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Sample records for iga class autoantibodies

  1. Autoantibodies targeting galactose-deficient IgA1 associate with progression of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Berthoux, Francois; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Thibaudin, Lise; Yanagawa, Hiroyuki; Maillard, Nicolas; Mariat, Christophe; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Julian, Bruce A; Novak, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Mesangial and circulating IgA1 with aberrantly glycosylated hinge region O-glycans characterize IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Unlike healthy individuals, some IgA1 is galactose deficient in patients with IgAN, leaving terminal N-acetylgalactosamine residues in the hinge region exposed. Circulating autoantibodies that recognize such galactose-deficient IgA1 as an autoantigen, or the levels of the autoantigen itself, may allow prediction of disease progression. Here, we analyzed serum samples obtained at diagnosis for autoantigen and autoantibodies from 97 patients with IgAN selected from our prospective cohort according to their absolute renal risk for progression to dialysis or death (0, very low; 1, low; 2, high; 3, very high). We also analyzed samples from controls comprising 30 healthy volunteers and 30 patients with non-IgAN disease. The mean follow-up was 13.8 years. We found that mean serum levels of total autoantigen, normalized IgG autoantibody, and total IgA autoantibody were significantly higher in patients than in the combined controls (all P≤0.01). Furthermore, increasing levels correlated with worse clinical outcomes. In Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses, IgG autoantibody levels ≥1.33 predicted dialysis or death (both P≤0.01). In conclusion, these data suggest that serum levels of IgG and IgA autoantibodies strongly associate with the progression of IgAN nephropathy.

  2. Recurrent IgA nephropathy is predicted by altered glycosylated IgA, autoantibodies and soluble CD89 complexes.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Laureline; Robert, Thomas; Vuiblet, Vincent; Tabary, Thierry; Braconnier, Antoine; Dramé, Moustapha; Toupance, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe; Monteiro, Renato C; Touré, Fatouma

    2015-10-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, frequently leads to end-stage renal disease and kidney transplantation. However, disease recurrence often occurs after transplantation. Here we evaluated the predictive value of three markers for IgAN recurrence: the presence of galactose-deficient IgA1, IgG anti-IgA autoantibodies, and IgA-soluble (s) CD89 complexes. This was analyzed in 38 kidney transplant recipients with IgAN recurrence and compared with 22 patients transplanted for IgAN but without recurrence and with 17 healthy controls. Pre-transplantation galactose-deficient IgA1 serum levels were significantly higher in the recurrence compared with the no recurrence or control groups. IgA-IgG complexes were significantly elevated in the recurrence group. Both the recurrence and no recurrence groups had increased values of IgA-sCD89 complexes compared with healthy controls, but values were significantly lower in patients with recurrence compared with no recurrence. Areas under the receiver operating curve of the markers in pre-transplantation sera were 0.86 for galactose-deficient-IgA, 0.82 for IgA-IgG, and 0.78 for sCD89-IgA; all significant. Disease recurrence was associated with decreased serum galactose-deficient IgA1 and appearance of mesangial-galactose-deficient IgA1 deposits, whereas increased serum IgA-sCD89 complexes were associated with mesangial sCD89 deposits. Thus, galactose-deficient-IgA1, IgG autoantibodies, and IgA-sCD89 complexes are valuable biomarkers to predict disease recurrence, highlighting major pathogenic mechanisms in IgAN.

  3. Recombinant human IgA1 and IgA2 autoantibodies to type VII collagen induce subepidermal blistering ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Recke, Andreas; Trog, Luisa M; Pas, Hendri H; Vorobyev, Artem; Abadpour, Aida; Jonkman, Marcel F; van Zandbergen, Ger; Kauderer, Claudia; Zillikens, Detlef; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2014-08-15

    Subepidermal autoimmune blistering dermatoses (AIBD) are prototypic autoantibody-mediated diseases. In epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), an autoimmune disease with severe and chronic skin blistering, autoantibodies are directed against type VII collagen. IgG is the predominant autoantibody isotype of EBA, the pathogenicity of which has been demonstrated in a variety of in vivo and ex vivo disease models. In contrast, there is not much evidence for the pathogenicity of IgA, which may appear as the only autoantibody isotype in some EBA patients. To investigate the pathogenic potential of IgA autoantibodies, we generated chimeric V gene-matched human IgA1, IgA2, and control IgG1 autoantibodies directed against type VII collagen. Immobilized immune complexes containing the rIgA1 and rIgA2 autoantibodies induced the dose-dependent release of reactive oxygen species from neutrophil granulocytes, a precondition for blister formation. Moreover, both rIgA1 and rIgA2 induced leukocyte-dependent dermal-epidermal separation in cryosections of human skin. In contrast with rIgG1, neither rIgA1 nor rIgA2 was capable of inducing complement deposition at the dermal-epidermal junction. Because complement activation is a prerequisite for blister induction, this lack of function compared with IgG1 may be compensated for by the stronger activation of neutrophil granulocytes by both IgA1 and IgA2. For IgG-mediated AIBD, immunoadsorption therapy is a convenient treatment modality for the removal of pathogenic autoantibodies, particularly in treatment-resistant cases. The results of this study show the pathogenic potential of IgA autoantibodies and support the development of adsorber matrices for IgA-mediated AIBD.

  4. IgA class switch in I alpha exon-deficient mice. Role of germline transcription in class switch recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Harriman, G R; Bradley, A; Das, S; Rogers-Fani, P; Davis, A C

    1996-01-01

    Studies have implicated defective Ig class switch in the pathogenesis of IgA deficiency. To understand better the molecular events that regulate IgA class switch, a 1.4-kb region of the IgA locus containing the I alpha exon was replaced with a human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase minigene by gene targeting in murine embryonic stem cells. The I alpha exon-deficient mice derived from these embryonic stem cells had normal IgA levels in serum and secretions and normal numbers of IgA B cells in Peyer's patches and spleen. Further, I alpha exon-deficient B cells efficiently underwent IgA class switch in vitro, despite the absence of I alpha exon-containing germline transcripts. Notably, I alpha exon-deficient B cells did not require TGF-beta for IgA class switch since stimulation with LPS alone led to IgA expression. Nonetheless, whereas I alpha exon-deficient B cells constitutively expressed human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase transcripts, they did not produce IgA in the absence of LPS stimulation. These results demonstrate that the I alpha exon or transcripts containing the I alpha exon are not required for IgA class switch. Further, the effects of TGF-beta on I alpha locus transcription can be supplanted by expression of a heterologous minigene at that locus, but a second signal is required for the induction of IgA class switch. PMID:8567970

  5. [Autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yasushi

    2005-06-01

    The autoantibody test gives significant information for diagnosis of autoimmune diseases. Since the finding of the LE-cell in 1948, dozens of autoantibodies have been found. Anti nuclear antibody (ANA) is the essential test for the screening of autoantibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is the conventional method for the detection of ANA. IIF can detect a wide spectrum of ANA and gives abundant information obtained from a staining pattern. However under the recent circumstances of using advanced fluorescent microscopes and reagents we often have difficulty interpreting positive results seen in normal individuals and in detailed staining patterns. ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), detecting disease specific autoantibodies alone, is one solution. Some antibodies such as anti-DNA or anti-ENA (extractable nuclear antigen) have a strong relation to specific diseases. These autoantibodies have been detected by IIF, RIA (radioimmunoassay) or DID (double immune diffusion). With the progress of molecular biology many autoantigens have been characterized. Now ELISA is a typical way to detect autoantibodies because purified or recombinant antigens are easily available. Though RF (rheumatoid factor) is the historical autoantibody detected in RA patients, the specificity to RA is low. The new anti-CCP is promising from its high specificity and sensitivity. Now we can choose various kind of autoantibody tests, not only conventional ones but also newly developed ones. For diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases, understanding of both clinical significance and methodology is important.

  6. Anti-DNA IgA autoantibodies are spontaneously generated in mouse Peyer's patches.

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, M; Inoue, Y; Ametani, A; Fujiwara, J; Tsuji, N M; Kurisaki, J; Azuma, N; Kanno, C

    1998-01-01

    IgA antibodies in the mucosal immune system are produced specifically to environmental antigens such as virus and bacteria, and possibly to some food components, which will provide a potential luminal antigen, DNA. To study the immune response to DNA in the gut, we established B-cell hybridomas producing IgA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) from Peyer's patches (PP) of non-immunized, non-autoimmune, specific pathogen-free BALB/c mice, and examined their specificity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Three mAb out of 18 bound strongly to self, bacterial and synthetic DNA, with Kd of about 10-7 m. One of the three mAb also reacted with the histone component and another reacted with some mouse food component. The VH genes of these three mAb have not previously been reported to have anti-DNA specificity, and carry putative somatically mutated sites favouring DNA binding in CDR. The features resemble those of anti-DNA antibodies found in human and murine models of systemic lupus erythmatosus (SLE), and are indicative of an antigen-driven selection process. Our findings suggest that even in normal healthy animals, anti-DNA antibodies of IgA isotype can be produced in certain peripheral environments such as in PP by spontaneous antigenic stimulation. PMID:9824476

  7. Catalytic autoantibodies against myelin basic protein (MBP) isolated from serum of autistic children impair in vitro models of synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Cuchacovich, Miguel; Francos, Rina; Cuchacovich, Stephanie; Blanco, Angel; Sandoval, Rodrigo; Gomez, Cristian Farias; Valenzuela, Javier A; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V

    2015-10-15

    Autoantibodies from autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) patients react with multiple proteins expressed in the brain. One such autoantibody targets myelin basic protein (MBP). ASD patients have autoantibodies to MBP of both the IgG and IgA classes in high titers, but no autoantibodies of the IgM class. IgA autoantibodies act as serine proteinases and degrade MBP in vitro. They also induce a decrease in long-term potentiation in the hippocampi of rats either perfused with or previously inoculated with this IgA. Because this class of autoantibody causes myelin sheath destruction in multiple sclerosis (MS), we hypothesized a similar pathological role for them in ASD.

  8. CR1/CR2 deficiency alters IgG3 autoantibody production and IgA glomerular deposition in the MRL/lpr model of SLE.

    PubMed

    Boackle, Susan A; Culhane, Kristin K; Brown, Jared M; Haas, Mark; Bao, Lihua; Quigg, Richard J; Holers, V Michael

    2004-03-01

    CR1 and CR2 expression is decreased by approximately 50% on B cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Expression is also decreased in the MRL/lpr murine model of SLE prior to the development of clinical disease, suggesting that this alteration may play a role in pathogenesis. To determine whether the decrease in receptor levels affects the development of SLE, we analyzed MRL/lpr mice in which CR1/CR2 expression was altered by gene targeting. Mice from each cohort (Cr2+/+, Cr2+/-, and Cr2-/-) were analyzed biweekly for the development of proteinuria and autoantibodies. Kidneys were examined at 12 and 16 weeks for evidence of immune complex deposition and renal disease. Deficiency of CR1/CR2 did not affect survival or development of renal disease as measured by proteinuria. Mice deficient in CR1/CR2 had significantly lower levels of IgG3 rheumatoid factor (RF) and total serum IgG3, suggesting a specific defect in production of IgG3 in response to endogenous autoantigens. Since IgG3 RF has been associated with the development of vasculitis in this model, we examined the mice for alterations in development of this clinical manifestation. Although there was no difference in the development of ear necrosis among the three groups, renal arteritis was not identified in any of the Cr2+/- mice, whereas it was present in 20% of the Cr2+/- and 40% of the Cr2+/+ mice. Finally, significantly higher levels of IgA were seen in the glomeruli of Cr2+/- mice compared to Cr2+/- or Cr2+/+ mice, suggesting that CR1/CR2 are involved in either the regulation of IgA production or the clearance of IgA immune complexes. Together these data support the concept that alterations in CR1/CR2 expression or function affect the regulation of autoantibody production and/or clearance and may have clinical consequences.

  9. CR1/CR2 deficiency alters IgG3 autoantibody production and IgA glomerular deposition in the MRL/lpr model of SLE.

    PubMed

    Boackle, Susan A; Culhane, Kristin K; Brown, Jared M; Haas, Mark; Bao, Lihua; Quigg, Richard J; Holers, V Michael

    2004-03-01

    CR1 and CR2 expression is decreased by approximately 50% on B cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Expression is also decreased in the MRL/lpr murine model of SLE prior to the development of clinical disease, suggesting that this alteration may play a role in pathogenesis. To determine whether the decrease in receptor levels affects the development of SLE, we analyzed MRL/lpr mice in which CR1/CR2 expression was altered by gene targeting. Mice from each cohort (Cr2+/+, Cr2+/-, and Cr2-/-) were analyzed biweekly for the development of proteinuria and autoantibodies. Kidneys were examined at 12 and 16 weeks for evidence of immune complex deposition and renal disease. Deficiency of CR1/CR2 did not affect survival or development of renal disease as measured by proteinuria. Mice deficient in CR1/CR2 had significantly lower levels of IgG3 rheumatoid factor (RF) and total serum IgG3, suggesting a specific defect in production of IgG3 in response to endogenous autoantigens. Since IgG3 RF has been associated with the development of vasculitis in this model, we examined the mice for alterations in development of this clinical manifestation. Although there was no difference in the development of ear necrosis among the three groups, renal arteritis was not identified in any of the Cr2+/- mice, whereas it was present in 20% of the Cr2+/- and 40% of the Cr2+/+ mice. Finally, significantly higher levels of IgA were seen in the glomeruli of Cr2+/- mice compared to Cr2+/- or Cr2+/+ mice, suggesting that CR1/CR2 are involved in either the regulation of IgA production or the clearance of IgA immune complexes. Together these data support the concept that alterations in CR1/CR2 expression or function affect the regulation of autoantibody production and/or clearance and may have clinical consequences. PMID:15293881

  10. Glycosylation of IgA1 and pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A; Mestecky, Jiri; Renfrow, Matthew B

    2012-05-01

    IgA nephropathy, described in 1968 as IgA-IgG immune-complex disease, is an autoimmune disease. Galactose-deficient IgA1 is recognized by unique autoantibodies, resulting in the formation of pathogenic immune complexes that ultimately induce glomerular injury. Thus, formation of the galactose-deficient IgA1-containing immune complexes is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. Studies of molecular defects of IgA1 can define new biomarkers specific for IgA nephropathy that can be developed into clinical assays to aid in the diagnosis, assessment of prognosis, and monitoring of disease progression.

  11. Microbiota regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to induce IgA class-switch recombination and generate protective gastrointestinal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ruane, Darren; Chorny, Alejo; Lee, Haekyung; Faith, Jeremiah; Pandey, Gaurav; Shan, Meimei; Simchoni, Noa; Rahman, Adeeb; Garg, Aakash; Weinstein, Erica G.; Oropallo, Michael; Gaylord, Michelle; Ungaro, Ryan; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Mucida, Daniel; Merad, Miriam; Cerutti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to oral antigens are usually orchestrated by gut dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that lung CD103+ and CD24+CD11b+ DCs induced IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) by activating B cells through T cell–dependent or –independent pathways. Compared with lung DCs (LDC), lung CD64+ macrophages had decreased expression of B cell activation genes and induced significantly less IgA production. Microbial stimuli, acting through Toll-like receptors, induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production by LDCs and exerted a profound influence on LDC-mediated IgA CSR. After intranasal immunization with inactive cholera toxin (CT), LDCs stimulated retinoic acid–dependent up-regulation of α4β7 and CCR9 gut-homing receptors on local IgA-expressing B cells. Migration of these B cells to the gut resulted in IgA-mediated protection against an oral challenge with active CT. However, in germ-free mice, the levels of LDC-induced, CT–specific IgA in the gut are significantly reduced. Herein, we demonstrate an unexpected role of the microbiota in modulating the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination through their effect on the IgA class-switching function of LDCs. PMID:26712806

  12. Microbiota regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to induce IgA class-switch recombination and generate protective gastrointestinal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Darren; Chorny, Alejo; Lee, Haekyung; Faith, Jeremiah; Pandey, Gaurav; Shan, Meimei; Simchoni, Noa; Rahman, Adeeb; Garg, Aakash; Weinstein, Erica G; Oropallo, Michael; Gaylord, Michelle; Ungaro, Ryan; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Mucida, Daniel; Merad, Miriam; Cerutti, Andrea; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2016-01-11

    Protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to oral antigens are usually orchestrated by gut dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that lung CD103(+) and CD24(+)CD11b(+) DCs induced IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) by activating B cells through T cell-dependent or -independent pathways. Compared with lung DCs (LDC), lung CD64(+) macrophages had decreased expression of B cell activation genes and induced significantly less IgA production. Microbial stimuli, acting through Toll-like receptors, induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production by LDCs and exerted a profound influence on LDC-mediated IgA CSR. After intranasal immunization with inactive cholera toxin (CT), LDCs stimulated retinoic acid-dependent up-regulation of α4β7 and CCR9 gut-homing receptors on local IgA-expressing B cells. Migration of these B cells to the gut resulted in IgA-mediated protection against an oral challenge with active CT. However, in germ-free mice, the levels of LDC-induced, CT-specific IgA in the gut are significantly reduced. Herein, we demonstrate an unexpected role of the microbiota in modulating the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination through their effect on the IgA class-switching function of LDCs.

  13. Antivimentin autoantibodies in angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Dellagi, K; Brouet, J C; Seligmann, M

    1984-01-26

    We evaluated the prevalence and specificity of smooth-muscle autoantibodies in 20 serum samples obtained from patients with angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Smooth-muscle antibodies in high titers were detected in 75 per cent of the samples. No such antibodies were found in 30 normal control serum samples or in 10 samples from patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 1 of 12 from patients with other types of polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia were positive. The antibodies were polyclonal and belonged to the IgM, IgG, and IgA classes. They reacted with vimentin, the major polypeptide of the intermediate-filament cytoskeleton of mesenchymal cells. The pattern of tissue reactivity and absorption experiments both show that these antibodies recognize special antigenic determinants of the vimentin polypeptide that are shared by vimentin and other classes of intermediate-filament proteins - namely, keratin and desmin. The frequency of this unusual autoantibody activity in angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy suggests that, like hypergammaglobulinemia and a positive Coombs' test, it may represent a useful serologic marker for the disease.

  14. Adalimumab (TNF α Inhibitor) Therapy Exacerbates IgA Glomerulonephritis Acute Renal Injury and Induces Lupus Autoantibodies in a Psoriasis Patient.

    PubMed

    Wei, S S; Sinniah, R

    2013-01-01

    Adalimumab (Humira) is a tumour necrosis factor α (TNF α ) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Sullivan and Preda (2009), Klinkhoff (2004), and Medicare Australia). Use of TNF α inhibitors is associated with the induction of autoimmunity (systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, and sarcoidosis or sarcoid-like granulomas) (Ramos-Casals et al. (2010)). We report a patient with extensive psoriasis presenting with renal failure and seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis after 18 months treatment with adalimumab. He has renal biopsy proven IgA nephritis instead. Renal biopsy is the key diagnostic tool in patients presenting with adalimumab induced nephritis and renal failure. He made a remarkable recovery after adalimumab cessation and steroid treatment. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a psoriasis patient presenting with seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis renal failure and had renal biopsy proven IgA glomerulonephritis after receiving adalimumab.

  15. Germinal center formation, immunoglobulin class switching, and autoantibody production driven by "non alpha/beta" T cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The production of class-switched antibodies, particularly immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 and IgE, occurs efficiently in T cell receptor (TCR) alpha-/- mice that are congenitally devoid of alpha/beta T cells. This finding runs counter to a wealth of data indicating that IgG1 and IgE synthesis are largely dependent on the collaboration between B and alpha/beta T cells. Furthermore, many of the antibodies synthesized in TCR alpha-/- mice are reactive to a similar spectrum of self-antigens as that targeted by autoantibodies characterizing human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE, too, is most commonly regarded as an alpha/beta T cell-mediated condition. To distinguish whether the development of autoantibodies in TCR alpha-/- mice is due to an intrinsic de-regulation of B cells, or to a heretofore poorly characterized collaboration between B and "non-alpha/beta T" cells, the phenotype has been reconstituted by transfer of various populations of B and non-alpha/beta T cells including cloned gamma/delta T cells derived from TCR alpha-/- mice, to severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The results establish that the reproducible production of IgG1 (including autoantibodies) is a product of non-alpha/beta T cell help that can be provided by gamma/delta T cells. This type of B-T collaboration sustains the production of germinal centers, lymphoid follicles that ordinarily are anatomical signatures of alpha/beta T-B cell collaboration. Thus, non-alpha/beta T cell help may drive Ig synthesis and autoreactivity under various circumstances, especially in cases of alpha/beta T cell immunodeficiency. PMID:8642336

  16. Analyzing antibody activity in IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Glassock, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is a chronic kidney disease defined by deposition of IgA in the glomeruli. An abnormality in the glycosylation of the hinge region of the IgA1 isotype of IgA is fundamental to the origins of this very common form of glomerulonephritis. In this issue of the JCI, Suzuki and coworkers describe the characteristics of IgG autoantibodies to the abnormally glycosylated IgA1 secreted by immortalized B cells derived from patients with sporadic forms of IgA nephropathy (see the related article beginning on page 1668). These IgG autoantibodies displayed remarkably restricted heterogeneity. These observations offer new insights into disease pathogenesis and may lead to new methods of diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy for patients with IgA nephropathy. PMID:19504718

  17. HLA Class I and II Blocks Are Associated to Susceptibility, Clinical Subtypes and Autoantibodies in Mexican Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Mercado-Velázquez, Pamela; Yu, Neng; Alosco, Sharon; Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism studies in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) have yielded variable results. These studies need to consider the genetic admixture of the studied population. Here we used our previously reported definition of genetic admixture of Mexicans using HLA class I and II DNA blocks to map genetic susceptibility to develop SSc and its complications. Methods We included 159 patients from a cohort of Mexican Mestizo SSc patients. We performed clinical evaluation, obtained SSc-associated antibodies, and determined HLA class I and class II alleles using sequence-based, high-resolution techniques to evaluate the contribution of these genes to SSc susceptibility, their correlation with the clinical and autoantibody profile and the prevalence of Amerindian, Caucasian and African alleles, blocks and haplotypes in this population. Results Our study revealed that class I block HLA-C*12:03-B*18:01 was important to map susceptibility to diffuse cutaneous (dc) SSc, HLA-C*07:01-B*08:01 block to map the susceptibility role of HLA-B*08:01 to develop SSc, and the C*07:02-B*39:05 and C*07:02-B*39:06 blocks to map the protective role of C*07:02 in SSc. We also confirmed previous associations of HLA-DRB1*11:04 and –DRB1*01 to susceptibility to develop SSc. Importantly, we mapped the protective role of DQB1*03:01 using three Amerindian blocks. We also found a significant association for the presence of anti-Topoisomerase I antibody with HLA-DQB1*04:02, present in an Amerindian block (DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02), and we found several alleles associated to internal organ damage. The admixture estimations revealed a lower proportion of the Amerindian genetic component among SSc patients. Conclusion This is the first report of the diversity of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes Mexican patients with SSc. Our findings suggest that HLA class I and class II genes contribute to the protection and susceptibility to develop SSc and its different clinical

  18. IgA1 Protease Treatment Reverses Mesangial Deposits and Hematuria in a Model of IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Sebastian M; Abbad, Lilia; Boedec, Erwan; Papista, Christina; Le Stang, Marie-Bénédicte; Moal, Christelle; Maillard, Julien; Jamin, Agnès; Bex-Coudrat, Julie; Wang, Yong; Li, Aiqun; Martini, Paolo G V; Monteiro, Renato C; Berthelot, Laureline

    2016-09-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), characterized by mesangial IgA1 deposits, is a leading cause of renal failure worldwide. IgAN pathogenesis involves circulating hypogalactosylated IgA1 complexed with soluble IgA Fc receptor I (sCD89) and/or anti-hypogalactosylated-IgA1 autoantibodies, but no specific treatment is available for IgAN. The absence of IgA1 and CD89 homologs in the mouse has precluded in vivo proof-of-concept studies of specific therapies targeting IgA1. However, the α1KI‑CD89Tg mouse model of IgAN, which expresses human IgA1 and human CD89, allows in vivo testing of recombinant IgA1 protease (IgA1‑P), a bacterial protein that selectively cleaves human IgA1. Mice injected with IgA1‑P (1-10 mg/kg) had Fc fragments of IgA1 in both serum and urine, associated with a decrease in IgA1-sCD89 complexes. Levels of mesangial IgA1 deposits and the binding partners of these deposits (sCD89, transferrin receptor, and transglutaminase 2) decreased markedly 1 week after treatment, as did the levels of C3 deposition, CD11b(+) infiltrating cells, and fibronectin. Antiprotease antibodies did not significantly alter IgA1‑P activity. Moreover, hematuria consistently decreased after treatment. In conclusion, IgA1‑P strongly diminishes human IgA1 mesangial deposits and reduces inflammation, fibrosis, and hematuria in a mouse IgAN model, and therefore may be a plausible treatment for patients with IgAN.

  19. IgA1 Protease Treatment Reverses Mesangial Deposits and Hematuria in a Model of IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Sebastian M; Abbad, Lilia; Boedec, Erwan; Papista, Christina; Le Stang, Marie-Bénédicte; Moal, Christelle; Maillard, Julien; Jamin, Agnès; Bex-Coudrat, Julie; Wang, Yong; Li, Aiqun; Martini, Paolo G V; Monteiro, Renato C; Berthelot, Laureline

    2016-09-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), characterized by mesangial IgA1 deposits, is a leading cause of renal failure worldwide. IgAN pathogenesis involves circulating hypogalactosylated IgA1 complexed with soluble IgA Fc receptor I (sCD89) and/or anti-hypogalactosylated-IgA1 autoantibodies, but no specific treatment is available for IgAN. The absence of IgA1 and CD89 homologs in the mouse has precluded in vivo proof-of-concept studies of specific therapies targeting IgA1. However, the α1KI‑CD89Tg mouse model of IgAN, which expresses human IgA1 and human CD89, allows in vivo testing of recombinant IgA1 protease (IgA1‑P), a bacterial protein that selectively cleaves human IgA1. Mice injected with IgA1‑P (1-10 mg/kg) had Fc fragments of IgA1 in both serum and urine, associated with a decrease in IgA1-sCD89 complexes. Levels of mesangial IgA1 deposits and the binding partners of these deposits (sCD89, transferrin receptor, and transglutaminase 2) decreased markedly 1 week after treatment, as did the levels of C3 deposition, CD11b(+) infiltrating cells, and fibronectin. Antiprotease antibodies did not significantly alter IgA1‑P activity. Moreover, hematuria consistently decreased after treatment. In conclusion, IgA1‑P strongly diminishes human IgA1 mesangial deposits and reduces inflammation, fibrosis, and hematuria in a mouse IgAN model, and therefore may be a plausible treatment for patients with IgAN. PMID:26850635

  20. Anti-cofactor autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: prevalence, clinical and HLA class II associations.

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Morozzi, Gabriella; Bellisai, Francesca; Fineschi, Irene; Bacarelli, Maria Romana; Simpatico, Antonella; Font, Josep; Cervera, Ricard; Houssiau, Frederic; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; De Ramon Garrido, Enrique; De Pità, Ornella; Smolen, Josef; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical and HLA-class II allele associations of some anti-cofactor antibodies in a homogeneous group of European patients with SLE. One hundred thirty-six patients with SLE, fulfilling four or more of the ACR 1997 revised criteria for the classification of the disease, coming from 7 European countries, were enrolled consecutively. Anti-prothrombin (anti-PT), anti-annexin V (anti-AnnV), anti-protein C (anti-Cprot) and anti-protein S (anti-Sprot) were determined by using commercial ELISA kits. Molecular typing of HLA-DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 loci was performed by using PCR-SSOP method, carried out using digoxygenin (DIG) labeled probes. The prevalence of anti-AnnV, anti-PT, anti-Cprot and anti-Sprot was 19%, 10.4%, 4.4% and 8.1%, respectively. Twenty-seven % of anti-AnnV positive patients reported migraine vs 5.5% of anti-AnnV negatives (p = 0.003, but p not significant, odds ratio (OR) = 6.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2-21). Anti-PT, anti-AnnV and anti-Sprot were positively associated with some HLA alleles, but pc was not significant. In this study we have shown that some HLA alleles carry the risk to produce antibodies against phospholipid-binding proteins, but these association need confirmation in other studies, because they have never been reported and appear to be weak associations.

  1. Galactosylation of serum IgA1 O-glycans in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Katri; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Novak, Jan; Collin, Pekka; Saavalainen, Päivi; Koskinen, Lotta L E; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2011-02-01

    In celiac disease, gluten ingestion provokes small-bowel mucosal injury and production of IgA autoantibodies against transglutaminase 2 (TG2). It has been suggested that in celiac patients IgA could mediate the transepithelial passage of gluten peptides in a mechanism involving the transferrin receptor. As IgA1 with galactose-deficient O-linked glycans has elevated affinity for the transferrin receptor, we assessed whether total serum IgA1 and IgA1 anti-TG2 autoantibodies in celiac patients are aberrantly glycosylated. We report that males with celiac disease have higher total serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 than non-celiac males. Furthermore, O-glycans of the disease-specific TG2 IgA1 autoantibodies in celiac patients exhibited elevated galactose deficiency. A gluten-free diet had no effect on the total serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1, whereas the amount of galactose-deficient anti-TG2 IgA1 decreased. Thus, the undergalactosylated IgA1 molecules are not pathognomonic for celiac disease, but galactose deficiency in IgA1 could be an aggravating factor.

  2. Affinity maturation of immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies during development of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, A; Ankelo, M; Simell, S; Ilonen, J; Knip, M; Simell, O; Hinkkanen, A E

    2007-05-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by ingestion of wheat gluten and related cereals in genetically predisposed individuals. Circulating immunoglobulin A (IgA) class autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TGA) are highly specific and sensitive serological markers for CD, which is ultimately confirmed by duodenal biopsy. Although CD is considered a life-long disorder, transient or fluctuating IgA-TGA seropositivity has been observed in asymptomatic individuals on a gluten-containing diet. We set out to explore possible differences in the maturation of IgA-TGA avidity between individuals progressing to CD and subjects remaining healthy despite occasional expression of autoantibodies. We developed a time-resolved fluorometric IgA-TGA assay based on human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (tTG), and further modified the method to also measure urea-dependent avidity of the autoantibodies. We measured the autoantibody titres and avidities of sequential serum samples from 10 children developing CD and 10 children presenting transient or fluctuating autoantibodies. Both the initial titres at seroconversion and peak values of transient/fluctuating IgA-TGA were significantly lower than corresponding autoantibody titres in samples drawn from individuals with progressing CD (P = 0.004 and P = 0.0002, respectively). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the initial or peak avidity index values between the two groups of children. The avidity index values increased during the follow-up period (P = 0.013 for both groups) with no significant difference in the rate of avidity maturation between children with transient/fluctuating IgA-TGA and children developing CD. According to our results, high autoantibody titres have a higher predictive value than avidity maturation of TGA-IgA in screening for CD.

  3. Mapping Novel Immunogenic Epitopes in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sang Hoon; Sigdel, Tara K.; Dinh, Van T.; Vu, Minh-Thien

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives IgA plays a key role in IgA nephropathy (IgAN) by forming immune complexes and depositing in the glomeruli, leading to an inflammatory response. However, the antigenic targets and functional characterization of IgA have been incompletely defined in this disease. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study was performed in sera from patients who were studied as part of a prospective, observational study of IgAN. These patients (n=22) all had biopsy-proven IgAN within 3 years of study initiation, complete clinical data, annual urinary inulin clearance for GFRs, and at least 5 years of follow-up. Progression was defined as loss of >5 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year of inulin clearance measured over at least 5 years. A protein microarray was used for detection of IgAN-specific IgA autoantibodies in blood across approximately 9000 human antigens to specifically identify the most immunogenic protein targets that drive IgA antibodies in IgAN (n=22), healthy controls (n=10), and non-IgAN glomerular diseases (n=17). Results were validated by ELISA assays in sera and by immunohistochemistry in IgAN kidney biopsies. IgA-specific antibodies were correlated with clinical and histologic variables to assess their effect on disease progression and prognosis. Results Fifty-four proteins mounted highly significant IgA antibody responses in patients with IgAN with a false discovery rate (q value) of ≤10%; 325 antibodies (P≤0.05) were increased overall. Antitissue transglutaminase IgA was significantly elevated in IgAN (P<0.001, q value of 0%). IgA antibodies to DDX4 (r=−0.55, P=0.01) and ZADH2 (r=−0.48, P=0.02) were significantly correlated with the decline of renal function. Specific IgA autoantibodies are elevated in IgAN compared with normal participants and those with other glomerular diseases. Conclusions In this preliminary study, IgA autoantibodies target novel proteins, highly expressed in the kidney glomerulus and tubules. These IgA

  4. Efficient generation of human IgA monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lorin, Valérie; Mouquet, Hugo

    2015-07-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody isotype produced in humans. IgA antibodies primarily ensure immune protection of mucosal surfaces against invading pathogens, but also circulate and are present in large quantities in blood. IgAs are heterogeneous at a molecular level, with two IgA subtypes and the capacity to form multimers by interacting with the joining (J) chain. Here, we have developed an efficient strategy to rapidly generate human IgA1 and IgA2 monoclonal antibodies in their monomeric and dimeric forms. Recombinant monomeric and dimeric IgA1/IgA2 counterparts of a prototypical IgG1 monoclonal antibody, 10-1074, targeting the HIV-1 envelope protein, were produced in large amounts after expression cloning and transient transfection of 293-F cells. 10-1074 IgAs were FPLC-purified using a novel affinity-based resin engrafted with anti-IgA chimeric Fabs, followed by a monomers/multimers separation using size exclusion-based FPLC. ELISA binding experiments confirmed that the artificial IgA class switching of 10-1074 did not alter its antigen recognition. In summary, our technical approach allows the very efficient production of various forms of purified recombinant human IgA molecules, which are precious tools in dissecting IgA B-cell responses in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and studying the biology, function and therapeutic potential of IgAs.

  5. Epidermal polymeric immunoglobulin receptors: leads from intraepidermal neutrophilic IgA dermatosis-type IgA pemphigus.

    PubMed

    Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Teye, Kwesi; Sogame, Ryosuke; Koga, Hiroshi; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we attempted to identify unknown autoantigen for intraepidermal neutrophilic IgA dermatosis-type IgA pemphigus by novel IgA-specific immunoprecipitation. Mass-spectrometry study identified polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (PIGR) as the candidate protein, and we confirmed that PIGR expressed in both epidermis and cultured keratinocytes. Eukaryotic recombinant protein of PIGR expressed in COS7 cells was reacted with both patient and normal sera, indicating that PIGR binds physiologically to IgA. To detect antigen-specific binding by IgA autoantibodies, we performed several experiments using deglycosylated PIGR and F(ab)2 fragments from patient sera. However, these analyses suggested that patient IgA bound physiologically, but not immunologically, to PIGR. Nevertheless, our study provided two important insights. Newly developed IgA-immunoprecipitation system should be a useful tool in the future study of identification of antigens for IgA autoantibodies. Detection of epidermal PIGR in this study confirmed previous results and indicated possible immunological role of PIGR in epidermis.

  6. Autoantibody Profiles in Collagen Disease Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Antibodies to Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Related Chain A (MICA) as Markers of ILD

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Shomi; Shimada, Kota; Masuo, Kiyoe; Nakajima, Fumiaki; Funano, Shunichi; Tanaka, Yuki; Komiya, Akiko; Fukui, Naoshi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Tadokoro, Kenji; Nose, Masato; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki; Tohma, Shigeto

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is frequently associated with collagen disease. It is then designated as collagen vascular disease-associated ILD (CVD-ILD), and influences patients’ prognosis. The prognosis of acute-onset diffuse ILD (AoDILD) occurring in patients with collagen disease is quite poor. Here, we report our investigation of auto-antibody (Ab) profiles to determine whether they may be useful in diagnosing CVD-ILD or AoDILD in collagen disease. Auto-Ab profiles were analyzed using the Lambda Array Beads Multi-Analyte System, granulocyte immunofluorescence test, Proto-Array Human Protein Microarray, AlphaScreen assay, and glutathione S-transferase capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 34 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with or without CVD-ILD and in 15 patients with collagen disease with AoDILD. The average anti-major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) Ab levels were higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD than in those without (P = 0.0013). The ratio of the average anti-MICA Ab level to the average anti-human leukocyte antigen class I Ab level (ie, MICA/Class I) was significantly higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD compared with those without (P = 4.47 × 10−5). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of auto-Ab profiles in CVD-ILD. The MICA/Class I ratio could be a better marker for diagnosing CVD-ILD than KL-6 (Krebs von den lungen-6). PMID:26327779

  7. Autoantibody Profiles in Collagen Disease Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Antibodies to Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Related Chain A (MICA) as Markers of ILD.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Shomi; Shimada, Kota; Masuo, Kiyoe; Nakajima, Fumiaki; Funano, Shunichi; Tanaka, Yuki; Komiya, Akiko; Fukui, Naoshi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Tadokoro, Kenji; Nose, Masato; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki; Tohma, Shigeto

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is frequently associated with collagen disease. It is then designated as collagen vascular disease-associated ILD (CVD-ILD), and influences patients' prognosis. The prognosis of acute-onset diffuse ILD (AoDILD) occurring in patients with collagen disease is quite poor. Here, we report our investigation of auto-antibody (Ab) profiles to determine whether they may be useful in diagnosing CVD-ILD or AoDILD in collagen disease. Auto-Ab profiles were analyzed using the Lambda Array Beads Multi-Analyte System, granulocyte immunofluorescence test, Proto-Array Human Protein Microarray, AlphaScreen assay, and glutathione S-transferase capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 34 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with or without CVD-ILD and in 15 patients with collagen disease with AoDILD. The average anti-major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) Ab levels were higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD than in those without (P = 0.0013). The ratio of the average anti-MICA Ab level to the average anti-human leukocyte antigen class I Ab level (ie, MICA/Class I) was significantly higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD compared with those without (P = 4.47 × 10(-5)). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of auto-Ab profiles in CVD-ILD. The MICA/Class I ratio could be a better marker for diagnosing CVD-ILD than KL-6 (Krebs von den lungen-6).

  8. HIV-1 evades virus-specific IgG2 and IgA class switching by targeting systemic and intestinal B cells via long-range intercellular conduits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weifeng; Santini, Paul A.; Sullivan, John S.; He, Bing; Shan, Meimei; Ball, Susan C.; Dyer, Wayne B.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Chadburn, Amy; Cohen-Gould, Leona; Knowles, Daniel M.; Chiu, April; Sanders, Rogier W.; Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Contact-dependent communication between immune cells generates protection, but also facilitates viral spread. We found that macrophages formed long-range actin-propelled conduits in response to negative factor (Nef), a human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protein with immunosuppressive functions. Conduits attenuated immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) and IgA class switching in systemic and intestinal lymphoid follicles by shuttling Nef from infected macrophages to B cells through a guanine exchange factor-dependent pathway involving the amino-terminal anchor, central core and carboxy-terminal flexible loop of Nef. By showing stronger virus-specific IgG2 and IgA responses in patients harboring Nef-deficient virions, our data suggest that HIV-1 exploits intercellular highways as a “Trojan horse” to deliver Nef to B cells and evade humoral immunity systemically and at mucosal sites of entry. PMID:19648924

  9. A case of severe chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance with alternating immunoglobulin class to IgM from IgA.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shintaro; Nagamine, Shun; Makioka, Kouki; Kusunoki, Susumu; Okamoto, Koichi

    2016-09-29

    A 71-year-old woman with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) with IgA-λ monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) showed the acute development of tetraplegia, respiratory failure, and a marked fluctuation of the blood pressure. Intravenous (IV) high-dose steroid therapy (methylprednisolone: 1 g/day × 3 days), followed by oral prednisolone (PSL) (40 mg/day), and IV immunoglobulin (IVIg, 0.4 g/kg/day × 5 days) administrations resulted in the amelioration of these symptoms. However, they soon relapsed, which eventually led to complete tetraplegia and the need for mechanical ventilation. At this time, serum components of IgA-λ and IgM-λ were biclonally positive. Seven courses of plasma exchange and the alternative administration of dexamethasone (12 mg/day) and methtorexate (15 mg/week) were conducted, but with no significant improvement. Nine months after admission, she showed totally-locked in syndrome. Cryo-preserved serum obtained at this time showed high titers of IgM class antibodies against ganglioside (GD3 +++, GT1a ++++, GT1b ++, GQ1b +++, and GD1b +++), which had been negative on admission. Biopsy of the left sural nerve showed moderate reductions of large and small myelinated fibers with no inflammation, no depositions of amyloid, IgG, IgA, or IgM, and teased fiber findings revealed neither myelin ovoids nor segmental demyelination. Alternatively, melphalan at 5 mg and PSL at 32 mg were administered, with no amelioration, while serum IgA-λ monoclonal protein diminished, and IgM-λ M protein positivity was continuously observed. She frequently developed sepsis; therefore, we could no longer continue any immunosupressive therapies, but monthly IVIg administrations were given. Twelve months after admission, her neurological symptoms gradually improved and she was weaned off of mechanical ventilation. Eighteen months after admission, her muscle strength corresponded to 2 on manual muscle testing

  10. A case of severe chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance with alternating immunoglobulin class to IgM from IgA.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shintaro; Nagamine, Shun; Makioka, Kouki; Kusunoki, Susumu; Okamoto, Koichi

    2016-09-29

    A 71-year-old woman with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) with IgA-λ monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) showed the acute development of tetraplegia, respiratory failure, and a marked fluctuation of the blood pressure. Intravenous (IV) high-dose steroid therapy (methylprednisolone: 1 g/day × 3 days), followed by oral prednisolone (PSL) (40 mg/day), and IV immunoglobulin (IVIg, 0.4 g/kg/day × 5 days) administrations resulted in the amelioration of these symptoms. However, they soon relapsed, which eventually led to complete tetraplegia and the need for mechanical ventilation. At this time, serum components of IgA-λ and IgM-λ were biclonally positive. Seven courses of plasma exchange and the alternative administration of dexamethasone (12 mg/day) and methtorexate (15 mg/week) were conducted, but with no significant improvement. Nine months after admission, she showed totally-locked in syndrome. Cryo-preserved serum obtained at this time showed high titers of IgM class antibodies against ganglioside (GD3 +++, GT1a ++++, GT1b ++, GQ1b +++, and GD1b +++), which had been negative on admission. Biopsy of the left sural nerve showed moderate reductions of large and small myelinated fibers with no inflammation, no depositions of amyloid, IgG, IgA, or IgM, and teased fiber findings revealed neither myelin ovoids nor segmental demyelination. Alternatively, melphalan at 5 mg and PSL at 32 mg were administered, with no amelioration, while serum IgA-λ monoclonal protein diminished, and IgM-λ M protein positivity was continuously observed. She frequently developed sepsis; therefore, we could no longer continue any immunosupressive therapies, but monthly IVIg administrations were given. Twelve months after admission, her neurological symptoms gradually improved and she was weaned off of mechanical ventilation. Eighteen months after admission, her muscle strength corresponded to 2 on manual muscle testing

  11. The pathogenic role of IgA1 O-linked glycosylation in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Jonathan; Smith, Alice C; Feehally, John

    2007-06-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the IgA immune system have been reported in IgAN but the most consistent finding remains aberrant IgA1 O-linked glycosylation of the IgA1 hinge region. The defect comprises reduced galactosylation of O-linked N-acetylgalactosamine residues with or without changes in the terminal sialylation of the O-linked sugars. Aberrant O-galactosylation has been found in serum IgA1, in IgA1 isolated from tonsillar lymphocytes, and in IgA1 eluted from mesangial deposits. There is evidence that changes in IgA1 O-galactosylation lead to IgA immune complex formation and mesangial IgA deposition. Mesangial cells exposed to these IgA immune complexes proliferate and adopt a pro-inflammatory phenotype; they secrete cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and extracellular matrix components promoting glomerular inflammation and glomerulosclerosis. Recent evidence suggests that the control of IgA1 O-glycosylation is linked to class switching from IgD to IgA1 synthesis and that the pattern of IgA1 O-glycosylation may be programmed at the time of initial antigen encounter. IgA1 glycosylation varies between systemic and mucosal sites and the association of aberrant IgA1 galactosylation with low affinity, polymeric IgA1 antibodies against mucosal antigens suggests undergalactosylated IgA1 may in fact be a mucosal glycoform of IgA1. Although suited to the mucosal compartment, when these IgA1 glycoforms enter the systemic circulation in appreciable quantities they deposit in the mesangium and trigger glomerular inflammation. This review will discuss the evidence for the role of IgA1 O-glycosylation in the pathogenesis of IgAN and propose an explanation for the presence of aberrantly O-glycosylated IgA1 in the circulation of patients with IgAN.

  12. IgA nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... glomerulonephritis ). Risk factors include: A personal or family history of IgA nephropathy or Henoch Schonlein purpura , a form of vasculitis that affects many parts of the body White or Asian ethnicity IgA nephropathy can occur in people of ...

  13. B-cell agonists up-regulate AID and APOBEC3G deaminases, which induce IgA and IgG class antibodies and anti-viral function.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Thomas; Whittall, Trevor; Babaahmady, Kaboutar; Lehner, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    B cells express two critical deaminases in the development of adaptive and innate immunity. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) functions in class switch recombination, somatic hypermutation and may result in affinity maturation of antibodies. Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G; A3G) is an innate anti-retroviral factor that inhibits HIV replication. We have studied a number of B-cell agonists with the aim of identifying the most effective agents that will up-regulate both deaminases and thereby enhance adaptive and innate immunity. CD40 ligand (CD40L) with interleukin-4 or HLA-class II antibodies significantly up-regulated both AID and A3G in isolated human CD19(+) B cells. The functions of these deaminases were demonstrated by enhancement of B-cell surface expression of IgA and IgG and inducing significantly higher IgA and IgG4 antibodies. An enhanced A3G function was then demonstrated by inhibition of HIV-1 replication in co-culture of CD4(+) T cells with autologous B cells, treated with CD40L and CD4 or HLA antibodies, compared with unstimulated human B cells. The dual B-cell-induced deaminase functions may be critical in IgA and IgG antibodies inhibiting pre-entry and A3G that of post-entry HIV-1 transmission and suggests a novel strategy of immunization, especially relevant to mucosal infections.

  14. Autoantibodies against MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A are associated with increased risk of concomitant autoimmune diseases in celiac patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of autologous proteins can lead to the formation of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases. MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A (MICA) is highly expressed in the enterocytes of patients with celiac disease, which arises in response to gluten. The aim of this study was to investigate anti-MICA antibody formation in patients with celiac disease and its association with other autoimmune processes. Methods We tested serum samples from 383 patients with celiac disease, obtained before they took up a gluten-free diet, 428 patients with diverse autoimmune diseases, and 200 controls for anti-MICA antibodies. All samples were also tested for anti-endomysium and anti-transglutaminase antibodies. Results Antibodies against MICA were detected in samples from 41.7% of patients with celiac disease but in only 3.5% of those from controls (P <0.0001) and 8.2% from patients with autoimmune disease (P <0.0001). These antibodies disappeared after the instauration of a gluten-free diet. Anti-MICA antibodies were significantly prevalent in younger patients (P <0.01). Fifty-eight patients with celiac disease (15.1%) presented a concomitant autoimmune disease. Anti-MICA-positive patients had a higher risk of autoimmune disease than MICA antibody-negative patients (P <0.0001; odds ratio = 6.11). The risk was even higher when we also controlled for age (odds ratio = 11.69). Finally, we found that the associated risk of developing additional autoimmune diseases was 16 and 10 times as high in pediatric patients and adults with anti-MICA, respectively, as in those without. Conclusions The development of anti-MICA antibodies could be related to a gluten-containing diet, and seems to be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases in patients with celiac disease, especially younger ones. PMID:24565339

  15. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    PubMed

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target.

  16. Autoantibodies to Posttranslational Modifications in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Burska, Agata N.; Hunt, Laura; Strollo, Rocky; Ryan, Brent J.; Vital, Ed; Nissim, Ahuva; Winyard, Paul G.; Emery, Paul; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies have been associated with human pathologies for a long time, particularly with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Rheumatoid factor (RF) is known since the late 1930s to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The discovery of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the last century has changed this and other posttranslational modifications (PTM) relevant to RA have since been described. Such PTM introduce neoepitopes in proteins that can generate novel autoantibody specificities. The recent recognition of these novel specificities in RA provides a unique opportunity to understand human B-cell development in vivo. In this paper, we will review the three of the main classes of PTMs already associated with RA: citrullination, carbamylation, and oxidation. With the advancement of research methodologies it should be expected that other autoantibodies against PTM proteins could be discovered in patients with autoimmune diseases. Many of such autoantibodies may provide significant biomarker potential. PMID:24782594

  17. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues) in serum and other body fluids... the body's own tissues are injured by autoantibodies). (b) Classification. Class II...

  18. Anti-Ig autoantibody and complement-mediated destruction of neoplastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towmey, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Some immune response are effected through immunoglobulins (Ig), of which five classes have been recognized, namely, IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Auto-antibodies associated with rheumatoid arthritis, termed rheumatoid factors (RF) react with antigenic determinants on IgG heavy chains. RF has predominant but not complete IgM specificity. This auto-antibody response was not detected in treated patients with primary brain tumors (where tissue is sequestered from the immune system by an intact bloodbrain barrier) or with multiple myeloma where humoral immunity is usually impaired. In addition, the prevalence of RF is not increased with solid tumors prior to initiation of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. It is proposed that RF is related to prior chemotherapy or radiotherapy of tumors anatomically accessible to immunologic tissues capable of antibody responses. A primary IgG response occurs, antigen-antibody complexes form, complexed IgG becomes immunologic, and an RF response results.

  19. Gluten exacerbates IgA nephropathy in humanized mice through gliadin-CD89 interaction.

    PubMed

    Papista, Christina; Lechner, Sebastian; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; LeStang, Marie-Bénédicte; Abbad, Lilia; Bex-Coudrat, Julie; Pillebout, Evangéline; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Jablonski, Mathieu; Flamant, Martin; Daugas, Eric; Vrtovsnik, François; Yiangou, Minas; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2015-08-01

    IgA1 complexes containing deglycosylated IgA1, IgG autoantibodies, and a soluble form of the IgA receptor (sCD89), are hallmarks of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Food antigens, notably gluten, are associated with increased mucosal response and IgAN onset, but their implication in the pathology remains unknown. Here, an IgAN mouse model expressing human IgA1 and CD89 was used to examine the role of gluten in IgAN. Mice were given a gluten-free diet for three generations to produce gluten sensitivity, and then challenged for 30 days with a gluten diet. A gluten-free diet resulted in a decrease of mesangial IgA1 deposits, transferrin 1 receptor, and transglutaminase 2 expression, as well as hematuria. Mice on a gluten-free diet lacked IgA1-sCD89 complexes in serum and kidney eluates. Disease severity depended on gluten and CD89, as shown by reappearance of IgAN features in mice on a gluten diet and by direct binding of the gluten-subcomponent gliadin to sCD89. A gluten diet exacerbated intestinal IgA1 secretion, inflammation, and villous atrophy, and increased serum IgA1 anti-gliadin antibodies, which correlated with proteinuria in mice and patients. Moreover, early treatment of humanized mice with a gluten-free diet prevented mesangial IgA1 deposits and hematuria. Thus, gliadin-CD89 interaction may aggravate IgAN development through induction of IgA1-sCD89 complex formation and a mucosal immune response. Hence, early-stage treatment with a gluten-free diet could be beneficial to prevent disease.

  20. The Origin and Activities of IgA1-Containing Immune Complexes in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Knoppova, Barbora; Reily, Colin; Maillard, Nicolas; Rizk, Dana V.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Mestecky, Jiri; Raska, Milan; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Julian, Bruce A.; Novak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis, frequently leading to end-stage renal disease, as there is no disease-specific therapy. IgAN is diagnosed from pathological assessment of a renal biopsy specimen based on predominant or codominant IgA-containing immunodeposits, usually with complement C3 co-deposits and with variable presence of IgG and/or IgM. The IgA in these renal deposits is galactose-deficient IgA1, with less than a full complement of galactose residues on the O-glycans in the hinge region of the heavy chains. Research from the past decade led to the definition of IgAN as an autoimmune disease with a multi-hit pathogenetic process with contributing genetic and environmental components. In this process, circulating galactose-deficient IgA1 (autoantigen) is bound by antiglycan IgG or IgA (autoantibodies) to form immune complexes. Some of these circulating complexes deposit in glomeruli, and thereby activate mesangial cells and induce renal injury through cellular proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix components and cytokines/chemokines. Glycosylation pathways associated with production of the autoantigen and the unique characteristics of the corresponding autoantibodies in patients with IgAN have been uncovered. Complement likely plays a significant role in the formation and the nephritogenic activities of these complexes. Complement activation is mediated through the alternative and lectin pathways and probably occurs systemically on IgA1-containing circulating immune complexes as well as locally in glomeruli. Incidence of IgAN varies greatly by geographical location; the disease is rare in central Africa but accounts for up to 40% of native-kidney biopsies in eastern Asia. Some of this variation may be explained by genetically determined influences on the pathogenesis of the disease. Genome-wide association studies to date have identified several loci associated with IgAN. Some of these loci are associated

  1. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 and Islet Cell Antigen 512/IA-2 Autoantibodies in Relation to Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II DR and DQ Alleles and Haplotypes in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stayoussef, Mouna; Benmansour, Jihen; Al-Jenaidi, Fayza A.; Said, Hichem B.; Rayana, Chiheb B.; Mahjoub, Touhami; Almawi, Wassim Y.

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and islet cell antigen (ICA) 512/IA-2 (512/IA-2) are functions of the specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We investigated the association of HLA class II (DR and DQ) alleles and haplotypes with the presence of GAD and IA-2 autoantibodies in T1D. Autoantibodies were tested in 88 Tunisian T1D patients and 112 age- and gender-matched normoglycemic control subjects by enzyme immunoassay. Among T1D patients, mean anti-GAD antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*030101 allele (P < 0.001), together with the DRB1*030101/DQB1*0201 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.002) haplotypes, while lower anti-GAD titers were associated with the DRB1*070101 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) alleles and DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.001) haplotypes. Mean anti-IA-2 antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*040101 allele (P = 0.007) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001) haplotypes but were lower in the DRB1*110101 allele (P = 0.010) and the DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.025) haplotypes. Multinomial regression analysis confirmed the positive association of DRB1*030101 and the negative association of DRB1*110101 and DQB1*030101, along with the DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 haplotypes, with anti-GAD levels. In contrast, only the DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 haplotype was positively associated with altered anti-IA-2 titers. Increased GAD65 and IA-2 antibody positivity is differentially associated with select HLA class II alleles and haplotypes, confirming the heterogeneous nature of T1D. PMID:21490167

  2. Cellular signaling and production of galactose-deficient IgA1 in IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Reily, Colin; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Mestecky, Jiri; Julian, Bruce A; Willey, Christopher D; Novak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN), the leading cause of primary glomerulonephritis, is characterized by IgA1-containing immunodeposits in the glomeruli. IgAN is a chronic disease, with up to 40% of patients progressing to end-stage renal disease, with no disease-specific treatment. Multiple studies of the origin of the glomerular immunodeposits have linked elevated circulating levels of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (galactose-deficient in some O-glycans; Gd-IgA1) with formation of nephritogenic Gd-IgA1-containing immune complexes. Gd-IgA1 is recognized as an autoantigen in susceptible individuals by anti-glycan autoantibodies, resulting in immune complexes that may ultimately deposit in the kidney and induce glomerular injury. Genetic studies have revealed that an elevated level of Gd-IgA1 in the circulation of IgAN patients is a hereditable trait. Moreover, recent genome-wide association studies have identified several immunity-related loci that associated with IgAN. Production of Gd-IgA1 by IgA1-secreting cells of IgAN patients has been attributed to abnormal expression and activity of several key glycosyltransferases. Substantial evidence is emerging that abnormal signaling in IgA1-producing cells is related to the production of Gd-IgA1. As Gd-IgA1 is the key autoantigen in IgAN, understanding the genetic, biochemical, and environmental aspects of the abnormal signaling in IgA1-producing cells will provide insight into possible targets for future disease-specific therapy.

  3. Interleukin (IL)-21 promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anthony T.; Yao, Suxia; Gong, Bin; Nurieva, Roza I.; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microbiota-specific Th17 cells are enriched in the intestines, which can convert into Tfh in Peyer’s patches, and are crucial for production of intestinal IgA against microbiota, however, the role of Th17 and Tfh cytokines in regulating the mucosal IgA response to enteric microbiota is still not completely known. In this study, we found that intestinal IgA was impaired in mice deficient in IL-17 or IL-21 signaling. IL-21, but not IL-17, is able to augment B cell differentiation to IgA+ cells as mediated by TGFβ1, and accelerate IgA class switch recombination (CSR). IL-21 and retinoic acid (RA) induce IgA+ B cell development and IgA production, and drives autocrine TGFβ1 production to initiate IgA CSR. Repletion of T cell-deficient TCRβxδ−/− mice with Th17 cells specific for commensal bacterial antigen, increased levels of IgA+ B cells and IgA production in the intestine, which was blocked by neutralizing IL-21. Thus, IL-21 functions to strongly augment IgA production under intestinal environment. Furthermore, IL-21 promotes intestinal B cell homing through α4β7 expression, alone or with TGFβ and RA. Together, IL-21 from microbiota-specific Th17 and/or Tfh cells contributes to robust intestinal IgA levels by enhancing IgA+ CSR, IgA production, and B cell trafficking into the intestine. PMID:25586558

  4. Interleukin (IL)-21 promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cao, A T; Yao, S; Gong, B; Nurieva, R I; Elson, C O; Cong, Y

    2015-09-01

    Commensal microbiota-specific T helper type 17 (Th17) cells are enriched in the intestines, which can convert into T follicular helper (Tfh) in Peyer's patches, and are crucial for production of intestinal immunoglobulin A (IgA) against microbiota; however, the role of Th17 and Tfh cytokines in regulating the mucosal IgA response to enteric microbiota is still not completely known. In this study, we found that intestinal IgA was impaired in mice deficient in interleukin (IL)-17 or IL-21 signaling. IL-21, but not IL-17, is able to augment B-cell differentiation to IgA(+) cells as mediated by transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) and accelerate IgA class switch recombination (CSR). IL-21 and retinoic acid (RA) induce IgA(+) B-cell development and IgA production and drives autocrine TGFβ1 production to initiate IgA CSR. Repletion of T-cell-deficient TCRβxδ(-/-) mice with Th17 cells specific for commensal bacterial antigen increased the levels of IgA(+) B cells and IgA production in the intestine, which was blocked by neutralizing IL-21. Thus IL-21 functions to strongly augment IgA production under intestinal environment. Furthermore, IL-21 promotes intestinal B-cell homing through α4β7 expression, alone or with TGFβ and RA. Together, IL-21 from microbiota-specific Th17 and/or Tfh cells contributes to robust intestinal IgA levels by enhancing IgA(+) CSR, IgA production and B-cell trafficking into the intestine.

  5. Maternal celiac disease autoantibodies bind directly to syncytiotrophoblast and inhibit placental tissue transglutaminase activity

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naheed; Baker, Philip N; Robinson, Nicola J; Aplin, John D

    2009-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) occurs in as many as 1 in 80 pregnant women and is associated with poor pregnancy outcome, but it is not known if this is an effect on maternal nutrient absorption or, alternatively, if the placenta is an autoimmune target. The major autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG), has previously been shown to be present in the maternal-facing syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane of the placenta. Methods ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase in a panel of CD sera. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the binding of IgA autoantibodies from CD serum to term placenta. In addition, novel direct binding and activity assays were developed to mimic the in vivo exposure of the villous placenta to maternal autoantibody. Results and Discussion CD IgA autoantibodies located to the syncytial surface of the placenta significantly more than IgA antibodies in control sera (P < 0.0001). The distribution of antigen was similar to that observed using a monoclonal antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Staining was reduced by pre-absorption of CD serum with recombinant human tissue transglutaminase. In direct binding assays, autoimmune immunoglobulin A (IgA) from the maternal compartment became associated with antigen at the syncytial surface of the placenta, as a result of which transglutaminase activity at this site was inhibited. Conclusion These data indicate that direct immune effects in untreated CD women may compromise placental function. PMID:19228395

  6. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins among atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Carter, R.L.; Yamakido, Michio

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to atomic bomb radiation affects immune responsiveness, such as the occurrence of autoantibodies and levels of immunoglobulins. Rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody and immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgM, IgA and IgE) were measured among 2,061 individuals exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki whose estimated doses ranged from 0 to 5.6 Gy. The prevalence and titers of rheumatoid factor were found to be increased in the individuals exposed to higher radiation doses. The IgA level in females and the IgM level in both sexes increased as radiation dose increased, although the effects of radiation exposure were not large. No effect of radiation was found on the prevalence of antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody and anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody or on the levels of IgG and IgE. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides.

  8. Childhood Pemphigus Foliaceus with Exclusive Immunoglobulin G Autoantibodies to Desmocollins.

    PubMed

    Geller, Shamir; Gat, Andrea; Harel, Avikam; Mashiah, Jacob; Zeeli, Tal; Eming, Rüdiger; Ishii, Norito; Hertl, Michael; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sprecher, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus refers to a group of potentially fatal blistering skin diseases that are often due to the deleterious effects of autoantibodies directed against desmosomal antigens. Although desmogleins have been mainly implicated as autoantigens in pemphigus, a steadily growing body of evidence suggests that other desmosomal proteins may be causally involved as well. Antibodies directed against desmocollin-3 have been shown to play a direct role in the pathogenesis of several types of pemphigus. Here we describe the case of a child with localized pemphigus foliaceus and immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivity exclusively directed to desmocollins. The present report suggests that autoantibodies against nondesmoglein antigens may play a role in the pathogenesis of superficial pemphigus, in addition to pemphigus vulgaris, paraneoplastic pemphigus, and IgA pemphigus. PMID:26758100

  9. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are dispensable for noninfectious intestinal IgA responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moro-Sibilot, Ludovic; This, Sebastien; Blanc, Pascal; Sanlaville, Amelien; Sisirak, Vanja; Bardel, Emilie; Boschetti, Gilles; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Defrance, Thierry; Dubois, Bertrand; Kaiserlian, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Intestinal DCs orchestrate gut immune homeostasis by dampening proinflammatory T-cell responses and inducing anti-inflammatory IgA responses. Although no specific DC subset has been strictly assigned so far to govern IgA response, some candidate subsets emerge. In particular, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), which notoriously promote anti-viral immunity and T-cell tolerance to innocuous antigens (Ags), contribute to IgA induction in response to intestinal viral infection and promote T-cell-independent IgA responses in vitro. Here, using two transgenic mouse models, we show that neither short-term nor long-term pDC depletion alters IgA class switch recombination in Peyer's patches and frequency of IgA plasma cells in intestinal mucosa at steady state, even in the absence of T-cell help. In addition, pDCs are dispensable for induction of intestinal IgA plasma cells in response to oral immunization with T-cell-dependent or T-cell-independent Ags, and are not required for proliferation and IgA switch of Ag-specific B cells in GALT. These results show that pDCs are dispensable for noninfectious IgA responses, and suggest that various DC subsets may play redundant roles in the control of intestinal IgA responses.

  10. [Autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Żebryk, Paweł; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2015-05-22

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare connective tissue disorder, which leads to progressive fibrosis of many organs. Its course is characterized by the presence of two classical autoantibodies: anti-topoisomerase I (ATA, Scl-70) and anti-centromere (ACA). In recent years, the presence of antibodies against a wider range of antigens was demonstrated, namely: RNA polymerase III, fibrillarin, NOR90, Th/To, PM-Scl-100, PM-Scl-75, Ku, PDGFR, but their clinical significance is relatively little known and until recently the methods of their assessment were available only in specialized laboratories. More and more reports in the literature indicate existence of links between the presence of selected autoantibodies with clinical correlations i.e. anti-RNA polymerase III with scleroderma renal crisis or anti-Ku and myositis, arthritis and joint contractures. The importance of autoantibodies in the diagnostic process was underlined by their inclusion into the new ACR/EULAR 2013 classification criteria for systemic sclerosis. This work reviews the current knowledge on the clinical significance of autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis.

  11. Irreversible aggregation of the Fc fragment derived from polymeric but not monomeric serum IgA1--implications in IgA-mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Almogren, Adel; Kerr, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    IgA is by far the most abundant immunoglobulin in humans. It is found in serum and in secretions (SIgA). Unlike any other class of immunoglobulin, each form of IgA occurs naturally in different polymerisation states. In serum, the predominant form of IgA is IgA1 of which around 90% is monomeric and 10% is dimeric or polymeric. The proportion of dimeric/polymeric IgA increases in a number of important diseases, such as IgA nephropathy and in chronic liver disease. In both, there is evidence that further aggregation of dimeric/polymeric IgA is the cause of the characteristic tissue deposition. To investigate the effect of role of IgA polymerisation on the structure and function of IgA, we purified different molecular forms of IgA1 from myeloma serum (monomer, dimer and trimer) and SIgA1 from colostrum. Structural features of these different IgA1 forms were examined following proteolysis using Neisseria gonorrhoeae IgA1 type 2 protease and Streptococcus pneumoniae IgA1 protease. These IgA1 proteases cleave IgA1 at the hinge region and produce Fcalpha and Fab fragments. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the Fcalpha fragments of serum dimeric and trimeric but not monomeric IgA1 aggregated to form multimers resistant to disruption in SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions. Size exclusion chromatography under native conditions of cleaved serum dimeric IgA1 demonstrated that aggregation occurs because of structural changes in the IgA per se and was not an effect of the SDS-PAGE system. In the same assay, SIgA1 (dimeric) did not aggregate after digestion. The results suggest an important, previously unrecognised, property of dimeric/polymeric serum IgA1, which might explain its propensity to aggregate and deposit in tissues.

  12. Increased APRIL Expression Induces IgA1 Aberrant Glycosylation in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ya-Ling; Zhu, Li; Shi, Su-Fang; Liu, Li-Jun; Lv, Ji-Cheng; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant glycosylated IgA1 molecules, mainly galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1), are important causal factors in IgA nephropathy; however, the underlying mechanism for the production of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 is unknown. A recent genome-wide association study identified a novel IgAN susceptibility gene, TNFSF13, which encoded a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) that promotes lymphocyte proliferation and IgA class switching. We aimed to explore the mechanism of APRIL's involvement in IgAN. We enrolled 166 patients with IgAN and 77 healthy controls and detected the plasma APRIL levels by the ELISA method, identified the mRNA expression of APRIL and its receptors by relative quantitative PCR, and confirmed by in vitro experiment. We identified increased plasma APRIL levels in IgAN, which was further proved by upregulated mRNA expression in B-lymphocytes from 27 IgAN patients. Analysis of the clinical characteristics of patients with IgAN showed that higher plasma APRIL level was associated with more severe clinical presentations (high proteinuria and low eGFR). The plasma APRIL level was positively correlated with Gd-IgA1 levels. Furthermore, exogenous APRIL could induce more production of Gd-IgA1 in cultured lymphocytes from patients with IgAN, compared with that from healthy controls. And, the relative higher expression of receptors of APRIL, that is, BCMA and TACI, in B-lymphocytes from IgAN patients were observed. Our findings implied that in patients with IgAN, increased APRIL is accompanied elevated expression of its receptors in B-lymphocytes, which induces overproduction of Gd-IgA1, ultimately contributing to the pathogenesis of IgAN.

  13. Autoantibodies interacting with purified native thyrotropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Atger, M; Misrahi, M; Young, J; Jolivet, A; Orgiazzi, J; Schaison, G; Milgrom, E

    1999-11-01

    Native thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from membrane extracts of stably transfected L cells. An ELISA test was devised to study anti-TSHR autoantibodies directly. Comparison of native TSHR with bacterially expressed, denatured TSHR showed that the latter was not recognized by the autoantibodies, suggesting that they bind to conformational epitopes only present on the native receptor. The use of deglycosylated TSHR and of purified receptor ectodomain (alpha-subunit) showed that the autoantibodies recognized only the protein backbone moiety of the receptor and that their epitopes were localized entirely in its ectodomain. Autoantibodies were detected in 45 of 48 subjects with untreated Graves' disease and in 26 of 47 healthy volunteers. The affinity for the receptor was similar in the two groups (Kd = 0.25-1 x 10-10 M) and the autoantibodies belonged to the IgG class in all cases. Although the concentration of autoantibodies was higher in Graves' disease patients (3.50 +/- 0.36 mg.L-1) than in control subjects (1.76 +/- 0.21) (mean +/- SEM), there was an overlap between the groups. Receptor-stimulating autoantibodies (TSAb) were studied by measuring cAMP synthesis in stably transfected HEK 293 cells. Their characteristics (recognition of alpha-subunit, of deglycosylated TSHR, nonrecognition of bacterially expressed denatured receptor) were similar to those of the antibodies detected by the ELISA test. TSAb were only found in individuals with Graves' disease. The ELISA test measures total anti-TSHR antibodies, whereas the test using adenylate cyclase stimulation measures antibodies that recognize specific epitopes involved in receptor activation. Our observations thus disprove the hypothesis according to which Graves' disease is related to the appearance of anti-TSHR antibodies not present in normal subjects. Actually, anti-TSHR antibodies exist in many euthyroid subjects, in some cases even at concentrations higher than those

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Disease-Related Autoantibodies in Individuals at Increased Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mikuls, Ted R.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Deane, Kevin D.; Payne, Jeffrey B.; O'Dell, James R.; Yu, Fang; Sayles, Harlan; Weisman, Michael H.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Buckner, Jane H.; Keating, Richard M.; Derber, Lezlie A.; Robinson, William H.; Holers, V. Michael; Norris, Jill M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) with the presence of autoantibodies in individuals at risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Participants included: 1) a cohort enriched with HLA-DR4 and 2) those at risk for RA by virtue of having a first-degree relative with RA. None satisfied 1987 ACR RA classification criteria. Autoantibodies measured included anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) and rheumatoid factor (RF; nephelometry, IgA, IgM, IgG). Individuals were considered autoantibody positive (n = 113) with ≥ 1 positive autoantibody with individuals further categorized as `high-risk' (n = 38; positive ACPA or ≥ 2 RF assays). Autoantibody negative individuals served as comparators (n = 171). Antibody to Pg, P. intermedia (Pi), and F. nucleatum (Fn) were measured. Associations of bacterial antibodies with group status were examined using logistic regression. Results Anti-Pg concentrations were higher in high-risk (p = 0.011) and autoantibody positive group (p = 0.010) than in the autoantibody negative group. There were no group differences in anti-Pi or anti-Fn concentrations. After multivariable adjustment, anti-Pg concentrations (but not anti-Pi or anti-Fn) were significantly associated with autoantibody positive and high-risk status (p < 0.05). Conclusion Immunity to Pg, but not Pi or Fn, is significantly associated with the presence of RA-related autoantibodies in individuals at risk for RA. These results support the hypothesis that infection with Pg may play a central role in the early loss of tolerance to self-antigens in RA pathogenesis. PMID:22736291

  15. [Autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Motomura, Masakatsu; Narita Masuda, Tomoko

    2013-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by the failure of neuromuscular transmission mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies (Abs). Generally, patients with MG are divided into 3 groups: (1) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG (AChR-MG: 80%), (2) muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase antibody-positive MG (MuSK-MG: 5-10%), which are AChR-associated transmembrane post-synaptic proteins involved in AChR aggregation, and (3) double-seronegative MG. In 2011, autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4) were identified in Japanese MG patients, and thereafter, have been reported in Germany and USA. We developed a simple technique termed Gaussia luciferase immunoprecipitation (GLIP) for detecting the antibodies to Lrp4. Our results showed that 9 generalized MG patients out of 300 without AChR Ab were positive for Lrp4 antibodies. These antibodies inhibit the binding of Lrp4 to its ligand and predominantly belong to the IgG1 subclass. In other studies, Lrp4 Ab-positive sera inhibited agrin-induced aggregation of AChRs in cultured myotubes, suggesting a pathogenic role in the dysfunction of the neuromuscular endplate. Further understanding of the structure and function of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) through newly discovered autoantibodies may provide specific clinical information and treatment for MG. PMID:23568991

  16. Defective immunoglobulin A (IgA) glycosylation and IgA deposits in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kolka, Ragnhildur; Valdimarsson, Helgi; Bodvarsson, Magnus; Hardarson, Sverrir; Jonsson, Thorbjorn

    2013-09-01

    Defective glycosylation and immune complex (IC) formation may be of primary importance in immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine whether defective IgA1 glycosylation might support renal deposition of IgA and disease activity. IgA was isolated from the serum of 44 IgAN patients and 46 controls and glycosylation analysed by ELISA using glycan-specific lectins. IgA was measured by immunodiffusion and immune complexes by ELISA. IgA subclasses in IC deposits in kidney glomeruli were identified by immunohistochemical methods. A significant increase in N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) in terminal position (p = 0.02) observed in some of the IgAN patients, became more pronounced when sialic acid was removed from IgA1, indicating enhanced expression of α-2,6-sialyltransferase in patients compared with controls (p < 0.0001). Patients with defective galactosylation had lower serum IgA than other IgAN patients (p = 0.003). IgAN patients with both IgA1 and IgA2 glomerular deposits (21.7%) had increased GalNAc in terminal position (p = 0.003). Taken together, our results show that increased IgA glycosylation in IgAN associates with low levels of IgA, concomitant IgA1 and IgA2 glomerular deposits and poor clinical outcome.

  17. Selected autoantibodies and normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona; Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Jamrozy-Witkowska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Background Although intraocular pressure is an important risk factor in glaucoma, there is growing body evidence indicating an immunological component in the pathogenesis of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). The aim of this study was to determine if NTG coexists with elevated levels of autoantibodies detected in rheumatic diseases. Material/Methods We enrolled 105 patients into the study: 35 with NTG, 34 with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and 36 controls. All patients underwent ophthalmic examination and blood tests. Blood was examined for the level of: antibodies against antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ENA), immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM), rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA), and antiphospholipid antibodies (anticardiolipin antibodies, beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies, antiprothrombin antibodies). Results The level of ANA was increased among 6 patients in the NTG group (17.1%), 8 in the POAG group (23.5%), and 6 in the control group (16.5%). The difference was not statistically significant (p=0.97). None of the patients in the NTG, POAG, or control group had positive antibodies to ENA. The level of immunoglobulins IgG, IgM, and IgA in the 3 groups was similar and within normal values. The median level of rheumatoid factor and ACPA was the highest in the NTG group, but it was within normal laboratory values. There was a statistically significant difference between antiprothrombin antibodies IgG between the NTG and POAG group (p=0.01), but not between the NTG and control group (p=0.24). Conclusions The results of our study do not confirm the hypothesis that NTG coexists with elevated blood levels of antibodies, which are a characteristic feature of rheumatic diseases. PMID:25016491

  18. Autoantibodies in the sicca syndrome (primary Sjögren's syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Elkon, K B; Gharavi, A E; Hughes, G R; Moutsoupoulos, H M

    1984-01-01

    IgA and IgM rheumatoid factors as well as antibodies to Ro and La were measured in 37 patients with the sicca syndrome and 9 patients with Sjögren's syndrome secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. Positive results were found in 84% (IgA rheumatoid factor), 76% (IgM rheumatoid factor), 62% (Ro), and 50% (La) of patients with the sicca syndrome. There was no significant difference in the frequency of positive results in patients with glandular versus extraglandular disease. Antibodies to La invariably occurred in patients with antibodies to Ro. In addition, patients who were anti-Ro positive also had significantly higher IgA (p less than 0.05) and IgM (p less than 0.01) rheumatoid factor activity. Since 81% of the sicca patients were concordant for 3 of the 4 antibodies tested, production of these autoantibodies appears to be related. PMID:6712296

  19. Increased serum levels of IgA1-IgG immune complexes and anti-F(ab')2 antibodies in patients with primary IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schena, F P; Pastore, A; Ludovico, N; Sinico, R A; Benuzzi, S; Montinaro, V

    1989-01-01

    A solid-phase ELISA was used to detect IgA1 immune complexes (IgA1 ICs) containing IgG and IgM in 38 serum samples from 30 patients with primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and 14 subjects with non-IgA chronic glomerulonephritis. A jackfruit lectin, jacalin, was used as the substrate for the selective binding of human IgA1 ICs in serum PEG precipitate (7%). The presence of IgG, A and M antibodies against the F(ab')2 region of IgG was also investigated by the solid-phase ELISA. Six patients were studied during remission and relapse (fever, upper respiratory tract infection and macroheamaturia). The results showed significant increases in serum levels of IgA1 ICs (P less than 0.001) in 39.4% of the IgAN patients, IgA1-IgG ICs (P less than 0.001) in 68.4%, and IgA1-IgM ICs (P less than 0.002) in 10.5% of the patients. A significant increase in IgA1-IgG ICs was observed during relapse (P less than 0.02). Significantly high values of IgG (P less than 0.003) and IgA (P less than 0.001) antibodies directed at the F(ab')2 region of IgG were found. A significant increase in anti F(ab')2 antibodies (class IgA and IgM) was seen in the acute phase of the disease. The data suggest that an increased production of IgA1 ICs occurs in IgAN patients; ICs are mainly IgA1-IgG ICs during relapse. The presence of high serum levels of IgG and IgA antibodies against the F(ab')2 region of IgG indicates that in addition to the multiple anomalies of IgA regulation described in IgAN patients there may be further aberrances. PMID:2788538

  20. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective.

  1. Pneumococcal IgA1 protease subverts specific protection by human IgA1.

    PubMed

    Janoff, E N; Rubins, J B; Fasching, C; Charboneau, D; Rahkola, J T; Plaut, A G; Weiser, J N

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases may sabotage the protective effects of IgA. In vitro, both exogenous and endogenously produced IgA1 protease inhibited phagocytic killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capsule-specific IgA1 human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) but not IgA2. These IgA1 proteases cleaved and reduced binding of the the effector Fcα1 heavy chain but not the antigen-binding F(ab)/light chain to pneumococcal surfaces. In vivo, IgA1 protease-resistant IgA2, but not IgA1 protease-sensitive IgA1, supported 60% survival in mice infected with wild-type S. pneumoniae. IgA1 hMAbs protected mice against IgA1 protease-deficient but not -producing pneumococci. Parallel mouse sera with human IgA2 showed more efficient complement-mediated reductions in pneumococci with neutrophils than did IgA1, particularly with protease-producing organisms. After natural human pneumococcal bacteremia, purified serum IgG inhibited IgA1 protease activity in 7 of 11 patients (64%). These observations provide the first evidence in vivo that IgA1 protease can circumvent killing of S. pneumoniae by human IgA. Acquisition of IgA1 protease-neutralizing IgG after infection directs attention to IgA1 protease both as a determinant of successful colonization and infection and as a potential vaccine candidate.

  2. TSH RECEPTOR AUTOANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, Krzysztof; Morshed, Syed A.; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2009-01-01

    Thyrotropin receptor autoantibodies (TSHR-Abs) of the stimulating variety are the hallmark of Graves’ disease. The presence of immune defects leading to synthesis of TSHR-Abs causes hyperthyroidism and is associated with other extrathyroidal manifestations. Further characterization of these antibodies has now been made possible by the generation of monoclonal antibodies with this unique stimulating capacity as well as similar TSHR-Abs not associated with hyperthyroidism. Their present classification divides TSHR-Abs into stimulating, blocking (competing with TSH binding) and neutral (no signaling). Recent studies using monoclonal TSHR-Abs has revealed that stimulating and blocking antibodies bind to the receptor using mostly conformational epitopes, whilst neutral antibodies utilize exclusively linear peptides. Subtle differences in epitopes for stimulating and blocking antibodies account for the diversity of their biological actions. Recently non-classical signaling elicited by neutral antibodies has also been described, raising the need for a new classification of TSHR-Abs. PMID:19332151

  3. Fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to immunoglobulin g autoantibody exacerbated by epstein-barr virus.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Simmons, Julie H; Jones, Mary Rose; Palavecino, Elizabeth L; Pomper, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are caused by the production of an autoantibody that targets determinants on red blood cells (RBCs). This autoantibody can be immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, or IgA. Some autoantibodies react optimally at 0° to 4°C (ie, cold agglutinin) and usually are clinically insignificant. High-titer cold agglutinins are associated with IgM autoantibody and complement fixation induced by infectious agents, including the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This case report describes a 31-year-old man who had jaundice, a hemoglobin of 6.0 gdL, and was diagnosed with a hemolytic crisis of AIHA. He received a total of 11 RBC transfusions during a 15-hour period without sustained response and later died. The direct antiglobulin test results for this patient were positive, whereas the cold-agglutinin-testing results were negative. We detected EBV DNA in blood via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report a rare case of AIHA associated with an IgG autoantibody and exacerbated by EBV infection, causing a fatal hemolytic anemia.

  4. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  5. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi), and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun) to 35% (ileum) at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum) or IgM (duodenum) plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses to other pathogens and

  6. IgA nephropathy and aberrant glycosylation of tonsillar, serum and glomerular IgA1.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Koichiro; Iwase, Hitoo

    2011-01-01

    Human IgA1, which is the predominant subtype deposited in the glomeruli in IgA nephropathy (IgAN), has a unique mucin-like structure in its hinge region. Several studies suggested that the IgA1 molecules in IgAN patients had an aberrant structure of O-glycans. The paper summarizes the analyses of O-glycan structure in the IgA1 molecules taken from tonsils, sera and glomeruli of patients with IgAN. Hypoglycosylation, especially hypogalactosylation of O-glycans has been observed not only in serum and glomerular IgA1 but also in tonsillar IgA1.

  7. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-06-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  8. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:27279139

  9. Crescentic IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, J G; Esparza, A R; Matarese, R A; Endreny, R G; Carvalho, J S; Allegra, S R

    1984-11-01

    We report five cases of crescentic IgA nephropathy. All are males, 16-60 years of age. One case each came to medical attention with uremia, nephrotic syndrome, and gross hematuria; two cases presented with microhematuria and proteinuria on routine urinalysis. All had hypertension, azotemia (serum creatinine 1.6-9.4 mg/dl), proteinuria (greater than 6 g/24 hr in four cases), hypoalbuminemia (less than 3 g/dl), and hematuria (gross in two cases). All progressed to end-stage renal failure renal failure ending in dialysis (three cases) or death from unrelated causes (two cases). Prednisone, 60 mg/day for 1 month in two patients (with two 1-g doses of iv methylprednisolone in 1 case) did not improve the serum creatinine level, but one patient subsequently experienced a less rapid fall in renal function. A crescentic glomerulonephritis was present in all biopsies (crescents in 31-80% of glomeruli; mean, 50%). The size and stage of the crescents were variable. Numerous glomeruli had focal or diffuse sclerosis. In all cases, there was a 3 or 4+ deposition of IgA. Low-intensity staining for IgG and IgM was noted in four and three patients, respectively. On electron microscopy, dense granular mesangial deposits were noted in all cases and in four patients capillary subepithelial deposits were also observed. This form of IgA nephropathy is not common, but some studies indicate that it may occur in about 5% of patients with IgA nephropathy.

  10. IgA Structure Variations Associate with Immune Stimulations and IgA Mesangial Deposition.

    PubMed

    Oruc, Zeliha; Oblet, Christelle; Boumediene, Ahmed; Druilhe, Anne; Pascal, Virginie; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Cuvillier, Armelle; El Hamel, Chahrazed; Lecardeur, Sandrine; Leanderson, Tomas; Morelle, Willy; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Aldigier, Jean-Claude; Cogné, Michel

    2016-09-01

    IgA1 mesangial deposition is the hallmark of IgA nephropathy and Henoch-Schönlein purpura, the onset of which often follows infections. Deposited IgA has been reported as polymeric, J chain associated, and often, hypogalactosylated but with no information concerning the influence of the IgA repertoire or the link between immune stimuli and IgA structure. We explored these issues in the α1KI mouse model, which produces polyclonal human IgA1 prone to mesangial deposition. Compared with mice challenged by a conventional environment, mice in a specific pathogen-free environment had less IgA deposition. However, serum IgA of specific pathogen-free mice showed more galactosylation and much lower polymerization. Notably, wild-type, α1KI, and even J chain-deficient mice showed increased polymeric serum IgA on exposure to pathogens. Strict germfree conditions delayed but did not completely prevent deposition; mice housed in these conditions had very low serum IgA levels and produced essentially monomeric IgA. Finally, comparing monoclonal IgA1 that had different variable regions and mesangial deposition patterns indicated that, independently of glycosylation and polymerization, deposition might also depend on IgA carrying specific variable domains. Together with IgA quantities and constant region post-translational modifications, repertoire changes during immune responses might, thus, modulate IgA propensity to deposition. These IgA features are not associated with circulating immune complexes and C3 deposition and are more pertinent to an initial IgA deposition step preceding overt clinical symptoms in patients.

  11. Aptamer BC 007 - A broad spectrum neutralizer of pathogenic autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Holtzhauer, Martin; Schlichtiger, Alice; Bartel, Sabine; Schimke, Ingolf; Müller, Johannes; Dandel, Michael; Luppa, Peter B; Wallukat, Gerd

    2016-10-15

    The effect of autoantibodies on G-protein coupled receptors in the pathogenesis of diseases, especially of the heart and vascular system, is an increasingly accepted fact today. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is the most intensively investigated pathological situation of these. With DCM, autoantibodies against the β1-adrenoceptor and the muscarinic M2-receptor have been found in high percentage of investigated patients. Immunoadsorption for autoantibody removal has already shown a long-term beneficial therapeutic effect, but has remained limited in its application because of the complexity of this method. A new easy applicable treatment strategy has, therefore, been discovered. Because of intra- and inter-loop epitope variability of the β1-adrenoceptor specific autoantibodies and also the occurrence of further autoantibodies of this class such as the ones against the β2- and α1-adrenoceptor, the ETA-, proteinase activated-, and the AT1-receptors in different pathological situations, this newly discovered broad-spectrum neutralizer of all these autoantibodies - aptamer BC 007 - is under development. The binding and neutralizing effect was investigated applying a bioassay of spontaneously beating neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) - technology. The usefulness of aptamer BC 007 to specify column technology for the removal of serum autoantibodies was also demonstrated. The presented data suggest that aptamer BC 007 might be an appropriate molecule candidate to support future research about the meaning of G-protein-coupled receptor autoantibodies.

  12. Autoantibody profiling in APS.

    PubMed

    Roggenbuck, D; Somma, V; Schierack, P; Borghi, M O; Meroni, P L

    2014-10-01

    The international consensus for the classification of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) requires clinical and laboratory criteria to be considered at an equal level for diagnosing APS. Thus, detection of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) being a hallmark of APS has been the object of intensive investigation over the past 40 years. However, appropriate detection of aPL still remains a laboratory challenge due to their heterogeneity comprising autoantibodies reactive to different phospholipid-binding plasma proteins, such as beta-2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI) and prothrombin. The relevance of aPL interacting with phospholipids other than cardiolipin (CL, diphosphatidylglycerol), such as phosphatidylserine (PS), remains elusive with regard to the diagnosis of APS. Recently, the concept of aPL profiling has been introduced to assess the risk of thrombotic complications in patients with APS. New assay techniques, apart from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) recommended by the international consensus for the classification of APS, have been proposed for multiplexing of aPL testing. Line immunoassays (LIAs) employing a novel hydrophobic solid phase for the simultaneous detection of different aPL seem to be an intriguing alternative. We evaluated a novel multiplex LIA employing a hydrophobic membrane coated with different phospholipid (PL)-binding proteins or PLs. The performance characteristics of this new multiplexing assay technique demonstrated its usefulness for aPL profiling.

  13. Development of the gut microbiota and mucosal IgA responses in twins and gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Planer, Joseph D; Peng, Yangqing; Kau, Andrew L; Blanton, Laura V; Ndao, I Malick; Tarr, Phillip I; Warner, Barbara B; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-05-25

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the major class of antibody secreted by the gut mucosa, is an important contributor to gut barrier function. The repertoire of IgA bound to gut bacteria reflects both T-cell-dependent and -independent pathways, plus glycans present on the antibody's secretory component. Human gut bacterial taxa targeted by IgA in the setting of barrier dysfunction are capable of producing intestinal pathology when isolated and transferred to gnotobiotic mice. A complex reorientation of gut immunity occurs as infants transition from passively acquired IgA present in breast milk to host-derived IgA. How IgA responses co-develop with assembly of the microbiota during this period remains poorly understood. Here, we (1) identify a set of age-discriminatory bacterial taxa whose representations define a program of microbiota assembly and maturation during the first 2 postnatal years that is shared across 40 healthy twin pairs in the USA; (2) describe a pattern of progression of gut mucosal IgA responses to bacterial members of the microbiota that is highly distinctive for family members (twin pairs) during the first several postnatal months then generalizes across pairs in the second year; and (3) assess the effects of zygosity, birth mode, and breast feeding. Age-associated differences in these IgA responses can be recapitulated in young germ-free mice, colonized with faecal microbiota obtained from two twin pairs at 6 and 18 months of age, and fed a sequence of human diets that simulate the transition from milk feeding to complementary foods. Most of these responses were robust to diet, suggesting that 'intrinsic' properties of community members play a dominant role in dictating IgA responses. The approach described can be used to define gut mucosal immune development in health and disease states and to help discover ways of repairing or preventing perturbations in this facet of host immunity.

  14. Development of the gut microbiota and mucosal IgA responses in twins and gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Planer, Joseph D; Peng, Yangqing; Kau, Andrew L; Blanton, Laura V; Ndao, I Malick; Tarr, Phillip I; Warner, Barbara B; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-06-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the major class of antibody secreted by the gut mucosa, is an important contributor to gut barrier function. The repertoire of IgA bound to gut bacteria reflects both T-cell-dependent and -independent pathways, plus glycans present on the antibody's secretory component. Human gut bacterial taxa targeted by IgA in the setting of barrier dysfunction are capable of producing intestinal pathology when isolated and transferred to gnotobiotic mice. A complex reorientation of gut immunity occurs as infants transition from passively acquired IgA present in breast milk to host-derived IgA. How IgA responses co-develop with assembly of the microbiota during this period remains poorly understood. Here, we (1) identify a set of age-discriminatory bacterial taxa whose representations define a program of microbiota assembly and maturation during the first 2 postnatal years that is shared across 40 healthy twin pairs in the USA; (2) describe a pattern of progression of gut mucosal IgA responses to bacterial members of the microbiota that is highly distinctive for family members (twin pairs) during the first several postnatal months then generalizes across pairs in the second year; and (3) assess the effects of zygosity, birth mode, and breast feeding. Age-associated differences in these IgA responses can be recapitulated in young germ-free mice, colonized with faecal microbiota obtained from two twin pairs at 6 and 18 months of age, and fed a sequence of human diets that simulate the transition from milk feeding to complementary foods. Most of these responses were robust to diet, suggesting that 'intrinsic' properties of community members play a dominant role in dictating IgA responses. The approach described can be used to define gut mucosal immune development in health and disease states and to help discover ways of repairing or preventing perturbations in this facet of host immunity. PMID:27279225

  15. Tumor-Associated and Disease-Associated Autoantibody Repertoires in Healthy Colostrum and Maternal and Newborn Cord Sera

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Asaf; Bransburg-Zabary, Sharron; Maayan-Metzger, Ayala; Dar, Gittit; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we studied autoantibody repertoires and Ig isotypes in 71 mothers and their 104 healthy newborns (including twins and triplets delivered term or premature). Newborns receive maternal IgG Abs via the placenta before birth, but developing infants must produce their own IgM and IgA Abs. We used an Ag microarray analysis to detect binding to a selection of 295 self-Ags, compared with 27 standard foreign Ags. The magnitude of binding to specific self-Ags was found to be not less than that to the foreign Ags. As expected, each newborn shared with its mother a similar IgG repertoire—manifest as early as the 24th week of gestation. IgM and IgA autoantibody repertoires in cord sera were highly correlated among the newborns and differed from their mothers’ repertoires; the latter differed in sera and milk. The autoantibodies bound to self-Ags known to be associated with tumors and to autoimmune diseases. Thus, autoantibody repertoires in healthy humans—the immunological homunculus—arise congenitally, differ in maternal milk and sera, and mark the potential of the immune system to attack tumors, beneficially, or healthy tissues, harmfully; regulation of the tissue site, the dynamics, and the response phenotype of homuncular autoimmunity very likely affects health. PMID:25917091

  16. Autoantibodies against small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein complexes and their clinical associations

    PubMed Central

    VAN EENENNAAM, H; VOGELZANGS, J H P; BISSCHOPS, L; TE BOOME, L C J; SEELIG, H P; RENZ, M; DE ROOIJ, D -J; BROUWER, R; PLUK, H; PRUIJN, G J M; VAN VENROOIJ, W J; VAN DEN HOOGEN, F H J

    2002-01-01

    Sera from patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic sclerosis (SSc) have been shown to contain reactivities to nuclear components. Autoantibodies specifically targeting nucleolar antigens are found most frequently in patients suffering from SSc or SSc overlap syndromes. We determined the prevalence and clinical significance of autoantibodies directed to nucleolar RNA-protein complexes, the so-called small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein complexes (snoRNPs). A total of 172 patient sera with antinucleolar antibodies were analysed by immunoprecipitation. From 100 of these patients clinical information was obtained by chart review. Autoantibodies directed to snoRNPs were detected not only in patients suffering from SSc and primary Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), but also in patients suffering from SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and myositis (PM/DM). Antibodies against box C/D small snoRNPs can be subdivided in antifibrillarin positive and antifibrillarin negative reactivity. Antifibrillarin-positive patient sera were associated with a poor prognosis in comparison with antifibrillarin negative (reactivity with U3 or U8 snoRNP only) patient sera. Anti-Th/To autoantibodies were associated with SSc, primary RP and SLE and were found predominantly in patients suffering from decreased co-diffusion and oesophagus motility and xerophthalmia. For the first time autoantibodies that recognize box H/ACA snoRNPs are described, identifying this class of snoRNPs as a novel autoantigenic activity. Taken together, our data show that antinucleolar patient sera directed to small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein complexes are found frequently in other diseases than SSc and that categorization of diagnoses and clinical manifestations based on autoantibody profiles seems particularly informative in patient sera recognizing box C/D snoRNPs. PMID:12452846

  17. Secretory IgA: Arresting Microbial Pathogens at Epithelial Borders

    PubMed Central

    Mantis, Nicholas J.; Forbes, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA), the predominant class of antibody found in intestinal secretions. While SIgA’s role in protecting the intestinal epithelium from the enteric pathogen and toxins has long been recognized, surprisingly little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which this is achieved. The present review summarizes the current understanding of how SIgA functions to prevent microbial pathogens and toxins from gaining access to the intestinal epithelium. We also discuss recent work from our laboratory examining the interaction of a particular protective monoclonal IgA with Salmonella and propose, based on this work, that SIgA has a previously unrecognized capacity to directly interfere with microbial virulence at mucosal surfaces. PMID:20450284

  18. The occurrence of autoantibodies in infectious mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, R. N. P.; Emond, R. T. D.; Thomas, D. B.; Doniach, D.

    1974-01-01

    Autoantibodies were looked for by immunofluorescence (IFL) in seventy-seven cases of infectious mononucleosis (IM) at the onset of symptoms and on recovery, to determine the time of appearance, duration and range of these responses, and to correlate them with serum immunoglobulin and EB virus antibody titres. Antibodies to lymphocyte membrane demonstrated by IFL, now identified with lymphocytotoxins, were present in 46% of patients in the acute stage, persisting for less than 7 weeks. Antibodies to smooth muscle (SMA) or to contractile fibres in other tissue cells including human thyroid and rat hepatocytes, were present in over 70% of cases, some being entirely of IgM class. The highest titres occurred soon after onset and these antibodies also disappeared during convalescence. By contrast ANA, mitochondrial, microsomal and reticulin antibodies, also thyroid and gastric organ-specific reactivity were seen only occasionally owing to the young age group of the patients. In individual cases there was no correlation between the appearance of lymphocyte antibodies and SMA, or between these and the EB virus antibody titres. The autoantibodies produced in this disease are highly selected. It is suggested that clones of B cells are stimulated to make these antibodies by virtue of being infected with EB virus, and that the T-cell clones in the circulation are more likely expanded in order to terminate the infection. PMID:4619789

  19. [IgA1 aberrant glycosylation in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy: an overivew].

    PubMed

    Xie, Linshen; Wang, Li; Huang, Jan; Fan, Junming

    2010-02-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis which mainly accounts for the development of end-stage renal diseases. It is characterized by deposits of IgA1 in mesangium. The pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy is complicated. Moreover, there is a wide range of clinical features and variable histomorphologies in the diagnosed cases of IgA nephropathy. It was demonstrated that the galactose-deficient of IgA1 O-glycan chains led IgA1 to self-aggregation and eventual deposition in mesangium. Abnormality of glycosyltransferases, genetic mutation and immunologic disorder were involved in the aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 which was recognized as the key etiopathogenisis of IgA nephropathy. However, the exact source and the pathogenic mechanism of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 remain obscure. The further studies on aberrant O-glycosylation of IgA1 would contribute to the understanding of IgA nephropathy and provide new therapeutical strategy.

  20. Selective deficiency of IgA

    MedlinePlus

    Consider genetic counseling if you have a family history of selective IgA deficiency and you plan to have children. If ... Genetic counseling may be of value to prospective parents with a family history of selective IgA deficiency.

  1. MHC associations with clinical and autoantibody manifestations in European SLE.

    PubMed

    Morris, D L; Fernando, M M A; Taylor, K E; Chung, S A; Nititham, J; Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Barcellos, L F; Behrens, T W; Cotsapas, C; Gaffney, P M; Graham, R R; Pons-Estel, B A; Gregersen, P K; Harley, J B; Hauser, S L; Hom, G; Langefeld, C D; Noble, J A; Rioux, J D; Seldin, M F; Vyse, T J; Criswell, L A

    2014-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease affecting multiple organ systems and characterized by autoantibody formation to nuclear components. Although genetic variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is associated with SLE, its role in the development of clinical manifestations and autoantibody production is not well defined. We conducted a meta-analysis of four independent European SLE case collections for associations between SLE sub-phenotypes and MHC single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and variant HLA amino acids. Of the 11 American College of Rheumatology criteria and 7 autoantibody sub-phenotypes examined, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibody subsets exhibited the highest number and most statistically significant associations. HLA-DRB1*03:01 was significantly associated with both sub-phenotypes. We found evidence of associations independent of MHC class II variants in the anti-Ro subset alone. Conditional analyses showed that anti-Ro and anti-La subsets are independently associated with HLA-DRB1*0301, and that the HLA-DRB1*03:01 association with SLE is largely but not completely driven by the association of this allele with these sub-phenotypes. Our results provide strong evidence for a multilevel risk model for HLA-DRB1*03:01 in SLE, where the association with anti-Ro and anti-La antibody-positive SLE is much stronger than SLE without these autoantibodies.

  2. The habitat, double life, citizenship, and forgetfulness of IgA.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Andrew J; Geuking, Markus B; Slack, Emma; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; McCoy, Kathy D

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the main secretory immunoglobulin of mucous membranes and is powerfully induced by the presence of commensal microbes in the intestine. B cells undergo class switch recombination to IgA in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues, particularly mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches, through both T-dependent and T-independent pathways. IgA B cells primed in the mucosa traffic from the intestinal lymphoid structures, initially through the lymphatics and then join the bloodstream, to home back to the intestinal mucosa as IgA-secreting plasma cells. Once induced, anti-bacterial IgA can be extremely long-lived but is replaced if there is induction of additional IgA specificities by other microbes. The mucosal immune system is anatomically separated from the systemic immune system by the MLNs, which act as a firewall to prevent penetration of live intestinal bacteria to systemic sites. Dendritic cells sample intestinal bacteria and induce B cells to switch to IgA. In contrast, intestinal macrophages are adept at killing extracellular bacteria and are able to clear bacteria that have crossed the mucus and epithelial barriers. There is both a continuum between innate and adaptive immune mechanisms and compartmentalization of the mucosal immune system from systemic immunity that function to preserve host microbial mutualism. PMID:22168417

  3. Antihelper T cell autoantibody in acquired agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, A; Sicklick, M; Mehra, V; Rosen, F S; Levey, R H

    1981-01-01

    A patient with acquired agammaglobulinemia had an antihelper T cell factor that was identified as an immunoglobulin of the IgG class. The factor specifically bound to the TH2- T cell subset and, in the presence of complement, abolished the helper effect of normal T cells. The antihelper T cell antibody preceded by several years the appearance of suppressor TH2+Ia+ T cells, at which time the clinical course rapidly deteriorated. Plasmapheresis resulted in lymphocytosis and reappearance of a functionally intact helper T cell population. It did not affect the suppressor cells. Conversely, total thymectomy resulted in a temporary disappearance of the TH2+Ia+ suppressor cells, but did not decrease the levels of the autoantibody to helper T cells. Neither of these treatments reversed the state of agammaglobulinemia. PMID:6450224

  4. [IgA linear dermatosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Jablonska, S; Chorzelski, T

    1979-09-01

    Besides the typical forms of dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) and bullous pemphigoid (BP) of adults and children, there are cases combining clinical, histological and electronmicroscopic features of both. Linear continuous IgA deposits along basement membrane zone (BMZ) are a most characteristic finding. They differ from the granular IgA deposits in DH, even if these are also distributed along the BMZ (however, preserving as a rule their granular pattern). IgG circulating anti-BMZ antibodies are absent, whereas in some cases IgA anti-BMZ antibodies may be found. In contrast to DH, there is no gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and the gluten-free diet is ineffective. The recognition of this bullous disease as a distinct entity is of practical significance because these cases respond well to combined treatment with sulfones and corticosteroids, all in small doses. Because of diagnostic importance of linear IgA deposits at BMZ we have proposed the name IgA linear dermatosis. In children a counterpart of IgA linear dermatosis of adults is chronic bullous disease of childhood (CBDC), which we propose to call IgA linear dermatosis of childhood.

  5. A comparison of IgA positive and IgA negative dapsone responsive dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Fry, L; Walkden, V; Wojnarowska, F; Haffenden, G; McMinn, R M

    1980-04-01

    A study of thirty-three patients with a clinical diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) referred to our DH clinic over the las 11 years is reported. Twenty-six were referred by other consultant dermatologists. The diagnosis had been made by the clinical features and response of the rash to dapsone. Seventeen patients were found to have IgA in the uninvolved skin (IgA positive) and in sixteen no IgA was found (IgA negative). The duration of the rash prior to referral to the DH clinic was 3 months to 19 years (mean 5.0 years) for the IgA negative patients and 2 months to 22 years (mean 5.2 years) for the IgA positive group. The length of follow-up was 3 months to 11 years (mean 5.0 years) for the IgA negative, and 2--11 years (mean 5.6 years) for the IgA positive group. During follow-up the rash cleared completely and required no treatment in seven of the sixteen IgA negative patients. Thirteen of these sixteen patients no longer required dapsone, but six patients were receiving alternative treatment. In the three patients still taking dapsone IgA has not been found on subsequent biopsy. Of the seventeen IgA positive patients only three were able to stop dapsone during follow-up and in these three the IgA was still detected in the skin. Small intestinal mucosa was abnormal in eight of eleven IgA positive patients, but was normal in all thirteen IgA negative patients in whom jejunal biopsies were performed. An alternative diagnosis to DH has subsequently been made in thirteen of the sixteen IgA negative patients. Although the significance of IgA in the skin in DH is not known it appears to be part of the disease process. Patients who have a rash suggestive of DH and which is dapsone responsive, but in whom IgA is not found in the uninvolved skin, usually turn out to have a dermatosis other than dermatitis herpetiformis. Referral to a unit with expertise in immunofluorescence techniques of skin biopsies would appear to be helpful.

  6. Acquired angio-oedema caused by IgA paraprotein.

    PubMed

    van Spronsen, D J; Hoorntje, S J; Hannema, A J; Hack, C E

    1998-01-01

    The syndrome of acquired angio-oedema is characterized by late onset of recurrent bouts of angio-oedema or abdominal pain and may be caused by an acquired deficiency of C1-inhibitor (C1-INH), the inhibitor of the first component of complement. Acquired C1-INH deficiency has been described in approximately 50 patients and is strongly associated with malignant B-cell proliferations. We describe a patient with an 8-year history of recurrent abdominal symptoms and angio-oedema with acquired C1-INH deficiency, caused by the presence of IgA-kappa antibodies that inactivate C1-INH. Analysis of the bone marrow revealed an IgA-kappa monoclonal population of plasma cells, without evidence of overt myeloma. Angio-oedema caused by an autoantibody of the IgA isotype is extremely rare and has never been described in a Dutch patient. Recognition of angio-oedema, both hereditary and acquired, is important because of the therapeutic consequences, as will be discussed.

  7. TGF-β1 improves mucosal IgA dysfunction and dysbiosis following intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Yu; Liu, Zi-Meng; Zhang, Hu-Fei; Li, Yun-Sheng; Wen, Shi-Hong; Shen, Jian-Tong; Huang, Wen-Qi; Liu, Ke-Xuan

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) severely disrupts gut barriers and leads to high mortality in the critical care setting. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 plays a pivotal role in intestinal cellular and immune regulation. However, the effects of TGF-β1 on intestinal I/R injury remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of TGF-β1 on gut barriers after intestinal I/R and the molecular mechanisms. Intestinal I/R model was produced in mice by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 1 hr followed by reperfusion. Recombinant TGF-β1 was intravenously infused at 15 min. before ischaemia. The results showed that within 2 hrs after reperfusion, intestinal I/R disturbed intestinal immunoglobulin A class switch recombination (IgA CSR), the key process of mucosal IgA synthesis, and resulted in IgA dysfunction, as evidenced by decreased production and bacteria-binding capacity of IgA. Meanwhile, the disruptions of intestinal microflora and mucosal structure were exhibited. Transforming growth factor-β1 activated IgA CSR as evidenced by the increased activation molecules and IgA precursors. Strikingly, TGF-β1 improved intestinal mucosal IgA dysfunction, dysbiosis and epithelial damage at the early stage after reperfusion. In addition, SB-431542, a specific inhibitor of activating mothers against decapentaplegic homologue (SMAD) 2/3, totally blocked the inductive effect of TGF-β1 on IgA CSR and almost abrogated the above protective effects on intestinal barriers. Taken together, our study demonstrates that TGF-β1 protects intestinal mucosal IgA immunity, microbiota and epithelial integrity against I/R injury mainly through TGF-β receptor 1/SMAD 2/3 pathway. Induction of IgA CSR may be involved in the protection conferred by TGF-β1.

  8. Expression of homing receptors on IgA1 and IgA2 plasmablasts in blood reflects differential distribution of IgA1 and IgA2 in various body fluids.

    PubMed

    Pakkanen, Sari H; Kantele, Jussi M; Moldoveanu, Zina; Hedges, Spencer; Häkkinen, Miikka; Mestecky, Jiri; Kantele, Anu

    2010-03-01

    Although secretory IgA is the most abundantly produced Ig isotype, the mechanisms underlying the differential distribution of IgA subclasses in various body fluids remain unclear. To explore these mechanisms, we examined the distribution of IgA subclasses, the influence of the nature and sites of encounters with antigens, and the correlation between IgA subclass distribution and homing potentials of circulating IgA plasmablasts. IgA1 predominated in serum, tears, nasal wash fluid, and saliva; the levels of IgA1 and IgA2 were comparable in vaginal wash fluid; and IgA2 predominated in intestinal lavage fluids. Seventy-one percent of circulating IgA plasmablasts secreted IgA1. The intestinal homing receptor (HR), alpha4beta7, was expressed more frequently on IgA2 than on IgA1 plasmablasts, with no differences in the expression of other HRs. IgA subclass distribution among circulating antigen-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) was dependent on the nature of the antigen: following vaccination with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, unconjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide, or Haemophilus influenzae polysaccharide-diphtheria toxoid conjugate, the proportions of specific IgA1 ASC were 74%, 47%, 56%, and 80%, respectively. HR expression depended on the route of administration: expression of HRs was different after oral than after parenteral vaccination, while no difference was seen between HR expression of antigen-specific IgA1 and IgA2 ASC induced via the same route. The key factors determining IgA subclass distribution in a given secretion are the nature of the antigens encountered at a particular site and the site-specific homing instructions given to lymphocytes at that site. These two factors are reflected as differences in the homing profiles of the total populations of circulating IgA1 and IgA2 plasmablasts.

  9. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Na; Hu, Shaomin

    2015-07-01

    The intestine harbors enormous numbers of commensal bacteria and is under frequent attack from food-borne pathogens and toxins. A properly regulated immune response is critical for homeostatic maintenance of commensals and for protection against infection and toxins in the intestine. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype antibodies function specifically in mucosal sites such as the intestines to help maintain intestinal health by binding to and regulating commensal microbiota, pathogens and toxins. IgA antibodies are produced by intestinal IgA antibody-secreting plasma cells generated in gut-associated lymphoid tissues from naïve B cells in response to stimulations of the intestinal bacteria and components. Research on generation, migration, and maintenance of IgA-secreting cells is important in our effort to understand the biology of IgA responses and to help better design vaccines against intestinal infections.

  10. Secretory IgA synthesis in Kwashiorkor.

    PubMed

    Beatty, D W; Napier, B; Sinclair-Smith, C C; McCabe, K; Hughes, E J

    1983-09-01

    The synthesis of intestinal secretory IgA was studied in in vitro cultures of duodenal mucosal biopsies from children with Kwashiorkor. Production of secretory IgA was measured by the incorporation of radioactive label and visualized following PAGE and autoradiography. Results obtained before and after nutritional rehabilitation demonstrate an enhanced synthesis of sIgA in children with acute Kwashiorkor. Histological examination of plasma cells in the biopsy tissue confirms a twofold increase in IgA staining plasma cells in acute Kwashiorkor. Peripheral blood B lymphocytes in acute Kwashiorkor however, showed a reduction in IgA synthesis in the acute stage. These results suggest an effective mucosal sIgA response to the increased intestinal antigen load in Kwashiorkor.

  11. Myositis autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ghirardello, Anna; Borella, Elisabetta; Beggio, Marianna; Franceschini, Franco; Fredi, Micaela; Doria, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Autoantibodies are powerful diagnostic tools in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, especially for confirming the diagnosis and contributing to the definition of disease subsets. They are present in over 80 % of patients with immuno-mediated myositis and directed towards ubiquitously expressed intracellular complexes. Most of these autoantibodies are reported also in other autoimmune diseases, while some are considered myositis-specific. Myositis autoantibodies are traditionally categorized in two groups, based on their diagnostic accuracy: myositis-specific antibodies (MSA) and myositis-associated antibodies (MAA), the latter mostly occurring in myositis-overlap syndromes. Besides the so-called traditional MSA, including anti-synthetases, anti-SRP and anti-Mi-2 antibodies, additional newly conceived immune targets have been recently identified, mostly in patients with severe forms of dermatomyositis or necrotizing myopathy. They mainly encompass enzymatic proteins essentially involved in the regulation of gene transcription or post-translational modifications, i.e., TIF1-γ, NXP-2, MDA5, SAE and HMGCR. Among the MAA, anti-PM/Scl and anti-Ku characterize an overlap polydermatomyositis/systemic sclerosis syndrome with severe interstitial lung involvement.

  12. Independence Day for IgA.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Andrew J; McCoy, Kathy D

    2015-09-15

    IgA is induced through T-cell-dependent and -independent pathways. In this issue, Bunker et al. (2015) now show that the T-cell-independent pathway is sufficient to coat most small intestinal microbes specifically, and Fransen et al. (2015) find that IgA coating promotes uptake of microbes into Peyer's patches and drives further induction in a positive-feedback loop. PMID:26377894

  13. Standardisation of the factor H autoantibody assay.

    PubMed

    Watson, Rachael; Lindner, Susanne; Bordereau, Pauline; Hunze, Eva-Maria; Tak, Federico; Ngo, Stéphanie; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Marchbank, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The screening of all atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS) patients for factor H autoantibodies is best practice. However, there is no consensus assay for the reporting of factor H autoantibody titres. In this study, three European complement laboratories with expertise in the field of autoantibody testing address this by systematically evaluating several ELISA methods used for the detection of factor H autoantibodies. All methods tested adequately detect high titre samples. However, this study recommends the Paris method for the detection and reporting of factor H autoantibodies to be used when setting up a factor H autoantibody screen. The importance of individual sample background subtraction in these ELISA tests was established. The use of a relative or arbitrary unit index with a common positive and negative serum allowed for consistent comparison of findings from different test centres. Therefore, it is recommended that a standard arbitrary unit scale based on a titration curve from a common positive anti-serum be adopted to allow future establishment of the relative importance of particular titres of factor H autoantibodies in aHUS. Systematic assay for the presence of factor H autoantibodies in patients using the Paris method will provide the longitudinal analysis needed to fully establish the importance of factor H autoantibodies in disease. This will feed into additional research to clarify whether additional factors have a bearing on the phenotype/outcome of autoimmune aHUS. PMID:23891327

  14. Autoantibodies: diagnostic fingerprints and etiologic perplexities.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, M J

    1997-02-01

    Autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic rheumatic diseases, organ-specific autoimmune diseases and paraneoplastic syndromes. Cell biologists have used autoantibodies as probes to define the structure and function of novel macromolecules and to determine the chromosomal location of their respective genes. The observation that many autoantibodies appear before the clinical expression of disease suggests that they are not epiphenomena. Some autoantibodies are disease-specific markers and are in aid to establishing a diagnosis. Although it has been difficult to link autoantibodies to pathogenesis, they can be used to predict disease progression and outcome. For example, autoantibodies directed against topoisomerase are associated with progression of scleroderma to diffuse skin involvement and severe systemic disease, whereas antibodies to centromere proteins predict a more slowly progressive disease and development of a limited variant of scleroderma. Certain models of autoantibody production hold promise of a clearer understanding of the mechanisms that underlie autoimmunity. Drugs such as procainamide and hydralazine induce the production of chromatin autoantibodies. Exposure to heavy metals (e.g., mercury) is also linked to the development of autoantibodies. The data provide evidence that the autoimmune response is driven by autoantigens, which are multimolecular complexes involved in essential cellular functions.

  15. Seroprevalence of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDA-R) autoantibodies in aging subjects without neuropsychiatric disorders and in dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Busse, Stefan; Busse, Mandy; Brix, Britta; Probst, Christian; Genz, Axel; Bogerts, Bernhard; Stoecker, Winfried; Steiner, Johann

    2014-09-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDA-R) play a key role in learning and memory. Therefore, they may be involved in the pathophysiology of dementia. NMDA-R autoantibodies directed against the NR1a subunit of the NMDA-R, which were first identified as a specific marker for a severe form of encephalitis, cause a decrease in NMDA-Rs, resulting in cognitive impairment and psychosis. We examined the prevalence of NR1a NMDA-R autoantibodies in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 24 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 20 patients with subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD), and 274 volunteers without neuropsychiatric disorder. The latter cases showed an association of seropositivity with age. Notably, the overall seroprevalence was not statistically different between dementia patients and matched controls. Further analysis of the patient samples showed that four patients with AD and three patients with SIVD had positive NMDA-R IgM, IgG, and/or IgA autoantibody titers in serum. These patients suffered from psychosis (with the exception of one case). CSF samples were negative for NMDA-R autoantibodies. We conclude that the seroprevalence of NMDA-R-directed autoantibodies is age-related. It has to be clarified by larger studies whether NMDA-R autoantibodies in peripheral blood may predispose patients with AD and SIVD to susceptibility for psychotic episodes if disturbances of blood-brain-barrier integrity occur.

  16. ISOLATION OF RABBIT IGA ANTIHAPTEN ANTIBODY AND DEMONSTRATION OF SKIN-SENSITIZING ACTIVITY IN HOMOLOGOUS SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Kaoru; Yagi, Yasuo; Pressman, David

    1966-01-01

    Multiple antibody components of rabbit antisera against p-azobenzenearsonate (Rp) were studied with respect to their globulin nature and skin-sensitizing activity. IgA antibody was characterized by isolating two IgA-rich fractions from a specifically purified antibody preparation. Examination of these fractions showed that IgA antibodies existed in two molecular forms, one with a sedimentation constant of 7S and the other 9S. Skin-sensitizing activity was examined by a P-K type test and a PCA test with Rp-rabbit serum albumin in homologous (rabbit) species. Only the 7S but not 9S IgA antibody sensitized rabbit skin. IgM antibody showed no activity and IgG antibody showed very low activity. In contrast, only IgG antibody was active in the P-K type test to sensitize a heterologous species (guinea pig). None of the antibodies of other classes showed sensitizing activity in heterologous skin. The 7S IgA antibody lost its sensitizing activity upon reduction and alkylation, although no change in its molecular size could be observed. The loss of sensitizing activity was not due to the destruction of antigen-binding activity since the treated 7S IgA antibody retained this activity as shown by radioimmunoelectrophoresis and by binding to the specific immunoadsorbent. The 9S IgA antibody was more resistant to these treatments than the IgM antibody and showed no indication of dissociation. The treated 9S IgA also retained antigen-binding activity. Both the P-K type and PCA reactions were considerably stronger when the interval between injections of antibody and antigen was 24 hr rather than 4 to 5 hr. PMID:4159250

  17. IgA glycosylation and IgA immune complexes in the pathogenesis of IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A.; Tomana, Milan; Mestecky, Jiri

    2008-01-01

    Circulating immune complexes containing aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of IgAN. A portion of IgA1 secreted by IgA1-producing cells in patients with IgAN is galactose-deficient and consequently recognized by anti-glycan IgG or IgA1 antibodies. Some of the resultant immune complexes in the circulation escape normal clearance mechanisms, deposit in the renal mesangium, and induce glomerular injury. Recent studies of the origin of these aberrant molecules, their glycosylation profiles, and mechanisms of biosynthesis have provided new insight into the autoimmune nature of the pathogenesis of this common renal disease. An imbalance in the activities of the pertinent glycosyltransferases in the IgA1-producing cells favors production of molecules with galactose-deficient O-linked glycans at specific sites in the hinge region of the alpha heavy chains. Using sophisticated analytical methods, it may be possible to define biomarkers for diagnostic purposes and identify new therapeutic targets for a future disease-specific therapy. PMID:18222349

  18. Prominent role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mucosal T cell-independent IgA induction.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yukiko; Asano, Jumpei; Sato, Taku; Liu, Jiajia; Iwata, Makoto; Ohteki, Toshiaki

    2011-02-25

    Although both conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are present in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), the roles of pDCs in the gut remain largely unknown. Here we show a critical role for pDCs in T cell-independent (TI) IgA production by B cells in the GALT. When pDCs of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches (PPs) (which are representative GALT) were cultured with naive B cells to induce TI IgA class switch recombination (CSR), IgA production was substantially higher than in cocultures of these cells with cDCs. IgA production was dependent on APRIL and BAFF production by pDCs. Importantly, pDC expression of APRIL and BAFF was dependent on stromal cell-derived type I IFN signaling under steady-state conditions. Our findings provide insight into the molecular basis of pDC conditioning to induce mucosal TI IgA production, which may lead to improvements in vaccination strategies and treatment for mucosal-related disorders. PMID:21333555

  19. Pathogenetic significance of aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Narita, Ichiei; Gejyo, Fumitake

    2008-10-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, is defined by predominant IgA1 deposits in the glomerular mesangium. Among abnormalities of the IgA immune system reported so far in IgAN, aberrant O-linked glycosylation in the hinge region of IgA1 is the most consistent finding. IgA1 molecules bearing abnormal glycosylation have been found in serum, in tonsillar lymphocytes, and in eluate from mesangial deposits, and characterized by decreased O-linked N-acetylgalactosamine residues with or without alteration in the terminal sialylation of the O-linked sugars. IgA1 with incomplete galactosylation has a tendency to accumulate in glomerular mesangium by self-aggregation or immune complex formation. Glomerular mesangial cells exposed to immune complexes of these IgA1 can proliferate and secrete cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and extracellular matrix components promoting inflammatory reactions in the glomeruli. Although genes encoding enzymes involved in the O-glycosylation process, such as C1GALT1, have been reported to be responsible for susceptibility to IgAN, recent evidence suggests that the abnormality is restricted to a small fraction of B cell populations and arises from dysregulated IgA1 production and secretion in mucosal immune system. This review will focus on and discuss the role of incompleteness of IgA1 O-galactosylation in the pathogenesis of IgAN and propose a possible mechanism in which abnormal IgA1 occurs in IgAN.

  20. Are There Enhanced MBP Autoantibodies in Autism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libbey, Jane E.; Coon, Hilary H.; Kirkman, Nikki J.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), may play a role in autism. We measured autoantibody titers to MBP in children with autism, both classic onset and regressive onset forms, controls (healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with Tourette syndrome via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We…

  1. Autoantibodies as predictive tools in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nihtyanova, Svetlana I; Denton, Christopher P

    2010-02-01

    The pathogenetic role of autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis (SSc) remains unclear, but these autoantibodies have been established as strong predictors of disease outcome and the pattern of organ complications in patients with this condition. The three most frequently observed types of SSc-specific autoantibody-anti-centromere antibodies, anti-topoisomerase antibodies and anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies-are found in over 50% of patients; the presence of each is generally exclusive of the others. Although a lot less frequently observed, antibodies directed against U3RNP and Th/To are also specific for scleroderma, whereas anti-Pm/Scl, anti-Ku and anti-U1RNP antibodies are seen mainly in patients with overlap syndromes. Up to 11% of patients with SSc can test negative for antinuclear antibodies. Strong links exist between autoantibody specificities and disease presentation and outcome, which make autoantibodies essential assessment tools in patients with SSc.

  2. Do IgA antigliadin and IgA antiendomysium antibodies show there is latent coeliac disease in primary IgA nephropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Sategna-Guidetti, C; Ferfoglia, G; Bruno, M; Pulitano, R; Roccatello, D; Amore, A; Coppo, R

    1992-01-01

    The finding in primary IgA nephropathy of increased levels of IgA to food antigens and particularly to gliadin prompted the hypothesis that a subgroup of these patients may have latent coeliac disease. The observation that gliadin may experimentally induce IgA mesangial deposits supported this hypothesis. We evaluated specific immunological markers of coeliac disease (antiendomysium antibodies) which parallel histological changes of gluten sensitive enteropathy, and an IgA immunofluorescent test for antigliadin antibodies in 18 patients with IgA nephropathy, in 56 untreated coeliac disease patients, in 254 controls (58 healthy and 196 disease controls). Antiendomysium antibodies were positive in 89.28% of coeliac patients, but negative in all IgA nephropathies and controls. IgA immunofluorescent test for antigliadin antibodies, negative in all IgA nephropathy patients, was positive in 76.78% of coeliac patients and in 4.91% of controls. ELISA IgA antigliadin antibodies were negative in controls, but positive in 22.22% of IgA nephropathy patients and in 60.71% of coeliac patients. Our data would suggest that in most patients with IgA nephropathy there is no evidence of latent coeliac disease. PMID:1582590

  3. Prevalence of Autoantibodies and HLA DR, DQ in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Usha; Singh, Gyanendra; Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar; Singh, Rana Gopal; Kumar, Shashi Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type I diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is caused by autoimmune destruction of β-cells of pancreas. Two forms of T1DM are known called as 1A (autoimmune) and 1B (idiopathic). Aim Aim was to study the prevalence of Anti-TTG IgA, Anti-TPO, GADA, ZnT8 and IA-2 autoantibodies and HLA DR and DQ genes and its diagnostic value in T1DM. Materials and Methods Thirty four T1DM patients, 59 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 healthy controls were included in study. Antibodies levels were estimated by ELISA and HLA typing was performed by SSP-PCR method. Result The prevalence of various autoantibodies in T1DM were Anti-TTG 14.7%, Anti-TPO 17.65%, GADA 38.23%, ZnT8 11.76% and IA-2 5.88%. Only GADA and ZnT8 were significantly positive in T1DM. GADA (66.67%) and ZnT8 (33.33%) positivity was more in patients below 15 years age while levels of other antibodies were higher after 15 years age. All autoantibodies were detected in higher frequency in T1DM than in T2DM and controls. HLA DR and DQ typing showed highly significant increase in DRB1*0301 (61.76%, p=0.00) and DQB1*0201 (64.71%, p=0.00) in T1DM. Subjects with HLA DRB1*0301 and DQB1*0201 had 80-100% positive prevalence of GADA, ZnT8, IA-2, Anti-TTG and Anti-TPO autoantibodies. Conclusion Combination of GADA antibody with DRB1 and DQB1 estimation improved diagnosis of T1A than insulin antigen specific antibodies alone.

  4. Prevalence of Autoantibodies and HLA DR, DQ in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Usha; Singh, Gyanendra; Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar; Singh, Rana Gopal; Kumar, Shashi Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type I diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is caused by autoimmune destruction of β-cells of pancreas. Two forms of T1DM are known called as 1A (autoimmune) and 1B (idiopathic). Aim Aim was to study the prevalence of Anti-TTG IgA, Anti-TPO, GADA, ZnT8 and IA-2 autoantibodies and HLA DR and DQ genes and its diagnostic value in T1DM. Materials and Methods Thirty four T1DM patients, 59 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 healthy controls were included in study. Antibodies levels were estimated by ELISA and HLA typing was performed by SSP-PCR method. Result The prevalence of various autoantibodies in T1DM were Anti-TTG 14.7%, Anti-TPO 17.65%, GADA 38.23%, ZnT8 11.76% and IA-2 5.88%. Only GADA and ZnT8 were significantly positive in T1DM. GADA (66.67%) and ZnT8 (33.33%) positivity was more in patients below 15 years age while levels of other antibodies were higher after 15 years age. All autoantibodies were detected in higher frequency in T1DM than in T2DM and controls. HLA DR and DQ typing showed highly significant increase in DRB1*0301 (61.76%, p=0.00) and DQB1*0201 (64.71%, p=0.00) in T1DM. Subjects with HLA DRB1*0301 and DQB1*0201 had 80-100% positive prevalence of GADA, ZnT8, IA-2, Anti-TTG and Anti-TPO autoantibodies. Conclusion Combination of GADA antibody with DRB1 and DQB1 estimation improved diagnosis of T1A than insulin antigen specific antibodies alone. PMID:27630850

  5. Nephrotic syndrome is a rare manifestation of IGA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Alshomar, Ahmad A

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is a rare presentation of IgA nephropathy. The degree of proteinuria in IgA nephropathy predicts poor prognosis. We herein report a teenager with IGA nephropathy, the nephrotic syndrome and segmental glomerular scars who after developing complications from high dose corticosteroid therapy was successfully treated with tacrolimus and low dose prednisone. PMID:27610069

  6. Nephrotic syndrome is a rare manifestation of IGA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Alshomar, Ahmad A

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is a rare presentation of IgA nephropathy. The degree of proteinuria in IgA nephropathy predicts poor prognosis. We herein report a teenager with IGA nephropathy, the nephrotic syndrome and segmental glomerular scars who after developing complications from high dose corticosteroid therapy was successfully treated with tacrolimus and low dose prednisone. PMID:27610069

  7. Cloning and structural analysis of two highly divergent IgA isotypes, IgA1 and IgA2 from the duck billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Vernersson, M; Belov, K; Aveskogh, M; Hellman, L

    2010-01-01

    To trace the emergence of modern IgA isotypes during vertebrate evolution we have studied the immunoglobulin repertoire of a model monotreme, the platypus. Two highly divergent IgA-like isotypes (IgA1 and IgA2) were identified and their primary structures were determined from full-length cDNAs. A comparative analysis of the amino acid sequences for IgA from various animal species showed that the two platypus IgA isotypes form a branch clearly separated from their eutherian (placental) counterparts. However, they still conform to the general structure of eutherian IgA, with a hinge region and three constant domains. This indicates that the deletion of the second domain and the formation of a hinge region in IgA did occur very early during mammalian evolution, more than 166 million years ago. The two IgA isotypes in platypus differ in primary structure and appear to have arisen from a very early gene duplication, possibly preceding the metatherian eutherian split. Interestingly, one of these isotypes, IgA1, appears to be expressed in only the platypus, but is present in the echidna based on Southern blot analysis. The platypus may require a more effective mucosal immunity, with two highly divergent IgA forms, than the terrestrial echidna, due to its lifestyle, where it is exposed to pathogens both on land and in the water. PMID:19913303

  8. Alpha-fodrin autoantibodies are reliable diagnostic markers for juvenile and adult Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lawind, Mohamed F; Alyasky, Ahmed; Elwan, Nahed M; Mourad, Heba; Al-Bendary, Amal

    2004-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is like other systemic autoimmune diseases, characterized by a large number of autoantigens and autoantibodies and infiltration of glandular tissue by predominantly CD4 T lymphocytes. The presence of certain autoantibodies is required for the diagnosis to be made, especially Anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of anti-alpha fodrin and its association with anti-Ro and anti-La in juvenile and adult SS. Thirteen cases with juvenile SS and 11 old SS patients were examined. Selection and classification of the patients was based on the revised European Community Criteria. The Juvenile SS group included 10 girls and 3 boys, their age ranged from 7 to 14 years. Adult SS group included 2 males and 9 female, their age ranged from 21 to 54 years. Blood samples were subjected to Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) mm/1 degree h, Complete blood count (CBC), Latex agglutination test for estimating rheumatoid factor (RF) and antinuclear antibodies (ANA), and assessment of Anti-alpha Fodrin IgG/IgA, anti-Ro and anti-La using ELISA. The two groups were matched for sex ratio. There was a significant difference of age (10.1 +/- 2.4 vs 35.1 +/- 9.3 yr) between both groups (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference of levels of ESR, ANA and anti-Ro, anti-La and anti-alpha fodrin IgG/IgA autoantibodies concentration in the sera of SS patients in both groups (P > 0.05) although their levels were elevated. The percentage of detection of anti-Ro, anti- La and anti-alpha fodrin IgG and IgA antibodies in the sera of Juvenile SS was 61.5%, 53.8%, 53.8% and 61.5% respectively, while in adult SS was 63.6%, 45.5%, 45.5% and 81.8%, respectively. Anti alpha fodrin IgA and IgG were positively detected in SS patients who had negative anti-Ro and/or anti-La. The anti-alpha fodrin IgG and IgA antibodies did not significantly correlated with antibodies against Ro and La, ESR and ANA (r < 0.25, P > 0.05). The

  9. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  10. Autoantibodies in Systemic Sclerosis: Unanswered Questions

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Cristiane; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular abnormalities, and cutaneous and visceral fibrosis. Serum autoantibodies directed to multiple intracellular antigens are present in more than 95% of patients and are considered a hallmark of SSc. They are helpful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of SSc and are associated with distinctive clinical manifestations. With the advent of more sensitive, multiplexed immunoassays, new and old questions about the relevance of autoantibodies in SSc are emerging. In this review, we discuss the clinical relevance of autoantibodies in SSc emphasizing the more recently published data. Moreover, we will summarize recent advances regarding the stability of SSc autoantibodies over the course of disease, whether they are mutually exclusive and their potential roles in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:25926833

  11. Practical Evaluation of Methods for Detection and Specificity of Autoantibodies to Extractable Nuclear Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Susan M.; Peace-Brewer, Amy; Schmitz, John L.; Freeman, Kristie; Miller, William C.; Folds, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Detection and specificity of autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) play a critical role in the diagnosis and management of autoimmune disease. Historically, the detection of these antibodies has employed double immunodiffusion (DID). Autoantibody specificity was correlated with diagnoses by this technique. Enzyme immunoassays have been developed by multiple manufacturers to detect and identify the specificity ENA autoantibodies. To address the relationship of ENA detection by DID and enzyme immunoassay, the performances of five immunoassays were compared. These included two DID and three enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA) (both screening and individual antigen profile kits). The sample set included 83 ENA-positive, antinuclear-antibody (ANA)-positive specimens, 77 ENA-negative, ANA-positive specimens, and 20 ENA- and ANA-negative specimens. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by two methods: first, by using the in-house DID result as the reference standard, and second, by using latent class analysis, which evaluates each kit result independently. Overall, the results showed that the ELISA methods were more sensitive for detection of ENA autoantibodies than DID techniques, but presence and/or specific type of ENA autoantibody did not always correlate with the patient's clinical presentation. Regardless of the testing strategy an individual laboratory uses, clear communication with the clinical staff regarding the significance of a positive result is imperative. The laboratory and the clinician must both be aware of the sensitivity and specificity of each testing method in use in the clinical laboratory. PMID:15013979

  12. B-1 cells as a source of IgA.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundantly produced immunoglobulin found primarily on mucosal surfaces. The generation of IgA and its involvement in mucosal immune responses have been intensely studied over the past years. IgA can be generated in T cell-dependent and T cell-independent pathways, and it has an important impact on maintaining homeostasis within the mucosal immune system. There is good evidence that B-1 cells contribute substantially to the production of mucosal IgA and thus play an important role in regulating commensal microbiota. However, whether B-1 cells produce antigen-specific or only nonspecific IgA remains to be determined. This review will discuss what is currently known about IgA production by B-1 cells and the functional relevance of B-1 cell-derived IgA both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Immunological studies of IgA nephropathy in blacks reveal elevations of serum IgA2 as well as IgA1.

    PubMed

    Crowley-Nowick, P A; Bull, R; van den Wall Bake, A W; Kulhavy, L; Julian, B A; Jackson, S

    1994-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is recognized worldwide as the most common primary glomerulonephritis, the prevalence of this disease among American blacks is strikingly low despite the frequency of other renal disorders. We have previously described the clinical features of 27 black patients enrolled in a multicentre IgAN database; in this paper we report several immunological parameters of the disease in this population. Quantification of serum immunoglobulins revealed significantly higher concentrations of total IgA, IgA1 and IgA2 (P = 0.0001, 0.002 and 0.005 respectively) in the patients, but no significant increases in IgG or IgM. Examination of immunoglobulin synthesis by peripheral blood lymphocytes indicated relatively few differences in the secretion of immunoglobulins by patients compared to healthy American blacks. The spontaneous production of total IgA, IgA1, and IgA2 in patients was depressed compared to the control subjects (P = 0.02, 0.04, 0.03,), yet the ratio of IgA1:IgA2 was normal. Stimulation with pokeweed mitogen enhanced secretion of immunoglobulin in both subject groups. However, a significantly greater IgA1:IgA2 ratio was noted in the patients (P = 0.002). Circulating immune complexes containing C3 and IgA as well as C3 and IgM were elevated in the patients (P = 0.0006, 0.0003 and 0.02, respectively). These immunological aberrancies did not correlate with clinical manifestations of disease. These data suggest the immune abnormalities of black IgAN patients are similar to, but not identical with, those of white patients.

  14. Serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels in children with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mengjie; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Rong, Liping; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Lizhi; Qiu, Zeting; Mo, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is an immunopathologic diagnosis based on a renal biopsy, it is characterized by deposits of IgA-containing immune complexes in the mesangium. Adults with IgAN have a galactose-deficient IgA1 in the circulation and glomerular deposition. There are few studies on the glycosylation of serum IgA1 in children with IgAN. To measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in pediatric patients with IgAN, 72 biopsy-proven IgAN children were divided into 3 groups based on the clinical features: isolated hematuria group (24 patients), hematuria and proteinuria group (22 patients), and nephritic syndrome group (26 patients). They were also divided into 3 groups according to pathologic grading: grade I + II group (25 patients), grade III group (33 patients) and grade IV + V group (14 patients). 30 healthy children were recruited as a control group. We used vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in all groups and controls. Serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in children with IgAN were higher than controls (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 among the different clinical and pathologic grading groups. The values of the area under the curve for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels were 0.976 (95% CI, 0.953-1.000). The cutoff point for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels was 0.125, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 83.3%, with a positive predictive value of 92.6% and a negative predictive value of 73.5% (P < 0.01). Children with IgAN presented serum galactose-deficient IgA1, which has shown no relationship with the clinical manifestations and pathologic grading of the disease. Detection of serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels by vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has a certain clinical value in diagnosis of children with IgAN.

  15. Detection of autoantibodies using chemiluminescence technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Michael; Bentow, Chelsea; Serra, Josep; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Context: Although autoantibody detection methods such as indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have been available for many years and are still in use the innovation of fast, fully automated instruments using chemiluminescence technology in recent years has led to rapid adoption in autoimmune disease diagnostics. In 2009, BIO-FLASH, a fully automated, random access chemiluminescent analyzer, was introduced, proceeded by the development of the QUANTA Flash chemiluminescent immunoassays (CIA) for autoimmune diagnostics. Objective: To summarize the evolution of CIAs for the detection of autoantibodies and to review their performance characteristics. Methods: Pubmed was screened for publications evaluating novel QUANTA Flash assays and how they compare to traditional methods for the detection of autoantibodies. In addition, comparative studies presented at scientific meetings were summarized. Results: Several studies were identified that compared the novel CIAs with conventional methods for autoantibody detection. The agreements ranged from moderate to excellent depending on the assay. The studies show how the CIA technology has enhanced the analytical and clinical performance characteristics of many autoantibody assays supporting both diagnosis and follow-up testing. Conclusion: CIA has started to improve the diagnostic testing of autoantibodies as an aid in the diagnosis of a broad range of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26525648

  16. Spectrum of IgA nephropathy in a single center.

    PubMed

    Das, Uttara; Dakshinamurty, Kaligotla Venkata; Prayaga, Aruna; Uppin, Megha

    2015-09-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common biopsy-proven primary glomerular disease in the world and a major contributor to the worldwide burden of endstage renal failure, with a wide geographical variation. To determine the incidence, clinical profile and histological pattern of IgAN in our institute, we reviewed all the patients who had native kidney biopsies with the diagnosis of primary IgAN during the period from 1998 to 2009 in the context of the clinical features. A total of 116 patients with IgAN were finally analyzed; 85 (73%) of the patients were male, the mean age of the patients was 29.2 ± 12.2 (range 10-70) years and the mean duration of disease was 10.4 ± 18.7 months (median: 2 months). Hypertension was present in 74 (63.2%) cases. Gross hematuria was rare. The most common clinical presentation was nephrotic syndrome, followed by chronic renal failure. The mean proteinuria level was 2.5 ± 2.3 g/day (median: 1.7 g/day) and the mean serum creatinine level was 3.04 ± 3.3 mg/dL (median:1.7 mg/dL). The morphological sub-classification (Haas): Class I was the most common (44.4%), followed by class V (23%). IgA co-deposition with C3 and lambda was the most common finding in the immunofluorescence study. The glomerular filtration rate decreased with advanced histological damage. The incidence of IgAN was 7.5%, which is lower as compared with studies from elsewhere. IgAN in our population had a more severe clinical presentation. PMID:26354591

  17. Role of IgA receptors in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Sebastian M; Papista, Christina; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) or Berger's disease is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis in the world and one of the first causes of end-stage renal failure. IgAN is characterized by the accumulation of immune complexes containing polymeric IgA1 in mesangial areas. The pathogenesis of this disease involves the deposition of polymeric and hypogalactosylated IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) in the mesangium. Quantitative and structural changes of Gd-IgA1 play a key role in the development of the disease due to functional abnormalities of two IgA receptors: the FcαRI (CD89) expressed by blood myeloid cells and the transferrin receptor (CD71) on mesangial cells. Abnormal Gd-IgA1 induces release of soluble CD89, which participates in the formation of circulating IgA1 complexes. These complexes are trapped by CD71 that is overexpressed on mesangial cells in IgAN patients together with the crosslinking enzyme transglutaminase 2 allowing pathogenic IgA complex formation in situ and mesangial cell activation. A humanized mouse model expressing IgA1 and CD89 develops IgAN in a similar manner as patients. In this model, a food antigen, the gliadin, was shown to be crucial for circulating IgA1 complex formation and deposition, which could be prevented by a gluten-free diet. Identification of these new partners opens new therapeutic prospects for IgAN treatment.

  18. Aberrant IgA1 glycosylation is inherited in familial and sporadic IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gharavi, Ali G; Moldoveanu, Zina; Wyatt, Robert J; Barker, Catherine V; Woodford, Susan Y; Lifton, Richard P; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A

    2008-05-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a complex trait determined by genetic and environmental factors. Most IgAN patients exhibit a characteristic undergalactosylation of the O-glycans of the IgA1 hinge region, which promotes formation and glomerular deposition of immune complexes. It is not known whether this aberrant glycosylation is the result of an acquired or inherited defect, or whether the presence of aberrant IgA1 glycoforms alone can produce IgAN. A newly validated lectin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine the serum level of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) in a cohort of 89 IgAN patients and 266 of their relatives. High Gd-IgA1 levels (> or =95th percentile for controls) were observed in all 5 available patients with familial IgAN, in 21 of 45 (47%) of their at-risk relatives (assuming autosomal dominant inheritance), and in only 1 of 19 (5%) of unrelated individuals who married into the family. This provides evidence that abnormal IgA1 glycosylation is an inherited rather than acquired trait. Similarly, Gd-IgA1 levels were high in 65 of 84 (78%) patients with sporadic IgAN and in 50 of 202 (25%) blood relatives. Heritability of Gd-IgA1 was estimated at 0.54 (P = 0.0001), and segregation analysis suggested the presence of a major dominant gene on a polygenic background. Because most relatives with abnormal IgA1 glycoforms were asymptomatic, additional cofactors must be required for IgAN to develop. The fact that abnormal IgA1 glycosylation clusters in most but not all families suggests that measuring Gd-IgA1 may help distinguish patients with different pathogenic mechanisms of disease.

  19. Role of IgA receptors in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Sebastian M; Papista, Christina; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) or Berger's disease is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis in the world and one of the first causes of end-stage renal failure. IgAN is characterized by the accumulation of immune complexes containing polymeric IgA1 in mesangial areas. The pathogenesis of this disease involves the deposition of polymeric and hypogalactosylated IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) in the mesangium. Quantitative and structural changes of Gd-IgA1 play a key role in the development of the disease due to functional abnormalities of two IgA receptors: the FcαRI (CD89) expressed by blood myeloid cells and the transferrin receptor (CD71) on mesangial cells. Abnormal Gd-IgA1 induces release of soluble CD89, which participates in the formation of circulating IgA1 complexes. These complexes are trapped by CD71 that is overexpressed on mesangial cells in IgAN patients together with the crosslinking enzyme transglutaminase 2 allowing pathogenic IgA complex formation in situ and mesangial cell activation. A humanized mouse model expressing IgA1 and CD89 develops IgAN in a similar manner as patients. In this model, a food antigen, the gliadin, was shown to be crucial for circulating IgA1 complex formation and deposition, which could be prevented by a gluten-free diet. Identification of these new partners opens new therapeutic prospects for IgAN treatment. PMID:26572664

  20. Yersinia enterocolitica serodiagnosis: a dual role of specific IgA. Evaluation of microagglutination and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Bitzan, M; Häck, H J; Mauff, G

    1987-12-01

    The microagglutination technique for the detection of antibodies against Y. enterocolitica, serovars 3 and 9 (corresponding to O-groups I and V), was compared with the conventional tube agglutination. An immunoglobulin class specific, indirect ELISA (polyvalent immunoglobulin, IgG, IgM, and IgA) was established employing as antigens formalinized whole bacteria ("OH"-antigens) and LPS preparations (hot phenol-water extraction). ELISA titers and net absorbancy (ELISA-"units") of single serum dilutions were in good agreement; the same was true for ELISA and agglutination results. Specificity (against healthy controls) and sensitivity of both serologic techniques were comparable. Cross-reacting antibodies against serovars 3 and 9 could be identified in the ELISA. Correct serovar-specific diagnosis was possible in 95% with a single assay (polyvalent Ig assay with LPS-antigen). The sensitivity of the LPS-ELISA was superior to the "OH" antigen assay after infections by serovar 3 strains, and antibodies were detected with LPS preparations for a longer period following reconvalescence. Specific IgA, due to its rapid decrease during reconvalescence, on one hand impresses as a valuable marker for the differentiation of recent disease from uncomplicated past infections, while persistence of IgA appears to be associated with Yersinia-induced arthritis. Persisting IgM but rarely IgA titers were characteristically found in patients with prolonged enteric yersiniosis.

  1. IL-1β in eosinophil-mediated small intestinal homeostasis and IgA production

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Y; Wen, T; Mingler, MK; Caldwell, JM; Wang, YH; Chaplin, DD; Lee, EH; Jang, MH; Woo, SY; Seoh, JY; Miyasaka, M; Rothenberg, ME

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that reside in the gastrointestinal (GI) lamina propria, where their basal function remains largely unexplored. In this study, by examining mice with a selective deficiency of systemic eosinophils (by lineage ablation) or GI eosinophils (eotaxin-1/2 double–deficient or CC chemokine receptor 3–deficient), we show that eosinophils support immunoglobulin A (IgA) class switching, maintain intestinal mucus secretions, affect intestinal microbial composition, and promote the development of Peyer’s patches. Eosinophil-deficient mice showed reduced expression of mediators of secretory IgA production, including intestinal interleukin 1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase, lymphotoxin (LT) α, and LT-β, and reduced levels of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t–positive (ROR-γt+) innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) while maintaining normal levels of APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand), BAFF (B cell–activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family), and TGF-β (transforming growth factor β). GI eosinophils expressed a relatively high level of IL-1β, and IL-1β–deficient mice manifested the altered gene expression profiles observed in eosinophil-deficient mice and decreased levels of IgA+ cells and ROR-γt+ ILCs. On the basis of these collective data, we propose that eosinophils are required for homeostatic intestinal immune responses including IgA production and that their affect is mediated via IL-1β in the small intestine. PMID:25563499

  2. A natural IgA-anti-F(ab')2gamma autoantibody occurring in healthy individuals and kidney graft recipients recognizes an IgG1 hinge region epitope.

    PubMed

    Terness, P; Navolan, D; Moroder, L; Siedler, F; Weyher, E; Kohl, I; Dufter, C; Welschof, M; Drugarin, D; Schneider, F; Opelz, G

    1996-11-01

    Natural anti-IgG autoantibodies are found both in healthy individuals and in patients with certain diseases. One group of these Abs recognizes epitopes located in the F(ab')2 region of the IgG molecule. The immunoregulatory role of these Abs in healthy individuals, graft rejection, and disease was previously studied, usually with a focus on the characterization of anti-idiotypic Abs. In the present study, we characterize the epitope recognized by an anti-F(ab')2gamma autoantibody of the IgA isotype, which occurs in the serum of healthy individuals and kidney transplant recipients. The autoantibody described herein reacts strongly with F(ab')2gamma but only poorly with Fab(gamma) fragments, a binding pattern pointing to an epitope located in the hinge region. Using synthetic peptides, we identified a conformational epitope that overlaps the middle and part of the lower hinge region. Structural analyses of peptide constructs showed that a defined conformation of the first three residues of the lower hinge is required for a full expression of the epitope. Binding of IgA to the hinge region of IgG1 covers part of the physiologically active Fc domain, immobilizes the Fab arms, and thereby can be expected to exert immunoregulatory functions.

  3. IgA1-secreting cell lines from patients with IgA nephropathy produce aberrantly glycosylated IgA1.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Moldoveanu, Zina; Hall, Stacy; Brown, Rhubell; Vu, Huong L; Novak, Lea; Julian, Bruce A; Tomana, Milan; Wyatt, Robert J; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Alarcón, Graciela S; Kimberly, Robert P; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan

    2008-02-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. This abnormality is manifested by a deficiency of galactose in the hinge-region O-linked glycans of IgA1. Biosynthesis of these glycans occurs in a stepwise fashion beginning with the addition of N-acetylgalactosamine by the enzyme N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 and continuing with the addition of either galactose by beta1,3-galactosyltransferase or a terminal sialic acid by a N-acetylgalactosamine-specific alpha2,6-sialyltransferase. To identify the molecular basis for the aberrant IgA glycosylation, we established EBV-immortalized IgA1-producing cells from peripheral blood cells of patients with IgA nephropathy. The secreted IgA1 was mostly polymeric and had galactose-deficient O-linked glycans, characterized by a terminal or sialylated N-acetylgalactosamine. As controls, we showed that EBV-immortalized cells from patients with lupus nephritis and healthy individuals did not produce IgA with the defective galactosylation pattern. Analysis of the biosynthetic pathways in cloned EBV-immortalized cells from patients with IgA nephropathy indicated a decrease in beta1,3-galactosyltransferase activity and an increase in N-acetylgalactosamine-specific alpha2,6-sialyltransferase activity. Also, expression of beta1,3-galactosyltransferase was significantly lower, and that of N-acetylgalactosamine-specific alpha2,6-sialyltransferase was significantly higher than the expression of these genes in the control cells. Thus, our data suggest that premature sialylation likely contributes to the aberrant IgA1 glycosylation in IgA nephropathy and may represent a new therapeutic target.

  4. Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses in IgA nephropathy patients after mucosal immunization, as part of a polymeric IgA response

    PubMed Central

    Eijgenraam, J W; Oortwijn, B D; Kamerling, S W A; de Fijter, J W; van den Wall Bake, A W L; Daha, M R; van Kooten, C

    2008-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), although generated at mucosal surfaces, is also found in low concentrations in the circulation. Recently, SIgA was demonstrated in mesangial deposits of patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), suggesting a role in the pathogenesis. This finding is in line with the belief that high molecular weight (HMW) immunoglobulin A (IgA) is deposited in the kidney. However, there is little information on the size distribution of antigen-specific IgA in circulation upon mucosal challenge. In this study we measured antigen-specific IgA, including SIgA, in serum following challenge of IgAN patients and controls via intranasal vaccination with a neoantigen, cholera toxin subunit B (CTB). We size-fractionated serum and nasal washes to study the size distribution of total IgA, SIgA and CTB-specific IgA. Finally, we compared the size distribution of antigen-specific IgA after mucosal immunization with the distribution upon systemic immunization. A significant induction of antigen-specific SIgA was detectable in serum of both patients with IgAN and controls after mucosal immunization with CTB. Independent of the route of immunization, in both groups the antigen-specific IgA response was predominantly in the polymeric IgA fractions. This is in contrast to total IgA levels in serum that are predominantly monomeric. We conclude that mucosal challenge results in antigen-specific SIgA in the circulation, and that the antigen-specific IgA response in both IgAN patients and in controls is of predominantly HMW in nature. No differences between IgAN patients and controls were detected, suggesting that the size distribution of antigen-specific IgA in the circulation is not disturbed specifically in IgAN patients. PMID:18336594

  5. IgA1-secreting cell lines from patients with IgA nephropathy produce aberrantly glycosylated IgA1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Moldoveanu, Zina; Hall, Stacy; Brown, Rhubell; Vu, Huong L.; Novak, Lea; Julian, Bruce A.; Tomana, Milan; Wyatt, Robert J.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. This abnormality is manifested by a deficiency of galactose in the hinge-region O-linked glycans of IgA1. Biosynthesis of these glycans occurs in a stepwise fashion beginning with the addition of N-acetylgalactosamine by the enzyme N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 and continuing with the addition of either galactose by β1,3-galactosyltransferase or a terminal sialic acid by a N-acetylgalactosamine–specific α2,6-sialyltransferase. To identify the molecular basis for the aberrant IgA glycosylation, we established EBV-immortalized IgA1-producing cells from peripheral blood cells of patients with IgA nephropathy. The secreted IgA1 was mostly polymeric and had galactose-deficient O-linked glycans, characterized by a terminal or sialylated N-acetylgalactosamine. As controls, we showed that EBV-immortalized cells from patients with lupus nephritis and healthy individuals did not produce IgA with the defective galactosylation pattern. Analysis of the biosynthetic pathways in cloned EBV-immortalized cells from patients with IgA nephropathy indicated a decrease in β1,3-galactosyltransferase activity and an increase in N-acetylgalactosamine–specific α2,6-sialyltransferase activity. Also, expression of β1,3-galactosyltransferase was significantly lower, and that of N-acetylgalactosamine–specific α2,6-sialyltransferase was significantly higher than the expression of these genes in the control cells. Thus, our data suggest that premature sialylation likely contributes to the aberrant IgA1 glycosylation in IgA nephropathy and may represent a new therapeutic target. PMID:18172551

  6. Neural autoantibodies and neurophysiologic abnormalities in patients exposed to molds in water-damaged buildings.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew W; Thrasher, Jack D; Madison, Roberta A; Vojdani, Aristo; Gray, Michael R; Johnson, Al

    2003-08-01

    Adverse health effects of fungal bioaerosols on occupants of water-damaged homes and other buildings have been reported. Recently, it has been suggested that mold exposure causes neurological injury. The authors investigated neurological antibodies and neurophysiological abnormalities in patients exposed to molds at home who developed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (i.e., numbness, tingling, tremors, and muscle weakness in the extremities). Serum samples were collected and analyzed with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique for antibodies to myelin basic protein, myelin-associated glycoprotein, ganglioside GM1, sulfatide, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, alpha-B-crystallin, chondroitin sulfate, tubulin, and neurofilament. Antibodies to molds and mycotoxins were also determined with ELISA, as reported previously. Neurophysiologic evaluations for latency, amplitude, and velocity were performed on 4 motor nerves (median, ulnar, peroneal, and tibial), and for latency and amplitude on 3 sensory nerves (median, ulnar, and sural). Patients with documented, measured exposure to molds had elevated titers of antibodies (immunoglobulin [Ig]A, IgM, and IgG) to neural-specific antigens. Nerve conduction studies revealed 4 patient groupings: (1) mixed sensory-motor polyneuropathy (n = 55, abnormal), (2) motor neuropathy (n = 17, abnormal), (3) sensory neuropathy (n = 27, abnormal), and (4) those with symptoms but no neurophysiological abnormalities (n = 20, normal controls). All groups showed significantly increased autoantibody titers for all isotypes (IgA, IgM, and IgG) of antibodies to neural antigens when compared with 500 healthy controls. Groups 1 through 3 also exhibited abnormal neurophysiologic findings. The authors concluded that exposure to molds in water-damaged buildings increased the risk for development of neural autoantibodies, peripheral neuropathy, and neurophysiologic abnormalities in exposed individuals. PMID:15259425

  7. Secretory immunity and the bacterial IgA proteases.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, S J; Plaut, A G

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics and functions of microbial IgA proteases are reviewed. These enzymes represent a structurally heterogeneous group of proteins that are secreted into the extracellular environment by bacteria capable of causing human disease. The IgA proteases, which vary in their requirements for metal ions, are neutral endopeptidases whose role in the infectious process is not known but whose pronounced substrate specificity for human proteins of the IgA1 subclass has repeatedly been demonstrated. As reagents, the IgA proteases are useful in cleaving IgA molecules to yield intact Fc alpha and Fab alpha fragments that will allow the study of the structure and function of the two large regions of IgA immunoglobulin proteins. The role, if any, of these enzymes in promoting infection by pathogenic members of the genera Neisseria, Hemophilus, and Streptococcus is not known, although the secretory immune system is primarily mediated by antibodies of the IgA isotype, among which are IgA1 subclass proteins, and these proteins are susceptible to cleavage by IgA protease. The determination of the role of these enzymes in the pathogenesis of human infection must await clearer understanding of antigenicity and antibody function at secretory sites and of the relative roles of the two subclasses of human IgA in immune defense.

  8. Corticosteroid Therapy in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Damin; Perkovic, Vlado; Ma, Xinxin; Johnson, David W.; Woodward, Mark; Levin, Adeera; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    The benefits and risks of steroids for the treatment of IgA nephropathy remain uncertain. We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for randomized, controlled trials of corticosteroid therapy for IgA nephropathy published between 1966 and March 2011. We identified nine relevant trials that included 536 patients who had urinary protein excretion >1 g/d and normal renal function. Forty-six (8.6%) of these patients developed a kidney failure event, defined as doubling of the serum creatinine/halving of the GFR or ESRD. Overall, steroid therapy was associated with a lower risk for kidney failure (relative risk, 0.32 [95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15–0.67]; P=0.002) and a reduction in proteinuria (weighted mean difference, −0.46 g/d [95% CI, −0.63 to −0.29 g/d]), with no evidence of heterogeneity in these outcomes. Subgroup analysis suggested that the dose modifies the effect of steroids for renal protection (P for heterogeneity=0.030): Relatively high-dose and short-term therapy (prednisone >30 mg/d or high-dose pulse intravenous methylprednisolone with duration ≤1 year) produced significant renal protection, whereas low-dose, long-term steroid use did not. Steroid therapy was associated with a 55% higher risk for adverse events. The quality of included studies was low, however, limiting the generalizability of the results. In conclusion, steroids appear to provide renal protection in patients with IgA nephropathy but increase the risk for adverse events. Reliably defining the efficacy and safety of steroids in IgA nephropathy requires a high-quality trial with a large sample size. PMID:22539830

  9. Transient Glyco-Engineering to Produce Recombinant IgA1 with Defined N- and O-Glycans in Plants.

    PubMed

    Dicker, Martina; Tschofen, Marc; Maresch, Daniel; König, Julia; Juarez, Paloma; Orzaez, Diego; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases, such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG), less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumor activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered ΔXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that ΔXT/FT N. benthamiana plants can be engineered toward the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans.

  10. Transient Glyco-Engineering to Produce Recombinant IgA1 with Defined N- and O-Glycans in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dicker, Martina; Tschofen, Marc; Maresch, Daniel; König, Julia; Juarez, Paloma; Orzaez, Diego; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases, such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG), less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumor activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered ΔXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that ΔXT/FT N. benthamiana plants can be engineered toward the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans. PMID:26858738

  11. The clinical relevance of autoantibodies in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Ho, Khanh T; Reveille, John D

    2003-01-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is associated with several autoantibodies, each of which is useful in the diagnosis of affected patients and in determining their prognosis. Anti-centromere antibodies (ACA) and anti-Scl-70 antibodies are very useful in distinguishing patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) from healthy controls, from patients with other connective tissue disease, and from unaffected family members. Whereas ACA often predict a limited skin involvement and the absence of pulmonary involvement, the presence of anti-Scl-70 antibodies increases the risk for diffuse skin involvement and scleroderma lung disease. Anti-fibrillarin autoantibodies (which share significant serologic overlap with anti-U3-ribonucleoprotein antibodies) and anti-RNA-polymerase autoantibodies occur less frequently and are also predictive of diffuse skin involvement and systemic disease. Anti-Th/To and PM-Scl, in contrast, are associated with limited skin disease, but anti-Th/To might be a marker for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Other autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens have less specificity for SSc, including anti-Ro, which is a risk factor for sicca symptoms in patients with SSc, and anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein, which in high titer is seen in patients with SSc/systemic lupus erythematosus/polymyositis overlap syndromes. Limited reports of other autoantibodies (anti-Ku, antiphospholipid) have not established them as being clinically useful in following patients with SSc.

  12. New autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease causing articular cartilage and bone destruction. Since irreversible joint destruction can be prevented by intervention at the early stages of disease, early diagnosis of RA is important. In this study, we identified new autoantibodies in the sera of patients with early (less than one year) RA. Methods We screened the sera of 20 RA patients with disease duration less than one year, 19 RA patients with disease duration more than five years and 23 controls on 8,268 human protein arrays. We confirmed the validity of protein array detection by ELISA assays. We then performed epitope mapping with overlapping 15-mers to analyze RA sera reactivity. Results WIBG (within BGCN homolog (Drosophila)), GABARAPL2 (GABA(A) receptor associated protein like 2) and ZNF706 (zinc finger protein 706) proteins are preferentially recognized by autoantibodies from early RA patients. Of interest, autoantibodies to WIBG are very specific for early RA. Indeed, 33% of early RA patients' sera recognize WIBG versus 5% of RA patients with disease duration more than 5 years and 2% of controls. We identified three linear peptides on WIBG GABARAPL2 and ZNF706 that are preferentially recognized by sera of early RA patients. Conclusions We identified new autoantibodies associated with RA with disease duration less than one year. These autoantibodies could be used as diagnosis markers in RA patients. PMID:23886014

  13. Targeting cancer with a lupus autoantibody#

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James E.; Chan, Grace; Liu, Yanfeng; Hegan, Denise C.; Dalal, Shibani; Dray, Eloise; Kwon, Youngho; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Xiaohua; Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Geiger, Erik; Liu, Yilun; Gera, Joseph; Sweasy, Joann B.; Sung, Patrick; Rockwell, Sara; Nishimura, Robert N.; Weisbart, Richard H.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is distinct among autoimmune diseases due to its association with circulating autoantibodies reactive against host DNA. The precise role that anti-DNA antibodies play in SLE pathophysiology remains to be elucidated, and potential applications of lupus autoantibodies in cancer therapy have not previously been explored. Here we report the unexpected finding that a cell-penetrating lupus autoantibody, 3E10, has potential as a targeted therapy for DNA-repair deficient malignancies. We find that 3E10 preferentially binds DNA single-strand tails, inhibits key steps in DNA single-strand and double-strand break repair, and sensitizes cultured tumor cells and human tumor xenografts to DNA-damaging therapy, including doxorubicin and radiation. Moreover, we demonstrate that 3E10 alone is synthetically lethal to BRCA2-deficient human cancer cells and selectively sensitizes such cells to low dose doxorubicin. Our results establish an approach to cancer therapy that we expect will be particularly applicable to BRCA2-related malignancies such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. In addition, our findings raise the possibility that lupus autoantibodies may be partly responsible for the intrinsic deficiencies in DNA repair and the unexpectedly low rates of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers observed in SLE patients. In summary, this study provides the basis for the potential use of a lupus anti-DNA antibody in cancer therapy and identifies lupus autoantibodies as a potentially rich source of therapeutic agents. PMID:23100628

  14. Induction of lupus autoantibodies by adjuvants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satoh, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Behney, K.M.; Mizutani, A.; Akaogi, J.; Nacionales, D.C.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Reeves, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the hydrocarbon oil pristane induces lupus specific autoantibodies in non-autoimmune mice. We investigated whether the capacity to induce lupus-like autoimmunity is a unique property of pristane or is shared by other adjuvant oils. Seven groups of 3-month-old female BALB/cJ mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of pristane, squalene (used in the adjuvant MF59), incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), three different medicinal mineral oils, or saline, respectively. Serum autoantibodies and peritoneal cytokine production were measured. In addition to pristane, the mineral oil Bayol F (IFA) and the endogenous hydrocarbon squalene both induced anti-nRNP/Sm and -Su autoantibodies (20% and 25% of mice, respectively). All of these hydrocarbons had prolonged effects on cytokine production by peritoneal APCs. However, high levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF?? production 2-3 months after intraperitoneal injection appeared to be associated with the ability to induce lupus autoantibodies. The ability to induce lupus autoantibodies is shared by several hydrocarbons and is not unique to pristane. It correlates with stimulation of the production of IL-12 and other cytokines, suggesting a relationship with a hydrocarbon's adjuvanticity. The potential to induce autoimmunity may complicate the use of oil adjuvants in human and veterinary vaccines. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Explanatory style and Immunoglobulin A (IgA).

    PubMed

    Brennan, F X; Charnetski, C J

    2000-01-01

    The construct of explanatory style has been related to numerous aspects of human psychology, including health. Our research has focused on the effects of various psychological variables on the immune system, in particular Immunoglobulin A (IgA). We had participants fill out the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ), the predominant measure of explanatory style, and assayed saliva samples for secretory IgA. No relationship was observed between overall ASQ score and IgA, or composite optimism score and IgA. However, we observed significant negative correlations between both the composite pessimism score and IgA, as well as the hopelessness score and IgA. Pessimistic explanatory style may therefore be related to immune system deficits and poor health. PMID:11330488

  16. Novel autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes in adult and juvenile myositis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Autoantibodies targeting intracellular proteins involved in key processes are detected in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. These myositisspecific autoantibodies have been increasingly demonstrated to correlate with distinct clinical phenotypes within the myositis spectrum. This review highlights the clinical associations of the myositisspecific autoantibodies, with particular attention to the recently identified and characterized novel myositis autoantibodies: p155/140, p140 (MJ), CADM-140 (MDA5), SAE, and 200/100. PMID:21457520

  17. O-glycosylation of serum IgA1 antibodies against mucosal and systemic antigens in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alice C; Molyneux, Karen; Feehally, John; Barratt, Jonathan

    2006-12-01

    In IgA nephropathy (IgAN), serum IgA1 with abnormal O-glycosylation deposits in the glomerular mesangium. The underlying mechanism of this IgA1 O-glycosylation abnormality is poorly understood, but recent evidence argues against a generic defect in B cell glycosyltransferases, suggesting that only a subpopulation of IgA1-committed B cells are affected. For investigation of whether the site of antigen encounter influences IgA1 O-glycosylation, the O-glycosylation of serum IgA1 antibodies against a systemic antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT), and a mucosal antigen, Helicobacter pylori (HP), was studied in patients with IgAN and control subjects. Serum IgA1 was purified from cohorts of patients with IgAN and control subjects with HP infection and after systemic TT immunization. The IgA1 samples were applied to HP- and TT-coated immunoplates to immobilize specific antibodies, and IgA1 O-glycosylation profiles were assessed by binding of the O-glycan-specific lectin Vicia villosa using a modified ELISA technique. Although total serum IgA1 had raised lectin binding in IgAN, the O-glycosylation of the specific IgA1 antibodies to TT and HP did not differ between patients and control subjects. In both groups, IgA1 anti-HP had higher lectin binding than IgA1 anti-TT. This study demonstrates that IgA1 O-glycosylation normally varies in different immune responses and that patients produce the full spectrum of IgA1 O-glycoforms. IgA1 with high lectin binding was produced in response to mucosal HP infection in all subjects. The raised circulating level of this type of IgA1 in IgAN is likely to be a consequence of abnormal systemic responses to mucosally encountered antigens rather than a fundamental defect in B cell O-glycosylation pathways.

  18. Evidence of the presence of rheumatoid factor and antibodies reacting with human and rabbit IgA in fluid from non-keratinizing jaw cysts.

    PubMed

    Skaug, N

    1976-01-01

    Fluid from an apical periodontal and a follicular jaw cyst formed, in double diffusion in agarose gel, a continuous precipitin line against IgA isolated from human and rabbit serum, IgA myeloma protein, and secretory IgA. Results of immunoelectrophoresis and absorption experiments indicated that the IgA precipitating factor was an immunoglobulin belonging to the IgM class. Furthermore, the two cyst fluids contained immune complexes, possibly IgA-anti-IgA, which precipitated in agar gel. The same two cyst fluids showed a positive reaction in the Waaler-Rose test with tires of 40 and 80, respectively. A series of the other cyst fluids examined were negative in the Waaler-Rose test. None of the cyst fluids conatined antinuclear antibodies.

  19. Abnormal miR-148b expression promotes aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Serino, Grazia; Sallustio, Fabio; Cox, Sharon N; Pesce, Francesco; Schena, Francesco P

    2012-05-01

    Aberrant O-glycosylation in the hinge region of IgA1 characterizes IgA nephropathy. The mechanisms underlying this abnormal glycosylation are not well understood, but reduced expression of the enzyme core 1, β1,3-galactosyltransferase 1 (C1GALT1) may contribute. In this study, high-throughput microRNA (miRNA) profiling identified 37 miRNAs differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with IgA nephropathy compared with healthy persons. Among them, we observed upregulation of miR-148b, which potentially targets C1GALT1. Patients with IgA nephropathy exhibited lower C1GALT1 expression, which negatively correlated with miR-148b expression. Transfection of PBMCs from healthy persons with a miR-148b mimic reduced endogenous C1GALT1 mRNA levels threefold. Conversely, loss of miR-148b function in PBMCs of patients with IgA nephropathy increased C1GALT1 mRNA and protein levels to those observed in healthy persons. Moreover, we found that upregulation of miR-148b directly correlated with levels of galactose-deficient IgA1. In vitro, we used an IgA1-producing cell line to confirm that miR-148b modulates IgA1 O-glycosylation and the levels of secreted galactose-deficient IgA1. Taken together, these data suggest a role for miRNAs in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. Abnormal expression of miR-148b may explain the aberrant glycosylation of IgA1, providing a potential pharmacologic target for IgA nephropathy.

  20. Accelerated autoantibody clearance by intravenous immunoglobulin therapy: studies in experimental models to determine the magnitude and time course of the effect.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, W K; Teeling, J L; Hack, C E

    2001-11-15

    Recently, it has been postulated that the beneficial effect of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) in antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders is based on accelerated catabolism of autoantibodies. In the current study, in vivo experiments were performed with mice in which autoantibody production was mimicked by continuous infusion of monoclonal antibodies. In this model, a single dose of IVIG reduced the plasma concentrations of the infused immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) by approximately 40% after 3 days, whereas the concentration of an IgA mAb was not affected. To extrapolate these findings to humans, a computational model for IgG clearance was established that accurately predicted the time course and magnitude of the decrease in IgG plasma levels observed in mice. Adapted for humans, this model predicted a gradually occurring decrease in autoantibody levels after IVIG administration (2 g/kg), with a maximum reduction of approximately 25% after 3 to 4 weeks and a continued decrease of several months. In conclusion, a single high dose of IVIG induces a relatively small but long-lasting reduction of autoantibody levels by accelerated IgG clearance. This mechanism has clinical relevance in the sense that it can fully explain, as the sole mechanism, the gradual decrease in autoantibody levels observed in several patient studies. However, in some clinical studies, larger or more rapid effects have been observed that cannot be explained by accelerated clearance. Hence, IVIG can also reduce autoantibody levels through mechanisms such as down-regulation of antibody production or neutralization by anti-idiotypic antibodies.

  1. Abnormalities of the IgA immune system in members of unrelated pedigrees from patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schena, F P; Scivittaro, V; Ranieri, E; Sinico, R; Benuzzi, S; Di Cillo, M; Aventaggiato, L

    1993-01-01

    In the last few years many investigators have reported the recurrence of primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN) or the presence of persistent microhaematuria and/or proteinuria in family members of patients with IgAN. Our study was undertaken to investigate the relevance of abnormalities in the regulation of the IgA and IgM immune system in microhaematuric and asymptomatic family members of IgAN patients. Fifty-four out of 120 members of nine unrelated pedigrees were examined by urinalysis; polymeric IgA (pIgA), IgA rheumatoid factor (IgARF), IgA1-IgG immune complexes (IgA 1-IgG IC) and IgA 1-IgM IC, and other immunoglobulins were measured in serum samples. Moreover, we studied the production of immunoglobulins, pIgA and IgARF by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in basal conditions and after pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulation. Our data demonstrate that persistent microhaematuria was present in 24% of relatives. High serum levels of IgA, mainly pIgA and IgARF, IgA 1-IgG IC and IgA 1-IgM IC occurred in 66% of relatives. Abnormal spontaneous production of IgA by PBMC and after PWM stimulation was present in 64% of family members. Interestingly, high serum levels of IgM and abnormal production of this immunoglobulin by PBMC were observed in relatives. However, the immunological abnormalities did not correlate in any way with the presence of urinary abnormalities such as microhaematuria, which was most likely determined by an underlying glomerular alteration. PMID:8467558

  2. Salivary IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase in man.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Taubman, M A; Ebersole, J L

    1985-01-01

    Parotid salivas of 97 young adults were screened for IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase (GTF) from laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans (serotypes c and g). Antibody levels to GTF from serotype c positively correlated with levels to serotype g GTF among these salivas. GTF's were prepared from S. mutans obtained from a subset of individuals in this population. All but one saliva showed IgA antibody activity to all of the GTF tested. In addition, the relative magnitude of each subject's antibody level was generally the highest to the GTF from their own S. mutans. Fractions, enriched for IgA by ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration, showed patterns of functional inhibition of GTF activity which were consistent with patterns of IgA antibody activity in ELISA of unfractionated salivas. These data indicate that detectable levels of IgA antibody to S. mutans GTF exist in many young adult salivas, while this IgA antibody activity reacts with GTF from different biotypes, subjects generally show the highest secretory IgA antibody levels to their own GTF, and the relative amount of IgA antibody to GTF and the ability to inhibit GTF activity are roughly correlated. PMID:2931224

  3. Role of complement in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Daha, Mohamed R; van Kooten, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by the deposition of IgA in the mesangium of glomeruli. This mesangial IgA has been found to consist mainly of polymeric IgA1 which drives the activation of the mesangial cells and results in excessive production of several inflammatory mediators. The activation of mesangial cells is amplified by the ability of IgA to activate the complement system, originally thought to occur mainly via the alternative pathway of complement. However more recent studies indicate that lectin pathway involvement has a strong association with progression of renal disease. In this review we summarize the contribution of complement to the IgA- mediated inflammatory process.

  4. Purification and characterisation of immunoglobulins from the Australian black flying fox (Pteropus alecto) using anti-fab affinity chromatography reveals the low abundance of IgA.

    PubMed

    Wynne, James W; Di Rubbo, Antonio; Shiell, Brian J; Beddome, Gary; Cowled, Christopher; Peck, Grantley R; Huang, Jing; Grimley, Samantha L; Baker, Michelle L; Michalski, Wojtek P

    2013-01-01

    There is now an overwhelming body of evidence that implicates bats in the dissemination of a long list of emerging and re-emerging viral agents, often causing illnesses or death in both animals and humans. Despite this, there is a paucity of information regarding the immunological mechanisms by which bats coexist with highly pathogenic viruses. Immunoglobulins are major components of the adaptive immune system. Early studies found bats may have quantitatively lower antibody responses to model antigens compared to conventional laboratory animals. To further understand the antibody response of bats, the present study purified and characterised the major immunoglobulin classes from healthy black flying foxes, Pteropus alecto. We employed a novel strategy, where IgG was initially purified and used to generate anti-Fab specific antibodies. Immobilised anti-Fab specific antibodies were then used to capture other immunoglobulins from IgG depleted serum. While high quantities of IgM were successfully isolated from serum, IgA was not. Only trace quantities of IgA were detected in the serum by mass spectrometry. Immobilised ligands specific to IgA (Jacalin, Peptide M and staphylococcal superantigen-like protein) also failed to capture P. alecto IgA from serum. IgM was the second most abundant serum antibody after IgG. A survey of mucosal secretions found IgG was the dominant antibody class rather than IgA. Our study demonstrates healthy P. alecto bats have markedly less serum IgA than expected. Higher quantities of IgG in mucosal secretions may be compensation for this low abundance or lack of IgA. Knowledge and reagents developed within this study can be used in the future to examine class-specific antibody response within this important viral host.

  5. Purification and Characterisation of Immunoglobulins from the Australian Black Flying Fox (Pteropus alecto) Using Anti-Fab Affinity Chromatography Reveals the Low Abundance of IgA

    PubMed Central

    Shiell, Brian J.; Beddome, Gary; Cowled, Christopher; Peck, Grantley R.; Huang, Jing; Grimley, Samantha L.; Baker, Michelle L.; Michalski, Wojtek P.

    2013-01-01

    There is now an overwhelming body of evidence that implicates bats in the dissemination of a long list of emerging and re-emerging viral agents, often causing illnesses or death in both animals and humans. Despite this, there is a paucity of information regarding the immunological mechanisms by which bats coexist with highly pathogenic viruses. Immunoglobulins are major components of the adaptive immune system. Early studies found bats may have quantitatively lower antibody responses to model antigens compared to conventional laboratory animals. To further understand the antibody response of bats, the present study purified and characterised the major immunoglobulin classes from healthy black flying foxes, Pteropus alecto. We employed a novel strategy, where IgG was initially purified and used to generate anti-Fab specific antibodies. Immobilised anti-Fab specific antibodies were then used to capture other immunoglobulins from IgG depleted serum. While high quantities of IgM were successfully isolated from serum, IgA was not. Only trace quantities of IgA were detected in the serum by mass spectrometry. Immobilised ligands specific to IgA (Jacalin, Peptide M and staphylococcal superantigen-like protein) also failed to capture P. alecto IgA from serum. IgM was the second most abundant serum antibody after IgG. A survey of mucosal secretions found IgG was the dominant antibody class rather than IgA. Our study demonstrates healthy P. alecto bats have markedly less serum IgA than expected. Higher quantities of IgG in mucosal secretions may be compensation for this low abundance or lack of IgA. Knowledge and reagents developed within this study can be used in the future to examine class-specific antibody response within this important viral host. PMID:23308125

  6. Purification and characterisation of immunoglobulins from the Australian black flying fox (Pteropus alecto) using anti-fab affinity chromatography reveals the low abundance of IgA.

    PubMed

    Wynne, James W; Di Rubbo, Antonio; Shiell, Brian J; Beddome, Gary; Cowled, Christopher; Peck, Grantley R; Huang, Jing; Grimley, Samantha L; Baker, Michelle L; Michalski, Wojtek P

    2013-01-01

    There is now an overwhelming body of evidence that implicates bats in the dissemination of a long list of emerging and re-emerging viral agents, often causing illnesses or death in both animals and humans. Despite this, there is a paucity of information regarding the immunological mechanisms by which bats coexist with highly pathogenic viruses. Immunoglobulins are major components of the adaptive immune system. Early studies found bats may have quantitatively lower antibody responses to model antigens compared to conventional laboratory animals. To further understand the antibody response of bats, the present study purified and characterised the major immunoglobulin classes from healthy black flying foxes, Pteropus alecto. We employed a novel strategy, where IgG was initially purified and used to generate anti-Fab specific antibodies. Immobilised anti-Fab specific antibodies were then used to capture other immunoglobulins from IgG depleted serum. While high quantities of IgM were successfully isolated from serum, IgA was not. Only trace quantities of IgA were detected in the serum by mass spectrometry. Immobilised ligands specific to IgA (Jacalin, Peptide M and staphylococcal superantigen-like protein) also failed to capture P. alecto IgA from serum. IgM was the second most abundant serum antibody after IgG. A survey of mucosal secretions found IgG was the dominant antibody class rather than IgA. Our study demonstrates healthy P. alecto bats have markedly less serum IgA than expected. Higher quantities of IgG in mucosal secretions may be compensation for this low abundance or lack of IgA. Knowledge and reagents developed within this study can be used in the future to examine class-specific antibody response within this important viral host. PMID:23308125

  7. Anti-fibrillarin autoantibodies in mercury-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hultman, P; Eneström, S; Pollard, K M; Tan, E M

    1989-12-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence (IF) with HEp-2 cells as a substrate serially bled SJL mice were found to gradually develop a high titre of anti-nucleolar antibodies (ANuA) after 3-5 weeks of s.c. injections of 1.6 mg HgCl2/kg body weight every third day. The ANuA showed a clumpy nucleolar pattern of localization and were composed of all IgG subclasses, but contained, in comparison with the antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in MRL-lpr/lpr mice, significantly lower titres of IgG2a and only traces of IgG3. Immunoblotting analysis using purified mouse liver nucleoli revealed that the sera with ANuA identified the same 34-kD nucleolar protein which was targeted by a human scleroderma serum containing autoantibodies monospecific for fibrillarin. In addition, a fraction of the mercury-treated SJL mice developed serum antibodies reacting with 10-15 and 60-70 kD nucleolar proteins in immunoblotting. The presence of serum autoantibodies reacting with the 10-15 kD proteins correlated with significantly increased titres of anti-histone antibodies of the IgG class in ELISA. Some mercury-treated SJL mice also developed a significantly increased titre of anti-histone antibodies of the IgM class. B10.S mice treated with mercuric chloride consistently developed ANuA, which also targeted a 34-kD nucleolar protein. Since anti-fibrillarin antibodies are specific markers of scleroderma, the present animal model may be valuable for studies of the immunological aberrations which are likely to induce this autoimmune response.

  8. Exposures influencing total IgA level in colostrum.

    PubMed

    Munblit, D; Sheth, S; Abrol, P; Treneva, M; Peroni, D G; Chow, L-Y; Boner, A L; Pampura, A; Warner, J O; Boyle, R J

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a predominant immunoglobulin present in human breast milk and is known to play an important role in infant gut immunity maturation. Breast milk composition varies between populations, but the environmental and maternal factors responsible for these variations are still unclear. We examined the relationship between different exposures and levels of IgA in colostrum. The objective of this study was to examine whether exposures analysed influence levels of IgA in colostrum. The present study used 294 colostrum samples from the MecMilk International cohort, collected from women residing in London, Moscow and Verona. Samples were analysed in automated Abbott Architect Analyser. We found an inverse correlation between time postpartum and colostrum total IgA level (r=-0.49, P<0.001). Adjusting for maternal parity, smoking, fresh fruit and fish consumption and allergen sensitization, multiple regression model showed that IgA levels were influenced by colostrum collection time (P<0.0001) and country of collection (P<0.01). Mode of delivery influence did not appear to be significant in univariate comparisons, once adjusted for the above maternal characteristics it showed a significant influence on total IgA (P=0.01). We conclude that the concentration of IgA in colostrum drops rapidly after birth and future studies should always consider this factor in analysis. IgA concentration varied significantly between countries, with the highest level detected in Moscow and lowest in Verona. Mode of delivery effect should be confirmed on larger cohorts. Further work is needed to determine ways to correct for IgA decline over time in colostrum, and to find the cause of variations in IgA levels between the countries.

  9. [How can we diagnose and better understand inflammatory myopathies? The usefulness of auto-antibodies].

    PubMed

    Sibilia, Jean; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Meyer, Alain; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Sordet, Christelle; Goetz, Joëlle

    2010-10-01

    The inflammatory myopathies are a group of quite proteiform, systemic auto-immune diseases which include polymyositis, dermatomyositis and inclusion body myopathies. To facilitate the diagnosis, classification criteria (Bohan and Peter, 1975) have been proposed, based essentially on clinical criteria. In addition, over the past fifteen years, auto-antibodies characterizing certain forms of inflammatory myopathy have been identified. One distinguishes schematically: auto-antibodies specific for myositis and auto-antibodies sometimes associated with myositis. Concerning the myositis specific auto-antibodies (MSA), schematically there are a dozen specificities which are classed according to the cellular distribution of the auto-antigen. The most characteristic are certainly the auto-antibodies directed against cytoplasmic antigens: the anti-tRNA synthetases (anti-Jo-1 (PL-1), anti-PL-7, PL-12, EJ, OJ, JS, KS, ZO, YRS), anti-SRP (signal recognition particle), anti-Mas and anti-KJ, anti-Fer (eEF1), anti-Wa and anti-CADM p140. Other auto-antibodies are directed against nuclear auto-antigens: the anti-Mi-2, anti-PMS (PMS1, PMS2) and related antibodies (MLH1, DNA PKcs…), anti-56 kDa, anti-MJ (NXP-2), anti-SAE and anti-p155/p140 (TIF-1γ). Concerning the auto-antibodies sometimes associated with myositis (myositis associated auto-antibodies or MAA), they can also be observed in other auto-immune diseases. These auto-antibodies are directed against nuclear or nucleolar auto-antigens: the anti-PM-Scl, anti-Ku, anti-RNP (U1 RNP and U2 RNP, U4/U6 RNP and U5 RNP), anti-Ro 52 kDa and more rarely, anti-Ro 60 kDa and anti-La. The auto-antibodies related to myositis are biological tools which are of interest in two main ways. They have allowed us to sort out the nosology of these inflammatory myopathies, in particular by defining anti-tRNA synthetase syndrome. It now remains to determine how they might be employed to complement the classical clinico-biological diagnostic criteria

  10. Autoantibodies to nervous system-specific proteins are elevated in sera of flight crew members: biomarkers for nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Abou-Donia, Mohamed B; Abou-Donia, Martha M; ElMasry, Eman M; Monro, Jean A; Mulder, Michel F A

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive study reports the results of assays performed to detect circulating autoantibodies in a panel of 7 proteins associated with the nervous system (NS) in sera of 12 healthy controls and a group of 34 flight crew members including both pilots and attendants who experienced adverse effects after exposure to air emissions sourced to the ventilation system in their aircrafts and subsequently sought medical attention. The proteins selected represent various types of proteins present in nerve cells that are affected by neuronal degeneration. In the sera samples from flight crew members and healthy controls, immunoglobin (IgG) was measured using Western blotting against neurofilament triplet proteins (NFP), tubulin, microtubule-associated tau proteins (tau), microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), myelin basic protein (MBP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and glial S100B protein. Significant elevation in levels of circulating IgG-class autoantibodies in flight crew members was found. A symptom-free pilot was sampled before symptoms and then again afterward. This pilot developed clinical problems after flying for 45 h in 10 d. Significant increases in autoantibodies were noted to most of the tested proteins in the serum of this pilot after exposure to air emissions. The levels of autoantibodies rose with worsening of his condition compared to the serum sample collected prior to exposure. After cessation of flying for a year, this pilot's clinical condition improved, and eventually he recovered and his serum autoantibodies against nervous system proteins decreased. The case study with this pilot demonstrates a temporal relationship between exposure to air emissions, clinical condition, and level of serum autoantibodies to nervous system-specific proteins. Overall, these results suggest the possible development of neuronal injury and gliosis in flight crew members anecdotally exposed to cabin air emissions containing organophosphates. Thus, increased

  11. Glomerulonephritis after hematopoietic cell transplantation: IgA nephropathy with increased excretion of galactose-deficient IgA1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Susie L; Colvin, Gerald A; Rifai, Abdalla; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Novak, Jan; Esparza, Alfredo; Farooqi, Shahida; Julian, Bruce A

    2010-05-01

    We report the development of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) following full myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in two patients with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched sibling donors, unrelated to active or chronic graft-versus-host disease. Both recipients had elevated urinary levels of galactose-deficient IgA1, and one donor-recipient pair had elevated serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1. We propose that IgAN developed after bone marrow transplantation due to a non-graft-versus-host-disease-related multi-hit process associated with glomerular deposition of galactose-deficient IgA1. These two cases provide unique insight into the kinetics of overproduction of galactose-deficient IgA1 and its glomerular deposition and consequential renal injury in IgAN.

  12. Patients with IgA nephropathy have increased serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels.

    PubMed

    Moldoveanu, Z; Wyatt, R J; Lee, J Y; Tomana, M; Julian, B A; Mestecky, J; Huang, W-Q; Anreddy, S R; Hall, S; Hastings, M C; Lau, K K; Cook, W J; Novak, J

    2007-06-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy is the most prevalent form of glomerulonephritis worldwide. A renal biopsy is required for an accurate diagnosis, as no convenient biomarker is currently available. We developed a serological test based upon the observation that this nephropathy is characterized by undergalactosylated IgA1 in the circulation and in mesangial immune deposits. In the absence of galactose, the terminal saccharide of O-linked chains in the hinge region of IgA1 is terminal or sialylated N-acetylgalactosamine. A lectin from Helix aspersa, recognizing N-acetylgalactosamine, was used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that measures galactose-deficient IgA1 in serum. The median serum lectin-binding IgA1 level was significantly higher for 153 Caucasian adult patients with IgA nephropathy without progression to end-stage renal disease as compared with that for 150 healthy Caucasian adult controls. As the lectin-binding IgA1 levels for the controls were not normally distributed, the 90th percentile was used for determination of significant elevation. Using a value of 1076 U/ml as the upper limit of normal, 117 of the 153 patients with IgA nephropathy had an elevated serum lectin-binding IgA1 level. The sensitivity as a diagnostic test was 76.5%, with specificity 94%; the positive predictive value was 88.6% and the negative predictive value was 78.9%. We conclude that this lectin-binding assay may have potential as a noninvasive diagnostic test for IgA nephropathy.

  13. Degradation of human secretory IgA1 and IgA2 by Entamoeba histolytica surface-associated proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Nieto, Rosa Maria; Rico-Mata, Rosa; Arias-Negrete, Sergio; Avila, Eva E

    2008-12-01

    The protozoan Entamoeba histolytica is the etiological agent of amebiasis, an infection with high prevalence worldwide. The host-ameba relationship outcome depends on parasite and host factors, and among these is secretory IgA. These antibodies reduce mucosal colonization by pathogens and neutralize a variety of toxins and enzymes. The functionality of secretory IgA depends on its integrity. Some bacteria produce IgA proteases that cleave mainly the IgA1 subclass; live E. histolytica trophozoites, and other ameba fractions are also able to degrade human IgA. The aim of this study was to determine if serum and secretory IgA, its subclasses and secretory component, are degraded by cysteine proteases, which are present and active on the surface of glutaraldehyde-fixed amebas. It was observed that secretory IgA1, IgA2, free and IgA-bound secretory component were degraded by E. histolytica surface-associated cysteine proteinases. Secretory IgA2, although it was degraded, conserved its ability to agglutinate live amebas better than IgA1. Therefore, while specificity of known ameba cysteine proteases is cathepsin B-like and is different from bacterial IgA proteases, IgA2 was functionally more resistant than IgA1 to ameba surface-associated cysteine protease degradation, similar to the greater resistance of IgA2 to bacterial IgA-specific proteases.

  14. Genesis and evolution of antichromatin autoantibodies in murine lupus implicates T-dependent immunization with self antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Burlingame, R W; Rubin, R L; Balderas, R S; Theofilopoulos, A N

    1993-01-01

    Autoantibodies reacting with chromatin and its components, histones and DNA, are characteristic of the human autoimmune disease SLE and drug-induced lupus, but the mechanisms of their induction remain unknown. Serial serum samples collected over short intervals from lupus-prone MRL/MP-lpr/lpr and BXSB mice were tested by ELISA on chromatin and its substructures to characterize the initial autoimmune response to these antigens. Direct binding studies demonstrated that the early autoantibodies recognized discontinuous epitopes on native chromatin and the (H2A-H2B)-DNA subnucleosome. As the immune response progressed, native DNA and other chromatin constituents generally became antigenic. Based on adsorption studies and IgG subclass restriction, antibodies to native DNA were more related to chromatin than to denatured DNA. The kinetics of autoantibody appearance and the Ig class distribution were similar to the kinetics and distribution seen in antibodies induced by immunization with an exogenous T-dependent antigen. These results are most consistent with the view that autoantibodies reacting with chromatin are generated by autoimmunization with chromatin, and antibodies to native DNA are a subset of the wide spectrum of antichromatin autoantibodies. Images PMID:8473512

  15. The influences of hinge length and composition on the susceptibility of human IgA to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-06-15

    The influences of IgA hinge length and composition on its susceptibility to cleavage by bacterial IgA1 proteases were examined using a panel of IgA hinge mutants. The IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus sanguis strains SK4 and SK49, Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae cleaved IgA2-IgA1 half hinge, an Ab featuring half of the IgA1 hinge incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA1 protease-resistant IgA2, whereas those of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and S. sanguis strain SK1 did not. Hinge length reduction by removal of two of the four C-terminal proline residues rendered IgA2-IgA1 half hinge resistant to all streptococcal IgA1 metalloproteinases but it remained sensitive to cleavage by the serine-type IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus spp. The four C-terminal proline residues could be substituted by alanine residues or transferred to the N-terminal extremity of the hinge without affect on the susceptibility of the Ab to cleavage by serine-type IgA1 proteases. However, their removal rendered the Ab resistant to cleavage by all the IgA1 proteases. We conclude that the serine-type IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus require the Fab and Fc regions to be separated by at least ten (or in the case of N. gonorrhoeae type I protease, nine) amino acids between Val(222) and Cys(241) (IgA1 numbering) for efficient access and cleavage. By contrast, the streptococcal IgA1 metalloproteinases require 12 or more appropriate amino acids between the Fab and Fc to maintain a minimum critical distance between the scissile bond and the start of the Fc.

  16. The Unexplored Roles of Human Serum IgA

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Ka Wai

    2014-01-01

    The roles of human serum IgA, in contrast to that of mucosal IgA, are relatively unexplored. Previous studies have shown that IgA mediates either pro- or anti-inflammatory effects in innate immune cells. Serum IgA has been shown to interact with many proteins and glycoproteins of which the functions and mechanisms are not fully characterized. Here, we present fresh perspectives into the roles of serum IgA, describing novel IgA–protein interactions, the importance of its glycosylation status in normal functions, and the plausible role of IgA as a driver and regulator of autoimmune diseases/immune overactivation. Other potential roles, including the regulation of cytokines, effector cell function, and homeostasis, are considered in view of the maintenance of immune function. We anticipate future research to uncover new anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory roles of human serum IgA in immune functions and dysfunctions, with implications on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PMID:25188736

  17. Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Soham

    2015-01-01

    Linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis is a rare autoimmune mucocutaneous disorder caused by immunoglobulin A autoantibodies produced against several different antigens in the basement membrane zone. Clinically, it is characterized by tense vesicles or bullae, which on histopathological exam demonstrate subepidermal blister with a predominantly neutrophilic infiltrate. A smooth, linear pattern of immunoglobulin A deposition in the basement membrane zone on direct immunofluorescence is considered the gold standard for establishing a diagnosis. Treatment consists of dapsone or sulfapyridine. The authors report a 60-year-old woman who presented with pruritic erythematous patches and plaques on her trunk, back, and legs without blisters, who was diagnosed with eczema for several months with no response to prior treatments. A biopsy was performed, which was consistent with linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis and later confirmed by direct immunofluorescence studies. The authors present this case to increase awareness of this rare disease, which could manifest in a nonclassical, nonblistering fashion. PMID:26557220

  18. Multiple autoantibodies following cytomegalovirus infection: virus distribution and specificity of autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomaeus, W N; O'Donoghue, H; Foti, D; Lawson, C M; Shellam, G R; Reed, W D

    1988-01-01

    Multiple autoantibodies were found in the sera of BALB/c, C57BL/10 and C3H mice following mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. The complex pattern of intra-organ, intratissue and intracellular reactivity observed by immunoperoxidase histochemistry suggested that many autoantibodies of varying specificities were elicited. This evidence from immunoperoxidase histochemistry was confirmed by immunoblot, where autoantibodies binding to polypeptides of a variety of sizes and tissues of origin were observed. In addition to these central findings, the tissue and organ distribution of MCMV in three mouse strains of differing genetic resistance were described. No correlation was found between the distribution of virus and the tissue and organ specificity of the autoantibodies produced following infection. Inflammatory responses accompanied MCMV infection in a number of tissues. In BALB/c mice, myocarditis and salivary gland inflammation were evident at Day 56 post-infection in the absence of MCMV, but in the presence of autoantibodies to cardiac muscle and salivary duct epithelium. This model for virus-induced autoimmunity can be applied to studies of the relationship between virus infection, autoimmunity and disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:2842252

  19. Strategies for building reference standards for autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Joanna; Dellavance, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Producing robust, certified, traceable reference material for autoantibody testing is a vital element in maintaining the validity of results that are generated in the daily clinical laboratory routine. This is a huge challenge because of the high number of variables involved in the detection and measurement of the autoantibodies. The production of such materials is time consuming and needs rigorous attention to detail; this is best achieved by an overarching independent body who will oversee the process in a "not for profit" manner. Much effort has been made to build international standards for quantitative and qualitative assays based on monoclonal antibodies, obtained from affinity purification and plasmapheresis. The big challenge is to respect individual differences in immune response to the same antigen. A promising ongoing initiative is the construction of pools with monospecific samples from different individuals.

  20. Muscle autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis: beyond diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Meriggioli, Matthew N; Sanders, Donald B

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. A number of molecules, including ion channels and other proteins at the neuromuscular junction, may be targeted by autoantibodies leading to abnormal neuromuscular transmission. In approximately 85% of patients, autoantibodies, directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor can be detected in the serum and confirm the diagnosis, but in general, do not precisely predict the degree of weakness or response to therapy. Antibodies to the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase are detected in approximately 50% of generalized myasthenia gravis patients who are seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and levels of anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies do appear to correlate with disease severity and treatment response. Antibodies to other muscle antigens may be found in the subsets of myasthenia gravis patients, potentially providing clinically useful diagnostic information, but their utility as relevant biomarkers (measures of disease state or response to treatment) is currently unclear. PMID:22882218

  1. Euthyroid Graves' ophthalmopathy with negative autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Mehtap

    2005-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune-based hyperthyroidism in which a number of different antibodies directed against thyroid tissue plays a role. Graves' ophthalmopathy is thought to be a consequence of this autoimmune basis and occurs in some patients with Graves' disease. On occasional cases, the disease may present only with ophthalmopathy without hyperthyroidism. A 32-year-old woman with euthyroid Graves' ophthalmopathy and negative thyroid autoantibodies, including TSH receptor antibody, is presented here. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16334503

  2. Autoantibodies: Focus on anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Nina; Winkler, Thomas H; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the days of Ehrlich and the birth of humoral immunity, self-reactivity or 'horror autotoxicus' as referred to by Paul Ehrlich, has been of great concern. For instance, in patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anti-nuclear and anti-DNA antibodies have been recognized for many years. Despite this, the exact mechanism as to how the immune system fails to protect the individual and allows these autoantibodies to develop in this and other systemic autoimmune diseases remains uncertain. So how can we explain their presence? Evidence suggests that B cells expressing autoreactive antibodies do not normally arise but rather undergo negative selection as they develop. In light of this, it might seem contradictory that not all autoreactive B cell clones are eliminated, although this may not even be the intention since autoantibodies are also found in healthy individuals and may even protect from autoimmunity. Here, we will discuss autoantibodies, in particular those recognizing DNA, with regard to their reactivity and their potentially pathogenic or protective properties. PMID:21776330

  3. Characterisation of osteoprotegerin autoantibodies in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Real, Ana; Gilbert, Nick; Hauser, Barbara; Kennedy, Nick; Shand, Alan; Gillett, Helen; Gillett, Peter; Goddard, Clive; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina; Fraser, William D; Satsangi, Jack; Ralston, Stuart H; Riches, Philip L

    2015-08-01

    Autoantibodies neutralising the effect of the bone regulatory cytokine osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been described in a patient with severe osteoporosis and coeliac disease. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and epitope specificity of autoantibodies to OPG in patients with coeliac disease, and correlate their presence with bone mineral density. A direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed and used to screen patients with coeliac disease for autoantibodies to OPG. Recombinant fragments of OPG were made to evaluate the epitope specificity and affinity of these antibodies. Phenotype information of the patients was obtained by case note review. Raised titres of antibodies to OPG were found in 7/71 (9.8 %) patients with coeliac disease, compared with 1/72 (1.4 %) non-coeliac osteoporosis clinic control patients (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that a polyclonal antibody response to OPG is raised in these patients capable of recognising different epitopes of OPG with varying affinity. The titre of OPG antibodies was associated with lower bone mineral density Z-score of the hip in coeliac patients on univariate (p < 0.05) and multivariate analysis including age, sex height and weight as covariates (p < 0.01). Polyclonal antibodies to OPG are more common in patients with coeliac disease and are independently associated with lower bone mineral density Z-scores of the hip. Further work is required to establish the clinical utility of testing for OPG antibodies.

  4. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed.

  5. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed. PMID:26852594

  6. IgG, IgM, and IgA antinuclear antibodies in discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Jost, Sheridan A; Tseng, Lin-Chiang; Matthews, Loderick A; Vasquez, Rebecca; Zhang, Song; Yancey, Kim B; Chong, Benjamin F

    2014-01-01

    IgG antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are elevated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with patients with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE). To provide an expanded immunologic view of circulating ANAs in lupus patients, we compared the expressions of IgG, IgM, and IgA ANAs in DLE and SLE patients. In this cross-sectional study, sera from age-, gender-, and ethnic-matched SLE (N = 35), DLE (N = 23), and normal patients (N = 22) were tested for IgG, IgM, and IgA ANAs using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) with monkey esophagus as substrate. ELISAs showed elevated levels of IgG ANA, IgM ANA, and IgG/IgM ANA ratios in SLE patients compared with DLE and normal patients. IgA ANA expression was higher in SLE and DLE patients versus normal patients. IIF studies showed higher percentages of patients positive for IgG, IgM, and IgA ANAs in the SLE group. Higher IgG/IgM ANA ratios in SLE than DLE show enhanced class-switching and a more sustained humoral response in SLE. They also suggest a potential connection of IgM ANAs with disease containment.

  7. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A.; Allan, Lenka L.; Jackson, Linda M.; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R.; Nero, Tracy L.; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W.; Lopez, Angel L.; Waddell, Thomas K.; Anderson, Gary P.; Hamilton, John A.; Schrader, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain. PMID:23620516

  8. Galactose-Deficient IgA1 as a Candidate Urinary Polypeptide Marker of IgA Nephropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Landino; Hall, Stacy; Wyatt, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), circulatory IgA1 and IgA1 in mesangial deposits contain elevated amounts of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1). We hypothesized that a fraction of Gd-IgA1 from the glomerular deposits and/or circulation may be excreted into the urine and thus represent a disease-specific biomarker. Levels of urinary IgA and Gd-IgA1 were determined in 207 patients with IgAN, 205 patients with other renal diseases, and 57 healthy controls, recruited in USA, Japan, and Italy. Urinary IgA was similarly elevated in patients with IgAN and renal-disease controls compared with healthy controls. However, urinary Gd-IgA1 levels were higher in patients with IgAN (IgAN, 28.0 ± 17.9; disease controls, 20.6 ± 17.4 units/mg urinary creatinine; P < 0.0001). Lectin western blotting data confirmed these results. In IgAN patients, levels of urinary Gd-IgA1 correlated with proteinuria (P < 0.001). When we purified IgA from serum and urine of an IgAN patient, the relative proportion of Gd-IgA1 to total IgA1 was higher in the urine compared with serum, suggesting selective excretion of Gd-IgA1 in IgAN. In summary, urinary excretion of Gd-IgA1 was elevated in patients with IgAN and the urinary Gd-IgA1 levels correlated with proteinuria. Urinary Gd-IgA1 may thus represent a disease-specific biomarker of IgAN.

  9. Galactose-Deficient IgA1 as a Candidate Urinary Polypeptide Marker of IgA Nephropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Landino; Hall, Stacy; Wyatt, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), circulatory IgA1 and IgA1 in mesangial deposits contain elevated amounts of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1). We hypothesized that a fraction of Gd-IgA1 from the glomerular deposits and/or circulation may be excreted into the urine and thus represent a disease-specific biomarker. Levels of urinary IgA and Gd-IgA1 were determined in 207 patients with IgAN, 205 patients with other renal diseases, and 57 healthy controls, recruited in USA, Japan, and Italy. Urinary IgA was similarly elevated in patients with IgAN and renal-disease controls compared with healthy controls. However, urinary Gd-IgA1 levels were higher in patients with IgAN (IgAN, 28.0 ± 17.9; disease controls, 20.6 ± 17.4 units/mg urinary creatinine; P < 0.0001). Lectin western blotting data confirmed these results. In IgAN patients, levels of urinary Gd-IgA1 correlated with proteinuria (P < 0.001). When we purified IgA from serum and urine of an IgAN patient, the relative proportion of Gd-IgA1 to total IgA1 was higher in the urine compared with serum, suggesting selective excretion of Gd-IgA1 in IgAN. In summary, urinary excretion of Gd-IgA1 was elevated in patients with IgAN and the urinary Gd-IgA1 levels correlated with proteinuria. Urinary Gd-IgA1 may thus represent a disease-specific biomarker of IgAN. PMID:27647947

  10. Serum autoantibodies directed against transglutaminase-2 have a low avidity compared with alloantibodies against gliadin in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Gelderman, K A; Drop, A C A D; Trouw, L A; Bontkes, H J; Bouma, G; van Hoogstraten, I M W; von Blomberg, B M E

    2014-07-01

    Coeliac disease is characterized by intolerance to gliadin and related gluten components present in wheat, barley and rye. Coeliac disease patients harbour antibodies directed against alloantigens such as gliadin, but also against the autoantigen transglutaminase-2 (TG2). The type and quality of antibody responses provides insight into the underlying immune activation processes. Therefore, in this study we have analysed the avidity of the antibody response directed against the autoantigen TG2 and compared this with antibody responses against the alloantigens gliadin and Escherichia coli. We observed that the immunoglobulin (Ig)A autoantibody response directed against TG2 is of low avidity compared with the IgA response against the alloantigens gliadin and E. coli in the same patients; the same was true for IgG, both in IgA-deficient and in -sufficient coeliac patients. The observed avidities appear not to be related to disease stage, antibody levels, age or duration of exposure to gluten. In conclusion, in coeliac disease there is a clear difference in avidity of the antibody responses directed against the auto- and alloantigens, indicating different regulation or site of initiation of these responses.

  11. IgA- and SIgA anti-PR3 antibodies in serum versus organ involvement and disease activity in PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sandin, C; Eriksson, P; Segelmark, M; Skogh, T; Kastbom, A

    2016-05-01

    Circulating immunoglobulin (Ig)A class anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) have been reported in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with mucosal involvement. However, secretory IgA (SIgA) PR3-ANCA has not been reported previously. In this study we compared serum levels of SIgA PR3-ANCA and IgA PR3-ANCA with IgG PR3-ANCA in relation to disease characteristics. Among 73 patients with AAV and PR3-ANCA at diagnosis, 84% tested positive for IgG PR3-ANCA, 47% for IgA-ANCA and 36% for SIgA PR3-ANCA at the time of sampling for the present study. IgA and IgG PR3-ANCA were represented similarly among patients with different organ manifestations, i.e. upper airway, lung or kidney at time of sampling. However, SIgA PR3-ANCA was significantly less represented among patients with upper airway involvement. During active disease, the proportions of IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA-positive patients were significantly higher compared to inactive disease. Eight patients were sampled prospectively during 24 months from onset of active disease. In these patients, IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA turned negative more often after remission induction compared to IgG PR3-ANCA. Our findings suggest that serum IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA are related more closely to disease activity in AAV compared to IgG PR3-ANCA. Further studies are required to reveal if this has implications for disease activity monitoring. The mean number of PR3-ANCA isotypes increased along with disease activity, suggesting a global B cell activation during active disease.

  12. Circulating anti-brain autoantibodies in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Margari, Francesco; Petruzzelli, Maria Giuseppina; Mianulli, Rossana; Campa, Maria Gloria; Pastore, Adriana; Tampoia, Marilina

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, an inflammatory autoimmune process, autoantibodies mediated, has been porposed as having a role in the development of different psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to assay organ-specific and non organ-specific circulating autoantibodies in schizophrenia, mood disorders and healthy controls; among organ-specific autoantibodies we focused on different fluorescence patterns of anti-brain autoantibodies against rat and monkey's sections of hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum. Serum samples from 50 acutelly ill patients (30 schizophrenia and 20 mood disorders) and from 20 healthy controls were collected. Autoantibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and chemiluminescence immunoassay. We found a significant difference for circulating autoantibodies to hypothalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum and for anti-nuclear autoantibodies in both schizophrenia and mood disorders when compared to the control group. Referring to the two groups of patients only, circulating antibodies anti-hypothalamus were found significant higher in mood disorders rather than in schizophrenia, with specific regard to nuclear and cytoplasmic staining of the neurons. These data suggest an aspecific diffuse brain involvement of anti-brain autoantibodies in acute phases of schizophrenia and mood disorders. The greater involvement of the hypothalamus in mood disorders highlights the close relationship between autoimmunity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and affective disorders.

  13. How Relevant Are GFAP Autoantibodies in Autism and Tourette Syndrome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Nikki J.; Libbey, Jane E.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Coon, Hilary H.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Controversy exists over the role of autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens in autism and Tourette Syndrome. We investigated plasma autoantibody titers to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in children with classic onset (33) and regressive onset (26) autism, controls (25, healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with…

  14. Enzymatic sialylation of IgA1 O-glycans: implications for studies of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuo; Raska, Milan; Stuchlova Horynova, Milada; Hall, Stacy D; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Yuzawa, Yukio; Moldoveanu, Zina; Julian, Bruce A; Renfrow, Matthew B; Novak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) have elevated circulating levels of IgA1 with some O-glycans consisting of galactose (Gal)-deficient N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) with or without N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc). We have analyzed O-glycosylation heterogeneity of naturally asialo-IgA1 (Ale) myeloma protein that mimics Gal-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) of patients with IgAN, except that IgA1 O-glycans of IgAN patients are frequently sialylated. Specifically, serum IgA1 of healthy controls has more α2,3-sialylated O-glycans (NeuAc attached to Gal) than α2,6-sialylated O-glycans (NeuAc attached to GalNAc). As IgA1-producing cells from IgAN patients have an increased activity of α2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6GalNAc), we hypothesize that such activity may promote premature sialylation of GalNAc and, thus, production of Gd-IgA1, as sialylation of GalNAc prevents subsequent Gal attachment. Distribution of NeuAc in IgA1 O-glycans may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IgAN. To better understand biological functions of NeuAc in IgA1, we established protocols for enzymatic sialylation leading to α2,3- or α2,6-sialylation of IgA1 O-glycans. Sialylation of Gal-deficient asialo-IgA1 (Ale) myeloma protein by an ST6GalNAc enzyme generated sialylated IgA1 that mimics the Gal-deficient IgA1 glycoforms in patients with IgAN, characterized by α2,6-sialylated Gal-deficient GalNAc. In contrast, sialylation of the same myeloma protein by an α2,3-sialyltransferase yielded IgA1 typical for healthy controls, characterized by α2,3-sialylated Gal. The GalNAc-specific lectin from Helix aspersa (HAA) is used to measure levels of Gd-IgA1. We assessed HAA binding to IgA1 sialylated at Gal or GalNAc. As expected, α2,6-sialylation of IgA1 markedly decreased reactivity with HAA. Notably, α2,3-sialylation also decreased reactivity with HAA. Neuraminidase treatment recovered the original HAA reactivity in both instances. These results suggest that binding of a GalNAc-specific lectin

  15. Enzymatic Sialylation of IgA1 O-Glycans: Implications for Studies of IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuo; Raska, Milan; Stuchlova Horynova, Milada; Hall, Stacy D.; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Yuzawa, Yukio; Moldoveanu, Zina; Julian, Bruce A.; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Novak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) have elevated circulating levels of IgA1 with some O-glycans consisting of galactose (Gal)-deficient N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) with or without N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc). We have analyzed O-glycosylation heterogeneity of naturally asialo-IgA1 (Ale) myeloma protein that mimics Gal-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) of patients with IgAN, except that IgA1 O-glycans of IgAN patients are frequently sialylated. Specifically, serum IgA1 of healthy controls has more α2,3-sialylated O-glycans (NeuAc attached to Gal) than α2,6-sialylated O-glycans (NeuAc attached to GalNAc). As IgA1-producing cells from IgAN patients have an increased activity of α2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6GalNAc), we hypothesize that such activity may promote premature sialylation of GalNAc and, thus, production of Gd-IgA1, as sialylation of GalNAc prevents subsequent Gal attachment. Distribution of NeuAc in IgA1 O-glycans may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IgAN. To better understand biological functions of NeuAc in IgA1, we established protocols for enzymatic sialylation leading to α2,3- or α2,6-sialylation of IgA1 O-glycans. Sialylation of Gal-deficient asialo-IgA1 (Ale) myeloma protein by an ST6GalNAc enzyme generated sialylated IgA1 that mimics the Gal-deficient IgA1 glycoforms in patients with IgAN, characterized by α2,6-sialylated Gal-deficient GalNAc. In contrast, sialylation of the same myeloma protein by an α2,3-sialyltransferase yielded IgA1 typical for healthy controls, characterized by α2,3-sialylated Gal. The GalNAc-specific lectin from Helix aspersa (HAA) is used to measure levels of Gd-IgA1. We assessed HAA binding to IgA1 sialylated at Gal or GalNAc. As expected, α2,6-sialylation of IgA1 markedly decreased reactivity with HAA. Notably, α2,3-sialylation also decreased reactivity with HAA. Neuraminidase treatment recovered the original HAA reactivity in both instances. These results suggest that binding of a GalNAc-specific lectin

  16. Autoantibodies against retinal proteins in paraneoplastic and autoimmune retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna; Ren, Gaoying; Weleber, Richard G

    2004-01-01

    Background Autoimmune retinal degeneration may occur in patients who present with sudden or, less commonly, subacute loss of vision of retinal origin, associated with an abnormal ERG, through the action of autoantibodies against retinal proteins. Often the patients are initially diagnosed with or suspected of having a paraneoplastic retinopathy (PR), such as cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR). However, there is limited information on the occurrence, the specificity of autoantibodies in these patients, and their association with clinical symptoms. Methods Sera were obtained from 193 retinopathy patients who presented with clinical symptoms resembling PR or autoimmune retinopathy (AR), including sudden painless loss of vision, typically associated with visual field defects and photopsias, and abnormal rod and/or cone responses on the electroretinogram (ERG). Sera were tested for the presence of anti-retinal autoantibodies by Western blot analysis using proteins extracted from human retina and by immunohistochemistry. Autoantibody titers against recoverin and enolase were measured by ELISA. Results We identified a higher prevalence of anti-retinal autoantibodies in retinopathy patients. Ninety-one patients' sera (47.1%) showed autoantibodies of various specificities with a higher incidence of antibodies present in retinopathy patients diagnosed with cancer (33/52; 63.5%; p = 0.009) than in retinopathy patients without cancer (58/141; 41.1%). The average age of PR patients was 62.0 years, and that of AR patients was 55.9 years. Autoantibodies against recoverin (p23) were only present in the sera of PR patients, autoantibodies against unknown p35 were more common in patients with AR, while anti-enolase (anti-p46) autoantibodies were nearly equally distributed in the sera of patients with PR and those with AR. In the seropositive patients, the autoantibodies persisted over a long period of time – from months to years. A rebound in anti-recoverin autoantibody titer was

  17. Autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune diseases: specificity and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, Jolien; Diamond, Betty

    2015-06-01

    In this Review we focus on the initiation of autoantibody production and autoantibody pathogenicity, with a special emphasis on the targeted antigens. Release of intracellular antigens due to excessive cell death or to ineffective clearance of apoptotic debris, modification of self-antigens during inflammatory responses, and molecular mimicry contribute to the initiation of autoantibody production. We hypothesize that those autoreactive B cells that survive and produce pathogenic autoantibodies have specificity for self-antigens that are TLR ligands. Such B cells experience both B cell receptor (BCR) activation and TLR engagement, leading to an escape from tolerance. Moreover, the autoantibodies they produce form immune complexes that can activate myeloid cells and thereby establish the proinflammatory milieu that further negates tolerance mechanisms of both B and T cells. PMID:25938780

  18. Tennis, incidence of URTI and salivary IgA.

    PubMed

    Novas, A M P; Rowbottom, D G; Jenkins, D G

    2003-04-01

    Tennis played at an elite level requires intensive training characterized by repeated bouts of brief intermittent high intensity exercise over relatively long periods of time (1 - 3 h or more). Competition can place additional stress on players. The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal association between specific components of tennis training and competition, the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), and salivary IgA, in a cohort of seventeen elite female tennis players. Timed, whole unstimulated saliva samples were collected before and after selected 1-h training sessions at 2 weekly intervals, over 12 weeks. Salivary IgA concentration was measured by ELISA and IgA secretion rate calculated (microg IgA x ml -1 x ml saliva x min -1). Players reported URTI symptoms and recorded training and competition in daily logs. Data analysis showed that higher incidence of URTI was significantly associated with increased training duration and load, and competition level, on a weekly basis. Salivary IgA secretion rate (S-IgA) dropped significantly after 1 hour of tennis play. Over the 12-week period, pre-exercise salivary IgA concentration and secretion rate were directly associated with the amount of training undertaken during the previous day and week (p < 0.05). However, the decline in S-IgA after 1 h of intense tennis play was also positively related to the duration and load of training undertaken during the previous day and week (p < 0.05). Although exercise-induced suppression of salivary IgA may be a risk factor, it could not accurately predict the occurrence of URTI in this cohort of athletes.

  19. Demonstration and characterization of anti-human mitochondria autoantibodies in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism and in other conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Betterle, C; Caretto, A; Zeviani, M; Pedini, B; Salviati, C

    1985-01-01

    We studied 32 patients with idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (IHP), 19 patients with organ-specific autoimmune diseases (OSAD) without IHP, 50 normal controls and a known serum with anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies (AMA). Patients' sera were tested by the classical indirect immunofluorescent technique and by the indirect immunofluorescent complement fixation technique on unfixed cryostat sections of normal human parathyroid, pancreas, thyroid, stomach, kidney, and rat kidney. Five out of 32 patients with IHP, three out of 19 patients with OSAD without IHP and one out of 50 normal controls revealed a bright reactivity against oxyphil cells and a weak reactivity against chief cells of normal parathyroid. These sera also brightly reacted with mitochondria-rich cells and weakly with the remaining cells of only human tissues. The absorption of positive sera with human mitochondria completely abolished this positivity but the absorption with rat mitochondria failed to prevent this reaction. This reactivity was due to an anti-human mitochondrial autoantibody (AHMA) of IgG class. By non-competitive ELISA and Western blot we also demonstrated that every AHMA-positive serum mainly reacted against a human mitochondrial membrane-bound protein of approximate mol. wt. of 46 kd, while the AMA-positive serum reacted against different mitochondrial antigens. The present study shows that a specific parathyroid autoantibody was not detectable in patients with IHP. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3910313

  20. Caspr2 autoantibodies target multiple epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Abby L.; Lai, Yongjie; Dalmau, Josep; Scherer, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To better understand the mechanisms of autoantibodies to the axonal protein contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2) by studying their target epitopes. Methods: A plasmid for expressing Caspr2 was modified so that the various extracellular subdomains were deleted individually and in groups. Cultured cells were transfected to express these constructs and assayed by immunofluorescence staining with a commercial Caspr2 antibody and a panel of patient sera known to react with Caspr2. Western blotting was also performed. The role of glycosylation in immunogenicity was tested with tunicamycin and PNGase F treatment. Results: Patient antibodies bound to the extracellular domain of Caspr2. Neither native protein structure nor glycosylation was required for immunoreactivity. Caspr2 constructs with single or multidomain deletions were expressed on the plasma membrane. All deletion constructs were recognized by patients' sera, although reactivity was significantly reduced with deletion of the discoidin-like subdomain and strongly reduced or abolished with larger deletions of multiple N-terminal subdomains. Caspr2 with all subdomains deleted except the discoidin-like domain was still recognized by the antibodies. Conclusion: Caspr2 autoantibodies recognize multiple target epitopes in the extracellular domain of Caspr2, including one in the discoidin-like domain. Reactivity for some epitopes is not dependent on glycosylation or native protein structure. PMID:26185774

  1. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of p53 epitopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for economical blood based, noninvasive molecular biomarkers to assist in the detection and diagnosis of cancers in a cost-effective manner at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Serum autoantibodies are attractive biomarkers for early cancer detection, but their development has been hindered by the punctuated genetic nature of the ten million known cancer mutations. A landmark study of 50,000 patients (Pedersen et al., 2013) showed that a few p53 15-mer epitopes are much more sensitive colon cancer biomarkers than p53, which in turn is a more sensitive cancer biomarker than any other protein. The function of p53 as a nearly universal "tumor suppressor" is well established, because of its strong immunogenicity in terms of not only antibody recruitment, but also stimulation of autoantibodies. Here we examine dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis for identifying the few sensitive epitopes from the p53 amino acid sequence, and show how it could be used for early cancer detection (ECD). We trim 15-mers to 7-mers, and identify specific 7-mers from other species that could be more sensitive to aggressive human cancers, such as liver cancer. Our results could provide a roadmap for ECD.

  2. Spontaneous disappearance of an IgA anti-factor IX inhibitor in a child with Christmas disease.

    PubMed

    Carroll, R R; Panush, R S; Kitchens, C S

    1984-10-01

    The few inhibitors to blood coagulation factor IX in patients with Christmas disease (hemophilia B) that have been studied have been shown to belong to the IgG class of immunoglobulins. We report the first case in which a factor IX inhibitor was of the IgA class. Additionally, he appears to be the youngest patient with hemophilia B to have developed an inhibitor. His inhibitor complicated treatment of the patient for several years because of its anamnestic rise following factor IX concentrate administration. It then spontaneously vanished and has not returned in spite of repeated factor IX complex administration.

  3. Sites in the CH3 domain of human IgA1 that influence sensitivity to bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2006-09-15

    The influence of regions, other than the hinge, on the susceptibility of human IgA1 to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases, was examined using IgA1 mutants bearing amino acid deletions, substitutions, and domain swaps. IgA1 lacking the tailpiece retained its susceptibility to cleavage by all of the IgA1 proteases. The domain swap molecule alpha1alpha2gamma3, in which the CH3 domain of IgA1 was exchanged for that of human IgG1, was resistant to cleavage with the type 1 and 2 serine IgA1 proteases of Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae, but remained sensitive to cleavage with the metallo-IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis. Substitution of the IgA1 Calpha3 domain motif Pro440 -Phe443 into the corresponding position in the Cgamma3 domain of alpha1alpha2gamma3 resulted now in sensitivity to the type 2 IgA1 protease of N. meningitidis, indicating the possible requirement of these amino acids for sensitivity to this protease. For the H. influenzae type 2 protease, resistance of an IgA1 mutant in which the CH3 domain residues 399-409 were exchanged with those from IgG1, but sensitivity of mutant HuBovalpha3 in which the Calpha3 domain of bovine IgA replaces that of human IgA1, suggests that CH3 domain residues Glu403, Gln406, and Thr409 influence sensitivity to this enzyme. Hence, unlike the situation with the metallo-IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus spp., the sensitivity of human IgA1 to cleavage with the serine IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus involves their binding to different sites specifically in the CH3 domain.

  4. Autoantibodies in the diagnosis and management of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J; Norman, Gary L

    2003-10-01

    Autoantibodies are nonpathogenic manifestations of immune reactivity, and they may occur in acute and chronic liver diseases. Autoantibodies may be consequences rather than causes of the liver injury, and they should be regarded as diagnostic clues rather than etiologic markers. Conventional autoantibodies used in the categorization of autoimmune liver disease are antinuclear antibodies, smooth muscle antibodies, antibodies to liver/kidney microsome type 1, antimitochondrial antibodies, and atypical perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Ancillary autoantibodies that enhance diagnostic specificity, have prognostic connotation, or direct treatment are antibodies to endomysium, tissue transglutaminase, histones, doubled-stranded DNA, and actin. Autoantibodies that have an emerging diagnostic and prognostic significance are antibodies to soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas, asialoglycoprotein receptor, liver cytosol type 1, and nuclear pore complex antigens. Autoantibodies of uncertain clinical value that remain under investigation are antibodies to chromatin, lactoferrin, and Saccharomyces cervisiae. Continued recognition and characterization of autoantibodies should improve diagnostic precision, provide prognostic indices, and elucidate target autoantigens. These advances may in turn clarify pathogenic mechanisms, facilitate the development of animal models, and generate novel site-specific therapies. PMID:14506390

  5. Anti-interleukin-1 alpha autoantibodies in humans: Characterization, isotype distribution, and receptor-binding inhibition--higher frequency in Schnitzler's syndrome (urticaria and macroglobulinemia)

    SciTech Connect

    Saurat, J.H.; Schifferli, J.; Steiger, G.; Dayer, J.M.; Didierjean, L. )

    1991-08-01

    Since autoantibodies (Abs) to cytokines may modify their biologic activities, high-affinity binding factors for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha BF) were characterized in human sera. IL-1 alpha BF was identified as IgG (1) by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation followed by immunodiffusion autoradiography, (2) by ligand-blotting method, (3) by ligand binding to affinity-immobilized serum IgG, and (4) by IgG affinity purification followed by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation. IL-1 alpha binding activity resided in the F(ab)2 fragment. The apparent equilibrium constant was in the range of IgG found after immunization with conventional antigens (i.e., 10(-9) to 10(-10) mol/L). Anti-IL-1 alpha IgG auto-Abs represented only an extremely small fraction of total IgG (less than 1/10(-5)). Some sera with IL-1 alpha BF and purified IgG thereof were able to inhibit by 96% to 98% the binding of human recombinant IL-1 alpha to its receptor on murine thymoma EL4-6.1 cells, whereas other sera did not. When 125I-labeled anti-IL-1 alpha IgG complexes were injected into rats, they prolonged the plasma half-life of 125I-labeled IL-1 alpha several fold and altered its tissue distribution. The predominant class was IgG (12/19), mainly IgG4 (9/19), but in five of the sera, anti-IL-1 alpha IgA was also detected. In a screening of 271 sera, IL-1 alpha BF was detected in 17/98 normal subjects and was not more frequent in several control groups of patients, except in patients with Schnitzler's syndrome (fever, chronic urticaria, bone pain, and monoclonal IgM paraprotein) (6/9; p less than 0.005). The pathologic significance of these auto-Abs remains to be determined.

  6. Self-aggregated deglycosylated IgA1 with or without IgG were associated with the development of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Y; Xu, L-X; Zhang, J-J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, M-H

    2006-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis, with various pathological phenotypes. Our previous study suggested that aberrant glycosylation of serum IgA1 was associated with different pathological phenotypes of IgAN, and substantial evidence indicated that deglycosylated IgA1 had an increased tendency to form macromolecules. The aim of the current study was to investigate the composition of IgA1-containing macromolecules in different pathological phenotypes of IgAN. Sera from 10 patients with mild mesangial proliferative IgAN (mIgAN), 10 with focal proliferative sclerosing IgAN (psIgAN) and 10 healthy blood donors were collected. The sera were applied and IgA1 binding proteins (IgA1-BP) were eluted from the columns immobilized with desialylated IgA1 (DesIgA1/Sepharose) or desialylated/degalactosylated IgA1 (DesDeGalIgA1/Sepharose), respectively. The amounts of IgA1 and IgG and the glycoform of IgA1 in the IgA1-BP were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and were compared between patients with different pathological phenotypes and normal controls. The amount of IgA1 in IgA1-BP eluted from both columns was significantly higher in patients with both pathological phenotypes of IgAN than in normal controls. In IgA1-BP eluted from DesDeGalIgA1/Sepharose, the desialylation of IgA1 was much more pronounced in patients with both pathological phenotypes of IgAN than in normal controls, while the degalactosylation of IgA1 was much more pronounced only in patients with psIgAN than in normal controls. Furthermore, the amount of IgG in IgA1-BP eluted from DesDeGalIgA1/Sepharose was significantly higher in patients with psIgAN than in normal controls. In patients with psIgAN, the amount of IgG eluted from DesDeGalIgA1/Sepharose was much greater than from DesIgA1/Sepharose. In conclusion, self-aggregated deglycosylated IgA1 with or without IgG were associated with the development of IgAN.

  7. Dimeric and polymeric IgA, but not monomeric IgA, enhance the production of IL-6 by human renal mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Schroeijers, W. E. M.; Es, L. A. van; Daha, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Depositions of IgA in the renal glomerular mesangial area are a hallmark of IgA nephropathy, and are thought to be crucial for the onset of inflammation processes in IgA nephropathy. In this report we show that human mesangial cells (MC) in vitro bind IgA and that binding of IgA enhances the production of IL-6 by MC. Furthermore we show that the size of IgA is crucial in its capability to enhance IL-6 production. Monomeric IgA does not affect basic IL-6 production, whereas dimeric and polymeric IgA enhance IL-6 production up to 3- to 9-fold respectively. Additional studies demonstrate that enhanced IL-6 production by MC is not accompanied by increased proliferation of human mesangial cells, a finding which is distinct from that found with rat mesangial cells. Taken together, these fmdings suggest that deposition of dimeric and polymeric IgA in the mesangial area of human kidneys in IgA nephropathy may amplify local inflammation. PMID:18475715

  8. Aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 and anti-glycan antibodies in IgA nephropathy: role of mucosal immune system.

    PubMed

    Novak, Jan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Julian, Bruce A; Raska, Milan; Wyatt, Robert J; Suzuki, Yusuke; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Gharavi, Ali G; Mestecky, Jiri; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common glomerulonephritis, is characterized by mesangial IgA1-containing immunodeposits, proliferation of mesangial cells, and matrix expansion. Clinical onset is frequently heralded by synpharyngitic hematuria, macroscopic hematuria during an upper-respiratory tract infection. Clinical and laboratory data support a postulated extrarenal origin of the glomerular IgA1, likely derived from circulating immune complexes containing polymeric IgA1, deficient in galactose in the hinge-region O-glycans, bound by antiglycan antibodies. This aberrant IgA1 is produced by IgA1-secreting cells with abnormal activities of specific glycosyltransferases. The galactose deficiency affects IgA1 induced by mucosal antigens and elevated circulating levels of this abnormal IgA1 are hereditable, suggesting interactions of genetic and environmental factors. An abnormal mucosal immune response resulting in production of galactose-deficient IgA1 in IgAN patients is supported by several observations: the aberrant glycosylation affects mostly polymeric IgA1 produced by mucosal-associated IgA1-secreting cells (including those from tonsils), the synpharyngitic nature of the macroscopic hematuria, and the association of disease severity with polymorphisms of a pattern-recognition receptor, TLR9. Thus, IgAN is an auto-immune disease, induced by mesangial deposition of circulating complexes containing galactose-deficient IgA1. The aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 may reflect abnormal mucosal immune responses to infections of the upper respiratory tract in genetically predisposed individuals.

  9. Both IgA nephropathy and alcoholic cirrhosis feature abnormally glycosylated IgA1 and soluble CD89-IgA and IgG-IgA complexes: common mechanisms for distinct diseases.

    PubMed

    Tissandié, Emilie; Morelle, Willy; Berthelot, Laureline; Vrtovsnik, François; Daugas, Eric; Walker, Francine; Lebrec, Didier; Trawalé, Jean-Marie; Francoz, Claire; Durand, François; Moura, Ivan C; Paradis, Valérie; Moreau, Richard; Monteiro, Renato C

    2011-12-01

    Abnormalities of IgA arise in alcoholic cirrhosis, including mesangial IgA deposits with possible development of secondary IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Since little is known about circulating immune complexes in cases of secondary IgAN, we analyzed IgA-associated parameters in the serum of 32 patients with compensated or advanced alcoholic cirrhosis. Galactose deficiency and decreased sialylation of IgA1, as well as increased amounts of abnormally glycosylated polymeric IgA1, were detected in the serum of patients with advanced alcoholic cirrhosis. Moreover, aberrant IgA1 formed complexes with IgG and soluble CD89 in serum of patients with advanced alcoholic cirrhosis, similar to those found in primary IgAN. The IgA1 of alcoholic cirrhosis, however, had a modified N-glycosylation, not found in primary IgAN. In patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and IgAN, IgA deposits were associated with CD71 overexpression in mesangial areas, suggesting that CD71 might be involved in deposit formation. Although the IgA1 found in alcoholic cirrhosis bound more extensively to human mesangial cells than control IgA1, they differ from primary IgAN by not inducing mesangial cell proliferation. Thus, abnormally glycosylated IgA1 and soluble CD89-IgA and IgA-IgG complexes, features of primary IgAN, are also present in alcoholic cirrhosis. Hence, common mechanisms appear to be shared by diseases of distinct origins, indicating that common environmental factors may influence the development of IgAN.

  10. Presence of circulating macromolecular IgA in patients with hematuria due to primary IgA nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Valentijn, R.M.; Kauffmann, R.H.; de la Riviere, G.B.; Daha, M.R.; Van, E.S.

    1983-03-01

    The relation between renal histologic features and the presence of circulating immune complexes was studied in 50 patients with hematuria. Primary IgA nephropathy was found in 25 patients, and various other forms of glomerulopathy were seen in the remaining 25 patients. Circulating immune complexes were detected with the 125I-C1q-binding assay, the conglutinin-binding assay, and the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay, the latter detecting specifically IgA-containing immune complex-like material. The 125I-C1q-binding assay gave negative findings for all patients except one. With the conglutinin-binding assay, immune complexes were found in a similar frequency for patients with and without IgA nephropathy. However, the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay gave positive results only in patients with primary IgA nephropathy (68 percent) and in none of the other patients. Sucrose density ultracentrifugation, as well as experiments in which the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay was performed with and without pretreatment of serum with polyethylene glycol, showed the presumed IgA immune complexes to have intermediate sedimentation coefficients (11 to 21S). The presence and level of this macromolecular IgA in the circulation correlated significantly (p less than 0.001) with the presence of hematuria in patients who had this clinical manifestation intermittently. Furthermore, a significant correlation (r . 0.69, p less than 0.0001) was found between the degree of hematuria and the degree of positive findings of the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay. This study shows that in patients presenting with hematuria, a positive finding on the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay is restricted to patients with primary IgA nephropathy and therefore could be of diagnostic value.

  11. IgA nephropathy and Henoch-Schoenlein purpura nephritis: aberrant glycosylation of IgA1, formation of IgA1-containing immune complexes, and activation of mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Novak, Jan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Renfrow, Matthew B; Yanagihara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Raska, Milan; Hall, Stacy; Brown, Rhubell; Huang, Wen-Qiang; Goepfert, Alice; Kilian, Mogens; Poulsen, Knud; Tomana, Milan; Wyatt, Robert J; Julian, Bruce A; Mestecky, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    IgA1 in the circulation and glomerular deposits of patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is aberrantly glycosylated; the hinge-region O-linked glycans are galactose-deficient. The circulating IgA1 of patients with Henoch-Schoenlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) has a similar defect. This aberrancy exposes N-acetylgalactosamine-containing neoepitopes recognized by naturally occurring IgG or IgA1 antibodies resulting in formation of immune complexes. IgA1 contains up to six O-glycosylation sites per heavy chain; it is not known whether the glycosylation defect occurs randomly or preferentially at specific sites. We sought to define the aberrant glycosylation of a galactose-deficient IgA1 myeloma protein and analyze the formation of the immune complexes and their biological activities. Supplementation of serum or cord-blood serum with this IgA1 protein resulted in formation of new IgA1 complexes. These complexes stimulated proliferation of cultured human mesangial cells, as did the naturally-occurring IgA1-containing complexes from sera of patients with IgAN and HSPN. Uncomplexed IgA1 did not affect cellular proliferation. Using specific proteases, lectin Western blots, and mass spectrometry, we determined the O-glycosylation sites in the hinge region of the IgA1 myeloma protein and IgA1 proteins from sera of IgAN patients. The IgA1 myeloma protein had galactose-deficient sites at residues 228 and/or 230 and 232. These sites reacted with IgG specific to galactose-deficient IgA1. IgA1 from the IgAN patients had galactose-deficient O-glycans at the same residues. In summary, we identified the neoepitopes on IgA1 responsible for formation of the pathogenic immune complexes. These studies may lead to development of noninvasive diagnostic assays and future disease-specific therapy.

  12. DNA methylation in Cosmc promoter region and aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 associated with pediatric IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Jianqian; Zhou, Nan; Liu, Xiaorong; Shen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is one of the most common glomerular diseases leading to end-stage renal failure. Elevation of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 is a key feature of it. The expression of the specific molecular chaperone of core1ß1, 3galactosyl transferase (Cosmc) is known to be reduced in IgAN. We aimed to investigate whether the methylation of CpG islands of Cosmc gene promoter region could act as a possible mechanism responsible for down-regulation of Cosmc and related higher secretion of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1in lymphocytes from children with IgA nephropathy. Three groups were included: IgAN children (n = 26), other renal diseases (n = 11) and healthy children (n = 13). B-lymphocytes were isolated and cultured, treated or not with IL-4 or 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZA). The levels of DNA methylation of Cosmc promotor region were not significantly different between the lymphocytes of the three children populations (P = 0.113), but there were significant differences between IgAN lymphocytes and lymphocytes of the other two children populations after IL-4 (P<0.0001) or AZA (P<0.0001). Cosmc mRNA expression was low in IgAN lymphocytes compared to the other two groups (P<0.0001). The level of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 was markedly higher in IgAN group compared to the other groups (P<0.0001). After treatment with IL-4, the levels of Cosmc DNA methylation and aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in IgAN lymphocytes were remarkably higher than the other two groups (P<0.0001) with more markedly decreased Cosmc mRNA content (P<0.0001). After treatment with AZA, the levels in IgAN lymphocytes were decreased, but was still remarkably higher than the other two groups (P<0.0001), while Cosmc mRNA content in IgAN lymphocytes were more markedly increased than the other two groups (P<0.0001). The alteration of DNA methylation by IL-4 or AZA specifically correlates in IgAN lymphocytes with alterations in Cosmc mRNA expression and with the level of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1

  13. IgA nephropathy: characterization of IgG antibodies specific for galactose-deficient IgA1.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Moldoveanu, Zina; Hall, Stacy; Brown, Rhubell; Julian, Bruce A; Wyatt, Robert J; Tomana, Milan; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Novak, Jan; Mestecky, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    The circulating immune complexes in IgA nephropathy (IgAN) are composed of galactose (Gal)-deficient IgA1 bound to IgG or IgA1 antibodies specific for hinge-region O-linked glycans of Gal-deficient IgA1. To analyze properties of the anti-glycan antibodies, we determined the binding of serum IgG and IgG secreted by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- immortalized B cells from patients with biopsy-proven IgAN (n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 5) to a panel of antigens coated on ELISA plates. These antigens were: (1) enzymatically desialylated and degalactosylated IgA1 myeloma protein (dd-IgA1), (2) Fab fragment of Gal-deficient IgA1 containing part of the hinge region with O-glycans (Fab-IgA1), (3) synthetic hinge-region peptide linked to bovine albumin (HR-BSA), and (4) synthetic hingeregion glycopeptide with three GalNAc residues linked to BSA (HR-GalNAc-BSA). IgG-secreting EBV-immortalized cell lines were subcloned by limiting dilution. The concentration of total IgG and distribution of IgG subclasses were measured by ELISA. The levels of IgG in sera and supernatants directed against dd-IgA1 and Fab-IgA1 were significantly higher in IgAN patients than in controls (p < 0.01). IgG from IgAN patients exhibited strong reactivity with HR-GalNAc-BSA, but not with HR-BSA. The IgG-secreting cell lines produced antibodies specific to dd-IgA1; the antigen-specific IgG was most frequently of the IgG2 subclass. In summary, sera and supernatants from IgG-secreting cell lines from patients with IgAN were characterized by high levels of IgG antibodies with specificity to the Gal-deficient O-linked glycans of IgA1. The immortalized cell lines will provide a stable and convenient source of IgG for molecular studies of antibodies specific to the aberrant O-glycans in IgA1.

  14. Nucleosome: a major immunogen for pathogenic autoantibody-inducing T cells of lupus

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Only a fraction (12%) of 268 "autoreactive" T cell clones derived from lupus-prone mice can selectively induce the production of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies in vitro and accelerate the development of lupus nephritis when transferred in vivo. The CDR3 loops of T cell receptor beta chains expressed by these pathogenic T helper (Th) clones contain a recurrent motif of anionic residues suggesting that they are selected by autoantigens with cationic residues. Herein, we found that approximately 50% of these pathogenic Th clones were specific for nucleosomal antigens, but none of them responded to cationic idiopeptides shared by variable regions of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies. Nucleosomes did not stimulate the T cells as a nonspecific mitogen or superantigen. Only the pathogenic Th cells of lupus responded to nucleosomal antigens that were processed and presented via the major histocompatibility class II pathway. Although the presentation of purified mononucleosomes to the Th clones could be blocked by inhibitors of endosomal proteases, neither of the two components of the nucleosomes--free DNA or histones by themselves-- could stimulate the Th clones. Thus critical peptide epitopes for the Th cells were probably protected during uptake and processing of the nucleosome particle as a whole. The nucleosome-specific Th clones preferentially augmented the production of IgG autoantibodies to histone-DNA complex in vitro. In vivo, nucleosome-specific, CD4+ T cells were not detectable in normal mice, but they were found in the spleens of lupus-prone mice as early as 1 mo of age, long before other autoimmune manifestations. Immunization of young, preautoimmune lupus mice with nucleosomes augmented the production of autoantibodies and markedly accelerated the development of severe glomerulonephritis. Previously, crude preparations containing nucleosomes were shown by others to have polyclonal mitogenic activity for B cells from normal as well as lupus mice

  15. Pancreatic autoantibodies after pancreas-kidney transplantation - do they matter?

    PubMed

    Martins, La Salete; Henriques, Antonio C; Fonseca, Isabel M; Rodrigues, Anabela S; Oliverira, José C; Dores, Jorge M; Dias, Leonidio S; Cabrita, Antonio M; Silva, José D; Noronha, Irene L

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence has been documented in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPKT), but this diagnosis may be underestimated. Antibody monitoring is the most simple, noninvasive, screening test for pancreas autoimmune activity. However, the impact of the positive autoimmune markers on pancreas graft function remains controversial. In our cohort of 105 SPKT, we studied the cases with positive pancreatic autoantibodies. They were immunosuppressed with antithymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and steroids. The persistence or reappearance of these autoantibodies after SPKT and factors associated with their evolution and with graft outcome were analyzed. Pancreatic autoantibodies were prospectively monitored. Serum samples were collected before transplantation and at least once per year thereafter. At the end of the follow-up (maximum 138 months), 43.8% of patients were positive (from pre-transplant or after recurrence) for at least one autoantibody - the positive group. Antiglutamic acid decarboxylase was the most prevalent (31.4%), followed by anti-insulin (8.6%) and anti-islet cell autoantibodies (3.8%). Bivariate analysis showed that the positive group had higher fasting glucose, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lower C-peptide levels, and a higher number of HLA-matches. Analyzing the sample divided into four groups according to pre-/post-transplant autoantibodies profile, the negative/positive group tended to present the higher HbA1c values. Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between pancreas autoimmunity and HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Positivity for these autoantibodies pre-transplantation did not influence pancreas survival. The unfavorable glycemic profile observed in the autoantibody-positive SPKT is a matter of concern, which deserves further attention.

  16. Complement Factor H Autoantibodies are Associated with Early Stage NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Amornsiripanitch, Nita; Hong, Shaolin; Campa, Michael J.; Frank, Michael M.; Gottlin, Elizabeth B.; Patz, Edward F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In order to discover diagnostic biomarkers associated with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we searched for autoantibodies preferentially present in stage I patients compared to patients with advanced stage disease. Here we describe an autoantibody against complement factor H (CFH) and its association with early stage NSCLC. Experimental Design Immunoblots were used to detect autoantibodies in the sera of stage I NSCLC patients. An autoantibody recognizing a 150 kDa protein was discovered and the protein was identified by mass spectrometry. The association of the autoantibody with early stage disease was suggested by the results of immunoblot analysis with sera from 28 stage I patients and 28 stage III/IV patients. This association was confirmed by protein microarray of sera from 125 NSCLC patients of all stages as well as 125 age, gender, and smoking history matched controls. Results The immunoreactive protein was identified as CFH. By immunoblot analysis, anti-CFH autoantibody was found in 50% of stage I NSCLC patients and 11% of late stage NSCLC patients (P=0.003). By protein microarray analysis, patients with stage I NSCLC had a significantly higher incidence of anti-CFH antibody than those with late stage NSCLC (P=0.0051). The percentage of sera with a positive level of CFH autoantibody was 30.4% in stage I, 21.1% in stage II, 12.5% in stage III, 7.4% in stage IV and 8.0% in the control group. Conclusions These findings suggest that in patients with NSCLC, CFH autoantibody is a molecular marker associated with early stage disease. PMID:20515868

  17. Detection of IgA and IgM antibodies to HIV-1 in neonates by radioimmune western blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Portincasa, P.; Conti, G.; Re, M. C.; Chezzi, C.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To detect infection with HIV-1 by IgA and IgM response at birth in children born to HIV-1 seropositive mothers. DESIGN--Western blotting and radioimmune western blotting on stored sera from infected and uninfected babies born to HIV-1 seropositive mothers. Sera were pretreated to remove IgG. SETTING--Parma and Bologna, Italy. SUBJECTS--12 infected and five uninfected babies born to HIV-1 seropositive mothers and three babies born to seronegative mothers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Effectiveness of western blotting and radioimmune western blotting in detecting antibodies to HIV-1 gene products. RESULTS--With conventional western blotting we found IgA class antibodies to HIV-1 proteins in serum from three out of 12 infected children; in two of these three the serum was collected at age 3 months (positive controls). Radioimmune western blotting detected both IgA and IgM antibodies in serum from all infected children tested, whereas all serum from uninfected children born to seropositive and seronegative mothers showed no such antibodies. CONCLUSION--Although the technique should be tested on more patients, radioimmune western blotting seems to be a valuable tool for serological diagnosis of congenital HIV-1 infection at birth in neonates born to seropositive mothers. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:1628052

  18. Transferrin receptor engagement by polymeric IgA1 induces receptor expression and mesangial cell proliferation: role in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tamouza, Houda; Vende, Florence; Tiwari, Meetu; Arcos-Fajardo, Michelle; Vrtovsnik, François; Benhamou, Marc; Monteiro, Renato C; Moura, Ivan C

    2007-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by IgA immune complex-mediated mesangial cell proliferation. We have previously identified the transferrin receptor (TfR) as an IgA1 receptor and found that, in kidney biopsies of patients with IgAN, TfR is overexpressed and co-localized with IgA1 mesangial deposits. We also showed that IgA1 binding to TfR was strikingly increased when IgA1 was hypogalactosylated and of high molecular weight, both features found in IgA from IgAN patients. More recently, we showed that purified polymeric IgA1 (pIgA1) is a major inducer of TfR expression (3-fold increase) in quiescent human mesangial cells (HMC). In addition, sera from IgAN patients upregulate TfR expression in cultured HMC in an IgA-dependent manner. IgA1-induced HMC proliferation is dependent on TfR engagement and can be inhibited by both TfR1 and TfR2 ectodomains as well as by the anti-TfR mAb A24. Finally, activation of mesangial cells through pIgA1 binding to TfR induced secretion of IL-6 and TGF-beta from the cells, that could be involved, respectively, in the inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic events observed in IgAN. We propose that deposited pIgA1 or IgA immune complexes could initiate an auto-amplification process involving hyper-expression of TfR allowing increased IgA1 mesangial deposition. Altogether, these data unveil a functional cooperation between pIgA1 and TfR for IgA1 deposition and HMC proliferation, features which are commonly implicated in the chronic mesangial injuries observed in IgAN.

  19. Clinical and histopathological spectrum of IgA nephropathy in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Amal Abdel; Al Waheeb, Salah; Al Homoud, Ekhlas; Al Helal, Bassam; Hussain, Naser

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the nature and the course of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) in Arab countries. The aim of this work was to study the spectrum of clinical presentation and histopathological findings at our institution. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective review, all renal biopsies at the Mubarak Al Kabeer Hospital between January 2000 and December 2004. METHODS: Cases of IgA nephropathy were selected, and their medical records and biopsy findings were reviewed. RESULTS: Eighty patients (9.2% of all native kidney biopsies) were diagnosed to have IgAN nephropathy. Sixty-nine biopsies were included in the study;11 were excluded. Forty-three (62.3%) patients were male and 26 (37.7) patients were female. Fifty (72.5%) patients were below the age of 40 years. Mean (SD) duration of follow-up was 3.6 (1.3) years. The first presentation included nephritic-range proteinuria (49.3%) and renal impairment (50.7%). During the follow-up period, 56 (81.2%) patients were stable or improved. Hass classification of biopsies showed 36.2% had class I, 27.5% had class II, 13.0% had class III, 5.8% had class IV, and 17.4% had class V IgAN. Females had milder forms of the disease than males. Macroscopic hematuria and renal impairment at presentation were seen more in patients with class IV and V IgAN. The presenting serum creatinine and uric acid values were higher in those with Hass classes III to V. Deterioration of renal function during the follow-up period was more significant in the presence of hypertension, renal impairment, or macroscopic hematuria at the time of biopsy . CONCLUSION: The prevalence of IgAN in Kuwait is about 9.2%. Renal impairment or macroscopic hematuria at presentation was seen in patients with more aggressive renal lesions and contributed to poor outcome. PMID:21403411

  20. The dog as a genetic model for immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency: identification of several breeds with low serum IgA concentrations.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mia; Frankowiack, Marcel; Tengvall, Katarina; Roosje, Petra; Fall, Tove; Ivansson, Emma; Bergvall, Kerstin; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene; Sundberg, Katarina; Hedhammar, Ake; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Hammarström, Lennart

    2014-08-15

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) serves as the basis of the secretory immune system by protecting the lining of mucosal sites from pathogens. In both humans and dogs, IgA deficiency (IgAD) is associated with recurrent infections of mucosal sites and immune-mediated diseases. Low concentrations of serum IgA have previously been reported to occur in a number of dog breeds but no generally accepted cut-off value has been established for canine IgAD. The current study represents the largest screening to date of IgA in dogs in terms of both number of dogs (n=1267) and number of breeds studied (n=22). Serum IgA concentrations were quantified by using capture ELISA and were found to vary widely between breeds. We also found IgA to be positively correlated with age (p<0.0001). Apart from the two breeds previously reported as predisposed to low IgA (Shar-Pei and German shepherd), we identified six additional breeds in which ≥ 10% of all tested dogs had very low (<0.07 g/l) IgA concentrations (Hovawart, Norwegian elkhound, Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever, Bullterrier, Golden retriever and Labrador retriever). In addition, we discovered low IgA concentrations to be significantly associated with canine atopic dermatitis (CAD, p<0.0001) and pancreatic acinar atrophy (PAA, p=0.04) in German shepherds.

  1. Design and Measurement of Nonislet-Specific Autoantibodies for the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium Autoantibody Workshop.

    PubMed

    Akolkar, Beena; Hilner, Joan; Nierras, Concepcion R

    2015-10-01

    The Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) comprised groups of investigators from many countries throughout the world, with a common goal of identifying genes predisposing to type 1 diabetes. The T1DGC ascertained and collected samples from families with two or more affected siblings with type 1 diabetes and generated a broad array of clinical, genetic, and immunologic data. The T1DGC Autoantibody Workshop was designed to distribute data for analyses to discover genes associated with autoantibodies in those with type 1 diabetes. In the T1DGC-affected sibling pair families, three T1DGC Network laboratories measured antibodies to the islet autoantigens GAD65 and the intracellular portion of protein tyrosine phosphatase (IA-2A). The availability of extensive genetic data provided an opportunity to investigate the associations between type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases for which autoantibodies could be measured. Measurements of additional nonislet autoantibodies, including thyroid peroxidase, tissue transglutaminase, 21-hydroxylase, and the potassium/hydrogen ion transporter H+/K+-ATPase, were performed by the T1DGC laboratory at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, Aurora, CO. Measurements of all autoantibodies were transmitted to the T1DGC Coordinating Center, and the data were made available to members of the T1DGC Autoantibody Working Groups for analysis in conjunction with existing T1DGC genetic data. This article describes the design of the T1DGC Autoantibody Workshop and the quality-control procedures to maintain and monitor the performance of each laboratory and provides the quality-control results for the nonislet autoantibody measurements. PMID:26405071

  2. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  3. Binding capacity of in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 to human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-jun; Xu, Li-xia; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2006-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common glomerular disease and it is characterized by deposition of IgA1 molecules in mesangium. Recent studies had demonstrated that serum and mesangial IgA1 in IgAN were deglycosylated and IgA1 could bind to human mesangial cells (HMC) through a novel receptor. The aim of the current study is to investigate and compare the binding capacities of different in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 on human mesangial cells. Serum IgA1 was purified by jacalin affinity chromatography and then was desialylated (DesIgA1) and/or degalactosylated (Des/DeGalIgA1) with neuraminidase and/or beta-galactosidase. The efficacy of deglycosylations was assessed by Peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Vicia villosa (VV) lectin. The sizes of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 were determined by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography and binding capacities to primary HMC were evaluated by radioligand binding assays. Normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 could bind to HMC in a dose-dependent, saturable manner. The maximal binding capacities and binding sites/cell of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1. However, more aggregated IgA1 was found in DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1. Scatchard analysis revealed a similar Kd of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1. The current study suggested that the binding capacities of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 to HMC were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1, which at least in part was due to more macromolecular IgA1 in deglycoslated IgA1. However, there were no significant differences in the affinities of normal IgA1, DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 with HMC. Deglycosylated IgA1 might play an important role in pathogenesis of IgAN.

  4. Integrin α1/β1 and α2/β1 as a receptor for IgA1 in human glomerular mesangial cells in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yoshikatsu; Otsuka, Tadashi; Tsuchida, Yohei; Gejyo, Fumitake; Narita, Ichiei

    2012-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by mesangial deposition of IgA1 and galactose-deficient IgA1 is expected to play a pathogenic role. However, the identity of the receptor for IgA1 is still controversial. Hence, the aim of this study was to explore the receptor for galactose-deficient IgA1. Human monoclonal IgA1 was treated with exoglycosidase and FITC-conjugated control, asialo- and agalactosyl-IgA1 was used as a probe to detect the receptor in cultured human mesangial cells. Tumor necrosis factor-α or transforming growth factor-β1 treatment accelerated IgA1-binding on mesangial cells, and these effects were diminished by the addition of dexamethasone, whereas these changes were not dependent on galactose-deficiency of IgA1. According to comprehensive gene expression analysis, we focused on integrin β1. Pre-treatment by Mn(2+), which activates integrin by changing its structure, enhanced the binding of IgA1 in cultured mesangial cells. Furthermore, pre-incubation with collagens specifically enhanced binding of IgA1 in the cultured human mesangial cells without activation by Mn(2+). Collagen type IV distributed in the mesangial region of the glomeruli as well as Bowman's capsule and tubular basal membrane in IgAN patients, and the IgA1 with collagen type IV induced proliferative signals on mesangial cells by phosphorylating extracellular signal-regulated kinase more effectively than the IgA1 alone. Immunoprecipitation assay revealed the binding of IgA1 and integrin α1/β1 and α2/β1 heterodimer and down-regulation of integrin α1, α2 and β1 expression in human mesangial cells induced by each specific small interfering RNA diminished the ability to bind IgA1 probe. Integrin α1/β1 and α2/β1 would be a candidate receptor for IgA1.

  5. Natural autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Matsiota, P; Druet, P; Dosquet, P; Guilbert, B; Avrameas, S

    1987-01-01

    We have tested the sera of 25 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for antibody activity against a panel of six antigens: DNA, TNP, actin, tubulin, myosin, albumin. Eluates from renal biopsy tissue were also tested. Sera from patients with lupus nephritis were found to contain high titres of IgA antibodies directed against the antigens of the panel, and marked IgG anti-DNA and anti-TNP antibody activity. The IgG anti-TNP antibodies isolated from SLE serum by affinity chromatography on a TNP-immunoadsorbent, were also found to possess anti-DNA activity. Kidney eluates obtained from biopsy specimens of SLE patients contained IgG antibodies strictly specific for DNA in three out of the nine patients tested, while three eluates from the remaining six patients reacted with DNA and TNP and three with DNA and all the other antigens of the panel. These results strongly suggest that in SLE sera there are at least three populations of circulating anti-DNA antibodies: those strictly specific for DNA, those recognizing DNA and TNP and those recognizing DNA and other macromolecules. Furthermore, because six out of nine of the eluates contained antibodies with an absolute or restricted specificity for DNA, this suggests that these antibodies are more often pathogenic than the polyspecific ones recognizing DNA and other macromolecules. PMID:3498588

  6. Increased Serum IgA in Children with IgA Nephropathy, Severity of Kidney Biopsy Findings and Long-Term Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mizerska-Wasiak, M; Małdyk, J; Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, M; Turczyn, A; Cichoń-Kawa, K; Rybi-Szumińska, A; Wasilewska, A; Firszt-Adamczyk, A; Stankiewicz, R; Bieniaś, B; Zajączkowska, M; Gadomska-Prokop, K; Grenda, R; Miklaszewska, M; Pietrzyk, J; Pukajło-Marczyk; Zwolińska, D; Szczepańska, M; Demkow, U; Roszkowska-Blaim, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether an elevated IgA level at the time of the diagnosis of IgA nephropathy has an effect on the severity of kidney biopsy findings and long-term outcomes in children. We retrospectively studied 89 children with IgA nephropathy who were stratified into Group 1- elevated serum IgA and Group 2 - normal serum IgA at baseline. The level of IgA, proteinuria, hematuria, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and hypertension (HTN) were compared at baseline and after the end of the follow-up period of 4.0 ± 3.1 years. Kidney biopsy findings were evaluated using the Oxford classification. The evaluation of treatment included immunosuppressive therapy and renoprotection with angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), or no treatment. The elevated serum IgA was found in 46 (52 %) patients and normal serum IgA level was found in 43 (48 %) patients. No differences were found between the two groups regarding the mean age of patients, proteinuria, and the number of patients with reduced GFR or HTN at baseline. In kidney biopsy, mesangial proliferation and segmental sclerosis were significantly more common in Group 1 compared with Group 2 (p < 0.05). Immunosuppressive therapy was used in 67 % children in Group 1 and 75 % children in Group 2. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves for renal function (with normal GFR) and persistent proteinuria did not differ significantly depending on the serum IgA level at baseline. We conclude that in IgA nephropathy the elevated serum IgA at baseline may be associated with mesangial proliferation and segmental sclerosis contribute to glomerulosclerosis, but has no effect on the presence of proteinuria or on the worsening of kidney function during several years of disease course.

  7. IgA nephropathy caused by unusual polymerization of IgA1 with aberrant N-glycosylation in a patient with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Kuno, Atsushi; Ito, Hiromi; Kaji, Hiroyuki; Kaneko, Syuzo; Usui, Joichi; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is a form of chronic glomerulonephritis characterized by the deposition of IgA immune complexes in the glomerular region. The cause of IgAN is unknown, but multiple mechanisms have been suggested. We previously reported a rare case of mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis in a patient with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease associated with monoclonal IgA1. In this study, we performed the detailed analyses of serum IgA1 from this patient in comparison with those from patients with mIgA plasma cell disorder without renal involvement and healthy volunteers. We found unusual polymerization of IgA1 with additional N-glycosylation distinctive in this patient, which was different from known etiologies. Glycan profiling of IgA1 by the lectin microarray revealed an intense signal for Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). This signal was reduced by disrupting the native conformation of IgA1, suggesting that the distinct glycan profile was reflecting the conformational alteration of IgA1, including the glycan conformation detected as additional N-glycans on both the heavy and light chains. This unusually polymerized state of IgA1 would cause an increase of the binding avidity for lectins. WFA specifically recognized highly polymerized and glycosylated IgA1. Our results of analysis in the rare case of a patient with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease suggest that the formation of unusually polymerized IgA1 is caused by divergent mechanisms including multiple structural alterations of glycans, which contributes to IgA1 deposition and mesangium proliferation.

  8. Differences in N-glycan structures found on recombinant IgA1 and IgA2 produced in murine myeloma and CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Esther M; Yu, Li J; Wims, Letitia A; Goldberg, David; Morrison, Sherie L

    2010-01-01

    The development and production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies is well established. Although most of these are IgGs, there is also great interest in producing recombinant IgAs since this isotype plays a critical role in providing immunologic protection at mucosal surfaces. The choice of expression system for production of recombinant antibodies is crucial because they are glycoproteins containing at least one N-linked carbohydrate. These glycans have been shown to contribute to the stability, pharmacokinetics and biologic function of antibodies. We have produced recombinant human IgA1 and all three allotypes of IgA2 in murine myeloma and CHO cell lines to systematically characterize and compare the N-linked glycans. Recombinant IgAs produced in murine myelomas differ significantly from IgA found in humans in that they contain the highly immunogenic Galalpha(1,3)Gal epitope and N-glycolylneuraminic acid residues, indicating that murine myeloma is not the optimal expression system for the production of human IgA. In contrast, IgAs produced in CHO cells contained glycans that were more similar to those found on human IgA. Expression of IgA1 and IgA2 in Lec2 and Lec8 cell lines that are defective in glycan processing resulted in a less complex pool of N-glycans. In addition, the level of sialylation of rIgAs produced in murine and CHO cells was significantly lower than that previously reported for serum IgA1. These data underscore the importance of choosing the appropriate cell line for the production of glycoproteins with therapeutic potential.

  9. Differences in N-glycan structures foundon recombinant IgA1 and IgA2 producedin murine myeloma and CHO cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li J; Wims, Letitia A; Goldberg, David; Morrison, Sherie L

    2010-01-01

    The development and production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies is well established. Although most of these are IgGs, there is also great interest in producing recombinant IgAs since this isotype plays a critical role in providing immunologic protection at mucosal surfaces. the choice of expression system for production of recombinant antibodies is crucial because they are glycoproteins containing at least one N-linked carbohydrate. these glycans have been shown to contribute to the stability, pharmacokinetics and biologic function of antibodies. We have produced recombinant human IgA1 and all three allotypes of IgA2 in murine myeloma and CHo cell lines to systematically characterize and compare the N-linked glycans. Recombinant IgAs produced in murine myelomas differ significantly from IgA found in humans in that they contain the highly immunogenic Galα(1,3)Gal epitope and N-glycolylneuraminic acid residues, indicating that murine myeloma is not the optimal expression system for the production of human IgA. In contrast, IgAs produced in CHo cells contained glycans that were more similar to those found on human IgA. expression of IgA1 and IgA2 in Lec2 and Lec8 cell lines that are defective in glycan processing resulted in a less complex pool of N-glycans. In addition, the level of sialylation of rIgAs produced in murine and CHo cells was significantly lower than that previously reported for serum IgA1. these data underscore the importance of choosing the appropriate cell line for the production of glycoproteins with therapeutic potential. PMID:20431350

  10. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Boggio, Elena; Soluri, Maria F; Comi, Cristoforo; Sblattero, Daniele; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current literature is showing that autoantibodies (AutoAbs) against cytokines are produced in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. In autoimmune diseases, these AutoAbs may also be prognostic markers, either negative (such as AutoAbs to IL-8 and IL-1α in rheumatoid arthritis) or positive (such as AutoAbs to IL-6 in systemic sclerosis and those to osteopontin in rheumatoid arthritis). They may have neutralizing activity and influence the course of the physiological and pathological immune responses. High levels of AutoAbs against cytokines may even lead to immunodeficiency, such as those to IL-17 in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I or those to IFN-γ in mycobacterial infections. Their role in human therapy may be exploited not only through passive immunization but also through vaccination, which may improve the costs for long lasting treatments of autoimmune diseases. Detection and quantification of these AutoAbs can be profoundly influenced by the technique used and standardization of these methods is needed to increase the value of their analysis. PMID:23885320

  11. Neuronal autoantibodies in patients with Rasmussen's encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Samanci, Bedia; Tektürk, Pınar; Tüzün, Erdem; Erdağ, Ece; Kınay, Demet; Yapıcı, Zuhal; Baykan, Betül

    2016-06-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE) is a rare disease with unknown pathophysiology. To disclose whether anti-neuronal autoimmunity participates in the aetiology of RE, various neuronal autoantibodies (NAAbs) were investigated in sera of patients with RE and controls. The study included five patients who fulfilled the RE diagnostic criteria (clinical, EEG, and MRI findings) as the patient group, and 50 multiple sclerosis patients and 50 healthy subjects as the control groups. Sera were evaluated for various NAAbs by radioimmunoassay or cell-based assays. All sera were also screened for uncharacterized antibodies to neuronal cell surface or synapse antigens by indirect immunofluorescence using hippocampal cell cultures. The mean age at onset of seizures was 8.3±3.4 years (range: 4-13.5) and mean follow-up time was 11.2±5.4 years (range: 5-19). All patients had unihemispheric atrophy of the cerebral cortex and epilepsia partialis continua. Two of the patients had moderate cognitive impairment, while the others were severely affected, as shown by neuropsychological testing. NAAb positivity was not detected in any of the patients. Immune aetiology is thought to have a role in RE, but the responsible players have not yet been elucidated. Our extensive antibody screening in a small number of patients does not support the presence of antigen-specific anti-neuronal autoimmunity in RE pathophysiology. PMID:27248684

  12. Autoantibodies in nonautoimmune individuals during infections.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Tatiana; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Blank, Miri; Matthias, Torsten; Pfeiffer, Sascha; Weis, Ingrid; Toubi, Elias; Singh, Sham; Asherson, Ronald; Fraser, Abigail; Gilburd, Boris; Sapir, Tal; Levy, Yair; Lukac, Janja; Rozman, Blaz; Kveder, Tanja; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2007-06-01

    Infections can act as environmental triggers inducing or promoting autoimmune disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Identification of microbial peptides similar to self-tissues may by molecular mimicry, provide the inducing mechanism for an immune response. The aim of this study was to identify autoantibodies (autoAbs) in nonautoimmune individuals during acute bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections. Specific Abs or specific infections with an increased autoAb load may shed insight into the mechanisms of autoimmune disease. Sera from 88 patients with acute infections (41 bacterial, 23 viral, 17 parasitic, and 7 rickettsial) were tested by the ELISA method for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) 8 Pro, and Abs to thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin, phospholipids, annexin-V, laminin, anti-Saccharomyces cervisiae (ASCA), and prothrombin, along with 80 normal controls. Elevated titers of Abs to annexin-V and prothrombin were the most prevalent in viral, parasitic, and rickettsial infections and to laminin in viral and parasitic infections. Elevated titers of ASCA and ANA were found in viral and bacterial infections. Antiphospholipid Abs were found in parasitic and Q-fever infections. Thirty-four individuals harbored elevated titers of at least two Abs. An autoAb burden was detected in individuals with hepatitis A, hepatitis B, toxoplasma or Q-fever infections. In nonautoimmune individuals with various (bacterial, viral, parasitic, and rickettsial) infections, elevated titers of Abs to annexin-V, prothrombin, laminin, ASCA, ANA, and phospholipids were most frequently detected. PMID:17894023

  13. The relative proportions of IgG-, IgA- and IgM-containing cells in rabbit tissues during experimental trichinosis

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, R. B.; Cebra, J. J.; Crandall, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    The relative proportions of IgG, IgM and IgA immunoglobulin-containing cells were determined in the intestinal mucosa, spleen, popliteal lymph nodes and diaphragm of rabbits after a single infection and after hyperinfection with Trichinella spiralis. Staining with pairs of immunofluorescent reagents, specifically reactive with γ, μ or α immunoglobulin heavy chains and labelled with contrasting fluorochromes, permitted direct counting of cells containing two different immunoglobulin classes in a single tissue section. By employing two different pairs of reagents on adjacent sections the relative numbers of cells containing IgG, IgM and IgA were calculated. The observed cellular distribution of γ, μ and α heavy chains in the rabbit intestinal mucosa corresponded with the reported distribution in the human intestine. A relative increase in IgM-containing cells in the mucosa was observed after early infection with Trichinella, followed by an apparent increase in cells with IgG late in infection and after hyperinfection. The proportion of cells staining for IgA remained uniformly high in the intestine throughout the course of infection. The proportions of cells containing different immunoglobulin classes in the spleen contrasted with those observed in the intestinal mucosa, particularly with respect to cells containing α chain. IgA cells made up 2–10 per cent of the immunoglobulin-containing cells in the spleen as compared to 80–90 per cent in the intestinal mucosa. Most spleen sections showed an increase in IgM cells late in infection with Trichinella and after hyperinfection. The proportions of immunoglobulin-containing cells in the popliteal lymph nodes generally paralleled those observed in the spleen. Local cellular infiltration of the diaphragm occurred at the time of larval encystment. Immunoglobulin-containing cells were often prominent and the cellular distribution of immunoglobulin classes resembled that found in the spleen. The indirect fluorescent

  14. HLA Antigens in Malay Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Association with Clinical and Autoantibody Expression

    PubMed Central

    Azizah, MR; Ainol, SS; Kong, NCT; Normaznah, Y; Rahim, MN

    2001-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that certain genes within the major histocompatibility complex predispose to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and may influence clinical and autoantibody expression. Thus, we studied the frequency of HLA-DR, -DQA, -DQB and -DPB alleles in ethnic Malays with SLE to determine the role of these genes in determining disease susceptibility and their association with clinical and immunological manifestations. Methods: Fifty-six Malay SLE patients were enrolled into the study. Demographic, clinical and immunological findings were obtained from medical records. HLA-DR, DQ and DP typing were done using modified PCR-RELP. Controls were from ethnically-matched healthy individuals. Results: We found a strongly significant association of the DR2 and DQB1 *0501 and DQB1 *0601 (pcorr=0.03, rr=3.83, pcorr=0.0036, rr=4.56 and pcorr=0.0048 and rr=6.0, respectively). There was also a weak increase of DQB1 *0.201 and DPB1 *0.0901 with a weak decrease of DQA1 *0601 and DQB1 *0503 and *0301 which were not significant after corrections for multiple comparisons were made. There was a significant positive association of DR2 and DQB1 *0501 with renal involvement and DR8 with alopecia. A nonsignificant increase of DQB1 *0503 in patients with photosensitivity was noted. Significant autoantibody associations were also found: DQB1 *0601 with anti-Sm/RNP, DR2 with antiSSA (Ro)/SSB (La), and DR2, DQB1 *0501 and *0601 with antibodies to ds DNA. There was no specific DR, DQ or DP associations with age of disease onset (below 30 years or those at or above 30 years). Conclusion: Our data suggests the role of the HLA class II genes in conferring SLE susceptibility and in clinical and autoantibody expression PMID:11590899

  15. Rheumatoid Rescue of Misfolded Cellular Proteins by MHC Class II Molecules: A New Hypothesis for Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Arase, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins localized in the endoplasmic reticulum are degraded promptly and thus are not transported outside cells. However, misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum are rescued from protein degradation upon association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and are transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules without being processed to peptides. Studies on the misfolded proteins rescued by MHC class II molecules have revealed that misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules are specific targets for autoantibodies produced in autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, a strong correlation has been observed between autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules and the autoimmune disease susceptibility conferred by each MHC class II allele. These new insights into MHC class II molecules suggest that misfolded proteins rescued from protein degradation by MHC class II molecules are recognized as "neo-self" antigens by immune system and are involved in autoimmune diseases as autoantibody targets.

  16. Expression of CD19(+)CD5(+)B cells and IgA1-positive cells in tonsillar tissues of IgA nephropathy patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Peng, You Ming; Liu, Hong; Hou, Qi Di; Liu, Fu You; Chen, Nan Lan; Bi, Hui Xin

    2011-01-01

    The hallmark of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the mesangial deposits of polymeric IgA. However, the source of IgA1 and the mechanism of deposition of IgA1 in the mesangium remain unknown. To better understand its pathogenesis, we investigated the expression of CD19(+)CD5(+)B cells and IgA1-positive cells in the tonsils of IgAN patients. Immunofluorescence was used to visualize the locations of CD19(+)CD5(+)B cells and IgA1-positive cells in the tonsils. In this study, it was demonstrated that CD19(+)CD5(+)B cells are usually found in germinal centers and in the capsule covering the upper parts of the nodules of lymphoid tissue (cap of the nodule). The expression of IgA1-positive cells in tonsil tissue can be seen in the cap of the nodule and subepithelial tissue. There is a significant relationship between IgA1 and CD19(+)CD5(+)B cells. The level of CD19(+)CD5(+)B cells is positively correlated to the severity of renal pathological changes. These findings suggest that CD19(+)CD5(+)B cells in the tonsils could have an impact on the pathogenesis of IgAN.

  17. The level of galactose-deficient IgA1 in the sera of patients with IgA nephropathy is associated with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Hou, Ping; Lv, Jicheng; Moldoveanu, Zina; Li, Yifu; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali G; Novak, Jan; Zhang, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Although high serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 (an important biomarker of IgA nephropathy (IgAN)) are found in most patients with IgAN, their relationship to disease severity and progression remains unclear. To help clarify this we prospectively enrolled 275 patients with IgAN and followed them for a median of 47 months (range 12-96 months). Serum galactose-deficient IgA1 was measured at the time of diagnosis using a lectin-based ELISA, and renal survival was modeled using the Cox proportional hazards method. The serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 were higher in patients with IgAN compared to those in healthy controls. Importantly, in adjusted analysis, higher levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 were independently associated with a greater risk of deterioration in renal function with a hazard ratio of 1.44 per standard deviation of the natural log-transformed galactose-deficient IgA1 concentration. In reference to the first quartile, the risk of kidney failure increased such that the hazard ratio for the second quartile was 2.47, 3.86 for the third, and 4.76 for the fourth quartile of the galactose-deficient IgA1 concentration. Hence, elevated serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 are associated with a poor prognosis in IgAN.

  18. Subclasses IgA1 and IgA2 in serum and synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis and reactive synovitis of local origin.

    PubMed Central

    Hrncír, Z; Tichý, M

    1978-01-01

    Subclasses IgA1 and IgA2 in serum were examined in 40 patients (28 cases of rheumatoid arthritis and 12 cases of reactive synovitis of local origin) and also in synovial fluid of the knee joint in 17 of these patients. The levels of IgA1 and IgA2 in serum were statistically significantly higher than in synovial fluid in both groups of patients (P = 0.0237--0.0018), but significant correlations between serum and synovial fluid for IgA1 (R = 0.8855, P = 0.0010) and for IgA2 (r = 0.7630, P = 0.0124) were found only in cases of rheumatoid arthritis. A percentage evaluation revealed a significant disproportion (P = 0.0028) in favour of IgA1 in synovial fluid during rheumatoid arthritis. The analysis of proportions of IgA subclasses and rheumatoid factor has shown no significant relationships. PMID:749696

  19. IgA nephropathy and tonsils--an approach from the structure of IgA1 produced by tonsillar lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Horie, Akeyo; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Iwase, Hitoo; Sugiyama, Satoshi

    2004-12-01

    Human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), which is the predominant subtype to be deposited in glomeruli in IgA nephropathy (IgAN), has a unique mucine-like structure in its hinge region. Namely, it contains O-glycans and proline-rich peptides We previously observed underglycosylation of the hinge region in serum and deposited IgA1 in IgAN. On the other hand, clinical development and exacerbation of IgAN are frequently preceded by episodes of upper respiratory tract infection, and palatine tonsils represent the predominant immunocompetent tissue of the upper respiratory tract. Therefore, we hypothesized that tonsils were one of the origins of glomerular IgA1 in IgAN, and investigated the O-glycan structure of IgA1 produced by tonsillar lymphocytes (tonsillar IgA1). A significant increase in asialo-agalacto type O-glycans was found in the tonsillar IgA1 hinge in IgAN. These results suggest that the tonsils produce underglycosylated IgA1 molecules, which enter the bloodstream and are then deposited in the glomeruli.

  20. Are autoantibodies the targets of B-cell-directed therapy?

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S; Grammer, Amrie C; Ning, Tony C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2011-09-01

    B-cell-directed therapy-the use of agents that eliminate B cells or block cytokines important for B-cell function-is emerging as a promising approach to the treatment of rheumatic disease. Target diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), display diverse patterns of autoantibody production and aberrant activation of B cells. Despite the success of this general approach, the mechanisms by which B-cell-directed therapy ameliorates disease, and the role of autoantibodies as biomarkers of clinical response remain unclear. Importantly, although B-cell-directed therapy can reduce the production of some autoantibodies, the effects can be variable and heterogeneous, probably reflecting the critical (but ill-defined) roles of different B-cell and plasma cell populations in autoantibody production. Future studies during clinical trials of these agents are needed to define which B-cell and autoantibody populations are affected (or ought to be), and to discover informative biomarkers of clinical response that can be used to advance this therapeutic approach.

  1. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Goscik, Joanna; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Lemancewicz, Adam; Laudanski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother's immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th-18th weeks of gestation). For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity) is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients.

  2. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Goscik, Joanna; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Lemancewicz, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother's immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th–18th weeks of gestation). For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity) is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients. PMID:27042674

  3. Aberrant sialylation of serum IgA1 was associated with prognosis of patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jia-Xiang; Xu, Li-Xia; Lv, Ji-Cheng; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2007-12-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of serum IgA1 was considered as an initial event and involvement in the pathogenesis of IgAN. We previously demonstrated that aberrant glycosylation of serum IgA1 was associated with pathologic phenotype of IgAN. The present study is to investigate if abnormal sialylation of IgA1 affects renal survival of IgAN. 127 patients with biopsy-proven IgAN were enrolled and followed up to 8 years. Seventy-nine healthy and 75 patients with non-IgAN renal diseases were selected as controls. Alpha 2, 6 sialic acid (SA) of serum IgA1 was measured by sandwich-ELISA. Renal survival rate was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Alpha 2, 6 SA level in patients with IgAN was lower than that in healthy controls (0.92+/-0.14 vs. 0.98+/-0.12, P=0.001) and non-IgAN glomerulonephritis (0.92+/-0.14 vs. 1.00+/-0.18, n=53, P=0.001). Patients with IgAN in Low SA Group were no significant differences compared with patients in Normal SA Group in age, gender, hypertension, serum creatinine, and excretion of proteinuria. Renal cumulative survival rate was 53.3% in patients in Low SA Group and 83.5% in Normal SA Group (P=0.0008). The lower the alpha 2, 6 SA level of serum IgA1 in patients with IgAN was, the worse their renal survival rate was. Although patients in Low SA Group had worse renal function evaluated by eGFR, there was no significant difference in various CKD stages in non-IgAN renal function controls (n=42, P=0.352). Alpha 2, 6 SA level of serum IgA1 was associated with the prognosis of patients with IgAN and could serve as a predictor of poor prognosis in IgAN.

  4. Anti-calreticulin immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies in refractory coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, D; Palová-Jelínková, L; Felsberg, J; Šimšová, M; Pekáriková, A; Pecharová, B; Swoboda, I; Mothes, T; Mulder, C J J; Beneš, Z; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H; Tučková, L

    2008-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a very rare and dangerous form of CD, in which gluten-free diet loses its therapeutic effect and the damage of intestinal mucosa persists. Because of the adherence to the diet, serological markers of CD [immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies against gliadin, tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and endomysium] are often missing in RCD patients. We found substantially elevated levels of IgA anti-calreticulin (CRT) antibodies in the sera of almost all RCD patients tested. These sera were negative for IgA antibodies to gliadin and tTG and only some of them showed IgA antibodies to enterocytes. Analysis of patients' IgA reactivity to CRT fragments (quarters and halves) by Western blotting revealed differences in the specificity of IgA antibodies between RCD and CD patients. We therefore used the Pepscan technique with synthetic overlapping decapeptides of CRT to characterize antigenic epitopes recognized by serum IgA antibodies of RCD patients. Employing this method we demonstrated several dominant antigenic epitopes recognized by IgA antibodies of RCD patients on the CRT molecule. Epitope GVTKAAEKQMKD was recognized predominantly by serum IgA of RCD patients. Our results suggest that testing for serum IgA antibodies against CRT and its selected peptide could be a very useful tool in RCD differential diagnosis. PMID:18637103

  5. Detection of at-risk pregnancy by means of highly sensitive assays for thyroid autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Stagnaro-Green, A.; Roman, S.H.; Cobin, R.H.; El-Harazy, E.; Alvarez-Marfany, M.; Davies, T.F. )

    1990-09-19

    The authors screened 552 women who presented to their obstetrician in the first trimester of pregnancy using highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the presence of thyroglobulin and thyroidperoxidase autoantibodies and found an incidence of positivity of 19.6%. The tendency to secrete detectable levels of thyroid autoantibodies was significantly correlated with an increased rate of miscarriage. Thyroid autoantibody-positive women miscarried at a rate of 17%, compared with 8.4% for the autoantibody-negative women. Individual levels of thyroglobulin and thyroidperoxidase autoantibodies were similarly related to this increased miscarriage rate, with no evidence of autoantibody specificity in the relationship. Furthermore, the increase in miscarriages could not be explained by differences in thyroid hormone levels, the presence of cardiolipin autoantibodies, maternal age, gestational age at the time of maternal entry into the study, or previous obstetric history. They conclude that thyroid autoantibodies are an independent marker of at-risk pregnancy.

  6. The role of tonsillectomy in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Feriozzi, Sandro; Polci, Rosaria

    2016-02-01

    The IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a very common glomerulonephritis and can result in end-stage renal disease. From a clinical point of view, IgAN is characterised by repeated events of macrohaematuria associated with infections of the upper airways. In IgAN, the IgA released by the tonsillar lymphatic tissue into blood circulation are defective in glycosylation. These aberrant IgA can reach the glomeruli and deposit into mesangium causing an inflammation with cellular proliferation. The treatment is not yet well defined: steroids and immunosuppressive drugs are suggested in cases with a progressive disease. Tonsillectomy was proposed to reduce the infective events of upper airways and the lymphatic tissue producing undergalactosylated IgA. The experiences in literature coming from Asia report positive effects of tonsillectomy on IgAN. In patients with tonsillectomy, the renal signs improved (less haematuria and proteinuria) and the renal outcome was better (slower progression of renal damage). These were uncontrolled studies and tonsillectomy was associated with steroid and immunosuppressive treatment, so it is not possible to tell the real effect of tonsillectomy. In contrast, the European studies reported that the tonsillectomy was not associated with a better outcome of IgAN. A critical review of the subject reveals that most of the papers with positive results were uncontrolled retrospective experiences, while in a randomised controlled trial paper the advantages of tonsillectomy disappeared. In conclusion, this review, in agreement with the international guidelines, concludes that tonsillectomy does not play any role in the progression of IgAN.

  7. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2-50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  8. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  9. The glycans deficiencies of macromolecular IgA1 is a contributory factor of variable pathological phenotypes of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, L-X; Yan, Y; Zhang, J-J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, M-H

    2005-12-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that IgA1-containing macromolecules and the glycosylation of IgA1 in sera from patients with IgAN might involve the pathogenesis of IgAN. However, whether the different histological phenotypes can be attributed or not to the aberrant glycosylation of macromolecular IgA1 has not yet been elucidated. The aim of the current study is to investigate the glycosylation of IgA1 molecules in serum IgA1-containing macromolecules and their association with pathological phenotypes of IgAN. Sera was collected from 40 patients with IgAN and 20 donors. Twenty patients had mild mesangial proliferative IgAN, the remaining 20 had focal proliferative sclerosing IgAN. Polyethylene glycol 6000 was used to precipitate the macromolecules from sera of patients and controls. Biotinylated lectins were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to examine different glycans on IgA1 molecules. The alpha2,6 sialic acid was detected by elderberry bark lectin (SNA) and the exposure of terminal galactose (Gal) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) were detected by Arachis hypogaea (PNA) and Vilsa villosa lectin (VVL), respectively. The IgA1 glycans levels corrected by IgA1 concentrations were compared between patients and controls. Reduced terminal alpha2,6 sialic acid of IgA1 (79.89 +/- 25.17 versus 62.12 +/- 24.50, P = 0.034) was demonstrated only in precipitates from sera of patients with focal proliferative sclerosing IgAN, compared with those from controls. Reduced galactosylation of IgA1 molecules in precipitates was demonstrated in patients with both mild mesangial proliferative IgAN and focal proliferative sclerosing IgAN compared with normal controls (24.52 +/- 18.71 versus 76.84 +/- 32.59 P = 0.000 and 33.48 +/- 25.36 versus 76.84 +/- 32.59 P = 0.000). However, no significant difference was found in IgA1 glycosylation in the supernatant between patients and normal controls (P > 0.05). The glycosylation deficiency of IgA1 existed only in serum IgA1

  10. The interaction of selective plant lectins with neuraminidase-treated and untreated IgA1 from the sera of IgA nephropathy patients.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Shuib, A S; Chua, C T

    2001-02-01

    A study on the binding interaction of lectins from Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin), Glycine max and Sambucus nigra with standardised quantity of IgA from the IgA nephropathy patients and normal controls was performed. The Glycine max lectin demonstrated higher affinity towards the serum IgA of IgAN patients as compared to normal controls. However, the affinity binding was lower in cases ofjacalin and the Sambucus nigra lectin. When serum samples were treated with neuraminidase, the differential jacalin affinity binding between IgA1 of patients and normal controls was abrogated. Our data are in support of the view that the O-linked oligosaccharide moieties of the patients IgA1 were generally lacking in galactose and sialic acid residues.

  11. Autoantibodies to Agrin in Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A.; Lisak, Robert P.; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  12. Autoantibodies to agrin in myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Shen, Chengyong; Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A; Lisak, Robert P; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  13. DNA-damaging autoantibodies and cancer: the lupus butterfly theory.

    PubMed

    Noble, Philip W; Bernatsky, Sasha; Clarke, Ann E; Isenberg, David A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Hansen, James E

    2016-07-01

    Autoantibodies reactive against host DNA are detectable in the circulation of most people with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The long-held view that antibodies cannot penetrate live cells has been disproved. A subset of lupus autoantibodies penetrate cells, translocate to nuclei, and inhibit DNA repair or directly damages DNA. The result of these effects depends on the microenvironment and genetic traits of the cell. Some DNA-damaging antibodies alone have little impact on normal cells, but in the presence of other conditions, such as pre-existing DNA-repair defects, can become highly toxic. These findings raise new questions about autoimmunity and DNA damage, and reveal opportunities for new targeted therapies against malignancies particularly vulnerable to DNA damage. In this Perspectives article, we review the known associations between SLE, DNA damage and cancer, and propose a theory for the effects of DNA-damaging autoantibodies on SLE pathophysiology and cancer risk. PMID:27009542

  14. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  15. Immune Alterations in Patients with Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Chruewkamlow, Nuttapol; Mahasongkram, Kodchakorn; Pata, Supansa; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Salee, Parichart; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) can cause immunodeficiency and are associated with various opportunistic infections. In the present study, we investigated other cellular immune parameters for a better understanding of the immunodeficiency condition in the patients. The numbers of WBC, monocytes and NK cells were increased in patients with anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies (AAbs). Upon TCR activation, T cell proliferation and IL-2 receptor of the patients remained intact. Nonetheless, the Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ and TNF-α) production was up-regulated. The production of Th2 (IL-4) and Th17 (IL-17) cytokines was unchanged. We suggest that, in addition to the presence of anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies, alterations in the cellular immune functions may also contribute to this immunodeficiency.

  16. β2-Glycoprotein I/HLA class II complexes are novel autoantigens in antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tanimura, Kenji; Jin, Hui; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Morikami, Satoko; Arase, Noriko; Kishida, Kazuki; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Kohyama, Masako; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Horita, Tetsuya; Takasugi, Kiyoshi; Ohmura, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Ken; Katayama, Ichiro; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Lanier, Lewis L.; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Yamada, Hideto

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy complications. β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) complexed with phospholipid is recognized as a major target for autoantibodies in APS; however, less than half the patients with clinical manifestations of APS possess autoantibodies against the complexes. Therefore, the range of autoantigens involved in APS remains unclear. Recently, we found that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules transport misfolded cellular proteins to the cell surface via association with their peptide-binding grooves. Furthermore, immunoglobulin G heavy chain/HLA class II complexes were specific targets for autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we demonstrate that intact β2GPI, not peptide, forms a complex with HLA class II molecules. Strikingly, 100 (83.3%) of the 120 APS patients analyzed, including those whose antiphospholipid antibody titers were within normal range, possessed autoantibodies that recognize β2GPI/HLA class II complexes in the absence of phospholipids. In situ association between β2GPI and HLA class II was observed in placental tissues of APS patients but not in healthy controls. Furthermore, autoantibodies against β2GPI/HLA class II complexes mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity against cells expressing the complexes. These data suggest that β2GPI/HLA class II complexes are a target in APS that might be involved in the pathogenesis. PMID:25733579

  17. Frequency of IgA deficiency in blood donors and Rh negative women in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, S; Jensson, O

    1977-04-01

    Sera from 6,842 individuals were tested for IgA deficiency, using double and radial immunodiffusion. Sera containing less than 1 mg/100 ml of IgA were classified as deficient. The frequency of selective IgA deficiency among 4,799 blood donors investigated was 1:533, but 1:340 among 1,017 Rh negative women screened and 1:485 for both groups combined. One of the nine IgA deficient blood donors detected belonged to a 1st cousin marriage family previously investigated, in which the mother also was deficient in IgA. One IgA deficient recipient was found among 704 hospital patients screened for this abnormality.

  18. Immunity of tonsil and IgA nephropathy--relationship between IgA nephropathy and tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Kiyonori; Gotoh, Hironobu; Hayashi, Masaki; Hujihara, Keiji; Tamura, Shinji; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2004-12-01

    Our study hypothesized that cytokines or chemokines induced in tonsils by infectious stimulations play an important role on the exacerbation of the glomerular injuries in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Tonsils from six patients with IgAN diagnosed by renal biopsy were studied after getting their written informed consents Tonsils from six patients with tonsil disorders with non-renal disorders were examined as controls. Tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMCs) were isolated and resuspended with RPMI 1640 with 10% FCS. These cells were incubated for 48 h with staphlococcus enterotoxin-B (SEB) or lipopolysaccaride (LPS). The levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and MCP-1 in the supernatants were measured by solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The actual cytokine concentrations were calculated by determining the standard curves. The experiments were performed in duplicate, and the mean value was calculated. We found that tonsillar mononuclear cells of IgA nephropathy produced mesangial proliferative chemokines (MCP-1, IL-8) in higher amounts compared to tonsils from non-IgA nephropathy. This result suggests that upper respiratory tract infections such as tonsillitis may be one of the risk factors of the aggravation in patients with IgA nephropathy.

  19. Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies identify a novel diisopropylfluorophosphate-binding protein in the lysosomes of normal human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Goldschmeding, R; van der Schoot, C E; ten Bokkel Huinink, D; Hack, C E; van den Ende, M E; Kallenberg, C G; von dem Borne, A E

    1989-11-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specifically associated with Wegener's granulomatosis were found to be directed against a saline-soluble glycoprotein triplet that migrates on SDS gels as distinct bands of Mr 29,000, 30,500, and 32,000 and is present in the azurophilic granules. This antigen was specifically recognized by all cytoplasmic-staining (C)-ANCA-positive sera from patients with Wegener's disease. C-ANCA antigen bound [3H]diisopropylfluorophosphate, which indicates that it is a serine protease, but it could clearly be distinguished from the serine proteases elastase and cathepsin G. Stimulation of cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils with FMLP induced release of C-ANCA antigen. This indicates that in vivo C-ANCA might interact with the C-ANCA antigen after its release upon inflammatory stimulation. We further demonstrate that in some perinuclear staining (P-ANCA) patients' sera autoantibodies against other myeloid lysosomal enzymes can be detected, such as antimyeloperoxidase and antielastase. C-ANCA and P-ANCA thus represent a novel class of autoantibodies directed against myeloid lysosomal enzymes. The originally described Wegener-specific C-ANCA show an apparently uniform specificity for the 29,000 serine protease. In contrast, P-ANCA may recognize myeloperoxidase as well as elastase and/or other antigens.

  20. Anti-Ku autoantibodies: series of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Gryga, Krzysztof; Milewski, Mamert; Zółciński, Marek; Dyczek, Andrzej; Musiał, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against nuclear protein Ku are infrequently detected. If present, they are found in high titers in patients with connective tissue overlap syndromes. This article describes 5 patients with anti-Ku antibodies in whom systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, idiopathic lung fibrosis or scleroderma - polymyositis overlap syndrome were diagnosed. Interestingly, signs and symptoms of transient cranial neuropathy involving trigeminal and facial nerves were reported by 3 patients. Cranial nerve neuropathy has not been described in patients with anti-Ku autoantibodies previously.

  1. The Myositis Autoantibody Phenotypes of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M.; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, “shawl-sign” rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and “mechanic’s hands,” and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was

  2. The myositis autoantibody phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rider, Lisa G; Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N; Miller, Frederick W

    2013-07-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, "shawl-sign" rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and "mechanic's hands," and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was characterized by high

  3. Thyroid Autoantibodies in Pregnancy: Their Role, Regulation and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Balucan, Francis S.; Morshed, Syed A.; Davies, Terry F.

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies to thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase are common in the euthyroid population and are considered secondary responses and indicative of thyroid inflammation. By contrast, autoantibodies to the TSH receptor are unique to patients with Graves' disease and to some patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Both types of thyroid antibodies are useful clinical markers of autoimmune thyroid disease and are profoundly influenced by the immune suppression of pregnancy and the resulting loss of such suppression in the postpartum period. Here, we review these three types of thyroid antibodies and their antigens and how they relate to pregnancy itself, obstetric and neonatal outcomes, and the postpartum. PMID:23691429

  4. The myositis autoantibody phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rider, Lisa G; Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N; Miller, Frederick W

    2013-07-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, "shawl-sign" rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and "mechanic's hands," and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was characterized by high

  5. Anti-DNA autoantibodies and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Blatt, N B; Glick, G D

    1999-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease that affects most of the organs and tissues of the body, causing glomerulonephritis, arthritis, and cerebritis. SLE can be fatal with nephritis, in particular, predicting a poor outcome for patients. In this review, we highlight what has been learned about SLE from the study of mouse models, and pay particular attention to anti-DNA autoantibodies, both as pathological agents of lupus nephritis and as DNA-binding proteins. We summarize the current approaches used to treat SLE and discuss the targeting of anti-DNA autoantibodies as a new treatment for lupus nephritis.

  6. Versatile substrates and probes for IgA1 protease activity.

    PubMed

    Choudary, Santosh K; Qiu, Jiazhou; Plaut, Andrew G; Kritzer, Joshua A

    2013-10-11

    Bacterial meningitis is a severe infectious disease with high mortality. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that cause meningitis secrete immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases to assist in mucosal colonization, invasion, and immune evasion. IgA1 proteases have unique selectivity, with few reported substrates other than IgA1 from human tissue. Here we describe the design, characterization, and application of peptide substrates for diverse IgA1 proteases from Neisseria, Haemophilus, and Streptococcus bacteria. IgA1 proteases from diverse strains showed unexpected selectivity profiles among peptide substrates derived from autoproteolytic sites. A fluorescence probe derived from one of these peptides was used to quantitate IgA1 protease activity in buffer and in human cerebrospinal fluid; it was able to detect recombinant Haemophilus influenzae type 1 IgA1 protease at less than 1 μg mL(-1) . We also used the probe to establish the first high-throughput screen for IgA1 protease inhibitors. This work provides tools that will help investigate the roles of IgA1 proteases in bacterial colonization, immune evasion, and infection.

  7. IgA myeloma presenting as Henoch-Schönlein purpura with nephritis.

    PubMed

    Zickerman, A M; Allen, A C; Talwar, V; Olczak, S A; Brownlee, A; Holland, M; Furness, P N; Brunskill, N J; Feehally, J

    2000-09-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) are both characterized by IgA-mediated tissue injury, including mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis. Abnormalities of IgA1 glycosylation are described in IgA nephropathy and HSP nephritis. IgA-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been inconsistently described in the serum of patients with HSP. In IgA myeloma, the paraprotein-mediated renal lesion is typically cast nephropathy; IgAN or HSP have only rarely been reported in myeloma even when an IgA paraprotein is circulating in large concentrations. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with IgA myeloma who presented with HSP including nephritis and rapidly progressive renal failure. His IgA1 had altered O-glycosylation in the pattern seen in IgAN and also contained an IgA-ANCA. This case adds further weight to the evidence that IgA1 O-glycosylation abnormalities predispose to mesangial IgA deposition and also that IgA-ANCA may have a pathogenic role in the development of HSP. PMID:10977812

  8. Enhancement of intestinal IgA production by Ajoene in mice.

    PubMed

    Washiya, Yuki; Nishikawa, Tomoaki; Fujino, Tsuchiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ajoene on intestinal IgA production. Ajoene (1.35, 4.5, and 13.5 µg/kg/d) was administered to mice for 4 weeks. The fecal IgA level in the 13.5 µg/kg/d group increased after 3 weeks. The intestinal IgA level also increased in a dose-dependent manner upon ajoene administration. An oil-macerated garlic extract, with 1500 µg/g of ajoene, enhanced the intestinal IgA production.

  9. The Influence of Costimulation and Regulatory Cd4+ T Cells on Intestinal Iga Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kagrdic, Dubrav; Kjerrulf, Martin; Bromander, Annakari; Vajdy, Michael; Hörnquist, Elisabeth; Lycke, Nils

    1998-01-01

    It is thought that IgA B-cell differentiation is highly dependent on activated CD4+ T cells. In particular, cell-cell interactions in the Peyer's patches involving CD40 and/or CD80/CD86 have been implicated in germinal-center formation and IgA B-cell development. Also soluble factors, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and TGFβ may be critical for IgA B-cell differentiation in vivo. Here we report on some paradoxical findings with regard to IgA B-cell differentiation and specific mucosal immune responses that we have recently made using gene knockout mice. More specifically, we have investigated to what extent absence of CD4+ T cells, relevant cytokines, or T-cell-B-cell interactions would influence IgA B-cell differentiation in vivo. Using CD4– or IL- 4-gene knockout mice or mice made transgenic for CTLA4Ig, we found that, although specific responses were impaired, total IgA production and IgA B-cell differentiation appeared to proceed normally. However, a poor correlation was found between, on the one hand, GC formation and IgA differentiation and, on the other hand, the ability to respond to T-celldependent soluble protein antigens in these mice. Thus, despite the various deficiencies in CD4+ T-cell functions seemingly intact IgA B-cell development was observed. PMID:9716905

  10. Macromolecular IgA1 taken from patients with familial IgA nephropathy or their asymptomatic relatives have higher reactivity to mesangial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tam, Ka Ying; Leung, Joseph C K; Chan, Loretta Y Y; Lam, Man Fai; Tang, Sydney C W; Lai, Kar Neng

    2009-06-01

    Multiple cases of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) may occur in families; we compared their prognosis to sporadic cases of this disease. We isolated macromolecular IgA1 from 60 patients with familial IgAN, 91 of their asymptomatic relatives, 43 patients with sporadic IgAN (SpIgAN), 90 of their asymptomatic relatives, and 43 healthy subjects. Compared with SpIgAN patients, those with multiplex familial IgAN (MpIgAN) had more advanced renal histopathology and more galactose-deficient macromolecular IgA1 in their serum. Further, when we tested the effects of the macromolecular IgA1 on human mesangial cells in culture, we found that the macromolecular IgA1 taken from familial clusters had enhanced binding to mesangial cells and caused increased expression of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and monocyte chemotactic peptide-1. The macromolecular IgA1 isolated from asymptomatic relatives caused increased cytokine expression in the mesangial cells when derived from MpIgAN compared with SpIgAN or healthy controls. While these studies suggest that macromolecular IgA1 isolated from patients with MpIgAN is more pathogenic than that from patients with SpIgAN, long term follow-up will be needed to clarify the risk in asymptomatic relatives of the patients with multiplex familial disease.

  11. Identification of distinct glycoforms of IgA1 in plasma from patients with immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Sylvain; Mi, Rongjuan; Aryal, Rajindra P; Wang, Yingchun; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Clausen, Henrik; van Die, Irma; Han, Yoosun; Chapman, Arlene B; Cummings, Richard D; Ju, Tongzhong

    2014-11-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of glomerulonephritis worldwide and is histologically characterized by the deposition of IgA1 and consequent inflammation in the glomerular mesangium. Prior studies suggested that serum IgA1 from IgAN patients contains aberrant, undergalactosylated O-glycans, for example, Tn antigen and its sialylated version, SialylTn (STn), but the mechanisms underlying aberrant O-glycosylation are not well understood. Here we have used serial lectin separation technologies, Western blot, enzymatic modifications, and mass spectrometry to explore whether there are different glycoforms of IgA1 in plasma from patients with IgAN and healthy individuals. Although total plasma IgA in IgAN patients was elevated ∼ 1.6-fold compared with that in healthy donors, IgA1 in all samples was unexpectedly separable into two distinct glycoforms: one with core 1 based O-glycans, and the other exclusively containing Tn/STn structures. Importantly, Tn antigen present on IgA1 from IgAN patients and controls was convertible into the core 1 structure in vitro by recombinant T-synthase. Our results demonstrate that undergalactosylation of O-glycans in IgA1 is not restricted to IgAN and suggest that in vivo inefficiency of T-synthase toward IgA1 in a subpopulation of B or plasma cells, as well as overall elevation of IgA, may contribute to IgAN pathogenesis.

  12. In vitro regulation of thyroglobulin (Tg) autoantibody production by Tg-specific T-cell lines and hybridomas.

    PubMed Central

    Champion, B R; Hutchings, P; Rayner, D C; Page, K; Tite, J; Cooke, A; Roitt, I M

    1991-01-01

    To define the interactions between self thyroglobulin (Tg)-reactive T and B we co-cultured enriched B cells taken from rat or mouse Tg-primed mice with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted T-cell lines specific for iodinated determinants on self-Tg, or hybridomas derived from those lines. Using two clonally distinct T-cell hybridomas, ADA2 and CH9, in vitro help for Tg autoantibody responses was observed using mouse (M)Tg-primed B cells and a 100 ng/ml MTg challenge. Using rat Tg-primed B cells and the same conditions, only CH9 provided help, indicating that the fine specificity of B cells influences their ability to interact with specific anti-Tg T-cell clones. In contrast to T-cell hybridomas, their parent T-cell lines MTg9B3 and MTg12B suppressed Tg autoantibody responses in vitro, although they augmented bystander proliferation of unprimed B cells. The MTg12B cells also (i) diminished the survival of Tg-primed B cells, and (ii) inhibited the proliferation of an antigen-presenting B-cell hybridoma (LK35.2) in a cytostasis assay. These findings together support the view that their suppressive activity is mediated through cytotoxicity. While the role of class II-restricted cytotoxic cells in thyroid autoimmunity is unknown, the results suggest that such cells may act to suppress autoantibody responses as well as to mediate tissue damage to class II-expressing thyroid cells. PMID:1717368

  13. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  14. The Choice of Laboratory Methodology Influences Autoantibody Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Rönnelid, Johan

    2015-01-01

    During the last 25 years, clinical autoantibody determinations have changed dramatically. Old and slow techniques with high diagnostic specificity have been replaced with automated and faster techniques that most often have a higher diagnostic sensitivity at the expense of a lower diagnostic specificity. Newer techniques are mostly quantitative, allowing for follow-up of autoantibody levels. Whereas the older procedures utilized autoantigens in soluble and native states, most modern techniques rely on autoantigens attached to surfaces, with the risk of exposure of denatured epitopes. Comparisons between antibody measurement techniques can be obtained from the results of external quality assessment programs. As the main objective for external quality assessment is the monitoring of clinical laboratories, they cannot focus on the kind of low-level and often polyreactive sera, which are common in the real world and in which a single definite target response cannot be easily defined. Such common sera are very useful, however, for analysis of differences between autoantibody measurement techniques. The European Consensus Finding Study Group on Autoantibodies has been working with this approach for 28 years. PMID:26284075

  15. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  1. Sites of catabolism of murine monomeric IgA

    SciTech Connect

    Moldoveanu, Z.; Epps, J.M.; Thorpe, S.R.; Mestecky, J.

    1988-07-01

    The tissue sites of monomeric IgA (mIgA) catabolism were determined in a BALB/c mouse model. Mouse mIgA myeloma proteins were labeled either by direct iodination or by coupling the residualizing label, dilactitol-125I-tyramine (125I-DLT) to the proteins; catabolites from protein labeled with 125I-DLT accumulate at the site of protein degradation, allowing identification of the tissue and cellular sites involved in catabolism of the protein. The circulating half-lives of 125I- and 125I-DLT-mIgA were the same. The distribution of radioactivity in tissues was measured at 1, 3, 24, and 96 h after iv. injection of 125I-DLT-labeled mIgA, dimeric IgA (dIgA), IgG, or mouse serum albumin. The greatest uptake of 125I-DLT-mIgA was attributable to the liver. This organ accounted for more internal catabolism of mIgA than all other tissues combined. In contrast, 125I-DLT-IgG was catabolized equally in skin, muscle, and liver. These data indicate that, in mice, the liver is the major site of mIgA catabolism. To determine the cell types involved, collagenase digestion was used to isolate parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells from perfused liver of animals injected with 125I-DLT-mIgA. Most of the radioactivity was associated with the hepatocyte fraction, even though both cell types showed uptake of 125I-DLT-mIgA. Inhibition studies, with asialofetuin and mouse IgA demonstrated that the uptake of mIgA by liver cells was mediated primarily by the asialoglycoprotein receptor.

  2. Cancer-associated autoantibodies to MUC1 and MUC4—A blinded case–control study of colorectal cancer in UK collaborative trial of ovarian cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Nøstdal, Alexander; Fourkala, Evangelia-Ourania; Dawnay, Anne; Burnell, Matthew; Zaikin, Alexey; Burchell, Joy; Papadimitriou, Joyce Taylor; Clausen, Henrik; Jacobs, Ian; Menon, Usha; Wandall, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that autoantibodies directed to aberrantly glycosylated mucins, in particular MUC1 and MUC4, are found in patients with colorectal cancer. There is, however, limited information on the autoantibody levels before clinical diagnosis, and their utility in cancer screening in the general population. In our study, we have generated O-glycosylated synthetic MUC1 and MUC4 peptides in vitro, to mimic cancer-associated glycoforms, and displayed these on microarrays. The assay’s performance was tested through an initial screening of serum samples taken from patients at the time of colorectal cancer diagnosis and healthy controls. Subsequently, the selected biomarkers were evaluated in a blinded nested case–control study using stored serum samples from among the 50,640 women randomized to the multimodal arm of the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS), where women gave annual blood samples for several years. Cases were 97 postmenopausal women who developed colorectal cancer after recruitment and were age-matched to 97 women without any history of cancer. MUC1-STn and MUC1-Core3 IgG autoantibodies identified cases with 8.2 and 13.4% sensitivity, respectively, at 95% specificity. IgA to MUC4 glycoforms were unable to discriminate between cases and controls in the UKCTOCS sera. Additional analysis was undertaken by combining the data of MUC1-STn and MUC1-Core3 with previously generated data on autoantibodies to p53 peptides, which increased the sensitivity to 32.0% at 95% specificity. These findings suggest that a combination of antibody signatures may have a role as part of a biomarker panel for the early detection of colorectal cancer. PMID:24122770

  3. Critical roles of chemokine receptor CCR10 in regulating memory IgA responses in intestines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaomin; Yang, KangKang; Yang, Jie; Li, Ming; Xiong, Na

    2011-11-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR10 is expressed by all intestinal IgA-producing plasma cells and is suggested to play an important role in positioning these cells in the lamina propria for proper IgA production to maintain intestinal homeostasis and protect against infection. However, interfering with CCR10 or its ligand did not impair intestinal IgA production under homeostatic conditions or during infection, and the in vivo function of CCR10 in the intestinal IgA response remains unknown. We found that an enhanced generation of IgA(+) cells in isolated lymphoid follicles of intestines offset defective intestinal migration of IgA(+) cells in CCR10-KO mice, resulting in the apparently normal IgA production under homeostatic conditions and in primary response to pathogen infection. However, the compensatorily generated IgA(+) cells in CCR10-KO mice carried fewer hypermutations in their Ig heavy chain alleles than those of WT mice, indicating that their IgA repertoires are qualitatively different, which might impact the intestinal homeostasis of microflora. In addition, CCR10-deficient long-lived IgA-producing plasma cells and IgA(+) memory B cells generated against the pathogen infection could not be maintained properly in intestines. Consequently, IgA memory responses to the pathogen reinfection were severely impaired in CCR10-KO mice. These findings elucidate critical roles of CCR10 in regulating the intestinal IgA response and memory maintenance and could help in design of vaccines against intestinal and possibly other mucosal pathogens.

  4. Lupus vulgaris with tubercular lymphadenitis and IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Khaira, Ambar; Rathi, Om P; Mahajan, Sandeep; Sharma, Alok; Dinda, Amit K; Tiwari, Suresh C

    2008-02-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a 10-year history of a large crusted plaque over the right thigh for 10 years and small reddish plaque over the left upper back for 3 months. On routine evaluation, she was found to have hematuria. Skin biopsy from the lesion was suggestive of skin tuberculosis (lupus vulgaris), and kidney biopsy showed features of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Fine-needle aspiration from the inguinal lymph node was consistent with granulomatous disease. The patient has been on anti-tubercular treatment, and the hematuria has subsided.

  5. Autoantibodies against neuronal progenitors in sera from children with autism.

    PubMed

    Mazur-Kolecka, Bozena; Cohen, Ira L; Gonzalez, Maripaz; Jenkins, Edmund C; Kaczmarski, Wojciech; Brown, W Ted; Flory, Michael; Frackowiak, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    The pathological role of autoantibodies in development of CNS disorders is a new idea with growing interest among neuroscientists. The involvement of autoimmune response in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been suggested by the presence of multiple brain-specific autoantibodies in children with ASD and in their mothers. The possibility of the effect of autoimmunity on neurogenesis and postnatal brain plasticity has not been determined. The presence of autoantibodies against human neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) stimulated for neuronal differentiation in culture was tested in sera from children with autism (n=20) and age-matched controls (n=18) by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Immunoreactivity against multiple NPCs proteins of molecular sizes of approximately 55 kDa, 105 kDa, 150 kDa, and 210 kDa in sera from individuals with autism had a higher incidence and was stronger than in control sera which immunoreacted mainly with a 150 kDa protein. The sera from children with autism immunoreacted the strongest with NPCs expressing neuronal markers Tuj1 and doublecortin, but not astrocyte marker GFAP. The epitopes recognized by antibodies from sera were not human-specific because they detected also NPCs in situ in murine hippocampus. The autoimmune reactions against NPCs suggest an impaired tolerance to neural antigens in autism. These autoantibodies may be symptomatic for autism and furthermore, their presence suggests that autoimmunity may affect postnatal neuronal plasticity particularly after impairment of blood-brain barrier. Future studies will determine the diagnostic value of the presence of autoantibodies in autism and the therapeutic value of prevention of autoimmunity in autism. PMID:23838310

  6. Intestinal bacteria trigger T cell-independent immunoglobulin A(2) class switching by inducing epithelial-cell secretion of the cytokine APRIL.

    PubMed

    He, Bing; Xu, Weifeng; Santini, Paul A; Polydorides, Alexandros D; Chiu, April; Estrella, Jeannelyn; Shan, Meimei; Chadburn, Amy; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Plebani, Alessandro; Knowles, Daniel M; Rescigno, Maria; Cerutti, Andrea

    2007-06-01

    Bacteria colonize the intestine shortly after birth and thereafter exert several beneficial functions, including induction of protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies. The distal intestine contains IgA(2), which is more resistant to bacterial proteases than is IgA(1). The mechanism by which B cells switch from IgM to IgA(2) remains unknown. We found that human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) triggered IgA(2) class switching in B cells, including IgA(1)-expressing B cells arriving from mucosal follicles, through a CD4(+) T cell-independent pathway involving a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL). IECs released APRIL after sensing bacteria through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and further increased APRIL production by activating dendritic cells via thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Our data indicate that bacteria elicit IgA(2) class switching by linking lamina propria B cells with IECs through a TLR-inducible signaling program requiring APRIL. Thus, mucosal vaccines should activate IECs to induce more effective IgA(2) responses.

  7. Increased miR-374b promotes cell proliferation and the production of aberrant glycosylated IgA1 in B cells of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuai; Bao, Hao; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhou, Xianguang; Qin, Weisong; Zeng, Caihong; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-12-21

    The number of B cells is increased and the O-glycans of IgA1 are incompletely galactosylated in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Here we report that expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and Cosmc is decreased in B cells, and correlates with B cell number and the aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 in IgAN. Patients with IgAN exhibit higher miR-374b in B cells compared to controls. We show that miR-374b targets PTEN and Cosmc by luciferase assays and western blot analysis. Inhibition of miR-374b increased PTEN and Cosmc expression, and prevented cell proliferation and aberrant glycosylation of IgA1, thus representing a new therapeutic approach for IgAN.

  8. Translocalized IgA mediates neutralization and stimulates innate immunity inside infected cells.

    PubMed

    Bidgood, Susanna R; Tam, Jerry C H; McEwan, William A; Mallery, Donna L; James, Leo C

    2014-09-16

    IgA is the most prevalent antibody type on mucosal surfaces and the second most prevalent antibody in circulation, yet its role in immune defense is not fully understood. Here we show that IgA is carried inside cells during virus infection, where it activates intracellular virus neutralization and innate immune signaling. Cytosolic IgA-virion complexes colocalize with the high-affinity antibody receptor tripartite motif-containing protein 21 (TRIM21) and are positive for lysine-48 ubiquitin chains. IgA neutralizes adenovirus infection in a TRIM21- and proteasome-dependent manner in both human and mouse cells. Translocated IgA also potently activates NF-κB signaling pathways in cells expressing TRIM21, whereas viral infection in the absence of antibody or TRIM21 is undetected. TRIM21 recognizes an epitope in IgG Fc that is not conserved in IgA; however, fluorescence anisotropy experiments demonstrate that direct binding to IgA is maintained. We use molecular modeling to show that TRIM21 forms a nonspecific hydrophobic seal around a β-loop structure that is present in IgG, IgM, and IgA, explaining how TRIM21 achieves such remarkable broad antibody specificity. The findings demonstrate that the antiviral protection afforded by IgA extends to the intracellular cytosolic environment.

  9. Neutrophils negatively regulate induction of mucosal IgA responses after sublingual immunization

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Junbae; Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Duverger, Alexandra; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Martin, Tara L.; Steiner, Haley E.; Bachman, Ryan C.; Boyaka, Prosper N.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of mucosal IgA capable of providing a first line of defense against bacterial and viral pathogens remains a major goal of needle-free vaccines given via mucosal routes. Innate immune cells are known to play a central role in induction of IgA responses by mucosal vaccines, but the relative contribution of myeloid cell subsets to these responses has not firmly been established. Using an in vivo model of sublingual vaccination with Bacillus anthracis edema toxin (EdTx) as adjuvant, we examined the role of myeloid cell subsets for mucosal secretory IgA responses. Sublingual immunization of wild-type mice resulted in a transient increase of neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes. These mice later developed Ag-specific serum IgG responses, but not serum or mucosal IgA. Interestingly, EdTx failed to increase neutrophils in sublingual tissues of IKKβΔMye mice, and these mice developed IgA responses. Partial depletion of neutrophils before immunization of wild-type mice allowed the development of both mucosal and serum IgA responses. Finally, co-culture of B cells with neutrophils from either wild-type or IKKβΔMye mice suppressed production of IgA, but not IgM or IgG. These results identify a new role for neutrophils as negative regulators of IgA responses. PMID:25563500

  10. Serum Galactose-Deficient IgA1 Level Is Not Associated with Proteinuria in Children with IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, M. Colleen; Afshan, Sabahat; Sanders, John T.; Kane, Oulimata; Eison, T. Matthew; Lau, Keith K.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Julian, Bruce A.; Novak, Jan; Wyatt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Percentage of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) relative to total IgA in serum was recently reported to correlate with proteinuria at time of sampling and during follow-up for pediatric and adult patients with IgA nephropathy. We sought to determine whether this association exists in another cohort of pediatric patients with IgA nephropathy. Methods. Subjects were younger than 18 years at entry. Blood samples were collected on one or more occasions for determination of serum total IgA and Gd-IgA1. Gd-IgA1 was expressed as serum level and percent of total IgA. Urinary protein/creatinine ratio was calculated for random specimens. Spearman's correlation coefficients assessed the relationship between study variables. Results. The cohort had 29 Caucasians and 11 African-Americans with a male : female ratio of 1.9 : 1. Mean age at diagnosis was 11.7 ± 3.7 years. No statistically significant correlation was identified between serum total IgA, Gd-IgA1, or percent Gd-IgA1 versus urinary protein/creatinine ratio determined contemporaneously with biopsy or between average serum Gd-IgA1 or average percent Gd-IgA1 and time-average urinary protein/creatinine ratio. Conclusion. The magnitude of proteinuria in this cohort of pediatric patients with IgA nephropathy was influenced by factors other than Gd-IgA1 level, consistent with the proposed multi-hit pathogenetic pathways for this renal disease. PMID:22754697

  11. Serological Analysis of Immunogenic Properties of Recombinant Meningococcus IgA1 Protease-Based Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikova, O V; Zinchenko, A A; Vikhrov, A A; Alliluev, A P; Serova, O V; Gordeeva, E A; Zhigis, L S; Zueva, V S; Razgulyaeva, O A; Melikhova, T D; Nokel, E A; Drozhzhina, E Yu; Rumsh, L D

    2016-07-01

    Using the genome sequence of IgA1 protease of N. meningitidis of serogroup B, four recombinant proteins of different structure and molecular weight were constructed. These proteins were equal in inducing the formation of specific antibodies to IgA1 protease and had protective properties against meningococci. In the sera of immunized mice, anti-IgA1 protease antibodies were detected by whole-cell ELISA, which indicated the presence of IgA1 protease on the surface of these bacteria. We hypothesized that the protective properties of IgA1 protease-based antigens and IgA1 protease analogs could be realized not only via impairment of bacterium adhesion to the mucosa, but also via suppression of this pathogen in the organism. The presented findings seem promising for using these proteins as the basis for anti-meningococcus vaccine.

  12. IgA cold agglutinins recognize Pr and Sa antigens expressed on glycophorins.

    PubMed

    Roelcke, D; Hack, H; Kreft, H; MacDonald, B; Pereira, A; Habibi, B

    1993-06-01

    Three cases of IgA kappa cold agglutinins (CAs) were studied. One had anti-Pr1 specificity, one had anti-Pra, and one had anti-Sa. The CAs recognize O-glycans of glycophorins. The findings supplement previous data on anti-Pr1 specificities of four IgA kappa CAs. Because all IgA kappa CAs described recognize O-glycans of glycophorins, a close association between the CA IgA isotype and specificities for O-glycans becomes apparent. It is unlikely, however, that the striking association reflects interrelations between IgA CA structure and specificity, because anti-Sa specificity and all anti-Pr subspecificities were originally defined with IgM CAs.

  13. Impaired selection of IgA and intestinal dysbiosis associated with PD-1-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maruya, Mikako; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Kato, Lucia M; Fagarasan, Sidonia

    2013-01-01

    A major function of immunoglobulin A (IgA) is to maintain balanced bacterial communities in the gut. We have previously shown that diversification of IgA upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) is critical for IgA function yet the principles governing the selection of IgA in the gut have remained elusive. Here we discuss recent progress in understanding this process as revealed by our studies in mice that lack the inhibitory co-receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). We found that PD-1 affects the dynamics of germinal center (GC) B cells by controlling the number and the nature of T helper cells in the Peyer's patches (PPs). Deregulation of the T cell compartment impacts the selection of IgA plasma cells leading to gut dysbiosis. When the PD-1-dependent checkpoint is missing, gut bacteria go beyond the mucosal barrier and induce systemic GCs that can generate antibodies with auto-reactive properties.

  14. [Minimal-change disease with mesangial IgA deposits associated with Sjogren syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mon, C; Sánchez Hernández, R; Fernández Reyes, M J; Estébanez, C; Ortiz, M; Alvarez-Ude, F; Mampaso, F

    2002-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome may be accompanied by a dysregulation of IgA system implying the presence of increased serum polymeric IgA or circulating immune complexes and their consequent deposition within the kidney. In this context IgA nephropathy may only represent one of the complications brought by IgA deposition. Glomerular involvement and primary Sjögren's syndrome has been described previously only in isolated case reports, membranous nephropathy and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis have been reported. We have not found any case of minimal change disease and glomerular IgA deposition associated with Sjögren's syndrome. In this patient nephrotic syndrome was related to serum increase of CA 19-9; this association has been reported in only three previous cases.

  15. Homeland security: IgA immunity at the frontiers of the body.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Andrew J; Geuking, Markus B; McCoy, Kathy D

    2012-04-01

    IgA is the most abundant immunoglobulin produced in mammals, and is mostly secreted across mucous membranes. At these frontiers, which are constantly assaulted by pathogenic and commensal microbes, IgA provides part of a layered system of immune protection. In this review, we describe how IgA induction occurs through both T-dependent and T-independent mechanisms, and how IgA is generated against the prodigious load of commensal microbes after mucosal dendritic cells (DCs) have sampled a tiny fraction of the microbial consortia in the intestinal lumen. To function in this hostile environment, IgA must be induced behind the 'firewall' of the mesenteric lymph nodes to generate responses that integrate microbial stimuli, rather than the classical prime-boost effects characteristic of systemic immunity. PMID:22410243

  16. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses by dietary palmitic acid and its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Eri; Inoue, Asuka; Nagasawa, Risa; Suzuki, Yuji; Ishikawa, Izumi; Shikata, Shiori; Arita, Makoto; Aoki, Junken; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-08-15

    Enhancement of intestinal IgA responses is a primary strategy in the development of oral vaccine. Dietary fatty acids are known to regulate host immune responses. In this study, we show that dietary palmitic acid (PA) and its metabolites enhance intestinal IgA responses. Intestinal IgA production was increased in mice maintained on a PA-enriched diet. These mice also showed increased intestinal IgA responses against orally immunized Ag, without any effect on serum Ab responses. We found that PA directly stimulates plasma cells to produce Ab. In addition, mice receiving a PA-enriched diet had increased numbers of IgA-producing plasma cells in the large intestine; this effect was abolished when serine palmitoyltransferase was inhibited. These findings suggest that dietary PA regulates intestinal IgA responses and has the potential to be a diet-derived mucosal adjuvant. PMID:25031459

  17. The heterogeneity of islet autoantibodies and the progression of islet failure in type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Bian, Lingling; Ji, Li; Chen, Yang; Chen, Heng; Gu, Yong; Ma, Bingqin; Gu, Wei; Xu, Xinyu; Shi, Yun; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Dalong; Sun, Zilin; Ma, Jianhua; Jin, Hui; Shi, Xing; Miao, Heng; Xin, Bing; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Zhenwen; Bu, Ruifang; Xu, Lan; Shi, Guangde; Tang, Wei; Li, Wei; Zhou, Dongmei; Liang, Jun; Cheng, Xingbo; Shi, Bimin; Dong, Jixiang; Hu, Ji; Fang, Chen; Zhong, Shao; Yu, Weinan; Lu, Weiping; Wu, Chenguang; Qian, Li; Yu, Jiancheng; Gao, Jialin; Fei, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Xueqin; Cui, Shiwei; Cheng, Jinluo; Xu, Ning; Wang, Guofeng; Han, Guoqing; Xu, Chunrong; Xie, Yun; An, Minmin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhixiao; Cai, Yun; Fu, Qi; Fu, Yu; Zheng, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Hu, Qingfang; Dai, Hao; Jin, Yu; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Kuanfeng; Li, Yifan; Shen, Jie; Zhou, Hongwen; He, Wei; Zheng, Xuqin; Han, Xiao; Yu, Liping; She, Jinxiong; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is heterogeneous in many facets. The patients suffered from type 1 diabetes present several levels of islet function as well as variable number and type of islet-specific autoantibodies. This study was to investigate prevalence and heterogeneity of the islet autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes of type 1 diabetes mellitus; and also discussed the process of islet failure and its risk factors in Chinese type 1 diabetic patients. A total of 1,291 type 1 diabetic patients were enrolled in this study. Demographic information was collected. Laboratory tests including mixed-meal tolerance test, human leukocyte antigen alleles, hemoglobinA1c, lipids, thyroid function and islet autoantibodies were conducted. The frequency of islet-specific autoantibody in newly diagnosed T1DM patients (duration shorter than half year) was 73% in East China. According to binary logistic regressions, autoantibody positivity, longer duration and lower Body Mass Index were the risk factors of islet failure. As the disease developed, autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase declined as well as the other two autoantibodies against zinc transporter 8 and islet antigen 2. The decrease of autoantibodies was positively correlated with aggressive beta cell destruction. Autoantibodies can facilitate the identification of classic T1DM from other subtypes and predict the progression of islet failure. As there were obvious heterogeneity in autoantibodies and clinical manifestation in different phenotypes of the disease, we should take more factors into consideration when identifying type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27225179

  18. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-Influenza Virus Antibodies: Enhancement of Neutralizing Potency in Polyclonal Mixtures and IgA Backbones

    PubMed Central

    He, Wenqian; Mullarkey, Caitlin E.; Duty, J. Andrew; Moran, Thomas M.; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    emergence of pandemic strains, a new class of broadly neutralizing antibodies has been recently discovered and may be the key to developing a “universal” influenza virus vaccine. While much has been learned about the biology of these antibodies, most studies have focused only on monoclonal antibodies of IgG subtypes. However, the study of monoclonal antibodies often fails to capture the complexity of antibody functions that occur during natural polyclonal responses. Here, we provide the first detailed analyses of the biological activity of these antibodies in polyclonal contexts, comparing both IgG and IgA isotypes isolated from human donors. The striking differences observed in the functional properties of broadly neutralizing antibodies in polyclonal contexts will be essential for guiding design of “universal” influenza virus vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:25589655

  19. Critical Role of Kupffer Cell CD89 Expression in Experimental IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Mengwen; Xie, Kun; Li, Dong; Li, You; Gu, Hua; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, its etiology remains only partly understood. It is clear that the pathogenesis of IgAN involves the formation of macromolecular IgA1 complexes and increased levels of serum IgA1 and IgA1-immune complexes(IC), due to defective IgA1 clearance. Previous studies suggest that the blood and tissue myeloid cell-expressed IgA Fc receptor (FcαR/CD89) mediates IgA-IC clearance and its dysfunction, via decreased activity or excessive levels of soluble FcαR/sCD89 induces IgAN. Such a mechanism requires robust stimulation of IgAN levels via forced expression of CD89. In the absence of unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism to date, we attempted to test the extent of CD89-evoked IgAN by generating a transgenic mouse strain expressing human CD89 under the control of murine CD14 promotor. No deposition of IgA-CD89 complexes or glomerulonephritis was detected, however. Further studies showed that elimination of murine IgA was mediated by Kupffer cells. In patients, however, CD89/IgA complexes were detected, and injection of patient IgA induced IgAN-like features in CD89 Tg mice. In transgenic mice, IgAN pathogenesis involves impaired clearance of abnormal IgA via CD89, primarily by the Kupffer cells. Conditional IgAN progression in CD89 transgenic mice thus reveals important aspects of IgAN pathogenesis.

  20. Naturally occurring structural isomers in serum IgA1 o-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuo; Smith, Archer D; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens; Julian, Bruce A; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan; Renfrow, Matthew B

    2012-02-01

    IgA is the most abundantly produced antibody and plays an important role in the mucosal immune system. Human IgA is represented by two isotypes, IgA1 and IgA2. The major structural difference between these two subclasses is the presence of nine potential sites of O-glycosylation in the hinge region between the first and second constant region domains of the heavy chain. Thr(225), Thr(228), Ser(230), Ser(232) and Thr(236) have been identified as the predominant sites of O-glycan attachment. The range and distribution of O-glycan chains at each site within the context of adjacent sites in this clustered region create a complex heterogeneity of surface epitopes that is incompletely defined. We previously described the analysis of IgA1 O-glycan heterogeneity by use of high resolution LC-MS and electron capture dissociation tandem MS to unambiguously localize all amino acid attachment sites in IgA1 (Ale) myeloma protein. Here, we report the identification and elucidation of IgA1 O-glycopeptide structural isomers that occur based on amino acid position of the attached glycans (positional isomers) and the structure of the O-glycan chains at individual sites (glycan isomers). These isomers are present in a model IgA1 (Mce1) myeloma protein and occur naturally in normal human serum IgA1. Variable O-glycan chains attached to Ser(230), Thr(233) or Thr(236) produce the predominant positional isomers, including O-glycans composed of a single GalNAc residue. These findings represent the first definitive identification of structural isomeric IgA1 O-glycoforms, define the single-site heterogeneity for all O-glycan sites in a single sample, and have implications for defining epitopes based on clustered O-glycan variability.

  1. Critical Role of Kupffer Cell CD89 Expression in Experimental IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Mengwen; Xie, Kun; Li, Dong; Li, You; Gu, Hua; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, its etiology remains only partly understood. It is clear that the pathogenesis of IgAN involves the formation of macromolecular IgA1 complexes and increased levels of serum IgA1 and IgA1-immune complexes(IC), due to defective IgA1 clearance. Previous studies suggest that the blood and tissue myeloid cell-expressed IgA Fc receptor (FcαR/CD89) mediates IgA-IC clearance and its dysfunction, via decreased activity or excessive levels of soluble FcαR/sCD89 induces IgAN. Such a mechanism requires robust stimulation of IgAN levels via forced expression of CD89. In the absence of unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism to date, we attempted to test the extent of CD89-evoked IgAN by generating a transgenic mouse strain expressing human CD89 under the control of murine CD14 promotor. No deposition of IgA-CD89 complexes or glomerulonephritis was detected, however. Further studies showed that elimination of murine IgA was mediated by Kupffer cells. In patients, however, CD89/IgA complexes were detected, and injection of patient IgA induced IgAN-like features in CD89 Tg mice. In transgenic mice, IgAN pathogenesis involves impaired clearance of abnormal IgA via CD89, primarily by the Kupffer cells. Conditional IgAN progression in CD89 transgenic mice thus reveals important aspects of IgAN pathogenesis. PMID:27437939

  2. [Evaluation of the new Hevylite™ IgA assay for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies].

    PubMed

    Lakomy, Daniela; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Denimal, Damien; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Lafon, Ingrid; Caillot, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma diagnosis and follow-up are based on monoclonal protein measurement. The estimation of monoclonal immunoglobulin production requires serum protein electrophoresis, immunoelectrophoresis and free light chain assay. However these classical assays have some limitations. Hevylite™ IgA (Binding Site) is a new nephelometric/turbidimetric assay allowing the IgA κ and IgA λ measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the performance of this assay, for the diagnosis and follow-up of myeloma patients at different stages. Sixty seven frozen sera from 26 patients were assayed. Total IgA, IgA κ, IgA λ concentrations, serum protein electrophoresis and serum immunofixation were performed at diagnosis and during follow-up. All myeloma patients had an abnormal IgA κ/IgA λ ratio at diagnosis. During disease monitoring, the IgA κ or IgA λ concentrations correlated well with the electrophoretic estimation of the monoclonal spike and the values of total IgA. Hevylite™ test was more sensitive than serum protein electrophoresis and provided numerical and reproductible assessment of the monoclonal and non-monoclonal isotype. The IgA κ/IgA λ ratio allowed early prediction of disease relapse. Hevylite™ is an interesting assay especially when the monoclonal IgA comigrates on electrophoresis with normal proteins making impossible a reliable densitometric estimation. Hevylite™ might become an important assay in the biological exploration of gammopathies.

  3. Is there IgA of gut mucosal origin in the serum of HIV1 infected patients?

    PubMed Central

    Quesnel, A; Moja, P; Lucht, F; Touraine, J L; Pozzetto, B; Genin, C

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed in 77 HIV1 seropositive adult patients to characterise the IgA hyperglobulinaemia seen in the serum during the course of HIV infection. It was shown that both IgA1 and IgA2 subclass concentrations were simultaneously increased but the IgA1 increase was predominant. Secretory IgA (SIgA) concentration was significantly increased and IgA activity to gliadin, bovine serum albumin, and casein could be detected and was correlated with SIgA concentration. In contrast, IgA activity to cytomegalovirus and to tetanus toxoid did not correlate with total IgA concentration. These data suggest the presence of IgA from gut mucosal origin in the serum of these patients. Hyper IgA was inversely correlated with the CD4+ cell number. The increase of all parameters studied varied according to the total IgA concentration in the serum but was also directly related to the stage of immune deficiency in patients with hyper IgA. PMID:7517378

  4. The role of B cells and autoantibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Stock, Ariel D; Chalmers, Samantha A; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-09-01

    The central nervous system manifestations of SLE (neuropsychiatric lupus, NPSLE) occur frequently, though are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Symptoms of NPSLE can be quite diverse, including chronic cognitive and emotional manifestations, as well as acute presentations, such as stroke and seizures. Although the pathogenesis of NPSLE has yet to be well characterized, B-cell mediated damage is believed to be an important contributor. B-cells and autoantibodies may traverse the blood brain barrier promoting an inflammatory environment consisting of glia activation, neurodegeneration, and consequent averse behavioral outcomes. This review will evaluate the various suggested roles of B-cells and autoantibodies in NPSLE, as well as therapeutic modalities targeting these pathogenic mediators.

  5. Distinctive autoantibody profile in Mexican Mestizo systemic sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S; Hinojosa-Azaola, Andrea; Martinez-Reyes, Cynthia; Nuñez-Alvarez, Carlos A; Torrico-Lavayen, Rocío; García-Hernández, José Luis; Cabiedes-Contreras, Javier

    2011-11-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) shows variable clinical expression among different ethnic groups. Herein, we describe the clinical features, prevalence of organ involvement, and autoantibody profile in Mexican Mestizo SSc patients and we compare them with patients from other ethnic groups.We included 139 SSc patients. They underwent clinical evaluation and were tested for antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anticentromere antibodies (ACA), anti-topoisomerase I, anti-RNA polymerase III, anti-U1 RNP, anti-U3 RNP, anti-U11/U12 RNP, anti-Th/To, anti-PM-Scl, anti-Ku, antinucleosome, anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), anti-Sm, anti-SSA, and anti-SSB antibodies. Female predominance (93.5%) was noted; 56.8% of patients had limited cutaneous SSc; 91% had peripheral vascular involvement; 70% had joint involvement; 27% had musculoskeletal damage; 66% had gastrointestinal involvement; 41% had interstitial lung disease; 32% had pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); 11% had cardiac involvement; and in 1.4% renal involvement was observed. Our patients showed lower frequency of renal crisis and higher frequency of PAH than patients from other ethnic groups; also they showed higher frequency of ACA than Japanese and African American patients, higher frequency of anti-topoisomerase I than Caucasian and African American patients, higher frequency of anti-PM-Scl and anti-Ku and lower frequency of anti-RNA Pol III than the other ethnic groups. High frequencies of antinucleosome (41%) and anti-dsDNA (63%) were identified. SSc-specific autoantibody frequencies are different in our patients and in those from other ethnic groups; associations of autoantibodies with clinical manifestations are confirmed in our patients. Ethnicity and the interaction of gene and environmental factors may influence the clinical picture and autoantibody profile in SSc patients.

  6. Autoantibody formation after alloimmunization inducing bystander immune hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Mota, M; Bley, C; Aravechia, M G; Hamerschlak, N; Sakashita, A; Kutner, J M; Castiho, L

    2009-01-01

    The development of RBC autoantibodies resulting from or associated with allogeneic blood transfusions is not an easily determined complication of RBC transfusions. This report discusses one patient who developed RBC autoantibodies in association with an allogeneic blood transfusion and alloimmunization leading to a temporary bystander immune hemolysis. A 72-year-old woman was hospitalized as a result of severe anemia and received two units of ABO- and D-compatible RBCs. She had a history of two pregnancies 40 years before, but no history of RBC transfusion, and her antibody screen was negative. On the tenth day after transfusion her hemoglobin dropped, and alloanti-c was identified in her serum and eluate. At this time she received another two units of compatible blood according to her phenotype (group O, R1R1, K:-1). After 48 hours, she developed joint pain, pyrexia, and hemoglobinuria, and her Hb dropped from 9.2 g/dL to 5.3 g/ dL. The direct antiglobulin test was positive, an IgG autoantibody was present in the eluate, and the antibody investigation revealed the presence of anti-Jk(b) in addition to the previously identified alloanti-c. Her genotype was determined, and, based on the findings, two additional units were selected, found to be compatible, and transfused without incident. Transfusions were discontinued, and she was treated with IVIG and corticosteroids. Her Hb increased to 9.7 g/dL, and the patient made an uneventful recovery. It was concluded that transfusion of incompatible RBCs induced the formation of an autoantibody in this patient, resulting in lysis of bystander RBCs. The need for additional blood transfusion was successfully avoided by treatment with IVIG, steroid therapy, and rituximab.

  7. [Progress of Autoantibody Examinations for Connective Tissue Diseases].

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kengo; Saegusa, Jun; Morinobu, Akio

    2015-05-01

    Connective tissue diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that can affect multiple organs and, thus, have a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. Various autoantibodies are detected in patients with connective tissue diseases, represented by anti-nuclear antibody for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), Sjögren's syndrome, and mixed connective tissue disease. Assessment of the autoantibody profile is fundamental for the clinical management of patients with connective tissue diseases, providing important data for the diagnosis, clinical characterization, and disease activity evaluation. Anti-ribosomal P antibody and anti-NMDA receptor antibody are associated with neuropsychiatric SLE. Anti-synthetase syndrome comprises the association of myositis (PM/DM), interstitial lung disease, fever, Raynaud's phenomenon, mechanic's hands, and anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibodies. Anti-MDA5 antibody is detected in patients with clinically amyopathic DM, often complicated by rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. Between 50 and 75% of malignancy-associated DM patients are positive for anti-TIF1-γ antibody. Anti-RNA polymerase III antibody is associated with diffuse cutaneous SSc and renal crisis. This review focuses on the importance and usefulness of these autoantibodies for the diagnosis and management of patients with connective tissue diseases in clinical practice.

  8. Interference of Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies with neutrophil Proteinase 3 activity.

    PubMed

    van de Wiel, B A; Dolman, K M; van der Meer-Gerritsen, C H; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-12-01

    Classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCA) are disease-specific markers of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The possible pathogenetic role of these autoantibodies, which are directed against Proteinase 3 (PR3), is not yet clear. We studied the effect of C-ANCA on PR3 proteolytic activity and on the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). C-ANCA IgG from eight patients with active WG significantly inhibited PR3 proteolytic activity, particularly towards elastin (median 84.2% inhibition). C-ANCA IgG significantly inhibited the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1AT (median 58.8% inhibition). Moreover, addition of purified PR3 to C-ANCA-positive sera from WG patients yielded less complexes with alpha 1AT (median 44.8%) compared with sera containing perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) or ANCA-negative sera. These findings indicate the existence of a hitherto unknown property of C-ANCA, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of WG.

  9. Implications of a Vasodilatory Human Monoclonal Autoantibody in Postural Hypotension*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Zuccolo, Jonathan; Kem, David C.; Zillner, Caitlin; Lee, Jiyeon; Smith, Kenneth; James, Judith A.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Yu, Xichun

    2013-01-01

    Functional autoantibodies to the autonomic receptors are increasingly recognized in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. To date, no human activating monoclonal autoantibodies to these receptors have been available. In this study, we describe for the first time a β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR)-activating monoclonal autoantibody (C5F2) produced from the lymphocytes of a patient with idiopathic postural hypotension. C5F2, an IgG3 isotype, recognizes an epitope in the N terminus of the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of β2AR. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed high binding affinity for the β2AR ECL2 peptide. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence demonstrated specific binding to β2AR in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, CHO cells expressing human β2AR, and rat aorta. C5F2 stimulated cyclic AMP production in β2AR-transfected CHO cells and induced potent dilation of isolated rat cremaster arterioles, both of which were specifically blocked by the β2AR-selective antagonist ICI-118551 and by the β2AR ECL2 peptide. This monoclonal antibody demonstrated sufficient activity to produce postural hypotension in its host. Its availability provides a unique opportunity to identify previously unrecognized causes and new pharmacological management of postural hypotension and other cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24043632

  10. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  11. Production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early-developing B cells in a mouse model of SLE.

    PubMed

    Umiker, Benjamin R; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG antinuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG antinucleic acid Abs. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicda(tg) ), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here, we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early-developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early-developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation, contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early-developing B cells.

  12. CD4-positive cells from patients with IgA nephropathy demonstrate increased mRNA of cytokines that induce the IgA switch and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lai, K N; Ho, R T; Leung, J C; Chui, Y L; Lim, P L; Lui, S F; Li, P K

    1994-09-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by raised serum IgA1 and mesangial IgA1 deposits. We have previously shown increased T-cell activation in IgAN. Recently, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) has been shown to induce IgA isotype switch at a clonal level and interleukin 5 (IL5) promotes differentiation into IgA-bearing B cells. In the present study we have examined the TGF-beta and IL5 mRNA expression by mitogen-activated CD4-positive T cells from patients with IgAN (n = 25), patients with other primary nephritides (CGN) (n = 24), and healthy control subjects (n = 25). The cytokine genes were analysed by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and were semi-quantitated by normalizing the differences occurring during RT and PCR using a housekeeping gene, beta-actin. CD4-positive T cells from IgA nephritic patients expressed a higher level of IL5 mRNA than healthy controls (P < 0.01) and patients with CGN (P < 0.005). CD4-positive T cells from IgA nephritic patients expressed a higher level of TGF-beta mRNA than healthy controls (P < 0.01) but no difference was demonstrated on comparison with CGN patients. Elevated TGF-beta mRNA expression in patients with CGN probably reflects its other important function as a 'sclerogenic' factor involved in the glomerulosclerosis found in these nephritides. Our data suggest that there is increased expression of cytokine genes which induce the IgA isotype switch and differentiation; these immunological abnormalities may be important in the pathogenesis of IgAN.

  13. Disseminated Talaromyces marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus in a Patient With Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pruetpongpun, Nattapol; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Damronglerd, Pansachee; Suthiwartnarueput, Worapop; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rujanavej, Sasinuch; Suwantarat, Nuntra

    2016-01-01

    Anti-interferon (IFN)-γ autoantibodies are increasingly recognized as a cause of adult-onset immunodeficiency and increased risk for infections with intracellular pathogens. We report on disseminated Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus infection in a 72-year-old, human immunodeficiency virus noninfected, Thai man with anti-IFN-γ autoantibody. The patient was successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy and rituximab to control B cell-derived autoantibodies. PMID:27419165

  14. Re-thinking the functions of IgA+ plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gommerman, Jennifer L; Rojas, Olga L; Fritz, Jörg H

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa harbors the largest population of antibody (Ab)-secreting plasma cells (PC) in the human body, producing daily several grams of immunoglobulin A (IgA). IgA has many functions, serving as a first-line barrier that protects the mucosal epithelium from pathogens, toxins and food antigens (Ag), shaping the intestinal microbiota, and regulating host–commensal homeostasis. Signals induced by commensal colonization are central for regulating IgA induction, maintenance, positioning and function and the number of IgA+ PC is dramatically reduced in neonates and germ-free (GF) animals. Recent evidence demonstrates that the innate immune effector molecules tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are required for IgA+ PC homeostasis during the steady state and infection. Moreover, new functions ascribed to PC independent of Ab secretion continue to emerge, suggesting that PC, including IgA+ PC, should be re-examined in the context of inflammation and infection. Here, we outline mechanisms of IgA+ PC generation and survival, reviewing their functions in health and disease. PMID:25483334

  15. Re-thinking the functions of IgA(+) plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Gommerman, Jennifer L; Rojas, Olga L; Fritz, Jörg H

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa harbors the largest population of antibody (Ab)-secreting plasma cells (PC) in the human body, producing daily several grams of immunoglobulin A (IgA). IgA has many functions, serving as a first-line barrier that protects the mucosal epithelium from pathogens, toxins and food antigens (Ag), shaping the intestinal microbiota, and regulating host-commensal homeostasis. Signals induced by commensal colonization are central for regulating IgA induction, maintenance, positioning and function and the number of IgA(+) PC is dramatically reduced in neonates and germ-free (GF) animals. Recent evidence demonstrates that the innate immune effector molecules tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are required for IgA(+) PC homeostasis during the steady state and infection. Moreover, new functions ascribed to PC independent of Ab secretion continue to emerge, suggesting that PC, including IgA(+) PC, should be re-examined in the context of inflammation and infection. Here, we outline mechanisms of IgA(+) PC generation and survival, reviewing their functions in health and disease.

  16. Infant gut immunity: a preliminary study of IgA associations with breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, S L; Konya, T; Azad, M B; Sears, M R; Becker, A B; Turvey, S E; Mandhane, P J; Subbarao, P; Scott, J A; Field, C J; Kozyrskyj, A L

    2016-02-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) plays a critical role in gut mucosal immune defense. Initially provided by breastmilk, IgA production by the infant gut is gradually stimulated by developing gut microbiota. This study reports associations between infant fecal IgA concentrations 4 months after birth, breastfeeding status and other pre/postnatal exposures in 47 infants in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development cohort. Breastfed infants and first-born infants had higher median fecal IgA concentrations (23.11 v. 9.34 µg/g protein, P<0.01 and 22.19 v. 8.23 µg/g protein, P=0.04). IgA levels increased successively with exclusivity of breastfeeding (β-coefficient, 0.37, P<0.05). This statistical association was independent of maternal parity and household pets. In the absence of breastfeeding, female sex and pet exposure elevated fecal IgA to levels found in breastfed infants. In addition to breastfeeding, infant fecal IgA associations with pre/postnatal exposures may affect gut immunity and risk of allergic disease.

  17. Anti-actin IgA antibodies in severe coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Granito, A; Muratori, P; Cassani, F; Pappas, G; Muratori, L; Agostinelli, D; Veronesi, L; Bortolotti, R; Petrolini, N; Bianchi, F B; Volta, U

    2004-01-01

    Anti-actin IgA antibodies have been found in sera of coeliacs. Our aim was to define the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-actin IgA in coeliacs before and after gluten withdrawal. One hundred and two biopsy-proven coeliacs, 95 disease controls and 50 blood donors were studied. Anti-actin IgA were evaluated by different methods: (a) antimicrofilament positivity on HEp-2 cells and on cultured fibroblasts by immunofluorescence; (b) anti-actin positivity by enzyme-linked immuosorbent assay (ELISA); and (c) presence of the tubular/glomerular pattern of anti-smooth muscle antibodies on rat kidney sections by immunofluorescence. Antimicrofilament IgA were present in 27% of coeliacs and in none of the controls. Antimicrofilament antibodies were found in 25 of 54 (46%) coeliacs with severe villous atrophy and in three of 48 (6%) with mild damage (P < 0·0001). In the 20 patients tested, antimicrofilaments IgA disappeared after gluten withdrawal in accordance with histological recovery. Our study shows a significant correlation between antimicrofilament IgA and the severity of intestinal damage in untreated coeliacs. The disappearance of antimicrofilament IgA after gluten withdrawal predicts the normalization of intestinal mucosa and could be considered a useful tool in the follow-up of severe coeliac disease. PMID:15270857

  18. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J.; Julian, Bruce A.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan–binding lectin–associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome–wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H–related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1–containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  19. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J; Julian, Bruce A; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Novak, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome-wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H-related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1-containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease.

  20. Immunogenetic risk and protective factors for the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: distinct HLA-A, -B, -Cw, -DRB1, and -DQA1 allelic profiles distinguish European American patients with different myositis autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlon, Terrance P; Carrick, Danielle Mercatante; Targoff, Ira N; Arnett, Frank C; Reveille, John D; Carrington, Mary; Gao, Xiaojiang; Oddis, Chester V; Morel, Penelope A; Malley, James D; Malley, Karen; Shamim, Ejaz A; Rider, Lisa G; Chanock, Stephen J; Foster, Charles B; Bunch, Thomas; Blackshear, Perry J; Plotz, Paul H; Love, Lori A; Miller, Frederick W

    2006-03-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) are systemic connective tissue diseases defined by chronic muscle inflammation and weakness associated with autoimmunity. We have performed low to high resolution molecular typing to assess the genetic variability of major histocompatibility complex loci (HLA-A, -B, -Cw, -DRB1, and -DQA1) in a large population of European American patients with IIM (n = 571) representing the major myositis autoantibody groups. We established that alleles of the 8.1 ancestral haplotype (8.1 AH) are important risk factors for the development of IIM in patients producing anti-synthetase/anti-Jo-1, -La, -PM/Scl, and -Ro autoantibodies. Moreover, a random forests classification analysis suggested that 8.1 AH-associated alleles B*0801 and DRB1*0301 are the principal HLA risk markers. In addition, we have identified several novel HLA susceptibility factors associated distinctively with particular myositis-specific (MSA) and myositis-associated autoantibody (MAA) groups of the IIM. IIM patients with anti-PL-7 (anti-threonyl-tRNA synthetase) autoantibodies have a unique HLA Class I risk allele, Cw*0304 (pcorr = 0.046), and lack the 8.1 AH markers associated with other anti-synthetase autoantibodies (for example, anti-Jo-1 and anti-PL-12). In addition, HLA-B*5001 and DQA1*0104 are novel potential risk factors among anti-signal recognition particle autoantibody-positive IIM patients (pcorr = 0.024 and p = 0.010, respectively). Among those patients with MAA, HLA DRB1*11 and DQA1*06 alleles were identified as risk factors for myositis patients with anti-Ku (pcorr = 0.041) and anti-La (pcorr = 0.023) autoantibodies, respectively. Amino acid sequence analysis of the HLA DRB1 third hypervariable region identified a consensus motif, 70D (hydrophilic)/71R (basic)/74A (hydrophobic), conferring protection among patients producing anti-synthetase/anti-Jo-1 and -PM/Scl autoantibodies. Together, these data demonstrate that HLA signatures, comprising both risk

  1. Heterogeneity of autoantibodies in 100 patients with autoimmune myositis: insights into clinical features and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Martial; Fritzler, Marvin J; Targoff, Ira N; Troyanov, Yves; Senécal, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, mutual associations, clinical manifestations, and diagnoses associated with serum autoantibodies, as detected using recently available immunoassays, in patients with autoimmune myositis (AIM). Sera and clinical data were collected from 100 patients with AIM followed longitudinally. Sera were screened cross-sectionally for 21 autoantibodies by multiplex addressable laser bead immunoassay, line blot immunoassay, immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated recombinant protein, protein A assisted immunoprecipitation, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Diagnoses were determined using the Bohan and Peter classification as well as recently proposed classifications. Relationships between autoantibodies and clinical manifestations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. One or more autoantibodies encompassing 19 specificities were present in 80% of the patients. The most common autoantibodies were anti-Ro52 (30% of patients), anti-Ku (23%), anti-synthetases (22%), anti-U1RNP (15%), and anti-fibrillarin (14%). In the presence of autoantibodies to Ku, synthetases, U1RNP, fibrillarin, PM-Scl, or scleroderma autoantigens, at least one more autoantibody was detected in the majority of sera and at least two more autoantibodies in over one-third of sera. The largest number of concurrent autoantibodies was six autoantibodies. Overall, 44 distinct combinations of autoantibodies were counted. Most autoantibodies were unrestricted to any AIM diagnostic category. Distinct clinical syndromes and therapeutic responses were associated with anti-Jo-1, anti-fibrillarin, anti-U1RNP, anti-Ro, anti-Ro52, and autoantibodies to scleroderma autoantigens. We conclude that a significant proportion of AIM patients are characterized by complex associations of autoantibodies. Certain myositis autoantibodies are markers for distinct overlap syndromes and predict therapeutic outcomes. The ultimate clinical features, disease course

  2. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies are associated with opportunistic infection in patients with thymic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Burbelo, Peter D.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Zaman, Rifat; Kristosturyan, Ervand; Rajan, Arun; Ding, Li; Ching, Kathryn H.; Berman, Arlene; Oliveira, Joao B.; Hsu, Amy P.; Klimavicz, Caitlin M.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Holland, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with thymic malignancy have high rates of autoimmunity leading to a variety of autoimmune diseases, most commonly myasthenia gravis caused by anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies. High rates of autoantibodies to cytokines have also been described, although prevalence, spectrum, and functionality of these anti-cytokine autoantibodies are poorly defined. To better understand the presence and function of anti-cytokine autoantibodies, we created a luciferase immunoprecipitation system panel to search for autoantibodies against 39 different cytokines and examined plasma from controls (n = 30) and patients with thymic neoplasia (n = 17). In this screen, our patients showed statistically elevated, but highly heterogeneous immunoreactivity against 16 of the 39 cytokines. Some patients showed autoantibodies to multiple cytokines. Functional testing proved that autoantibodies directed against interferon-α, interferon-β, interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-12p35, IL-12p40, and IL-17A had biologic blocking activity in vitro. All patients with opportunistic infection showed multiple anti-cytokine autoantibodies (range 3-11), suggesting that anti-cytokine autoantibodies may be important in the pathogenesis of opportunistic infections in patients with thymic malignancy. This study was registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00001355. PMID:20716769

  3. A systematic review of serum autoantibodies as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Dumstrei, Karin; Chen, Hongda; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the western world. Patients with pancreatic cancer have poor prognosis, partly due to difficulties in detecting it at early stages. While different markers have been associated with pancreatic cancer, many of them show suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Serum autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens have recently emerged as early stage biomarkers for different types of cancers. Given the urgent need for early and reliable biomarkers for pancreatic cancer, we undertook a systematic review of the published literature to identify primary articles that evaluated serum autoantibodies in pancreatic cancer detection by searching PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge. Two reviewers extracted data on study characteristics and results independently. Overall, 31 studies evaluating 124 individual serum autoantibodies in pancreatic cancer detection met the inclusion criteria. In general, single autoantibody markers showed relatively low sensitivities at high specificity. A combination of markers, either multiple serum autoantibodies or serum autoantibodies combined with tumor-associated markers, led to a better diagnostic performance. However, most of the analyzed autoantibodies have only been reported in single studies and therefore need to be independently validated. We conclude that serum autoantibodies might present an option as biomarkers for early detection of pancreatic cancer, but more work is needed to identify and validate autoantibody signatures that are associated with early stage pancreatic cancer. PMID:26840568

  4. Heterogeneity of autoantibodies in 100 patients with autoimmune myositis: insights into clinical features and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Martial; Fritzler, Marvin J; Targoff, Ira N; Troyanov, Yves; Senécal, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, mutual associations, clinical manifestations, and diagnoses associated with serum autoantibodies, as detected using recently available immunoassays, in patients with autoimmune myositis (AIM). Sera and clinical data were collected from 100 patients with AIM followed longitudinally. Sera were screened cross-sectionally for 21 autoantibodies by multiplex addressable laser bead immunoassay, line blot immunoassay, immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated recombinant protein, protein A assisted immunoprecipitation, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Diagnoses were determined using the Bohan and Peter classification as well as recently proposed classifications. Relationships between autoantibodies and clinical manifestations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. One or more autoantibodies encompassing 19 specificities were present in 80% of the patients. The most common autoantibodies were anti-Ro52 (30% of patients), anti-Ku (23%), anti-synthetases (22%), anti-U1RNP (15%), and anti-fibrillarin (14%). In the presence of autoantibodies to Ku, synthetases, U1RNP, fibrillarin, PM-Scl, or scleroderma autoantigens, at least one more autoantibody was detected in the majority of sera and at least two more autoantibodies in over one-third of sera. The largest number of concurrent autoantibodies was six autoantibodies. Overall, 44 distinct combinations of autoantibodies were counted. Most autoantibodies were unrestricted to any AIM diagnostic category. Distinct clinical syndromes and therapeutic responses were associated with anti-Jo-1, anti-fibrillarin, anti-U1RNP, anti-Ro, anti-Ro52, and autoantibodies to scleroderma autoantigens. We conclude that a significant proportion of AIM patients are characterized by complex associations of autoantibodies. Certain myositis autoantibodies are markers for distinct overlap syndromes and predict therapeutic outcomes. The ultimate clinical features, disease course

  5. Purification and functional characterization of mucosal IgA from vaccinated and SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Musich, Thomas; Demberg, Thorsten; Morgan, Ian L; Estes, Jacob D; Franchini, Genoveffa; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2015-06-01

    Vaccine-induced mucosal antibodies are often evaluated using small volumes of secretory fluids. However, fecal matter containing mucosal IgA is abundant. We purified fecal IgA from five SIV-vaccinated and five SIV-infected rhesus macaques by sequential affinity chromatography. The purified IgA was dimeric by native PAGE, contained secretory component, and was analogous to IgA in colostrum and vaginal fluid by western blot. IgA from one infected and four vaccinated animals neutralized H9-derived SIV(mac)251 with IC(50)s as low as 1 μg/mL. Purified IgAs inhibited transcytosis and exhibited phagocytic activity, the latter significantly correlated with SIV(mac)251 Env-specific IgA in the purified samples. Among different affinity resins, peptide M was optimal compared to jacalin, anti-monkey IgA and SSL7 for IgA purification, as confirmed using tandem peptide M/anti-monkey IgA columns. Fecal IgA provided material sufficient for several assays relevant to protective efficacy, and was shown to be multifunctional. Our approach is potentially applicable to human clinical studies.

  6. [IgA Nephropathy. Facts, uncertainties, and potential causal therapy approaches].

    PubMed

    Matoušovic, Karel; Městecký, Jiří; Vondrák, Karel; Dušek, Jiří; Chvátalová, Eliška; Háček, Jaromír; Horynová, Milada; Kašperová, Alena; Rossmann, Pavel; Šterzl, Ivan; Raška, Milan

    2015-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is currently the most frequently investigated glomerulonephritis. The disease is defined by the presence of dominant or co-dominant deposits of IgA1 in the glomerular mesangium. Circulating immune complexes are most likely the source of the deposited IgA1. However, it is also possible that the aggregates of structurally altered IgA1 or enhanced binding to IgA receptors expressed on mesangial cells lead to deposition. The cause of the formation of immune complexes responsible for IgA nephropathy lies in the incomplete O-linked oligosaccharide side chains, which, due to the deficiency of corresponding glycosyltransferases, lack terminal galactose residues leading to the exposure of N-acetylgalactosamine. Naturally occurring antibodies of the IgG or IgA1 isotype bind to this sugar antigen. In the clinical course, we differentiate between the early stage usually characterized by hematuria, and a variable late stage characterized either by a clinical remission, by persistence of hematuria, or by increasing proteinuria and blood pressure and decreasing renal function in one third of the patients. In the early stage, it is difficult to predict the prognosis of IgA nephropathy, either on the basis of clinical presentation and morphological findings, or according to the level of galactose-deficient IgA1 in the circulation. The reliable criteria of serious prognosis emerge only in the later stages of the disease and include proteinuria, hypertension, and histologically apparent tubular atrophy and interstitial sclerosis. The dominant trend in the treatment of IgA nephropathy is the emphasis on administration of ACE inhibitors/sartans, which are introduced into the treatment at the time of microalbuminuria. If proteinuria does not decrease below 1 g/24 h, treatment with prednisone is justifiable. New findings concerning the molecular/cellular mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy suggest the possible therapeutical interference with the

  7. Characterization of jacalin, the human IgA and IgD binding lectin from jackfruit.

    PubMed

    Aucouturier, P; Mihaesco, E; Mihaesco, C; Preud'homme, J L

    1987-05-01

    The lectin jacalin from the jackfruit Artocarpus heterophyllus reacts by precipitation and western blotting with human IgA1 and IgD but not with IgA2 (nor IgG and IgM). However, it weakly binds IgA2 as shown by affinity chromatography and competitive ELISA. Predominantly reactive carbohydrates are D-galactose and N-acetyl D-galactosamine. Jacalin has an apparent Mr of about 54,000 and is probably made up of three non-glycosylated and one glycosylated non-covalently linked subunits. Its electrophoretic properties and amino acid and carbohydrate composition are indicated.

  8. [Disseminated tuberculosis revealing IgA nephropathy with nephrotic syndrome : A case report].

    PubMed

    Morbieu, Caroline; Michel, Pierre-Antoine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Canestri, Ana; Boffa, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-01

    A 27-year-old man without any medical history presented concomitantly a pulmonary and urinary tuberculosis and a nephrotic syndrome with hematuria and renal failure. The renal biopsy showed increased mesangial matrix, few focal segmental lesions, and IgA deposits confirming the diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Nephrotic syndrome remission occurred quickly after antituberculous treatment. The association between tuberculosis and IgA nephropathy has been previously reported in 9 patients. Renal outcome was always favorable with antituberculous treatment. No relapse occurred, with a maximal follow-up of 42 months. Here, we discuss this singular association and previous similar cases.

  9. Vibration Induces BAFF Overexpression and Aberrant O-Glycosylation of IgA1 in Cultured Human Tonsillar Mononuclear Cells in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Muyao; Liu, Chan; Yan, Wenzhe; Peng, Xiaofei; He, Liyu; Liu, Hong; Liu, Fuyou

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of in vitro vibratory stimulation of human tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMCs). Methods. Fourteen IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients with chronic tonsillitis (CT) and 12 CT patients with no renal pathology were enrolled. Group A TMCs were collected after 24 hours of culture and used to determine baseline levels. TMCs in groups B, C, D, E, and F were exposed to vibratory stimulation (60 Hz) for 0 (as the control group), 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively. Results. Baseline concentrations of B-cell-activation factor (BAFF) and IgA1, BAFF mRNA expression, and aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 level were higher in the IgAN group as compared to that in the CT group, and all increased after vibratory stimulation. Baseline mRNA expressions of core β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and core β1,3GalT-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) were lower in the IgAN group; the levels decreased further after vibratory stimulation. Conclusion. In patients with IgAN, vibratory stimulation of TMCs appears to induce IgA1 secretion through activation of BAFF release and to aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 by suppressing C1GALT1 and Cosmc expression. In vitro vibratory stimulation of human TMCs mimics the vibratory simulation of palatine tonsils produced by vocal cords during phonation.

  10. Vibration Induces BAFF Overexpression and Aberrant O-Glycosylation of IgA1 in Cultured Human Tonsillar Mononuclear Cells in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Muyao; Liu, Chan; Yan, Wenzhe; Peng, Xiaofei; He, Liyu; Liu, Hong; Liu, Fuyou

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of in vitro vibratory stimulation of human tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMCs). Methods. Fourteen IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients with chronic tonsillitis (CT) and 12 CT patients with no renal pathology were enrolled. Group A TMCs were collected after 24 hours of culture and used to determine baseline levels. TMCs in groups B, C, D, E, and F were exposed to vibratory stimulation (60 Hz) for 0 (as the control group), 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively. Results. Baseline concentrations of B-cell-activation factor (BAFF) and IgA1, BAFF mRNA expression, and aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 level were higher in the IgAN group as compared to that in the CT group, and all increased after vibratory stimulation. Baseline mRNA expressions of core β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and core β1,3GalT-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) were lower in the IgAN group; the levels decreased further after vibratory stimulation. Conclusion. In patients with IgAN, vibratory stimulation of TMCs appears to induce IgA1 secretion through activation of BAFF release and to aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 by suppressing C1GALT1 and Cosmc expression. In vitro vibratory stimulation of human TMCs mimics the vibratory simulation of palatine tonsils produced by vocal cords during phonation. PMID:27672662

  11. Isolated Lymphoid Follicles are Dynamic Reservoirs for the Induction of Intestinal IgA

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, Kathryn A.; Newberry, Rodney D.

    2012-01-01

    IgA is one of the most important molecules in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis. Peyer’s patches have been traditionally recognized as sites for the induction of intestinal IgA responses, however more recent studies demonstrate that isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs) can perform this function as well. ILF development is dynamic, changing in response to the luminal microbial burden, suggesting that ILFs play an important role providing an expandable reservoir of compensatory IgA inductive sites. However, in situations of immune dysfunction, ILFs can over-develop in response to uncontrollable enteric flora, resulting in ILF hyperplasia. The ability of ILFs to expand and respond to help control the enteric flora makes this dynamic reservoir an important arm of IgA inductive sites in intestinal immunity. PMID:22566964

  12. Comparison of Salivary IgA Secretion Rate Collected by the Aspiration Method and Swab Method

    PubMed Central

    HAMURO, Koji; KOTANI, Yoshifumi; TOBA, Masamichi; KAKUMOTO, Keiji; KOHDA, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) is used as an immunity marker, as saliva can be easily collected, noninvasively with little stress. However, several saliva collection methods can be used. Our comparison between samples collected using different methods demonstrated that the salivary IgA secretion rate in samples collected using an aspiration method was significantly correlated with that in samples collected using a swab method. Moreover, the significant circadian variation in salivary IgA secretion rate in the aspirated saliva suggested that the aspiration method does not suppress salivary IgA secretion rate variability compared with the swab method. Therefore, the aspiration method should be considered as the preferable saliva collection method. PMID:24936369

  13. A rapid screening test for detection of IgA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg, B J; Plapp, F V; Rachel, J M

    1991-09-01

    A solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assay has been developed to screen blood donors for IgA deficiency, and 6117 donor sera have been screened by this method. Eighteen sera were found to be IgA deficient, which represents a frequency of 1 in 340. Seventeen of these sera were retested by passive hemagglutination inhibition, which has a sensitivity of approximately 0.1 mg per dL. Eight sera were confirmed as IgA deficient, and nine were found to contain low levels of IgA (less than 1 mg/dL). The approximate sensitivity of the SPRCA assay is 1 mg per dL. The speed, simplicity, and sensitivity of this assay make it a good alternative to conventional methods of screening.

  14. Four-layer enzyme immunoassay (EIA) detection of differences in IgG, IgM and IgA antibody response to Aujeszky's disease virus in infected and vaccinated pigs.

    PubMed

    Rodák, L; Smíd, B; Valícek, L; Jurák, E

    1987-02-01

    The use of the four-layer enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies against Aujeszky's disease virus in blood and oropharyngeal swabs of infected and vaccinated pigs is described. Mean antibody titres obtained using the four-layer EIA were 6.1 and 3829 times higher compared with the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and virus neutralization (VN) test, respectively. The VN test detected mainly IgG antibodies, while the IgM antibodies did not react. Using the EIA, the first antiviral antibodies in sera were demonstrated on Days 5-7 after infection or vaccination. Up to the 7th day, demonstrable antibodies were almost exclusively of the IgM class. In infected pigs high titres of IgM antibodies were still detected on Day 18, while in vaccinated animals they were absent by this time. Antibodies of the IgG class appeared in infected pigs sooner (Day 7) than in vaccinated pigs (Day 10) and reached higher mean titres. Antibodies of the IgA class were demonstrable from Day 10 only in samples from infected pigs. Similar antibody dynamics and distribution were detected in oropharyngeal swabs, except that the IgG and IgM titres were roughly 100 times lower than in sera. However, titres of IgA antibodies in oropharyngeal swabs were two times higher than in sera. The greatest differences between both groups of animals were recorded on Day 18; in the infected pigs, IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies were present in sera and oropharyngeal swabs at that time, while in vaccinated pigs only IgG antibodies were demonstrable. The effect of infection and vaccination on the pattern of the immune response as well as the importance of the detection of individual immunoglobulin classes for the specificity of the enzyme immunoassay are discussed.

  15. Specificity of human anti-variable heavy (VH ) chain autoantibodies and impact on the design and clinical testing of a VH domain antibody antagonist of tumour necrosis factor-α receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Cordy, J C; Morley, P J; Wright, T J; Birchler, M A; Lewis, A P; Emmins, R; Chen, Y Z; Powley, W M; Bareille, P J; Wilson, R; Tonkyn, J; Bayliffe, A I; Lazaar, A L

    2015-11-01

    During clinical trials of a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-R1 domain antibody (dAb™) antagonist (GSK1995057), infusion reactions consistent with cytokine release were observed in healthy subjects with high levels of a novel, pre-existing human anti-VH (HAVH) autoantibody. In the presence of HAVH autoantibodies, GSK1995057 induced cytokine release in vitro due to binding of HAVH autoantibodies to a framework region of the dAb. The epitope on GSK1995057 was characterized and dAbs with reduced binding to HAVH autoantibodies were generated; pharmacological comparability was determined in human in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal experiments. A Phase I clinical trial was conducted to investigate the safety and tolerability of the modified dAb (GSK2862277). A significant reduction in HAVH binding was achieved by adding a single alanine residue at the C-terminus to create GSK2862277. Screening a pool of healthy donors demonstrated a reduced frequency of pre-existing autoantibodies from 51% to 7%; in all other respects, GSK2862277 and the parent dAb were comparable. In the Phase I trial, GSK2862277 was well tolerated by both the inhaled and intravenous routes. One subject experienced a mild infusion reaction with cytokine release following intravenous dosing. Subsequently, this subject was found to have high levels of a novel pre-existing antibody specific to the extended C-terminus of GSK2862277. Despite the reduced binding of GSK2862277 to pre-existing HAVH autoantibodies, adverse effects associated with the presence of a novel pre-existing antibody response specific to the modified dAb framework were identified and highlight the challenge of developing biological antagonists to this class of receptor.

  16. T cell cytokine polarity as a determinant of immunoglobulin A (IgA) glycosylation and the severity of experimental IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chintalacharuvu, S R; Yamashita, M; Bagheri, N; Blanchard, T G; Nedrud, J G; Lamm, M E; Tomino, Y; Emancipator, S N

    2008-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) glycosylation, recognized as an important pathogenic factor in IgA nephropathy (IgAN), is apparently controlled by the polarity of T helper (Th) cytokine responses. To examine the role of cytokine polarity in IgAN, inbred mice were immunized by intraperitoneal priming with inactivated Sendai virus (SeV) emulsified in either complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), which promote Th1- or Th2-immune response, respectively, and then boosted identically twice orally with aqueous suspensions of inactivated virus. Next, some mice were challenged intranasally with infectious SeV. Mice primed with CFA or IFA had equal reductions in nasal viral titre relative to non-immune controls, and equally increased serum levels of SeV-specific IgA antibody. Mice primed with CFA showed higher SeV-specific IgG than those with IFA. Splenocytes from mice primed with IFA produced copious amounts of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5, but little interferon-γ and IL-2; those primed with CFA had reciprocal cytokine recall responses. Total serum IgA and especially SeV-specific IgA from mice primed with IFA showed a selective defect in sialylation and galactosylation. Although the frequency and intensity of glomerular deposits and haematuria did not differ, glomerulonephritis in mice primed with IFA and challenged with infectious virus was more severe than in those given CFA, as judged by serum creatinine level. We conclude that the polarity of T cell cytokines controls the pattern of IgA glycosylation and exerts direct or indirect effects on functional glomerular responses to immune complex deposition. PMID:18637102

  17. Salivary IgA versus HIV and Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Malay; Acharya, Sonu; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Mohanty, Susant; Saha, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The inter-relationship of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and dental caries as well as Salivary Immunoglobulin-A (S-IgA) level appear to remain under explored while a manual and electronic search of the literature was made. Hence, the present study was undertaken to assess the relationship of S-IgA and dental caries status in HIV positive children. Aim The aim of this study was to find out the relationship of S-IgA antibody with dental caries by measuring the concentration of IgA in saliva of HIV positive and negative children and determine the dental caries status in HIV positive and HIV negative children, which may help in treatment planning and prevention of the same. Materials and Methods A total of 28 HIV positive children aged between 6-14 years and 28 age matched HIV negative children were included in this study and both samples were randomly selected from the same Non-Governmental Organization (NGO). The HIV status of both these samples was confirmed from their medical records provided by the NGO. Only 2cc of unstimulated saliva was collected from both groups in special tubes coded numerically using the method described by Collins and Dawes and the samples were analyzed to measure the concentration of IgA using commercially available ELISA kit (DRG Diagnostics, Germany). Examination of dental caries was carried out according to WHO criteria (1997) using a flat mouth mirror and CPI probe. Results In HIV +ve group mean S-IgA level was calculated as 81.61 ± 6.20 μg/ml, mean DMFT was 3.86 ± 3.37, mean deft was 4.75 ± 2.86. In HIV -ve group mean S-IgA level was calculated as 145.57 ± 17.83μg/ml, mean DMFT was 2.54 ± 0.69, mean deft was 2.43 ± 2.01. Strong-ve correlation between S-IgA and DMFT (r = -0.781, t = 6.38, p < 0.001) and negative but Not Significant (N.S.) correlation (r = -0.19, t = 0.99, p > 0.05) between S-IgA and deft was found in HIV +ve group. Strong –ve correlation between S-IgA and DMFT (r = -0.655, t = 4

  18. Cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, K N; Leung, J C; Li, P K; Lui, S F

    1991-01-01

    The regulation of cytokine production and T cell proliferation by other cytokines is mandatory in mediating inflammatory responses but the full understanding is far from complete. We have previously reported increased production of IL-2 and IL-2 receptors (IL-2R) in IgA nephropathy. The present study was undertaken to examine other cytokine production during T cell activation in IgA nephropathy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 17 IgA nephritic patients and 14 controls were cultured with phytohaemagglutinin and phorbol myristate acetate for 48 h for maximal cytokine production. IL-2Rs and IL-4 receptors (IL-4Rs) expressed on cultured PBMC were studied by a radioimmunoassay using monoclonal antibodies against these receptors. Although the total cellular IL-2R expression and percentages of T helper and T suppressor cells did not differ between the patients and controls, there was a significant increase in activated T helper cells expressing IL-2R in patients with IgA nephropathy. The total cellular IL-4R expression was elevated in IgA nephritic patients (P less than 0.005). IL-2 production by PBMC was raised in IgA nephritic patients compared with controls (P less than 0.05) but no difference in IL-4 or IL-6 production was observed. The interferon-gamma production by PBMC was significantly increased in patients with IgA nephropathy (P less than 0.025). No correlation was observed between individual cytokine levels. Our data suggest there are selective increases in cytokine production in IgA nephropathy. PMID:1907530

  19. Progress in understanding the diagnostic and pathogenic role of autoantibodies associated with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, May Y.; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review At the time of diagnosis, systemic sclerosis (SSc) is often well established with significant irreversible tissue and organ damage. Definitions of ‘early SSc’ have been proposed, which include the presence of SSc-associated autoantibodies. In addition, functional autoantibodies that are believed to be involved in SSc pathogenesis need to be considered. In this review, recent advances in the diagnostic utility and pathogenic role of autoantibodies in early SSc are summarized. Moreover, we propose a clinical care pathway illustrating how autoantibody testing along with key clinical features can be used to make an earlier diagnosis of SSc. Recent findings Recent evidence has helped to develop a clearer understanding of the natural history, early clinical features, and autoantibodies that are predictors of SSc. The role of functional autoantibodies is leading to innovative approaches to evidence-based interventions and therapies that are based on mechanisms of disease. Summary Despite substantial advances, the high morbidity and mortality that currently characterizes SSc can largely be attributed to a delay in diagnosis, gaps in our understanding of the role of autoantibodies in early disease, and limited effective therapeutic options. An early and accurate diagnosis of SSc and use of autoantibody testing embedded in evidence-based clinical care pathways will help improve SSc-associated clinical outcomes and healthcare expenditures. PMID:27387266

  20. Secretion of IgA into "antigen-free" isografts of mouse small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Anne

    1974-01-01

    The immunoglobulins secreted into "antigen-free" isografts of mouse small intestine have been measured by single radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis of tissue extracts. IgA was detected in high concentration, and small amounts of IgG1 and IgG2 were also present. The IgA content of material within the graft lumen was considerably higher than the IgA content of the graft wall, indicating that IgA had been secreted and stored. Graft IgA increased with time after implantation, and no differences in immunoglobulin contents were found when grafts in thymus-deprived and in normal mice were compared. A group of host mice had been immunized with BSA and had high titres of circulating antibody to BSA; anti-BSA was not detected in the grafts implanted in these mice. However, graft extracts had moderately high titres of bacterial agglutinins when tested against a panel of commensal gut bacteria. These results indicate that secretion of IgA into a segment of small intestine is not dependent upon the presence of antigens within its lumen; however, the immunoglobulins secreted may have antibody activity against antigens present in small intestine elsewhere in the animal. PMID:4468869

  1. IgA modulates respiratory dysfunction as a sequela to pulmonary chlamydial infection as neonates.

    PubMed

    Lanka, Gopala Krishna Koundinya; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Gong, Siqi; Gupta, Rishein; Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Zhong, Guangming; Chambers, James P; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal Chlamydia lung infections are associated with serious sequelae such as asthma and airway hyper-reactivity in children and adults. Our previous studies demonstrated the importance of Th-1 type cytokines, IL-12 and IFN-γ in protection against neonatal pulmonary chlamydial challenge; however, the role of the humoral arm of defense has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that B-cells and IgA, the major mucosal antibody, play a protective role in newborns against development of later life respiratory sequelae to Chlamydia infection. Our studies using neonatal mice revealed that all WT and IgA-deficient (IgA(-/-)) animals survived a sublethal pulmonary Chlamydia muridarum challenge at one day after birth with similar reduction in bacterial burdens over time. In contrast, all B-cell-deficient (μMT) mice succumbed to infection at the same challenge dose correlating to failure to control bacterial burdens in the lungs. Although IgA may not be important for bacterial clearance, we observed IgA(-/-) mice displayed greater respiratory dysfunction 5 weeks post challenge. Specifically, comparative respiratory functional analyses revealed a significant shift upward in P-V loops, and higher dynamic resistance in IgA(-/-) animals. This study provides insight(s) into the protective role of IgA in neonates against pulmonary chlamydial infection induced respiratory pathological sequelae observed later in life.

  2. High-affinity monoclonal IgA regulates gut microbiota and prevents colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Okai, Shinsaku; Usui, Fumihito; Yokota, Shuhei; Hori-I, Yusaku; Hasegawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Kurosawa, Manabu; Okada, Seiji; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Nishiyama, Eri; Mori, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takuji; Kurokawa, Ken; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Nanno, Masanobu; Naito, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Yohei; Kato, Tamotsu; Miyauchi, Eiji; Ohno, Hiroshi; Shinkura, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the main antibody isotype secreted into the intestinal lumen. IgA plays a critical role in the defence against pathogens and in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. However, how secreted IgA regulates gut microbiota is not completely understood. In this study, we isolated monoclonal IgA antibodies from the small intestine of healthy mouse. As a candidate for an efficient gut microbiota modulator, we selected a W27 IgA, which binds to multiple bacteria, but not beneficial ones such as Lactobacillus casei. W27 could suppress the cell growth of Escherichia coli but not L. casei in vitro, indicating an ability to improve the intestinal environment. Indeed W27 oral treatment could modulate gut microbiota composition and have a therapeutic effect on both lymphoproliferative disease and colitis models in mice. Thus, W27 IgA oral treatment is a potential remedy for inflammatory bowel disease, acting through restoration of host-microbial symbiosis. PMID:27562257

  3. New developments in the genetics, pathogenesis, and therapy of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Magistroni, Riccardo; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Appel, Gerald B.; Kiryluk, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have brought notable progress in the field of IgA nephropathy. Here, we highlight important new directions and latest developments, including successful discovery of several genetic susceptibility loci, formulation of the multi-hit pathogenesis model that integrates findings from studies of galactose-deficient IgA1, anti-glycan response and immune complex-induced kidney injury, introduction of the Oxford pathology scoring system, and formalization of the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) consensus treatment guidelines. We focus on the latest genetic findings that confirm a strong contribution of inherited factors and explain some of the geo-ethnic disparities in disease susceptibility. Most IgA nephropathy susceptibility loci discovered to date encode genes involved in the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The concerted pattern of inter-population allelic differentiation across all Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) loci parallels the disease prevalence and correlates with variation in local pathogens, suggesting that multi-locus adaptation might have shaped the present-day landscape of IgA nephropathy. Importantly, the “Intestinal Immune Network for IgA Production” emerged as one of the new targets for potential therapeutic intervention. We place these findings in the context of the multi-hit pathogenesis model and existing knowledge of IgA immunobiology. Lastly, we provide our perspective on the existing treatment options, discuss areas of clinical uncertainty, and outline ongoing clinical trials and translational studies. PMID:26376134

  4. Isolated lymphoid follicles are not IgA inductive sites for recombinant Salmonella

    SciTech Connect

    Hashizume, Tomomi; Momoi, Fumiki; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi; Hosono, Akira; Kataoka, Kosuke; Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Kweon, Mi-Na; Yamamoto, Masafumi . E-mail: yamamoto.masafumi@nihon-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    In this study, we investigated whether isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF) play a role in the regulation of intestinal IgA antibody (Ab) responses. The transfer of wild type (WT) bone marrow (BM) to lymphotoxin-{alpha}-deficient (LT{alpha}{sup -/-}) mice resulted in the formation of mature ILF containing T cells, B cells, and FDC clusters in the absence of mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. Although the ILF restored total IgA Abs in the intestine, antigen (Ag)-specific IgA responses were not induced after oral immunization with recombinant Salmonella expressing fragment C of tetanus toxin. Moreover, Ag-specific cell proliferation was not detected in the ILF. Interestingly, no IgA anti-LPS Abs were detected in the fecal extracts of LT{alpha}{sup -/-} mice reconstituted with WT BM. On the basis of these findings, ILF can be presumed to play a role in the production of IgA Abs, but lymphoid nodules are not inductive sites for the regulation of Ag-specific intestinal IgA responses to recombinant Salmonella.

  5. Autoantibodies predicting the outcome of rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation in two subsets of patients according to severity of radiographic damage

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, O; Combe, B; Elias, A; Benali, K; Clot, J; Sany, J; Eliaou, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Autoantibodies such as rheumatoid factor (RF), antikeratin antibodies (AKA), antiperinuclear factor (APF), and anti-RA 33 antibodies are considered of value for the diagnosis of RA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these autoantibodies as predictors of severe radiographic damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Eighty six patients with RA (70 women, 16 men) fulfilling 1987 ACR criteria were selected from a cohort of 469 patients followed up since the first year of RA onset because they could be divided in two groups according to the severity of the radiographic damage. These 86 patients had a mean (SD) disease duration of eight (four) years: 43 patients had severe radiographic damage (Larsen score ⩾2) and 43 had limited radiographic damage (Larsen score < 2). The two groups were matched by disease duration and sex. The following autoantibodies were looked for: RF, ANA, AKA, APF, and anti-RA 33 antibodies. In addition, HLA class II DR β alleles and standard inflammatory parameters (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein) were determined.
RESULTS—Patients with severe radiographic damage differed from those with limited radiographic damage in that they had higher RF (p=0.01), APF (p<0.02), and AKA (p=0.001) titres. Stepwise regression analysis was done to calculate the odds ratios (OR) for each clinical and laboratory variable; only presence of cutaneous nodules (OR: 14.9; 95% CI: 7, 128), HLA DRB1*04 or DRB1*01 (OR: 7.53; 95% CI: 1.32, 42.9), AKA (OR: 3.11; 95%, CI: 0.58, 16.8 ), a high erthrocyte sedimentation rate (OR: 2.66; 95% CI: 0.60, 11.9), and a high C reactive protein value (OR: 7.4; 95% CI : 1.43, 38.1) were predictive of severe radiographic damage.
CONCLUSION—These data suggest that the risk of severe radiographic damage in RA patients is higher when cutaneous nodules, HLA DRB1*04 or DRB1*01, and/or AKA are present. The other autoantibodies of diagnostic significance are

  6. Anti-dsDNA Antibodies are one of the many autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu Man; Dai, Chao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Gaskin, Felicia

    2015-01-01

    Anti-dsDNA antibodies are the most studied antibodies of the lupus-related autoantibodies. The dogma is that these are the most important autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, evidence is presented to show that these antibodies (as measured by modern clinical laboratories) are not the most important autoantibodies in the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus, and are of limited value in clinical correlation and in predicting disease flares. In addition, they are not likely to be the initiating autoantibodies in lupus nephritis. Thus, several pervasively held beliefs on anti-dsDNA antibodies are not valid. We suggest that anti-dsDNA antibodies should be considered as just one of the many autoantibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26594353

  7. Anti-heat shock protein autoantibody profiling in breast cancer using customized protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liu; Gehin, Thomas; Chevolot, Yann; Souteyrand, Eliane; Mangé, Alain; Solassol, Jérôme; Laurenceau, Emmanuelle

    2016-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are over-expressed in a wide range of human cancers. It results in the stimulation of the immune system and consequently in elevated concentration of anti-HSP autoantibodies. Elevated anti-HSP autoantibodies were found in breast cancer patients, and they are associated with tumor metastasis. Therefore, screening these autoantibodies could be of diagnostic and prognostic values. Protein microarrays have already demonstrated their great potential as a diagnostic tool. However, protein diversity requires optimization of the microarray fabrication to achieve high sensitivity and specificity. In this study, seven HSPs were immobilized on six different surface chemistries. After evaluation and optimization with purified antibodies of the six surface chemistries, two surfaces were selected to detect anti-HSP autoantibodies in breast cancer sera. Multiplex detection of anti-HSP autoantibodies allowed discrimination of breast cancer patients (50) from healthy controls (26) with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 100%. PMID:26715250

  8. Experimental erythrocyte autoantibodies. V. Induction and suppression of red blood cell autoantibodies in mice injected with rat bromelain-treated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, K O; McAuliffe, A

    1983-10-01

    Mice injected with rat red blood cells (RBC), or rat bromelain-treated (brom) RBC, produce RBC autoantibodies and suppressor cells that specifically inhibit the autoimmune response without inhibiting the net production of antibodies against rat RBC. It has been investigated whether suppressor cells induced by injections of rat RBC are effective in preventing autoantibody production induced by rat brom RBC and vice versa. Autoantibodies were induced in C3H mice by weekly ip injections, each 0.2 ml, of a 6% suspension of rat RBC or rat brom RBC. Autoantibody production was assayed using Coombs' test. Suppressor cells were present in the spleens of mice positive in Coombs' tests and were shown by intravenous injections of 40 X 10(6) viable cells per mouse into untreated syngeneic mice 18 hr before the first injection of rat RBC or rat brom RBC. Autoantibodies eluted from mice positive in Coombs' tests after injections of rat RBC or brom RBC were absorbed by either type of rat RBC but not by RBC from sheep. This suggests that rat RBC and rat brom RBC display antigens that are similar, if not identical, to autoantigens on the mouse RBC. Spleen cells from mice injected with rat RBC suppressed autoantibodies induced by both rat RBC and rat brom RBC. In contrast, spleen cells from mice injected with rat brom RBC suppressed autoantibodies induced by rat brom RBC but not those induced by unmodified rat RBC. This differential suppression may be due to the removal from rat RBC, by bromelain, of a suppressor site and/or autoantigens of some specificities. Thus rat brom RBC may not induce the total range of specificities of autoantibodies, and of suppressor cells, induced by rat RBC.

  9. IgG and IgM autoantibody differences in discoid and systemic lupus patients

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Benjamin F.; Tseng, Lin-chiang; Lee, Thomas; Vasquez, Rebecca; Li, Quan Z.; Zhang, Song; Karp, David R.; Olsen, Nancy J.; Mohan, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus (SLE) patients with discoid lupus (DLE) were reported to have milder disease. To test this observation, we employed sandwich arrays containing 98 autoantigens to compare autoantibody profiles of SLE subjects without DLE (DLE−SLE+) (N=9), SLE subjects with DLE (DLE+SLE+) (N=10), DLE subjects without SLE (DLE+SLE−) (N=11), and healthy controls (N=11). We validated differentially expressed autoantibodies using immunoassays in DLE−SLE+ (N=18), DLE+SLE+ (N=17), DLE+SLE− (N=23), and healthy subjects (N=22). Arrays showed 15 IgG autoantibodies (ten against nuclear antigens) and four IgM autoantibodies that were differentially expressed (q-value<0.05). DLE−SLE+ subjects had higher IgG autoantibodies against dsDNA, ssDNA, dsRNA, histone H2A and H2B, and SS-A (52 kDa) than all other groups including DLE+SLE+ subjects (p<0.05). Immunoassays measuring anti-dsDNA, -ssDNA, and -SS-A (52 kDa) IgG autoantibodies showed similar trends (p<0.05). Healthy and DLE+SLE−subjects expressed higher IgM autoantibodies against alpha beta crystallin, lipopolysaccharide, heat shock cognate 70, and desmoglein-3 than DLE+SLE+ and DLE−SLE+ subjects. IgG:IgM ratios of autoantibodies against nuclear antigens progressively rose from healthy to DLE−SLE+ subjects. In conclusion, lower IgG autoantibodies against nuclear antigens in DLE+SLE+ versus DLE−SLE+ subjects suggest that DLE indicates lower disease severity. Higher IgM autoantibodies against selected antigens in healthy and DLE+SLE−subjects may be non-pathogenic. PMID:22763789

  10. Usage of cancer associated autoantibodies in the detection of disease

    PubMed Central

    Dudas, Steven P.; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Tainsky, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts toward deciphering the complexity of the tumor specific proteome by profiling immune responses generated against tumor associated antigens (TAAs) holds great promise for predicting the presence of cancer long before the development of clinical symptoms. The immune system is capable of sensing aberrant expression of certain cellular components involved in tumorigenesis and the resultant autoantibody response provides insights to the targets that are responsible for eliciting immunogenicity to these cellular components. Analysis of the cancer-specific humoral immune response has led to panels of biomarkers that are specific and sensitive biomarkers of disease. Using multianalyte-based in vitro analytical discovery platforms which can be easily adapted into clinical diagnostic screening tests, body fluids such as serum, plasma saliva, or urine can be interrogated to detect autoantibodies against natural or recombinant antigens, which may possess etiologic significance to cancer. Non-invasive screening tests exhibiting high specificity and sensitivity to detect early stage cancer in the heterogeneous population of cancer patients potentially have the greatest impact in decreasing mortality rates. Overall, this review summarizes different experimental approaches in the development of diagnostic screening tests for the early detection of cancer and their implementation in the development of clinical multianalyte biomarker assays. PMID:20938086

  11. Novel Diabetes Autoantibodies and Prediction of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies are currently the most robust biomarkers of type 1 diabetes and are frequently used to establish entry criteria for the participation of genetically at-risk individuals in secondary prevention/intervention clinical trials. Since their original description almost 40 years ago, considerable efforts have been devoted toward identifying the precise molecular targets that are recognized. Such information can have significant benefit for developing improved metrics for identifying/stratifying of at-risk subjects, developing potential therapeutic targets, and advancing understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Currently, four major molecular targets ([pro]insulin, GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8) have been confirmed, with approximately 94% of all subjects with a clinical diagnosis of type 1 diabetes expressing autoantibodies to at least one of these molecules at clinical onset. In this review, we summarize some of the salient properties of these targets that might contribute to their autoantigenicity and methods that have been used in attempts to identify new components of the humoral autoresponse. PMID:23900975

  12. Autoantibody-Associated Central Nervous System Neurologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Linnoila, Jenny; Pittock, Sean J

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune neurology is a rapidly evolving new subspecialty driven by the discovery of novel neural- (neuronal- or glial-) specific autoantibodies and their target antigens. The neurologic manifestations affecting the central nervous system include encephalitis, dementia, epilepsy, and movement and sleep disorders. Laboratory testing is now available for most of these neural-specific autoantibodies, which serve as diagnostic markers, in some instances directing the physician toward specific cancer types (e.g., N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antibodies for teratoma, collapsin response mediator protein 5 for small-cell lung cancer) and assisting in therapeutic decision making. Antibodies targeting intracellular proteins serve as markers of cytotoxic effector T-cell-mediated injury, which is generally poorly responsive to immunotherapy. By contrast, antibodies targeting extracellular plasma membrane proteins may act as pathogenic effectors and often infer good responses to immunotherapy. Diagnosing these conditions and implementing treatment as early into the clinical course as possible ensures the best possible clinical outcomes. An adequate immunotherapy trial to assess maximum reversibility of symptoms, as assessed through objective functional measures, is crucial and can help to determine whether maintenance therapy is needed. PMID:27643908

  13. Obstetric and vascular APS: same autoantibodies but different diseases?

    PubMed

    Meroni, P L; Raschi, E; Grossi, C; Pregnolato, F; Trespidi, L; Acaia, B; Borghi, M O

    2012-06-01

    Beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI)-dependent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are the main pathogenic autoantibody population and at the same time the laboratory diagnostic tool for the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). These antibodies are responsible for both the vascular and the obstetric manifestations of the syndrome but the pathogenic mechanisms behind these manifestations are not the same. For example, thrombotic events do not appear to play a major role in APS miscarriages and a direct reactivity of β2GPI-dependent aPLs on decidual and trophoblast cells was reported. A local expression of β2GPI on these tissues was reported both in physiological conditions and in APS women, thus explaining the local tropism of the autoantibodies. The two hit hypothesis was suggested to explain why the vascular manifestations of APS may occur only occasionally in spite of the persistent presence of aPLs. This is not apparently the case for the obstetric variant of the syndrome, making the difference even more striking. A different pathogenesis may also provide the rationale for the well-known fact that the vascular and the obstetric manifestations may occur independently although in a minority of cases.

  14. Subclasses of immunoglobulins and autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Outschoorn, I; Rowley, M J; Cook, A D; Mackay, I R

    1993-01-01

    The differing capacity of subclasses of IgG to bind to protein A and protein G was used in a sequential affinity purification procedure to examine immunoglobulin isotypes and subclasses in autoimmune disease. The utility of the procedure is that affinity-purified fractions containing particular isotypes and subclasses of immunoglobulin can be analyzed for their content of autoantibodies using standard techniques. For each of four autoimmune diseases studied, chronic active hepatitis, Sjogren's syndrome, primary biliary cirrhosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, there were characteristic protein elution profiles and the various disease-specific autoantibodies showed preferential distributions among the isotypes and subclasses. Moreover there was not an absolute correlation between an increased level of a particular subclass and the occurrence of antibodies of that subclass. The occurrence of highly disease-specific immunoglobulin subclass profiles suggests that the hypergammaglobulinemia associated with autoimmunity cannot be attributed entirely to polyclonal B-cell activation. Rather, there are disease-specific alterations in isotype subclass switching which may reflect different cytokine-dependent influences on autoimmune B cells and their products.

  15. [Measurement of antiganglioside autoantibodies by immunodot-blot assay: clinical importance in peripheral neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Caudie, C; Vial, C; Petiot, P; Bancel, J; Later, R; Gonnaud, P M

    1999-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated measurement data and clinical relevance of autoantibodies to gangliosides in peripheral neuropathies (PN). The IgG and IgM antiganglioside autoantibodies were determined by our own immunodot-blot assay on membrane and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa) in sera of 1,342 patients with peripheral neuropathies. Anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b autoantibodies formed a part of the normal autoantibody repertoire and were common place in 12% of normal subjects and in 14% of disease control groups. Polyclonal IgM antiganglioside autoantibodies were detected in chronic PN, polyclonal IgG antiganglioside autoantibodies were detected in acute PN. Polyclonal IgM anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b autoantibodies were detected in 35 patients out of 48 with treatable multifocal motor neuropathy with persistent conduction blocks. These autoantibodies well discriminated between suspected motor peripheral neuropathies and motor neuron diseases (sensitivity 73%, specificity 83%, positive predictive value 60%, negative predictive value 91%). Monoclonal IgM autoantibodies reacted strongly with gangliosides in 15 patients out of 77 with M-IgM neuropathy (19%). M-IgM autoantibodies differed in their fine specificities with different principal target antigens as demonstrated with cross-reactivity. Such findings provide further evidence for a relationship between neurological syndromes and antiganglioside antibody profiles and also suggest that different gangliosides could be principal target antigens such as GM1, GD1b, GT1b, GD1a or GM2. Polyclonal IgG anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b autoantibodies were detected in 21 patients out of 22 with acute motor axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome with antecedent of infection by Campylobacter jejuni, polyclonal IgG anti-GQ1b autoantibodies in 9 patients out of 10 with Miller-Fisher syndrome. Detection of antiganglioside autoantibodies by immunodot-blot assay which is simple and quick in testing a large panel of gangliosides has become very

  16. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine /sup 125/-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Masouredis, S.P.; Branks, M.J.; Garratty, G.; Victoria, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine /sup 125/-labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. /sup 125/I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two /sup 125/I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D.

  17. Rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jihua; Wang, Yanhong; Liu, Xinyan; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Li, Rongshan

    2015-07-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most frequent type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. The role of cell cycle regulation in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy has been studied. The present study was designed to explore whether rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms. After establishing an IgA nephropathy model, rats were randomly divided into four groups. Coomassie Brilliant Blue was used to measure the 24-h urinary protein levels. Renal function was determined using an autoanalyzer. Proliferation was assayed via Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry. Rat mesangial cells were cultured and divided into the six groups. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry were used to detect cell proliferation and the cell cycle phase. Western blotting was performed to determine cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, p27(Kip1), p70S6K/p-p70S6K, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2/p- extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein expression. A low dose of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin prevented an additional increase in proteinuria, protected kidney function, and reduced IgA deposition in a model of IgA nephropathy. Rapamycin inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase. Rapamycin did not affect the expression of cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2. However, rapamycin upregulated p27(Kip1) at least in part via AKT (also known as protein kinase B)/mTOR. In conclusion, rapamycin can affect cell cycle regulation to inhibit mesangial cell proliferation, thereby reduce IgA deposition, and slow the progression of IgAN.

  18. Rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jihua; Wang, Yanhong; Liu, Xinyan; Zhou, Xiaoshuang

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most frequent type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. The role of cell cycle regulation in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy has been studied. The present study was designed to explore whether rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms. After establishing an IgA nephropathy model, rats were randomly divided into four groups. Coomassie Brilliant Blue was used to measure the 24-h urinary protein levels. Renal function was determined using an autoanalyzer. Proliferation was assayed via Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry. Rat mesangial cells were cultured and divided into the six groups. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry were used to detect cell proliferation and the cell cycle phase. Western blotting was performed to determine cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, p27Kip1, p70S6K/p-p70S6K, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2/p- extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein expression. A low dose of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin prevented an additional increase in proteinuria, protected kidney function, and reduced IgA deposition in a model of IgA nephropathy. Rapamycin inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase. Rapamycin did not affect the expression of cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2. However, rapamycin upregulated p27Kip1 at least in part via AKT (also known as protein kinase B)/mTOR. In conclusion, rapamycin can affect cell cycle regulation to inhibit mesangial cell proliferation, thereby reduce IgA deposition, and slow the progression of IgAN. PMID:25349217

  19. Analysis of IgA1 N-glycosylation and its contribution to FcalphaRI binding.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Michelle M; Wall, Stephanie B; Takahashi, Kazuo; Novak, Jan; Renfrow, Matthew B; Herr, Andrew B

    2008-10-28

    The IgA isotype of human antibodies triggers inflammatory responses via the IgA-specific receptor FcalphaRI (CD89). Structural studies have suggested that IgA1 N-glycans could modulate the interaction with FcalphaRI. We have carried out detailed biophysical analyses of three IgA1 samples purified from human serum and recombinant IgA1-Fc and compared their binding to FcalphaRI. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed wide variation in the distribution of polymeric species between IgA1 samples, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry showed overlapping but distinct populations of N-glycan species between IgA1 samples. Kinetic and equilibrium data from surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that variation in the IgA1 C H2 N-glycans had no effect on the kinetics or affinity constants for binding to FcalphaRI. Indeed, complete enzymatic removal of the IgA1 N-glycans yielded superimposable binding curves. These findings have implications for renal diseases such as IgA nephropathy.

  20. Analysis of IgA1 N-glycosylation and its contribution to FcαRI binding†

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Michelle M.; Wall, Stephanie B.; Takahashi, Kazuo; Novak, Jan; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Herr, Andrew B.

    2008-01-01

    The IgA isotype of human antibodies triggers inflammatory responses via the IgA-specific receptor FcαRI (CD89). Structural studies have suggested that IgA1 N-glycans could modulate the interaction with FcαRI. We have carried out detailed biophysical analyses of three IgA1 samples purified from human serum and recombinant IgA1-Fc and compared their binding to FcαRI. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed wide variation in the distribution of polymeric species between IgA1 samples, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry showed overlapping but distinct populations of N-glycan species between IgA1 samples. Kinetic and equilibrium data from surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that variation in the IgA1 CH2 N-glycans had no effect on the kinetics or affinity constants for binding to FcαRI. Indeed, complete enzymatic removal of the IgA1 N-glycans yielded superimposable binding curves. These findings have implications for renal diseases such as IgA nephropathy. PMID:18826328

  1. Aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in IgA nephropathy patients is recognized by IgG antibodies with restricted heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Fan, Run; Zhang, Zhixin; Brown, Rhubell; Hall, Stacy; Julian, Bruce A; Chatham, W Winn; Suzuki, Yusuke; Wyatt, Robert J; Moldoveanu, Zina; Lee, Jeannette Y; Robinson, James; Tomana, Milan; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan

    2009-06-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by circulating immune complexes composed of galactose-deficient IgA1 and a glycan-specific IgG antibody. These immune complexes deposit in the glomerular mesangium and induce the mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis characteristic of IgAN. To define the precise specificities and molecular properties of the IgG antibodies, we generated EBV-immortalized IgG-secreting lymphocytes from patients with IgAN and found that the secreted IgG formed complexes with galactose-deficient IgA1 in a glycan-dependent manner. We cloned and sequenced the heavy- and light-chain antigen-binding domains of IgG specific for galactose-deficient IgA1 and identified an A to S substitution in the complementarity-determining region 3 of the variable region of the gene encoding the IgG heavy chain in IgAN patients. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis that reverted the residue to alanine reduced the binding of recombinant IgG to galactose-deficient IgA1. Finally, we developed a dot-blot assay for the glycan-specific IgG antibody that differentiated patients with IgAN from healthy and disease controls with 88% specificity and 95% sensitivity and found that elevated levels of this antibody in the sera of patients with IgAN correlated with proteinuria. Collectively, these findings indicate that glycan-specific antibodies are associated with the development of IgAN and may represent a disease-specific marker and potential therapeutic target.

  2. Aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in IgA nephropathy patients is recognized by IgG antibodies with restricted heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Fan, Run; Zhang, Zhixin; Brown, Rhubell; Hall, Stacy; Julian, Bruce A.; Chatham, W. Winn; Suzuki, Yusuke; Wyatt, Robert J.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Robinson, James; Tomana, Milan; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan

    2009-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by circulating immune complexes composed of galactose-deficient IgA1 and a glycan-specific IgG antibody. These immune complexes deposit in the glomerular mesangium and induce the mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis characteristic of IgAN. To define the precise specificities and molecular properties of the IgG antibodies, we generated EBV-immortalized IgG-secreting lymphocytes from patients with IgAN and found that the secreted IgG formed complexes with galactose-deficient IgA1 in a glycan-dependent manner. We cloned and sequenced the heavy- and light-chain antigen-binding domains of IgG specific for galactose-deficient IgA1 and identified an A to S substitution in the complementarity-determining region 3 of the variable region of the gene encoding the IgG heavy chain in IgAN patients. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis that reverted the residue to alanine reduced the binding of recombinant IgG to galactose-deficient IgA1. Finally, we developed a dot-blot assay for the glycan-specific IgG antibody that differentiated patients with IgAN from healthy and disease controls with 88% specificity and 95% sensitivity and found that elevated levels of this antibody in the sera of patients with IgAN correlated with proteinuria. Collectively, these findings indicate that glycan-specific antibodies are associated with the development of IgAN and may represent a disease-specific marker and potential therapeutic target. PMID:19478457

  3. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of a new dengue IgA capture assay (Platelia Dengue IgA Capture, Bio-Rad) for dengue infection detection.

    PubMed

    De Decker, Sophie; Vray, Muriel; Sistek, Viridiana; Labeau, Bhety; Enfissi, Antoine; Rousset, Dominique; Matheus, Séverine

    2015-03-01

    Considering the short lifetime of IgA antibodies in serum and the key advantages of antibody detection ELISAs in terms of sensitivity and specificity, Bio-Rad has just developed a new ELISA test based on the detection of specific anti-dengue IgA. This study has been carried out to assess the performance of this Platelia Dengue IgA Capture assay for dengue infection detection. A total of 184 well-characterized samples provided by the French Guiana NRC sera collection (Laboratory of Virology, Institut Pasteur in French Guiana) were selected among samples collected between 2002 and 2013 from patients exhibiting a dengue-like syndrome. A first group included 134 sera from confirmed dengue-infected patients, and a second included 50 sera from non-dengue infected patients, all collected between day 3 and day 15 after the onset of fever. Dengue infection diagnoses were all confirmed using reference assays by direct virological identification using RT-PCR or virus culture on acute sera samples or on paired acute-phase sera samples of selected convalescent sera. This study revealed: i) a good overall sensitivity and specificity of the IgA index test, i.e., 93% and 88% respectively, indicating its good correlation to acute dengue diagnosis; and ii) a good concordance with the Panbio IgM capture ELISA. Because of the shorter persistence of dengue virus-specific IgA than IgM, these results underlined the relevance of this new test, which could significantly improve dengue diagnosis accuracy, especially in countries where dengue virus is (hyper-) endemic. It would allow for additional refinement of dengue diagnostic strategy.

  4. Effect of superposition and masking between red blood cell autoantibodies and alloantibodies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Wang, D Q

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the law of superposition and masking between autoantibodies and alloantibodies, and to ensure the detection of alloantibodies and to improve the safety of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia patients. Eight kinds of commercial IgG red blood cell antibody reagents were serially diluted, and 3 kinds of antibodies at dilutions showing a continuous gradual decline in agglutination strength with the corresponding antigen red blood cells were treated as the target antibodies. Anti-D and anti-M were treated as simulated autoantibodies, and anti-Fya was treated as a simulated alloantibody. Four concentrations, 4+, 3+, 2+ and 1+, of autoantibodies and three concentrations, 3+, 2+ and 1+, of alloantibodies were combined, and 12 kinds of hybrid antibodies were detected and evaluated by the anti-human globulin micro-column gel assay. When the simulated strong autoantibody (4+) was used, the alloantibodies (3+, 2+, 1+) had no effect on the final agglutination strength; when the strength of agglutination produced by the simulated autoantibody was less than 4+, and at the same time there were alloantibodies (3+, 2+, 1+), the differences in agglutination strength with a panel of RBCs could be clearly observed. Strong autoantibodies (4+) can exert a masking effect, leading to alloantibodies being undetected; autoantibodies less than 4+, will produce the superimposed effect with alloantibodies, resulting in differences in agglutination strength. PMID:25036516

  5. The Significance of Autoantibody Changes Over Time in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Tana, Michele M.; Shums, Zakera; Milo, Jay; Norman, Gary L.; Leung, Patrick S.; Gershwin, M. Eric; Noureddin, Mazen; Kleiner, David E.; Zhao, Xiongce; Heller, Theo; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), the antimitochondrial antibody is a cornerstone of diagnosis, but there have been conflicting reports about the correlation of autoantibodies with disease stage and prognosis. We studied whether autoantibody levels changed over time and sought correlations with clinical outcomes in a cohort of patients with PBC. Methods We tested serial serum samples from patients with PBC at a research institution for several autoantibodies. Long-term clinical follow-up data were used to calculate the slopes (change over time) for autoantibodies, platelet count, Ishak fibrosis score, biopsy copper, and number of portal areas with bile ducts. An adverse clinical outcome was defined as hepatic decompensation, development of hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation, or liver-related death. We performed linear or logistic regression or Fisher exact test as appropriate, adjusting for multiple comparisons. Results Twenty-seven patients with PBC with 145 serum samples were studied. Of the cohort, 85% was white, 81% was female, and median follow-up time was 20 years. Of the autoantibodies tested, only sp100 changed significantly over time. The sp100 slope was inversely associated with the Ishak fibrosis slope (parameter estimate, −0.05; P = .0003). Conclusions While changes in most autoantibodies over time do not seem to correlate with clinical outcomes in PBC, a change in the sp100 autoantibody level may have prognostic utility with respect to the development of fibrosis on liver biopsy. PMID:26386081

  6. Evaluation of the diagnostic value of 64 simultaneously measured autoantibodies for early detection of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Simone; Chen, Hongda; Butt, Julia; Michel, Angelika; Knebel, Phillip; Holleczek, Bernd; Zörnig, Inka; Eichmüller, Stefan B.; Jäger, Dirk; Pawlita, Michael; Waterboer, Tim; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been suggested as biomarkers for early detection of gastric cancer. However, studies that systematically assess the diagnostic performance of a large number of autoantibodies are rare. Here, we used bead-based multiplex serology to simultaneously measure autoantibody responses against 64 candidate TAAs in serum samples from 329 gastric cancer patients, 321 healthy controls and 124 participants with other diseases of the upper digestive tract. At 98% specificity, sensitivities for the 64 tested autoantibodies ranged from 0–12% in the training set and a combination of autoantibodies against five TAAs (MAGEA4 + CTAG1 + TP53 + ERBB2_C + SDCCAG8) was able to detect 32% of the gastric cancer patients at a specificity of 87% in the validation set. Sensitivities for early and late stage gastric cancers were similar, while chronic atrophic gastritis, a precursor lesion of gastric cancer, was not detectable. However, the 5-marker combination also detected 26% of the esophageal cancer patients. In conclusion, the tested autoantibodies and combinations alone did not reach sufficient sensitivity for gastric cancer screening. Nevertheless, some autoantibodies, such as anti-MAGEA4, anti-CTAG1 or anti-TP53 and their combinations could possibly contribute to the development of cancer early detection tests (not necessarily restricted to gastric cancer) when being combined with other markers. PMID:27140836

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors upregulate B cell microRNAs that silence AID and Blimp-1 expression for epigenetic modulation of antibody and autoantibody responses.

    PubMed

    White, Clayton A; Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Tat, Connie; Hayama, Ken L; Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2014-12-15

    Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), which require activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and plasma cell differentiation, which requires B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1), are critical for the generation of class-switched and hypermutated (mature) Ab and autoantibody responses. We show that histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid and butyrate dampened AICDA/Aicda (AID) and PRDM1/Prdm1 (Blimp-1) mRNAs by upregulating miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361 to silence AICDA/Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b to silence PRDM1/Prdm1, in human and mouse B cells. This led to downregulation of AID, Blimp-1, and X-box binding protein 1, thereby inhibiting CSR, SHM, and plasma cell differentiation without altering B cell viability or proliferation. The selectivity of histone deacetylase inhibitor-mediated silencing of AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 was emphasized by unchanged expression of HoxC4 and Irf4 (important inducers/modulators of AICDA/Aicda), Rev1 and Ung (central elements for CSR/SHM), and Bcl6, Bach2, or Pax5 (repressors of PRDM1/Prdm1 expression), as well as unchanged expression of miR-19a/b, miR-20a, and miR-25, which are not known to regulate AICDA/Aicda or PRDM1/Prdm1. Through these B cell-intrinsic epigenetic mechanisms, valproic acid blunted class-switched and hypermutated T-dependent and T-independent Ab responses in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, it decreased class-switched and hypermutated autoantibodies, ameliorated disease, and extended survival in lupus MRL/Fas(lpr/lpr) mice. Our findings outline epigenetic mechanisms that modulate expression of an enzyme (AID) and transcription factors (Blimp-1 and X-box binding protein 1) that are critical to the B cell differentiation processes that underpin Ab and autoantibody responses. They also provide therapeutic proof-of-principle in autoantibody-mediated autoimmunity.

  8. Autoantibody Profiling of Glioma Serum Samples to Identify Biomarkers Using Human Proteome Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Parvez; Gupta, Shabarni; Choudhary, Saket; Pandala, Narendra Goud; Atak, Apurva; Richharia, Annie; KP, Manubhai; Zhu, Heng; Epari, Sridhar; Noronha, Santosh B.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-01-01

    The heterogeneity and poor prognosis associated with gliomas, makes biomarker identification imperative. Here, we report autoantibody signatures across various grades of glioma serum samples and sub-categories of glioblastoma multiforme using Human Proteome chips containing ~17000 full-length human proteins. The deduced sets of classifier proteins helped to distinguish Grade II, III and IV samples from the healthy subjects with 88, 89 and 94% sensitivity and 87, 100 and 73% specificity, respectively. Proteins namely, SNX1, EYA1, PQBP1 and IGHG1 showed dysregulation across various grades. Sub-classes of GBM, based on its proximity to the sub-ventricular zone, have been reported to have different prognostic outcomes. To this end, we identified dysregulation of NEDD9, a protein involved in cell migration, with probable prognostic potential. Another subcategory of patients where the IDH1 gene is mutated, are known to have better prognosis as compared to patients carrying the wild type gene. On a comparison of these two cohorts, we found STUB1 and YWHAH proteins dysregulated in Grade II glioma patients. In addition to common pathways associated with tumourigenesis, we found enrichment of immunoregulatory and cytoskeletal remodelling pathways, emphasizing the need to explore biochemical alterations arising due to autoimmune responses in glioma. PMID:26370624

  9. Elevated Plasma P-Selectin Autoantibodies in Primary Sjögren Syndrome Patients with Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ya-Hui; Zhou, Peng-Fei; Long, Guang-Feng; Tian, Xin; Guo, Yu-Fan; Pang, Ai-Ming; Di, Ran; Shen, Yan-Na; Liu, Yun-De; Cui, Yu-Jie

    2015-11-28

    BACKGROUND Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is one of the most common chronic systemic autoimmune diseases, and thrombocytopenia is one of the hematological manifestations of pSS. When platelet and endothelial cells are activated, P-selectin is expressed on the cell surface. This study aimed to investigate the role of P-selectin autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in pSS. MATERIAL AND METHODS P-selectin autoantibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 38 pSS patients without thrombocytopenia and 32 pSS patients with thrombocytopenia, 32 idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients, and 35 healthy controls. RESULTS The plasma P-selectin autoantibodies (A490) in ITP patients and pSS patients with/without thrombocytopenia were significantly higher than those in healthy controls, but there were no significant differences between ITP patients and pSS patients with thrombocytopenia. The positive rate of P-selectin autoantibodies in pSS patients with thrombocytopenia was significantly higher than that in ITP patients. The platelet count was lower in P-selectin autoantibodies-positive patients, while among pSS patients with thrombocytopenia, the platelet count was lower in P-selectin autoantibodies-positive patients than in P-selectin autoantibodies-negative patients. In ITP patients and pSS patients with thrombocytopenia, the platelet count was lower in P-selectin autoantibodies-positive patients. CONCLUSIONS Elevated plasma P-selectin autoantibodies may play a role in the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in pSS patients.

  10. New developments in the genetics, pathogenesis, and therapy of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Magistroni, Riccardo; D'Agati, Vivette D; Appel, Gerald B; Kiryluk, Krzysztof

    2015-11-01

    Recent years have brought notable progress in the field of IgA nephropathy. Here, we highlight important new directions and latest developments, including successful discovery of several genetic susceptibility loci, formulation of the multihit pathogenesis model, introduction of the Oxford pathology scoring system, and formalization of the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) consensus treatment guidelines. We focus on the latest genetic findings that confirm a strong contribution of inherited factors and explain some of the geoethnic disparities in disease susceptibility. Most IgA nephropathy susceptibility loci discovered to date encode genes involved in the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The concerted pattern of interpopulation allelic differentiation across all genetic loci parallels the disease prevalence and correlates with variation in local pathogens, suggesting that multilocus adaptation might have shaped the present-day landscape of IgA nephropathy. Importantly, the 'Intestinal Immune Network for IgA Production' emerged as one of the new targets for potential therapeutic intervention. We place these findings in the context of the multihit pathogenesis model and existing knowledge of IgA immunobiology. Lastly, we provide our perspective on the existing treatment options, discuss areas of clinical uncertainty, and outline ongoing clinical trials and translational studies.

  11. Humoral immune response in patients with IgA and IgM glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Pasternack, A; Mustonen, J; Leinikki, P

    1986-01-01

    A single dose of inactivated mumps virus vaccine was administered to male patients with IgA glomerulonephritis (IgA-GN), IgM glomerulonephritis (IgM-GN) and to healthy males. Antibodies to mumps virus were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with IgA-GN showed a higher and more sustained IgG and IgA antibody response compared to patients with IgM-GN or healthy controls. Before vaccination, patients with IgM-GN had higher levels of IgG antibodies than the controls or those with IgA-GN. However, the IgA antibody and IgG responses after vaccination were low. IgM antibody responses did not vary among the groups studied. It is concluded that patients with IgA-GN are high responders for IgA and IgG antibody production. Patients with IgM-GN are low responders, especially for IgA antibody. PMID:3955883

  12. High fecal IgA is associated with reduced Clostridium difficile colonization in infants.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, Sarah L; Konya, Tedd; Azad, Meghan B; Guttman, David S; Sears, Malcolm R; Becker, Allan B; Turvey, Stuart E; Mandhane, Piush J; Subbarao, Padmaja; Scott, James A; Field, Catherine J; Kozyrskyj, Anita L

    2016-09-01

    Colonization of infants with Clostridium difficile is on the rise. Although better tolerated by infants than adults, it is a risk factor for future allergic disease. The present study describes associations between infant fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and colonization with C. difficile in 47 infants enrolled in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study. C. difficile colonization was observed in over half (53%) of the infants. Median IgA was lower in infants colonized with C. difficile (10.9 μg versus 25.5 μg per g protein; p = 0.18). A smaller proportion of infants with IgA in the highest tertile were colonized with C. difficile compared to the other tertiles (31.3% versus 64.5%, p = 0.03). In unadjusted analysis, odds of colonization with C. difficile was reduced by 75% (OR 0.25 95% CI 0.07, 0.91 p = 0.04) among infants with IgA in the highest tertile compared to those in the other tertiles. Following adjustment for parity, birth mode and breastfeeding, this association was even stronger (aOR 0.17, 95% CI 0.03, 0.94, p = 0.04). Our study provides evidence that high fecal IgA, independent of breastfeeding, is associated with reduced likelihood of C. difficile colonization in infancy.

  13. Fecal IgA antibody responses after oral poliovirus vaccination in infants and elder children.

    PubMed

    Nishio, O; Sumi, J; Sakae, K; Ishihara, Y; Isomura, S; Inouye, S

    1990-01-01

    We investigated fecal IgA antibody responses after oral polyvalent poliovirus vaccination. Infants were given vaccines twice with an interval of 6 weeks. Specific IgA antibodies in the feces were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and viruses were isolated in tissue cultures. We found that, after the first vaccination, antibody responses seemed to be elicited only against the serotypes of isolated viruses. After the second vaccination, however, antibodies were detected to all three serotypes with higher titers, suggesting that the first vaccination induced the immunologic memory. The IgA antibodies had virus-neutralizing activity, and existed in the feces as both intact 11S and fragmented 4S molecules. Next, children were given the third vaccination 3 or 9 years later. Fecal IgA antibody responses were found to be poorer in elder children, while they responded with high serum neutralization titers. The secretory IgA memory seemed to last much shorter the serum IgG memory.

  14. PetIGA: A framework for high-performance isogeometric analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Dalcin, Lisandro; Collier, Nathaniel; Vignal, Philippe; Cortes, Adriano M. A.; Calo, Victor M.

    2016-05-25

    We present PetIGA, a code framework to approximate the solution of partial differential equations using isogeometric analysis. PetIGA can be used to assemble matrices and vectors which come from a Galerkin weak form, discretized with Non-Uniform Rational B-spline basis functions. We base our framework on PETSc, a high-performance library for the scalable solution of partial differential equations, which simplifies the development of large-scale scientific codes, provides a rich environment for prototyping, and separates parallelism from algorithm choice. We describe the implementation of PetIGA, and exemplify its use by solving a model nonlinear problem. To illustrate the robustness and flexibility ofmore » PetIGA, we solve some challenging nonlinear partial differential equations that include problems in both solid and fluid mechanics. Lastly, we show strong scaling results on up to 4096 cores, which confirm the suitability of PetIGA for large scale simulations.« less

  15. Toward Noninvasive Diagnosis of IgA Nephropathy: A Pilot Urinary Metabolomic and Proteomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Neprasova, Michaela; Suchanek, Miloslav; Tesar, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is diagnosed by renal biopsy, an invasive procedure with a risk of significant complications. Noninvasive approaches are needed for possible diagnostic purposes and especially for monitoring disease activity or responses to treatment. In this pilot project, we assessed the utility of urine samples as source of biomarkers of IgA nephropathy. We used spot urine specimens from 19 healthy controls, 11 patients with IgA nephropathy, and 8 renal-disease controls collected on day of renal biopsy. Urine samples were analyzed using untargeted metabolomic and targeted proteomic analyses by several experimental techniques: liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, immunomagnetic isolation of target proteins coupled with quantitation by mass spectrometry, and protein arrays. No single individual biomarker completely differentiated the three groups. Therefore, we tested the utility of several markers combined in a panel. Discriminant analysis revealed that combination of seven markers, three metabolites (dodecanal, 8-hydroxyguanosine, and leukotriene C4), three proteins (α1-antitrypsin, IgA-uromodulin complex, and galactose-deficient IgA1), and heparan sulfate, differentiated patients with IgA nephropathy from patients with other renal diseases and healthy controls. Future studies are needed to validate these preliminary findings and to determine the power of these urinary markers for assessment of responses to therapy. PMID:27799660

  16. Complete atrioventricular block in adult Sjögren's syndrome with anti-Ro autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Sung, Myung Jun; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Young-Soo; Park, Chul-Yeon; Choe, Jung-Yoon

    2011-06-01

    Anti-Ro autoantibody is associated with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and neonatal lupus syndrome (i.e., congenital complete heart block in newborns). Generally, the adult atrioventricular (AV) node is believed to be relatively resistant to the scarring effects of anti-Ro/anti-La autoantibodies. However, there have been some reports of adult complete AV block in SS and SLE patients. Here, we report a case of complete heart block in primary SS with anti-Ro autoantibodies, with no other risk factor for the development of heart block, and review their etiological association.

  17. Protein microarrays: a new tool for the study of autoantibodies in immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jacob M; Utz, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is highly coincident with immunodeficiency. In a small but growing number of primary immunodeficiencies, autoantibodies are diagnostic of a given disease and implicated in disease pathogenesis. In order to improve our understanding of the role of autoantibodies in immunodeficiencies and to discover novel autoantibodies, new proteomic tools are needed. Protein microarrays have the ability to screen for reactivity to hundreds to many thousands of unique autoantigens simultaneously on a single chip using minimal serum input. Here, we review different types of protein microarrays and how they can be useful in framing the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies. PMID:25904912

  18. Application of radioimmunological methods for checking the quality of class-specific antibodies against bovine and porcine immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Rodák, L

    1984-03-01

    Class-specific antibodies against bovine IgG1, IgG2, IgM and IgA and porcine IgG, IgM and IgA immunoglobulins were prepared. Their class specificity was assessed by two radioimmunological methods, namely, radioimmunoelectrophoresis and double antibody sandwich radioimmunoassay. The methods are highly specific and sensitive and do not require the use of purified immunoglobulins, but can be performed with normal serum or colostrum. It was confirmed that antibodies found satisfactory in these tests were suitable for a wide range of use including radioimmunoassay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.

  19. "Racializing" Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  20. Cocoa and cocoa fibre differentially modulate IgA and IgM production at mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Massot-Cladera, Malen; Franch, Àngels; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castell, Margarida

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that a 10 % cocoa (C10) diet, containing polyphenols and fibre among others, modifies intestinal and systemic Ig production. The present study aimed at evaluating the impact of C10 on IgA and IgM production in the intestinal and extra-intestinal mucosal compartments, establishing the involvement of cocoa fibre (CF) in such effects. Mechanisms by which C10 intake may affect IgA synthesis in the salivary glands were also studied. To this effect, rats were fed either a standard diet, a diet containing C10, CF or inulin. Intestinal (the gut wash (GW), Peyer's patches (PP) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN)) and extra-intestinal (salivary glands) mucosal tissues and blood samples were collected for IgA and IgM quantification. The gene expressions of IgA production- and homing-related molecules were studied in the salivary glands. The C10 diet decreased intestinal IgA and IgM production. Although the CF diet decreased the GW IgA concentration, it increased PP, MLN and serum IgA concentrations. Both the C10 and the CF diets produced a down-regulatory effect on IgA secretion in the extra-intestinal tissues. The C10 diet interacted with the mechanisms involved in IgA synthesis, whereas the CF showed particular effects on the homing and transcytosis of IgA across the salivary glands. Overall, CF was able to up-regulate IgA production in the intestinal-inductor compartments, whereas it down-regulated its production at the mucosal-effector ones. Further studies must be directed to ascertain the mechanisms involved in the effect of particular cocoa components on gut-associated lymphoid tissue.

  1. Cocoa and cocoa fibre differentially modulate IgA and IgM production at mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Massot-Cladera, Malen; Franch, Àngels; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castell, Margarida

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that a 10 % cocoa (C10) diet, containing polyphenols and fibre among others, modifies intestinal and systemic Ig production. The present study aimed at evaluating the impact of C10 on IgA and IgM production in the intestinal and extra-intestinal mucosal compartments, establishing the involvement of cocoa fibre (CF) in such effects. Mechanisms by which C10 intake may affect IgA synthesis in the salivary glands were also studied. To this effect, rats were fed either a standard diet, a diet containing C10, CF or inulin. Intestinal (the gut wash (GW), Peyer's patches (PP) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN)) and extra-intestinal (salivary glands) mucosal tissues and blood samples were collected for IgA and IgM quantification. The gene expressions of IgA production- and homing-related molecules were studied in the salivary glands. The C10 diet decreased intestinal IgA and IgM production. Although the CF diet decreased the GW IgA concentration, it increased PP, MLN and serum IgA concentrations. Both the C10 and the CF diets produced a down-regulatory effect on IgA secretion in the extra-intestinal tissues. The C10 diet interacted with the mechanisms involved in IgA synthesis, whereas the CF showed particular effects on the homing and transcytosis of IgA across the salivary glands. Overall, CF was able to up-regulate IgA production in the intestinal-inductor compartments, whereas it down-regulated its production at the mucosal-effector ones. Further studies must be directed to ascertain the mechanisms involved in the effect of particular cocoa components on gut-associated lymphoid tissue. PMID:26975903

  2. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy and anti-HMGCR autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Mohassel, Payam; Mammen, Andrew L

    2013-10-01

    Statins are among the most commonly prescribed medications that significantly reduce cardiovascular risk in selected individuals. However, these drugs can also be associated with muscle symptoms ranging from mild myalgias to severe rhabdomyolysis. Although statin myotoxicity is usually self-limited, in some instances statin-exposed subjects can develop an autoimmune myopathy typically characterized by progressive weakness, muscle enzyme elevations, a necrotizing myopathy on muscle biopsy, and autoantibodies that recognize 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the pharmacologic target of statins. These antibodies are also found in some autoimmune myopathy patients without statin exposure. Importantly, anti-HMGCR antibodies are not found in the vast majority of statin-exposed subjects without autoimmune myopathy, including those with self-limited statin intolerance. Thus, testing for these antibodies may help differentiate those with self-limited statin myopathy who recover after statin discontinuation from those with a progressive statin-associated autoimmune myopathy who typically require immunosuppressive therapy.

  3. Clinical significance of autoantibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Minoru

    2014-08-01

    Antimitochondrial, anti-gp210, anti-sp100, and anticentromere antibodies are specifically detected in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). In clinical practice, they are useful for the diagnosis of PBC or for evaluating disease severity, clinical phenotype, and long-term outcome. In the typical or classical form of PBC which shows slow progressive loss of small bile ducts with a parallel increase in liver fibrosis, anti-gp210 antibodies are a strong risk factor for progression to jaundice and hepatic failure, whereas the presence of anticentromere antibodies is a risk factor for progression to cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Of note, the autoimmune repertoire, which is established during the early stage of the disease process, can influence the clinical phenotype and the long-term prognosis of PBC. Because the natural course of PBC is being altered by treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid, the clinical significance of these PBC-specific autoantibodies awaits re-evaluation in various ethnicities.

  4. The SL autoantibody-antigen system: clinical and biochemical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, R M; Morgan, S H; Bunn, C C; Gainey, R C; Hughes, G R; Mathews, M B

    1986-01-01

    A recently described autoantibody, SL, was found in serum from 27 patients with autoimmune disease, including 20 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) where the frequently was 7%. Analysis of clinical, serological, and HLA data from 119 SLE patients showed no positive associations with anti-SL antibody apart from a higher frequency of non-infective fever. Most SL positive sera contained other precipitins, notably antibodies to Ro(SS-A) and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA. Anti-SL IgG recognised a protein of 32 000 daltons without associated RNA. This polypeptide was distinguished from a similarly sized component of the Sm and RNP ribonucleoprotein particles by demonstrating different products of partial proteolysis. Although anti-SL antibody is of limited clinical importance, it occurs with twice the frequency of anti-SM antibody in white patients with SLE. Preliminary studies indicate that SL and the Japanese Ki system are identical. Images PMID:3487291

  5. O-linked oligosaccharides of the IgA1 hinge region: roles of its aberrant structure in the occurrence and/or progression of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Yoshiyuki

    2009-10-01

    Primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN) has been regarded as an immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis characterized immunohistologically by the predominant deposition of IgA in the glomerular mesangial area with a variety of histopathologic injuries (Clarkson et al. in Ann Rev Med 38:157-168, 1987). In 1992, the characteristic structure of O-linked oligosaccharides (O-glycans) in the IgA1 hinge and its possible aberrancy were simultaneously and independently proposed by Mesteckey et al. (Cont Nephrol 104:172-182, 1993), and our group (Cont Nephrol 104:217, 1993) at the International Congress of Nephrology (IgA Nephropathy 25th year) held in Nancy, France. Since then, the aberrancy has been confirmed by several research groups and is suspected to play a role in the occurrence and/or the progression of IgAN. At the end of the 1980s, I took an interest in the existence of O-glycans in the hinge region of IgA1 and have pursued the structure of the carbohydrate chains. Since an excellent review on the structure and the role of the carbohydrate in IgA molecules was recently published by Narita et al. (Clin Ex Nephrol 12:332-338, 2008), this review focuses on the process by which I developed the idea of aberrant O-glycosylation in IgA1 molecules in IgAN patients and summarizes our recent observations concerning IgA1 molecules.

  6. A monoclonal autoantibody that promotes central nervous system remyelination in a model of multiple sclerosis is a natural autoantibody encoded by germline immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Rodriguez, M.

    1995-03-01

    Antibodies directed against self-Ags are frequently considered detrimental, and have been shown to play a pathogenic role in certain autoimmune diseases. However, the presence of autoreactive Abs in normal individuals suggests that some autoantibodies could participate in normal physiology. Our previous studies demonstrated that monoclonal autoantibodies SCH94.03 and SCH94.32, generated from the splenocytes of uninfected SJL/J mice injected with normal homogenized spinal cord, promote central nervous system remyelination when passively transferred into syngeneic mice chronically infected with Theiler`s murine encephalomyelitis virus, an established experimental model of multiple sclerosis. In this study we show that these two monoclonal autoantibodies are identical, and have phenotypic characteristics of natural autoantibodies. By using a solid phase assay system, SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 showed reactivity toward several protein Ags and chemical haptens, with prominent reactivity toward spectrin, (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl, and fluorescein. Sequence analysis showed that both SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 were encoded by identical germline Ig light chain V{sub K}10/J{sub K}l and heavy chain V23/DFL16.1/J{sub H}2 genes, with no definitive somatic mutations. These results indicate that a natural autoantibody participates in a beneficial physiologic response to central nervous system injury. 60 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Reduced IgG anti-small nuclear ribonucleoprotein autoantibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with positive IgM anti-cytomegalovirus antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Palafox Sánchez, Claudia Azucena; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward KL; Carcamo, Wendy C; Muñoz Valle, José Francisco; Orozco Barocio, Gerardo; Oregon Romero, Edith; Navarro Hernández, Rosa Elena; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio; Vázquez del Mercado, Mónica

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by production of autoantibodies to RNA or DNA–protein complexes such as small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). A role of Epstein–Barr virus in the pathogenesis has been suggested. Similar to Epstein–Barr virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects the majority of individuals at a young age and establishes latency with a potential for reactivation. Homology of CMV glycoprotein B (UL55) with the U1snRNP-70 kDa protein (U1–70 k) has been described; however, the role of CMV infection in production of anti-snRNPs is controversial. We investigated the association of CMV serology and autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Sixty-one Mexican patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were tested for CMV and Epstein–Barr virus serology (viral capsid antigen, IgG, IgM) and autoantibodies by immunoprecipitation and ELISA (IgG and IgM class, U1RNP/Sm, U1–70 k, P peptide, rheumatoid factor, dsDNA, β2-glycoprotein I). Results IgG anti-CMV and IgM anti-CMV were positive in 95% (58/61) and 33% (20/61), respectively, and two cases were negative for both. Clinical manifestation and autoantibodies in the IgM anti-CMV(+) group (n = 20) versus the IgM anti-CMV(-)IgG (+) (n = 39) group were compared. Most (19/20) of the IgM anti-CMV(+) cases were IgG anti-CMV(+), consistent with reactivation or reinfection. IgM anti-CMV was unrelated to rheumatoid factor or IgM class autoantibodies and none was positive for IgM anti-Epstein–Barr virus–viral capsid antigen, indicating that this is not simply due to false positive results caused by rheumatoid factor or nonspecific binding by certain IgM. The IgM anti-CMV(+) group has significantly lower levels of IgG anti-U1RNP/Sm and IgG anti-U1–70 k (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.0046, respectively). This finding was also confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Among the IgM anti-CMV(-) subset, anti-Su was associated with anti-U1RNP and anti-Ro (P < 0.05). High levels of Ig

  8. Recognition of oxidized albumin and thyroid antigens by psoriasis autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Rasheed, Zafar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the role of reactive-oxygen-species (ROS) induced epitopes on human-serum-albumin (HSA) and thyroid antigens in psoriasis autoimmunity. Methods: This study was performed in the College of Medicine, Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia between May 2014 and February 2015. The study was designed to explore the role of ROS-induced epitopes in psoriasis autoimmunity. Singlet-oxygen (or ROS)-induced epitopes on protein (ROS-epitopes-albumin) was characterized by in-vitro and in-vivo. Thyroid antigens were prepared from rabbit thyroid, and thyroglobulin was isolated from thyroid extract. Immunocross-reactions of protein-A purified anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-immunoglobulin G (IgGs) with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin, and their oxidized forms were determined. Binding characteristics of autoantibodies in chronic plaque psoriasis patients (n=26) against ROS-epitopes-HSA and also with native and oxidized thyroid antigens were screened, and the results were compared with age-matched controls (n=22). Results: The anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-IgGs showed cross-reactions with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin and with their oxidized forms. High degree of specific binding by psoriasis IgGs to ROS-epitopes-HSA, ROS-thyroid antigen and ROS-thyroglobulin was observed. Immunoglobulin G from normal-human-controls showed negligible binding with all tested antigens. Moreover, sera from psoriasis patients had higher levels of carbonyl contents compared with control sera. Conclusion: Structural alterations in albumin, thyroid antigens by ROS, generate unique neo-epitopes that might be one of the factors for the induction of autoantibodies in psoriasis. PMID:26620982

  9. [Juvenile dermatomyositis and new autoantibodies: Cases and review].

    PubMed

    Guarella, M; Jurquet, A-L; Retornaz, K; Bardin, N; Chastang, M-C; Desjonquere, M; Fabien, N; Belot, A

    2015-12-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is the most common inflammatory myopathy in children. Its diagnosis is usually made on a clinical basis following the criteria of Bohan and Peter (1975). Recently, the presence of myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) have started to be associated with specific outcome in adult patients; the diagnosis and prognosis value of these autoantibodies remains to be identified in children. We report four cases of JDM with MSAs focusing on clinical, biological, and radiological manifestations, and then we describe associated treatment. The cohort comprises four girls with an average age of 8.5 years. The time to diagnosis was 1 week to 4 months. For these patients, the immunologic study found one patient positive for the MDA5 antibody (or CADM 140), one positive for the TIF1γ antibody (or p155/140), and two patients positive for the NXP2 antibody (or p140/MJ). Each patient showed specific and characteristic cutaneous manifestations. For example, the girl positive for the TIF1γ antibody presented the most severe skin disease with urticaria, face edema, and vascularity of the neck and shoulders. However, regarding muscular features, proximal weakness was present in most of the cohort, except for the child positive for the MDA5 antibody, who presented no sign of muscular disease at the beginning with low CK levels. Importantly, acute pancreatitis also affected this patient. Concerning radiological indications, muscular MRI evidenced hyperinflammation, a sign of diffuse myositis, in all these patients. Treatments consisted in corticosteroids together with methotrexate or mycofenolate mofetil associated or not with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. This report highlights the importance of systematic detection and analysis of MSA in diagnosis and characterization of JDM, and describes a new approach that would allow more focused treatments and be a useful predictor of clinical complications and prognosis in JDM-affected subjects. PMID:26598044

  10. CYP2E1 autoantibodies in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Sutti, Salvatore; Rigamonti, Cristina; Vidali, Matteo; Albano, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune reactions involving cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) are a feature of idiosyncratic liver injury induced by halogenated hydrocarbons and isoniazid, but are also detectable in about one third of the patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC). In these latter the presence of anti-CYP2E1 auto-antibodies is an independent predictor of extensive necro-inflammation and fibrosis and worsens the recurrence of hepatitis following liver transplantation, indicating that CYP2E1-directed autoimmunity can contribute to hepatic injury. The molecular characterization of the antigens recognized by anti-CYP2E1 auto-antibodies in ALD and CHC has shown that the targeted conformational epitopes are located in close proximity on the molecular surface. Furthermore, these epitopes can be recognized on CYP2E1 expressed on hepatocyte plasma membranes where they can trigger antibody-mediated cytotoxicity. This does not exclude that T cell-mediated responses against CYP2E1 might also be involved in causing hepatocyte damage. CYP2E1 structural modifications by reactive metabolites and molecular mimicry represent important factors in the breaking of self-tolerance against CYP2E1 in, respectively, ALD and CHC. However, genetic or acquired interferences with the mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of the immune system are also likely to contribute. More studies are needed to better characterize the impact of anti-CYP2E1 autoimmunity in liver diseases particularly in relation to the fact that common metabolic alterations such as obesity and diabetes stimulates hepatic CYP2E1 expression.

  11. Thyrotropin receptor autoantibodies (TSHRAbs): epitopes, origins and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Leonard D; Harii, Norikazu

    2003-01-01

    Epitopes for > 95% stimulating thyrotropin receptor autoantibodies (TSHRAbs) causally implicated in Graves' disease (Basedow's disease or primary hyperthyroidism) have been identified on on the N-terminal portion of the TSHR extracellular domain, residues 8-165. If the stimulating TSHRAb activity is solely dependent on this region, it is termed homogeneous; if its activity is only largely related to this region, it is termed heterogeneous. The presence of a heterogeneous stimulating TSHRAb in a patient is associated with rapid responses to propylthiouracil or methimazole and may be predictive of long term remission with these oral immunosuppressives. Epitopes for two different Graves' autoantibodies that inhibit TSH binding, TSH binding inhibition immunoglobulins or TBIIs, have also been identified on this region of the TSHR. They do not increase cAMP levels, although one may activate the inositol phosphate, Ca++, arachidonate release signal system. The epitope of blocking TSHRAbs with the ability to inhibit TSH binding (TBII activity), TSH activity, and stimulating TSHRAb activity, and that are causally implicated in the primary hypothyroidism of patients with idiopathic myxedema or some patients with Hashimoto's disease have, in contrast, been largely identified largely on the C-terminal portion of the TSHR extracellular domain, residues 270-395. They have been implicated as important in pregnancy where they attenuate the signs and symptoms of Graves' hyperthyroidism. The appearance of these blocking TSHRAbs during pregnancy in Graves' patients might cause overt or occult hypothyroidism, with resultant effects on fetal development and postnatal intelligence levels. The different TSHRAbs can exist in the same patient at any moment in time, potentially making disease expression a sum of their activities. Assays taking advantage of the epitope mapping findings enable us to detect individual TSHRAbs within a single patient and to better understand their clinical

  12. Fine binding characteristics of human autoantibodies-partial molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Bunting, Karen; Ravirajan, Chelliah T; Latchman, David S; Pearl, Laurence H; Isenberg, David A

    2004-07-01

    The fine binding characteristics of three well-characterized human autoantibodies B3, RH14 (anti-DNA) and UK4 (anti-cardiolipin) in their IgG and cloned Fab formats, were investigated. Although in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice B3 and RH14 both induce proteinuria, only RH14 induces early features of lupus nephritis, whereas UK4 exhibits lupus anticoagulant activity. RH14 exhibited up to 10 fold higher binding to DNA compared to that shown by B3 or UK4 and involved significant electrostatic and phosphate group interactions. Only RH14 exhibited strong anti-Sm cross-reactivity residing on the C-terminus of the antigen as determined by the use of 76 overlapping 15mer peptides. Chain shuffling experiments indicate that anti-Sm/RNP and anti-Jo-1 activities of B3 and UK4 co-exist on one of the two chains (light, B3; heavy, UK4). The present study provides evidence that a human anti-DNA antibody can also be an anti-ENA antibody. Furthermore, the anti-DNA antibodies also exhibited cross-reactivity against glutathione-S-transferase and DNA polymerase PolIV of bacterial origin. This is the first demonstration of the presence of such cross-reactivities on lupus anti-DNA antibodies. We now demonstrate that subsets of sera from the patients with lupus, recognise these antigens. This observation may in some cases provide a mechanism for the common expression of a variety of autoantibodies observed in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

  13. Clinicopathologic correlations in a series of 143 patients with IgA glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, J; Pasternack, A; Helin, H; Nikkilä, M

    1985-01-01

    In an unselected series of patients with IgA glomerulonephritis, old age, high blood pressure, and high urinary protein excretion at the time of renal biopsy were found to correlate with impaired renal function, whereas sex, estimated duration of the disease, or high serum IgA levels did not. The following clinical features were favorable prognostic signs: asymptomatic proteinuria, macroscopic hematuria, and isolated microscopic hematuria. The degree of diffuse mesangial alteration and the presence of segmental glomerular lesions correlated clearly with the subsequent clinical outcome. Vascular lesions, i.e. arteriosclerosis and renal vascular deposition of C3, were most often present in patients with severe glomerulopathy. The presence of electron-dense deposits in glomerular capillary walls was also an unfavorable prognostic finding. Renal biopsy findings of interstitial infiltrates of inflammatory cells and IgA distributed along glomerular capillary walls were usually associated with extrarenal manifestations of the disease. PMID:4014321

  14. Evolution of the Iga Heavy Chain Gene in the Genus Mus

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, B. A.; Golde, T. E.; Schwartz, R. L.; Rudikoff, S.

    1988-01-01

    To examine questions of immunoglobulin gene evolution, the IgA α heavy chain gene from Mus pahari, an evolutionarily distant relative to Mus musculus domesticus, was cloned and sequenced. The sequence, when compared to the IgA gene of BALB/c or human, demonstrated that the IgA gene is evolving in a mosaic fashion with the hinge region accumulating mutations most rapidly and the third domain at a considerably lower frequency. In spite of this pronounced accumulation of mutations, the hinge region appears to maintain the conformation of a random coil. A marked propensity to accumulate replacement over silent site changes in the coding regions was noted, as was a definite codon bias. The possibility that these two phenomena are interrelated is discussed. PMID:2842228

  15. Circulating IgA immune complexes in patients with psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.P.; Peck, G.L.; Lawley, T.J.

    1983-06-01

    The sera of 21 patients with psoriasis were examined for the presence of IgA-containing circulating immune complexes (CIC) using the Raji IgA radioimmunoassay. In addition, the Raji IgG radioimmunoassay and 125I-Clq binding assay were used to detect IgG- and IgM-containing CIC. Twenty-five patients with other hyperkeratotic skin disorders were studied as controls. Patients were studied before institution of systemic therapy with etretinate (20 patients) or 13-cis-retinoic acid (1 patient). In addition, sera of 15 of the patients treated with etretinate were studied before, during, and after therapy. The extent of pretreatment disease involvement as well as response to therapy were evaluated in a blinded fashion. Fourteen of 21 (67%) patients with psoriasis had evidence of IgA-containing CIC at some time during the course of their disease, as compared to only 1 of 25 patients with other hyperkeratotic skin disorders. In contrast, only 2 of 19 (11%) had evidence of IgG-containing CIC using the Raji IgG assay, and only 1 of 19 (5%) had evidence of IgG- or IgM-containing CIC using the 125I-Clq binding assay. A positive correlation was found between the extent of pretreatment disease involvement and the level of IgA-containing CIC by linear regression analysis (p . 0.01). There was, however, no correlation between clinical improvement and the presence or level of IgA-containing CIC in 15 patients followed during therapy. Sucrose density gradient analysis of the IgA-containing CIC found in 2 of these patients demonstrated IgA-containing CIC in the 9S to 13S region. The finding of IgA-containing CIC in a significant number of patients with psoriasis and the relative absence of IgG- or IgM-containing CIC suggest that IgA-containing CIC may play a role in psoriasis.

  16. IgA nephropathy in Brazil: apropos of 600 cases.

    PubMed

    Soares, Maria Fernanda; Caldas, M L R; Dos-Santos, W L C; Sementilli, A; Furtado, P; Araújo, S; Pegas, K L; Petterle, R R; Franco, M F

    2015-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is th e commonest primary glomerular disease worldwide. Studies on its prevalence in Brazil are however scarce. Databases and clinical records from 10 reference centres were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical and laboratory features at the moment of the biopsy were retrieved (age, gender, presence of hematuria, serum creatinine [mg/dL], proteinuria [g/24 h]). Renal biopsy findings were classified according to Haas single grade classification scheme and the Oxford Classification of IgAN. 600 cases of IgAN were identified, of which 568 (94.7 %) were on native kidneys. Male to female ratio was 1.24:1. Patients averaged 32.76 ± 15.12 years old (range 4-89, median 32). Proteinuria and hematuria were observed, respectively in 56.63 and 72.29 % of patients. The association of both these findings occurred in 37.95 % of the cases. Serum creatinine averaged 1.65 ± 0.67 mg/dL (median 1.5 mg/dL) at diagnosis. Segmental sclerosis and mesangial hypercellularity were the main glomerular findings (47.6 and 46.2 %) The commonest combination by Oxford Classification of IgAN, was M0 E0 S0 T0 (22.4 %). Chronic tubulo-interstitial lesions with an extension wider than 25 % of the renal cortex could be identified in 32.2 % of the cases. Tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis were more strongly associated with higher 24-h proteinuria and serum creatinine levels. Segmental sclerosis (S1) showed a stronger tendency of association with the presence of tubulo-interstitial lesions (T1 and T2) than other glomerular variables. To the best of our knowledge this is the largest series of IgAN in Brazil. It depicts the main biopsy findings and their possible clinical correlates. Our set of data is comparable to previous reports. PMID:26435893

  17. Prevalence of IgA deficiency in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moradinejad, Mohammad Hasan; Rafati, Ali Hoseinpoor; Ardalan, Maryam; Rabiei, Mahnaz; Farghadan, Maryam; Ashtiani, Mohammad Taghi Haghi; Pourpak, Zahra; Moin, Mostafa

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate any association between IgA deficiency (IgAD) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) among Iranian children.This case-control study was carried out on 83 children who were diagnosed as JRA according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria; Patients were admitted at the rheumatology clinic of Children's Medical Center, (Tehran). Serum immunoglobulins concentrations were determined by nephelometry method. Control group was 112 healthy children who were matched for age and gender. Informed consent obtained from all parents.Selective IgA deficiency (sIgAD) was found only in a boy (1.2%) among JRA children; however, partial IgA deficiency was found in 6(7.1%) of patients with JRA and in 12(10.7%) of control subjects, this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.46). Immunoglobulins levels in patients with JRA (IgM: 126.7±57.2, IgG: 1182.3±351 and IgA:169.3±98) were significantly higher than their controls (IgM: 104±52, IgG:802±220 and IgA: 94.6±47) (p<0.05). Patients with growth failure had higher IgM, IgG and IgA levels in comparison with patients without growth failure; however, this difference was significant about IgM and IgG levels (p<0.05).In contrast to other similar studies, the number of IgAD did not differ significantly between JRA patients and their control counterpart; this might be partly due to the high rate of consanguineous marriages in Iran that resulted in increased prevalence of clinically undiagnosed partial IgAD in general population. Hence, future epidemiological studies are warranted to make it clear.

  18. Levels and complexity of IgA antibody against oral bacteria in samples of human colostrum.

    PubMed

    Petrechen, L N; Zago, F H; Sesso, M L T; Bertoldo, B B; Silva, C B; Azevedo, K P; de Lima Pereira, S A; Geraldo-Martins, V R; Ferriani, V P L; Nogueira, R D

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (SM) have three main virulence antigens: glucan binding protein B (gbpB), glucosyltransferase (Gtf) and antigens I/II (Ag I/II) envolved in the capacity of those bacteria to adhere and accumulate in the dental biofilm. Also, the glycosyltransferases 153 kDa of Streptococcus gordonii (SGO) and 170kDa of Streptococcus sanguinis (SSA) were important antigens associated with the accumulation of those bacterias. Streptococcus mitis (SMI) present IgA1 protease of 202 kDa. We investigated the specificity and levels IgA against those antigens of virulence in samples of human colostrum. This study involved 77 samples of colostrum that were analyzed for levels of immunoglobulian A, M and G by Elisa. The specificity of IgA against extracts of SM and initials colonizators (SSA, SMI, SGO) were analyzed by the Western blot. The mean concentration of IgA was 2850.2 (±2567.2) mg/100 mL followed by IgM and IgG (respectively 321.8±90.3 and 88.3±51.5), statistically different (p<0.05). Results showed that the majority of samples had detectable levels of IgA antibodies to extracts of bacteria antigens and theirs virulence antigens. To SM, the GbpB was significantly lower detected than others antigens of SM (p<0.05). High complexities of response to Ags were identified in the samples. There were no significant differences in the mean number of IgA-reactive Ags between the antigens (p>0.4). So, the breast milk from first hours after birth presented significant levels of IgA specific against important virulence of antigens those oral streptococci, which can disrupt the installation and accumulation process of these microorganisms in the oral cavity.

  19. Immunoglobulin A multiple myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with reduced sialylation of IgA1.

    PubMed

    Van Der Helm-Van Mil, Annette H M; Smith, Alice C; Pouria, Shideh; Tarelli, Edward; Brunskill, Nigel J; Eikenboom, Heroen C J

    2003-09-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is characterized by immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) depositions in blood vessels of the skin or in glomeruli, resulting from altered hinge region O-glycosylation. Henoch-Schönlein purpura is seldom reported as a complication of IgA1 myeloma, even when the circulating IgA concentration is very high. We report two patients with IgA1 myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The O-glycosylation of these patients' IgA1 was studied. Both patients showed increased binding to peanut agglutinin lectin, suggesting a low degree of sialylation of the hinge region of IgA1 that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. IgA multiple myeloma, secreting IgA1 molecules with decreased sialylation, presenting with a Henoch-Schönlein purpura-like syndrome was diagnosed.

  20. Immunoglobulin A multiple myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with reduced sialylation of IgA1.

    PubMed

    Van Der Helm-Van Mil, Annette H M; Smith, Alice C; Pouria, Shideh; Tarelli, Edward; Brunskill, Nigel J; Eikenboom, Heroen C J

    2003-09-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is characterized by immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) depositions in blood vessels of the skin or in glomeruli, resulting from altered hinge region O-glycosylation. Henoch-Schönlein purpura is seldom reported as a complication of IgA1 myeloma, even when the circulating IgA concentration is very high. We report two patients with IgA1 myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The O-glycosylation of these patients' IgA1 was studied. Both patients showed increased binding to peanut agglutinin lectin, suggesting a low degree of sialylation of the hinge region of IgA1 that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. IgA multiple myeloma, secreting IgA1 molecules with decreased sialylation, presenting with a Henoch-Schönlein purpura-like syndrome was diagnosed. PMID:12956761

  1. A case of arteriovenous fistula after renal biopsy in an IgA nephropathy patient with macroscopic hematuria.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Takahata, Akiko; Shiraishi, Akihiko; Fukuda, Hiromitsu; Ohsawa, Isao; Kuwatsuru, Ryohei; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Macroscopic hematuria is a common symptom in IgA nephropathy and is also one of the most frequent complications after a percutaneous renal biopsy. Here, we describe a patient with IgA nephropathy and recurrent macroscopic hematuria who developed an arteriovenous fistula after renal biopsy.

  2. A Case of Arteriovenous Fistula after Renal Biopsy in an IgA Nephropathy Patient with Macroscopic Hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Takahata, Akiko; Shiraishi, Akihiko; Fukuda, Hiromitsu; Ohsawa, Isao; Kuwatsuru, Ryohei; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Macroscopic hematuria is a common symptom in IgA nephropathy and is also one of the most frequent complications after a percutaneous renal biopsy. Here, we describe a patient with IgA nephropathy and recurrent macroscopic hematuria who developed an arteriovenous fistula after renal biopsy. PMID:24167514

  3. Production of erythrocyte autoantibodies in NZB mice is inhibited by CD4 antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, G G; Hutchings, P R; Roitt, I M; Lydyard, P M

    1994-01-01

    NZB mice spontaneously develop haemolytic anaemia as the result of production of erythrocyte autoantibodies. The mechanisms leading to breakdown in tolerance to erythrocyte autoantigens are unknown. Antibodies to CD4 have been successfully used to treat several murine models of autoimmune disease. In this study we injected NZB mice with non-depleting CD4 antibodies and were able to prevent and abrogate erythrocyte autoantibody production in young (Coombs' negative) and old (Coombs' positive) mice, respectively. Our data indicate the dependency of autoantibody production on CD4+ T cells. However, withdrawal of anti-CD4 antibodies resulted in the appearance of erythrocyte autoantibodies, showing that under these conditions we were unable to re-establish tolerance to autoantigens on erythrocytes using anti-CD4 treatment. PMID:8187337

  4. Genetic linkage of IgA deficiency to the major histocompatibility complex: evidence for allele segregation distortion, parent-of-origin penetrance differences, and the role of anti-IgA antibodies in disease predisposition.

    PubMed Central

    Vorechovský, I; Webster, A D; Plebani, A; Hammarström, L

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency (IgAD) is characterized by a defect of terminal lymphocyte differentiation, leading to a lack of IgA in serum and mucosal secretions. Familial clustering, variable population prevalence in different ethnic groups, and a predominant inheritance pattern suggest a strong genetic predisposition to IgAD. The genetic susceptibility to IgAD is shared with a less prevalent, but more profound, defect called "common variable immunodeficiency" (CVID). Here we show an increased allele sharing at 6p21 in affected members of 83 multiplex IgAD/CVID pedigrees and demonstrate, using transmission/diseqilibrium tests, family-based associations indicating the presence of a predisposing locus, designated "IGAD1," in the proximal part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The recurrence risk of IgAD was found to depend on the sex of parents transmitting the defect: affected mothers were more likely to produce offspring with IgAD than were affected fathers. Carrier mothers but not carrier fathers transmitted IGAD1 alleles more frequently to the affected offspring than would be expected under random segregation. The differential parent-of-origin penetrance is proposed to reflect a maternal effect mediated by the production of anti-IgA antibodies tentatively linked to IGAD1. This is supported by higher frequency of anti-IgA-positive females transmitting the disorder to children, in comparison with female IgAD nontransmitters, and by linkage data in the former group. Such pathogenic mechanisms may be shared by other MHC-linked complex traits associated with the production of specific autoantibodies, parental effects, and a particular MHC haplotype. PMID:10090895

  5. The Role of Interleukin-6 in Mucosal IgA Antibody Responses in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Alistair J.; Husband, Alan J.; Ramshaw, Ian A.; Bao, Shisan; Matthaei, Klaus I.; Koehler, Georges; Kopf, Manfred

    1994-04-01

    In mice with targeted disruption of the gene that encodes interleukin-6 (IL-6), greatly reduced numbers of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-producing cells were observed at mucosae and grossly deficient local antibody responses were recorded after mucosal challenge with either ovalbumin or vaccinia virus. The IgA response in the lungs was completely restored after intranasal infection with recombinant vaccinia viruses engineered to express IL-6. These findings demonstrate a critical role for IL-6 in vivo in the development of local IgA antibody responses and illustrate the effectiveness of vector-directed cytokine gene therapy.

  6. Differential binding characteristics of native monomeric and polymeric immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) on human mesangial cells and the influence of in vitro deglycosylation of IgA1 molecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y-H; Xu, L-X; Zhang, J-J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, M-H; Wang, H-Y

    2007-06-01

    Recent studies had demonstrated that serum and mesangial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) were polymeric and deglycosylated. The current study was to investigate the binding characteristics of monomeric and polymeric normal human IgA1 on mesangial cells and the influence of in vitro deglycosylation of IgA1 molecules. The normal human IgA1 was desialylated and degalactosylated with specific enzymes, respectively. The monomeric IgA1 (mIgA1) and polymeric IgA1 (pIgA1) were separated by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. The binding capacities of the mIgA1 and pIgA1 to primary human mesangial cells (HMC) were evaluated by classical radioligand assay. Both the native mIgA1 and pIgA1 could bind to HMC in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. The maximal binding capacity of the native pIgA1 were significantly higher than that of the native mIgA1 (P < 0.05). However, the affinity of the native mIgA1 was almost 100 times higher than that of the native pIgA1. After deglycosylation, binding of the two deglycosylated mIgA1 to HMC could not be detected. However, the maximal binding capacities of the two deglycosylated pIgA1 to HMC were increased significantly compared with that of native pIgA1. The affinity of the two deglycosylated pIgA1 was similar to that of native pIgA1 (P > 0.05). The current study suggests differential binding characteristics of native monomeric and polymeric IgA1 on mesangial cells. Glycosylation of IgA1 molecules could significantly affect the binding of IgA1 on HMC.

  7. Analysis of the roles of antilipopolysaccharide and anti-cholera toxin immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies in protection against Vibrio cholerae and cholera toxin by use of monoclonal IgA antibodies in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Apter, F M; Michetti, P; Winner, L S; Mack, J A; Mekalanos, J J; Neutra, M R

    1993-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies (sIgA) directed against cholera toxin (CT) and surface components of Vibrio cholerae are associated with protection against cholera, but the relative importance of specific sIgAs in protection is unknown. A monoclonal IgA directed against the V. cholerae lipopolysaccharide (LPS), secreted into the intestines of neonatal mice bearing hybridoma tumors, was previously shown to provide protection against a lethal oral dose of 10(7) V. cholerae cells. We show here that a single oral dose of 5 to 50 micrograms of the monoclonal anti-LPS IgA, given within 2 h before V. cholerae challenge, protected neonatal mice against challenge. In contrast, an oral dose of 80 micrograms of monoclonal IgA directed against CT B subunit (CTB) failed to protect against V. cholerae challenge. A total of 80 micrograms of monoclonal anti-CTB IgA given orally protected neonatal mice from a lethal (5-micrograms) oral dose of CT. Secretion of the same anti-CTB IgA antibodies into the intestines of mice bearing IgA hybridoma backpack tumors, however, failed to protect against lethal oral doses of either CT (5 micrograms) or V. cholerae (10(7) cells). Furthermore, monoclonal anti-CTB IgA, either delivered orally or secreted onto mucosal surfaces in mice bearing hybridoma tumors, did not significantly enhance protection over that provided by oral anti-LPS IgA alone. These results demonstrate that anti-LPS sIgA is much more effective than anti-CT IgA in prevention of V. cholerae-induced diarrheal disease. Images PMID:8225601

  8. Differential binding characteristics of native monomeric and polymeric immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) on human mesangial cells and the influence of in vitro deglycosylation of IgA1 molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y-H; Xu, L-X; Zhang, J-J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, M-H; Wang, H-Y

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies had demonstrated that serum and mesangial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) were polymeric and deglycosylated. The current study was to investigate the binding characteristics of monomeric and polymeric normal human IgA1 on mesangial cells and the influence of in vitro deglycosylation of IgA1 molecules. The normal human IgA1 was desialylated and degalactosylated with specific enzymes, respectively. The monomeric IgA1 (mIgA1) and polymeric IgA1 (pIgA1) were separated by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. The binding capacities of the mIgA1 and pIgA1 to primary human mesangial cells (HMC) were evaluated by classical radioligand assay. Both the native mIgA1 and pIgA1 could bind to HMC in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. The maximal binding capacity of the native pIgA1 were significantly higher than that of the native mIgA1 (P < 0·05). However, the affinity of the native mIgA1 was almost 100 times higher than that of the native pIgA1. After deglycosylation, binding of the two deglycosylated mIgA1 to HMC could not be detected. However, the maximal binding capacities of the two deglycosylated pIgA1 to HMC were increased significantly compared with that of native pIgA1. The affinity of the two deglycosylated pIgA1 was similar to that of native pIgA1 (P > 0·05). The current study suggests differential binding characteristics of native monomeric and polymeric IgA1 on mesangial cells. Glycosylation of IgA1 molecules could significantly affect the binding of IgA1 on HMC. PMID:17386074

  9. Significance of Myositis Autoantibody in Patients with Idiopathic Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ju Sun; Hwang, Jiwon; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Some patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) related to connective tissue disease (CTD) have a delayed diagnosis of the underlying CTD when the ILD is categorized as idiopathic. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of myositis autoantibodies in patients diagnosed with idiopathic ILD and investigated the clinical significance stemming from the presence of the antibodies. Materials and Methods A total 32 patients diagnosed with idiopathic ILD were enrolled in this study. We analyzed a panel of 11 myositis autoantibody specificities in the patients using a line blot immunoassay. Then, we divided them into myositis autoantibody-positive and -negative groups and compared the clinical features and laboratory data between the two groups. Results Of the 32 idiopathic ILD patients, 12 patients had myositis autoantibodies encompassing 9 specificities, except for anti-Mi-2 and anti-PM-Scl 100 (12/32, 38%). Anti-synthetase autoantibodies including Jo-1, EJ, OJ, PL-7, and PL-12 were present in 7 patients (7/32, 22%). The group with myositis autoantibodies presented more frequently with the symptom of mechanic's hand and showed abnormal pulmonary function test results with low forced vital capacity, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, total lung capacity, and high lactate dehydrogenase values in blood when compared with the group without myositis antibodies. Conclusion We strongly suggest that patients undergo an evaluation of myositis autoantibodies, if they are diagnosed with idiopathic ILD in the presence of clinical characteristics including mechanic's hand, arthralgia, and autoantibodies which are insufficient to make a diagnosis of a specific CTD category. PMID:25837172

  10. Extensive morphea profunda with autoantibodies and benign tumors: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Budamakuntla, Leelavathy; Malvankar, Dipali

    2012-01-01

    The term deep morphea describes a variant of morphea (localised scleroderma) in which inflammation and sclerosis are found in the deep dermis, panniculus, fascia or superficial muscle. It is sometimes associated with autoantibodies. We report the case of a 49 year-old male who had morphea profunda (radiologically and histopathologically confirmed) affecting mainly the left side of the body with face, trunk and limb involvement, along with autoantibody production and associated neurofibromas and lipomas. PMID:23189258

  11. Generation of Antigen Microarrays to Screen for Autoantibodies in Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y. Y.; Nguyen, Albert; Lioe, Jocelyn; Tumiati, Laura C.; Kozuszko, Stella; Tinckam, Kathryn J.; Rao, Vivek; Dunn, Shannon E.; Persinger, Michael A.; Levy, Gary A.; Ross, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against endogenous proteins including contractile proteins and endothelial antigens are frequently detected in patients with heart failure and after heart transplantation. There is evidence that these autoantibodies contribute to cardiac dysfunction and correlate with clinical outcomes. Currently, autoantibodies are detected in patient sera using individual ELISA assays (one for each antigen). Thus, screening for many individual autoantibodies is laborious and consumes a large amount of patient sample. To better capture the broad-scale antibody reactivities that occur in heart failure and post-transplant, we developed a custom antigen microarray technique that can simultaneously measure IgM and IgG reactivities against 64 unique antigens using just five microliters of patient serum. We first demonstrated that our antigen microarray technique displayed enhanced sensitivity to detect autoantibodies compared to the traditional ELISA method. We then piloted this technique using two sets of samples that were obtained at our institution. In the first retrospective study, we profiled pre-transplant sera from 24 heart failure patients who subsequently received heart transplants. We identified 8 antibody reactivities that were higher in patients who developed cellular rejection (2 or more episodes of grade 2R rejection in first year after transplant as defined by revised criteria from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) compared with those who did have not have rejection episodes. In a second retrospective study with 31 patients, we identified 7 IgM reactivities that were higher in heart transplant recipients who developed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) compared with control recipients, and in time course studies, these reactivities appeared prior to overt graft dysfunction. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the autoantibody microarray technique outperforms traditional ELISAs as it uses less patient sample, has

  12. Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure is Associated with Clinical and Autoantibody Phenotypes in Juvenile Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mona; Targoff, Ira N.; Rice, Madeline M.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genetic and environmental factors may contribute to the etiology of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM), systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by muscle and skin inflammation. We investigated the association between ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and the clinical and autoantibody expression of JIIM. Methods We assessed the relationship between UVR exposure in the month before symptom onset and prevalence of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) versus polymyositis (JPM) in 298 patients. Among JDM patients, the association between UVR exposure and myositis autoantibodies was assessed. Regression models were stratified by sex and race. The association between regional UV index in U.S. geoclimatic zones and the clinical and autoantibody subgroups was examined by weighted least squares regression analysis. Results We observed increasing odds of JDM compared with JPM per unit increase in the patients’ highest UV index in the month before symptom onset in girls (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.00–1.40). The average and highest UV indices were associated with increasing odds of anti-p155/140 autoantibodies, which was strongest in white males (OR 1.30 and 1.23, respectively). No association was observed between the UV index and anti-MJ autoantibodies or patients without myositis autoantibodies. Across US geoclimatic regions, the average UV index was associated with increasing odds of JDM and anti-p155/140 autoantibodies but decreasing odds of anti-MJ autoantibodies. Conclusion Short-term UVR exposure prior to illness onset may have a role in the clinical and serologic expression of juvenile myositis. Research examining mechanisms of UVR in JIIM pathogenesis is suggested from these findings. PMID:23658122

  13. Role of PPM1A and anti-PPM1A Autoantibodies in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Sokolove, Jeremy; Lindstrom, Tamsin M.; Yoo, Bin; Lee, Chang-Keun; Reveille, John D.; Taurog, Joel D.; Robinson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is driven by immunemediated processes, little is known about the presence and role of autoantibodies in this disease. Methods We performed human protein microarray analysis of sera derived from patients with AS and other autoimmune disorders to identify autoantibodies associated specifically with AS, and identified autoantibody targeting of protein phosphatase magnesium-dependent 1A (PPM1A) in AS. We performed ELISA analysis of sera from two independent AS cohorts to confirm autoantibody targeting of PPM1A, and to assess associations between levels of anti-PPM1A antibodies and AS disease severity or response (as measured by BASDAI score) to anti-TNF therapy. Levels of anti-PPM1A antibodies were also evaluated in sera from transgenic rats overexpressing HLA-B27 and human β2-microglobulin. The expression of PPM1A was assessed by immunohistochemistry in synovial tissues from patients with AS, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. The role of PPM1A on osteoblast differentiation was investigated by gene knock-down and overexpression. Results AS was associated with autoantibody targeting of PPM1A, and levels of anti-PPM1A autoantibodies were significantly higher in patients with more advanced sacroiliitis and correlated with BASDAI score after treatment with anti-TNF agents. The levels of anti-PPM1A autoantibodies were also higher in sera of transgenic rats that are prone to develop AS than in those that are not. PPM1A was expressed in AS synovial tissue, and PPM1A overexpression promoted osteoblast differentiation, whereas PPM1A knockdown suppressed it. Conclusions Anti-PPM1A autoantibodies are present in AS, and our findings suggest that PPM1A may contribute to the pathogenic bone ankylosis characteristic of AS. PMID:24980965

  14. Human Traumatic Brain Injury Induces Autoantibody Response against Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Its Breakdown Products

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, Stefania; Newsom, Kimberly J.; Yang, Zhihui; Yang, Boxuan; Kobeissy, Firas; Guingab, Joy; Glushakova, Olena; Robicsek, Steven; Heaton, Shelley; Buki, Andras; Hannay, Julia; Gold, Mark S.; Rubenstein, Richard; Lu, Xi-chun May; Dave, Jitendra R.; Schmid, Kara; Tortella, Frank; Robertson, Claudia S.; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2014-01-01

    The role of systemic autoimmunity in human traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other forms of brain injuries is recognized but not well understood. In this study, a systematic investigation was performed to identify serum autoantibody responses to brain-specific proteins after TBI in humans. TBI autoantibodies showed predominant immunoreactivity against a cluster of bands from 38–50 kDa on human brain immunoblots, which were identified as GFAP and GFAP breakdown products. GFAP autoantibody levels increased by 7 days after injury, and were of the IgG subtype predominantly. Results from in vitro tests and rat TBI experiments also indicated that calpain was responsible for removing the amino and carboxyl termini of GFAP to yield a 38 kDa fragment. Additionally, TBI autoantibody staining co-localized with GFAP in injured rat brain and in primary rat astrocytes. These results suggest that GFAP breakdown products persist within degenerating astrocytes in the brain. Anti-GFAP autoantibody also can enter living astroglia cells in culture and its presence appears to compromise glial cell health. TBI patients showed an average 3.77 fold increase in anti-GFAP autoantibody levels from early (0–1 days) to late (7–10 days) times post injury. Changes in autoantibody levels were negatively correlated with outcome as measured by GOS-E score at 6 months, suggesting that TBI patients with greater anti-GFAP immune-responses had worse outcomes. Due to the long lasting nature of IgG, a test to detect anti-GFAP autoantibodies is likely to prolong the temporal window for assessment of brain damage in human patients. PMID:24667434

  15. Autoantibodies to Harmonin and Villin Are Diagnostic Markers in Children with IPEX Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lampasona, Vito; Passerini, Laura; Barzaghi, Federica; Lombardoni, Carlo; Bazzigaluppi, Elena; Brigatti, Cristina; Bacchetta, Rosa; Bosi, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies to enterocyte antigens harmonin (75 kDa USH1C protein) and villin (actin-binding 95 kDa protein) are associated with the Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic value of harmonin and villin autoantibodies in IPEX and IPEX-like syndromes. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were measured by a novel Luminescent-Immuno-Precipitation-System (LIPS) quantitative assay, in patients with IPEX, IPEX-like syndrome, Primary Immunodeficiencies (PID) with enteropathy, all diagnosed by sequencing of the FOXP3 gene, and in type 1 diabetes (T1D), celiac disease and healthy blood donors as control groups. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were detected in 12 (92%) and 6 (46%) of 13 IPEX patients, and in none of the IPEX-like, PID, T1D, celiac patients, respectively. All IPEX patients, including one case with late and atypical clinical presentation, had either harmonin and/or villin autoantibodies and tested positive for enterocyte antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. When measured in IPEX patients in remission after immunosuppressive therapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, harmonin and villin autoantibodies became undetectable or persisted at low titers in all cases but one in whom harmonin autoantibodies remained constantly high. In one patient, a peak of harmonin antibodies paralleled a relapse phase of enteropathy. Our study demonstrates that harmonin and villin autoantibodies, measured by LIPS, are sensitive and specific markers of IPEX, differentiate IPEX, including atypical cases, from other early childhood disorders associated with enteropathy, and are useful for screening and clinical monitoring of affected children. PMID:24250806

  16. IgH loci of American alligator and saltwater crocodile shed light on IgA evolution.

    PubMed

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-07-01

    Immunoglobulin loci of two representatives of the order Crocodylia were studied from full genome sequences. Both Alligator mississippiensis and Crocodylus porosus have 13 genes for the heavy chain constant regions of immunoglobulins. The IGHC locus contains genes encoding four immunoglobulins M (IgM), one immunoglobulin D (IgD), three immunoglobulins A (IgA), three immunoglobulins Y (IgY), and two immunoglobulins D2 (IgD2). IgA and IgD2 genes were found in reverse transcriptional orientation compared to the other Ig genes. The IGHD gene contains 11 exons, four of which containing stop codons or sequence alterations. As described in other reptiles, the IgD2 is a chimeric Ig with IgA- and IgD-related domains. This work clarifies the origin of bird IgA and its evolutionary relationship with amphibian immunoglobulin X (IgX) as well as their links with mammalian IgA.

  17. Characterization of the ligand binding site of the bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R).

    PubMed

    Morton, H Craig; Pleass, Richard J; Woof, Jenny M; Brandtzaeg, Per

    2004-12-24

    Recently, we identified a bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R), which shows high homology to the human myeloid Fc alpha R, CD89. IgA binding has previously been shown to depend on several specific residues located in the B-C and F-G loops of the membrane-distal extracellular domain 1 of CD89. To compare the ligand binding properties of these two Fc alpha Rs, we have mapped the IgA binding site of bFc alpha R. We show that, in common with CD89, Tyr-35 in the B-C loop is essential for IgA binding. However, in contrast to earlier observations on CD89, mutation of residues in the F-G loop did not significantly inhibit IgA binding.

  18. Quantification of β-region IgA monoclonal proteins - should we include immunochemical Hevylite® measurements? Point.

    PubMed

    Evans, Josie A R; Jenner, Ellen L; Carr Smith, Hugh D; Berlanga, Oscar; Harding, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    Accurate measurement of IgA monoclonal proteins presents a significant challenge to laboratory staff. IgA heavy/light chain (Hevylite, HLC) analysis is an alternative methodology for monoclonal protein assessment, giving an independent measure of IgAκ and IgAλ concentrations. Clonality is assessed by calculating the ratio of involved immunoglobulin to background uninvolved immunoglobulin concentrations (e.g. IgAκ/IgAλ in an IgAκ patient). Here we discuss the challenges faced by the laboratory in IgA monoclonal protein assessment, and compare the performance of Hevylite assays with electrophoresis and total IgA results. We present data which validates the use of Hevylite for response assessment: in most cases, Hevylite provides comparable response assignment to that provided by serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) and total IgA; in other cases Hevylite provides additional information, such as detection of residual disease or relapse.

  19. Elevated Plasma α-Defensins (HNP1-3) Levels Correlated with IgA1 Glycosylation and Susceptibility to IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Cheng, Fa-Juan; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Aim. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of glomerulonephritis. Recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) suggested that DEFA locus (which encodes α-defensins) may play a key role in IgAN. Methods. The levels of α-defensins in 169 IgAN patients and 83 healthy controls were tested by ELISA. Results. We observed that α-defensins human neutrophil peptides 1-3 (HNP1-3) in IgAN patients were elevated compared with healthy controls. The mean levels of α-defensins of 83 healthy controls and 169 IgAN patients were 50 ng/mL and 78.42 ng/mL. When the results were adjusted to the mean levels of α-defensins of IgAN patients, the percentage of individuals with high levels of α-defensins increased in IgAN patients (22.5%) compared to healthy controls (9.6%) (p = 0.013). The elevation of α-defensins in IgAN patients was independent of renal function or neutrophil count, which were major sources of α-defensins in circulation. More importantly, negative correlation was observed between galactose-deficient IgA1and α-defensins. Conclusion. As α-defensin is a lectin-like peptide, we speculated that it might be involved in IgA galactose deficiency. The data implied that patients with IgAN had higher plasma α-defensins levels and high α-defensins correlated with IgA galactose deficiency, further suggesting a pathogenic role of α-defensins in IgAN. PMID:27563166

  20. Elevated Plasma α-Defensins (HNP1–3) Levels Correlated with IgA1 Glycosylation and Susceptibility to IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xu-jie; Cheng, Fa-juan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of glomerulonephritis. Recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) suggested that DEFA locus (which encodes α-defensins) may play a key role in IgAN. Methods. The levels of α-defensins in 169 IgAN patients and 83 healthy controls were tested by ELISA. Results. We observed that α-defensins human neutrophil peptides 1–3 (HNP1–3) in IgAN patients were elevated compared with healthy controls. The mean levels of α-defensins of 83 healthy controls and 169 IgAN patients were 50 ng/mL and 78.42 ng/mL. When the results were adjusted to the mean levels of α-defensins of IgAN patients, the percentage of individuals with high levels of α-defensins increased in IgAN patients (22.5%) compared to healthy controls (9.6%) (p = 0.013). The elevation of α-defensins in IgAN patients was independent of renal function or neutrophil count, which were major sources of α-defensins in circulation. More importantly, negative correlation was observed between galactose-deficient IgA1and α-defensins. Conclusion. As α-defensin is a lectin-like peptide, we speculated that it might be involved in IgA galactose deficiency. The data implied that patients with IgAN had higher plasma α-defensins levels and high α-defensins correlated with IgA galactose deficiency, further suggesting a pathogenic role of α-defensins in IgAN. PMID:27563166

  1. Detection of multiple autoantibodies in patients with ankylosing spondylitis using nucleic acid programmable protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cynthia; Sibani, Sahar; Trudgian, David; Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt; LaBaer, Joshua; Bowness, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, inflammatory rheumatic disease that primarily affects the axial skeleton and is associated with sacroiliitis, uveitis, and enthesitis. Unlike other autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus, autoantibodies have not yet been reported to be a feature of AS. We therefore wished to determine whether plasma from patients with AS contained autoantibodies and, if so, characterize and quantify this response in comparison to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy controls. Two high density nucleic acid programmable protein arrays expressing a total of 3498 proteins were screened with plasma from 25 patients with AS, 17 with RA, and 25 healthy controls. Autoantigens identified were subjected to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to determine the patterns of signaling cascades or tissue origin. 44% of patients with ankylosing spondylitis demonstrated a broad autoantibody response, as compared with 33% of patients with RA and only 8% of healthy controls. Individuals with AS demonstrated autoantibody responses to shared autoantigens, and 60% of autoantigens identified in the AS cohort were restricted to that group. The autoantibody responses in the AS patients were targeted toward connective, skeletal, and muscular tissue, unlike those of RA patients or healthy controls. Thus, patients with AS show evidence of systemic humoral autoimmunity and multispecific autoantibody production. Nucleic acid programmable protein arrays constitute a powerful tool to study autoimmune diseases.

  2. Autoantibodies to the epidermal growth factor receptor in systemic sclerosis, lupus, and autoimmune mice.

    PubMed

    Planque, Stephanie; Zhou, Yong-Xin; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Sinha, Meenal; O'Connor-Mccourt, Maureen; Arnett, Frank C; Paul, Sudhir

    2003-02-01

    Autoantibodies to the recombinant extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (exEGFR) were detected by ELISA in the serum of Fas-defective old MRL/MpJ/lpr and C3H/HeJ/gld mice, but not young mice from these strains, or nonautoimmune young and old BALB/c, MRL/MpJ/++, and C3H/HeJ/MMTV mice. Compared with control human subjects without autoimmune disease, the frequency of exEGFR-binding autoantibodies was increased in scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) patients and to a lesser extent in lupus patients. Phage autoantibodies (Fv fragments) isolated from a lupus library by selection on a linear epitope of EGFR (residues 294-310) displayed the ability to bind exEGFR. Treatment of EGFR-expressing A431 cells with autoantibodies purified by affinity chromatography on immobilized exEGFR resulted in specific staining of the cells. Short-lived but strong inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis was observed in the presence of the autoantibodies. We concluded that autoantibody responses to EGFR hold the potential of fulfilling a pathogenic role in autoimmune disease.

  3. Induction of osteoclastogenesis and bone loss by human autoantibodies against citrullinated vimentin

    PubMed Central

    Harre, Ulrike; Georgess, Dan; Bang, Holger; Bozec, Aline; Axmann, Roland; Ossipova, Elena; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Baum, Wolfgang; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Szarka, Eszter; Sarmay, Gabriella; Krumbholz, Grit; Neumann, Elena; Toes, Rene; Scherer, Hans-Ulrich; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Klareskog, Lars; Jurdic, Pierre; Schett, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmunity is complicated by bone loss. In human rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most severe inflammatory joint disease, autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins are among the strongest risk factors for bone destruction. We therefore hypothesized that these autoantibodies directly influence bone metabolism. Here, we found a strong and specific association between autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins and serum markers for osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in RA patients. Moreover, human osteoclasts expressed enzymes eliciting protein citrullination, and specific N-terminal citrullination of vimentin was induced during osteoclast differentiation. Affinity-purified human autoantibodies against mutated citrullinated vimentin (MCV) not only bound to osteoclast surfaces, but also led to robust induction of osteoclastogenesis and bone-resorptive activity. Adoptive transfer of purified human MCV autoantibodies into mice induced osteopenia and increased osteoclastogenesis. This effect was based on the inducible release of TNF-α from osteoclast precursors and the subsequent increase of osteoclast precursor cell numbers with enhanced expression of activation and growth factor receptors. Our data thus suggest that autoantibody formation in response to citrullinated vimentin directly induces bone loss, providing a link between the adaptive immune system and bone. PMID:22505457

  4. Induction of osteoclastogenesis and bone loss by human autoantibodies against citrullinated vimentin.

    PubMed

    Harre, Ulrike; Georgess, Dan; Bang, Holger; Bozec, Aline; Axmann, Roland; Ossipova, Elena; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Baum, Wolfgang; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Szarka, Eszter; Sarmay, Gabriella; Krumbholz, Grit; Neumann, Elena; Toes, Rene; Scherer, Hans-Ulrich; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Klareskog, Lars; Jurdic, Pierre; Schett, Georg

    2012-05-01

    Autoimmunity is complicated by bone loss. In human rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most severe inflammatory joint disease, autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins are among the strongest risk factors for bone destruction. We therefore hypothesized that these autoantibodies directly influence bone metabolism. Here, we found a strong and specific association between autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins and serum markers for osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in RA patients. Moreover, human osteoclasts expressed enzymes eliciting protein citrullination, and specific N-terminal citrullination of vimentin was induced during osteoclast differentiation. Affinity-purified human autoantibodies against mutated citrullinated vimentin (MCV) not only bound to osteoclast surfaces, but also led to robust induction of osteoclastogenesis and bone-resorptive activity. Adoptive transfer of purified human MCV autoantibodies into mice induced osteopenia and increased osteoclastogenesis. This effect was based on the inducible release of TNF-α from osteoclast precursors and the subsequent increase of osteoclast precursor cell numbers with enhanced expression of activation and growth factor receptors. Our data thus suggest that autoantibody formation in response to citrullinated vimentin directly induces bone loss, providing a link between the adaptive immune system and bone. PMID:22505457

  5. Aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 is inherited in both pediatric IgA nephropathy and Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Moldoveanu, Zina; Sanders, John T; Eison, T Matthew; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Julian, Bruce A; Novak, Jan; Gharavi, Ali G; Wyatt, Robert J

    2011-07-01

    Serum galactose-deficient immunoglobulin A1 (Gd-IgA1) is an inherited risk factor for adult IgA nephropathy (IgAN). In this paper, we determined the heritability of serum Gd-IgA1 levels in children with IgAN and Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN), two disorders with clinical phenotypes sharing common pathogenic mechanisms. Serum Gd-IgA1 concentrations were quantified using a Helix aspersa-lectin-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. As a group, 34 children with either disorder (20 with HSPN and 14 with IgAN) had significantly higher Gd-IgA1 levels compared with 51 age- and ethnicity-matched pediatric controls. Serum levels of Gd-IgA1 were also elevated in a large fraction of 54 first-degree relatives of pediatric IgAN and HSPN patients compared with 141 unrelated healthy adult controls. A unilineal transmission of the trait was found in 17, bilineal transmission in 1, and sporadic occurrence in 5 of 23 families when both parents and the patient were analyzed. There was a significant age-, gender-, and household-adjusted heritability of serum galactose-deficient IgA1 estimated at 76% in pediatric IgAN and at 64% in HSPN patients. Thus, serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels are highly inherited in pediatric patients with IgAN and HSPN, providing support for another shared pathogenic link between these disorders.

  6. Systemic administration of an HIV 1 broadly neutralizing dimeric IgA yields mucosal secretory IgA and virus neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Fouda, Genevieve G.; Amos, Joshua D.; Liebl, Brooke E.; Himes, Jonathan; Boakye-Agyeman, Felix; Beck, Krista; Michaels, Anthony J.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Haynes, Barton F.; Reimann, Keith A.; Permar, Sallie R.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the mucosal distribution and neutralization potency of rhesus recombinant versions of the HIV-specific, broadly neutralizing antibody b12 (RhB12) following intravenous administration to lactating rhesus monkeys. IgG and dimeric IgA (dIgA) administration resulted in high plasma concentrations of bnAb, but the monomeric IgA (mIgA) was rapidly cleared from the systemic compartment. Interestingly differences in the distribution of the RhB12 isoform were observed between the mucosal compartments. The peak concentration of RhB12 IgG was higher than dIgA in saliva, rectal and vaginal secretions, but the bnAb concentration in milk was one to two logs higher after dIgA administration than with IgG or mIgA infusion. Neutralization was observed in plasma of all animals, but only those infused with RhB12 dIgA showed moderate levels of virus neutralization in milk. Remarkably, virus-specific secretory IgA was detected in mucosal compartments following dIgA administration. The high milk RhB12 dIgA concentration suggests that passive immunization with dIgA could be more effective than IgG to inhibit virus in breast milk. PMID:27072605

  7. Suppression of adiponectin by aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in glomerular mesangial cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tatsuyuki; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Masashi; Takiue, Keiichi; Morinaga, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Ayu; Kikumoto, Yoko; Kitamura, Shinji; Maeshima, Yohei; Makino, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) may be associated with the mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1. To identify mediators affected by aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in cultured human mesangial cells (HMCs), we generated enzymatically modified desialylated and degalactosylated (deSial/deGal) IgA1. The state of deglycosylated IgA1 was confirmed by lectin binding to Helix aspersa (HAA) and Sambucus nigra (SNA). In the cytokine array analysis, 52 proteins were upregulated and 34 were downregulated in HMCs after stimulation with deSial/deGal IgA1. Among them, the secretion of adiponectin was suppressed in HMCs after stimulation with deSial/deGal IgA1. HMCs expressed mRNAs for adiponectin and its type 1 receptor, but not the type 2 receptor. Moreover, we revealed a downregulation of adiponectin expression in the glomeruli of renal biopsy specimens from patients with IgAN compared to those with lupus nephritis. We also demonstrated that aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 was deposited in the mesangium of patients with IgAN by dual staining of HAA and IgA. Moreover, the urinary HAA/SNA ratio of lectin binding was significantly higher in IgAN compared to other kidney diseases. Since adiponectin has anti-inflammatory effects, including the inhibition of adhesion molecules and cytokines, these data suggest that the local suppression of this adipokine by aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 could be involved in the regulation of glomerular inflammation and sclerosis in IgAN.

  8. A comparison of anti-HER2 IgA and IgG1 in vivo efficacy is facilitated by high N-glycan sialylation of the IgA.

    PubMed

    Rouwendal, Gerard Ja; van der Lee, Miranda M; Meyer, Saskia; Reiding, Karli R; Schouten, Jan; de Roo, Guy; Egging, David F; Leusen, Jeanette Hw; Boross, Peter; Wuhrer, Manfred; Verheijden, Gijs F; Dokter, Wim H; Timmers, Marco; Ubink, Ruud

    2016-01-01

    Monomeric IgA has been proposed as an alternative antibody format for cancer therapy. Here, we present our studies on the production, purification and functional evaluation of anti-HER2 IgA antibodies as anti-cancer agents in comparison to the anti-HER2 IgG1 trastuzumab. MALDI-TOF MS analysis showed profound differences in glycosylation traits across the IgA isotypes and cell lines used for production, including sialylation and linkage thereof, fucosylation (both core and antennary) and the abundance of high-mannose type species. Increases in sialylation proved to positively correlate with in vivo plasma half-lives. The polymerization propensity of anti-HER2 IgA2m2 could be suppressed by an 18-aa deletion of the heavy chain tailpiece - coinciding with the loss of high-mannose type N-glycan species - as well as by 2 cysteine to serine mutations at positions 320 and 480. The HER2 F(ab')2-mediated anti-proliferative effect of the IgA2m1 and IgA2m2 subtypes was similar to IgG1, whereas the IgA1 isotype displayed considerably lower potency and efficacy. The Fc-mediated induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) using human whole blood ADCC assays did not demonstrate such clear differences between the IgA isotypes. However, the potency of the anti-HER2 IgA antibodies in these ADCC assays was found to be significantly lower than that of trastuzumab. In vivo anti-tumor activity of the anti-HER2 IgA antibodies was compared to that of trastuzumab in a BT-474 breast cancer xenograft model. Multiple dosing and sialylation of the IgA antibodies compensated for the short in vivo half-life of native IgA antibodies in mice compared to a single dose of IgG1. In the case of the IgA2m2 antibody, the resulting high plasma exposure levels were sufficient to cause clear tumor stasis comparable to that observed for trastuzumab at much lower plasma exposure levels.

  9. A comparison of anti-HER2 IgA and IgG1 in vivo efficacy is facilitated by high N-glycan sialylation of the IgA

    PubMed Central

    Rouwendal, Gerard JA; van der Lee, Miranda M; Meyer, Saskia; Reiding, Karli R; Schouten, Jan; de Roo, Guy; Egging, David F; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Boross, Peter; Wuhrer, Manfred; Verheijden, Gijs F; Dokter, Wim H; Timmers, Marco; Ubink, Ruud

    2016-01-01

    Monomeric IgA has been proposed as an alternative antibody format for cancer therapy. Here, we present our studies on the production, purification and functional evaluation of anti-HER2 IgA antibodies as anti-cancer agents in comparison to the anti-HER2 IgG1 trastuzumab. MALDI-TOF MS analysis showed profound differences in glycosylation traits across the IgA isotypes and cell lines used for production, including sialylation and linkage thereof, fucosylation (both core and antennary) and the abundance of high-mannose type species. Increases in sialylation proved to positively correlate with in vivo plasma half-lives. The polymerization propensity of anti-HER2 IgA2m2 could be suppressed by an 18-aa deletion of the heavy chain tailpiece - coinciding with the loss of high-mannose type N-glycan species - as well as by 2 cysteine to serine mutations at positions 320 and 480. The HER2 F(ab')2-mediated anti-proliferative effect of the IgA2m1 and IgA2m2 subtypes was similar to IgG1, whereas the IgA1 isotype displayed considerably lower potency and efficacy. The Fc-mediated induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) using human whole blood ADCC assays did not demonstrate such clear differences between the IgA isotypes. However, the potency of the anti-HER2 IgA antibodies in these ADCC assays was found to be significantly lower than that of trastuzumab. In vivo anti-tumor activity of the anti-HER2 IgA antibodies was compared to that of trastuzumab in a BT-474 breast cancer xenograft model. Multiple dosing and sialylation of the IgA antibodies compensated for the short in vivo half-life of native IgA antibodies in mice compared to a single dose of IgG1. In the case of the IgA2m2 antibody, the resulting high plasma exposure levels were sufficient to cause clear tumor stasis comparable to that observed for trastuzumab at much lower plasma exposure levels. PMID:26440530

  10. Amphibians have immunoglobulins similar to ancestral IgD and IgA from Amniotes.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Olivia; Garet, Elina; Olivieri, David; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We studied the immunoglobulin genes from either the genomes or RNAs of amphibians. In particular, we obtained data from one frog genome (Nanorana parkeri) and three transcriptomes of the Caudata order (Andrias davidianus, Notophthalmus viridescens and Cynops pyrrhogaster). Apart from the immunoglobulins IgM and IgY previously described, we identified several IgD related immunoglobulins. The species N. parkeri, N. viridescens and C. pyrrhogaster have two IgD genes, while Andrias davidianus has three such genes. The three Caudata species have long IgD immunoglobulins similar to IgD of reptiles, and could be an ancient relic from the common ancestor of IgD of all mammals and reptiles. We also found two IgA isotypes. The results suggest that one of the IgA may be the ancestor of IgA in crocodiles and birds, while the other could be the ancestor IgA found in mammals. These results provide information that could help understand the evolution of immunoglobulins in terrestrial vertebrates.

  11. Development of recombinant human IgA for anticardiolipin antibodies assay standardization.

    PubMed

    Knappik, Achim; Capuano, Francesco; Frisch, Christian; Ylera, Francisco; Bonelli, Fabrizio

    2009-09-01

    Controls and calibrators in autoimmune assays are typically developed from patient sera. However, the use of sera is accompanied by a number of disadvantages, such as lack of monospecificity, lack of assay comparability, and supply limitations. Ideally, the control reagent would be an antigen-specific human monoclonal antibody preparation that is defined and pure, easy to produce without any supply limitations, and of defined isotype (IgG, IgM, or IgA). The generation of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies has been complicated, but recent advances in development of fully human antibodies by means of in vitro antibody gene library selection has opened a way for the isolation of human antibodies to virtually any antigen, including self-antigens. Such antibodies can be converted to any isotype by gene cloning. Here we developed a set of human monoclonal IgA antibodies specific for the cardiolipin-beta2-glycoprotein 1 complex, using the HuCAL technology. We evaluated the IgA variants of those antibodies for their use as standards in IgA anticardiolipin antibody assays and compared these reagents with serum controls. Such recombinant antibodies may ultimately replace patient sera as assay control and calibration reagents. PMID:19758150

  12. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis responsive to a gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Egan, C A; Smith, E P; Taylor, T B; Meyer, L J; Samowitz, W S; Zone, J J

    2001-06-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis is associated with a gluten-sensitive enteropathy in >85% of cases. Both the skin lesions and the enteropathy respond to gluten restriction. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis has a much lower prevalence of histological small bowel abnormalities, and lesions are not known to respond to gluten restriction. We report a patient with linear IgA bullous dermatosis and gluten-sensitive enteropathy. This report addresses the issue of whether linear IgA bullous dermatosis can be associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy. We evaluated the response to gluten restriction and normal diet by following the status of the patient's jejunal biopsies and skin lesions. The patient responded to gluten restriction, as shown by resolution of jejunal abnormalities and skin lesions and subsequently by recurrence of jejunal abnormalities and skin lesions with reinstitution of a gluten-containing diet. This report demonstrates that linear IgA bullous dermatosis can respond to gluten restriction if an underlying gluten-sensitive enteropathy is present.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 IgA antibody in breast milk and serum.

    PubMed

    Duprat, C; Mohammed, Z; Datta, P; Stackiw, W; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Kreiss, J K; Holmes, K K; Plummer, F A; Embree, J E

    1994-07-01

    Breast-feeding plays a potentially significant role in mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The additional transmission risk attributable to breast-feeding and the factors that enhance or inhibit transmission are presently unknown. One mechanism by which breast milk might inhibit HIV-1 transmission is the presence of specific antibodies directed against HIV-1 in breast milk of seropositive mothers. In this study serum and breast milk samples from women in Nairobi, Kenya, were tested to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 IgA antibodies. A Western blot test developed in our laboratory was used to detect anti-HIV-1 immunoglobulin A in serum and anti-HIV-1 secretory IgA (sIgA) in breast milk. Ninety-four percent of 63 HIV-1 seropositive women had anti-HIV-1 IgA in serum and 59% had anti-HIV-1 sIgA in their breast milk. No significant associations with maternal characteristics or serum anti-HIV-1 IgA or IgG banding patterns and the presence of anti-HIV-1 sIgA in breast milk were found. No protective effect of anti-HIV-1 sIgA was seen regarding mother to child transmission; however, further studies are necessary to determine the effect of these antibodies in maternal sera or in breast milk on the efficacy of HIV-1 transmission.

  14. Anti-ETAR and anti-AT1R autoantibodies are elevated in patients with endstage cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Budding, K; van de Graaf, E A; Hoefnagel, T; Kwakkel-van Erp, J M; van Kessel, D A; Dragun, D; Hack, C E; Otten, H G

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies against endothelin-1 type A receptor (ETAR) are present in systemic sclerosis complicated by lung fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. As increased serum levels and local overproduction of endothelin-1 in the airways are reported in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we reasoned that anti-ETAR antibodies could be prevalent in endstage CF patients prior to lung transplantation (LTx). Also, ETAR autoantibodies are frequently associated with autoantibodies against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). We analyzed the presence of anti-ETAR and anti-AT1R autoantibodies in 43 LTx patients (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), n=20; CF, n=13; interstitial lung disease (ILD), n=1). We observed overall higher anti-ETAR and anti-AT1R autoantibody titers in sera taken prior to LTx in the CF patient group as compared to COPD. No difference was found in autoantibody levels between patients with CF versus ILD. In sera taken post-LTx we found the same difference in anti-ETAR and anti-AT1R autoantibody titers between patients with CF versus COPD. No difference was found in antibody titers between sera taken prior to or 6 months after LTx. There was no association between autoantibody levels and other relevant demographic parameters, and we found no association between autoantibody titers and the development of the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Both autoantibody titers were strongly correlated. We hypothesize that due to prolonged exposure to bacterial infection, increased levels of AT1R and ETAR result in a deregulated immune response causing autoantibody formation. Further research is expedient to elucidate the occurrence of autoantibodies against ETAR and AT1R and their role in disease progression.

  15. A study of type-1 diabetes associated autoantibodies in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hallford, Philomena; Clair, David St; Halley, Lorna; Mustard, Colette; Wei, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological studies revealed an association between type-1 diabetes (T1D) and schizophrenia but the findings reported to date have been controversial. To clarify the inconsistency across studies, T1D-associated autoantibodies were examined in plasma samples collected from 272 patients with schizophrenia and 276 control subjects. An in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using three linear peptide antigens, one of which was derived from glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and two were derived from insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA2). Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant decrease in the levels of plasma IgG against the IA2b antigen in schizophrenia patients as compared to control subjects (Z=-3.54, p=0.0007), while no significant difference was found between these two groups either in anti-IA2a IgG levels (Z=-1.62, p=0.105) or in anti-GAD IgG levels (Z=-1.63, p=0.104). Linear regression analysis indicated no association of antipsychotic medication with the levels of plasma IgG against IA2a, IA2b or GAD, while the levels of plasma IgG for these 3 peptide antigens were significantly correlated with each other. Binary logistic regression showed that neither the DQ2.5 variant nor the DQ8 variant was associated with circulating levels of 3 T1D-associated autoantibodies in both the patient group and the control group. The coefficient of variation was 10.7% for anti-IA2a IgG assay, 10.1% for anti-IA2b IgG assay and 10.7% for anti-GAD IgG assay. The present work suggests that T1D-associated antibodies are unlikely to confer risk of schizophrenia and that the in-house ELISA developed with linear peptide antigens is highly reproducible. PMID:27474348

  16. The combined role of galactose-deficient IgA1 and streptococcal IgA-binding M Protein in inducing IL-6 and C3 secretion from human mesangial cells: implications for IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Roland; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Olin, Anders I; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Rebetz, Johan; Novak, Jan; Lindahl, Gunnar; Karpman, Diana

    2014-07-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix expansion associated with immune deposits consisting of galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1 and C3. We have previously shown that IgA-binding regions of streptococcal M proteins colocalize with IgA in mesangial immune deposits in patients with IgAN. In the present study, the IgA-binding M4 protein from group A Streptococcus was found to bind to galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1 with higher affinity than to other forms of IgA1, as shown by surface plasmon resonance and solid-phase immunoassay. The M4 protein was demonstrated to bind to mesangial cells not via the IgA-binding region but rather via the C-terminal region, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. IgA1 enhanced binding of M4 to mesangial cells, but not vice versa. Costimulation of human mesangial cells with M4 and galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1 resulted in a significant increase in IL-6 secretion compared with each stimulant alone. Galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1 alone, but not M4, induced C3 secretion from the cells, and costimulation enhanced this effect. Additionally, costimulation enhanced mesangial cell proliferation compared with each stimulant alone. These results indicate that IgA-binding M4 protein binds preferentially to galactose-deficient polymeric IgA1 and that these proteins together induce excessive proinflammatory responses and proliferation of human mesangial cells. Thus, tissue deposition of streptococcal IgA-binding M proteins may contribute to the pathogenesis of IgAN.

  17. IgA binding lectins isolated from distinct Artocarpus species demonstrate differential specificity.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Ng, C L; Gendeh, S; Nik Jaafar, M I

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of jacalin, a group of lectins from jackfruit seeds (Artocarpus heterophyllus), has attracted considerable attention due to its numerous interesting immunological properties as well as its usefulness in the isolation of various serum proteins. We have further identified a similar lectin from the seeds of Champedak (Artocarpus integer) which we refer to as lectin-C and performed comparative studies with two types of jacalin isolated from different batches of the Malaysian jackfruit seeds (jacalin-M1 and jacalin-M2). The three purified lectins demonstrated equivalent apparent Mr of about 52,500, each of which comprised of a combination of two types of non-covalently-linked subunits with apparent Mr of approximately 13,300 and 16,000. The lectins demonstrated equal haemagglutinating activity against human erythrocytes of blood groups A, B, AB and O. Our data also demonstrated that lectin-C, jacalin-M1 and jacalin-M2 are similar by selectively precipitating human serum IgA1 and colostral sIgA but not IgA2, IgD, IgG and IgM. When immunoelectrophoresis was performed on normal human sera and reacted with the lectins, single precipitin arcs corresponding to IgA immunoprecipitates were detected with lectin-C and jacalin-MI. Jacalin-M2, however, exhibited two closely associated precipitin arcs. The binding of these lectins with IgA was pronouncedly inhibited in the presence of p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, 1-o-methyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside, D-melibiose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and D-galactose. The data therefore provide evidence on the differential specificity of IgA binding lectins isolated from seeds of similar as well as distinct Artocarpus species.

  18. Lactoferrin Combined with Retinoic Acid Stimulates B1 Cells to Express IgA Isotype and Gut-homing Molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong-Ho; Jin, Bo-Ra; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Seo, Goo-Young; Jang, Young-Saeng; Kim, Sun-Jin; An, Sun-Jin; Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Woan-Sub; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2015-02-01

    It is well established that TGF-β1 and retinoic acid (RA) cause IgA isotype switching in mice. We recently found that lactoferrin (LF) also has an activity of IgA isotype switching in spleen B cells. The present study explored the effect of LF on the Ig production by mouse peritoneal B cells. LF, like TGF-β1, substantially increased IgA production in peritoneal B1 cells but little in peritoneal B2 cells. In contrast, LF increased IgG2b production in peritoneal B2 cells much more strongly than in peritoneal B1 cells. LF in combination with RA further enhanced the IgA production and, interestingly, this enhancement was restricted to IgA isotype and B1 cells. Similarly, the combination of the two molecules also led to expression of gut homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9 on peritoneal B1 cells, but not on peritoneal B2 cells. Thus, these results indicate that LF and RA can contribute to gut IgA response through stimulating IgA isotype switching and expression of gut-homing molecules in peritoneal B1 cells.

  19. Intra-tumour IgA1 is common in cancer and is correlated with poor prognosis in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Charlotte; Jirström, Karin; Lehn, Sophie; Nodin, Björn; Marko-Varga, György; Blixt, Ola; Danielsson, Lena; Jansson, Bo

    2016-08-01

    A high frequency of IgA1-positive tumour cells was found in tissue micro-arrays of oesophagus, colon, testis, lung, breast, bladder and ovarian cancer. IgA1 was observed in the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. A correlation was found between intra-tumour IgA1 and poor overall survival in a large cohort of bladder cancer patients (n = 99, p = 0.011, log-rank test). The number of IgA1-positive tumour cells was also found to be higher in female than male bladder cancer patients. The presence of IgA1 was confirmed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded ovarian carcinoma samples using LC-MS/MS analysis. Uptake of IgA1 was also observed in breast cancer and melanoma cell lines when cultivated in the presence of serum from healthy individuals, indicating a possible origin of the IgA1 antibodies in cancer cells. PMID:27579449

  20. A panel of autoantibodies as potential early diagnostic serum biomarkers in patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Huangfu, Mingmei; Xu, Shuang; Li, Siyao; Sun, Baosheng; Lee, Kuang-Hui; Liu, Linlin; Sun, Shilong

    2016-07-01

    The study was designed to test whether circulating autoantibodies against associated antigens (TAAs) were altered in early cervical cancer and benign cervical tumors. A total of 111 cervical cancer patients, 137 cervical benign tumor patients, and 160 healthy volunteers matched in age were recruited in this study. The expression of autoantibodies was tested using in-house developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with linear peptide envelope antigens derived from TAAs. One-way ANOVA test showed that there was no difference in the CD25 autoantibody expression among the cervical cancer group, benign tumor group, and healthy control group (P = 0.063; P = 0.191). The expression of autoantibodies against survivin and TP53 in the cervical cancer group was significantly higher than that in the benign tumor group (P < 0.001; P < 0.001). The levels of autoantibodies against cyclinB-1 and ANXA-1 were higher in the cervical cancer group than in the healthy control group (P = 0.010; P = 0.001), while autoantibodies in the cervical cancer group showed no difference in expression compared with that in the benign tumor group. The panel of five TAAs showed a sensitivity of 37.8 % and a specificity of 90 %, which was much higher than the sensitivity of the single-TAA testing group. The data from this study further support our previous hypothesis that the detection of autoantibodies for the diagnosis of a specific cancer type can be enhanced using a panel of several selected TAAs as target antigens.

  1. Autoantibodies to evolutionarily conserved epitopes of enolase in a patient with discoid lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Gitlits, V M; Sentry, J W; Matthew, M L; Smith, A I; Toh, B H

    1997-01-01

    Although the pathology of discoid lupus erythematosus is well documented the causative agents are not known. Here, we report the identity of the target antigen of an autoantibody present in high titre in the serum of a patient with discoid lupus erythematosus. We have demonstrated that the antigen is enolase; first, because it has properties consistent with this glycolytic enzyme (47,000 MW, cytosolic localization and ubiquitous tissue distribution). Secondly, limited amino acid sequence determination after trypsin digestion shows identity with alpha-enolase. Finally, the autoimmune serum immunoblots rabbit and yeast enolase and predominantly one isoelectric form of enolase (PI approximately 6.1). These results indicate that the reactive autoepitopes are highly conserved from man to yeast. The results also suggest that the autoantibodies are most reactive to the alpha-isoform of enolase, although it is possible that they may also be reactive with gamma-enolase, and have least reactivity to beta-enolase. The anti-enolase autoantibodies belong to the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) isotype. This is the first report of IgG1 autoantibodies to evolutionarily conserved autoepitopes of enolase in the serum of a patient with discoid lupus erythematosus. Previous reports of autoantibodies to enolase have suggested associations with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I and cancer-associated retinopathy. This report and an earlier report of what is likely to be enolase autoantibodies in two patients without systemic disease suggest that enolase autoantibodies have a broad association and are not restricted to any particular disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9486109

  2. Predictors of slow progression to diabetes in children with multiple islet autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Steck, Andrea K; Dong, Fran; Waugh, Kathleen; Frohnert, Brigitte I; Yu, Liping; Norris, Jill M; Rewers, Marian J

    2016-08-01

    Although most children with multiple islet autoantibodies develop type 1 diabetes, rate of progression is highly variable. The goal of this study was to explore potential factors involved in rate of progression to diabetes in children with multiple islet autoantibodies. The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed 118 children with multiple islet autoantibodies for progression to diabetes. After excluding 27 children currently diabetes-free but followed for <10 years, the study population was grouped into: rapid progressors (N = 39) who developed diabetes in <5 years; moderate progressors (N = 25), diagnosed with diabetes within 5-10 years; and slow progressors (N = 27), diabetes-free for >10 years. Islet autoimmunity appeared at 4.0 ± 3.5, 3.2 ± 1.8 and 5.8 ± 3.1 years of age in rapid, moderate and slow progressors, respectively (p = 0.006). Insulin autoantibody levels were lower in slow progressors compared to moderate and rapid progressors. The groups did not differ by gender, ethnicity, family history, susceptibility HLA and non-HLA genes. The rate of development of individual islet autoantibodies including mIAA, GADA, IA-2A and ZnT8A were all slower in the slow versus moderate/rapid progressors. In multivariate analyses, older age at seroconversion and lower initial mIAA levels independently predicted slower progression to diabetes. Later onset of islet autoimmunity and lower autoantibody levels predicted slower progression to diabetes among children with multiple islet autoantibodies. These factors may need to be considered in the design of trials to prevent type 1 diabetes.

  3. Functional Characterization of Autoantibodies against Complement Component C3 in Patients with Lupus Nephritis*

    PubMed Central

    Vasilev, Vasil V.; Noe, Remi; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Chauvet, Sophie; Lazarov, Valentin J.; Deliyska, Boriana P.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Dimitrov, Jordan D.; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a complication of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Because the complement system plays a critical role in orchestrating inflammatory and immune responses as well as in the clearance of immune complexes, autoreactivity to complement components may have considerable pathological consequences. Autoantibodies against the central complement component C3 have been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus, but their molecular mechanism and functional relevance are not well understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and the functional properties of the anti-C3 autoantibodies. Anti-C3 autoantibodies were measured in plasma of 39 LN patients, and identification of their epitopes on the C3 molecule was performed. By using surface plasmon resonance, we analyzed the influence of patient-derived IgG antibodies on the interaction of C3b with Factor B, Factor H, and complement receptor 1. The capacity of these antibodies to dysregulate the C3 convertase on the surface of endothelial cell was measured by flow cytometry. Here we report that the frequency of anti-C3 autoantibodies in LN is ∼30%. They inhibited interactions of the negative complement regulators Factor H and complement receptor 1 with C3b. An enhanced C3 deposition was also observed on human endothelial cells in the presence of C3 autoantibodies. In addition, anti-C3 autoantibody levels correlated with disease activity. In conclusion, the anti-C3 autoantibodies in LN may contribute to the autoimmune pathology by their capacity to overactivate the complement system. PMID:26245903

  4. [Interferon alpha antibodies show no cross reactions with typical autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Görg, S; Klouche, M; Wilhelm, D; Kirchner, H

    1993-04-01

    Patients treated with natural human interferon alpha develop anti-interferon antibodies (IFN-AB) only in very rare cases. By contrast, patients with autoimmune disorders are able to generate high-titered IFN-AB against endogenous interferon alpha. One explanation for the development of auto-IFN-AB could be cross-reactivity with typical autoimmune antigens. We investigated the cross-reactivity of 3 high-titered IgG IFN-AB of female autoimmune patients (aged 32, 36, 74 years; two severe cases of SLE, one case of autoimmune thyroiditis) as well as 25 low-titered natural IgM IFN-AB of healthy blood donors (aged 19-48 years). Typical autoimmune antigens including dsDNA, ENA, as well as natural interferon beta and recombinant interferon gamma are not able to inhibit binding of IFN-AB to interferon alpha in an ELISA test system. Preincubation of sera containing either dsDNA antibodies (dsDNA-AB) (24 patients), thyroid peroxidase (TPO-AB) (9 patients) or thyroglobulin (TG-AB) (12 patients) with interferon alpha resulted in no change in the respective autoantibody titer. These data suggest that there is no cross-reactivity between IFN-alpha-AB and dsDNA-AB, TPO-AB or TG-AB. Thus, an explanation for the occurrence of IFN-AB in autoimmune disorders cannot be found in a cross-reaction between interferon alpha with typical autoimmune antigens.

  5. [Autoantibodies and their clinical characteristics in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by microvascular damage and excessive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs with autoimmune background. One representative feature of the immunological abnormalities in SSc patients is the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). More than 90% of patients with SSc are positive for ANA. Although a role of ANA in the pathogenesis in SSc remains unclear, the particular ANA are often indicative of clinical feature, disease course, and overall severity. Therefore, subgrouping patients based on the type of autoantibodies present can be useful in diagnosis and management. Anticentromere antibody (ACA), anti-DNA topoisomerase I antibody (Ab), and anti-RNA polymerase Ab are the representative autoAbs found in patients with SSc. Other serum ANA found in SSc include anti-Th/To Ab, anti-U3RNP Ab, anit-human upstream-binding protein (hUBF) Ab, anti-centriole Ab, anti-U1RNP Ab, anti-Ku Ab, and anti-PM-Scl Ab. It is documented that the prevalence of SSc-related Abs and clinical characteristics of patients with SSc are influenced by ethnicity. Identifying several SSc-related Abs requires a complicated technique that include immunoprecipitation assay. Establishment of a system routinely available to screen ANA specificities such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is needed.

  6. [Detection of autoantibodies to polymerized human serum albumin].

    PubMed

    Manns, M; Müller, M; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1984-11-01

    Binding activity of antibodies against polymerized human serum albumin (pHSA) was measured in the serum of 348 patients with various hepatic and non-hepatic diseases and in the serum of 108 control persons. The methods used were passive hemagglutination (PH) with antigen loaded human erythrocytes and radial immunodiffusion (ID). In the PH-method only HBsAg-positive sera reacted. Blocking experiments with pHSA, polymerized bovine serum albumin (pBSA) and monomeric human serum albumin (mHSA) showed, that the PH-method measures HBsAG associated receptors for pHSA. In HBeAG-positive cases titers were significantly higher than in anti-HBe-positive sera. Using the ID-method it could be shown, that 40% of sera of patients with liver diseases (n = 272), 37% of patients with LED (n = 27), 72% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 32), 6% of patients with glomerulonephritis (n = 17) and 2% of normal persons (n = 108) reacted. These sera reacted in the immunodiffusion assay with pHSA and pBSA but not with mHSA. Autoantibodies against non species specific determinants of pHSA which are not specific for liver diseases and possibly due to disturbed immunoregulation can be demonstrated by immunodiffusion. They may possibly be modulators of the pHSA mediated binding of hepatitis B-virus to hepatocytes.

  7. Autoantibody to the gastrin receptor in pernicious anemia

    SciTech Connect

    de Aizpurua, H.J.; Ungar, B.; Toh, B.H.

    1985-08-22

    The authors examined serum IgG fractions from 20 patients with pernicious anemia and 25 control subjects for their capacity to inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)15-leu human gastrin-17 to parietal-cell-enriched gastric mucosal cells. IgG fractions from six patients reduced gastrin binding by 45.6 +/- 12.2 per cent, as compared with a reduction of 1.8 +/- 0.7 per cent by fractions from the 25 controls. The fractions from these six patients also reduced gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake by gastric cells (an index of gastric acid secretory activity in vitro) by 50.2 +/- 8.4 per cent (mean +/- S.D.), as compared with 9.2 +/- 4.1 per cent for the controls. IgG fractions from six other patients that did not reduce gastrin binding also inhibited gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake, by 48.1 +/- 9.1 per cent. These reductions in gastrin binding and aminopyrine uptake were abolished by absorption of the IgG fractions with suspensions of viable gastric mucosal cells but not by absorption with liver or kidney cells. The IgG fractions did not inhibit (/sup 3/H)histamine binding or histamine-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake. These results suggest that serum IgG from some patients with pernicious anemia contains autoantibodies to the gastrin receptor.

  8. Autoantibodies against Leydig cells in patients after spermatic cord torsion.

    PubMed Central

    Zanchetta, R; Mastrogiacomo, I; Graziotti, P; Foresta, C; Betterle, C

    1984-01-01

    This study is aimed at searching for the presence of circulating antibodies against frozen sections of human testis, ovary and trophoblast in patients that had spermatic cord torsion. Sixty-eight sera samples were studied. Nine patients (13.2%) were positive for organ specific anti-testis autoantibodies. Six patients were positive for antibodies against Leydig cells: five were positive only with the indirect immunofluorescence technique of complement fixing (ITT/CF), the sixth patient was positive only with the indirect immunofluorescence technique (ITT). The other three patients were positive for antibodies against germ line cells: two patients were positive with both techniques, the third was positive only with indirect immunofluorescence technique. Eight of these patients were negative for antibodies against adrenal cortex while only one case was positive with indirect immunofluorescence technique both on adrenal cortex and Leydig cells. Human lyophilized testis absorbed the reactive antibodies against Leydig cells and germ line cells, while adrenal cortex and lyophilized testosterone were ineffective. This study shows the identification of a specific antibody against Leydig cells and germ line cells in patients after spermatic cord torsion. PMID:6362937

  9. SLAP deficiency decreases dsDNA autoantibody production.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa K; Pennington, Luke F; Shaw, Laura A; Brown, Meredith; Treacy, Eric C; Friend, Samantha F; Hatlevik, Øyvind; Rubtsova, Kira; Rubtsov, Anatoly V; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-02-01

    Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) adapts c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, to activated components of the BCR signaling complex regulating BCR levels and signaling in developing B cells. Based on this function, we asked whether SLAP deficiency could decrease the threshold for tolerance and eliminate development of autoreactive B cells in two models of autoantibody production. First, we sensitized mice with a dsDNA mimetope that causes an anti-dsDNA response. Despite equivalent production of anti-peptide antibodies compared to BALB/c controls, SLAP(-/-) mice did not produce anti-dsDNA. Second, we used the 56R tolerance model. SLAP(-/-) 56R mice had decreased levels of dsDNA-reactive antibodies compared to 56R mice due to skewed light chain usage. Thus, SLAP is a critical regulator of B-cell development and function and its deficiency leads to decreased autoreactive B cells that are otherwise maintained by inefficient receptor editing or failed negative selection.

  10. Liver abnormalities and liver membrane autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Kushimoto, K; Nagasawa, K; Ueda, A; Mayumi, T; Ishii, Y; Yamauchi, Y; Tada, Y; Tsukamoto, H; Kusaba, T; Niho, Y

    1989-01-01

    The hepatic involvement of 57 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was studied with special reference to liver membrane autoantibody (LMA). Liver abnormalities were found predominantly in patients with active SLE (27/48 (56%) in active SLE v 3/20 (15%) in inactive SLE). They were, however, rather mild or moderate and tended to disappear as the disease activity of SLE decreased. In this respect the liver abnormalities observed in this study differed from those in patients with lupoid hepatitis. The incidence of LMA in active SLE (8/11 (73%] was significantly greater than that in inactive SLE (4/12 (33%)). The mean LMA index value in active SLE was 8.3, which was also greater than the 2.9 in inactive SLE. Furthermore, in active SLE the mean LMA titre was significantly higher in patients with liver abnormalities than in those without. These results suggest that LMA may be associated with the activity of SLE and may be one of the factors which cause transient liver abnormalities. Images PMID:2596885

  11. Thyroid Dysfunction and Autoantibodies Association with Hypertensive Disorders during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Azin; Adabi, Khadijeh; Nekuie, Sepideh; Jahromi, Elham Kazemi; Solati, Mehrdad; Sobhani, Alireza; Karmostaji, Hoda; Jahanlou, Alireza Shahab

    2012-01-01

    Background. Thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity are relatively common in reproductive age and have been associated with adverse health outcomes for both mother and child, including hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Objective. To survey the relation between thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity and incidence and severity of pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders. Method. In this case control study 48 hypertensive patients in 4 subgroups (gestational hypertension, mild preeclampsia, severe preeclampsia, eclampsia) and 50 normotensive ones were studied. The samples were nulliparous and matched based on age and gestational age and none of them had previous history of hypertensive or thyroid disorders and other underlying systemic diseases or took medication that might affect thyroid function. Their venous blood samples were collected using electrochemiluminescence and ELISA method and thyroid hormones and TSH and autoantibodies were measured. Results. Hypertensive patients had significant lower T3 concentration compared with normotensive ones with mean T3 values 152.5 ± 48.93 ng/dL, 175.36 ± 58.07 ng/dL respectively. Anti-TPO concentration is higher in control group 6.07 ± 9.02 IU/mL compared with 2.27 ± 2.94 IU/mL in cases. Conclusion. The severity of preeclampsia and eclampsia was not associated with thyroid function tests. The only significant value was low T3 level among pregnancy, induced hypertensive patients. PMID:22848832

  12. Role of Natural Autoantibodies and Natural IgM Anti-Leucocyte Autoantibodies in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Peter Isaac

    2016-01-01

    We review how polyreactive natural IgM autoantibodies (IgM-NAA) protect the host from invading micro-organisms and host neo-antigens that are constantly being produced by oxidation mechanisms and cell apoptosis. Second, we discuss how IgM-NAA and IgM anti-leukocyte antibodies (IgM-ALA) inhibits autoimmune inflammation by anti-idiotypic mechanisms, enhancing removal of apoptotic cells, masking neo-antigens, and regulating the function of dendritic cells (DC) and effector cells. Third, we review how natural IgM prevents autoimmune disorders arising from pathogenic IgG autoantibodies, triggered by genetic mechanisms (e.g., SLE) or micro-organisms, as well as by autoreactive B and T cells that have escaped tolerance mechanisms. Studies in IgM knockout mice have clearly demonstrated that regulatory B and T cells require IgM to effectively regulate inflammation mediated by innate, adaptive, and autoimmune mechanisms. It is, therefore, not surprising why the host positively selects such autoreactive B1 cells that generate IgM-NAA, which are also evolutionarily conserved. Fourth, we show that IgM-ALA levels and their repertoire can vary in normal humans and disease states and this variation may partly explain the observed differences in the inflammatory response after infection, ischemic injury, or after a transplant. We also show how protective IgM-NAA can be rendered pathogenic under non-physiological conditions. We also review IgG-NAA that are more abundant than IgM-NAA in plasma. However, we need to understand if the (Fab)2 region of IgG-NAA has physiological relevance in non-disease states, as in plasma, their functional activity is blocked by IgM-NAA having anti-idiotypic activity. Some IgG-NAA are produced by B2 cells that have escaped tolerance mechanisms and we show how such pathogenic IgG-NAA are regulated to prevent autoimmune disease. The Fc region of IgG-NAA can influence inflammation and B cell function in vivo by binding to activating and inhibitory Fc

  13. Muscarinic type 3 receptor autoantibodies are associated with anti-SSA/Ro autoantibodies in Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Jian; Williams, Adrienne E.G.; Park, Yun-Jong; Choi, Kevin; Chan, Annie L.; Reeves, Westley H.; Bubb, Michael R.; Lee, Yun Jong; Park, Kyungpyo; Stewart, Carol M.; Cha, Seunghee

    2016-01-01

    Anti-muscarinic type 3 receptor autoantibodies (anti-M3R) are reported as potential inhibitors of saliva secretion in Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS). However, despite extensive efforts to establish an anti-M3R detection method, there is no clinical test available for these autoantibodies. The purpose of this study was to propose inclusion of anti-M3R testing for SjS diagnosis through investigation of their prevalence using a modified In-Cell Western (ICW) assay. A stable cell line expressing human M3R tagged with GFP (M3R-GFP) was established to screen unadsorbed and adsorbed plasma from primary SjS (n = 24), rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 18), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 18), and healthy controls (HC, n = 23). Anti-M3R abundance was determined by screening for the intensity of human IgG interacting with M3R-GFP cells by ICW assay, as detected by an anti-human IgG IRDye800-conjugated secondary antibody and normalized to GFP. Method comparisons and receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC)-curve analyses were performed to evaluate the diagnostic value of our current approaches. Furthermore, clinical parameters of SjS were also analyzed in association with anti-M3R. Anti-M3R was significantly elevated in SjS plasma in comparison with HC, SLE, or RA (P < 0.01). SjS anti-M3R intensities were greater than two-standard deviations above the HC mean for both unadsorbed (16/24, 66.67%) and adsorbed (18/24, 75%) plasma samples. Furthermore, anti-M3R was associated with anti-SjS-related-antigen A/Ro positivity (P = 0.0353). Linear associations for anti-M3R intensity indicated positive associations with focus score (R2 = 0.7186, P < 0.01) and negative associations with saliva flow rate (R2 = 0.3052, P < 0.05). Our study strongly supports our rationale to propose inclusion of anti-M3R for further testing as a non-invasive serological marker for SjS diagnosis. PMID:27460476

  14. Identification of a major epitope by anti-interferon-γ autoantibodies in patients with mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Chi, Chih-Yu; Shih, Han-Po; Ding, Jing-Ya; Lo, Chia-Chi; Wang, Shang-Yu; Kuo, Chen-Yen; Yeh, Chun-Fu; Tu, Kun-Hua; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Chen, Hung-Kai; Ho, Chen-Hsuan; Ho, Mao-Wang; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Lai, Hsin-Chin; Ku, Cheng-Lung

    2016-09-01

    The binding of autoantibodies (autoAbs) to interferon (IFN)-γ in people with mycobacterial diseases has become an emerging medical concern. Many patients display specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II haplotypes, which suggests that a common T cell-dependent and B cell-dependent mechanism might underlie the production of specific anti-IFN-γ autoAbs. We show here that these autoAbs target a major epitope (amino acids 121-131, designated position (P)121-131) in a region crucial for IFN-γ receptor (IFN-γR) activation to impair IFN-γ-mediated activities. The amino acid sequence of this epitope is highly homologous to a stretch in the Noc2 protein of Aspergillus spp., which was cross-reactive with autoAbs from patients. Rats immunized with Aspergillus Noc2 developed antibodies that reacted with human IFN-γ. We generated an epitope-erased variant of IFN-γ (EE-IFN-γ), in which the major neutralizing epitope region was altered. The binding affinity of anti-IFN-γ autoAbs for EE-IFN-γ was reduced by about 40%, as compared to that for IFN-γ1-131. Moreover, EE-IFN-γ activated the IFN-γR downstream signaling pathway ex vivo, irrespectively of anti-IFN-γ autoAbs. In conclusion, we identified a common, crucial B cell epitope that bound to anti-IFN-γ autoAbs in patients, and we propose a molecular-mimicry model for autoAb development. In addition, treatment with EE-IFN-γ might be worth investigating in patients producing anti-IFN-γ autoAbs.

  15. IgA mesangial deposits in C3H/HeJ mice after oral immunization with ferritin or bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Genin, C; Laurent, B; Sabatier, J C; Colon, S; Berthoux, F C

    1986-01-01

    In order to study an experimental model of IgA nephropathy, C3H/HeJ mice which are high IgA responders were strongly immunized orally with ferritin and compared to syngeneic C3H/eB. C3H/HeJ exhibited a significant increase of total IgA level in the serum and of IgA deposits in the mesangium. However the low level of IgA antibody to ferritin detected in the serum and the unsuccessful search for ferritin and antibody to ferritin in the glomeruli suggest that strong oral immunization of C3H/HeJ mice leads to high level of non specific IgA in the serum and deposition of IgA in the kidney. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3516467

  16. Interaction of Artocarpus lectins with human IgA does not involve asparagine-linked oligosaccharide of the immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Hashim, O H; Kobayashi, K; Taniguchi, N

    1992-07-01

    In view of the controversy with respect to the interaction of jacalin with human IgA2, a study was undertaken to assess the reactivity of the Artocarpus heterophyllus lectin, as well as the lectin from Artocarpus integer (lectin C), with subclasses of human immunoglobulin A by ELISA. Our data is consistent with the view that Artocarpus lectins have no affinity for the IgA2 immunoglobulins. In further support of the findings, we have established that N-linked oligosaccharide moieties of IgA have no significant bearing in the lectin-immunoglobulin binding. Interaction was also not affected in the presence of 1% (w/v) BSA.

  17. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas I.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief introduction identifying current issues and trends in research on class size, this brochure reviews five recent studies bearing on the relationship of class size to educational effectiveness. Part 1 is a review of two interrelated and highly controversial "meta-analyses" or statistical integrations of research findings on class size,…

  18. Class Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdata, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Ever since George Washington opted for the title of president rather than king, Americans have been uncomfortable with the idea of class distinctions. This article presents an interview with Dr. Janet Galligani Casey regarding the idea of class distinctions. Galligani Casey, who grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Somerville, Massachusetts,…

  19. IgA production in the large intestine is modulated by a different mechanism than in the small intestine: Bacteroides acidifaciens promotes IgA production in the large intestine by inducing germinal center formation and increasing the number of IgA+ B cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Hosono, Akira; Oyama, Akihito; Tsuda, Masato; Suzuki, Ami; Hachimura, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Momose, Yoshika; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2013-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that intestinal commensal bacteria induce immunoglobulin (Ig) A production by promoting the development of gut-associated lymphoid tissues in the small intestine. However, the precise mechanism whereby these bacteria modulate IgA production in the large intestine, which harbors the majority of intestinal commensals, is poorly understood. In addition, it is not known which commensal bacteria induce IgA production in the small intestine and which induce production in the large intestine. To address these issues, we generated gnotobiotic mice mono-associated with different murine commensal bacteria by inoculating germ-free (GF) mice with Lactobacillus johnsonii or Bacteroides acidifaciens. In GF mice, IgA production was barely detectable in the small intestine and was not detected in the large intestine. Interestingly, total IgA secretion in the large intestinal mucosa of B. acidifaciens mono-associated (BA) mice was significantly greater than that of GF and L. johnsonii mono-associated (LJ) mice. However, there was no difference in total IgA production in the small intestine of GF, LJ and BA mice. In addition, in the large intestine of BA mice, the expression of IgA(+) cells and germinal center formation were more remarkable than in GF and LJ mice. Furthermore, B. acidifaciens-specific IgA was detected in the large intestine of BA mice. These results suggest that the production of IgA in the large intestine may be modulated by a different mechanism than that in the small intestine, and that B. acidifaciens is one of the predominant bacteria responsible for promoting IgA production in the large intestine.

  20. Impact of troponin I-autoantibodies in chronic dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Doesch, Andreas O; Mueller, Susanne; Nelles, Manfred; Konstandin, Mathias; Celik, Sultan; Frankenstein, Lutz; Goeser, Stefan; Kaya, Ziya; Koch, Achim; Zugck, Christian; Katus, Hugo A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of circulating troponin I (TNI)-autoantibodies in plasma of patients with chronic heart failure. Sera of 390 heart failure patients were tested for the presence of anti-TNI antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), including 249 (63.8% of total) patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and 141 (36.2% of total) patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). A total of 72 patients (18.5% of total) were female and 318 (81.5% of total) were male. Mean patient age was 54.6 ± 11.3 years and mean follow-up time was 3.8 ± 3.2 years. TNI-autoantibodies (titer of ≥1:40) were detected in 73 out of 390 patients (18.7% of total). In TNI-autoantibody positive patients mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 27.6 ± 5.8%, compared to 25.8 ± 5.9% in TNI-autoantibody negative patients, P = 0.03. The combined end-point of death (n = 118, 30.3% of total) or heart transplantation (HTX) (n = 44, 11.3% of total) was reached in 162 patients (41.5% of total). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated superior survival (combined end-point of death or HTX) in patients with DCM versus ICM (P = 0.0198) and TNI-autoantibody positive patients versus TNI-autoantibody negative patients (P = 0.0348). Further subgroup analysis revealed a favorable outcome in TNI-positive patients with heart failure if the patients suffered from DCM (P = 0.0334), whereas TNI-autoantibody status in patients with ICM was not associated with survival (P = 0.8486). In subsequent multivariate Weibull-analysis, a positive TNI serostatus was associated with a significantly lower all-cause mortality in DCM patients (P = 0.0492). The presence of TNI-autoantibodies in plasma is associated with an improved survival in patients with chronic DCM, but not ICM. This might possibly indicate a prophylactic effect of TNI-autoantibodies in this subgroup of patients, encouraging further studies into possible protective

  1. Impact of troponin I-autoantibodies in chronic dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Doesch, Andreas O; Mueller, Susanne; Nelles, Manfred; Konstandin, Mathias; Celik, Sultan; Frankenstein, Lutz; Goeser, Stefan; Kaya, Ziya; Koch, Achim; Zugck, Christian; Katus, Hugo A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of circulating troponin I (TNI)-autoantibodies in plasma of patients with chronic heart failure. Sera of 390 heart failure patients were tested for the presence of anti-TNI antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), including 249 (63.8% of total) patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and 141 (36.2% of total) patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). A total of 72 patients (18.5% of total) were female and 318 (81.5% of total) were male. Mean patient age was 54.6 ± 11.3 years and mean follow-up time was 3.8 ± 3.2 years. TNI-autoantibodies (titer of ≥1:40) were detected in 73 out of 390 patients (18.7% of total). In TNI-autoantibody positive patients mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 27.6 ± 5.8%, compared to 25.8 ± 5.9% in TNI-autoantibody negative patients, P = 0.03. The combined end-point of death (n = 118, 30.3% of total) or heart transplantation (HTX) (n = 44, 11.3% of total) was reached in 162 patients (41.5% of total). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated superior survival (combined end-point of death or HTX) in patients with DCM versus ICM (P = 0.0198) and TNI-autoantibody positive patients versus TNI-autoantibody negative patients (P = 0.0348). Further subgroup analysis revealed a favorable outcome in TNI-positive patients with heart failure if the patients suffered from DCM (P = 0.0334), whereas TNI-autoantibody status in patients with ICM was not associated with survival (P = 0.8486). In subsequent multivariate Weibull-analysis, a positive TNI serostatus was associated with a significantly lower all-cause mortality in DCM patients (P = 0.0492). The presence of TNI-autoantibodies in plasma is associated with an improved survival in patients with chronic DCM, but not ICM. This might possibly indicate a prophylactic effect of TNI-autoantibodies in this subgroup of patients, encouraging further studies into possible protective

  2. Tumour-Associated Autoantibodies as Diagnostic Biomarkers for Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, J; Shi, J; Wang, P; Song, C; Wang, K; Zhang, J; Ye, H

    2016-06-01

    Tumour-associated autoantibodies may be promising biomarkers that could facilitate breast cancer (BC) diagnosis and improve patient outcomes. This review aims to identify the tumour-associated autoantibodies with the greatest diagnostic potential. Systematic searches were conducted using PubMed and Web of Science. The most studied tumour-associated autoantibody was included in a meta-analysis, and its clinical value was determined using Fagan's nomogram. The analysis included 84 studies regarding tumour-associated autoantibodies with the diagnostic value. Anti-p53 antibody was the most frequently studied autoantibody, followed by autoantibodies against MUC1, HER2 and cyclin B1. Although individual tumour-associated autoantibodies showed low diagnostic sensitivity, combinations of autoantibodies offered relatively high sensitivity. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was the most common detection method, and nucleic acid programmable protein microarrays appeared preferable to common protein microarrays. As the most commonly studied autoantibody, anti-p53 antibody was included in a meta-analysis. When it had been detected using ELISA and cut-off values were defined as the mean +2 or 3 standard deviations, the summary area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the presence of BC was 0.78. Fagan's nomogram showed post-test probabilities of 32% and 6% for positive and negative results, respectively. Mammography might be supplemented by the use of tumour-associated autoantibodies as biomarkers for BC diagnosis in younger women with increased risks of BC. Even though several studies have investigated the diagnostic use of tumour-associated autoantibodies as biomarkers for BC detection, a high-quality prospective study is needed to validate their diagnostic value in practice. PMID:26991924

  3. Cancer biomarkers defined by autoantibody signatures to aberrant O-glycopeptide epitopes.

    PubMed

    Wandall, Hans H; Blixt, Ola; Tarp, Mads A; Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Mandel, Ulla; Ragupathi, Govind; Livingston, Phil O; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Burchell, Joy; Clausen, Henrik

    2010-02-15

    Autoantibodies to cancer antigens hold promise as biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Proteins that are aberrantly processed in cancer cells are likely to present autoantibody targets. The extracellular mucin MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many cancers; thus, we evaluated whether autoantibodies generated to aberrant O-glycoforms of MUC1 might serve as sensitive diagnostic biomarkers for cancer. Using an antibody-based glycoprofiling ELISA assay, we documented that aberrant truncated glycoforms were not detected in sera of cancer patients. An O-glycopeptide microarray was developed that detected IgG antibodies to aberrant O-glycopeptide epitopes in patients vaccinated with a keyhole limpet hemocyanin-conjugated truncated MUC1 peptide. We detected cancer-associated IgG autoantibodies in sera from breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer patients against different aberrent O-glycopeptide epitopes derived from MUC1. These autoantibodies represent a previously unaddressed source of sensitive biomarkers for early detection of cancer. The methods we have developed for chemoenzymatic synthesis of O-glycopeptides on microarrays may allow for broader mining of the entire cancer O-glycopeptidome. PMID:20124478

  4. Voltage-gated potassium channels autoantibodies in a child with rasmussen encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Marie-Aude; Dubois-Teklali, Fanny; Vercueil, Laurent; Sabourdy, Cécile; Nugues, Frédérique; Vincent, Angela; Oliver, Viviana; Bulteau, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a severe epileptic and inflammatory encephalopathy of unknown etiology, responsible for focal neurological signs and cognitive decline. The current leading hypothesis suggests a sequence of immune reactions induced by an indeterminate factor. This sequence is thought to be responsible for the production of autoantibody-mediated central nervous system degeneration. However, these autoantibodies are not specific to the disease and not all patients present with them. We report the case of a 4-year-old girl suffering from RE displaying some atypical features such as fast evolution and seizures of left parietal onset refractory to several antiepileptics, intravenous immunoglobulins, and corticosteroids. Serum autoantibodies directed against voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) were evidenced at 739 pM, a finding never previously reported in children. This screening was performed because of an increased signal in the temporolimbic areas on brain magnetic resonance imaging, which was similar to what is observed during limbic encephalitis. The patient experienced epilepsia partialis continua with progressive right hemiplegia and aphasia. She underwent left hemispherotomy at the age of 5.5 years after which she became seizure free with great cognitive improvement. First described in adults, VGKC autoantibodies have been recently described in children with various neurological manifestations. The implication of VGKC autoantibodies in RE is a new observation and opens up new physiopathological and therapeutic avenues of investigation.

  5. Neural Autoantibody Evaluation in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Population-Based Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pittock, Sean J.; Lennon, Vanda A.; Dege, Carissa L.; Talley, Nicholas J.; Richard Locke, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our goal is to investigate the serum profile of neural autoantibodies in community-based patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or functional dyspepsia. The pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including IBS and dyspepsia, are unknown. Theories range from purely psychological to autoimmune alterations in GI tract neuromuscular function. Methods The study subjects, based in Olmsted County, MN, reported symptoms of functional dyspepsia or IBS (n = 69), or were asymptomatic controls (n = 64). Their coded sera were screened for antibodies targeting neuronal, glial, and muscle autoantigens. Results The prevalence of neural autoantibodies with functional GI disorders did not differ significantly from controls (17% vs. 13%; P = 0.43). In no case was a neuronal or glial nuclear autoantibody or enteric neuronal autoantibody identified. Neuronal cation channel antibodies were identified in 9% of cases (voltage-gated potassium channel [VGKC] in one dyspepsia case and one IBS case, ganglionic acetylcholine receptor [AChR] in four IBS cases) and in 6% of controls (ganglionic AChR in one, voltage-gated calcium channel [VGCC], N-type, in two and VGKC in one; P = 0.36). The frequency of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD65) autoantibodies was similar in cases (10%) and controls (5%; P = 0.23). Conclusions Our data do not support neural autoimmunity as the basis for most IBS or functional dyspepsia cases. PMID:21181442

  6. Presence of retinal pericyte-reactive autoantibodies in diabetic retinopathy patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingjun; Li, Yan; Payne, John; Srivastava, Sunil; Fan, Xingjun; Fung, John; Li, Xiaorong; Kern, Timothy S.; Lin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The loss of retinal pericytes (RPCs) is a hallmark of early stage diabetic retinopathy (DR), but the mechanism underlying RPC death is unclear. Although it was postulated in previous studies using bovine RPCs that autoantibodies against RPCs might develop and induce RPC death, it is unknown whether autoantibodies against cell-surface antigens on human RPCs exist in DR patients, whether such autoantibodies contribute to RPC damage/loss, and if they do, through which mechanism. We screened serum samples from DR patients and controls using primary human RPCs and found that that levels of IgGs reactive to RPCs were significantly higher in the DR group than the control group. Serum samples with higher RPC-reactive IgG levels induced more severe complement-mediated RPC damage than those with lower RPC-reactive IgG levels. We also assessed levels of the complement-activation products C3a, C4a and C5a in these serum samples, and found that serum levels of C3a and C5a, but not C4a, were higher in the DR group than control group. These data provide evidence the first time showing that autoantibodies against RPCs can develop in DR patients, and that these autoantibodies could contribute to pericyte damage through complement activation. PMID:26839120

  7. Autoantibody Targets and their Cancer Relationship in the Pathogenicity of Paraneoplastic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna

    2009-01-01

    Paraneoplastic retinopathies (PR), including cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) or the closely related melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR) occur in a small subset of patients with retinal degeneration and systemic cancer. This autoimmune syndrome is characterized by sudden, progressive loss of vision in association with circulating anti-retinal autoantibodies. The PR syndromes are heterogeneous, may produce a number of ocular symptoms, and may be associated with several different neoplasms, including lung, breast, prostate, gynecological, and colon cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. We examined the onset of retinopathy in correlation to the diagnosis of cancer and the presence of specific anti-retinal autoantibodies in PR patients. In some patients without diagnosed malignant tumors, the onset of ocular symptoms and the presence of autoantibodies preceded the diagnosis of cancer by months to years, including anti-recoverin, anti-transducin-α, and anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies. Although anti-retinal autoantibodies may not be a good predictor of a specific neoplasm, they can be used as biomarkers for different subtypes of retinopathy. Identification of autoantibodies involved in autoimmune-mediated PR will help elucidate the mechanisms underlying the PR syndromes and develop targeted therapies for these sight-threatening disorders. PMID:19168157

  8. Immune thrombocytopenia: antiplatelet autoantibodies inhibit proplatelet formation by megakaryocytes and impair platelet production in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Iraqi, Muna; Perdomo, Jose; Yan, Feng; Choi, Philip Y-I; Chong, Beng H.

    2015-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disease mediated by antiplatelet autoantibodies that cause platelet destruction and suppression of platelet production. In vitro effects of autoantibodies on megakaryocyte production and maturation have been reported recently. However, the impact of these autoantibodies on crucial megakaryocyte functions, proplatelet formation and subsequent platelet release, has not been evaluated. We examined the effects of serum and IgG from 19 patients with immune thrombocytopenia using day 8 or 9 megakaryocytes (66.3 ± 10.6% CD41+), derived from cord blood hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+). The number of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes, the number of platelets released in the culture, total megakaryocyte numbers, ploidy pattern and caspase activation were measured at various times after treatment. After 5 days of treatment the number of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes was significantly decreased by 13 immune thrombocytopenia autoantibodies relative to the control group (P<0.0001) and this decrease was accompanied by a corresponding reduction of platelet release. Other features, including total megakaryocyte numbers, maturation and apoptosis, were not affected by immune thrombocytopenia antibodies. Treating the megakaryocytes with the thrombopoietin receptor agonists romiplostim and eltrombopag reversed the effect of the autoantibodies on megakaryocytes by restoring their capacity to form proplatelets. We conclude that antiplatelet antibodies in immune thrombocytopenia inhibit proplatelet formation by megakaryocytes and hence the ability of the megakaryocytes to release platelets. Treatment with either romiplostim or eltrombopag regenerates proplatelet formation from the megakaryocytes. PMID:25682608

  9. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  10. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  11. Structure of a human IgA1 Fab fragment at 1.55 Å resolution: potential effect of the constant domains on antigen-affinity modulation.

    PubMed

    Correa, Agustin; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Obal, Gonzalo; Pritsch, Otto; Dighiero, Guillermo; Oppezzo, Pablo; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2013-03-01

    Despite being the most abundant class of immunoglobulins in humans and playing central roles in the adaptive immune response, high-resolution structural data are still lacking for the antigen-binding region of human isotype A antibodies (IgAs). The crystal structures of a human Fab fragment of IgA1 in three different crystal forms are now reported. The three-dimensional organization is similar to those of other Fab classes, but FabA1 seems to be more rigid, being constrained by a hydrophobic core in the interface between the variable and constant domains of the heavy chain (VH-CH1) as well as by a disulfide bridge that connects the light and heavy chains, influencing the relative heavy/light-chain orientation. The crystal structure of the same antibody but with a G-isotype CH1 which is reported to display different antigen affinity has also been solved. The differential structural features reveal plausible mechanisms for constant/variable-domain long-distance effects whereby antibody class switching could alter antigen affinity.

  12. The diagnostic utility of folate receptor autoantibodies in blood.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Jeffrey M; Ramaekers, Vincent Th; Quadros, Edward V

    2013-03-01

    Folate supplementation reduces the risk of neural tube defect (NTD) pregnancy, and folinic acid has been used to correct cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) in children with developmental disorders. In the absence of systemic folate deficiency, the discovery of autoantibodies (AuAbs) to folate receptor α (FRα) that block the uptake of folate offers one mechanism to explain the response to folate in these disorders. The association of FRα AuAbs with pregnancy-related complications, CFD syndrome, and autism spectrum disorders and response to folate therapy is highly suggestive of the involvement of these AuAbs in the disruption of brain development and function via folate pathways. The two types of antibodies identified in the serum of patients are blocking antibody and binding antibody. The two antibodies can be measured by the specific assays described and exert their pathological effects either by functional blocking of folate transport as previously shown or hypothetically by disrupting the FR by an antigen-antibody-mediated inflammatory response. We have identified both IgG and IgM AuAbs in these conditions. The predominant antibodies in women with NTD pregnancy belong to the IgG1 and IgG2 isotype and in CFD children, the IgG1 and IgG4 isotype. This review describes the methods used to measure these AuAbs, their binding characteristics, affinity, cross-reactivity, and potential mechanisms by which folate therapy could work. Because these AuAbs are associated with various pathologies during fetal and neonatal development, early detection and intervention could prevent or reverse the consequences of exposure to these AuAbs. PMID:23314538

  13. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Negm, Ola H; Hamed, Mohamed R; Schoen, Robert E; Whelan, Richard L; Steele, Robert J; Scholefield, John; Dilnot, Elizabeth M; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Robertson, John F R; Sewell, Herbert F

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls) from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls) and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls) were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19), stage II (n = 40), stage III (n = 34) and stage IV (n = 6) was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively), with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice. PMID:27383396

  14. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Schoen, Robert E.; Whelan, Richard L.; Steele, Robert J.; Scholefield, John; Dilnot, Elizabeth M.; Shantha Kumara, H. M. C.; Robertson, John F. R.; Sewell, Herbert F.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls) from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls) and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls) were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19), stage II (n = 40), stage III (n = 34) and stage IV (n = 6) was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively), with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice. PMID:27383396

  15. Detection and persistence of specific IgA antibodies in serum of patients with hepatitis A by capture radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Sikuler, E; Keynan, A; Hanuka, N; Friedman, M G; Sarov, I

    1983-01-01

    The serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) response to hepatitis A virus (HAV) was investigated with a sensitive capture radioimmunoassay. In serial serum samples drawn from 15 patients with viral hepatitis A, IgA anti-HAV antibodies reached their highest titer between 1-2 weeks after onset and peak titers ranged from 10,000-20,000. Serum samples were available from six patients 30-32 months after onset of illness. These samples were all positive for IgA anti-HAV and some had titers similar to peak titers during illness. However, the height of the titration curves, expressed as the binding ratio (BR) at a dilution of 1/1000, was in all cases significantly lower at 30-32 months than during acute illness and early convalescence. The significance of the persistence of the IgA anti-HAV and possible reasons for the change in the BR are discussed.

  16. The IgA1 immune complex-mediated activation of the MAPK/ERK kinase pathway in mesangial cells is associated with glomerular damage in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tamouza, Houda; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Raskova Kafkova, Leona; Berthelot, Laureline; Flamant, Martin; Demion, Marie; Mesnard, Laurent; Paubelle, Etienne; Walker, Francine; Julian, Bruce A; Tissandié, Emilie; Tiwari, Meetu K; Camara, Niels O S; Vrtovsnik, François; Benhamou, Marc; Novak, Jan; Monteiro, Renato C; Moura, Ivan C

    2012-12-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, has significant morbidity and mortality as 20-40% of patients progress to end-stage renal disease within 20 years of onset. In order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of IgAN, we systematically evaluated renal biopsies from such patients. This showed that the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway was activated in the mesangium of patients presenting with over 1 g/day proteinuria and elevated blood pressure, but absent in biopsy specimens of patients with IgAN and modest proteinuria (<1 g/day). ERK activation was not associated with elevated galactose-deficient IgA1 or IgG specific for galactose-deficient IgA1 in the serum. In human mesangial cells in vitro, ERK activation through mesangial IgA1 receptor (CD71) controlled pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and was induced by large-molecular-mass IgA1-containing circulating immune complexes purified from patient sera. Moreover, IgA1-dependent ERK activation required renin-angiotensin system as its blockade was efficient in reducing proteinuria in those patients exhibiting substantial mesangial activation of ERK. Thus, ERK activation alters mesangial cell-podocyte crosstalk, leading to renal dysfunction in IgAN. Assessment of MAPK/ERK activation in diagnostic renal biopsies may predict the therapeutic efficacy of renin-angiotensin system blockers in IgAN.

  17. The effect of platelet autoantibodies on the course of the disease and clinical response of patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Sikorska, A; Konopka, L; Maślanka, K

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the response to treatment of 409 idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients who were tested for the presence of platelet-associated autoantibodies by direct-platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) and for the presence of plasma antibodies directed against the GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb and GPIa/IIa by monoclonal antibody immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA). In patients with platelet autoantibodies in comparison with patients without antibodies more frequently were observed the chronic form of disease (83.5%vs. 68.5%) and severe symptoms of haemorrhage diathesis (17.3%vs. 6.9%). Evaluation of the treatment response (to corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and splenectomy) referred to patients with complete response, e.g. complete remission defined as platelet count of >100 x 10(9)/l for at least 2 years. The percentage of complete response in the whole population of ITP patients, both with and without autoantibodies regardless of the method of treatment, was similar (about 54%). However, the presence of platelet autoantibodies had effect on patients treated with corticosteroids: complete response approximately 71% (36/51) of patients with autoantibodies and in 60% (72/120) of patients without antibodies, as well as in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs (cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, vincristin and vinblastin); complete response approximately 51% (11/21) of patients with autoantibodies and in 34.8% (6/17) of patients without autoantibodies. The presence of autoantibodies had no effect on the response of splenectomy patients. PMID:18190469

  18. The relevance of the IgG subclass of autoantibodies for blister induction in autoimmune bullous skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Sitaru, Cassian; Mihai, Sidonia; Zillikens, Detlef

    2007-04-01

    Autoimmune bullous skin diseases are characterized by autoantibodies and T cells specific to structural proteins maintaining cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion in the skin. Existing clinical and experimental evidence generally supports a pathogenic role of autoantibodies for blister formation. These autoantibodies belong to several IgG subclasses, which associate with different functional properties and may thus determine the pathogenic potential of IgG antibodies. In pemphigus diseases, binding of IgG to keratinocytes is sufficient to cause intraepidermal blisters without engaging innate immune effectors and IgG4 autoantibodies seem to mainly mediate acantholysis. In contrast, in most subepidermal autoimmune blistering diseases, complement activation and recruitment and activation of leukocytes by autoantibodies are required for blister induction. In these conditions, tissue damage is thought to be mainly mediated by IgG1, but not IgG4 autoantibodies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the pathogenic relevance of the IgG subclass of autoantibodies for blister formation. Characterization of the pathogenically relevant subclass(es) of autoantibodies not only provides mechanistic insights, but should greatly facilitate the development of improved therapeutic modalities of autoimmune blistering diseases.

  19. An increased frequency of autoantibody-inducing CD4+ T cells in pre-diseased lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Busser, Brian W; Cancro, Michael P; Laufer, Terri M

    2004-07-01

    Pathogenic autoantibody production in murine models of lupus is dependent on autoreactive CD4+ helper T cells. However, the mechanisms which permit the selection and maintenance of this autoantibody-inducing CD4+ T-cell repertoire are currently unknown. We hypothesized that the peripheral CD4+ T-cell repertoire of lupus-prone mice was enriched with autoantibody-inducing specificities. To test this, we utilized the splenic focus assay to determine if pre-diseased lupus-prone (NZB x NZW)F(1) mice have an elevated frequency of autoreactive CD4+ T lymphocytes capable of supporting autoantibody production. The splenic focus limiting dilution assay permits anti-nuclear antibodies to be generated from contact-dependent T-B interactions in vitro. We show that young, pre-diseased lupus-prone mice have an elevated frequency of autoantibody-inducing CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, these autoantibody-inducing CD4+ T-cell responses are also present in the thymus. Therefore, an elevated frequency of autoantibody-inducing CD4+ T cells predisposes lupus-prone mice to the development of autoantibodies.

  20. Shared idiotypes and restricted immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain genes characterize murine autoantibodies of various specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Monestier, M; Manheimer-Lory, A; Bellon, B; Painter, C; Dang, H; Talal, N; Zanetti, M; Schwartz, R; Pisetsky, D; Kuppers, R

    1986-01-01

    The study of the Ig variable region heavy chain (VH) genes used to encode antibodies specific for self-epitopes from murine hybridomas showed that three VH families are primarily utilized: VH J558, the largest family, and VH QPC52 and VH 7183, the families most proximal to the Ig joining region heavy chain genes. These monoclonal autoantibodies express cross-reactive idiotopes shared by rheumatoid factors and antibodies specific for Sm. The expression of these idiotypes is independent of major histocompatibility complex and Ig constant region heavy chain haplotypes, self-antigen specificity, and even the VH gene family utilized. Though the experiments described here are limited to murine autoantibodies, similarities exist between murine and human autoimmune diseases. Studies that aim to investigate the relationship between VH gene expression and the presence of cross-reactive idiotypes among human autoantibodies should enable us to better understand the mechanisms of autoimmunity and self-tolerance. Images PMID:2427543

  1. Label-free nanoplasmonic sensing of tumor-associate autoantibodies for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Soler, Maria; Estevez, M-Carmen; Villar-Vazquez, Roi; Casal, J Ignacio; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is treatable and curable when detected at early stages. However there is a lack of less invasive and more specific screening and diagnosis methods which would facilitate its prompt identification. Blood circulating autoantibodies which are immediately produced by the immune system at tumor appearance have become valuable biomarkers for preclinical diagnosis of cancer. In this work, we present the rapid and label-free detection of colorectal cancer autoantibodies directly in blood serum or plasma using a recently developed nanoplasmonic biosensor. Our nanoplasmonic device offers sensitive and real-time quantification of autoantibodies with excellent selectivity and reproducibility, achieving limits of detection around 1 nM (150-160 ng mL(-1)). A preliminary evaluation of clinical samples of colorectal cancer patients has shown good correlation with ELISA. These results demonstrate the reliability of the nanobiosensor strategy and pave the way towards the achievement of a sensitive diagnostic tool for early detection of colorectal cancer.

  2. [Detection and characterization of anti-red cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemias].

    PubMed

    Kamesaki, T; Kajii, E

    1996-09-01

    Autoimmuine hemolytic anemias (AIHA) are classified into two groups of warm type and cold type according to the thermal properties of the anti-red cell autoantibody. A positive result of the antiglobulin test (DAT) confirms the presence of autoantibodies on red cells. DAT-negative AIHA are diagnosed by means of the elevation of red blood cell-associated IgG. The sera in low titer cold agglutinin disease show a low cold agglutinin titer but a high titer in the presence of bovine albumin. The antigenic specificity of warm reacting autoantibodies has been demonstrated, by using immunoblot and immunoprecipitation, such as Rh-related proteins, band 3, glycophorin A or Wrb antigen.

  3. Autoantibodies in Alzheimer’s disease: potential biomarkers, pathogenic roles, and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianming; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a prevalent and debilitating neurodegenerative disorder in the elderly. The etiology of AD has not been fully defined and currently there is no cure for this devastating disease. Compelling evidence suggests that the immune system plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of AD. Autoantibodies against a variety of molecules have been associated with AD. The roles of these autoantibodies in AD, however, are not well understood. This review attempts to summarize recent findings on these autoantibodies and explore their potential as diagnostic/ prognostic biomarkers for AD, their roles in the pathogenesis of AD, and their implications in the development of effective immunotherapies for AD. PMID:27476881

  4. [Significance of autoantibodies in the diagnosis of non-A, non-B hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Manns, M; Arnold, W; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1984-09-01

    Various autoantibodies against different components of the hepatocytes have been demonstrated in chronic active hepatitis (CAH) which is an etiologically heterogeneous disease. These antibodies are essentially antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antibodies against liver cell membranes (LMA), antibodies against a microsomal antigen from liver and kidney (LKM), antibodies against soluble liver antigen (SLA) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). These various autoantibodies mentioned could not be demonstrated in 18 patients with clearly established acute and 27 patients with clearly established acute and 27 patients with clearly established chronic hepatitis non-A-non-B. In addition these autoantibodies could not be found in our own cases of clearly established hepatitis non-A-non-B after the acute stage of the disease. Testing for the presence of these antibodies thus helps essentially to differentiate the autoimmunologically caused form of CAH from the CAH non-A-non-B.

  5. Serum and salivary IgA antibody responses to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans in orofacial granulomatosis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Savage, N W; Barnard, K; Shirlaw, P J; Rahman, D; Mistry, M; Escudier, M P; Sanderson, J D; Challacombe, S J

    2004-03-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a condition of unknown aetiology with histological and, in some cases, clinical association with Crohn's disease (CD). However, the exact relationship between OFG and CD remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine whether OFG could be distinguished immunologically from CD by comparing non-specific and specific aspects of humoral immunity in serum, whole saliva and parotid saliva in three groups of patients: (a) OFG only (n = 14), (b) those with both oral and gut CD (OFG + CD) (n = 12) and (c) CD without oral involvement (n = 22) and in healthy controls (n = 29). Non-specific immunoglobulin (IgA, SigA, IgA subclasses and IgG) levels and antibodies to whole cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum, whole saliva and parotid saliva. Serum IgA and IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses were raised in all patient groups (P < 0.01). Salivary IgA (and IgG) levels were raised in OFG and OFG + CD (P < 0.01) but not in the CD group. Parotid IgA was also raised in OFG and OFG + CD but not in CD. The findings suggest that serum IgA changes reflect mucosal inflammation anywhere in the GI tract but that salivary IgA changes reflect involvement of the oral cavity. Furthermore, the elevated levels of IgA in parotid saliva suggest involvement of the salivary glands in OFG. Serum IgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae were raised markedly in the two groups with gut disease while serum IgA (or IgG) antibodies to C. albicans were elevated significantly in all three patient groups (P < 0.02). No differences were found with antibodies to S. mutans. Whole saliva IgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae (and C. albicans) were raised in the groups with oral involvement. These findings suggest that raised serum IgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae may reflect gut inflammation while raised SIgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae or raised IgA or IgA2 levels in saliva reflect oral but

  6. Development of intestinal mucin 2, IgA, and polymeric Ig receptor expressions in broiler chickens and Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Eicher, Susan D; Applegate, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Intestinal mucin 2 (MUC2), a major gel-forming mucin, represents a primary barrier component of mucus layers and a target site for secretory IgA. Polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) expressed on the basolateral surface of epithel