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Sample records for igg inhibits testosterone

  1. Testosterone inhibits trust but promotes reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Boksem, Maarten A S; Mehta, Pranjal H; Van den Bergh, Bram; van Son, Veerle; Trautmann, Stefan T; Roelofs, Karin; Smidts, Ale; Sanfey, Alan G

    2013-11-01

    The steroid hormone testosterone has been associated with behavior intended to obtain or maintain high social status. Although such behavior is typically characterized as aggressive and competitive, it is clear that high social status is achieved and maintained not only through antisocial behavior but also through prosocial behavior. In the present experiment, we investigated the impact of testosterone administration on trust and reciprocity using a double-blind randomized control design. We found that a single dose of 0.5 mg of testosterone decreased trust but increased generosity when repaying trust. These findings suggest that testosterone may mediate different types of status-seeking behavior. It may increase competitive, potentially aggressive, and antisocial behavior when social challenges and threats (i.e., abuse of trust and betrayal) need to be considered; however, it may promote prosocial behavior in the absence of these threats, when high status and good reputation may be best served by prosocial behavior.

  2. Potential Mechanisms for IgG4 Inhibition of Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K; Till, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    IgG4 is the least abundant IgG subclass in human serum, representing less than 5% of all IgG. Increases in IgG4 occur following chronic exposure to antigen and are generally associated with states of immune tolerance. In line with this, IgG4 is regarded as an anti-inflammatory antibody with a limited ability to elicit effective immune responses. Furthermore, IgG4 attenuates allergic responses by inhibiting the activity of IgE. The mechanism by which IgG4 inhibits IgE-mediated hypersensitivity has been investigated using a variety of model systems leading to two proposed mechanisms. First by sequestering antigen, IgG4 can function as a blocking antibody, preventing cross-linking of receptor bound IgE. Second IgG4 has been proposed to co-stimulate the inhibitory IgG receptor FcγRIIb, which can negatively regulate FcεRI signaling and in turn inhibit effector cell activation. Recent advances in our understanding of the structural features of human IgG4 have shed light on the unique functional and immunologic properties of IgG4. The aim of this review is to evaluate our current understanding of IgG4 biology and reassess the mechanisms by which IgG4 functions to inhibit IgE-mediated allergic responses.

  3. Testosterone Administration Inhibits Hepcidin Transcription and is Associated with Increased Iron Incorporation into Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen; Bachman, Eric; Li, Michelle; Roy, Cindy N.; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Wong, Siu; Chan, Stephen Y.; Serra, Carlo; Jasuja, Ravi; Travison, Thomas G.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Bhasin, Shalender

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone administration increases hemoglobin levels and has been used to treat anemia of chronic disease. Erythrocytosis is the most frequent adverse event associated with testosterone therapy of hypogonadal men, especially older men. However, the mechanisms by which testosterone increases hemoglobin remain unknown. Testosterone administration in male and female mice was associated with a greater increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit, reticulocyte count, reticulocyte hemoglobin concentration, and serum iron and transferring saturation than placebo. Testosterone downregulated hepatic hepcidin mRNA expression, upregulated renal erythropoietin mRNA expression, and increased erythropoietin levels. Testosterone-induced suppression of hepcidin expression was independent of its effects on erythropoietin or hypoxia-sensing mechanisms. Transgenic mice with liver-specific constitutive hepcidin over-expression failed to exhibit the expected increase in hemoglobin in response to testosterone administration. Testosterone upregulated splenic ferroportin expression and reduced iron retention in spleen. After intravenous administration of transferrin-bound 58Fe, the amount of 58Fe incorporated into red blood cells was significantly greater in testosterone-treated mice than in placebo-treated mice. Serum from testosterone-treated mice stimulated hemoglobin synthesis in K562 erythroleukemia cells more than that from vehicle-treated mice. Testosterone administration promoted the association of androgen receptor (AR) with Smad1 and Smad4 to reduce their binding to BMP-response elements in hepcidin promoter in the liver. Ectopic expression of AR in hepatocytes suppressed hepcidin transcription; this effect was blocked dose-dependently by AR antagonist flutamide. Testosterone did not affect hepcidin mRNA stability. Conclusion: Testosterone inhibits hepcidin transcription through its interaction with BMP-Smad signaling. Testosterone administration is associated with increased iron

  4. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone inhibit gallbladder motility through multiple signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kline, Loren W; Karpinski, Edward

    2008-10-01

    Testosterone (T) has been shown to cause vasodilation in rabbit coronary arteries through a nongenomic pathway. Part of this T-induced relaxation was shown to be mediated by opening voltage dependent K(+) channels. T infusion also reduces peripheral resistance in human males with heart failure. The effects of T or its active metabolite 5-alpha dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are not well studied. This study investigates the effect of T and DHT on contraction in guinea pig gallbladder strips. T or DHT induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK)-induced tension. Pretreatment of the strips with PKA inhibitor 14-22 amide myristolated had no significant effect on the relaxation induced by either T or DHT. Pretreatment of strips with 2-APB, an inhibitor of IP(3) induced Ca(2+) release, produced a significant (p<0.001) reduction in the T- or DHT-induced relaxation. Bisindolymaleimide IV and chelerythrine Cl(-) when used in combination had no significant effect on the amount of CCK-induced tension, but significantly (p<0.01) decreased the amount of T- or DHT-induced relaxation. The flavone chrysin, an aromatase inhibitor, and genistein, an isoflavone, each produced a significant (p<0.01) reduction in CCK-induced tension. Chrysin significantly (p<0.05) increased T-induced relaxation; however, genistein had no effect on T-induced relaxation. It is concluded that T and DHT inhibits gallbladder motility rapidly by nongenomic actions of the hormones. Multiple pathways that include inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release, inhibition of extracellular Ca(2+) entry, and the actions of PKC may mediate this effect.

  5. High levels of testosterone inhibit ovarian follicle development by repressing the FSH signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Cui, Yu-qian; Zhao, Han; Liu, Hong-bin; Zhao, Shi-dou; Gao, Yuan; Mu, Xiao-li; Gao, Fei; Chen, Zi-jiang

    2015-10-01

    The effect of high concentrations of testosterone on ovarian follicle development was investigated. Primary follicles and granulosa cells were cultured in vitro in media supplemented with a testosterone concentration gradient. The combined effects of testosterone and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on follicular growth and granulosa cell gonadotropin receptor mRNA expression were also investigated. Follicle growth in the presence of high testosterone concentrations was promoted at early stages (days 1-7), but inhibited at later stage (days 7-14) of in vitro culture. Interestingly, testosterone-induced follicle development arrest was rescued by treatment with high concentrations of FSH (400 mIU/mL). In addition, in cultured granulosa cells, high testosterone concentrations induced cell proliferation, and increased the mRNA expression level of FSH receptor (FSHR), and luteinized hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor. It was concluded that high concentrations of testosterone inhibited follicle development, most likely through regulation of the FSH signaling pathway, although independently from FSHR downregulation. These findings are an important step in further understanding the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome.

  6. Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells In Vitro: Implications for Men

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statin drugs lower blood cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. During drug development it was shown that statins inhibit production of cholesterol in the testis. We evaluated testosterone production in vitro, using highly purified rat ...

  7. Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells In Vitro: Implications for Men

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statin drugs lower blood cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. During drug development it was shown that statins inhibit production of cholesterol in the testis. We evaluated testosterone production in vitro, using highly purified rat ...

  8. Effects of aromatase inhibition vs. testosterone in older men with low testosterone: randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dias, J P; Melvin, D; Simonsick, E M; Carlson, O; Shardell, M D; Ferrucci, L; Chia, C W; Basaria, S; Egan, J M

    2016-01-01

    Aging in men is associated with loss of bone mass, impaired physical function and altered body composition. The objective of this proof-of-concept randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, single-center trial was to determine the relative effects of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E(2)) on bone mineral density, body composition, and physical performance in older men. The primary outcome was lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD), and secondary outcomes were body composition, muscle strength, gait speed, and sex hormone concentrations. Forty three men (age range, 65-82 years; mean age 71 years) with low total T levels <350 ng/dL were randomized to one of three groups: 5 g transdermal testosterone gel (TT) (N = 16), anastrozole (AI) 1 mg (N = 14) or placebo daily (N = 13) for 12 months. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Both TT and AI increased serum TT levels (>500 ng/dL, p < 0.05) compared to baseline; T values remained stable throughout the duration of the trial. At 12 months, TT improved the primary outcome of lumbar spine BMD (p < 0.01).Both interventions improved knee strength at 12 months compared to baseline (p < 0.05) while lean body mass significantly increased only in the AI group at 6 and 12 months (1.49 ± 0.38 kg, p < 0.01; 1.24 ± 0.39 kg, p < 0.05, respectively) compared to baseline. Interestingly, TT improved fast gait speed at 3 and 12 months (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, this proof-of-concept study confirms that aromatization of T is required for maintaining BMD in older men with low-T levels. The trial also uncovered the novel finding that aromatization of T is required for improvement in fast gait speed, an observation that needs to be verified in future studies.

  9. IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL TESTIS
    Chad R. Blystone1, 2, David J. Dix2, and John C. Rockett2
    1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Box 7633, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA and 2U.S. Envi...

  10. IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL TESTIS
    Chad R. Blystone1, 2, David J. Dix2, and John C. Rockett2
    1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Box 7633, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA and 2U.S. Envi...

  11. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of oral testosterone undecanoate with concomitant inhibition of 5α-reductase by finasteride

    PubMed Central

    Roth, M. Y.; Dudley, R. E.; Hull, L.; Leung, A.; Christenson, P.; Wang, C.; Swerdloff, R.; Amory, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Oral testosterone undecanoate (TU) is used to treat testosterone deficiency; however, oral TU treatment elevates dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which may be associated with an increased risk of acne, male pattern baldness and prostate hyperplasia. Co-administration of 5α-reductase inhibitors with other formulations of oral testosterone suppresses DHT production and increases serum testosterone. We hypothesized that finasteride would increase serum testosterone and lower DHT during treatment with oral TU. Therefore, we studied the steady-state pharmacokinetics of oral TU, 200 mg equivalents of testosterone twice daily for 7 days, alone and with finasteride 0.5 and 1.0 mg po twice daily in an open-label, three-way crossover study in 11 young men with experimentally induced hypogonadism. On the seventh day of each dosing period, serum testosterone, DHT and oestradiol were measured at baseline and 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 13, 14, 16, 20 and 24 h after the morning dose. Serum testosterone and DHT were significantly increased into and above their normal ranges similarly by all three treatments. Co-administration of finasteride at 0.5 and 1.0 mg po twice daily had no significant effect on either serum testosterone or DHT. Oral TU differs from other formulations of oral testosterone in its response to concomitant inhibition of 5α-reductase, perhaps because of its unique lymphatic route of absorption. PMID:20969601

  12. Inhibition of in vitro metabolism of testosterone in human, dog and horse liver microsomes to investigate species differences.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Jana; Mevissen, Meike

    2015-04-01

    Testosterone hydroxylation was investigated in human, canine and equine liver microsomes and in human and canine single CYPs. The contribution of the CYP families 1, 2 and 3 was studied using chemical inhibitors. Testosterone metabolites were analyzed by HPLC. The metabolites androstenedione, 6β- and 11β-hydroxytestosterone were found in microsomes of all species, but the pattern of metabolites varied within species. Androstenedione was more prominent in the animal species, and an increase over time was seen in equines. Testosterone hydroxylation was predominantly catalyzed by the CYP3A subfamily in all three species. While CYP2C9 did not metabolise testosterone, the canine ortholog CYP2C21 produced androstenedione. Quercetin significantly inhibited 6β- and 11β-hydroxytestosterone in all species investigated, suggesting that CYP2C8 is involved in testosterone metabolism, whereas sulfaphenazole significantly inhibited the formation of 6β- and 11β-hydroxytestosterone in human microsomes, at 60 min in equine microsomes, but not in canine microsomes. A contribution of CYP2B6 in testosterone metabolism was only found in human and equine microsomes. Inhibition of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 indicated its involvement in androstenedione formation in humans, increased androstenedione formation was found in equines and no involvement in canines. These findings provide improved understanding of differences in testosterone biotransformation in animal species.

  13. Testosterone delays vascular smooth muscle cell senescence and inhibits collagen synthesis via the Gas6/Axl signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-qing; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Cheng-wei; Li, Yi-hui; Tang, Meng-xiong; Wang, Zhi-hao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yun; Li, Li; Zhong, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases in men. However, its effect on cell senescence, which plays a causal role in vascular aging, remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone alleviated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) senescence and collagen synthesis via growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6)/Axl- and Akt/FoxO1a-dependent pathways. Testosterone significantly ameliorated angiotensin II-induced VSMC senescence and collagen overexpression. In addition, testosterone inhibited angiotensin II-induced matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity, which played a pivotal role in facilitating age-related collagen deposition. Testosterone increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 but decreased the expression of MMP-2 and membrane type-1 metalloproteinase which contributed to increase MMP-2 activity. The effects on VSMCs senescence and collagen synthesis were mediated by restoration of angiotensin II-induced downregulation of Gas6 and Axl expression and a subsequent reduction of Akt and FoxO1a phosphorylation. The effects of testosterone were reversed by a Gas6 blocker, Axl-Fc, and a specific inhibitor of Axl, R428. Treatment of VSMCs with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 abrogated the downregulating effect of testosterone on MMP-2 activity. Furthermore, when FoxO1a expression was silenced by using a specific siRNA, the inhibitory effect of testosterone on MMP-2 activity was revered as well, that indicated this process was Akt/FoxO1a dependence. Taken together, Gas6/Axl and Akt/FoxO1a were involved in protective effects of testosterone on VSMCs senescence and collagen synthesis. Our results provide a novel mechanism underlying the protective effect of testosterone on vascular aging and may serve as a theoretical basis for testosterone replacement therapy.

  14. The spermatogenic effect of yacon extract and its constituents and their inhibition effect of testosterone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Sook; Han, Kun

    2013-03-01

    We screened the pharmacological effects of a 50% ethanol extract of Yacon tubers and leaves on spermatogenesis in rats. As a result, we found that Yacon tuber extracts increased sperm number and serum testosterone level in rats. It has been reported that the crude extract of Yacon tubers and leaves contain phenolic acids, such as, chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid by HPLC/MS analysis. We were interested in the contributions made by phenolic acid, particularly chlorogenic acid of Yacon tuber extract to the spermatogenic activity. After administering Yacon tuber extract or chlorogenic acid to rats for 5 weeks, numbers of sperm in epididymis were increased by 34% and 20%, respectively. We also administered ferulic acid, which has been reported to be a metabolite of chlorogenic acid and a constituent of Yacon tuber extract to investigate its spermatogenic activity in rats. Yacon tuber extract and ferulic acid increased sperm numbers by 43% and 37%, respectively. And, Yacon tuber extract, and chlorogenic acid showed significantly inhibition effect of testoeterone degradation in rat liver homogenate. We considered that the spermatogenic effect of Yacon tuber extract might be related to phenolic compounds and their inhibitory effect of testosterone degradation. Yacon showed the possibility as ameliorable agents of infertility by sperm deficiency and late onset hypogonadism syndrome with low level of testosterone.

  15. The Spermatogenic Effect of Yacon Extract and Its Constituents and Their Inhibition Effect of Testosterone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Sook; Han, Kun

    2013-01-01

    We screened the pharmacological effects of a 50% ethanol extract of Yacon tubers and leaves on spermatogenesis in rats. As a result, we found that Yacon tuber extracts increased sperm number and serum testosterone level in rats. It has been reported that the crude extract of Yacon tubers and leaves contain phenolic acids, such as, chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid by HPLC/MS analysis. We were interested in the contributions made by phenolic acid, particularly chlorogenic acid of Yacon tuber extract to the spermatogenic activity. After administering Yacon tuber extract or chlorogenic acid to rats for 5 weeks, numbers of sperm in epididymis were increased by 34% and 20%, respectively. We also administered ferulic acid, which has been reported to be a metabolite of chlorogenic acid and a constituent of Yacon tuber extract to investigate its spermatogenic activity in rats. Yacon tuber extract and ferulic acid increased sperm numbers by 43% and 37%, respectively. And, Yacon tuber extract, and chlorogenic acid showed significantly inhibition effect of testoeterone degradation in rat liver homogenate. We considered that the spermatogenic effect of Yacon tuber extract might be related to phenolic compounds and their inhibitory effect of testosterone degradation. Yacon showed the possibility as ameliorable agents of infertility by sperm deficiency and late onset hypogonadism syndrome with low level of testosterone. PMID:24009874

  16. Inhibition of testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate of sprague-dawley rats by pumpkin seed oil.

    PubMed

    Gossell-Williams, M; Davis, A; O'Connor, N

    2006-01-01

    The oil from the pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) seed is claimed to be useful in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. This investigation seeks to examine the effect of pumpkin seed oil on testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate of rats. Hyperplasia was induced by subcutaneous administration of testosterone (0.3 mg/100 g of body weight) for 20 days. Simultaneous oral administration of either pumpkin seed oil (2.0 and 4.0 mg/100 g of body weight) or corn oil (vehicle) was also given for 20 days. The weights of the rats were recorded weekly, and the influence of testosterone and pumpkin seed oil on the weight gain of the rats was examined. On day 21, rats were sacrificed, and the prostate was removed, cleaned, and weighed. The prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat body weight) was then calculated. Neither testosterone nor pumpkin seed oil had any significant influence on the weight gain of the rats. Testosterone significantly increased prostate size ratio (P < .05), and this induced increase was inhibited in rats fed with pumpkin seed oil at 2.0 mg/100 g of body weight. The protective effect of pumpkin seed oil was significant at the higher pumpkin seed oil dose (P < .02). We conclude pumpkin seed oil can inhibit testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate and therefore may be beneficial in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  17. 5α-Reductase Inhibition Suppresses Testosterone-Induced Initial Regrowth of Regressed Xenograft Prostate Tumors in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Ramos Garcia, Raquel; Pascal, Laura E.; Wang, Yujuan; Ma, Hei M.; O'Malley, Katherine; Eisermann, Kurtis; Shevrin, Daniel H.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Vessella, Robert L.; Nelson, Joel B.; Parikh, Rahul A.

    2013-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment for patients with prostate-specific antigen progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer. An alternative to continuous ADT is intermittent ADT (IADT), which allows recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor. IADT offers patients a reduction in side effects associated with ADT, improved quality of life, and reduced cost with no difference in overall survival. Our previous studies showed that IADT coupled with 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI), which blocks testosterone conversion to DHT could prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was fixed. To further investigate this clinically relevant observation, we measured the time course of testosterone-induced regrowth of regressed LuCaP35 and LNCaP xenograft tumors in the presence or absence of a 5ARI. 5α-Reductase inhibitors suppressed the initial regrowth of regressed prostate tumors. However, tumors resumed growth and were no longer responsive to 5α-reductase inhibition several days after testosterone replacement. This finding was substantiated by bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 staining of LuCaP35 tumors, which showed inhibition of prostate tumor cell proliferation by 5ARI on day 2, but not day 14, after testosterone replacement. 5α-Reductase inhibitors also suppressed testosterone-stimulated proliferation of LNCaP cells precultured in androgen-free media, suggesting that blocking testosterone conversion to DHT can inhibit prostate tumor cell proliferation via an intracrine mechanism. These results suggest that short off-cycle coupled with 5α-reductase inhibition could maximize suppression of prostate tumor growth and, thus, improve potential survival benefit achieved in combination with IADT. PMID:23671262

  18. Evidence of sexual dimorphism in placental vitamin D metabolism: Testosterone inhibits calcitriol-dependent cathelicidin expression.

    PubMed

    Olmos-Ortiz, Andrea; García-Quiroz, Janice; López-Marure, Rebeca; González-Curiel, Irma; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Olivares, Aleida; Avila, Euclides; Barrera, David; Halhali, Ali; Caldiño, Felipe; Larrea, Fernando; Díaz, Lorenza

    2016-10-01

    Male fetus and neonates show increased immune vulnerability compared to females, which results in a higher risk of perinatal infections. These differences could partially be due to sex steroids differential modulation of vitamin D metabolism; since calcitriol, the most active vitamin D metabolite, regulates immune responses and transcriptionally induces the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin in the human placenta. Calcitriol availability depends on CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 expression, the cytochromes involved in its synthesis and degradation, respectively. However, the effects of testosterone upon these enzymes and the final biological outcome upon the calcitriol-dependent immune-target cathelicidin in the placenta have not been studied. In this study we show that testosterone significantly inhibited CYP27B1 while stimulated CYP24A1 gene expression in cultured trophoblasts. These effects were accompanied by CREB activation through cAMP-independent and androgen receptor-dependent mechanisms. Male placental cotyledons showed reduced basal CYP27B1 and cathelicidin gene expression compared to females (P<0.05). Testosterone concentration was higher in the cord blood of male neonates (P=0.007), whereas cathelicidin levels were lesser compared to females (P=0.002). Altogether our results suggest that male placentas produce less cathelicidin due to decreased calcitriol bioavailability. We propose that the observed sex-dependent differences in placental vitamin D metabolism contribute in fetal responses to infections and could partially explain why the increased male fetuses immune vulnerability. Moreover, gestational hyperandrogenemia could adversely affect placental vitamin D metabolism independently of fetal sex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS THROUGH THE INHIBITION OF CYP17 ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS THROUGH THE INHIBITION OF CYP17 ACTIVITY

    Chad R. Blystone1, David J. Dix2, and John C. Rockett2
    1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, NC State University, R...

  20. IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS THROUGH THE INHIBITION OF CYP17 ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS THROUGH THE INHIBITION OF CYP17 ACTIVITY

    Chad R. Blystone1, David J. Dix2, and John C. Rockett2
    1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, NC State University, R...

  1. Moringa oleifera leaf extracts inhibit 6β-hydroxylation of testosterone by CYP3A4

    PubMed Central

    Monera, Tsitsi G.; Wolfe, Alan R.; Maponga, Charles C.; Benet, Leslie Z.; Guglielmo, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Background Moringa oleifera is a tropical tree often used as a herbal medicine, including by people who test positive for HIV. Since herbal constituents may interact with drugs via inhibition of metabolizing enzymes, we investigated the effects of extracts of M. oleifera on the CYP3A4-mediated 6ß-hydroxylation of testosterone. Methods Methanolic and aqueous leaf and root of extracts of M. oleifera with concentrations between 0.01 and 10 mg/ml were incubated with testosterone and mixed-sex human liver microsomes in the presence of NADPH. Metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was tested with HepG2 cells using the MTT formazan assay. Results Significant CYP3A4 inhibitory effects were found, with IC50 values of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/ml for leaf-methanol and leaf-water extracts, respectively. Root extracts were less active. Cytotoxicity was observed only with the leaf-water extract (IC50 = 6 mg/ml). Conclusions Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the potential of M. oleifera for clinically significant interactions with antiretroviral and other drugs. PMID:19745507

  2. Moringa oleifera leaf extracts inhibit 6beta-hydroxylation of testosterone by CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Monera, Tsitsi G; Wolfe, Alan R; Maponga, Charles C; Benet, Leslie Z; Guglielmo, Joseph

    2008-10-01

    Moringa oleifera is a tropical tree often used as a herbal medicine, including by people who test positive for HIV. Since herbal constituents may interact with drugs via inhibition of metabolizing enzymes, we investigated the effects of extracts of M. oleifera on the CYP3A4-mediated 6beta-hydroxylation of testosterone. Methanolic and aqueous leaf and root of extracts of M. oleifera with concentrations between 0.01 and 10 mg/ml were incubated with testosterone and mixed-sex human liver microsomes in the presence of NADPH. Metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was tested with HepG2 cells using the MTT formazan assay. Significant CYP3A4 inhibitory effects were found, with IC50 values of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/ml for leaf-methanol and leaf-water extracts, respectively. Root extracts were less active. Cytotoxicity was observed only with the leaf-water extract (IC50 = 6 mg/ml). Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the potential of M. oleifera for clinically significant interactions with antiretroviral and other drugs.

  3. Involvement of lipids in dimethoate-induced inhibition of testosterone biosynthesis in rat interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Astiz, Mariana; Hurtado de Catalfo, Graciela E; de Alaniz, María J T; Marra, Carlos Alberto

    2009-08-01

    The mechanism involved in the inhibition of testosterone (Te) biosynthesis after a sub-chronic exposure to low doses of dimethoate (D) was studied in rat interstitial cells (IC). Expression of COX-2 in IC isolated from D-treated rats increased by 44% over C data, while transcription of StAR decreased by approx. 50% and the expression of this protein was diminished by approximately 40%. PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) were increased by 61 and 78%, respectively. Te concentration decreased by 49% in IC homogenates. Concomitantly, plasma concentration of LH and FSH both increased. Araquidonate (ARA) and C(22) fatty acyl chains in phospholipids from IC mitochondrial fraction decreased by approx. 30% after D treatment. Protein carbonyls, lipoperoxides and nitrite content increased while alpha-tocopherol and the antioxidant capacity of the soluble cellular fraction decreased significantly. Stimulation with h-CG 10 nM overnight failed to overcome the inhibition caused by D on both Te biosynthesis and 3beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Decreased Te biosynthesis may be attributed to (1) inhibition of StAR protein activity due to the stimulation of COX-2 and the overproduction of PGF(2alpha), (2) decreased stimulatory effect of ARA on StAR with a subsequent reduction in the availability of CHO for the androgenic pathway, and/or (3) indirect inhibition of steroidogenic enzymes by a lower transcriptional rate caused by elevated PGF(2alpha). Rofecoxib administration prevents the deleterious effect(s) exerted by D.

  4. Allergen-specific IgG as a mediator of allergy inhibition: Lessons from mother to child

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Allergen-specific IgG produced by immune mothers is associated with less predisposition to allergy development in their children. This finding has been described by several groups over the last few decades, but the mechanisms by which maternal IgG can inhibit allergy development are still not fully understood. With the purpose of summarizing past investigations, we review the literature on murine models of maternal immunization with allergens and on immune regulation in humans after passive therapy with purified IgG. Based on our review, a new hypothesis about these mechanisms is presented, which may provide a foundation for the future development of therapies to inhibit allergy development. PMID:27808600

  5. STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP OF PHTHALATE ESTERS TO INHIBITED FETAL TESTICULAR TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE SPRAGUE DAWLEY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several of the phthalate esters (widely used as plasticizers of polyvinyl chloride and other applications) have been shown to inhibit fetal testicular testosterone (T) production and Insl3 mRNA in the laboratory rat. The current study was designed to define the dose response of 7...

  6. Galactosylation of IgG1 modulates FcγRIIB-mediated inhibition of murine autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazunori; Ito, Kiyoaki; Furukawa, Jun-Ichi; Nakata, Junichiro; Alvarez, Montserrat; Verbeek, J Sjef; Shinohara, Yasuro; Izui, Shozo

    2013-12-01

    Murine immune effector cells express three different stimulatory FcγRs (FcγRI, FcγRIII and FcγRIV) and one inhibitory receptor, FcγRIIB. Competitive engagement of stimulatory and inhibitory FcγRs has been shown to be critical for the development of immune complex-mediated inflammatory disorders. Because of the previous demonstration that FcγRIIB was unable to inhibit FcγRIII-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by 105-2H IgG1 anti-RBC mAb, we reevaluated the regulatory role of FcγRIIB on the development of anemia using two additional IgG1 anti-RBC mAbs (34-3C and 3H5G1) and different 34-3C IgG subclass-switch variants. We were able to induce a more severe anemia in FcγRIIB-deficient mice than in FcγRIIB-sufficient mice after injection of 34-3C and 3H5G1 IgG1, but not 105-2H IgG1. Structural analysis of N-linked oligosaccharides attached to the CH2 domain revealed that 105-2H was poorly galactosylated as compared with the other mAbs, while the extent of sialylation was comparable between all mAbs. In addition, we observed that a more galactosylated 105-2H variant provoked more severe anemia in FcγRIIB-deficient mice than FcγRIIB-sufficient mice. In contrast, the development of anemia induced by three non-IgG1 subclass variants of the 34-3C mAb was not down-regulated by FcγRIIB, although they were more galactosylated than its IgG1 variant. These data indicate that FcγRIIB-mediated inhibition of autoimmune hemolytic anemia is restricted to the IgG1 subclass and that galactosylation, but not sialylation, of IgG1 (but not other IgG subclasses) is critical for the interaction with FcγR, thereby determining the pathogenic potential of IgG1 autoantibodies.

  7. Influence of aromatase inhibition on the bone-protective effects of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Beck, Darren T; Yarrow, Joshua F; Beggs, Luke A; Otzel, Dana M; Ye, Fan; Conover, Christine F; Miller, Julie R; Balaez, Alexander; Combs, Sarah M; Leeper, Alicia M; Williams, Alyssa A; Lachacz, Stephanie A; Zheng, Nigel; Wronski, Thomas J; Borst, Stephen E

    2014-11-01

    The influence of the aromatase enzyme in androgen-induced bone maintenance after skeletal maturity remains somewhat unclear. Our purpose was to determine whether aromatase activity is essential to androgen-induced bone maintenance. Ten-month-old male Fisher 344 rats (n = 73) were randomly assigned to receive Sham surgery, orchiectomy (ORX), ORX + anastrozole (AN; aromatase inhibitor), ORX + testosterone-enanthate (TE, 7.0 mg/wk), ORX + TE + AN, ORX + trenbolone-enanthate (TREN; nonaromatizable, nonestrogenic testosterone analogue; 1.0 mg/wk), or ORX + TREN + AN. ORX animals exhibited histomorphometric indices of high-turnover osteopenia and reduced cancellous bone volume compared with Shams. Both TE and TREN administration suppressed cancellous bone turnover similarly and fully prevented ORX-induced cancellous bone loss. TE- and TREN-treated animals also exhibited greater femoral neck shear strength than ORX animals. AN co-administration slightly inhibited the suppression of bone resorption in TE-treated animals but did not alter TE-induced suppression of bone formation or the osteogenic effects of this androgen. In TREN-treated animals, AN co-administration produced no discernible effects on cancellous bone turnover or bone volume. ORX animals also exhibited reduced levator ani/bulbocavernosus (LABC) muscle mass and elevated visceral adiposity. In contrast, TE and TREN produced potent myotrophic effects in the LABC muscle and maintained fat mass at the level of Shams. AN co-administration did not alter androgen-induced effects on muscle or fat. In conclusion, androgens are able to induce direct effects on musculoskeletal and adipose tissue, independent of aromatase activity.

  8. The plant polyphenol butein inhibits testosterone-induced proliferation in breast cancer cells expressing aromatase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Chan, Franky L; Chen, Shiuan; Leung, Lai K

    2005-05-20

    Chalcones are precursor compounds for flavonoid synthesis in plants, and they can also be synthesized in laboratory. Previous study has documented some of the pharmacological applications of these compounds. Estrogen has long been associated with the initiation and promotion of breast cancer. Inhibiting estrogen synthesis can be effective in the prevention and treatment of the disease. Since most breast cancers received estrogen supplied from local tissues, we employed a breast cancer cell line expressing aromatase to screen for the inhibitory potentials of five hydroxychalcones, i.e. 2-hydroxychalcone, 2'-hydroxychalcone, 4-hydroxychalcone, 4,2',4'-trihydroxy-chalcone (isoquiritigenin), 3,4,2',4'-tetrahydroxychalcone (butein). In the preliminary results, butein was found to be the strongest inhibitor among the tested compounds, and its IC(50) value was 3.75 microM. Subsequent enzyme kinetic study revealed that butein acted on aromatase with a mixed type of inhibition and the K(i) value was determined to be 0.32 microM. Cell proliferation assay indicated that the cell number increased by 10 nM-testosterone treatment was significantly reduced by 5 microM butein, and the administration of flutamide could not reverse the effect. The present study illustrated that butein was an aromatase inhibitor and a potential natural alternative for the chemoprevention or therapy of breast cancer.

  9. A novel mechanism regulating a sexual signal: the testosterone-based inhibition of female sex pheromone expression in garter snakes.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Rockwell; Mason, Robert T

    2014-08-01

    Vertebrates communicate their sex to conspecifics through the use of sexually dimorphic signals, such as ornaments, behaviors and scents. Furthermore, the physiological connection between hormones and secondary sexual signal expression is key to understanding their dimorphism, seasonality and evolution. The red-sided garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis) is the only reptile for which a described pheromone currently exists, and because garter snakes rely completely on the sexual attractiveness pheromone for species identification and mate choice, they constitute a unique model species for exploring the relationship between pheromones and the endocrine system. We recently demonstrated that estrogen can activate female pheromone production in male garter snakes. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) acting to prevent female pheromone production in males. We found that castrated males (GX) are courted by wild males in the field and produce appreciable amounts of female sex pheromone. Furthermore, pheromone production is inhibited in castrates given testosterone implants (GX+T), suggesting that pheromone production is actively inhibited by the presence of testosterone. Lastly, testosterone supplementation alone (T) increased the production of several saturated methyl ketones in the pheromone but not the unsaturated ketones; this may indicate that saturated ketones are testosterone-activated components of the garter snake's skin lipid milieu. Collectively, our research has shown that pheromone expression in snakes results from two processes: activation by the feminizing steroid estradiol and inhibition by testosterone. We suggest that basal birds and garter snakes share common pathways of activation that modulate crucial intraspecific signals that originate from skin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of testosterone biosynthesis by ethanol. Relation to hepatic and testicular acetaldehyde, ketone bodies and cytosolic redox state in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, C J; Widenius, T V; Ylikahri, R H; Härkönen, M; Leinonen, P

    1983-01-01

    In experiments in which liver and testis freeze-stops were performed on pentobarbital-anaesthetized rats, ethanol (1.5 g/kg body wt.) reduced plasma testosterone concentration from 13.1 to 3.2 nmol/litre. 4-Methylpyrazole abolished the ethanol-induced hepatic and testicular increase in the lactate/pyruvate ratio, and the testicular acetaldehyde level, but did not diminish the reduction in plasma testosterone concentration. In testes, but not in liver, ethanol decreased the 3-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate ratio, and 4-methylpyrazole did not prevent this effect. In experiments in which freeze-stop was performed after cervical dislocation, ethanol decreased the testis testosterone concentration from 590 to 220 pmol per g wet wt. The effects of ethanol and 4-methylpyrazole on testis acetaldehyde, lactate/pyruvate and 3-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate ratios were the same as found during anaesthesia. The NAD+-dependent ethanol oxidation capacity in testis ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 mumol/min per g wet wt. and seemed to be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole both in vivo and in vitro. In additional experiments, ethanol doses between 0.3 and 0.9 g/kg body wt. did not alter the plasma testosterone concentration in rats treated, or not treated, with cyanamide, which induced elevated acetaldehyde levels in blood and testes. The results suggest that ethanol-induced inhibition of testosterone biosynthesis was not caused by extratesticular redox increases, or by extra- or intra-testicular acetaldehyde per se. The inhibition is accompanied by changes in testicular ketone-body metabolism. PMID:6847648

  11. Taenia taeniaeformis: inhibition of rat testosterone production by excretory-secretory product of the cultured metacestode.

    PubMed

    Rikihisa, Y; Lin, Y C; Fukaya, T

    1985-06-01

    In 3- to 5-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats infected with the hepatic metacestode, Taenia taeniaeformis, the serum testosterone level was significantly lower than in comparable uninfected controls. By transmission electron microscopy, testicular Leydig cells of infected rats had less smooth endoplasmic reticulum than control Leydig cells. Cultured metacestodes isolated from the hepatic cysts secreted or excreted substances into the incubation medium. The effect of the excretory-secretory product on testosterone concentration in the sera and testes of 15-day-old rats was examined. Subcutaneous injection of 50-200 micrograms of excretory-secretory product/0.1 ml saline/rat for 2 days significantly reduced human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated serum and testicular testosterone concentrations. Furthermore, the effect of the excretory-secretory product on isolated rat Leydig cell testosterone production was examined. Rat Leydig cells produced testosterone in vitro and, in the presence of 50 IU human chorionic gonadotropin/ml incubation medium, they responded with approximately 100% increase in testosterone production. Addition of 2-10 micrograms excretory-secretory product protein/ml of culture medium significantly reduced the testosterone production by rat Leydig cells in vitro. These results indicate that excretory-secretory product of cultured T. taeniaeformis metacestodes has a direct inhibitory effect on Leydig cell testosterone production under stimulation with human chorionic gonadotropin.

  12. Testosterone inhibits transforming growth factor-β signaling during myogenic differentiation and proliferation of mouse satellite cells: Potential role of follistatin in mediating testosterone action

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Melissa; Bhasin, Shalender; Jasuja, Ravi; Pervin, Shehla; Singh, Rajan

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone (T) administration is associated with increased satellite cell number and skeletal muscle hypertrophy, although there is considerable heterogeneity in the response of different skeletal muscle groups to T in vivo. We investigated the effects of T on the growth and differentiation of satellite cells isolated from levator ani (LA) and gastrocnemius (gastroc) muscles. T up regulated follistatin (Fst) expression, but down regulated the mRNA and protein expression of a number of genes in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)-signaling pathway. Inhibition of Fst expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited myogenic differentiation and blocked the pro-myogenic effects of T. Treatment of satellite cells with T or Fst up regulated the expression of Pax7 and PCNA, and increased their proliferation. T and Fst blocked TGF-β induced inhibition of growth and myogenic differentiation and down regulated TGF-β-dependent transcriptome in both LA and gastroc cells. We conclude that T stimulation of satellite cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation are associated with up regulation of Fst and inhibition of TGF-β-signaling. PMID:22138414

  13. Testosterone inhibition of growth hormone release stimulated by a growth hormone secretagogue: studies in the rat and dog.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Antonello E; Cella, Silvano G; Giordani, Claudio; Bonomo, Sara M; Giunta, Marialuisa; Sartorio, Alessandro; Muller, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    Anabolic steroids are frequently taken by athletes and bodybuilders together with recombinant human GH (rhGH), though there is some scientific evidence that the use of anabolic steroids reverses the rhGH-induced effects. Recently, we have shown that treatment with rhGH (0.2 IU/kg s.c., daily x 12 days) in the dog markedly reduced the canine GH (cGH) responses stimulated by EP51216, a GH secretagogue (GHS), evaluated after 3 and 5 daily rhGH injections, and that the inhibition was still present a few days after rhGH discontinuation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in the dog the GH response to EP51216 (125 mug/kg i.v.) in a condition of enhanced androgenic function (i.e. acute injection or 15-day treatment with testosterone at the dose of 2 mg/kg i.m. on alternate days), and in the hypophysectomized rat the hypothalamic and hippocampal expression of ghrelin, the receptor of GHSs (GHS-R), GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SS) after specific hormonal replacement therapies (testosterone, 1 mg/kg/day s.c.; hydrocortisone, 500 mug/kg/day s.c.; rhGH, 400 mug/kg/day s.c.; 0.9% saline 0.1 ml/kg/day s.c.; x11 days). In the dog experiments, under baseline conditions, a single injection of EP51216 elicited an abrupt rise of plasma cGH. Twenty-four hours from the acute bolus injection of testosterone, C(max) and AUC(0-90) of the GHS-stimulated cGH response were significantly lower than baseline cGH response; 5 days later, there was still a significant decrease of either parameter versus the original values. Short-term treatment with testosterone markedly reduced the GHS-stimulated cGH responses evaluated during (5th bolus) and at the end (8th bolus) of testosterone treatment. Four and 8 days after testosterone withdrawal, the EP51216-stimulated cGH response was still significantly reduced when compared with that under baseline conditions. Plasma concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were stable until the 5th bolus of testosterone and

  14. Disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) selectively inhibits IgE production and enhances IgG4 production by human B cell in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kimata, H; Yoshida, A; Ishioka, C; Mikawa, H

    1991-06-01

    The effect of DSCG on human IgE production in vitro was studied. DSCG selectively inhibited interleukin-4 (IL-4) induced IgE production by mononuclear cells (MNC) from normal donors without affecting IgM, IgA, IgG1, IgG2 or IgG3 production. In contrast, DSCG enhanced IgG4 production. To achieve this effect, DSCG must be added to the culture at the initiation and be present throughout the entire culture period. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) also inhibited IL-4-induced IgE production, but IgG4 production was not affected by IFN-gamma. Monoclonal anti-IFN-gamma antibody blocked the inhibition of IgE production by IFN-gamma, but did not block the inhibition of IgE production by DSCG. DSCG also selectively inhibited spontaneous IgE production and enhanced IgG4 production by B cells from atopic patients in the presence of T cells and monocytes. These results indicate that there is a mechanism of IgE production inhibition which is not mediated by IFN-gamma. We also found that DSCG is an excellent reagent for the study of IgE and IgG4 regulation in vitro.

  15. Disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) selectively inhibits IgE production and enhances IgG4 production by human B cell in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, H; Yoshida, A; Ishioka, C; Mikawa, H

    1991-01-01

    The effect of DSCG on human IgE production in vitro was studied. DSCG selectively inhibited interleukin-4 (IL-4) induced IgE production by mononuclear cells (MNC) from normal donors without affecting IgM, IgA, IgG1, IgG2 or IgG3 production. In contrast, DSCG enhanced IgG4 production. To achieve this effect, DSCG must be added to the culture at the initiation and be present throughout the entire culture period. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) also inhibited IL-4-induced IgE production, but IgG4 production was not affected by IFN-gamma. Monoclonal anti-IFN-gamma antibody blocked the inhibition of IgE production by IFN-gamma, but did not block the inhibition of IgE production by DSCG. DSCG also selectively inhibited spontaneous IgE production and enhanced IgG4 production by B cells from atopic patients in the presence of T cells and monocytes. These results indicate that there is a mechanism of IgE production inhibition which is not mediated by IFN-gamma. We also found that DSCG is an excellent reagent for the study of IgE and IgG4 regulation in vitro. PMID:1904324

  16. Performance of 14 rubella IgG immunoassays on samples with low positive or negative haemagglutination inhibition results.

    PubMed

    Huzly, Daniela; Hanselmann, Ingeborg; Neumann-Haefelin, Dieter; Panning, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Rubella IgG testing is routinely done in prenatal care and seroepidemiological studies. Recently concern was raised that seropositivity rates were decreasing questioning vaccination policies. Manufacturers of rubella IgG assays and authors of seroepidemiological studies use different cut-offs for the definition of seropositivity. As rubella virus circulation is reduced since many years, seronegativity rates might be overestimated using an inappropriate cut-off. Using different cut-off definitions we compared fourteen current rubella IgG immunoassays for sensitivity and qualitative result concordance in samples with low positive or negative haemagglutination inhibition (HI) titre. 150 clinical samples from patients and health care workers were included in the study. All samples were measured in 14 different rubella IgG immunoassays. Seropositivity was defined using recombinant rubella IgG immunoblot as reference standard. The concordance of qualitative results using the manufacturers cut-off definitions was 56.4% if grey-zone results were analysed separately and 69.8% if grey-zone results were defined as positive. Using universal cut-offs of 10 IU/ml or 15 IU/ml the concordance was 70% and 61.4% respectively. Using the different cut-off definitions up to 71 out of the 124 immunoblot-positive samples tested negative in the immunoassays. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) of quantitative results in positive samples was 51% (range 19-113%). Determination of rubella immunity by measurement of rubella-IgG in a population with high vaccination coverage with current assays leads to a high number of false negative results. The value of routine rubella antibody testing in countries with high vaccination coverage should be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of Rat 5α-Reductase Activity and Testosterone-Induced Sebum Synthesis in Hamster Sebocytes by an Extract of Quercus acutissima Cortex.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Junichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Matsubara, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Junko; Kaneko, Atsushi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Maemura, Kazuya; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Bokusoku (BK) is an extract from the Quercus cortex used in folk medicine for treatment of skin disorders and convergence, and is present in jumihaidokuto, a traditional Japanese medicine that is prescribed for purulent skin diseases like acne vulgaris. The excess of sebum production induced by androgen is involved in the development of acne. Our aim is to examine whether BK and its constituents inhibit testosterone metabolism and testosterone-induced sebum synthesis. Methods. Measurements of 5α-reductase activity and lipogenesis were performed using rat liver microsomes and hamster sebocytes, respectively. Results. BK dose-dependently reduced the conversion of testosterone to a more active androgen, dihydrotestosterone in a 5α-reductase enzymatic reaction. Twenty polyphenols in BK categorized as gallotannin, ellagitannin, and flavonoid were identified by LC-MS/MS. Nine polyphenols with gallate group, tetragalloyl glucose, pentagalloyl glucose, eugeniin, 1-desgalloyl eugeniin, casuarinin, castalagin, stenophyllanin C, (-)-epicatechin gallate, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, inhibited testosterone metabolism. In particular, pentagalloyl glucose showed the strongest activity. BK and pentagalloyl glucose suppressed testosterone-induced lipogenesis, whereas they weakly inhibited the lipogenic action of insulin. Conclusions. BK inhibited androgen-related pathogenesis of acne, testosterone conversion, and sebum synthesis, partially through 5α-reductase inhibition, and has potential to be a useful agent in the therapeutic strategy of acne.

  18. Inhibition of Rat 5α-Reductase Activity and Testosterone-Induced Sebum Synthesis in Hamster Sebocytes by an Extract of Quercus acutissima Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Koseki, Junichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Matsubara, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Junko; Kaneko, Atsushi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Maemura, Kazuya; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Bokusoku (BK) is an extract from the Quercus cortex used in folk medicine for treatment of skin disorders and convergence, and is present in jumihaidokuto, a traditional Japanese medicine that is prescribed for purulent skin diseases like acne vulgaris. The excess of sebum production induced by androgen is involved in the development of acne. Our aim is to examine whether BK and its constituents inhibit testosterone metabolism and testosterone-induced sebum synthesis. Methods. Measurements of 5α-reductase activity and lipogenesis were performed using rat liver microsomes and hamster sebocytes, respectively. Results. BK dose-dependently reduced the conversion of testosterone to a more active androgen, dihydrotestosterone in a 5α-reductase enzymatic reaction. Twenty polyphenols in BK categorized as gallotannin, ellagitannin, and flavonoid were identified by LC-MS/MS. Nine polyphenols with gallate group, tetragalloyl glucose, pentagalloyl glucose, eugeniin, 1-desgalloyl eugeniin, casuarinin, castalagin, stenophyllanin C, (−)-epicatechin gallate, and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate, inhibited testosterone metabolism. In particular, pentagalloyl glucose showed the strongest activity. BK and pentagalloyl glucose suppressed testosterone-induced lipogenesis, whereas they weakly inhibited the lipogenic action of insulin. Conclusions. BK inhibited androgen-related pathogenesis of acne, testosterone conversion, and sebum synthesis, partially through 5α-reductase inhibition, and has potential to be a useful agent in the therapeutic strategy of acne. PMID:25709710

  19. Is aromatization of testosterone to estradiol required for inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion in men?

    PubMed Central

    Santen, R J

    1975-01-01

    A variety of studies in man and animals demonstrate that testosterone (T) is aromatized to estradiol (E) in the hypothalamus and limbic system. These observations suggested the possibility that conversion to E is an absolute requirement for the biologic activity of T on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Since this hypothesis implies a common mechanism of action of these two steroids, the demonstration of divergent effects of T and E on luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion would exclude this possibility. To test this hypothesis, the actions of T and E on three separate aspects of LH release (mean LH, pulsatile LH secretion, and responsiveness to LH-releasing hormone [LH-RH]) were contrasted. T and E, infused at two times their respective production rates into normal men, reduced mean LH levels similarly during 6 h of steroid infusion and for 6 h thereafter. However, these steroids exerted different effects on pulsatile secretion. E reduced the amplitude of spontaneous LH pulse from pre- and postinfusion control levels of 75+/-14 and 68+/-5.6% (SEM) to 39+/-5.7%. In contrast, T increased pulse amplited to 96+/-14% and decreased pulse frequency from basal levels of 3.4+/-0.31 to 1.8+/-0.31 pulses/6h. The site of suppressive action was determined by administering 25 microgms of LH-RH to the same men during T and E infusions and during three additional control periods without steroid administration. LH-RH produced similar 170-190% increments in serum LH during the three control periods and during T infusion. In contrast, E markedly blunted (76+/-31%, p less than 0.005) the LH response to LH-RH. Under the conditions of acute steroid infusion at doses (utilized in these experiments) producing similar inhibition of mean LH, E but not T acted directly on the pituitary to diminish LH-RH responsiveness. As further support that androgens can act without conversion to estrogens, the effects of a nonaromatizable androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), on mean LH levels were studied

  20. Feedback inhibition of gonadotropins by testosterone in men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: comparison to the intact pituitary-testicular axis in primary hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Shimon, Ilan; Lubina, Alexandra; Gorfine, Malka; Ilany, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) due to hypothalamic-pituitary disease present with low serum testosterone levels combined with undetectable, low, or normal gonadotropin levels. Treatment consists of testosterone replacement to reverse the symptoms of androgen deficiency. The aim of this study was to examine the dynamics and feedback inhibition of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in relation to testosterone in 38 men with HH treated with testosterone. Findings were compared with 11 men with primary hypergonadism (PH). Testosterone replacement led to a suppression of FSH levels from 2.8 IU/L at baseline to 1.1 IU/L and to a suppression of LH levels from 2.3 to 0.8 IU/L. There was a linear correlation between levels of FSH and LH (after natural log transformation for both) and testosterone levels in both the HH and PH groups. However, the differences in intercepts and slopes between the groups were significant. To determine whether nonsuppressed FSH or LH during testosterone replacement reduces the probability of eugonadism, as reflected by normal testosterone levels, gonadotropin levels were measured and categorized as low (<0.5 IU/L), medium (0.5-2 IU/L), and high levels (>2 IU/L). The higher FSH or LH levels were found to significantly decrease the chance for achieving eugonadism. In conclusion, in men with HH due to hypothalamic-pituitary disease or injury, the pituitary-testicular hormonal axis maintains its physiological negative feedback between testosterone and gonadotropins. Thus, gonadotropin levels in men with HH might be useful, together with testosterone concentrations, for assessing the adequacy of androgen replacement.

  1. Testosterone replacement effectively inhibits the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis in rats: evidence for a direct role of testosterone on regulatory T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Fijak, Monika; Schneider, Eva; Klug, Jörg; Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Hackstein, Holger; Schuler, Gerhard; Wygrecka, Malgorzata; Gromoll, Jörg; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Despite the immune-privileged status of the male genital tract, infection and inflammation of the male genital tract are important etiological factors in male infertility. A common observation in clinical and experimental orchitis as well as in systemic infection and inflammation are decreased levels of testosterone. Emerging data point to an immunosuppressive role of testosterone. In our study, we substituted testosterone levels in experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in rat by s.c. testosterone implants. EAO development was reduced to 17% when animals were treated with low-dose testosterone implants (3 cm long, EAO+T3) and to 33% when rats were supplied with high-dose testosterone implants (24 cm, EAO+T24) compared with 80% of animals developing disease in the EAO control group. In the testis, testosterone replacement in EAO animals prevented the accumulation of macrophages and significantly reduced the number of CD4(+) T cells with a strong concomitant increase in the number of regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)) compared with EAO control. In vitro testosterone treatment of naive T cells led to an expansion of the regulatory T cell subset with suppressive activity and ameliorated MCP-1-stimulated chemotaxis of T lymphocytes in a Transwell assay. Moreover, expression of proinflammatory mediators such as MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the testis and secretion of Th1 cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-2 by mononuclear cells isolated from testicular draining lymph nodes were decreased in the EAO+T3 and EAO+T24 groups. Thus, our study shows an immunomodulatory and protective effect of testosterone substitution in the pathogenesis of EAO and suggests androgens as a new factor in the differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  2. Inhibition of hair growth by testosterone in the presence of dermal papilla cells from the frontal bald scalp of the postpubertal stumptailed macaque.

    PubMed

    Obana, N; Chang, C; Uno, H

    1997-01-01

    Hair-follicle regression in the bald scalps of stumptailed macaques develops after puberty, which corresponds to an elevation of serum testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Using the cultured cells from the pre- and postpubertal macaques, we examined the role of dermal papilla cells in testosterone-induced inhibition of outer root sheath cell proliferation. Testosterone showed no effects on proliferation of either dermal papilla cells or outer root sheath cells cultured alone. Testosterone-induced inhibition of outer root sheath cell proliferation occurred only in coculture with dermal papilla cells derived from the bald scalps of adult macaques but not with dermal papilla cells from the hairy occipital scalps of adult macaques or the prebald frontal scalps of juvenile macaques. Furthermore, RU 58841, an androgen receptor blocker, antagonized this testosterone-elicited inhibition. Together our data indicate that the inhibitory effect of testosterone on proliferation of epithelial cells is age dependent, and androgen may play an essential role in hair growth either by inducing repressor(s) from dermal papilla cells, which may then inhibit the growth of epithelial cells of the hair follicle, or by inducing growth factor(s) from dermal papilla cells, which, in turn, may trigger the induction of some repressors in epithelial cells, thereby inhibiting the epithelial cell growth. Our animal studies also showed that RU 58841 has a dramatic effect on hair regrowth in the bald frontal scalp of the stumptailed macaque, which may further support our in vitro culture studies showing that antiandrogens can antagonize testosterone-elicited hair growth. In summary, our studies may provide a model for further isolation of androgen-regulated repressor(s)/growth factors, which may help control hair growth and baldness.

  3. Growth Inhibition by Testosterone in an Androgen Receptor Splice Variant-Driven Prostate Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Daisuke; Nakayama, Kazuhide; Masaki, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Akira; Kusaka, Masami; Watanabe, Tatsuya

    2016-12-01

    Castration resistance creates a significant problem in the treatment of prostate cancer. Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR) have emerged as drivers for resistance to androgen deprivation therapy, including the next-generation androgen-AR axis inhibitors abiraterone and enzalutamide. In this study, we describe the characteristics of a novel castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) model, designated JDCaP-hr (hormone refractory). JDCaP-hr was established from an androgen-dependent JDCaP xenograft model after surgical castration. The expression of AR and its splice variants in JDCaP-hr was evaluated by immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The effects of AR antagonists and testosterone on JDCaP-hr were evaluated in vivo and in vitro. The roles of full-length AR (AR-FL) and AR-V7 in JDCaP-hr cell growth were evaluated using RNA interference. JDCaP-hr acquired a C-terminally truncated AR protein during progression from the parental JDCaP. The expression of AR-FL and AR-V7 mRNA was upregulated by 10-fold in JDCaP-hr compared with that in JDCaP, indicating that the JDCaP and JDCaP-hr models simulate castration resistance with some clinical features, such as overexpression of AR and its splice variants. The AR antagonist bicalutamide did not affect JDCaP-hr xenograft growth, and importantly, testosterone induced tumor regression. In vitro analysis demonstrated that androgen-independent prostate-specific antigen secretion and cell proliferation of JDCaP-hr were predominantly mediated by AR-V7. JDCaP-hr cell growth displayed a bell-shaped dependence on testosterone, and it was suppressed by physiological concentrations of testosterone. Testosterone induced rapid downregulation of both AR-FL and AR-V7 expression at physiological concentrations and suppressed expression of the AR target gene KLK3. Our findings support the clinical value of testosterone therapy, including bipolar androgen therapy, in the

  4. Fraction of Macroporous Resin from Smilax china L. Inhibits Testosterone Propionate–Induced Prostatic Hyperplasia in Castrated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Xiong, Chao-Mei; Song, Shan-Shan; Han, Pan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a fraction of macroporous resin (FMR), a bioactive component of Smilax china L., on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in castrated rats induced by testosterone propionate. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: the negative control group (sham-operated), the model group, two FMR-treated groups (at doses of 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg of body weight), and the positive control group (treated with finasteride at the dose of 3 mg/kg). Drugs were administered once a day for three consecutive weeks by gastric gavage. Prostates were weighed, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum were determined, and histopathological examinations were carried out. FMR treatment inhibited prostatic hyperplasia, reducing the DHT level in serum and improving the prostate gland morphology compared with the model group. The overall results of this study suggest that FMR is effective at inhibiting experimentally induced prostate enlargement, and it presents a valuable resource for the treatment of human BPH. PMID:22510101

  5. Fraction of macroporous resin from Smilax china L. inhibits testosterone propionate-induced prostatic hyperplasia in castrated rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Xiong, Chao-Mei; Song, Shan-Shan; Han, Pan; Ruan, Jin-Lan

    2012-07-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a fraction of macroporous resin (FMR), a bioactive component of Smilax china L., on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in castrated rats induced by testosterone propionate. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: the negative control group (sham-operated), the model group, two FMR-treated groups (at doses of 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg of body weight), and the positive control group (treated with finasteride at the dose of 3 mg/kg). Drugs were administered once a day for three consecutive weeks by gastric gavage. Prostates were weighed, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum were determined, and histopathological examinations were carried out. FMR treatment inhibited prostatic hyperplasia, reducing the DHT level in serum and improving the prostate gland morphology compared with the model group. The overall results of this study suggest that FMR is effective at inhibiting experimentally induced prostate enlargement, and it presents a valuable resource for the treatment of human BPH.

  6. Gossypol inhibits human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production by cultured canine testicular interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, M; Kulp, S; Chang, W; Lin, Y C

    1996-03-01

    Gossypol (GP) is a natural polyphenolic compound that possesses antifertility and antisteroidogenic activities in both males and females. The dog is highly sensitive to GP toxicity, yet GP's effect on canine testicular steroidogenesis has never been reported. Thus, the present study examines GP's effects on human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced testosterone (T) production by primary cultured canine testicular interstitial cells. After decapsulation and enzymatic dissociation of canine testes in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium with Ham's Nutrient Mixture F-12 (1:1; DME/F-12) containing 0.1% collagenase, 0.1% BSA, and 10 micrograms/ml DNase 1 (37 degrees C, 20 min), interstitial cells were isolated by sedimentation and filtration (140 microns) and then cultured in supplemented DME/F-12 medium (5 micrograms/ml insulin, 5 micrograms/ml transferrin, 5 ng/ml sodium selenite; DME/F-12/S) containing 0.1% fetal bovine serum (FBS). FBS was used to enhance cell attachment during the first 24 hours of culture. After 24 hours, the medium was replaced with serum-free DME/F-12/S and the cells were cultured for an additional 24 hours. Thereafter, cells were treated with hCG (0.1 IU/ml) alone and in combination with GP (0.05, 0.5, 2.5 and 5.0 microM). Media were collected for T radioimmunoassay and cells for protein estimation after 8, 16 and 24 hours of treatment. Treatment with hCG significantly (p < 0.05) stimulated T production over that of controls at all treatment times examined. At 8, 16 and 24 hours, T secretion was elevated from 0.91 +/- 0.25, 1.32 +/- 0.42, and 1.41 +/- 0.40 pg/microgram protein to 2.36 +/- 0.50, 2.84 +/- 0.60, and 2.82 +/- 0.43 pg/microgram protein, respectively. At 0.5, 2.5 and 5.0 microM, GP significantly (p < 0.05) reduced hCG-induced T secretion at 16 and 24 hours of treatment to 1.79 +/- 0.50, 1.62 +/- 0.12, 1.34 +/- 0.16 (16 hr), and 1.53 +/- 0.38, 1.43 +/- 0.11, 1.42 +/- 0.32 (24 hr) pg/microgram protein, respectively. At 8 hours, T

  7. “Auto-anti-IgE”: Naturally occurring IgG anti-IgE antibodies may inhibit allergen-induced basophil activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yih-Chih; Ramadani, Faruk; Santos, Alexandra F.; Pillai, Prathap; Ohm-Laursen, Line; Harper, Clare E.; Fang, Cailong; Dodev, Tihomir S.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Ying, Sun; Corrigan, Christopher J.; Gould, Hannah J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Naturally occurring IgE-specific IgG autoantibodies have been identified in patients with asthma and other diseases, but their spectrum of functions is poorly understood. Objective Address the hypothesis that: (i) IgG anti-IgE autoantibodies are detectable in the serum of all subjects but elevated in asthmatic patients regardless of atopic status as compared with controls; (ii) some activate IgE-sensitized basophils; and (iii) some inhibit allergen-induced basophil activation. Methods IgE-specific IgG autoantibodies were detected and quantified in sera using ELISA. Sera were examined for their ability to activate IgE-sensitized human blood basophils in the presence and absence of allergen using a basophil activation test, and to inhibit allergen binding to specific IgE on a rat basophilic cell line stably expressing human FcεRI. Results IgG autoantibodies binding to both free and FcεRI-bound IgE were detected in patients with atopic and non-atopic asthma, as well as controls. While some were able to activate IgE-sensitised basophils, others inhibited allergen-induced basophil activation, at least partly by inhibiting binding of IgE to specific allergen. Conclusion Naturally occurring IgG anti-IgE autoantibodies may inhibit, as well as induce, basophil activation. They act in a manner distinct from therapeutic IgG anti-IgE antibodies such as omalizumab. They may at least partly explain why atopic subjects who make allergen-specific IgE never develop clinical symptoms, and why omalizumab therapy is of variable clinical benefit in severe atopic asthma. PMID:25112697

  8. Glycyrrhizic acid prevents astrocyte death by neuromyelitis optica-specific IgG via inhibition of C1q binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Cheon, Soyoung; Kim, Seung Woo; Kim, Boram; Kim, Heejaung; Park, Ki Duk; Kim, Sung-Min

    2016-09-16

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and is mediated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of NMO-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies (NMO-IgG). Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) has numerous pharmacological effects including inhibition of the complement pathway. We aimed to study the influence of GA on NMO-IgG-induced CDC. NMO-IgG samples from 7 patients with NMO, together with human complement, induced CDC in an aquaporin 4 M23-overexpressing glial cell line, an in vitro NMO model. GA attenuated NMO-IgG-induced CDC in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanism of the GA-related CDC inhibition was sequentially dissected and found to involve inhibition of C1q binding to NMO-IgG. Consequently, GA attenuates NMO-IgG-induced CDC and may be a promising novel therapeutic agent against NMO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 17beta-estradiol combined with testosterone promotes chicken osteoblast proliferation and differentiation by accelerating the cell cycle and inhibiting apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuxia; Deng, Yifeng; Zhou, Zhenlei; Tao, Qingshu; Zhu, Jie; Li, Xiaolan; Chen, Jinli; Hou, Jiafa

    2010-02-01

    Medullary bone is a unique tissue in the long bones cavities of lay hens, and plays an important role as a calcium reservoir for egg-shell formation. Medullary bone formation requires the synergistic action of estrogen and androgen on osteoblasts during the early stage of sexual maturity. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of 17beta-estradiol, testosterone, and the combination on the proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, apoptosis, the cell cycle of chicken osteoblasts in vitro. The proliferation of osteoblasts was examined with the MTT assay. Apoptosis and the cell cycle were assessed with flow cytometry. Either 17beta-estradiol (200 pg ml(-1)) or testosterone (100 pg ml(-1)) or the combination (100 pg ml(-1) each) significantly enhanced osteoblast proliferation and ALP activity, accelerated the osteoblast cell cycle, and stimulated osteoblast DNA synthesis in a period of 24 h. 17beta-estradiol, used alone or with testosterone, inhibited chicken osteoblast apoptosis; However, testosterone alone induced cell apoptosis. In conclusion, 17beta-estradiol combined with testosterone promoted osteoblast proliferation and ALP activity, accelerated the osteoblast cell cycle, inhibited osteoblast apoptosis.

  10. Pyrroloquinoline quinone prevents testosterone deficiency-induced osteoporosis by stimulating osteoblastic bone formation and inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuan; Li, Jie; Zhang, Hengwei; Wang, Hui; Yin, Guoyong; Miao, Dengshun

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidences suggest that oxidative stress caused and deteriorated the aging related osteoporosis and pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a powerful antioxidant. However, it is unclear whether PQQ can prevent testosterone deficiency-induced osteoporosis. In this study, the orchidectomized (ORX) mice were supplemented in diet with/without PQQ for 48 weeks, and compared with each other and with sham mice. Results showed that bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume, collagen deposition and osteoblast number were decreased significantly in ORX mice compared with shame mice, whereas PQQ supplementation largely prevented these alterations. In contrast, osteoclast surface and ratio of RANKL and OPG mRNA relative expression levels were increased significantly in ORX mice compared with shame mice, but were decreased significantly by PQQ supplementation. Furthermore, we found that CFU-f and ALP positive CFU-f forming efficiency and the proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells were reduced significantly in ORX mice compared with shame mice, but were increased significantly by PQQ supplementation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in thymus were increased, antioxidant enzymes SOD-1, SOD-2, Prdx I and Prdx IV protein expression levels in bony tissue were down-regulated, whereas the protein expression levels of DNA damage response related molecules including γ-H2AX, p53, Chk2 and NFκB-p65 in bony tissue were up-regulated significantly in ORX mice compared with shame mice, whereas PQQ supplementation largely rescued these alterations observed in ORX mice. Our results indicate that PQQ supplementation can prevent testosterone deficiency-induced osteoporosis by inhibiting oxidative stress and DNA damage, stimulating osteoblastic bone formation and inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption. PMID:28386349

  11. Sex differences in the inhibition by ATD of testosterone-activated mounting behavior in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Roy, M M; Goy, R W

    1988-09-01

    Adult male and female guinea pigs from a genetically heterogeneous stock were gonadectomized and tested for mounting behavior before and during various treatments with testosterone cypionate (TC) alone or in combination with an aromatase inhibitor, 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD). ATD was implanted subdermally in Silastic capsules (either 1 or 2 in females; 2 or 3 in males). In females 2 capsules of ATD completely blocked the behavioral effects of TC, and 1 capsule was an effective blocker in 58% of the females. The blocking effect was reversed by injection of diethylstilbestrol. In males, there was no measurable effect of ATD on mounting activity even when 3 capsules were implanted. Moreover, the TC induction of higher components of male sexual behavior (intromission and ejaculation) was also not impaired by ATD. Results are interpreted as indicating that either the process of male sexual differentiation or the male genotype eliminates the requirement for aromatization in androgenic activation of sexual behavior.

  12. Testosterone suppresses uropathogenic Escherichia coli invasion and colonization within prostate cells and inhibits inflammatory responses through JAK/STAT-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chen-Hsun; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Wu, Chia-Chang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Liu, Shih-Ping; Cheng, Po-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Prostatitis is a common condition in adult men of all ages. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are most frequent pathogen involved in bacterial prostatitis by refluxing the infected urine into prostatic ducts and resulting in an ascending urethral infection. However, the study about the mechanisms of UPEC to invade, replicate and persist in normal prostate epithelial cell is only few. Given the fact that UPEC is pathogen most frequently involved in prostatitis and that testosterone has been demonstrated to attenuate prostate inflammation caused by other etiologies. In this study we investigated whether the testosterone reduces the prostatitis and related mechanism by regulating IFN-γ/STAT1 signaling pathway. In the current study aimed to clarify whether testosterone influences the process of UPEC-induced prostate inflammation and invasion into the prostate epithelial cells. In addition, we set up a normal prostate cell model for UPEC infection to evaluate the ability to invade the urothelial cells as well as the colonization of intercellular bacterial communities in vitro. By using the model, we examine the effects of testosterone to suppress effectively the invasion and survival of UPEC in the prostate cells, and inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses through the JAK/STAT1 pathway have also been indicated. Our results demonstrated testosterone not only suppressed the invasion and colonization of UPEC, but also inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines expression induced by UPEC in a dose-dependent manner. We found the effective dose of testosterone to suppress UPEC infect prostate cells may be appropriate under 40μg/ml. Our data also revealed 20μg/ml testosterone treated PZ-HPV-7 cells significantly suppressed the LPS-induced JAK/STAT1 pathway and inflammatory responses, and reached to maximal effects at 40μg/ml treatment. These results indicate that testosterone plays an anti-inflammatory role in LPS-induced prostate

  13. Exogenous testosterone in women enhances and inhibits competitive decision-making depending on victory-defeat experience and trait dominance.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Pranjal H; van Son, Veerle; Welker, Keith M; Prasad, Smrithi; Sanfey, Alan G; Smidts, Ale; Roelofs, Karin

    2015-10-01

    The present experiment tested the causal impact of testosterone on human competitive decision-making. According to prevailing theories about testosterone's role in social behavior, testosterone should directly boost competitive decisions. But recent correlational evidence suggests that testosterone's behavioral effects may depend on specific aspects of the context and person relevant to social status (win-lose context and trait dominance). We tested the causal influence of testosterone on competitive decisions by combining hormone administration with measures of trait dominance and a newly developed social competition task in which the victory-defeat context was experimentally manipulated, in a sample of 54 female participants. Consistent with the hypothesis that testosterone has context- and person-dependent effects on competitive behavior, testosterone increased competitive decisions after victory only among high-dominant individuals but testosterone decreased competitive decisions after defeat across all participants. These results suggest that testosterone flexibly modulates competitive decision-making depending on prior social experience and dominance motivation in the service of enhancing social status.

  14. Comparison of the Hemagglutination Inhibition Test and IgG ELISA in Categorizing Primary and Secondary Dengue Infections Based on the Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test

    PubMed Central

    Lukman, Nurhayati; Susanto, Nugroho Harry; Parwati, Ida; Fitri, Silvita; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Widjaja, Susana; Williams, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Secondary dengue infection by heterotypic serotypes is associated with severe manifestations of disease, that is, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended criteria based on the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test to distinguish between primary and secondary dengue infections. Since the HI test has practical limitations and disadvantages, we evaluated the accuracy of WHO HI criteria and compared it with criteria based on an IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) as the gold standard. Both WHO HI criteria and IgG ELISA criteria performed strongly (16/16) in determining primary infection. However, to determine secondary infection, the IgG ELISA criteria performed better (72/73) compared to the WHO HI criteria (23/73). PMID:27446953

  15. PERIPUBERTAL PROCHLORAZ EXPOSURE STRONGLY INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION, BUT HAS WEAK EFFECTS ON PUBERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and development of reproductive organs. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed wit...

  16. PERIPUBERTAL PROCHLORAZ EXPOSURE STRONGLY INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION, BUT HAS WEAK EFFECTS ON PUBERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and development of reproductive organs. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed wit...

  17. Prochloraz inhibits testosterone production at dosages below those that affect androgen-dependent organ weights or the onset of puberty in the male Sprague Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Blystone, Chad R; Furr, Johnathan; Lambright, Christy S; Howdeshell, Kembra L; Ryan, Bryce C; Wilson, Vickie S; Leblanc, Gerald A; Gray, Leon Earl

    2007-05-01

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits gonadal steroidogenesis and antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR). We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to PCZ would reduce testosterone production and delay male rat reproductive development. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed by gavage with 0, 31.3, 62.5, or 125 mg/kg/day of PCZ from postnatal day (PND) 23 to 42 or 51. There was a significant delay in preputial separation (PPS) at 125 mg/kg/day PCZ and several of the androgen-dependent organ weights were decreased significantly, but the significant organ weight effects were not consistent between the 2 necropsies (PND 42 vs. 51). At both ages, serum testosterone levels and ex vivo testosterone release from the testis were significantly decreased whereas serum progesterone and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone levels were significantly increased at dose levels below those that affected PPS or reproductive organ weights. The hormone results suggested that PCZ was inhibiting CYP17 activity. In a second pubertal study (0, 3.9, 7.8, 15.6, 31.3, or 62.5 mg/kg/day PCZ), serum testosterone levels and ex vivo testosterone production were significantly reduced at 15.6 mg/kg/day PCZ. In order to examine the AR antagonism effects of PCZ, independent of its effects on testosterone synthesis, castrated immature male rats were dosed with androgen and 0, 15.6, 31.3, 62.5, or 125 mg/kg/day PCZ for 10-11 days (Hershberger assay). In this assay, androgen-sensitive organ weights were only significantly decreased at 125 mg/kg/day PCZ. These data from the pubertal assays demonstrate that PCZ decreases testosterone levels and delays rat pubertal development, as hypothesized. However, the fact that hormone levels were affected at dosage eightfold below that which delayed the onset of puberty suggests that rather large reductions in serum testosterone may be required to delay puberty and consistently reduce androgen-dependent tissue weights.

  18. High-fat diet aggravates 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether-inhibited testosterone production via DAX-1 in Leydig cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhan; Yu, Yongquan; Xu, Hengsen; Wang, Chao; Ji, Minghui; Gu, Jun; Yang, Lu; Zhu, Jiansheng; Dong, Huibin; Wang, Shou-Lin

    2017-03-12

    Growing evidence has revealed that a high-fat diet (HFD) could lead to disorders of glycolipid metabolism and insulin-resistant states, and HFDs have been associated with the inhibition of testicular steroidogenesis. Our previous study demonstrated that 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE47) could increase the risk of diabetes in humans and reduce testosterone production in rats. However, whether the HFD affects BDE47-inhibited testosterone production by elevating insulin levels and inducing related pathways remains unknown. In male rats treated with BDE47 by gavage for 12 weeks, the HFD significantly increased the BDE47 content of the liver and testis and increased the weight of the adipose tissue; increased macrovesicular steatosis in the liver and the levels of triglycerides, fasting glucose and insulin; further aggravated the disruption of the seminiferous epithelium; and lowered the level of testosterone, resulting in fewer sperm in the epididymis. Of note, the HFD enhanced BDE47-induced DAX-1 expression and decreased the expression levels of StAR and 3β-HSD in the testicular interstitial compartments in rats. In isolated primary Leydig cells from rats, BDE47 or insulin increased DAX-1 expression, decreased the expression of StAR and 3β-HSD, and reduced testosterone production, which was nearly reversed by knocking down DAX-1. These results indicated that the HFD aggravates BDE47-inhibited testosterone production through hyperinsulinemia, and the accumulation of testicular BDE47 that induces the up-regulation of DAX-1 and the subsequent down-regulation of steroidogenic proteins, i.e., StAR and 3β-HSD, in Leydig cells.

  19. Castration inhibits biliary proliferation induced by bile duct obstruction: novel role for the autocrine trophic effect of testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fuquan; Priester, Sally; Onori, Paolo; Venter, Julie; Renzi, Anastasia; Franchitto, Antonio; Munshi, Md Kamruzzaman; Wise, Candace; Dostal, David E.; Marzioni, Marco; Saccomanno, Stefania; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Increased cholangiocyte growth is critical for the maintenance of biliary mass during liver injury by bile duct ligation (BDL). Circulating levels of testosterone decline following castration and during cholestasis. Cholangiocytes secrete sex hormones sustaining cholangiocyte growth by autocrine mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that testosterone is an autocrine trophic factor stimulating biliary growth. The expression of androgen receptor (AR) was determined in liver sections, male cholangiocytes, and cholangiocyte cultures [normal rat intrahepatic cholangiocyte cultures (NRICC)]. Normal or BDL (immediately after surgery) rats were treated with testosterone or antitestosterone antibody or underwent surgical castration (followed by administration of testosterone) for 1 wk. We evaluated testosterone serum levels; intrahepatic bile duct mass (IBDM) in liver sections of female and male rats following the administration of testosterone; and secretin-stimulated cAMP levels and bile secretion. We evaluated the expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (17β-HSD3, the enzyme regulating testosterone synthesis) in cholangiocytes. We evaluated the effect of testosterone on the proliferation of NRICC in the absence/presence of flutamide (AR antagonist) and antitestosterone antibody and the expression of 17β-HSD3. Proliferation of NRICC was evaluated following stable knock down of 17β-HSD3. We found that cholangiocytes and NRICC expressed AR. Testosterone serum levels decreased in castrated rats (prevented by the administration of testosterone) and rats receiving antitestosterone antibody. Castration decreased IBDM and secretin-stimulated cAMP levels and ductal secretion of BDL rats. Testosterone increased 17β-HSD3 expression and proliferation in NRICC that was blocked by flutamide and antitestosterone antibody. Knock down of 17β-HSD3 blocks the proliferation of NRICC. Drug targeting of 17β-HSD3 may be important for managing cholangiopathies. PMID:21903763

  20. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers with excellent biocompatibility for the selective separation and inhibition of testosterone in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoshuang; Li, Feng; Jia, Jing; Yang, Chao; Liu, Wei; Jin, Ben; Wang, Xinyang; Gao, Ruixia; He, Dalin; Guo, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Androgen plays an important role in the progression of prostate cancer. In the present study, novel magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) with good biocompatibility were produced for the selective separation and inhibition of testosterone in prostate cancer cells. Materials and methods MMIPs were prepared by using magnetic nanospheres, gelatin, and testosterone as the supporting materials, functional monomer, and the template molecule, respectively. The characterization of the resultant products was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry. To test whether MMIPs can remove testosterone in biologic samples, human LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and C4-2 (androgen-independent) prostate cancer cells were selected as cell models. The translocation of androgen receptor (AR) was detected by immunofluorescence assay, and the expression of PSA mRNA was detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Cell flow cytometry analysis was performed to detect cell cycle arrest. Results The synthesized nanomaterials (MMIPs) possessed high crystallinity, satisfactory superparamagnetic properties, and uniform imprinted shell, and exhibited high adsorption capacity, fast kinetics, and high selectivity for testosterone. Moreover, the obtained imprinted nanomaterials could selectively enrich and detect testosterone in the LNCaP cell samples as a solid-phase extractant coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography. In addition, the MMIPs could freely enter prostate cancer cells and suppress the translocation of AR into the cell nucleus. We further found that MMIPs inhibited upregulation of AR downstream target genes in LNCaP and C4-2 cells; also, MMIPs inhibited cell growth and induced obvious cell cycle arrest in androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, but had no obvious effect on androgen-independent C4-2 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that the obtained imprinted nanomaterials can

  1. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers with excellent biocompatibility for the selective separation and inhibition of testosterone in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoshuang; Li, Feng; Jia, Jing; Yang, Chao; Liu, Wei; Jin, Ben; Wang, Xinyang; Gao, Ruixia; He, Dalin; Guo, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Androgen plays an important role in the progression of prostate cancer. In the present study, novel magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) with good biocompatibility were produced for the selective separation and inhibition of testosterone in prostate cancer cells. MMIPs were prepared by using magnetic nanospheres, gelatin, and testosterone as the supporting materials, functional monomer, and the template molecule, respectively. The characterization of the resultant products was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry. To test whether MMIPs can remove testosterone in biologic samples, human LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and C4-2 (androgen-independent) prostate cancer cells were selected as cell models. The translocation of androgen receptor (AR) was detected by immunofluorescence assay, and the expression of PSA mRNA was detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Cell flow cytometry analysis was performed to detect cell cycle arrest. The synthesized nanomaterials (MMIPs) possessed high crystallinity, satisfactory superparamagnetic properties, and uniform imprinted shell, and exhibited high adsorption capacity, fast kinetics, and high selectivity for testosterone. Moreover, the obtained imprinted nanomaterials could selectively enrich and detect testosterone in the LNCaP cell samples as a solid-phase extractant coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography. In addition, the MMIPs could freely enter prostate cancer cells and suppress the translocation of AR into the cell nucleus. We further found that MMIPs inhibited upregulation of AR downstream target genes in LNCaP and C4-2 cells; also, MMIPs inhibited cell growth and induced obvious cell cycle arrest in androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, but had no obvious effect on androgen-independent C4-2 cells. Our results indicate that the obtained imprinted nanomaterials can specifically and effectively bind testosterone and

  2. Testosterone inhibits growth in juvenile male eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus): implications for energy allocation and sexual size dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robert M; Skelly, Stephanie L; John-Alder, Henry B

    2005-01-01

    In the eastern fence lizard, Sceloporus undulatus, female-larger sexual size dimorphism develops because yearling females grow faster than males before first reproduction. This sexual growth divergence coincides with maturational increases in male aggression, movement, and ventral coloration, all of which are influenced by the sex steroid testosterone (T). These observations suggest that male growth may be constrained by energetic costs of activity and implicate T as a physiological regulator of this potential trade-off. To test this hypothesis, we used surgical castration and subsequent administration of exogenous T to alter the physiological and behavioral phenotypes of field-active males during the period of sexual growth divergence. As predicted, T inhibited male growth, while castration promoted long-term growth. Males treated with T also exhibited increased daily activity period, movement, and home range area. Food consumption did not differ among male treatments or sexes, suggesting that the inhibitory effects of T on growth are mediated by patterns of energy allocation rather than acquisition. On the basis of estimates derived from published data, we conclude that the energetic cost of increased daily activity period following T manipulation is sufficient to explain most (79%) of the associated reduction in growth. Further, growth may have been constrained by additional energetic costs of increased ectoparasite load following T manipulation. Similar studies of the proximate behavioral, ecological, and physiological mechanisms involved in growth regulation should greatly improve our understanding of sexual size dimorphism.

  3. C-fos down-regulation inhibits testosterone-dependent male sexual behavior and the associated learning.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Neville-Andrew; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F; Charlier, Thierry D

    2013-11-01

    Environmental stimulation results in an increased expression of transcription factors called immediate early genes (IEGs) in specific neuronal populations. In male Japanese quail, copulation with a female increases the expression of the IEGs zenk and c-fos in the medial pre-optic nucleus (POM), a key nucleus controlling male sexual behavior. The functional significance of this increased IEG expression that follows performance of copulatory behavior is unknown. We addressed this question by repeatedly quantifying the performance of appetitive (learned social proximity response) and consummatory (actual copulation) sexual behavior in castrated, testosterone-treated males that received daily intra-cerebroventricular injection of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting c-fos or control vehicle. Daily antisense injections significantly inhibited the expression of copulatory behavior as well as the acquisition of the learned social proximity response. A strong reduction of the proximity response was still observed in antisense-treated birds that copulated with a female, ruling out the indirect effect of the absence of interactions with females on the learning process. After a 2-day interruption of behavioral testing but not of antisense injections, birds were submitted to a final copulatory test that confirmed the behavioral inhibition in antisense-injected birds. Brains were collected at 90 min after the behavioral testing for quantification of c-fos-immunoreactive cells. A significant reduction of the number of c-fos-positive cells in the POM but not in other brain regions was observed following antisense injection. Taken together, the data suggest that c-fos expression in the POM modulates copulatory behavior and sexual learning in male quail. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. C-fos down-regulation inhibits testosterone-dependent male sexual behavior and the associated learning

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Neville-Andrew; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F.; Charlier, Thierry D.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental stimulation results in an increased expression of transcription factors called immediate early genes (IEG) in specific neuronal populations. In male Japanese quail, copulation with a female increases the expression of the IEGs zenk and c-fos in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM), a key nucleus controlling male sexual behavior. The functional significance of this increased IEG expression that follows performance of copulatory behavior is unknown. We addressed this question by repeatedly quantifying the performance of appetitive (learned social proximity response) and consummatory (actual copulation) sexual behavior in castrated, testosterone-treated males that received daily intracerebroventricular injection of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting c-fos or control vehicle. Daily antisense injections significantly inhibited expression of copulatory behavior as well as acquisition of the learned social proximity response. A strong reduction of the proximity response was still observed in antisense-treated birds that copulated with a female, ruling out the indirect effect of the absence of interactions with females on the learning process. After a two-day interruption of behavioral testing but not of antisense injections, birds were submitted to a final copulatory test that confirmed the behavioral inhibition in antisense-injected birds. Brains were collected 90 min after the behavioral testing for quantification of c-fos immunoreactive cells. A significant reduction of the number of c-fos-positive cells in POM but not in other brain regions was observed following antisense injection. Together, data suggest that c-fos expression in POM modulates copulatory behavior and sexual learning in male quail. PMID:23895306

  5. Excretory-secretory product of Paragonimus westermani newly excysted metacercariae inhibits superoxide production of granulocytes stimulated with IgG

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that the cysteine proteases in excretory-secretory product (ESP) of Paragonimus westermani newly excysted metacercariae (PwNEM) are capable of degrading IgG in vitro. Recent evidence suggests that the IgG-coated surface, such as found on parasites, is one of the most effective physiologic stimuli for granulocyte activation. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the effect of excretory-secretory product (ESP) of PwNEM on superoxide production of granulocytes stimulated with IgG. The 96-well plates were coated with human IgG (0, 10, 30, 100 µg/ml) in the absence or presence of ESP. When granulocytes were incubated in the wells coated with human IgG in the presence of ESP, the level of superoxide production of granulocytes was reduced to about 90% when compared to the cells incubated in the wells coated with IgG alone. This inhibitory effect of the ESP on IgG-induced superoxide production of granulocytes was concentration-dependent. These results suggest that ESP secreted by PwNEM may be important in the control of effector functions of granulocytes stimulated with IgG in human paragonimiasis. PMID:10905073

  6. Testosterone Therapies.

    PubMed

    Khera, Mohit

    2016-05-01

    There are numerous testosterone formulations now available, and patients and clinicians should take into account the "4 Cs": cost, compliance, convenience, and concentration levels. Testosterone is a natural contraceptive and should not be used in men trying to achieve a pregnancy. All testosterone gels and solutions have an increased risk of transference, and there should be increased caution when in contact with children and pregnant women.

  7. Hypoxia reduces testosterone synthesis in mouse Leydig cells by inhibiting NRF1-activated StAR expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueting; Pan, Longlu; Zou, Zhiran; Wang, Dan; Lu, Yapeng; Dong, Zhangji; Zhu, Li

    2017-03-07

    Male fertility disorders play a key role in half of all infertility cases. Reduction in testosterone induced by hypoxia might cause diseases in reproductive system and other organs. Hypoxic exposure caused a significant decrease of NRF1. Software analysis reported that the promoter region of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) contained NRF1 binding sites, indicating NRF1 promoted testicular steroidogenesis. The purpose of this study is to determine NRF1 is involved in testosterone synthesis; and under hypoxia, the decrease of testosterone synthesis is caused by lower expression of NRF1. We designed both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Under hypoxia, the expressions of NRF1 in Leydig cells and testosterone level were significantly decreased both in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression and interference NRF1 could induced StAR and testosterone increased and decreased respectively. ChIP results confirmed the binding of NRF1 to StAR promoter region. In conclusion, decline of NRF1 expression downregulated the level of StAR, which ultimately resulted in a reduction in testosterone synthesis.

  8. Epicoccum allergy: skin reaction patterns and spore/mycelium disparities recognized by IgG and IgE ELISA inhibition.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, J; Chapman, J; Burge, H; Muilenberg, M; Solomon, W

    1987-07-01

    Comparable degrees of skin reactivity were observed towards spore and mycelium extracts from two isolates of Epicoccum and to one preparation of Alternaria in 35 rural and 120 university patients. The best experimental extracts detected Epicoccum sensitivity in 70% of the group tested while the commercial extract detected sensitivity in only 6%. Skin reaction correlations were greatest within isolates (eg, spore-A/mycelium-A), then for specific fungus parts (eg, spore-A/spore-B), then between isolates and parts (spore-A/mycelium-B). High correlations were found between individual IgG and IgE ELISA values for all antigens using serum from Epicoccum skin-reactive patients. ELISA inhibition results suggested that significant cross-reactivity exists between Epicoccum and Alternaria antigens recognized by IgG but not by IgE. ELISA inhibition cross-reaction patterns among Epicoccum antigens were comparable to skin reactions while IgG patterns showed little variability. Further characterization of spore/mycelium and interstrain recognition patterns among different immunoglobulin isotypes will be necessary before complete standardization of extracts from different parts of fungi will be possible. The use of spore material for skin testing and treatment of Epicoccum sensitivity appears to be both premature and unnecessary at this time.

  9. Inhibition of HIV-1 Infectivity and Epithelial Cell Transfer by Human Monoclonal IgG and IgA Antibodies Carrying the b12 V Region1

    PubMed Central

    Mantis, Nicholas J.; Palaia, Jana; Hessell, Ann J.; Mehta, Simren; Zhu, Zhiyi; Corthésy, Blaise; Neutra, Marian R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Janoff, Edward N.

    2010-01-01

    Both IgG and secretory IgA Abs in mucosal secretions have been implicated in blocking the earliest events in HIV-1 transit across epithelial barriers, although the mechanisms by which this occurs remain largely unknown. In this study, we report the production and characterization of a human rIgA2 mAb that carries the V regions of IgG1 b12, a potent and broadly neutralizing anti-gp120 Ab which has been shown to protect macaques against vaginal simian/HIV challenge. Monomeric, dimeric, polymeric, and secretory IgA2 derivatives of b12 reacted with gp120 and neutralized CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic strains of HIV-1 in vitro. With respect to the protective effects of these Abs at mucosal surfaces, we demonstrated that IgG1 b12 and IgA2 b12 inhibited the transfer of cell-free HIV-1 from ME-180 cells, a human cervical epithelial cell line, as well as Caco-2 cells, a human colonic epithelial cell line, to human PBMCs. Inhibition of viral transfer was due to the ability of b12 to block both viral attachment to and uptake by epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that IgG and IgA MAbs directed against a highly conserved epitope on gp120 can interfere with the earliest steps in HIV-1 transmission across mucosal surfaces, and reveal a possible mechanism by which b12 protects the vaginal mucosal against viral challenge in vivo. PMID:17709529

  10. [Testosterone therapy].

    PubMed

    Diemer, T; Hauptmann, A; Wagenlehner, F M E

    2016-04-01

    Hormone replacement therapy with testosterone has become well-established over the course of time. The initial substantial concerns with respect to complications and potential adverse events, particularly in older patients, were proven to be unfounded over time. Testosterone therapy has therefore gradually become a regular treatment modality in urological practice. It has also been shown to represent a valuable tool as supportive treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism. A variety of testosterone preparations are available for treatment. Recent pharmaceutical developments have greatly improved the practicability and ease of administration for patients. Several guidelines have been developed that provide clearly formulated standards and instructions for indications, contraindications, application, risk factors and monitoring of testosterone therapy. Adverse events affecting the cardiovascular system and especially diseases of the prostate gland are of great importance, thus making the urologist the primary partner in the treatment of patients with testosterone deficiency.

  11. IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody inhibits the voltage-dependent calcium channel currents in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Nagaoka, Takumi; Hotta, Sayako; Utsunomiya, Iku; Yoshino, Hiide; Miyatake, Tadashi; Hoshi, Keiko; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the effects of IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies, produced by immunizing rabbits with GalNAc-GD1a, on the voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCCs) currents in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. VDCCs currents in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Immunized rabbit serum that had a high titer of anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies inhibited the VDCCs currents in the NGF-differentiated PC12 cells (36.0+/-9.6% reduction). The inhibitory effect of this serum was reversed to some degree within 3-4 min by washing with bath solution. Similarly, application of purified IgG from rabbit serum immunized with GalNAc-GD1a significantly inhibited the VDCCs currents in PC12 cells (30.6+/-2.5% reduction), and this inhibition was recovered by washing with bath solution. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect was also observed in the GalNAc-GD1a affinity column binding fraction (reduction of 31.1+/-9.85%), while the GalNAc-GD1a affinity column pass-through fraction attenuated the inhibitory effect on VDCCs currents. Normal rabbit serum and normal rabbit IgG did not affect the VDCCs currents in the PC12 cells. In an immunocytochemical study using fluorescence staining, the PC12 cells were stained using GalNAc-GD1a binding fraction. These results indicate that anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies inhibit the VDCCs currents in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells.

  12. IgG4 inhibits peanut-induced basophil and mast cell activation in peanut-tolerant children sensitized to peanut major allergens

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alexandra F.; James, Louisa K.; Bahnson, Henry T.; Shamji, Mohammed H.; Couto-Francisco, Natália C.; Islam, Sabita; Houghton, Sally; Clark, Andrew T.; Stephens, Alick; Turcanu, Victor; Durham, Stephen R.; Gould, Hannah J.; Lack, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Background Most children with detectable peanut-specific IgE (P-sIgE) are not allergic to peanut. We addressed 2 non–mutually exclusive hypotheses for the discrepancy between allergy and sensitization: (1) differences in P-sIgE levels between children with peanut allergy (PA) and peanut-sensitized but tolerant (PS) children and (2) the presence of an IgE inhibitor, such as peanut-specific IgG4 (P-sIgG4), in PS patients. Methods Two hundred twenty-eight children (108 patients with PA, 77 PS patients, and 43 nonsensitized nonallergic subjects) were studied. Levels of specific IgE and IgG4 to peanut and its components were determined. IgE-stripped basophils or a mast cell line were used in passive sensitization activation and inhibition assays. Plasma of PS subjects and patients submitted to peanut oral immunotherapy (POIT) were depleted of IgG4 and retested in inhibition assays. Results Basophils and mast cells sensitized with plasma from patients with PA but not PS patients showed dose-dependent activation in response to peanut. Levels of sIgE to peanut and its components could only partially explain differences in clinical reactivity between patients with PA and PS patients. P-sIgG4 levels (P = .023) and P-sIgG4/P-sIgE (P < .001), Ara h 1–sIgG4/Ara h 1–sIgE (P = .050), Ara h 2–sIgG4/Ara h 2–sIgE (P = .004), and Ara h 3–sIgG4/Ara h 3–sIgE (P = .016) ratios were greater in PS children compared with those in children with PA. Peanut-induced activation was inhibited in the presence of plasma from PS children with detectable P-sIgG4 levels and POIT but not from nonsensitized nonallergic children. Depletion of IgG4 from plasma of children with PS (and POIT) sensitized to Ara h 1 to Ara h 3 partially restored peanut-induced mast cell activation (P = .007). Conclusions Differences in sIgE levels and allergen specificity could not justify the clinical phenotype in all children with PA and PS children. Blocking IgG4 antibodies provide an additional

  13. Inhibition of NOS-NO System Prevents Autoimmune Orchitis Development in Rats: Relevance of NO Released by Testicular Macrophages in Germ Cell Apoptosis and Testosterone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Jarazo Dietrich, Sabrina; Fass, Mónica Irina; Jacobo, Patricia Verónica; Sobarzo, Cristian Marcelo Alejandro; Lustig, Livia; Theas, María Susana

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the testis is considered an immunoprivileged organ it can orchestrate immune responses against pathological insults such as infection and trauma. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is a model of chronic inflammation whose main histopathological features it shares with human orchitis. In EAO an increased number of macrophages infiltrate the interstitium concomitantly with progressive germ cell degeneration and impaired steroidogenesis. Up-regulation of nitric oxide (NO)-NO synthase (NOS) system occurs, macrophages being the main producers of NO. Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of NO-NOS system in orchitis development and determine the involvement of NO released by testicular macrophages on germ cell apoptosis and testosterone secretion. Method and Results EAO was induced in rats by immunization with testicular homogenate and adjuvants (E group) and a group of untreated normal rats (N) was also studied. Blockage of NOS by i.p. injection of E rats with a competitive inhibitor of NOS, L-NAME (8mg/kg), significantly reduced the incidence and severity of orchitis and lowered testicular nitrite content. L-NAME reduced germ cell apoptosis and restored intratesticular testosterone levels, without variations in serum LH. Co-culture of N testicular fragments with testicular macrophages obtained from EAO rats significantly increased germ cell apoptosis and testosterone secretion, whereas addition of L-NAME lowered both effects and reduced nitrite content. Incubation of testicular fragments from N rats with a NO donor DETA-NOnoate (DETA-NO) induced germ cell apoptosis through external and internal apoptotic pathways, an effect prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). DETA-NO inhibited testosterone released from Leydig cells, whereas NAC (from 2.5 to 15 mM) did not prevent this effect. Conclusions We demonstrated that NO-NOS system is involved in the impairment of testicular function in orchitis. NO secreted mainly by testicular

  14. MuSK IgG4 autoantibodies cause myasthenia gravis by inhibiting binding between MuSK and Lrp4

    PubMed Central

    Huijbers, Maartje G.; Zhang, Wei; Klooster, Rinse; Niks, Erik H.; Friese, Matthew B.; Straasheijm, Kirsten R.; Thijssen, Peter E.; Vrolijk, Hans; Plomp, Jaap J.; Vogels, Pauline; Losen, Mario; Van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Burden, Steven J.; Verschuuren, Jan J.

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a severely debilitating autoimmune disease that is due to a decrease in the efficiency of synaptic transmission at neuromuscular synapses. MG is caused by antibodies against postsynaptic proteins, including (i) acetylcholine receptors, the neurotransmitter receptor, (ii) muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), a receptor tyrosine kinase essential for the formation and maintenance of neuromuscular synapses, and (iii) low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), which responds to neural Agrin by binding and stimulating MuSK. Passive transfer studies in mice have shown that IgG4 antibodies from MuSK MG patients cause disease without requiring complement or other immune components, suggesting that these MuSK antibodies cause disease by directly interfering with MuSK function. Here we show that pathogenic IgG4 antibodies to MuSK bind to a structural epitope in the first Ig-like domain of MuSK, prevent binding between MuSK and Lrp4, and inhibit Agrin-stimulated MuSK phosphorylation. In contrast, these IgG4 antibodies have no direct effect on MuSK dimerization or MuSK internalization. These results provide insight into the unique pathogenesis of MuSK MG and provide clues toward development of specific treatment options. PMID:24297891

  15. MuSK IgG4 autoantibodies cause myasthenia gravis by inhibiting binding between MuSK and Lrp4.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Maartje G; Zhang, Wei; Klooster, Rinse; Niks, Erik H; Friese, Matthew B; Straasheijm, Kirsten R; Thijssen, Peter E; Vrolijk, Hans; Plomp, Jaap J; Vogels, Pauline; Losen, Mario; Van der Maarel, Silvère M; Burden, Steven J; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2013-12-17

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a severely debilitating autoimmune disease that is due to a decrease in the efficiency of synaptic transmission at neuromuscular synapses. MG is caused by antibodies against postsynaptic proteins, including (i) acetylcholine receptors, the neurotransmitter receptor, (ii) muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), a receptor tyrosine kinase essential for the formation and maintenance of neuromuscular synapses, and (iii) low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), which responds to neural Agrin by binding and stimulating MuSK. Passive transfer studies in mice have shown that IgG4 antibodies from MuSK MG patients cause disease without requiring complement or other immune components, suggesting that these MuSK antibodies cause disease by directly interfering with MuSK function. Here we show that pathogenic IgG4 antibodies to MuSK bind to a structural epitope in the first Ig-like domain of MuSK, prevent binding between MuSK and Lrp4, and inhibit Agrin-stimulated MuSK phosphorylation. In contrast, these IgG4 antibodies have no direct effect on MuSK dimerization or MuSK internalization. These results provide insight into the unique pathogenesis of MuSK MG and provide clues toward development of specific treatment options.

  16. The protection of selenium on cadmium-induced inhibition of spermatogenesis via activating testosterone synthesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiang-mei; Wang, Gai-gai; Xu, Dong-qing; Luo, Kang; Liu, Yu-xin; Zhong, Yi-hong; Cai, Yun-qing

    2012-10-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trance element in testis. However, the potential protective effects of Se against cadmium (Cd)-induced reproductive toxicity remained to be elucidated. Male ICR mice were orally administered by gavage with Na2SeO3 (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 mg/kg BW) for 1h prior to CdCl2 (5 mg/kg BW) alone or in combination for 15, 25 or 35 days. Cd exposure caused a significant decrease in body weight, sperm concentration and motility as well as plasma testosterone level which was accompanied by decreased antioxidant enzymatic activity of SOD and GSH-Px and by increased lipid peroxidation (as malondialdehyde, MDA). Se pretreatment compensated deficits in the sperm parameters (concentration, motility and morphology) induced by Cd. Se (0.4 mg/kg BW) treatment significantly increased serum testosterone level that was reduced by Cd (on 15th, 25th and 35th day) (P<0.01). Se treatment ameliorated Cd-induced reduction in testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) activities. The present study suggest that the protective potential of Se against Cd-induced reprotoxicity might be due to up-regulation StAR and testosterone synthetic enzyme activity, which could be useful for increasing testosterone synthesis for achieving optimum protection in sperm quality and spermatogenesis.

  17. Testosterone Buccal

    MedlinePlus

    ... left and right of the two front teeth). Alternate sides at every dose so that you never ... thoughts or beliefs that have no basis in reality). People who use higher doses of testosterone than ...

  18. Hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 enzyme activity in relation to in vitro metabolism/inhibition of polychlorinated biphenyls and testosterone in Baltic grey seal (Halichoerus grypus).

    PubMed

    Li, Hongxia; Boon, Jan P; Lewis, Wilma E; van den Berg, Martin; Nyman, Madeleine; Letcher, Robert J

    2003-03-01

    Among other factors, cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activity determines polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) bioaccumulation, biotransformation, and toxicity in exposed species. We measured the oxidative metabolism in vitro of 12 PCB congeners, representing structural groups based on the number and position of the chlorine atoms, by the hepatic microsomes of one Baltic grey seal (Halichoerus grypus). Microsomal metabolism was observed for several PCBs with vicinal H atoms exclusively in the ortho and meta positions and without any ortho-Cl substituents (CB-15 [4,4'-Cl2] and CB-77 [3,3',4,4'-Cl4]), vicinal meta and para-H atoms (CB-52 [2,2',5,5'-Cl4], and -101 [2,2',4,5,5'-Cl5]) or with both characteristics in combination with either only one ortho-Cl (CB-26 [2,3',5-Cl3], CB-31 [2,4',5-Cl3]) or two ortho-Cl substituents (CB-44 [2,2',3,5'-Cl4]). To allocate PCB biotransformation to specific CYPs, the inhibitive effect of compounds with known CYP-specific inhibition properties was assessed on in vitro PCB metabolism and on regio- and stereospecific testosterone hydroxylase activities. Metabolic inhibition was considered relevant at concentrations < or = 1.0 microM because these inhibitors became decreasingly selective at higher concentrations. At < 1.0 microM, ellipticine (CYPIAI/2 inhibitor) selectively inhibited CB-15, -26, -31, and -77 metabolism, with no significant inhibition of CB-44, -52, and -101 metabolism. Inhibition of CB-52 and -101 metabolism by chloramphenicol (CYP2B inhibitor) started at 1.0 microM and maximized at about 100% at 10 microM. Ketoconazole (CYP3A inhibitor) appeared to selectively inhibit CB-26, -31, and -44 metabolism relative to CB-15, -77, and -52 at concentrations < or = 1.0 microM. Major testosterone metabolites formed in vitro were 2beta-(CYP3A), 6beta- (CYP3A, CYPIA), and 16beta- (CYP2B) hydroxytestosterone and androstenedione (CYP2B, CYP2C11). The CYP forms indicated are associated with the specific metabolism of testosterone in laboratory

  19. Inhibition of Testosterone Aromatization by the Indole-3-carbinol Derivative CTet in CYP19A1-overexpressing MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Mauro; Carloni, Elisa; Galluzzi, Luca; Diotallevi, Aurora; Lucarini, Simone; Magnani, Mauro; Brandi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Natural products such as aromatase inhibitors have been the object of growing attention in recent years because of their potential to inhibit aromatase with fewer side effects and the possible translation of their current use as chemotherapeutic agents to future clinical applications in breast cancer chemoprevention. We have previously investigated CTet, a novel anticancer agent obtained from the broccoli-derived compound indole-3- carbinol (I3C), that shows great anticancer potential in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Here we evaluated the potential of CTet as a chemopreventive agent in aromatase expressing MCF-7/AROM-1 breast cancer cells. The testosterone (TE) aromatization in estradiol (E2) was indirectly evaluated in terms of inhibition of TE-induced cell proliferation, ERα phosphorylation/activation and Bcl-2 and IGF-1R ERE-regulated protein accumulation. Our results showed that CTet inhibited TE-driven ERα phosphorylation of both cytosolic and nuclear ERα pools, suggesting an inhibitory effect of TE aromatization in E2. CTet did not inhibit E2-driven nuclear ERα phosphorylation, but partially inhibited E2-driven cytosolic ERα phosphorylation. Moreover, CTet inhibited Bcl-2 and IGF-1R accumulation induced by TE but not that which was induced by E2. A cell-free enzymatic assay showed that CTet did not inhibit aromatase activity directly; however, since CTet treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, the TE aromatization could be affected because the aromatase enzyme is located within the endoplasmic reticulum. Finally, CTet and letrozole synergistically inhibited TE-induced cell proliferation. These results showed the potential of the I3C derivative CTet as a chemopreventive agent that interferes with aromatase activity.

  20. Phosphonic analogues of glutamic acid as irreversible inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus endoproteinase GluC: an efficient synthesis and inhibition of the human IgG degradation.

    PubMed

    Burchacka, Ewa; Skoreński, Marcin; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Oleksyszyn, Józef

    2013-03-01

    Endoproteinase GluC (V8 protease) is one of many virulence factors released by the Staphylococcus aureus species in vivo. The V8 protease is able to hydrolyze some serpins and all classes of mammalian immunoglobulins. The application of specific and potent inhibitors of V8 protease may lead to the development of new antibacterial agents. Herein, we present the synthesis and the inhibitory properties of novel peptidyl derivatives of a phosphonic glutamic acid analogue. One of the compounds Boc-Phe-Leu-Glu(P)(OC(6)H(4))(2) displayed an apparent second-order inhibition rate value of 8540 M(-1)s(-1). The Boc-Phe-Leu-Glu(P)(OC(6)H(4))(2) compound with the highest inhibitory potency showed the ability to prevent V8-mediated human IgG proteolysis in vitro. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of in vitro human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production in testis and of ovulation in the rat by charcoal-treated rat testicular extract

    SciTech Connect

    de Bellabarba, G.A.; Bishop, W.; Rojas, F.J.

    1984-01-16

    Previously, the authors described the presence of a factor obtained from rat testis that was found to inhibit human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) binding to gonadal receptors. In the present study, similarly prepared testicular extract was tested for its effects on in vitro hCG-stimulated testosterone production by isolated testis interstitial cells and for its effect on spontaneous ovulation in the rat. Incubation of interstitial cells with charcoal-treated extract significantly inhibited the steroidogenic response to hCG in a dose-related manner. This inhibition was also apparent after heating the extract for 10 min at 100/sup 0/C. A single i.p. injection of testicular extract inhibited spontaneous ovulation in the rat. This effect was also observed after heating the extract for 10 min at 100/sup 0/C. It is concluded that the aqueous testicular extract contains a factor able to antagonize the physiological events mediated by luteinizing hormone (LH)/hCG, and that this factor is consistent with the presence of an LH/hCG-binding inhibitory activity in rat testis.

  2. Failure of GnRH analogue to inhibit serum concentrations of testosterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone in hCG-substituted hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Vicari, E; Mongioi, A; Recupero, D; Coniglione, F; Macchi, M; Sipione, C; Calogero, A; D'Agata, R

    1986-11-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRH-A) induce inhibition of testicular function and reduction of serum testosterone (T) in man, but the mechanism involved is still debatable. To elucidate it we studied six patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) in chronic substitution with hCG for correction of androgen deficiency symptoms, and evaluated the effect of addition of GnRH-A to the hCG therapy on plasma levels of T and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17 OHP). All patients were treated with 1000 U of hCG in every 3rd day for 24 weeks. After 8 weeks of this regimen, GnRH-A, Buserelin (D-Ser-TBU-EA-LHRH), 200 micrograms per day sc, was added and given for 8 weeks. After cessation of analogue administration patients were followed for 8 further weeks. The levels of the two steroids did not differ markedly in the pre- and post-GnRH-A period. GnRH-A given for two months did not lower T or 17 OHP levels as in eugonadal men after similar treatment. The median T concentrations during GnRH-A tended to be increased, with plasma values higher (P less than 0.025) than the peak values observed during hCG alone. Since administration of Buserelin did not inhibit hCG-sustained steroid levels in these HH patients, it is conceivable that GnRH-A may have lacked a direct inhibitory gonadal effect in such experimental conditions.

  3. The direct pituitary effect of testosterone to inhibit gonadotropin secretion in men is partially mediated by aromatization to estradiol.

    PubMed

    Bagatell, C J; Dahl, K D; Bremner, W J

    1994-01-01

    In men, administration of exogenous testosterone (T) exerts direct negative feedback effects at the pituitary as well as at the hypothalamic level. This study was undertaken to determine whether T itself causes the inhibitory effects on the pituitary, or whether conversion to estradiol (E2) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is required. We assessed the biological activity of serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), as well as immunoactivity. Blood samples were drawn before, during, and after a continuous, 72-hour i.v. infusion of T (15 mg/day), E2 (90 micrograms/day), or DHT (500 micrograms/day). Each of these doses is twice the daily production rate of the steroid. Each man received each of the three steroid infusions. We studied four men, ages 23-35, with idiopathic hypothalamic hypogonadism (IHH), who were treated with pulsatile gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) until their gonadotropins reached the normal range. Serum levels of T, E2, DHT, and levels of immunologically active and biologically active LH and FSH were measured. We found that administration of each steroid increased serum levels of the infused steroid to the upper physiologic range. Administration of T or E2 resulted in decreased mean levels of biologically and immunologically active LH and FSH; administration of DHT did not alter gonadotropin secretion. These data suggest that some of the direct effect of T at the pituitary level in men is mediated by E2, whereas peripherally formed DHT may not play an important role in this process.

  4. Enhanced inhibition of tumour growth and metastasis, and induction of antitumour immunity by IL-2-IgG2b fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Budagian, V; Nanni, P; Lollini, P L; Musiani, P; Di Carlo, E; Bulanova, E; Paus, R; Bulfone-Paus, S

    2002-05-01

    Cytokine-immunoglobulin (Ig)-fusion proteins have attracted increasing interest as antitumour agents. Here, we have investigated the antimetastatic and antitumour responses elicited in vivo by mammary adenocarcinoma cells (TS/A) engineered to secrete interleukin (IL)-2-IgG fusion proteins. TS/A cells were transfected with DNA coding for IL-2-IgG2b, IgG2b or IL-2, and injected subcutaneously into syngeneic mice. Animals injected with TS/A-IL-2 or TS/A-IL-2-IgG2b both efficiently rejected tumours, whereas treatment with parental cells or TS/A-IgG2b was lethal. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with IL-2-IgG2b fusion protein-secreting cells showed a long-lasting protective immunity against a later challenge with parental tumour cells. Moreover, the metastatic potential of TS/A-IL-2-IgG2b-transfected cells was dramatically decreased compared with TS/A-IL-2-cells, with a virtual absence of lung metastases after intravenous injection. Adenocarcinomas secreting IL-2-IgG2b exhibited a more prominent, early and persistent infiltration of CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer (NK) cells than TS/A-IL-2 cells. Therefore, upon transfection into adenocarcinoma cells, the IgG2b part of IL-2 fusion protein exerts intriguing added antitumour properties over IL-2 alone, thus contributing to a long-lasting tumour immunity, probably by the recruitment of specific immune effector cells. These findings suggest a promising new oncotherapeutic strategy for poorly immunogenic tumours: vaccination with tumour cells engineered to secrete IL-2-IgG2b fusion protein.

  5. Endocrine control of sexual behavior in sneaker males of the peacock blenny Salaria pavo: effects of castration, aromatase inhibition, testosterone and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, David; Alpedrinha, João; Teles, Magda; Oliveira, Rui F

    2007-04-01

    The effects of castration and sex steroid manipulations on the expression of sexual behavior were investigated in a small fish, the peacock blenny, Salaria pavo. In this species, large males defend nests and attract females while small "sneaker" males reproduce by imitating the female morphology and courtship behavior in order to approach nests during spawning events and parasitically fertilize eggs. Sneakers switch into nest holders in their second breeding season, thus displaying both male and female-like sexual behavior during their lifetime. We tested the effects of castration and of an aromatase inhibitor (Fadrozole, F), testosterone (T) or 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) implants on the expression of male and female-like behavior in sneakers. Sneakers were either sham-operated, castrated or castrated and implanted with vehicle, F, T+F or E(2)+F. Seven days after the treatment, sneakers were placed in a tank with a nesting male, two ripe females and an available nest. Castrated fish had lower levels of circulating T and increased the time spent displaying female typical nuptial coloration. T implants had the opposite effect, inhibiting the expression of female-like behavior and coloration. E(2) implants had no significant effect on the display of sexual behavior but the frequency of aggressive displays decreased. The results agree with previous findings in sneakers of S. pavo that demonstrated an inhibition of female-like behavior by 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). The reported increase in T and 11-KT production when sneakers change into nest holders may thus contribute to behaviorally defeminize sneakers. Contrarily, both T and E(2) failed to promote male-like behavior, suggesting that behavioral masculization during tactic switching depends on other neuroendocrine mechanisms or that the time length of the experiment was insufficient to induce male-like behavioral changes in sneakers.

  6. Voltage-dependent sodium channels in human small-cell lung cancer cells: role in action potentials and inhibition by Lambert-Eaton syndrome IgG.

    PubMed

    Blandino, J K; Viglione, M P; Bradley, W A; Oie, H K; Kim, Y I

    1995-01-01

    Sodium channels of human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells were examined with whole-cell and single-channel patch clamp methods. In the tumor cells from SCLC cell line NCI-H146, the majority of the voltage-gated Na+ channels are only weakly tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive (Kd = 215 nM). With the membrane potential maintained at -60 to -80 mV, these cells produced all-or-nothing action potentials in response to depolarizing current injection (> 20 pA). Similar all-or-nothing spikes were also observed with anodal break excitation. Removal of external Ca2+ did not affect the action potential production, whereas 5 microM TTX or substitution of Na+ with choline abolished it. Action potentials elicited in the Ca(2+)-free condition were reversibly blocked by 4 mM MnCl2 due to the Mn(2+)-induced inhibition of voltage-dependent sodium currents (INa). Therefore, Na+ channels, not Ca2+ channels, underlie the excitability of SCLC cells. Whole-cell INa was maximal with step-depolarizing stimulations to 0 mV, and reversed at +45.2 mV, in accord with the predicted Nernst equilibrium potential for a Na(+)-selective channel. INa evoked by depolarizing test potentials (-60 to +40 mV) exhibited a transient time course and activation/inactivation kinetics typical of neuronal excitable membranes; the plot of the Hodgkin-Huxley parameters, m infinity and h infinity, also revealed biophysical similarity between SCLC and neuronal Na+ channels. The single channel current amplitude, as measured with the inside-out patch configuration, was 1.0 pA at -20 mV with a slope conductance of 12.1 pS. The autoantibodies implicated in the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LES), which are known to inhibit ICa and INa in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, also significantly inhibited INa in SCLC cells. These results indicate that (i) action potentials in human SCLC cells result from the regenerative increase in voltage-gated Na+ channel conductance; (ii) fundamental characteristics of SCLC Na+ channels

  7. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH.

  8. Rabbit IgG directed to a synthetic C-terminal peptide of the major grass pollen allergen Lol p I inhibits human basophil histamine release induced by natural Lol p I.

    PubMed

    van Ree, R; Aalberse, R C

    1995-03-01

    The potential role of allergen-specific IgG antibodies as 'blocking' antibodies in allergen-induced human basophil histamine release was investigated. This was studied in a model with the major grass pollen allergen Lol p I and polyclonal rabbit antisera directed against this allergen and against a synthetic peptide of its C terminus. When allergen and antibodies were allowed to preincubate, Lol p I induced histamine release was inhibited up to 85% by the antiserum against Lol p I. By omitting preincubation, and thereby more closely mimicking an in vivo situation, up to 55% inhibition was realized. This indicates that allergen-specific IgG can act as 'blocking' antibody without preincubation. Immunization of rabbits with a synthetic C-terminal peptide of Lol p I resulted in antibodies reactive with natural Lol p I. Despite their 100-fold lower avidity for Lol p I (as compared with antinatural Lol p I), these antibodies had the capacity to inhibit Lol p I induced histamine release for > 90% (up to 50% without preincubation). This indicates that it is possible to block histamine release induced by a major allergen with low-avidity IgG antibodies directed against a minor proportion of the allergen (25 amino acids). IgE antibodies from the donors studied were unreactive with this synthetic peptide, indicating that for blocking activity identical epitope specificity of IgE and IgG is not essential. This opens interesting perspectives for application of synthetic peptides in immunotherapy, distinct from their effects on T cell reactivity.

  9. Testosterone Therapy in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... softness of the testicles Size of the penis Measurement of testosterone levels Generally, blood levels of testosterone ... levels may be different in different laboratories. Morning measurement (when levels are highest) is recommended. Illness, malnutrition, ...

  10. Assays of Serum Testosterone.

    PubMed

    Herati, Amin S; Cengiz, Cenk; Lamb, Dolores J

    2016-05-01

    The diagnosis of male hypogonadism depends on an assessment of the clinical signs and symptoms of hypogonadism and serum testosterone level. Current clinical laboratory testosterone assay platforms include immunoassays and mass spectrometry. Despite significant advances to improve the accuracy and precision of the currently available assays, limited comparability exists between assays at the lower and upper extremes of the testosterone range. Because of this lack of comparability, there is no current gold standard assay for the assessment of total testosterone levels.

  11. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  12. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  13. Testosterone and aggressive behavior in man.

    PubMed

    Batrinos, Menelaos L

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant's testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  14. Testosterone and reproductive effort in male primates.

    PubMed

    Muller, Martin N

    2016-09-08

    Considerable evidence suggests that the steroid hormone testosterone mediates major life-history trade-offs in vertebrates, promoting mating effort at the expense of parenting effort or survival. Observations from a range of wild primates support the "Challenge Hypothesis," which posits that variation in male testosterone is more closely associated with aggressive mating competition than with reproductive physiology. In both seasonally and non-seasonally breeding species, males increase testosterone production primarily when competing for fecund females. In species where males compete to maintain long-term access to females, testosterone increases when males are threatened with losing access to females, rather than during mating periods. And when male status is linked to mating success, and dependent on aggression, high-ranking males normally maintain higher testosterone levels than subordinates, particularly when dominance hierarchies are unstable. Trade-offs between parenting effort and mating effort appear to be weak in most primates, because direct investment in the form of infant transport and provisioning is rare. Instead, infant protection is the primary form of paternal investment in the order. Testosterone does not inhibit this form of investment, which relies on male aggression. Testosterone has a wide range of effects in primates that plausibly function to support male competitive behavior. These include psychological effects related to dominance striving, analgesic effects, and effects on the development and maintenance of the armaments and adornments that males employ in mating competition.

  15. ALPK1 affects testosterone mediated regulation of proinflammatory cytokines production.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzer-Min; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Hsu, Hui-Ting; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Huang, Chung-Ming; Tu, Hung-Pin; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-protein kinase 1, also known as alpha-kinase 1 (ALPK1), is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), myocardial infarction, gout and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). In addition to having an inductive effect on the proinflammatory cytokines in monocytic THP1 cells, ALPK1 is expressed abundantly in the mouse testes. Low testosterone levels are commonly associated with arthritis, CKD, type 2 DM, cardiovascular disease and inflammation. The testosterone's anti-inflammatory effect has been demonstrated to reduce proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. In this study, we found that ALPK1 transgenic mice showed lower levels of testosterone in both the testes and the serum. Decreasing endogenous ALPK1 enhanced testosterone levels and transcripts of testosterone-regulated genes (P450scc, 3beta-HSD, P450C17, 17beta-HSD, StAR, and INSL3) in TM3 Leydig cells. In contrast, increasing testosterone decreased ALPK1 in both TM3 and monocytic THP1 cells. This decrease was accompanied by a reduction of the proinflammatory cytokines. Increased ALPK1 levels attenuated the testosterone effects in THP1 cells. Finally, we also found that ALPK1 increased the release of TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 in the human embryonic kidney 293 cells, while testosterone inhibited ALPK1 in the primary kidney cells. Taken together, this data suggests that the balance between ALPK1 and testosterone plays a critical role in the testosterone-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines.

  16. Testosterone and Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Archival data on 4,462 military veterans linked higher levels of serum testosterone to lower-status occupations. A structural equation model was supported in which higher testosterone, mediated through lower intellectual ability, greater antisocial behavior, and lower education, leads away from white-collar occupations. Contains 49 references.…

  17. Testosterone and Social Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Granger, Douglas A.; Mazur, Allan; Kivlighan, Katie T.

    2006-01-01

    Popular perceptions of the effect of testosterone on "manly" behavior are inaccurate. We need to move away from such simplistic notions by treating testosterone as one component along with other physiological, psychological and sociological variables in interactive and reciprocal models of behavior. Several hormones can now be measured in saliva,…

  18. Testosterone and Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Archival data on 4,462 military veterans linked higher levels of serum testosterone to lower-status occupations. A structural equation model was supported in which higher testosterone, mediated through lower intellectual ability, greater antisocial behavior, and lower education, leads away from white-collar occupations. Contains 49 references.…

  19. Testosterone and Social Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Granger, Douglas A.; Mazur, Allan; Kivlighan, Katie T.

    2006-01-01

    Popular perceptions of the effect of testosterone on "manly" behavior are inaccurate. We need to move away from such simplistic notions by treating testosterone as one component along with other physiological, psychological and sociological variables in interactive and reciprocal models of behavior. Several hormones can now be measured in saliva,…

  20. Testosterone and musical talent.

    PubMed

    Hassler, M

    1991-01-01

    Two recently published hypotheses on the biological basis of special talents are discussed in relation to experimental data obtained from musical composers, instrumentalists, painters, and non-musicians, and from adolescent boys and girls with different levels of musical capacities. Both hypotheses assign an important influence to prenatal testosterone effects on the developing brain. Geschwind and Galaburda (1985) predict that subjects with special talents may have anomalous hemispheric dominance for verbal material. This was confirmed experimentally in adolescents and in adults using a dichotic listening task to assess functional lateralization. Hassler and Nieschlag (1989) expect musicians of both sexes to be psychologically androgynous and to have current testosterone levels that differ from sex-typed males and females. Salivary testosterone was measured in adults and in adolescents. Creative musical behavior was associated with very low testosterone values in males, and with high testosterone levels in females. Sexual activity level and motivation did not differ between males with testosterone levels less than or equal to 200 pmol/l and those with greater than 220 pmol/l. We tentatively suggest from our data that, among a complex interaction of biological and social factors, an optimal testosterone range may exist for the expression of creative musical behavior. Exceeding the range in the course of adolescence may be detrimental for musical creativity in boys.

  1. Monitoring testosterone levels in testosterone-treated men.

    PubMed

    Winters, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Dose adjustment with transdermal testosterone preparations should recognize the variability of serum total testosterone levels between applications and over the course of 24 h. Dose adjustments are also made difficult by between-laboratory assay variability. Low SHBG with obesity and diabetes lowers the total testosterone level, and free or bioavailable testosterone may prove to be a better choice for monitoring the progress and dosing of testosterone-treated men with adult onset hypogonadism.

  2. Estrogens regulate glycosylation of IgG in women and men

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Altan; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Cui, Jing; Deane, Kevin D.; Yu, Elaine W.; Campbell, Harry; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Wilson, James F.; Finkelstein, Joel S.; Nigrovic, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    The immunologic potency of IgG is modulated by glycosylation, but mechanisms regulating this process are undefined. A role for sex hormones is suggested by differences in IgG glycans between women and men, most prominently with respect to galactose. We therefore assessed IgG galactosylation in 713 healthy adults from 2 cohorts as well as in 159 subjects from 4 randomized controlled studies of endocrine manipulation: postmenopausal women receiving conjugated estrogens, raloxifene, or placebo; premenopausal women deprived of gonadal hormones with leuprolide and treated with estradiol or placebo; men deprived of gonadal hormones with goserelin and given testosterone or placebo; and men deprived of gonadal hormones with goserelin and given testosterone or placebo together with anastrozole to block conversion of testosterone to estradiol. Menopause was associated with an increase in agalactosylated IgG glycans, particularly in the most abundant fucosylated nonbisected (G0F) glycoform. Conjugated estrogens and raloxifene reduced G0F glycans in postmenopausal women, while in premenopausal women leuprolide increased G0F glycans in a manner reversed by estradiol. Among men, goserelin increased G0F glycans, an effect blocked by testosterone through conversion to estradiol. These results establish estrogens as an in vivo modulator of IgG galactosylation in both women and men, defining a pathway by which sex modulates immunity. PMID:28239652

  3. Estrogens regulate glycosylation of IgG in women and men.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Altan; Kohrt, Wendy M; Cui, Jing; Deane, Kevin D; Pezer, Marija; Yu, Elaine W; Hausmann, Jonathan S; Campbell, Harry; Kaiser, Ursula B; Rudd, Pauline M; Lauc, Gordan; Wilson, James F; Finkelstein, Joel S; Nigrovic, Peter A

    2017-02-23

    The immunologic potency of IgG is modulated by glycosylation, but mechanisms regulating this process are undefined. A role for sex hormones is suggested by differences in IgG glycans between women and men, most prominently with respect to galactose. We therefore assessed IgG galactosylation in 713 healthy adults from 2 cohorts as well as in 159 subjects from 4 randomized controlled studies of endocrine manipulation: postmenopausal women receiving conjugated estrogens, raloxifene, or placebo; premenopausal women deprived of gonadal hormones with leuprolide and treated with estradiol or placebo; men deprived of gonadal hormones with goserelin and given testosterone or placebo; and men deprived of gonadal hormones with goserelin and given testosterone or placebo together with anastrozole to block conversion of testosterone to estradiol. Menopause was associated with an increase in agalactosylated IgG glycans, particularly in the most abundant fucosylated nonbisected (G0F) glycoform. Conjugated estrogens and raloxifene reduced G0F glycans in postmenopausal women, while in premenopausal women leuprolide increased G0F glycans in a manner reversed by estradiol. Among men, goserelin increased G0F glycans, an effect blocked by testosterone through conversion to estradiol. These results establish estrogens as an in vivo modulator of IgG galactosylation in both women and men, defining a pathway by which sex modulates immunity.

  4. Intranasal immunization with lipoteichoic acid and cholera toxin evokes specific pharyngeal IgA and systemic IgG responses and inhibits streptococcal adherence to pharyngeal epithelial cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuji; Harabuchi, Yasuaki

    2002-05-15

    Streptococcus (S.) pyogenes is common cause of acute tonsillitis. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA), which is a common constitute of the cell surface of most gram positive bacteria, is known to act as a substance of bacterial site for adherence to epithelium and antiserum to LTA is reported to inhibit bacterial attachment to epithelial cells in vitro. Cholera toxin subunit B (CT-B) is known to be a mucosal adjuvant. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether intranasal immunization with LTA and CT-B may be a possible candidate for vaccine formulation. Six-week-old male BALB/c mice were assigned to three experimental groups, mice immunized with LTA and CT-B, with LTA alone and with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) as a control. Immunizations were performed intranasally every 2 days for 2 weeks in every group. At the 21 days after immunization, sera, pharyngeal washings and pharyngeal epithelial cells were taken. The levels of serum IgG and pharyngeal IgA antibodies to LTA were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The adherence rates of S. pyogenes pretreated by pharyngeal washings to pharyngeal epithelial cells from the mice were determined by in vitro adherence assay. The serum anti-LTA IgG antibody levels of either mice immunized with LTA and CT-B or mice immunized with LTA alone were significantly higher than those of mice administered with PBS alone. The pharyngeal anti-LTA IgA antibody levels of the mice immunized with LTA and CT-B were significantly higher than those of either mice with LTA alone or mice with PBS alone. The streptococcal adherence rates to pharyngeal epithelial cells were significantly decreased by pretreatment with pharyngeal washings from the mice immunized with LTA and CT-B as compared with pretreatment with those from either mice with PBS or mice with LTA alone. These data shows that intranasal immunization with LTA and CT-B evokes a good pharyngeal IgA response as well as systemic IgG response to LTA and inhibits

  5. Neutralization of the neuromuscular inhibition of venom and taipoxin from the taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus) by F(ab')2 and whole IgG antivenoms.

    PubMed

    Herrera, María; de Cássia de O Collaço, Rita; Villalta, Mauren; Segura, Álvaro; Vargas, Mariángela; Wright, Christine E; Paiva, Owen K; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Jensen, Simon D; León, Guillermo; Williams, David J; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa; Gutiérrez, José María

    2016-01-22

    The neuromuscular junction activity of Oxyuranus scutellatus venom and its presynaptic neurotoxin, taipoxin, and their neutralization by two antivenoms were examined in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. The action of taipoxin was also studied at 21°C. The efficacy of the antivenoms was also assessed in an in vivo mouse model. Both antivenoms were effective in neutralizing the neuromuscular blocking activity in preincubation-type experiments. In experiments involving independent addition of venom and antivenoms, neutralization depended on the time interval between venom addition and antivenom application. When taipoxin was incubated for 5, 10 or 20min at 21°C, and antivenom added and temperature increased to 37°C, neutralization was achieved only when the toxin was incubated for 5 or 10min. The neutralization by the two antivenoms in an in vivo model showed that both whole IgG and F(ab')2 antivenoms were effective in neutralizing lethality. Our findings highlight the very rapid action of taipan venom at the nerve terminal, and the poor capacity of antivenoms to revert neurotoxicity as the time interval between venom or taipoxin application and antivenom addition increased. Additionally the disparity between molecular masses of the active substances of the two antivenoms did not result in differences in neutralization.

  6. Sexual Health: Testosterone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testosterone helps maintain men's: Bone density Fat distribution Muscle strength and mass Facial and body hair Red blood ... changes are possible, including increased body fat, reduced muscle bulk and strength, and decreased bone density. Swollen or tender breasts ( ...

  7. Testosterone, thrombophilia, and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Richardson-Royer, Caitlin; Schultz, Reiker; Burger, Tim; Labitue, Fanta; Riaz, Muhammad K; Padda, Jagjit; Bowe, Dedrick; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    We describe thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis (DVT) pulmonary embolism (PE; n = 9) and hip-knee osteonecrosis (n = 5) that developed after testosterone therapy (median 11 months) in 14 previously healthy patients (13 men and 1 woman; 13 Caucasian and 1 African American), with no antecedent thrombosis and previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Of the 14 patients, 3 were found to be factor V Leiden heterozygotes, 3 had high factor VIII, 3 had plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 4G4G homozygosity, 2 had high factor XI, 2 had high homocysteine, 1 had low antithrombin III, 1 had the lupus anticoagulant, 1 had high anticardiolipin antibody Immunoglobulin G, and 1 had no clotting abnormalities. In 4 men with thrombophilia, DVT-PE recurred when testosterone was continued despite therapeutic international normalized ratio on warfarin. In 60 men on testosterone, 20 (33%) had high estradiol (E2 >42.6 pg/mL). When exogenous testosterone is aromatized to E2, and E2-induced thrombophilia is superimposed on thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis, thrombosis occurs. The DVT-PE and osteonecrosis after starting testosterone are associated with previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Thrombophilia should be ruled out before administration of exogenous testosterone.

  8. Biotransformation of testosterone and testosterone heptanoate by four filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Sabrieh; Mohajeri, Maryam; Habibi, Zohreh

    2014-12-01

    The microbial transformations of testosterone and testosterone heptanoate by four fungi: Absidia griseolla var. igachii PTCC 5260, Acremonium chrysogenu PTCC 5271, Fusarium fujikuroi PTCC 5144, and Fusarium solani complex PTCC 5285 were investigated for the first time. Incubation of testosterone heptanoate with F. fujikuroi and F. solani yielded three metabolites, which were isolated and characterized as testosterone, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, and 6β-hydroxy testosterone. 6β-Hydroxy testosterone was the major metabolite obtained from testosterone heptanoate biotransformation by two fungal species. A. griseolla and A. chrysogenu produced 14α-hydroxy testosterone as major metabolite, together with testosterone and 6β-hydroxy testosterone in lower yields. The biotransformation of testosterone by F. fujikuroi and A. griseolla was also investigated in order to examine the influence of the ester group on the course of transformation. Androst-4-ene-3,17-dione was only identified in the biotransformation of testosterone by F. fujikuroi. The same product was observed in incubation of testosterone by A. griseolla, together with 14α-hydroxy testosterone in very low yield. Furthermore, time course study was also carried out in order to examine the formation of metabolites as a function of time, which was determined by HPLC. The structures of compounds were determined by their comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and comparison with literature data.

  9. Testosterone Stimulates Duox1 Activity through GPRC6A in Skin Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eunbi; Choi, Hyun; Kim, Borim; Kim, Minsun; Park, Kkot-Nara; Bae, Il-Hong; Sung, Young Kwan; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook; Bae, Yun Soo

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone is an endocrine hormone with functions in reproductive organs, anabolic events, and skin homeostasis. We report here that GPRC6A serves as a sensor and mediator of the rapid action of testosterone in epidermal keratinocytes. The silencing of GPRC6A inhibited testosterone-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) mobilization and H2O2 generation. These results indicated that a testosterone-GPRC6A complex is required for activation of Gq protein, IP3 generation, and [Ca2+]i mobilization, leading to Duox1 activation. H2O2 generation by testosterone stimulated the apoptosis of keratinocytes through the activation of caspase-3. The application of testosterone into three-dimensional skin equivalents increased the apoptosis of keratinocytes between the granular and stratified corneum layers. These results support an understanding of the molecular mechanism of testosterone-dependent apoptosis in which testosterone stimulates H2O2 generation through the activation of Duox1. PMID:25164816

  10. Human IgG4: a structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Anna M; Sutton, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    IgG4, the least represented human IgG subclass in serum, is an intriguing antibody with unique biological properties, such as the ability to undergo Fab-arm exchange and limit immune complex formation. The lack of effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity, is desirable for therapeutic purposes. IgG4 plays a protective role in allergy by acting as a blocking antibody, and inhibiting mast cell degranulation, but a deleterious role in malignant melanoma, by impeding IgG1-mediated anti-tumor immunity. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the interaction between IgG4 and Fcγ receptors. Despite a wealth of structural information for the IgG1 subclass, including complexes with Fcγ receptors, and structures for intact antibodies, high-resolution crystal structures were not reported for IgG4-Fc until recently. Here, we highlight some of the biological properties of human IgG4, and review the recent crystal structures of IgG4-Fc. We discuss the unexpected conformations adopted by functionally important Cγ2 domain loops, and speculate about potential implications for the interaction between IgG4 and FcγRs. PMID:26497518

  11. Erythrocytosis Following Testosterone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Samuel J; Varghese, Bibin; Pastuszak, Alexander W

    2017-05-16

    A rapid increase in awareness of androgen deficiency has led to substantial increases in prescribing of testosterone therapy (TTh), with benefits of improvements in mood, libido, bone density, muscle mass, body composition, energy, and cognition. However, TTh can be limited by its side effects, particularly erythrocytosis. This review examines the literature on testosterone-induced erythrocytosis and polycythemia. To review the available literature on testosterone-induced erythrocytosis, discuss possible mechanisms for pathophysiology, determine the significance of formulation, and elucidate potential thromboembolic risk. A literature review was performed using PubMed for articles addressing TTh, erythrocytosis, and polycythemia. Mechanism, pharmacologic contribution, and risk of testosterone-induced erythrocytosis. For men undergoing TTh, the risk of developing erythrocytosis compared with controls is well established, with short-acting injectable formulations having the highest associated incidence. Potential mechanisms explaining the relation between TTh and erythrocytosis include the role of hepcidin, iron sequestration and turnover, erythropoietin production, bone marrow stimulation, and genetic factors. High blood viscosity increases the risk for potential vascular complications involving the coronary, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular circulations, although there is limited evidence supporting a relation between TTh and vascular complications. Short-acting injectable testosterone is associated with greater risk of erythrocytosis compared with other formulations. The mechanism of the pathophysiology and its role on thromboembolic events remain unclear, although some data support an increased risk of cardiovascular events resulting from testosterone-induced erythrocytosis. Ohlander SJ, Varghese B, Pastuszak AW. Erythrocytosis Following Testosterone Therapy. Sex Med Rev 2017;X:XXX-XXX. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine

  12. Compounded Testosterone Troches TO OPTIMIZE HEALTH AND THE TESTOSTERONE CONTROVERSY.

    PubMed

    Guth, Michael A S

    2015-01-01

    As men age, testosterone levels progressively fall and inflammatory biomarkers increase. The gradual decline in testosterone production with aging, known as andropause, is common and may have deleterious effects on men including decreased overall well-being, increased sarcopenia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease, reduced sexual function, and bone loss. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that an increasing number of men worldwide have begun requesting testosterone replacement therapy from their physicians. Occasionally, physicians discourage male patients from getting testosterone replacement therapy based on a few recent studies indicating the therapy causes cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarctions. Yet, an extensive review of the testosterone replacement therapy literature reveals that the majority of clinical studies show that properly administered testosterone replacement therapy, in which estradiol and dihydrotestosterone levels are also controlled, has no adverse effects on myocardial infarction risk. The current state-of-the-art in testosterone replacement therapy comprises compounded testosterone troches; an aromatase inhibitor, such as generic Anastrazole, to control estradiol levels; and a 5α-reductase inhibitor, such as beneric Dutasteride or Finasteride, to control dihydrotestosterone. Compounded testosterone troches easily raise serum testosterone levels to the optimal range, are highly cost effective at $82 for a 180-day supply, and provide affordable access to testosterone replacement therapy to millions of men requesting it. Yet, the Blue Cross Blue Shield-associated firms have largely denied requests for coverage of compounded medications, including testosterone troches. Despite data demonstrating strong links between testosterone deficiency and significant comorbid conditions (including Type 2 diabetes and other metabolic syndrome diseases) as well as the health benefits of testosterone replacement therapy, some physian have

  13. Inhibition of nitrate transport by anti-nitrate reductase IgG fragments and the identification of plasma membrane associated nitrate reductase in roots of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, M. R.; Tischner, R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Membrane associated nitrate reductase (NR) was detected in plasma membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) roots. The PM associated NR was not removed by washing vesicles with 500 millimolar NaCl and 1 millimolar EDTA and represented up to 4% of the total root NR activity. PM associated NR was stimulated up to 20-fold by Triton X-100 whereas soluble NR was only increased 1.7-fold. The latency was a function of the solubilization of NR from the membrane. NR, solubilized from the PM fraction by Triton X-100 was inactivated by antiserum to Chlorella sorokiniana NR. Anti-NR immunoglobulin G fragments purified from the anti-NR serum inhibited NO3- uptake by more than 90% but had no effect on NO2- uptake. The inhibitory effect was only partially reversible; uptake recovered to 50% of the control after thorough rinsing of roots. Preimmune serum immunoglobulin G fragments inhibited NO3- uptake 36% but the effect was completely reversible by rinsing. Intact NR antiserum had no effect on NO3- uptake. The results present the possibility that NO3- uptake and NO3- reduction in the PM of barley roots may be related.

  14. Inhibition of nitrate transport by anti-nitrate reductase IgG fragments and the identification of plasma membrane associated nitrate reductase in roots of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, M. R.; Tischner, R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Membrane associated nitrate reductase (NR) was detected in plasma membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) roots. The PM associated NR was not removed by washing vesicles with 500 millimolar NaCl and 1 millimolar EDTA and represented up to 4% of the total root NR activity. PM associated NR was stimulated up to 20-fold by Triton X-100 whereas soluble NR was only increased 1.7-fold. The latency was a function of the solubilization of NR from the membrane. NR, solubilized from the PM fraction by Triton X-100 was inactivated by antiserum to Chlorella sorokiniana NR. Anti-NR immunoglobulin G fragments purified from the anti-NR serum inhibited NO3- uptake by more than 90% but had no effect on NO2- uptake. The inhibitory effect was only partially reversible; uptake recovered to 50% of the control after thorough rinsing of roots. Preimmune serum immunoglobulin G fragments inhibited NO3- uptake 36% but the effect was completely reversible by rinsing. Intact NR antiserum had no effect on NO3- uptake. The results present the possibility that NO3- uptake and NO3- reduction in the PM of barley roots may be related.

  15. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF PUBERTY IN THE MALE SPRAGUE DAWLEY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: Since prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits gonadal steroidogenesis and antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), we hypothesized that pubertal exposure to PCZ would delay male rat reproductive development. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed by gavage with...

  16. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF PUBERTY IN THE MALE SPRAGUE DAWLEY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: Since prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits gonadal steroidogenesis and antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), we hypothesized that pubertal exposure to PCZ would delay male rat reproductive development. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed by gavage with...

  17. CENTRAL 5-ALPHA REDUCTION OF TESTOSTERONE IS REQUIRED FOR TESTOSTERONE’S INHIBITION OF THE HYPOTHALAMO-PITUITARY-ADRENAL AXIS RESPONSE TO RESTRAINT STRESS IN ADULT MALE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Robert J.; Kudwa, Andrea E.; Donner, Nina C.; McGivern, Robert F.; Brown, Roger

    2013-01-01

    In rodents, the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is controlled by a precise regulatory mechanism that is influenced by circulating gonadal and adrenal hormones. In males, gonadectomy increases the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) response to stressors, and androgen replacement returns the response to that of the intact male. Testosterone (T) actions in regulating HPA activity may be through aromatization to estradiol, or by 5α-reduction to the more potent androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). To determine if the latter pathway is involved, we assessed the function of the HPA axis response to restraint stress following hormone treatments, or after peripheral or central treatment with the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride. Initially, we examined the timecourse whereby gonadectomy alters the CORT response to restraint stress. Enhanced CORT responses were evident within 48hrs following gonadectomy. Correspondingly, treatment of intact male rats with the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride, for 48 hrs, enhanced the CORT and ACTH response to restraint stress. Peripheral injections of gonadectomized male rats with DHT or T for 48 hrs reduced the ACTH and CORT response to restraint stress. The effects of T, but not DHT, could be blocked by the third ventricle administration of finasteride prior to stress application. These data indicate that the actions of T in modulating HPA axis activity involve 5α-reductase within the central nervous system. These results further our understanding of how T acts to modulate the neuroendocrine stress responses and indicate that 5α reduction to DHT is a necessary step for T action. PMID:23880372

  18. Testosterone treatment in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Srinivas-Shankar, U; Sharma, D

    2009-01-01

    Testosterone has been used in testicular and hypothalamo-pituitary diseases since the 1940s. There is growing interest in the use of testosterone in aging men, and this has stimulated research into the benefits of male hormone replacement. Testosterone treatment of men with hypogonadism might have beneficial effects on body composition, muscle strength, sexual function, and cognition. There are several modes of administration of the male hormone, with injectable testosterone esters and implanted testosterone pellets being the mainstay of treatment until recently. These preparations are increasingly being replaced by transdermal patches, gels, and long-acting parenteral preparations. Testosterone patches and gels are ideally for elderly men. Treatment with the male hormone is relatively safe, if patients are selected appropriately and monitored carefully. The most important adverse effects are on the prostate. In this review, we briefly discuss the indications, contraindications, and benefits of testosterone treatment. Further, we list the adverse effects, advantages, and disadvantages of various testosterone preparations in elderly men.

  19. Could you have low testosterone?

    MedlinePlus

    Male menopause; Andropause; Testosterone deficiency; Androgen deficiency of the aging male; Late-onset hypogonadism ... Testosterone makes a man look and feel like a man. In a man, this hormone helps: Keep ...

  20. Testosterone and Men's Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Among 4,462 former servicemen surveyed, testosterone levels were positively related to not marrying and marital instability, and negatively related to every aspect of marital quality examined. Findings are analyzed in relation to three sociological theories of marital success based on socioeconomic status (educational attainment, income, and…

  1. Testosterone and Men's Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Among 4,462 former servicemen surveyed, testosterone levels were positively related to not marrying and marital instability, and negatively related to every aspect of marital quality examined. Findings are analyzed in relation to three sociological theories of marital success based on socioeconomic status (educational attainment, income, and…

  2. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE LEVELS BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF MALE RAT PUBERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that has several endocrine modes of action. In vitro, PCZ inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and growth of an...

  3. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE LEVELS BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF MALE RAT PUBERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that has several endocrine modes of action. In vitro, PCZ inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and growth of an...

  4. Subclass specificity of the Fc receptor for human IgG on K562.

    PubMed

    Chiofalo, M S; Teti, G; Goust, J M; Trifiletti, R; La Via, M F

    1988-07-01

    The erythroleukemic cell line K562 bears a 40-kDa Fc receptor (Fc gamma RII) serologically related to and with a similar molecular weight as the Fc gamma R present on a broad range of leukocytes. The human IgG subclass specificity of the Fc gamma R on K562 was investigated using IgG aggregates of defined size, obtained from purified human myeloma proteins. The monoclonal antibody IV.3, which reacts with the Fc gamma RII present on various cell types, totally prevented binding of 125I-IgG2 trimers to K562. Experiments with radiolabeled IgG2 trimers showed that K562 cells bound a mean of 156,764 +/- 9895 molecules per cell with an association constant (Ka) of 1.8 +/- 0.7 X 10(8) M-1. Similar results were obtained with IgG3 oligomers. IgG3 and IgG2 trimers were about two- to threefold more effective in inhibiting binding of 125I-IgG2 trimers to K562 than IgG1 and IgG4 trimers. These results were confirmed by inhibition experiments using IgG monomers. The subclass specificity of the Fc gamma RII on K562 (i.e., IgG2 = IgG3 greater than IgG1 = IgG4) is quite distinct from the one reported for the Fc gamma RI and III of human cells (i.e., IgG1 = IgG3 greater than IgG4 and IgG2).

  5. An Overview of Testosterone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, O Danny; Tillman, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Millions of men, as a result of the natural aging process, injury, illness, and medical therapies, experience a decline in testosterone levels that necessitate a need for testosterone supplementation therapy (TST). The signs and symptoms of testosterone decline may occur gradually, and low testosterone levels may be misdiagnosed as other medical conditions. Over the past two decades, there has been an increase in testing of testosterone levels and the use of TST. With so many men now on TST, it is essential for health care professionals to know the signs and symptoms, the causes of testosterone decline, how testosterone deficiency is diagnosed, what pathological changes are associated with testosterone decline, and the benefits and risks of TST. In addition, health care providers need to be aware of the various forms of testosterone available as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each. This article provides a brief overview of testosterone deficiency, TST treatment options and guidelines, and the risks and benefits associated with of TST.

  6. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kathleen; Miner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term prospective studies to determine safety. Literature spanning over the past 30 years has suggested that not only is there a possible increased CV risk in men with low levels of testosterone, but the benefits from testosterone therapy may even lower this risk. We review here the recent studies that have garnered such intense scrutiny. This article is intended as a thorough review of testosterone levels and CV risk, providing the clinician with the facts needed to make informed clinical decisions in managing patients with clinical hypogonadism.

  7. Prenatal testosterone and stuttering.

    PubMed

    Montag, Christian; Bleek, Benjamin; Breuer, Svenja; Prüss, Holger; Richardt, Kirsten; Cook, Susanne; Yaruss, J Scott; Reuter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of stuttering is much higher in males compared to females. The biological underpinnings of this skewed sex-ratio is poorly understood, but it has often been speculated that sex hormones could play an important role. The present study investigated a potential link between prenatal testosterone and stuttering. Here, an indirect indicator of prenatal testosterone levels, the Digit Ratio (2D:4D) of the hand, was used. As numerous studies have shown, hands with more "male" characteristics (putatively representing greater prenatal testosterone levels) are characterized by a longer ring finger compared to the index finger (represented as a lower 2D:4D ratio) in the general population. We searched for differences in the 2D:4D ratios between 38 persons who stutter and 36 persons who do not stutter. In a second step, we investigated potential links between the 2D:4D ratio and the multifaceted symptomatology of stuttering, as measured by the Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering (OASES), in a larger sample of 44 adults who stutter. In the first step, no significant differences in the 2D:4D were observed between individuals who stutter and individuals who do not stutter. In the second step, 2D:4D correlated negatively with higher scores of the OASES (representing higher negative experiences due to stuttering), and this effect was more pronounced for female persons who stutter. The findings indicate for the first time that prenatal testosterone may influence individual differences in psychosocial impact of this speech disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Testosterone Therapy and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Emily; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2016-05-01

    Changes in understanding regarding the relationship of androgens and prostate cancer have led to changes in the use of testosterone therapy. The evidence supports a finite ability of androgens to stimulate prostate cancer growth, with a maximum achieved at low testosterone concentrations, called the saturation model. The saturation point corresponds with maximal androgenic stimulation at 250 ng/dL. Evidence is reviewed herein regarding the relationship of testosterone to prostate cancer and the relatively new practice of offering testosterone therapy to men with a history of prostate cancer. Although no prospective controlled trials have been performed, results have been reassuring.

  9. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  10. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels. PMID:25652634

  11. Plasmonic sensors for the competitive detection of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Yockell-Lelièvre, H; Bukar, N; McKeating, K S; Arnaud, M; Cosin, P; Guo, Y; Dupret-Carruel, J; Mougin, B; Masson, J-F

    2015-08-07

    The ability to detect small molecules in a rapid and sensitive manner is of great importance in the field of clinical chemistry, and the advancement of novel biosensors is key to realising point-of-care analysis for essential targets. Testosterone is an example of such a small molecule, the detection of which is important in both clinical analysis, and in the sporting industry to prevent doping. As such, a portable, rapid and sensitive test for testosterone would be of great use across a variety of analytical fields. Here we report on a novel method of testosterone analysis, based on a competitive inhibition assay utilising functionalized gold nanoparticles. Two sensing platforms are directly compared for the detection of testosterone based on both classical SPR and LSPR. We provide an in-depth discussion on the optimum surface chemistries needed to create a stable detection conjugate before successfully detecting testosterone using our newly developed portable 4-channel SPR instrument. We provide the first detailed study into the comparison of SPR and LSPR for the analysis of a small molecule, and provide a simple and effective method of testosterone detection that could potentially be extended to a variety of different analytes.

  12. Testosterone therapy in erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shabsigh, R

    2004-12-01

    Studies in animals have indicated that the nitric oxide erectile pathway is testosterone-dependent. Castration induces erectile dysfunction and a reduction in nitric oxide synthase-stained nerves in erectile tissue. Furthermore, castration adversely affects penile hemodynamics and smooth muscle content, leading to veno-occlusive dysfunction. Testosterone replenishment reverses these physiological, biochemical and structural changes. Several clinical studies have demonstrated the benefits of a combination of testosterone and sildenafil. A recently published, multicenter study evaluated the safety and efficacy of testosterone gel 1% (Testogel; Schering AG, Germany/AndroGel; Solvay Pharmaceuticals) vs. placebo gel in conjunction with sildenafil, in producing an erectile response in hypogonadal men who did not respond to treatment with sildenafil alone for erectile dysfunction. The selection criteria required subjects to have had erectile dysfunction for at least 3 months, to be non-responsive to 100 mg sildenafil and to have low testosterone levels (< 400 ng/dl). The primary efficacy measurement was the mean change from baseline in the Erectile Function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Secondary outcome measures included the mean change from baseline in the other domains and the total sum of the IIEF. Subjects were randomized to receive either testosterone gel + sildenafil, or placebo gel + sildenafil for 12 weeks. Testosterone therapy with testosterone gel improved the erectile response to sildenafil. Therefore, testosterone therapy may be considered for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men with low to low-normal testosterone levels, who have failed prior treatment with sildenafil alone. Consequently, it is important to screen for hypogonadism in men who fail PDE5 inhibitors.

  13. GSK-3β/NFAT Signaling Is Involved in Testosterone-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Duran, Javier; Oyarce, Cesar; Pavez, Mario; Valladares, Denisse; Basualto-Alarcon, Carla; Lagos, Daniel; Barrientos, Genaro; Troncoso, Mayarling Francisca; Ibarra, Cristian; Estrada, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone induces cardiac hypertrophy through a mechanism that involves a concerted crosstalk between cytosolic and nuclear signaling pathways. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) is associated with the promotion of cardiac hypertrophy, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is considered to function as a negative regulator, mainly by modulating NFAT activity. However, the role played by calcineurin-NFAT and GSK-3β signaling in testosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy has remained unknown. Here, we determined that testosterone stimulates cardiac myocyte hypertrophy through NFAT activation and GSK-3β inhibition. Testosterone increased the activity of NFAT-luciferase (NFAT-Luc) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with the activity peaking after 24 h of stimulation with 100 nM testosterone. NFAT-Luc activity induced by testosterone was blocked by the calcineurin inhibitors FK506 and cyclosporine A and by 11R-VIVIT, a specific peptide inhibitor of NFAT. Conversely, testosterone inhibited GSK-3β activity as determined by increased GSK-3β phosphorylation at Ser9 and β-catenin protein accumulation, and also by reduction in β-catenin phosphorylation at residues Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41. GSK-3β inhibition with 1-azakenpaullone or a GSK-3β-targeting siRNA increased NFAT-Luc activity, whereas overexpression of a constitutively active GSK-3β mutant (GSK-3βS9A) inhibited NFAT-Luc activation mediated by testosterone. Testosterone-induced cardiac myocyte hypertrophy was established by increased cardiac myocyte size and [3H]-leucine incorporation (as a measurement of cellular protein synthesis). Calcineurin-NFAT inhibition abolished and GSK-3β inhibition promoted the hypertrophy stimulated by testosterone. GSK-3β activation by GSK-3βS9A blocked the increase of hypertrophic markers induced by testosterone. Moreover, inhibition of intracellular androgen receptor prevented testosterone-induced NFAT-Luc activation. Collectively, these results suggest that

  14. GSK-3β/NFAT Signaling Is Involved in Testosterone-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Javier; Oyarce, Cesar; Pavez, Mario; Valladares, Denisse; Basualto-Alarcon, Carla; Lagos, Daniel; Barrientos, Genaro; Troncoso, Mayarling Francisca; Ibarra, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone induces cardiac hypertrophy through a mechanism that involves a concerted crosstalk between cytosolic and nuclear signaling pathways. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) is associated with the promotion of cardiac hypertrophy, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is considered to function as a negative regulator, mainly by modulating NFAT activity. However, the role played by calcineurin-NFAT and GSK-3β signaling in testosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy has remained unknown. Here, we determined that testosterone stimulates cardiac myocyte hypertrophy through NFAT activation and GSK-3β inhibition. Testosterone increased the activity of NFAT-luciferase (NFAT-Luc) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with the activity peaking after 24 h of stimulation with 100 nM testosterone. NFAT-Luc activity induced by testosterone was blocked by the calcineurin inhibitors FK506 and cyclosporine A and by 11R-VIVIT, a specific peptide inhibitor of NFAT. Conversely, testosterone inhibited GSK-3β activity as determined by increased GSK-3β phosphorylation at Ser9 and β-catenin protein accumulation, and also by reduction in β-catenin phosphorylation at residues Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41. GSK-3β inhibition with 1-azakenpaullone or a GSK-3β-targeting siRNA increased NFAT-Luc activity, whereas overexpression of a constitutively active GSK-3β mutant (GSK-3βS9A) inhibited NFAT-Luc activation mediated by testosterone. Testosterone-induced cardiac myocyte hypertrophy was established by increased cardiac myocyte size and [3H]-leucine incorporation (as a measurement of cellular protein synthesis). Calcineurin-NFAT inhibition abolished and GSK-3β inhibition promoted the hypertrophy stimulated by testosterone. GSK-3β activation by GSK-3βS9A blocked the increase of hypertrophic markers induced by testosterone. Moreover, inhibition of intracellular androgen receptor prevented testosterone-induced NFAT-Luc activation. Collectively, these results suggest that

  15. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  16. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  17. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  18. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  19. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  20. Dose addition predicts the effects of a mixture of five phthalate esters to inhibit fetal testosterone production and gene expression, and postnatal reproductive development in the Sprague Dawley rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to some phthalate esters (PE) during sexual differentiation induces reproductive malformations in male and female rats. In the fetal male, these lesions result from phthalate-induced reductions in testicular testosterone (T) production and insulin-like hormone 3 (insl3) ...

  1. Dose addition predicts the effects of a mixture of five phthalate esters to inhibit fetal testosterone production and gene expression, and postnatal reproductive development in the Sprague Dawley rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to some phthalate esters (PE) during sexual differentiation induces reproductive malformations in male and female rats. In the fetal male, these lesions result from phthalate-induced reductions in testicular testosterone (T) production and insulin-like hormone 3 (insl3) ...

  2. IgG4 subclass antibodies impair antitumor immunity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gilbert, Amy E.; Josephs, Debra H.; Ali, Niwa; Dodev, Tihomir; Saul, Louise; Correa, Isabel; Roberts, Luke; Beddowes, Emma; Koers, Alexander; Hobbs, Carl; Ferreira, Silvia; Geh, Jenny L.C.; Healy, Ciaran; Harries, Mark; Acland, Katharine M.; Blower, Philip J.; Mitchell, Tracey; Fear, David J.; Spicer, James F.; Lacy, Katie E.; Nestle, Frank O.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2013-01-01

    Host-induced antibodies and their contributions to cancer inflammation are largely unexplored. IgG4 subclass antibodies are present in IL-10–driven Th2 immune responses in some inflammatory conditions. Since Th2-biased inflammation is a hallmark of tumor microenvironments, we investigated the presence and functional implications of IgG4 in malignant melanoma. Consistent with Th2 inflammation, CD22+ B cells and IgG4+-infiltrating cells accumulated in tumors, and IL-10, IL-4, and tumor-reactive IgG4 were expressed in situ. When compared with B cells from patient lymph nodes and blood, tumor-associated B cells were polarized to produce IgG4. Secreted B cells increased VEGF and IgG4, and tumor cells enhanced IL-10 secretion in cocultures. Unlike IgG1, an engineered tumor antigen-specific IgG4 was ineffective in triggering effector cell–mediated tumor killing in vitro. Antigen-specific and nonspecific IgG4 inhibited IgG1-mediated tumoricidal functions. IgG4 blockade was mediated through reduction of FcγRI activation. Additionally, IgG4 significantly impaired the potency of tumoricidal IgG1 in a human melanoma xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, serum IgG4 was inversely correlated with patient survival. These findings suggest that IgG4 promoted by tumor-induced Th2-biased inflammation may restrict effector cell functions against tumors, providing a previously unexplored aspect of tumor-induced immune escape and a basis for biomarker development and patient-specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23454746

  3. IgG4 subclass antibodies impair antitumor immunity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gilbert, Amy E; Josephs, Debra H; Ali, Niwa; Dodev, Tihomir; Saul, Louise; Correa, Isabel; Roberts, Luke; Beddowes, Emma; Koers, Alexander; Hobbs, Carl; Ferreira, Silvia; Geh, Jenny L C; Healy, Ciaran; Harries, Mark; Acland, Katharine M; Blower, Philip J; Mitchell, Tracey; Fear, David J; Spicer, James F; Lacy, Katie E; Nestle, Frank O; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2013-04-01

    Host-induced antibodies and their contributions to cancer inflammation are largely unexplored. IgG4 subclass antibodies are present in IL-10-driven Th2 immune responses in some inflammatory conditions. Since Th2-biased inflammation is a hallmark of tumor microenvironments, we investigated the presence and functional implications of IgG4 in malignant melanoma. Consistent with Th2 inflammation, CD22+ B cells and IgG4(+)-infiltrating cells accumulated in tumors, and IL-10, IL-4, and tumor-reactive IgG4 were expressed in situ. When compared with B cells from patient lymph nodes and blood, tumor-associated B cells were polarized to produce IgG4. Secreted B cells increased VEGF and IgG4, and tumor cells enhanced IL-10 secretion in cocultures. Unlike IgG1, an engineered tumor antigen-specific IgG4 was ineffective in triggering effector cell-mediated tumor killing in vitro. Antigen-specific and nonspecific IgG4 inhibited IgG1-mediated tumoricidal functions. IgG4 blockade was mediated through reduction of FcγRI activation. Additionally, IgG4 significantly impaired the potency of tumoricidal IgG1 in a human melanoma xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, serum IgG4 was inversely correlated with patient survival. These findings suggest that IgG4 promoted by tumor-induced Th2-biased inflammation may restrict effector cell functions against tumors, providing a previously unexplored aspect of tumor-induced immune escape and a basis for biomarker development and patient-specific therapeutic approaches.

  4. The ball's in your court: testosterone 101.

    PubMed

    Horn, T; Cooper, S

    1997-11-01

    Testosterone, a hormone, plays several important functions in nutrition, libido, and the development of masculine traits. Studies have shown that testosterone levels in both men and women with HIV and AIDS are generally very low. The definition of normal testosterone is broad and determining when a person has low levels is difficult since individuals have different testosterone baselines. Testosterone replacement therapy, available for men but not for women yet, is used to increase body mass and prevent wasting. Testosterone is available in several forms, including a patch, and the advantages of each form are discussed. Testosterone level tests are readily available and are generally covered by insurance and Medicaid.

  5. Lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by monoclonal antibodies to the T3 complex. Differential modulation by human IgG.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, C D; Lambris, J; Lotz, M; Valentine, M A; Vaughan, J H; Carson, D A

    1984-11-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies OKT3 (IgG2), 64.1 (IgG2), and Leu 4 (IgG1) react with a common membrane antigen on human T cells and induce potent mitogenesis at concentrations of 1 ng/ml, 10 ng/ml, and 100 ng/ml, respectively. Human serum inhibits the mitogenic effect of antibodies OKT3 and 64.1, but not that of Leu 4. The inhibitor in serum has been identified as immunoglobulin G (IgG) as evidenced by the ability of anti-human IgG-Sepharose affinity columns to retain the inhibitory activity. Various immunoglobulin classes and subclasses obtained from human myelomas differ in their ability to inhibit the OKT3-induced activation. The best inhibition is obtained with the IgG subclasses IgG1 and IgG3, followed by IgG2; IgG4, IgM, and IgA have little if any effect. None of the IgG subclasses inhibit the Leu 4-induced mitogenesis. Indomethacin as well as supernatants containing interleukin 2 (IL-2) can reverse the inhibitory effects of IgG. Prostaglandins (PGE1 and PGE2) inhibit both the OKT3- and Leu 4-induced mitogenesis, thus lacking the selectivity seen with IgG. Since stimulation by the monoclonal antibodies requires the participation of monocytes, an interpretation consistent with the present data is that IgG stimulates monocytes via its Fc portion to release prostaglandins and/or other suppressor factors via an indomethacin-sensitive pathway. The inability of IgG to inhibit Leu 4-induced mitogenesis may therefore relate to an inability of the monocyte subpopulation, which mediates the Leu 4 response, to secrete suppressor factors. These data suggest a potential value of the mitogenic monoclonal antibodies as probes in studying monocyte heterogeneity and T-cell-monocyte interactions.

  6. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kathleen; Miner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term prospective studies to determine safety. Literature spanning over the past 30 years has suggested that not only is there a possible increased CV risk in men with low levels of testosterone, but the benefits from testosterone therapy may even lower this risk. We review here the recent studies that have garnered such intense scrutiny. This article is intended as a thorough review of testosterone levels and CV risk, providing the clinician with the facts needed to make informed clinical decisions in managing patients with clinical hypogonadism. PMID:25652628

  7. Dutasteride reduces prostate size and prostate specific antigen in older hypogonadal men with benign prostatic hyperplasia undergoing testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Page, Stephanie T; Hirano, Lianne; Gilchriest, Janet; Dighe, Manjiri; Amory, John K; Marck, Brett T; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2011-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia and hypogonadism are common disorders in aging men. There is concern that androgen replacement in older men may increase prostate size and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. We examined whether combining dutasteride, which inhibits testosterone to dihydrotestosterone conversion, with testosterone treatment in older hypogonadal men with benign prostatic hyperplasia reduces androgenic stimulation of the prostate compared to testosterone alone. We conducted a double-blind, placebo controlled trial of 53 men 51 to 82 years old with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate volume 30 cc or greater and serum total testosterone less than 280 ng/dl (less than 9.7 nmol/l). Subjects were randomized to daily transdermal 1% T gel plus oral placebo or dutasteride for 6 months. Testosterone dosing was adjusted to a serum testosterone of 500 to 1,000 ng/dl. The primary outcomes were prostate volume measured by magnetic resonance imaging, serum prostate specific antigen and androgen levels. A total of 46 subjects completed all procedures. Serum testosterone increased similarly into the mid-normal range in both groups. Serum dihydrotestosterone increased in the testosterone only but decreased in the testosterone plus dutasteride group. In the testosterone plus dutasteride group prostate volume and prostate specific antigen (mean ± SEM) decreased 12% ± 2.5% and 35% ± 5%, respectively, compared to the testosterone only group in which prostate volume and prostate specific antigen increased 7.5% ± 3.3% and 19% ± 7% (p = 0.03 and p = 0.008), respectively, after 6 months of treatment. Prostate symptom scores improved in both groups. Combined treatment with testosterone plus dutasteride reduces prostate volume and prostate specific antigen compared to testosterone only. Coadministration of a 5α-reductase inhibitor with testosterone appears to spare the prostate from androgenic stimulation during testosterone replacement in older

  8. Testosterone supplementation improves glucose homeostasis despite increasing hepatic insulin resistance in male mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pal, M; Gupta, S

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have revealed that testosterone supplementation had a positive effect on glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but did not address how testosterone supplementation affected insulin responsiveness in the liver, a key glucose homeostatic organ. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of testosterone supplementation on hepatic insulin responsiveness and glucose homeostasis through liver in male high-fat diet-induced T2DM mice. Testosterone treatment to T2DM animals showed reduced hepatic glucose output. Testosterone inhibited the insulin signaling in liver, thus increased insulin resistance. However, testosterone treatment inactivated GSK3α independent of PI3K/AKT pathway and inhibited FOXO1 By interaction of androgen receptor to FOXO1 and downregulated PEPCK, causing repression of gluconeogenic pathway, which is otherwise upregulated in T2DM, resulted in better glucose homeostasis. PMID:27941939

  9. Experimental increase of testosterone increases boldness and decreases anxiety in male African striped mouse helpers.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Julien; Schradin, Carsten

    2014-04-22

    Males of many species can adjust their behaviors to environmental conditions by changing reproductive tactics. Testosterone surges in adult breeding males typically inhibit the expression of paternal care while facilitating the expression of aggression during environmental changes. Similarly, in non-breeding philopatric males of cooperatively breeding species, up-regulation of testosterone may inhibit alloparental care while facilitating dispersal, i.e. males might become bolder and more explorative. We tested this hypothesis in philopatric male African striped mice, Rhabdomys pumilio. Striped mouse males can either remain in their natal groups providing alloparental care or they can disperse seeking mating opportunities. Compared to philopatric males, dispersed males typically show higher testosterone levels and lower corticosterone levels, and more aggression toward pups and same sex conspecifics. We experimentally increased the testosterone levels of the philopatric males kept in their family groups when pups were present. Testosterone-treated males did not differ significantly from control males in alloparental care and in aggression toward same-sex conspecifics. Compared to the control males, testosterone treated males were bolder, more active, and less anxious; they also showed lower corticosterone levels. The philopatric males were sensitive to our testosterone treatment for dispersal- and anxiety-like behavior but insensitive for social behaviors. Our results suggest a role of testosterone in dispersal.

  10. Testosterone Undecanoate-Schering AG.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Schering AG is developing a formulation of testosterone undecanoate [Nebido] for the treatment of testosterone deficiency or hypogonadism. This deficiency can lead to decreased muscle mass, impaired muscle function, osteoporosis, reduced sexual function and mental degeneration. Schering claims that its new formulation provides superior control of blood levels of the drug and permits a longer period of application. Nebido requires only four injections per year, and represents a major improvement for men with testosterone deficiency. Schering AG received approval of its testosterone undecanoate formulation in its first European country, Finland, in November 2003 for the treatment of hypogonadism in men. In July 2004, Schering's testosterone undecanoate formulation completed approval of the European mutual recognition procedure. This approval clears the way for marketing the product (as Nebido) in the large pharmaceutical markets like Germany, France and the UK. The initial phase of the product launch will occur in Finland in October 2004, and in Germany in November 2004. Other European countries will follow in 2005, and following receipt of approval, it will be introduced in the first Latin American and Asian countries. In its 2002 Annual Report, Schering predicted that testosterone undecanoate has the potential to reach peak sales of euro 100 million, 3 years after launch-launch in Europe was at the time anticipated in 2004.

  11. Estrogen, testosterone, and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Dluzen, Dean E

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to gain some current perspective on the definition, bases, and trends for research associated with gender differences. To accomplish this goal an analysis on the number of citations from a 1994-2004 Medline search with the terms estrogen, testosterone, gender differences, sex differences as well as the combinations of these terms was performed. Other combinations of terms included separate searches of estrogen, testosterone, and their combination within males or females, and an analysis of gender and sex differences with the terms human and animal. The salient results from this survey include: (1) An overall greater ratio of estrogen:testosterone citations when these terms were searched alone or in combination with gender differences; (2) an overall greater ratio of testosterone:estrogen citations when these terms were combined with sex differences or conducted separately within males or females, although this trend was shifting toward decreased testosterone and increased estrogen citation numbers toward the latter years of the survey; (3) a trend for increasing numbers of estrogen and gender differences citations over the period of the survey; (4) a clear indication for the term gender differences to be associated with the search term human; and (5) a very small number of citations when the terms estrogen and testosterone were combined. Interpretations and implications of these results are discussed.

  12. IgG antinuclear antibodies with cross-reactive rheumatoid factor activity.

    PubMed

    Darwin, B S; Grudier, J P; Klatt, C L; Pisetsky, D S

    1986-12-15

    To investigate whether IgG antinuclear antibodies have cross-reactive rheumatoid factor activity, monoclonal IgG antibodies to DNA and Sm from autoimmune MRL-lpr/lpr mice were assayed by ELISA for binding to IgG antigens. Of the nine anti-DNA and anti-Sm monoclonals tested, six showed significant binding to affinity-purified rabbit IgG (RIgG) and human IgG (HIgG). To confirm that cross-reactivities were due to a single antibody, immunoabsorption of a representative polyspecific monoclonal termed C11 (anti-DNA, anti-Sm) on either Sepharose-DNA or Sepharose-RIgG resulted in marked loss of activity to the three antigens DNA, Sm and RIgG compared with immunoabsorption on Sepharose-bovine serum albumin. The monomolecular nature of the cross-reacting antibody was also suggested by inhibition analysis of C11; DNA inhibited C11 binding to RIgG 64%, whereas Sm inhibited binding to RIgG 33%. Aggregated RIgG and HIgG, however, did not inhibit binding of C11 to DNA, Sm, or solid-phase RIgG, probably reflecting the low affinity of this antibody for fluid phase Ig. Together, these findings suggest that antinuclear autoantibodies of the IgG, as well as the IgM, class have polyspecific IgG binding activity and suggest that IgG antinuclear antibodies may emerge from rheumatoid factor responses.

  13. T15 group A streptococcal Fc receptor binds to the same location on IgG as staphylococcal protein A and IgG rheumatoid factors.

    PubMed

    Nardella, F A; Schröder, A K; Svensson, M L; Sjöquist, J; Barber, C; Christensen, P

    1987-02-01

    Previous work has shown that IgG rheumatoid factors (RF) bind to the C gamma 2-C gamma 3 interface region of human IgG in the same area that binds staphylococcal protein A (SPA). Group A, C, and G strains of Streptococci possess Fc receptors that bind to IgG but not to fragments containing only the C gamma 2 or C gamma 3 domains. This work describes the binding site location on human IgG for the binding of the isolated Fc receptor from the T15 strain of a Group A streptococcus and its relationship to the site that binds SPA and the IgG RF. The isolated T15 Fc receptor (T15) with a molecular mass of 29.5 kD inhibited the binding of IgG RF to IgG. The binding of T15 itself to IgG was strongly inhibited by SPA (42.0 kD) and its monovalent fragment D (7 kD). Human IgG fragments consisting of the C gamma 3 domains did not inhibit the binding of T15 to IgG, whereas those with both domains were effective inhibitors. T15 did not bind to rabbit IgG fragments consisting of either the C gamma 2 or C gamma 3 domains, but did bind to those with both domains. An IgG3 myeloma protein was a poor inhibitor and has been shown to bind poorly to the IgG RF. Most IgG3 myeloma proteins did not bind to SPA. The substitution of Arg and Phe for His 435 and Tyr 436 is responsible for the poor binding of IgG3 to SPA and to the IgG RF. Chemical modification of His or Tyr on IgG reduced its ability to inhibit the binding of T15 to IgG. Reversal of the chemical modifications with hydroxylamine resulted in near complete restoration of inhibitory capacity. This information, collectively, coupled with the known positions in space of the His and Tyr residues in the C gamma 2-C gamma 3 interface region, verified that both His 435 and Tyr 436, and possibly His 310 and 433, are involved. These residues are also involved in binding SPA and the IgG RF. These data therefore indicate that the T15 Group A Streptococcal Fc receptor binds to the same location on the Fc of IgG as SPA and the IgG RF. The

  14. Effects of chrysin on urinary testosterone levels in human males.

    PubMed

    Gambelunghe, Cristiana; Rossi, Ruggero; Sommavilla, Marco; Ferranti, Chiara; Rossi, Riccardo; Ciculi, Chiara; Gizzi, Stefania; Micheletti, Alessandra; Rufini, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The equilibrium of sexual hormones in both sexes is controlled in vertebrates by the enzyme aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, which catalyzes the conversion of androstenedione and testosterone into estrone and estradiol, respectively. Flavonoids are diphenolic compounds present in whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables that are strongly implicated as protective in coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer. One flavonoid, chrysin, found in high concentrations in honey and propolis, has been shown to be an inhibitor of aromatase enzyme activity. These foods are often used as supplements, particulary by sportsmen for their energetic and antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to verify if daily treatment for 21 days with propolis and honey, containing chrysin, would modify urinary concentrations of testosterone in volunteer male subjects. In fact, aromatase inhibition by chrysin could block the conversion of androgens into estrogens with a consequent increase of testosterone, eventually measurable in urine samples. The obtained data did not show alterations of the levels of testosterone in the volunteers after 7, 14, and 21 days of treatment in comparison with baseline values and compared with measurements on the control subjects at the same time. In conclusion, the use of these foods for 21 days at the doses usually taken as oral supplementation does not have effects on the equilibrium of testosterone in human males.

  15. Fetal testosterone and empathy.

    PubMed

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Raggatt, Peter; Taylor, Kevin; Hackett, Gerald

    2006-03-01

    In animals, fetal testosterone (fT) plays a central role in organizing the brain and in later social behavior. In humans, exposure to atypical levels of prenatal androgens may result in masculine behavior and ability patterns. Normal inter-individual variation in fT levels has also been correlated with later sex-typed behavior. In the current study, 38 children (24 male, 14 female), whose fT was analyzed in amniotic fluid, were followed up at age 4. They were asked to describe cartoons with 2 moving triangles whose interactions with each other suggested social relationships and psychological motivations. Females used more mental and affective state terms to describe the cartoons than males. fT was not associated with the frequency of mental or affective state terms. Females also used more intentional propositions than males. fT was negatively correlated with the frequency of intentional propositions, taking sex differences into account. fT was also negatively correlated with the frequency of intentional propositions when males were examined separately. Males used more neutral propositions than females. fT was directly correlated with the frequency of neutral propositions, taking sex differences into account. This relationship was not seen when males and females were examined separately. These findings implicate fT in human social development. The relevance of our findings to the 'extreme male brain' theory of autism is also discussed.

  16. IgG4-Related Tubulointerstitial Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingchuan; Cornell, Lynn D

    2017-03-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory disorder that can involve nearly any organ. The disorder has increasingly become known as a distinct clinical entity during the last decade. IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN) is the most common manifestation of IgG4-RD in the kidney. Many patients with IgG4-TIN are diagnosed after IgG4-RD has been recognized in other organ systems, but the kidney may also be the first or only site involved. The presenting clinical features of IgG4-TIN are most commonly kidney insufficiency, kidney mass lesion(s), or both. On biopsy, IgG4-TIN shows a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, increased IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and often tubular basement membrane immune complex deposits. Elevation of serum IgG4 often accompanies IgG4-RD; however, it is not specific in reaching the diagnosis. Like IgG4-RD in other organs, IgG4-TIN characteristically responds promptly to steroids, although there is a high relapse rate on discontinuation of immunosuppression. The pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is not understood.

  17. Chagasic IgG modifies the activity of sarcolemmal ATPases through a beta adrenergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L

    1987-01-26

    The effect of anti beta adrenoceptor IgG from chagasic sera upon Ca2+-ATPase and Na++K+-ATPase of myocardial membrane was studied. Chagasic IgG stimulated Ca2+-ATPase and inhibited Na++K+-ATPase activities. Both enzymatic effects of the IgG could be prevented after beta adrenoceptor blockade or after the absorption of chagasic IgG with turkey red blood cells. Isoproterenol acted similarly. These results provide information concerning to the biochemical mechanism, by which an antibody, known to activate adenylate cyclase system coupled to cardiac beta adrenoceptor, produces stimulation of myocardial contractility.

  18. IgG rheumatoid factors and staphylococcal protein A bind to a common molecular site on IgG.

    PubMed

    Nardella, F A; Teller, D C; Barber, C V; Mannik, M

    1985-12-01

    The antigenic determinant on the Fc region of human IgG for two IgG rheumatoid factors (IgG-RF) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis were investigated in detail. The RF did not interact with IgG fragments that contained the C gamma 2 or C gamma 3 region alone, but required the presence of both regions for binding. The RF binding to solid-phase IgG were poorly inhibited by the IgG3 subclass and strongly inhibited by staphylococcal protein A (SPA) (42 kD), and fragment D of SPA (7 kD), indicating that the binding site is most likely the same as the Ga antigenic determinant described for IgM-RF, and is in the same location as the site on IgG that binds SPA. pH titration studies of the RF binding to IgG indicated the involvement of histidine and lysine or tyrosine side chains. Chemical modification studies showed the histidines were involved on the Fc side of the interactions, and tyrosines were involved on both the antigenic and antibody sides of the interactions. Lysines were not involved. The above information, and the knowledge of the number and position in space of the amino acid residues involved in the C gamma 2-C gamma 3 interface region of IgG, the binding site for SPA, and the amino acid substitutions in IgG3 that account for its inability to bind protein A, allowed the identification of the site on IgG that bind IgG-RF. This binding site involves some of the same amino acid side chains, His 435, Tyr 436, and one or both His 433 and 310, and is in the same location as the site that binds SPA. The same site is likely to be a common antigenic determinant for other RF. Furthermore, the described molecular mimicry suggests a biological relationship between bacterial Fc-binding proteins and the production of RF in rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Testosterone, thrombophilia, thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Friedman, Joel; Hafeez, Ahsan; Hassan, Atif; Wang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    We assessed previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis in 11 testosterone (T)-taking men, five of whom developed deep venous thrombosis (DVT), four pulmonary embolism, one spinal cord infarction, and one osteonecrosis 3.5 months (median) after starting T gel (50-160 mg/day) or T intramuscular (50-250 mg/week). In the order of referral because of thrombosis after starting T, thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis was studied in 11 men, and, separately, in two control groups without thrombosis - 44 healthy normal male controls and 39 healthy men taking T. Nine men had DVT or DVT-pulmonary embolism after 3.5 months (median) on T, one spinal cord infarction after 5 days on T, and one had osteonecrosis (knee and then hip osteonecrosis after 6 and 18 months on T). Four of the 11 men (36%) had high factor VIII (≥150%) vs. one of 42 (2%) controls (P = 0.005), and vs. one of 25 (4%) T-controls, (P = 0.023). Of the 11 men, two (18%) had factor V Leiden heterozygosity vs. none of 44 controls, (P = 0.04) and vs. none of 39 T-controls(P = 0.045). Of the 11 men, three had 4G4G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 homozygosity, one prothrombin G20210A heterozygosity, one low protein S, and one high factor XI. When T was continued, second DVT-pulmonary embolism recurred in three of 11 men despite adequate anticoagulation. T interacts with thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis leading to thrombosis. Men sustaining DVT-pulmonary embolism-osteonecrosis on T should be studied for thrombophilia. Continuation of T in thrombophilic men appears to be contraindicated because of recurrent thrombosis despite adequate anticoagulation. Before starting T, to prevent T-associated thrombosis, we recommend measures of factor V Leiden, factor VIII, and the prothrombin gene.

  20. Testosterone deficiency: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Nieschlag, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The biological effects of the testes and testosterone are known since antiquity. Aristotle knew the effects of castration and his hypothesis on fertilization is one of the first scientific encounters in reproductive biology. Over centuries, castration has been performed as punishment and to produce obedient slaves, but also to preserve the soprano voices of prepubertal boys. The Chinese imperial (and other oriental) courts employed castrates as overseers in harems who often obtained high-ranking political positions. The era of testis transplantation and organotherapy was initiated by John Hunter in London who transplanted testes into capons in 1786. The intention of his experiments was to prove the 'vital principle' as the basis for modern transplantation medicine, but Hunter did not consider endocrine aspects. Arnold Adolph Berthold postulated internal secretion from his testicular transplantation experiments in 1849 in Göttingen and is thus considered the father of endocrinology. Following his observations, testicular preparations were used for therapy, popularized by self-experiments by Charles-Edouard Brown-Séquard in Paris (1889), which can at best have placebo effects. In the 1920s Sergio Voronoff transplanted testes from animals to men, but their effectiveness was disproved. Today testicular transplantation is being refined by stem cell research and germ cell transplantation. Modern androgen therapy started in 1935 when Enrest Lacquer isolated testosterone from bull testes in Amsterdam. In the same year testosterone was chemically synthesized independently by Adolf Butenandt in Göttingen and Leopold Ruzicka in Basel. Since testosterone was ineffective orally it was either compressed into subcutaneous pellets or was used orally as 17α-methyl testosterone, now obsolete because of liver toxicity. The early phases of testosterone treatment coincide with the first description of the most prominent syndromes of hypogonadism by Klinefelter, by Kallmann, Del

  1. Testosterone deficiency: a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Nieschlag, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The biological effects of the testes and testosterone are known since antiquity. Aristotle knew the effects of castration and his hypothesis on fertilization is one of the first scientific encounters in reproductive biology. Over centuries, castration has been performed as punishment and to produce obedient slaves, but also to preserve the soprano voices of prepubertal boys. The Chinese imperial (and other oriental) courts employed castrates as overseers in harems who often obtained high-ranking political positions. The era of testis transplantation and organotherapy was initiated by John Hunter in London who transplanted testes into capons in 1786. The intention of his experiments was to prove the ‘vital principle’ as the basis for modern transplantation medicine, but Hunter did not consider endocrine aspects. Arnold Adolph Berthold postulated internal secretion from his testicular transplantation experiments in 1849 in Göttingen and is thus considered the father of endocrinology. Following his observations, testicular preparations were used for therapy, popularized by self-experiments by Charles-Edouard Brown-Séquard in Paris (1889), which can at best have placebo effects. In the 1920s Sergio Voronoff transplanted testes from animals to men, but their effectiveness was disproved. Today testicular transplantation is being refined by stem cell research and germ cell transplantation. Modern androgen therapy started in 1935 when Enrest Lacquer isolated testosterone from bull testes in Amsterdam. In the same year testosterone was chemically synthesized independently by Adolf Butenandt in Göttingen and Leopold Ruzicka in Basel. Since testosterone was ineffective orally it was either compressed into subcutaneous pellets or was used orally as 17α-methyl testosterone, now obsolete because of liver toxicity. The early phases of testosterone treatment coincide with the first description of the most prominent syndromes of hypogonadism by Klinefelter, by Kallmann, Del

  2. Testosterone Induces Molecular Changes in Dopamine Signaling Pathway Molecules in the Adolescent Male Rat Nigrostriatal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Purves-Tyson, Tertia D.; Owens, Samantha J.; Double, Kay L.; Desai, Reena; Handelsman, David J.; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent males have an increased risk of developing schizophrenia, implicating testosterone in the precipitation of dopamine-related psychopathology. Evidence from adult rodent brain indicates that testosterone can modulate nigrostriatal dopamine. However, studies are required to understand the role testosterone plays in maturation of dopamine pathways during adolescence and to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) by which testosterone exerts its effects. We hypothesized that molecular indices of dopamine neurotransmission [synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase), breakdown (catechol-O-methyl transferase; monoamine oxygenase), transport [vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT), dopamine transporter (DAT)] and receptors (DRD1-D5)] would be changed by testosterone or its metabolites, dihydrotestosterone and 17β-estradiol, in the nigrostriatal pathway of adolescent male rats. We found that testosterone and dihydrotestosterone increased DAT and VMAT mRNAs in the substantia nigra and that testosterone increased DAT protein at the region of the cell bodies, but not in target regions in the striatum. Dopamine receptor D2 mRNA was increased and D3 mRNA was decreased in substantia nigra and/or striatum by androgens. These data suggest that increased testosterone at adolescence may change dopamine responsivity of the nigrostriatal pathway by modulating, at a molecular level, the capacity of neurons to transport and respond to dopamine. Further, dopamine turnover was increased in the dorsal striatum following gonadectomy and this was prevented by testosterone replacement. Gene expression changes in the dopaminergic cell body region may serve to modulate both dendritic dopamine feedback inhibition and reuptake in the dopaminergic somatodendritic field as well as dopamine release and re-uptake dynamics at the presynaptic terminals in the striatum. These testosterone-induced changes of molecular indices of dopamine neurotransmission in males are primarily androgen receptor

  3. TESTOSTERONE AND SPORT: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.; Stanton, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids enhance athletic performance in men and women. As a result, exogenous androgen is banned from most competitive sports. However, due to variability in endogenous secretion, and similarities with exogenous testosterone, it has been challenging to establish allowable limits for testosterone in competition. Endogenous androgen production is dynamically regulated by both exercise and winning in competition. Furthermore, testosterone may promote athletic performance, not only through its long-term anabolic actions, but also through rapid effects on behavior. In women, excess production of endogenous testosterone due to inborn disorders of sexual development (DSD) may convey a competitive advantage. For many years, female competitors have been subject to tests of sexual genotype and phenotype known as gender verification. Although gender verification has not identified any normal man competing as a woman, this process has identified women athletes with DSD. As understanding of DSD has expanded in recent years, women with DSD are increasingly able to continue athletic competition. PMID:21983229

  4. Testosterone and weight loss: the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Traish, Abdulmaged M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this article is to examine the contemporary data linking testosterone therapy in overweight and obese men with testosterone deficiency to increased lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvement in overall body composition and sustained weight loss. This is of paramount importance because testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency represents a novel and a timely therapeutic strategy for managing obesity in men with testosterone deficiency. Recent findings Long-term testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency produces significant and sustained weight loss, marked reduction in waist circumference and BMI and improvement in body composition. Further, testosterone therapy ameliorates components of the metabolic syndrome. The aforementioned improvements are attributed to improved mitochondrial function, increased energy utilization, increased motivation and vigor resulting in improved cardio-metabolic function and enhanced physical activity. Summary The implication of testosterone therapy in management of obesity in men with testosterone deficiency is of paramount clinical significance, as it produces sustained weight loss without recidivism. On the contrary, alternative therapeutic approaches other than bariatric surgery failed to produce significant and sustained outcome and exhibit a high rate of recidivism. These findings represent strong foundations for testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency and should spur clinical research for better understanding of usefulness of testosterone therapy in treatment of underlying pathophysiological conditions of obesity. PMID:25105998

  5. Effects of testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone on luteal lifespan in dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Silvia, W J; Jacobs, A L; Hayes, S H

    1989-11-01

    Endogenous concentrations of testosterone increase approximately 7 d prior to estrus in cattle and goats. Inhibition of testosterone synthesis results in a delay of luteal regression in both species. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if treatment with testosterone or 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 2 to 6 d prior to the endogenous rise in testosterone, would result in premature luteal regression. Sixteen heifers were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: 1) Control (n = 6); 2) testosterone (100 mug, n = 5); or 3) DHT (100 mug, n = 5). Each heifer received a single injection of the appropriate steriod on Day 8, 9, 10, 11 or 12 post estrus. Jugular venous blood samples were collected at frequent intervals for 24 h to quantify testosterone, and then daily for 14 d to quantify progesterone. Concentrations of testosterone increased within 15 min of injection of testosterone, and reached a maximum at 30 min. Concentrations were maintained at > 2 ng/ml throughout the first 24 h after injection. Based on concentrations of progesterone, neither androgen had any effect on the lifespan of the corpus luteum or the level of luteal function.

  6. IgG is involved in the migration and invasion of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhengzuo; Liu, Yang; Qin, Caipeng; Liu, Zhenhua; Yuan, Yeqing; Hu, FengZhan; Du, Yiqing; Yin, Huaqi; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Tao

    2016-06-01

    To investigate if IgG can be expressed in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (cRCC) , and the expression of IgG is involved in the cancer progression. If IgG expression can serve as a potential target in cancer therapies and be used for judging the prognosis. By immunohistochemistry, we detected IgG in cRCC tissues(75 cRCC tissues and75 adjacent normal kidney tissues). Immunofluorescence and Western blot was used to detect the IgG in cRCC cell lines (786-0, ACHN and CAKI-I). By RT-PCR, the functional transcript of IgG heavy chain was detected. Knockdown of IgG was to analyze the proliferation, migration and invasion ability by CCK8, Transwell and Matrigel and apoptosis in cRCC cell lines. By immunohistochemistry, we found strong staining of IgG in 66 cases of 75 cRCC tissues and 63 cases of 75 adjacent normal kidney tissues. Immunofluorescence and Western blot was found IgG in cRCC cell lines. Knock-down IgG in cRCC cell lines resulted in significant inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and the induction of apoptosis of the 786-0 cells. The immunohistochemistry analysis showed that high IgG expression significantly correlated with the poor differentiation and advanced stage of cRCC. IgG was over expressed in cRCC and was involved in the proliferation, migration and invasion of cancer cells. IgG expression may serve as a potential target in cancer therapies and could be used for judging the prognosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Testosterone, thrombophilia, thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Joel; Glueck, Charles J; Prince, Marloe; Riaz, Rashid; Wang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    We screened previously undiagnosed thrombophilia (V Leiden-prothrombin mutations, Factors VIII and XI, homocysteine, and antiphospholipid antibody [APL] syndrome) in 15 men and 2 women with venous thromboembolism (VTE) or osteonecrosis 7 months (median) after starting testosterone therapy (TT), gel (30-50 mg/d), intramuscular (100-400 mg/wk), or human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) (6000 IU/wk). Thrombophilia was studied in 2 healthy control groups without thrombosis (97 normal controls, 31 subjects on TT) and in a third control group (n = 22) with VTE, not on TT. Of the 17 cases, 76% had ≥1 thrombophilia vs 19% of 97 normal controls (P < 0.0001), vs 29% of 31 TT controls (P = 0.002). Cases differed from normal controls by Factor V Leiden (12% vs 0%, P = 0.021), by high Factor VIII (>150%) (24% vs 7%, P = 0.058), by high homocysteine (29% vs 5%, P = 0.007), and from both normal and TT controls for APL syndrome (18% vs 2%, P = 0.023, vs 0%, P = 0.04). Despite adequate anticoagulation with TT continued after the first deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary embolus (DVT-PE), 1 man sustained 3 DVT-PEs 5, 8, and 11 months later and a second man had 2 DVT-PEs 1 and 2 months later. Of the 10 cases with serum T measured on TT, 6 (60%) had supranormal T (>800 ng/dL) and of 9 with estradiol measured on TT, 7 (78%) had supranormal levels (>42.6 pg/mL). TT interacts with thrombophilia leading to thrombosis. TT continuation in thrombophilic men is contraindicated because of recurrent thrombi despite anticoagulation. Screening for thrombophilia before starting TT should identify subjects at high risk for VTE with an adverse the risk to benefit ratio for TT.

  8. Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate health.

    PubMed

    Polackwich, A Scott; Ostrowski, Kevin A; Hedges, Jason C

    2012-12-01

    There is an emerging evolution in the understanding of the relationship between the prostate and testosterone. It has long been generally believed that with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), increasing serum testosterone levels led to prostatic growth and worsening of voiding dysfunction and associated complications. A new theory, the Saturation Model of Testosterone and its effect on the Prostate has gained attention. This theory suggests that the prostate's response to increasing levels of serum testosterone reaches a limit beyond which there is minimal effect. This model predicts that testosterone replacement therapy occurs above this saturation point, and replacing testosterone to eugonadal levels should not worsen prostate related benign disease. We evaluated the recent published data, with an emphasis on clinical studies done within the last 3 years, for the effects of testosterone supplementation on benign prostatic disease.

  9. TV Ads Help Drive Testosterone Supplement Sales

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_164208.html TV Ads Help Drive Testosterone Supplement Sales Study found link between ads airing, ... TV ads have helped spur a boom in testosterone treatments, convincing many men that they need hormone ...

  10. Testosterone replacement in older men and women.

    PubMed

    Morley, J E

    2001-01-01

    This article examines in detail the present state of the art concerning androgen deficiency in aging males. There is increasing evidence that testosterone replacement in hypogonadal older males can result in an improvement in quality of life. The major effects of testosterone are on libido, muscles, bone, and cognition. Less information is available concerning the role of testosterone in postmenopausal women, but testosterone replacement may have a role to play in treating disorders of libido and the sarcopenia that occurs at menopause.

  11. Gender-Typed Play and Amniotic Testosterone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca Christine; Wheelwright, Sally; Taylor, Kevin; Raggatt, Peter; Hackett, Gerald; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Sex differences in play are apparent in a number of mammalian species, including humans. Prenatal testosterone may contribute to these differences. The authors report the first attempt to correlate gender-typed play in a normative sample of humans with measurements of amniotic testosterone (aT). Testosterone was measured in the amniotic fluid of…

  12. Gender-Typed Play and Amniotic Testosterone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca Christine; Wheelwright, Sally; Taylor, Kevin; Raggatt, Peter; Hackett, Gerald; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Sex differences in play are apparent in a number of mammalian species, including humans. Prenatal testosterone may contribute to these differences. The authors report the first attempt to correlate gender-typed play in a normative sample of humans with measurements of amniotic testosterone (aT). Testosterone was measured in the amniotic fluid of…

  13. IgG subclasses to food antigens.

    PubMed

    Quinti, I; Papetti, C; D'Offizi, G; Cavagni, G; Panchor, M L; Lunardi, C; Paganelli, R

    1988-02-01

    Involvement of sub-classes of IgG that are specific for food allergens in anaphylactoid reactions and some manifestations of atopy no longer needs to be shown. Accordingly, sub-classes of IgG specific for ovalbumin (OVA) and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) were compared in healthy subjects and those who presented with an intolerance or food allergy to OVA and BLG to decide whether a restrictive diet was necessary. The four sub-classes of IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 were isolated in all the groups. IgG4 was highest in the allergic subjects and the IgG sub-class values were modified by the diet differently in each group. Unfortunately, the small number of subjects does not allow the formation of a definite conclusion to this study.

  14. Testosterone vs. aromatase inhibitor in older men with low testosterone: effects on cardiometabolic parameters.

    PubMed

    Dias, J P; Shardell, M D; Carlson, O D; Melvin, D; Caturegli, G; Ferrucci, L; Chia, C W; Egan, J M; Basaria, S

    2017-01-01

    Testosterone (T) replacement is being increasingly offered to older men with age-related decline in testosterone levels. The effects of long-term testosterone replacement and aromatase inhibition (AI) on glucose homeostasis and cardiometabolic markers were determine in older non-diabetic men with low testosterone levels. Men ≥65 years, mean age 71 ± 3 years with serum total T < 350 ng/dL were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, proof-of-concept trial evaluating the effects of 5 g transdermal testosterone gel (TT) (n = 10), 1 mg anastrozole (n = 10) or placebo (n = 9) daily for 12 months. Homeostatic Model Assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR ) was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included OGIS in response to OGTT, fasting lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP), adipokines, and abdominal and mid-thigh fat by computed tomography. All outcomes were assessed at baseline and 12 months. After 12 months, absolute changes in HOMAIR in both treatment arms (TT group: -0.05 ± 0.21); (AI group: 0.15 ± 0.10) were similar to placebo (-0.11 ± 0.26), as were CRP and fasting lipid levels. Adiponectin levels significantly decreased in the TT group (-1.8 ± 0.9 mg/L, p = 0.02) and abdominal subcutaneous fat (-60.34 ± 3.19 cm(2) , p = 0.003) and leptin levels (-1.5 ± 1.2 ng/mL, p = 0.04) were significantly lower with AI. Mid-thigh subcutaneous fat was reduced in both treatment arms (TT group: -4.88 ± 1.24 cm(2) , p = 0.008); (AI group: -6.05 ± 0.87 cm(2) , p = 0.0002). In summary, in this proof-of-concept trial, changes in HOMAIR AI were similar in all three groups while the effects of intervention on subcutaneous fat distribution and adipokines were variable. Larger efficacy and safety trials are needed before AI pharmacotherapy can be considered as a treatment option for low T levels in older men.

  15. [Testosterone and atherosclerosis in males during andropause].

    PubMed

    Medraś, M; Jankowska, E

    1999-04-01

    Nowadays besides the commonly accepted atherogenic risk factors a special emphasis is laid on the significance of testosterone in atherogenesis in men which physiologic deficit during "andropause" is able to promote this pathology. An elevated estradiol:testosterone ratio seems to be an independent risk factor of atheromatous heart complications. There is a proved positive correlation between free testosterone, total testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and HDL-cholesterol, apoA1 apolipoprotein. The relationship between LDL-cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol and total and free testosterone seems to be unanimous, but in certain studies the beneficial influence of testosterone on the mentioned lipids has been observed. The discussed hormone is also functionally connected with coagulation and fibrynolisis; a positive correlation was found between endogenous testosterone and tPA-Fx and a negative correlation between testosterone and PAI-1, fibrinogen, D-dimers, alpha 2-antiplasmin. Testosterone is a functional regulator of the vascular tonus and influences on reological properties of microcirculation (the application of testosterone infusion into canine coronary arteries causes the dilatation of main and the small vessels, through NO syntetase induction and ATP-dependent K(+)- channel activation). A statistically significant positive correlation between testosterone and insulin has been stated (an elevated oestradiol:testosterone ratio is connected with the insulin resistance). Additionally a negative relationship between testosterone and android obesity has been observed. Although nowadays there are more and more facts proving the benefits of the retaining the proper testosterone levels in aging men, the final influence of the testosterone supplementary therapy on atherogenesis is not solved.

  16. The Anxiolytic and Antidepressant-like Effects of Testosterone and Estrogen in Gonadectomized Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Nicole; Saland, Samantha K; Duclot, Florian; He, Huan; Mercer, Roger; Kabbaj, Mohamed

    2015-08-15

    While the influence of testosterone levels on vulnerability to affective disorders is not straightforward, research suggests this hormone may confer some degree of resiliency in men. We recently demonstrated a role for the dentate gyrus in mediating testosterone's protective effects on depressive-like behavior in gonadectomized male rats. Here, testosterone may exert its effects through androgen receptor-mediated mechanisms or via local aromatization to estradiol. Gonadectomized male rats were implanted with a placebo, testosterone, or estradiol pellet, and subsequent protective anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of testosterone and its aromatized metabolite, estradiol, were then investigated in the open field and sucrose preference tests, respectively. Moreover, their influence on gene expression in the hippocampus was analyzed by genome-wide complementary DNA microarray analysis. Finally, the contribution of testosterone's aromatization within the dentate gyrus was assessed by local infusion of the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole, whose efficacy was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Both hormones had antidepressant-like effects associated with a substantial overlap in transcriptional regulation, particularly in synaptic plasticity- and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway-related genes. Further, chronic aromatase inhibition within the dentate gyrus blocked the protective effects of testosterone. Both testosterone and estradiol exhibit anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in gonadectomized male rats, while similarly regulating critical mediators of these behaviors, suggesting common underlying mechanisms. Accordingly, we demonstrated that testosterone's protective effects are mediated, in part, by its aromatization in the dentate gyrus. These findings thus provide further insight into a role for estradiol in mediating the protective anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of testosterone. Copyright © 2015 Society

  17. Encapsulation of testosterone by chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chanphai, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-05-01

    The loading of testosterone by chitosan nanoparticles was investigated, using multiple spectroscopic methods, thermodynamic analysis, TEM images and modeling. Thermodynamic parameters showed testosterone-chitosan bindings occur mainly via H-bonding and van der Waals contacts. As polymer size increased more stable steroid-chitosan conjugates formed and hydrophobic contact was also observed. The loading efficacy of testosterone-nanocarrier was 40-55% and increased as chitosan size increased. Testosterone encapsulation markedly alters chitosan morphology. Chitosan nanoparticles are capable of transporting testosterone in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Testosterone replacement therapy for older men

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Stephen E; Mulligan, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Despite intensive research on testosterone therapy for older men, important questions remain unanswered. The evidence clearly indicates that many older men display a partial androgen deficiency. In older men, low circulating testosterone is correlated with low muscle strength, with high adiposity, with insulin resistance and with poor cognitive performance. Testosterone replacement in older men has produced benefits, but not consistently so. The inconsistency may arise from differences in the dose and duration of testosterone treatment, as well as selection of the target population. Generally, studies reporting anabolic responses to testosterone have employed higher doses of testosterone for longer treatment periods and have targeted older men whose baseline circulating bioavailable testosterone levels were low. Most studies of testosterone replacement have reported anabolic that are modest compared to what can be achieved with resistance exercise training. However, several strategies currently under evaluation have the potential to produce greater anabolic effects and to do so in a safe manner. At this time, testosterone therapy can not be recommended for the general population of older men. Older men who are hypogonadal are at greater risk for the catabolic effects associated with a number of acute and chronic medical conditions. Future research is likely to reveal benefits of testosterone therapy for some of these special populations. Testosterone therapy produces a number of adverse effects, including worsening of sleep apnea, gynecomastia, polycythemia and elevation of PSA. Efficacy and adverse effects should be assessed frequently throughout the course of therapy. PMID:18225456

  19. Testosterone administration in women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Miller, K K; Grieco, K A; Klibanski, A

    2005-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is complicated by severe bone loss, cognitive function deficits, and a high prevalence of major depression. We hypothesized that bone formation would increase and depressive symptoms and spatial cognition would improve with short-term physiological testosterone administration. We randomized 33 women with AN and relative testosterone deficiency to transdermal testosterone (Intrinsa, Procter and Gamble Pharmaceuticals, Cincinnati, OH), 150 mug, 300 mug, or placebo, for 3 wk. At baseline, free testosterone correlated with L4 bone density (r = 0.51, P < 0.001), body mass index (r = 0.39, P = 0.02), depressive symptoms (r = -0.44, P = 0.02), and spatial cognition (r = 0.45, P = 0.04). C-terminal propeptide of type 1 collagen levels were higher during testosterone administration than placebo (P = 0.03). The change in propeptide of type 1 collagen correlated with change in free testosterone over 3 wk (r = 0.50, P = 0.02). Osteocalcin and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase did not change. Depressed patients receiving testosterone improved from severely depressed to moderately depressed; the placebo group was unchanged (P = 0.02). Spatial cognition improved in the testosterone group, compared with placebo (P = 0.0015). Therefore, short-term low-dose testosterone may improve depressive symptoms and spatial cognition in women with AN. Low-dose testosterone may also prevent decreased bone formation in AN, but because testosterone did not affect all markers of bone formation studied, further data are needed.

  20. Rituximab impairs immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG (subclass) responses after influenza vaccination in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Westra, J; van Assen, S; Wilting, K R; Land, J; Horst, G; de Haan, A; Bijl, M

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX) treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients severely hampers humoral response after influenza vaccination as determined by haemagglutination inhibition assay (HI). It is not known whether HI reflects both immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG (subclass) influenza response, and whether IgM antibodies contribute to the low rate of influenza infection seen in RA patients. Twenty RA patients on methotrexate (MTX), 23 on RTX and 28 healthy controls (HC) received trivalent influenza subunit vaccination. Before and 28 days after vaccination, H1N1- and H3N2-specific antibodies were measured by HI and by IgM and IgG (subclass) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels were determined in serum samples before vaccination. Vaccination induced a significant increase of IgM and IgG (IgG1 and IgG3) antibodies against both strains in the HC and MTX groups (all P < 0·01), but not in the RTX group. HI correlated significantly in all cases with IgG (IgG1) but not with IgM. In RTX late patients (RTX treatment 6–10 months before vaccination), IgG (IgG1 and IgG3) response to vaccination was restored, but not IgM response. BAFF levels were significantly increased in RA-RTX patients and correlated with total IgG levels. Haemagglutination inhibition assay, used as gold standard, detects primarily IgG (IgG1) responses. IgM- and IgG influenza-specific antibodies increase after vaccination in HC and RA patients except in patients on RTX treatment. BAFF levels are increased in both early and late RTX-treated patients, but do not correlate with an influenza-specific antibody response. PMID:24889761

  1. Identification of the site on IgG Fc for interaction with streptococci of groups A, C and G.

    PubMed

    Schröder, A K; Nardella, F A; Mannik, M; Johansson, P J; Christensen, P

    1987-12-01

    The interaction between living groups A, C and G streptococci and IgG Fc was studied using human IgG, IgG Fc and IgG Fc-intermediate (Fci) fragments, chemically modified human IgG and fragment D of staphylococcal protein A (SPA). Diethylpyrocarbonate modification of His or N-acetylimidazole modification of Tyr of human IgG resulted in the loss of its capacity to inhibit the binding of radiolabelled human IgG Fc to the group A streptococci types M1 and M55, and to the group C strain SC-1, indicating that the amino acids His and Tyr are involved in the binding. Lys seems not to participate in the binding of IgG to these bacteria, however, since reductive methylation of Lys did not reduce its inhibitory capacity. Fragment D of SPA also inhibited the binding of radiolabelled human IgG Fc to strains M1, M55 and SC-1. We have previously shown that these bacteria do not bind to IgG fragments consisting of only the C gamma 2 or C gamma 3 domains. On the basis of these results, and the known relative positions in space of the His and Tyr residues on IgG Fc, it is speculated whether streptococci with IgG Fc receptors, like SPA and rheumatoid factors, interact with IgG in the interface between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains and involve His 435 and one or more of Tyr 436, His 433 and His 310. The similarities in binding sites on IgG for RFs and these bacterial Fc binding proteins suggest structural similarities between them that may be relevant to the production of rheumatoid factors in rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. COMBINATION DOSE OF TWO PHTHALATES ADDITIVELY DEPRESSES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AND INSL3 GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE RAT FETUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) are phthalate esters used to modify plastic and polymer textures. Individually,DEHP and DBP reduce testosterone production, inhibit reproductive tract development, andinduce reproductive organ malformationsin male rats...

  3. IgG4-related kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Lynn D

    2012-11-01

    IgG4-related kidney disease is a term that refers to any form of renal involvement by IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD), a recently recognized systemic immune-mediated disease. The most common renal manifestation is IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN), which presents as acute or chronic renal insufficiency, renal mass lesions, or both. On biopsy, IgG4-TIN shows a plasma cell-rich interstitial inflammatory infiltrate with increased IgG4+ plasma cells, along with expansile interstitial fibrosis; tubular basement membrane immune complex deposits are common. IgG4-TIN usually shows a brisk response to immunosuppressive therapy. Glomeruli may be affected by IgG4-RD, usually in the form of membranous glomerulonephritis. Other patterns of glomerular disease include IgA nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and endocapillary or mesangioproliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis. IgG4-related plasma cell arteritis has also been observed in the kidney. This review describes the histopathologic and immunophenotypic patterns of renal involvement by IgG4-RD, with associated clinical, radiographic, and serologic features.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling in the HVC is required for testosterone-induced song of female canaries.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Tessa E; Dittrich, Falk; Pieneman, Anton W; Jansen, René F; Frankl-Vilches, Carolina; Lessmann, Volkmar; Lilliehook, Christina; Goldman, Steven A; Gahr, Manfred

    2009-12-09

    Testosterone-induced singing in songbirds is thought to involve testosterone-dependent morphological changes that include angiogenesis and neuronal recruitment into the HVC, a central part of the song control circuit. Previous work showed that testosterone induces the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase), which in turn leads to an upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) production in HVC endothelial cells. Here we report for the first time that systemic inhibition of the VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase is sufficient to block testosterone-induced song in adult female canaries, despite sustained androgen exposure and the persistence of the effects of testosterone on HVC morphology. Expression of exogenous BDNF in HVC, induced locally by in situ transfection, reversed the VEGFR2 inhibition-mediated blockade of song development, thereby restoring the behavioral phenotype associated with androgen-induced song. The VEGFR2-inhibited, BDNF-treated females developed elaborate male-like song that included large syllable repertoires and high syllable repetition rates, features known to attract females. Importantly, although functionally competent new neurons were recruited to HVC after testosterone treatment, the time course of neuronal addition appeared to follow BDNF-induced song development. These findings indicate that testosterone-associated VEGFR2 activity is required for androgen-induced song in adult songbirds and that the behavioral effects of VEGFR2 inhibition can be rescued by BDNF within the adult HVC.

  5. A multi-institutional observational study of testosterone levels after testosterone pellet (Testopel(®)) insertion.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Andrew R; Khera, Mohit; Goldstein, Irwin; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Morgentaler, Abraham; Levine, Laurence A

    2012-02-01

    Implantable testosterone pellets were approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1972 for the treatment of testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS). Clinical use of this testosterone delivery modality has been limited until its recent reintroduction (Testopel(®) , Slate Pharmaceuticals, Durham, NC, USA). Six academic institutions collaborated and combined their databases to more fully characterize serum testosterone levels after the pellet implantations. To assess the time-dependent serum testosterone levels after subcutaneous testosterone pellets in clinical practice for the treatment of TDS. Data were retrospectively pooled and analyzed from data in six academic institutions. Variables included patient age, total testosterone concentrations before and after implantation, the number of testosterone pellets implanted, and the time from implantation to measurement of serum testosterone concentrations. Three hundred eighty men undergoing 702 insertions were included for analysis using JMP (version 4.0.4; SAS Institute, Cary, NC, USA). Main outcome measures were postimplantation total testosterone levels and investigator-reported adverse events. Testosterone levels as a function of the number of pellets implanted and time from implantation were assessed. Implantation of six to ≥10 testosterone pellets (450 to ≥750 mg) increased total testosterone into the therapeutic range at 1 month postimplantation and sustained therapeutic levels (>300) for 4-6 months. Higher pellet numbers (10-12 pellets) were associated with higher, more consistent, and longer maintenance of testosterone levels within the therapeutic range. Four extrusions and three hematomas were reported early in our experience; other investigator-reported adverse events were generally mild to moderate in nature and transient in duration. No subjects required analgesics. Testosterone pellets (Testopel(®) , Slate Pharmaceuticals) provide sustained levels of testosterone for at least 4 months and up to 6

  6. Effect of beta adrenergic antagonist on the production of testosterone by rat's Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Umar Ali; Aslam, Muhammad; Saeed, S Abdul

    2004-01-01

    The Leydig cell is the source of the male sex steroids, or androgens, which are essential for the maintenance of the male phenotype, the male gonads. and spermatogenesis. It has been reported that patients taking beta-blockers experience sexual dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the direct mechanism by which beta adrenergic antagonist exert its' effect on testosterone production by rat Leydig cells. Enzymatic dispersion of rat Leydig cell was done. About 85000 cells per tube were taken. After removal of endogenous testosterone by preincubation, The rat Leydig cells were incubated with varying concentrations of Atenolol: [Selective Beta-Adrenergic Antagonist] (10(-6), 10(-7) and 10(-9) M) with or with out LH 250 IU for three hours to measure the testosterone release by RIA. Atenolol, in varying concentrations caused a significant (P<0.05) reduction in testosterone release by the rat Leydig cells as compared to the basal release of testosterone in a dose-dependent fashion. Atenolol decreased the testosterone release by LH stimulated Leydig cells more significantly (P<0.001) as compared to the effects of Atenolol produced on non-stimulated Leydig cells. The current data indirectly suggest that Atenolol inhibits testosterone releasee via mechanism involving decrease production of cAMP but not affecting the enzyme activities of steroidogenesis.

  7. Drug insight: Testosterone and selective androgen receptor modulators as anabolic therapies for chronic illness and aging.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Shalender; Calof, Olga M; Storer, Thomas W; Lee, Martin L; Mazer, Norman A; Jasuja, Ravi; Montori, Victor M; Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2006-03-01

    Several regulatory concerns have hindered development of androgens as anabolic therapies, despite unequivocal evidence that testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass and strength in men; it induces hypertrophy of type I and II muscle fibers, and increases myonuclear and satellite cell number. Androgens promote differentiation of mesenchymal multipotent cells into the myogenic lineage and inhibit their adipogenic differentiation, by facilitating association of androgen receptors with beta-catenin and activating T-cell factor 4. Meta-analyses indicate that testosterone supplementation increases fat-free mass and muscle strength in HIV-positive men with weight loss, glucocorticoid-treated men, and older men with low or low-normal testosterone levels. The effects of testosterone on physical function and outcomes important to patients have not, however, been studied. In older men, increased hematocrit and increased risk of prostate biopsy and detection of prostate events are the most frequent, testosterone-related adverse events. Concerns about long-term risks have restrained enthusiasm for testosterone use as anabolic therapy. Selective androgen-receptor modulators that are preferentially anabolic and that spare the prostate hold promise as anabolic therapies. We need more studies to determine whether testosterone or selective androgen-receptor modulators can induce meaningful improvements in physical function and patient-important outcomes in patients with physical dysfunction associated with chronic illness or aging.

  8. Paternal behavior and testosterone plasma levels in the Volcano Mouse Neotomodon alstoni (Rodentia: Muridae).

    PubMed

    Luis, Juana; Ramírez, Lorena; Carmona, Agustín; Ortiz, Guadalupe; Delgado, Jesús; Cárdenas, René

    2009-01-01

    Paternal behavior and testosterone plasma levels in the Volcano Mouse Neotomodon alstoni (Rodentia: Muridae). Although initially it was thought that testosterone inhibited the display of paternal behavior in males of rodents, it has been shown that in some species high testosterone levels are needed for exhibition of paternal care. In captivity, males of Volcano Mouse (Neotomodon alstoni) provide pups the same care provided by the mother, with the exception of suckling. Here we measured plasmatic testosterone concentrations 10 days after mating, five and 20 days postpartum, and 10 days after males were isolated from their families in order to determine possible changes in this hormone, associated to the presence and age of pups. Males of Volcano Mouse exhibited paternal behavior when their testosterone levels were relatively high. Although levels of this hormone did not change with the presence or pups age, males that invested more time in huddling showed higher testosterone levels. It is possible that in the Volcano Mouse testosterone modulates paternal behavior indirectly, as in the California mouse.

  9. Drug Insight: testosterone and selective androgen receptor modulators as anabolic therapies for chronic illness and aging

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Shalender; Calof, Olga M; Storer, Thomas W; Lee, Martin L; Mazer, Norman A; Jasuja, Ravi; Montori, Victor M; Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Several regulatory concerns have hindered development of androgens as anabolic therapies, despite unequivocal evidence that testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass and strength in men; it induces hypertrophy of type I and II muscle fibers, and increases myonuclear and satellite cell number. Androgens promote differentiation of mesenchymal multipotent cells into the myogenic lineage and inhibit their adipogenic differentiation, by facilitating association of androgen receptors with β-catenin and activating T-cell factor 4. Meta-analyses indicate that testosterone supplementation increases fat-free mass and muscle strength in HIV-positive men with weight loss, glucocorticoid-treated men, and older men with low or low-normal testosterone levels. The effects of testosterone on physical function and outcomes important to patients have not, however, been studied. In older men, increased hematocrit and increased risk of prostate biopsy and detection of prostate events are the most frequent, testosterone-related adverse events. Concerns about long-term risks have restrained enthusiasm for testosterone use as anabolic therapy. Selective androgen-receptor modulators that are preferentially anabolic and that spare the prostate hold promise as anabolic therapies. We need more studies to determine whether testosterone or selective androgen-receptor modulators can induce meaningful improvements in physical function and patient-important outcomes in patients with physical dysfunction associated with chronic illness or aging. PMID:16932274

  10. Testosterone decreases urinary bladder smooth muscle excitability via novel signaling mechanism involving direct activation of the BK channels.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Parajuli, Shankar P; Provence, Aaron; Petkov, Georgi V

    2016-12-01

    In addition to improving sexual function, testosterone has been reported to have beneficial effects in ameliorating lower urinary tract symptoms by increasing bladder capacity and compliance, while decreasing bladder pressure. However, the cellular mechanisms by which testosterone regulates detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) excitability have not been elucidated. Here, we used amphotericin-B perforated whole cell patch-clamp and single channel recordings on inside-out excised membrane patches to investigate the regulatory role of testosterone in guinea pig DSM excitability. Testosterone (100 nM) significantly increased the depolarization-induced whole cell outward currents in DSM cells. The selective pharmacological inhibition of the large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels with paxilline (1 μM) completely abolished this stimulatory effect of testosterone, suggesting a mechanism involving BK channels. At a holding potential of -20 mV, DSM cells exhibited transient BK currents (TBKCs). Testosterone (100 nM) significantly increased TBKC activity in DSM cells. In current-clamp mode, testosterone (100 nM) significantly hyperpolarized the DSM cell resting membrane potential and increased spontaneous transient hyperpolarizations. Testosterone (100 nM) rapidly increased the single BK channel open probability in inside-out excised membrane patches from DSM cells, clearly suggesting a direct BK channel activation via a nongenomic mechanism. Live-cell Ca(2+) imaging showed that testosterone (100 nM) caused a decrease in global intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, consistent with testosterone-induced membrane hyperpolarization. In conclusion, the data provide compelling mechanistic evidence that under physiological conditions, testosterone at nanomolar concentrations directly activates BK channels in DSM cells, independent from genomic testosterone receptors, and thus regulates DSM excitability. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. The aromatase inhibitor 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD) reduces disinhibitory behavior in intact adult male rats treated with a high dose of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Anders I

    2010-01-20

    Anabolic androgenic steroids and high testosterone doses have been reported to induce impulsive behavior in man and behavioral disinhibition in rats. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether aromatization of testosterone to estradiol is of importance for the behavioral disinhibiting effect of a high testosterone dose in adult male rats. Testosterone administered via five testosterone-filled silastic capsules implanted subcutaneously (s.c.) to non-castrated, group-housed rats for six days induced behavioral disinhibition in a modified Vogel's drinking conflict model and yielded supraphysiological serum levels of testosterone and increased accessory sex organ weights. Moreover, concurrent administration of the aromatase inhibitor 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD; 60 mg/kg/day s.c.) decreased behavioral disinhibition in testosterone-treated rats (without affecting accessory sex organ weights) while behavior was not significantly affected in sham-treated animals. Since some reports indicate that ATD, in addition to inhibit aromatase, also may affect the binding of testosterone to the androgen receptor, the effect of the non-steroidal androgen receptor antagonist flutamide was investigated. Flutamide treatment did not affect disinhibited behavior in testosterone-treated rats. However, in sham-treated animals, flutamide (50mg/kg/day) produced behavioral disinhibition. These results suggest that estradiol is of importance in the mechanisms underlying behavioral disinhibition in non-castrated rats treated with a high testosterone dose. Speculatively, aromatization may be involved in pro-impulsive effects of high testosterone doses in humans.

  12. Testosterone perturbs epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kao, J S; Garg, A; Mao-Qiang, M; Crumrine, D; Ghadially, R; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    2001-03-01

    Although there are no known gender-related differences in permeability barrier function in adults, estrogens accelerate whereas testosterone retards barrier development in fetal skin, and male fetuses demonstrate slower barrier development than female littermates. Moreover, prenatal administration of the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide, equalizes developmental rates in male and female fetuses. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of changes in testosterone on barrier homeostasis in adult murine and human skin. Hypogonadal mice (whether by castration or by treatment with systemic flutamide) displayed significantly faster barrier recovery at 3, 6, and 12 h than did controls, and testosterone replacement slowed barrier recovery in castrated mice. Moreover, testosterone directly effects the skin, as topical flutamide also accelerated barrier recovery in normal male mice. These findings appear to be of physiologic significance, since prepubertal male mice (age 5 wk) displayed accelerated barrier recovery in comparison with adult postpubertal (11 wk) males. These studies also appear to be relevant for humans, as a hypopituitary human subject demonstrated repeated changes in barrier recovery in parallel with peaks and nadirs in serum testosterone levels during intermittent testosterone replacement. Mechanistic studies showed that differences in epidermal lipid synthesis do not account for the testosterone-induced functional alterations. Instead, epidermal lamellar body (LB) formation and secretion both decrease, resulting in decreased extracellular lamellar bilayers in testosterone-replete animals. These studies demonstrate that fluctuations in testosterone modulate barrier function, and that testosterone repletion can have negative consequences for permeability barrier homeostasis.

  13. Binding kinetics of monomeric and aggregated IgG to Kupffer cells and hepatocytes of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, J; González, E; Escanero, J F; Egido, J

    1984-01-01

    The binding kinetics of human monomeric IgG and stable heat-aggregated IgG (A-IgG) to Fc receptors of hepatocytes and Kupffer cells isolated from mice was studied. After injection of radiolabelled proteins the 60-70% of hepatic uptake was recovered in parenchymal cells (hepatocytes). In experiments in vitro the A-IgG bound in larger amounts to hepatocytes and Kupffer cells than monomeric IgG. The association rate constants of aggregates were somewhat higher for Kupffer cells than for hepatocytes whereas the percentage uptake of aggregates by Kupffer cells was only 5-15% of that of hepatocytes. The equilibrium constants of aggregates binding to both cells amounted to 0.4-1 X 10(8) M-1 for A-IgG compared with an equilibrium constant for monomeric IgG of 1-2 X 10(7)M-1. The maximum number of IgG and A-IgG molecules bound per cell was higher on hepatocytes (mean 14 X 10(6)) than on Kupffer cells (mean 2 X 10(5)) which is in agreement with the higher binding capacity of hepatocytes for these proteins observed in vivo and in vitro experiments. The ability to compete for receptor binding seemed to reside exclusively in the Fc portion of IgG since F(ab')2 fragments of IgG failed to inhibit labelled monomeric IgG or A-IgG. The receptor seems to be specific for IgG since unlabelled monomeric IgA demonstrated no binding inhibition of labelled IgG or A-IgG on hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. The overall results further suggest that hepatocytes might through Fc receptors play a collaborative role with the mononuclear phagocytic system in the clearance of circulating immune complexes. PMID:6237982

  14. Detection of testosterone esters in blood.

    PubMed

    Forsdahl, Guro; Erceg, Damir; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Turkalj, Mirjana; Plavec, Davor; Thevis, Mario; Tretzel, Laura; Gmeiner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Injections of synthetic esters of testosterone are among the most common forms of testosterone application. In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in blood gives unequivocal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. The aim of the current project was to investigate the detection window for injected testosterone esters as a mixed substance preparation and as a single substance preparation in serum and plasma. Furthermore, the suitability of different types of blood collection devices was evaluated. Collection tubes with stabilizing additives, as well as non-stabilized serum separation tubes, were tested. A clinical study with six participants was carried out, comprising a single intramuscular injection of either 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate (Nebido(®)) or a mixture of 30 mg testosterone propionate, 60 mg testosterone phenylpropionate, 60 mg testosterone isocaproate, and 100 mg testosterone decanoate (Sustanon(®)). Blood was collected throughout a testing period of 60 days. The applied analytical method for blood analysis included liquid-liquid extraction and preparation of oxime derivatives, prior to TLX-sample clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. All investigated testosterone esters could be detected in post-administration blood samples. The detection time depended on the type of ester administered. Furthermore, results from the study show that measured blood concentrations of especially short-chained testosterone esters are influenced by the type of blood collection device applied. The testosterone ester detection window, however, was comparable. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. IL-27 induces the production of IgG1 by human B cells.

    PubMed

    Boumendjel, Amel; Tawk, Lina; Malefijt, René de Waal; Boulay, Vera; Yssel, Hans; Pène, Jérôme

    2006-12-01

    It has been reported that IL-27 specifically induces the production of IgG2a by mouse B cells and inhibits IL-4-induced IgG1 synthesis. Here, we show that human naïve cord blood expresses a functional IL-27 receptor, consisting of the TCCR and gp130 subunits, although at lower levels as compared to naïve and memory splenic B cells. IL-27 does not induce proliferative responses and does not increase IgG1 production by CD19(+)CD27(+) memory B cells. However, it induces a low, but significant production of IgG1 by naïve CD19(+)CD27(-)IgD(+)IgG(-) spleen and cord blood B cells, activated via CD40, whereas it has no effect on the production of the other IgG subclasses. In addition, IL-27 induces the differentiation of a population of B cells that express high levels of CD38, in association with a down-regulation of surface IgD expression, and that are surface IgG(+/int), CD20(low), CD27(high), indicating that IL-27 promotes isotype switching and plasma cell differentiation of naive B cells. However, as compared to the effects of IL-21 and IL-10, both switch factors for human IgG1 and IgG3, those of IL-27 are modest and regulate exclusively the production of IgG1. Finally, although IL-27 has no effect on IL-4 and anti-CD40-induced Cepsilon germline promoter activity, it up-regulates IL-4-induced IgE production by naive B cells. These results point to a partial redundancy of switch factors regulating the production of IgG1 in humans, and furthermore indicate the existence of a common regulation of the human IgG1and murine IgG2a isotypes by IL-27.

  16. Testosterone: use, misuse and abuse.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, David J

    2006-10-16

    Testosterone is among the oldest drugs in medicine. It has a long efficacy and safety record for its prime role of androgen replacement therapy in men with androgen deficiency. Testosterone and synthetic analogue androgens have also been used in pharmacological androgen therapy (PAT) to produce androgenic effects on marrow, muscle or bone. Although PAT is increasingly being superseded by newer, more expensive drugs, androgens remain cost-effective in many older applications. Androgen misuse is the systematic over-prescribing for unproven medical indications. Misuse is increasingly evident for male ageing ("andropause") and some other clinical conditions. Further trials for new indications for androgens require reliable safety data, but rising costs may make it increasingly attractive to circumvent the need for evidence by promoting off-label mass marketing. Androgen abuse is the illicit self-administration of often massive doses of androgens for non-medical purposes - notably power sports and body building. In parallel with effective detection reducing androgen abuse in elite sports, more focus is needed on non-sporting cosmetic, recreational and occupational androgen abuse. Despite ongoing androgen misuse and abuse, testosterone remains under-prescribed for younger men with classical androgen deficiency that frequently remains undiagnosed.

  17. Testosterone therapy and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Rodriguez, Katherine M.; Nguyen, Taylor M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of exogenous testosterone to treat hypogonadism in the men with a history of prostate cancer (CaP) remains controversial due to fears of cancer recurrence or progression. Due to the detrimental impact of hypogonadism on patient quality of life, recent work has examined the safety of testosterone therapy (TTh) in men with a history of CaP. In this review, we evaluate the literature with regards to the safety of TTh in men with a history of CaP. TTh results in improvements in quality of life with little evidence of biochemical recurrence or progression in men with a history of CaP, or de novo cancer in unaffected men. An insufficient amount of evidence is currently available to truly demonstrate the safe use of TTh in men with low risk CaP. In men with high-risk cancer, more limited data suggest that TTh may be safe, but these findings remain inconclusive. Despite the historic avoidance of TTh in men with a history of CaP, the existing body of evidence largely supports the safe and effective use of testosterone in these men, although additional study is needed before unequivocal safety can be demonstrated. PMID:28078223

  18. Metformin Attenuates Testosterone-Induced Prostatic Hyperplasia in Rats: A Pharmacological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Hala H; Esmat, Ahmed; Atawia, Reem T; Shoieb, Sherif M; Mosli, Hisham A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2015-10-23

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is uncontrolled proliferation of prostate tissue. Metformin, a widely prescribed anti-diabetic agent, possesses anticancer activity through induction of apoptotic signaling and cell cycle arrest. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of metformin against experimentally-induced BPH in rats. Treatment with 500 and 1000 mg/kg metformin orally for 14 days significantly inhibited testosterone-mediated increase in the prostate weight &prostate index (prostate weight/body weight [mg/g]) and attenuated the pathological alterations induced by testosterone. Mechanistically, metformin significantly protected against testosterone-induced elevation of estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and decrease of estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) expression, with no significant effect of androgen receptor (AR) and 5α-reductase expression. It decreased mRNA expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1R and protein expression ratio of pAkt/total Akt induced by testosterone. Furthermore, it significantly ameliorated testosterone-induced reduction of mRNA expression Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, P21 and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and AMPK [PT-172] activity. In conclusion, these findings elucidate the effectiveness of metformin in preventing testosterone-induced BPH in rats. These results could be attributed, at least partly, to its ability to enhance expression ratio of ER-β/ER-α, decrease IGF-1, IGF-1R and pAkt expressions, increase P21, PTEN, Bax/Bcl-2 expressions and activate AMPK with a subsequent inhibition of prostate proliferation.

  19. Effects of ciprofloxacin on testosterone and cortisol concentrations in healthy males.

    PubMed Central

    Waite, N M; Edwards, D J; Arnott, W S; Warbasse, L H

    1989-01-01

    Several inhibitors of oxidative drug metabolism inhibit the synthesis of endogenous compounds such as testosterone and cortisol. Since ciprofloxacin is a potent inhibitor of the metabolism of a number of drugs, we studied its effect on serum testosterone and cortisol concentrations in eight healthy male subjects. Blood samples were collected over a 12-h period under baseline conditions and following the first and final doses of ciprofloxacin (500 mg orally every 12 h for 4 days). No significant differences in concentrations or area under the concentration-time curve were found when baseline values were compared with those observed for either testosterone or cortisol after ciprofloxacin administration. These results suggest that ciprofloxacin is unlikely to have either antiandrogenic side effects or clinical utility in lowering testosterone or cortisol concentration. PMID:2610498

  20. Sialylation of IgG Fc domain impairs complement-dependent cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Quast, Isaak; Keller, Christian W.; Maurer, Michael A.; Giddens, John P.; Tackenberg, Björn; Wang, Lai-Xi; Münz, Christian; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Dalakas, Marinos C.; Lünemann, Jan D.

    2015-01-01

    IgG molecules exert both pro- and antiinflammatory effector functions based on the composition of the fragment crystallizable (Fc) domain glycan. Sialylated IgG Fc domains have antiinflammatory properties that are attributed to their ability to increase the activation threshold of innate effector cells to immune complexes by stimulating the upregulation of the inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB). Here, we report that IgG Fc sialylation of human monoclonal IgG1 molecules impairs their efficacy to induce complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). Fc sialylation of a CD20-targeting antibody had no impact on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and did not change the affinity of the antibody for activating Fcγ receptors. In contrast, the presence of sialic acid abrogated the increased binding of C1q to Fc-galactosylated IgG1 and resulted in decreased levels of C3b deposition on the cell surface. Similar to monoclonal antibodies, sialic acid inhibited the increased C1q binding to galactosylated Fc fragments in human polyclonal IgG. In sera derived from patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system in which humoral immune responses mediate tissue damage, induction of IgG Fc sialylation was associated with clinical disease remission. Thus, impairment of CDC represents an FcγR-independent mechanism by which Fc-sialylated glycovariants might limit proinflammatory IgG effector functions. PMID:26436649

  1. Epitestosterone- and testosterone-replacement in immature castrated rats changes main testicular developmental characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cavalari, Fernanda Carvalho; da Rosa, Luciana Abreu; Escott, Gustavo Monteiro; Dourado, Tadeu; de Castro, Alexandre Luz; Kohek, Maria Beatriz da Fonte; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques; Partata, Wania Aparecida; de Fraga, Luciano Stürmer; Loss, Eloísa da Silveira

    2017-09-01

    Epitestosterone is the 17α-epimer of testosterone and has been described as an anti-androgen, since it inhibits the effects produced by testosterone and dihydrotestosterone via the nuclear androgen receptor (nAR). However, epitestosterone also displays an effect which is similar to the non-classical effect of testosterone, depolarizing the membrane potential of Sertoli cells and inducing a rapid Ca(2+) uptake. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a treatment with epitestosterone on developmental parameters of immature rats. Animals were chemically castrated by using the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist cetrorelix and then received a replacement of 7 days with epitestosterone or testosterone. Replacement with either epitestosterone or testosterone restored the anogenital distance (AGD) and testicular weight which had been reduced by chemical castration. The immunocontent of nAR and the nAR-immunoreactivity were reduced by epitestosterone treatment in the testis of both castrated and non-castrated animals. Furthermore, testosterone was unable of changing the membrane potential of Sertoli cells through its non-classical action in the group of animals castrated and replaced with epitestosterone. In conclusion, in relation to the level of protein expression of nAR epitestosterone acts as an anti-androgen. However, it acts in the same way as testosterone when genital development parameters are evaluated. Moreover, in castrated rats epitestosterone suppressed the non-classical response of testosterone, changing the pattern of testosterone signalling via a membrane mechanism in Sertoli cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testosterone test system. 862.1680 Section 862....1680 Testosterone test system. (a) Identification. A testosterone test system is a device intended to measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testosterone test system. 862.1680 Section 862....1680 Testosterone test system. (a) Identification. A testosterone test system is a device intended to measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testosterone test system. 862.1680 Section 862....1680 Testosterone test system. (a) Identification. A testosterone test system is a device intended to measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testosterone test system. 862.1680 Section 862....1680 Testosterone test system. (a) Identification. A testosterone test system is a device intended to measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testosterone test system. 862.1680 Section 862....1680 Testosterone test system. (a) Identification. A testosterone test system is a device intended to measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are...

  7. Testosterone Regulates Bone Response to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, J. P.; Herrera, B. S.; Coimbra, L. S.; Stephens, D. N.; Rossa, C.; Spolidorio, L. C.; Kantarci, A.; Van Dyke, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the alveolar bone response to testosterone and the impact of Resolvin D2 (RvD2) on testosterone-induced osteoblast function. For the in vivo characterization, 60 male adult rats were used. Treatments established sub-physiologic (L), normal (N), or supra-physiologic (H) concentrations of testosterone. Forty rats were subjected to orchiectomy; 20 rats received periodical testosterone injections while 20 rats received testicular sham-operation. Four weeks after the surgeries, 10 rats in each group received a subgingival ligature around the lower first molars to induce experimental periodontal inflammation and bone loss. In parallel, osteoblasts were differentiated from neonatal mice calvariae and treated with various doses of testosterone for 48 h. Cell lysates and conditioned media were used for the determination of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, RANKL, and osteoprotegerin. Micro-computed tomography linear analysis demonstrated that bone loss was significantly increased for both L and H groups compared to animals with normal levels of testosterone. Gingival IL-1β expression was increased in the L group (p < 0.05). Ten nM testosterone significantly decreased osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG levels in osteoblasts; 100 nM significantly increased the RANKL:OPG ratio. RvD2 partially reversed the impact of 10 nM testosterone on osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG. These findings suggest that both L and H testosterone levels increase inflammatory bone loss in male rats. While low testosterone predominantly increases the inflammatory response, high testosterone promotes a higher osteoblast-derived RANKL:OPG ratio. The proresolving mediator RvD2 ameliorates testosterone-derived downregulation of osteocalcin, RANKL, and OPG in primary murine osteoblasts suggesting a direct role of inflammation in osteoblast function. PMID:24526374

  8. Suppression of human spermatogenesis by testosterone implants.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, D J; Conway, A J; Boylan, L M

    1992-11-01

    Hormonally induced azoospermia is an effective, reversible form of male contraception; however, some men treated with weekly im testosterone enanthate (TE) injections fail to become azoospermic. As weekly injections cause widely fluctuating and supraphysiological testosterone levels, we tested the hypothesis that more stable, physiological testosterone levels would consistently produce azoospermia. Using a depot testosterone formulation which provides stable, physiological range testosterone levels for up to 6 months, we studied nine men before and after insertion of six 200 mg testosterone implants under the abdominal wall skin and compared the results with 38 men treated in a previous study with weekly im injections of 200 mg TE. Testosterone implants suppressed sperm output to near-azoospermia between the second to fourth postimplant months returning to normal by the sixth postimplant month. The fall in sperm output at the first month was greater after testosterone implants than TE injections (58% vs. 17%, P = 0.011) but similar proportions of men became azoospermic (5/9 vs. 25/38) or severely oligozoospermic (< 1 million/ml; 9/9 vs. 37/38). Plasma testosterone and estradiol levels remained mostly within the eugonadal range after implants but were markedly supraphysiological during TE injections. Both treatments suppressed immunoreactive LH and FSH to undetectable levels by ultrasensitive fluoroimmunoassay. Sex hormone-binding globulin levels were decreased and PRL levels increased by TE injections but neither was changed by testosterone implants. Prostate-specific antigen demonstrated a small rise of marginal significance (P = 0.065) after testosterone implants. Fewer men experienced acne after implants (0/9 vs. 25/38, p = 0.0004). Therefore a depot testosterone preparation with quasi-zero-order release demonstrates higher dose efficiency with similar (but not uniform) efficacy at inducing azoospermia but may cause fewer androgenic side-effects than weekly TE

  9. IgG4-related skin disease.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Y; Yagi, H; Yanaguchi, H; Majima, Y; Kasuya, A; Ito, T; Maekawa, M; Hashizume, H

    2014-11-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently established clinical entity characterized by high levels of circulating IgG4, and tissue infiltration of IgG4(+) plasma cells. IgG4-RD exhibits a distinctive fibroinflammatory change involving multiple organs, such as the pancreas and salivary and lacrimal glands. The skin lesions of IgG4-RD have been poorly characterized and may stem not only from direct infiltration of plasma cells but also from IgG4-mediated inflammation. Based on the documented cases together with ours, we categorized the skin lesions into seven subtypes: (1) cutaneous plasmacytosis (multiple papulonodules or indurations on the trunk and proximal part of the limbs), (2) pseudolymphoma and angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (plaques and papulonodules mainly on the periauricular, cheek and mandible regions), (3) Mikulicz disease (palpebral swelling, sicca syndrome and exophthalmos), (4) psoriasis-like eruption (strikingly mimicking psoriasis vulgaris), (5) unspecified maculopapular or erythematous eruptions, (6) hypergammaglobulinaemic purpura (bilateral asymmetrical palpable purpuric lesions on the lower extremities) and urticarial vasculitis (prolonged urticarial lesions occasionally with purpura) and (7) ischaemic digit (Raynaud phenomenon and digital gangrene). It is considered that subtypes 1-3 are induced by direct infiltration of IgG4(+) plasma cells, while the other types (4-7) are caused by secondary mechanisms. IgG4-related skin disease is defined as IgG4(+) plasma-cell-infiltrating skin lesions that form plaques, nodules or tumours (types 1-3), but may manifest secondary lesions caused by IgG4(+) plasma cells and/or IgG4 (types 4-7).

  10. Testosterone attenuates expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 by conversion to estradiol by aromatase in endothelial cells: implications in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Tapan K; Dinh, Hillary; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Nathan, Lauren

    2002-03-19

    We previously reported that testosterone attenuated atherogenesis in LDLR(-/-) male mice, and that this effect of testosterone was most likely caused by its conversion to estradiol. Estradiol inhibits vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression, and expression of VCAM-1 is one of the early events in atherogenesis. We assessed the cellular mechanism(s) involved by which testosterone attenuates atherogenesis. We evaluated whether testosterone inhibited TNFalpha-induced VCAM-1 expression via its conversion to estradiol by the enzyme aromatase in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Aromatase mRNA was dedected by reverse transcription-PCR in these cells. Testosterone (30 nM-1 microM) attenuated VCAM-1 mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. The non aromatizable androgen, dihydrotestosterone, had no effect on VCAM-1 mRNA expression. Testosterone was less effective in attenuating VCAM-1 expression in the presence of anastrozole, an inhibitor of aromatase, indicating that testosterone inhibited VCAM-1 via conversion to estradiol. Estradiol also attenuated VCAM-1 mRNA expression, but this action was not abolished in the presence of anastrozole, indicating that anastrozole itself did not modulate VCAM-1 mRNA expression. The effect of testosterone on VCAM-1 mRNA expression was inhibited in the presence of the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI-182780. Testosterone also attenuated TNFalpha-induced VCAM-1 protein expression, and this attenuation was abolished in the presence of anastrozole. In conclusion, testosterone inhibited VCAM-1 mRNA and protein expression in HUVEC by its conversion to estradiol via the enzyme aromatase present in the endothelial cells. Results from our study may help explain the mechanism by which testosterone may have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system.

  11. Delivering enhanced testosterone replacement therapy through nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Ferrati, Silvia; Nicolov, Eugenia; Bansal, Shyam; Zabre, Erika; Geninatti, Thomas; Ziemys, Arturas; Hudson, Lee; Ferrari, Mauro; Goodall, Randal; Khera, Mohit; Palapattu, Ganesh; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-02-18

    Primary or secondary hypogonadism results in a range of signs and symptoms that compromise quality of life and requires life-long testosterone replacement therapy. In this study, an implantable nanochannel system is investigated as an alternative delivery strategy for the long-term sustained and constant release of testosterone. In vitro release tests are performed using a dissolution set up, with testosterone and testosterone:2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (TES:HPCD) 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratio complexes release from the implantable nanochannel system and quantify by HPLC. 1:2 TES:HPCD complex stably achieve 10-15 times higher testosterone solubility with 25-30 times higher in vitro release. Bioactivity of delivered testosterone is verified by LNCaP/LUC cell luminescence. In vivo evaluation of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and multiplex assay is performed in castrated Sprague-Dawley rats over 30 d. Animals are treated with the nanochannel implants or degradable testosterone pellets. The 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implant exhibits sustained and clinically relevant in vivo release kinetics and attains physiologically stable plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by providing long-term steady release 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implants may represent a major breakthrough for the treatment of male hypogonadism. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. IgG4-related nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Quattrocchio, Giacomo; Roccatello, Dario

    2016-08-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently recognized disorder, often with multiple organ involvement, characterized by dense tissue infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis and frequently elevated serum IgG4 concentration. The kidney can be involved either directly or indirectly. The most frequent direct renal manifestations of IgG4-RD are IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) and membranous glomerulonephropathy. Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) is another condition that is frequently IgG4-related and that can indirectly affect the kidney causing ureteral obstruction and hydronephrosis. Contrast-enhanced computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography show different imaging findings and are useful tools for monitoring therapeutic response. Steroid treatment is the first line of therapy, but relapsing or refractory forms of the disease are frequently observed and require more aggressive therapeutic approaches. At our centre, we treated three cases of aggressive IgG4-related TIN and two cases of IgG4-related RPF with an intensified, immune suppressive protocol, obtaining good results without severe adverse effects.

  13. Banana peel extract suppressed prostate gland enlargement in testosterone-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Akamine, Kiichiro; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Yazawa, Kazunaga

    2009-09-01

    A methanol extract of banana peel (BPEx, 200 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly suppressed the regrowth of ventral prostates and seminal vesicles induced by testosterone in castrated mice. Further studies in the androgen-responsive LNCaP human prostate cancer cell line showed that BPEx inhibited dose-dependently testosterone-induced cell growth, while the inhibitory activities of BPEx did not appear against dehydrotestosterone-induced cell growth. These results indicate that methanol extract of banana peel can inhibit 5alpha-reductase and might be useful in the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia.

  14. Intravenous IgG (IVIG) and subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) preparations have comparable inhibitory effect on T cell activation, which is not dependent on IgG sialylation, monocytes or B cells.

    PubMed

    Issekutz, Andrew C; Rowter, Derek; Miescher, Sylvia; Käsermann, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    IVIG modulates T cell activation in vitro and inflammatory-autoimmune conditions in vivo. Sialylation of IgG, Fc receptor interactions, modulation of monocyte/macrophage/B cell functions have been implicated in IVIG effects. Subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) therapy is increasingly used for IgG replacement but whether these preparations share the effects of IVIG on T cell modulation is not documented. We compared the potency of SCIG-Hizentra™ (20% IgG preparation) with IVIG-Privigen® (10% IgG) for T cell inhibition, and assessed the involvement of IgG sialylation, monocytes and B cells in this process. Human PBMCs or sorted cells were cultured 3-7 days, and T cells were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 mAb or Candida antigen. Thymidine incorporation into DNA was quantitated and cytokines assayed by ELISA/Luminex® assay. IVIG and SCIG both dose-dependently (1-20mg/ml) inhibited (up to >80%) T cell proliferation to anti-CD3 mAb. Response to Candida albicans was comparably inhibited by IVIG and SCIG by 50-80% at 10mg/ml with inhibition even at 3mg/ml (P<0.05). These effects were not affected by depletion of sialic acid containing IgG using neuraminidase treatment or lectin affinity chromatography. With anti-CD3 or Candida stimulation, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, GMCSF, TNF-α, interferon-γ (with anti-CD3) and IL-17 (with Candida) levels were suppressed by IVIG or SCIG, with no effect on IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15 or TGFβ. Monocytes or B cells were not required for IgG-induced suppression of proliferation, in fact depletion of monocytes potentiated the IgG-induced inhibition. Reconstitution with monocytes restored the original inhibitory effect. These data show that IVIG (Privigen®) and SCIG (Hizentra™) have comparable inhibitory effects on T cell activation, which do not require sialylation of IgG. Inhibition is independent of monocytes or B cells. There is a potent suppression of multiple effector cytokines. Like IVIG, SCIG therapy is expected to show

  15. MuSK myasthenia gravis IgG4 disrupts the interaction of LRP4 with MuSK but both IgG4 and IgG1-3 can disperse preformed agrin-independent AChR clusters.

    PubMed

    Koneczny, Inga; Cossins, Judith; Waters, Patrick; Beeson, David; Vincent, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A variable proportion of patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) have autoantibodies to muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). During development agrin, released from the motor nerve, interacts with low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 (LRP4), which then binds to MuSK; MuSK interaction with the intracellular protein Dok7 results in clustering of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on the postsynaptic membrane. In mature muscle, MuSK helps maintain the high density of AChRs at the neuromuscular junction. MuSK antibodies are mainly IgG4 subclass, which does not activate complement and can be monovalent, thus it is not clear how the antibodies cause disruption of AChR numbers or function to cause MG. We hypothesised that MuSK antibodies either reduce surface MuSK expression and/or inhibit the interaction with LRP4. We prepared MuSK IgG, monovalent Fab fragments, IgG1-3 and IgG4 fractions from MuSK-MG plasmas. We asked whether the antibodies caused endocytosis of MuSK in MuSK-transfected cells or if they inhibited binding of LRP4 to MuSK in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel, we investigated their ability to reduce AChR clusters in C2C12 myotubes induced by a) agrin, reflecting neuromuscular development, and b) by Dok7- overexpression, producing AChR clusters that more closely resemble the adult neuromuscular synapse. Total IgG, IgG4 or IgG1-3 MuSK antibodies were not endocytosed unless cross-linked by divalent anti-human IgG. MuSK IgG, Fab fragments and IgG4 inhibited the binding of LRP4 to MuSK and reduced agrin-induced AChR clustering in C2C12 cells. By contrast, IgG1-3 antibodies did not inhibit LRP4-MuSK binding but, surprisingly, did inhibit agrin-induced clustering. Moreover, both IgG4 and IgG1-3 preparations dispersed agrin-independent AChR clusters in Dok7-overexpressing C2C12 cells. Thus interference by IgG4 antibodies of the LRP4-MuSK interaction will be one pathogenic mechanism of MuSK antibodies, but IgG1-3 Mu

  16. MuSK Myasthenia Gravis IgG4 Disrupts the Interaction of LRP4 with MuSK but Both IgG4 and IgG1-3 Can Disperse Preformed Agrin-Independent AChR Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Koneczny, Inga; Cossins, Judith; Waters, Patrick; Beeson, David; Vincent, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A variable proportion of patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) have autoantibodies to muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). During development agrin, released from the motor nerve, interacts with low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 (LRP4), which then binds to MuSK; MuSK interaction with the intracellular protein Dok7 results in clustering of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on the postsynaptic membrane. In mature muscle, MuSK helps maintain the high density of AChRs at the neuromuscular junction. MuSK antibodies are mainly IgG4 subclass, which does not activate complement and can be monovalent, thus it is not clear how the antibodies cause disruption of AChR numbers or function to cause MG. We hypothesised that MuSK antibodies either reduce surface MuSK expression and/or inhibit the interaction with LRP4. We prepared MuSK IgG, monovalent Fab fragments, IgG1-3 and IgG4 fractions from MuSK-MG plasmas. We asked whether the antibodies caused endocytosis of MuSK in MuSK-transfected cells or if they inhibited binding of LRP4 to MuSK in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel, we investigated their ability to reduce AChR clusters in C2C12 myotubes induced by a) agrin, reflecting neuromuscular development, and b) by Dok7- overexpression, producing AChR clusters that more closely resemble the adult neuromuscular synapse. Total IgG, IgG4 or IgG1-3 MuSK antibodies were not endocytosed unless cross-linked by divalent anti-human IgG. MuSK IgG, Fab fragments and IgG4 inhibited the binding of LRP4 to MuSK and reduced agrin-induced AChR clustering in C2C12 cells. By contrast, IgG1-3 antibodies did not inhibit LRP4-MuSK binding but, surprisingly, did inhibit agrin-induced clustering. Moreover, both IgG4 and IgG1-3 preparations dispersed agrin-independent AChR clusters in Dok7-overexpressing C2C12 cells. Thus interference by IgG4 antibodies of the LRP4-MuSK interaction will be one pathogenic mechanism of MuSK antibodies, but IgG1-3 Mu

  17. Testosterone suppresses oxidative stress in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Marin, Douglas Popp; Bolin, Anaysa Paola; dos Santos, Rita de Cassia Macedo; Curi, Rui; Otton, Rosemari

    2010-07-01

    The in vitro effect of testosterone on human neutrophil function was investigated. Blood neutrophils from healthy male subjects were isolated and treated with 10 nM, 0.1 and 10 microM testosterone for 24 h. As compared with untreated cells, the testosterone treatment produced a significant decrease of superoxide production as indicated by the measurement of extra- and intracellular superoxide content. An increment in the production of nitric oxide was observed at 0.1 and 10 microM testosterone concentrations, whereas no effect was found for 10 nM. Intracellular calcium mobilization was significantly increased at 10 nM, whereas it was reduced at 10 microM testosterone. There was an increase in phagocytic capacity at 10 nM and a decrease of microbicidal activity in neutrophils treated with testosterone at 10 microM. Glutathione reductase activity was increased by testosterone treatment, whereas no effect was observed in other antioxidant enzyme activities. An increase in the content of thiol groups was observed at all testosterone concentrations. Lipid peroxidation in neutrophils evaluated by levels of TBARS was decreased at 10 nM and 0.1 microM testosterone. These results indicate the antioxidant properties of testosterone in neutrophils as suggested by reduction of superoxide anion production, and lipid peroxidation, and by the increase in nitric oxide production, glutathione reductase activity and the content of thiol groups. Therefore, the plasma levels of testosterone are important regulators of neutrophil function and so of the inflammatory response.

  18. Identification of a novel host-specific IgG protease in Streptococcus phocae subsp. phocae.

    PubMed

    Rungelrath, Viktoria; Wohlsein, Jan Christian; Siebert, Ursula; Stott, Jeffrey; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph G; Seele, Jana

    2017-03-01

    Streptococcus (S.) phocae subsp. phocae causes bronchopneumonia and septicemia in a variety of marine mammals. Especially in harbor seals infected with phocine distemper virus it plays an important role as an opportunistic pathogen. This study was initiated by the detection of IgG cleavage products in Western blot analysis after incubation of bacterial supernatant with harbor seal serum. Hence, the objectives of this study were the identification and characterization of a secreted IgG cleaving protease in S. phocae subsp. phocae isolated from marine mammals. To further identify the responsible factor of IgG cleavage a protease inhibitor profile was generated. Inhibition of the IgG cleaving activity by iodoacetamide and Z-LVG-CHN2 indicated that a cysteine protease is involved. Moreover, an anti-IdeS antibody directed against the IgG endopeptidase IdeS of S. pyogenes showed cross reactivity with the putative IgG protease of S. phocae subsp. phocae. The IgG cleaving factor of S. phocae subsp. phocae was identified through an inverse PCR approach and designated IdeP (Immunoglobulin G degrading enzyme of S. phocae subsp. phocae) in analogy to the cysteine protease IdeS. Notably, recombinant (r) IdeP is a host and substrate specific protease as it cleaves IgG from grey and harbor seals but not IgG from harbor porpoises or non-marine mammals. The identification of IdeP represents the first description of a protein in S. phocae subsp. phocae involved in immune evasion. Furthermore, the fact that IdeP cleaves solely IgG of certain marine mammals reflects functional adaption of S. phocae subsp. phocae to grey and harbor seals as its main hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of testosterone on the proliferation and collagen synthesis of cardiac fibroblasts induced by angiotensin II in neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaocun; Wang, Ying; Yan, Shuxun; Sun, Lina; Yang, Guojie; Li, Yuan; Yu, Chaonan

    2017-01-02

    The objective is to explore the effect of testosterone on the proliferation and collagen synthesis of neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (CF) induced by Angiotensin II (Ang II) and the underlying mechanisms. Derived from neonatal rats, the CFs were divided into 4 groups: the control group, Ang II group, testosterone group, and testosterone + Ang II group in vitro. Cell cycle distribution, collagen counts, and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) (p - ERK1/2) expression were assessed by flow cytometry, VG staining, and immunocytochemistry, respectively. The Ang II group had a much higher proportion of cells in the S-phase, higher collagen contents, and a higher p - ERK1/2 expression level than either the control or testosterone group. However, these factors were significantly reduced in the testosterone + Ang II group as compared to the Ang II group. In terms of cells in the S-phase and the collagen contents, there was not a significant difference between the testosterone group and the control. However, the protein expression of p-ERK1/2 was significantly increased in the testosterone group as compared to the control. Testosterone inhibits the proliferation and collagen synthesis of CF induced by Ang II. The underlying mechanism may involve the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  20. Cigarette smoking and testosterone in men and women: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Leung, June Yue Yan; Lin, Shi Lin; Schooling, C Mary

    2016-04-01

    Recently Health Canada and the Food and Drug Administration warned about the cardiovascular risk of testosterone, making environmental drivers of testosterone potential prevention targets. Cotinine, a tobacco metabolite, inhibits testosterone breakdown. We assessed the association of smoking with testosterone in a systematic review and meta-analysis, searching PubMed and Web of Science through March 2015 using ("testosterone" or "androgen" or "sex hormone") and ("smoking" or "cigarette"). Two reviewers independently searched, selected, assessed quality and abstracted with differences resolved by consensus or reference to a third reviewer. The initial search yielded 2881 studies; 28 met the selection criteria. In 22 studies of 13,317 men, mean age 18-61years, smokers had higher mean testosterone than non-smokers (1.53nmol/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11 to 1.96) using a random effects model with inverse variance weighting. In 6 studies of 6089 women, mean age 28-62years, smoking was not clearly associated with testosterone (0.11nmol/L, 95% CI -0.08 to 0.30). Fixed effects models provided similar results, but suggested a positive association in women. Whether products which raise cotinine, such as e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement, also raise testosterone, should be investigated, to inform any regulatory action for e-cigarettes, which emit nicotine into the surrounding air, with relevance for both active and passive smokers.

  1. Fulfilling Desire: Evidence for negative feedback between men’s testosterone, sociosexual psychology, and sexual partner number

    PubMed Central

    Puts, David A.; Pope, Lauramarie E.; Hill, Alexander K.; Cárdenas, Rodrigo A.; Welling, Lisa L. M.; Wheatley, John R.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Across human societies and many nonhuman animals, males have greater interest in uncommitted sex (more unrestricted sociosexuality) than do females. Testosterone shows positive associations with male-typical sociosexual behavior in nonhuman animals. Yet, it remains unclear whether the human sex difference in sociosexual psychology (attitudes and desires) is mediated by testosterone, whether any relationships between testosterone and sociosexuality differ between men and women, and what the nature of these possible relationships might be. In studies to resolve these questions, we examined relationships between salivary testosterone concentrations and sociosexual psychology and behavior in men and women. We measured testosterone in all men in our sample, but only in those women taking oral contraception (OC-using women) in order to reduce the influence of ovulatory cycle variation in ovarian hormone production. We found that OC-using women did not differ from normally-ovulating women in sociosexual psychology or behavior, but that circulating testosterone mediated the sex difference in human sociosexuality and predicted sociosexual psychology in men but not OC-using women. Moreover, when sociosexual psychology was controlled, men’s sociosexual behavior (number of sexual partners) was negatively related to testosterone, suggesting that testosterone drives sociosexual psychology in men and is inhibited when those desires are fulfilled. This more complex relationship between androgen and male sexuality may reconcile some conflicting prior reports. PMID:25644313

  2. PRESENTED AT NC SOCIETY OF TOXICOLOGY MEETING IN RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC ON 2/16/2006: PERIPUBERTAL PROCHLORAZ EXPOSURE STRONGLY INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION, BUT HAS WEAK EFFECTS ON PUBERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and development of reproductive organs. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed wit...

  3. [IgG4-related disease].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2012-02-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized systemic syndrome characterized by mass-forming lesions, mainly in exocrine tissue, that consist of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and sclerosis. There are numerous IgG4+ plasma cells in the affected tissues, and the serum IgG4 level is elevated in these patients. Ocular adnexal IgG4-related disease frequently involves bilateral lacrimal glands, and obliterative phlebitis is rare. Moreover, some malignant lymphomas, especially mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, arise from ocular adnexal IgG4-related disease. It is known that hyper IL-6 syndromes, such as multicentric Castleman's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other autoimmune diseases, fulfill the histological diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease; therefore, hyper IL-6 syndromes and IgG4-related disease cannot be differentially diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining alone. However, upon laboratory examination, hype IL-6 syndromes show elevation of the CRP level, polyclonal hyper gamma-globulinemia, anemia, and hypoalbuminemia. These findings are quite different from IgG4-related disease, which is not characterized by elevated serum IgA, IgM, and CRP levels. Therefore, laboratory findings are crucial for the differential diagnosis.

  4. Relationship Between Testosterone and Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rajfer, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    Although erectile function is clearly androgen dependent, is it just as clear at what level of testosterone erectile dysfunction (ED) begins? Does the decline in testosterone that occurs with aging always produce ED? Are exogenous androgens the answer to ED? The answers range from clear to complex. PMID:16985751

  5. Andropause. Testosterone replacement therapy for aging men.

    PubMed Central

    Bain, J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the rationale for treating symptomatic aging men whose testosterone levels are mildly reduced or low-normal with testosterone replacement therapy. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Large-scale multicentre prospective studies on the value of treating andropausal men with hormone therapy do not exist because the whole area of hormone therapy is barely 10 years old. Evidence presented is based on physiologic studies, particularly studies in which treatment has been assessed. These were largely uncontrolled open studies. Studies to date report positive responses to testosterone treatment with very few serious side effects. MAIN MESSAGE: Physicians should consider hypoandrogenism if male patients complain of loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, weakness, fatigue, lethargy, loss of motivation, or mood swings. Less obvious associations with reduced levels of testosterone are anemia and osteoporosis. The main cause of reduced testosterone production is primary gonadal insufficiency, but secondary causes, such as hypothalamic-pituitary disease, should be considered. Evidence shows that most men treated with testosterone will feel better about themselves and their lives. CONCLUSION: Andropause is a term of convenience describing a complex of symptoms in aging men who have low testosterone levels. Physicians should be aware of its existence, should consider ordering tests for men who have symptoms, and should treat carefully selected patients whose serum testosterone levels are low. PMID:11212438

  6. Testosterone deficiency: myth, facts, and controversy.

    PubMed

    Miner, Martin; Barkin, Jack; Rosenberg, Matt T

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone deficiency (TD) afflicts approximately 30% of men ages 40-79 years, with an increase in prevalence strongly associated with aging and common medical conditions including obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. There appears to be a strong relationship between TD and metabolic syndrome, though the relationship is not certain to be causal. Several studies have suggested that repletion of testosterone in deficient men with these comorbidities may indeed reverse or delay their progression. While testosterone repletion has been largely thought of in a sexual realm, we discuss its potential role in general men's health concerns: metabolic, body composition, and its association with decreased all-cause mortality. Recent guidelines and studies have suggested variable prevalence statistics and expanded uses of testosterone repletion in certain populations with both biochemical and clinical signs of testosterone deficiency. Yet, this is not done without risk. A recent randomized placebo-controlled trial of testosterone repletion in elderly frail men with limited mobility has suggested potential negative cardiovascular risks in this older, sicker group of men. Two more recent retrospective studies of variable clinical design and interpretation suggest testosterone poses an increased cardiovascular risk in older men than 65 years and younger men with heart disease. This review examines these and other studies, with practical recommendations for the diagnosis of testosterone deficiency and repletion in middle aged and older men, including an analysis of treatment modalities and areas of concern and uncertainty.

  7. Testosterone, Marital Quality, and Role Overload

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Johnson, David R.; Granger, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    In a sample of established working- and middle-class families with school-aged children (N= 307 wives and 307 husbands), neither husbands nor wives testosterone showed a direct connection with marital quality. In contrast, the association between husbands' testosterone and positive and negative marital quality (as evaluated by both spouses) was…

  8. [Testosterone--effects, metabolism and genetic determination].

    PubMed

    Schmidtová, E

    2008-01-01

    Testosterone (C19H28O2), the main testicular hormone, is 19-carbonic steroid substance with -OH group in position 17. Precursor for its synthesis is cholesterol, or possibly androstendione released by adrenal cortex. Testosterone is produced in smooth endoplasmatic reticulum of Leydig cells of testes. Apart from testes it is also produced in adrenal cortex, liver, kidneys, in fat and muscle tissue, even though in smaller extent--around 5% (Bidlingmaier, F. et al., 1986). Approximately 4-9 mg (13.9-31.2 nmol/l) of testosterone is daily produced in healthy men. Absolute majority, around 99% from overall plasmatic testosterone is bound to albumin, erythrocytes, but mainly to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (Diver, M.J. et al., 2003). Only small proportion (1-2%) of testosterone circulates as free fraction (Ostatníková, D., 2003). Production and secretion of the main androgen in testes is regulated by well known and accepted axis of hypothalamus, hypophysis and testes. Testosterone and its metabolite dihydrotestosterone can influence the expression of genes, development of masculine type of habitus and behavior, acting via androgen receptor (AR) (Zitzmann, M. and Nieschlag, E., 2003). Testosterone can affect also via its metabolites, whose production is conditioned by enzymes. In peripheral tissues is testosterone converted via aromatase to estradiol and via 5alpha-reductase to dihydrotestosterone (Weber, K.S. et al., 1999).

  9. Testosterone, Marital Quality, and Role Overload

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Johnson, David R.; Granger, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    In a sample of established working- and middle-class families with school-aged children (N= 307 wives and 307 husbands), neither husbands nor wives testosterone showed a direct connection with marital quality. In contrast, the association between husbands' testosterone and positive and negative marital quality (as evaluated by both spouses) was…

  10. Effects of varicocelectomy on serum testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele is most often surgically repaired due to male infertility, however, has recently been linked to low serum testosterone. This paper serves to review the current literature regarding varicocele and its subsequent repair on serum testosterone. Twenty-eight human studies were identified with fifteen showing improved serum testosterone after repair. The majority of the studies that demonstrated improvement had preoperative testosterone levels that were low or below normal. Additionally, multiple well-designed studies with control groups not undergoing surgical repair demonstrated significant difference between groups. This improvement was less observed in studies with normal preoperative serum testosterone. A majority of these patients studied were presenting for infertility. It remains to be determined if these findings can be reproduced in men without infertility. The findings suggest that microsurgical varicocele repair can improve serum testosterone in men with low levels preoperatively in appropriately counseled men. It remains to be seen whether varicocele repair can help prevent the development of low testosterone in the future or which patients are at risk of developing low testosterone due to varicocele. PMID:28078218

  11. Preventive effect of Pueraria mirifica on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Masrudin, S S; Mohamad, J

    2015-12-01

    Pueraria mirifica (PM) extract contains phytoestrogen daidzein and genistein. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of PM extract, daidzein and genistein on a testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats. Testosterone was administered at 3 mg kg(-1) to rats followed by the PM extract, daidzein and genistein for a period of 30 days with finasteride as positive control. The testosterone level was increased, indicating inhibition of 5α-reductase converting testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. This was confirmed by prostate-specific antigen level that significantly decreased when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein. The PM extract, daidzein and genistein reduced the increase in the prostate/body weight ratio in testosterone-induced rats. This gives indication that PM extract, daidzein and genistein possessed protective activity for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The analysis of histoarchitechture of the prostate has also shown that there was a significant improvement in prostatic cells of the testosterone-induced rats when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein.

  12. Activity Exerted by a Testosterone Derivative on Myocardial Injury Using an Ischemia/Reperfusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Maria, López-Ramos; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Betty, Sarabia-Alcocer; Monica, Velázquez-Sarabia Betty

    2014-01-01

    Some reports indicate that several steroid derivatives have activity at cardiovascular level; nevertheless, there is scarce information about the activity exerted by the testosterone derivatives on cardiac injury caused by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Analyzing these data, in this study, a new testosterone derivative was synthetized with the objective of evaluating its effect on myocardial injury using an ischemia/reperfusion model. In addition, perfusion pressure and coronary resistance were evaluated in isolated rat hearts using the Langendorff technique. Additionally, molecular mechanism involved in the activity exerted by the testosterone derivative on perfusion pressure and coronary resistance was evaluated by measuring left ventricular pressure in the absence or presence of the following compounds: flutamide, prazosin, metoprolol, nifedipine, indomethacin, and PINANE TXA2. The results showed that the testosterone derivative significantly increases (P = 0.05) the perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in isolated heart. Other data indicate that the testosterone derivative increases left ventricular pressure in a dose-dependent manner (0.001–100 nM); however, this phenomenon was significantly inhibited (P = 0.06) by indomethacin and PINANE-TXA2  (P = 0.05) at a dose of 1 nM. In conclusion, these data suggest that testosterone derivative induces changes in the left ventricular pressure levels through thromboxane receptor activation. PMID:24839599

  13. Testosterone-induced responsiveness to androgen in Shionogi mouse carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jung-Testas, I.; Baulieu, E.E. )

    1987-05-01

    Primary cell cultures from an androgen-dependent mouse mammary carcinoma, the Shionogi-SC 115 tumor, were cultured in the presence or absence of testosterone (50 nM). Characteristic changes in cellular morphology and cell growth were observed according to the presence or absence of the androgen. The testosterone-dependent changes were observed in culture as long as cells were maintained in androgen-containing medium. Cellular proteins were analyzed after culture in the presence or absence of testosterone. After ({sup 35}S)methionine labeling of cells and SDS-PAGE of the cytosol, several proteins were specifically synthesized in the presence of testosterone, predominantly a 45 kD protein, which was not seen in the absence of the androgen. Conversely, a protein of 35 kD present in absence of the hormone disappeared in the presence of testosterone. The anti-androgen cyproterone acetate inhibited the characteristic cellular morphology, cell proliferation and protein synthesis observed in the presence of the androgen. The anti-progestin and anti-glucocorticosteroid RU 486 also showed limited anti-androgen activity. The concentration of specific androgen receptor-binding sites did not change significantly after 3 months of culture with or without testosterone, i.e., in responsive and unresponsive cells.

  14. Testosterone synthesized in cultured human SZ95 sebocytes derives mainly from dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Chen, WenChieh; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Tsai, Jih-Chien; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2010-05-01

    Human sebaceous gland possesses all the steroidogenic enzymes required for androgen synthesis. It remains unclear whether the testosterone produced in situ mainly derives from circulating dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or from de novo synthesis utilizing serum cholesterol. Using testosterone radioimmunoassay, we found that testosterone was barely detectable in the supernatant of cultured human SZ95 sebocytes when cholesterol was added alone, indicating a low basal expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in SZ95 cells. Human chorionic gonadotropin and fibroblast growth factor-9 were as potent as forskolin in activating StAR to enhance testosterone production, while interleukin-1 beta, dexamethasone, insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 showed no stimulatory effect. A two-fold increase of testosterone production was observed in supplementation of DHEA as compared to pregnenolone, progesterone or 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone. Based on our findings, testosterone synthesized in cultured sebocytes derived mainly from DHEA and inhibition of 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase may be a new target of androgen suppression for acne treatment.

  15. Morphine Attenuates Testosterone Response to Central Injection of Kisspeptin in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Fariba; Khazali, Homayoun; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2014-01-01

    Background Kisspeptin and naloxone stimulate the reproductive axis while morphine inhibits its function. We have investigated the effect of central injection of kisspeptin-10 on mean plasma testosterone concentration in morphine or naloxone pretreated rats. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 60 male Wistar rats that were divid- ed into 12 groups (n=5 per group) received saline, kisspeptin (1 nmol, ICV), naloxone (2 mg/kg, subcutaneously), morphine (5 or 10 mg/kg, sc) or co-administrations of kisspeptin, morphine and naloxone at 09:00 - 09:30. In the co-administrated groups, kisspeptin was injected 15 minutes following morphine or naloxone injections. Blood samples were collected 60 minutes following injections via the tail vein. Plasma testosterone concentration was measured by a rat testosterone ELISA kit. Results Central injection of kisspeptin or subcutaneous injection of naloxone significantly increased the mean plasma testosterone concentration compared to saline while subcutaneous injections of different doses of morphine (5 or 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased testosterone compared to saline. The results revealed that morphine significantly attenuated the testosterone increase after kisspeptin injection compared to kisspeptin while a stimulatory additive effect was observed in the kisspeptin/naloxone group compared to either naloxone or kisspeptin. Conclusion Morphine and kisspeptin systems may interact with each other to control the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. PMID:25083187

  16. Activity exerted by a testosterone derivative on myocardial injury using an ischemia/reperfusion model.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Maria, López-Ramos; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Betty, Sarabia-Alcocer; Monica, Velázquez-Sarabia Betty

    2014-01-01

    Some reports indicate that several steroid derivatives have activity at cardiovascular level; nevertheless, there is scarce information about the activity exerted by the testosterone derivatives on cardiac injury caused by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Analyzing these data, in this study, a new testosterone derivative was synthetized with the objective of evaluating its effect on myocardial injury using an ischemia/reperfusion model. In addition, perfusion pressure and coronary resistance were evaluated in isolated rat hearts using the Langendorff technique. Additionally, molecular mechanism involved in the activity exerted by the testosterone derivative on perfusion pressure and coronary resistance was evaluated by measuring left ventricular pressure in the absence or presence of the following compounds: flutamide, prazosin, metoprolol, nifedipine, indomethacin, and PINANE TXA2. The results showed that the testosterone derivative significantly increases (P = 0.05) the perfusion pressure and coronary resistance in isolated heart. Other data indicate that the testosterone derivative increases left ventricular pressure in a dose-dependent manner (0.001-100 nM); however, this phenomenon was significantly inhibited (P = 0.06) by indomethacin and PINANE-TXA2  (P = 0.05) at a dose of 1 nM. In conclusion, these data suggest that testosterone derivative induces changes in the left ventricular pressure levels through thromboxane receptor activation.

  17. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Engi, Sheila A.; Planeta, Cleopatra S.; Crestani, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6), animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances. PMID:26760038

  18. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training.

    PubMed

    Engi, Sheila A; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Crestani, Carlos C

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6), animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances.

  19. IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhang; Tongxi, Liu; Jie, Luo; Yujuan, Jiao; Wei, Jiang; Xia, Liu; Yumin, Zheng; Xin, Lu

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to study the clinical, laboratory, imaging pathology, and prognosis features of IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis. We worked with a 55-year-old man suffering from IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis who had the most widespread lesion in his dura mater. We also review previous related studies and discuss the clinical characteristics of this rare disease. In total, eight IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis patients have been reported in the literature since 2009. They were mostly male patients, 51.7 ± 11.9 years old on average. Cervical and thoracic vertebrae were the most common sites for lesions. The most prominent symptom was varying numbness and weakness of the limbs and/or body associated with spinal cord compression. There was one patient (1/5) with elevated serum IgG4 levels and three patients (3/3) with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IgG4 index. Positive histopathologic findings are the strongest basis for a diagnosis. All the patients with IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis responded well to glucocorticoid therapy. IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis is an orphan disease that mainly occurs in cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Older males are the most susceptible group. Serum IgG4 levels were consistently normal in these cases, so analysis of CSF for IgG4 production (IgG4 index) could become a useful tool. Pathological findings remain the gold standard for diagnosis. Most patients responded favorably to glucocorticoid treatment.

  20. Free Testosterone During Androgen Deprivation Therapy Predicts Castration-Resistant Progression Better Than Total Testosterone.

    PubMed

    Regis, Lucas; Planas, Jacques; Carles, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Comas, Inma; Ferrer, Roser; Morote, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The optimal degree of testosterone suppression in patients with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy remains in question. Furthermore, serum free testosterone, which is the active form of testosterone, seems to correlate with intraprostatic testosterone. Here we compared free and total serum testosterone as predictors of survival free of castration resistance. Total testosterone (chemiluminescent assay, lower sensitivity 10 ng/dl) and free testosterone (analogue-ligand radioimmunoassay, lower sensitivity 0.05 pg/ml) were determined at 6 months of LHRH agonist treatment in a prospective cohort of 126 patients with prostate cancer. During a mean follow-up of 67 months (9-120), 75 (59.5%) events of castration-resistant progression were identified. Multivariate analysis and survival analysis according to total testosterone cutoffs of 50, 32, and 20 ng/dl, and free testosterone cutoffs of 1.7, 1.1, and 0.7 pg/ml were performed. Metastatic spread was the most powerful predictor of castration resistance, HR: 2.09 (95%CI: 1.18-3.72), P = 0.012. Gleason score, baseline PSA and PSA at 6 months were also independents predictors, but not free and total testosterone. Stratified analysis was conducted on the basis of the status of metastatic diseases and free testosterone was found to be an independent predictor of survival free of castration resistance in the subgroup of patients without metastasis, HR: 2.12 (95%CI: 1.16-3.85), P = 0.014. The lowest threshold of free testosterone which showed significant differences was 1.7 pg/ml, P = 0.003. Free testosterone at 6 months of LHRH agonist treatment seems to be a better surrogate than total testosterone to predict castration resistance in no metastatic prostate cancer patients. Prostate 77:114-120, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters.

  2. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Sahar

    2016-04-01

    As testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has emerged as a commonly prescribed therapy for symptomatic low testosterone, conflicting data have been reported in terms of both its efficacy and potential adverse outcomes. One of the most controversial associations has been that of TRT and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review briefly provides background on the history of TRT, the indications for TRT, and the data behind TRT for symptomatic low testosterone. It then specifically delves into the rather limited data for cardiovascular outcomes of those with low endogenous testosterone and those who receive TRT. The available body of literature strongly suggests that more work, by way of clinical trials, needs to be done to better understand the impact of testosterone and TRT on the cardiovascular system.

  3. Testosterone induces off-line perceptual learning.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicholas D; Edwards, Thomas; Fleming, Stephen M; Dolan, Raymond J

    2012-12-01

    Perceptual learning operates on distinct timescales. How different neuromodulatory systems impact on learning across these different timescales is poorly understood. Here, we test the causal impact of a novel influence on perceptual learning, the androgen hormone testosterone, across distinct timescales. In a double-blind, placebo- controlled, cross-over study with testosterone, subjects undertook a simple contrast detection task during training sessions on two separate days. On placebo, there was no learning either within training sessions or between days, except for a fast, rapidly saturating, improvement early on each testing day. However, testosterone caused "off-line" learning, with no learning seen within training sessions, but a marked performance improvement over the days between sessions. This testosterone-induced learning occurred in the absence of changes in subjective confidence or introspective accuracy. Our findings show that testosterone influences perceptual learning on a timescale consistent with an influence on "off-line" consolidation processes.

  4. Testosterone

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovary syndrome Precocious puberty Prolactinoma Testicular cancer Testicular failure Review Date 2/3/2016 Updated by: Brent Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David ...

  5. REDD1 Is a Major Target of Testosterone Action in Preventing Dexamethasone-Induced Muscle Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Zhao, Weidong; Zhao, Jingbo; Zhang, Yuanfei; Qin, Weiping; Pan, Jiangping; Bauman, William A.; Blitzer, Robert D.; Cardozo, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are a well-recognized and common cause of muscle atrophy that can be prevented by testosterone. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such protection have not been described. Thus, the global effects of testosterone on dexamethasone-induced changes in gene expression were evaluated in rat gastrocnemius muscle using DNA microarrays. Gene expression was analyzed after 7-d administration of dexamethasone, dexamethasone plus testosterone, or vehicle. Dexamethasone changed expression of 876 probe sets by at least 2-fold. Among these, 474 probe sets were changed by at least 2-fold in the opposite direction in the dexamethasone plus testosterone group (genes in opposition). Major biological themes represented by genes in opposition included IGF-I signaling, myogenesis and muscle development, and cell cycle progression. Testosterone completely prevented the 22-fold increase in expression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor regulated in development and DNA damage responses 1 (REDD1), and attenuated dexamethasone induced increased expression of eIF4E binding protein 1, Forkhead box O1, and the p85 regulatory subunit of the IGF-I receptor but prevented decreased expression of IRS-1. Testosterone attenuated increases in REDD1 protein in skeletal muscle and L6 myoblasts and prevented dephosphorylation of p70S6 kinase at the mTOR-dependent site Thr389 in L6 myoblast cells. Effects of testosterone on REDD1 mRNA levels occurred within 1 h, required the androgen receptor, were blocked by bicalutamide, and were due to inhibition of transcriptional activation of REDD1 by dexamethasone. These data suggest that testosterone blocks dexamethasone-induced changes in expression of REDD1 and other genes that collectively would otherwise down-regulate mTOR activity and hence also down-regulate protein synthesis. PMID:20032058

  6. Effect of extracellular matrix on testosterone production during in vitro culture of bovine testicular cells.

    PubMed

    Akbarinejad, Vahid; Tajik, Parviz; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Youssefi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Testosterone is believed to play a significant role in spermatogenesis, but its contribution to the process of spermatogenesis is not completely understood. Given that extracellular matrix (ECM) facilitates differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) during culture, the present study was conducted to elucidate whether testosterone contribute to the permissive effect of ECM on SSCs differentiation. In experiment 1, testosterone production was measured in testicular cells cultured for 12 days on ECM or plastic (control). In experiment 2, testosterone production was assessed in testicular cells cultured on ECM or plastic (control) and exposed to different concentrations of hCG. In experiment 3, the gene expression of factors involved in testosterone production was analyzed. Testosterone concentration was lower in ECM than in the control group in experiment 1 (p < 0.05). In experiment 2, testosterone concentration was increased in response to hCG in both groups but cells cultured on ECM were more responsive to hCG than those cultured on plastic (p < 0.05). In the experiment 3, qRT-PCR revealed the inhibitory effect of ECM on the gene expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, the expression of LH receptor was greater in ECM-exposed than in unexposed cells (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the present study showed that inhibiting the expression of StAR, ECM could lower testosterone production by Leydig cells during in vitro culture. In addition, the results indicated that ECM could augment the responsiveness of Leydig cells to hCG through stimulating the expression of LH receptor.

  7. [Testosterone therapy improves cardiac function of male rats with right heart failure].

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Bin; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ju-Xiang; Chen, Xun-Min; Jiang, Shi-Sen

    2009-11-01

    Clinical studies have shown decreased levels of sexual hormones, particularly testosterone deficiency, in men with chronic heart failure (CHF). The authors aimed to investigate the effect of testosterone on cardiac function and the possible mechanism of androgen protecting the heart in male rats. Forty-three male SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: right heart failure (RHF, n = 15), physiologic testosterone treatment (TT, n = 15) and control (n = 13). The RHF group was given intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline at 60 mg/kg to make RHF models; the TT group was injected with testosterone at 5 mg/kg 3 days after monocrotaline administration; and the control group received equal volume of saline. The CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood of each rat were counted by flow cytometry. The levels of serum testosterone and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The hearts, lungs and livers of all the surviving rats were excised at 6 weeks for pathological and immunohistochemical examinations. The level of serum testosterone was gradually decreased, while that of TNF-alpha obviously increased in the RHF group. After testosterone treatment, the TT group showed a remarkable improvement of cardiac performance and a significant decrease in the level of serum TNF-alpha as compared with the RHF group. Statistically significant differences were observed neither in the CD34+ cell count in the peripheral blood nor in the CD34+ expression of the myocardial cells between the TT and RHF groups. Physiological supplementation of testosterone can improve the cardiac function of RHF male rats, probably through its inhibition of TNF-alpha rather than by autologous mobilization of bone marrow stem cells.

  8. Testosterone ethosomes for enhanced transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Ainbinder, Denize; Touitou, Elka

    2005-01-01

    Physiological decrease in testosterone levels in men with age causes various changes with clinical significance. Recent testosterone replacement therapy is based mainly on transdermal nonpatch delivery systems. These products have the drawback of application on extremely large areas to achieve required hormone blood levels. The objective of the present study was to design and test a testosterone nonpatch formulation using ethosomes for enhanced transdermal absorption. The ethosomal formulation was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering for structure and size distribution and by ultracentrifugation for entrapment capacity. To evaluate the feasibility of this delivery system to enhance testosterone permeation through the skin, first the systemic absorption in rats was compared with a currently used gel (AndroGel). Further, theoretical estimation of testosterone blood concentration following ethosomal application in men was made. For this purpose, in vitro permeation experiments through human skin were performed to establish testosterone skin permeation values. In the design of these experiments, testosterone solubility in various solutions was measured and the effect of the receiver medium on the skin barrier function was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Theoretical estimation shows that testosterone human plasma concentration value in the upper part of the physiological range could be achieved by application of the ethosomal formulation on an area of 40 cm(2). This area is about 10 times smaller than required with current nonpatch formulations. Our work shows that the ethosomal formulation could enhance testosterone systemic absorption and also be used for designing new products that could solve the weaknesses of the current testosterone replacement therapies.

  9. Testosterone signals through mTOR and androgen receptor to induce muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Basualto-Alarcón, Carla; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Jaimovich, Enrique; Estrada, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    The anabolic hormone testosterone induces muscle hypertrophy, but the intracellular mechanisms involved are poorly known. We addressed the question whether signal transduction pathways other than the androgen receptor (AR) are necessary to elicit hypertrophy in skeletal muscle myotubes. Cultured rat skeletal muscle myotubes were preincubated with inhibitors for ERK1/2 (PD98059), PI3K/Akt (LY294002 and Akt inhibitor VIII) or mTOR/S6K1 (rapamycin), and then stimulated with 100 nM testosterone. The expression of α-actin and the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, Akt and S6K1 (a downstream target for mTOR) were measured by Western blot. mRNA levels were evaluated by real time RT-PCR. Myotube size and sarcomerization were determined by confocal microscopy. Inhibition of AR was assessed by bicalutamide. Testosterone-induced myotube hypertrophy was assessed as increased myotube cross-sectional area (CSA) and increased α-actin mRNA and α-actin protein levels, with no changes in mRNA expression of atrogenes (MAFbx and MuRF-1). Morphological development of myotube sarcomeres was evident in testosterone-stimulated myotubes. Known hypertrophy signaling pathways were studied at short times: ERK1/2 and Akt showed an increase in phosphorylation status after testosterone stimulus at 5 and 15 min, respectively. S6K1 was phosphorylated at 60 min. This response was abolished by PI3K/Akt and mTOR inhibition but not by ERK1/2 inhibition. Similarly, the CSA increase at 12 h was abolished by inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt pathway as well as by AR inhibition. These results suggest a crosstalk between pathways involving fast intracellular signaling and the AR to explain testosterone-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  10. Testosterone regulates 3T3-L1 pre-adipocyte differentiation and epididymal fat accumulation in mice through modulating macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaojiao; Fu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Xinhua; Chen, Shiqiang; Huang, Shuguang; Yao, Lun; Liu, Guoquan

    2017-09-15

    Low testosterone levels are strongly related to obesity in males. The balance between the classically M1 and alternatively M2 polarized macrophages also plays a critical role in obesity. It is not clear whether testosterone regulates macrophage polarization and then affects adipocyte differentiation. In this report, we demonstrate that testosterone strengthens interleukin (IL) -4-induced M2 polarization and inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced M1 polarization, but has no direct effect on adipocyte differentiation. Cellular signaling studies indicate that testosterone regulates macrophage polarization through the inhibitory regulative G-protein (Gαi) mainly, rather than via androgen receptors, and phosphorylation of Akt. Moreover, testosterone inhibits pre-adipocyte differentiation induced by M1 macrophage medium. Lowering of serum testosterone in mice by injecting a luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) peptide increases epididymal white adipose tissue. Testosterone supplementation reverses this effect. Therefore, our findings indicate that testosterone inhibits pre-adipocyte differentiation by switching macrophages to M2 polarization through the Gαi and Akt signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. IgG4 autoantibodies against muscle-specific kinase undergo Fab-arm exchange in myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Koneczny, Inga; Stevens, Jo A A; De Rosa, Anna; Huda, Saif; Huijbers, Maartje G; Saxena, Abhishek; Maestri, Michelangelo; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzartos, Socrates; Verschuuren, Jan; van der Maarel, Silvère M; van Damme, Philip; De Baets, Marc H; Molenaar, Peter C; Vincent, Angela; Ricciardi, Roberta; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar; Losen, Mario

    2017-02-01

    Autoimmunity mediated by IgG4 subclass autoantibodies is an expanding field of research. Due to their structural characteristics a key feature of IgG4 antibodies is the ability to exchange Fab-arms with other, unrelated, IgG4 molecules, making the IgG4 molecule potentially monovalent for the specific antigen. However, whether those disease-associated antigen-specific IgG4 are mono- or divalent for their antigens is unknown. Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies to muscle specific kinase (MuSK-MG) is a well-recognized disease in which the predominant pathogenic IgG4 antibody binds to extracellular epitopes on MuSK at the neuromuscular junction; this inhibits a pathway that clusters the acetylcholine (neurotransmitter) receptors and leads to failure of neuromuscular transmission. In vitro Fab-arm exchange-inducing conditions were applied to MuSK antibodies in sera, purified IgG4 and IgG1-3 sub-fractions. Solid-phase cross-linking assays were established to determine the extent of pre-existing and inducible Fab-arm exchange. Functional effects of the resulting populations of IgG4 antibodies were determined by measuring inhibition of agrin-induced AChR clustering in C2C12 cells. To confirm the results, κ/κ, λ/λ and hybrid κ/λ IgG4s were isolated and tested for MuSK antibodies. At least fifty percent of patients had IgG4, but not IgG1-3, MuSK antibodies that could undergo Fab-arm exchange in vitro under reducing conditions. Also MuSK antibodies were found in vivo that were divalent (monospecific for MuSK). Fab-arm exchange with normal human IgG4 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of serum derived MuSK antibodies on AChR clustering in C2C12 mouse myotubes. The results suggest that a considerable proportion of MuSK IgG4 could already be Fab-arm exchanged in vivo. This was confirmed by isolating endogenous IgG4 MuSK antibodies containing both κ and λ light chains, i.e. hybrid IgG4 molecules. These new findings demonstrate that Fab-arm exchanged antibodies

  12. Dominant suppression of inflammation by glycan-hydrolyzed IgG

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Collin, Mattias; Happonen, Kaisa E.; Croxford, Allyson M.; Lundström, Susanna L.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Rowley, Merrill J.; Blom, Anna M.; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2013-01-01

    A unique anti-inflammatory property of IgG, independent of antigen specificity, is described. IgG with modification of the heavy-chain glycan on asparagine 297 by the streptococcal enzyme endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoS) induced a dominant suppression of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation, such as arthritis, through destabilization of local ICs by fragment crystallizable–fragment crystallizable (Fc-Fc) interactions. Small amounts (250 µg) of EndoS-hydrolyzed IgG were sufficient to inhibit arthritis in mice and most effective during the formation of ICs in the target tissue. The presence of EndoS-hydrolyzed IgG disrupted larger IC lattice formation both in vitro and in vivo, as visualized with anti-C3b staining. Neither complement binding in vitro nor antigen–antibody binding per se was affected. PMID:23671108

  13. Evaluation of a dengue IgG indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a Japanese encephalitis IgG indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diagnosis of secondary dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shingo; Alonzo, Maria T G; Kurosawa, Yae; Mapua, Cynthia A; Reyes, Joyce D; Dimaano, Efren M; Alera, Maria Theresa P; Saito, Mariko; Oishi, Kazunori; Hasebe, Futoshi; Matias, Ronald R; Natividad, Filipinas F; Morita, Kouichi

    2010-03-01

    To establish a new method for the diagnosis of dengue secondary infection, 187 serum samples from the patients with dengue secondary infection, 40 serum samples from the patients with dengue primary infection, and 44 serum samples from the healthy volunteers were tested using the dengue IgG indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DEN IgG ELISA). The results of the test were compared with those from the dengue hemagglutination inhibition (DEN HI) test, which has been recommended as the gold standard by the World Health Organization (WHO, 1997). Japanese encephalitis IgG indirect ELISA (JE IgG ELISA) was also performed to measure anti-flavivirus IgG, which cross-reacts with the Japanese encephalitis virus, to test the possibility of an alternative to DEN IgG ELISA. The results of DEN IgG and JE IgG ELISAs were highly correlated with those of the DEN HI test. In the DEN IgG ELISA, a titer of 1:29,000 was the cut-off value for the diagnosis of dengue secondary infection (91.5% accuracy [95% confidence interval, CI], 90.9% sensitivity [95%CI], and 92.9% specificity [95%CI]). A titer of 1:52,000 was the cut-off value for dengue secondary infection using JE IgG ELISA (95.6% accuracy [95%CI], 98.9% sensitivity [95%CI], and 88.1% specificity [95%CI]). In conclusion, this study confirmed that the results of both DEN IgG and JE IgG ELISAs were highly correlated with the results of DEN HI test. Thus, these ELISAs are simple, rapid, sensitive, and quantitative tests that can be used in the determination of dengue secondary infection.

  14. Placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) enzyme activity and binding to IgG in Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Sartori, M J; Mezzano, L; de Fabro, S P

    2005-11-01

    Placentas and plasma from women with and without Chagas' disease and cultures of human placental villi with Trypanosoma cruzi, neuraminidase, phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C were analyzed in order to verify if the alterations in placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) enzyme activity are caused by T. cruzi as observed in previous works. As IgG receptivity happens to be one of the proposed functions of PLAP, general IgG binding ability of the placentas treated with the mentioned enzymes, which are present on the parasite's surface, were also tested. The phospholipases caused an increase of PLAP's enzyme activity in the supernatant of infected placentas and a decrease of enzyme activity in the membrane of cultured placentas, therefore suggesting the cleavage of PLAP by parasitic enzymes. Desialylation could also partially inhibit PLAP's enzyme activity in supernatant and membrane of placenta culture. Placentas from healthy patients presented higher IgG receptivity than those from patients with Chagas' disease. In vitro infection of healthy placentas with T. cruzi caused no difference in IgG receptivity in placental sections with respect to controls but the phospholipases and neuraminidase increased the IgG receptivity of cultured placentas. The IgG transference index was higher for patients with Chagas' disease than for those without it. Although binding to IgG does not completely inhibit the enzyme activity of PLAP, it interferes with the enzyme activity of PLAP. We concluded that the enzymes on the surface of T. cruzi trypomastigotes can not only affect PLAP's enzyme activity but also increase the IgG binding ability of the placenta and this can be related to the actions of neuraminidase-transsialidase, phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C on the parasite surface. The modification of PLAP from women with Chagas' disease should be considered as a result of multiple factors.

  15. Gallibacterium anatis-secreted metalloproteases degrade chicken IgG.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, E; Vaca, S; Pérez-Méndez, A; Ibarra-Caballero, J; Pérez-Márquez, V; Tenorio, V R; Negrete-Abascal, E

    2005-10-01

    Gallibacterium anatis (previously named Pasteurella haemolytica-like) is considered a normal inhabitant of genital and upper respiratory tracts of healthy chickens, but it is also associated with different pathological conditions. Secreted metalloproteases from field and reference G. anatis cultures were obtained by methanol precipitation and were characterized. Proteins of molecular mass higher than 100 kDa showing proteolytic activity were observed in 10% polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with 1% bovine casein. They were active at alkaline pH, and inhibited by ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Their activity was stable at 50 degrees C, but partially inhibited at 60 degrees C, and totally inhibited at higher temperatures. Secreted proteins were able to degrade chicken IgG after 24 h of incubation, and cross-reacted with a polyclonal antibody against purified protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Secreted metalloproteases could play a role in infections caused by G. anatis.

  16. Testosterone and cardiovascular disease in men

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul D; Channer, Kevin S

    2012-01-01

    Despite regional variations in the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD), men are consistently more at risk of developing and dying from CAD than women, and the gender-specific effects of sex hormones are implicated in this inequality. This ‘Perspectives' article reviews the current evidence regarding the cardiovascular effects of testosterone in men including an examination of the age-related decline in testosterone, the relationship between testosterone levels and coronary disease, coronary risk factors and mortality. We also review the vaso-active effects of testosterone, and discuss how these have been used in men with heart failure and angina. We discuss the ‘cause' versus ‘effect' controversy, regarding low testosterone levels in men with coronary heart disease, as well as concerns over the use of testosterone replacement therapy in middle aged and elderly men. The article concludes with a discussion regarding the future direction for work in this interesting area, including the relative merits of screening for, and treating hypogonadism with testosterone replacement therapy in men with heart disease. PMID:22522504

  17. Simvastatin reduces fetal testosterone production and permanently alters reproductive tract development in the male rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen signaling by fetal Leydig cells is critical in the proper development of the male reproductive tract. As cholesterol is a precursor for hormone biosynthesis,inhibition of the cholesterol pathway during sex differentiation may reduce testosterone {T). We hypothesized tha...

  18. Simvastatin reduces fetal testosterone production and permanently alters reproductive tract development in the male rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen signaling by fetal Leydig cells is critical in the proper development of the male reproductive tract. As cholesterol is a precursor for hormone biosynthesis,inhibition of the cholesterol pathway during sex differentiation may reduce testosterone {T). We hypothesized tha...

  19. IgG4-related prostatitis progressed from localized IgG4-related lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Dujuan; Kan, Yunzhen; Fu, Fangfang; Wang, Shuhuan; Shi, Ligang; Liu, Jie; Kong, Lingfei

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently described inflammatory disease involving multiple organs. Prostate involvement with IgG4-RD is very rare. In this report, we describe a case of IgG4-related prostatitis progressed from localized IgG4-related lymphadenopathy. This patient was present with urine retention symptoms. MRI and CT examination revealed the prostatic enlargement and the multiple lymphadenopathy. Serum IgG4 levels were elevated. Prostatic tissue samples resected both this time and less than 1 year earlier showed the same histological type of prostatitis with histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings characteristic of IgG4-RD. The right submandibular lymph nodes excised 2 years earlier were eventually proven to be follicular hyperplasia-type IgG4-related lymphadenopathy. This is the first case of IgG4-RD that began as localized IgG4-related lymphadenopathy and progressed into a systemic disease involving prostate and multiple lymph nodes. This patient showed a good response to steroid therapy. This leads us to advocate a novel pathogenesis of prostatitis, and a novel therapeutic approach against prostatitis. Pathologists and urologists should consider this disease entity in the patients with elevated serum IgG4 levels and the symptoms of prostatic hyperplasia to avoid ineffective medical or unnecessary surgical treatment.

  20. IgG4-related skin manifestations in patients with IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tetsuya; Oka, Masahiro; Shimizu, Hideki; Hatakeyama, Mayumi; Kanki, Haruhisa; Kunisada, Makoto; Tsuji, Goh; Morinobu, Akio; Kumagai, Shunichi; Azumi, Atsushi; Negi, Akira; Nishigori, Chikako

    2013-04-01

    We describe two cases of IgG4-related disease associated with skin manifestations with IgG4-positive plasma cells. The first patient was a 52-year-old woman with a 3-year history of IgG4-related sialadenitis who presented with pruritic, indurated erythematous lesions on the auricle, postauricular and submandibular regions and neck. A skin biopsy showed infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the subcutaneous tissue. The second patient was a 53-year-old woman with IgG4-related lesions in the ocular adnexal tissues and nasal cavity who presented with pruritic, indurated erythema on the cheek and submandibular region. Histopathological examination of a skin biopsy revealed a dense, patchy infiltrate comprised of lymphocytes, IgG4-positive plasma cells and eosinophils around blood vessels and sweat glands in the entire dermis and subcutis. The skin lesions in these cases were considered to be skin manifestations of IgG4-related disease. The findings of these two cases together with the three reported cases of IgG4-related disease with skin manifestations in the literature suggest that IgG4-related skin lesions may appear on the scalp, face, neck, auricle and postauricular regions during the course of IgG4-related disease.

  1. IgG4-related prostatitis progressed from localized IgG4-related lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dujuan; Kan, Yunzhen; Fu, Fangfang; Wang, Shuhuan; Shi, Ligang; Liu, Jie; Kong, Lingfei

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently described inflammatory disease involving multiple organs. Prostate involvement with IgG4-RD is very rare. In this report, we describe a case of IgG4-related prostatitis progressed from localized IgG4-related lymphadenopathy. This patient was present with urine retention symptoms. MRI and CT examination revealed the prostatic enlargement and the multiple lymphadenopathy. Serum IgG4 levels were elevated. Prostatic tissue samples resected both this time and less than 1 year earlier showed the same histological type of prostatitis with histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings characteristic of IgG4-RD. The right submandibular lymph nodes excised 2 years earlier were eventually proven to be follicular hyperplasia-type IgG4-related lymphadenopathy. This is the first case of IgG4-RD that began as localized IgG4-related lymphadenopathy and progressed into a systemic disease involving prostate and multiple lymph nodes. This patient showed a good response to steroid therapy. This leads us to advocate a novel pathogenesis of prostatitis, and a novel therapeutic approach against prostatitis. Pathologists and urologists should consider this disease entity in the patients with elevated serum IgG4 levels and the symptoms of prostatic hyperplasia to avoid ineffective medical or unnecessary surgical treatment. PMID:26617921

  2. Interactions of testosterone and all-trans retinoic acid in regulation of androgen receptor expression in rat lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Ubels, John L; Veenstra, Eric; Ditlev, Jonathon; Ingersoll, Kyle

    2003-12-01

    All-trans retinoic acid down-regulates androgen receptor (AR) expression in lacrimal gland acinar cells in culture. The goal of this study was to determine if retinoic acid inhibits androgen-stimulated up-regulation of AR protein and AR mRNA expression in lacrimal glands of orchiectomized rats in vivo. Delivery of androgens to orchiectomized rats was accomplished by subcutaneous implantation of a 25 or 50 mg 21-day slow-release testosterone pellet. Rats were treated with retinoic acid by gastric gavage at 20 mg kg(-1) day(-1). After 7 days of treatment lacrimal glands were removed, AR protein expression in frozen sections was determined by immunohistochemistry and total RNA was probed for AR mRNA expression. Serum testosterone was measured by ELISA and serum retinoic acid was detected by HPLC. Orchiectomy decreases serum testosterone to 17 +/- 8 ng dl(-1), compared to 143 +/- 27 ng dl(-1) in normal rats, and reduces the number of lacrimal acinar cell nuclei expressing ARs to less than 30% of normal. Implantation of testosterone pellets restored lacrimal AR expression, but increased serum testosterone to more than 10 times the normal levels. Retinoic acid failed to inhibit AR expression in rats with high serum testosterone. Therefore a dose-response study was conducted in which testosterone was delivered by injection of a single dose of Depotestosterone at 2.5-200 mg kg(-1). Treatment of orchiectomized rats with a dose of testosterone as low as 2.5 mg kg(-1) resulted in serum testosterone levels of 62 +/- 17 ng dl(-1) and significantly increased lacrimal gland AR expression. Delivery of retinoic acid at 20 or 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1) simultaneously with a 2.5 mg kg(-1) testosterone injection prevented restoration of lacrimal gland AR expression and significantly reduced AR mRNA expression. A pharmacologic dose of retinoic acid inhibits AR expression in lacrimal gland acinar cells in vivo, as well as in vitro. This indicates that effects of retinoic acid and testosterone

  3. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    PubMed

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of D-004, a lipid extract from Cuban royal palm fruit, on inhibiting prostatic hypertrophy induced with testosterone or dihydrotestosterone in a rat model: A randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Daisy; Arruzazabala, Maria de Lourdes; Rosa, Más; Molina, Vivian; Rodríguez, Eduardo; González, Victor

    2004-11-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy is the nonmalignant, uncontrolled growth of prostatic epithelial cells and stroma that, left untreated, may lead to difficult urination and other complications. A common treatment of BPH is lipid extract from saw palmetto fruit, and lipid extract from Cuban Royal palm (a palm of the same family) fruit is being studied for this use. One study found that the latter, D-004, at 100 to 400 mg/kg daily prevented prostatic hypertrophy (PH) induced with testosterone (T) in a rat model. This study comprised 2 experiments in a rat model. The first assessed the effects of different doses of D-004 on T-induced PH; the second investigated the effects of D-004 on PH induced with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In experiment 1, rats were distributed in 6 groups of 10 rats each. One group received an SC injection of soy oil and oral treatment with Tween 65/water vehicle (negative control). The other 5 groups received an SC injection of T 3 mg/kg daily and oral treatment with vehicle (positive control) or D-004 at 50, 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg daily suspended in vehicle. In experiment 2, rats were distributed in 3 groups of 10 rats each. A negative control group received treatment as in experiment 1. Positive controls received an SC injection of DHT 1.5 mg/kg and vehicle orally. The third group received an SC injection of DHT and oral treatment with D-004 at 800 mg/kg suspended in vehicle. All treatments were given for 14 days. At sacrifice, prostates were removed and weighed. Mean prostatic weights and prostatic/body weight ratios were calculated. In experiment 1, in the groups receiving D-004 at 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg daily, prostatic weight was significantly lower compared with the positive control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.001, respectively); this effect was not seen in the group receiving 50 mg/kg daily. In the groups receiving D-004 at 400 and 800 mg/kg daily, prostatic/body weight ratio was significantly lower compared with positive controls

  5. Effects of D-004, a lipid extract from Cuban royal palm fruit, on inhibiting prostatic hypertrophy induced with testosterone or dihydrotestosterone in a rat model: A randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Carbajal, Daisy; Arruzazabala, Maria de Lourdes; Rosa, Más; Molina, Vivian; Rodríguez, Eduardo; González, Victor

    2004-01-01

    Background: Benign prostatic hypertrophy is the nonmalignant, uncontrolled growth of prostatic epithelial cells and stroma that, left untreated, may lead to difficult urination and other complications. A common treatment of BPH is lipid extract from saw palmetto fruit, and lipid extract from Cuban Royal palm (a palm of the same family) fruit is being studied for this use. One study found that the latter, D-004, at 100 to 400 mg/kg daily prevented prostatic hypertrophy (PH) induced with testosterone (T) in a rat model. Objectives: This study comprised 2 experiments in a rat model. The first assessed the effects of different doses of D-004 on T-induced PH; the second investigated the effects of D-004 on PH induced with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Methods: In experiment 1, rats were distributed in 6 groups of 10 rats each. One group received an SC injection of soy oil and oral treatment with Tween 65/water vehicle (negative control). The other 5 groups received an SC injection of T 3 mg/kg daily and oral treatment with vehicle (positive control) or D-004 at 50, 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg daily suspended in vehicle. In experiment 2, rats were distributed in 3 groups of 10 rats each. A negative control group received treatment as in experiment 1. Positive controls received an SC injection of DHT 1.5 mg/kg and vehicle orally. The third group received an SC injection of DHT and oral treatment with D-004 at 800 mg/kg suspended in vehicle. All treatments were given for 14 days. At sacrifice, prostates were removed and weighed. Mean prostatic weights and prostatic/body weight ratios were calculated. Results: In experiment 1, in the groups receiving D-004 at 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg daily, prostatic weight was significantly lower compared with the positive control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.001, respectively); this effect was not seen in the group receiving 50 mg/kg daily. In the groups receiving D-004 at 400 and 800 mg/kg daily, prostatic/body weight ratio was

  6. Effects of Testosterone Treatment in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Peter J; Bhasin, Shalender; Cunningham, Glenn R; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J; Cauley, Jane A; Gill, Thomas M; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Wang, Christina; Ensrud, Kristine E; Lewis, Cora E; Farrar, John T; Cella, David; Rosen, Raymond C; Pahor, Marco; Crandall, Jill P; Molitch, Mark E; Cifelli, Denise; Dougar, Darlene; Fluharty, Laura; Resnick, Susan M; Storer, Thomas W; Anton, Stephen; Basaria, Shehzad; Diem, Susan J; Hou, Xiaoling; Mohler, Emile R; Parsons, J Kellogg; Wenger, Nanette K; Zeldow, Bret; Landis, J Richard; Ellenberg, Susan S

    2016-02-18

    Serum testosterone concentrations decrease as men age, but benefits of raising testosterone levels in older men have not been established. We assigned 790 men 65 years of age or older with a serum testosterone concentration of less than 275 ng per deciliter and symptoms suggesting hypoandrogenism to receive either testosterone gel or placebo gel for 1 year. Each man participated in one or more of three trials--the Sexual Function Trial, the Physical Function Trial, and the Vitality Trial. The primary outcome of each of the individual trials was also evaluated in all participants. Testosterone treatment increased serum testosterone levels to the mid-normal range for men 19 to 40 years of age. The increase in testosterone levels was associated with significantly increased sexual activity, as assessed by the Psychosexual Daily Questionnaire (P<0.001), as well as significantly increased sexual desire and erectile function. The percentage of men who had an increase of at least 50 m in the 6-minute walking distance did not differ significantly between the two study groups in the Physical Function Trial but did differ significantly when men in all three trials were included (20.5% of men who received testosterone vs. 12.6% of men who received placebo, P=0.003). Testosterone had no significant benefit with respect to vitality, as assessed by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue scale, but men who received testosterone reported slightly better mood and lower severity of depressive symptoms than those who received placebo. The rates of adverse events were similar in the two groups. In symptomatic men 65 years of age or older, raising testosterone concentrations for 1 year from moderately low to the mid-normal range for men 19 to 40 years of age had a moderate benefit with respect to sexual function and some benefit with respect to mood and depressive symptoms but no benefit with respect to vitality or walking distance. The number of participants was

  7. Effects of Testosterone Treatment in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, P.J.; Bhasin, S.; Cunningham, G.R.; Matsumoto, A.M.; Stephens-Shields, A.J.; Cauley, J.A.; Gill, T.M.; Barrett-Connor, E.; Swerdloff, R.S.; Wang, C.; Ensrud, K.E.; Lewis, C.E.; Farrar, J.T.; Cella, D.; Rosen, R.C.; Pahor, M.; Crandall, J.P.; Molitch, M.E.; Cifelli, D.; Dougar, D.; Fluharty, L.; Resnick, S.M.; Storer, T.W.; Anton, S.; Basaria, S.; Diem, S.J.; Hou, X.; Mohler, E.R.; Parsons, J.K.; Wenger, N.K.; Zeldow, B.; Landis, J.R.; Ellenberg, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Serum testosterone concentrations decrease as men age, but benefits of raising testosterone levels in older men have not been established. METHODS We assigned 790 men 65 years of age or older with a serum testosterone concentration of less than 275 ng per deciliter and symptoms suggesting hypoandrogenism to receive either testosterone gel or placebo gel for 1 year. Each man participated in one or more of three trials — the Sexual Function Trial, the Physical Function Trial, and the Vitality Trial. The primary outcome of each of the individual trials was also evaluated in all participants. RESULTS Testosterone treatment increased serum testosterone levels to the mid-normal range for men 19 to 40 years of age. The increase in testosterone levels was associated with significantly increased sexual activity, as assessed by the Psychosexual Daily Questionnaire (P<0.001), as well as significantly increased sexual desire and erectile function. The percentage of men who had an increase of at least 50 m in the 6-minute walking distance did not differ significantly between the two study groups in the Physical Function Trial but did differ significantly when men in all three trials were included (20.5% of men who received testosterone vs. 12.6% of men who received placebo, P=0.003). Testosterone had no significant benefit with respect to vitality, as assessed by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue scale, but men who received testosterone reported slightly better mood and lower severity of depressive symptoms than those who received placebo. The rates of adverse events were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS In symptomatic men 65 years of age or older, raising testosterone concentrations for 1 year from moderately low to the mid-normal range for men 19 to 40 years of age had a moderate benefit with respect to sexual function and some benefit with respect to mood and depressive symptoms but no benefit with respect to vitality or

  8. The role of testosterone in social interaction.

    PubMed

    Eisenegger, Christoph; Haushofer, Johannes; Fehr, Ernst

    2011-06-01

    Although animal researchers established the role of testosterone as a 'social hormone' decades ago, the investigation of its causal influence on human social behaviors has only recently begun. Here, we review and discuss recent studies showing the causal effects of testosterone on social interactions in animals and humans, and outline the basic neurobiological mechanisms that might underlie these effects. Based on these recent findings, we argue that the role of testosterone in human social behavior might be best understood in terms of the search for, and maintenance of, social status. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Testosterone patches for female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    2009-03-01

    There is some suggestion of a link between sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women and low circulating concentrations of testosterone.1 This underlies the development of a new transdermal testosterone patch (black triangle down Intrinsa - Procter & Gamble) that has recently been licensed in the UK for the treatment of women who have hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) following a menopause induced by surgery (i.e. bilateral salpingooophorectomy and hysterectomy) and who are receiving concomitant oestrogen replacement therapy.2 Here we discuss the diagnosis of HSDD, as well as the evidence for using transdermal testosterone patches in women in whom this diagnosis is made.

  10. Testosterone replacement therapy and voiding dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Baas, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) represents an increasing popular treatment option for men with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Because of unsubstantiated beliefs of testosterone’s effect on the prostate, the FDA has recently placed a warning on testosterone products, stating that TRT may worsen benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Within this review article we have demonstrated the current understanding of the physiology of testosterone and its relationship with prostatic and lower urinary tract physiology. The current evidence suggests that not only does TRT not worsen lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), but that hypogonadism itself is an important risk factor for LUTS/BPH. PMID:28078221

  11. Human IgG1 antibodies suppress angiogenesis in a target-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanovich, Sasha; Kim, Younghee; Mizutani, Takeshi; Yasuma, Reo; Tudisco, Laura; Cicatiello, Valeria; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Kerur, Nagaraj; Hirano, Yoshio; Baffi, Judit Z; Tarallo, Valeria; Li, Shengjian; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Arpitha, Parthasarathy; Fowler, Benjamin J; Wright, Charles B; Apicella, Ivana; Greco, Adelaide; Brunetti, Arturo; Ruvo, Menotti; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Nozaki, Miho; Ijima, Ryo; Kaneko, Hiroki; Ogura, Yuichiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Ambati, Balamurali K; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Langdon, Wallace Y; Clark, Michael R; Armour, Kathryn L; Bruhns, Pierre; Verbeek, J Sjef; Gelfand, Bradley D; De Falco, Sandro; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant angiogenesis is implicated in diseases affecting nearly 10% of the world’s population. The most widely used anti-angiogenic drug is bevacizumab, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets human VEGFA. Although bevacizumab does not recognize mouse Vegfa, it inhibits angiogenesis in mice. Here we show bevacizumab suppressed angiogenesis in three mouse models not via Vegfa blockade but rather Fc-mediated signaling through FcγRI (CD64) and c-Cbl, impairing macrophage migration. Other approved humanized or human IgG1 antibodies without mouse targets (adalimumab, alemtuzumab, ofatumumab, omalizumab, palivizumab and tocilizumab), mouse IgG2a, and overexpression of human IgG1-Fc or mouse IgG2a-Fc, also inhibited angiogenesis in wild-type and FcγR humanized mice. This anti-angiogenic effect was abolished by Fcgr1 ablation or knockdown, Fc cleavage, IgG-Fc inhibition, disruption of Fc-FcγR interaction, or elimination of FcRγ-initated signaling. Furthermore, bevacizumab’s Fc region potentiated its anti-angiogenic activity in humanized VEGFA mice. Finally, mice deficient in FcγRI exhibited increased developmental and pathological angiogenesis. These findings reveal an unexpected anti-angiogenic function for FcγRI and a potentially concerning off-target effect of hIgG1 therapies. PMID:26918197

  12. Development and validation of a simple and direct ELISA method for the determination of conjugated (glucuronide) and non-conjugated testosterone excretion in urine.

    PubMed

    Al-Dujaili, Emad A S

    2006-02-01

    Several methods are now available to estimate urinary testosterone levels that can only be performed in established big laboratories using GC/MS techniques. In clinical practice or for research projects, an inexpensive method that does not require skilled technicians would be useful. A simple, rapid and accurate ELISA method has been developed and applied in our laboratory to measure urinary non-conjugated and total testosterone. High affinity anti-testosterone antibody and HRP-Donkey anti-sheep IgG (Horse Radish Peroxidase) as enzyme tracer were used to develop the ELISA method. The assay was evaluated for specificity, sensitivity, parallelism, accuracy and imprecision by the established methods on samples obtained from healthy volunteers. The results from the direct ELISA were compared to those after enzyme hydrolysis plus solvent extraction and HPLC or commercial kits. A satisfactory standard curve for the direct testosterone ELISA has been developed with good sensitivity. Cross-reactivity values of anti-testosterone antibody with major interfering steroids were minimal except for testosterone-3-glucuronide (58.8%). The validity of urinary testosterone assay was confirmed by the good correlation between the results obtained by the direct ELISA and those after enzyme hydrolysis and solvent extraction (Y = 0.987X + 0.398, R2 = 0.97). Accuracy studies, parallelism and imprecision data were determined and all found to be satisfactory. Urinary testosterone excretion values obtained by our direct ELISA from healthy volunteers were generally in agreement with those published by other workers. Male urinary total testosterone excretion (non-conjugated and testosterone glucuronide) ranged from 177.9 to 865.3 nmol/day, which was about 3-6 times more than the range for women urinary testosterone excretion (34.5-308.8 nmol/day). A direct, reliable, easy to perform, sensitive and highly specific ELISA type assay for the measurement of total testosterone in urine samples

  13. Andropause or male menopause? Rationale for testosterone replacement therapy in older men with low testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2013-01-01

    To provide rationale for testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in older men with low testosterone levels and symptoms consistent with testosterone deficiency. The relevant literature was reviewed using PubMed. Cross-sectional and longitudinal population-based studies indicate that total and free testosterone levels fall with aging, and they may be accompanied by symptoms consistent with androgen deficiency. Testosterone treatment of younger men with very low testosterone levels and hypothalamic, pituitary, or testicular disease is associated with improvements in symptoms, body composition, bone density, and hematocrit/hemoglobin. Studies evaluating testosterone treatment of older men with low testosterone levels are limited, but they suggest some increase in fat free mass, some decrease in fat mass, and some increase in bone density of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. The Testosterone Trial should provide definitive information regarding the potential benefits of TRT in men ≥65 years of age. If efficacy is confirmed, we will still need more information regarding the risks of TRT in older men.

  14. Direct radioimmunoassay (RIA) of salivary testosterone: correlation with free and total serium testosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Vittek, J.; L'Hommedieu, D.G.; Gordon, G.G.; Rappaport, S.C.; Southren, A.L.

    1985-08-26

    Simple and sensitive direct RIA for determination of salivary testosterone was developed by using RSL NOSOLVEX TM (125 1) kit produced by Radioassay System Laboratories (Carcon, California). In addition, a relationship between salivary and serum free and total testosterone concentrations was studied in randomly selected 45 healthy subjects, 5 females on oral contraceptive pills and 28 hypertensive patients on various treatment regimens. The lowest weight of testosterone detectable by the modified method was equivalent to 1 pg/ml of saliva, taking into account analytical variability. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 5.09 +/- 2.7% and 8.2 +/- 5.9% respectively. Statistically significant correlations were found between salivary and serum free testosterone (r = 0.97) and salivary and serum total testosterone concentrations (r = 0.70 - 0.87). The exception to this was a group of hypertensive females in which no correlation (r = 0.14) between salivary and total serum testosterone was found. It is also of interest that, while salivary testosterone was significantly increased in subjects taking oral contraceptives and most of the hypertensive patients, the total serum testosterone concentration was in normal range. These findings suggest that the determination of salivary testosterone is a reliable method to detect changes in the concentration of available biologically active hormone in the circulation. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  15. Testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency: Are we beyond the point of no return?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency was introduced in the early 1940s, utilization of this effective treatment approach in hypogonadal men is met with considerable skepticism and resistance. Indeed, for decades, the fear that testosterone may cause prostate cancer has hampered clinical progress in this field. Nevertheless, even after considerable knowledge was acquired that this fear is unsubstantiated, many in the medical community remain hesitant to utilize this therapeutic approach to treat men with hypogonadism. As the fears concerning prostate cancer have subsided, a new controversy regarding use of testosterone therapy and increase in cardiovascular disease was introduced. Although the new controversy was based on one ill-fated clinical trial, one meta-analysis with studies that utilized unapproved formulation in men with liver cirrhosis, and two retrospective studies with suspect or nonvalidated statistical methodologies and database contaminations, the flames of such controversy were fanned by the lay press and academics alike. In this review we discuss the adverse effect of testosterone deficiency and highlight the numerous proven benefits of testosterone therapy on men's health and debunk the myth that testosterone therapy increases cardiovascular risk. Ultimately, we believe that there is considerable scientific and clinical evidence to suggest that testosterone therapy is safe and effective with restoration of physiological levels in men with testosterone deficiency, irrespective of its etiology. PMID:27847912

  16. Second to fourth digit ratio, adult testosterone level and testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    García-Cruz, Eduardo; Huguet, Jorge; Piqueras, Marta; Ribal, María J; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The ratio of the second and fourth finger lengths (2D/4D) is related to intrauterine exposure to testosterone. The relationship between 2D/4D and adult hormonal pattern is controversial. The aim of our study was to determine if there was a relationship between adult serum testosterone levels and the 2D/4D ratio. We prospectively recruited 204 consecutive patients referred for transrectal prostate biopsy between January 2008 and June 2009. The same physician performed clinical examinations, 2D/4D measurements and the transrectal biopsy in all cases. Cut-off points of 231 and 346 ng/dL testosterone (8 and 12 nmol/L) were used. 2D/4D determination was done with a vernier calliper on the left hand. The hormonal profile (testosterone and sexual hormone binding globulin) of the patients was determined between 7.00 am and 11.00 am. Age, weight, height, body mass index, toxic habits, digital rectal examination, prostate-specific antigen and 2D and 4D measurements were recorded prospectively. The mean age was 67 ± 7 years and the mean testosterone level was 413 ± 18 ng/dL (14.33 ± 0.62 nmol/L). The percentages of patients with testosterone <231 ng/dL (8 nmol/L) and testosterone <346 ng/dL (12 nmol/L) were 6.1 and 30.6 respectively. Univariate analysis showed that low 2D/4D ratios were related to higher levels of testosterone (B=-741.98; β=-0.165, P= 0.045) and also with low prevalence of biochemical hypogonadism (testosterone <346 ng/dL). Mean 2D/4D ratio in patients with testosterone >346 ng/dL was lower than in patients with testosterone <346 ng/dL (2D/4D 0.97 ± 0.037 vs 0.99 ± 0.043 depending on their hormonal status, P= 0.05). High 2D/4D ratio was associated with low testosterone serum levels (P= 0.046). The 2D/4D ratio is related to adult testosterone levels and the presence of testosterone deficiency syndrome. Patients with high 2D/4D ratios have lower testosterone levels and higher risk of testosterone deficiency syndrome. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL

  17. Salivary Testosterone Levels Under Psychological Stress and Its Relationship with Rumination and Five Personality Traits in Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Afrisham, Reza; Sadegh-Nejadi, Sahar; SoliemaniFar, Omid; Kooti, Wesam; Ashtary-Larky, Damoon; Alamiri, Fatima; Najjar-Asl, Sedigheh; Khaneh-Keshi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the salivary testosterone levels under psychological stress and its relationship with rumination and five personality traits in medical students. Methods A total of 58 medical students, who wanted to participate in the final exam, were selected by simple random sampling. Two months before the exam, in the basal conditions, the NEO Inventory short form, and the Emotional Control Questionnaire (ECQ) were completed. Saliva samples were taken from students in both the basal conditions and under exam stress. Salivary testosterone was measured by ELISA. Data was analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures, paired samples t-test, Pearson correlation and stepwise regression analysis. Results Salivary testosterone level of men showed a significant increase under exam stress (p<0.05). However, a non-significant although substantial reduction observed in women. A significant correlation was found between extroversion (r=-0.33) and openness to experience (r=0.30) with salivary testosterone (p<0.05). Extraversion, aggression control and emotional inhibition predicted 28% of variance of salivary testosterone under stress. Conclusion Salivary testosterone reactivity to stress can be determined by sexual differences, personality traits, and emotional control variables which may decrease or increase stress effects on biological responses, especially the salivary testosterone. PMID:27909455

  18. Salivary Testosterone Levels Under Psychological Stress and Its Relationship with Rumination and Five Personality Traits in Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Afrisham, Reza; Sadegh-Nejadi, Sahar; SoliemaniFar, Omid; Kooti, Wesam; Ashtary-Larky, Damoon; Alamiri, Fatima; Aberomand, Mohammad; Najjar-Asl, Sedigheh; Khaneh-Keshi, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the salivary testosterone levels under psychological stress and its relationship with rumination and five personality traits in medical students. A total of 58 medical students, who wanted to participate in the final exam, were selected by simple random sampling. Two months before the exam, in the basal conditions, the NEO Inventory short form, and the Emotional Control Questionnaire (ECQ) were completed. Saliva samples were taken from students in both the basal conditions and under exam stress. Salivary testosterone was measured by ELISA. Data was analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures, paired samples t-test, Pearson correlation and stepwise regression analysis. Salivary testosterone level of men showed a significant increase under exam stress (p<0.05). However, a non-significant although substantial reduction observed in women. A significant correlation was found between extroversion (r=-0.33) and openness to experience (r=0.30) with salivary testosterone (p<0.05). Extraversion, aggression control and emotional inhibition predicted 28% of variance of salivary testosterone under stress. Salivary testosterone reactivity to stress can be determined by sexual differences, personality traits, and emotional control variables which may decrease or increase stress effects on biological responses, especially the salivary testosterone.

  19. Serum Testosterone Levels in Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnani, Prem D.; Dwyer, Margretta

    1986-01-01

    Reports that with the increase in diagnosis of offenders across the nation, physicians and psychiatric personnel need to be aware of low testosterone as a possible indicator of hypo-sexuality and possible concurrent offending behavior. (Author/ABB)

  20. [Testosterone and bone: indications and limitations].

    PubMed

    Stoll, Delphine; Puder, Jardena J; Lamy, Olivier

    2011-06-15

    Osteoporosis incidence increases exponentially with age in men and hypogonadism represents a risk factor. Sex steroids levels are correlated to bone mineral density and to fracture prevalence. Most studies demonstrate an improvement in bone mineral density in men with hypogonadism as a result of testosterone therapy. Nevertheless there are no data evaluating the effect of testosterone therapy on fractures in men. Approximately 20% of men older than 60 have a total testosterone level lower than the lower limit of the reference range but there is no true consensus on the definition of hypogonadism in older men. In older men we recommend to treat only if total morning testosterone levels are < 8 nmol/l or even < 6,9 nmol/l on several occasions in the absence of any reversible illness and if there is no contraindication for treatment.

  1. Serum Testosterone Levels in Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnani, Prem D.; Dwyer, Margretta

    1986-01-01

    Reports that with the increase in diagnosis of offenders across the nation, physicians and psychiatric personnel need to be aware of low testosterone as a possible indicator of hypo-sexuality and possible concurrent offending behavior. (Author/ABB)

  2. Testosterone abolishes implicit subordination in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Rosenberger, Lisa A; Heany, Sarah J; Stein, Dan J; Honk, Jack van

    2016-10-01

    Neuro-evolutionary theories describe social anxiety as habitual subordinate tendencies acquired through a recursive cycle of social defeat and submissive reactions. If so, the steroid hormone testosterone might be of therapeutic value, as testosterone is a main force behind implicit dominance drive in many species including humans. We combined these two theories to investigate whether the tendency to submit to the dominance of others is an implicit mechanism in social anxiety (Study-1), and whether this can be relieved through testosterone administration (Study-2). Using interactive eye-tracking we demonstrate that socially anxious humans more rapidly avert gaze from subliminal angry eye contact (Study-1). We replicate this effect of implicit subordination in social anxiety in an independent sample, which is subsequently completely abolished after a single placebo-controlled sublingual testosterone administration (Study-2). These findings provide crucial evidence for hormonal and behavioral treatment strategies that specifically target mechanisms of dominance and subordination in social anxiety.

  3. Interactions of Morphine and Peptide 234 on Mean Plasma Testosterone Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Fariba; Khazali, Homayoun; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Kisspeptin-GPR54 system stimulates the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis; dysfunction of the gene encoding the GPR54 receptor causes hypogonadism and infertility. Opioid peptides inhibit the reproductive axis. Peptide 234 is a GPR54 receptor antagonist and blocks the stimulatory effects of kisspeptin on HPG axis. Objectives: Interactions of morphine, kisspeptin and peptide 234 on mean plasma testosterone concentration was investigated in rats. . Materials and Methods: In the present experimental study, seventy male Wistar rats in 14 groups (n = 5 in each group) received saline, different doses of kisspeptin (100 pmol, 1 or 3 nmol, Intracerebroventricular (ICV)), P234 (1 or 2.5 nmol) or Co- administration of kisspeptin, P234, morphine and naloxone at 09:00 - 09:30 am. In the co-administrated groups, kisspeptin was injected at 15 min following P234, morphine or naloxone injections. Blood samples were collected 60 min following injections. Plasma testosterone concentration was measured using the rat testosterone ELISA kit. Results: Injections of kisspeptin (1 or 3 nmol) significantly increased the mean testosterone concentration compared to saline. Injection of different doses of P234 (1 or 2.5nmol) did not significantly decrease mean testosterone compared to saline. Co-administration of kisspeptin and different doses of P234 significantly decreased mean testosterone concentration compared to the kisspeptin group. Co-administration of P234/morphine or P234/naloxone significantly decreased mean testosterone concentration compared to kisspeptin/saline, kisspeptin/morphine or kisspeptin/ naloxone groups. Conclusions: Morphine and kisspeptin/GPR54 signaling pathway may interact with each other to control the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:24696695

  4. Nandrolone decanoate interferes with testosterone biosynthesis altering blood-testis barrier components.

    PubMed

    Barone, Rosario; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Rappa, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Barone, Fulvio; Sangiorgi, Claudia; D'Amico, Daniela; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Cipolloni, Luigi; Di Felice, Valentina; Schiavone, Stefania; Rapisarda, Venerando; Sani, Gabriele; Tambo, Amos; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Pomara, Cristoforo

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether nandrolone decanoate (ND) use affects testosterone production and testicular morphology in a model of trained and sedentary mice. A group of mice underwent endurance training while another set led a sedentary lifestyle and were freely mobile within cages. All experimental groups were treated with either ND or peanut oil at different doses for 6 weeks. Testosterone serum levels were measured via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Western blot analysis and quantitative real-time PCR were utilized to determine gene and protein expression levels of the primary enzymes implicated in testosterone biosynthesis and gene expression levels of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) components. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were conducted for testicular morphological evaluation. The study demonstrated that moderate to high doses of ND induced a diminished serum testosterone level and altered the expression level of the key steroidogenic enzymes involved in testosterone biosynthesis. At the morphological level, ND induced degradation of the BTB by targeting the tight junction protein-1 (TJP1). ND stimulation deregulated metalloproteinase-9, metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and the tissue inhibitor of MMP-2. Moreover, ND administration resulted in a mislocalization of mucin-1. In conclusion, ND abuse induces a decline in testosterone production that is unable to regulate the internalization and redistribution of TJP1 and may induce the deregulation of other BTB constituents via the inhibition of MMP-2. ND may well be considered as both a potential inducer of male infertility and a potential risk factor to a low endogenous bioavailable testosterone. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. Testosterone induces an intracellular calcium increase by a nongenomic mechanism in cultured rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Ibarra, Cristian; Estrada, Manuel; Chiong, Mario; Soto, Dagoberto; Parra, Valentina; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Lavandero, Sergio

    2006-03-01

    Androgens are associated with important effects on the heart, such as hypertrophy or apoptosis. These responses involve the intracellular androgen receptor. However, the mechanisms of how androgens activate several membrane signaling pathways are not fully elucidated. We have investigated the effect of testosterone on intracellular calcium in cultured rat cardiac myocytes. Using fluo3-AM and epifluorescence microscopy, we found that exposure to testosterone rapidly (1-7 min) led to an increase of intracellular Ca2+, an effect that persisted in the absence of external Ca2+. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that these effects occurred before translocation of the intracellular androgen receptor to the perinuclear zone. Pretreatment of the cells with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethylester and thapsigargin blocked this response, suggesting the involvement of internal Ca2+ stores. U-73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, and xestospongin C, an inhibitor of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, abolished the Ca2+ signal. The rise in intracellular Ca2+ was not inhibited by cyproterone, an antagonist of intracellular androgen receptor. Moreover, the cell impermeant testosterone-BSA complex also produced the Ca2+ signal, indicating its origin in the plasma membrane. This effect was observed in cultured neonatal and adult rat cardiac myocytes. Pertussis toxin and the adenoviral transduction of beta- adrenergic receptor kinase carboxy terminal peptide, a peptide inhibitor of betagamma-subunits of G protein, abolished the testosterone-induced Ca2+ release. In summary, this is the first study of rapid, nongenomic intracellular Ca2+ signaling of testosterone in cardiac myocytes. Using various inhibitors and testosterone-BSA complex, the mechanism for the rapid, testosterone-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ is through activation of a plasma membrane receptor associated with a Pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein-phospholipase C

  6. Androgens and opiates: testosterone interaction with morphine self-administration in male rats.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sarah E; Wood, Ruth I

    2014-05-07

    Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) and opioids intersects in athletics. Evidence from humans and animals suggests that AAS may act in the brain through opioidergic mechanisms, and may potentiate effects of opioids. To determine whether AAS enhance motivation for opioid intake, in this study, male rats were treated chronically for 6 weeks with high levels of testosterone (7.5 mg/kg) or vehicle subcutaneously, and they were tested for morphine self-administration under fixed-ratio (FR) and progressive-ratio (PR) schedules. Initially, rats received chronic morphine infusion (16.8-50 mg/kg/day) over 7 days. Subsequently, rats were tested for morphine self-administration (3.2 mg/kg) 6 h/day for 3 days under an FR1 schedule, and for 7 days under a PR 9-4 schedule. Under the FR1 schedule, controls self-administered more morphine (95.9±8.5 mg/kg) than testosterone-treated rats (63.2±7.2 mg/kg; P<0.05). Under the PR schedule, there was no effect of testosterone on morphine intake or operant responding (26.7±5.7 responses vs. 30.9±5.9 responses for vehicle; NS). To determine whether testosterone enhances morphine sedation, additional rats were treated with testosterone or vehicle and evaluated for locomotor behavior and rearing activity over 30 min in response to saline or 10 mg/kg morphine. Morphine inhibited locomotor activity and rearing; testosterone selectively reduced rearing behavior, but did not alter locomotor behavior. These results suggest that testosterone does not increase motivation for morphine.

  7. The Anxiolytic and Antidepressant-like Effects of Testosterone and Estrogen in Gonadectomized Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Nicole; Saland, Samantha K.; Duclot, Florian; He, Huan; Mercer, Roger; Kabbaj, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Background While the influence of testosterone levels on vulnerability to affective disorders is not straightforward, research suggests this hormone may confer some degree of resiliency in men. We recently demonstrated a role for the dentate gyrus in mediating testosterone’s protective effects on depressive-like behavior in gonadectomized male rats. Here, testosterone may exert its effects through androgen receptor-mediated mechanisms or via local aromatization to estradiol. Methods Gonadectomized male rats were implanted with a placebo, testosterone, or estradiol pellet, and subsequent protective anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of testosterone and its aromatized metabolite, estradiol, were then investigated in the open field and sucrose preference tests, respectively. Moreover, their influence on gene expression in the hippocampus was analyzed by genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis. Finally, the contribution of testosterone’s aromatization within the dentate gyrus was assessed by local infusion of the aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, whose efficacy was confirmed by LC-MS/MS. Results Both hormones had antidepressant-like effects associated with a substantial overlap in transcriptional regulation, particularly in synaptic plasticity- and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway-related genes. Further, chronic aromatase inhibition within the dentate gyrus blocked the protective effects of testosterone. Conclusions Both testosterone and estradiol exhibit anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in gonadectomized male rats, while similarly regulating critical mediators of these behaviors, suggesting common underlying mechanisms. Accordingly, we demonstrated that testosterone’s protective effects are mediated, in part, by its aromatization in the dentate gyrus. These findings thus provide further insight into a role for estradiol in mediating the protective anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of testosterone. PMID:25683735

  8. Diagnosis and management of testosterone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    McBride, James A; Carson, Culley C; Coward, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) use has dramatically increased over the past decade, due to the availability of newer agents, aggressive marketing, and an increasing incidence of testosterone deficiency (TD). Despite the increase in TST, a degree of ambiguity remains as to the exact diagnostic criteria of TD, and administration and monitoring of TST. One explanation for this phenomenon is the complex role testosterone plays in multiple physiologic pathways. Numerous medical co-morbidities and medications can alter testosterone levels resulting in a wide range of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms of TD. The diagnosis is also challenging due to the lack of a definitive serum total testosterone level that reliably correlates with symptoms. This observation is particularly true in the aging male and is exacerbated by inconsistencies between different laboratory assays. Several prominent medical societies have developed guideline statements to clarify the diagnosis, but they differ from each other and with expert opinion in several ways. Aside from diagnostic dilemmas, there are numerous subtle advantages and disadvantages of the various testosterone agents to appreciate. The available TST agents have changed significantly over the past decade similar to the trends in the diagnosis of TD. Therefore, as the usage of TST increases, clinicians will be challenged to maintain an up-to-date understanding of TD and TST. The purpose of this review is to provide a clear description of the current strategies for diagnosis and management of TD. PMID:25532575

  9. Diagnosis and management of testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    McBride, James A; Carson, Culley C; Coward, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) use has dramatically increased over the past decade, due to the availability of newer agents, aggressive marketing, and an increasing incidence of testosterone deficiency (TD). Despite the increase in TST, a degree of ambiguity remains as to the exact diagnostic criteria of TD, and administration and monitoring of TST. One explanation for this phenomenon is the complex role testosterone plays in multiple physiologic pathways. Numerous medical co-morbidities and medications can alter testosterone levels resulting in a wide range of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms of TD. The diagnosis is also challenging due to the lack of a definitive serum total testosterone level that reliably correlates with symptoms. This observation is particularly true in the aging male and is exacerbated by inconsistencies between different laboratory assays. Several prominent medical societies have developed guideline statements to clarify the diagnosis, but they differ from each other and with expert opinion in several ways. Aside from diagnostic dilemmas, there are numerous subtle advantages and disadvantages of the various testosterone agents to appreciate. The available TST agents have changed significantly over the past decade similar to the trends in the diagnosis of TD. Therefore, as the usage of TST increases, clinicians will be challenged to maintain an up-to-date understanding of TD and TST. The purpose of this review is to provide a clear description of the current strategies for diagnosis and management of TD.

  10. Diagnosing and managing low serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Ana Marcella; Mulkey, Zachary; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin; Yarbrough, Shannon

    2014-10-01

    Measuring testosterone levels became easier in the 1970s, and it wasn't long before levels were being checked in men across all age groups. At that time, several authors reported an age-associated decline of serum testosterone levels beginning in the fourth or fifth decades of life. Other studies found that the decline in testosterone with age might be more related to comorbidities that develop in many aging men. Aggressive marketing campaigns by pharmaceutical companies have led to increased awareness of this topic, and primary care physicians are seeing more patients who are concerned about "low T." Unfortunately, testosterone replacement therapy has not been straightforward. Many men with low testosterone levels have no symptoms, and many men with symptoms who receive treatment and reach goal testosterone levels have no improvement in their symptoms. The actual prevalence of hypogonadism has been estimated to be 39% in men aged 45 years or older presenting to primary care offices in the United States. As the US population ages, this number is likely to increase. This article, targeted to primary care physicians, reviews the concept of late-onset hypogonadism, describes how to determine the patients who might benefit from therapy, and offers recommendations regarding the workup and initiation of treatment.

  11. Testosterone regulates the autophagic clearance of androgen binding protein in rat Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Yang, Hao-Zheng; Xu, Long-Mei; Huang, Yi-Ran; Dai, Hui-Li; Kang, Xiao-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of androgen-binding protein (ABP) is associated with a number of endocrine and andrology diseases. However, the ABP metabolism in Sertoli cells is largely unknown. We report that autophagy degrades ABP in rat Sertoli cells, and the autophagic clearance of ABP is regulated by testosterone, which prolongs the ABP biological half-life by inhibiting autophagy. Further studies identified that the autophagic clearance of ABP might be selectively regulated by testosterone, independent of stress (hypoxia)-induced autophagic degradation. These data demonstrate that testosterone up-regulates ABP expression at least partially by suppressing the autophagic degradation. We report a novel finding with respect to the mechanisms by which ABP is cleared, and by which the process is regulated in Sertoli cells. PMID:25745956

  12. Prostaglandin D2 Uses Components of ROS Signaling to Enhance Testosterone Production in Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Mantel, Alon; McDonald, J Tyson; Goldsborough, Kennedy; Harvey, Valerie M; Chan, Joanne

    2017-10-01

    Elevated levels of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) have been shown to be present in the bald scalp of androgenic alopecia (AGA) patients and to functionally inhibit hair growth. However, its precise mechanism in AGA has yet to be clearly defined. Although testosterone plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of AGA, the existence of a possible link between PGD2 and testosterone in skin has not been investigated. Here we show that human keratinocytes treated with PGD2 show enhanced capacity to convert the weak androgen, androstenedione, to testosterone. At the same time, treatment with PGD2 induced reactive oxygen species as indicated by generation of the lipid peroxidation product, 4-hydroxynonenal. To determine whether these two events are linked, we used the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine, which blocked the enhanced testosterone production from PGD2-treated keratinocytes. Our study suggests the existence of a possible crosstalk between the PGD2-reactive oxygen species axis and testosterone metabolism in keratinocytes. Thus, we propose that AGA patients might benefit from the use of N-acetyl-cysteine or other antioxidants as a supplement to currently available or emerging AGA therapies such as finasteride, minoxidil, and PGD2 receptor blockers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. IgG4 related sclerosing mastitis: expanding the morphological spectrum of IgG4 related diseases.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Abhijit; Bal, Amanjit; Das, Ashim; Singh, Gurpreet

    2015-01-01

    IgG4 related disease (IgG4RD) is a recently recognised condition characterised by mass forming lesions associated with storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate rich in IgG4 positive plasma cells and elevated serum IgG4 levels. Although rare, mammary involvement has been reported as IgG4 related sclerosing mastitis, the morphological counterpart of a growing family of IgG4 related diseases. A total of 17 cases belonging to mass forming benign inflammatory breast lesions such as plasma cell mastitis, granulomatous lobular mastitis, non-specific mastitis and inflammatory pseudotumour were investigated as a possible member of IgG4 related sclerosing mastitis. Clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemistry findings were noted in all cases. Cases diagnosed as inflammatory pseudotumour showed all the histopathological features of IgG4RD along with increased number of IgG4 positive plasma cells and IgG4/IgG ratio >40%. However, only a few IgG4 positive cells were seen in plasma cell mastitis, granulomatous lobular mastitis and non-specific mastitis cases. These cases also did not fulfill the morphological criteria for the diagnosis of IgG4 related diseases. IgG4RD should be excluded in plasma cell rich lesions diagnosed on core biopsies by IgG4 immunostaining. This can avoid unnecessary surgery as IgG4 related diseases respond to simple and effective steroid treatment.

  14. Serum IgG subclasses in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoze; Li, Ping; Wu, Di; Xu, Dong; Hou, Yong; Wang, Qian; Li, Mengtao; Li, Yongzhe; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Shi, Qun

    2015-01-01

    To characterize serum IgG subclass levels in several autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We aimed to analyze serum IgG subclass distribution and to test whether serum IgG4 levels are elevated in these diseases. Serum IgG subclass levels from 102 pSS, 102 SSc, 100 SLE, and 59 PBC patients, as well as 40 healthy controls (HCs), were measured using the immunonephelometric assay. The distribution of IgG subclasses among these autoimmune diseases was analyzed. In this cross-sectional study, serum IgG1 (IgG1/IgG) and/or IgG3 (IgG3/IgG) were significantly increased, compared with those in HCs. Only 6.34% of patients had levels of serum IgG4 >135 mg/dL. There were no significant differences in the frequency of elevated serum IgG4 levels between patients and HC. In pSS, serum IgG1 levels were much higher than those in other disease groups, whereas serum IgG2 and IgG3 levels were most prominently increased in PBC. A strikingly different serum IgG subclass distribution was detected in patients with autoimmune diseases compared with HCs. Serum IgG subclass levels also showed distinct characteristics among different autoimmune diseases. Serum IgG4 levels in these patients were lower or not much higher than those in HCs, which differed from IgG4-related diseases.

  15. IgG4-related kidney disease--A review.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Dinesh; Pattnaik, Niharika; Silowash, Russell; Mohanty, Sambit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently recognized systemic autoimmune disorder characterized by high levels of serum IgG4 and dense infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in multiple organs. The condition was first described as a disease of the pancreas, and has since been recognized in various organ systems including the kidneys. IgG4 related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) signifies any form of renal involvement by IgG4-RD. The most common renal involvement by IgG4-RD is tubulointerstitial nephritis. Glomerular disease, in particular membranous glomerulonephritis, may also be seen. Other co-existent glomerular diseases such as IgA nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and mesangioproliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis may be identified. IgG4-related plasma cell arteritis has also been noted in the kidney. As with IgG4-RD in general, IgG4 related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) usually occurs in middle-aged to elderly men. Common findings in IgG4-RKD are plasma cell-rich interstitial inflammatory infiltrate either in a focal or diffuse pattern with increased IgG4+ plasma cells, expansile swirling interstitial fibrosis, high levels of serum IgG and IgG4, hypocomplementemia, high serum IgE levels and/or peripheral blood eosinophilia. By immunofluorescence, most of the cases show IgG4 dominant tubular basement membrane immune complex deposits. Similar to IgG4-RD, IgG4-RKD often shows a rapid response to steroid therapy. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on IgG4-RKD and its clinical relevance.

  16. Asymmetric Fab glycosylation in guinea-pig IgG1 and IgG2.

    PubMed Central

    Malan Borel, I; Gentile, T; Angelucci, J; Margni, R A; Binaghi, R A

    1990-01-01

    The presence of asymmetric antibody molecules has been investigated in both IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses of guinea-pig immunoglobulins. It was found that about 20% of the IgG1 and 10% of the IgG2 were of asymmetric type. The proportion was essentially the same in the sera of normal animals, animals hyperimmunized with dinitrophenyl-bovine gamma globulin (DNP-BGG) and Freund's adjuvant, and animals infected with Trichinella spiralis. In the case of animals immunized with DNP-BGG, no differences were observed in the proportion of asymmetric molecules between the specific antibodies and the IgG not specific for the immunizing antigen. It is concluded that the asymmetric glycosylation occurs to a different extent in each subclass and that it is not affected by the antigen specificity of the antibodies studied. PMID:2379937

  17. Reflexive testosterone release: a model system for studying the nongenomic effects of testosterone upon male behavior.

    PubMed

    Nyby, John G

    2008-05-01

    Male mammals of many species exhibit reflexive testosterone release in mating situations. In house mice (Mus musculus), the dramatic robustness of such release, occurring primarily in response to a novel female, suggests some function. The resulting testosterone elevations typically peak during copulatory behavior and may serve to activate transitory motivational and physiological responses that facilitate reproduction. However, such a function requires that testosterone be working through either nongenomic, or very quick genomic, mechanisms. The first part of the review describes reflexive sex hormone release in house mice. The second part summarizes research implicating testosterone's fast actions in affecting anxiety, reward, learning, analgesia, and penile reflexes in rodents, all of which could optimize male mating success. The review concludes with a speculative model of how spontaneous and reflexive hormone release might interact to regulate reproductive behavior and why mice appear to be an ideal species for examining testosterone's quick effects.

  18. Human polyreactive IgM monoclonal antibodies with blocking activity against self-reactive IgG.

    PubMed

    Melero, J; Tarragó, D; Núñez-Roldán, A; Sánchez, B

    1997-04-01

    Natural IgM antibodies have been found to be involved in the control of IgG reactivity in normal serum. The authors investigated the blocking activity of four human IgM monoclonal antibodies (BY-2, BY-7, BY-10 and IRM-7) derived from B-cells from blood samples of three renal dialysis patients, which had shown multispecific properties similar to those observed for natural polyreactive autoantibodies. To achieve this, competitive inhibition assays were performed with these MoAbs on the binding of IgG purified from a healthy control, three patients with SLE, and two patients with autoimmune thyroiditis, to histone, dsDNA, RNP and thyroglobulin. MoAbs inhibited binding of self-reactive IgG to histone and dsDNA, but not to thyroglobulin or RNP, of natural and active or inactive phase disease-associated autoreactive IgG. The inhibitory effect of the MoAbs was mediated by V-region dependent interactions with autoreactive IgG, as shown by the ability of these MoAbs to block the binding of F(ab')2 fragments of autoreactive IgG to antigens (histone and dsDNA). The blocking of autoantibody activity was dose-dependent with maximal inhibition occurring at a specific molar ratio between the patient's IgG and a given MoAb. In contrast, MoAbs did not inhibit binding of IgG alloantibodies present in the sera of four polytransfused renal dialysis patients to target antigens on the surface of different cells. These results support the concept of a functional idiotypic network regulating autoimmune responses, and suggest that the IgM MoAbs under study may be natural polyreactive antibodies belonging to the physiological network of autoantibodies with highly connected V-regions, capable of binding and functionally neutralizing V-regions of natural and pathologic autoantibodies.

  19. Heat sensitivity of porcine IgG.

    PubMed

    Metzger, J J; Bourdieu, C; Rouze, P; Houdayer, M

    1975-09-01

    The sensitivity to heat of porcine IgG was studied. The serum from immunized pigs was heated at 56 degrees C for 30 min as for decomplementation. The elution pattern of the serum proteins on an agarose gel column showed a dramatic change with the appearance of a large peak of the gel-excluded material. This peak contained mainly IgG molecules which still retained its antibody activity. This fact points to misinterpretations which can easily occur in 7S and 19S antibody recognition during the porcine immune response. Correlation is suggested of this property with the large number of interheavy chain disulfide bridges present in porcine IgG.

  20. Testosterone, cardiovascular risk, and hormonophobia.

    PubMed

    Morgentaler, Abraham

    2014-06-01

    A public outcry against testosterone (T) therapy has suddenly occurred based on two reports suggesting treatment was associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) risks. To analyze scientific and social bases for concerns regarding T therapy. Analysis of recent articles regarding CV risks with T and comparison with events surrounding publication of results of the Women's Health Initiative in 2002. In the first study, the percentage of individuals with an adverse event was lower by half in men who received T compared with untreated men (10.1% vs. 21.2%). However, an opposite conclusion was reached via complex statistics. The second study reported minor increased rate of nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) up to 90 days after receiving a T prescription compared with the prior 12 months. However, there was no control group, so it is unknown whether this MI rate was increased, reduced, or unchanged compared with untreated men. Neither study provided substantive evidence of risk, yet these were lauded as proof of dangers, despite a substantial literature to the contrary. Similar events followed the publication of the Women's Health Initiative in 2002 when a media frenzy over increased risks with female hormone replacement therapy obscured the fact that the reported excess risk was clinically meaningless, at two events per 1,000 person-years. Stakeholders driving concerns regarding hormone risks are unlikely to be clinicians with real-world patient experience. The use of weak studies as proof of danger indicates that cultural (i.e., nonscientific) forces are at play. Negative media stories touting T's risks appear fueled by antipharma sentiment, anger against aggressive marketing, and antisexuality. This stance is best described as "hormonophobia." As history shows, evidence alone may be insufficient to alter a public narrative. The true outrage is that social forces and hysteria have combined to deprive men of a useful treatment without regard for medical science.

  1. 'Roid rage in rats? Testosterone effects on aggressive motivation, impulsivity and tyrosine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I; Armstrong, Abigail; Fridkin, Vlad; Shah, Vivek; Najafi, Allison; Jakowec, Michael

    2013-02-17

    In humans and animals, anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) increase aggression, but the underlying behavioral mechanisms are unclear. AAS may increase the motivation to fight. Alternatively, AAS may increase impulsive behavior, consistent with the popular image of 'roid rage. To test this, adolescent male rats were treated chronically with testosterone (7.5mg/kg) or vehicle and tested for aggressive motivation and impulsivity. Rats were trained to respond on a nose-poke on a 10 min fixed-interval schedule for the opportunity to fight in their home cage with an unfamiliar rat. Although testosterone increased aggression (6.3±1.3 fights/5 min vs 2.4±0.8 for controls, p<0.05), there was no difference in operant responding (28.4±1.6 nose-pokes/10 min for testosterone, 32.4±7.0 for vehicle). This suggests that testosterone does not enhance motivation for aggression. To test for impulsivity, rats were trained to respond for food in a delay-discounting procedure. In an operant chamber, one lever delivered one food pellet immediately, the other lever gave 4 pellets after a delay (0, 15, 30 or 45 s). In testosterone- and vehicle-treated rats, body weights and food intake did not differ. However, testosterone-treated rats chose the larger, delayed reward more often (4.5±0.7 times in 10 trials with 45 s delay) than vehicle controls (2.5±0.5 times, p<0.05), consistent with a reduction in impulsive choice. Thus, although chronic high-dose testosterone enhances aggression, this does not include an increase in impulsive behavior or motivation to fight. This is further supported by measurement of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) by Western immunoblot analysis in brain regions important for motivation (nucleus accumbens, Acb) and executive function (medial prefrontal cortex, PFC). There were no differences in TH between testosterone- and vehicle-treated rats in Acb or PFC. However, testosterone significantly reduced TH (to 76.9±3.1% of controls, p<0.05) in the caudate-putamen, a

  2. ‘Roid rage in rats? Testosterone effects on aggressive motivation, impulsivity and tyrosine hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.; Armstrong, Abigail; Fridkin, Vlad; Shah, Vivek; Najafi, Allison; Jakowec, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In humans and animals, anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) increase aggression, but the underlying behavioral mechanisms are unclear. AAS may increase the motivation to fight. Alternatively, AAS may increase impulsive behavior, consistent with the popular image of ‘roid rage. To test this, adolescent male rats were treated chronically with testosterone (7.5 mg/kg) or vehicle and tested for aggressive motivation and impulsivity. Rats were trained to respond on a nose-poke on a 10 min fixed-interval schedule for the opportunity to fight in their home cage with an unfamiliar rat. Although testosterone increased aggression (6.3±1.3 fights/5 min vs 2.4±0.8 for controls, p<0.05), there was no difference in operant responding (28.4±1.6 nose-pokes/ 10 min for testosterone, 32.4±7.0 for vehicle). This suggests that testosterone does not enhance motivation for aggression. To test for impulsivity, rats were trained to respond for food in a delay-discounting procedure. In an operant chamber, one lever delivered one food pellet immediately, the other lever gave 4 pellets after a delay (0, 15, 30 or 45 s). In testosterone- and vehicle-treated rats, body weights and food intake did not differ. However, testosterone-treated rats chose the larger, delayed reward more often (4.5±0.7 times in 10 trials with 45 s delay) than vehicle controls (2.5±0.5 times, p<0.05), consistent with a reduction in impulsive choice. Thus, although chronic high-dose testosterone enhances aggression, this does not include an increase in impulsive behavior or motivation to fight. This is further supported by measurement of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) by Western immunoblot analysis in brain regions important for motivation (nucleus accumbens, Acb) and executive function (medial prefrontal cortex, PFC). There were no differences in TH between testosterone- and vehicle-treated rats in Acb or PFC. However, testosterone significantly reduced TH (to 76.9±3.1% of controls, p<0.05) in the caudate-putamen, a

  3. [IgG4-related disease].

    PubMed

    González-Moreno, Juan; Losada López, Inés; Ortego Centeno, Norberto

    2015-12-21

    IgG4-related disease is a recently described clinicopathological entity showing a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that share a common pathology. Its most characteristic feature is the formation of inflammatory tumors in different organs, which makes differentiation mainly with neoplastic diseases fundamental. The inflammatory process is typically comprised of IgG4 lymphoplasmacytic cells. The pathophysiological role of the immunoglobulin is not clear. The treatment of choice is corticosteroids. This article aims to summarize the main features of the disease.

  4. Testosterone, territoriality, and the 'home advantage'.

    PubMed

    Neave, Nick; Wolfson, Sandy

    2003-02-01

    The consistently better performance seen by teams in various sporting contexts when playing at home is referred to as the 'home advantage'. Various explanations have been put forward to account for this robust phenomenon, though none has yet focussed on possible hormonal factors. In an initial study, we showed that salivary testosterone levels in soccer players were significantly higher before a home game than an away game.In a second study involving a different group of soccer players, this finding was replicated over two home games, two away games, and three training sessions. Perceived rivalry of the opposing team was important as testosterone levels were higher before playing an 'extreme' rival than a 'moderate' rival. Self-reported measures of mood in both studies were not linked to testosterone level. The present results corroborate and extend earlier findings on the relationships between testosterone, territoriality, and dominance in human competitive encounters and further suggest an important role for testosterone in the home advantage seen in various team sports.

  5. Prenatal Testosterone and Preschool Disruptive Behavior Disorders.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Bethan A; Martel, Michelle M

    2013-11-01

    Disruptive Behaviors Disorders (DBD), including Oppositional-Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), are fairly common and highly impairing childhood behavior disorders that can be diagnosed as early as preschool. Prenatal exposure to testosterone may be particularly relevant to these early-emerging DBDs that exhibit a sex-biased prevalence rate favoring males. The current study examined associations between preschool DBD symptom domains and prenatal exposure to testosterone measured indirectly via right 2D:4D finger-length ratios. The study sample consisted of 109 preschool-age children between ages 3 and 6 (64% males;72% with DBD) and their primary caregivers. Primary caregivers completed a semi-structured interview (i.e., Kiddie Disruptive Behavior Disorder Schedule), as well as symptom questionnaires (i.e., Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, Peer Conflict Scale); teachers and/or daycare providers completed symptom questionnaires and children provided measures of prenatal testosterone exposure, measured indirectly via finger-length ratios (i.e., right 2D:4D). Study results indicated a significant association of high prenatal testosterone (i.e., smaller right 2D:4D) with high hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms in girls but not boys, suggesting that the effect may be driven by, or might only exist in, girls. The present study suggests that prenatal exposure to testosterone may increase risk for early ADHD, particularly hyperactivity-impulsivity, in preschool girls.

  6. Prenatal Testosterone and Preschool Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Bethan A.; Martel, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Disruptive Behaviors Disorders (DBD), including Oppositional-Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), are fairly common and highly impairing childhood behavior disorders that can be diagnosed as early as preschool. Prenatal exposure to testosterone may be particularly relevant to these early-emerging DBDs that exhibit a sex-biased prevalence rate favoring males. The current study examined associations between preschool DBD symptom domains and prenatal exposure to testosterone measured indirectly via right 2D:4D finger-length ratios. The study sample consisted of 109 preschool-age children between ages 3 and 6 (64% males;72% with DBD) and their primary caregivers. Primary caregivers completed a semi-structured interview (i.e., Kiddie Disruptive Behavior Disorder Schedule), as well as symptom questionnaires (i.e., Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, Peer Conflict Scale); teachers and/or daycare providers completed symptom questionnaires and children provided measures of prenatal testosterone exposure, measured indirectly via finger-length ratios (i.e., right 2D:4D). Study results indicated a significant association of high prenatal testosterone (i.e., smaller right 2D:4D) with high hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms in girls but not boys, suggesting that the effect may be driven by, or might only exist in, girls. The present study suggests that prenatal exposure to testosterone may increase risk for early ADHD, particularly hyperactivity-impulsivity, in preschool girls. PMID:25598567

  7. Testosterone replacement therapy in obese males.

    PubMed

    Drewa, Tomasz; Olszewska-Słonina, Dorota; Chlosta, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Controversy surrounds testosterone replacement therapy in obese ageing due to no generally accepted lower limits of normal testosterone level and high prevalence of hypogonadal symptoms in the ageing male population and the non-specific nature of these symptoms. Late onset hypogonadism is a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advancing age, often coexisting with obesity and metabolic syndrome. High fat and carbohydrates (fructose) consumption is responsible for development of obesity and metabolic syndrome which is one of risk factors for hypogonadism in older men. High fructose intake has been shown to cause dyslipidemia and to impair hepatic insulin sensitivity. Obesity and lack of physical activity negatively influence testosterone level. Low testosterone level should be regarded as an effect of obesity, but reverse relationship has not been proved yet. The management of late-onset hypogonadism symptoms has to be treated by a change of a life style and prevented with healthy nutrition and physical activity. The question related to rational indications for testosterone replacement therapy in obese males seems to be still actual.

  8. Competition, testosterone, and adult neurobehavioral plasticity.

    PubMed

    Losecaat Vermeer, A B; Riečanský, I; Eisenegger, C

    2016-01-01

    Motivation in performance is often measured via competitions. Winning a competition has been found to increase the motivation to perform in subsequent competitions. One potential neurobiological mechanism that regulates the motivation to compete involves sex hormones, such as the steroids testosterone and estradiol. A wealth of studies in both nonhuman animals and humans have shown that a rise in testosterone levels before and after winning a competition enhances the motivation to compete. There is strong evidence for acute behavioral effects in response to steroid hormones. Intriguingly, a substantial testosterone surge following a win also appears to improve an individual's performance in later contests resulting in a higher probability of winning again. These effects may occur via androgen and estrogen pathways modulating dopaminergic regions, thereby behavior on longer timescales. Hormones thus not only regulate and control social behavior but are also key to adult neurobehavioral plasticity. Here, we present literature showing hormone-driven behavioral effects that persist for extended periods of time beyond acute effects of the hormone, highlighting a fundamental role of sex steroid hormones in adult neuroplasticity. We provide an overview of the relationship between testosterone, motivation measured from objective effort, and their influence in enhancing subsequent effort in competitions. Implications for an important role of testosterone in enabling neuroplasticity to improve performance will be discussed. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  10. Testosterone treatment of hypogonadal men participating in competitive sports.

    PubMed

    Gooren, L J; Behre, H M

    2008-06-01

    Testosterone has a steeply dose-dependent effect on muscle mass and strength irrespective of gonadal status. So, for reasons of fairness, people who engage in competitive sports should not administer exogenous testosterone raising their blood testosterone levels beyond the range of normal. There is a ban on exogenous androgens for men and women in sports, but an exception has been made for men with androgen deficiency due to pituitary or testicular disease. Men who receive testosterone administration for the indication hypogonadism have an interest in the use of testosterone preparations generating blood testosterone levels within the normal range of healthy, eugonadal men. On the grounds of a positive correlation between blood testosterone concentrations muscle and volume/strength, they are best served with a parenteral testosterone preparation, rather than transdermal testosterone, but they should not run the risk of being excluded from competition because of supraphysiological testosterone levels. The latter is a realistic risk with the traditional parenteral testosterone esters. The new parenteral testosterone undecanoate preparation offers much better perspectives. Its pharmacokinetics have been investigated in detail and there is a fair degree of predictability of resulting blood testosterone levels with use of this preparation.

  11. Prostate Cancer Cells Differ in Testosterone Accumulation, Dihydrotestosterone Conversion, and Androgen Receptor Signaling Response to Steroid 5α-Reductase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Godoy, Alejandro; Azzouni, Faris; Wilton, John H.; Ip, Clement; Mohler, James L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Blocking 5α-reductase-mediated testosterone conversion to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) with finasteride or dutasteride is the driving hypothesis behind two prostate cancer prevention trials. Factors affecting intracellular androgen levels and the androgen receptor (AR) signaling axis need to be examined systematically in order to fully understand the outcome of interventions using these drugs. METHODS The expression of three 5α-reductase isozymes, as determined by immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR, was studied in five human prostate cancer cell lines. Intracellular testosterone and DHT were analyzed using mass spectrometry. A luciferase reporter assay and AR-regulated genes were used to evaluate the modulation of AR activity. RESULTS Prostate cancer cells were capable of accumulating testosterone to a level 15–50 times higher than that in the medium. The profile and expression of 5α-reductase isozymes did not predict the capacity to convert testosterone to DHT. Finasteride and dutasteride were able to depress testosterone uptake in addition to lowering intracellular DHT. The inhibition of AR activity following drug treatment often exceeded the expected response due to reduced availability of DHT. The ability to maintain high intracellular testosterone might compensate for the shortage of DHT. CONCLUSIONS The biological effect of finasteride or dutasteride appears to be complex and may depend on the interplay of several factors, which include testosterone turnover, enzymology of DHT production, ability to use testosterone and DHT interchangeably, and propensity of cells for off-target AR inhibitory effect. PMID:23813697

  12. IgG4-related kidney disease – an update

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Takako

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently recognized systemic inflammatory disorder that can affect most organs/tissues such as sarcoidosis. The kidney is a frequently affected organ with tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN), the representative lesion of IgG4-RD. This review focuses on the latest knowledge of IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD). Recent findings A wide range of renal manifestations of IgG4-RD, that is TIN, membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) and other glomerular lesions, and pyelitis, are collectively referred to as IgG4-RKD. Clinically, decreased renal function, or characteristic imaging findings such as multiple low-density lesions on contrast-enhanced computed tomography or diffuse thickening of the renal pelvic wall, are typical presenting features. Although a rapid response to corticosteroid therapy is a very important feature of IgG4-TIN, in cases in which renal function is moderately to severely decreased before therapy, only partial recovery of renal function is obtained. Summary TIN with characteristic imaging findings is a typical manifestation of IgG4-RKD in the interstitium, while MGN is a representative manifestation of the glomerular lesions. Although IgG4 is a central feature of IgG4-RD, the recent discovery of IgG4-negative IgG4-RD raises questions about the causative role of the IgG4 molecule in this context. PMID:25594543

  13. Effects of dutasteride on serum free-testosterone and clinical significance of testosterone changes.

    PubMed

    Enatsu, N; Miyake, H; Haraguchi, T; Chiba, K; Fujisawa, M

    2016-12-01

    Sixty-two patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) who were being treated with dutasteride participated in this study. Prostate volume, uroflowmetry, blood tests, the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) were determined before and 1, 3 and 12 months after the treatment with dutasteride. Patients were divided into two groups based on changes in serum testosterone after 1 month: Group A (>20% increase; n = 33) or Group B (<20% increase; n = 29). Serum free-testosterone levels were 20.4% higher after 1 month and remained constant thereafter. When Groups A and B were compared, baseline free-testosterone levels were significantly lower in Group A, IPSS QOL was significantly better in Group A at 3 and 12 months, and no significant differences were observed in uroflowmetry, prostate volume, IPSS or IIEF-5. A univariate analysis identified serum free-testosterone levels and the IPSS storage symptom subscore as significant factors influencing IPSS QOL at 12 months, and only the IPSS storage symptom subscore appeared to be independently related to IPSS QOL. These results indicate that dutasteride increases serum free-testosterone levels in BPH patients, particularly with low baseline free-testosterone levels, and the increase in free-testosterone may have further add-on impacts on their urinary tract symptoms.

  14. Exogenous Testosterone, Finasteride and Castration Effects on Testosterone, Insulin, Zinc and Chromium in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yousofvand, Namdar; Zarei, Fatemeh; Ghanbari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although effects of trace elements on secretion of sex steroids and insulin have been studied, the effects of these hormones on serum level of trace elements have been rarely investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of testosterone and finasteride administration and castration on serum levels of testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium. Methods: Male adult rats (n = 32) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8). Group 1, control; Group 2, castration, castration was done at the first day of the study; Group 3, finasteride (20 mg/kg/day, dissolved in drinking water) and Group 4, testosterone (5 mg/kg/day, i.p.). At the end of the period of the study (35 days), serum testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium levels were determined in the blood samples collected directly from the right atrium of the heart of the animals. Results: The data indicated that the serum levels of testosterone, insulin and zinc were significantly increased (P<0.01) in testosterone-administrated and finasteride groups, but the level of chromium was decreased in both groups (P<0.01). Castrated group had the lowest serum levels of testosterone, insulin and zinc (P<0.05). Also, the levels of serum chromium in this group were increased. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that testosterone and finasteride increases insulin and zinc levels and decreases chromium levels in the serum of male adult rats. According to these data, it seems that testosterone may affect glucose cycle through effect on serum insulin levels and trace elements such as zinc and chromium. PMID:23279835

  15. Exogenous testosterone, finasteride and castration effects on testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Yousofvand, Namdar; Zarei, Fatemeh; Ghanbari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although effects of trace elements on secretion of sex steroids and insulin have been studied, the effects of these hormones on serum level of trace elements have been rarely investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of testosterone and finasteride administration and castration on serum levels of testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium. Male adult rats (n = 32) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8). Group 1, control; Group 2, castration, castration was done at the first day of the study; Group 3, finasteride (20 mg/kg/day, dissolved in drinking water) and Group 4, testosterone (5 mg/kg/day, i.p.). At the end of the period of the study (35 days), serum testosterone, insulin, zinc and chromium levels were determined in the blood samples collected directly from the right atrium of the heart of the animals. The data indicated that the serum levels of testosterone, insulin and zinc were significantly increased (P<0.01) in testosterone-administrated and finasteride groups, but the level of chromium was decreased in both groups (P<0.01). Castrated group had the lowest serum levels of testosterone, insulin and zinc (P<0.05). Also, the levels of serum chromium in this group were increased. The study demonstrates that testosterone and finasteride increases insulin and zinc levels and decreases chromium levels in the serum of male adult rats. According to these data, it seems that testosterone may affect glucose cycle through effect on serum insulin levels and trace elements such as zinc and chromium.

  16. Gender moderates the relationship between testosterone and marital interaction.

    PubMed

    Cohan, Catherine L; Booth, Alan; Granger, Douglas A

    2003-03-01

    Higher testosterone levels are related to assertiveness and dominance. Given the relevance of those behavioral correlates to spouses' daily transactions, links between testosterone levels and marital interaction were explored among 92 newlywed couples. Marital problem-solving and social support transactions were assessed, and saliva was collected and assayed for testosterone. Whether marital behavior was related to husbands' and wives' testosterone levels was examined. The link between spouses' testosterone and their behavior was contingent on the partner's testosterone levels. Husbands exhibited more adaptive problem-solving behaviors and social support provision when husbands and wives were concordant for lower testosterone levels. In contrast, wives exhibited more adaptive support provision when spouses had discordant testosterone levels such that wives had higher levels and husbands had lower levels.

  17. Testosterone Therapy May Have Benefits, but Risks Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163696.html Testosterone Therapy May Have Benefits, But Risks Too While ... 21, 2017 TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone treatment can boost bone density and reduce anemia ...

  18. Effects of in vivo testosterone manipulation on ovarian morphology, follicular development, and follicle yolk testosterone in the homing pigeon.

    PubMed

    Goerlich, Vivian C; Dijkstra, Cor; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2010-07-01

    To date, our understanding of the function of testosterone in female reproductive physiology is only marginal although there are indications that testosterone is involved in modulating follicular recruitment, growth, atresia, and ovulation. Studies elevating testosterone in breeding female birds have, in most instances, found detrimental effects, such as delayed clutch initiation or decreased clutch size. In our previous study, testosterone treatment of female homing pigeons delayed clutch initiation without diminishing fecundity. In this study, we explore whether the observed effect might have been caused by testosterone influencing follicle maturation or ovulation. We implanted mature female pigeons with testosterone prior to pairing, which resulted in constant elevation of circulating testosterone concentrations within the physiological range. We killed females after they had laid the first egg and measured ovarian and follicular development. Ovarian mass and pre-hierarchical yolky follicles were not affected by the treatment; however, testosterone females produced smaller and lighter preovulatory follicles. High plasma testosterone levels at oviposition or a strong temporal increase in testosterone were negatively related to mass and diameter of second follicles. We proposed that sustained elevation of testosterone delays follicular maturation, potentially via negative feedback on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. Furthermore, to gain better insight into the regulation of yolk hormone acquisition, we measured testosterone concentrations in the preovulatory follicles. We found no differences between treatment groups but follicle yolk contained much higher levels of testosterone than yolk of un-incubated eggs, suggesting that hormone measurements performed after oviposition do not correctly reflect maternal allocation.

  19. Skin permeation of testosterone and its ester derivatives in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, M K; Lee, C H; Kim, D D

    2000-04-01

    To establish the optimum conditions for improving the transdermal delivery of testosterone, we studied the relationship between the lipophilicity of testosterone ester derivatives and the rat skin permeation rate of testosterone. We performed a rat skin permeation study of testosterone and its commercially available ester derivatives, testosterone hemisuccinate, testosterone propionate and testosterone-17beta-cypionate, using an ethanol/water co-solvent system. The aqueous solubility and rat skin permeation rate of each drug, saturated in various compositions of an ethanol/water system, was determined at 37 degrees C. The aqueous solubility of testosterone and its ester derivatives increased exponentially as the volume fraction of ethanol increased up to 100% (v/v). The stability of testosterone propionate in both the skin homogenate and the extract was investigated to observe the enzymatic degradation during the skin permeation process. Testosterone propionate was found to be stable in the isotonic buffer solution and in the epidermis-side extract for 10h at 37 degrees C. However, in the skin homogenate and the dermis-side extract testosterone propionate rapidly degraded producing testosterone, implying that testosterone propionate rapidly degraded to testosterone during the skin permeation process. The steady-state permeation rates of testosterone in the ethanol/water systems increased exponentially as the volume fraction of ethanol increased, reaching the maximum value (2.69+/-0.69 microg cm(-2)h(-1)) at 70% (v/v) ethanol in water, and then decreasing with further increases in the ethanol volume fraction. However, in the skin permeation study with testosterone esters saturated in 70% (v/v) ethanol in water system, testosterone esters were hardly detected in the receptor solution, probably due to the rapid degradation to testosterone during the skin permeation process. Moreover, a parabolic relationship was observed between the permeation rate of testosterone and

  20. Testosterone affects song modulation during simulated territorial intrusions in male black redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros).

    PubMed

    Apfelbeck, Beate; Kiefer, Sarah; Mortega, Kim G; Goymann, Wolfgang; Kipper, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that testosterone plays an important role in resource allocation for competitive behavior, details of the interplay between testosterone, territorial aggression and signal plasticity are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated if testosterone acts specifically on signals that communicate the motivation or ability of individuals to engage in competitive situations in a natural context. We studied the black redstart, a territorial songbird species, during two different life-cycle stages, the early breeding phase in spring and the non-breeding phase in fall. Male territory holders were implanted with the androgen receptor blocker flutamide (Flut) and the aromatase inhibitor letrozole (Let) to inhibit the action of testosterone and its estrogenic metabolites. Controls received a placebo treatment. Three days after implantation birds were challenged with a simulated territorial intrusion (STI). Song was recorded before, during and after the challenge. In spring, both treatment groups increased the number of elements sung in parts of their song in response to the STI. However, Flut/Let-implanted males reacted to the STI with a decreased maximum acoustic frequency of one song part, while placebo-implanted males did not. Instead, placebo-implanted males sang the atonal part of their song with a broader frequency range. Furthermore, placebo-, but not Flut/Let-implanted males, sang shorter songs with shorter pauses between parts in the STIs. During simulated intrusions in fall, when testosterone levels are naturally low in this species, males of both treatment groups sang similar to Flut/Let-implanted males during breeding. The results suggest that song sung during a territorial encounter is of higher competitive value than song sung in an undisturbed situation and may, therefore, convey information about the motivation or quality of the territory holder. We conclude that testosterone facilitates context-dependent changes in song structures

  1. Deleterious effects of endogenous and exogenous testosterone on mesenchymal stem cell VEGF production.

    PubMed

    Ray, Rinki; Herring, Christine M; Markel, Troy A; Crisostomo, Paul R; Wang, Meijing; Weil, Brent; Lahm, Tim; Meldrum, Daniel R

    2008-05-01

    Modulating the paracrine effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) may be important for the treatment of ischemic myocardial tissue. In this regard, endogenous estrogen may enhance BMSC vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production. However, little information exists regarding the effect of testosterone on stem cell function. We hypothesized that 1) endogenous or exogenous estrogen will enhance stem cell production of VEGF and 2) endogenous or exogenous testosterone will inhibit BMSC VEGF production. BMSCs were collected from adult male, female, castrated male, and ovariectomized female rats. One hundred thousand cells were incubated with testosterone (1, 10, or 100 nM) or estrogen (0.15, 1.5, or 15 nM) for 48 h. Cell supernatants were collected, and VEGF was measured by ELISA. BMSCs harvested from castrated males, normal females, and ovariectomized females produced more VEGF compared with normal males. Castration was associated with the highest level (1,018 +/- 98.26 pg/ml) of VEGF production by BMSCs, which was significantly more than that produced by BMSCs harvested from normal male and normal female animals. Exogenous testosterone significantly reduced VEGF production in BMSCs harvested from ovariectomized females in a dose-dependent manner. Exogenous estrogen did not alter BMSC VEGF production. These findings suggest that testosterone may work on BMSCs to decrease protective growth factor production and that effective removal of testosterone's deleterious effects via castration may prove to be beneficial in terms of protective factor production. By manipulating the mechanisms that BMSCs use to produce growth factors, we may be able to engineer stem cells to produce maximum growth factors during therapeutic use.

  2. Experimental Manipulation of Corticosterone Does Not Influence the Clearance Rate of Plasma Testosterone in Birds.

    PubMed

    Deviche, Pierre; Desaivre, Stève; Giraudeau, Mathieu

    In vertebrates, exposure to acute stressors stimulates the secretion of adrenal glucocorticoids such as corticosterone, and in some situations this hormone plays an important role in orchestrating the trade-off that exists between reproduction and self-maintenance. Stressful conditions often lead to a decrease in plasma levels of sex steroids such as testosterone in males, and it has been hypothesized that corticosterone contributes to this decrease. Generally supporting this proposition, glucocorticoids can inhibit the reproductive axis activity at multiple levels, including direct effects on testicular endocrine function. Here we tested for the first time the additional hypothesis that stress-induced glucocorticoids are associated with an increased clearance rate of circulating testosterone. To test this hypothesis, we performed two experiments comparing changes in plasma testosterone as a function of time (6-60 min) after a single injection of this hormone into captive male house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus) that either were intact (controls) or were pharmacologically adrenalectomized by administration of the glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitor mitotane. Control finches rapidly elevated their plasma corticosterone in response to handling, whereas mitotane treatment abolished this response by approximately 95%. Contrary to our prediction, we found no clear evidence that control birds eliminated exogenous testosterone from circulation at a different rate than pharmacologically adrenalectomized finches. These findings do not support the hypothesis that, during acute stress, elevated plasma glucocorticoids stimulate the clearance rate of testosterone. The rapid inhibitory effect of stress on plasma testosterone may rather result from direct actions of glucocorticoids on the gonadal production of the androgen or involve a glucocorticoid-independent mechanism.

  3. Testosterone nasal gel (Natesto) for hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    2015-05-11

    In one study, Natesto nasal gel administered intranasally 3 times daily was effective in raising low serum testosterone levels into the normal range in patients with hypogonadism. Whether patients will find this method of administration more acceptable than an intramuscular injection every 2-4 weeks or once-daily application to the skin remains to be determined. Based on the lack of convincing evidence of benefit in older men and concerns about its safety, the FDA has warned against using testosterone to treat hypogonadism due solely to aging.

  4. Off label therapies for testosterone replacement

    PubMed Central

    DiGiorgio, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of hypogonadism has been steadily increasing over the last few years. Exogenous testosterone has been the standard treatment for hypogonadal men, but is associated with suppression of spermatogenesis as well as other possible adverse effects. There are other medications, currently considered “off label” for androgen replenishment, that exert their effect through modulation of the hypothalamic-gonadal axis. These medications increase endogenous testosterone levels and offer a different therapeutic approach. This review will focus on these alternative (off-label) therapies for androgen replacement in men. PMID:28078215

  5. Testosterone metabolism and its testosterone-dependent activation in the uropygial gland of quail.

    PubMed

    Floch, J Y; Morfin, R F; Daniel, J Y; Floch, H H

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism in the uropygial gland of the male quail results into large yields of 5 beta-reduced and/or 17 alpha-hydroxylated metabolites. This metabolism was studied in glands of sexually quiescent quails five days after a single intra-muscular injection of testosterone to the birds. This treatment led to an increased production of inactive metabolites (epitestosterone and its 5 beta-reduced metabolites) and to a decrease of unmetabolized testosterone. Thus testosterone controls its own metabolism and by this way means to modulate its action in the uropygial gland of quail.

  6. Expression of somatostatin receptor type-2 (sst2A) in immature porcine Leydig cells and a possible role in the local control of testosterone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Fombonne, Joanna; Csaba, Zsolt; von Boxberg, Ysander; Valayer, Amandine; Rey, Catherine; Benahmed, Mohamed; Dournaud, Pascal; Krantic, Slavica

    2003-01-01

    We recently reported that immature porcine Leydig cells express both somatostatin (SRIF) and SRIF receptor type-2 (sst-2) transcripts. The present study was therefore undertaken to assess whether SRIF might exert autocrine actions on these cells through sst2A receptor, one of the two sst2 isoforms known to exert important neuroendocrine and endocrine functions. Using a polyclonal antibody directed towards the C-terminal tail of the sst2A receptor subtype, receptor immunoreactivity was detected in a subpopulation of Leydig cells and spermatogonia. To address the physiological correlates of this expression we then studied the possible involvement of sst2 receptor in the regulation of testosterone secretion. Functional assays showed that the sst2 agonist octreotide inhibited both basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by testosterone pretreated Leydig cells. To assess whether sst2 receptor expression might be regulated by testosterone, we performed a semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of sst2 mRNA expression in Leydig cells cultured in the presence or in the absence of the androgen. A significant increase in sst2 receptor transcripts was observed in testosterone-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SRIF can inhibit testosterone secretion through the sst2A receptor. The mechanism of the local inhibitory actions of SRIF is probably autocrine since immature porcine Leydig cells express SRIF itself and it might involve testosterone-induced increase of sst2 receptor expression in immature Leydig cells. PMID:12646058

  7. Localization of the binding site on IgG for solubilized placental Fc gamma receptor.

    PubMed

    Matre, R; Tönder, O

    1984-01-01

    Placental Fc gamma R (FcR) inhibited the rosette formation between monocytes and rabbit IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA), whereas the rosette formation with granulocytes was not impaired. Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) inhibited the rosette formation with both cell types. Results obtained in absorption and agglutination experiments showed that SpA blocked the binding of FcR to IgG, and Cl did not. Furthermore, FcR did not interfere with the binding of SpA to IgG, whereas C1 affected this binding. FcR apparently bind to the C gamma 3 region. Since FcR inhibited the binding of EA to monocytes, the monocyte FcR binding site is probably also located within the C gamma 3 region.

  8. Protective effects of physiological testosterone on advanced glycation end product-induced injury in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yaping; Yu, Dan; Wu, Jiahua; Li, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The effect of testosterone, a sex steroid, on endothelial cells is controversial as it is uncertain if it has a protective effect on them. Whether physiological testosterone can inhibit the deleterious effects of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. The present study focused on elucidating the effect of testosterone on the injury of endothelial cells induced by AGEs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured in vitro and treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of various concentrations of testosterone. The cell viability in each group was measured using an MTS assay. Early-stage apoptosis was detected using flow cytometry with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining, and the expression levels of apoptosis-associated proteins, B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and caspase-3, were determined using western blot analysis. Oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory parameters in the medium were evaluated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The MTS results showed that AGEs significantly decreased the proliferation of HUVECs, whereas a physiological concentration of testosterone alleviated this damage. Physiological concentrations of testosterone protected the HUVECs from AGE-induced apoptosis, mediated by caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl-2. In addition, treatment of the HUVECs with AGEs caused a significant decrease in anti-oxidative parameters, but increased the concentrations of malondialdehyde and tumor necrosis factor-α. The activation of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 was significantly increased by incubation with AGEs. However, pre-incubation with a physiological concentration of testosterone attenuated these changes. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study established the potential role of physiological testosterone in ameliorating AGE-induced damage in HUVECs. PMID:28112379

  9. Testosterone-derived estradiol production by male endothelium is robust and dependent on p450 aromatase via estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Villablanca, Amparo C; Tetali, Sarada; Altman, Robin; Ng, Kenneth F; Rutledge, John C

    2013-12-01

    Vascular endothelium expresses both the estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β, and ERα mediates development of early atherosclerosis in male mice. This process is thought to be testosterone-dependent. We hypothesized that male murine aortic endothelium produces robust levels of estradiol by aromatase conversion of testosterone, and that regulation of this process is mediated by the presence of ERs, primarily ERα. Aortic endothelium was isolated from ERα knockout (ERα -/-) and wild-type (ERα +/+) male mice and treated with testosterone or the 5α reduction product dihydrotestosterone (DHT), with or without the P450 aromatase inhibitor anastrazole, or a non-specific estrogen receptor antagonist. Aromatase gene expression and estradiol production were assayed. Treatment with testosterone, but not DHT, caused increased aromatase expression and estradiol production in ERα +/+ endothelium that was attenuated by disruption of ERα in the ERα -/- group. Anastrazole inhibition of aromatase reduced testosterone-induced aromatase expression and estradiol levels in both ERα -/- and ERα +/+ endothelium. Antagonism of both ERs decreased testosterone-induced aromatase expression in both wild-type and knockout groups. The effects of the receptor antagonist on estradiol production differed between the two groups, however, with a reduction in estradiol release from the ERα +/+ cells and complete abolition of estradiol release from the ERα -/- cells. Thus, estradiol production in vascular endothelium from male mice is robust, depends on the aromatic conversion of testosterone and requires functional ERα to achieve maximal levels of estradiol generation. Local vascular production of aromatase-mediated estradiol in response to circulating testosterone may affect ERα-dependent mechanisms to increase susceptibility to early atheroma formation in male mice. This pathway may have important therapeutic relevance for reducing the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in

  10. Testosterone and photoperiod interact to affect spatial learning and memory in adult male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Pyter, Leah M; Trainor, Brian C; Nelson, Randy J

    2006-06-01

    Gonadal hormones affect spatial learning and memory in mammals and circulating gonadal hormone concentrations fluctuate by season. Most nontropical rodents are spring/summer breeders and males display higher testosterone concentrations during the breeding season compared with the nonbreeding season (fall/winter). Seasonal patterns of testosterone concentration (as well as many other seasonal modifications of physiology, morphology, and behaviour) are induced by manipulation of photoperiod (day length; i.e. short or long days) in the laboratory. Coincident with reducing testosterone concentration, short days also impair spatial learning and memory performance in male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) compared with long days. We hypothesized that short-day-induced reduction of testosterone concentrations inhibits spatial learning and memory performance compared with long days. Adult male white-footed mice were maintained in long (16 h light/day) or short (8 h light/day) days for 14 weeks following sham-castration, castration plus saline implant, or castration plus testosterone implant treatment. Spatial learning and memory was assessed using a water maze, and photoperiod-evoked changes in gene expression of sex steroid receptors within the hippocampus were also examined. Castrated, short-day mice with testosterone replacement displayed enhanced water maze performance compared with other short-day mice, but no differences among testosterone treatments were observed in long-day mice. Photoperiod did not affect hippocampal androgen, oestrogen alpha, or oestrogen beta receptor gene expression. These results suggest that photoperiod modulates the effects of testosterone on spatial learning performance by mechanisms indirect of the hippocampus.

  11. Protective effects of physiological testosterone on advanced glycation end product‑induced injury in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yaping; Yu, Dan; Wu, Jiahua; Li, Lin

    2017-03-01

    The effect of testosterone, a sex steroid, on endothelial cells is controversial as it is uncertain if it has a protective effect on them. Whether physiological testosterone can inhibit the deleterious effects of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. The present study focused on elucidating the effect of testosterone on the injury of endothelial cells induced by AGEs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured in vitro and treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of various concentrations of testosterone. The cell viability in each group was measured using an MTS assay. Early‑stage apoptosis was detected using flow cytometry with Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining, and the expression levels of apoptosis‑associated proteins, B cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and caspase‑3, were determined using western blot analysis. Oxidative stress and pro‑inflammatory parameters in the medium were evaluated using an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. The MTS results showed that AGEs significantly decreased the proliferation of HUVECs, whereas a physiological concentration of testosterone alleviated this damage. Physiological concentrations of testosterone protected the HUVECs from AGE‑induced apoptosis, mediated by caspase‑3 and Bax/Bcl‑2. In addition, treatment of the HUVECs with AGEs caused a significant decrease in anti‑oxidative parameters, but increased the concentrations of malondialdehyde and tumor necrosis factor‑α. The activation of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 was significantly increased by incubation with AGEs. However, pre‑incubation with a physiological concentration of testosterone attenuated these changes. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study established the potential role of physiological testosterone in ameliorating AGE‑induced damage in

  12. Effects of testosterone on the electrical properties and nicotinic transmission of the major pelvic and coeliac ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Félix, B; Catalin, D; Miolan, J P; Niel, J P

    2001-02-01

    The effects of testosterone on the electrical properties and nicotinic activation of prevertebral ganglion neurones were investigated in vitro on the male rat major pelvic ganglion and rabbit coeliac ganglion. The electrical activity of the neurones was recorded using intracellular recording techniques. Nicotinic activation was triggered for neurones of the major pelvic ganglion by stimulating the hypogastric, pelvic and cavernous nerves and for coeliac neurones by stimulating the splanchnic nerves. Testosterone modified the resting membrane potential of neurones in the major pelvic ganglion by triggering a slow depolarization, and was without significant effect on the resting membrane potential of coeliac ganglion neurones. In neurones of the major pelvic and coeliac ganglia, testosterone had no significant effect on the firing pattern, on the characteristics of the action potential (firing threshold, duration, overshoot) and on the after-hyperpolarization (amplitude and duration). Testosterone affected, in opposite ways, the nicotinic activation of neurones of the two prevertebral ganglia. In the major pelvic ganglion, testosterone triggered an increase in the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials induced by stimulation of the hypogastric, pelvic and cavernous nerves with a single pulse, revealing a facilitation of nicotinic activation. On coeliac ganglion neurones, testosterone elicited a decrease in the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials induced by stimulation of the splanchnic nerves, indicating an inhibition of nicotinic activation. Our study shows that testosterone acts differently on neurones of prevertebral ganglia involved in the nervous control of different functions, its facilitatory action being exerted on neurones of the major pelvic ganglion which is particularly involved in the control of the urogenital tract. Our study reinforces the concept, derived from neuroanatomical and pharmacological studies, of the major pelvic

  13. Expansion of blood IgG4+ Bcells, Th2 and Tregulatory cells in IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Jorn J; Karim, A Faiz; van Laar, Jan A M; Verdijk, Robert M; Paridaens, Dion; van Hagen, P Martin; van Zelm, Menno C

    2017-08-19

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic fibro-inflammatory condition affecting various organs and has a diverse clinical presentation. Fibrosis and accumulation of IgG4+ plasma cells in tissue are hallmarks of the disease and IgG4-RD is associated with elevated IgG4 serum levels. However, disease pathogenesis is still unclear and these cellular and molecular parameters are neither sensitive nor specific for diagnosis of IgG4-RD. We here sought to develop a flowcytometric gating strategy to reliably identify blood IgG4+ B-cells to study their cellular and molecular characteristics and investigate their contribution in disease pathogenesis. Sixteen patients with histologically confirmed IgG4-RD, 11 patients with sarcoidosis and 30 healthy individuals were included for 11-color flowcytometric analysis of peripheral blood for IgG4-expressing B cells and T-helper (Th) subsets. In addition, detailed analysis of activation markers and chemokine receptors was performed on IgG4-expressing B cells and IgG4 transcripts were analyzed for somatic hypermutations. Cellular and molecular analyses revealed increased numbers of blood IgG4+ memory B-cells in patients with IgG4-RD. These cells showed reduced expression of CD27 and CXCR5 and increased signs of antibody maturation. Furthermore, IgG4-RD patients, but not patients with sarcoidosis, had increased numbers of circulating plasma blasts and CD21(low) B-cells, as well as Th2 and regulatory T-cells, indicating of a common disease pathogenesis in IgG4-RD. These results provide new insights into the dysregulated IgG4 response in patients with IgG4-RD. A specific "peripheral lymphocyte signature" observed in patients with IgG4-RD, could support diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  15. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  16. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  17. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  18. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  19. Testosterone metabolism in the uropygial gland of the quail.

    PubMed

    Floch, J Y; Morfin, R; Picart, D; Daniel, J Y; Floch, H H

    1985-05-01

    The metabolism of testosterone in the uropygial gland of the quail principally results in the production of 17 alpha, 5 beta derivatives. Moreover, an unusually small amount of testosterone is converted to 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. These results question the role played by intracellular 5 alpha-reduction in the response of the gland to testosterone stimulation.

  20. Study of natural IgG antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yilai; Yan, Zhaoping; Huang, Yile; Qiu, Cailing; Chen, Xiangyun; Hu, Ying; Meng, Qingyong; Wei, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Natural antibodies have been found to have anti-tumorigenic function. This study was designed to investigate whether natural IgG antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) could suppress the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Three HCC cell lines and A549 lung cancer cells were used for this study. They were grown, respectively, with human plasma positive or negative for anti-VEGFR1 IgG. Cell viability, apoptosis and VEGFR1 gene expression were examined. Three patients with HCC were recruited for a case study. The results showed that plasma anti-VEGFR1 IgG significantly inhibited the proliferation of all three HCC cell lines but not A549 cell line; the proportions of apoptotic cells were significantly higher in HCC cells treated with anti-VEGFR1 IgG positive plasma than those treated with IgG negative plasma. The expression of the VEGFR1 gene was significantly higher in HCC cells than A549 cells. Of three HCC patients who received transfusion of anti-VEGFR1 IgG positive plasma, two cases with stage B showed a good response to the treatment but one with distant metastasis did not. Human plasma IgG against VEGFR1 may be a promising agent for anti-HCC therapy.

  1. Molecular characterization of human IgG monoclonal antibodies specific for the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1. Anti-allergen IgG can enhance the anaphylactic reaction.

    PubMed

    Denépoux, S; Eibensteiner, P B; Steinberger, P; Vrtala, S; Visco, V; Weyer, A; Kraft, D; Banchereau, J; Valenta, R; Lebecque, S

    2000-01-07

    We report the molecular characterization of five human monoclonal antibodies, BAB1-5 (BAB1: IgG(1); BAB4: IgG(2); BAB2, 3, 5: IgG(4)), with specificity for the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1. BAB1-5 were obtained after immunotherapy and contained a high degree of somatic mutations indicative of an antigen-driven affinity maturation process. While BAB1 inhibited the binding of patients IgE to Bet v 1, BAB2 increased IgE recognition of Bet v 1, and, even as Escherichia coli-expressed Fab, augmented Bet v 1-induced immediate type skin reactions. The demonstration that IgG antibodies can enhance allergen-induced allergic reactions is likely to explain the unpredictability of specific immunotherapy.

  2. Testosterone deficiency syndrome: benefits, risks, and realities associated with testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Jacob; Barkin, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone deficiency syndrome, which has sometimes been termed age-related or late-onset hypogonadism, is a syndrome characterized by both clinical manifestations as well as a biochemical deficiency of testosterone. This condition is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, accounting for billions of dollars in health care costs. There is some evidence that suggests that restoring testosterone levels in these individuals may help to manage or delay progression of the associated morbidities. Furthermore, despite controversies in the literature and media, testosterone replacement has proven to be quite safe in most men with minimal if any adverse effects when dosing to achieve the eugonadal range. It is nevertheless very important for clinicians to be aware of the possible risks and contraindications of treatment to ensure proper patient selection and appropriate monitoring.

  3. Effect of s-triazine compounds on testosterone metabolism in the rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Kniewald, J; Osredecki, V; Gojmerac, T; Zechner, V; Kniewald, Z

    1995-01-01

    The influence of s-triazine compounds (atrazine, prometryne and deethylatrazine) on testosterone conversion and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone-receptor complex formation was studied in vitro and in vivo in the rat prostate. A marked in vitro influence of atrazine and prometryne (from 0.465 to 1.392 mumol) and their mixtures (in total concentration, 0.928 mumol) on 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone formation was detected. 5 alpha-Dihydrotestosterone-specific receptor complex formation was inhibited in vitro by ca. 0.5 mumol of atrazine or deethylatrazine and only in vivo by 6 mg of atrazine 100 g-1 body wt. daily during 7 days in the prostate cytosol. The inhibition of the enzymic activities responsible for testosterone conversion and steroid hormone-receptor complex formation was non-competitive and reversible, and s-triazine compounds act as antiandrogens.

  4. Metformin Attenuates Testosterone-Induced Prostatic Hyperplasia in Rats: A Pharmacological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mosli, Hala H.; Esmat, Ahmed; Atawia, Reem T.; Shoieb, Sherif M.; Mosli, Hisham A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is uncontrolled proliferation of prostate tissue. Metformin, a widely prescribed anti-diabetic agent, possesses anticancer activity through induction of apoptotic signaling and cell cycle arrest. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of metformin against experimentally-induced BPH in rats. Treatment with 500 and 1000 mg/kg metformin orally for 14 days significantly inhibited testosterone-mediated increase in the prostate weight & prostate index (prostate weight/body weight [mg/g]) and attenuated the pathological alterations induced by testosterone. Mechanistically, metformin significantly protected against testosterone-induced elevation of estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and decrease of estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) expression, with no significant effect of androgen receptor (AR) and 5α-reductase expression. It decreased mRNA expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1R and protein expression ratio of pAkt/total Akt induced by testosterone. Furthermore, it significantly ameliorated testosterone–induced reduction of mRNA expression Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, P21 and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and AMPK [PT-172] activity. In conclusion, these findings elucidate the effectiveness of metformin in preventing testosterone-induced BPH in rats. These results could be attributed, at least partly, to its ability to enhance expression ratio of ER-β/ER-α, decrease IGF-1, IGF-1R and pAkt expressions, increase P21, PTEN, Bax/Bcl-2 expressions and activate AMPK with a subsequent inhibition of prostate proliferation. PMID:26492952

  5. Epitestosterone and testosterone have similar nonclassical actions on membrane of Sertoli cells in whole seminiferous tubules.

    PubMed

    de Castro, A L; Cavalari, F C; Diello, M V; Fracasso, B M; Loss, E S

    2013-01-01

    Epitestosterone is the 17α-epimer of testosterone. This steroid possesses antiandrogenic activities. The mechanism of action of epitestosterone has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the nonclassical effect of epitestosterone on the membrane of Sertoli cells in proliferative phase (rats aged 15 days) and in nonproliferative phase (rats aged 21 and 35 days). The membrane potential of Sertoli cells was recorded using a standard single microelectrode technique. Epitestosterone (0.5, 1, and 2 μM) or testosterone (1 μM) was administered alone and after infusion with flutamide (1 μM), verapamil (100 μM), or U-73122 (2 μM). The testes of rats aged 12-15 days were preincubated with 45Ca2+ with or without flutamide (1 μM) and incubated with epitestosterone (1 μM) or testosterone (1 μM). Epitestosterone and testosterone produced a depolarization in the membrane potential and increased the membrane input resistance on Sertoli cells from rats of all 3 ages. The effect of epitestosterone did not change after perfusion with flutamide. Epitestosterone increased 45Ca2+ uptake within 5 min and this effect was not inhibited by flutamide. The absence of an effect by flutamide suggests that epitestosterone acts independently of the intracellular androgen receptor. The depolarizing effect was inhibited by verapamil, a voltage-dependent calcium channel blocker, and by U-73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor. These results indicate that epitestosterone acts on the membrane via a nonclassical signaling pathway; the effect was similar to the testosterone action on membrane of Sertoli cells in whole seminiferous tubules from rat testes.

  6. Techniques to measure testosterone in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Klee, G G; Heser, D W

    2000-01-01

    In today's clinical and research settings, there is an unfortunate lack of consistency for the term "measuring testosterone status." This term is often used to refer to a measure of biologic androgen activity rather than the specific measurement of the chemical concentration of the testosterone steroid molecule. Even the measurements of chemical concentrations show considerable methodologic differences. This is true for measurements in elderly men, as well as in other populations, including women. All of the current methods for measuring total testosterone have limitations, especially with regard to low concentrations. In addition, unresolved questions concerning the active form of the hormone preclude definitive determination of which form of testosterone and which other androgen hormones are best suited for measuring androgen activity. When measurement techniques are compared, the numbers correlate with each other but certainly do not represent the same value. There is a need for a consensus as to which forms of hormones should be measured to best assess androgen status, and there is a need to standardize the procedures used to measure these hormones.

  7. Melamine negatively affects testosterone synthesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiarui; Cao, Yinan; Zhang, Xinchen; Zhao, Qiling; Bao, Endong; Lv, Yingjun

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have found that melamine causes damage to the testes, epididymis and sperm. However, few studies have investigated the effect of melamine on the synthesis of testosterone, which plays an import role in testicular development and spermatogenesis. In present study, mice were orally administrated with 2, 10 or 50mg/kg of melamine for 28days. In these groups, various abnormalities were observed including disruption of the seminiferous tubule structure, an increased necrotic germ cells and sperm abnormalities, and a reduced sperm count. Melamine exposure also decreased the level of serum testosterone and levels of testicular StAR, P450scc and 17β-HSD. In addition, melamine exposure reduced the number of Leydig cells. Taken together, these results indicate that melamine exposure reduces the level of testosterone through down-regulation of StAR and testosterone synthetic enzyme expression and also a decreased number of Leydig cells. This may further affect testicular development and lead to sperm damage.

  8. Testosterone and Aggression: Berthold, Birds and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Soma, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    Berthold’s classic study of domesticated roosters in 1849 demonstrated that testicular secretions are necessary for the normal expression of aggressive behaviour. Although this conclusion is undoubtedly correct, field studies of wild songbirds have yielded important modifications and limitations of Berthold’s original hypothesis. For example, studies of the North American song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) during the breeding season reveal that not only does testosterone increase aggression, but aggressive interactions also increase plasma testosterone levels. Furthermore, in winter, nonbreeding song sparrows have low plasma testosterone levels but are very aggressive, and castration of nonbreeding song sparrows does not decrease aggression. Interestingly, an aromatase inhibitor (fadrozole) does decrease male aggression in the nonbreeding season, and the effects of fadrozole can be rescued with oestradiol. In winter, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) from the periphery can be metabolised within the brain to supply oestradiol to specific neural circuits. Additionally, oestradiol might be synthesised de novo from cholesterol entirely within the brain. These mechanisms may have evolved to avoid the ‘costs’ of circulating testosterone in the nonbreeding season. Recent studies in tropical birds, hamsters, and humans suggest that these neuroendocrine mechanisms are important for the control of aggression in many vertebrate species. PMID:16774503

  9. Pharmacology of testosterone replacement therapy preparations

    PubMed Central

    Shoskes, Jennifer J.; Wilson, Meghan K.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is to return serum testosterone levels to within physiologic range and improve symptoms in hypogonadal men. Some of the symptoms aimed to improve upon include decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, infertility, hot flashes, depressed mood, and loss of muscle mass or hair. Clinical use of testosterone for replacement therapy began approximately 70 years ago. Over the decades, numerous preparations and formulations have been developed primarily focusing on different routes of delivery and thus pharmacokinetics (PKs). Currently the routes of delivery approved for use by the United States Food and Drug Administration encompasses buccal, nasal, subdermal, transdermal, and intramuscular (IM). Many factors must be considered when a clinician is choosing the most correct formulation for a patient. As this decision depends highly on the patient, active patient participation is important for effective selection. The aim of this review is to describe and compare all testosterone preparations currently available and approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Areas of focus will include pharmacology, PKs, adverse effects, and specifics related to individual delivery routes. PMID:28078214

  10. Testosterone Represses Estrogen Signaling by Upregulating miR-22: A Mechanism for Imbalanced Steroid Hormone Production in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xuan; Liu, Yanlei; Liu, Ming; Wang, Yongqing; Yan, Liying; Wang, Hao; Ma, Liyang; Li, Yu-Xia; Zhao, Yangyu; Wang, Yan-Ling

    2017-04-01

    Preeclampsia, a multisystem syndrome occurring during mid- to late gestation in humans, is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Patients usually present with high circulating testosterone and reduced estradiol production, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Revealing the mechanism that modulating the imbalance of testosterone and estradiol in preeclampsia is of great value in understanding the cause of the disease. The placenta is the predominant source of steroid hormone production during gestation, and we observed markedly increased 17β-HSD3 (17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3) levels and downregulated aromatase expression, the key enzymes responsible for synthesis of testosterone and estradiol, respectively, in preeclamptic placentas compared with controls. Furthermore, we found a significant upregulation of microRNA (miR)-22 in preeclamptic placentas. In a trophoblast cell line, JEG-3 cells, testosterone repressed the expression of aromatase and estrogen receptor α and the production of estradiol while promoting miR-22 expression. miR-22 directly targeted and inhibited estrogen receptor α expression while indirectly decreasing aromatase expression and estradiol production by interfering with estrogen receptor α signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of miR-22 expression significantly reversed the inhibitory effect of testosterone on de novo estradiol synthesis in human trophoblastic cells. The findings reveal a mechanism underlying the balanced production of androgen and estrogen modulated by miR-22 in the human placenta and provide new insights into the pathogenesis of preeclampsia from the aspect of endocrine regulation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Effect of Testosterone Replacement Therapy on Cognitive Performance and Depression in Men with Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the effect of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) on cognitive function and depression in men with testosterone deficiency syndrome. Materials and Methods We carried out a prospective, placebo-controlled trial involving 106 men with total testosterone levels <3.3 ng/mL and symptoms of hypogonadism. Based on whether the patients received TRT (injection with 1,000 mg testosterone undecanoate) or a placebo (advice to modify lifestyle), the study population was divided into a TRT group (n=54) and a control group (n=52). Results The age among patients in the TRT and control groups was 56.7±12.6 years and 57.8±11.4 years, respectively (p> 0.05). At baseline, no significant differences between the TRT and control groups were noted regarding serum testosterone or prostate-specific antigen levels, or regarding the scores for aging symptoms (Aging Males' Symptoms scale), erectile function (5-item International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire), cognitive function (Korean Mini-Mental State Examination), and depression (Beck Depression Inventory). At 8 months after intervention total serum testosterone levels and erectile function scores had significantly increased (p<0.05), whereas the scores for aging symptoms and depression had significantly decreased (p<0.05) in the TRT group; no significant improvement in any parameters was noted for the control group. Notably, significant improvement in cognitive function was noted among patients with cognitive impairment at baseline (cognitive function score <25) who received TRT. Conclusions TRT may be considered in men with testosterone deficiency syndrome if low testosterone levels are associated with depression or cognitive impairment. PMID:28053949

  12. Wide variability in laboratory reference values for serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Stephen; Reyes-Vallejo, Luis; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2006-11-01

    The laboratory determination of testosterone levels consistent with a diagnosis of hypogonadism is complicated by the availability of multiple testosterone assays and varying reference ranges. To assess current laboratory practices regarding availability of testosterone assays and use of reference values. A telephone survey of 12 academic, 12 community medical laboratories, and one national laboratory. Types of androgen assays offered and determination of reference values. All of the academic and eight of the community centers performed total testosterone testing. Free testosterone was performed in-house by six of the 12 academic and one community center. Testing for bioavailable testosterone, free androgen index, and percent free testosterone was performed in-house by no more than two centers. There were eight and four different assays used for total and free testosterone, respectively. One national laboratory offered equilibrium dialysis measurement of free testosterone. Of the 25 labs, there were 17 and 13 different sets of reference values for total and free testosterone, respectively. The low reference value for total testosterone ranged from 130 to 450 ng/dL (350% difference), and the upper value ranged from 486 to 1,593 ng/dL (325% difference). Age-adjusted reference values were applied in four centers for total testosterone and in seven labs for free testosterone. All reference values were based on a standard statistical model without regard for clinical aspects of hypogonadism. Twenty-three of the 25 lab directors responded that clinically relevant testosterone reference ranges would be preferable to current standards. Laboratory reference values for testosterone vary widely, and are established without clinical considerations.

  13. Metabolic studies of 1-testosterone in horses.

    PubMed

    Kwok, W H; Ho, Emmie N M; Leung, Gary N W; Tang, Francis P W; Wan, Terence S M; Wong, Henry N C; Yeung, John H K

    2013-02-01

    1-Testosterone (17β-hydroxy-5α-androst-1-en-3-one), a synthetic anabolic steroid, has been described as one of the most effective muscle-building supplements currently on the market. It has an anabolic potency of 200 as compared to 26 for testosterone. Apart from its abuse in human sports, it can also be a doping agent in racehorses. Metabolic studies on 1-testosterone have only been reported for human in the early seventies, whereas little is known about its metabolic fate in horses. This paper describes the studies of in vitro and in vivo metabolism of 1-testosterone in horses, with the aim of identifying the most appropriate target metabolites to be monitored for controlling the misuse or abuse of 1-testosterone in racehorses. Six in vitro metabolites, namely 5α-androst-1-ene-3α,17β-diol (T1a), 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol (T2), epiandrosterone (T3), 16,17-dihydroxy-5α-androst-1-ene-3-one (T4 & T5), and 5α-androst-1-ene-3,17-dione (T6), were identified. For the in vivo studies, two thoroughbred geldings were each administered orally with 800 mg of 1-testosterone by stomach tubing. The results revealed that the parent drug and eight metabolites were detected in urine. Besides the four in vitro metabolites (T1a, T2, T3, and T5), four other urinary metabolites, namely 5α-androst-1-ene-3β,17α-diol (T1b), 5α-androst-1-ene-3β,17β-diol (T1c), 5α-androstane-3α,17α-diol (T7) and 5α-androstane-3β,17α-diol (T8) were identified. This study shows that the detection of 1-testosterone administration is best achieved by monitoring the parent drug, which could be detected for up to 30 h post-administration. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. IgG1 Is Pathogenic in Leishmania mexicana Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Niansheng; Thomas, Bolaji N.; Patel, Supriya R.; Buxbaum, Laurence U.

    2010-01-01

    There are over 2 million new cases of leishmaniasis annually, and no effective vaccine has been developed to prevent infection. In murine infection, Leishmania mexicana, which lives intracellularly in host macrophages, has developed pathways to hijack host IgG to induce a suppressive IL-10 response through FcγRs, the cell-surface receptors for IgG. To guide vaccine development away from detrimental Ab responses, which can accompany attempts to induce cell-mediated immunity, it is crucial to know which isotypes of IgG are pathogenic in this infection. We have found that IgG1 and IgG2a/c induce IL-10 from macrophages in vitro equally well but through different FcγR subtypes: IgG1 through FcγRIII, and IgG2a/c through FcγRI primarily, but also through FcγRIII. In sharp contrast, mice lacking IgG1 develop earlier and stronger IgG2a/c, IgG3, and IgM responses to L. mexicana infection and yet are more resistant to the infection. Thus, IgG1, but not IgG2a/c or IgG3, is pathogenic in vivo, in agreement with prior studies indicating that FcγRIII is required for chronic disease. This calls into question the assumption that macrophages, which should secrete IL-10 in response to both IgG1 and IgG2a/c immune complexes, are the most important source of IL-10 generated by IgG-FcγR engagement in L. mexicana infection. Further investigations are required to better determine the cell type responsible for this immunosuppressive FcγRIII-induced IL-10 pathway and whether IgG2a/c is protective. PMID:21037092

  15. Oxytocin, testosterone, and human social cognition.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Bernard J

    2016-05-01

    I describe an integrative social-evolutionary model for the adaptive significance of the human oxytocinergic system. The model is based on a role for this hormone in the generation and maintenance of social familiarity and affiliation across five homologous, functionally similar, and sequentially co-opted contexts: mothers with offspring, female and male mates, kin groups, individuals with reciprocity partners, and individuals within cooperating and competing social groups defined by culture. In each situation, oxytocin motivates, mediates and rewards the cognitive and behavioural processes that underlie the formation and dynamics of a more or less stable social group, and promotes a relationship between two or more individuals. Such relationships may be positive (eliciting neurological reward, reducing anxiety and thus indicating fitness-enhancing effects), or negative (increasing anxiety and distress, and thus motivating attempts to alleviate a problematic, fitness-reducing social situation). I also present evidence that testosterone exhibits opposite effects from oxytocin on diverse aspects of cognition and behaviour, most generally by favouring self-oriented, asocial and antisocial behaviours. I apply this model for effects of oxytocin and testosterone to understanding human psychological disorders centrally involving social behaviour. Reduced oxytocin and higher testosterone levels have been associated with under-developed social cognition, especially in autism. By contrast, some combination of oxytocin increased above normal levels, and lower testosterone, has been reported in a notable number of studies of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, and, in some cases, higher oxytocin involves maladaptively 'hyper-developed' social cognition in these conditions. This pattern of findings suggests that human social cognition and behaviour are structured, in part, by joint and opposing effects of oxytocin and testosterone, and that extremes of such joint

  16. COMBINATION DOSE OF TWO PHTHALATES ADDITIVELY DEPRESSES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AND INSL3 GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE RAT FETUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) are phthalate esters used to modify plastic and polymer textures. Individually,in uteroexposure to DEHP and DBP inhibit reproductive tract development,induce reproductive organ malformations, and reduce testosterone (T...

  17. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration.

    PubMed

    Rouver, Wender Nascimento; Delgado, Nathalie Tristão Banhos; Menezes, Jussara Bezerra; Santos, Roger Lyrio; Moyses, Margareth Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium-dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM), castrated (CAST), castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group) or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group) of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin (BK) was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO), L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT). We observed significant endothelium-dependent, BK-induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP.

  18. Testosterone Rescues the De-Differentiation of Smooth Muscle Cells through Serum Response Factor/Myocardin.

    PubMed

    Leimgruber, Carolina; Quintar, Amado A; Peinetti, Nahuel; Scalerandi, María V; Nicola, Juan P; Miano, Joseph M; Maldonado, Cristina A

    2016-11-09

    Prostatic smooth muscle cells (pSMCs) differentiation is a key factor for prostatic homeostasis, with androgens exerting multiple effects on these cells. Here, we demonstrated that the myodifferentiator complex Srf/Myocd is up-regulated by testosterone in a dose-dependent manner in primary cultures of rat pSMCs, which was associated to the increase in Acta2, Cnn1, and Lmod1 expressions. Blocking Srf or Myocd by siRNAs inhibited the myodifferentiator effect of testosterone. While LPS led to a dedifferentiated phenotype in pSMCs, characterized by down-regulation of Srf/Myocd and smooth muscle cell (SMC)-restricted genes, endotoxin treatment on Myocd-overexpressing cells did not result in phenotypic alterations. Testosterone at a physiological dose was able to restore the muscular phenotype by normalizing Srf/Myocd expression in inflammation-induced dedifferentiated pSMCs. Moreover, the androgen reestablished the proliferation rate and IL-6 secretion increased by LPS. These results provide novel evidence regarding the myodifferentiating role of testosterone on SMCs by modulating Srf/Myocd. Thus, androgens preserve prostatic SMC phenotype, which is essential to maintain the normal structure and function of the prostate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Exercise Training and Testosterone Replacement on Skeletal Muscle Wasting in Patients With Heart Failure With Testosterone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Marcelo R; Sayegh, Ana L C; Bacurau, Aline V N; Arap, Marco A; Brum, Patrícia C; Pereira, Rosa M R; Takayama, Liliam; Barretto, Antônio C P; Negrão, Carlos E; Alves, Maria Janieire de Nazaré Nunes

    2016-05-01

    To examine whether combined testosterone replacement and exercise training (ET) therapies would potentiate the beneficial effects of isolated therapies on neurovascular control and muscle wasting in patients with heart failure (HF) with testosterone deficiency. From January 10, 2010, through July 25, 2013, 39 male patients with HF, New York Heart Association functional class III, total testosterone level less than 249 ng/dL (to convert to nmol/L, multiply by .03467), and free testosterone level less than 131 pmol/L were randomized to training (4-month cycloergometer training), testosterone (intramuscular injection of testosterone undecylate for 4 months), and training + testosterone groups. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was measured using microneurography, forearm blood flow using plethysmography, body composition using dual X-ray absorptiometry, and functional capacity using cardiopulmonary test. Skeletal muscle biopsy was performed in the vastus lateralis. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased in ET groups (training, P<.01; training + testosterone, P<.01), whereas no changes were observed in the testosterone group (P=.89). Forearm blood flow was similar in all groups. Lean mass increased in ET groups (training, P<.01; training + testosterone, P<.01), whereas lean mass decreased in the testosterone group (P<.01). The response of cross-sectional area of type I (P<.01) and type II (P<.05) fibers increased in the training + testosterone group as compared with the isolated testosterone group. Our findings provide evidence for a superior effect of combined ET and testosterone replacement therapies on muscle sympathetic nerve activity, muscle wasting, and functional capacity in patients with HF with testosterone deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Testosterone and its dimers alter tRNA morphology.

    PubMed

    Chanphai, P; Agudelo, D; Vesper, A R; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-02-05

    The morphology of tRNA was studied upon conjugation with testosterone and its aliphatic and aromatic dimers, using multiple spectroscopic methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular modeling. Structural analysis showed that testosterone binds tRNA through A62, A64, C60, C61, C63, G51, U50 and U59 bases. The binding affinity was testosterone dimer-aromatic>testosterone dimer-aliphatic>testosterone. The steroid loading efficacy was 35-45%. Transmission electron microscopy showed major changes in tRNA morphology upon testosterone interaction with an increase in the diameter of the tRNA aggregate, indicating encapsulation of testosterone by tRNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. DI(N-BUTYL) PHTHALATE AND DIETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE IN COMBINATION ALTER SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION IN A CUMULATIVE MANNER AS A RESULT OF DEPRESSED FETAL TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AND INSL3 GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasticizers di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) and diehtylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) have similar modes of action: in utero exposure reduces testosterone (T) production in fetal male rats, inhibits reproductive tract differentiation, and induces reproductive organ malformations. In utero e...

  2. Inhibition of estrogen-activated sexual behavior by androgens.

    PubMed

    Dohanich, G P; Clemens, L G

    1983-12-01

    Experiments to determine the potential of androgen to inhibit estrogen-activated female sexual behavior in rats were conducted. Treatment with either testosterone propionate (0.8 or 1.6 mg/day) or dihydrotestosterone propionate (0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 mg/day) significantly reduced the incidence of lordosis in ovariectomized females receiving estradiol benzoate (1 microgram/day). A similar suppression of estrogen-activated lordosis by testosterone was observed in castrated male rats. Flutamide, an androgen-receptor blocker, prevented the inhibition of lordosis by testosterone in females, indicating that the interaction of testosterone or a metabolite with an androgen receptor may be an important feature of this inhibition. Furthermore, the ability of dihydrotestosterone to inhibit lordosis at lower doses than testosterone suggests that the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone may also be necessary. These experiments demonstrate the potential of testosterone to inhibit the occurrence of female sexual behavior in rats, in contrast to its established facilitative effect on this behavior.

  3. Genetic Determinants of Serum Testosterone Concentrations in Men

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Marcello; Coviello, Andrea D.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Heier, Margit; Hofman, Albert; Holliday, Kate L.; Jansson, John-Olov; Kähönen, Mika; Karasik, David; Karlsson, Magnus K.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Liu, Yongmei; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Meitinger, Thomas; Mellström, Dan; Melzer, David; Miljkovic, Iva; Nauck, Matthias; Nilsson, Maria; Penninx, Brenda; Pye, Stephen R.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Reincke, Martin; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Tajar, Abdelouahid; Teumer, Alexander; Uitterlinden, André G.; Ulloor, Jagadish; Viikari, Jorma; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Wichmann, H. Erich; Wu, Tsung-Sheng; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Ziv, Elad; Wu, Frederick C. W.; Raitakari, Olli; Eriksson, Anna; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Harris, Tamara B.; Murray, Anna; de Jong, Frank H.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Bhasin, Shalender; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Haring, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone concentrations in men are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, osteoporosis, and mortality and are affected by age, smoking, and obesity. Because of serum testosterone's high heritability, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 8,938 men from seven cohorts and followed up the genome-wide significant findings in one in silico (n = 871) and two de novo replication cohorts (n = 4,620) to identify genetic loci significantly associated with serum testosterone concentration in men. All these loci were also associated with low serum testosterone concentration defined as <300 ng/dl. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) locus (17p13-p12) were identified as independently associated with serum testosterone concentration (rs12150660, p = 1.2×10−41 and rs6258, p = 2.3×10−22). Subjects with ≥3 risk alleles of these variants had 6.5-fold higher risk of having low serum testosterone than subjects with no risk allele. The rs5934505 polymorphism near FAM9B on the X chromosome was also associated with testosterone concentrations (p = 5.6×10−16). The rs6258 polymorphism in exon 4 of SHBG affected SHBG's affinity for binding testosterone and the measured free testosterone fraction (p<0.01). Genetic variants in the SHBG locus and on the X chromosome are associated with a substantial variation in testosterone concentrations and increased risk of low testosterone. rs6258 is the first reported SHBG polymorphism, which affects testosterone binding to SHBG and the free testosterone fraction and could therefore influence the calculation of free testosterone using law-of-mass-action equation. PMID:21998597

  4. Diagnostic performance of serum IgG4 level for IgG4-related disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-long; Ling, Ying-chun; Wang, Zhi-kai; Deng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    An elevated serum IgG4 level is one of the most useful factors in the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of the published articles assessing the diagnostic accuracy of serum IgG4 concentrations for IgG4-RD. The databases of MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were systematically searched for relevant studies. Sensitivities and specificities of serum IgG4 in each study were calculated, and the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) model with a random effects model were employed to obtain the individual and pooled estimates of sensitivities and specificities. In total, twenty-three studies comprising 6048 patients with IgG4-RD were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity was 85% with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 78–90%; the pooled specificity was 93% with a 95% CI of 90–95%. The HSROC curve for quantitative serum IgG4 lies closer to the upper left corner of the plot, and the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.95 (95% CI 0.93, 0.97), which suggested a high diagnostic accuracy of serum IgG4 for the entity of IgG4-RD. Our study suggests that serum IgG4 has high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of IgG4-RD. PMID:27558881

  5. Testosterone levels and fecundity in the hermaphroditic aquatic snail Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to testosterone and endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Arnaud; Ducrot, Virginie; Joaquim-Justo, Célia; Lagadic, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Endocrine disruptors are known to alter endogenous free and esterified levels of androgenic and estrogenic steroid hormones in aquatic mollusks. The origin of steroids in these animals, however, remains controversial. In the present study, free and esterified testosterone concentrations were measured in the hermaphroditic aquatic gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to molecules known for their androgenic (testosterone and tributyltin), anti-androgenic (cyproterone-acetate), and estrogenic (chlordecone) properties, by reference to their mode of action in vertebrates. In parallel, snail oviposition and fecundity were followed over a 21-d exposure period. Testosterone exposure resulted in increased esterified testosterone levels, whereas free testosterone concentrations remained stable. In contrast, cyproterone-acetate significantly increased the free form of testosterone with no changes in the esterified form, whereas chlordecone showed a tendency to reduce (though not significantly) esterified testosterone concentrations without changing free testosterone levels. Finally, tributyltin did not alter testosterone homeostasis. The production of egg clutches and eggs was significantly reduced only in the snails exposed to the highest concentrations of chlordecone (19.6 µg/L) and tributyltin (94.2 ng Sn/L). Overall, the present study demonstrates that uptake of testosterone from the exposure medium occurs in L. stagnalis. Moreover, it shows that cyproterone-acetate and, to a lesser extent, chlordecone can alter endogenous testosterone levels in this freshwater snail. However, the relationship between hormonal changes and snail reproduction has not been established. Environ Toxicol Chem 2013;32:1740-1745. © 2013 SETAC.

  6. Testosterone metabolism in the estuarine mysid neomysis integer (Crustacea; Mysidacea): identification of testosterone metabolites and endogenous vertebrate-type steroids.

    PubMed

    Verslycke, Tim; De Wasch, Katia; De Brabander, Hubert F; Janssen, Colin R

    2002-04-01

    Testosterone metabolism by Neomysis integer (Crustacea; Mysidacea) was assessed to obtain initial data on its metabolic capacity. N. integer were exposed to both testosterone and [(14)C]testosterone. Identification of testosterone metabolites and endogenous steroids was performed using thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography with multiple mass spectrometry. Endogenous production of testosterone in mysids was detected for the first time. N. integer were exposed to testosterone and metabolized administered testosterone extensively. At least 11 polar testosterone metabolites (R(f,metabolite) < R(f,testosterone)), androstenedione, dihydrotestosterone, and testosterone were produced in vivo by N. integer. A sex-specific testosterone metabolism was also observed, although this observation requires further confirmation. The anabolic steroid beta-boldenone was also identified for the first time in invertebrates. The metabolic pathway leading to the formation of beta-boldenone remains unknown, since the steroidal precursor androstadienedione could not be detected. These results reveal interesting similarities in enzyme systems in invertebrate and vertebrate species. Alterations in steroid hormone metabolism may be used as a new biomarker for the effects of endocrine disruptors in invertebrates.

  7. IgG4-related pleuritis with chylothorax.

    PubMed

    Kato, Eisuke; Takayanagi, Noboru; Ishiguro, Takashi; Kagiyama, Naho; Shimizu, Yoshihiko; Sugita, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Presently, 6 cases of IgG4-related pleuritis have been reported. We encountered a patient who developed chylothorax due to IgG4-related disease. To our knowledge, such patients have not been reported. This patient developed right-sided chylothorax and left-sided non-chylothorax lymphocyte-predominant pleuritis. Elevated serum and pleural IgG4 concentrations and histopathological analysis of pleural biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of IgG4-related pleuritis. Left-sided pleuritis improved with corticosteroid therapy, but right-sided chylothorax persists. IgG4-related disease can be one cause of chylothorax.

  8. Detection of Serum IgG4 Levels in Patients with IgG4-Related Disease and Other Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenqiong; Wu, Xuefen; Miao, Ye; Xiong, Hui; Bai, Lin; Dong, Lingli

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated serum IgG4 levels are an important hallmark for diagnosing IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD), but can also be observed in other diseases. This study aimed to compare two different testing methods for IgG4: ELISA and nephelometric assay. Both assays were used to measure serum IgG4 concentrations, and to assess the prevalence of high serum IgG4 levels in both IgG4-RD and non-IgG4-RD diseases. Methods A total of 80 serum samples were tested using the nephelometric assay and ELISA method that we established. Serum IgG4 concentrations were determined by ELISA for 957 patients with distinct diseases, including 12 cases of IgG4-RD and 945 cases of non-IgG4-RD. Results IgG4 levels from 80 selected serum samples examined by ELISA were in agreement with those detected using the nephelometry assay. Meanwhile, the serum IgG4 concentrations measured by ELISA were also consistent with the clinical diagnoses of patients with IgG4-RD during the course of disease. The Elevated levels of serum IgG4 (>1.35 g/L) were detected in all IgG4-RD (12/12) patients, and the prevalence of high IgG4 serum levels was 3.39% in non-IgG4-RD cases. Among them, the positive rates of serum IgG4 were 2.06% in patients with carcinoma and 6.3% in patients with other non-IgG4 autoimmune diseases. Conclusion Our established ELISA method is a reliable and convenient technique, which could be extensively used in the clinic to measure serum IgG4 levels. High levels of IgG4 were observed in IgG4-RD. However, this phenomenon could also be observed in other diseases, such as carcinomas and other autoimmune diseases. Thus, a diagnosis of IgG4 disease cannot only be dependent on the detection of elevated serum IgG4 levels. PMID:25885536

  9. Effect of Benincasa hispida fruits on testosterone-induced prostatic hypertrophy in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Nandecha, Chetan; Nahata, Alok; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Background: Benincasa hispida Cogn. has been used traditionally in India for the management of urinary disorders. The fruit of B hispida is used as a diuretic and the seeds have been reported to possess antiangiogenic effects in prostate cells. Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of petroleum ether extract, ethanolic extract, and B hispida seed oil on hyperplasia of the prostate induced by the subcutaneous administration of testosterone in rats. Methods: In vitro studies were performed to determine the 5α-reductase inhibitory potential of the extracts. The results of those studies paved the way for the pharmacologic screening of the extracts to assess their potential against testosterone-induced hyperplasia in rats. Nine groups containing 10 rats per group were created for this study. Hyperplasia was induced by administration of testosterone (3 mg/kg SC) for 14 days in all the groups except the vehicle-treated group. Simultaneous administration of petroleum ether extract (100 or 200 mg/kg PO), ethanolic extract (100 or 200 mg/kg PO), and B hispida seed oil (20 or 40 mg/kg PO) was conducted. A standard 5α-reductase inhibitor (ie, finasteride) was used as a positive control. The weight of the rats was recorded on day 0 (ie, day 1 of the study) and on day 14, and the influence of testosterone and test extracts on the weight of the rats was determined. On day 14, rats were euthanized; prostates were dissected out, and weighed. The rats' prostate/body weight (P/BW) ratio was then determined. Histologic examinations were performed on prostates from each group. Results: The petroleum ether extract as well as B hispida seed oil exhibited inhibition of 5α-reductase activity in in vitro studies. Ethanolic extract did not exhibit significant inhibitory potential in vitro. Further in vivo study found that testosterone treatment significantly increased the rats' P/BW ratio in all the groups except the vehicle-treated rats, and this increase in

  10. [Histopathology of IgG4-related disease].

    PubMed

    Detlefsen, S; Klöppel, G

    2016-09-01

    At an international consensus conference in 2011, multifocal chronic fibrosing inflammatory processes, which are associated with elevated IgG4 serum levels and/or tissue infiltration with IgG4 positive plasma cells, were recognized as a distinct disease entity called IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). As IgG4-RD responds well to steroid treatment but imitates a tumor in many organs, particularly in the pancreas, a biopsy for confirmation of the diagnosis is often warranted. The histological criteria for IgG4-RD as defined in 2011 are based on the following main features: 1) dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, 2) storiform fibrosis and 3) obliterative phlebitis. The diagnosis is further supported by immunohistochemical demonstration of an increased infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and an elevated IgG4/IgG ratio. The morphological criteria of IgG4-RD are in most cases detectable in biopsies and can significantly contribute to the diagnosis of this disease, in concert with clinical, serological (elevated serum IgG4 level) and radiological features.

  11. Divergent Specificity Development of IgG1 and IgG4 Autoantibodies in Endemic Pemphigus Foliaceus (Fogo Selvagem).

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Mike; Diaz, Luis A; Prisayanh, Phillip; Yang, Jinsheng; Qaqish, Bahjat F; Aoki, Valeria; Hans-Filho, Gunter; Rivitti, Evandro A; Culton, Donna A; Qian, Ye

    2017-08-01

    We have shown that although the IgG response in fogo selvagem (FS) is mainly restricted to desmoglein (Dsg) 1, other keratinocyte cadherins are also targeted by FS patients and healthy control subjects living in the endemic region of Limão Verde, Brazil (endemic controls). Evaluating nonpathogenic IgG1 and pathogenic IgG4 subclass responses to desmosomal proteins may reveal important differences between pathogenic and nonpathogenic responses, and how these differences relate to the pathogenic IgG4 response and resultant FS. In this study, we tested by ELISA >100 sera from each FS patient, endemic control, and nonendemic control for IgG1 and IgG4 autoantibodies to keratinocyte cadherins besides Dsg1. IgG1 and IgG4 subclass responses in endemic controls are highly correlated between Dsg1 and other keratinocyte cadherins. This correlation persists in the IgG1 response among FS patients, but diminishes in IgG4 response, suggesting that IgG1 binds highly conserved linear epitopes among cadherins, whereas IgG4 binds mainly specific conformational epitopes on Dsg1. A confirmatory test comparing serum samples of 11 individuals before and after their FS onset substantiated our findings that IgG1 recognizes primarily linear epitopes on Dsg1 both before and after disease onset, whereas IgG4 recognizes primarily linear epitopes before disease onset, but recognizes more conformational epitopes on Dsg1 after the onset of disease. This study may provide a mechanism by which a specificity convergence of the IgG4 response to unique Dsg1 epitopes, most likely conformational pathogenic epitopes, leads to the onset of FS disease.

  12. Divergent Specificity Development of IgG1 and IgG4 Autoantibodies in Endemic Pemphigus Foliaceus (Fogo Selvagem)

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Mike; Diaz, Luis A.; Prisayanh, Phillip; Yang, Jinsheng; Qaqish, Bahjat F.; Aoki, Valeria; Hans-Filho, Gunter; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Culton, Donna A.; Qian, Ye

    2017-01-01

    We have shown that although the IgG response in fogo selvagem (FS) is mainly restricted to desmoglein (Dsg) 1, other keratinocyte cadherins are also targeted by FS patients and healthy control subjects living in the endemic region of Limão Verde, Brazil (endemic controls). Evaluating nonpathogenic IgG1 and pathogenic IgG4 subclass responses to desmosomal proteins may reveal important differences between pathogenic and nonpathogenic responses, and how these differences relate to the pathogenic IgG4 response and resultant FS. In this study, we tested by ELISA >100 sera from each FS patient, endemic control, and nonendemic control for IgG1 and IgG4 autoantibodies to keratinocyte cadherins besides Dsg1. IgG1 and IgG4 subclass responses in endemic controls are highly correlated between Dsg1 and other keratinocyte cadherins. This correlation persists in the IgG1 response among FS patients, but diminishes in IgG4 response, suggesting that IgG1 binds highly conserved linear epitopes among cadherins, whereas IgG4 binds mainly specific conformational epitopes on Dsg1. A confirmatory test comparing serum samples of 11 individuals before and after their FS onset substantiated our findings that IgG1 recognizes primarily linear epitopes on Dsg1 both before and after disease onset, whereas IgG4 recognizes primarily linear epitopes before disease onset, but recognizes more conformational epitopes on Dsg1 after the onset of disease. This study may provide a mechanism by which a specificity convergence of the IgG4 response to unique Dsg1 epitopes, most likely conformational pathogenic epitopes, leads to the onset of FS disease. PMID:28868524

  13. Effects of coconut oil on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Arruzazabala, María; Molina, Vivian; Más, Rosa; Carbajal, Daisy; Marrero, David; González, Víctor; Rodríguez, Eduardo

    2007-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the benign uncontrolled growth of the prostate gland, leading to difficulty with urination. Saw palmetto lipid extracts (SPLE), used to treat BPH, have been shown to inhibit prostate 5a-reductase, and some major components, such as lauric, myristic and oleic acids also inhibit this enzyme. Coconut oil (CO) is also rich in fatty acids, mainly lauric and myristic acids. We investigated whether CO prevents testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia (PH) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were distributed into seven groups (10 rats each). A negative control group were injected with soya oil; six groups were injected with testosterone (3 mg kg(-1)) to induce PH: a positive control group, and five groups treated orally with SPLE (400 mg kg(-1)), CO or sunflower oil (SO) (400 and 800 mg kg(-1)). Treatments were given for 14 days. Rats were weighed before treatment and weekly thereafter. Rats were then killed and the prostates were removed and weighed. CO (400 and 800 mg kg(-1)), SPLE (400 mg kg(-1)) and SO at 800 mg kg(-1), but not at 400 mg kg(-1), significantly reduced the increase in prostate weight (PW) and PW:body weight (BW) ratio induced by testosterone (% inhibition 61.5%, 82.0%, 43.8% and 28.2%, respectively). Since CO and SPLE, but not SO, contain appreciable concentrations of lauric and myristic acids, these results could be attributed to this fact. In conclusion, this study shows that CO reduced the increase of both PW and PW:BW ratio, markers of testosterone-induced PH in rats.

  14. [IgG4 immunohistochemistry in Riedle thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Luo, Y F; Cao, J L; Zhang, H; Shi, X H; Liang, Z Y; Feng, R E

    2017-03-08

    Objective: To observe the histopathological changes and immunohistochemical expression of IgG4 in Riedle thyroiditis (RT) and to study the relationship between RT and IgG4-related diseases (IgG4-RD). Methods: A total of 5 RT patients were collected from the Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital during April 2012 to August 2014. The clinical and immunohistochemical features were analyzed in the 5 patients. Histopathologic analysis was performed on hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Results: There were one male and four female patients, aged 52 to 78 years (median 59 years). Five cases were characterized by multiple nodules of thyroid, which increased year by year. All patients were found to have surrounding tissue compression symptoms and signs. Two female patients were found to have hypothyroidism. The serum concentration of IgG was elevated in 2 cases, and the serum concentration of IgG was not tested before operation in the remaining patients. By ultrasound, all presented as low echo or medium low echo. Strong echo occasionally appeared in hypoechoic nodules. Microscopically, fibrous tissue hyperplasia was infiltrated with varying numbers of lymphocytes and plasma cells. The occlusion of phlebitis was found in 4 cases and eosinophils were found in 3 cases. IgG4 counts and IgG4/IgG ratios in 5 cases were 20/HPF, 16%; 60/HPF, 82%; 22/HPF, 28%; 400/HPF, 266% and 33/HPF, 71%, respectively. Conclusions: With the similar pathological manifestations between RT and IgG4-RD, immunohistochemical staining shows that the number of IgG4 positive plasma cells and IgG4/IgG ratio of RT are increased in varying degrees. Some cases meet the diagnostic criteria of IgG4-RD, and speculate that some cases of RT belong to IgG4-RD.

  15. Testosterone Treatment and Coronary Artery Plaque Volume in Older Men With Low Testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Budoff, Matthew J.; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Lewis, Cora E.; Mohler, Emile R.; Wenger, Nanette K.; Bhasin, Shalender; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Stephens-Shields, Alisa; Cauley, Jane A.; Crandall, Jill P.; Cunningham, Glenn R.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Gill, Thomas M.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Molitch, Mark E.; Nakanishi, Rine; Nezarat, Negin; Matsumoto, Suguru; Hou, Xiaoling; Basaria, Shehzad; Diem, Susan J.; Wang, Christina; Cifelli, Denise; Snyder, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Recent studies have yielded conflicting results as to whether testosterone treatment increases cardiovascular risk. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that testosterone treatment of older men with low testosterone slows progression of noncalcified coronary artery plaque volume. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial at 9 academic medical centers in the United States. The participants were 170 of 788 men aged 65 years or older with an average of 2 serum testosterone levels lower than 275 ng/dL (82 men assigned to placebo, 88 to testosterone) and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism who were enrolled in the Testosterone Trials between June 24, 2010, and June 9, 2014. INTERVENTION Testosterone gel, with the dose adjusted to maintain the testosterone level in the normal range for young men, or placebo gel for 12 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was non calcified coronary artery plaque volume, as determined by coronary computed tomographic angiography. Secondary outcomes included total coronary artery plaque volume and coronary artery calcium score (range of 0 to >400 Agatston units, with higher values indicating more severe atherosclerosis). RESULTS Of 170 men who were enrolled, 138 (73 receiving testosterone treatment and 65 receiving placebo) completed the study and were available for the primary analysis. Among the 138 men, the mean (SD) age was 71.2 (5.7) years, and 81%were white. At baseline, 70 men (50.7%) had a coronary artery calcification score higher than 300 Agatston units, reflecting severe atherosclerosis. For the primary outcome, testosterone treatment compared with placebo was associated with a significantly greater increase in noncalcified plaque volume from baseline to 12 months (from median values of 204 mm3 to 232 mm3 vs 317 mm3 to 325 mm3, respectively; estimated difference, 41 mm3; 95%CI, 14 to 67 mm3; P = .003). For the secondary outcomes, the median total plaque volume increased

  16. Prenatal exposure of testosterone prevents SDN-POA neurons of postnatal male rats from apoptosis through NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H K; Yang, R C; Shih, H C; Hsieh, Y L; Chen, U Y; Hsu, C

    2001-11-01

    The role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in mediating the effect of testosterone exposure prenatally on neuronal apoptosis in the sexual dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) of rats was studied. The endogenous testosterone was diminished by prenatal stress (PNS) or simulated by testosterone exposure (TE) to understand the effect of testosterone on NR(1) (a functional subunit protein of NMDA receptor) expression and neuronal apoptosis. To further study whether the testosterone, after being converted into estradiol, modulates NR(1) expression, 4-androstein-4-ol-3,17-dione (ATD; an aromatase inhibitor) was used to block the conversion of estradiol from testosterone. The expressions of the NR(1) mRNA and NR(1) subunit protein were quantified by RT-PCR and western blotting analysis, respectively. In addition, a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptor, MK-801, was used to find out whether blockage of NMDA receptor affects the naturally occurring apoptosis in SDN-POA. The results showed the following. 1) Expression of perinatal NR(1) subunit protein in the central part of the medial preoptic area of male rats was significantly higher than that of females, especially on postnatal days 1 and 3. 2) The testosterone level of male fetuses on embryonic day 18 was significantly higher than that of females, while the testosterone level of TE females or PNS males was similar to that of intact males or intact females, respectively. 3) The apoptotic incidence of intact male rats was significantly less than that of females, and the apoptosis was stimulated by PNS in male or inhibited by TE in female. 4) The expression of NR(1) subunit protein could be inhibited by PNS or ATD-treatment in male, while stimulated by TE in female. 5) NR(1) mRNA showed no significant difference among intact male, PNS male, ATD-treated male, TE female and intact female rats. 6) The low apoptotic incidence of male rats was significantly increased when NMDA receptor was blocked by MK

  17. Cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the action of testosterone on human skeletal muscle. A basis for illegal performance enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kadi, F

    2008-06-01

    The popularity of testosterone among drug users is due to its powerful effects on muscle strength and mass. Important mechanisms behind the myotrophic effects of testosterone were uncovered both in athletes using steroids for several years and in short-term controlled studies. Both long-term and short-term steroid usage accentuates the degree of fibre hypertrophy in human skeletal muscle by enhancing protein synthesis. A mechanism by which testosterone facilitates the hypertrophy of muscle fibres is the activation of satellite cells and the promotion of myonuclear accretion when existing myonuclei become unable to sustain further enhancement of protein synthesis. Interestingly, long-term steroid usage also enhances the frequency of fibres with centrally located myonuclei, which implies the occurrence of a high regenerative activity. Under the action of testosterone, some daughter cells generated by satellite cell proliferation may escape differentiation and return to quiescence, which help to replenish the satellite cell reserve pool. However, whether long-term steroid usage induces adverse effects of satellite cells remains unknown. Testosterone might also favour the commitment of pluripotent precursor cells into myotubes and inhibit adipogenic differentiation. The effects of testosterone on skeletal muscle are thought to be mediated via androgen receptors expressed in myonuclei and satellite cells. Some evidence also suggests the existence of an androgen-receptor-independent pathway. Clearly, testosterone abuse is associated with an intense recruitment of multiple myogenic pathways. This provides an unfair advantage over non-drug users. The long-term consequences on the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle are unknown.

  18. Winners, losers, and posers: The effect of power poses on testosterone and risk-taking following competition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kristopher M; Apicella, Coren L

    2016-11-10

    A contribution to a special issue on Hormones and Human Competition. The effect of postural power displays (i.e. power poses) on hormone levels and decision-making has recently been challenged. While Carney et al. (2010) found that holding brief postural displays of power leads to increased testosterone, decreased cortisol and greater economic risk taking, this failed to replicate in a recent high-powered study (Ranehill et al. 2015). It has been put forward that subtle differences in social context may account for the differences in results. Power displays naturally occur within the context of competitions, as do changes in hormones, and researchers have yet to examine the effects of poses within this ecologically relevant context. Using a large sample of 247 male participants, natural winners and losers of a physical competition were randomly assigned to hold a low, neutral or high-power postural display. We found no main effect of pose type on testosterone, cortisol, risk or feelings of power. Winners assigned to a high-power pose had a relative, albeit small, rise in testosterone compared to winners who held neutral or low-power poses. For losers, we found little evidence that high-power poses lead to increased testosterone relative to those holding neutral or low-powered poses. If anything, the reverse was observed - losers had a reduction in testosterone after holding high-power poses. To the extent that changes in testosterone modulate social behaviors adaptively, it is possible that the relative reduction in testosterone observed in losers taking high-powered poses is designed to inhibit further "winner-like" behavior that could result in continued defeat and harm. Still, effects were small, multiple comparisons were made, and the results ran counter to our predictions. We thus treat these conclusions as preliminary.

  19. Inhibitory effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bi-Cheng; Jin, Li-Li; Yang, Yi-Fang; Li, Kun; Peng, Dan-Ming

    2014-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. Rape pollen is an apicultural product that is composed of nutritionally valuable and biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract (SFE-CO2) in BPH development using a testosterone-induced BPH rat model. BPH was induced in the experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone for a period of 30 days. Rape pollen SFE-CO2 was administered daily by oral gavage concurrently with the testosterone injections. Animals were sacrificed at the scheduled termination and the prostates were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 5α-reductase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels were also measured. BPH-induced animals exhibited an increase in prostate weight with increased testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 expression levels. However, rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment resulted in significant reductions in the prostate index and testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels compared with those in BPH-induced animals. Histopathological examination also demonstrated that rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment suppressed testosterone-induced BPH. These observations indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 inhibits the development of BPH in rats and these effects are closely associated with reductions in DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels. Therefore, the results of the present study clearly indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 extract may be a useful agent in BPH treatment.

  20. Inhibitory effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, BI-CHENG; JIN, LI-LI; YANG, YI-FANG; LI, KUN; PENG, DAN-MING

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. Rape pollen is an apicultural product that is composed of nutritionally valuable and biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract (SFE-CO2) in BPH development using a testosterone-induced BPH rat model. BPH was induced in the experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone for a period of 30 days. Rape pollen SFE-CO2 was administered daily by oral gavage concurrently with the testosterone injections. Animals were sacrificed at the scheduled termination and the prostates were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 5α-reductase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels were also measured. BPH-induced animals exhibited an increase in prostate weight with increased testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 expression levels. However, rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment resulted in significant reductions in the prostate index and testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels compared with those in BPH-induced animals. Histopathological examination also demonstrated that rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment suppressed testosterone-induced BPH. These observations indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 inhibits the development of BPH in rats and these effects are closely associated with reductions in DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels. Therefore, the results of the present study clearly indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 extract may be a useful agent in BPH treatment. PMID:24944593

  1. Physiological levels of testosterone kill salmonid leukocytes in vitro

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slater, C.H.; Schreck, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Adult spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) elaborate high plasma concentrations of testosterone during sexual maturation, and these levels of testosterone have been shown to reduce the salmonid immune response in vitro. Our search for the mechanism of testosterone's immunosuppressive action has led to the characterization of an androgen receptor in salmonid leukocytes. In the present study we examined the specific effects that testosterone had on salmonid leukocytes. Direct counts of viable leukocytes after incubation with and without physiological levels of testosterone demonstrate a significant loss of leukocytes in cultures exposed to testosterone. At least 5 days of contact with testosterone was required to produce significant immunosuppression and addition of a 'conditioned media' (supernatant from proliferating lymphocytes not exposed to testosterone) did not reverse the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. These data lead us to conclude that testosterone may exert its immunosuppressive effects by direct action on salmonid leukocytes, through the androgen receptor described, and that this action leads to the death of a significant number of these leukocytes.

  2. Testosterone-Related Cortical Maturation Across Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James; Ducharme, Simon; Botteron, Kelly N.; Mahabir, Megan; Johnson, Wendy; Israel, Mimi; Evans, Alan C.; Karama, Sherif

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine theories of brain development hold testosterone as the predominant factor mediating sex-specific cortical growth and the ensuing lateralization of hemispheric function. However, studies to date have focussed on prenatal testosterone rather than pubertal changes in testosterone. Yet, animal studies have shown a high density of androgen-sensitive receptors in multiple key cortical areas, and puberty is known to coincide with both a significant rise in testosterone and the emergence of behavioral sex differences, suggesting peripubertal influences of testosterone on brain development. Here, we used linear mixed models to examine sex-specific cortical maturation associated with changes in testosterone levels in a longitudinal sample of developmentally healthy children and adolescents. A significant “sex by age by testosterone” interaction on cortical thickness (CTh) involving widespread areas of the developing brain was found. Testosterone levels were associated with CTh changes in regions of the left hemisphere in males and of the right hemisphere in females. In both sexes, the relationship between testosterone and CTh varied across the age span. These findings show the association between testosterone and CTh to be complex, highly dynamic, and to vary, depending on sex and age; they also suggest sex-related hemispheric lateralization effects of testosterone in humans. PMID:22617851

  3. The TRPM8 Protein Is a Testosterone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Demirkhanyan, Lusine; Sun, Xiaohui; Elustondo, Pia A.; Krishnan, Vivek; Baskaran, Padmamalini; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Pavlov, Evgeny V.; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is a key steroid hormone in the development of male reproductive tissues and the regulation of the central nervous system. The rapid signaling mechanism induced by testosterone affects numerous behavioral traits, including sexual drive, aggressiveness, and fear conditioning. However, the currently identified testosterone receptor(s) is not believed to underlie the fast signaling, suggesting an orphan pathway. Here we report that an ion channel from the transient receptor potential family, TRPM8, commonly known as the cold and menthol receptor is the major component of testosterone-induced rapid actions. Using cultured and primary cell lines along with the purified TRPM8 protein, we demonstrate that testosterone directly activates TRPM8 channel at low picomolar range. Specifically, testosterone induced TRPM8 responses in primary human prostate cells, PC3 prostate cancer cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and hippocampal neurons. Picomolar concentrations of testosterone resulted in full openings of the purified TRPM8 channel in planar lipid bilayers. Furthermore, acute applications of testosterone on human skin elicited a cooling sensation. Our data conclusively demonstrate that testosterone is an endogenous and highly potent agonist of TRPM8, suggesting a role of TRPM8 channels well beyond their well established function in somatosensory neurons. This discovery may further imply TRPM8 channel function in testosterone-dependent behavioral traits. PMID:25480785

  4. Increased testosterone to cortisol ratio in psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Andrea L.; Raine, Adrian; Schug, Robert A.; Gao, Yu; Granger, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Only a few studies have examined hormones in psychopathy and results have been mixed. It has been suggested that since hormone systems are highly interconnected, it may be important to examine multiple systems simultaneously to gain a clearer picture of how hormones work together to predispose for a certain construct. In the present study, we attempt to clarify the role of the hormones cortisol and testosterone in psychopathy by examining both hormones in a community sample of 178 adults demonstrating a wide range of psychopathy scores. Results showed that psychopathy scores were associated with an increased ratio of testosterone (baseline) to cortisol responsivity to a stressor. Psychopathy was not associated with either of these measures independently, or with baseline cortisol levels. These findings suggest that these highly interconnected hormone systems may work in concert to predispose to psychopathy. PMID:21133509

  5. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L

    2015-11-10

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to "sex differences" in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology.

  6. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men

    PubMed Central

    van Anders, Sari M.; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to “sex differences” in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology. PMID:26504229

  7. Effect of IgG subclasses on in vivo bioavailability and metabolic fate of immune-complexed insulin in Lewis rats

    SciTech Connect

    Arquilla, E.R.; Stenger, D.; McDougall, B.; Ulich, T.R.

    1987-10-01

    The bioavailability, distribution, and metabolic fate of /sup 125/I-labeled insulin complexed to antibodies in guinea pig antiserum, purified guinea pig IgG1, IgG2, a mixture of IgG1 and IgG2, and homologous Lou/m rat antiserum were studied in inbred Lewis rats. /sup 125/I-insulin complexed to purified guinea pig IgG2 antibodies was rapidly cleared from the blood and sequestered in increasing amounts with time in the liver. Large amounts of the /sup 125/I-insulin complexed to guinea pig IgG1 antibodies remained in the blood for at least 30 min. The bioavailability of /sup 125/I-insulin bound to IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies was inhibited for at least 30 min because significantly less was available for rapid binding to insulin receptors on hepatocytes and renal tubular cells and its subsequent rapid degradation. The bioavailability of /sup 125/I-insulin was further decreased when bound to antibodies in native guinea pig antiserum or a mixture of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies compared with the /sup 125/I-insulin complexed to either purified IgG1 or IgG2 antibodies alone. The /sup 125/I-insulin bound to antibodies in native guinea pig antiserum or a mixture of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies was distributed in vivo in a manner reflecting the relative concentrations of the IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies present. The bioavailability, distribution, and metabolic fate of /sup 125/I-insulin in immune complexes prepared with homologous Lou/m rat insulin antiserum was qualitatively similar to that observed with immune complexes prepared with guinea pig insulin antiserum. It appears that the Lewis rat can be used as an in vivo model to study the bioavailability,distribution,and metabolic fate of insulin bound to xenogenic or homologous insulin antibodies.

  8. Transcriptome Profile of Rat Adrenal Evoked by Gonadectomy and Testosterone or Estradiol Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jopek, Karol; Celichowski, Piotr; Szyszka, Marta; Tyczewska, Marianna; Milecka, Paulina; Malendowicz, Ludwik K.; Rucinski, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Sex differences in adrenal cortex structure and function are well known in different species. In the rat, they are manifested as larger adrenal cortex and higher corticosterone secretion by females compared with males. These sex differences depend, among others, on functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). In this aspect, it is widely accepted that testosterone exerts an inhibitory and estradiol stimulatory effect on the said axis. The molecular bases of these sex-related differences are poorly understood. Therefore, we performed studies aimed to demonstrate the effect of testosterone and estradiol on the expression of differentially regulated genes in rat adrenal gland. The classical method applied in the study—gonadectomy and gonadal hormone replacement—allows obtaining results suggesting a physiological role of the tested hormone (testosterone or estradiol) in the regulation of the specific genes. Adult male and female rats were either gonadectomized or sham operated. Half of orchiectomized rats were replaced with testosterone while ovariectomized ones with estradiol. Transcriptome was identified by means of Affymetrix® Rat Gene 2.1 ST Array. Differentially expressed genes were analyzed by means of DAVID web-based bioinformatic tools and confirmed by means of Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. For selected genes, validation of the results was performed using QPCR. Performed experiments have provided unexpected results. Contrary to expectations, in orchiectomized rats, testosterone replacement stimulates expression of numerous genes, mainly those associated with lipids and cholesterol metabolism. However, in ovariectomized animals, estradiol replacement inhibits the expression of genes, mainly those involved in intracellular signaling pathways. The physiological relevance of these findings awaits further research. PMID:28261157

  9. Testosterone Replacement Therapy: The Emperor's New Clothes.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Andrea; Sansone, Massimiliano; Lenzi, Andrea; Romanelli, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    The mean age of the world population has steadily increased in the last decades, as a result of increased life expectancy and reduced birth rate. Global aging has led to a greater worldwide cost for healthcare: hormonal alterations contribute to the pathogenesis of several conditions and might cause a significant reduction in the perceived sense of well-being. Menopause is archetypal of hormonal alterations occurring during aging: in males, sex hormones do not decrease abruptly, yet testosterone levels decrease steadily and continuously during aging, ultimately resulting in late-onset hypogonadism. Treatment of this condition might mitigate most symptoms; however, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) should be prescribed only in selected patients and it should not be considered as an antiaging treatment. In recent years, different authors have questioned health risks associated with testosterone treatment; while position statements from many scientific societies seem to be reassuring, the Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning in regard to the possible side effects of this therapy. We aim to review recent controversies and discoveries in regard to TRT.

  10. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men.

    PubMed

    Ullah, M Iftekhar; Riche, Daniel M; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule.

  11. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, M Iftekhar; Riche, Daniel M; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule. PMID:24470750

  12. Serum or breast milk immunoglobulins mask the self-reactivity of human natural IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Manoylov, Iliyan; Dimitrov, Jordan D; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    B cells producing IgG antibodies specific to a variety of self- or foreign antigens are a normal constituent of the immune system of all healthy individuals. These naturally occurring IgG antibodies are found in the serum, external secretions, and pooled human immunoglobulin preparations. They bind with low affinity to antigens, which can also be targets for pathologic autoantibodies. An enhancement of naturally occurring IgG autoantibody activity was observed after treatment of human IgG molecules with protein-destabilizing agents. We have investigated the interactions of human immunoglobulins that were obtained from serum or from breast milk of healthy individuals or IVIg with human liver antigens. Proteins from an individual serum or milk were isolated by two methods, one of which included exposure to low pH and the other did not. Purified serum, mucosal IgM, IgA, and the fraction containing immunoglobulin G F(ab')2 fragments each inhibited the binding of a single donor or pooled IgG to human liver antigens. Our study presents findings regarding the role of the breast milk or serum antibodies in blocking the self-reactivity of IgG antibodies. It supports the suggestion that not IVIg only, but also the pooled human IgM and IgA might possess a potent beneficial immunomodulatory activity in autoimmune patients.

  13. Involvement of cancer-derived IgG in the proliferation, migration and invasion of bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhengzuo; Liu, Yang; Qin, Caipeng; Liu, Zhenhua; Yuan, Yeqing; Yin, Huaqi; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that immunoglobulin (Ig), the classical immune molecule, is extensively expressed in many cell types other than B-cells (non-B-IgG), including some malignant cells. The expression of Ig in malignant cells has been associated with a poor prognosis. In the present study, immunohistochemical analysis detected strong positive staining of IgG in three bladder cancer cell lines, the cancer cells in 77 bladder cancer patient samples and the cells in 3 cystitis glandularis tissue samples, while negative staining was observed in 4 specimens of normal transitional epithelial tissues. Importantly, functional transcripts of IgG with unique VHDJH rearrangement patterns were also found in bladder cancer cells. The knockdown of IgG in bladder cancer cell lines using small interfering RNA significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of the cells. Notably, high IgG expression, as determined by immunostaining, was significantly correlated with a high histological grade and recurrence. The results of the present study suggested that IgG expression is involved in the malignant biological behavior and poor prognosis of bladder cancer. Therefore, IgG may serve as a novel target for bladder cancer therapy. PMID:28105218

  14. A circulating IgG in Chagas' disease which binds to beta-adrenoceptors of myocardium and modulates their activity.

    PubMed Central

    Borda, E; Pascual, J; Cossio, P; De La Vega, M; Arana, R; Sterin-Borda, L

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown that sera from chagasic patients with positive EVI serology could act in co-operation with complement or normal human lymphocytes as a partial beta-adrenoceptor agonist increasing the contractile tension and frequency of isolated rat atria, as occurs with IgG purified from chagasic serum. In this paper we demonstrated that IgG present in chagasic patients sera could bind to the beta-adrenoceptors of the heart and stimulate contractile activity of myocardium. The positive inotropic and chronotropic effect could be blocked by the specific beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist but not by the beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Chagasic IgG inhibited the binding of (-) 3H-DHA to beta-adrenoceptors of purified rat myocardial membranes behaving as non-competitive inhibitors. The reactivity of chagasic serum or IgG with beta 1-adrenoceptor was lost after absorptions with turkey red blood cells. In contrast, guinea-pig red blood cells were unable to remove the beta 1 reactivity of chagasic serum or chagasic IgG. This supports the specificity of beta 1-adrenoceptors of the chagasic IgG and the independence of beta 1-adrenoceptor reactivity in relation to the EVI system. Clinical specificity of the beta 1-adrenoceptor reactivity seems rather high in Chagas' disease since it was lacking in 14 individuals with other cardiopathies, such as ischaemic and rheumatic heart disease, even after heart surgery. PMID:6088139

  15. Nonenzymatic glycosylation of serum IgG and its effect on antibody activity in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kaneshige, H

    1987-07-01

    Susceptibility to infection is assumed to be increased in diabetic patients, although its mechanism is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether glycosylation of circulating immunoglobulins is related to the decrease of antibody activity in diabetic patients. Thirty-five patients with type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes and 14 age-matched normal controls were examined. Nonenzymatic glycosylation of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) in vivo was measured by two different techniques, colorimetry and affinity chromatography. The levels of glycosylated IgG were significantly higher in diabetic patients than in normal controls. To evaluate the antibody activity of glycosylated IgG, anti-streptolysin O (ASO) titers after in vitro glycosylation of IgG and antibody titers before and after in vivo immunization with influenza vaccine were determined. IgG specific for streptolysin O purified by affinity chromatography decreased ASO titers after in vitro glycosylation. In diabetic patients, serum titers of hemagglutinin-inhibiting antibody against influenza viruses 4 wk after initial immunization were significantly lower than those in normal controls. These results indicate that serum IgG in diabetic patients was nonenzymatically glycosylated, and this modification in vivo might be associated with its functional alteration.

  16. Effects of arecoline on testosterone release in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shyi-Wu; Hwang, Guey-Shyang; Chen, Te-Jung; Wang, Paulus S

    2008-08-01

    Arecoline is one of the major components of betel nuts, which have been consumed as chewing gum in Southeast Asia. In this study, the effects of arecoline on testosterone (T) secretion were explored. Male rats were injected with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, 5 IU/kg) or arecoline (1 microg/kg) plus hCG via a jugular catheter. Blood samples were collected at several time intervals subsequent to the challenge. Rat anterior pituitary was treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone in vitro with or without arecoline, and then the concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) in the medium were measured. Rat Leydig cells were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation and incubated with arecoline, hCG, forskolin, 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP), nifedipine, nimodipine, or tetrandrine at 34 degrees C for 1 h. A single intravenous injection of arecoline resulted in an increase of the hCG-induced level of plasma T. Administration of arecoline (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) in vitro increased T production in Leydig cells. The stimulatory effect of arecoline on T release in vitro was enhanced by hCG (0.001 IU/ml), forskolin (10(-6) M), or 8-Br-cAMP (10(-5) M). By contrast, nifedipine, nimodipine, or tetrandrine inhibited the increased T concentrations induced by arecoline. Western blot showed that arecoline increases steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein expression compared with vehicle. These results suggested that arecoline stimulates testosterone production by acting directly on Leydig cells via mechanisms involving an activation of L-type calcium channels, increasing the activity of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and enhancing the expression of StAR.

  17. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and month of birth: A link to the solstitial-melatonin-testosterone effect.

    PubMed

    Szwed, Anita; Kosinska, Magdalena; Manning, John T

    2017-01-01

    Digit ratio (2D:4D) is a sexually dimorphic trait and its determination in utero is influenced by testosterone. The solstitial-melatonin-testosterone hypothesis posits that melatonin inhibits the production of foetal testosterone and melatonin levels are at their lowest in months when light levels are high. We test the relationship between 2D:4D, month-of-birth and light levels. We recruited participants whose year of birth was spread across the 20th Century. 323 Polish men and women. Finger lengths, month-of-birth, mean daylight hours per month in and around Poznan, Poland. Our sample was born between 1907 and 1997. In comparison to late-Spring births, late-Autumn births had low right-left 2D:4D (high prenatal testosterone). Regarding light levels, there were significant relationships between low right 2D:4D and right-left 2D:4D (high prenatal testosterone) and long days at the end of the 1st trimester. These relationships were strongest for participants born in the first half of the 20th Century. Participants born in the late-Autumn and who experienced long days in the 2nd and 3rd prenatal months had low 2D:4D. The effects were strongest for early 20th Century births where photoperiods would be less disrupted by artificial light. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phase transitions in human IgG solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil F; Laubach, Jacob P; Hideshima, Teru; Richardson, Paul G; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C; Benedek, George B

    2013-09-28

    Protein condensations, such as crystallization, liquid-liquid phase separation, aggregation, and gelation, have been observed in concentrated antibody solutions under various solution conditions. While most IgG antibodies are quite soluble, a few outliers can undergo condensation under physiological conditions. Condensation of IgGs can cause serious consequences in some human diseases and in biopharmaceutical formulations. The phase transitions underlying protein condensations in concentrated IgG solutions is also of fundamental interest for the understanding of the phase behavior of non-spherical protein molecules. Due to the high solubility of generic IgGs, the phase behavior of IgG solutions has not yet been well studied. In this work, we present an experimental approach to study IgG solutions in which the phase transitions are hidden below the freezing point of the solution. Using this method, we have investigated liquid-liquid phase separation of six human myeloma IgGs and two recombinant pharmaceutical human IgGs. We have also studied the relation between crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation of two human cryoglobulin IgGs. Our experimental results reveal several important features of the generic phase behavior of IgG solutions: (1) the shape of the coexistence curve is similar for all IgGs but quite different from that of quasi-spherical proteins; (2) all IgGs have critical points located at roughly the same protein concentration at ~100 mg/ml while their critical temperatures vary significantly; and (3) the liquid-liquid phase separation in IgG solutions is metastable with respect to crystallization. These features of phase behavior of IgG solutions reflect the fact that all IgGs have nearly identical molecular geometry but quite diverse net inter-protein interaction energies. This work provides a foundation for further experimental and theoretical studies of the phase behavior of generic IgGs as well as outliers with large propensity to

  19. Phase transitions in human IgG solutions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil F.; Laubach, Jacob P.; Hideshima, Teru; Richardson, Paul G.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Benedek, George B.

    2013-01-01

    Protein condensations, such as crystallization, liquid-liquid phase separation, aggregation, and gelation, have been observed in concentrated antibody solutions under various solution conditions. While most IgG antibodies are quite soluble, a few outliers can undergo condensation under physiological conditions. Condensation of IgGs can cause serious consequences in some human diseases and in biopharmaceutical formulations. The phase transitions underlying protein condensations in concentrated IgG solutions is also of fundamental interest for the understanding of the phase behavior of non-spherical protein molecules. Due to the high solubility of generic IgGs, the phase behavior of IgG solutions has not yet been well studied. In this work, we present an experimental approach to study IgG solutions in which the phase transitions are hidden below the freezing point of the solution. Using this method, we have investigated liquid-liquid phase separation of six human myeloma IgGs and two recombinant pharmaceutical human IgGs. We have also studied the relation between crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation of two human cryoglobulin IgGs. Our experimental results reveal several important features of the generic phase behavior of IgG solutions: (1) the shape of the coexistence curve is similar for all IgGs but quite different from that of quasi-spherical proteins; (2) all IgGs have critical points located at roughly the same protein concentration at ∼100 mg/ml while their critical temperatures vary significantly; and (3) the liquid-liquid phase separation in IgG solutions is metastable with respect to crystallization. These features of phase behavior of IgG solutions reflect the fact that all IgGs have nearly identical molecular geometry but quite diverse net inter-protein interaction energies. This work provides a foundation for further experimental and theoretical studies of the phase behavior of generic IgGs as well as outliers with large propensity to

  20. Phase transitions in human IgG solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil F.; Laubach, Jacob P.; Hideshima, Teru; Richardson, Paul G.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Benedek, George B.

    2013-09-01

    Protein condensations, such as crystallization, liquid-liquid phase separation, aggregation, and gelation, have been observed in concentrated antibody solutions under various solution conditions. While most IgG antibodies are quite soluble, a few outliers can undergo condensation under physiological conditions. Condensation of IgGs can cause serious consequences in some human diseases and in biopharmaceutical formulations. The phase transitions underlying protein condensations in concentrated IgG solutions is also of fundamental interest for the understanding of the phase behavior of non-spherical protein molecules. Due to the high solubility of generic IgGs, the phase behavior of IgG solutions has not yet been well studied. In this work, we present an experimental approach to study IgG solutions in which the phase transitions are hidden below the freezing point of the solution. Using this method, we have investigated liquid-liquid phase separation of six human myeloma IgGs and two recombinant pharmaceutical human IgGs. We have also studied the relation between crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation of two human cryoglobulin IgGs. Our experimental results reveal several important features of the generic phase behavior of IgG solutions: (1) the shape of the coexistence curve is similar for all IgGs but quite different from that of quasi-spherical proteins; (2) all IgGs have critical points located at roughly the same protein concentration at ˜100 mg/ml while their critical temperatures vary significantly; and (3) the liquid-liquid phase separation in IgG solutions is metastable with respect to crystallization. These features of phase behavior of IgG solutions reflect the fact that all IgGs have nearly identical molecular geometry but quite diverse net inter-protein interaction energies. This work provides a foundation for further experimental and theoretical studies of the phase behavior of generic IgGs as well as outliers with large propensity to

  1. Reflexive Testosterone Release: A Model System for Studying the Nongenomic Effects of Testosterone Upon Male Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nyby, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Male mammals of many species exhibit reflexive testosterone release in mating situations. In house mice (Mus musculus), the dramatic robustness of such release, occurring primarily in response to a novel female, suggests some function. The resulting testosterone elevations typically peak during copulatory behavior and may serve to activate transitory motivational and physiological responses that facilitate reproduction. However, such a function requires that testosterone be working through either nongenomic, or very quick genomic, mechanisms. The first part of the review describes reflexive sex hormone release in house mice. The second part summarizes research implicating testosterone’s fast actions in affecting anxiety, reward, learning, analgesia, and penile reflexes in rodents, all of which could optimize male mating success. The review concludes with a speculative model of how spontaneous and reflexive hormone release might interact to regulate reproductive behavior and why mice appear to be an ideal species for examining testosterone’s quick effects. PMID:17976710

  2. Heteroantibody-mediated cytotoxicity: antibody to the high affinity Fc receptor for IgG mediates cytotoxicity by human monocytes that is enhanced by interferon-gamma and is not blocked by human IgG.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Guyre, P M; Anderson, C L; Fanger, M W

    1986-12-01

    An IgG1 monoclonal antibody, 32.2, raised against the 72,000 dalton monocyte high affinity Fc receptor, was used to examine the role of this receptor in ADCC. This antibody did not inhibit the binding of human IgG1 to monocytes or to the U937 cell line, nor did it block or stimulate their killing of IgG-coated chicken erythrocytes (CE). Whole 32.2 or its Fab fragments were cross-linked to Fab fragments of rabbit anti-CE by using the agent SPDP. The resulting heteroantibodies (32.2 X Fab anti-CE) mediated monocyte and U937 cytotoxicity against CE, whereas an anti-HLA X anti-CE reagent did not. Both FcR expression and heteroantibody-mediated cytotoxicity were increased by culturing monocytes or U937 with IFN-gamma. Although IgG-mediated ADCC was significantly inhibited by 40 micrograms/ml human IgG1, cytotoxicity mediated by 32.2 X Fab anti-CE was not blocked by 2 mg/ml human IgG1, suggesting that such cytotoxicity might not be blocked by IgG in vivo. These data indicate the potential of 32.2 heteroantibodies in analysis of FcR function and in therapy.

  3. Rapid signaling responses in Sertoli cell membranes induced by follicle stimulating hormone and testosterone: calcium inflow and electrophysiological changes.

    PubMed

    Loss, Eloísa S; Jacobus, Ana Paula; Wassermann, Guillermo F

    2011-10-10

    This minireview describes the rapid signaling actions of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone in immature Sertoli cells mainly related to Ca(2+) inflow and the electrophysiological changes produced by hormones. The rapid membrane actions of FSH occur in a time frame of seconds to minutes, which include membrane depolarization and the stimulation of (45)Ca(2+) uptake. These effects can be prevented by pertussis toxin (PTX), suggesting that they are likely mediated by Gi-protein coupled receptor activation. Furthermore, these effects were inhibited by verapamil, a blocker of the L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC). Finally, FSH stimulation of (45)Ca(2+) uptake was inhibited by the (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. These results suggest that the rapid action of FSH on L-type Ca(2+) channel activity in Sertoli cells from pre-pubertal rats is mediated by the Gi/Gβγ/PI3Kγ pathway, independent of its effects on insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I). Testosterone depolarizes the membrane potential and increases the resistance and the (45)Ca(2+) uptake in Sertoli cells of the seminiferous tubules of immature rats. These actions were nullified by diazoxide (K(+)(ATP) channel opener). Testosterone actions were blocked by both PTX and the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, suggesting the involvement of PLC - phosphatidylinositol 4-5 bisphosphate (PIP2) hydrolysis via the Gq protein in the testosterone-mediated pathway. These results indicate that testosterone acts on the Sertoli cell membrane through the K(+)(ATP) channels and PLC-PIP2 hydrolysis, which closes the channel, depolarizes the membrane and stimulates (45)Ca(2+) uptake. These results demonstrate the existence of rapid non-classical pathways in immature Sertoli cells regulated by FSH and testosterone.

  4. Development of an IgG4-RD Responder Index

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Mollie N.; Stone, John H.; Deshpande, Vikram; Khosroshahi, Arezou

    2012-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a multiorgan inflammatory disease in which diverse organ manifestations are linked by common histopathological and immunohistochemical features. Prospective studies of IgG4-RD patients are required to clarify the natural history, long-term prognosis, and treatment approaches in this recently recognized condition. Patients with IgG4-RD have different organ manifestations and are followed by multiple specialties. Divergent approaches to the assessment of patients can complicate the interpretation of studies, emphasizing the critical need for validated outcome measures, particularly assessments of disease activity and response to treatment. We developed a prototype IgG4-RD Responder Index (IgG4-RD RI) based on the approach used in the development of the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score for Wegener's granulomatosis (BVAS/WG). The IgG4-RD RI was refined by members of the International IgG4-RD Symposium Organizing Committee in a paper case exercise. The revised instrument was applied retrospectively to fifteen IgG4-RD patients at our institution. Those scores were compared to physician's global assessment scale for the same visits. This paper describes the philosophy and goals of the IgG4-RD RI, the steps in the development of this instrument to date, and future plans for validation of this instrument as an outcome measure. PMID:22611406

  5. Current approaches to erectile dysfunction and testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wespes, E

    2010-12-01

    Androgens are essential for the development of the penis and it is well known that testosterone play a critical role in the physiology of erectile function. From animal studies, testosterone insufficiency disrupts cellular-signaling pathways and induces pathologic alterations in penile tissues leading to erectile dysfunction. In human, the testosterone threshold for maintaining erection is low which explains the reason why some contracted men still have an erection due to the androgens produced by the adrenal gland. Testosterone alone can improve erectile function in hypogonadic patients. Associated with PDE5-I, testosterone supplementation is a treatment for the hypogonadic patients non responders to therapy. The article reviews the different aspects of the testosterone role in the pathophysiology of erection.

  6. Testosterone deficiency, insulin-resistant obesity and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Pintana, Hiranya; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2015-08-01

    Testosterone is an androgenic steroid hormone, which plays an important role in the regulation of male reproduction and behaviors, as well as in the maintenance of insulin sensitivity. Several studies showed that testosterone exerted beneficial effects in brain function, including preventing neuronal cell death, balancing brain oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, improving synaptic plasticity and involving cognitive formation. Although previous studies showed that testosterone deficiency is positively correlated with cognitive impairment and insulin-resistant obesity, several studies demonstrated contradictory findings. Thus, this review comprehensively summarizes the current evidence from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies of the relationship between testosterone deficiency and insulin-resistant obesity as well as the correlation between either insulin-resistant obesity or testosterone deficiency and cognitive impairment. Controversial reports and the mechanistic insights regarding the roles of testosterone in insulin-resistant obesity and cognitive function are also presented and discussed.

  7. Testosterone, cortisol, and psychopathic traits in men and women.

    PubMed

    Welker, Keith M; Lozoya, Elianna; Campbell, Jocelyn A; Neumann, Craig S; Carré, Justin M

    2014-04-22

    Cortisol and testosterone are theorized to independently and jointly influence antisocial behaviors. The current research examined the independent and interactive effects of baseline testosterone and cortisol on individual differences in psychopathic traits in a relatively large non-clinical sample (N=237). Participants completed the Self-Report Psychopathy - Short Form (SRP; Paulhus, Neumann, & Hare, in press) and provided saliva samples. Analyses indicated that testosterone and cortisol were positively correlated with psychopathic traits in men, but beyond these effects, cortisol moderated the relationship between testosterone and psychopathy in men. The relationship between testosterone and psychopathy within men was positive when cortisol levels were high, but negative when cortisol levels were low. These results have implications for work surrounding the dual hormone hypothesis and suggest that nonclinical variability in psychopathy can be predicted by baseline testosterone and cortisol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Testosterone biases the amygdala toward social threat approach

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Sina; Volman, Inge; Mehta, Pranjal; van Son, Veerle; Enter, Dorien; Sanfey, Alan; Toni, Ivan; de Bruijn, Ellen R. A.; Roelofs, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone enhances amygdala reactions to social threat, but it remains unclear whether this neuroendocrine mechanism is relevant for understanding its dominance-enhancing properties; namely, whether testosterone biases the human amygdala toward threat approach. This pharmacological functional magnetic-resonance imaging study shows that testosterone administration increases amygdala responses in healthy women during threat approach and decreases it during threat avoidance. These findings support and extend motivational salience models by offering a neuroendocrine mechanism of motivation-specific amygdala tuning. PMID:26601187

  9. Pharmacokinetics of testosterone cream applied to scrotal skin.

    PubMed

    Iyer, R; Mok, S F; Savkovic, S; Turner, L; Fraser, G; Desai, R; Jayadev, V; Conway, A J; Handelsman, D J

    2017-03-23

    Scrotal skin is thin and has high steroid permeability, but the pharmacokinetics of testosterone via the scrotal skin route has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to define the pharmacokinetics of testosterone delivered via the scrotal skin route. The study was a single-center, three-phase cross-over pharmacokinetic study of three single doses (12.5, 25, 50 mg) of testosterone cream administered in random sequence on different days with at least 2 days between doses to healthy eugonadal volunteers with endogenous testosterone suppressed by administration of nandrolone decanoate. Serum testosterone, DHT and estradiol concentrations were measured by liquid chromatograpy, mass spectrometry in extracts of serum taken before and for 16 h after administration of each of the three doses of testosterone cream to the scrotal skin. Testosterone administration onto the scrotal skin produced a swift (peak 1.9-2.8 h), dose-dependent (p < 0.0001) increase in serum testosterone with the 25 mg dose maintaining physiological levels for 16 h. Serum DHT displayed a time- (p < 0.0001), but not dose-dependent, increase in concentration reaching a peak concentration of 1.2 ng/mL (4.1 nm) at 4.9 h which was delayed by 2 h after peak serum testosterone. There were no significant changes in serum estradiol over time after testosterone administration. We conclude that testosterone administration to scrotal skin is well tolerated and produces dose-dependent peak serum testosterone concentration with a much lower dose relative to the non-scrotal transdermal route.

  10. [IgG4-related systemic disease/systemic IgG4-related disease].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2010-05-01

    IgG4-related systemic disease/systemic IgG4-related disease has been established as a new systemic disease entity. It is characterized by high serum IgG4 concentrations and abundant IgG4-bearing plasma cell infiltration in the involved organs. The chronic inflammation can attack lacrimal glands, salivary glands, the thyroid, lung, pancreas, kidney, and prostate. The concept includes Mikulicz's disease, Riedel's thyroiditis, pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary pseudotumor, autoimmune pancreatitis, a part of tubulointerstitial nephritis, and chronic prostatitis. It is important to note that these lesions can occur at different times and sites. So, it is necessary to reconfirm the disease definition and entity in each specialized field. The diagnosis of this disease is confirmed by the above serological and histopathological characteristics. There are clinical diagnostic criteria of Mikulicz's disease (the Japanese Medical Society for Sjögren's Syndrome) and autoimmune pancreatitis (the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, and the Japan Pancreas Society). They are convenient and useful. Glucocorticoid improves the physical abnormalities, and the initial dose of prednisolone is 30 mg/day, tapered in 5-mg reductions every two weeks. Nevertheless, there are some cases unable to achieve complete remission.

  11. IgG4 plasma cell myeloma: new insights into the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Julia T; Niesvizky, Ruben; Jayabalan, David S; Mathew, Susan; Subramaniyam, Shivakumar; Geyer, Alexander I; Orazi, Attilio; Ely, Scott A

    2014-03-01

    IgG4-related disease is a newly described systemic fibroinflammatory process, characterized by increase in IgG4-positive plasma cells. Its pathogenesis, including the role of IgG4, remains poorly understood. Plasma cell myeloma is typically associated with a large monoclonal serum spike, which is frequently of IgG isotype. We sought to identify and characterize a subset of IgG4-secreting myeloma, as it may provide a biological model of disease with high serum levels of IgG4. Six out of 158 bone marrow biopsies (4%) from patients with IgG myeloma expressed IgG4. Four patients were men and two were women, with a mean age of 64 (range 53-87) years. Imaging showed fullness of pancreatic head (1), small non-metabolic lymphadenopathy (1), and bone lytic lesions (6). Two patients developed necrotizing fasciitis. All had elevated serum M-protein (mean 2.4, range 0.5-4.2 g/dl), and none had definite signs or symptoms of IgG4-related disease. Four myelomas had plasmablastic morphology. Four had kappa and two had lambda light chain expression. Three cases expressed CD56. Two patients had a complex karyotype. In conclusion, the frequency of IgG4 myeloma correlates with the normal distribution of IgG4 isoform. The patients with IgG4 myeloma appear to have a high rate of plasmablastic morphology and could be predisposed to necrotizing fasciitis. Despite high serum levels of IgG4, none had evidence of IgG4-related disease. These findings suggest that the increased number of IgG4-positive plasma cells is not the primary etiologic agent in IgG4-related disease. Elevated serum levels of IgG4 is not sufficient to produce the typical disease presentation and should not be considered diagnostic of IgG4-related disease.

  12. Binding of fusion protein FLSC IgG1 to CCR5 is enhanced by CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Latinovic, Olga; Schneider, Kate; Szmacinski, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Heredia, Alonso; Redfield, Robert R

    2014-12-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is crucial for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, acting as the principal coreceptor for HIV-1 entry and transmission and is thus an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Studies have suggested that CCR5 surface density and its conformational changes subsequent to virion engagement are rate limiting for entry, and consequently, infection. Not all CCR5 antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection, suggesting a need for more potent reagents. Here we evaluated full length single chain (FLSC) IgG1, a novel IgG-CD4-gp120(BAL) fusion protein with several characteristics that make it an attractive candidate for treatment of HIV-1 infections, including bivalency and a potentially increased serum half-life over FLSC, the parental molecule. FLSC IgG1 binds two domains on CCR5, the N-terminus and the second extracellular loop, lowering the levels of available CCR5 viral attachment sites. Furthermore, FLSC IgG1 synergizes with Maraviroc (MVC), the only licensed CCR5 antagonist. In this study, we used both microscopy and functional assays to address the mechanistic aspects of the interactions of FLSC IgG1 and MVC in the context of CCR5 conformational changes and viral infection. We used a novel stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), based on high resolution localization of photoswitchable dyes to visualize direct contacts between FLSC IgG1 and CCR5. We compared viral entry inhibition by FLSC IgG1 with that of other CCR5 blockers and showed FLSC IgG1 to be the most potent. We also showed that lower CCR5 surface densities in HIV-1 infected primary cells result in lower FLSC IgG1 EC50 values. In addition, CCR5 binding by FLSC IgG1, but not CCR5 Ab 2D7, was significantly increased when cells were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC allosterically increases exposure of the FLSC IgG1 binding site. These data have implications for future antiviral therapy development.

  13. Testosterone Replacement Therapy on the Natural History of Prostate Disease.

    PubMed

    Moore, Aaron; Butcher, Michael J; Köhler, Tobias S

    2015-08-01

    The physiology of testosterone production and action are closely related to prostatic disease. An understanding of the natural history of testosterone and prostate growth and development is needed in order to understand this complex relationship. Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostate cancer, and sexual function are common disorders for which testosterone is thought to play a role. Proposed in this review are some theories as to how testosterone interacts to potentially ameliorate these conditions. Further research is needed, but we feel our proposed points are valid given the review of the literature.

  14. The nanochannel delivery system for constant testosterone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferrati, Silvia; Nicolov, Eugenia; Zabre, Erika; Geninatti, Thomas; Shirkey, Beverly A; Hudson, Lee; Hosali, Sharath; Crawley, Michael; Khera, Mohit; Palapattu, Ganesh; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    The goal of testosterone replacement is to provide long-term physiological supplementation at sufficient levels to mitigate the symptoms of hypogonadism. The objective of this work is to determine if the implantable nanochannel delivery system (nDS) can present an alternative delivery strategy for the long-term sustained and constant release of testosterone. A formulation of common testosterone esters (F1) was developed to enable nanochannel delivery of the low water soluble hormone. In vivo evaluation of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and a multiplex assay, respectively, in castrated Sprague-Dawley rats implanted with nDS-F1 implants or polymeric pellets was performed over a 6-month period. The percent of testosterone concentrations observed that fell within the normal range of testosterone levels for each animal was calculated and used to compare the study groups. Sustain release of testosterone in vivo for over 6 months. The subcutaneous release of F1 from nDS implants exhibited sustained in vivo release kinetics and attained stable clinically relevant plasma testosterone levels. Plasma LH and FSH levels were significantly diminished in nDS-F1 implant-treated animals, confirming biological activity of the released testosterone. In conclusion, we demonstrate that nDS-F1 implants represents a novel approach for the treatment of male hypogonadism. Further studies will be performed in view of translating the technology to clinical use. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Mouse Spermatogenesis Requires Classical and Nonclassical Testosterone Signaling.

    PubMed

    Toocheck, Corey; Clister, Terri; Shupe, John; Crum, Chelsea; Ravindranathan, Preethi; Lee, Tae-Kyung; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Raj, Ganesh V; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E; Walker, William H

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone acts though the androgen receptor in Sertoli cells to support germ cell development (spermatogenesis) and male fertility, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which testosterone acts are not well understood. Previously, we found that in addition to acting through androgen receptor to directly regulate gene expression (classical testosterone signaling pathway), testosterone acts through a nonclassical pathway via the androgen receptor to rapidly activate kinases that are known to regulate spermatogenesis. In this study, we provide the first evidence that nonclassical testosterone signaling occurs in vivo as the MAP kinase cascade is rapidly activated in Sertoli cells within the testis by increasing testosterone levels in the rat. We find that either classical or nonclassical signaling regulates testosterone-mediated Rhox5 gene expression in Sertoli cells within testis explants. The selective activation of classical or nonclassical signaling pathways in Sertoli cells within testis explants also resulted in the differential activation of the Zbtb16 and c-Kit genes in adjacent spermatogonia germ cells. Delivery of an inhibitor of either pathway to Sertoli cells of mouse testes disrupted the blood-testis barrier that is essential for spermatogenesis. Furthermore, an inhibitor of nonclassical testosterone signaling blocked meiosis in pubertal mice and caused the loss of meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells in adult mouse testes. An inhibitor of the classical pathway caused the premature release of immature germ cells. Collectively, these observations indicate that classical and nonclassical testosterone signaling regulate overlapping and distinct functions that are required for the maintenance of spermatogenesis and male fertility.

  16. "Mitochondrial Eve", "Y Chromosome Adam", testosterone, and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Howard, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    I suggest primate evolution began as a consequence of increased testosterone in males which increased aggression and sexuality, therefore, reproduction and success. With time, negative effects of excessive testosterone reduced spermatogenesis and started a decline of the group. Approximately 30-40 million years ago, the gene DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) appeared on the Y chromosome, increased spermatogenesis, and rescued the early primates from extinction. (Note: DAZ is considered by some to specifically, positively affect spermatogenesis; others suggest it has no effect on spermatogenesis.) Hominid evolution continued with increasing testosterone. The advent of increased testosterone in females of Homo erectus (or Homo ergaster) increased the female-to-male body size ratio, and eventually produced another era of excessive testosterone. Excessive testosterone caused a reduction in population size (bottleneck) that produced the "Mitochondrial Eve" (ME) mechanism. (Only certain females continued during the bottleneck to transmit their mitochondrial DNA.) That is, the ME mechanism culminated, again, in excessive testosterone and reduced spermatogenesis in the hominid line. Approximately 50,000 to 200,000 years ago, a "doubling" of the DAZ gene occurred on the Y chromosome in hominid males which rescued the hominid line with increased spermatogenesis in certain males. This produced the "Y Chromosome Adam" event. The doubling of DAZ allowed further increases in testosterone in hominids that resulted in the increased size and development of the brain. Modern humans periodically fluctuate between the positive and negative consequences of increased levels of testosterone, currently identifiable as the secular trend, increased infections, and reduced spermatogenesis.

  17. IgG subclass co-expression brings harmony to the quartet model of murine IgG function.

    PubMed

    Collins, Andrew M

    2016-11-01

    A model of murine IgG function is presented in which the co-expression of the IgG subclasses is a central feature, class switching occurs before the commencement of somatic hypermutation, and there is little switching between subclasses. It is named the quartet model to emphasize the harmony that comes from the simultaneous presence of the four subclasses. In this model, IgG3 and IgG2b antibodies are particularly important early in the response, when T-cell help may be limiting. IgG3 initiates inflammation through complement fixation, whereas IgG2b provides early FcγR-mediated effector functions. As T-cell help strengthens, IgG2a antibodies increase the power of the response, whereas IgG1 production helps limit the inflammatory drive and limits immunopathology. The model highlights the fact that murine IgG subclasses function quite differently to human IgG subclasses. This allows them to serve the special immunological needs of a species that is vulnerable because of its small size.

  18. Epitope-Specific Suppression of IgG Responses by Passively Administered Specific IgG: Evidence of Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Joakim J. E.; Xu, Hui; Heyman, Birgitta

    2017-01-01

    Specific IgG, passively administered together with particulate antigen, can completely prevent induction of antibody responses to this antigen. The ability of IgG to suppress antibody responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) is intact in mice lacking FcγRs, complement factor 1q, C3, or complement receptors 1 and 2, suggesting that Fc-dependent effector functions are not involved. Two of the most widely discussed explanations for the suppressive effect are increased clearance of IgG–antigen complexes and/or that IgG “hides” the antigen from recognition by specific B cells, so-called epitope masking. The majority of data on how IgG induces suppression was obtained through studies of the effects on IgM-secreting single spleen cells during the first week after immunization. Here, we show that IgG also suppresses antigen-specific extrafollicular antibody-secreting cells, germinal center B-cells, long-lived plasma cells, long-term IgG responses, and induction of memory antibody responses. IgG anti-SRBC reduced the amount of SRBC in the spleens of wild-type, but not of FcγR-deficient mice. However, no correlation between suppression and the amount of SRBC in the spleen was observed, suggesting that increased clearance does not explain IgG-mediated suppression. Instead, we found compelling evidence for epitope masking because IgG anti-NP administered with NP-SRBC suppressed the IgG anti-NP, but not the IgG anti-SRBC response. Vice versa, IgG anti-SRBC administered with NP-SRBC, suppressed only the IgG anti-SRBC response. In conclusion, passively transferred IgG suppressed all measured parameters of an antigen-specific antibody/B cell response and an important mechanism of action is likely to be epitope masking. PMID:28321225

  19. Epitope specificity of rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) elicited by pneumococcal type 23F synthetic oligosaccharide- and native polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines: comparison with human anti-polysaccharide 23F IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso de Velasco, E; Verheul, A F; van Steijn, A M; Dekker, H A; Feldman, R G; Fernández, I M; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F; Verhoef, J; Snippe, H

    1994-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae type 23F capsular polysaccharide (PS23F) consitss of a repeating glycerol-phosphorylated branched tetrasaccharide. The immunogenicities of the following related antigens were investigated: (i) a synthetic trisaccharide comprising the backbone of one repeating unit, (ii) a synthetic tetrasaccharide comprising the complete repeating unit, and (iii) native PS23F (all three conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin [KLH]) and (iv) formalin-killed S. pneumoniae 23F. All antigens except the trisaccharide-KLH conjugate induced relatively high anti-PS23F antibody levels in rabbits. The epitope specificity of such antibodies was then studied by means of an inhibition immunoassay. The alpha(1-->2)-linked L-rhamnose branch was shown to be immunodominant for immunoglobulin G (IgG) induced by tetrasaccharide-KLH, PS23F-KLH, and killed S. pneumoniae 23F: in most sera L-rhamnose totally inhibited the binding of IgG to PS23F. Thus, there appears to be no major difference in epitope specificity between IgG induced by tetrasaccharide-KLH and that induced by antigens containing the polymeric form of PS23F. Human anti-PS23F IgG (either vaccine induced or naturally acquired) had a different epitope specificity: none of the inhibitors used, including L-rhamnose and tetrasaccharide-KLH, exhibited substantial inhibition. These observations suggest that the epitope recognized by human IgG on PS23F is larger than the epitope recognized by rabbit IgG. Both human and rabbit antisera efficiently opsonized type 23F pneumococci, as measured in a phagocytosis assay using human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:7509318

  20. Diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related ophthalmic disease.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hiroshi; Takahira, Masayuki; Takahira, Masahiro; Azumi, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease is a novel clinical entity characterized by infiltration of IgG4-immunopositive plasmacytes and elevated serum IgG4 concentration accompanied by enlargement of and masses in various organs, including the lacrimal gland, salivary gland, and pancreas. Recent studies have clarified that conditions previously diagnosed as Mikulicz disease as well as various types of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrative disorders of the ocular adnexa are consistent with a diagnosis of IgG4-related disease. Against this background, the diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related ophthalmic disease have recently been established, based on both the clinical and the histopathologic features of the ocular lesions. This article reviews these new criteria with reference to the comprehensive diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease for all systemic conditions reported in 2012.

  1. IgG4 Staining in Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Irwin; Rajak, Saul N; Kearney, Daniel J; Andrew, Nicholas H; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-09-10

    IgG4-related ophthalmic disease is increasingly widely recognized. Moreover, IgG4 staining can occur in other inflammatory diseases. The authors report a case of IgG4 staining of an enlarged, inflamed levator palpebrae superioris in a patient with a past history of thyroid eye disease. A 78-year-old woman with quiescent hyperthyroidism had clinical and radiological evidence of levator palpebrae superioris inflammation without superior rectus involvement. A biopsy was consistent with IgG4-related ophthalmic disease. There was a marked but incomplete response to an orbital injection of triamcinolone. The authors discuss the association between thyroid eye disease and IgG4 staining and the diagnostic issues that arise when IgG4-related ophthalmic disease criteria are fulfilled in patients with other orbital inflammatory conditions.

  2. Serum testosterone levels in non-dosed females after secondary exposure to 1.62% testosterone gel: effects of clothing barrier on testosterone absorption.

    PubMed

    Stahlman, Jodi; Britto, Margaret; Fitzpatrick, Sherahe; McWhirter, Cecilia; Testino, Samuel A; Brennan, John J; Zumbrunnen, Troy L

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate secondary exposure of testosterone transferred to females from a male partner, dosed with 1.62% testosterone gel after direct skin-to-skin contact with the application site, and to investigate the effect of wearing a t-shirt on testosterone transfer. Across three studies, a total of 72 healthy males applied 5.0 g 1.62% testosterone gel to their abdomen alone, upper arms/shoulders alone, or a combination of their upper arms/shoulders and abdomen (single dose or once daily for 7 days). Male-female contact occurred 2 or 12 hours after testosterone gel application, with males either wearing or not wearing a t-shirt. There were 15 minutes of supervised contact with the application site between the male and his female partner. Blood samples were collected over a 24 hour period in females for assessment of serum testosterone levels at baseline and after contact. Pharmacokinetic parameters included C(max) (maximum serum concentration), AUC(0-24) (area under the serum concentration-time curve from 0-24 hours), and C(av) (time-averaged concentration over the 24-hour period post-contact). Subjects were monitored for adverse events. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NCT NUMBERS: Study 1 was not registered (first subject enrolled 8 March 2007); Study 2: 00998933; Study 3, 01130298. Testosterone levels (C(av) and C(max)) in females increased 86-185% from baseline after direct abdominal skin contact, although C(av) levels remained within female eugonadal range. Testosterone concentrations returned to baseline within 48 hours after last skin contact. A t-shirt barrier reduced testosterone transfer by approximately 40-48% when 5.0 g of testosterone gel was applied to the abdomen alone. A t-shirt barrier prevented transfer when 5.0 g of testosterone gel was applied to the upper arms and shoulders or to a combination of the upper arms and shoulders and the abdomen (C(max) and C(av) increased by approximately 5-11%). No major safety events were observed during the studies

  3. Evaluation of Quantitative Anti-F1 IgG and Anti-V IgG ELISAs for use as an in Vitro-Based Potency Assay of Plague Vaccine in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    and translocation of Yersinia outer proteins ( Yops ) [11], inhibits chemotaxis [12], and modulates the cytokine response [13,14]. Two early plague... protein , rF1-V, which is being developed as a plague vaccine. Several fundamental parameters of the ELISA were evaluated: specificity, precision, accuracy...quantitative anti-F1 IgG and anti-V IgG ELISAs, might be used to evaluate the rF1-V fusion protein vaccine. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of The

  4. IgG4 Characteristics and Functions in Cancer Immunity.

    PubMed

    Crescioli, Silvia; Correa, Isabel; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Davies, Anna M; Sutton, Brian J; Nestle, Frank O; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2016-01-01

    IgG4 is the least abundant subclass of IgG in normal human serum, but elevated IgG4 levels are triggered in response to a chronic antigenic stimulus and inflammation. Since the immune system is exposed to tumor-associated antigens over a relatively long period of time, and tumors notoriously promote inflammation, it is unsurprising that IgG4 has been implicated in certain tumor types. Despite differing from other IgG subclasses by only a few amino acids, IgG4 possesses unique structural characteristics that may be responsible for its poor effector function potency and immunomodulatory properties. We describe the unique attributes of IgG4 that may be responsible for these regulatory functions, particularly in the cancer context. We discuss the inflammatory conditions in tumors that support IgG4, the emerging and proposed mechanisms by which IgG4 may contribute to tumor-associated escape from immune surveillance and implications for cancer immunotherapy.

  5. IgG subclasses determine pathways of anaphylaxis in mice.

    PubMed

    Beutier, Héloïse; Gillis, Caitlin M; Iannascoli, Bruno; Godon, Ophélie; England, Patrick; Sibilano, Riccardo; Reber, Laurent L; Galli, Stephen J; Cragg, Mark S; Van Rooijen, Nico; Mancardi, David A; Bruhns, Pierre; Jönsson, Friederike

    2017-01-01

    Animal models have demonstrated that allergen-specific IgG confers sensitivity to systemic anaphylaxis that relies on IgG Fc receptors (FcγRs). Mouse IgG2a and IgG2b bind activating FcγRI, FcγRIII, and FcγRIV and inhibitory FcγRIIB; mouse IgG1 binds only FcγRIII and FcγRIIB. Although these interactions are of strikingly different affinities, these 3 IgG subclasses have been shown to enable induction of systemic anaphylaxis. We sought to determine which pathways control the induction of IgG1-, IgG2a-, and IgG2b-dependent passive systemic anaphylaxis. Mice were sensitized with IgG1, IgG2a, or IgG2b anti-trinitrophenyl mAbs and challenged with trinitrophenyl-BSA intravenously to induce systemic anaphylaxis that was monitored by using rectal temperature. Anaphylaxis was evaluated in mice deficient for FcγRs injected with mediator antagonists or in which basophils, monocytes/macrophages, or neutrophils had been depleted. FcγR expression was evaluated on these cells before and after anaphylaxis. Activating FcγRIII is the receptor primarily responsible for all 3 models of anaphylaxis, and subsequent downregulation of this receptor was observed. These models differentially relied on histamine release and the contribution of mast cells, basophils, macrophages, and neutrophils. Strikingly, basophil contribution and histamine predominance in mice with IgG1- and IgG2b-induced anaphylaxis correlated with the ability of inhibitory FcγRIIB to negatively regulate these models of anaphylaxis. We propose that the differential expression of inhibitory FcγRIIB on myeloid cells and its differential binding of IgG subclasses controls the contributions of mast cells, basophils, neutrophils, and macrophages to IgG subclass-dependent anaphylaxis. Collectively, our results unravel novel complexities in the involvement and regulation of cell populations in IgG-dependent reactions in vivo. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier

  6. Agalactosyl glycoforms of IgG autoantibodies are pathogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, T W; Williams, P; Dwek, R A

    1994-01-01

    The glycosylation of IgG results in many different glycoforms. A large body of correlative data (including remission of arthritis during pregnancy) has suggested that IgG molecules lacking galactose were associated with rheumatoid arthritis. We now demonstrate that agalactosyl IgG glycoforms are directly associated with pathogenicity in murine collagen-induced arthritis. We show that passive transfer of an acute synovitis in T-cell-primed mice can be enhanced by using IgG containing autoantibodies to type II collagen when the antibodies are present as the agalactosyl glycoform. Thus, nonpathogenic doses of autoantibodies can be made pathogenic by altering their glycosylation state. PMID:8016124

  7. Sialylation Determines the Nephritogenicity of IgG3 Cryoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Masako; Kuroki, Aki; Kikuchi, Shuichi; Kihara, Masao; Nakata, Junichiro; Ito, Kiyoaki; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal 6-19 IgG3 anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor derived from lupus-prone MRL-Faslpr mice can induce GN and cryoglobulinemia, but the features that confer nephritogenic potential are not completely understood. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharide chains of 6-19 IgG3 mAb are poorly galactosylated and hardly sialylated, possibly contributing to the pathogenic potential of 6-19 IgG3 rheumatoid factors. Here, we used the 6-19 model of cryoglobulin-associated GN to define the relative contributions of galactosylation and sialylation, in relation to cryoglobulin activity, to the nephritogenic potential of IgG3 antibodies. We generated one highly sialylated and two distinct more galactosylated 6-19 IgG3 rheumatoid factor variants. Although the mere extent of galactosylation had no effect on either the cryogenic and nephritogenic activities of 6-19 IgG3 rheumatoid factor, terminal sialylation attenuated the nephritogenic potential of 6-19 IgG3 by limiting its cryoglobulin activity. These data suggest a protective role of IgG sialylation against the development of cryoglobulin-mediated GN, highlighting the anti-inflammatory activity of sialylated IgG antibodies. PMID:23024299

  8. Adult testosterone treatment but not surgical disruption of vomeronasal function augments male-typical sexual behavior in female mice.

    PubMed

    Martel, Kristine L; Baum, Michael J

    2009-06-17

    It was recently reported that female mice lacking a functional vomeronasal organ (VNO) displayed male-typical sexual behavior indiscriminately toward female and male conspecifics. These results have been cited as showing that a circuit controlling male-typical sex behavior exists in both sexes, with its activation in females being tonically inhibited by VNO signaling, independent of adult sex hormones. We further assessed this hypothesis while controlling the endocrine status of female mice in which VNO function was surgically disrupted. In experiment 1, VNO-lesioned (VNOx) female mice showed no more mounting or pelvic-thrusting behavior toward an estrous female or a castrated, urine-swabbed male (presented simultaneously) than sham-operated (VNOi) females. This was true when subjects were either ovary-intact or ovariectomized and treated with estradiol, estradiol plus progesterone, or testosterone. In experiment 2, female mice given accessory olfactory bulb lesions or a sham lesion displayed equivalent frequencies of male sex behaviors when given testosterone after ovariectomy. In experiment 3, VNOx and VNOi females displayed equivalent frequencies of male sex behaviors toward an estrous female or a castrated male (presented in separate tests), again, when given testosterone after ovariectomy. Our results confirm early reports that adult testosterone can stimulate appreciable male-typical sex behavior in female mice. However, we failed to corroborate the recent claim that VNO signaling normally inhibits the activity of neural circuitry controlling the expression of male-typical mating behavior by female mice.

  9. Tissue engineered testicular prostheses with prolonged testosterone release.

    PubMed

    Raya-Rivera, Atlantida M; Baez, Carlos; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2008-08-01

    Bilateral anorchia, either congenital or acquired, often requires testicular prostheses placement and testosterone supplementation. Several types of testosterone compounds and various modes of hormone delivery are currently used clinically, however, their pharmacokinetic properties are not ideal. In this study, we explored the possibility of creating hormone releasing testicular prostheses that could continuously supply and maintain physiologic levels of testosterone in vivo over time. Chondrocytes, harvested from bovine articular cartilage, were seeded on testicular shaped polymer scaffolds at a concentration of 100 x 10(6) ml(-1). The scaffolds were maintained in a bioreactor for 4 weeks to form cartilage tissue. Subsequently, testosterone enanthate (100 microg) was injected into the central hollow space of each testicular prosthesis, and maintained for 40 weeks in culture. A sample of the medium was collected every 2 days for testosterone assays. Another group of ex vivo engineered testicular prostheses was implanted into the scrotal space of castrated athymic mice (n = 10). Intratesticular injection of testosterone enanthate was made into each prosthesis at a concentration of 100 microg. Control groups consisted of animals with castration only (n = 8) and sham operations (n = 5). Testosterone levels were measured prior and 2 weeks after castration, 1 day after testosterone administration, and weekly up to 14 weeks. The engineered testicular prostheses were retrieved at sacrifice for histomorphological and immunocytochemical analyses. Milky white cartilage testicular protheses were formed by 4 weeks. The ex vivo prostheses showed an initial burst effect of testosterone followed by a broad plateau for 16 weeks (>500 ng/dl) and a decreased level of testosterone until 40 weeks. The testosterone levels were physiologic throughout 40 weeks and the entire testosterone released was calculated as 60% of the injected volume. The circulating testosterone levels in the

  10. Free testosterone: clinical utility and important analytical aspects of measurement.

    PubMed

    Shea, Jennifer L; Wong, Pui-Yuen; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone, the most abundant androgen in men, is a steroid hormone that is synthesized predominantly by the testes. In women, minor amounts are synthesized in the ovaries. Androgen precursors are also produced and secreted from the adrenal glands in both sexes, where they undergo peripheral conversion to testosterone. Circulating concentrations are approximately 15-25 times higher in adult men compared to women. Maintenance of these levels is necessary for development and maintenance of secondary sexual characteristics, libido, growth, prevention of osteoporosis, and most importantly in men, spermatogenesis. Most testosterone circulates tightly bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) or weakly bound to albumin. A minor amount circulates as free testosterone, and it is believed that this is the metabolically active fraction. Measurement of free testosterone is important in the diagnosis of many diseases, most importantly disorders of androgen deficiency in men (i.e., hypogonadism) and androgen excess in women (i.e., polycystic ovary syndrome and hirsutism). Many methodologies are available for free testosterone measurement including the reference methods (equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration), analog immunoassay, and calculated free testosterone based on measurement of total testosterone, SHBG, and albumin. Moreover, measurement of bioavailable testosterone, a combination of albumin-bound and free testosterone, also has clinical utility and can be measured by selective protein precipitation or calculation. In this review, the advantages and limitations of each of these methods will be discussed in the context of clinical utility and implementation into a routine hospital laboratory. Furthermore, up and coming methodologies for free testosterone measurement, including liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, will also be discussed.

  11. Testosterone and social and reproductive behaviour in Aphelocoma jays.

    PubMed

    Vleck; Brown

    1999-11-01

    When there is a direct relationship between testosterone level and payoff in reproductive success through aggression, testosterone levels should be elevated. Elevated testosterone, however, has fitness costs, particularly a decreased tendency to display parental care. Thus the pattern of testosterone secretion in males should vary with the social and mating system. Western scrub-jays, Aphelocoma californica woodhouseii, form monogamous pairs on territories during the breeding season. Mexican jays, A. ultramarina, live in large, stable groups and up to five females within a group attempt nesting each spring. In both species, testosterone levels rose rapidly in March and peak levels did not differ. Elevated testosterone levels were only observed for about 3 weeks in the monogamous western scrub-jay, but were observed into May in Mexican jays, a reflection of prolonged opportunity for males to mate with multiple females and continual interaction with other competing males. In Mexican jays, nonbreeding yearlings had lower testosterone levels than all other age groups. Testosterone in males owning nests did not differ from that in other adult males, many of whom engage in extrapair fertilizations. Testosterone was elevated throughout the incubation phase, but was significantly lower when chicks were present in any nest in the group. Nearly all birds in the group fed all chicks. These observations support the hypothesis that testosterone is elevated when male-male competition is frequent and mating opportunities depend on the outcome of that competition, and testosterone is decreased when the necessity for parental or alloparental care would make its effects deleterious. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  12. Developmental programing: impact of testosterone on placental differentiation.

    PubMed

    Beckett, E M; Astapova, O; Steckler, T L; Veiga-Lopez, A; Padmanabhan, V

    2014-08-01

    Gestational testosterone treatment causes maternal hyperinsulinemia, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), low birth weight, and adult reproductive and metabolic dysfunctions. Sheep models of IUGR demonstrate placental insufficiency as an underlying cause of IUGR. Placental compromise is probably the cause of fetal growth retardation in gestational testosterone-treated sheep. This study tested whether testosterone excess compromises placental differentiation by its androgenic action and/or via altered insulin sensitivity. A comparative approach of studying gestational testosterone (aromatizable androgen) against dihydrotestosterone (non-aromatizable androgen) or testosterone plus androgen antagonist, flutamide, was used to determine whether the effects of testosterone on placental differentiation were programed by its androgenic actions. Co-treatment of testosterone with the insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, was used to establish whether the effects of gestational testosterone on placentome differentiation involved compromised insulin sensitivity. Parallel cohorts of pregnant females were maintained for lambing and the birth weight of their offspring was recorded. Placental studies were conducted on days 65, 90, or 140 of gestation. Results indicated that i) gestational testosterone treatment advances placental differentiation, evident as early as day 65 of gestation, and culminates in low birth weight, ii) placental advancement is facilitated at least in part by androgenic actions of testosterone and is not a function of disrupted insulin homeostasis, and iii) placental advancement, while helping to increase placental efficiency, was insufficient to prevent IUGR and low-birth-weight female offspring. Findings from this study may be of relevance to women with polycystic ovary syndrome, whose reproductive and metabolic phenotype is captured by the gestational testosterone-treated offspring.

  13. Testosterone replacement in the infertile man

    PubMed Central

    Sabanegh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is a common clinical condition affecting men of different age groups. In addition to its sexual consequences, it has several implications posing significant concerns for a man’s health and well-being. Recent advances in testosterone (T) supplementation have facilitated hypogonadism treatment. Despite that, patients complaining of infertility or seeking conception are still hindered by the unfavorable effects supplemental T has on testicular function. Consequently, alternative approaches that can stimulate endogenous T production are favored. Selective estrogen receptor modulators, gonadotropins and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) can be successful in restoring serum T levels, preserving fertility, and providing symptomatic relief. PMID:28078217

  14. Charge variants in IgG1

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sirj; Hutchinson, Ryan; Kwong, Zephania W; Yang, Jihong; Wang, Xiangdan; Yao, Zhenling; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Cano, Tony; Tesar, Devin; Nijem, Ihsan; Allison, David E; Wong, Pin Yee; Kao, Yung-Hsiang; Quan, Cynthia; Joshi, Amita; Harris, Reed J; Motchnik, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Antibody charge variants have gained considerable attention in the biotechnology industry due to their potential influence on stability and biological activity. Subtle differences in the relative proportions of charge variants are often observed during routine biomanufacture or process changes and pose a challenge to demonstrating product comparability. To gain further insights into the impact on biological activity and pharmacokinetics (PK) of monoclonal antibody (mAb) charge heterogeneity, we isolated the major charge forms of a recombinant humanized IgG1 and compared their in vitro properties and in vivo PK. The mAb starting material had a pI range of 8.7–9.1 and was composed of about 20% acidic variants, 12% basic variants and 68% main peak. Cation exchange displacement chromatography was used to isolate the acidic, basic and main peak fractions for animal studies. Detailed analyses were performed on the isolated fractions to identify specific chemical modification contributing to the charge differences and were also characterized for purity and in vitro potency prior to being administered either subcutaneously (SC) or intravenously (IV) in rats. All isolated materials had similar potency and rat FcRn binding relative to the starting material. Following IV or SC administration (10 mg/kg) in rats, no difference in serum PK was observed, indicating that physiochemical modifications and pI differences among charge variants were not sufficient to result in PK changes. Thus, these results provided meaningful information for the comparative evaluation of charge-related heterogeneity of mAbs and suggested that charge variants of IgGs do not affect the in vitro potency, FcRn binding affinity or the PK properties in rats. PMID:20818176

  15. Reformatting Rituximab into Human IgG2 and IgG4 Isotypes Dramatically Improves Apoptosis Induction In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Könitzer, Jennifer D.; Sieron, Annette; Wacker, Angelika; Enenkel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The direct induction of cell death, or apoptosis, in target cells is one of the effector mechanisms for the anti CD20 antibody Rituximab. Here we provide evidence that Rituximab’s apoptotic ability is linked to the antibody IgG isotype. Reformatting Rituximab from the standard human IgG1 heavy chain into IgG2 or IgG4 boosted in vitro apoptosis induction in the Burkitt’s lymphoma B cell line Ramos five and four-fold respectively. The determinants for this behavior are located in the hinge region and CH1 domain of the heavy chain. By transplanting individual IgG2 or IgG4 specific amino acid residues onto otherwise IgG1 like backbones, thereby creating hybrid antibodies, the same enhancement of apoptosis induction could be achieved. The cysteines at position 131 of the CH1 domain and 219 in the hinge region, involved in IgG2 and IgG4 disulfide formation, were found to be of particular structural importance. Our data indicates that the hybrid antibodies possess a different CD20 binding mode than standard Rituximab, which appears to be key in enhancing apoptotic ability. The presented work opens up an interesting engineering route for enhancing the direct cytotoxic ability of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26713448

  16. Clinicopathologic analysis of IgG4-related skin disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuharu; Takeuchi, Mai; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Ohno, Kyotaro; Iwaki, Noriko; Orita, Yorihisa; Goto, Naoe; Hida, Akira I; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki; Asano, Naoko; Ito, Toshihiro; Hanakawa, Hiroyuki; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2013-04-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized systemic syndrome characterized by mass-forming lesions with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, increase in the number of IgG4(+) cells in affected tissues and elevation of serum IgG4 levels. In 2009, we were the first to report skin lesions in patients with IgG4-related disease, but no large case series has been reported and clinicopathological findings remain unclear. To clarify these features, we herein report 10 patients (9 men and 1 woman; median age, 64 years; age range, 46-81 years) with IgG4-related skin disease. All patients had erythematous and itchy plaques or subcutaneous nodules on the skin of the head and neck, particularly in the periauricular, cheek, and mandible regions, except for one patient, whose forearm and waist skin were affected. In addition, eight patients had extracutaneous lesions: these were found on the lymph nodes in six patients, the lacrimal glands in three patients, the parotid glands in three patients, and the kidney in one patient. Histologically examined extracutaneous lesions were consistent with IgG4-related disease; five of six lymph node lesions showed progressively transformed germinal centers-type IgG4-related lymphadenopathy. Cases of IgG4-related skin disease were classified into two histological patterns: those exhibiting a nodular dermatitis pattern and those with a subcutaneous nodule pattern. The infiltrate was rich in plasma cells, small lymphocytes, and eosinophils; the majority of the plasma cells were IgG4(+). The IgG4(+) cell count was 49-396 per high-power field (mean±s.d., 172±129), with an IgG4(+)/IgG(+) cell ratio ranging from 62 to 92%. Serum IgG4 levels were elevated in all examined patients. In conclusion, patients with IgG4-related skin disease had uniform clinicopathology. Lesions were frequently present on the skin of the periauricular, cheek, and mandible regions, and were frequently accompanied by IgG4-related lymphadenopathy.

  17. IgG4-related disease and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Cortazar, Frank B; Stone, John H

    2015-10-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic fibroinflammatory condition that involves almost every organ system. In this Review, we summarize current knowledge of IgG4-RD and its most frequent manifestations in the kidney—IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) and membranous glomerulonephropathy (MGN). Diagnosis of IgG4-RD relies on histopathology: the typical features are a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate and storiform fibrosis. A high percentage of plasma cells observed within lesions stain positively for IgG4. IgG4-related TIN bears the hallmark pathological findings of IgG4-RD; distinctive radiographic characteristics are also frequently observed with use of contrast-enhanced CT. MGN secondary to IgG4-RD seems to be distinct from idiopathic MGN. Humoral and cell-mediated immunity seem to have roles in the pathophysiology of IgG4-RD, but the details of these roles remain unclear. The IgG4 molecule itself is unlikely to be the primary driver of inflammation; rather, it probably downregulates the immune response. Fibrosis might be caused by activation of innate immune cells by polarized CD4(+) T cells. Glucocorticoids are the standard initial treatment for IgG4-RD, but their long-term adverse effects and the high frequency of relapse and renal damage associated with use of this treatment has prompted a search for more effective options. B-cell depletion and the targeting of plasmablasts are both promising approaches.

  18. The long-term efficacy and safety of a testosterone mucoadhesive buccal tablet in testosterone-deficient men.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, Wallace W; Wyllie, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Striant® SR is the only available buccal delivery system for testosterone replacement therapy. Previous pharmacokinetic studies have shown that Striant SR effectively produces physiological serum testosterone levels in hypogonadal men. Efficacy and safety data from previously unpublished studies over 2 years of continuous use indicate that Striant SR is effective long term in maintaining serum testosterone within a physiological range, is well tolerated and has a high level of patient acceptance. Striant® sustained-release (SR) is a mucoadhesive buccal tablet (30 mg testosterone, The Urology Company) that adheres to the gum surface in the mouth providing controlled- and sustained-release of testosterone over a 12-h dosing period, offering a unique and rational method of testosterone delivery. Striant SR is indicated for testosterone-replacement therapy (TRT) for male hypogonadism when testosterone deficiency has been confirmed by clinical features and biochemical tests. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that testosterone is released from Striant SR in a manner similar to the normal daily rhythm of endogenous testosterone secretion, with serum levels rising rapidly after insertion and peak levels reached by the second 12-hourly dose with no accumulation over time. In clinical trials involving hypogonadal men receiving Striant SR for up to 2 years, mean serum testosterone levels have always remained within the normal range. Striant SR is well tolerated, with gum-related disorders (such as irritation, inflammation and gingivitis) and taste perversion being the most commonly reported adverse events, reported by 5.6-16.3% and 3.0-4.1% of patients, respectively. Once patients have become accustomed to it, Striant SR has a high level of patient acceptance. In a long-term study, 90% of patients rated the twice-daily dosing as acceptable, just under half preferred it to other forms of TRT that they have used and

  19. Lupus-specific kidney deposits of HSP90 are associated with altered IgG idiotypic interactions of anti-HSP90 autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    KENDEROV, A; MINKOVA, V; MIHAILOVA, D; GILTIAY, N; KYURKCHIEV, S; KEHAYOV, I; KAZATCHKINE, M; KAVERI, S; PASHOV, A

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that autoantibodies to heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) are elevated in a significant proportion of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are more likely to have renal disease and a low C3 level. Using samples from 24 patients, we searched for glomerular deposits of HSP90 in renal biopsy specimens from seven patients with lupus nephritis and 17 cases of glomerulonephritis from patients without SLE. Positive glomerular immunofluorescent staining for HSP90 was observed in six of seven cases of SLE and positive tubular staining in two of seven SLE patients. The staining for HSP90 was granular in nature and was located in subepithelial, subendothelial and mesangial areas. None of the non-SLE renal biopsies revealed positive staining for HSP90 deposition. Further we showed the presence of anti-HSP90 IgG autoantibodies in IgG from sera of patients with SLE as well as in normal human IgG (IVIg). In normal IgG this autoreactivity could be adsorbed almost completely on F(ab′)2 fragments from the same IgG preparation, coupled to Sepharose and could be inhibited by the effluent obtained after subjecting normal IgG to HSP90 affinity column. These findings indicate that anti-HSP90 natural autoantibodies are blocked by idiotypic interactions within the IgG repertoire. Unlike natural autoantibodies, anti-HSP90 IgG from SLE patients’ sera were only moderately adsorbed on F(ab′)2 fragments of normal IgG. These results demonstrate that immunopathogenesis of lupus nephritis is associated with HSP90 (as an autoantigen) and that the pathology is associated with altered idiotypic regulation of the anti-HSP90 IgG autoantibodies. PMID:12100037

  20. Testosterone in men with hypogonadism and high cardiovascular risk, Pros.

    PubMed

    Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Vitale, Cristiana; Fini, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Although numerous randomized studies have shown that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) improves intermediate outcomes in patients at risk and in those with proven cardiovascular disease (CVD), results derived mainly from registries and observational studies have suggested an increased cardiovascular risk in elderly men receiving often supra-therapeutic doses of testosterone. Recent meta-analyses have shown that when testosterone has been used in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions, the effect on the disease has been either beneficial or neutral. Similar results have been reported in hypo- and eugonadal men. Contrasting results have been reported by two trials of testosterone treatment in frail elderly men. Reports from poorly analyzed databases have reported an increased risk of cardiovascular events with testosterone use. More recently, a population-based study showed no increased cardiovascular risk of testosterone replacement in hypogonadal men. Available data from controlled clinical trials suggest that the use of testosterone in elderly men does not increase cardiovascular risk nor the risk of events. Studies in men with CVD, angina, or heart failure report a benefit from testosterone replacement in men with or without hypogonadism. Therefore, at present, the cardiovascular benefits of TRT in elderly men outweigh the risks. This is particularly evident in those men with pre-existing CVD.

  1. A Mendelian randomization study of testosterone and cognition in men

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie V.; Lam, Tai Hing; Jiang, Chaoqiang; Cherny, Stacey S.; Liu, Bin; Cheng, Kar Keung; Zhang, Weisen; Leung, Gabriel M.; Schooling, C Mary

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone replacement for older men is increasingly common, with some observations suggesting a protective effect on cognitive function. We examined the association of endogenous testosterone with cognitive function among older men in a Mendelian randomization study using a separate-sample instrumental variable (SSIV) analysis estimator to minimize confounding and reverse causality. A genetic score predicting testosterone was developed in 289 young Chinese men from Hong Kong, based on selected testosterone-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs10046, rs1008805 and rs1256031). The association of genetically predicted testosterone with delayed 10-word recall score and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was assessed at baseline and follow-up using generalized estimating equation among 4,212 older Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Predicted testosterone was not associated with delayed 10-word recall score (−0.02 per nmol/L testosterone, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.06–0.02) or MMSE score (0.06, 95% CI −0.002–0.12). These estimates were similar after additional adjustment for age, education, smoking, use of alcohol, body mass index and the Framingham score. Our findings do not corroborate observed protective effects of testosterone on cognitive function among older men. PMID:26864717

  2. Methadone induces testosterone suppression in patients with opioid addiction

    PubMed Central

    Bawor, Monica; Dennis, Brittany B.; Samaan, M. Constantine; Plater, Carolyn; Worster, Andrew; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Marsh, David C.; Desai, Dipika; Steiner, Meir; Anglin, Rebecca; Coote, Margaret; Pare, Guillaume; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones may have a role in the pathophysiology of substance u