants were required to compare known (exemplar) signatures of an individual to questioned signatures and asked to express an opinion regarding whether the writer of the known signatures wrote each of the questioned signatures. The questioned signatures comprised a mixture of genuine, disguised and simulated signatures. The forty participants were divided into two separate groupings. Group 'A' were requested to complete the trial as directed and were advised that for each correct answer they would be financially rewarded, for each incorrect answer they would be financially penalized, and for each inconclusive opinion they would receive neither penalty nor reward. Group 'B' was requested to complete the trial as directed, with no mention of financial recompense or penalty. The results of this study do not support the proposition that motivation rather than skill difference is the source of the statistical difference in opinions between individuals' results in blinded signature proficiency trials.

  3. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Samuel, Todd J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Tucker, Brian J.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Skorpik, James R.; Reid, Larry D.; Munley, John T.; Pappas, Richard A.; Wright, Bob W.; Panetta, Paul D.; Thompson, Jason S.

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  4. Forward secure digital signature for electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao-Chang; Huang, To-Yeh; Hou, Ting-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The Technology Safeguard in Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Title II has addressed a way to maintain the integrity and non-repudiation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR). One of the important cryptographic technologies is mentioned in the ACT is digital signature; however, the ordinary digital signature (e.g. DSA, RSA, GQ...) has an inherent weakness: if the key (certificate) is updated, than all signatures, even the ones generated before the update, are no longer trustworthy. Unfortunately, the current most frequently used digital signature schemes are categorized into the ordinary digital signature scheme; therefore, the objective of this paper is to analyze the shortcoming of using ordinary digital signatures in EMR and to propose a method to use forward secure digital signature to sign EMR to ensure that the past EMR signatures remain trustworthy while the key (certificate) is updated.

  5. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Signature Identification Software

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C.

    2009-03-17

    This is an extendable open-source Loop-mediated isothermal AMPlification (LAMP) signature design program called LAVA (LAMP Assay Versatile Analysis). LAVA was created in response to limitations of existing LAMP signature programs.

  6. Exobiology and the search for biological signatures on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Schwartz, Deborah E.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for a Mars Rover/Sample return mission, the mission goals and objectives must be identified. One of the most important objectives must address exobiology and the question of the possibility of the origin and evolution of life on Mars. In particular, key signatures or bio-markers of a possible extinct Martian biota must be defined. To that end geographic locations (sites) that are likely to contain traces of past life must also be identified. Sites and experiments are being defined in support of a Mars rover sample return mission. In addition, analyses based on computer models of abiotic processes of CO2 loss from Mars suggest that the CO2 from the atmosphere may have precipitated as carbonates and be buried within the Martian regolith. The carbon cycle of perennially frozen lakes in the dry valley of Antarctica are currently being investigated. These lakes were purported to be a model system for the ancient Martian lakes. By understanding the dynamic balance between the abiotic vs. biotic cycling of carbon within this system, information is gathered which will enable the interpretation of data obtained by a Mars rover with respect to possible carbonate deposits and the processing of carbon by biological systems. These ancient carbonate deposits, and other sedimentary units would contain traces of biological signatures that would hold the key to understanding the origin and evolution of life on Mars, as well as Earth.

  7. Condition monitoring of machinery using motor current signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryter, R. C.; Haynes, H. D.

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is a powerful monitoring tool for motor-driven equipment that provides a nonintrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment, including altered conditions in the process downstream of the motor-driven equipment. It was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the effects of aging and service wear systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. These motor current variations are carried by the electrical cables processes as desired. Motor current signatures, obtained in both time and over time to provide early indication of degradation. Successful applications of MCSA technology (patent applied for) include not only motor-operated valves but also pumps of various designs, blowers, and air conditioning systems. Examples are presented briefly, and speculation regarding the applicability of MCSA to a broader range of equipment monitoring and production line testing is also given.

  8. Condition monitoring of machinery using motor current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, H.D.; Kryter, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is a powerful monitoring tool for motor-driven equipment that provides a nonintrusive means for detecting changes in process conditions or the presence of mechanical abnormalities. It was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a means for determining the effects of service wear on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plant safety systems. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer, sensing both large and small, long-term and rapid, mechanical load variation and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. The motor current signature, which is carried by the motor power cables, can be extracted at a convenient location and processed as needed to obtain time- and frequency-domain (spectral) characteristics which provide equipment condition indicators for trending over time. MCSA technology (patent applied for) has already been applied successfully to motor-operated valves, vacuum pumps, water pumps, air blowers and air conditioning systems, and examples of such application will be presented. The applicability of MCSA to a broader range of equipment monitoring and production line testing is also discussed. 1 ref., 8 figs.

  9. Condition monitoring of machinery using motor current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kryter, R.C.; Haynes, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is a powerful monitoring tool for motor-driven equipment that provides a nonintrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment, including altered conditions in the process ''downstream'' of the motor-driven equipment. It was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the effects of aging and service wear systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. These motor current variations are carried by the electrical cables processes as desired. Motor current signatures, obtained in both time and over time to provide early indication of degradation. Successful applications of MCSA technology (patent applied for) include not only motor-operated valves but also pumps of various designs, blowers, and air conditioning systems. Examples are presented briefly, and speculation regarding the applicability of MCSA to a broader range of equipment monitoring and production line testing is also given. 1 ref., 13 figs.

  10. Landscape cultivation alters δ30Si signature in terrestrial ecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandevenne, F. I.; Delvaux, C.; Huyghes, H.; Ronchi, B.; Govers, G.; Barão, A. L.; Clymans, W.; Meire, P.; André, L.; Struyf, E.

    2014-12-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the importance of biological Si cycling in controlling dissolved Si (DSi) in soil and stream water, effects of human cultivation on the Si cycle remain poorly understood. Sensitive tracer techniques to identify and quantify Si in the soil-plant-water system could be highly relevant in addressing these uncertainties. Stable Si isotopes are promising tools to define Si sources and sinks along the ecosystem flow path, as intense fractionation occurs during chemical weathering and uptake of dissolved Si in plants. Yet they remain underexploited in the end product of the soil-plant system: the soil water. Here, stable Si isotope ratios (δ30Si) of dissolved Si in soil water were measured along a land use gradient (continuous forest, continuous pasture, young cropland and continuous cropland) with similar parent material (loess) and homogenous bulk mineralogical and climatological properties (Belgium). Soil water δ30Si signatures are clearly separated along the gradient, with highest average signatures in continuous cropland (+1.61‰), intermediate in pasture (+1.05‰) and young cropland (+0.89 ‰) and lowest in forest soil water (+0.62‰). Our data do not allow distinguishing biological from pedogenic/lithogenic processes, but point to a strong interaction of both. We expect that increasing export of light isotopes in disturbed land uses (i.e. through agricultural harvest), and higher recycling of 28Si and elevated weathering intensity (including clay dissolution) in forest systems will largely determine soil water δ30Si signatures of our systems. Our results imply that soil water δ30Si signature is biased through land management before it reaches rivers and coastal zones, where other fractionation processes take over (e.g. diatom uptake and reverse weathering in floodplains). In particular, a direct role of agriculture systems in lowering export Si fluxes towards rivers and coastal systems has been shown. Stable Si isotopes have

  11. Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Department of Geophysics

    2008-06-30

    Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx}20 % to 23%). This trend is explained by a sequence stratigraphic model which predicts progressive increase in sorting by turbidity current along the flow, as well as, quantified by a rock model that heuristically accounts for sorting. The results can be applied to improve quantitative predication of sediment parameters from seismic impedance, away from well locations.

  12. Core Formation Under Dynamic Conditions: Physical Processes and Geochemical Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmer, T.; Gaetani, G.; Jones, J. H.; Sparks, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated liquid metal segregation from a solid silicate matrix under conditions of applied stress. Liquid moves in fractures and formation of fayalitic olivine from orthopyroxene by migrating Fe-Ni-S-O liquids is observed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Determinants of Clay and Shale Microfabric Signatures: Processes and Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    impr- sludy by Syvilski and Lewis (1980) revealed the characteristics tant in polymer bridging and the production of biogenic of marine zooplankton ...presetice of numerous aggregates scattered randomly through- ter. Alldredge (1986) has shown how the planktonic gelatinous out a matrix of

  14. SAR Polarimetric Signatures for Urban Targets - Polarimetric Signature Calculation and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, A.; Sashtri, B.

    2012-08-01

    Various urban targets (land use) from Ahmedabad city were chosen, followed by generation of polarimetric signatures for each target using the developed tool. These polarimetric signatures were then studied and analyzed in detail. An attempt has been to develop a Polarimetric Signature Calculation and Visual Representation Tool assigned name "POLSIC", to generate Co-polarized and Cross polarized signatures, based on the calculation of Stokes Matrix and the backscattered power at various ellipticity and orientation angles. The input parameters required for the developed tool, are the amplitude and phase values of all the four polarizations, for each target using any quadpol radar imagery. In this study, RADARSAT-2 imagery has been used to obtain the amplitude and phase values of each target, in all four polarization states. Polarimetric signatures were generated for various urban targets using the developed tool. Vegetated land, built up in the city, built up within lake, and road were found to have an overall higher polarimetric response (backscattered power) as compared to grass lawn, fallow land and minimum in case of water body. Such Polarimetric responses were obtained due to factors like surface roughness and orientation of the target with respect to the radar look angle. The shape of the signature also indicates the scattering characteristics.

  15. Signature Tracking for Optimized Nutrition and Training (STRONG)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    ii   AFRL-RH-WP-TP-2014-0038 SIGNATURE TRACKING FOR OPTIMIZED NUTRITION AND TRAINING (STRONG) Joshua Hagen Human Signatures Branch...Signature TRacking for Optimized Nutrition and TraininG (STRONG) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62202F 6...human performance augmentation led by multiple researchers at AFRL. Research areas include Physical Training, Nutrition /Supplementation, Signatures, and

  16. Brain oscillatory signatures of motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Birbaumer, Niels

    2015-06-01

    Noninvasive brain-computer-interfaces (BCI) coupled with prosthetic devices were recently introduced in the rehabilitation of chronic stroke and other disorders of the motor system. These BCI systems and motor rehabilitation in general involve several motor tasks for training. This study investigates the neurophysiological bases of an EEG-oscillation-driven BCI combined with a neuroprosthetic device to define the specific oscillatory signature of the BCI task. Controlling movements of a hand robotic orthosis with motor imagery of the same movement generates sensorimotor rhythm oscillation changes and involves three elements of tasks also used in stroke motor rehabilitation: passive and active movement, motor imagery, and motor intention. We recorded EEG while nine healthy participants performed five different motor tasks consisting of closing and opening of the hand as follows: 1) motor imagery without any external feedback and without overt hand movement, 2) motor imagery that moves the orthosis proportional to the produced brain oscillation change with online proprioceptive and visual feedback of the hand moving through a neuroprosthetic device (BCI condition), 3) passive and 4) active movement of the hand with feedback (seeing and feeling the hand moving), and 5) rest. During the BCI condition, participants received contingent online feedback of the decrease of power of the sensorimotor rhythm, which induced orthosis movement and therefore proprioceptive and visual information from the moving hand. We analyzed brain activity during the five conditions using time-frequency domain bootstrap-based statistical comparisons and Morlet transforms. Activity during rest was used as a reference. Significant contralateral and ipsilateral event-related desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm was present during all motor tasks, largest in contralateral-postcentral, medio-central, and ipsilateral-precentral areas identifying the ipsilateral precentral cortex as an integral

  17. Spectral induced polarization signature of contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, N.; Huisman, J. A.; Shefer, I.; Furman, A.

    2012-04-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) signatures of porous media contaminated with non aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) were measured using an accurate impedance meter. The samples were prepared by mixing air-dried sand with 15% by weight of bentonite clay, tap water and either diesel fuel or motor oil. Next, the soil was packed in a column and left for 24 hr before electrical measurements were performed. For all the samples, water saturation was constant (Sw = 0.47) and the NAPL saturation was 0 (control), 5, or 15 percent. Counter-intuitively, the results show that addition of NAPL to the porous media resulted in an increase of the real part of the complex conductivity. Evidently, for each type of contaminant, an increase in the contaminant saturation resulted in an increase in the real part of the conductivity. The imaginary part of the complex conductivity showed a reversed behavior: higher NAPL saturation resulted in a reduction of the imaginary part of the complex conductivity. For both the real and the imaginary part of the complex conductivity, the effect of NAPL on the complex electrical conductivity was more significant for motor oil than for diesel fuel. In addition to the electrical measurements, we also performed an extraction experiment to examine the effect of the presence of NAPL on the electrical conductivity (EC) of the pore water. The results from the extraction experiment showed that addition of NAPL to the porous media resulted in an increase of the pore water EC. We argue that this increase in the real part of the complex conductivity is related to adsorption of organic polar compounds from the NAPL onto the mineral surface and the associated release of inorganic ions from the mineral surface to the pore water. These exchange processes affect both the surface and the pore water conductivity. In addition, we suggest that the decrease in polarization (associated with the imaginary part of the complex conductivity) of the NAPL contaminated porous media

  18. The Nucleosynthetic Signature of Population III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heger, A.; Woosley, S. E.

    2002-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the first generation of stars may have been quite massive (~100-300 Msolar). Could these stars have left a distinct nucleosynthetic signature? We explore the nucleosynthesis of helium cores in the mass range MHe=64-133 Msolar, corresponding to main-sequence star masses of approximately 140-260 Msolar. Above MHe=133 Msolar, without rotation and using current reaction rates, a black hole is formed, and no nucleosynthesis is ejected. For lighter helium core masses, ~40-63 Msolar, violent pulsations occur, induced by the pair instability and accompanied by supernova-like mass ejection, but the star eventually produces a large iron core in hydrostatic equilibrium. It is likely that this core, too, collapses to a black hole, thus cleanly separating the heavy-element nucleosynthesis of pair instability supernovae from those of other masses, both above and below. Indeed, black hole formation is a likely outcome for all Population III stars with main-sequence masses between about 25 and 140 Msolar (MHe=9-63 Msolar) as well as those above 260 Msolar. Nucleosynthesis in pair instability supernovae varies greatly with the mass of the helium core. This core determines the maximum temperature reached during the bounce. At the upper range of exploding core masses, a maximum of 57 Msolar of 56Ni is produced, making these the most energetic and the brightest thermonuclear explosions in the universe. Integrating over a distribution of masses, we find that pair instability supernovae produce a roughly solar distribution of nuclei having even nuclear charge (Si, S, Ar, etc.) but are remarkably deficient in producing elements with odd nuclear charge-Na, Al, P, V, Mn, etc. This is because there is no stage of stable post-helium burning to set the neutron excess. Also, essentially no elements heavier than zinc are produced owing to a lack of s- and r-processes. The Fe/Si ratio is quite sensitive to whether the upper bound on the initial mass function is

  19. Merger Signatures in the Dynamics of Star-forming Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Hayward, Christopher C.; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Lanz, Lauranne; Martínez-Galarza, Juan R.; Sanders, D. B.; Zezas, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The recent advent of integral field spectrographs and millimeter interferometers has revealed the internal dynamics of many hundreds of star-forming galaxies. Spatially resolved kinematics have been used to determine the dynamical status of star-forming galaxies with ambiguous morphologies, and constrain the importance of galaxy interactions during the assembly of galaxies. However, measuring the importance of interactions or galaxy merger rates requires knowledge of the systematics in kinematic diagnostics and the visible time with merger indicators. We analyze the dynamics of star-forming gas in a set of binary merger hydrodynamic simulations with stellar mass ratios of 1:1 and 1:4. We find that the evolution of kinematic asymmetries traced by star-forming gas mirrors morphological asymmetries derived from mock optical images, in which both merger indicators show the largest deviation from isolated disks during strong interaction phases. Based on a series of simulations with various initial disk orientations, orbital parameters, gas fractions, and mass ratios, we find that the merger signatures are visible for ˜0.2-0.4 Gyr with kinematic merger indicators but can be approximately twice as long for equal-mass mergers of massive gas-rich disk galaxies designed to be analogs of z ˜ 2-3 submillimeter galaxies. Merger signatures are most apparent after the second passage and before the black holes coalescence, but in some cases they persist up to several hundred Myr after coalescence. About 20%-60% of the simulated galaxies are not identified as mergers during the strong interaction phase, implying that galaxies undergoing violent merging process do not necessarily exhibit highly asymmetric kinematics in their star-forming gas. The lack of identifiable merger signatures in this population can lead to an underestimation of merger abundances in star-forming galaxies, and including them in samples of star-forming disks may bias the measurements of disk properties such

  20. MERGER SIGNATURES IN THE DYNAMICS OF STAR-FORMING GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Sanders, D. B.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Martínez-Galarza, Juan R.; Zezas, Andreas; Lanz, Lauranne

    2016-01-10

    The recent advent of integral field spectrographs and millimeter interferometers has revealed the internal dynamics of many hundreds of star-forming galaxies. Spatially resolved kinematics have been used to determine the dynamical status of star-forming galaxies with ambiguous morphologies, and constrain the importance of galaxy interactions during the assembly of galaxies. However, measuring the importance of interactions or galaxy merger rates requires knowledge of the systematics in kinematic diagnostics and the visible time with merger indicators. We analyze the dynamics of star-forming gas in a set of binary merger hydrodynamic simulations with stellar mass ratios of 1:1 and 1:4. We find that the evolution of kinematic asymmetries traced by star-forming gas mirrors morphological asymmetries derived from mock optical images, in which both merger indicators show the largest deviation from isolated disks during strong interaction phases. Based on a series of simulations with various initial disk orientations, orbital parameters, gas fractions, and mass ratios, we find that the merger signatures are visible for ∼0.2–0.4 Gyr with kinematic merger indicators but can be approximately twice as long for equal-mass mergers of massive gas-rich disk galaxies designed to be analogs of z ∼ 2–3 submillimeter galaxies. Merger signatures are most apparent after the second passage and before the black holes coalescence, but in some cases they persist up to several hundred Myr after coalescence. About 20%–60% of the simulated galaxies are not identified as mergers during the strong interaction phase, implying that galaxies undergoing violent merging process do not necessarily exhibit highly asymmetric kinematics in their star-forming gas. The lack of identifiable merger signatures in this population can lead to an underestimation of merger abundances in star-forming galaxies, and including them in samples of star-forming disks may bias the measurements of disk

  1. Can specific transcriptional regulators assemble a universal cancer signature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Janine; Isik, Zerrin; Pilarsky, Christian; Schroeder, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Recently, there is a lot of interest in using biomarker signatures derived from gene expression data to predict cancer progression. We assembled signatures of 25 published datasets covering 13 types of cancers. How do these signatures compare with each other? On one hand signatures answering the same biological question should overlap, whereas signatures predicting different cancer types should differ. On the other hand, there could also be a Universal Cancer Signature that is predictive independently of the cancer type. Initially, we generate signatures for all datasets using classical approaches such as t-test and fold change and then, we explore signatures resulting from a network-based method, that applies the random surfer model of Google's PageRank algorithm. We show that the signatures as published by the authors and the signatures generated with classical methods do not overlap - not even for the same cancer type - whereas the network-based signatures strongly overlap. Selecting 10 out of 37 universal cancer genes gives the optimal prediction for all cancers thus taking a first step towards a Universal Cancer Signature. We furthermore analyze and discuss the involved genes in terms of the Hallmarks of cancer and in particular single out SP1, JUN/FOS and NFKB1 and examine their specific role in cancer progression.

  2. Signature Pedagogies in Support of Teachers' Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Melissa; Patton, Kevin; O'Sullivan, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Signature pedagogies [Shulman, L. 2005. "Signature pedagogies in the professions." "Daedalus" 134 (3): 52--59.] are a focus of teacher educators seeking to improve teaching and teacher education. The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary common language of signature pedagogies for teacher professional development…

  3. Inverted Signature Trees and Text Searching on CD-ROMs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lorraine K. D.; Tharp, Alan L.

    1989-01-01

    Explores the new storage technology of optical data disks and introduces a data structure, the inverted signature tree, for storing data on optical data disks for efficient text searching. The inverted signature tree approach is compared to the use of text signatures and the B+ tree. (22 references) (Author/CLB)

  4. 17 CFR 1.4 - Use of electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of electronic signatures... REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Definitions § 1.4 Use of electronic signatures. For purposes of... broker, a pool participant or a client of a commodity trading advisor, an electronic signature...

  5. 17 CFR 201.65 - Identity and signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Identity and signature. 201.65... of 1934 § 201.65 Identity and signature. Applications pursuant to this subpart may omit the identity, mailing address, and signature of the applicant; provided, that such identity, mailing address...

  6. 37 CFR 2.193 - Trademark correspondence and signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trademark correspondence and... Correspondence in Trademark Cases § 2.193 Trademark correspondence and signature requirements. (a) Signature required. Each piece of correspondence that requires a signature must bear: (1) A handwritten...

  7. 37 CFR 2.193 - Trademark correspondence and signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trademark correspondence and... Correspondence in Trademark Cases § 2.193 Trademark correspondence and signature requirements. (a) Signature required. Each piece of correspondence that requires a signature must bear: (1) A handwritten...

  8. 37 CFR 2.193 - Trademark correspondence and signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trademark correspondence and... Correspondence in Trademark Cases § 2.193 Trademark correspondence and signature requirements. (a) Signature required. Each piece of correspondence that requires a signature must bear: (1) A handwritten...

  9. 37 CFR 2.193 - Trademark correspondence and signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trademark correspondence and... Correspondence in Trademark Cases § 2.193 Trademark correspondence and signature requirements. (a) Signature required. Each piece of correspondence that requires a signature must bear: (1) A handwritten...

  10. Workshop on the Analysis of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the analysis of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) over the past few years. This workshop provided a forum for the discussion of the following topics: observation and modeling of dust in the solar system, mineralogy and petrography of IDP's, processing of IDP's in the solar system and terrestrial atmosphere, comparison of IDP's to meteorites and micrometeorites, composition of IDP's, classification, and collection of IDP's.

  11. A 4-miRNA signature predicts the therapeutic outcome of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Pitea, Adriana; Mittelbronn, Michel; Steinbach, Joachim; Sticht, Carsten; Zehentmayr, Franz; Piehlmaier, Daniel; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Ganswindt, Ute; Rödel, Claus; Lauber, Kirsten; Belka, Claus; Unger, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal therapy of glioblastoma (GBM) reveals inter-individual variability in terms of treatment outcome. Here, we examined whether a miRNA signature can be defined for the a priori identification of patients with particularly poor prognosis. FFPE sections from 36 GBM patients along with overall survival follow-up were collected retrospectively and subjected to miRNA signature identification from microarray data. A risk score based on the expression of the signature miRNAs and cox-proportional hazard coefficients was calculated for each patient followed by validation in a matched GBM subset of TCGA. Genes potentially regulated by the signature miRNAs were identified by a correlation approach followed by pathway analysis. A prognostic 4-miRNA signature, independent of MGMT promoter methylation, age, and sex, was identified and a risk score was assigned to each patient that allowed defining two groups significantly differing in prognosis (p-value: 0.0001, median survival: 10.6 months and 15.1 months, hazard ratio = 3.8). The signature was technically validated by qRT-PCR and independently validated in an age- and sex-matched subset of standard-of-care treated patients of the TCGA GBM cohort (n=58). Pathway analysis suggested tumorigenesis-associated processes such as immune response, extracellular matrix organization, axon guidance, signalling by NGF, GPCR and Wnt. Here, we describe the identification and independent validation of a 4-miRNA signature that allows stratification of GBM patients into different prognostic groups in combination with one defined threshold and set of coefficients that could be utilized as diagnostic tool to identify GBM patients for improved and/or alternative treatment approaches. PMID:27302927

  12. mRNA Expression Signature of Gleason Grade Predicts Lethal Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Penney, Kathryn L.; Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Fall, Katja; Pawitan, Yudi; Hoshida, Yujin; Kraft, Peter; Stark, Jennifer R.; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Perner, Sven; Finn, Stephen; Calza, Stefano; Flavin, Richard; Freedman, Matthew L.; Setlur, Sunita; Sesso, Howard D.; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Martin, Neil; Kantoff, Philip W.; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Rubin, Mark A.; Loda, Massimo; Golub, Todd R.; Andrén, Ove; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Prostate-specific antigen screening has led to enormous overtreatment of prostate cancer because of the inability to distinguish potentially lethal disease at diagnosis. We reasoned that by identifying an mRNA signature of Gleason grade, the best predictor of prognosis, we could improve prediction of lethal disease among men with moderate Gleason 7 tumors, the most common grade, and the most indeterminate in terms of prognosis. Patients and Methods Using the complementary DNA–mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation assay, we measured the mRNA expression of 6,100 genes in prostate tumor tissue in the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort (n = 358) and Physicians' Health Study (PHS; n = 109). We developed an mRNA signature of Gleason grade comparing individuals with Gleason ≤ 6 to those with Gleason ≥ 8 tumors and applied the model among patients with Gleason 7 to discriminate lethal cases. Results We built a 157-gene signature using the Swedish data that predicted Gleason with low misclassification (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.91); when this signature was tested in the PHS, the discriminatory ability remained high (AUC = 0.94). In men with Gleason 7 tumors, who were excluded from the model building, the signature significantly improved the prediction of lethal disease beyond knowing whether the Gleason score was 4 + 3 or 3 + 4 (P = .006). Conclusion Our expression signature and the genes identified may improve our understanding of the de-differentiation process of prostate tumors. Additionally, the signature may have clinical applications among men with Gleason 7, by further estimating their risk of lethal prostate cancer and thereby guiding therapy decisions to improve outcomes and reduce overtreatment. PMID:21537050

  13. More Efficient VLR Group Signature Satisfying Exculpability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingliang; Ma, Lizhen; Sun, Rong; Wang, Yumin

    In this letter, we improve NF'07 (Nakanishi and Funabiki) VLR group signature scheme such that it satisfies exculpability and has lower computation costs. In the proposed scheme, a group member generates his own private key together with the group manager in order to realize exculpability while the signature size is not made longer. Also, a new revocation check method is proposed at the step of verifying, and the computation costs of verifying are independent of the number of the revoked members, while they are linear with the number of the revoked members in the original scheme. Thus, the proposed scheme is more efficient than the original scheme and can be applicable to mobile environments such as IEEE 802.1x.

  14. Vibration signature analysis of multistage gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Savage, M.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for multistage multimesh gear transmission systems. The analysis predicts the overall system dynamics and the transmissibility to the gear box or the enclosed structure. The modal synthesis approach of the analysis treats the uncoupled lateral/torsional model characteristics of each stage or component independently. The vibration signature analysis evaluates the global dynamics coupling in the system. The method synthesizes the interaction of each modal component or stage with the nonlinear gear mesh dynamics and the modal support geometry characteristics. The analysis simulates transient and steady state vibration events to determine the resulting torque variations, speeds, changes, rotor imbalances, and support gear box motion excitations. A vibration signature analysis examines the overall dynamic characteristics of the system, and the individual model component responses. The gear box vibration analysis also examines the spectral characteristics of the support system.

  15. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they...

  16. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they...

  17. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they...

  18. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they...

  19. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they...

  20. Determining activities of radionuclides from coincidence signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Glen A.; Smith, L. Eric; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ellis, Edward; Hossbach, Todd W.; Valsan, Andrei B.

    2006-05-01

    The spectral analysis of simultaneously observed photons in separate detectors may provide an invaluable tool for radioisotope identification applications. A general recursive method to determine the activity of an isotope from the observed coincidence signature rate is discussed. The method coherently accounts for effects of true coincidence summing within a single detector and detection efficiencies. A verification of the approach with computer simulations is also discussed.

  1. Short Signature Scheme From Bilinear Pairings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    model. 3.3 Efficiency We compare our signature scheme with the BLS scheme and ZSS scheme from the implementation point of view. PO, SM , PA, Squ, Inv, MTP ...1 SM 1 SM 2 SM Signing 1 MTP , 1 SM 1 H, 1 Inv, 1 SM 1 H, 1 Squ, 1 Inv, 1 SM Verification 1 MTP , 2 PO 1 H, 1 SM , 1 PO 1 H, 1 Squ, 1 SM , 2 PA, 1 PO

  2. The Observable Signatures of GRB Cocoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2017-01-01

    As a long gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet propagates within the stellar atmosphere it creates a cocoon composed of an outer Newtonian shocked stellar material and an inner (possibly relativistic) shocked jet. The jet deposits {10}51{--}{10}52 erg into this cocoon. This is comparable to the energies of the GRB and of the accompanying supernova, yet the cocoon’s signature has been largely ignored. The cocoon radiates a fraction of this energy as it expands, following the breakout from the star, and later as it interacts with the surrounding matter. We explore the possible signatures of this emission and outline a framework to calculate them from the conditions of the cocoon at the time of the jet breakout. The cocoon signature depends strongly on the, currently unknown, mixing between the shocked jet and shocked stellar material. With no mixing the γ-ray emission from the cocoon is so bright that it should have been already detected. The lack of such detections indicates that some mixing must take place. For partial and full mixing the expected signals are weaker than regular GRB afterglows. However, the latter are highly beamed while the former are wider. Future optical, UV, and X-ray transient searches, like LSST, ZTF, ULTRASAT, ISS-Lobster, and others, will most likely detect such signals, providing a wealth of information on the progenitors and jets of GRBs. While we focus on long GRBs, analogous (but weaker) cocoons may arise in short GRBs. Their signatures might be the most promising electromagnetic counterparts for gravitational wave signals from compact binary mergers.

  3. Infra-sound Signature of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Badillo, E.; Johnson, J.; Edens, H. E.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    We have analyzed thunder from over 200 lightning flashes to determine which part of thunder comes from the gas dynamic expansion of portions of the rapidly heated lightning channel and which from electrostatic field changes. Thunder signals were recorded by a ~1500 m network of 3 to 4 4-element microphone deployed in the Magdalena mountains of New Mexico in the summers of 2011 and 2012. The higher frequency infra-sound and audio-range portion of thunder is thought to come from the gas dynamic expansion, and the electrostatic mechanism gives rise to a signature infra-sound pulse peaked at a few Hz. More than 50 signature infra-sound pulses were observed in different portions of the thunder signal, with no preference towards the beginning or the end of the signal. Detection of the signature pulse occurs sometimes only for one array and sometimes for several arrays, which agrees with the theory that the pulse is highly directional (i.e., the recordings have to be in a specific position with respect to the cloud generating the pulse to be able to detect it). The detection of these pulses under quiet wind conditions by different acoustic arrays corroborates the electrostatic mechanism originally proposed by Wilson [1920], further studied by Dessler [1973] and Few [1985], observed by Bohannon [1983] and Balachandran [1979, 1983], and recently analyzed by Pasko [2009]. Pasko employed a model to explain the electrostatic-to-acoustic energy conversion and the initial compression waves in observed infrasonic pulses, which agrees with the observations we have made. We present thunder samples that exhibit signature infra-sound pulses at different times and acoustic source reconstruction to demonstrate the beaming effect.

  4. Radar Signature Control Using Metamaterials (U)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    segment line selected from the array of segments that make up the metamaterial specimen. Résumé Une méthode permettant le contrôle de la signature...ring’’ ou de fils parallèles. Ces travaux, menés sous un projet ‘‘TIF’’, présentent les résultats de la gestion de RCS en utilisant des

  5. Phycoerythrin Signatures in the Littoral Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-30

    grey-green pigment allophycocyanin alsways present in the core of the PBS and the blue-green pigment phycocyanin (PC) always present in the proximal...and different spectral forms of Synechococcus can be obtained from optical data, particularly hyperspectral data. IMPACT/ APPLICATION It is commonly...projects, “Spectral Signatures of Optical Processes” (NRL 6.1 core funding) and “ Applications of the SeaWiFS for coastal monitoring of harmful algal

  6. Failure Modes and Diagnostic Signatures Working Group - Ignition Diagnostics Requirements Update

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C; Haan, S; Hatchett, S; Koch, J

    2007-03-26

    We have performed an initial assessment of the sensitivity of various expected ignition diagnostic signatures to ignition failure modes using one and two-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations and post-processed simulated diagnostic output. As a result of this assessment, we recommend several changes to the current requirements for the ignition diagnostic suite. These recommendations are summarized in Table 1.

  7. Assessing signatures of selection through variation in linkage disequilibrium between taurine and indicine cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Signatures of selection are regions in the genome that have been preferentially maintained because of their functional importance in specific processes. These regions can be detected because of their lower genetic variability and specific regional linkage disequilibrium patterns. The varLD methodol...

  8. Chili peppers: Challenges and advances in transitioning harvesting of New Mexico's signature crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New Mexico-type chile (Capsicum annuum L.), often referred to as ‘Anaheim’, is the signature crop of New Mexico. Both the red and green (fully sized, but physiologically immature) crops are celebrated in local cuisine, culture and art, and production and processing of chile is an integral contributo...

  9. Cryptanalysis of enhancement on "quantum blind signature based on two-state vector formalism"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Wen-Min

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Yang et al. (Quantum Inf Process 12(1):109, 2013) proposed an enhanced quantum blind signature based on two-taste vector formalism. The protocol can prevent signatory Bob from deriving Alice's message with invisible photon eavesdropping attack or fake photon attack. In this paper, we show that the enhanced protocol also has a loophole that Alice can utilize an entanglement swapping attack to obtain Bob's secret key and forge Bob's valid signature at will later. Then, we reanalyze two existing protocols and try to find some further methods to fix them.

  10. Magnetic Signatures of Ionospheric and Magnetospheric Current Systems During Geomagnetic Quiet Conditions—An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    High-precision magnetic measurements taken by LEO satellites (flying at altitudes between 300 and 800 km) allow for studying the ionospheric and magnetospheric processes and electric currents that causes only weak magnetic signature of a few nanotesla during geomagnetic quiet conditions. Of particular importance for this endeavour are multipoint observations in space, such as provided by the Swarm satellite constellation mission, in order to better characterize the space-time-structure of the current systems. Focusing on geomagnetic quiet conditions, we provide an overview of ionospheric and magnetospheric sources and illustrate their magnetic signatures with Swarm satellite observations.

  11. SIGNATURES OF LONG-LIVED SPIRAL PATTERNS

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Garcia, Eric E.; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. E-mail: martinez@astro.unam.mx

    2013-03-10

    Azimuthal age/color gradients across spiral arms are a signature of long-lived spirals. From a sample of 19 normal (or weakly barred) spirals where we have previously found azimuthal age/color gradient candidates, 13 objects were further selected if a two-armed grand-design pattern survived in a surface density stellar mass map. Mass maps were obtained from optical and near-infrared imaging, by comparison with a Monte Carlo library of stellar population synthesis models that allowed us to obtain the mass-to-light ratio in the J band, (M/L){sub J}, as a function of (g - i) versus (i - J) color. The selected spirals were analyzed with Fourier methods in search of other signatures of long-lived modes related to the gradients, such as the gradient divergence toward corotation, and the behavior of the phase angle of the two-armed spiral in different wavebands, as expected from theory. The results show additional signatures of long-lived spirals in at least 50% of the objects.

  12. Measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthoor, Ittoop Vergheese; Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Curty, Marcos; Andersson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Digital signatures play an important role in software distribution, modern communication, and financial transactions, where it is important to detect forgery and tampering. Signatures are a cryptographic technique for validating the authenticity and integrity of messages, software, or digital documents. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. Quantum digital signatures (QDS), on the other hand, provide information-theoretic security based on the laws of quantum physics. Recent work on QDS Amiri et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 032325 (2016);, 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032325 Yin, Fu, and Zeng-Bing, Phys. Rev. A 93, 032316 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032316 shows that such schemes do not require trusted quantum channels and are unconditionally secure against general coherent attacks. However, in practical QDS, just as in quantum key distribution (QKD), the detectors can be subjected to side-channel attacks, which can make the actual implementations insecure. Motivated by the idea of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), we present a measurement-device-independent QDS (MDI-QDS) scheme, which is secure against all detector side-channel attacks. Based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our MDI-QDS protocol could also be experimentally implemented, since it requires a similar experimental setup.

  13. On psychoanalytic supervision as signature pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Watkins, C Edward

    2014-04-01

    What is signature pedagogy in psychoanalytic education? This paper examines that question, considering why psychoanalytic supervision best deserves that designation. In focusing on supervision as signature pedagogy, I accentuate its role in building psychoanalytic habits of mind, habits of hand, and habits of heart, and transforming theory and self-knowledge into practical product. Other facets of supervision as signature pedagogy addressed in this paper include its features of engagement, uncertainty, formation, and pervasiveness, as well as levels of surface, deep, and implicit structure. Epistemological, ontological, and axiological in nature, psychoanalytic supervision engages trainees in learning to do, think, and value what psychoanalytic practitioners in the field do, think, and value: It is, most fundamentally, professional preparation for competent, "good work." In this paper, effort is made to shine a light on and celebrate the pivotal role of supervision in "making" or developing budding psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists. Now over a century old, psychoanalytic supervision remains unparalleled in (1) connecting and integrating conceptualization and practice, (2) transforming psychoanalytic theory and self-knowledge into an informed analyzing instrument, and (3) teaching, transmitting, and perpetuating the traditions, practice, and culture of psychoanalytic treatment.

  14. Visual signature reduction of unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Z. W.; Ma, Z. X.; Jayawijayaningtiyas; Ngoh, J. H. H.

    2016-10-01

    With the emergence of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in multiple tactical defence missions, there was a need for an efficient visual signature suppression system for a more efficient stealth operation. One of our studies experimentally investigated the visual signature reduction of UAVs achieved through an active camouflage system. A prototype was constructed with newly developed operating software, Cloak, to provide active camouflage to the UAV model. The reduction of visual signature was analysed. Tests of the devices mounted on UAVs were conducted in another study. A series of experiments involved testing of the concept as well as the prototype. The experiments were conducted both in the laboratory and under normal environmental conditions. Results showed certain degrees of blending with the sky to create a camouflage effect. A mini-UAV made mostly out of transparent plastic was also designed and fabricated. Because of the transparency of the plastic material, the visibility of this UAV in the air is very small, and therefore the UAV is difficult to be detected. After re-designs and tests, eventually a practical system to reduce the visibility of UAVs viewed by human observers from the ground was developed. The system was evaluated during various outdoor tests. The scene target-to-background lightness contrast and the scene target-to-background colour contrast of the adaptive control system prototype were smaller than 10% at a stand-off viewing distance of 20-50 m.

  15. Identity-Based Verifiably Encrypted Signatures without Random Oracles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wu, Qianhong; Qin, Bo

    Fair exchange protocol plays an important role in electronic commerce in the case of exchanging digital contracts. Verifiably encrypted signatures provide an optimistic solution to these scenarios with an off-line trusted third party. In this paper, we propose an identity-based verifiably encrypted signature scheme. The scheme is non-interactive to generate verifiably encrypted signatures and the resulting encrypted signature consists of only four group elements. Based on the computational Diffie-Hellman assumption, our scheme is proven secure without using random oracles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first identity-based verifiably encrypted signature scheme provably secure in the standard model.

  16. Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Suite: Asset Fault Signature Database

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Randall Bickford; Richard Rusaw

    2015-06-01

    Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using the Electric Power Research Institute’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. The FW-PHM Suite is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The FW-PHM Suite has four main modules: (1) Diagnostic Advisor, (2) Asset Fault Signature (AFS) Database, (3) Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and (4) Remaining Useful Life Database. The paper focuses on the AFS Database of the FW-PHM Suite, which is used to catalog asset fault signatures. A fault signature is a structured representation of the information that an expert would use to first detect and then verify the occurrence of a specific type of fault. The fault signatures developed to assess the health status of generator step-up transformers are described in the paper. The developed fault signatures capture this knowledge and implement it in a standardized approach, thereby streamlining the diagnostic and prognostic process. This will support the automation of proactive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

  17. Signatures of quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron-beam collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.

    2015-09-15

    Electron dynamics in the collision of an electron beam with a high-intensity focused ultrashort laser pulse are investigated using three-dimensional QED particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and the results are compared with those calculated by classical Landau and Lifshitz PIC simulations. Significant differences are observed from the angular dependence of the electron energy distribution patterns for the two different approaches, because photon emission is no longer well approximated by a continuous process in the quantum radiation-dominated regime. The stochastic nature of photon emission results in strong signatures of quantum radiation-reaction effects under certain conditions. We show that the laser spot size and duration greatly influence these signatures due to the competition of QED effects and the ponderomotive force, which is well described in the classical approximation. The clearest signatures of quantum radiation reaction are found in the limit of large laser spots and few cycle pulse durations.

  18. A framework for mining signatures from event sequences and its applications in healthcare data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Lee, Noah; Hu, Jianying; Sun, Jimeng; Ebadollahi, Shahram; Laine, Andrew F

    2013-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel temporal knowledge representation and learning framework to perform large-scale temporal signature mining of longitudinal heterogeneous event data. The framework enables the representation, extraction, and mining of high-order latent event structure and relationships within single and multiple event sequences. The proposed knowledge representation maps the heterogeneous event sequences to a geometric image by encoding events as a structured spatial-temporal shape process. We present a doubly constrained convolutional sparse coding framework that learns interpretable and shift-invariant latent temporal event signatures. We show how to cope with the sparsity in the data as well as in the latent factor model by inducing a double sparsity constraint on the β-divergence to learn an overcomplete sparse latent factor model. A novel stochastic optimization scheme performs large-scale incremental learning of group-specific temporal event signatures. We validate the framework on synthetic data and on an electronic health record dataset.

  19. Thermal signatures of voluntary deception in ecological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Panasiti, Maria Serena; Cardone, Daniela; Pavone, Enea F.; Mancini, Alessandra; Merla, Arcangelo; Aglioti, Salvatore M.

    2016-01-01

    Deception is a pervasive phenomenon that greatly influences dyadic, groupal and societal interactions. Behavioural, physiological and neural signatures of this phenomenon have imporant implications for theoretical and applied research, but, because it is difficult for a laboratory to replicate the natural context in which deception occurs, contemporary research is still struggling to find such signatures. In this study, we tracked the facial temperature of participants who decided whether or not to deceive another person, in situations where their reputation was at risk or not. We used a high-sensitivity infrared device to track temperature changes to check for unique patterns of autonomic reactivity. Using a region-of-interest based approach we found that prior to any response there was a minimal increase in periorbital temperature (which indexes sympathetic activation, together with reduced cheek temperature) for the self-gain lies in the reputation-risk condition. Crucially, we found a rise in nose temperature (which indexes parasympathetic activation) for self-gain lies in the reputation-risk condition, not only during response preparation but also after the choice was made. This finding suggests that the entire deception process may be tracked by the nose region. Furthermore, this nasal temperature modulation was negatively correlated with machiavellian traits, indicating that sympathetic/parasympathetic regulation is less important for manipulative individuals who may care less about the consequences of lie-related moral violations. Our results highlight a unique pattern of autonomic reactivity for spontaneous deception in ecological contexts. PMID:27734927

  20. Isotopic signatures of sulfur in shallow Antarctic ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patris, Nicolas; Delmas, Robert J.; Jouzel, Jean

    2000-03-01

    Sulfur stable isotopes from Antarctic snow samples have been used to assess sources of sulfate. The novel experimental procedure presented here is suitable for the determination of sulfur isotopic composition at the micromolar level and has been adapted to polar ice samples. Measurements were carried out on three contiguous firn cores (PS6, PS7, and PS8) collected near Amundsen-Scott Station (South Pole), covering the record of the Agung eruption (March 1963). Taking into account the minimum amount of sulfate required for the isotope analysis, it has been possible to delineate three time periods along the cores: pre-1964 years (background sulfate level), 1964-1965 (volcanic deposition peak), and 1966-1968 (volcanic peak tail). A deeper part of another core (PS12) has been used to extend the background picture. Assuming the conservation of isotopic signatures during long-range transport and deposition processes, results demonstrate the significant volcanic contribution to sulfate deposition on the central Antarctic ice cap a few months after a major low-latitude eruption. They also confirm the marine biogenic origin of present background sulfate. Isotopic signatures (δ34S) of marine biogenic sulfate and volcanic sulfate from Mt. Agung have been found to be +18.6±0.9‰ and +2.7± .1‰, respectively.

  1. Frequency tagging yields an objective neural signature of Gestalt formation.

    PubMed

    Alp, Nihan; Kogo, Naoki; Van Belle, Goedele; Wagemans, Johan; Rossion, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The human visual system integrates separate visual inputs into coherently organized percepts, going beyond the information given. A striking example is the perception of an illusory square when physically separated inducers are positioned and oriented in a square-like configuration (illusory condition). This illusory square disappears when the specific configuration is broken, for instance, by rotating each inducer (non-illusory condition). Here we used frequency tagging and electroencephalography (EEG) to identify an objective neural signature of the global integration required for illusory surface perception. Two diagonal inducers were contrast-modulated at different frequency rates f1 and f2, leading to EEG responses exactly at these frequencies over the occipital cortex. Most importantly, nonlinear intermodulation (IM) components (e.g., f1+f2) appeared in the frequency spectrum, and were much larger in response to the illusory square figure than the non-illusory control condition. Since the IMs reflect long-range interactions between the signals from the inducers, these data provide an objective (i.e., at a precise and predicted EEG frequency) signature of neural processes involved in the emergence of illusory surface perception. More generally, these findings help to establish EEG frequency-tagging as a highly valuable approach to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms of subjective Gestalt phenomena in an objective and quantitative manner, at the system level in humans.

  2. Studies of the spectral signatures of a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brindley, H. E.

    2008-12-01

    Observations of the outgoing longwave spectrum of the Earth have been made from a number of spacecraft, dating back to the IRIS experiment on Nimbus 4 in 1970. Using these observations, and following very careful calibration exercises, we have searched cloud-cleared (clear sky) spectra , and found changes in the spectral signatures of greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4, O3 and CFCl3. The OLR spectrum also contains information on feedback processes, such as those due to water vapour (and the water vapour continuum) and clouds. The paper reports on studies of these observations, and on simulations of the spectral signatures, using both model runs and re-analysis data from NCEP and ERA-40. A major problem is that of sampling of the fields, especially of clouds, and this will be discussed. It also transpires that the primary mechanism of water vapour feedback is through emission from the pure rotation band in the far IR. We find that inter-annual variability contributes to changes with time that can either increase or decrease the effectiveness of this feedback. This work contributes to the specification of the CLARREO project, in which the development of well-calibrated, Fourier transform spectrometers in orbit is proposed, for monitoring these changes in the Earth's OLR spectrum.

  3. GESearch: An Interactive GUI Tool for Identifying Gene Expression Signature.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ning; Yin, Hengfu; Liu, Jingjing; Dai, Xiaogang; Yin, Tongming

    2015-01-01

    The huge amount of gene expression data generated by microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies present challenges to exploit their biological meanings. When searching for the coexpression genes, the data mining process is largely affected by selection of algorithms. Thus, it is highly desirable to provide multiple options of algorithms in the user-friendly analytical toolkit to explore the gene expression signatures. For this purpose, we developed GESearch, an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) toolkit, which is written in MATLAB and supports a variety of gene expression data files. This analytical toolkit provides four models, including the mean, the regression, the delegate, and the ensemble models, to identify the coexpression genes, and enables the users to filter data and to select gene expression patterns by browsing the display window or by importing knowledge-based genes. Subsequently, the utility of this analytical toolkit is demonstrated by analyzing two sets of real-life microarray datasets from cell-cycle experiments. Overall, we have developed an interactive GUI toolkit that allows for choosing multiple algorithms for analyzing the gene expression signatures.

  4. Millimeter-wave imaging of thermal and chemical signatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.

    1999-03-30

    Development of a passive millimeter-wave (mm-wave) system is described for remotely mapping thermal and chemical signatures of process effluents with application to arms control and nonproliferation. Because a large amount of heat is usually dissipated in the air or waterway as a by-product of most weapons of mass destruction facilities, remote thermal mapping may be used to detect concealed or open facilities of weapons of mass destruction. We have developed a focal-plane mm-wave imaging system to investigate the potential of thermal mapping. Results of mm-wave images obtained with a 160-GHz radiometer system are presented for different target scenes simulated in the laboratory. Chemical and nuclear facilities may be identified by remotely measuring molecular signatures of airborne molecules emitted from these facilities. We have developed a filterbank radiometer to investigate the potential of passive spectral measurements. Proof of principle is presented by measuring the HDO spectral line at 80.6 GHz with a 4-channel 77-83 GHz radiometer.

  5. Seismic signature analysis for discrimination of people from animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damarla, Thyagaraju; Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Cadence analysis has been the main focus for discriminating between the seismic signatures of people and animals. However, cadence analysis fails when multiple targets are generating the signatures. We analyze the mechanism of human walking and the signature generated by a human walker, and compare it with the signature generated by a quadruped. We develop Fourier-based analysis to differentiate the human signatures from the animal signatures. We extract a set of basis vectors to represent the human and animal signatures using non-negative matrix factorization, and use them to separate and classify both the targets. Grazing animals such as deer, cows, etc., often produce sporadic signals as they move around from patch to patch of grass and one must characterize them so as to differentiate their signatures from signatures generated by a horse steadily walking along a path. These differences in the signatures are used in developing a robust algorithm to distinguish the signatures of animals from humans. The algorithm is tested on real data collected in a remote area.

  6. Real-time simulation of moving ground-target signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, James L.; Gross, David C.; Wasserman, Aaron

    2001-08-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) and feature-aided tracking (FAT) algorithms that use one-dimensional (1-D) high range resolution (HRR) profiles require unique or distinguishable target features. This paper explores the use of Xpatch extracted scattering centers to generate synthetic moving ground target signatures. The goal is to develop a real-time prediction capability for generating moving ground target signatures to facilitate the determination of unique and distinguishable target features. The repository of moving ground target signatures is extremely limited in target variation, target articulation, and aspect and illumination angle coverage. The development of a real-time moving target signature capability that provides first order moving target signature will facilitate the development of features and their analysis. The proposed moving target signature simulation is described in detail and includes both the strengths and weaknesses of using a scattering center approach for generation of moving target signatures.

  7. A Secure and Efficient Threshold Group Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yansheng; Wang, Xueming; Qiu, Gege

    The paper presents a secure and efficient threshold group signature scheme aiming at two problems of current threshold group signature schemes: conspiracy attack and inefficiency. Scheme proposed in this paper takes strategy of separating designed clerk who is responsible for collecting and authenticating each individual signature from group, the designed clerk don't participate in distribution of group secret key and has his own public key and private key, designed clerk needs to sign part information of threshold group signature after collecting signatures. Thus verifier has to verify signature of the group after validating signature of the designed clerk. This scheme is proved to be secure against conspiracy attack at last and is more efficient by comparing with other schemes.

  8. Statistical Signature of Deep-seated Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Belmont, P.; Mackey, B. H.; Fuller, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the statistical signature of deep-seated landslides using basin wide topographic data and flowpath arrangement and explore the extent to which these globally derived signatures can be used to locally map landslides. We used directed distance from the divide, which accounts for the distance traveled along flowpaths starting from significant ridgelines, as a scale parameter and demonstrate that local slope vs. directed distance and curvature vs. local slope offer powerful means for identifying the presence of landslides in a landscape. By exploring a threshold on the probability distribution of local slopes conditional on directed distance we show that mapping of landslide features is possible. We apply the methodology to three 0.5 to 2.5 km2 watersheds in northern California and document three regions of distinct geomorphic signatures [Gangodagamage et al., 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010WR009252]. In region A, hillslope gradient increases with distance from the divide and flowpaths are divergent or parallel. Region B corresponds to the zone with highly convergent flowpaths and exhibits the strongest signal of landslide related features. Region C is a moderately convergent zone that transitions into the fluvial channel network. Next, we use specific quantiles of the probability density function of local slopes conditioned on directed distance from the divide to map individual landslide features. This analysis allows us to explore the 3D morphometry of the landslide affected basins and to develop a supervised set of ensemble templates for landslides as a function of local slope vs. directed distance (DD) relationship. Then we use this template and demonstrate that the landslide affected basins can be identified by iterative matching the landslide signature template with the basin wide signatures of the tributary basins in the South Fork Eel River, CA. Finally, we perform a multiscale analysis of the contributing area parameterized by directed

  9. Statistical evaluation of the influence of writing postures on on-line signatures. Study of the impact of time.

    PubMed

    Thiéry, A; Marquis, R; Montani, I

    2013-07-10

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of unusual writing positions on a person's signature, in comparison to a standard writing position. Ten writers were asked to sign their signature six times, in each of four different writing positions, including the standard one. In order to take into consideration the effect of the day-to-day variation, this same process was repeated over 12 sessions, giving a total of 288 signatures per subject. The signatures were collected simultaneously in an off-line and on-line acquisition mode, using an interactive tablet and a ballpoint pen. Unidimensional variables (height to width ratio; time with or without in air displacement) and time-dependent variables (pressure; X and Y coordinates; altitude and azimuth angles) were extracted from each signature. For the unidimensional variables, the position effect was assessed through ANOVA and Dunnett contrast tests. Concerning the time-dependent variables, the signatures were compared by using dynamic time warping, and the position effect was evaluated through classification by linear discriminant analysis. Both of these variables provided similar results: no general tendency regarding the position factor could be highlighted. The influence of the position factor varies according to the subject as well as the variable studied. The impact of the session factor was shown to cover the impact that could be ascribed to the writing position factor. Indeed, the day-to-day variation has a greater effect than the position factor on the studied signature variables. The results of this study suggest guidelines for best practice in the area of signature comparisons and demonstrate the importance of a signature collection procedure covering an adequate number of sampling sessions, with a sufficient number of samples per session.

  10. Techni-Dilaton Signatures at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, S.; Yamawaki, K.

    2012-02-01

    We explore discovery signatures of techni-dilaton (TD) at LHC. The TD was predicted long ago as a composite pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson (pNGB) associated with the spontaneous breaking of the approximate scale symmetry in the walking technicolor (WTC) (initially dubbed ``scale-invariant technicolor''). Being pNGB, whose mass arises from the explicit scale-symmetry breaking due to the spontaneous breaking itself (dynamical mass generation), the TD as a composite scalar should have a mass M_{TD} lighter than other techni-hadrons, say M_{TD} ≃ 600 GeV for the typical WTC model, which is well in the discovery range of the ongoing LHC experiment. We develop a spurion method of nonlinear realization to calculate the TD couplings to the standard model (SM) particles and explicitly evaluate the TD LHC production cross sections at √{s} = 7 TeV times the branching ratios in terms of M_{TD} as an input parameter for the region 200 GeV < M_{TD} < 1000 GeV in the typical WTC models. It turns out that the TD signatures are quite different from those of the SM Higgs: In the one-doublet model (1DM) all the cross sections including the WW/ZZ mode are suppressed compared to those of the SM Higgs due to the suppressed TD couplings, while in the one-family model (1FM) all those cross sections get highly enhanced because of the presence of extra colored fermion (techni-quark) contributions. We compare the {TD} → WW/ZZ signature with the recent ATLAS and CMS bounds and find that in the case of 1DM the signature is consistent over the whole mass range 200 GeV < M_{TD} < 1000 GeV due to the large suppression of TD couplings, and by the same token the signal is too tiny for the TD to be visible through this channel at LHC. As for the 1FMs, on the other hand, a severe constraint is given on the TD mass to exclude the TD with mass ≲ 600 GeV, which, however, would imply an emergence of somewhat dramatic excess as the TD signature at 600 GeV ≲ M_{TD} < 1000 GeV in the near future. We

  11. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for

  12. Noise-Robust Spectral Signature Classification in Non-resolved Object Detection using Feedback Controlled Adaptive Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalz, M.; Key, G.

    2012-09-01

    Accurate spectral signature classification is key to reliable nonresolved detection and recognition of spaceborne objects. In classical signature-based recognition applications, classification accuracy has been shown to depend on accurate spectral endmember discrimination. Unfortunately, signatures are corrupted by noise and clutter that can be nonergodic in astronomical imaging practice. In previous work, we have shown that object class separation and classifier refinement results can be severely corrupted by input noise, leading to suboptimal classification. We have also shown that computed pattern recognition, like its human counterpart, can benefit from processes such as learning or forgetting, which in spectral signature classification can support adaptive tracking of input nonergodicities. In this paper, we model learning as the acquisition or insertion of a new pattern into a classifier's knowledge base. For example, in neural nets (NNs), this insertion process could correspond to the superposition of a new pattern onto the NN weight matrix. Similarly, we model forgetting as the deletion of a pattern currently stored in the classifier knowledge base, for example, as a pattern deletion operation on the NN weight matrix, which is a difficult goal with classical neural nets (CNNs). In particular, this paper discusses the implementation of feedback control for pattern insertion and deletion in lattice associative memories (LAMs) and dynamically adaptive statistical data fusion (DASDAF) paradigms, in support of signature classification. It is shown that adaptive classifiers based on LNN or DASDAF technology can achieve accurate signature classification in the presence of nonergodic Gaussian and non-Gaussian noise, at low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Demonstration involves classification of multiple closely spaced, noise corrupted signatures from a NASA database of space material signatures at SNR > 0.1:1.

  13. Sweet Structural Signatures Unveiled in Ketohexoses.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Peña, Isabel; Mata, Santiago; Alonso, José L

    2016-11-14

    The conformational behaviour of naturally occurring ketohexoses has been revealed in a supersonic expansion by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy coupled with a laser ablation source. Three, two and one conformers of d-tagatose, d-psicose and l-sorbose, respectively, have been identified by their rotational constants extracted from the analysis of the spectra. Singular structural signatures involving the hydroxyl groups OH(1) and OH(2) have been disentangled from the intricate intramolecular hydrogen bond networks stabilising the most abundant conformers. The present results place the old Shallenberger and Kier sweetness theories on a firmer footing.

  14. Oil pollution signatures by remote sensing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catoe, C. E.; Mclean, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the possibility of developing an effective remote sensing system for oil pollution monitoring which would be capable of detecting oil films on water, mapping the areal extent of oil slicks, measuring slick thickness, and identifying the oil types. In the spectral regions considered (ultraviolet, visible, infrared, microwave, and radar), the signatures were sufficiently unique when compared to the background so that it was possible to detect and map oil slicks. Both microwave and radar techniques are capable of operating in adverse weather. Fluorescence techniques show promise in identifying oil types. A multispectral system will be required to detect oil, map its distribution, estimate film thickness, and characterize the oil pollutant.

  15. Signatures for quark clustering in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, C.E.; Lassila, K.E.

    1994-04-01

    As a signature for the presence of quark clusters in nuclei, the authors suggest studying backward protons produced by electron scattering off deuterons and suggest a ratio that cancels out much of the detailed properties of deuterons or 6-quark clusters. The test may be viewed as a test that the short range part of the deuteron is still a 2-nucleon system. They make estimates to show how it fails in characteristic and significant ways if the two nucleons at short range coalesce into a kneaded 6-quark cluster.

  16. Mapping trilobite state signatures in atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Eiles, Matthew T.; Greene, Chris H.

    2016-07-01

    A few-body approach relying on static line broadening theory is developed to treat the spectroscopy of a single Rydberg excitation to a trilobite-like state immersed in a high density ultracold medium. The present theoretical framework implements the recently developed compact treatment of polyatomic Rydberg molecules, allowing for an accurate treatment of a large number of perturbers within the Rydberg orbit. This system exhibits two unique spectral signatures: its lineshape depends on the Rydberg quantum number n but, strikingly, is independent of the density of the medium, and it is characterized by sharply peaked features reflecting the oscillatory structure of the potential energy landscape.

  17. Fractal signatures in the aperiodic Fibonacci grating.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rupesh; Banerjee, Varsha; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam

    2014-05-01

    The Fibonacci grating (FbG) is an archetypal example of aperiodicity and self-similarity. While aperiodicity distinguishes it from a fractal, self-similarity identifies it with a fractal. Our paper investigates the outcome of these complementary features on the FbG diffraction profile (FbGDP). We find that the FbGDP has unique characteristics (e.g., no reduction in intensity with increasing generations), in addition to fractal signatures (e.g., a non-integer fractal dimension). These make the Fibonacci architecture potentially useful in image forming devices and other emerging technologies.

  18. Microbial community signature of high-solid content methanogenic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Abbassi-Guendouz, Amel; Trably, Eric; Hamelin, Jérôme; Dumas, Claire; Steyer, Jean Philippe; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Escudié, Renaud

    2013-04-01

    In this study, changes in bacterial and archaeal communities involved in anaerobic digestion processes operated with high solid contents were investigated. Batch tests were performed within a range of total solids (TS) of 10-35%. Between 10% and 25% TS, high methanogenic activity was observed and no overall specific structure of active bacterial communities was found. At 30% and 35%, methanogenesis was inhibited as a consequence of volatile fatty acids accumulation. Here, a specific bacterial signature was observed with three main dominant bacteria related to Clostridium sp., known for their ability to grow at low pH. Additionally, archaeal community was gradually impacted by TS content. Three archaeal community structures were observed with a gradual shift from Methanobacterium sp. to Methanosarcina sp., according to the TS content. Overall, several species were identified as biomarkers of methanogenesis inhibition, since bacterial and archaeal communities were highly specific at high TS contents.

  19. New Suns in the Cosmos. III. Multifractal Signature Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, D. B.; Nepomuceno, M. M. F.; de Moraes Junior, P. R. V.; Lopes, C. E. F.; Das Chagas, M. L.; Bravo, J. P.; Costa, A. D.; Canto Martins, B. L.; De Medeiros, J. R.; Leão, I. C.

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the multifractality signatures in hourly time series extracted from the CoRoTspacecraft database. Our analysis is intended to highlight the possibility that astrophysical time series can be members of a particular class of complex and dynamic processes, which require several photometric variability diagnostics to characterize their structural and topological properties. To achieve this goal, we search for contributions due to a nonlinear temporal correlation and effects caused by heavier tails than the Gaussian distribution, using a detrending moving average algorithm for one-dimensional multifractal signals (MFDMA). We observe that the correlation structure is the main source of multifractality, while heavy-tailed distribution plays a minor role in generating the multifractal effects. Our work also reveals that the rotation period of stars is inherently scaled by the degree of multifractality. As a result, analyzing the multifractal degree of the referred series, we uncover an evolution of multifractality from shorter to larger periods.

  20. Role of fermion exchanges in statistical signatures of composite bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Combescot, M.; Dubin, F.; Dupertuis, M. A.

    2009-07-15

    We study statistical signatures of composite bosons made of two fermions by extending number states to these quantum particles. Two-particle correlations as well as the dispersion of the probability distribution are analyzed. We show that the particle composite nature reduces the antibunching effect predicted for elementary bosons. Furthermore, the probability distribution exhibits a dispersion that is greater for composite bosons than for elementary bosons. This dispersion corresponds to the one of sub-Poissonian processes, as for a quantum state but, unlike its elementary boson counterpart, it is not minimum. In general, our work shows that it is necessary to take into account the Pauli exclusion principle, which acts between fermionic components of composite bosons - along the line used here - to possibly extract statistical properties in a precise way.