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Sample records for ignar antibodies evidence

  1. Maturation of Shark Single-Domain (IgNAR) Antibodies: Evidence for Induced-Fit Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, R.L.; Dooley, H.; Verdino, P.; Flajnik, M.F.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Maryland U.

    2007-07-13

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  2. The structural analysis of shark IgNAR antibodies reveals evolutionary principles of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Feige, Matthias J; Gräwert, Melissa A; Marcinowski, Moritz; Hennig, Janosch; Behnke, Julia; Ausländer, David; Herold, Eva M; Peschek, Jirka; Castro, Caitlin D; Flajnik, Martin; Hendershot, Linda M; Sattler, Michael; Groll, Michael; Buchner, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Sharks and other cartilaginous fish are the phylogenetically oldest living organisms that rely on antibodies as part of their adaptive immune system. They produce the immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR), a homodimeric heavy chain-only antibody, as a major part of their humoral adaptive immune response. Here, we report the atomic resolution structure of the IgNAR constant domains and a structural model of this heavy chain-only antibody. We find that despite low sequence conservation, the basic Ig fold of modern antibodies is already present in the evolutionary ancient shark IgNAR domains, highlighting key structural determinants of the ubiquitous Ig fold. In contrast, structural differences between human and shark antibody domains explain the high stability of several IgNAR domains and allowed us to engineer human antibodies for increased stability and secretion efficiency. We identified two constant domains, C1 and C3, that act as dimerization modules within IgNAR. Together with the individual domain structures and small-angle X-ray scattering, this allowed us to develop a structural model of the complete IgNAR molecule. Its constant region exhibits an elongated shape with flexibility and a characteristic kink in the middle. Despite the lack of a canonical hinge region, the variable domains are spaced appropriately wide for binding to multiple antigens. Thus, the shark IgNAR domains already display the well-known Ig fold, but apart from that, this heavy chain-only antibody employs unique ways for dimerization and positioning of functional modules.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies for the identification and purification of vNAR domains and IgNAR immunoglobulins from the horn shark Heterodontus francisci.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Karla; Dubberke, Gudrun; Lugo, Pavel; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Buck, Friedrich; Haag, Friedrich; Licea, Alexei

    2011-08-01

    In addition to conventional antibodies, cartilaginous fish have evolved a distinctive type of immunoglobulin, designated as IgNAR, which lacks the light polypeptide chains and is composed entirely by heavy chains. IgNAR molecules can be manipulated by molecular engineering to produce the variable domain of a single heavy chain polypeptide (vNARs). These, together with the VHH camel domains, constitute the smallest naturally occurring domains able to recognize an antigen. Their special features, such as small size, long extended finger-like CDR3, and thermal and chemical stability, make them suitable candidates for biotechnological purposes. Here we describe the generation of two mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), MAb 370-12 and MAb 533-10, that both specifically react with vNAR domains of the horn shark Heterodontus francisci. While the former recognizes a broad spectrum of recombinant vNAR proteins, the latter is more restricted. MAb 370-12 precipitated a single band from whole shark serum, which was identified as IgNAR by mass spectrometry. Additionally, we used MAb 370-12 to follow the IgNAR-mediated immune response of sharks during immunization protocols with two different antigens (complete cells and a synthethic peptide), thus corroborating that MAb 370-12 recognizes both isolated vNAR domains and whole IgNAR molecules. Both MAbs represent an affordable molecular, biochemical, and biotechnological tool in the field of shark single-domain antibodies.

  4. The Shark Strikes Twice: Hypervariable Loop 2 of Shark IgNAR Antibody Variable Domains and Its Potential to Function as an Autonomous Paratope.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Könning, Doreen; Grzeschik, Julius; Krah, Simon; Becker, Stefan; Dickgießer, Stephan; Kolmar, Harald

    2015-08-01

    In this present study, we engineered hypervariable loop 2 (HV2) of the IgNAR variable domain in a way that it solely facilitates antigen binding, potentially functioning as an autonomous paratope. For this, the surface-exposed loop corresponding to HV2 was diversified and antigen-specific variable domain of IgNAR antibody (vNAR) molecules were isolated by library screening using yeast surface display (YSD) as platform technology. An epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-specific vNAR was used as starting material, and nine residues in HV2 were randomized. Target-specific clones comprising a new HV2-mediated paratope were isolated against cluster of differentiation 3ε (CD3ε) and human Fcγ while retaining high affinity for EpCAM. Essentially, we demonstrate that a new paratope comprising moderate affinities against a given target molecule can be engineered into the vNAR scaffold that acts independent of the original antigen-binding site, composed of complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) and CDR1. PMID:26003538

  5. The Shark Strikes Twice: Hypervariable Loop 2 of Shark IgNAR Antibody Variable Domains and Its Potential to Function as an Autonomous Paratope.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Könning, Doreen; Grzeschik, Julius; Krah, Simon; Becker, Stefan; Dickgießer, Stephan; Kolmar, Harald

    2015-08-01

    In this present study, we engineered hypervariable loop 2 (HV2) of the IgNAR variable domain in a way that it solely facilitates antigen binding, potentially functioning as an autonomous paratope. For this, the surface-exposed loop corresponding to HV2 was diversified and antigen-specific variable domain of IgNAR antibody (vNAR) molecules were isolated by library screening using yeast surface display (YSD) as platform technology. An epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-specific vNAR was used as starting material, and nine residues in HV2 were randomized. Target-specific clones comprising a new HV2-mediated paratope were isolated against cluster of differentiation 3ε (CD3ε) and human Fcγ while retaining high affinity for EpCAM. Essentially, we demonstrate that a new paratope comprising moderate affinities against a given target molecule can be engineered into the vNAR scaffold that acts independent of the original antigen-binding site, composed of complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) and CDR1.

  6. Targeting the hepatitis B virus precore antigen with a novel IgNAR single variable domain intrabody.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Renae; Nuttall, Stewart; Revill, Peter; Colledge, Danni; Cabuang, Liza; Soppe, Sally; Dolezal, Olan; Griffiths, Kate; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Locarnini, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    The Hepatitis B virus precore protein is processed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into secreted hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), which acts as an immune tolerogen to establish chronic infection. Downregulation of secreted HBeAg should improve clinical outcome, as patients who effectively respond to current treatments (IFN-α) have significantly lower serum HBeAg levels. Here, we describe a novel reagent, a single variable domain (V(NAR)) of the shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) antibodies. V(NAR)s possess advantages in stability, size (~14 kDa) and cryptic epitope recognition compared to conventional antibodies. The V(NAR) domain displayed biologically useful affinity for recombinant and native HBeAg, and recognised a unique conformational epitope. To assess therapeutic potential in targeting intracellular precore protein to reduce secreted HBeAg, the V(NAR) was engineered for ER-targeted in vitro delivery to function as an intracellular antibody (intrabody). In vitro data from HBV/precore hepatocyte cell lines demonstrated effective intrabody regulation of precore/HBeAg.

  7. Isolation of a pH-Sensitive IgNAR Variable Domain from a Yeast-Displayed, Histidine-Doped Master Library.

    PubMed

    Könning, Doreen; Zielonka, Stefan; Sellmann, Carolin; Schröter, Christian; Grzeschik, Julius; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, engineering of pH-sensitivity into antibodies as well as antibody-derived fragments has become more and more attractive for biomedical and biotechnological applications. Herein, we report the isolation of the first pH-sensitive IgNAR variable domain (vNAR), which was isolated from a yeast-displayed, semi-synthetic master library. This strategy enables the direct identification of pH-dependent binders from a histidine-enriched CDR3 library. Displayed vNAR variants contained two histidine substitutions on average at random positions in their 12-residue CDR3 loop. Upon screening of seven rounds against the proof-of-concept target EpCAM (selection for binding at pH 7.4 and decreased binding at pH 6.0), a single clone was obtained that showed specific and pH-dependent binding as characterized by yeast surface display and biolayer interferometry. Potential applications for such pH-dependent vNAR domains include their employment in tailored affinity chromatography, enabling mild elution protocols. Moreover, utilizing a master library for the isolation of pH-sensitive vNAR variants may be a generic strategy to obtain binding entities with prescribed characteristics for applications in biotechnology, diagnostics, and therapy. PMID:26838965

  8. Sequencing Antibody Repertoires Provides Evidence for Original Antigenic Sin Shaping the Antibody Response to Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yann-Chong; Scalfone, Lisa K.; Kongpachith, Sarah; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Cai, Xiaoyong; Lindstrom, Tamsin M.; Sokolove, Jeremy; Robinson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    We used a DNA barcoding method to enable high-throughput sequencing of the cognate heavy- and light-chain pairs of expressed antibodies. We used this approach to elucidate the plasmablast antibody response to influenza vaccination. We show that >75% of the rationally selected plasmablast antibodies bind and neutralize influenza, and that antibodies from clonal families, defined by sharing both heavy chain VJ and light chain VJ sequence usage, do so most effectively. Vaccine-induced heavy chain VJ regions contained on average >20 nucleotide mutations as compared to their predicted germline gene sequences, and some vaccine-induced antibodies exhibited higher binding affinities for hemagglutinins derived from prior years’ seasonal influenza as compared to their affinities for the immunization strains. Our results show that influenza vaccination induces the recall of memory B cells that express antibodies that previously underwent affinity maturation against prior years’ seasonal influenza, suggesting that ‘original antigenic sin’ shapes the antibody response to influenza vaccination. PMID:24525048

  9. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  10. Leptospiral Antibodies in Cattle in Alberta and Evidence of an Emerging Serovar

    PubMed Central

    Kingscote, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    Antibodies to Leptospira interrogans serovars hardjo and pomona were present in 8.3% and 0.5% of sera respectively, from adult female cattle in Alberta surveyed in 1984-85. Criterion for a positive serum sample was 50% agglutination at 1/100 dilution in the microscopic agglutination test. A positive herd contained one or more cows with positive serum. Prevalences were calculated on sample sizes that would give 80-95% reliability. Hardjo antibody prevalences and hardjo-positive herd prevalences were 0-53.9% and 0-83.3%, respectively, among 65 municipalities surveyed. Pomona prevalences by comparison were 0-3.4% and 0-11.7% respectively. Hardjo had increased significantly since 1980-82, and antibodies were found throughout the province. Pomona occurred mainly in southeastern Alberta, where it was isolated from cattle, swine and skunks. Hardjo was isolated only from cattle and it was found in many areas. Antibodies to icterohaemorrhagiae were present in 0.4% of sera from parts of Alberta surveyed in 1980; evidence of the presence of leptospires related to this serovar in bovine and porcine urinary tracts was obtained by immunofluorescence. ImagesFigure 3. PMID:17423101

  11. No evidence of a link between influenza vaccines and Guillain–Barre syndrome–associated antiganglioside antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David J.; Boltz, David A.; McElhaney, Janet; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Wang et al. (2011) No evidence of a link between influenza vaccines and Guillain–Barre syndrome–associated antiganglioside antibodies. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), 159–166. Background  Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by acute, progressive peripheral neuropathy and is commonly associated with the presence of antiganglioside antibodies. Previously, influenza vaccination was linked with the increased incidence of GBS; however, whether antiganglioside antibodies are subsequently induced remains unresolved. Methods  Sera from human subjects vaccinated with seasonal influenza vaccines from the 2007–2008, 2008–2009, or 1976–1977 influenza seasons were screened for the induction of immunity to influenza and the presence of antiganglioside antibodies pre‐ and post‐vaccination. Likewise, sera from mice vaccinated with seasonal influenza vaccines (1988–1989, 2007–2008) or “swine flu” pandemic vaccines (1976, 2009) were assessed in the same manner. Viruses were also screened for cross‐reacting ganglioside epitopes. Results  Antiganglioside antibodies were found to recognize influenza viruses; this reactivity correlated with virus glycosylation. Antibodies to influenza viruses were detected in human and mouse sera, but the prevalence of antiganglioside antibodies was extremely low. Conclusions  Although the correlation between antiganglioside antibody cross‐reactivity and glycosylation of viruses suggests the role of shared carbohydrate epitopes, no correlation was observed between hemagglutinin‐inhibition titers and the induction of antiganglioside antibodies after influenza vaccination. PMID:21955390

  12. Rigidity Emerges during Antibody Evolution in Three Distinct Antibody Systems: Evidence from QSFR Analysis of Fab Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B.; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of somatic mutations that transform polyspecific germline (GL) antibodies to affinity mature (AM) antibodies with monospecificity are compared among three GL-AM Fab pairs. In particular, changes in conformational flexibility are assessed using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). We have previously established that the DCM can be robustly applied across a series of antibody fragments (VL to Fab), and subsequently, the DCM was combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to similarly characterize five thermostabilizing scFv mutants. The DCM is an ensemble based statistical mechanical approach that accounts for enthalpy/entropy compensation due to network rigidity, which has been quite successful in elucidating conformational flexibility and Quantitative Stability/Flexibility Relationships (QSFR) in proteins. Applied to three disparate antibody systems changes in QSFR quantities indicate that the VH domain is typically rigidified, whereas the VL domain and CDR L2 loop become more flexible during affinity maturation. The increase in CDR H3 loop rigidity is consistent with other studies in the literature. The redistribution of conformational flexibility is largely controlled by nonspecific changes in the H-bond network, although certain Arg to Asp salt bridges create highly localized rigidity increases. Taken together, these results reveal an intricate flexibility/rigidity response that accompanies affinity maturation. PMID:26132144

  13. Rigidity Emerges during Antibody Evolution in Three Distinct Antibody Systems: Evidence from QSFR Analysis of Fab Fragments.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J; Livesay, Dennis R

    2015-07-01

    The effects of somatic mutations that transform polyspecific germline (GL) antibodies to affinity mature (AM) antibodies with monospecificity are compared among three GL-AM Fab pairs. In particular, changes in conformational flexibility are assessed using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). We have previously established that the DCM can be robustly applied across a series of antibody fragments (VL to Fab), and subsequently, the DCM was combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to similarly characterize five thermostabilizing scFv mutants. The DCM is an ensemble based statistical mechanical approach that accounts for enthalpy/entropy compensation due to network rigidity, which has been quite successful in elucidating conformational flexibility and Quantitative Stability/Flexibility Relationships (QSFR) in proteins. Applied to three disparate antibody systems changes in QSFR quantities indicate that the VH domain is typically rigidified, whereas the VL domain and CDR L2 loop become more flexible during affinity maturation. The increase in CDR H3 loop rigidity is consistent with other studies in the literature. The redistribution of conformational flexibility is largely controlled by nonspecific changes in the H-bond network, although certain Arg to Asp salt bridges create highly localized rigidity increases. Taken together, these results reveal an intricate flexibility/rigidity response that accompanies affinity maturation.

  14. No evidence of chikungunya virus and antibodies shortly before the outbreak on Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Panning, Marcus; Wichmann, Dominic; Grywna, Klaus; Annan, Augustina; Wijesinghe, Sriyal; Kularatne, S A M; Drosten, Christian

    2009-05-01

    A massive outbreak of chikungunya disease occurred on Sri Lanka in 2006. Reasons for the explosive nature of the epidemic are being intensively discussed. According to recognised and anecdotal concepts, absence of human population immunity against chikungunya virus (CHIKV) might have supported virus amplification. However, formal proof of concept is lacking. This study determined the prevalence of anti-CHIKV IgG antibodies as well as CHIKV RNA shortly before the outbreak. Two hundred and six human sera were collected from patients with acute febrile illness in 2004/2005. Validated indirect immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR assays for dengue as well as CHIKV were employed. Laboratory evidence of dengue virus infection was seen in 67% of patients, indicating virus activity and exposure to Aedes spp. vectors. These vectors are the same as for chikungunya. However, no evidence of acute or previous chikungunya infection could be demonstrated in the same cohort. This study gives formal evidence that the absence of human population immunity correlated with a large chikungunya epidemic.

  15. Structural insights and biomedical potential of IgNAR scaffolds from sharks

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Grzeschik, Julius; Könning, Doreen; Barelle, Caroline J; Kolmar, Harald

    2015-01-01

    In addition to antibodies with the classical composition of heavy and light chains, the adaptive immune repertoire of sharks also includes a heavy-chain only isotype, where antigen binding is mediated exclusively by a small and highly stable domain, referred to as vNAR. In recent years, due to their high affinity and specificity combined with their small size, high physicochemical stability and low-cost of production, vNAR fragments have evolved as promising target-binding scaffolds that can be tailor-made for applications in medicine and biotechnology. This review highlights the structural features of vNAR molecules, addresses aspects of their generation using immunization or in vitro high throughput screening methods and provides examples of therapeutic, diagnostic and other biotechnological applications. PMID:25523873

  16. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  17. Evidence of T-cell mediated neuronal injury in stiff-person syndrome with anti-amphiphysin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Poh, Mervyn Q W; Simon, Neil G; Buckland, Michael E; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Watson, Shaun

    2014-02-15

    Paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome (SPS) has been associated with antibodies against amphiphysin. Current evidence supports a pathogenic role for anti-amphiphysin antibodies. A 74-year-old female was diagnosed with amphiphysin-associated paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome and associated encephalomyelitis. She had initial response to IVIG, however her symptoms worsened after two months and were resistant to further treatment. Subsequently the patient died and a post-mortem was performed. Neuropathology revealed perivascular and parenchymal lymphocytic infiltrates, with neuronophagia mediated by CD8+ T cells and microglia in brainstem, spinal cord, and mesial temporal lobe structures. These findings suggest a pathogenic role of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells, with potential implication for therapy of future patients.

  18. Evidence for cross-reactivity of JAM-C antibodies: implications for cellular localization studies

    PubMed Central

    Betanzos, Abigail; Schnoor, Michael; Severson, Eric A.; Liang, Tony W.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Background information JAM-C (junctional adhesion molecule C) has been implicated in the regulation of leukocyte migration, cell polarity, spermatogenesis, angiogenesis and nerve conduction. JAM-C has been also reported to concentrate at TJs (tight junctions) and desmosomes, although detailed localization studies remain incomplete. Results Monoclonal (LUCA14, MAB1189, Gi11, and PACA4) and polyclonal (40–9000) antibodies were employed to evaluate JAM-C expression/localization in various epithelial cell lines. However, RT–PCR (reverse transcription– PCR) assays revealed no JAM-C mRNA in SK-CO15, HeLa and HPAF-II cells, whereas abundant mRNA was detected in platelets, Caco-2 and ARPE cells. Interestingly, immunofluorescence localization in all cells revealed strong intercellular junctional staining with all of the above antibodies, except PACA4. Given the positive staining results in cells lacking JAM-C mRNA, immunoblot analyses were performed. Western blots revealed a prominent protein band at 52 kDa in all cells tested with all antibodies except PACA4. However, the correct size of JAM-C (37 kDa) was only detected in cells containing JAM-C mRNA. Immunofluorescence staining of JAM-C mRNA-expressing Caco-2 cells using mAb PACA4 revealed co-localization with occludin and ZO-1 (zonula occludens 1) at TJs. Analyses by MS identified the cross-reactive 52 kDa protein band as K8 (keratin 8). Furthermore, siRNA (small interfering RNA)-mediated downregulation of K8 in JAM-C mRNA-negative cells resulted in diminished junctional staining along with a reduction in the intensity of the 52 kDa protein band. Using an antibody specific for K8 phosphorylated at Ser73, the 52 kDa protein was identified as this phosphorylated form of K8. Conclusions The results from the present study demonstrate that a majority of available anti-human JAM-C antibodies cross-react with phosphorylated K8 and suggest that cellular localization studies using these reagents should be interpreted with

  19. Antibody responses to hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1: evidence for cross-reactivity and immune-mediated sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, M U; Cerino, A; Lisa, A; Brambilla, S; Segagni, L; Cividini, A; Bissolati, M; Missale, G; Bellati, G; Meola, A; Bruniercole, B; Nicosia, A; Galfrè, G; Silini, E

    1999-08-01

    Sequence heterogeneity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is unevenly distributed along the genome, and maximal variation is confined to a short sequence of the HCV second envelope glycoprotein (E2), designated hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), whose biological function is still undefined. We prospectively studied serological responses to synthetic oligopeptides derived from HVR1 sequences of patients with acute and chronic HCV infection obtained at baseline and after a defined follow-up period. Extensive serological cross-reactivity for unrelated HVR1 peptides was observed in the majority of the patients. Antibody response was restricted to the IgG1 isotype and was focused on the carboxyterminal end of the HVR1 region. Cross-reactive antibodies could be readily elicited following immunization of mice with multiple antigenic peptides carrying HVR1 sequences derived from our patients. The vigor and heterogeneity of cross-reactive antibody responses were significantly higher in patients with chronic hepatitis compared with those with acute hepatitis and in patients infected with HCV type 2 compared with patients infected with other viral genotypes (predominantly type 1), which suggest that higher time-related HVR1 sequence diversification previously described for type 2 may result from immune selection. The finding of a statistically significant correlation between HVR1 sequence variation, and intensity, and cross-reactivity of humoral immune responses provided stronger evidence in support of the contention that HCV variant selection is driven by the host's immune pressure.

  20. Immune escape by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from neutralizing antibodies: evidence for multiple pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, B A; Reitz, M S; Wilson, C A; Aldrich, K; Davis, A E; Robert-Guroff, M

    1993-01-01

    Sera from many HIV-1-infected individuals contain broadly reactive, specific neutralizing antibodies. Despite their broad reactivity, variant viruses, resistant to neutralization, can be selected in vitro in the presence of such antisera. We have previously shown that neutralization resistance of an escape mutant with an amino acid substitution in the transmembrane protein (A582T) occurs because of alteration of a conformational epitope that is recognized by neutralizing antibodies directed against the CD4 binding site. In this report we demonstrate that immune escape via a single-amino-acid substitution (A281V) within a conserved region of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 confers neutralization resistance against a broadly reactive neutralizing antiserum from a seropositive individual. We show this alteration affects V3 and additional regions unrelated to V3 or the CD4 binding site. Together with previous studies on escape mutants selected in vitro, our findings suggest that immune-selective pressure can arise by multiple pathways. PMID:7693973

  1. Amyloid beta directed antibody for Alzheimer's disease, an evidence based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Ma, Q; Chen, S; Feng, J; He, Y

    2016-01-01

    In several preclinical researches, antibody of Aacting directly in the central nervous system showed a great efficacy on the clearance of plaques. However, the other researches were opposite. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the amyloid-beta-directed antibody treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We searched Pubmed, Web of science, Embase and Cochrane library. Pooled data was calculated by standard mean difference. The heterogeneity and publication bias were evaluated by I2 and funnel plot. Totally, 5 RCTs (randomized clinical trials) with high qualities were included. There weas no difference of mean change form baseline between therapy and placebo group based on Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, SMD = 0.00, p = 0.97, 95% CI = -0.23 0.22) and Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB, SMD = 0.22, p = 0.39, 95% CI = -0.28 0.71), but a significant decrease according to Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog, SMD = 0.07, p = 0.01, 95% CI = -0.02 0.13). In conclusion, Antibody was not benefit for AD based on MMSE and CDR-SB but had a little effect according to ADAS-cog. PMID:27188740

  2. Serological evidence of antibodies to Neospora caninum in stray and owned Grenadian dogs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Kimmitt, T; Tiwari, K; Chikweto, A; Thomas, D; Lanza Perea, M; Bhaiyat, M I

    2015-06-01

    Neospora caninum causes abortion in cattle and neuromuscular disease in dogs, world wide. Cattle become infected by ingesting oocysts voided by dogs. The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of Neospora caninum in two populations of dogs (stray and owned) in Grenada, West Indies. Sera were collected from 625 dogs from all parishes in Grenada. Three hundred and sixty eight dogs were stray, while 257 dogs were owned. Sera were tested for the presence of antibodies against N. caninum using an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) IDvet, France. Antibodies to N. caninum were found in 6 (1.6%) (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.32% to 2.88%) of the stray dogs and in 3 (1.2%, 95% CI: 0.13% to 2.53%) of the owned dogs. Seroprevalence did not differ significantly between the two populations (p=0.74) and between the males and females (p=1). These results suggest that the prevalence of N. caninum infection in dogs in Grenada is low.

  3. Reactivity of IgE antibodies with crustacea and oyster allergens: evidence for common antigenic structures.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, S B; McCants, M L

    1987-08-01

    IgE-antibody reactivity to oysters and crustacea of sera from six oyster-sensitive, seven oyster- and crustacea-sensitive, and 12 crustacea-sensitive subjects was investigated. All six subjects with a history of only oyster sensitivity had minimal RAST reactivity (ratios 2 to 5) to extracts of raw or boiled oysters. Three of the seven oyster- and crustacea-sensitive subjects and six of the 12 crustacea-sensitive, oyster-tolerant or unexposed subjects had elevated RAST ratios to oyster (14 to 41). Generally, elevated oyster RAST correlated with skin prick test reactivity to oyster but not with total serum IgE levels. The oyster RAST values of the 19 crustacea-sensitive subjects (with or without oyster sensitivity) correlated with crustacea RAST reactivity (crab RAST, most significant; shrimp RAST, least significant). Rabbit antisera to crustacea extracts detected precipitating antigens present in extracts of raw or boiled oysters. Significant inhibition of the oyster RAST was obtained with oyster or crustacea extracts. These studies suggest that in the diagnosis of oyster sensitivity the RAST may not be useful and that oyster and crustacea contain common antigenic structures.

  4. Positive hepatitis B virus core antibody in HIV infection--false positive or evidence of previous infection?

    PubMed

    Pallawela, S N S; Sonnex, C; Mabayoje, D; Bloch, E; Chaytor, S; Johnson, M A; Carne, C; Webster, D P

    2015-02-01

    Isolated HBV core antibody (anti-HBc) is defined as the presence of anti-HBc with a negative HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs <10 IU/l). In patients infected with HIV with isolated anti-HBc, the aim was to determine: The prevalence of isolated positive anti-HBc; The most effective method of identifying which patients have had previous Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection; The prevalence of false positive anti-HBc. HBV serology results were identified from 539 patients infected with HIV sampled between January 2010 and December 2012. In those with an isolated anti-HBc and negative anti-HBe, a second anti-HBc test was carried out using a different assay. Samples were also screened for HBV DNA. The anti-retroviral regimens at time of screening were documented. 101/539 had an isolated anti-HBc. Of these, 32 (32%) had a positive anti-HBe (including 1 equivocal) and 69(68%) were anti-HBe negative. Of those negative for anti-HBe, 32 were tested for both DNA and a second anti-HBc. Of these 26 (81%) were on cART at time of HBV testing, with 25 (78%) on ART with anti-HBV activity. The prevalence of isolated anti-HBc was 19%. Only 32% were also anti-HBe positive, whereas 97% of those anti-HBe negative were positive on a second anti-HBc assay suggesting lack of utility of anti-HBe in resolving serological quandaries. One subject (3%) had a false positive anti-HBc. There was no evidence of chronic HBV but 78% patients were on HBV-suppressive combination anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:25174739

  5. Type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats. Passive transfer with serum and evidence that IgG anticollagen antibodies can cause arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have found that serum from rats with type II collagen-induced arthritis, when fractionated with 50% ammonium sulfate and concentrated, would transfer arthritis to nonimmunized recipients. The arthritis in recipients developed within 18-72 h and displayed all of the major histopathologic characteristics of the early lesion in immunized animals but was transient and less severe. Although consideration was given to the possibility that a circulating immune complex was involved, no evidence of such a complex was detected. Further fractionation of the serum yielded an IgG anticollagen antibody that was fully active in transferring disease. The antibody's reaction was inhibited by the native bovine type II collagen used for immunization of donors and the antibody strongly cross-reacted with homologous type II collage but not with denatured collagen. These studies demonstrate that arthritis in rats can be induced with anti- type II collagen antibodies and suggest that an autoimmune process is involved. Because antibodies to collagen have also been detected in human rheumatic diseases, further investigation of the characteristics of collagen antibodies capable of inducing arthritis seems warranted. PMID:7054355

  6. Familial systemic lupus erythematosus: evidence for separate loci controlling C4 deficiency and formation of antibodies to DNA, nRNP, Ro and La.

    PubMed

    Verrier Jones, J; Jones, E; Forsyth, S J; Skanes, V M; Reichlin, M; MacSween, J M; Eastwood, S; Carr, R I

    1987-04-01

    A family has been identified in the Canadian province of Prince Edward Island in which 2 sisters have systemic lupus erythematosus in a sibship of 14. Studies are reported on 11 of the siblings and 16 other family members. The affected siblings, and 4 other members of their sibship, are halfnull homozygotes for the C4A component of complement. We studied the distribution in family members of antibodies to ss and dsDNA, and to Ro(SSA), La(SSB), Sm and nRNP. Eight of 11 members of the affected sibship are antibody producers, compared to only 3 of 13 members of the parental generation. Our study provides further evidence for an association between null genes for C4A and familial lupus, and suggests, in an unusually large kindred, that several other genetic factors are involved in the production of antinuclear antibodies.

  7. Selection of cell lines resistant to anti-transferrin receptor antibody: evidence for a mutation in transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lesley, J F; Schulte, R J

    1984-01-01

    Some anti-murine transferrin receptor monoclonal antibodies block iron uptake in mouse cell lines and inhibit cell growth. We report here the selection and characterization of mutant murine lymphoma cell lines which escape this growth inhibition by anti-transferrin receptor antibody. Growth assays and immunoprecipitation of transferrin receptor in hybrids between independently derived mutants or between mutants and antibody-susceptible parental cell lines indicate that all of the selected lines have a similar genetic alteration that is codominantly expressed in hybrids. Anti-transferrin receptor antibodies and transferrin itself still bind to the mutant lines with saturating levels and Kd values very similar to those of the parental lines. However, reciprocal clearing experiments by immunoprecipitation and reciprocal blocking of binding to the cell surface with two anti-transferrin receptor antibodies indicate that the mutant lines have altered a fraction of their transferrin receptors such that the growth-inhibiting antibody no longer binds, whereas another portion of their transferrin receptors is similar to those of the parental lines and binds both antibodies. These results argue that the antibody-selected mutant cell lines are heterozygous in transferrin receptor expression, probably with a mutation in one of the transferrin receptor structural genes. Images PMID:6092931

  8. Evidence of a new antigen-antibody system (anti-Mic-1) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Páramo, M; García-de la Torre, I; Hernández-Vazquez, L; Ortíz-Cadena, A

    1989-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases may occur in association with systemic rheumatic disorders, and usually they show a high prevalence of antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies. We report 6 patients with the clinical association of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and hyperthyroidism. Of interest, in 5 of the 6 patients (83%), we found an antibody directed against a microsomal extract of human thyroid gland which was different than previous microsomal antibodies in that it was a precipitating antibody; we have called it anti-Mic-1 antibody. We investigated the prevalence of this specific autoimmune reaction in 58 patients with idiopathic SLE, 30 with hyperthyroidism, 15 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 25 with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, 45 with rheumatoid arthritis, and 25 healthy controls. No control had anti-Mic-1 antibody. In addition, this antibody was shown to be organ specific. We suggest that patients with the combined association of SLE and hyperthyroidism may represent a different subset in the spectrum of SLE. The high prevalence of this antigen-antibody reaction in these cases may serve as a serological marker of this association. PMID:2746564

  9. Markers of Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Evidence for Antibody-Endothelium Interaction during Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Recipients.

    PubMed

    Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Peltier, Julie; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Suberbielle-Boissel, Caroline; Djamali, Arjang; Reese, Shannon; Mooney, Nuala; Keuylian, Zela; Lion, Julien; Ouali, Nacéra; Levy, Pierre P; Jouanneau, Chantal; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of allograft loss. Treatment efficacy depends on accurate diagnosis at an early stage. However, sensitive and reliable markers of antibody-endothelium interaction during ABMR are not available for routine use. Using immunohistochemistry, we retrospectively studied the diagnostic value of three markers of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47, for ABMR in 53 renal transplant biopsy specimens, including 20 ABMR specimens, 24 cell-mediated rejection specimens, and nine normal grafts. We validated our results in an independent set of 74 unselected biopsy specimens. Endothelial cells of the peritubular capillaries in grafts with ABMR expressed fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47 strongly, whereas those from normal renal grafts did not. The level of EndMT marker expression was significantly associated with current ABMR criteria, including capillaritis, glomerulitis, peritubular capillary C4d deposition, and donor-specific antibodies. These markers allowed us to identify C4d-negative ABMR and to predict late occurrence of disease. EndMT markers were more specific than capillaritis for the diagnosis and prognosis of ABMR and predicted late (up to 4 years after biopsy) renal graft dysfunction and proteinuria. In the independent set of 74 renal graft biopsy specimens, the EndMT markers for the diagnosis of ABMR had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85%. Fascin1 expression in peritubular capillaries was also induced in a rat model of ABMR. In conclusion, EndMT markers are a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for detecting endothelial activation during ABMR and predicting late loss of allograft function.

  10. Markers of Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Evidence for Antibody-Endothelium Interaction during Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Recipients.

    PubMed

    Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Peltier, Julie; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Suberbielle-Boissel, Caroline; Djamali, Arjang; Reese, Shannon; Mooney, Nuala; Keuylian, Zela; Lion, Julien; Ouali, Nacéra; Levy, Pierre P; Jouanneau, Chantal; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of allograft loss. Treatment efficacy depends on accurate diagnosis at an early stage. However, sensitive and reliable markers of antibody-endothelium interaction during ABMR are not available for routine use. Using immunohistochemistry, we retrospectively studied the diagnostic value of three markers of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47, for ABMR in 53 renal transplant biopsy specimens, including 20 ABMR specimens, 24 cell-mediated rejection specimens, and nine normal grafts. We validated our results in an independent set of 74 unselected biopsy specimens. Endothelial cells of the peritubular capillaries in grafts with ABMR expressed fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47 strongly, whereas those from normal renal grafts did not. The level of EndMT marker expression was significantly associated with current ABMR criteria, including capillaritis, glomerulitis, peritubular capillary C4d deposition, and donor-specific antibodies. These markers allowed us to identify C4d-negative ABMR and to predict late occurrence of disease. EndMT markers were more specific than capillaritis for the diagnosis and prognosis of ABMR and predicted late (up to 4 years after biopsy) renal graft dysfunction and proteinuria. In the independent set of 74 renal graft biopsy specimens, the EndMT markers for the diagnosis of ABMR had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85%. Fascin1 expression in peritubular capillaries was also induced in a rat model of ABMR. In conclusion, EndMT markers are a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for detecting endothelial activation during ABMR and predicting late loss of allograft function. PMID:25995444

  11. Direct evidence for role of anti-saliva antibodies against salivary gland homogenate of P. argentipes in modulation of protective Th1-immune response against Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Pushpanjali; Thakur, Ajit K; Purkait, Bidyut; Jamal, Fauzia; Singh, Manish K; Ahmed, Ghufran; Bimal, Sanjiva; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Subhankar K; Keshri, Srikant; Das, Pradeep; Narayan, Shyam

    2016-10-01

    Currently the main concerns regarding control of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by L. donovani are immunosuppression, relating toxicity of anti-leishmanial drug and little development in appropriate vaccine and vector (P. argentipes) control. Reports available from ex-vivo studies reflect significance of vector salivary gland homogenate (SGH) in reverting immunosuppression of infected VL subjects and as such the immunogenic nature of SGH can be a strategy to modulate immune system and anti-leishmanial function to enable immune response to control the disease. Several related studies also identified a better utility of vector anti-saliva antibodies in achieving such effects by an adoptive transfer approach instead of direct stimulation with SGH protein. However, conclusive evidences on VL cases are far beyond satisfactory to suggest role of SGH into modulation of host immune response in VL subjects in India. This study was under taken to make comparison on change in cytokines (TH1 and TH2) response pattern and anti-leishmanial macrophage (Mϕ) function following stimulation of their PBMCS with SGH protein derived from P. argentipes sand fly vector for VL or anti SGH antibodies raised in rabbit. This study reports for the first time that L. donovani sensitized healthy subject demonstrates an up-regulated Interferon-γ (TH1) and down regulate Interleukin-10 (TH2) production following stimulation of their PBMCs by P. argentipes anti-saliva antibodies accompanied with an improvement in anti-leishmanial Mϕ function for nitric oxide (NO) production. Subsequent experiments suggest that P. argentipes based anti-SGH antibodies when used to stimulate LD infected PBMCs in healthy subjects resulted in better clearance of Leishmania amastigotes load compare to SGH protein. Possibly the immunogenic components of anti-saliva an antibody maintains the level of protective cytokine (INF-γ) and seems to restrict the infection by host protection by vector saliva. PMID:27484246

  12. Evidence for trisulfide bonds in a recombinant variant of a human IgG2 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Pristatsky, Pavlo; Cohen, Steven L; Krantz, Debra; Acevedo, Jillian; Ionescu, Roxana; Vlasak, Josef

    2009-08-01

    The hinge region of human IgG2 contains four cysteine residues involved in disulfide linkages between the heavy chains, as well as the heavy and light chains. These linkages provide the fundamental framework of three distinct IgG2 disulfide isoforms recently described. Here, we detail another, disulfide-related post-translational modification in a recombinant variant of human IgG2. Heterogeneity associated with this antibody was separated into several fractions by anion-exchange chromatography (AEX), which is an important initial step that highlights the resolving power of surface charge-based HPLC techniques. Mass spectrometry of the intact antibody revealed weakly resolved discrete covalent additions of 25-35 Da in one of the two main AEX fractions. Digestion by endoproteinase Lys-C performed under nonreducing conditions, as well as tandem MS experiments, narrowed the modification to the peptide-containing disulfide-bridged hinge structure. High mass resolution and accuracy measurements of the peptide strongly suggested an addition of one or two S atoms. The modification could be eliminated by a mild reducing treatment of the intact antibody. Overall, these findings are consistent with the replacement of up to two disulfide bridges (S-S) with a like number of trisulfides (S-S-S) in the antibody hinge. The trisulfide modification is rather uncommon for proteins and its possible origins in the IgG2 variant are discussed.

  13. Aggregation of Antibody Drug Conjugates at Room Temperature: SAXS and Light Scattering Evidence for Colloidal Instability of a Specific Subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Frka-Petesic, B; Zanchi, D; Martin, N; Carayon, S; Huille, S; Tribet, C

    2016-05-17

    Coupling a hydrophobic drug onto monoclonal antibodies via lysine residues is a common route to prepare antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), a promising class of biotherapeutics. But a few chemical modifications on protein surface often increase aggregation propensity, without a clear understanding of the aggregation mechanisms at stake (loss of colloidal stability, self-assemblies, denaturation, etc.), and the statistical nature of conjugation introduces polydispersity in the ADC population, which raises questions on whether the whole ADC population becomes unstable. To characterize the average interactions between ADC, we monitored small-angle X-ray scattering in solutions of monoclonal IgG1 human antibody drug conjugate, with average degree of conjugation of 0, 2, or 3 drug molecules per protein. To characterize stability, we studied the kinetics of aggregation at room temperature. The intrinsic Fuchs stability ratio of the ADC was estimated from the variation over time of scattered light intensity and hydrodynamic radius, in buffers of varying pH, and at diverse sucrose (0% or 10%) and NaCl (0 or 100 mM) concentrations. We show that stable ADC stock solutions became unstable upon pH shift, well below the pH of maximum average attraction between IgGs. Data indicate that aggregation can be ascribed to a fraction of ADC population usually representing less than 30 mol % of the sample. In contrast to the case of (monodisperse) monoclonal antibodies, our results suggest that a poor correlation between stability and average interaction parameters should be expected as a corollary of dispersity of ADC conjugation. In practice, the most unstable fraction of the ADC population can be removed by filtration, which affects remarkably the apparent stability of the samples. Finally, the lack of correlation between the kinetic stability and variations of the average inter-ADC interactions is tentatively attributed to the uneven nature of charge distributions and the presence of

  14. Aggregation of Antibody Drug Conjugates at Room Temperature: SAXS and Light Scattering Evidence for Colloidal Instability of a Specific Subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Frka-Petesic, B; Zanchi, D; Martin, N; Carayon, S; Huille, S; Tribet, C

    2016-05-17

    Coupling a hydrophobic drug onto monoclonal antibodies via lysine residues is a common route to prepare antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), a promising class of biotherapeutics. But a few chemical modifications on protein surface often increase aggregation propensity, without a clear understanding of the aggregation mechanisms at stake (loss of colloidal stability, self-assemblies, denaturation, etc.), and the statistical nature of conjugation introduces polydispersity in the ADC population, which raises questions on whether the whole ADC population becomes unstable. To characterize the average interactions between ADC, we monitored small-angle X-ray scattering in solutions of monoclonal IgG1 human antibody drug conjugate, with average degree of conjugation of 0, 2, or 3 drug molecules per protein. To characterize stability, we studied the kinetics of aggregation at room temperature. The intrinsic Fuchs stability ratio of the ADC was estimated from the variation over time of scattered light intensity and hydrodynamic radius, in buffers of varying pH, and at diverse sucrose (0% or 10%) and NaCl (0 or 100 mM) concentrations. We show that stable ADC stock solutions became unstable upon pH shift, well below the pH of maximum average attraction between IgGs. Data indicate that aggregation can be ascribed to a fraction of ADC population usually representing less than 30 mol % of the sample. In contrast to the case of (monodisperse) monoclonal antibodies, our results suggest that a poor correlation between stability and average interaction parameters should be expected as a corollary of dispersity of ADC conjugation. In practice, the most unstable fraction of the ADC population can be removed by filtration, which affects remarkably the apparent stability of the samples. Finally, the lack of correlation between the kinetic stability and variations of the average inter-ADC interactions is tentatively attributed to the uneven nature of charge distributions and the presence of

  15. The Level of IgA Antibodies to Endothelial Cells Correlates with Histological Evidence of Disease Activity in Patients with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Ayako; Mizuno, Tomohiro; Kato, Akihiro; Hirano, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Naoki; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Shigehisa; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Midori; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Shunji; Miura, Keiji; Yuzawa, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) are frequently detected in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but their pathological role remains unclear. We recently developed a solubilized cell surface protein capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CSP-ELISA) to detect antibodies against membrane proteins involved in autoimmune reactions. In this study, sera from 51 patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis (LN), 25 with SLE without renal involvement (non-LN SLE), 42 disease control (DC) subjects, and 80 healthy control (HC) subjects were tested for IgG- and IgA-AECA for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human glomerular EC (HGEC) by using CSP-ELISA. IgG- and IgA-AECA titers were significantly higher in LN and non-LN SLE patients than in the DC or HC (P < 0.001) groups. IgG- and IgA-AECA titers for HUVEC corresponded well with those for HGEC. The IgA-AECA level correlated with the SLE disease activity index and with histological evidence of active lesions (cellular proliferations, hyaline thrombi and wire loops, leukocytic infiltration, and fibrinoid necrosis) in LN patients (P < 0.001). The sensitivity of IgA-AECA as a diagnostic test for histological evidence of active lesions in LN patients was 0.92, with a specificity of 0.70. The significant correlation of IgA-AECA with glomerular hypercellularity indicates that IgA-AECA are associated with endothelial damage in LN. PMID:27788140

  16. Evidence for sialylated type 1 blood group chains on human erythrocyte membranes revealed by agglutination of neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes with Waldenström's macroglobulin IgMWOO and hybridoma antibody FC 10.2.

    PubMed

    Picard, J K; Loveday, D; Feizi, T

    1985-01-01

    Haemagglutination studies have been performed with untreated and neuraminidase-treated human erythrocytes of the three Lewis antigen types Le(a-b-), Le(a+b-) and Le(a-b+) using two monoclonal antibodies, IgMWOO and FC 10.2, which were previously shown to recognize the type 1 based blood group chains: Gal beta 1----3GlcNAc beta 1----3Gal beta 1----4Glc/GlcNAc (for explanation of abbreviations see table IV legend). Both antibodies behaved as cold agglutinins with neuraminidase-treated but not with untreated erythrocytes of the three Lewis antigen types. Neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes of i antigen type were similarly agglutinated. This haemagglutination was specifically inhibited by the type 1 based milk oligosaccharide lacto-N-tetraose. Thus, there is strong evidence for the occurrence of sialylated type 1 chains on human erythrocyte membranes of I and i antigen types. In addition, evidence for the presence of type 1 chains which are both sialylated and fucosylated was obtained by (1) haemagglutination of Le(a+b-) erythrocytes with the monoclonal antibody 19.9; (2) increased haemagglutination of neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes with anti-H antibodies of Bombay serum; (3) increased haemagglutination of neuraminidase-treated Le(a+b-) cells with anti-Lea antibodies, and (4) the appearance of Lea antigen activity on neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes of Le(a-b+) type.

  17. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  19. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  20. Antibodies differentiate desmosome-form and nucleus-form pinin: evidence that pinin is a moonlighting protein with dual location at the desmosome and within the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, P

    1999-09-16

    Pinin is a desmosome-associated protein occurring in epithelia, cardiac muscle, and meninges. This molecule was found to be capable of enhancing cell junction formation and thought to play a key role in reorganization and stabilization of the desmosome-intermediate filament complex in epithelial cells (J. Cell Biol. (1996) 135, 1027-1042). Recently a protein, claimed to be localized exclusively in the nucleus, however, with amino acid sequence identical to pinin, was reported (E. J. Cell Biol. (1998) 75, 295-298). Here I present evidence that pinin exists simultaneously at the desmosome and within the nucleus by generating location-specific monoclonal antibodies. Although the desmosome-form (d-form) and the nucleus-form (n-form) pinin share identical amino acid sequences as demonstrated by cDNA library screening and DNA sequencing, they exhibit remarkably different biochemical properties, reflecting the apparent different multiprotein nature of their differential cellular locations. In addition, the d-form pinin is characterized by a dynamic transport process which involves the gradual diminishing of nuclear materials relative to enhanced anchoring of pinin to the desmosome upon mature cells. Finally I demonstrate that pinin exists in two forms of different gene product: pinin1 and pinin2. These data argue strongly against the statement that pinin is an exclusive nuclear protein and support the notion that pinin is a moonlighting protein with more than one function as a consequence of its dual cellular location.

  1. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  2. Germline variable region gene segment derivation of human monoclonal anti-Rh(D) antibodies. Evidence for affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation and repertoire shift.

    PubMed Central

    Bye, J M; Carter, C; Cui, Y; Gorick, B D; Songsivilai, S; Winter, G; Hughes-Jones, N C; Marks, J D

    1992-01-01

    To date, there has been no systematic study of the process of affinity maturation of human antibodies. We therefore sequenced the variable region genes (V genes) of 14 human monoclonal antibodies specific for the erythrocyte Rh(D) alloantigen and determined the germline gene segments of origin and extent of somatic hypermutation. These data were correlated with determinations of antibody affinity. The four IgM antibodies (low affinity) appear to be derived from two germline heavy chain variable region gene segments and one or two germline light chain variable region gene segments and were not extensively mutated. The 10 IgG antibodies (higher affinity) appear to be derived from somatic hypermutation of these V gene segments and by use of new V gene segments or V gene segment combinations (repertoire shift). Affinity generally increased with increasing somatic hypermutation; on average, there were 8.9 point mutations in the V gene segments of the four IgM antibodies (Ka = 1-4 x 10(7)/M-1) compared with 19 point mutations in the V gene segments of the 10 IgG antibodies. The four highest affinity antibodies (Ka = 0.9-3 x 10(9)/M-1) averaged 25.5 point mutations. The use of repertoire shift and somatic hypermutation in affinity maturation of human alloantibodies is similar to data obtained in inbred mice immunized with haptens. PMID:1469099

  3. Localization of α-synuclein in teleost central nervous system: immunohistochemical and Western blot evidence by 3D5 monoclonal antibody in the common carp, Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Rosa; Toni, Mattia; Casini, Arianna; Vivacqua, Giorgio; Yu, Shun; D'este, Loredana; Cioni, Carla

    2015-05-01

    Alpha synuclein (α-syn) is a 140 amino acid vertebrate-specific protein, highly expressed in the human nervous system and abnormally accumulated in Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, known as synucleinopathies. The common occurrence of α-syn aggregates suggested a role for α-syn in these disorders, although its biological activity remains poorly understood. Given the high degree of sequence similarity between vertebrate α-syns, we investigated this proteins in the central nervous system (CNS) of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio, with the aim of comparing its anatomical and cellular distribution with that of mammalian α-syn. The distribution of α-syn was analyzed by semiquantitative western blot, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence by a novel monoclonal antibody (3D5) against a fully conserved epitope between carp and human α-syn. The distribution of 3D5 immunoreactivity was also compared with that of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and serotonin (5HT) by double immunolabelings. The results showed that a α-syn-like protein of about 17 kDa is expressed to different levels in several brain regions and in the spinal cord. Immunoreactive materials were localized in neuronal perikarya and varicose fibers but not in the nucleus. The present findings indicate that α-syn-like proteins may be expressed in a few subpopulations of catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons in the carp brain. However, evidence of cellular colocalization 3D5/TH or 3D5/5HT was rare. Differently, the same proteins appear to be coexpressed with ChAT by cholinergic neurons in several motor and reticular nuclei. These results sustain the functional conservation of the α-syn expression in cholinergic systems and suggest that α-syn modulates similar molecular pathways in phylogenetically distant vertebrates.

  4. Evidence of a pro-apoptotic effect of specific antibodies in a bovine macrophage model of infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Ana; Lompardía, Silvina; Hajos, Silvia E; Mundo, Silvia L

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants. Understanding the protective immune response following infection is crucial to improve the diagnosis and the development of vaccines against this disease. The goal of this work was to assess whether specific antibodies were able to modulate the macrophage response to MAP infection by evaluating apoptosis and TNF-α secretion in an in vitro model. Sera from healthy (n=2), MAP-infected (n=3) and lipoarabinomannan (LAM)-immunized (n=3) bovines were evaluated. LAM was chosen as immunogen due to its relevant role in mycobacterial pathogenesis. We demonstrated by two different techniques (Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide microscopy and Annexin V/7-Amino-Actinomycin D flow cytometry) that the immune sera from both, MAP-infected and LAM-immunized bovines, significantly increased macrophage apoptosis in infected cultures. Comparable levels of apoptosis were detected when MAP was pre-incubated with purified specific antibodies instead of whole serum. Furthermore, this effect was accompanied by a significantly higher secretion of TNF-α. These results strongly suggest that specific antibodies could limit the impact of MAP on the apoptosis of bovine cells. This work would contribute to elucidate the role of the specific antibody response in bovine JD and its prevention. PMID:26827838

  5. QUANTITATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF IDIOTYPIC ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Hopper, John E.; MacDonald, A. Bruce; Nisonoff, Alfred

    1970-01-01

    Idiotypic antibodies were investigated quantitatively by a method of indirect precipitation, which utilizes labeled F(ab')2 fragments of specifically purified antibenzoate antibody from the donor, anti-antibody, and an antiglobulin reagent. The contribution of allotypic and hidden determinants to these reactions was excluded. Greater fractions of an idiotypic antibody population are precipitated by this method, as compared to direct precipitation, and in two instances large proportions of idiotypic antibodies were detected in populations which failed to form precipitates by double diffusion in agar gel. The greater sensitivity of the indirect method was attributed to its capacity to detect molecules bearing a small number of antigenic determinants. Extensive studies of cross-reactions, carried out by an inhibition technique, failed to reveal any strong reactions of anti-idiotypic antibodies with heterologous antibenzoate antibody preparations, heterologous sera, or IgG, although a few weak cross-reactions were noted. One definite cross-reaction was observed by a direct binding measurement with heterologous antiserum. Antisera prepared in more than one recipient against a single donor preparation reacted with identical or overlapping subpopulations of the donor molecules. Instances in which two recipient antisera reacted with different proportions of the molecules of a single donor provided evidence for the existence of more than one idiotypic antibody population in the antibenzoate antibody of an individual rabbit. PMID:5308065

  6. Genetic characterization of Bagaza virus (BAGV) isolated in India and evidence of anti-BAGV antibodies in sera collected from encephalitis patients.

    PubMed

    Bondre, Vijay P; Sapkal, Gajanan N; Yergolkar, Prasanna N; Fulmali, Pradip V; Sankararaman, Vasudha; Ayachit, Vijay M; Mishra, Akhilesh C; Gore, Milind M

    2009-11-01

    During investigations into the outbreak of encephalitis in 1996 in the Kerala state in India, an arbovirus was isolated from a Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquito pool. It was characterized as a Japanese encephalitis and West Nile virus cross-reactive arbovirus by complement fixation test. A plaque reduction-neutralization test was performed using hyperimmune sera raised against the plaque-purified arbovirus isolate. The sera did not show reactivity with Japanese encephalitis virus and were weakly reactive with West Nile virus. Complete open reading frame sequence analysis characterized the arbovirus as Bagaza virus (BAGV), with 94.80 % nucleotide identity with African BAGV strain DakAr B209. Sera collected from the encephalitic patients during the acute phase of illness showed 15 % (8/53) positivity for anti-BAGV neutralizing antibodies. This is the first report of the isolation of BAGV from India. The presence of anti-BAGV neutralizing antibodies suggests that the human population has been exposed to BAGV.

  7. A Mouse Model for Conditional Secretion of Specific Single-Chain Antibodies Provides Genetic Evidence for Regulation of Cortical Plasticity by a Non-cell Autonomous Homeoprotein Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Eva; Ribot, Jérôme; Di Nardo, Ariel A.; Volovitch, Michel; Prochiantz, Alain

    2016-01-01

    During postnatal life the cerebral cortex passes through critical periods of plasticity allowing its physiological adaptation to the environment. In the visual cortex, critical period onset and closure are influenced by the non-cell autonomous activity of the Otx2 homeoprotein transcription factor, which regulates the maturation of parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons (PV cells). In adult mice, the maintenance of a non-plastic adult state requires continuous Otx2 import by PV cells. An important source of extra-cortical Otx2 is the choroid plexus, which secretes Otx2 into the cerebrospinal fluid. Otx2 secretion and internalization requires two small peptidic domains that are part of the DNA-binding domain. Thus, mutating these “transfer” sequences also modifies cell autonomous transcription, precluding this approach to obtain a cell autonomous-only mouse. Here, we develop a mouse model with inducible secretion of an anti-Otx2 single-chain antibody to trap Otx2 in the extracellular milieu. Postnatal secretion of this single-chain antibody by PV cells delays PV maturation and reduces plasticity gene expression. Induced adult expression of this single-chain antibody in cerebrospinal fluid decreases Otx2 internalization by PV cells, strongly induces plasticity gene expression and reopens physiological plasticity. We provide the first mammalian genetic evidence for a signaling mechanism involving intercellular transfer of a homeoprotein transcription factor. Our single-chain antibody mouse model is a valid strategy for extracellular neutralization that could be applied to other homeoproteins and signaling molecules within and beyond the nervous system. PMID:27171438

  8. Competitive binding of antibodies and antigen—antibody complexes to receptors on spleen lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, W.

    1974-01-01

    We have confirmed that adherence of antibodies to spleen lymphocytes is stabilized when the antibodies form complexes with antigen. Furthermore, there is evidence that antibodies having both binding sites occupied are less easily supplanted from the lymphocyte receptor by unspecific IgG than antibodies carrying one antigen only. Based on these results a hypothetical model for a feed-back control of the humoral immune response is put forward. PMID:4846174

  9. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  10. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  11. Evidence of the presence of rheumatoid factor and antibodies reacting with human and rabbit IgA in fluid from non-keratinizing jaw cysts.

    PubMed

    Skaug, N

    1976-01-01

    Fluid from an apical periodontal and a follicular jaw cyst formed, in double diffusion in agarose gel, a continuous precipitin line against IgA isolated from human and rabbit serum, IgA myeloma protein, and secretory IgA. Results of immunoelectrophoresis and absorption experiments indicated that the IgA precipitating factor was an immunoglobulin belonging to the IgM class. Furthermore, the two cyst fluids contained immune complexes, possibly IgA-anti-IgA, which precipitated in agar gel. The same two cyst fluids showed a positive reaction in the Waaler-Rose test with tires of 40 and 80, respectively. A series of the other cyst fluids examined were negative in the Waaler-Rose test. None of the cyst fluids conatined antinuclear antibodies.

  12. Evidence of Dengue Virus Transmission and Factors Associated with the Presence of Anti-Dengue Virus Antibodies in Humans in Three Major Towns in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Demanou, Maurice; Pouillot, Régis; Grandadam, Marc; Boisier, Pascal; Kamgang, Basile; Hervé, Jean Pierre; Rogier, Christophe; Rousset, Dominique; Paupy, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is not well documented in Africa. In Cameroon, data are scarce, but dengue infection has been confirmed in humans. We conducted a study to document risk factors associated with anti-dengue virus Immunoglobulin G seropositivity in humans in three major towns in Cameroon. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross sectional survey was conducted in Douala, Garoua and Yaounde, using a random cluster sampling design. Participants underwent a standardized interview and were blood sampled. Environmental and housing characteristics were recorded. Randomized houses were prospected to record all water containers, and immature stages of Aedes mosquitoes were collected. Sera were screened for anti-dengue virus IgG and IgM antibodies. Risk factors of seropositivity were tested using logistic regression methods with random effects. Anti-dengue IgG were found from 61.4% of sera in Douala (n = 699), 24.2% in Garoua (n = 728) and 9.8% in Yaounde (n = 603). IgM were found from 0.3% of Douala samples, 0.1% of Garoua samples and 0.0% of Yaounde samples. Seroneutralization on randomly selected IgG positive sera showed that 72% (n = 100) in Douala, 80% (n = 94) in Garoua and 77% (n = 66) in Yaounde had antibodies specific for dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2). Age, temporary house walls materials, having water-storage containers, old tires or toilets in the yard, having no TV, having no air conditioning and having travelled at least once outside the city were independently associated with anti-dengue IgG positivity in Douala. Age, having uncovered water containers, having no TV, not being born in Garoua and not breeding pigs were significant risk factors in Garoua. Recent history of malaria, having banana trees and stagnant water in the yard were independent risk factors in Yaounde. Conclusion/Significance In this survey, most identified risk factors of dengue were related to housing conditions. Poverty and underdevelopment are central to the dengue

  13. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  14. No evidence of misdiagnosis in patients with multiple sclerosis and repeated positive anticardiolipin antibody testing based on magnetic resonance imaging and long term follow‐up

    PubMed Central

    Liedorp, M; Sanchez, E; van Hoogstraten, I M W; von Blomberg, B M E; Barkhof, F; Polman, C H

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine whether patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) and repeated positive anticardiolipin antibody (aCL Ab) testing fulfil the recently updated criteria for the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Also, to determine if these patients form a separate subgroup in terms of long term follow‐up and MRI characteristics. Design A blinded case control study comparing MRI patterns between aCL Ab positive and negative MS patients with a clinical follow‐up of 7 years. Participants 8 (5.6%; male:female ratio 2:6; 6 relapsing–remitting subtype, 1 primary progressive subtype and 1 neuromyelitis optica (NMO)) of 143 consecutive patients with definite MS or NMO (71% relapsing–remitting, 18% secondary progressive and 6% primary progressive disease course; 4% NMO) showed repeated positive aCL Ab testing. Setting Outpatient clinic of a tertiary MS centre in the Netherlands. Results All eight aCL Ab positive patients had levels below 40 MPL/GPL units, with the majority of intervals between tests of at least 12 weeks. After follow‐up, none of the patients fulfilled the criteria for APS. No specific MRI features were present compared with 24 matched aCL Ab negative patients. Conclusions No aCL Ab positive MS patient fulfilled the criteria for APS, arguing against a possible misdiagnosis or coexistence. PMID:17878195

  15. Detection of Borna disease virus (BDV) antibodies and BDV RNA in psychiatric patients: evidence for high sequence conservation of human blood-derived BDV RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sauder, C; Müller, A; Cubitt, B; Mayer, J; Steinmetz, J; Trabert, W; Ziegler, B; Wanke, K; Mueller-Lantzsch, N; de la Torre, J C; Grässer, F A

    1996-01-01

    In several vertebrate species, Borna disease virus (BDV), the prototype of a new group of animal viruses, causes central nervous system disease accompanied by diverse behavioral abnormalities. Seroepidemiological data indicate that BDV may contribute to the pathophysiology of certain human mental disorders. This hypothesis is further supported by the detection of both BDV antigens and BDV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with psychiatric disorders and the isolation of BDV from such PBMCs. Here we describe serological and molecular epidemiological studies on psychiatric patients and healthy individuals from the area of Homburg, Germany. Using a novel Western blot (immunoblot) assay, we found a BDV seroprevalence of 9.6% among 416 neuropsychiatric patients, which is significantly higher than the 1.4% found among 203 healthy control individuals. Human sera displayed a prominent immunoreactivity against the virus nucleoprotein, the p40 antigen. Reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR analysis of RNA extracted from PBMCs of a subset of 26 of the neuropsychiatric patients revealed that 50% were BDV RNA positive. Three of the 13 BDV RNA-positive patients also had BDV-positive serology, whereas one patient with serum antibodies to BDV p40 antigen did not harbor detectable BDV RNA in PBMCs. BDV p40 and p24 sequences derived from human PBMCs exhibited both a high degree of inter- and intrapatient conservation and a close genetic relationship to animal-derived BDV sequences. PMID:8892892

  16. Studies of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. I. Evidence using novel monoclonal antibodies that most human LAK precursor cells share a common surface marker

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Separation of LAK precursor (LAKp) cells (as defined by LAK effector generation after incubation with IL-2 for 7 d) from cells with NK activity/LGL morphology was achieved on Percoll gradients using a longer, slower centrifugation than that used for optimal NK enrichment. mAb were generated using the various Percoll fractions as the immunizing cells and used for separation and depletion studies. Two mAbs DM-1 (IgM,k) and DM-2 (IgM,k) recognizing 2-15% and 15-30% of PBL, respectively, abrogated a large proportion of LAK generative potential after complement depletion, but had little effect on NK or LAK effector activity. Cell sorting experiments indicated that the majority of LAKp cells are found within the DM-1+ population and that DM-1+ cells are not simply an accessory cell required for LAKp generation. Further, these two mAbs do not recognize cells that are responsible for generating cytotoxicity during MLC or co-culture with the PR-1 EBV lymphoblastoid cell line. Western blot analysis indicated that DM-1 and DM-2 recognize a 38,000 and 44,000 dalton moiety, respectively. The frequency of cells bearing these antigens and the intensity of cell surface staining decreased during the 7-d culture period, suggesting that these antibodies recognize determinants found only at the precursor level. These findings indicate that cells other than NK effectors or mature T cells are capable of generating a LAK cell response. These LAK precursor cells share a common differentiation surface antigen and are different from AK or antigen-specific CTL precursors. The possibility exists that these cells are identical to, or include, the NK precursor cell. PMID:2784480

  17. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  19. Production and Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Raised Against Surface Antigens from Mycelium of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici: Evidence for an Extracellular Polyphenol Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Thornton, C R; Dewey, F M; Gilligan, C A

    1997-01-01

    ABSTRACT A murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) of immunoglobulin class M (IgM) was raised against surface antigens from Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, recognized isolates of G. graminis var. tritici, G. graminis var. avenae and G. graminis var. graminis. Characterization of the antigen by heat and protease treatments showed that the epitope recognized by the MAb was a protein. Antigen production was detected only in live mycelia. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the antigen was associated with both the broad melanized macrohyphae and hyaline mycelia of G. graminis var. tritici. Secretion of antigen into an aqueous minimal medium was promoted only by exposure of live mycelia to certain phenolic substrates, including monophenols ortho-, para-, and meta-cresol; 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid (gallic acid); and phenolic amino acid L-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) alanine (L-DOPA). Antigen secretion was not promoted by 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) alanine (L-tyrosine). The MAb reacted strongly with purified enzyme laccase (polyphenol oxidase, EC 1.10.3.2) but did not recognize purified tyrosinase (monophenol oxidase, EC 1.14.18.1). Moreover, chemicals that bind to copper and inhibit copper-containing enzymes such as laccase completely inhibited antigen secretion in response to L-DOPA. The MAb was tested for specificity against a wide range of fungi, common yeast species, and gram positive and negative bacteria. It did not recognize antigens from a broad range of unrelated fungi, including Gliocladium roseum, Fusarium sp., Phoma exigua, Phialophora fastigiata, Penicillium crustosum, Pythium ultimum, Rhizopus stolonifer, Rhizoctonia carotae, R. oryzae, R. tuliparum, and Trichoderma viride, nor did it recognize surface antigens from yeasts or bacteria. The MAb cross-reacted with antigens from Botrytis spp., Chaetomium globosum, R. cerealis, and R. solani. However, secretion of antigen by R. solani and R. cerealis was not promoted by L

  20. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  1. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  2. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-zhe; Coljee, Vincent W.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  3. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Zhe; Coljee, Vincent W; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2013-11-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  4. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  5. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2016-06-30

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  6. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  7. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page ... Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content ...

  8. How to successfully patent therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lahrtz, Fritz

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have become an established class of drugs for the treatment of a variety of diseases, especially cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, and a sufficient patent protection is a prerequisite for their successful commercialization. As monoclonal antibodies and their therapeutic potential have been well known for decades, the mere production of yet another therapeutic antibody is in many jurisdictions not considered a patentable invention. In contrast, antibodies with novel structural features and/or improved properties may be patentable. When drafting the claims, care should be taken to obtain a broad patent scope that protects both the antibody of interest and related antibodies having the same functional features, thereby preventing competitors from marketing a functionally equivalent antibody. Furthermore, the application should contain experimental evidence showing the improved properties of the claimed antibody. After the filing of a priority patent application, patent protection should be initiated at least in countries that are of particular commercial importance. Subsequent inventions relating to novel uses, formulations, dosage regimens, and combinations with other treatment modalities should be protected by further patent applications to extend patent term. PMID:25614506

  9. How to successfully patent therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lahrtz, Fritz

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have become an established class of drugs for the treatment of a variety of diseases, especially cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, and a sufficient patent protection is a prerequisite for their successful commercialization. As monoclonal antibodies and their therapeutic potential have been well known for decades, the mere production of yet another therapeutic antibody is in many jurisdictions not considered a patentable invention. In contrast, antibodies with novel structural features and/or improved properties may be patentable. When drafting the claims, care should be taken to obtain a broad patent scope that protects both the antibody of interest and related antibodies having the same functional features, thereby preventing competitors from marketing a functionally equivalent antibody. Furthermore, the application should contain experimental evidence showing the improved properties of the claimed antibody. After the filing of a priority patent application, patent protection should be initiated at least in countries that are of particular commercial importance. Subsequent inventions relating to novel uses, formulations, dosage regimens, and combinations with other treatment modalities should be protected by further patent applications to extend patent term.

  10. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  11. Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, A; Newsom Davis, J

    1980-01-01

    Early suggestions that a humoral factor might be implicated in the disorder of neuromuscular transmission in myasthenia gravis have been confirmed by the detection of anti-AChR antibody in 85-90% of the patients with generalised disease and in 75% of cases with restricted ocular myasthenia. Plasma exchange reveals that serum anti-AChR usually has an inverse relationship to muscle strength and present evidence indicates that patients responding to thymectomy and immunosuppressive durg treatment usually show a consistent decline in serum anti-AChR titres. The antibody is heterogeneous and can lead to a loss of muscle AChR by several mechanisms. Anti-AChR is produced in the thymus in relatively small amounts. Anti-AChR antibody synthesis by thymic lymphocytes and pokeweed stimulated peripheral lymphocytes in culture provides a means of studying the effect of different lymphocyte populations in vitro. Analysis of clinical, immunological and HLA antigen characteristics in MG suggest that more than one mechanism may underlie the breakdown in tolerance to AChR, leading to the production of anti-AChR antibodies. PMID:7400823

  12. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  13. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  14. Advances in Antibody Design.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Kathryn E; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody-drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  15. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  16. Polyreactive antibodies in adaptive immune responses to viruses.

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Hugo; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2012-05-01

    B cells express immunoglobulins on their surface where they serve as antigen receptors. When secreted as antibodies, the same molecules are key elements of the humoral immune response against pathogens such as viruses. Although most antibodies are restricted to binding a specific antigen, some are polyreactive and have the ability to bind to several different ligands, usually with low affinity. Highly polyreactive antibodies are removed from the repertoire during B-cell development by physiologic tolerance mechanisms including deletion and receptor editing. However, a low level of antibody polyreactivity is tolerated and can confer additional binding properties to pathogen-specific antibodies. For example, high-affinity human antibodies to HIV are frequently polyreactive. Here we review the evidence suggesting that in the case of some pathogens like HIV, polyreactivity may confer a selective advantage to pathogen-specific antibodies.

  17. Antibodies to prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, M L

    2012-06-01

    Research on antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and the thrombotic manifestations associated with these antibodies has grown since the description of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) by Harris and colleagues in the early 1980s. Antiprothrombin (aPT) antibodies are commonly detected by ELISA, using irradiated plates (aPT) or prothrombin in complex with phosphatidylserine (aPS/PT). Although aPT and/or aPS/PT are associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) -related clinical features and these antibodies correlate with each other, aPT and aPS/PT belong to different populations of autoantibodies even though they can both be present in the same patient. Early studies suggested that these antibodies might be the antigenic target of lupus anticoagulant (LA) and their correlation and clinical significance is being investigated. PMID:22635215

  18. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  19. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  20. Antibodies to cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, G M; Gentry, M K; Amende, L M; Blanchette-Mackie, E J; Alving, C R

    1988-01-01

    Cholesterol-dependent complement activation has been proposed as a factor that might influence the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although antibodies to cholesterol conjugates have been reported, cholesterol is widely regarded as a poorly immunogenic substance. Monoclonal IgM complement-fixing antibodies to cholesterol were obtained in the present study after immunizing mice with liposomes containing high amounts of cholesterol (71 mol % relative to phosphatidylcholine) and lipid A as an adjuvant. Clones were selected for the ability of secreted antibodies to react with liposomes containing 71% cholesterol but not with liposomes containing 43% cholesterol. The antibodies also reacted with crystalline cholesterol in a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to the surface of crystalline cholesterol was demonstrated by electron microscopy by utilizing a second antibody (anti-IgM) labeled with colloidal gold. The immunization period required to induce monoclonal antibodies was very short (3 days) and a high fraction of the hybrid cells (at least 70%) were secreting detectable antibodies to cholesterol. The results demonstrate that cholesterol can be a highly immunogenic molecule and that complement-fixing antibodies to cholesterol can be readily obtained. Images PMID:3162316

  1. Anti-hapten antibodies in response to skin sensitization.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Helen; Popple, Amy; Gellatly, Nichola; Maxwell, Gavin; Williams, Jason; Friedmann, Peter S; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2016-04-01

    Whereas T lymphocyte (T cell) activation is the key event in the acquisition of skin sensitization and subsequent elicitation of allergic contact dermatitis, the humoral component of immune responses to organic contact allergens has received little consideration. There is evidence that, in experimental animals, topical exposure to potent contact allergens is associated with B cell activation and proliferation, and hapten-specific antibody production. However, there is very limited evidence available for anti-hapten antibody responses being induced following topical exposure of humans to contact allergens. Nevertheless, it is important to appreciate that there are almost no negative studies in which evidence for antibody production as the result of skin sensitization has been sought and not found. That is, there is absence of evidence rather than evidence of absence. Furthermore, exposure to chemical respiratory allergens, in which the skin has been implicated as a potential route of sensitization, results in anti-hapten antibody responses. It is proposed that skin sensitization to contact allergens will normally be accompanied by antibody production. The phenomenon is worthy of investigation, as anti-hapten antibodies could potentially influence and/or regulate the induction of skin sensitization. Moreover, such antibodies may provide an informative correlate of the extent to which sensitization has been acquired.

  2. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  3. Antibodies as natural adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies in complex with specific antigen can dramatically change the antibody response to this antigen. Depending on antibody class and type of antigen, >99 % suppression or >100-fold enhancement of the response can take place. IgM and IgG3 are efficient enhancers and operate via the complement system. In contrast, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b enhance antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to protein antigens via activating Fcγ-receptors. IgE also enhances antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to small proteins but uses the low-affinity receptor for IgE, CD23. Most likely, IgM and IgG3 work by increasing the effective concentration of antigen on follicular dendritic cells in splenic follicles. IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgE probably enhance antibody responses by increasing antigen presentation by dendritic cells to T helper cells. IgG antibodies of all subclasses have a dual effect, and suppress antibody responses to particulate antigens such as erythrocytes. This capacity is used in the clinic to prevent immunization of Rhesus-negative women to Rhesus-positive fetal erythrocytes acquired via transplacental hemorrage. IgG-mediated suppression in mouse models can take place in the absence of Fcγ-receptors and complement and to date no knock-out mouse strain has been found where suppression is abrogated.

  4. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  5. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  6. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  7. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  8. Affinity Purification of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M; McGarvey, Jeffery A

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that include antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant, or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facilitate assay reproducibility, economy, and reduced interference of nonspecific components as well as improved storage, stability, and bio-conjugation. Although not always necessary, the relative simplicity of antibody purification using commercially available protein-A, protein-G, or protein-L resins with basic chromatographic principles warrants purification when antibody source material is available in sufficient quantity. Here, we define three simple methods using immobilized (1) protein-A, (2) protein-G, and (3) protein-L agarose beads to yield highly purified antibody. PMID:26160561

  9. Anti Transglutaminase Antibodies Cause Ataxia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo, Sabrina; Lorenzon, Andrea; Sblattero, Daniele; Florian, Fiorella; Stebel, Marco; Marzari, Roberto; Not, Tarcisio; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Ventura, Alessandro; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder characterized by the presence of anti-transglutaminase 2 (TG2) and anti-gliadin antibodies. Amongst the neurological dysfunctions associated with CD, ataxia represents the most common one. Methods We analyzed by immunohistochemistry, the anti-neural reactivity of the serum from 20 CD patients. To determine the role of anti-TG2 antibodies in ataxia, two anti-TG2 single chain variable fragments (scFv), isolated from a phage-display IgA antibody library, were characterized by immunohistochemistry and ELISA, and injected in mice to study their effects on motor coordination. We found that 75% of the CD patient population without evidence of neurological involvement, has circulating anti-neural IgA and/or IgG antibodies. Two anti-TG2 scFvs, cloned from one CD patient, stained blood vessels but only one reacted with neurons. This anti-TG2 antibody showed cross reactivity with the transglutaminase isozymes TG3 and TG6. Intraventricular injection of the anti-TG2 or the anti-TG2/3/6 cross-reactive scFv provoked transient, equally intensive ataxia in mice. Conclusion The serum from CD patients contains anti-TG2, TG3 and TG6 antibodies that may potentially cause ataxia. PMID:20300628

  10. Introduction to Antigen and Antibody Assays.

    PubMed

    Day, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Serological tests are used widely in veterinary practice; most often in the diagnosis of infectious disease. Such tests may be used to detect antigen from an infectious agent within a biological sample or to detect the presence of serum antibody specific for the pathogen as evidence of immunological exposure. These tests are all based on the fundamental principles of interaction between antigenic epitopes and antibodies of either the immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, IgA, or IgE classes. The relative concentration of specific antibody within a sample is traditionally determined by calculation of the titer of antibody. With few exceptions, the primary interaction between an antigen and antibody in vitro cannot be visualized and so serological tests generally employ a secondary indicator system based on the use of a polyclonal antiserum or monoclonal antibody. A range of such tests has been developed, but many in veterinary medicine are based on the principle of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, which is described in detail in this article. The interpretation of serological tests must be made carefully, taking into consideration the sensitivity and specificity of the test and the possible reasons for false-positive and false-negative outcomes. PMID:27154595

  11. The INNs and outs of antibody nonproprietary names

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tim D.; Carter, Paul J.; Plückthun, Andreas; Vásquez, Max; Holgate, Robert G.E.; Hötzel, Isidro; Popplewell, Andrew G.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Enzelberger, Markus; Rademaker, Hendrik J.; Clark, Michael R.; Lowe, David C.; Dahiyat, Bassil I.; Smith, Victoria; Lambert, John M.; Wu, Herren; Reilly, Mary; Haurum, John S.; Dübel, Stefan; Huston, James S.; Schirrmann, Thomas; Janssen, Richard A.J.; Steegmaier, Martin; Gross, Jane A.; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Chester, Kerry A.; Glennie, Martin J.; Davies, Julian; Walker, Adam; Martin, Steve; McCafferty, John; Baker, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    An important step in drug development is the assignment of an International Nonproprietary Name (INN) by the World Health Organization (WHO) that provides healthcare professionals with a unique and universally available designated name to identify each pharmaceutical substance. Monoclonal antibody INNs comprise a –mab suffix preceded by a substem indicating the antibody type, e.g., chimeric (-xi-), humanized (-zu-), or human (-u-). The WHO publishes INN definitions that specify how new monoclonal antibody therapeutics are categorized and adapts the definitions to new technologies. However, rapid progress in antibody technologies has blurred the boundaries between existing antibody categories and created a burgeoning array of new antibody formats. Thus, revising the INN system for antibodies is akin to aiming for a rapidly moving target. The WHO recently revised INN definitions for antibodies now to be based on amino acid sequence identity. These new definitions, however, are critically flawed as they are ambiguous and go against decades of scientific literature. A key concern is the imposition of an arbitrary threshold for identity against human germline antibody variable region sequences. This leads to inconsistent classification of somatically mutated human antibodies, humanized antibodies as well as antibodies derived from semi-synthetic/synthetic libraries and transgenic animals. Such sequence-based classification implies clear functional distinction between categories (e.g., immunogenicity). However, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Dialog between the WHO INN Expert Group and key stakeholders is needed to develop a new INN system for antibodies and to avoid confusion and miscommunication between researchers and clinicians prescribing antibodies. PMID:26716992

  12. Maternal antibody-mediated dyslexia? Evidence for a pathogenic serum factor in a mother of two dyslexic children shown by transfer to mice using behavioural studies and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Angela; Deacon, Robert; Dalton, Paola; Salmond, Claire; Blamire, Andrew M; Pendlebury, Sarah; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Rajogopalan, Bheeshma; Styles, Peter; Stein, John

    2002-09-01

    The causes of dyslexia are unknown, but previous studies have suggested an immunological basis in some cases. We hypothesised that maternal antibodies, which cross the placenta and bind to fetal antigens, could be responsible, particularly when the dyslexia recurs in consecutive pregnancies. We injected serum samples from five mothers of two or more children with dyslexia into pregnant mice, and tested the offspring for behavioural abnormalities and cerebellar metabolites by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Mice exposed in utero to serum factors from one woman with two dyslexic children, who had also had three spontaneous fetal losses, showed deficits in motor tests which correlated with cerebellar choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr) levels. These preliminary results are consistent with a role for maternal serum factors, probably antibodies, in causing some of the features of dyslexia, and possibly in other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  13. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  14. Eliminating antibody polyreactivity through addition of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Zhang, Baoshan; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Kwon, Young Do; Zhou, Tongqing; Blinn, Julie; Lloyd, Krissey; Parks, Robert; Von Holle, Tarra; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Pegu, Amarendra; Wang, Keyun; Baruah, Kavitha; Crispin, Max; Mascola, John R; Moody, M Anthony; Haynes, Barton F; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwong, Peter D

    2015-06-01

    Antibody polyreactivity can be an obstacle to translating a candidate antibody into a clinical product. Standard tests such as antibody binding to cardiolipin, HEp-2 cells, or nuclear antigens provide measures of polyreactivity, but its causes and the means to resolve are often unclear. Here we present a method for eliminating antibody polyreactivity through the computational design and genetic addition of N-linked glycosylation near known sites of polyreactivity. We used the HIV-1-neutralizing antibody, VRC07, as a test case, since efforts to increase VRC07 potency at three spatially distinct sites resulted in enhanced polyreactivity. The addition of N-linked glycans proximal to the polyreactivity-enhancing mutations at each of the spatially distinct sites resulted in reduced antibody polyreactivity as measured by (i) anti-cardiolipin ELISA, (ii) Luminex AtheNA Multi-Lyte ANA binding, and (iii) HEp-2 cell staining. The reduced polyreactivity trended with increased antibody concentration over time in mice, but not with improved overall protein stability as measured by differential scanning calorimetry. Moreover, glycan proximity to the site of polyreactivity appeared to be a critical factor. The results provide evidence that antibody polyreactivity can result from local, rather than global, features of an antibody and that addition of N-linked glycosylation can be an effective approach to reducing antibody polyreactivity.

  15. Principles of antibody-mediated TNF receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Wajant, H

    2015-01-01

    From the beginning of research on receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), agonistic antibodies have been used to stimulate TNFRSF receptors in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, CD95, one of the first cloned TNFRSF receptors, was solely identified as the target of cell death-inducing antibodies. Early on, it became evident from in vitro studies that valency and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) binding of antibodies targeting TNFRSF receptors can be of crucial relevance for agonistic activity. TNFRSF receptor-specific antibodies of the IgM subclass and secondary cross-linked or aggregation prone dimeric antibodies typically display superior agonistic activity compared with dimeric antibodies. Likewise, anchoring of antibodies to cell surface-expressed FcγRs potentiate their ability to trigger TNFRSF receptor signaling. However, only recently has the relevance of oligomerization and FcγR binding for the in vivo activity of antibody-induced TNFRSF receptor activation been straightforwardly demonstrated in vivo. This review discusses the crucial role of oligomerization and/or FcγR binding for antibody-mediated TNFRSF receptor stimulation in light of current models of TNFRSF receptor activation and especially the overwhelming relevance of these issues for the rational development of therapeutic TNFRSF receptor-targeting antibodies. PMID:26292758

  16. Mining human antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become drugs of choice for the management of an increasing number of human diseases. Human antibody repertoires provide a rich source for human mAbs. Here we review the characteristics of natural and non-natural human antibody repertoires and their mining with non-combinatorial and combinatorial strategies. In particular, we discuss the selection of human mAbs from naïve, immune, transgenic and synthetic human antibody repertoires using methods based on hybridoma technology, clonal expansion of peripheral B cells, single-cell PCR, phage display, yeast display and mammalian cell display. Our reliance on different strategies is shifting as we gain experience and refine methods to the efficient generation of human mAbs with superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:20505349

  17. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  18. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-01-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change. Images Fig. 1 PMID:389957

  19. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... despite the fact that the person is infected ( false negative ). If an HIV antibody test is negative ... infection (around 28 days) and may give a false-negative result. ^ Back to top Is there anything ...

  20. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  1. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  2. Engineering antibodies for therapy.

    PubMed

    Adair, J R

    1992-12-01

    Success in the generation of an antibody-based therapeutic requires careful consideration of the binding site, to achieve specificity and high affinity; of the effector, to produce the desired therapeutic effect; of the means of attachment of the effector to the binding site; production of the end product; and the response made by the patient to the administered compound. Each of these areas is receiving attention by antibody-engineering techniques. The number of potentially useful monoclonal antibodies developed over the last 10 years, and currently in clinical trials or preregistration, is now being increased by these engineered newcomers. It will be interesting to see over the next few years how many of these antibodies, and of which kind, emerge as products.

  3. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  4. Infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT-1: Evidence using antibodies specific to the receptor's large extracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib . E-mail: galkhati@iupui.edu

    2006-05-25

    To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we developed a highly sensitive vaccinia virus-based assay measuring activation of a reporter gene upon fusion of two distinct cell populations. We used this system in a functional cDNA screening to isolate and confirm that the glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) is a receptor for HTLV-1. GLUT-1 is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane glycoprotein with 12 transmembrane domains and 6 extracellular loops (ECL). We demonstrate for the first time that peptide antibodies (GLUT-IgY) raised in chicken to the large extracellular loop (ECL1) detect GLUT-1 at the cell surface and inhibit envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and infection. Efficient GLUT-IgY staining was detected with peripheral blood CD4{sup +} lymphocytes purified by positive selection. Further, GLUT-IgY caused efficient inhibition of Env-mediated fusion and infection of CD4{sup +} T and significantly lower inhibition of CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes. The specificity of GLUT-IgY antibodies to GLUT-1 was demonstrated by ECL1 peptide competition studies. Grafting ECL1 of GLUT-1 onto the receptor-negative GLUT-3 conferred significant receptor activity. In contrast, grafting ECL1 of GLUT-3 onto GLUT-1 resulted in a significant loss of the receptor activity. The ECL1-mediated receptor activity was efficiently blocked with four different human monoclonal antibody (HMab) to HTLV-1 Env. The ECL1-derived peptide blocked HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with several nonhuman mammalian cell lines. The results demonstrate the utilization of cell surface GLUT-1 in HTLV-1 infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes and implicate a critical role for the ECL1 region in viral tropism.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  6. Engineering antibodies for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Boder, Eric T; Jiang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The advent of modern antibody engineering has led to numerous successes in the application of these proteins for cancer therapy in the 13 years since the first Food and Drug Administration approval, which has stimulated active interest in developing more and better drugs based on these molecules. A wide range of tools for discovering and engineering antibodies has been brought to bear on this challenge in the past two decades. Here, we summarize mechanisms of monoclonal antibody therapeutic activity, challenges to effective antibody-based treatment, existing technologies for antibody engineering, and current concepts for engineering new antibody formats and antibody alternatives as next generation biopharmaceuticals for cancer treatment.

  7. Viral antibody dynamics in a chiropteran host

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate S; Suu-Ire, Richard; Barr, Jennifer; Hayman, David T S; Broder, Christopher C; Horton, Daniel L; Durrant, Christopher; Murcia, Pablo R; Cunningham, Andrew A; Wood, James L N

    2014-01-01

    Bats host many viruses that are significant for human and domestic animal health, but the dynamics of these infections in their natural reservoir hosts remain poorly elucidated. In these, and other, systems, there is evidence that seasonal life-cycle events drive infection dynamics, directly impacting the risk of exposure to spillover hosts. Understanding these dynamics improves our ability to predict zoonotic spillover from the reservoir hosts. To this end, we followed henipavirus antibody levels of >100 individual E. helvum in a closed, captive, breeding population over a 30-month period, using a powerful novel antibody quantitation method. We demonstrate the presence of maternal antibodies in this system and accurately determine their longevity. We also present evidence of population-level persistence of viral infection and demonstrate periods of increased horizontal virus transmission associated with the pregnancy/lactation period. The novel findings of infection persistence and the effect of pregnancy on viral transmission, as well as an accurate quantitation of chiropteran maternal antiviral antibody half-life, provide fundamental baseline data for the continued study of viral infections in these important reservoir hosts. PMID:24111634

  8. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus.

  9. Polyreactive Antibodies: Function and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2015-07-15

    Polyreactive antibodies, a major component of the natural antibody repertoire, bind with low affinity to a variety of structurally unrelated antigens. Many of these antibodies are germline or near germline in sequence. Little is known, however, about the function of these antibodies. In the present mini-review we show: (1) that the broad antibacterial activity of the natural antibody repertoire is largely due to polyreactive antibodies, which in the presence of complement lyse bacteria and enhance phagocytosis; (2) that polyreactive antibodies bind to UV- or human immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptotic cells and with complement enhance the phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages; and (3) that dinitrophenol can be used as a surrogate for quantitating the level of polyreactive antibodies in serum. We conclude that polyreactive antibodies protect the host against both foreign invaders and its own damaged/apoptotic cells.

  10. ANTIBODY FORMATION IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, M.

    1961-01-01

    Neutralizing activity against T2 bacteriophage appeared in cultures of lymph node cells from normal rats in response to their in vitro stimulation with a cell-free filtrate derived from homogenized rat macrophages which had been incubated with T2 bacteriophage. This activity was specifically directed against T2 bacteriophage. It resided in a fraction of the culture fluid which had the salting-out properties of serum globulin. Phage neutralization was inhibited by antibody specific for rat serum gamma globulin. Antibody production against T2 bacteriophage in cultures of lymph node cells from normal animals failed to occur if (a) T2 bacteriophage alone was added, (b) if the incubation period of macrophages and T2 phage was unduly shortened, (c) if the cell-free filtrate was heated at 80–100°C for 15 minutes, (d) if more than an optimal amount of T2 bacteriophage was added to the macrophages. Additional factors which prevented the formation of antibody were the heat inactivation of the lymph node cells or the addition to the culture medium of either streptomycin or ribonuclease. Finally, it was found that macrophages and lymph node cells had to be obtained from animals of one and the same species. All essential findings on the production of antibody to T2 bacteriophage in vitro could be confirmed by substitution of the chick embryo for the tissue culture medium. The results are discussed in terms of a possible mechanism of antibody production in which an RNAse-sensitive substance resulting from the interaction of macrophages and antigen is capable of stimulating antibody synthesis in lymphocytic cells. PMID:13893304

  11. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  12. Antibody determination in the diagnosis of Wuchereria bancrofti infection in man

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, S.; Ismail, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    The levels of IgG and IgE antibodies reacting with somatic antigens of adult Setaria digitata and Wuchereria bancrofti microfilariae were determined in sera of 90 patients with Bancroftian filariasis and 379 non-filarial subjects. Antibodies reacting with adult antigens and with soluble microfilarial antigens were seen in both microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic patients. Antibodies reacting with surface antigens of W. bancrofti microfilariae were seen only in amicrofilaraemic subjects. IgE antibodies were detected with the adult antigen only in both microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic patients. The absolute levels of IgG antibodies were significantly higher than those of IgE antibodies. It is concluded that the determination of serum antibodies reacting with adult antigens is suitable for the diagnosis of both the microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic phases of infection, and the determination of antibody to microfilarial surface antigens is applicable in patients with clinically evident disease. PMID:7032737

  13. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:27683635

  14. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-09-24

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:27683635

  15. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation.

  16. Therapeutic antibodies in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Magdelaine-Beuzelin, Charlotte; Pinault, Coralie; Paintaud, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    More than a century after the first successful use of serotherapy, antibody-based therapy has been renewed by the availability of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. As in the past, current clinical experience has prompted new pharmacological questions and induced much debate among practitioners, notably in the field of ophthalmology. An examination of the history of antibodies as treatments for ocular disorders reveals interesting parallels to the modern era. The fact that a treatment administered by a systemic route could be efficacious in a local disease was not widely accepted and the “chemical” nature of antibodies was not clearly understood in the late 19th century. Clinical studies by Henry Coppez, a Belgian ophthalmologist, established in 1894 that antidiphtheric antitoxins could be used to treat conjunctival diphtheria. Nearly 20 years later, Coppez and Danis described age-related macular degeneration, a disorder which today benefits from ranibizumab therapy. The product, a locally-administered recombinant monoclonal Fab fragment, is directed against vascular endothelial growth factor A. Interestingly, its full-size counterpart, bevacizumab, which is approved for the treatment of solid tumors, has also demonstrated efficacy in age-related macular degeneration when administered either intravenously or locally, which raises new questions about antibody pharmacology and biodistribution. In order to shed some light on this debate, we recount the early history of serotherapy applied to ophthalmology, review the exact molecular differences between ranibizumab and bevacizumab, and discuss what is known about IgG and the blood-retina barrier and the possible role of FcRn, an IgG transporter. PMID:21358858

  17. Trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab

    PubMed Central

    Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan; Brockhoff, Gero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab bivalently targets the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) on epithelial (tumor) cells and the T cell specific CD3 antigen, and its Fc region is selectively recognized by Fcγ type I/III receptor-positive immune cells. As a trifunctional immunoglobulin, ertumaxomab therefore not only targets Her2 on cancer cells, but also triggers immunological effector mechanisms mediated by T and accessory cells (e.g., macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells). Whether molecular effects, however, might contribute to the cellular antitumor efficiency of ertumaxomab are largely unknown. Methods: Potential molecular effects of ertumaxomab on Her2-overexpressing BT474 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells were evaluated. The dissociation constant Kd of ertumaxomab was calculated from titration curves that were recorded by flow cytometry. Treatment-induced changes in Her2 homodimerization were determined by flow cytometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements on a cell-by-cell basis. Potential activation / deactivation of Her2, ERK1/2, AKT and STAT3 were analyzed by western blotting, Immunochemistry and immunofluorescent cell staining. Results: The Kd of ertumaxomab for Her2-binding was determined at 265 nM and the ertumaxomab binding epitope was found to not overlap with that of the therapeutic anti-Her2 monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Ertumaxomab caused an increase in Her2 phosphorylation at higher antibody concentrations, but changed neither the rate of Her2-homodimerization /-phosphorylation nor the activation state of key downstream signaling proteins analyzed. Conclusions: The unique mode of action of ertumaxomab, which relies more on activation of immune-mediated mechanisms against tumor cells compared with currently available therapeutic antibodies for breast cancer treatment, suggests that modular or sequential treatment with the trifunctional bivalent antibody might complement

  18. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  19. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell ...

  20. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  1. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  2. Detection of novel diagnostic antibodies in ankylosing spondylitis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Quaden, Dana H F; De Winter, Liesbeth M; Somers, Veerle

    2016-08-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a debilitating, chronic, rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation and new bone formation resulting in fusion of the spine and sacroiliac joints. Since early treatment is impeded by a delayed diagnosis, it is highly important to find new biomarkers that improve early diagnosis and may also contribute to a better assessment of disease activity, prognosis and therapy response in AS. Because of the absence of rheumatoid factor, AS was long assumed to have a seronegative character and antibodies are thus not considered a hallmark of the disease. However, emerging evidence suggests plasma cells and autoantibodies to be involved in the disease course. In this review, the role of B cells and antibodies in AS is discussed. Furthermore, an overview is provided of antibodies identified in AS up till now, and their diagnostic potential. Many of these antibody responses were based on small study populations and further validation is lacking. Moreover, most were identified by a hypothesis-driven approach and thus limited to antibodies against targets that are already known to be involved in AS pathogenesis. Hence, we propose an unbiased approach to identify novel diagnostic antibodies. The already successfully applied techniques cDNA phage display and serological antigen selection will be used to identify antibodies against both known and new antigen targets in AS plasma. These newly identified antibodies will enhance early diagnosis of AS and provide more insight into the underlying disease pathology, resulting in a more effective treatment strategy and eventually an improved disease outcome. PMID:27288842

  3. Demonstration of Usutu virus antibodies in horses, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Barbic, Ljubo; Vilibic-Cavlek, Tatjana; Listes, Eddy; Stevanovic, Vladimir; Gjenero-Margan, Ira; Ljubin-Sternak, Suncanica; Pem-Novosel, Iva; Listes, Irena; Mlinaric-Galinovic, Gordana; Di Gennaro, Annapia; Savini, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    We report the first serological evidence of Usutu virus (USUV) infection in horses in Croatia. During 2011, 1380 horse serum samples from healthy animals were collected from six northern Croatian counties. All samples were first screened for West Nile virus (WNV) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sixty-nine WNV ELISA-reactive samples were further tested for WNV antibodies by a virus neutralization assay (VN assay) and plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), and USUV by a VN assay and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) antibodies by PRNT. During the same period, 306 human serum samples from patients coming for routine testing with no symptoms of acute febrile disease were tested for USUV IgG using ELISA. Reactive samples were tested for both USUV and WNV using a VN assay. USUV-specific neutralizing antibodies were detected in two of 69 WNV ELISA-reactive horse serum samples. Seropositive animals were found in two different regions of Croatia. One additional sample showed specific WNV-neutralizing antibodies that cross-neutralized USUV. Only one human sample (0.3%) was reactive to USUV antibodies in an ELISA test. In a confirmatory test, WNV-neutralizing antibodies were detected, indicating cross-reactive antibodies with USUV in ELISA. The exposure to USUV was documented in two WNV ELISA-reactive horses at distant locations. These results indicate the presence of USUV in northern Croatia.

  4. Detection of novel diagnostic antibodies in ankylosing spondylitis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Quaden, Dana H F; De Winter, Liesbeth M; Somers, Veerle

    2016-08-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a debilitating, chronic, rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation and new bone formation resulting in fusion of the spine and sacroiliac joints. Since early treatment is impeded by a delayed diagnosis, it is highly important to find new biomarkers that improve early diagnosis and may also contribute to a better assessment of disease activity, prognosis and therapy response in AS. Because of the absence of rheumatoid factor, AS was long assumed to have a seronegative character and antibodies are thus not considered a hallmark of the disease. However, emerging evidence suggests plasma cells and autoantibodies to be involved in the disease course. In this review, the role of B cells and antibodies in AS is discussed. Furthermore, an overview is provided of antibodies identified in AS up till now, and their diagnostic potential. Many of these antibody responses were based on small study populations and further validation is lacking. Moreover, most were identified by a hypothesis-driven approach and thus limited to antibodies against targets that are already known to be involved in AS pathogenesis. Hence, we propose an unbiased approach to identify novel diagnostic antibodies. The already successfully applied techniques cDNA phage display and serological antigen selection will be used to identify antibodies against both known and new antigen targets in AS plasma. These newly identified antibodies will enhance early diagnosis of AS and provide more insight into the underlying disease pathology, resulting in a more effective treatment strategy and eventually an improved disease outcome.

  5. Molecular Insights into Fully Human and Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julian; Glasebrook, Andrew; Tang, Ying; Glaesner, Wolfgang; Nickoloff, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a large number of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have come to market to treat a variety of conditions including patients with immune-mediated chronic inflammation. Distinguishing the relative clinical efficacy and safety profiles of one monoclonal antibody relative to another can be difficult and complex due to different clinical designs and paucity of head-to-head comparator studies. One distinguishing feature in interpreting clinical trial data by dermatologists may begin by determining whether a monoclonal antibody is fully human or humanized, which can be discerned by the generic name of the drug. Herein, this commentary highlights the distinctions and similarities of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies in their nomenclature, engineering, and clinical profiles. While there are a number of differences between these types of monoclonal antibodies, current evidence indicates that this designation does not impart any measurable impact on overall clinical efficacy and safety profiles of a given drug. Based on molecular insights provided in this commentary, it is clear that each monoclonal antibody, irrespective of being fully human or humanized, should be individually assessed for its clinical impact regarding safety and efficacy. Going beyond the type of generic name ascribed to a monoclonal antibody will be an ever-increasing theme for dermatologists as more therapeutic monoclonal antibodies emerge to potentially treat a wider scope of diseases with cutaneous manifestations. PMID:27672407

  6. Natural antibodies in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Veres, J

    1975-01-01

    The serum of 100 adults living in Budapest was examined for isohaemagglutinin titre with haemaglutination, for staphylococcal-antitoxin titre with haemolysis inhibition and for bacterial antibody titre against 17 different groups of bacteria with passive haemagglutination. Antibody levels in males, except for certain bacterial antibodies, were somewhat lower than in females. The antibody titres, especially in men, decreased gradually from 20 to 50 years of age and were usually lower in Rh negative than in Rh positive persons.

  7. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  8. Electron Microscopic Observations of Rabbit Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hall, C E; Nisonoff, A; Slayter, H S

    1959-12-01

    Electron micrographs were obtained showing the individual, shadow-cast macromolecules from solutions of purified anti-p-azobenzoate rabbit antibody and of normal gamma-globulin. The two materials look alike and consist mainly of asymmetrical rod-like particles about 30 to 40 A in diameter. Lengths are not constant but the weight average is about 250 A for the antibodies and about 200 A for the gamma-globulin. The average observed dimensions are reasonably consistent with values deduced from physical-chemical methods, although the shape is more nearly that of a cylindrical rod rather than the ellipsoid employed in hydrodynamical theory. Mixtures of antibody and specific dihaptenic dye were examined in attempts to establish the mode of the specific aggregation. At the high dilutions necessary for electron microscopy (0.1 mg./ml.), the effect of the dye was small and tended to be masked by non-specific aggregation on drying. The evidence suggests that under these conditions the specific reaction involves an end-to-end aggregation of the elementary particles to produce a weight average length about twice that of the pure antibody.

  9. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed.

  10. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  11. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  12. Genetic linkage of IgA deficiency to the major histocompatibility complex: evidence for allele segregation distortion, parent-of-origin penetrance differences, and the role of anti-IgA antibodies in disease predisposition.

    PubMed Central

    Vorechovský, I; Webster, A D; Plebani, A; Hammarström, L

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency (IgAD) is characterized by a defect of terminal lymphocyte differentiation, leading to a lack of IgA in serum and mucosal secretions. Familial clustering, variable population prevalence in different ethnic groups, and a predominant inheritance pattern suggest a strong genetic predisposition to IgAD. The genetic susceptibility to IgAD is shared with a less prevalent, but more profound, defect called "common variable immunodeficiency" (CVID). Here we show an increased allele sharing at 6p21 in affected members of 83 multiplex IgAD/CVID pedigrees and demonstrate, using transmission/diseqilibrium tests, family-based associations indicating the presence of a predisposing locus, designated "IGAD1," in the proximal part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The recurrence risk of IgAD was found to depend on the sex of parents transmitting the defect: affected mothers were more likely to produce offspring with IgAD than were affected fathers. Carrier mothers but not carrier fathers transmitted IGAD1 alleles more frequently to the affected offspring than would be expected under random segregation. The differential parent-of-origin penetrance is proposed to reflect a maternal effect mediated by the production of anti-IgA antibodies tentatively linked to IGAD1. This is supported by higher frequency of anti-IgA-positive females transmitting the disorder to children, in comparison with female IgAD nontransmitters, and by linkage data in the former group. Such pathogenic mechanisms may be shared by other MHC-linked complex traits associated with the production of specific autoantibodies, parental effects, and a particular MHC haplotype. PMID:10090895

  13. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  14. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  15. Targeting antibodies to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Andrea L J; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Schüngel, Manuela; Dübel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of research consortia are now focused on generating antibodies and recombinant antibody fragments that target the human proteome. A particularly valuable application for these binding molecules would be their use inside a living cell, e.g., for imaging or functional intervention. Animal-derived antibodies must be brought into the cell through the membrane, whereas the availability of the antibody genes from phage display systems allows intracellular expression. Here, the various technologies to target intracellular proteins with antibodies are reviewed.

  16. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  17. Antibody Therapy for Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Hamilton, Andrew J.; Guimarães, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    The endemic human pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum is a major fungal pathogen with a broad variety of clinical presentations, ranging from mild, focal pulmonary disease to life-threatening systemic infections. Although azoles, such as itraconazole and voriconazole, and amphotericin B have significant activity against H. capsulatum, about 1 in 10 patients hospitalized due to histoplasmosis die. Hence, new approaches for managing disease are being sought. Over the past 10 years, studies have demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can modify the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Disease has been shown to be impacted by mAbs targeting either fungal cell surface proteins or host co-stimulatory molecules. This review will detail our current knowledge regarding the impact of antibody therapy on histoplasmosis. PMID:22347215

  18. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  19. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin. Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody epitopes from the sequence and/or the three-dimensional structure of a target protein. PMID:26424260

  20. Commercial antibodies and their validation

    PubMed Central

    Voskuil, JLA

    2014-01-01

    Despite an impressive growth in the business of research antibodies a general lack of trust in commercial antibodies remains in place. A variety of issues, each one potentially causing an antibody to fail, underpin the frustrations that scientists endure. Lots of money goes to waste in buying and trying one failing antibody after the other without realizing all the pitfalls that come with the product: Antibodies can get inactivated, both the biological material and the assay itself can potentially be flawed, a single antibody featuring in many different catalogues can be deemed as a set of different products, and a bad choice of antibody type, wrong dilutions, and lack of proper validation can all jeopardize the intended experiments. Antibodies endorsed by scientific research papers do not always meet the scientist’s requirements either due to flawed specifications, or due to batch-to-batch variations. Antibodies can be found with Quality Control data obtained from previous batches that no longer represent the batch on sale. In addition, one cannot assume that every antibody is fit for every application. The best chance of success is to try an antibody that already was confirmed to perform correctly in the required platform. PMID:25324967

  1. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  2. Engineering antibody affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Webster, D M; Roberts, S; Cheetham, J C; Griest, R; Rees, A R

    1988-01-01

    A combination of ab initio calculations, "knowledge-based prediction", molecular graphics and site-directed mutagenesis has enabled us to probe the molecular details of antibody:antigen recognition and binding and to alter the affinity and specificity of an antibody for its antigen. The significance of electrostatic hydrogen bonding, hydrophilic/hydrophobic patch matching and van der Waals interactions as well as CDR:CDR interactions are discussed in relation to the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments on the anti-lysozyme antibody Gloop2. The ability to generate reconstructed antibodies, chimeric antibodies, catalytic antibodies and the use of modelled antibodies for the design of drugs is discussed. PMID:3209295

  3. Engineering antibodies by yeast display.

    PubMed

    Boder, Eric T; Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Price, J Vincent

    2012-10-15

    Since its first application to antibody engineering 15 years ago, yeast display technology has been developed into a highly potent tool for both affinity maturing lead molecules and isolating novel antibodies and antibody-like species. Robust approaches to the creation of diversity, construction of yeast libraries, and library screening or selection have been elaborated, improving the quality of engineered molecules and certainty of success in an antibody engineering campaign and positioning yeast display as one of the premier antibody engineering technologies currently in use. Here, we summarize the history of antibody engineering by yeast surface display, approaches used in its application, and a number of examples highlighting the utility of this method for antibody engineering.

  4. QUANTITATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF IDIOTYPIC ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Daugharty, Harry; Hopper, John E.; MacDonald, A. Bruce; Nisonoff, Alfred

    1969-01-01

    Specifically purified anti-p-azobenzoate antibodies of the IgG class from individual rabbits were used to elicit anti-idiotypic antibodies in recipient rabbits. Allotypes of each donor and recipient were matched. When polymerized antibodies were used for immunization, more than 80% of the recipients responded with the formation of antibodies that precipitated the monomeric donor antibody. Percentages of precipitable molecules in the donor antibody population (D) varied from 4 to 56. As little as 4% was readily detectable by the Ouchterlony method or precipitin test. Specificity of the reaction was tested by double diffusion in agar gel against a panel of purified antibenzoate antibodies from 14 heterologous rabbits and, quantitatively, in three systems by measurement of the extent of coprecipitation of heterologous, radiolabeled antibenzoate antibodies. No cross-reactions were observed. Reactions were shown to be attributable to antibenzoate antibodies in the donor serum, and contributions of allotypic reactions were excluded. In three systems investigated quantitatively, and in one studied qualitatively, two recipients of the same donor antibody produced anti-antibody that reacted with essentially the same subfraction of the donor antibody population. The findings that only a portion of the D population is immunogenic, and that the same subfraction is frequently immunogenic in different recipients, suggest that the immunogenic population comprises a limited number of homogeneous groups of antibody molecules. This is supported by the small number of bands usually observed by the Ouchterlony technique. Quantitative methods of analysis should provide an approach to the study of cell populations producing antibodies of a particular idiotype. PMID:5347693

  5. Anti-DNA antibody mediated catalysis is isotype dependent.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Zhang, Qiuting; Cowburn, David; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus, and participate in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with multiple renal antigens. Previously, using a panel of murine anti-DNA IgGs that share identical variable regions but that differ in the constant regions, we demonstrated that the cross-reaction and renal pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. In this study, we investigated the catalytic potential of this anti-DNA antibody panel, and determined its isotype dependency. The three isotype switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) and the parent IgG3 PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies were compared in their catalysis of 500 base pair linear double stranded DNA and a 12-mer peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP), by gel analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to double stranded DNA and peptide antigens were assessed by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. We found that the PL9-11 antibody isotypes vary significantly in their potential to catalyze the cleavage of both linear and double stranded DNA and the proteolysis of peptides. The degree of the cleavage and proteolysis increases with the incubation temperature and time. While different PL9-11 isotypes have the same initial attack sites within the ALWPPNLHAWVP peptide, there was no correlation between binding affinity to the peptide and proteolysis rates. In conclusion, the catalytic properties of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. This finding provides further evidence that antibodies that share the same variable region, but which have different constant regions, are functionally distinct. The catalytic effects modulated by antibody constant regions need to be considered in the design of therapeutic antibodies (abzymes) and peptides designed to block pathogenic autoantibodies. PMID:26655427

  6. Anti-DNA antibody mediated catalysis is isotype dependent.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Zhang, Qiuting; Cowburn, David; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus, and participate in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with multiple renal antigens. Previously, using a panel of murine anti-DNA IgGs that share identical variable regions but that differ in the constant regions, we demonstrated that the cross-reaction and renal pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. In this study, we investigated the catalytic potential of this anti-DNA antibody panel, and determined its isotype dependency. The three isotype switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) and the parent IgG3 PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies were compared in their catalysis of 500 base pair linear double stranded DNA and a 12-mer peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP), by gel analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to double stranded DNA and peptide antigens were assessed by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. We found that the PL9-11 antibody isotypes vary significantly in their potential to catalyze the cleavage of both linear and double stranded DNA and the proteolysis of peptides. The degree of the cleavage and proteolysis increases with the incubation temperature and time. While different PL9-11 isotypes have the same initial attack sites within the ALWPPNLHAWVP peptide, there was no correlation between binding affinity to the peptide and proteolysis rates. In conclusion, the catalytic properties of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. This finding provides further evidence that antibodies that share the same variable region, but which have different constant regions, are functionally distinct. The catalytic effects modulated by antibody constant regions need to be considered in the design of therapeutic antibodies (abzymes) and peptides designed to block pathogenic autoantibodies.

  7. Autoimmune antibodies in chronic lymphatic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C M; Pegrum, G D

    1978-01-01

    In chronic lymphocytic leukaemia a factor in patients' serum enhances the in vitro viability of the abnormal cells and this has been identified as an antibody. The activity of this factor can be removed by interaction with anti-immunoglobulin and by ammonium sulphate precipitation with a degree of saturation in excess of 46%. Cohn fractionation and chromatography with A-50 Sephadex show that the factor is not a complex but an immunoglobulin. No activity is removed after reaction of sera with 2-mercapto-ethanol and di-thiothreitol. The evidence therefore suggests that a gamma-G immunoglobulin is involved. Concentrated washings from the leukaemic cells behave in exactly the same way as patients' sera and activity is retained in the same fraction during precipitation and purification procedure. The extensive cross-reactivity of the sera suggests a common chronic lymphatic leukaemic antibody and it is considered that an active autoimmune response may be an integral part of the disease.

  8. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R.; Buckley, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Method: Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody–positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. Results: Three distinct clinicoradiologic phenotypes were recognized: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Conclusion: Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease. PMID:25340058

  9. Antineurofilament and antiretinal antibodies in AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosberger, D F; Tshering, S L; Polsky, B; Heinemann, M H; Klein, R F; Cunningham-Rundles, S

    1994-01-01

    Sera obtained from AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis before and after treatment with foscarnet, AIDS patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) retinopathy, AIDS patients without retinal disease, and normal healthy controls with and without positive CMV serologies were assayed for the presence of antibodies against the 200-kDa outer, 160-kDa middle, and 68-kDa core subunits of the neurofilament triplet. Additional studies were performed to determine the presence of antibodies reactive with proteins extracted from crude human retinal antigen preparations. Antibodies against the 200-, 260-, and 68-kDa proteins of the neurofilament triplet were detected in 15 of 15 AIDS patients with CMV retinitis. The expression of these antibodies was unaffected, qualitatively, by successful treatment with foscarnet. In contrast, only 30% of patients with HIV retinopathy unrelated to CMV, fewer than 35% of AIDS patients with positive CMV titers but without evident retinitis, and fewer than 25% of healthy controls with positive or negative CMV titers possessed antibodies against any of the triplet proteins (P < 0.001). Antibodies against several clusters of retinal antigens were also identified in the sera of patients with CMV retinitis. In summary, the data indicate that retinal elements damaged by CMV infection induce an antibody response against the 200-, 160-, and 68kDa components of the neurofilament triplet as well as other, as yet undefined retinal antigens. Images PMID:8556483

  10. Clinical value of non-HLA antibodies in kidney transplantation: Still an enigma?

    PubMed

    Michielsen, Laura A; van Zuilen, Arjan D; Krebber, Merle M; Verhaar, Marianne C; Otten, Henny G

    2016-10-01

    HLA antibodies play a major role in the recipient's immune response against the renal allograft and are an established risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection and subsequent impaired graft survival. Evidence originating from HLA-identical donor-recipient pairs indicates that non-HLA antibodies may play a role as well. Numerous non-HLA antibodies have been identified in renal organ transplantation, directed against a heterogeneous subset of both allo- and autoantigens including MHC Class-I-related chain A (MICA) and Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms predisposing to non-HLA antibody formation, the possible synergy with HLA-antibodies in their pathologic potential and the mechanisms involved in allograft damage. Furthermore, an overview of the identified non-HLA antibodies and antigens and their relation with rejection and graft survival will be provided. PMID:27395083

  11. Antibodies to West Nile virus in wild and farmed crocodiles in southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; Padilla-Paz, Sergio E; Weber, Manuel; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa; Juarez-Ordaz, José Alfredo; Loroño-Pino, María Alba; Ulloa, Armando; Wang, Chong; Garcia-Rejon, Julián; Blitvich, Bradley J

    2013-07-01

    Surveillance for evidence of West Nile virus (WNV) infection in Morelet's crocodiles (Crocodylus moreletii) was conducted in Campeche State, Mexico, in 2007. Sera from 62 crocodiles (32 free-ranging and 30 captive) were assayed for antibodies to WNV by epitope-blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies to WNV were detected in 13 (41%) wild and nine (30%) captive crocodiles, and the overall antibody prevalence was 35%. Although evidence of WNV infection in captive crocodiles has been reported in Mexico, we provide the first evidence of WNV exposure in wild crocodiles in Mexico.

  12. Pregnancy affected by isoimmunisation caused by a unique haemolytic rhesus type antibody in a Somali woman.

    PubMed

    Madu, Anthony Emeka; Martin, W L

    2005-11-01

    Clinical suspicion and biochemical evidence of isoimmunisation in pregnancy have from contemporary times led to clinical curiousity and intervention at various stages of pregnancy for the sake of the fetus. Some of these interventions only found unnecessary after the causative antibodies have been properly identified and characterised. Hundreds of these antibodies were identified accidentally or by planned clinical and biochemical investigation. Here we present a unique case of isoimmunisation in pregnancy caused by a unique haemolytic antibody.

  13. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  14. Induction of antihemagglutinin antibodies by polyclonal antiidiotype antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dinca, L; Neuwirth, S; Schulman, J; Bona, C

    1993-01-01

    Antiidiotypic antibodies can be envisioned as an alternative approach in the development of vaccines against influenza virus, which exhibits natural antigenic variations. In our work, we obtained two polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies against PY102, VM113, and VM202 mAbs, which in turn are specific respectively for PR8 virus and laboratory-induced virus variants (PY102-V1 and VM113-V1). With these cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies, we were able to elicit anti-HA antibodies in mice. In comparing the anti-HA antibody response in animals injected with anti-Id antibodies to those immunized with PR8 influenza virus, we demonstrated that the HI titer was higher after virus immunization and that the PR8 virus boost was more efficient in this group. Our results showed that the polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies were more efficient than the individual anti-Ids at eliciting responses. At the same time, we demonstrated that PR8-primed T cells, cultured with B cells from animals immunized with anti-Id antibodies, were able to produce anti-PR8 antibodies subsequent to stimulation with influenza virus. PMID:8476510

  15. Induction of antihemagglutinin antibodies by polyclonal antiidiotype antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dinca, L; Neuwirth, S; Schulman, J; Bona, C

    1993-01-01

    Antiidiotypic antibodies can be envisioned as an alternative approach in the development of vaccines against influenza virus, which exhibits natural antigenic variations. In our work, we obtained two polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies against PY102, VM113, and VM202 mAbs, which in turn are specific respectively for PR8 virus and laboratory-induced virus variants (PY102-V1 and VM113-V1). With these cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies, we were able to elicit anti-HA antibodies in mice. In comparing the anti-HA antibody response in animals injected with anti-Id antibodies to those immunized with PR8 influenza virus, we demonstrated that the HI titer was higher after virus immunization and that the PR8 virus boost was more efficient in this group. Our results showed that the polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies were more efficient than the individual anti-Ids at eliciting responses. At the same time, we demonstrated that PR8-primed T cells, cultured with B cells from animals immunized with anti-Id antibodies, were able to produce anti-PR8 antibodies subsequent to stimulation with influenza virus.

  16. Antibody Glossary —

    Cancer.gov

    The components of the immune system have diverse roles in the initial development of cancers, progression of early-stage malignancies to invasive tumors, establishment of metastatic lesions, tumor dormancy, and response or resistance to therapy. Characterizing the components of the immune system and their functional status in tissues and in tumors requires the use of highly specific reagents. Researchers employ antibodies in a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications to delineate, enrich, or deplete specific immune subsets in order to understand their role(s) in tumorigenesis. This is a glossary of validated reagents and protocols that are useful for functional phenotyping of the immune system in murine cancer models.

  17. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The physicochemical and biological properties of purified guinea-pig reaginic antibody were studied. It is a labile protein different to γ1. Its antibody activity is completely destroyed by heating at 56° for 6 hours and by treatment with mercaptoethanol. The capacity to give PCA is decreased by repeated freezing and thawing. It is a bivalent antibody, haemagglutinating, does not fix complement and is capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA reaction after a latent period of a week but not after 3 hours. Reaginic antibody appears on day 7–8 after the first inoculation and the higher levels (PCA reaction) are obtained at the eleventh to thirteenth days. After the fifteenth to seventeenth days the PCA is negative. The reaginic antibody does not pass the placenta. Higher levels of reaginic antibody were obtained when the guinea-pigs were inoculated with the antigen in saline with simultaneous inoculation, intraperitoneally, of killed Bordetella pertussis, phase I. PMID:4354828

  18. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:20954327

  19. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

  20. Antiphospholipid antibodies: Paradigm in transition

    PubMed Central

    Horstman, Lawrence L; Jy, Wenche; Bidot, Carlos J; Ahn, Yeon S; Kelley, Roger E; Zivadinov, Robert; Maghzi, Amir H; Etemadifar, Masoud; Mousavi, Seyed Ali; Minagar, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This is a critical review of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL). Most prior reviews focus on the aPL syndrome (APS), a thrombotic condition often marked by neurological disturbance. We bring to attention recent evidence that aPL may be equally relevant to non-thrombotic autoimmune conditions, notably, multiple sclerosis and ITP. Organization After a brief history, the recent proliferation of aPL target antigens is reviewed. The implication is that many more exist. Theories of aPL in thrombosis are then reviewed, concluding that all have merit but that aPL may have more diverse pathological consequences than now recognized. Next, conflicting results are explained by methodological differences. The lupus anticoagulant (LA) is then discussed. LA is the best predictor of thrombosis, but why this is true is not settled. Finally, aPL in non-thrombotic disorders is reviewed. Conclusion The current paradigm of aPL holds that they are important in thrombosis, but they may have much wider clinical significance, possibly of special interest in neurology. PMID:19154576

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  2. A solid phase antibody screen.

    PubMed

    Plapp, F V; Sinor, L T; Rachel, J M; Beck, M L; Coenen, W M; Bayer, W L

    1984-12-01

    An automated solid phase antibody screen (SPAS) in microplates has been developed. Red blood cell (RBC) adherence was used as the end point instead of agglutination. Consequently, positive and negative reactions were readily distinguished by a microplate spectrophotometer. The SPAS performed as well as conventional antiglobulin methods for detecting IgG antibodies in donor sera and had increased sensitivity as determined by serial dilutions of antibodies.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Miraldi, F

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.

  5. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  6. Orthopoxvirus antibodies in grey squirrels (Sciurus aureogaster) in Mexico City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Duque, Paola; Avila-Flores, Rafael; Emerson, Ginny L; Carroll, Darin S; Suzán, Gerardo; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia F

    2014-07-01

    Serum from Mexican grey squirrels (Sciurus aureogaster) from Mexico City reacted to Orthopoxvirus by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Real-time PCR based on oral swabs and scabs did not detect viral DNA. Antibody prevalence was 30% (n=366), providing the first evidence of Orthopoxvirus antibodies in Mexican wild rodents. PMID:24807351

  7. Creating Ordered Antibody Arrays with Antibody-Polymer Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuehui; Obermeyer, Allie; Olsen, Bradley

    Antibodies are a category of functional proteins that play crucial roles in the immune system and have been widely applied in the area of cancer therapeutics, targeting delivery, signal detection, and sensors. Due to the extremely large size and lack of specific functional groups on the surface, it is challenging to functionalize antibodies and manipulate the ordered packing of antibodies in an array with high density and proper orientation, which is critical to achieve outstanding performance in materials. In this work, we demonstrate an efficient and facile approach for preparing antibody-polymer conjugates with two-step sequential ``click'' reaction to form antibody-polymer block copolymers. Highly ordered nanostructures are fabricated based on the principles of block copolymer self-assembly. The nanostructures are studied with both small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lamellae with alternating antibody domain and polymer domain are observed with an overall domain size of ~50 nm. The nanostructure not only increases the packing density and promotes proper orientation of the antibody, but also provides possible channel to facilitate substrate transportation and improves the stability of the antibody.

  8. Three sensitive assays do not provide evidence for circulating HuD-specific T cells in the blood of patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes with anti-Hu antibodies

    PubMed Central

    de Jongste, Adriaan H.C.; de Graaf, Marieke T.; Martinuzzi, Emanuela; van den Broek, Patricia D.M.; Kraan, Jaco; Lamers, Cor H.J.; Mallone, Roberto; Gratama, Jan W.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Anti-Hu antibody–associated paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (Hu-PNSs) are severe and often precede the detection of a malignancy, usually small-cell lung cancer. In Hu-PNS, it is hypothesized that neuronal cells are destroyed by T cells targeted against HuD, a protein expressed by small-cell lung cancer cells and neurons. There is only limited evidence for the existence of HuD-specific T cells. To detect these T cells in the blood of Hu-PNS patients, we employed 3 highly sensitive assays that included T cell stimulation with dendritic cells (DCs) to specifically expand the number of any HuD-specific T cells. A total of 17 Hu-PNS patients were tested with 1 or more of the following 3 assays: (1) tetramer staining after stimulation of T cells with conventionally generated DCs (n = 9), (2) interleukin (IL)-13 enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot; n = 3), IL-4 and IL-5 and interferon (IFN)–γ multiplex cytokine bead array (n = 2) to assay cytokine production by T cells after stimulation with conventionally generated DCs, and (iii) IFN-γ ELISpot and tetramer staining after T cell stimulation with accelerated co-cultured DCs (n = 11). No circulating HuD-specific T cells were found. We suggest that either autoaggressive T cells in Hu-PNS are not targeted against HuD or that their numbers in the blood are too low for detection by highly sensitive techniques. PMID:22591661

  9. Immunological effects of the anti-programmed death-1 antibody on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Nonomura, Chizu; Kondou, Ryota; Miyata, Haruo; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Maeda, Chie; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint antibody-mediated blockade has gained attention as a new cancer immunotherapy strategy. Accumulating evidence suggests that this therapy imparts a survival benefit to metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer patients. A substantial amount of data on immune checkpoint antibodies has been collected from clinical trials; however, the direct effect of the antibodies on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has not been exclusively investigated. In this study, we developed an anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibody (with biosimilarity to nivolumab) and examined the effects of the antibody on PBMCs derived from cancer patients. Specifically, we investigated the effects of the anti-PD-1 antibody on proliferation, cytokine production, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and regulatory T cells. These investigations yielded several important results. First, the anti-PD-1 antibody had no obvious effect on resting PBMCs; however, high levels of the anti-PD-1 antibody partly stimulated PBMC proliferation when accompanied by an anti-CD3 antibody. Second, the anti-PD-1 antibody restored the growth inhibition of anti-CD3 Ab-stimulated PBMCs mediated by PD-L1. Third, the anti-PD-1 antibody exhibited a moderate inhibitory effect on the induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) by anti-CD3 antibody stimulation. Additionally, the presence of the anti-PD-1 antibody promoted antigen-specific CTL induction, which suggests that combining anti-PD-1 antibody and conventional immunotherapy treatments may have beneficial effects. These results indicate that specific cellular immunological mechanisms are partly responsible for the antitumor effect exhibited by the anti-PD-1 antibody against advanced cancers in clinical trials. PMID:27573705

  10. Central nervous system immunity in mice infected with theiler's virus. I. Local neutralizing antibody response.

    PubMed

    Lipton, H L; Gonzalez-Scarano, F

    1978-02-01

    Experimental Theiler's mouse encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection in mice is atypical of most other picornavirus infections because virus persists in the host. It was shown previously that low levels of infectious virus are readily detectable in the central nervous system (CNS) despite the presence of substantial titers of serum neutralizing antibody. In this study antibody assays were performed on CNS tissue homogenates, and neutralizing antibody was regularly found in the CNS of TMEV-infected mice. That neutralization by infected CNS extracts was due to antibody was demonstrated by the specificity of neutralization for TMEV and by elimination or marked reduction of neutralization by in vitro treatment with goat antiserum to mouse IgG. In addition, immunofluorescent staining consistently revealed IgG- but not IgM-containing cells in perivascular cuffs and parenchymal lesions of the brains of infected animals. Evidence of local antibody formation in the CNS was found in the actual reversal of the serum-CNS antibody ratio in about one-third of infected mice after three weeks. In contrast, normal mice had a mean serum-CNS antibody ratio of approximately 100:1 after passive transfer of antibody. Possible reasons for the fact that TMEV is not neutralized by antibody and chronic infection is not aborted include the formation of complexes of infectious virus and antibody in the CNS and the production of antibodies with low affinity for TMEV.

  11. Antibodies: Protective, destructive and regulatory role

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, F.; Abeyounis, C.J.; Albini, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers under 10 subject headings. The headings are: Production and Function of Antibodies, Protective Role of Antibodies, Antibodies to Foreign and Neoplastic Cells, Autoantibodies, Regulatory Mechanisms, Allergy, Immune Complexes, Antibodies in Pregnancy and Aging, Administration of Antibodies for Prevention and Therapy, and Abstracts of Poster Presentations.

  12. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs you take. ANA testing can produce a “false positive.” This typically signals the presence of antinuclear ... keep looking. In fact, you may have a “false positive” ANA, which means that the evidence is ...

  13. Production of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Freysd'ottir, J

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced by "hybridoma technology" by George Köhler and Cesar Milstein in 1975 has had a great impact both on basic biological research and on clinical medicine. However, this impact was not immediately recognized. It took around 10 years to appreciate the importance of using these mAbs in various fields of science other than immunology, such as cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, para-sitology, physiology, genetics, and molecular biology; and also in areas of clinical medicine, such as pathology, hematology, oncology, and infectious disease. The contribution of mAbs to science and clinical medicine was recognized in 1984 by the award of the Nobel Prize for Medicine to Köhler and Milstein.

  14. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Jacobson, K. Bruce; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  15. Radiolabeled antibodies in gynecologic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.G.; Perkins, A.C.; Symonds, E.M.; Wastie, M.L.; Pimm, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been raised against an osteogenic sarcoma cell line and radiolabeled with iodine-131. The antibody was administered to 12 patients with suspected ovarian tumors, two with recurrent carcinoma of the cervix and one with carcinoma of the body of the uterus. Each patient received an intravenous dose of 70 MBq I-131-labeled antibody and was imaged either 24 or 48 hours later. Image enhancement was achieved by subtraction of background activity using Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells and pertechnetate. In eleven patients with ovarian malignancies antibody uptake was detected at the suspected tumor sites, and agreed with the operative findings in the eight patients who subsequently underwent surgery. The patient in whom the antibody failed to localize was found to have a benign lesion. Uptake of antibody was seen at the tumor sites in the patients with carcinoma of the cervix and body of the uterus. The localization of tumor sites using I-131-labeled antibodies is difficult due to background activity, particularly from radioiodine in the bladder. In only five cases could the abnormal antibody concentration be identified on the iodine images alone. This problem was overcome by the use of background subtraction techniques. Immunoscintigraphy is proving useful for the assessment of tumor recurrence and as an aid to radiotherapy treatment planning.

  16. New engineered antibodies against prions

    PubMed Central

    Škrlj, Nives; Dolinar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A number of recently developed and approved therapeutic agents based on highly specific and potent antibodies have shown the potential of antibody therapy. As the next step, antibody-based therapeutics will be bioengineered in a way that they not only bind pathogenic targets but also address other issues, including drug targeting and delivery. For antibodies that are expected to act within brain tissue, like those that are directed against the pathogenic prion protein isoform, one of the major obstacles is the blood-brain barrier which prevents efficient transfer of the antibody, even of the engineered single-chain variants. We recently demonstrated that a specific prion-specific antibody construct which was injected into the murine tail vein can be efficiently transported into brain tissue. The novelty of the work was in that the cell penetrating peptide was used as a linker connecting both specificity-determining domains of the antibody peptide, thus eliminating the need for the standard flexible linker, composed of an arrangement of three consecutive (Gly4Ser) repeats. This paves the road toward improved bioengineered antibody variants that target brain antigens. PMID:23941991

  17. The anti-DNA antibody: origin and impact, dogmas and controversies.

    PubMed

    Rekvig, Ole P

    2015-09-01

    The inclusion of 'the anti-DNA antibody' by the ACR and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) as a criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus does not convey the diverse origins of these antibodies, whether their production is transient or persistent (which is heavily influenced by the nature of the inducing antigens), the specificities exerted by these antibodies or their clinical impact-or lack thereof. A substantial amount of data not considered in clinical medicine could be added from basic immunology evidence, which could change the paradigms linked to what 'the anti-DNA antibody' is, in a pathogenic, classification or diagnostic context.

  18. Properties of protective malarial antibody

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S.; Butcher, G. A.

    1970-01-01

    Properties of protective malarial antibody have been studied in cultures of P. knowlesi giving average parasite multiplication rates of sixfold in 24 hours. Parasite growth was assessed by incorporation of [3H]-leucine into protein. Immune serum has little effect upon the growth of intracellular parasites, but prevents reinvasion of red cells and inhibits the succeeding cycle of parasite development. Protective antibody is present in relatively low titre in immune sera even after long immunization and this may explain certain characteristic features of malarial immunity. Protective antibody in the sera studied is associated with IgG and IgM; its action is not complement dependent, but requires at least two combining sites per molecule. Anti-malarial antibody has several features in common with viral neutralizing antibody. PMID:4990404

  19. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  20. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed.

  1. QUANTITATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF IDIOTYPIC ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Brient, Bruce W.; Nisonoff, Alfred

    1970-01-01

    Rabbit anti-idiotypic antibodies were prepared by injection of specifically purified anti-p-azobenzoate antibodies (D) from individual donor rabbits. Benzoate derivatives were found to be strong inhibitors of the reactions of D with anti-D antisera. There was a close correlation between the combining affinities of the benzoate derivatives used and their effectiveness as inhibitors. Compounds tested that are chemically unrelated to benzoate were ineffective. The results indicate either that the combining site of anti-benzoate antibody is part of an important idiotypic determinant, which is sterically blocked by hapten, or that the hapten induces a conformational change which alters idiotypic determinants not involving the active site. Such conformational changes, if they occur, must be restricted since hapten has little effect on the reactions of F(ab')2 fragments of anti-benzoate antibodies with antisera directed to rabbit fragment Fab and no detectable effect on reactions with antibodies directed to allotypic determinants. PMID:4097134

  2. B cells mediate chronic allograft rejection independently of antibody production.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Ng, Yue-Harn; Singh, Tripti; Jiang, Ke; Sheriff, Khaleefathullah A; Ippolito, Renee; Zahalka, Salwa; Li, Qi; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Ramaswami, Balathiripurasundari; Lund, Frances E; Chalasani, Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Chronic rejection is the primary cause of long-term failure of transplanted organs and is often viewed as an antibody-dependent process. Chronic rejection, however, is also observed in mice and humans with no detectable circulating alloantibodies, suggesting that antibody-independent pathways may also contribute to pathogenesis of transplant rejection. Here, we have provided direct evidence that chronic rejection of vascularized heart allografts occurs in the complete absence of antibodies, but requires the presence of B cells. Mice that were deficient for antibodies but not B cells experienced the same chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which is a pathognomonic feature of chronic rejection, as WT mice; however, mice that were deficient for both B cells and antibodies were protected from CAV. B cells contributed to CAV by supporting splenic lymphoid architecture, T cell cytokine production, and infiltration of T cells into graft vessels. In chimeric mice, in which B cells were present but could not present antigen, both T cell responses and CAV were markedly reduced. These findings establish that chronic rejection can occur in the complete absence of antibodies and that B cells contribute to this process by supporting T cell responses through antigen presentation and maintenance of lymphoid architecture.

  3. Antibody responses to Bordetella bronchiseptica in vaccinated and infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Ellis, John; Rhodes, Carrie; Lacoste, Stacey; Krakowka, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb) whole cell bacterins have been replaced with acelluar vaccines. We evaluated the response to the acellular Bb vaccines in Bb-seropositive commingled laboratory beagles and client-owned dogs with various lifestyles and vaccination histories. A single parenteral dose of the acellular Bb vaccine resulted in consistent anamnestic IgG, and to a lesser, but notable extent, IgA, Bb-reactive antibody responses in the seropositive beagles. Associated with the increase in antibodies measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was an increase in the complement (C)-dependent IgG antibody mediated bactericidal effect on Bb in vitro. Antibody responses in client-owned dogs were more variable and were dependent upon the vaccination history and serological evidence of previous Bb exposure. Antibodies from vaccinated dogs recognized several Bb proteins, notably P68 (pertactin) and P220 (fimbrial hemagglutinin), the response to which has been shown to be disease-sparing in Bp infections. These antibody responses were similar to those in experimentally infected dogs and in dogs that had received a widely used whole cell bacterin.

  4. Antibody responses to Bordetella bronchiseptica in vaccinated and infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Ellis, John; Rhodes, Carrie; Lacoste, Stacey; Krakowka, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb) whole cell bacterins have been replaced with acelluar vaccines. We evaluated the response to the acellular Bb vaccines in Bb-seropositive commingled laboratory beagles and client-owned dogs with various lifestyles and vaccination histories. A single parenteral dose of the acellular Bb vaccine resulted in consistent anamnestic IgG, and to a lesser, but notable extent, IgA, Bb-reactive antibody responses in the seropositive beagles. Associated with the increase in antibodies measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was an increase in the complement (C)-dependent IgG antibody mediated bactericidal effect on Bb in vitro. Antibody responses in client-owned dogs were more variable and were dependent upon the vaccination history and serological evidence of previous Bb exposure. Antibodies from vaccinated dogs recognized several Bb proteins, notably P68 (pertactin) and P220 (fimbrial hemagglutinin), the response to which has been shown to be disease-sparing in Bp infections. These antibody responses were similar to those in experimentally infected dogs and in dogs that had received a widely used whole cell bacterin. PMID:25183893

  5. Suppression of reagin synthesis in rabbits by passively administered antibody

    PubMed Central

    Strannegård, Ö.; Belin, L.

    1970-01-01

    The formation of rabbit antibodies, capable of sensitizing homologous skin, (reagins), was completely inhibited by passive administration of serum containing large quantities of 7S antibody 24 hours before or after antigen injection. No evident effect on reagin formation was noted when passive antibody was administered 8 days after antigen injection although some suppression of agglutinating antibody synthesis was observed. In rabbits not treated with passive antibody the injection of haemocyanin resulted in the formation of reagins reaching maximum serum concentrations 1 and 3 weeks following antigen injection. Both the `early' and `late' reagins persisted for a long time in the skin of injected rabbits, they appeared to have similar molecular size and both were devoid of PCA activity when injected into decomplemented rabbits. There was some indication that the `early' reagins may be more heat-labile than the `late' ones. A secondary reagin response was obtained in several animals which had shown a primary reagin response, but not in rabbits with inhibited primary response. The reagins formed in response to secondary antigen stimulation disappeared rapidly from the circulation, simultaneously with the rise in agglutinating antibody titres. The possible implications of the findings for the immunological treatment of allergic disorders is discussed. PMID:5420728

  6. RosettaAntibody: antibody variable region homology modeling server.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Aroop; Kim, Eric T; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2009-07-01

    The RosettaAntibody server (http://antibody.graylab.jhu.edu) predicts the structure of an antibody variable region given the amino-acid sequences of the respective light and heavy chains. In an initial stage, the server identifies and displays the most sequence homologous template structures for the light and heavy framework regions and each of the complementarity determining region (CDR) loops. Subsequently, the most homologous templates are assembled into a side-chain optimized crude model, and the server returns a picture and coordinate file. For users requesting a high-resolution model, the server executes the full RosettaAntibody protocol which additionally models the hyper-variable CDR H3 loop. The high-resolution protocol also relieves steric clashes by optimizing the CDR backbone torsion angles and by simultaneously perturbing the relative orientation of the light and heavy chains. RosettaAntibody generates 2000 independent structures, and the server returns pictures, coordinate files, and detailed scoring information for the 10 top-scoring models. The 10 models enable users to use rational judgment in choosing the best model or to use the set as an ensemble for further studies such as docking. The high-resolution models generated by RosettaAntibody have been used for the successful prediction of antibody-antigen complex structures.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    EBV antibody test; EBV serology ... a lab, where a lab specialist looks for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. In the first stages of an illness, little antibody may be detected. For this reason, the test ...

  8. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  9. Circulating Candida antigens and antibodies: useful markers of candidemia.

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, J; Maroto, C; Piédrola, G; Martín, E; Perez, J A

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the utility of the 48-kDa antigen from Candida albicans in its commercial form (Directigen; Becton Dickinson) and three other serodiagnostic methods (detection of one antigen by Pastorex Candida [Sanofi Diagnostics Pasteur] and detection of immunoglobulin G [IgG] and IgM antibodies to C. albicans blastoconidia [bioMerieux]) for diagnosis of invasive Candida infection, we conducted a prospective clinical trial among 10 patients with candidemia (group 1), 30 patients colonized by C. albicans (group 2), 20 patients with bacteremia (group 3), and 20 subjects without clinical or microbiological evidence of infection. The Directigen system was positive for at least one serum sample each from eight patients in group 1. In groups 2, 3, and 4, it was positive for only three patients. There was no reaction to the Pastorex system in any of the patients infected with or colonized by C. albicans or in the non-Candida-carrying controls. The IgG antibody concentration oscillated between 100 and 800 (mean, 510 +/- 268) IU/ml for the patients in group 1. In this group, eight patients had IgG antibody levels of > 400 IU/ml. The percentages of persons with IgG antibody levels of > 400 IU/ml in groups 2, 3, and 4 were 43.3, 0, and 0, respectively. Specific IgM antibody was present in all group 1 patients but not in those in groups 2, 3, and 4. The sensitivity and specificity of the Directigen test were 65 and 97.1%, respectively. For the Pastorex test, the sensitivity was 0%. The sensitivity of IgG antibodies was 80%, with a specificity of 81.4%, while the IgM antibodies were 100% specific and sensitive. Both the positive and negative predictive values of specific IgM antibodies appeared to be superior to those of the other three tests. PMID:8408589

  10. Antibodies elicited by pneumococcal antigens bear an anti-DNA--associated idiotype.

    PubMed Central

    Grayzel, A; Solomon, A; Aranow, C; Diamond, B

    1991-01-01

    There is evidence in both murine and human lupus that the production of anti-DNA antibodies may be triggered by environmental antigens. To explore this further, we studied the serum of 10 nonautoimmune individuals immunized with a polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. All 10 patients showed a rise in the titer of antipneumococcal antibodies bearing an anti-DNA-associated idiotype. The antipneumococcal response was specific as no idiotypic antitetanus antibodies were detected. Furthermore, no anti-DNA antibodies were present in postvaccination sera. The molecular analysis of antipneumococcal and anti-DNA antibodies bearing a common idiotype will help elucidate how foreign antigen might lead to the production of anti-DNA antibodies in susceptible individuals. PMID:1999497

  11. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  12. QUANTITATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF IDIOTYPIC ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Kuettner, Mirta Goffan; Wang, Ai-Lan; Nisonoff, Alfred

    1972-01-01

    Antisera were prepared in rabbits against anti-p-azobenzoate antibodies of an A/J and a BALB/c mouse and anti-p-azophenylarsonate antibodies of an A/J mouse. After appropriate absorption the antisera reacted with the anti-hapten antibody of the donor mouse but, by sensitive quantitative tests, not at all with other components of the hyperimmune serum or with preimmune serum of the donor mouse. The absorbed antiserum therefore appeared to be specific for idiotypic determinants. Nearly all idiotypic specificities identified in the serum of the donor were also present in the serum of other mice of the same strain, immunized against the same hapten group, but not in mice immunized with a different hapten. In each case the antibodies of the donor mouse reacted most effectively on a weight basis with antiidiotypic antiserum. Cross-reactions were observed among different strains of mice but homologous anti-bodies reacted most effectively with antiidiotypic antisera. C57/BL and DBA antisera contained very low concentrations of specificities present in the A/J and BALB/c antibody populations; antibodies of A/J and BALB/c antisera are more closely related to one another. The results indicate that idiotypic specificity may provide a genetic marker for the variable regions of immunoglobulin polypeptide chains. PMID:4110016

  13. Antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex and the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sciascia, S; Bertolaccini, M L

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies to prothrombin can be detected by ELISA using prothrombin coated onto irradiated plates (aPT) or the phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex as antigen (aPS/PT) and they have been both related with the clinical manifestation of APS. Current evidence supports the concept that they belong to distinct populations of autoantibodies. Nevertheless, they can both be detected simultaneously in one patient. This mini-review will focus on data available on aPS/PT antibodies and their clinical utility in the diagnosis of APS. PMID:25228735

  14. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants

    PubMed Central

    Hehle, Verena K.; Paul, Matthew J.; Roberts, Victoria A.; van Dolleweerd, Craig J.; Ma, Julian K.-C.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformed Nicotiana tabacum. Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy’s 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently in N. tabacum and demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.—Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. PMID:26712217

  15. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J; Roberts, Victoria A; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformedNicotiana tabacum Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy's 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently inN. tabacumand demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.-Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. PMID:26712217

  16. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  17. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼ 70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion.

  18. Reducing heterophilic antibody interference in immunoassays using single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Tan, Ruimin; Fischer, Christopher J.; Victry, Kristin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2011-12-15

    Sandwich ELISA microarrays have the potential to simultaneously quantify the levels of multiple diagnostic targets in a biological sample. However, as seen with traditional ELISA diagnostics, heterophilic antibodies (HA) in patient sera have the potential to cause interference in these assays. We demonstrate here that reducing the diagnostic capture antibody to its minimal functional unit, the variable heavy and light domains artificially connected with a short polypeptide linker (scFv), is an effective strategy for reducing the HA assay interference.

  19. Heterophile antibodies in human transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, F. T.; Kano, K.; Milgrom, F.

    1968-01-01

    Sensitization of human recipients with transplantation antigens (leucocytes, skin, or kidney allografts) has resulted in the appearance of serum hemagglutinins directed against sheep, guinea pig, and rat erythrocytes. Such hemagglutinins have been identified as IgG and IgM antibodies. Their appearance was not related to AB0 erythrocyte group incompatibility between donors and recipients, and the antibodies were not of the Forssman or Paul-Bunnel type. The antibody responses appeared to be primarily directed against antigen(s) present on rat erythrocytes, but shared to varying extents by other species. The peak antibody titers occurred in association with allograft rejection. In this regard, they may be of interest as a possible early warning system for the diagnosis and prompt management of rejection crises in clinical organ transplantation. Images PMID:4866325

  20. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  1. Antiphospholipid antibodies and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rollino, C; Boero, R; Elia, F; Montaruli, B; Massara, C; Beltrame, G; Ferro, M; Quattrocchio, G; Quarello, F

    2004-01-01

    Hypertension is a common manifestation of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) have been described in patients with hypertension secondary to renal artery stenosis (RAS). Twenty-six patients with RAS and 25 patients with severe essential hypertension (diastolic blood pressure > 110 mmHg or > or = 3 hypertensive drugs) were studied and compared to 61 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Serum samples were tested for lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin (aCL) IgG and IgM, antiprothrombin (aPT) IgG and IgM, anti-beta2glycoprotein 1 (abeta2GP1) IgG and IgM. aPL were negative in all patients with RAS. Two patients with essential hypertension had positive aPL (8%) (LA in one patient confirmed in a second assay and abeta2GP1-IgG in the other patient confirmed one year later together with aCL IgG positivity). Among healthy subjects, one case (1.6%) was found to be positive for LA, aCL IgM, abeta2GP1 IgM, aPT IgG, aPT IgM. In conclusion, the association between RAS and aPL seems to be casual rather than an expression of an elective thrombotic localization ofAPS. The positive finding of aPL in 8% of patients with essential hypertension, a frequency higher than that of the control population, deserves further studies in larger series to better explore the relationship between aPL and hypertension. PMID:15540508

  2. Characterization and pathological significance of monoclonal DNA-binding antibodies from mice with experimental malaria infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, C M; Collins, I; Belcher, A J; Manuelpillai, N; Wozencraft, A O; Staines, N A

    1994-01-01

    Malaria infection is accompanied by the production of a number of autoantibodies, including some that react with DNA. Epidemiological evidence implicates these in the nephritides that arise in human quartan malaria and in experimental malaria infections in mice. Through parallels with the involvement of DNA-reactive antibodies in the autoimmune syndrome systemic lupus erythematosus, a role for DNA-reactive antibodies in forming phlogistic immune deposits in the kidneys is implied. To more fully understand the relationship between antibodies of this specificity made in malaria and systemic lupus erythematosus, we prepared monoclonal DNA-reactive antibodies from BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei (clone RC) and compared their properties with those of other antibodies previously isolated from lupous MRL/Mp lpr/lpr and (NZB x NZW)F1 mice. Antibodies from malarial mice were all immunoglobulin M class and bound to single-stranded but not double-stranded DNA in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. They also reacted with synthetic polyribonucleotides in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and with parasitized erythrocytes and parasite pigment in kidney sections. None of the antibodies from lupous mice had identical specificities. The potential involvement of the DNA-reactive antibodies in malarial nephritis was demonstrated, by use of immunocytochemical methods, on the basis of their binding to existing immune deposits in kidney sections from malarial mice, a similar property having been previously demonstrated for antibodies from lupous mice. Furthermore, antibodies from malarial mice expressed public idiotypes, notably Id.V-88, which is a member of the Id.16/6 family, commonly found on DNA-reactive antibodies in lupus and other infectious and connective tissue diseases. This study indicates that DNA-reactive antibodies in malaria have immunochemical properties similar but not identical to those of such antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and that they

  3. Novel antibody-antibiotic conjugate eliminates intracellular S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Lehar, Sophie M; Pillow, Thomas; Xu, Min; Staben, Leanna; Kajihara, Kimberly K; Vandlen, Richard; DePalatis, Laura; Raab, Helga; Hazenbos, Wouter L; Morisaki, J Hiroshi; Kim, Janice; Park, Summer; Darwish, Martine; Lee, Byoung-Chul; Hernandez, Hilda; Loyet, Kelly M; Lupardus, Patrick; Fong, Rina; Yan, Donghong; Chalouni, Cecile; Luis, Elizabeth; Khalfin, Yana; Plise, Emile; Cheong, Jonathan; Lyssikatos, Joseph P; Strandh, Magnus; Koefoed, Klaus; Andersen, Peter S; Flygare, John A; Wah Tan, Man; Brown, Eric J; Mariathasan, Sanjeev

    2015-11-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is considered to be an extracellular pathogen. However, survival of S. aureus within host cells may provide a reservoir relatively protected from antibiotics, thus enabling long-term colonization of the host and explaining clinical failures and relapses after antibiotic therapy. Here we confirm that intracellular reservoirs of S. aureus in mice comprise a virulent subset of bacteria that can establish infection even in the presence of vancomycin, and we introduce a novel therapeutic that effectively kills intracellular S. aureus. This antibody-antibiotic conjugate consists of an anti-S. aureus antibody conjugated to a highly efficacious antibiotic that is activated only after it is released in the proteolytic environment of the phagolysosome. The antibody-antibiotic conjugate is superior to vancomycin for treatment of bacteraemia and provides direct evidence that intracellular S. aureus represents an important component of invasive infections. PMID:26536114

  4. Antibodies to watch in 2015.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 7 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, blinatumomab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other 'antibodies to watch' are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are 'antibodies to watch' in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively.

  5. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents. PMID:17530025

  6. Antibodies to watch in 2014.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  7. Antibodies to watch in 2015.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 7 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, blinatumomab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other 'antibodies to watch' are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are 'antibodies to watch' in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  8. Antibodies to watch in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry’s progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the “Antibodies to watch” series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration’s Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  9. Natural monoclonal antibodies and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Peter H; Brändlein, Stephanie

    2008-06-01

    Immunity is responsible for recognition and elimination of infectious particles and for removal of cellular waste, modified self structures and transformed cells. Innate or natural immunity acts as a first line defense and is also the link to acquired immunity and memory. By using the human hybridoma technology, a series of monoclonal antibodies and several new tumor-specific targets could be identified. A striking phenomenon of immunity against malignant cells is that all so far isolated tumor-specific antibodies were germ-line coded natural IgM antibodies. And neither in animals nor in humans affinity-maturated tumor-specific IgG antibodies have been detected so far. These IgM's preferentially bind to carbohydrate epitopes on post-transcriptionally modified surface receptors, which are recently patented and preferentially remove malignant cells by inducing apoptosis to avoid inflammatory processes. Our "biology-" or "function-driven" method represents a unique yet powerful approach compared to the typical approaches on screening compounds or antibodies against non-validated targets (mostly differentially expressed). Moreover, the approach creates a competitive patenting strategy of creating proprietary antibodies and validated targets at the same time, which has the potential of further streamlining the discovery of new cancer therapies. PMID:18537750

  10. Computer-aided antibody design

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Daisuke; Shirai, Hiroki; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical trials using antibodies with low toxicity and high efficiency have raised expectations for the development of next-generation protein therapeutics. However, the process of obtaining therapeutic antibodies remains time consuming and empirical. This review summarizes recent progresses in the field of computer-aided antibody development mainly focusing on antibody modeling, which is divided essentially into two parts: (i) modeling the antigen-binding site, also called the complementarity determining regions (CDRs), and (ii) predicting the relative orientations of the variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) chains. Among the six CDR loops, the greatest challenge is predicting the conformation of CDR-H3, which is the most important in antigen recognition. Further computational methods could be used in drug development based on crystal structures or homology models, including antibody–antigen dockings and energy calculations with approximate potential functions. These methods should guide experimental studies to improve the affinities and physicochemical properties of antibodies. Finally, several successful examples of in silico structure-based antibody designs are reviewed. We also briefly review structure-based antigen or immunogen design, with application to rational vaccine development. PMID:22661385

  11. Antibodies to watch in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 6 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other ‘antibodies to watch’ are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are ‘antibodies to watch’ in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  12. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David Sherman

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  13. Antibody therapeutics - the evolving patent landscape.

    PubMed

    Petering, Jenny; McManamny, Patrick; Honeyman, Jane

    2011-09-01

    The antibody patent landscape has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years, particularly in areas of technology relating to antibody modification to reduce immunogenicity in humans or improve antibody function. In some cases antibody techniques that were developed in the 1980s are still the subject of patent protection in the United States or Canada.

  14. Alternative downstream processes for production of antibodies and antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ejima, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    Protein-A or Protein-L affinity chromatography and virus inactivation are key processes for the manufacturing of therapeutic antibodies and antibody fragments. These two processes often involve exposure of therapeutic proteins to denaturing low pH conditions. Antibodies have been shown to undergo conformational changes at low pH, which can lead to irreversible damages on the final product. Here, we review alternative downstream approaches that can reduce the degree of low pH exposure and consequently damaged product. We and others have been developing technologies that minimize or eliminate such low pH processes. We here cover facilitated elution of antibodies using arginine in Protein-A and Protein-G affinity chromatography, a more positively charged amidated Protein-A, two Protein-A mimetics (MEP and Mabsorbent), mixed-mode and steric exclusion chromatography, and finally enhanced virus inactivation by solvents containing arginine. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody. PMID:24859179

  15. Engineered antibodies take center stage.

    PubMed

    Huston, J S; George, A J

    2001-01-01

    The start of the post-genomic era provides a useful juncture for reflection on the state of antibody engineering, which will be a critical technology for relating function and pathology to genomic sequence in biology and medicine. The phenomenal progress in deciphering the human genome has given significant impetus to the application of engineered antibodies in proteomics. Thus, advances in phage display antibody libraries can now help to define novel gene function and the measurement of abnormal protein expression in pathological states. Furthermore, intrabody and antibody engineering provide vehicles for the development of molecular medicines of the future. In addition to these new directions, antibody engineering has begun to show concrete success in its long-term efforts to develop targeted immunotherapies for cancer and other diseases. The cornerstones of clinical development are the detailed academic clinical trials that continue to push the boundaries of engineered antibodies into the real world. The field displays a healthy impatience for practical results, as research accelerates with concerted efforts to transfer preclinical insights into clinical trials. Growing private and governmental expenditures will lead to the rapid expansion of life-saving immunotherapeutic agents. The present review developed from our effort to report on the 11th Annual International Conference on Antibody Engineering (3-6 December 2000). This annual meeting is a forum for discussions on the latest advances in antibody engineering groups from around the world, and now includes the broader agenda of engineering in molecular immunology. In bringing scientists together to exchange ideas at this open forum, new collaborations and the threads of new discoveries are woven. For example, Professors Gerhard Wagner (Harvard Medical School), Dennis Burton (Scripps Research Institute), and Peter Hudson (CSIRO, Melbourne, Australia) gave exciting insights on structural immunobiology that had

  16. Serological antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Prideaux, Lani; De Cruz, Peter; Ng, Siew C; Kamm, Michael A

    2012-07-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is traditionally based on a combination of clinical, endoscopic, histological, and radiological criteria. However, further testing is needed in cases of diagnostic uncertainty and in predicting disease course. This systematic review focuses on the potential for 10 serological antibodies to fill these roles: pANCA, ASCA, anti-OmpC, anti-CBir1, anti-I2, ALCA, ACCA, AMCA, anti-L, and anti-C. We discuss their prevalence in IBD and health; their role in disease diagnosis and risk stratification; their stability over time; their presence in unaffected relatives; their association with genetic variants; and differences across ethnic groups. Serological antibodies have some role in primary diagnosis and in differentiating between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In indeterminate colitis, preoperative measurement of serological antibodies can help to predict the likelihood of complications among patients undergoing pouch surgery. The combined presence and magnitude of a large panel of antibodies appear to be of value in predicting disease progression. There is currently insufficient evidence to recommend the use of antibody testing to predict responses to treatment or surgery in patients with IBD.

  17. Antibodies and immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, S; Berger, P

    2000-05-01

    As a glycoprotein hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is not a single molecular entity. This term comprises not only the bioactive heterodimer hCG but also an array of molecular protein backbone and glycosylation variants, such as its free beta (hCGbeta) and alpha (hCGalpha) subunits and clipped, cleaved, terminally differently sialylated, and overglycosylated forms. This heterogeneity places great demands on selective detection systems for hCG-derived molecules. Measurement of hCG and/or its derivatives is highly dependent on the selection of target molecules and the natural variability of hCG in the specimens analyzed. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based immunoassays are still the state-of-the-art technique for both clinical and research applications but a major problem is the different extents of recognition of hCG variants by mAbs used in different immunoassays. On the whole, construction of sandwich-type assays obviously must take into consideration mAb characteristics, such as main and fine specificities, cross-reactivities, epitope locations and compatibilities, overlap and overhang in specificities (pairs of mAbs), and, finally, overspecificity. Consequences of overhang and overlap in antigen recognition of coating and detection mAb specificities are nondesirable assay cross-reactions and competitive interference by antigenic variants. The general agreement on the most favorable assay design is contrasted by the variety of isotopic and nonisotopic detection systems in current use. The immunoenzymometric assay (IEMA) technique is hampered by a relatively small measuring range and limited sensitivity. By measuring substrate absorption values off the absorption maximum, the measuring range of any IEMA can be extended significantly, as shown for 3,3',5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), without jeopardizing assay characteristics. Sensitivity of the IEMA can be enhanced by modifying the horseradish peroxidase (HRPO) labeling technique by using highly purified m

  18. Geographic pattern of serum antibody prevalence for Brucella spp. in caribou, grizzly bears, and wolves from Alaska, 1975-1998.

    PubMed

    Zarnke, Randall L; Ver Hoef, Jay M; DeLong, Robert A

    2006-07-01

    Blood samples were collected from 2,635 caribou (Rangifer tarandus), 1,238 grizzly bears (Ursus arctos), and 930 wolves (Canis lupus) from throughout mainland Alaska during 1975-98. Sera were tested for evidence of exposure to Brucella spp. Serum antibody prevalences were highest in the northwestern region of the state. In any specific area, antibody prevalences for caribou and wolves were of a similar magnitude, whereas antibody prevalence for bears in these same areas were two to three times higher.

  19. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  20. [Correlation between measles-neutralizing antibody and HI antibody, between measles-neutralizing antibody and PA antibody among pregnant women, and protective levels of three titration types].

    PubMed

    Takayama, Naohide; Shoda, Akiko; Okazaki, Takayuki; Ichinohe, Sadato; Saika, Shizuko; Inaba, Noriyuki

    2007-11-01

    When measles antibody levels among pregnant women were measured with measles hemagglutinin inhibition (HI), 31% of subjects had negative HI antibody titers. When the same blood samples were tested with measles gelatin particle agglutination (PA) and neutralizing (NT), the percentages of those with negative antibody levels were 1% and 3%. We conducted the correlation between antibody titers measured by the three types of titration. Correlation between NT and HI antibody titers higher than 1:8 and that between NT and PA antibody titers were good, but 81% of subjects whose HI antibody titer was below 1:8 and all women with HI antibody of 1:8 were found to have NT antibody titer higher than 1:4. NT antibody titer higher than 1:4 was found in 95% of women having PA antibody titer of 1:256 and in 99% of those with PA antibody titer of 1:512. Based on the relationships to measles NT antibody level, the majority of subjects with HI antibody titer higher than 1:8 or PA antibody level higher than 1:512 was reasonably assumed to be protected against clinical measles. PA seemed superior to HI in finding subjects with insufficient immunity against measles, because the former detects weak immunity more efficiently than the latter.

  1. Anti-Human T-lymphotropic virus type-I antibodies in atomic-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Nakashima, E; Carter, R L; Neriishi, K; Mabuchi, K; Akiyama, M; Shimaoka, K; Kinoshita, K; Tomonaga, M; Ichimaru, M

    1995-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), induced by human T- lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-I), is endemic in Nagasaki, Japan. To investigate the effects of atomic-bomb radiation on development of this specific type of leukemia, 6182 individuals in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Adult Health Study sample in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were examined for positive rate of HTLV-I antibody. Several lymphocyte parameters were also studied for 70 antibody- positive subjects in Nagasaki. The HTLV-I antibody-positive rate was higher in Nagasaki (6.36%) than in Hiroshima (0.79%) and significantly increased with increasing age, but no association was observed with radiation dose. Whether relationship existed between antibody titer levels and radiation dose among antibody-positive subjects was not The frequency of abnormal lymphocytes tended to be higher in antibody-positive subjects than in antibody-negative subjects, and higher in females than in males regardless of radiation dose. The lymphocyte count was lower in antibody-positive subjects than in antibody-negative subjects and lower in female than in male subjects. No evidence was found to suggest that atomic-bomb radiation plays an important role in HTLV-I infection.

  2. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalopathies and Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Thouin, Anaïs; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years it has become clear that rare but highly recognizable diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including newly identified forms of limbic encephalitis and other encephalopathies, are likely to be mediated by antibodies (Abs) to CNS proteins. The Abs are directed against membrane receptors and ion channel-associated proteins that are expressed on the surface of neurons in the CNS, such as N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein like 2, that are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels. The diseases are not invariably cancer-related and are therefore different from the classical paraneoplastic neurological diseases that are associated with, but not caused by, Abs to intracellular proteins. Most importantly, the new antibody-associated diseases almost invariably respond to immunotherapies with considerable and sometimes complete recovery, and there is convincing evidence of their pathogenicity in the relatively limited studies performed so far. Treatments include first-line steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchange, and second-line rituximab and cyclophosphamide, followed in many cases by steroid-sparing agents in the long-term. This review focuses mainly on N-methyl D-aspartate receptor- and voltage-gated potassium channel complex-related Abs in adults, the clinical phenotypes, and treatment responses. Pediatric cases are referred to but not reviewed in detail. As there have been very few prospective studies, the conclusions regarding immunotherapies are based on retrospective studies. PMID:26692392

  3. Autoantibodies: Focus on anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Nina; Winkler, Thomas H; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the days of Ehrlich and the birth of humoral immunity, self-reactivity or 'horror autotoxicus' as referred to by Paul Ehrlich, has been of great concern. For instance, in patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anti-nuclear and anti-DNA antibodies have been recognized for many years. Despite this, the exact mechanism as to how the immune system fails to protect the individual and allows these autoantibodies to develop in this and other systemic autoimmune diseases remains uncertain. So how can we explain their presence? Evidence suggests that B cells expressing autoreactive antibodies do not normally arise but rather undergo negative selection as they develop. In light of this, it might seem contradictory that not all autoreactive B cell clones are eliminated, although this may not even be the intention since autoantibodies are also found in healthy individuals and may even protect from autoimmunity. Here, we will discuss autoantibodies, in particular those recognizing DNA, with regard to their reactivity and their potentially pathogenic or protective properties. PMID:21776330

  4. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases. PMID:15844826

  5. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015. PMID:26651519

  6. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015.

  7. Antinuclear antibodies in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Turner, W.G.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Peebles, C.; Tan, E.; Olsen, D.M.

    1983-03-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were detected using a mouse kidney substrate in 69 of 238 (29 percent) underground Utah coal miners at a titer of 1:16. At titers of 1:4 and higher, 52 percent were positive. The majority had a speckled pattern and were not directed against any previously characterized antigens. Fifteen of 28 with high titer ANA had reduced complement. The ANA was more apt to be present in those with coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), and as ANA titer increased, the percentage with CWP increased. The ANA increased with both age and coal mine dust exposure. It is hypothesized that ANA and CWP both result from long-term dust exposure, but that there is insufficient evidence to implicate ANA in the pathogenesis of CWP.

  8. Transfusion significance of LWa allo-antibodies.

    PubMed

    Napier, J A; Rowe, G P

    1987-01-01

    An example of anti-LWa, arising as a complication during a RhD immunization programme, has been studied for evidence of its likely in vivo haemolytic properties. In vitro testing of the anti-LWa showed it to be largely IgG1 acting by the antiglobulin technique. Results of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and macrophage phagocytic assays were both negative. However, 99mTc-labelled Lw(a+) donor cells showed a slight reduction in t1/2 (18 h) compared with the normal survival of autologous cells. Despite this observation, and bearing in mind the difficulties of interpreting apparently accelerated destruction of small serologically incompatible red cells, it was concluded that the presence of this example of anti-LWa should not be a bar to urgent transfusion. PMID:3125687

  9. Pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus: more than a positive antinuclear antibody.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer E

    2012-02-01

    Based on strong research evidence and consensus, the most common disease manifestations at diagnosis of pSLE are constitutional symptoms, arthritis, and malar rash. Based on some research evidence and consensus, patients with pSLE tend to have major organ system involvement (renal/central nervous system) and a greater disease burden compared with adults. Despite these findings, mortality is low. Based on some research evidence and consensus, the diagnosis of pSLE is unlikely if the ANA is negative, and most patients with SLE have a positive ANA at a titer ≥1:160. Based on strong research evidence, both MMF and cyclophosphamide can be used for induction therapy in class III and IV lupus nephritis. Based on strong research evidence, patients with SLE and anticardiolipin antibodies or LA have a two and six times greater risk of venous thrombosis, respectively, compared with patients with SLE without antiphospholipid antibodies. Based on strong research evidence, patients with pSLE have a higher risk for subclinical atherosclerosis when there is weight-adjusted prednisone use, azathioprine use, increasing age, male gender, high BMI, abnormal creatinine clearance, and elevated lipoprotein(a) levels.

  10. MERS-CoV Antibodies in Humans, Africa, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Liljander, Anne; Meyer, Benjamin; Jores, Joerg; Müller, Marcel A.; Lattwein, Erik; Njeru, Ian; Bett, Bernard; Corman, Victor Max

    2016-01-01

    Dromedaries in Africa and elsewhere carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). To search for evidence of autochthonous MERS-CoV infection in humans, we tested archived serum from livestock handlers in Kenya for MERS-CoV antibodies. Serologic evidence of infection was confirmed for 2 persons sampled in 2013 and 2014. PMID:27071076

  11. Remembering antibodies coming of age.

    PubMed

    Melchers, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Norbert Hilschmann discovered that antibodies have variable immunoglobulin domains to bind antigens, and constant domains to carry out effector functions in the immune system. Just as this happened, the author of this perspective entered the field of immunology. Ten years later, the genetic basis of antibody variability was discovered by Susumu Tonegawa and his colleagues at the Basel Institute for Immunology, where the author had become a scientific member. At the same time, Georges Köhler, a former graduate student of the author's at the Basel Institute, invented with Cesar Milstein at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, the method to produce monoclonal antibodies. The author describes here his memories connected to these three monumental, paradigm-changing discoveries, which he observed in close proximity. PMID:27144253

  12. Remembering antibodies coming of age.

    PubMed

    Melchers, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Norbert Hilschmann discovered that antibodies have variable immunoglobulin domains to bind antigens, and constant domains to carry out effector functions in the immune system. Just as this happened, the author of this perspective entered the field of immunology. Ten years later, the genetic basis of antibody variability was discovered by Susumu Tonegawa and his colleagues at the Basel Institute for Immunology, where the author had become a scientific member. At the same time, Georges Köhler, a former graduate student of the author's at the Basel Institute, invented with Cesar Milstein at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, the method to produce monoclonal antibodies. The author describes here his memories connected to these three monumental, paradigm-changing discoveries, which he observed in close proximity.

  13. Antibodies to watch in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The transitions of antibody therapeutics to late-stage clinical development, regulatory review and the market are proceeding at a rapid pace in 2013. Since late 2012, two monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics (itolizumab, trastuzumab emtansine) received their first approvals, first marketing applications for three mAbs (vedolizumab, ramucirumab, obinutuzumab) were submitted to regulatory agencies, and five mAbs (brodalumab, MABp1, moxetumomab pasudotox, tildrakizumab, rilotumumab) entered their first Phase 3 studies. The current total of commercially-sponsored antibody therapeutics undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies is 30. Recently announced study results for farletuzumab, naptumomab estafenatox, and tabalumab indicate that clinical endpoints were not met in some Phase 3 studies of these product candidates. PMID:23727858

  14. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The methods for isolation and purification of a guinea-pig serum protein with homocytotropic antibody activity and characteristics of IgE are described. By precipitation in the equivalence zone or immunoadsorption and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, we isolated an homocytotropic antibody, that was not able to give a precipitin line when it was reacted directly with the antigen. It was capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA after a latent period of 24–48 hours but not after 3 hours; it was sensitive to treatment with mercaptoethanol. It had antigenic determinants present in the other guinea-pig immunoglobulins and particular antigenic determinants. All these properties make us believe that this protein belongs to an immunoglobulin different from γ1 and similar to the reaginic antibody (IgE) described in other species. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4126261

  15. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  16. Epigenetics of the antibody response.

    PubMed

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and miRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR), and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and miRNAs modulate the expression of critical elements of that machinery, such as activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), as well as factors central to plasma cell differentiation, such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). These inducible B cell-intrinsic epigenetic marks instruct the maturation of antibody responses. Their dysregulation plays an important role in aberrant antibody responses to foreign antigens, such as those of microbial pathogens, and self-antigens, such as those targeted in autoimmunity, and B cell neoplasia.

  17. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bush, Derek B; Knotts, Thomas A

    2015-08-14

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays. PMID:26277119

  18. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  19. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  20. REGULATION OF CELLULAR ANTIBODY SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Göran

    1968-01-01

    Transfer of spleen cells from mice immunized against sheep red blood cells (SRBC) into irradiated (600 R) nonimmune, syngeneic mice in the presence of antigen resulted in excessive cellular 7S production 7 days later. The number of 7S plaque-forming cells usually exceeded 106 per spleen and the mean proportion varied between 1 and 70%. In occasional animals all spleen cells were producing antibodies to SRBC. Serum antibody synthesis was also excessively increased, the titers in agglutination after 2-ME treatment and in hemolysis varying between 215 and 225. The generation time of the 7S PFC was found to be 9.6 hr in the secondary hosts. It seemed possible that the excessive production of 7S PFC and antibodies in the irradiated nonimmune recipients was caused by the absence of feedback inhibition of the immune response by antibody, a mechanism which would normally function to restrict antibody synthesis. This conclusion was strengthened by the demonstration that transfer of antigen-stimulated immune cells into actively or passively immunized irradiated recipients resulted in a marked suppression of cellular 7S synthesis. Serial transfers of antigen-stimulated immune cell populations in irradiated hosts resulted in an equally high number of 7S PFC during the first four transfer generations. However, after the fifth to seventh transfer generation the number of 7S PFC rapidly declined and disappeared within one to three passages. Serum antibodies and 7S PFC declined in parallel during the last transfer generations. Further passages of antigen-stimulated spleen cells lacking 7S PFC did not lead to reappearance of PFC. Thus, antigen-sensitive cells have a limited lifespan and/or multiplication capacity. From the hypothesis that the 7S PFC developed by division from antigen-sensitive precursors it was calculated that 38–40 divisions occurred, Thus, one antigen-sensitive precursor has the potential to give rise to 1012 7S PFC. PMID:5635380

  1. Therapeutic Antibodies in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Martin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic arsenal in solid tumors comprises different anticancer strategies with diverse chemotherapeutic agents and a growing number of biological substances. Large clinical study-based chemotherapeutic protocols combined with biologicals have become an important component in (neo-) adjuvant therapy alongside surgery in solid cancers as well as radiation therapy in some instances. In recent years, monoclonal antibodies have entered the mainstream of cancer therapy. Their first use was as antagonists of oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, but today monoclonal antibodies have emerged as long-sought vehicles for the targeted delivery of potent chemotherapeutic agents and as powerful tools to manipulate anticancer immune responses. There is a growing number of FDA approved monoclonal antibodies and small molecules targeting specific types of cancer suggestive of the clinical relevance of this approach.Targeted cancer therapies , also referred to as personalized medicine, are being studied for use alone, in combination with other targeted therapies, and in combination with chemotherapy. The use of monoclonal antibodies in colorectal and gastric cancer for example have shown best outcome when combined with chemotherapy, even though single agent anti-EGFR antibodies seem to be active in particular setting of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. However, it is not well defined whether the addition of anti-VEGF - and anti-EGFR strategies to chemotherapy could improve outcome in those patients susceptible to colorectal cancer-related metastases resection. Among the most promising approaches to activating therapeutic antitumor immunity is the blockade of immune checkpoints, exemplified by the recently FDA-approved agent, Ipilimumab, an antibody that blocks the coinhibitory receptor CTLA-4. Capitalizing on the success of Ipilimumab, agents that target a second coinhibitory receptor, PD-1, or its ligand, PD-L1, are in clinical development. This section attempts to

  2. Antibodies to marine caliciviruses in the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus Schreber).

    PubMed

    Barlough, J E; Berry, E S; Goodwin, E A; Brown, R F; DeLong, R L; Smith, A W

    1987-01-01

    Sera from 145 Steller sea lions (76 adults, three subadults, 37 pups, and 29 fetuses) were tested for neutralizing antibodies to nine marine calicivirus serotypes. Antibodies were found to San Miguel sea lion virus (SMSV) types 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 and 13, and to Tillamook (bovine) calicivirus, but no antibodies were found to the walrus calicivirus. Titers (microtiter neutralization assay) ranged from 1:20 to 1:320, with many positive reactions at the higher dilutions (greater than or equal to 1:80). Antibodies to SMSV's 5 and 10 were most common among animals sampled in Alaskan waters, while antibodies to SMSV-6 were most common among pups from the southern Oregon coast. These data provide evidence that Steller sea lions, like their California sea lion (Zalophus c. californianus Lesson) counterparts, have experienced widespread exposure to multiple serotypes of marine caliciviruses. PMID:3820427

  3. Anti-dsDNA Antibodies are one of the many autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu Man; Dai, Chao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Gaskin, Felicia

    2015-01-01

    Anti-dsDNA antibodies are the most studied antibodies of the lupus-related autoantibodies. The dogma is that these are the most important autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, evidence is presented to show that these antibodies (as measured by modern clinical laboratories) are not the most important autoantibodies in the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus, and are of limited value in clinical correlation and in predicting disease flares. In addition, they are not likely to be the initiating autoantibodies in lupus nephritis. Thus, several pervasively held beliefs on anti-dsDNA antibodies are not valid. We suggest that anti-dsDNA antibodies should be considered as just one of the many autoantibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26594353

  4. Internalized antibodies to the Abeta domain of APP reduce neuronal Abeta and protect against synaptic alterations.

    PubMed

    Tampellini, Davide; Magrané, Jordi; Takahashi, Reisuke H; Li, Feng; Lin, Michael T; Almeida, Cláudia G; Gouras, Gunnar K

    2007-06-29

    Immunotherapy against beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) is a leading therapeutic direction for Alzheimer disease (AD). Experimental studies in transgenic mouse models of AD have demonstrated that Abeta immunization reduces Abeta plaque pathology and improves cognitive function. However, the biological mechanisms by which Abeta antibodies reduce amyloid accumulation in the brain remain unclear. We provide evidence that treatment of AD mutant neuroblastoma cells or primary neurons with Abeta antibodies decreases levels of intracellular Abeta. Antibody-mediated reduction in cellular Abeta appears to require that the antibody binds to the extracellular Abeta domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and be internalized. In addition, treatment with Abeta antibodies protects against synaptic alterations that occur in APP mutant neurons.

  5. Antibodies to marine caliciviruses in the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus Schreber).

    PubMed

    Barlough, J E; Berry, E S; Goodwin, E A; Brown, R F; DeLong, R L; Smith, A W

    1987-01-01

    Sera from 145 Steller sea lions (76 adults, three subadults, 37 pups, and 29 fetuses) were tested for neutralizing antibodies to nine marine calicivirus serotypes. Antibodies were found to San Miguel sea lion virus (SMSV) types 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 and 13, and to Tillamook (bovine) calicivirus, but no antibodies were found to the walrus calicivirus. Titers (microtiter neutralization assay) ranged from 1:20 to 1:320, with many positive reactions at the higher dilutions (greater than or equal to 1:80). Antibodies to SMSV's 5 and 10 were most common among animals sampled in Alaskan waters, while antibodies to SMSV-6 were most common among pups from the southern Oregon coast. These data provide evidence that Steller sea lions, like their California sea lion (Zalophus c. californianus Lesson) counterparts, have experienced widespread exposure to multiple serotypes of marine caliciviruses.

  6. Therapeutic antibodies in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Garcia, José; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Cortés, Javier; Scaltriti, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    The discovery of HER2 and development of trastuzumab pioneered the field of targeted therapy in breast cancer. Hoping to emulate the same clinical success, pharmaceutical companies have developed several antibodies against newly identified membrane-bound targets. Unfortunately, none of these agents has yet matched the thousands of lives saved by trastuzumab. In this article we review the most advanced therapeutic antibodies in breast cancer. While acknowledging their unquestionable benefit, we emphasize the need to better understand their biology and mechanisms of action in order to optimize their use in defined patient populations.

  7. Enhancing Blockade of Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Invasion: Assessing Combinations of Antibodies against PfRH5 and Other Merozoite Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Choudhary, Prateek; Murungi, Linda M.; Furze, Julie M.; Diouf, Ababacar; Miotto, Olivo; Crosnier, Cécile; Wright, Gavin J.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Long, Carole A.; Draper, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    No vaccine has yet proven effective against the blood-stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. We recently found that PfRH5, a P. falciparum-specific protein expressed in merozoites, is efficiently targeted by broadly-neutralizing, vaccine-induced antibodies. Here we show that antibodies against PfRH5 efficiently inhibit the in vitro growth of short-term-adapted parasite isolates from Cambodia, and that the EC50 values of antigen-specific antibodies against PfRH5 are lower than those against PfAMA1. Since antibody responses elicited by multiple antigens are speculated to improve the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines, we conducted detailed assessments of parasite growth inhibition by antibodies against PfRH5 in combination with antibodies against seven other merozoite antigens. We found that antibodies against PfRH5 act synergistically with antibodies against certain other merozoite antigens, most notably with antibodies against other erythrocyte-binding antigens such as PfRH4, to inhibit the growth of a homologous P. falciparum clone. A combination of antibodies against PfRH4 and basigin, the erythrocyte receptor for PfRH5, also potently inhibited parasite growth. This methodology provides the first quantitative evidence that polyclonal vaccine-induced antibodies can act synergistically against P. falciparum antigens and should help to guide the rational development of future multi-antigen vaccines. PMID:23144611

  8. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  9. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies in Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1991-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been applied clinically to the diagnosis and therapy of an array of human disorders, including cancer and infectious diseases, and have been used for the modulation of immune responses. Effective therapy using unmodified monoclonal antibodies has, however, been elusive. Recently, monoclonal antibody-mediated therapy has been revolutionized by advances such as the definition of cell-surface structures on abnormal cells as targets for effective monoclonal antibody action, genetic engineering to create less immunogenic and more effective monoclonal antibodies, and the arming of such antibodies with toxins or radionuclides to enhance their effector function.

  11. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    alteration in IgM affinity occurred at a late stage, as serum IgM levels increased, in cats which progressed to develop GN. These findings suggested that an increase in both serum IgG and IgM anti-HSA values, in particular IgM, was associated with the development of a more severe immune complex renal disease in these cats. Although there was no evidence that differences in the average affinity of either the IgG or IgM antibody populations for HSA, were associated with the development of disease, the increase in IgM values was also accompanied by a concomitant alteration in IgM affinity for antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1430350

  12. Establishing Assay Cutoffs for HLA Antibody Screening of Apheresis Donors

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Danielle M.; Norris, Philip J.; Endres, Robert O.; Pandey, Suchitra; Kleinman, Steven H.; Wright, David; Sun, Yu; Busch, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related deaths. Donor HLA antibodies have been implicated in TRALI cases. Blood centers are implementing TRALI risk reduction strategies based on HLA antibody screening of some subpopulations of ever-pregnant apheresis platelet donors. However, if screening assay cutoffs are too sensitive, donation loss may adversely impact blood availability. STUDY DESIGN Pregnancy history and HLA antibody screening and single antigen bead (SAB) data from blood donors in the REDS-II Leukocyte Antibody Prevalence Study (LAPS) were evaluated for correlations between assay screening values, HLA antibody titer, and number of HLA antigen specificities. The probabilities of matching a cognate antigen in a recipient were calculated and examined in association with total number of specificities observed and screening values. The relative impact of imposing various screening assay cutoffs or pregnancy stratification was examined in relation to detection of HLA antibody reactive donations and loss of donors and donations. RESULTS We provide evidence that higher HLA Ab screening assay values are associated with maintaining higher screening signals upon dilution and an increased breadth of specificities compared with lower screening values; the latter correlated with an increased risk of a cognate antigen match in potential recipients. Depending upon the TRALI risk reduction strategy used, the potential loss of donations ranged between 0.9 and 6.0%. CONCLUSION This analysis should enable blood centers to decide upon a TRALI risk reduction strategy for apheresis platelets that is consistent with how much donation loss the blood center can tolerate. PMID:21332726

  13. Thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) of Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Zakarija, M; McKenzie, J M

    The current knowledge of thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) and its significance in Graves' disease is reviewed under 4 headings. 1) Methods of assay; these are categorized as thyroid-stimulation or thyrotropin-receptor-modulation type methods. The latter are convenient but non-specific and the former are inconvenient but specific. The use of guinea pig fat cell membranes as a source of receptor for thyrotropin may improve the specificity of the thyrotropin-binding inhibition (TBI) system. 2) Immunochemistry of TSAb; evidence for the restricted heterogeneity, or oligoclonality, of the antibody as it occurs in some sera, viz. selected for the very high titer, includes a relatively constant pI on isoelectric focussing, restriction to IgG1 and having only lambda or k as the light chain. 3) Are antibodies other than TSAb pathogenic in hyperthyroidism? data are provided indicating the presence in one serum of an antibody that inhibits the action of TSAb in vitro. Clinically this novel antibody caused delayed onset of neonatal hyperthyroidism in 2 children. The prevalence of the antibody and its general clinical significance are unknown, but ways of testing for its presence are reviewed. 4) Clinical significance of the assay of TSAb; TSAb occurs in at least 90% of patients but should not be necessary for the diagnosis of Graves' disease. Its persistence at the end of a course of antithyroid drugs predicates relapse; a high level on first diagnosis may forecast such persistence and be an indication for ablative therapy for hyperthyroidism. A high level of TSAb in the third trimester of pregnancy is a reliable index of neonatal hyperthyroidism. It should be recognized that there is a marked tendency for TSAb values to fall throughout the course of pregnancy.

  14. The European antibody network's practical guide to finding and validating suitable antibodies for research.

    PubMed

    Roncador, Giovanna; Engel, Pablo; Maestre, Lorena; Anderson, Amanda P; Cordell, Jacqueline L; Cragg, Mark S; Šerbec, Vladka Č; Jones, Margaret; Lisnic, Vanda J; Kremer, Leonor; Li, Demin; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Pascual, Núria; Rodríguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio; Torensma, Ruurd; Turley, Helen; Pulford, Karen; Banham, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are widely exploited as research/diagnostic tools and therapeutics. Despite providing exciting research opportunities, the multitude of available antibodies also offers a bewildering array of choice. Importantly, not all companies comply with the highest standards, and thus many reagents fail basic validation tests. The responsibility for antibodies being fit for purpose rests, surprisingly, with their user. This paper condenses the extensive experience of the European Monoclonal Antibody Network to help researchers identify antibodies specific for their target antigen. A stepwise strategy is provided for prioritising antibodies and making informed decisions regarding further essential validation requirements. Web-based antibody validation guides provide practical approaches for testing antibody activity and specificity. We aim to enable researchers with little or no prior experience of antibody characterization to understand how to determine the suitability of their antibody for its intended purpose, enabling both time and cost effective generation of high quality antibody-based data fit for publication.

  15. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    PubMed Central

    Dowall, S. D.; Graham, V. A.; Corbin-Lickfett, K.; Empig, C.; Schlunegger, K.; Bruce, C. B.; Easterbrook, L.; Hewson, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus. PMID:25815346

  16. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction. PMID:27438459

  17. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  18. Specific antibody in the equine genital tract following systemic and local immunization.

    PubMed Central

    Widders, P R; Stokes, C R; David, J S; Bourne, F J

    1985-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was adapted for the horse to investigate the production of antibody in response to subcutaneous, intrauterine or intravaginal immunization with dinitro-phenylated human serum albumin. An IgM response was not detected, but antibodies of the IgGab, IgGc, IgGT and IgA isotypes were measured in serum, uterine and vaginal secretions. Local immunization produced antibody titres in serum and secretions, with evidence of significant local production. Images Figure 1 PMID:3980048

  19. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and cardiac rhythm disturbances: Present and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Santos-Pardo, Irene; Villuendas, Roger; Salvador-Corres, Iñaki; Martínez-Morillo, Melania; Olivé, Alejandro; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2015-04-01

    Several case reports, small case series, and original research papers have recently suggested that the action of certain auto-antibodies related to connective tissue diseases may be responsible for significant cardiac rhythm disturbances in adults. The relationship between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and congenital complete atrioventricular block is well recognized in the fetal heart. Herein we review the emerging evidences of the link to increased levels of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies with rhythm disorders of unknown origin in the adult. Confirmation of this distinct etiology may eventually be the basis for new therapies.

  20. Anti-Sulfoglucuronosyl Paragloboside Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongpei; Usuki, Seigo; Quarles, Brandy; Rivner, Michael H.; Ariga, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Although the etiology of ALS is obscure, genetic studies of familiar ALS suggest a multifactorial etiology for this condition. Similarly, there probably are multiple causes for sporadic ALS. Autoimmune-mediated motor neuron dysfunction is one proposed etiology for sporadic ALS. In the present study, anti-glycolipid antibodies including GM1, GD1b, GD3, and sulfoglucuronosyl paragloboside (SGPG) were investigated in the sera of a large number of patient samples, including 113 ALS patients and 50 healthy controls, by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with affinity parametric complex criterion evaluation and thin-layer chromatography immunooverlay (immuno-TLC). Anti-SGPG antibodies were found in the sera of 13.3% ALS patients (15 out of 113). The highest titer reached 1:1600. The presence of anti-SGPG antibodies in the serum samples was also confirmed by immuno-TLC. Importantly, a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of anti-SGPG antibody was positively correlated with age (p < .01) and negatively correlated with ALS Functional Rating Scale score (p < .05). Moreover, the localization of SGPG-immunoreactivity on the motor neurons of rat spinal cord and a mouse motor neuronal cell line, NSC-34 was observed by an immunofluorescence method. These data suggest that SGPG could represent a specific pathogenic antigen in those ALS patients. The presence of anti-SGPG antibodies in the serum of ALS patients should represent a diagnostic biomarker of ALS, and it could reflect the severity of the disease. PMID:27683876

  1. Western Blotting Inaccuracies with Unverified Antibodies: Need for a Western Blotting Minimal Reporting Standard (WBMRS)

    PubMed Central

    Gilda, Jennifer E.; Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Cheah, Jenice X.; West, Toni M.; Bodine, Sue C.; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a commonly used technique in biological research. A major problem with Western blotting is not the method itself, but the use of poor quality antibodies as well as the use of different experimental conditions that affect the linearity and sensitivity of the Western blot. Investigation of some conditions that are commonly used and often modified in Western blotting, as well as some commercial antibodies, showed that published articles often fail to report critical parameters needed to reproduce the results. These parameters include the amount of protein loaded, the blocking solution and conditions used, the amount of primary and secondary antibodies used, the antibody incubation solutions, the detection method and the quantification method utilized. In the present study, comparison of ubiquitinated proteins in rat heart and liver samples showed different results depending on the antibody utilized. Validation of five commercial ubiquitin antibodies using purified ubiquitinated proteins, ubiquitin chains and free ubiquitin showed that these antibodies differ in their ability to detect free ubiquitin or ubiquitinated proteins. Investigating proteins modified with interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) in young and old rat hearts using six commercially available antibodies showed that most antibodies gave different semi-quantitative results, suggesting large variability among antibodies. Evidence showing the importance of the Western blot buffer and the concentration of antibody used is presented. Hence there is a critical need for comprehensive reporting of experimental conditions to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of Western blot analysis. A Western blotting minimal reporting standard (WBMRS) is suggested to improve the reproducibility of Western blot analysis. PMID:26287535

  2. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Peter J.; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Siggins, Matthew K.; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A.; Goulding, David A.; Crump, John A.; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies. PMID:26741681

  3. Establishment of the first WHO Erythropoietin antibody reference panel: Report of an international collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Meenu; Mytych, Daniel T; Bird, Chris; Barger, Troy; Dougall, Thomas; Han, Hong; Rigsby, Peter; Kromminga, Arno; Thorpe, Robin

    2016-08-01

    A panel of 9 fully human monoclonal antibodies against human erythropoietin (EPO) with defined characteristics (non-neutralizing, neutralizing, various isotypes, affinities) representative of those evident in antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and non-PRCA patients were formulated and lyophilized. The panel was evaluated in a multi-centre international collaborative study comprising eighteen different laboratories using different assay platforms including those in routine use. These included binding assays, some based on use of novel technologies and neutralization assays predominantly employing EPO responsive cell-lines. Results showed that detection and titre varied depending on antibody characteristics and the method used. Only selective assay platforms were capable of detecting the diverse repertoire of EPO antibodies in the panel indicating that some clinically relevant antibodies are likely to be missed in some assays. Importantly, the clinical samples from PRCA patients were distinguished as antibody-positive and the healthy donor serum as antibody negative across all different platforms tested. For neutralization, data was generally consistent across the assays for the different samples regardless of the cell-line and the assay conditions. The heterogeneity in data from the study clearly indicated the need for reference standards for consistency in detecting and measuring EPO antibodies across different assay platforms for monitoring the safety and efficacy of erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Therefore, the WHO ECBS at its meeting in October'15 established the EPO antibody panel, available from NIBSC, to facilitate decision-making on assay selection for testing antibodies against human EPO, for evaluating assay performance of antibody assays for clinical use, for assay validation and for standardization. PMID:27173074

  4. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Hart, Peter J; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Siggins, Matthew K; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A; Goulding, David A; Crump, John A; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  5. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  6. [Neuroimmunological diseases associated with VGKC complex antibodies].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels(VGKC) were first identified by radioimmunoassay of radioisotope labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were found only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in Morvan's syndrome and in a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins(for example LGI-1, Caspr-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now usually known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most common in limbic encephalitis with SIADH. Caspr-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability.

  7. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and cardiac arrhythmias in the adult: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lazzerini, P E; Capecchi, P L; Laghi-Pasini, F

    2010-09-01

    It is well established that the passive trans-placental passage of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies from mother to foetus is associated with the risk to develop an uncommon syndrome named neonatal lupus (NLE), where the congenital heart block represents the most severe clinical feature. Recent evidence demonstrated that also adult heart, classically considered invulnerable to the anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, may represent a target of the arrhythmogenicity of these autoantibodies. In particular, the prolongation of the QTc interval appears the most frequent abnormality observed in adults with circulating anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, with some data suggesting an association with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias, also life threatening. Moreover, even though the association between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and conduction disturbances is undoubtedly less evident in adults than in infants, from the accurate dissection of the literature data the possibility arises that sometimes also the adult cardiac conduction tissue may be affected by such antibodies. The exact arrhythmogenic mechanisms involved in foetus/newborns and adults, respectively, have not been completely clarified as yet. However, increasing evidence suggests that anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may trigger rhythm disturbances through an inhibiting cross-reaction with several cardiac ionic channels, particularly the calcium channels (L-type and T-type), but also the potassium channel hERG, whose different expression and involvement in the cardiac electrophysiology during lifespan might account for the occurrence of age-related differences.

  8. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and cardiac arrhythmias in the adult: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lazzerini, P E; Capecchi, P L; Laghi-Pasini, F

    2010-09-01

    It is well established that the passive trans-placental passage of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies from mother to foetus is associated with the risk to develop an uncommon syndrome named neonatal lupus (NLE), where the congenital heart block represents the most severe clinical feature. Recent evidence demonstrated that also adult heart, classically considered invulnerable to the anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, may represent a target of the arrhythmogenicity of these autoantibodies. In particular, the prolongation of the QTc interval appears the most frequent abnormality observed in adults with circulating anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, with some data suggesting an association with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias, also life threatening. Moreover, even though the association between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and conduction disturbances is undoubtedly less evident in adults than in infants, from the accurate dissection of the literature data the possibility arises that sometimes also the adult cardiac conduction tissue may be affected by such antibodies. The exact arrhythmogenic mechanisms involved in foetus/newborns and adults, respectively, have not been completely clarified as yet. However, increasing evidence suggests that anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may trigger rhythm disturbances through an inhibiting cross-reaction with several cardiac ionic channels, particularly the calcium channels (L-type and T-type), but also the potassium channel hERG, whose different expression and involvement in the cardiac electrophysiology during lifespan might account for the occurrence of age-related differences. PMID:20696018

  9. Alloimmunization due to red cell antibodies in Rhesus positive Omani Pregnant Women: Maternal and Perinatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dughaishi, Tamima; Al-Rubkhi, Ikhlass S.; Al-Duhli, Maymoona; Al-Harrasi, Yusra; Gowri, Vaidyanathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization due to antibodies to red blood cell (RBC) antigens (other than rhesus [Rh] antigen) and report the maternal, perinatal, and neonatal outcomes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of all patients with minor RBCs antibodies alloimmunization who were followed and delivered at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman from June 2011 to June 2013. Maternal characteristics, antibody type, antibody titer in addition to perinatal and neonatal outcomes were reviewed. Results: There were 1160 patients with Rh positive status in the study. The most common ABO blood group was O, followed by A, B, and AB. We found 33 out of 1160 Rh positive women alloimmunized with minor RBCs antibodies that gave a prevalence of minor RBCs alloimmunization of 2.7%. The most frequent antibody was anti-E 38%, followed by anti-c 17% and anti-kell 17%. 6 of these 33 patients were identified to have significant antibody titer, and two cases showed evidence of fetal anemia. Only one case required an intrauterine blood transfusion. The most common neonatal complication was jaundice in 53%, followed by respiratory distress syndrome in 28%. Two cases complicated by neonatal anemia required a postnatal blood transfusion. Conclusion: Alloimmunization with anti-E, anti-c, and anti-kell were the most common antibodies among the study group. Minor RBCs alloimmunization was an important cause of neonatal morbidity. PMID:26420934

  10. Temporal Variation in Sindbis Virus Antibody Prevalence in Bird Hosts in an Endemic Area in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Jan O.; Tok, Atalay; Östman, Örjan; Lundkvist, Åke

    2016-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is a mosquito-borne bird virus that occasionally causes human disease in Fennoscandia, suggested to have cyclic 7-year intervals between outbreaks. Reliable data on human infections in Sweden is however lacking. Here we investigated the SINV antibody prevalence among birds in a Swedish area endemic to SINV to scrutinize if a cyclic variation in antibody prevalence is present in the natural host of SINV. Serum from birds were sampled in the summers of 2002–2004 and 2009 in the floodplains of the River Dalälven in central Sweden, with 2002 and 2009 representing hypothesized years of SINV outbreaks. A total of 963 birds from 52 species (mainly passerines) were tested for the presence of SINV antibodies using a plaque reduction neutralization test. The highest SINV antibody prevalence was found in Turdidae species, specifically Fieldfare, Redwing and Song thrush in which more than 70% of sampled individuals had antibodies to SINV in 2009. The SINV antibody prevalence significantly varied between years with 2% in 2002, 8% in 2003, 14% in 2004 and 37% in 2009. Antibodies were found equally often in hatchlings and in adults and increased from early to late in the season. Clearly, the SINV antibody prevalence was not elevated in the bird hosts in the predicted outbreak year 2002, thus solid evidence of a cyclic occurrence of SINV in Sweden is still lacking. PMID:27579607

  11. Temporal Variation in Sindbis Virus Antibody Prevalence in Bird Hosts in an Endemic Area in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Hesson, Jenny Christina; Lundström, Jan O; Tok, Atalay; Östman, Örjan; Lundkvist, Åke

    2016-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is a mosquito-borne bird virus that occasionally causes human disease in Fennoscandia, suggested to have cyclic 7-year intervals between outbreaks. Reliable data on human infections in Sweden is however lacking. Here we investigated the SINV antibody prevalence among birds in a Swedish area endemic to SINV to scrutinize if a cyclic variation in antibody prevalence is present in the natural host of SINV. Serum from birds were sampled in the summers of 2002-2004 and 2009 in the floodplains of the River Dalälven in central Sweden, with 2002 and 2009 representing hypothesized years of SINV outbreaks. A total of 963 birds from 52 species (mainly passerines) were tested for the presence of SINV antibodies using a plaque reduction neutralization test. The highest SINV antibody prevalence was found in Turdidae species, specifically Fieldfare, Redwing and Song thrush in which more than 70% of sampled individuals had antibodies to SINV in 2009. The SINV antibody prevalence significantly varied between years with 2% in 2002, 8% in 2003, 14% in 2004 and 37% in 2009. Antibodies were found equally often in hatchlings and in adults and increased from early to late in the season. Clearly, the SINV antibody prevalence was not elevated in the bird hosts in the predicted outbreak year 2002, thus solid evidence of a cyclic occurrence of SINV in Sweden is still lacking. PMID:27579607

  12. Production and Screening of Monoclonal Peptide Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Mortensen, Anne; Schiolborg, Annette; Friis, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Hybridoma technology is a remarkable and indispensable tool for generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies. Hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibodies not only serve as powerful research and diagnostic reagents, but have also emerged as the most rapidly expanding class of therapeutic biologicals. In this chapter, an overview of hybridoma technology and the laboratory procedures used routinely for hybridoma production and antibody screening are presented, including characterization of peptide antibodies.

  13. The antibody response in seabather's eruption.

    PubMed

    Burnett, J W; Kumar, S; Malecki, J M; Szmant, A M

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-six of 44 patients with seabather's eruption had specific IgG antibodies against Linuche unguilata (thimble jelly) medusae antigen. ELISA detected antibodies in serum stored for 10 years. The extent of the cutaneous eruption or sting severity was correlated with antibody titer. Antibodies were detected in patients acquiring the eruption in Florida, the Bahamas and Aruba, reflecting the habitat of these jellyfish. This serological assay can be useful to confirm the clinical diagnosis. PMID:7778134

  14. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  15. Effects of medium concentration on antibody production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody production by two different cell lines was measured as the media were supplemented with varied amounts of glucose and fetal bovine serum. Both cell lines elaborated antidinitrophenyl hapten antibodies. Two basic media were used: RPMI 1640 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. The production of antibodies was followed from 0 to 180 h and was assayed by radioimmunoassay.

  16. Immunology update: symposium on antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Silver, R M

    1997-02-01

    The seventh international symposium on antiphospholipid antibodies was held in New Orleans, LA, USA, on October 9-13, 1996. The meeting was attended by over 230 people and was hosted by Azzudin E. Gharavi and Wendell A. Wilson. Workshops were also conducted on assays for lupus anticoagulant, antiphospholipid antibodies, and anti-endothelial cell antibodies. PMID:9080388

  17. Prevalence of antibodies to Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in cattle and water buffaloes in southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huong, L T; Ljungström, B L; Uggla, A; Björkman, C

    1998-02-15

    Serum samples from 200 dairy cattle and 200 beef water buffaloes were collected in southern Vietnam during May to September 1995. The sera were analysed for antibodies to Neospora caninum by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the indirect fluorescent antibody test, and for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii by the direct agglutination test. Significant levels of N. caninum antibodies were detected in 5.5% of the cattle sera and in 1.5% of the water buffalo sera. 10.5% of the cattle sera and 3% of the water buffalo sera were found to contain T. gondii antibodies. Two of the cattle sera had both T. gondii and N. caninum antibodies. The present communication is the first to report serological evidence of N. caninum infection in the water buffalo.

  18. Mechanisms of resistance to HER family targeting antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Kruser, Tim J.; Wheeler, Deric L.

    2010-04-15

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of receptor tyrosine kinases consists of four members: EGFR (HER1/ErbB1), HER2/neu (ErbB2), HER3 (ErbB3) and HER4 (ErbB4). Receptor activation via ligand binding leads to downstream signaling that influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR and HER2 have been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and breast cancer. With this, intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of the EGFR and HER2 by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab, panitumumab and trastuzumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both approaches have shown considerable clinical promise. However, increasing evidence suggests that the majority of patients do not respond to these therapies, and those who show initial response ultimately become refractory to treatment. While mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been extensively studied, resistance to monoclonal antibodies is less well understood, both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. In this review, we discuss resistance to antibody-based therapies against the EGFR and HER2, similarities between these resistance profiles, and strategies to overcome resistance to HER family targeting monoclonal antibody therapy.

  19. The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Prion Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodemer, Walter

    Detection of PrP and its pathological isoform(s) is the key to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. There is ample evidence that PrP isoforms constitute a major component of an unknown and perhaps unconventional infectious agent. An etiological relationship between human and zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may be revealed with monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of the conformational transition rendering a nonpathogenic, almost ubiquitous cellular protein into a pathogenic one is crucial to defining pathomechanisms. The stepwise or even continuous formation of pathogenic molecules can be monitored. Any improvement in the early diagnosis could help to conceive new therapeutic measures which are not currently available. Determination of PrP isoforms in tissue, cells, or body fluids may be of prognostic value. Many experimental approaches in molecular medicine and molecular biology of the prion protein already rely on monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies such as the single-chain Fv may soon replace traditional hybridoma techniques. Binding affinity can easily be manipulated by a number of techniques, including in vitro mutagenesis - a step which could never be carried out using the traditional hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibodies are and will remain an essential support for ongoing research on the prion protein in general and on the unconventional infectious prions.

  20. Antibody biosimilars: Fears or opportunities?

    PubMed Central

    Guillon-Munos, Audrey; Daguet, Arnaud; Watier, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The annual “LabEx MAbImprove industrial workshops” are primarily intended to provide scientists involved in therapeutic antibodies, a comprehensive view about topics of interest for the pharmaceutical industry. They are organized by the “LabEx MAbImprove industrial committee”, for this first edition especially in partnership with ARITT, the regional agency for innovation and technology transfer which operates in the French Région Centre, the 1st French region for pharmaceutical production. The 2013 edition, held May 28 at the Vinci Center of Tours, was dedicated to antibody biosimilars. Depending on opinions, the impending expiry of antibody patents and the imminent marketing approval of competitors to blockbusters can be perceived as good or bad things. Fears or opportunities? Risks for patients? Breath of fresh air for the health systems? Opportunity for re-industrializing France? In this context, it is necessary for people to form a fair and informed opinion on the current landscape of antibody biosimilars. In particular, this is especially important for scientists from the academic world, from the industry or from the regulation agencies, for pharmacists, for pharmacovigilance specialists, for health authorities, and staff from health insurance and decision makers. The first session was devoted to market and regulatory issues, and included both an overview of the evolution of the patent landscape and a description of biosimilars regulation in the European Union (EU). This session was closed by a talk on manufacturing processes for biosimilars. In the next session, quality control attributes of biosimilars were discussed and compared with the consistent quality of biotechnology products to raise the question: “How close is close enough?” In vitro assays for evaluating the Fc function of therapeutic antibodies were also discussed. The third session focused on development of biosimilars and primarily on the stepwise process for introducing an antibody

  1. New Insights into the Functional Behavior of Antibodies as Revealed by Binding Studies on an Anti-Uranium Monoclonal Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.; Xia Li; Haini Yu; Blake, Robert C.

    2004-03-17

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop immunoassays for chelated uranium(VI) on a hand-held flow fluorimeter, an anti-uranium monoclonal antibody designated as 8A11 was fluorescently labeled using two different strategies. When 8A11 was coupled via reactive lysines to either ALEXATM 488 or Cy5TM, the resulting fluorescent antibody conjugate exhibited positive cooperativity in the presence of its antigen, U(VI) chelated with 2,9-dicarboxy-1,10-phenanthroline (U(VI)-DCP). That is, when one of the two binding sites on the covalently modified 8A11 was occupied with bound antigen, the affinity of the remaining site on the antibody for U(VI)-DCP appeared to increase. Unmodified 8A11 bound U(VI)-DCP with the expected hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of antigen, consistent with independent and equal binding of ligand at both sites. Proteolytic cleavage of the fluorescently conjugated 8A11 to produce the fluorescent monovalent Fab fragment yielded an active preparation that now bound U(VI)-DCP with no evidence of positive cooperativity. Although, in principle, any divalent antibody has the potential to exhibit positive cooperativity in its binding interactions with its antigen, very little literature precedent for this type of behavior exists. Native 8A11 was also noncovalently labeled with highly fluorescent ZENONTM reagents. These reagents are fluorescently-labeled Fab fragments of goat anti-mouse antibodies that bind to the Fc portion of 8A11. These high-affinity, monovalent fluorescent reagents permitted the intact 8A11 mouse antibody to be labeled in situ with no covalent modifications. Incubation of the 8A11 with ZENON 647 produced a fluorescent protein complex that showed an 8-fold higher affinity for U(VI)-DCP than did the free 8A11 alone. Again, very few literature precedents exist for this phenomenon, where agents that bind to the Fc portion of an intact antibody change the affinity of the antibody for the antigen at the structurally distant Fab portion

  2. Serological evidence of arboviral infections among humans of coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Morrill, J C; Johnson, B K; Hyams, C; Okoth, F; Tukei, P M; Mugambi, M; Woody, J

    1991-06-01

    A serosurvey was conducted during September 1987 for evidence of human arboviral infections in the Coast Province of Kenya. Sera were collected from 1624 outpatients at three hospitals and tested for antibody to eight arboviruses by the indirect immunofluorescent antibody technique. Antibody prevalence rates were: Rift Valley fever, 2.8%; Sindbis, 2.6%; dugbe, 2.1%; dengue-2, 1.0%; West Nile, 0.9%; chikungunya, 0.7% and Nairobi sheep disease, 0.3%. Evidence of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever viral antibody was not detected. The data suggested low arbovirus activity since 1982, when an epidemic of dengue occurred in this region, and revealed the first evidence of dugbe viral infection among humans in Kenya.

  3. Neutralizing antibodies against interferon-Beta.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2008-09-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is a major problem in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon-beta (IFN-ß). Whereas binding antibodies (BAbs) can be demonstrated in the vast majority of patients, only a smaller proportion of patients develop NAbs. The principle in NAb in vitro assays is the utilization of cultured cell lines that are responsive to IFN-ß. The cytopathic effect (CPE) assay measures the capacity of NAbs to neutralize IFN- ß's protective effect on cells challenged with virus and the MxA induction assay measures the ability of NAbs to reduce the IFN-ß-induced expression of MxA, either at the mRNA or the protein level. A titer of >20 neutralizing units/ml traditionally defines NAb posi-tivity. NAbs in high titers completely abrogate the in vivo response to IFN-ß, whereas the effect of low and intermediate titers is unpredictable. As clinically important NAbs appear only after 9-18 months IFN- ß0 therapy, short-term studies of two years or less are unsuitable for evaluation of clinical NAb effects. All long-term trials of three years or more concordantly show evidence of a detrimental effect of NAbs on relapses, disease activity on MRI, or on disease progression. Persistent high titers of NAbs indicate an abrogation of the biological response and, hence, absence of therapeutic efficacy, and this observation should lead to a change of therapy. As low and medium titers are ambiguous treatment decisions in patients with low NAb titres should be guided by determination of in vivo mRNA MxA induction and clinical disease activity.

  4. Viral Epitopes and Monoclonal Antibodies: Isolation of Blocking Antibodies that Inhibit Virus Neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard J.; Schochetman, Gerald

    1981-07-01

    The inability of pathogenic animal viruses to be completely neutralized by antibodies can lead to chronic viral infections in which infectious virus persists even in the presence of excess neutralizing antibody. A mechanism that results in this nonneutralized fraction of virus was defined by the topographical relationships of viral epitopes identified with monoclonal antibodies wherein monoclonal antibodies bind to virus and sterically block the binding of neutralizing antibodies.

  5. Therapeutic antibodies: Discovery, design and deployment.

    PubMed

    Ramsland, Paul A; Hutchinson, Andrew T; Carter, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have come of age with major progress being made in cancer, autoimmunity and chronic inflammation, as well as a wide range of other human diseases. Antibody engineering is further driving development of novel antibody formats and genetically modified cell-based therapies that harness the power of the immune system to progress cures in otherwise intractable human diseases. Nevertheless, there are still significant challenges ahead for basic and applied research relating to therapeutic antibodies. This special issue of the journal provides reviews and opinions that relate to the discovery, design and deployment of antibodies as therapeutics.

  6. Antibody engineering and therapeutics conference

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A; Burton, Dennis R; Adams, Gregory P; Weiner, Louis M; Scott, Jamie K; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    The 25th anniversary of the Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics Conference, the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA, December 7–11, 2014. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the event will celebrate past successes, educate participants on current activities and offer a vision of future progress in the field. Keynote addresses will be given by academic and industry experts Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Ira Pastan (National Cancer Institute), James Wells (University of California, San Francisco), Ian Tomlinson (GlaxoSmithKline) and Anthony Rees (Rees Consulting AB and Emeritus Professor, University of Bath). These speakers will provide updates of their work, placed in the context of the substantial growth of the industry over the past 25 years. PMID:25517297

  7. [Industrial production of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Baron, D

    1990-10-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (mabs) are produced in either mouse ascites or bioreactors (spinner culture, stirred-tank reactor, airlift reactor, hollow-fiber reactor). Human mabs are produced solely in bioreactors. Encapsulation represents a special technology. Hybridoma cells have to be adapted prior to growth in bioreactors. Of crucial importance is the construction of over-producing cell lines by cell- and gene-technological methods. Manipulated cell lines often produce modified mabs.

  8. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  9. Single-Chain Antibody Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baird, Cheryl

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have constructed a nonimmune library consisting of 109 human antibody scFv fragments, which have been cloned and expressed on the surface of yeast. Nanomolar-affinity scFvs are routinely obtained by magnetic bead screening and flow cytometric sorting. The yeast library can be amplified 1010 fold without measurable loss of clonal diversity. This allows for indefinite expansion of the library. All scFv clones can be assessed directly on the yeast cell surface by immunofluorescent labeling and flow cytometry, obviating separate subcloning, expression, and purification steps. The ability to use multiplex library screening demonstrates the utility of this approach for high-throughput antibody isolation for proteomic applications. The yeast library may be used for research projects or teaching performed for U.S. Government purposes only. If you would like to request an aliquot of the single-chain antibody library for your research, please print and fill out the Materials Transfer Agreement (MTA) [PDF, 20K]. The website provides the contact information for mailing the MTA. [copied from http://www.sysbio.org/dataresources/singlechain.stm

  10. Methods of identification employing antibody profiles

    DOEpatents

    Francoeur, Ann-Michele

    1993-12-14

    An identification method, applicable to the identification of animals or inanimate objects, is described. The method takes advantage of the set of individual-specific antibodies that are part of the unique antibody repertoire present in animals, by reacting an effective amount of such antibodies with a particular panel, of n-dimensional array (where n is typically one or two) consisting of an effective amount of many different antigens (typically greater than one thousand), to give antibody-antigen complexes. The profile or pattern formed by the antigen-antibody complexes, termed an antibody fingerprint, when revealed by an effective amount of an appropriate detector molecule, is uniquely representative of a particular individual. The method can similarly be used to distinguish genetically, or otherwise similar individuals, or their body parts containing individual-specific antibodies.

  11. Natural human antibodies to amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Paul; Relkin, Norman; Weksler, Marc E

    2008-06-01

    Properties of human, natural anti-Abeta antibodies and commercially available intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) have been examined in light of the beneficial effects of passive immunotherapy with IVIg for patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). Anti-Abeta antibodies in IVIg recognize conformation-specific epitopes as well as linear epitopes from different regions of the Abeta peptide. Anti-Abeta antibodies in circulation, especially those with high avidity, are often masked by ligands and the avidity of these antibodies increases upon dissociation of the bound ligands from the antibodies. Such natural anti-Abeta antibodies have the capacity to prevent Abeta oligomer-induced neurotoxicity in N2A neuroblastoma cells. This neuro-protective effect may reflect the therapeutic potential of the natural anti-Abeta antibodies found in IVIg for the treatment of patients with AD.

  12. Antibodies directed against receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    FAUVEL, Bénédicte; Yasri, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for cancers and inflammatory diseases, and monoclonal antibodies continue to be one of the fastest growing classes of therapeutic molecules. Because aberrant signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is a commonly observed factor in cancer, most of the subclasses of RTKs are being extensively studied as potential targets for treating malignancies. The first two RTKs that have been targeted by antibody therapy, with five currently marketed antibodies, are the growth factor receptors EGFR and HER2. However, due to systemic side effects, refractory patients and the development of drug resistance, these treatments are being challenged by emerging therapeutics. This review examines current monoclonal antibody therapies against RTKs. After an analysis of agents that have already been approved, we present an analysis of antibodies in clinical development that target RTKs. Finally, we highlight promising RTKs that are emerging as new oncological targets for antibody-based therapy. PMID:24859229

  13. Hemoglobin-specific antibody in a multiply transfused patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Noronha, P A; Vida, L N; Park, C L; Honig, G R

    1997-03-15

    Human hemoglobins (Hbs) are known to be immunogenic, and both normal and variant forms of Hb have been shown to stimulate antibody formation in a variety of animal species. In patients who are homozygous for the sickle Hb (HbS) mutation, transfusion of normal, HbA-containing erythrocytes provides a potential stimulus for HbA alloimmunization. We tested serum samples for the presence of anti-Hb antibody by a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using Hb-coated polystyrene microtiter plates. Hb-bound antibody was identified using an antihuman IgG antibody. Serum samples from 89 patients with sickle cell disease were initially tested for evidence of Hb antibody. The serum from three individuals exhibited antibody activity against HbA with little or no activity against HbS. Only one of them, a multiply transfused adult with HbSS, was available for further study. When this patient's antibody was tested against a variety of normal and mutant Hbs using antibody either to human IgG or to kappa chains, the anti-Hb antibody demonstrated specificity for the region of the Hb beta chain corresponding to the site of the amino acid substitution of HbS. The level of activity of the patient's anti-HbA showed no significant change over 1.5 years of observation. The transfusion of erythrocytes containing Hb structurally different from that of the recipient appeared to be capable of stimulating the production of Hb-specific alloimmune antibody. PMID:9058739

  14. Mechanisms of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): anti-leukocyte antibodies.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R; McFarland, Janice G

    2006-05-01

    There is abundant evidence that leukocyte antibodies in blood donor products are somehow involved in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, HLA class II, and neutrophil-specific antibodies in the plasma of both blood donors and recipients have been implicated in the pathogenesis of TRALI. The case for a relationship between leukocyte antibodies and TRALI is more compelling if concordance between the antigen specificity of the leukocyte antibodies in the donor plasma and the corresponding antigen on the cells of the affected recipient is demonstrated. Such antibody-antigen concordance can be investigated by typing the recipient for the cognate leukocyte antigens or by cross-matching the donor plasma against the recipient's leukocytes. Two proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms for TRALI have received the most attention: the antibody hypothesis and the two-event hypothesis. The final common pathway in all of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of TRALI is increased pulmonary capillary permeability, which results in movement of plasma into the alveolar space causing pulmonary edema. A typical TRALI serologic workup consists of tests for HLA class I and II and neutrophil-specific antibodies. The use of flow cytometry and HLA-coated microbeads is recommended for detection of HLA antibodies in plasma of implicated blood donors and a combination of the granulocyte agglutination test and granulocyte immunofluorescence test for detection of neutrophil-specific antibodies. Genotyping for class I and II HLA and for a limited number of neutrophil antigens may also be helpful in establishing antibody-antigen concordance. PMID:16617255

  15. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood. PMID:23299692

  16. The occurrence of leptospiral antibodies in rural inhabitants of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Myers, D M; Varela-Díaz, V M

    1979-06-01

    Sera collected during surveys of presumably healthy rural inhabitants of the Provinces of Corrientes and Neuquén, Argentina, were examined for serological evidence of leptospirosis. Significant antibody levels (1:100 or greater) were found in 8.7 per cent of 1,029 sera from residents of Corrientes Province. The most frequent reactions occurred against the serotypes australis, hebdomadis group, pomona, and icterohaemorrhagiae. The predominance of antibodies to the Australis group in the country is new and suggests the emergence of leptospirosis in an unrecognized animal reservoir host. Out of 706 sera collected from rural school students and sera from 71 adults in the Province of Neuquén, only 4 (0.5%) showed leptospiral agglutinin in the microscopic agglutination test and these were only at a 1:100 serum dilution. The higher percentage of reactors in the Corrientes population appears to reflect a more favorable environment and a greater risk of infection.

  17. A review of monoclonal antibody therapies in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Teo, Esmeralda Chi-yuan; Chew, Yveline; Phipps, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (moAb) represent a novel way of delivering therapy through specific target antigens expressed on lymphoma cells and minimizes the collateral damage that is common with conventional chemotherapy. The paradigm of this approach is the targeting of CD20 by rituximab. Since its FDA approval in 1997, rituximab has become the standard of care in almost every line of therapy in most B-cell lymphomas. This review will briefly highlight some of the key rituximab trials while looking more closely at the evidence that is bringing other antibodies, including next generation anti-CD20 moAbs, and anti-CD30 moAbs, among others to the forefront of lymphoma therapy. PMID:26318093

  18. Glycine receptor antibodies in PERM and related syndromes: characteristics, clinical features and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-González, Alexander; Leite, M. Isabel; Waters, Patrick; Woodhall, Mark; Coutinho, Ester; Balint, Bettina; Lang, Bethan; Pettingill, Philippa; Carr, Aisling; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Press, Raomand; Lunn, Michael P.; Lim, Ming; Maddison, Paul; Meinck, H.-M.; Vandenberghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    monoclonal antibodies to glycine receptor-α1. Ten glycine receptor antibody positive samples were also identified in a retrospective cohort of 56 patients with stiff person syndrome and related syndromes. Glycine receptor antibodies are strongly associated with spinal and brainstem disorders, and the majority of patients have progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. The antibodies demonstrate in vitro evidence of pathogenicity and the patients respond well to immunotherapies, contrasting with earlier studies of this syndrome, which indicated a poor prognosis. The presence of glycine receptor antibodies should help to identify a disease that responds to immunotherapies, but these treatments may need to be sustained, relapses can occur and maintenance immunosuppression may be required. PMID:24951641

  19. Measurement of affinity of viral monoclonal antibodies by ELISA titration of free antibody in equilibrium mixtures.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, A; Van Regenmortel, M H

    1991-08-01

    The binding affinity of a monoclonal antibody (Mab) to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was determined by measuring, in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the amount of free antibody present after ultracentrifugation of virus-antibody complexes at equilibrium. In antibody excess, univalent binding of Mabs was observed and the affinity constant was K = 3.2 +/- 0.4 10(8) l/mol; in antigen excess, bivalent antibody binding was observed and the antibody avidity was about 15 times higher. In antigen excess, it was imperative to correct experimental data for the presence of 0.55% inactive molecules in the immunopurified antibody preparation. Modelling studies suggest that in the case of antibodies of increasing affinity, it becomes increasingly important to correct for the presence of inactive antibody in the binding assay.

  20. Distinction between MOG antibody-positive and AQP4 antibody-positive NMO spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Douglas Kazutoshi; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurelio; Waters, Patrick J.; Jorge, Frederico M. de Haidar; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nakashima, Ichiro; Apostolos-Pereira, Samira Luisa; Talim, Natalia; Simm, Renata Faria; Lino, Angelina Maria Martins; Misu, Tatsuro; Leite, Maria Isabel; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical features among patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) who have myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies, or seronegativity for both antibodies. Methods: Sera from patients diagnosed with NMOSD in 1 of 3 centers (2 sites in Brazil and 1 site in Japan) were tested for MOG and AQP4 antibodies using cell-based assays with live transfected cells. Results: Among the 215 patients with NMOSD, 7.4% (16/215) were positive for MOG antibodies and 64.7% (139/215) were positive for AQP4 antibodies. No patients were positive for both antibodies. Patients with MOG antibodies represented 21.1% (16/76) of the patients negative for AQP4 antibodies. Compared with patients with AQP4 antibodies or patients who were seronegative, patients with MOG antibodies were more frequently male, had a more restricted phenotype (optic nerve more than spinal cord), more frequently had bilateral simultaneous optic neuritis, more often had a single attack, had spinal cord lesions distributed in the lower portion of the spinal cord, and usually demonstrated better functional recovery after an attack. Conclusions: Patients with NMOSD with MOG antibodies have distinct clinical features, fewer attacks, and better recovery than patients with AQP4 antibodies or patients seronegative for both antibodies. PMID:24415568

  1. Rituximab in treatment-resistant CIDP with antibodies against paranodal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Querol, Luis; Rojas-García, Ricard; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Barcena, Joseba; Pardo, Julio; Ortega-Moreno, Angel; Sedano, Maria Jose; Seró-Ballesteros, Laia; Carvajal, Alejandra; Ortiz, Nicolau; Gallardo, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the response to rituximab in patients with treatment-resistant chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) with antibodies against paranodal proteins and correlate the response with autoantibody titers. Methods: Patients with CIDP and IgG4 anti–contactin-1 (CNTN1) or anti–neurofascin-155 (NF155) antibodies who were resistant to IV immunoglobulin and corticosteroids were treated with rituximab and followed prospectively. Immunocytochemistry was used to detect anti-CNTN1 and anti-NF155 antibodies and ELISA with human recombinant CNTN1 and NF155 proteins was used to determine antibody titers. Results: Two patients had a marked improvement; another patient improved slightly after 10 years of stable, severe disease; and the fourth patient had an ischemic stroke unrelated to treatment and was lost to follow-up. Autoantibodies decreased in all patients after rituximab treatment. Conclusions: Rituximab treatment is an option for patients with CIDP with IgG4 anti-CNTN1/NF155 antibodies who are resistant to conventional therapies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that rituximab is effective for patients with treatment-resistant CIDP with IgG4 anti-CNTN1 or anti-NF155 antibodies. PMID:26401517

  2. [2-site competitive immunoenzyme analysis based on monoclonal antibodies for the detection and titration of antihemagglutinating measles antibodies].

    PubMed

    Nagieva, F G; Nikulina, V G; Krasnova, N I; Barkova, E P; Karmanova, R I; Pikhtianen, A I; Andzhaparidze, O G

    1991-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies (MCA) to measles virus (strain Leningrad-16) hemagglutinin, a competitive enzyme immunoassay (cEIA) was developed for the detection and titration of antihemagglutinating antibodies in human sera. Serum samples from children, collected in measles foci, were tested in cEIA, SP-EIA, HI, and PHA tests. The results evidence a high correlation of antihemagglutinin titres in cEIA and HI tests, the correlation coefficient of cEIA and PHA being 97.7%. The cEIA based on MCA to measles virus hemagglutinin is highly specific for the detection and titration of measles antihemagglutinins, it does not involve the use of simian erythrocytes. A significant advantage of this test system consists in the possibility of using unpurified antigen prepared from the infected cell lysate.

  3. Individual-specific antibody identification methods

    DOEpatents

    Francoeur, Ann -Michele

    1989-11-14

    An identification method, applicable to the identification of animals or inanimate objects, is described. The method takes advantage of a hithertofore unknown set of individual-specific, or IS antibodies, that are part of the unique antibody repertoire present in animals, by reacting an effective amount of IS antibodies with a particular panel, or n-dimensional array (where n is typically one or two) consisting of an effective amount of many different antigens (typically greater than one thousand), to give antibody-antigen complexes. The profile or pattern formed by the antigen-antibody complexes, termed an antibody fingerprint, when revealed by an effective amount of an appropriate detector molecule, is uniquely representative of a particular individual. The method can similarly by used to distinguish genetically, or otherwise similar individuals, or their body parts containing IS antibodies. Identification of inanimate objects, particularly security documents, is similarly affected by associating with the documents, an effective amount of a particular individual's IS antibodies, or conversely, a particular panel of antigens, and forming antibody-antigen complexes with a particular panel of antigens, or a particular individual's IS antibodies, respectively. One embodiment of the instant identification method, termed the blocked fingerprint assay, has applications in the area of allergy testing, autoimmune diagnostics and therapeutics, and the detection of environmental antigens such as pathogens, chemicals, and toxins.

  4. Dengue Virus (DENV) Neutralizing Antibody Kinetics in Children After Symptomatic Primary and Postprimary DENV Infection.

    PubMed

    Clapham, Hannah E; Rodriguez-Barraquer, Isabel; Azman, Andrew S; Althouse, Benjamin M; Salje, Henrik; Gibbons, Robert V; Rothman, Alan L; Jarman, Richard G; Nisalak, Ananda; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Nimmannitya, Suchitra; Vaughn, David W; Green, Sharone; Yoon, In-Kyu; Cummings, Derek A T

    2016-05-01

    The immune response to dengue virus (DENV) infection is complex and not fully understood. Using longitudinal data from 181 children with dengue in Thailand who were followed for up to 3 years, we describe neutralizing antibody kinetics following symptomatic DENV infection. We observed that antibody titers varied by serotype, homotypic vs heterotypic responses, and primary versus postprimary infections. The rates of change in antibody titers over time varied between primary and postprimary responses. For primary infections, titers increased from convalescence to 6 months. By comparing homotypic and heterotypic antibody titers, we saw an increase in type specificity from convalescence to 6 months for primary DENV3 infections but not primary DENV1 infections. In postprimary cases, there was a decrease in titers from convalescence up until 6 months after infection. Beginning 1 year after both primary and postprimary infections, there was evidence of increasing antibody titers, with greater increases in children with lower titers, suggesting that antibody titers were boosted due to infection and that higher levels of neutralizing antibody may be more likely to confer a sterilizing immune response. These findings may help to model virus transmission dynamics and provide baseline data to support the development of vaccines and therapeutics.

  5. In-situ Detection of Squalane in Sedimentary Organic Matter Using Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. V.; Corsetti, F. A.; Moldowan, J. M.; Fago, F.; Caron, D.

    2008-12-01

    Sedimentary geolipids can serve as powerful tools for reconstructing ancient ecosystems, but only if investigators can demonstrate that the hydrocarbons are indigenous to their host rocks. The association of molecules with primary sedimentary fabrics could indicate a syngenetic relationship. However, traditional biomarker analyses require extraction from large quantities of powdered rock, confounding detailed spatial correlations. Biological studies commonly use antibodies as extremely sensitive molecular probes. When coupled with fluorescent labels, antibodies allow for the visual localization of molecules. Here we show that monoclonal antibodies that bind specifically to geolipid compounds can be used for in situ detection and labeling of such compounds in mineral-bound organic macerals. Monoclonal antibodies to squalene, produced for human health studies, also react with the geolipid, squalane. We show that squalene antibodies do not react with other common sedimentary hydrocarbons. We also show that squalane antibodies bind specifically to isolated organic-rich lamina in Eocene-age, squalane-containing rocks. These results suggest that squalane is confined to discrete organo-sedimentary fabrics within those rocks, providing evidence for its syngeneity. The chemical similarity of squalane to other sedimentary hydrocarbons hints at the potential for developing monoclonal antibodies to a variety of biomarkers that could then be localized in rocks, sediments, and extant cells.

  6. Serum and tear antibodies to Chlamydia after reinfection with guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis agent.

    PubMed

    Malaty, R; Dawson, C R; Wong, I; Lyon, C; Schachter, J

    1981-12-01

    Repeated inoculation of th eyes of guinea pigs with the naturally occurring Chlamydia psittaci agent, guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC), showed that animals gradually become susceptible to reinfection with the passage of time after primary infection. Higher levels of serum IgG antibody had a significant association with resistance to challenge inoculation only with a high dose (250 ELD50) but not with a low dose (25 ELD50) inoculum. With each inoculum, however, some animals with high serum antibody were susceptible. the presence of antibodies in tears did not correlate with resistance to the first low-dose challenge inoculation, but both tear IgG and secretory antibody did have a significant association with resistance on the second rechallenge with a high-dose inoculum. Topical treatment of the eye with immune serum or tears during primary infection reduced the amount of agent in the conjunctiva only during the period of application. Local treatment of the eye with heat-killed vaccine prior to primary infection did not produce detectable antibody or protect animals against challenge inoculation; this local immunization did "prime" the animals, however, so that they had an accelerated antibody response after infection. Although there is abundant evidence that local immunity has an important role in resistance to challenge inoculation with GPIC, serum and tear antibody levels correlate equally well with resistance to repeated ocular challenge inoculation. Effective immunization procedures for this chlamydial infection then would involve stimulation of both local and systemic immune responses.

  7. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J.; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  8. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  9. Anti-neural antibody reactivity in patients with a history of Lyme borreliosis and persistent symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Abhishek; Wormser, Gary P.; Klempner, Mark S.; Trevino, Richard P.; Crow, Mary K.; Latov, Norman; Alaedini, Armin

    2010-01-01

    Some Lyme disease patients report debilitating chronic symptoms of pain, fatigue, and cognitive deficits despite recommended courses of antibiotic treatment. The mechanisms responsible for these symptoms, collectively referred to as post-Lyme disease syndrome (PLS) or chronic Lyme disease, remain unclear. We investigated the presence of immune system abnormalities in PLS by assessing the levels of antibodies to neural proteins in patients and controls. Serum samples from PLS patients, post-Lyme disease healthy individuals, patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and normal healthy individuals were analyzed for anti-neural antibodies by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Anti-neural antibody reactivity was found to be significantly higher in the PLS group than in the post-Lyme healthy (p<0.01) and normal healthy (p<0.01) groups. The observed heightened antibody reactivity in PLS patients could not be attributed solely to the presence of cross-reactive anti-borrelia antibodies, as the borrelial seronegative patients also exhibited elevated anti-neural antibody levels. Immunohistochemical analysis of PLS serum antibody activity demonstrated binding to cells in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The results provide evidence for the existence of a differential immune system response in PLS, offering new clues about the etiopathogenesis of the disease that may prove useful in devising more effective treatment strategies. PMID:20227484

  10. Suitability of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α7 and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor 3 Antibodies for Immune Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rommel, Frank R.; Raghavan, Badrinarayanan; Paddenberg, Renate; Kummer, Wolfgang; Tumala, Susanne; Lochnit, Günter; Gieler, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence reveals a crucial role for acetylcholine and its receptors in the regulation of inflammation, particularly of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (Chrna7) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 3 (Chrm3). Immunohistochemistry is a key tool for their cellular localization in functional tissues. We evaluated nine different commercially available antibodies on back skin tissue from wild-type (Wt) and gene-deficient (KO) mice. In the immunohistochemical analysis, we focused on key AChR-ligand sensitive skin cells (mast cells, nerve fibers and keratinocytes). All five antibodies tested for Chrm3 and the first three Chrna7 antibodies stained positive in both Wt and respective KO skin. With the 4th antibody (ab23832) nerve fibers were unlabeled in the KO mice. By western blot analysis, this antibody detected bands in both Wt and Chrna7 KO skin and brain. qRT-PCR revealed mRNA amplification with a primer set for the undeleted region in both Wt and KO mice, but none with a primer set for the deleted region in KO mice. By 2D electrophoresis, we found β-actin and β-enolase cross reactivity, which was confirmed by double immunolabeling. In view of the present results, the tested antibodies are not suitable for immunolocalization in skin and suggest thorough control of antibody specificity is required if histomorphometry is intended. PMID:25673288

  11. Increased brain penetration and potency of a therapeutic antibody using a monovalent molecular shuttle.

    PubMed

    Niewoehner, Jens; Bohrmann, Bernd; Collin, Ludovic; Urich, Eduard; Sade, Hadassah; Maier, Peter; Rueger, Petra; Stracke, Jan Olaf; Lau, Wilma; Tissot, Alain C; Loetscher, Hansruedi; Ghosh, Anirvan; Freskgård, Per-Ola

    2014-01-01

    Although biotherapeutics have vast potential for treating brain disorders, their use has been limited due to low exposure across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We report that by manipulating the binding mode of an antibody fragment to the transferrin receptor (TfR), we have developed a Brain Shuttle module, which can be engineered into a standard therapeutic antibody for successful BBB transcytosis. Brain Shuttle version of an anti-Aβ antibody, which uses a monovalent binding mode to the TfR, increases β-Amyloid target engagement in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease by 55-fold compared to the parent antibody. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that the monovalent binding mode facilitates transcellular transport, whereas a bivalent binding mode leads to lysosome sorting. Enhanced target engagement of the Brain Shuttle module translates into a significant improvement in amyloid reduction. These findings have major implications for the development of biologics-based treatment of brain disorders.

  12. Transgenic plants expressing a functional single-chain Fv antibody are specifically protected from virus attack.

    PubMed

    Tavladoraki, P; Benvenuto, E; Trinca, S; De Martinis, D; Cattaneo, A; Galeffi, P

    1993-12-01

    Expression of viral genes in transgenic plants is a very effective tool for attenuating plant viral infection. Nevertheless, the lack of generality and risk issues related to the expression of viral genes in plants might limit the exploitation of this strategy. Expression in plants of antibodies against essential viral proteins could provide an alternative approach to engineer viral resistance. Recently, expression of complete or engineered antibodies has been successfully achieved in plants. The engineered single-chain Fv antibody scFv (refs 10, 11) is particularly suitable for expression in plants because of its small size and the lack of assembly requirements. Here we present evidence that constitutive expression in transgenic plants of a scFv antibody, directed against the plant icosahedral tombusvirus artichoke mottled crinkle virus, causes reduction of infection incidence and delay in symptom development. PMID:8247156

  13. Stabilization of antibody fragments in adverse environments.

    PubMed

    Dooley, H; Grant, S D; Harris, W J; Porter, A J

    1998-08-01

    Antibody fragments have the potential to be used as sensitive and specific binding agents in a broad range of industrial applications. Genetic manipulation has been used to design a series of antibody fragment configurations with a flexible linker and/or a disulphide bond between the heavy chain and light chain of an antibody fragment against the herbicide atrazine. The thermostability and stability to a range of denaturants, polar and non-polar solvents, surfactants and proteases have been compared. It has been found that a novel antibody fragment construct (STAB: stabilized antibody) containing both a flexible linker and a disulphide bond can be effectively produced and shows greatly improved stability in these diverse environments. These STABs should be useful in environmental diagnostics and remediation, and may provide a generic approach for stabilizing antibody fragments in formulations containing detergents and penetrants for topical application in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.

  14. Factors determining antibody distribution in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    The development of antibody therapies for cancer is increasing rapidly, primarily owing to their specificity. Antibody distribution in tumors is often extremely uneven, however, leading to some malignant cells being exposed to saturating concentrations of antibody, whereas others are completely untargeted. This is detrimental because large regions of cells escape therapy, whereas other regions might be exposed to suboptimal concentrations that promote a selection of resistant mutants. The distribution of antibody depends on a variety of factors, including dose, affinity, antigens per cell and molecular size. Because these parameters are often known or easily estimated, a quick calculation based on simple modeling considerations can predict the uniformity of targeting within a tumor. Such analyses should enable experimental researchers to identify in a straightforward way the limitations in achieving evenly distributed antibody, and design and test improved antibody therapeutics more rationally. PMID:18179828

  15. The antibody crossmatch in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Robert D.; Fung, John J.; Markus, Bernd; Fox, Ira; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Esquivel, Carlos O.; Tzakis, Andreas; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Six hundred sixty-seven first, second, and third orthotopic liver allografts in 520 patients were reviewed to determine the effect of recipient panel-reactive antibody (PRA) and donor-recipient antibody crossmatch on 2-year patient and liver allograft survival rates. Neither a high panel-reactive antibody nor a positive crossmatch for donor-specific preformed antibody was associated with decreased patient or liver allograft survival for primary grafts or retransplants. Two patients have been given kidney transplants immediately after a liver allograft from a donor with whom each patient had an initial strongly positive donor-specific antibody crossmatch. The liver apparently removed or neutralized circulating anti-donor antibody, since the renal allografts functioned promptly and did not experience hyperacute rejection. PMID:3532391

  16. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  17. Peptide Antibodies: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies recognize epitopes with amino acid residues adjacent in sequence ("linear" epitopes). Such antibodies can be made to virtually any sequence and have been immensely important in all areas of molecular biology and diagnostics due to their versatility and to the rapid growth in protein sequence information. Today, peptide antibodies can be routinely and rapidly made to large numbers of peptides, including peptides with posttranslationally modified residues, and are used for immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoassays. In the future, peptide antibodies will continue to be immensely important for molecular biology, TCR- and MHC-like peptide antibodies may be produced routinely, peptide antibodies with predetermined conformational specificities may be designed, and peptide-based vaccines may become part of vaccination programs.

  18. Radioimmunotherapy of malignancy using antibody targeted radionuclides.

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, L. M.; Humm, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Antibodies directed against tumour associated antigens provide a means for delivering preferentially cytotoxic radionuclides to the cells of primary and secondary tumours. The factors that influence the effectiveness of the radiation in the tumour compared with its effect on the radiosensitive normal tissues include the specificity of the antibody, the distribution of targeted energy within the tumour and the host's response to the injected foreign antibody. Recently some encouraging results from clinical trials of radioimmunotherapy have been reported in the literature. There is a continual search for more avid and specific antibodies, and the techniques of genetic engineering are being applied to the problem of reducing the antigenicity and mass of the carrier antibody. The improved efficiency of the labelled antibody needs to be supplemented by an identification of those tumours most likely to respond to this form of therapy. PMID:3542006

  19. Antibody Based Imaging Strategies of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Warram, Jason M; de Boer, Esther; Sorace, Anna G; Chung, Thomas K; Kim, Hyunki; Pleijhuis, Rick G; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2014-01-01

    Although mainly developed for preclinical research and therapeutic use, antibodies have high antigen specificity, which can be used as a courier to selectively deliver a diagnostic probe or therapeutic agent to cancer. It is generally accepted that the optimal antigen for imaging will depend on both the expression in the tumor relative to normal tissue and the homogeneity of expression throughout the tumor mass and between patients. For the purpose of diagnostic imaging, novel antibodies can be developed to target antigens for disease detection, or current FDA-approved antibodies can be repurposed with the covalent addition of an imaging probe. Reuse of therapeutic antibodies for diagnostic purposes reduces translational costs since the safety profile of the antibody is well defined and the agent is already available under conditions suitable for human use. In this review, we will explore a wide range of antibodies and imaging modalities that are being translated to the clinic for cancer identification and surgical treatment. PMID:24913898

  20. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  1. Nanoliposome-mediated targeting of antibodies to tumors: IVIG antibodies as a model.

    PubMed

    Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Tavakkol-Afshari, Jalil; Gholizadeh, Zahra; Sadri, Kayvan; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Badiee, Ali; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-11-10

    Monoclonal antibodies are routinely used as tools in immunotherapies against solid tumors. However, administration of monoclonal antibodies may cause undesired side effects due to their accumulation in non-targeted organs. Nanoliposomes of less than 200 nm can target antibodies to tumors by enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) mechanisms. To direct monoclonal antibodies to tumors, nanoliposomes encapsulating intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) as a model antibody were prepared. The liposomes had average diameters of 100 nm and encapsulation efficiencies of 31 to 46%. They showed less than 10% release in plasma at 37°C up to seven days. The secondary and tertiary structures of liposome-encapsulated antibodies were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The near and far-UV spectra analyses revealed no obvious conformational changes in the structures of the encapsulated antibodies. The biodistribution of free and liposome-encapsulated iodinated antibodies was investigated in mice bearing C-26 colon carcinoma tumors. The accumulation of liposome-encapsulated antibodies in tumors was significantly greater than that of free antibodies due to the EPR effect. The PEGylated liposomes were more efficient in the delivery of antibodies to the tumor site than non-PEGylated liposomes. We conclude that administration of monoclonal antibodies in PEGylated liposomes is more efficient than administration of non-encapsulated monoclonal antibodies for solid tumor immunotherapy. PMID:26302860

  2. Role of anti-vimentin antibodies in allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Rose, Marlene L

    2013-11-01

    Production of anti-vimentin antibodies (AVA) after solid organ transplantation are common. Although classically thought to be expressed mainly within the cytosol, recent evidence demonstrates that extracellular or cell surface expression of vimentin is not unusual. This review examines the evidence to assess whether AVA contribute to allograft pathology. Clinical studies suggest that AVA are associated with cardiac allograft vasculopathy in heart transplant recipients. Studies in non-human primates confirm that production of AVA after renal and heart transplantation are not inhibited by Cyclosporine. Experimental studies have demonstrated that mice pre-immunised with vimentin undergo accelerated acute rejection and vascular intimal occlusion of cardiac allografts. Adoptive transfer of hyperimmune sera containing AVA into B-cell-knock-out mice caused accelerated rejection of allografted hearts, this is clear evidence that antibodies to vimentin accelerate rejection. AVA act in concert with the alloimmune response and AVA do not damage syngeneic or native heart allografts. Confocal microscopy of allografted organs in vimentin immunised mice shows extensive expression of vimentin on endothelial cells, apoptotic leukocytes and platelet/leukocyte conjugates, co-localising with C4d. One explanation for the ability of AVA to accelerate rejection would be fixation of complement within the graft and subsequent pro-inflammatory effects; there may also be interactions with platelets within the vasculature.

  3. Antibody engineering and therapeutics, The Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society: December 8-12, 2013, Huntington Beach, CA.

    PubMed

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul W H I; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates.

  4. Anti-enterobacteria antibodies in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lapadula, G; Iannone, F; Covelli, M; Numo, R; Pipitone, V

    1992-01-01

    The occurrence of certain antibacterial antibodies was studied in the sera of 22 healthy donors (HD) and 66 patients with different diseases. The cases investigated included 22 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 22 non-arthritic-psoriasis (NAP), and 22 psoriatic arthritis (PA) patients. A complement fixation test was used with Yersinia enterocolitica 0:3 type (YEC), Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YPT), Campylobacter jejuni (CJ), and Campylobacter fetus (CF) antigens; the detection of anti-Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) antibodies was carried out using an immunoperoxidase colorimetric slide test that allowed the detection of isotypes of specific antibodies. It was found that the synthesis of anti-CF, CJ, YEC, and YPT antibodies in NAP patients does not differ significantly from that of the HD group; on the contrary, the antibody levels were statistically higher in PA than in the other disease groups or in the healthy controls, although only anti-CF antibodies seemed to significantly differentiate (p = 0.000003) the PA group from the others. Anti-CT IgA antibody titers were found to be significantly higher in the PA as well as in the RA groups when compared with the controls, while the antibody levels in NAP patients showed no clear-cut difference with respect to those of either the arthritic patients or the healthy controls. By showing that anti-enterobacterial antibodies are increased in PA but not in NAP patients, our data furnish additional support to the thesis of a pathogenic role of bacterial infections in psoriatic arthritis.

  5. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  6. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  7. 5th Annual Monoclonal Antibodies Conference

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The conference, which was organized by Visiongain and held at the BSG Conference Center in London, provided an excellent opportunity for participants to exchange views on the development, production and marketing of therapeutic antibodies, and discuss the current business environment. The conference included numerous interactive panel and group discussions on topics such as isotyping for therapeutic antibodies (panel chair: Nick Pullen, Pfizer), prospects for fully human monoclonal antibodies (chair: Christian Rohlff, Oxford BioTherapeutics), perspectives on antibody manufacturing and development (chair: Bo Kara, Avecia), market impact and post-marketing issues (chair: Keith Rodgers, Bodiam Consulting) and angiogenesis inhibitors (chair: David Blakey, AstraZeneca). PMID:20073132

  8. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, Patricia J; Castiblanco, Diana P; Russell Knode, Lisa M

    2015-12-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  9. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  10. Reducing the cost of HIV antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, H; Maskill, W; Emmanuel, J; Fauquex, A; Sato, P; Heymann, D

    1993-07-10

    Available tests to detect antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a range of applications, and injudicious selection and inappropriate use can add a significant financial burden to budgets for AIDS programmes in developing countries. There are several ways by which the cost of HIV antibody testing can be reduced; they include use of tests appropriate for existing laboratory capabilities; adoption of cost-effective testing strategies; pooling of serum samples before testing; and ensuring best possible purchase prices. Each approach can significantly reduce the cost of HIV antibody testing alone or in combination, which increases the potential sustainability of antibody testing programmes, even in settings of limited resources. PMID:8100916

  11. Studies on the control of antibody synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, T. P.; Kim, Young Tai; Quagliata, F.; Siskind, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The distribution and heterogeneity of antibody affinity has been followed with time after immunization. Initially, a symmetrical distribution of heterogeneous low affinity antibody molecules is present. With time the population becomes skewed towards the high affinity end of the distribution, the average affinity increases, and the bulk of the antibody generally comes to be present in a subpopulation of high affinity and of relatively restricted heterogeneity. Still later after immunization, the proportion of high affinity antibody decreases and a highly heterogeneous population of antibody molecules is present with a somewhat decreased average affinity. Low affinity subpopulations were found to persist throughout the course of the immune response. In addition it was noted that by day 42 after immunization a significant amount of the highest affinity antibody that a given rabbit would synthesize at any time during its immune response was already present. Thus, changes in average affinity can be accounted for by shifts in the relative amounts of those antibody subpopulations already present by day 42 and do not require the appearance of any new antibody species. The results can be interpreted as consistent with a selection theory of antibody synthesis in which cells of high affinity are preferentially selected in what amounts to a micro-evolutionary system. PMID:4574576

  12. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Patricia J.; Castiblanco, Diana P.; Russell Knode, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  13. Antibodies in myasthenia gravis and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Angela; McConville, John; Farrugia, Maria Elena; Bowen, John; Plested, Paul; Tang, Teresa; Evoli, Amelia; Matthews, Ian; Sims, Gary; Dalton, Paolo; Jacobson, Leslie; Polizzi, Agata; Blaes, Frans; Lang, Bethan; Beeson, David; Willcox, Nick; Newsom-Davis, John; Hoch, Werner

    2003-09-01

    Acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies are present in around 85% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) as measured by the conventional radioimmunoprecipitation assay. Antibodies that block the fetal form of the AChR are occasionally present in mothers who develop MG after pregnancy, especially in those whose babies are born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. The antibodies cross the placenta and block neuromuscular transmission, leading to joint deformities and often stillbirth. In these mothers, antibodies made in the thymus are mainly specific for fetal AChR and show restricted germline origins, suggesting a highly mutated clonal response; subsequent spread to involve adult AChR could explain development of maternal MG in those cases who first present after pregnancy. In the 15% of "seronegative" MG patients without AChR antibodies (SNMG), there are serum factors that increase AChR phosphorylation and reduce AChR function, probably acting via a different membrane receptor. These factors are not IgG and could be IgM or even non-Ig serum proteins. In a proportion of SNMG patients, however, IgG antibodies to the muscle-specific kinase, MuSK, are present. These antibodies are not found in AChR antibody-positive MG and are predominantly IgG4. MuSK antibody positivity appears to be associated with more severe bulbar disease that can be difficult to treat effectively.

  14. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  15. Snake venom antibodies in Ecuadorian Indians.

    PubMed

    Theakston, R D; Reid, H A; Larrick, J W; Kaplan, J; Yost, J A

    1981-10-01

    Serum samples from 223 Waorani Indians, a tribe in eastern Ecuador, were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies to snake venom. Seventy-eight per cent were positive, confirming the highest incidence and mortality from snake bite poisoning yet recorded in the world. Most samples were positive for more than one venom antibody. Antibodies were found to venoms of Bothrops viper in 60% of positive cases, of Micrurus coral snake in 21%, and of the bushmaster, Lachesis muta, in 18%. Further studies are needed to determine whether high venom-antibody levels afford protection against further snake envenoming. PMID:7299877

  16. Somatic diversification of antibody responses

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B.; Kelsoe, G.; Han, S.

    1996-01-01

    The humoral immune response is the culmination of a complex series of cellular interactions and migrations that define specific pathways of antigen-driven B cell differentiation. There are about 5 x 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 12} B lymphocyte lineage cells in the mouse and human, respectively, after the immune system has been established. B lymphocytes perceive antigen in their environment by virtue of their surface receptors (B cell receptor; BCR), in which membrane-associated immunoglobulin (mIg) is the antigen recognition substructure and the associated Ig{alpha} and Ig{beta} molecules transduce the activation signal. mIgs have extensive structural homology to immunoglobulins which are secreted by differentiated daughter cells following antigen stimulation. The specificity of a given BCR or antibody is created by a programmed successive process of gene rearrangements, first of D to J segments, then of V to DJ segments of the Ig heavy (H)-chain gene loci, and finally, of V to J segments of the Ig light (L)-chain gene loci. V,D, and J elements are assembled in a enormous number of combinations; variability is further achieved at the break-points of joining segments, including the insertion of non-germline-encoded nucleotide (N)sequences at the borders of V(D)J points, hence the almost unlimited specificities of the B cells or antibody repertoire. 129 refs.

  17. The second life of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Navolotskaya, E V

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins, Ig) are used by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign objects and are responsible for antigen-binding and effector functions. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is the major serum immunoglobulin of a healthy human (~75% of the total Ig fraction). The discovery in 1970 of the endogenous tetrapeptide tuftsin (Thr-Lys-Pro-Arg, fragment 289-292 of the C(H2)-domain of the heavy (H) chain of IgG), possessing both immunostimulatory and neurotrophic activities, was an impetus for the search for new biologically active peptides of immunoglobulin origin. As a result, fragments of the H-chain of IgG produced as a result of enzymatic cleavage of IgG within the antigen-antibody complex were discovered, synthesized, and studied. These fragments include rigin (341-344), immunorphin (364-373), immunocortin (11-20), and peptide p24 (335-358) and its fragments. In this review the properties of these peptides and their role in regulating the immune response are analyzed. PMID:24512657

  18. QUANTITATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF IDIOTYPIC ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Susan B.; Schroeder, Kenneth W.; Nisonoff, Alfred

    1971-01-01

    The effect of challenge by antigen on persistence of clones of antibody-producing cells and on the induction of new clones was investigated through quantitative measurements of idiotypic specificities. In each of nine rabbits idiotypic specificities present in the earliest bleedings were completely replaced after a few months; subsequent changes occurred much more slowly. On a quantitative basis the population of molecules used as immunogen always reacted most effectively with the homologous anti-idiotypic antiserum. Little effect of increased antigen dose on the rate of change of idiotype was observed. Even large amounts of antigen administered every 2 wk caused only gradual changes in idiotypic specificities. This was attributed either to more effective capture of antigen by memory cells, as compared to precursor cells, or to the induction of tolerance in those clones that were not expressed. In two of three rabbits on a monthly injection schedule, the idiotypic specificities identified underwent very slow changes over a period as long as 17 months. Changes occurred more rapidly when antigen was administered every 2 wk. In each of four rabbits investigated, all idiotypic specificities identified before a 5 month rest period were still present afterwards, indicating the survival of essentially all clones of antibody-producing cells during that interval. Quantitative inhibition data indicated that some new clones of cells were initiated. PMID:15776574

  19. Antibody Staining in Drosophila Germaria.

    PubMed

    Lie-Jensen, Anette; Haglund, Kaisa

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila oogenesis is a powerful model for studying a wide spectrum of cellular and developmental processes in vivo. Oogenesis starts in a specialized structure called the germarium, which harbors the stem cells for both germ and somatic cells. The germarium produces egg chambers, each of which will develop into an egg. Active areas of research in Drosophila germaria include stem cell self-renewal, division, and maintenance, cell cycle control and differentiation, oocyte specification, intercellular communication, and signaling, among others. The solid knowledge base, the genetic tractability of the Drosophila model, as well as the availability and fast development of tools and imaging techniques for oogenesis research ensure that studies in this model will keep being instrumental for novel discoveries within cell and developmental biology also in the future. This chapter focuses on antibody staining in Drosophila germaria and provides a protocol for immunostaining as well as an overview of commonly used antibodies for visualization of different cell types and cellular structures. The protocol is well-suited for subsequent confocal microscopy analyses, and in addition we present key adaptations of the protocol that are useful when performing structured illumination microscopy (SIM) super-resolution imaging. PMID:27557571

  20. Monoclonal antibodies with group specificity toward sulfonamides: Selection of hapten and antibody selectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although many antibodies to sulfonamides have been generated, immunoassays based on the current available antibodies for large multi-sulfonamide screening programs have properties dependent on the immunizing hapten structure and have always suffered from high selectivity for individual sulfonamides....

  1. Optimization of monoclonal antibody delivery via the lymphatics: the dose dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, M.A.; Parker, R.J.; Covell, D.G.; Holton, O.D. 3d.; Keenan, A.M.; Sieber, S.M.; Weinstein, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    After interstitial injection in mice, antibody molecules enter local lymphatic vessels, flow with the lymph to regional lymph nodes, and bind to target antigens there. Compared with i.v. administration, delivery via the lymphatics provides a more efficient means for localizing antibody in lymph nodes. An IgG2a (36-7-5) directed against the murine class I major histocompatibility antigen H-2Kk has proved useful for studying the pharmacology of lymphatic delivery. At very low doses, most of the antibody remains at the injection site in Kk-positive animals. As the dose is progressively increased, most effective labeling occurs first in nodes proximal to the injection site and then in the next group of nodes along the lymphatic chain. At higher doses, antibody overflows the lymphatic system and enters the blood-stream via the thoracic duct and other lymphatic-venous connections. Once in the blood, antibody is rapidly cleared, apparently by binding to Kk-bearing cells. These findings indicate that the single-pass distribution of monoclonal antibodies in the lymphatics can be strongly dose dependent, a principle which may be of clinical significance in the improvement of immunolymphoscintigraphic imaging, especially with antibodies directed against normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Monoclonal antibodies directed against normal cell types in the lymph node may be useful for assessing the integrity of lymphatic chains by immunolymphoscintigraphy or, more speculatively, for altering the status of regional immune function. The results presented here indicate that a low or intermediate antibody dose may optimize the signal:noise ratio for imaging. In Kk-negative animals, the percentage of dose taken up in the major organs was essentially independent of the dose administered; there was no evidence for saturable sites of nonspecific binding.

  2. Role of group 3 innate lymphoid cells in antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Giuliana; Cerutti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) constitute a heterogeneous family of effector lymphocytes of the innate immune system that mediate lymphoid organogenesis, tissue repair, immunity and inflammation. The initial view that ILCs exert their protective functions solely during the innate phase of an immune response has been recently challenged by evidence indicating that ILCs shape adaptive immunity by establishing both contact-dependent and contact-independent interactions with multiple hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells, including B cells. Some of these interactions enhance antibody responses both systemically and at mucosal sites of entry. PMID:25621842

  3. Comparison of the lateral tail vein and the retro-orbital venous sinus routes of antibody administration in pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Angela; Thorey, Irmgard S; Engert, Julia; Winter, Gerhard; Emrich, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    In pharmacokinetic studies, intravenous (i.v.) administration of antibodies to mice is usually done via the lateral tail vein. This approach can cause stress to the mice and has a high rate of failure because it is challenging to perform correctly. Administration via the retro-orbital venous sinus has been suggested as a good alternative to tail vein i.v. administration of antibodies. Evidence is still needed, however, to determine whether the route of administration has an effect on the absorption or the pharmacokinetic activity of the injected antibody. The authors compared serum concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters of a therapeutic antibody administered via tail vein injection or via retro-orbital injection. The findings suggest that there is no difference in the absorption or pharmacokinetic activity of therapeutic antibodies when administered via the lateral tail vein versus the retro-orbital venous sinus.

  4. Heparanase-neutralizing antibodies attenuate lymphoma tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, Marina; Arvatz, Gil; Horowitz, Netanel; Feld, Sari; Naroditsky, Inna; Zhang, Yi; Ng, Mary; Hammond, Edward; Nevo, Eviatar; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans, resulting in disassembly of the extracellular matrix underlying endothelial and epithelial cells and associating with enhanced cell invasion and metastasis. Heparanase expression is induced in carcinomas and sarcomas, often associating with enhanced tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. In contrast, the function of heparanase in hematological malignancies (except myeloma) was not investigated in depth. Here, we provide evidence that heparanase is expressed by human follicular and diffused non-Hodgkin's B-lymphomas, and that heparanase inhibitors restrain the growth of tumor xenografts produced by lymphoma cell lines. Furthermore, we describe, for the first time to our knowledge, the development and characterization of heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that inhibit cell invasion and tumor metastasis, the hallmark of heparanase activity. Using luciferase-labeled Raji lymphoma cells, we show that the heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies profoundly inhibit tumor load in the mouse bones, associating with reduced cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Notably, we found that Raji cells lack intrinsic heparanase activity, but tumor xenografts produced by this cell line exhibit typical heparanase activity, likely contributed by host cells composing the tumor microenvironment. Thus, the neutralizing monoclonal antibodies attenuate lymphoma growth by targeting heparanase in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26729870

  5. Antibody profiling as an identification tool for forensic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Davis, Tilton; Nieto, Sylvia R.; Unger, Thomas F.

    1999-02-01

    A novel identification technique called antibody profiling was examined as an alternative to DNA-based methods for matching crime scene evidence to a suspect. This technique provides results within 2 hours, is 1/100 the cost of DNA tests, and does not require skilled technicians or expensive equipment. A matrix of 422 blood samples were prepared to mimic typical crime scene conditions and provide validation for the technique. The effects of sample size, drying temperature, binary and ternary blood mixtures, adulteration with chemicals, and placement on a variety of surfaces were examined. Using the antibody profiling method, 91% of the 422 samples were correctly identified. In addition, binary blood mixtures could be identified with up to 40% contaminating blood. Temperatures at or above 60 degree(s)C and the presence of soil in the samples interfered with the ability to correctly identify samples. In this study, the antibody profiling technique was shown to be an excellent alternative to DNA-based identification methods. This method will find applications in situations where results are needed rapidly, where it is necessary to screen multiple suspects, and in remote areas where the equipment and technical skills needed for DNA testing are not available.

  6. REGULATION OF THE SECONDARY ANTIBODY RESPONSE IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Charles T.

    1973-01-01

    A material inhibiting antibody synthesis in vitro is produced during the productive phase by rabbit lymph node organ cultures undergoing a secondary response. This antibody inhibitory material (AIM) has been isolated from serum-free medium taken from the cultures and also extracted from lymph node fragments as late as their 4th wk in vitro. AIM inhibits most strikingly the early productive phase of the secondary response in vitro (i.e, during the 2nd wk). AIM isolated from cultures undergoing a given immune response inhibits the same as well as different responses, thus indicating an immunologically nonspecific effect. Ultrafiltration and related studies reveal that the molecular size of AIM is 10,000–50,000 daltons and that it is not antibody. AIM can readily be separated from 7S globulin by use of CM-cellulose. The inhibitory activity of AIM is lost by digestion with ribonuclease. Thus the avoidance of serum with its high levels of ribonucleases may be crucial in the study of this material. The presence in eukaryotic cells of metabolic regulators, governors, etc. has been postulated largely by analogy with microbial systems (27). There is little direct evidence about the chemical nature of these presumed regulators. Our data on the RNase sensitivity of AIM raises the possibility in this lymphoid system of regulation by a species of RNA. PMID:4709267

  7. Donor-specific antibodies accelerate arteriosclerosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gary S; Nochy, Dominique; Bruneval, Patrick; Duong van Huyen, J P; Glotz, Denis; Suberbielle, Caroline; Zuber, Julien; Anglicheau, Dany; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Loupy, Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    In biopsies of renal allografts, arteriosclerosis is often more severe than expected based on the age of the donor, even without a history of rejection vasculitis. To determine whether preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) may contribute to the severity of arteriosclerosis, we examined protocol biopsies from patients with (n=40) or without (n=59) DSA after excluding those with any evidence of vasculitis. Among DSA-positive patients, arteriosclerosis significantly progressed between month 3 and month 12 after transplant (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 1.12 ± 0.10, P=0.014); in contrast, among DSA-negative patients, we did not detect a statistically significant progression during the same timeframe (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 0.81 ± 0.10, P=not significant). Available biopsies at later time points supported a rate of progression of arteriosclerosis in DSA-negative patients that was approximately one third that in DSA-positive patients. Accelerated arteriosclerosis was significantly associated with peritubular capillary leukocytic infiltration, glomerulitis, subclinical antibody-mediated rejection, and interstitial inflammation. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that donor-specific antibodies dramatically accelerate post-transplant progression of arteriosclerosis.

  8. Scrub Typhus antibody in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Heisey, G B; Gan, E; Shirai, A; Groves, M G

    1981-06-01

    Using an indirect immunofluorescence technique, sera from 113 cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), trapped in Peninsular Malaysia, were screened for the presence of antibody to six prototype strains of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi combined into three polyvalent groupings: I--Karp, TA716, and TA763; II--Gilliam; and III--TA678 and TH1817. Fifteen percent (17/113) of the monkeys had antibody titers greater than or equal to 1:50 to one or more of the antigenic groups. Although a titer greater than or equal to 1:150 is generally considered indicative or prior Rickettsia tsutsugamushi infection, we selected a less than 1:25 titer as a conservative standard to insure non-infected animals. Using this criterion, 62 (55%) of the 113 monkeys were accepted for use in scrub typhus studies. The high prevalence of antibody to scrub typhus in the semi-arboreal cynomolgus monkey is in marked contrast to the low prevalence reported in the strictly arboreal silvered leaf monkeys (Presbytis cristatus). The results of this study indicate that cynomolgus monkeys should be rigorously screened for evidence of prior infection before they are included in experimental scrub typhus studies.

  9. Neutralising antibodies for Mayaro virus in Pantanal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Juliano, Raquel Soares; Campos, Zilca; Velez, Jason; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; Komar, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    The Pantanal hosts diverse wildlife species and therefore is a hotspot for arbovirus studies in South America. A serosurvey for Mayaro virus (MAYV), eastern (EEEV), western (WEEV) and Venezuelan (VEEV) equine encephalitis viruses was conducted with 237 sheep, 87 free-ranging caimans and 748 equids, including 37 collected from a ranch where a neurologic disorder outbreak had been recently reported. Sera were tested for specific viral antibodies using plaque-reduction neutralisation test. From a total of 748 equids, of which 264 were immunised with vaccine composed of EEEV and WEEV and 484 had no history of immunisation, 10 (1.3%) were seropositive for MAYV and two (0.3%) for VEEV using criteria of a ≥ 4-fold antibody titre difference. Among the 484 equids without history of immunisation, 48 (9.9%) were seropositive for EEEV and four (0.8%) for WEEV using the same criteria. Among the sheep, five were sero- positive for equine encephalitis alphaviruses, with one (0.4%) for EEEV, one (0.4%) for WEEV and three (1.3%) for VEEV. Regarding free-ranging caimans, one (1.1%) and three (3.4%), respectively, had low titres for neutralising antibodies to VEEV and undetermined alphaviruses. The neurological disorder outbreak could not be linked to the alphaviruses tested. Our findings represent strong evidence that MAYV and all equine encephalitis alphaviruses circulated in the Pantanal. PMID:25742272

  10. Nephritogenic-antinephritogenic antibody network in lupus glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Doria, A; Gatto, M

    2012-12-01

    Lupus glomerulonephritis (LGN) is one of the most threatening manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and a major predictor of poor prognosis. The mechanisms leading to kidney inflammation are not completely clear; however, autoantibodies seem to play a pivotal role. Apoptosis dysregulation in SLE is likely to trigger generation of autoantibodies, the released nucleosomes being the driving autoantigen for further epitope amplification and selection of DNA or nucleosome-specific B cells. Growing evidence supports a multistep path to LGN involving initial autoantibody binding to chromatin fragments in the mesangial matrix, where they can induce mesangial inflammation leading to a shut-down of the renal DNase gene, generation and deposition of secondary necrotic chromatin on the glomerular basement membrane favouring antibody binding, complement activation and development of membrano-proliferative glomerular lesions. Anti-DNA IgG antibodies display the major pathogenetic potential in LGN initiation; however, other isotypes (IgA or IgE) as well as autoantibodies targeting other molecules (e.g. anti-C1q, anti-C reactive protein) can perpetuate renal injury. Conversely, protective autoantibodies are also likely in SLE which can contain renal damage targeting either DNA (i.e. IgM anti-DNA) or other molecules (e.g. pentraxin 3). Thus, lupus nephritogenic-antinephritogenic antibodies orchestrate the balance between harm and defence of renal tissue.

  11. COMPARISONS OF ELISA AND WESTERN BLOT ASSAYS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM ANTIBODY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A seroprevalence survey was conducted using ELISA and Western blot (WB) assays for antibody to three Cryptosporidium antigens on 380 blood donors in Jackson County, Oregon. The purpose was to determine if either assay could detect serological evidence of an outbreak which occurre...

  12. Induction and detection of antibodies to squalene.

    PubMed

    Matyas, G R; Wassef, N M; Rao, M; Alving, C R

    2000-11-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing antigen coated on hydrophobic polyvinyldiene fluoride (PVDF) membranes is described for detecting antibodies that bind to squalene (SQE). Because of the prior lack of availability of validated antibodies to SQE, positive controls for the assay were made by immunization with formulations containing SQE to create monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that reacted with SQE. Among eight immunogens tested, only two induced detectable murine antibodies to SQE: liposomes containing dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine, dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol, 71% SQE, and lipid A [L(71% SQE+LA)], and, to a much lesser extent, an oil-in-water emulsion containing SQE, Tween 80, Span 85, and lipid A. In each case, lipid A served as an adjuvant, but neither SQE alone, SQE mixed with lipid A, liposomes containing 43% SQE and lipid A, nor several other emulsions containing both SQE and lipid A, induced antibodies that reacted with SQE. Monoclonal antibodies produced after immunizing mice with [L(71% SQE+LA)] served as positive controls for developing the ELISA. Monoclonal antibodies were produced that either recognized SQE alone but did not recognize squalane (SQA, the hydrogenated form of SQE), or that recognized both SQE and SQA. As found previously with other liposomal lipid antigens, liposomes containing lipid A also induced antibodies that reacted with the liposomal phospholipids. However, mAbs were also identified that reacted with SQE on PVDF membranes, but did not recognize either SQA or liposomal phospholipid. The polyclonal antiserum produced by immunizing mice with [L(71% SQE+LA)] therefore contained a mixed population of antibody specificities and, as expected, the ELISA of polyclonal antiserum with PVDF membranes detected antibodies both to SQE and SQA. We conclude that SQE is a weak antigen, but that antibodies that specifically bind to SQE can be readily induced by immunization with [L(71% SQE+LA)] and detected by ELISA with PVDF

  13. Quality Issues of Research Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    According to several recent studies, an unexpectedly high number of landmark papers seem to be not reproducible by independent laboratories. Nontherapeutic antibodies used for research, diagnostic, food analytical, environmental, and other purposes play a significant role in this matter. Although some papers have been published offering suggestions to improve the situation, they do not seem to be comprehensive enough to cover the full complexity of this issue. In addition, no obvious improvements could be noticed in the field as yet. This article tries to consolidate the remarkable variety of conclusions and suggested activities into a more coherent conception. It is concluded that funding agencies and journal publishers need to take first and immediate measures to resolve these problems and lead the way to a more sustainable way of bioanalytical research, on which all can rely with confidence. PMID:27013861

  14. B Cells, Antibodies, and More

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell–targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell–targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  15. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  16. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  17. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  18. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs. PMID:26292154

  19. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  20. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  1. 8th Annual European Antibody Congress 2012

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Alain; Carter, Paul J.; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.; Wurch, Thierry; Junutula, Jagath R.; Kontermann, Roland E; Mabry, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The 8th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The new agenda format for 2012 included three parallel tracks on: (1) naked antibodies; (2) antibody drug conjugates (ADCs); and (3) bispecific antibodies and alternative scaffolds. The meeting started and closed with three plenary lectures to give common background and to share the final panel discussion and conclusions. The two day event included case studies and networking for nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The monoclonal antibody track was focused on understanding the structure-function relationships, optimization of antibody design and developability, and processes that allow better therapeutic candidates to move through the clinic. Discussions on novel target identification and validation were also included. The ADC track was dedicated to evaluation of the ongoing success of the established ADC formats alongside the rise of the next generation drug-conjugates. The bispecific and alternative scaffold track was focused on taking stock of the multitude of bispecific formats being investigated and gaining insight into recent innovations and advancements. Mechanistic understanding, progression into the clinic and the exploration of multispecifics, redirected T cell killing and alternative scaffolds were extensively discussed. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:23493119

  2. 7th Annual European Antibody Congress 2011

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 7th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The 2011 version of the EAC was attended by nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The first day focused on advances in understanding structure-function relationships, choosing the best format, glycoengineering biobetter antibodies, improving the efficacy and drugability of mAbs and epitope mapping. On the second day, the discovery of novel targets for mAb therapy, clinical pipeline updates, use of antibody combinations to address resistance, generation and identification of mAbs against new targets and biosimilar mAb development were discussed. Antibody-drug conjugates, domain antibodies and new scaffolds and bispecific antibodies were the topics of the third day. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:22453093

  3. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric P.; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E.; Chan, Ying N.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. PMID:26078040

  4. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs. PMID:26292154

  5. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain.

  6. Anti-miroestrol polyclonal antibodies: a comparison of immunogen preparations used to obtain desired antibody properties.

    PubMed

    Kitisripanya, Tharita; Jutathis, Kamonthip; Inyai, Chadathorn; Komaikul, Jukrapun; Udomsin, Orapin; Yusakul, Gorawit; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Putalun, Waraporn

    2016-04-01

    Immunogen quality is one important factor that contributes to desirable antibody characteristics. Highly specific antibodies against miroestrol can be used to develop a quality control immunoassay for Pueraria candollei products. In this study, we investigated how various immunogen preparations affect antibody properties. The results show that immunogen prepared using the Mannich reaction provides antibodies with higher specificity and sensitivity against miroestrol than immunogen prepared with the periodate reaction. The results suggest the Mannich reaction maintains the original structure of miroestrol and generates useful antibodies for developing immunoassays. PMID:26563142

  7. Anti-miroestrol polyclonal antibodies: a comparison of immunogen preparations used to obtain desired antibody properties.

    PubMed

    Kitisripanya, Tharita; Jutathis, Kamonthip; Inyai, Chadathorn; Komaikul, Jukrapun; Udomsin, Orapin; Yusakul, Gorawit; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Putalun, Waraporn

    2016-04-01

    Immunogen quality is one important factor that contributes to desirable antibody characteristics. Highly specific antibodies against miroestrol can be used to develop a quality control immunoassay for Pueraria candollei products. In this study, we investigated how various immunogen preparations affect antibody properties. The results show that immunogen prepared using the Mannich reaction provides antibodies with higher specificity and sensitivity against miroestrol than immunogen prepared with the periodate reaction. The results suggest the Mannich reaction maintains the original structure of miroestrol and generates useful antibodies for developing immunoassays.

  8. Edelman's view on the discovery of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2015-04-01

    Gerald M. Edelman began working to the structure of antibodies when joined as graduate student the laboratory of Henry Kunkel in 1958 at the "Rockefeller University" in New York, obtaining his doctorate in 1960. Edelman's focus on the structure of antibodies led to the 1972 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with Rodney R. Porter. Edelman and Porter decided to approach the problem of antibodies structure by splitting. In 1959, Porter published a report in which he used the enzyme papain to cleave the antibody molecule into three pieces of about 50,000 Da, corresponding to the two Fab (antigen-binding) and constant Fc (crystallizable) fragments. In the same year, Edelman showed that reduction of the disulfide bonds of antibodies in the presence of denaturizing agents led to dissociation of the molecule into smaller pieces, now known to be the light (L) and heavy (H) chains.

  9. Clearance of pathological antibodies using biomimetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Jonathan A.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Luk, Brian T.; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Kang; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Pathological antibodies have been demonstrated to play a key role in type II immune hypersensitivity reactions, resulting in the destruction of healthy tissues and leading to considerable morbidity for the patient. Unfortunately, current treatments present significant iatrogenic risk while still falling short for many patients in achieving clinical remission. In the present work, we explored the capability of target cell membrane-coated nanoparticles to abrogate the effect of pathological antibodies in an effort to minimize disease burden, without the need for drug-based immune suppression. Inspired by antibody-driven pathology, we used intact RBC membranes stabilized by biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle cores to serve as an alternative target for pathological antibodies in an antibody-induced anemia disease model. Through both in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrated efficacy of RBC membrane-cloaked nanoparticles to bind and neutralize anti-RBC polyclonal IgG effectively, and thus preserve circulating RBCs. PMID:25197051

  10. Development and Detection of Kidd Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kimberly Williams; Bourikian, Seda; McClain, Aryn; Curtis, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Kidd antibodies have a reputation for causing hemolytic transfusion reactions and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. We present a case of an untransfused male patient who developed anti-Kidd(a) (Jk(a)) antibodies after receiving an allogenic renal transplant. The formation of this antibody was associated with exposure to the Kidd antigen expressed on the tubular epithelium of the transplanted kidney. The 59-year-old white male patient had received a cadaveric renal transplant at our clinic and returned 5 years later with proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine levels, consistent with nephrotic syndrome. We review the expression of Kidd antigens and the development and detection of Kidd antibodies, and discuss the case reports from the literature of Kidd antibodies associated with kidney-graft rejection that suggest Kidd antigens play a role as a minor histocompatibility antigen. PMID:26199265

  11. Genetically engineered antibody molecules and their application.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S L; Wims, L; Wallick, S; Tan, L; Oi, V T

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin genes can be efficiently expressed following transfection into myeloma cells. Using protoplast fusion, transfection frequencies greater than 10(-3) can be achieved. Compatible plasmids containing two different selectible markers are used to simultaneously deliver heavy and light chain genes to the same cell. To produce molecules with differing specificities the rearranged and expressed variable regions can be cloned from the appropriate hybridoma. In some cases, variable regions from cDNAs can be inserted into the expression vectors. It is possible to manipulate the immunoglobulin genes and produce novel antibody molecules. Antibodies have been produced in which the variable regions from mouse antibodies have been joined to human constant regions. In addition, antibodies with altered constant regions have been produced. These genetically engineered antibodies provide a unique set of reagents to study structure-function relationships within the molecule. They also can potentially be used in the diagnosis and therapy of human disease.

  12. Development and Detection of Kidd Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kimberly Williams; Bourikian, Seda; McClain, Aryn; Curtis, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Kidd antibodies have a reputation for causing hemolytic transfusion reactions and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. We present a case of an untransfused male patient who developed anti-Kidd(a) (Jk(a)) antibodies after receiving an allogenic renal transplant. The formation of this antibody was associated with exposure to the Kidd antigen expressed on the tubular epithelium of the transplanted kidney. The 59-year-old white male patient had received a cadaveric renal transplant at our clinic and returned 5 years later with proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine levels, consistent with nephrotic syndrome. We review the expression of Kidd antigens and the development and detection of Kidd antibodies, and discuss the case reports from the literature of Kidd antibodies associated with kidney-graft rejection that suggest Kidd antigens play a role as a minor histocompatibility antigen.

  13. Dual targeting strategies with bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammatory and infectious diseases and other disorders. Most of the marketed antibodies are monospecific and therefore capable of interacting and interfering with a single target. However, complex diseases are often multifactorial in nature, and involve redundant or synergistic action of disease mediators or upregulation of different receptors, including crosstalk between their signaling networks. Consequently, blockade of multiple, different pathological factors and pathways may result in improved therapeutic efficacy. This result can be achieved by combining different drugs, or use of the dual targeting strategies applying bispecific antibodies that have emerged as an alternative to combination therapy. This review discusses the various dual targeting strategies for which bispecific antibodies have been developed and provides an overview of the established bispecific antibody formats. PMID:22453100

  14. Antibody-mediated immunity in CFW mice infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium. Humoral immune response in murine leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Casoluengo-Méndez, M; Díaz, G V

    1976-01-01

    A depression in antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) measured both in terms of circulating antibody and plaque-forming cells in the spleen was observed in CFW mice infected with M. lepraemurium when sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and human gammaglobulin (HGG) were used as antigens. The impairment in AMI was evident only after 75 days of infection thereafter the antibody response to SRBC antigen progressively decreased until the last day of experimentation (135 days). Within the first 60 days of infection no alteration in AMI was observed with the HGG antigen while the response to the SRBC antigen was significantly higher in the infected animals than in uninfected controls. PMID:795574

  15. Geographic pattern of serum antibody prevalence for Brucella spp. in caribou, grizzly bears, and wolves from Alaska, 1975-1998.

    PubMed

    Zarnke, Randall L; Ver Hoef, Jay M; DeLong, Robert A

    2006-07-01

    Blood samples were collected from 2,635 caribou (Rangifer tarandus), 1,238 grizzly bears (Ursus arctos), and 930 wolves (Canis lupus) from throughout mainland Alaska during 1975-98. Sera were tested for evidence of exposure to Brucella spp. Serum antibody prevalences were highest in the northwestern region of the state. In any specific area, antibody prevalences for caribou and wolves were of a similar magnitude, whereas antibody prevalence for bears in these same areas were two to three times higher. PMID:17092888

  16. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody inhibits apoptotic cell clearance by macrophages in pregnant NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Sóñora, Cecilia; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Calo, Guillermina; Hauk, Vanesa; Ramhorst, Rosanna; Hernández, Ana; Leirós, Claudia Pérez

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmunity is a feature of celiac disease (CD) with tissue transglutaminase (tTG) as a major autoantigen. A correlation between gynecological-obstetric disorders in CD patients and the presence of circulating antibodies anti-tTG that inhibited tTG activity was reported. Serum anti-tTG antibodies were detected in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type I insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and Sjögren's syndrome, two comorbid states with CD. Since pregnancy complications have been described in NOD mice, we evaluated the ability of anti-tTG antibodies to affect the functions of tTG relevant to the normal course of an early pregnancy like extracellular matrix assembling and apoptotic cell phagocytosis by macrophages. Circulating IgG antibodies against tTG were detected in NOD mice with titers that decreased at early pregnancy; interestingly, the in vitro transamidating activity of tTG was reduced by NOD serum samples. Particularly, anti-tTG antibody inhibited apoptotic cell phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages from pregnant NOD mice that express the enzyme on surface. Evidence provided support for a role for anti-tTG antibodies through reduced transamidating activity and reduced apoptotic cell clearance by the macrophages of pregnant NOD mice. PMID:24377394

  17. Acute thrombocytopenia in patients treated with amiodarone is caused by antibodies specific for platelet membrane glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Sahud, Mervyn A.; Caulfield, Michael; Clarke, Nigel; Koch, Robert; Bougie, Daniel; Aster, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Summary Amiodarone has been implicated as a cause of thrombocytopenia but the responsible mechanism is unknown. We performed studies in three patients to characterize the pathogenesis of this complication. No amiodarone-dependent, platelet-reactive antibodies were identified using conventional serological techniques. However, water-insoluble amiodarone solubilized in methanol and diluted to 1·0 mg/ml in aqueous buffer reproducibly promoted binding of IgG antibodies in patient serum to platelets. Solid phase assays identified drug-dependent antibodies specific for platelet gly coproteins (GP)Ia/IIa (integrin α2β1) in each patient and a second antibody specific for GPIIb/IIIa (αIIbβ3 integrin) in one patient. When studied by ion mobility analysis and transmission electron microscopy, the serologically active amiodarone preparation, a milky suspension, was found to consist of particles 2–30 nm in diameter, typical of a coacervate, a state characteristic of amiodarone in aqueous medium. The findings provide evidence that thrombocytopenia in the three patients studied was caused by drug-dependent antibodies specific for platelet glycoproteins GPIa/IIa and/or GPIIb/IIIa. We postulate that, in vivo, amiodarone may become incorporated into occult lipophilic domains in platelet glycoproteins, producing structural modifications that are immunogenic in some individuals, and that the resulting antibodies can cause platelet destruction in a person taking this drug. PMID:23952260

  18. Anti-centromere protein A antibodies in systemic sclerosis: Significance and origin.

    PubMed

    Perosa, Federico; Prete, Marcella; Di Lernia, Giuseppe; Ostuni, Carmela; Favoino, Elvira; Valentini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is systemic, autoimmune, connective tissue disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities, collagen deposition (fibrosis), and the production of autoantibodies to nuclear proteins. About 20%-40% of patients have antibodies to centromere protein (CENP)-A or -B. Despite the known association of anti-CENP antibodies with certain clinical features of SSc, the role of these antibodies in SSc physiopathology is still poorly understood. To better understand the clinical significance and origin of these antibodies, we and others have been studying the epitopic motifs (amino acid contact sites) on CENP-A with the aim of determining whether other proteins can prime or be targeted by them. Here, we review published and ongoing studies aimed at defining the fine specificity and origin of anti-CENP-A antibodies. We describe progress made in identifying the CENP-A epitopic motif amino acids, and the discovery of one of these motifs in forkhead box protein E3 (FOXE-3), a transcription factor previously studied only for its role in the development of lens fiber cells. Moreover, we discuss preliminary evidence for a possible role of FOXE-3 in SSc pathogenesis and for the association of different subsets of anti-CENP-A antibodies, heterogeneously expressed among SSc patients, with some clinical correlates.

  19. Iron as the Key Modulator of Hepcidin Expression in Erythroid Antibody-Mediated Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, J. C.; Garrido, P.; Ribeiro, S.; Rocha-Pereira, P.; Bronze-da-Rocha, E.; Belo, L.; Costa, E.; Reis, F.; Santos-Silva, A.

    2014-01-01

    Erythroid hypoplasia (EH) is a rare complication associated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapies, due to development of anti-rHuEPO antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly clarified. Our aim was to manage a rat model of antibody-mediated EH induced by rHuEPO and study the impact on iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Wistar rats treated during 9 weeks with a high rHuEPO dose (200 IU) developed EH, as shown by anemia, reduced erythroblasts, reticulocytopenia, and plasmatic anti-rHuEPO antibodies. Serum iron was increased and associated with mRNA overexpression of hepatic hepcidin and other iron regulatory mediators and downregulation of matriptase-2; overexpression of divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin was observed in duodenum and liver. Decreased EPO expression was observed in kidney and liver, while EPO receptor was overexpressed in liver. Endogenous EPO levels were normal, suggesting that anti-rHuEPO antibodies blunted EPO function. Our results suggest that anti-rHuEPO antibodies inhibit erythropoiesis causing anemia. This leads to a serum iron increase, which seems to stimulate hepcidin expression despite no evidence of inflammation, thus suggesting iron as the key modulator of hepcidin synthesis. These findings might contribute to improving new therapeutic strategies against rHuEPO resistance and/or development of antibody-mediated EH in patients under rHuEPO therapy. PMID:25580431

  20. Principles and application of antibody libraries for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bee Nar; Tye, Gee Jun; Choong, Yee Siew; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Ismail, Asma; Lim, Theam Soon

    2014-12-01

    Antibodies have been used efficiently for the treatment and diagnosis of many diseases. Recombinant antibody technology allows the generation of fully human antibodies. Phage display is the gold standard for the production of human antibodies in vitro. To generate monoclonal antibodies by phage display, the generation of antibody libraries is crucial. Antibody libraries are classified according to the source where the antibody gene sequences were obtained. The most useful library for infectious diseases is the immunized library. Immunized libraries would allow better and selective enrichment of antibodies against disease antigens. The antibodies generated from these libraries can be translated for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This review focuses on the generation of immunized antibody libraries and the potential applications of the antibodies derived from these libraries.

  1. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, Amin I.; Khawli, Leslie A.

    1991-01-01

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabelled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody.

  2. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, A.I.; Khawli, L.A.

    1991-02-19

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabeled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody. No Drawings

  3. Molecular Insights into Fully Human and Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies: What are the Differences and Should Dermatologists Care?

    PubMed

    Mallbris, Lotus; Davies, Julian; Glasebrook, Andrew; Tang, Ying; Glaesner, Wolfgang; Nickoloff, Brian J

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, a large number of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have come to market to treat a variety of conditions including patients with immune-mediated chronic inflammation. Distinguishing the relative clinical efficacy and safety profiles of one monoclonal antibody relative to another can be difficult and complex due to different clinical designs and paucity of head-to-head comparator studies. One distinguishing feature in interpreting clinical trial data by dermatologists may begin by determining whether a monoclonal antibody is fully human or humanized, which can be discerned by the generic name of the drug. Herein, this commentary highlights the distinctions and similarities of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies in their nomenclature, engineering, and clinical profiles. While there are a number of differences between these types of monoclonal antibodies, current evidence indicates that this designation does not impart any measurable impact on overall clinical efficacy and safety profiles of a given drug. Based on molecular insights provided in this commentary, it is clear that each monoclonal antibody, irrespective of being fully human or humanized, should be individually assessed for its clinical impact regarding safety and efficacy. Going beyond the type of generic name ascribed to a monoclonal antibody will be an ever-increasing theme for dermatologists as more therapeutic monoclonal antibodies emerge to potentially treat a wider scope of diseases with cutaneous manifestations. PMID:27672407

  4. Anti-endothelial cell antibodies to the endothelial hybridoma cell line (EAhy926) in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, J; Gotoh, M; Gohchi, K; Kawasugi, K; Tsukamoto, M; Saitoh, N

    1997-04-01

    The endothelial hybridoma (EAhy926) cell line was employed to clarify whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPA) [lupus anticoagulant (LA), antiprothrombin antibody (aPT) and/or anticardiolipin antibody (aCL)] and anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) are identical, and establish whether beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2-GPI) is needed for reactivity of aPA to endothelial cells. Ig-G AECA was positive in 9/30 SLE patients with aPA (30.0%) and 10/22 SLE patients negative for aPA (45.5%). Ig-M AECA was positive in one SLE patient with aPA and one SLE patient without aPA. AECA-positivity was not significantly different among unfixed, TNF-stimulated and fixed EAhy926. The influence of beta2-GPI on the reactivity of serum to EAhy926 was minimal, and absorption experiments of serum with cardiolipin-liposome/beta2-GPI or phosphatidylserine-liposome/prothrombin gave little evidence of cross-reactivity of aPA and AECA. The results of our study suggest that aPA and AECA may have partially cross-reacted, but were different antibodies. However, further study is needed to clarify the clinico-pathological significance of AECA. PMID:9136970

  5. A murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody detects a common idiotope on human, mouse and rabbit antibodies to allergen Lol p IV.

    PubMed

    Zhou, E M; Dzuba-Fischer, J M; Rector, E S; Sehon, A H; Kisil, F T

    1991-09-01

    A syngeneic mouse monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (anti-Id), designated as B1/1, was generated against a monoclonal antibody (MoAb 91) specific for Ryegrass pollen allergen Lol p IV. This anti-Id recognized an idiotope (Id) that was also present on other monoclonal antibodies with the same specificity as MoAb 91. Observations that (i) the anti-Id inhibited the binding of MoAb 91 to Lol p IV and (ii) the Id-anti-Id interaction could be inhibited by Lol p IV indicated that the Id was located within or near the antigen combining site. These properties served to characterize B1/1 as an internal image anti-Id. Evidence that an immune response in different species to Lol p IV elicits the formation of antibodies which express a common Id was provided by the observations that (i) the Id-anti-Id interactions could be inhibited by mouse, human and rabbit antisera to Lol p IV and (ii) the binding of these antisera to Lol p IV could be inhibited by the anti-Id. Interestingly, the internal image anti-Id B1/1 also recognized an Id on a monoclonal antibody which was directed to an epitope of Lol p IV, different from that recognized by MoAb 91.

  6. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries.

  7. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  8. Seroprevalence of unexpected red blood cell antibodies among pregnant women in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Eipl, K; Nakabiito, C; Bwogi, K; Motevalli, M; Roots, A; Blagg, L; Jackson, J B

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study among pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda, to determine ABO and D blood types and to determine the percentage who have unexpected red blood cell (RBC) antibodies and their specificities. De-identified blood samples from routine testing of 1001 pregnant women at the Mulago Hospital antenatal clinics in Kampala were typed for ABO and D and screened for the presence of unexpected RBC antibodies with confirmation and subsequent antibody identification. Of the 1001 blood samples tested, 48.9 percent, 26.4 percent, 21.0 percent, and 3.8 percent tested positive for blood groups 0, A, B, and AB, respectively. Of these samples, 23 (2.3%)were negative forD, and 55 (5.5%) showed initial reactivity with at least one screening RBC. The RBC antibody screen was repeated on these 55 samples, and antibody identification was performed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Blood Bank in Baltimore, Maryland. Twenty-one of the 55 samples were confirmed to have evidence of agglutination. Nine of the 21 samples demonstrated the presence of clinically significant RBC antibodies with anti-S being the most common, 8 samples demonstrated the presence of benign or naturally occurring antibodies, and 4 had only inconclusive reactivity. This study revealed a relatively high frequency of D and a low frequency of demonstrable clinically significant alloantibodies that may cause hemolytic disease of the newborn or hemolytic transfusion reactions among pregnant women in Kampala, with anti-S being the most frequent antibody specificity.

  9. Antibody-induced Enhancement of Factor VIIa Activity through Distinct Allosteric Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lisbeth M.; Andreasen, Peter A.; Svendsen, Ivan; Keemink, Janneke; Østergaard, Henrik; Persson, Egon

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of its cofactor tissue factor (TF), coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) predominantly exists in a zymogen-like, catalytically incompetent state. Here we demonstrate that conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be used to characterize structural features determining the activity of FVIIa. We isolated two classes of mAbs, which both increased the catalytic efficiency of FVIIa more than 150-fold. The effects of the antibodies were retained with a FVIIa variant, which has been shown to be inert to allosteric activation by the natural activator TF, suggesting that the antibodies and TF employ distinct mechanisms of activation. The antibodies could be classified into two groups based on their patterns of affinities for different conformations of FVIIa. Whereas one class of antibodies affected both the Km and kcat, the other class mainly affected the Km. The antibody-induced activity enhancement could be traced to maturation of the S1 substrate binding pocket and the oxyanion hole, evident by an increased affinity for p-aminobenzamidine, an increased rate of antithrombin inhibition, an increased rate of incorporation of diisopropylfluorophosphate, and an enhanced fraction of molecules with a buried N terminus of the catalytic domain in the presence of antibodies. As demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis, the two groups of antibodies appear to have overlapping, although clearly different, epitopes in the 170-loop. Our findings suggest that binding of ligands to specific residues in the 170-loop or its spatial vicinity may stabilize the S1 pocket and the oxyanion hole, and they may have general implications for the molecular understanding of FVIIa regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22275370

  10. Antibody-induced enhancement of factor VIIa activity through distinct allosteric pathways.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lisbeth M; Andreasen, Peter A; Svendsen, Ivan; Keemink, Janneke; Østergaard, Henrik; Persson, Egon

    2012-03-16

    In the absence of its cofactor tissue factor (TF), coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) predominantly exists in a zymogen-like, catalytically incompetent state. Here we demonstrate that conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be used to characterize structural features determining the activity of FVIIa. We isolated two classes of mAbs, which both increased the catalytic efficiency of FVIIa more than 150-fold. The effects of the antibodies were retained with a FVIIa variant, which has been shown to be inert to allosteric activation by the natural activator TF, suggesting that the antibodies and TF employ distinct mechanisms of activation. The antibodies could be classified into two groups based on their patterns of affinities for different conformations of FVIIa. Whereas one class of antibodies affected both the K(m) and k(cat), the other class mainly affected the K(m). The antibody-induced activity enhancement could be traced to maturation of the S1 substrate binding pocket and the oxyanion hole, evident by an increased affinity for p-aminobenzamidine, an increased rate of antithrombin inhibition, an increased rate of incorporation of diisopropylfluorophosphate, and an enhanced fraction of molecules with a buried N terminus of the catalytic domain in the presence of antibodies. As demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis, the two groups of antibodies appear to have overlapping, although clearly different, epitopes in the 170-loop. Our findings suggest that binding of ligands to specific residues in the 170-loop or its spatial vicinity may stabilize the S1 pocket and the oxyanion hole, and they may have general implications for the molecular understanding of FVIIa regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22275370

  11. Dengue virus infections in Nigeria: a survey for antibodies in monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Fagbami, A H; Monath, T P; Fabiyi, A

    1977-01-01

    A retrospective serological survey for dengue immunity was conducted in Nigeria to determine the prevalence of infection in man and non-human primates. Preliminary haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) tests revealed that 63% of persons tested had HI antibodies against one or more of the following flaviviruses: dengue type 1, yellow fever, West Nile and Wesselsbron. Parallel HI and neutralization (N) tests on 179 human sera showed that six of 20 sera (30%) negative for flavivirus HI antibody contained dengue N antibody. This finding emphasized the advantage of the N test over HI in screening for dengue virus immunity. Neutralization tests performed on 1,816 human sera from different geographical locations in Nigeria showed that 45% of Nigerians were immune to dengue type 2 virus. The percentage of immunity in adults aged 20 years and older (51%) was significantly higher than in children (37%) (P less than 0-01). In all four ecological zones sampled, the highest percentage of dengue N antibody was observed in the derived Savannah zone (63%) followed by the rain forest zone (42%). The Southern Guinea savannah and plateau zones had lower percentages of dengue-immune persons. There was a higher prevalence of antibodies in urban (48%) than in rural communities (37%). Tests on dengue-immune sera showed that 35% of such sera contained N antibodies to dengue only or to dengue and one other virus. Therefore, dengue immunity cannot be explained by heterologous cross reactions within the flavivirus group. In addition, evidence of dengue infection was found in monkeys and galagos. 48% of monkeys and 25% of galagos contained dengue N antibody. The presence of specific dengue N antibodies in a few sera suggests that the occurrence of a forest cycle of dengue is possible in Nigeria.

  12. Combinatorial antibody libraries: new advances, new immunological insights.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Immunochemists have become quite proficient in engineering existing antibody molecules to control their pharmacological properties. However, in terms of generating new antibodies, the combinatorial antibody library has become a central feature of modern immunochemistry. These libraries are essentially an immune system in a test tube and enable the selection of antibodies without the constraints of whole animal or cell-based systems. This Review provides an overview of how antibody libraries are constructed and discusses what can be learnt from these synthetic systems. In particular, the Review focuses on new biological insights from antibody libraries - such as the concept of 'SOS antibodies' - and the growing use of intracellular antibodies to perturb cellular functions.

  13. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Laurent; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Malmström, Vivianne; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3–18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all), but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1–2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are affected by

  14. Antibody production in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)

    PubMed Central

    Coe, J. E.; Peel, L. F.

    1970-01-01

    Serum antibody was found by radioimmunoelectrophoresis (RIEP) in thirty-one of thirty-five bullfrogs (BF) immunized with one of four protein antigens. Rabbit γ-globulin (RGG) and hen egg albumin were the best antigens, whereas human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin induced a less consistent immune response. Although a IgM to IgG sequence of antibody production usually was detected with RGG as antigen, a similar sequence was infrequent with the other antigens and the initial response was usually a IgG antibody. IgM antibody was detected in the serum for a prolonged interval (>100 days) and precipitating quantities of IgG antibody were found more than 1 year after antigen inoculation. As measured by haemagglutination, the IgM antibody was routinely inactivated by mercaptoethanol (ME) treatment and IgG antibody was frequently inactivated by ME, although it still had antigen binding capacity by RIEP. IgG hemagglutinins, which were resistant to ME treatment, were found in some sera obtained from BF after booster injections of antigen. Immunoelectrophoretic examination of normal or immune BF sera revealed a prominent precipitin line of slow γ-mobility which did not bind 131I-labelled antigen but did bind 59Fe. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4097586

  15. Next generation of antibody therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenping; Yan, Li

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become a major class of therapeutic agents providing effective alternatives to treating various human diseases. To date, 15 mAbs have been approved by regulatory agencies in the world for clinical use in oncology indications. The selectivity and specificity, the unique pharmacokinetics, and the ability to engage and activate the host immune system differentiate these biologics from traditional small molecule anticancer drugs. mAb-based regimens have brought clinical benefits, including improvements in overall survival, to patients with a variety of cancers. Many challenges still remain, however, to fully realize the potential of these new medicines. With our further understanding of cancer biology, mechanism of antibody action, and advancement of antibody engineering technologies, many novel antibody formats or antibody-derived molecules are emerging as promising new generation therapeutics. Carefully designed and engineered, they retain the advantage of specificity and selectivity of original antibodies, but in the meantime acquire additional special features such as improved pharmacokinetics, increased selectivity, and enhanced anticancer efficacy. Promising clinical results are being generated with these newly improved antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:21527062

  16. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  17. Glycosylation of plant produced human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kallolimath, Somanath; Steinkellner, Herta

    2015-12-23

    Human immunoglobulins circulate as highly heterogeneously glycosylated mixture of otherwise homogeneous protein backbones. A series of studies, mainly on IgG, have unequivocally proven that antibodies modulate their effector function through sugars present in the Fc domain. However, our limited technology in producing complex proteins such as antibodies, with defined glycan structures hamper in depths studies. This review introduces a plant based expression platform enabling engineering of antibody glycans. The procedure is based on the simultaneous delivery of appropriate constructs, carrying cDNAs of target proteins (e.g. heavy and light chain of antibodies) in combination with human glycosylation enzymes into plant leaves. Harvesting of recombinant proteins one week post construct delivery allows high speed and flexibility. Major achievements include the production of functional active slialylated pentameric IgMs in tobacco leaves. The system provides a viable approach to the generation of antibodies with defined glycoforms on demand, contributing to studies on antibody glycans and the development of novel antibody based drugs. PMID:27472861

  18. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  19. Idiotype and antigen-specific T cell responses in mice on immunization with antigen, antibody, and anti-idiotypic antibody.

    PubMed

    Mitra-Kaushik, S; Shaila, M S; Karande, A K; Nayak, R

    2001-05-01

    Idiotypic determinants of immunoglobulin molecules can evoke both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T responses and exist not only as the integral components of a bona fide antigen binding receptor but also as distinct molecular entities in the processed forms on the cell surface of B lymphocytes. The present work provides experimental evidence for the concept that regulation of memory B cell populations can be achieved through the presentation of idiotypic and anti-idiotypic determinants to helper and cytotoxic cell. The potential of B cells to present antigens to helper and cytotoxic T cells through class II and class I MHC suggests a mechanism by which both B and T cell homeostasis can be maintained. We provide evidence for the generation of idiotype- and antigen-specific Th and Tc cells upon immunization of syngenic mice with antigen or idiotypic antibody (Ab1) or anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab2). The selective activation and proliferation of the antigen-specific Th and Tc cells mediated by idiotypic stimulation observed in these experiments suggests a B-cell-driven mechanism for the maintenance of antigen-specific T cell memory in the absence of antigenic stimulation, under certain conditions.

  20. Distinct Therapeutic Mechanisms of Tau Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristen E.; Mirbaha, Hilda; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of Tau amyloids, and include Alzheimer disease and certain frontotemporal dementias. Trans-neuronal propagation of amyloid mediated by extracellular Tau may underlie disease progression. Consistent with this, active and passive vaccination studies in mouse models reduce pathology, although by unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that intracerebroventricular administration of three anti-Tau monoclonal antibodies (HJ8.5, HJ9.3, and HJ9.4) reduces pathology in a model overexpressing full-length mutant (P301S) human Tau. We now study effects of these three antibodies and a negative control antibody (HJ3.4) on Tau aggregate uptake into BV2 microglial-like cells and primary neurons. Antibody-independent Tau uptake into BV2 cells was blocked by heparin, consistent with a previously described role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Two therapeutic antibodies (HJ8.5 and HJ9.4) promoted uptake of full-length Tau fibrils into microglia via Fc receptors. Surprisingly, HJ9.3 promoted uptake of fibrils composed of the Tau repeat domain or Alzheimer disease-derived Tau aggregates, but failed to influence full-length recombinant Tau fibrils. Size fractionation of aggregates showed that antibodies preferentially promote uptake of larger oligomers (n ≥∼20-mer) versus smaller oligomers (n ∼10-mer) or monomer. No antibody inhibited uptake of full-length recombinant fibrils into primary neurons, but HJ9.3 blocked neuronal uptake of Tau repeat domain fibrils and Alzheimer disease-derived Tau. Antibodies thus have multiple potential mechanisms, including clearance via microglia and blockade of neuronal uptake. However these effects are epitope- and aggregate size-dependent. Establishing specific mechanisms of antibody activity in vitro may help in design and optimization of agents that are more effective in vivo. PMID:26126828

  1. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  2. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  3. Clinical Characteristics of Anti-3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Antibodies in Chinese Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yongpeng; Lu, Xin; Peng, Qinglin; Shu, Xiaoming; Wang, Guochun

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to detect the prevalence of anti-3-hydroxyl-3- methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (anti-HMGCR) antibodies in Chinese patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs), and to analyze the clinical features of the antibody-positive IIM patients. Methods The presence of anti-HMGCR antibodies was detected in 405 patients with IIMs, 90 healthy controls, and 221 patients with other rheumatic diseases by using an ELISA kit. Clinical data from anti-HMGCR antibody-positive and -negative patients were compared. Long-term follow-up of the anti-HMGCR antibody-positive patients was conducted to evaluate the role of anti-HMGCR antibody in IIM disease prognosis. Results Of the 405 IIM patients, 22 (5.4%) were found to carry the anti-HMGCR antibody. These IIM patients were predominantly female (73%), and only 3 anti-HMGCR antibody-positive patients with IIM were exposure to statins. Most patients experienced progressive onset, and presented with muscular weakness. Dysphagia was observed in half of the patients (p < 0.01), and 15% of these patients experienced the complication of interstitial lung disease (ILD) (p > 0.05). Mean creatine kinase (CK) levels were higher in antibody-positive patients than in antibody-negative patients (p < 0.05). Muscle biopsies were available from 12 anti-HMGCR antibody-positive patients, eight who experienced myofiber necrosis and showed very little or no evidence of inflammatory cell infiltrates in their muscle biopsies. Of these eleven patients who were followed-up 2.5- to 29-month, 73% experienced improvement after treatment. A cross-sectional study showed that anti-HMGCR antibody levels were significantly associated with CK levels (r = 0.486, p = 0.026) as well as with Myositis Disease Activity Assessment (MYOACT) scores (r = -0.67, p = 0.003) during the initial visit. However, changes in serum anti-HMGCR antibody levels did not correlate with changes in CK levels, Manual Muscle Testing 8 (MMT-8

  4. Anti-TNF levels and anti-drug antibodies, immunosuppressants and clinical outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ha, Christina; Mathur, Jagrati; Kornbluth, Asher

    2015-04-01

    The anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) antibodies have revolutionized the management of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The development of assays to allow for the measurements of serum drug levels and anti-drug antibodies have provided a more objective means of therapeutic decision making, particularly among patients losing response to treatment. Additionally, more evidence is emerging that indicates the relationship between drug levels and response to therapy including clinical response, mucosal healing and sustained remission. The use of combination therapies of the anti-TNF agents and the thiopurine immunosuppressants may also decrease immunogenicity to the anti-TNF agents and potentiate response to therapy. With more evidence emerging evidence of the importance of therapeutic drug levels and anti-drug antibodies, clinicians may be able to better optimize the current arsenal of inflammatory bowel disease therapeutics to achieve greater rates of durable remission and improved quality of life.

  5. Evidence for two immunologically distinct acetyl-coenzyme A synthetases in yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Mandel, A. D.; Klein, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that clearly establishes the presence of two acetyl-CoA synthetases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one elaborated under 'aerobic' conditions, the other under 'nonaerobic' conditions. The antibody produced by each enzyme is immunologically specific.

  6. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  7. AIDS antibody tests on inpatient psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Binder, R L

    1987-02-01

    An antibody test for the causative virus of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) became commercially available in 1985. The author discusses the use of the AIDS antibody test on inpatient psychiatric units. She reviews the controversial legal and ethical questions related to its use, addressing such questions as Who should be tested for the AIDS antibody? When and to whom should the results of the test be disclosed? and How should the doctrine of "right to privacy" be balanced with the "duty to warn"?

  8. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  9. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  10. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  11. Emerging antibody products and Nicotiana manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Kevin J; Hiatt, Andrew; Zeitlin, Larry

    2011-03-01

    Antibody based products are not widely available to address multiple global health challenges due to high costs, limited manufacturing capacity, and long manufacturing lead times. Nicotiana-based manufacturing of antibody products may now begin to address these challenges as a result of revolutionary advances in transient expression and altered glycosylation pathways. This review provides examples of emerging antibody-based products (mucosal and systemic) that could be competitive and commercially viable when the attributes of Nicotiana-based manufacturing (large scale, versatile, rapid, low cost) are utilized.

  12. Immunocytochemical and Immunohistochemical Staining with Peptide Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Friis, Tina; Pedersen, Klaus Boberg; Hougaard, David; Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies are particularly useful for immunocytochemistry (ICC) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), where antigens may denature due to fixation of tissues and cells. Peptide antibodies can be made to any defined sequence, including unknown putative proteins and posttranslationally modified sequences. Moreover, the availability of large amounts of the antigen (peptide) allows inhibition/adsorption controls, which are important in ICC/IHC, due to the many possibilities for false-positive reactions caused by immunoglobulin Fc receptors, nonspecific reactions, and cross-reactivity of primary and secondary antibodies with other antigens and endogenous immunoglobulins, respectively. Here, simple protocols for ICC and IHC are described together with recommendations for appropriate controls.

  13. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity. PMID:12532043

  14. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today.

  15. [Anti-basal ganglia antibody].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-04-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) is a major manifestation of rheumatic fever, and the production of anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) has been proposed in SC. The pathogenesis is hypothesized as autoimmune targeting of the basal ganglia via molecular mimicry, triggered by streptococcal infection. The spectrum of diseases in which ABGA may be involved has been broadened to include other extrapyramidal movement disorders, such as tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The autoimmune hypothesis in the presence and absence of ABGA has been suggested in Tourette's syndrome (TS), early onset obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Recently, the relationship between ABGA and dopamine neurons in the basal ganglia has been examined, and autoantibodies against dopamine receptors were detected in the sera from patients with basal ganglia encephalitis. In Japan, the occurrence of subacute encephalitis, where patients suffer from episodes of altered behavior and involuntary movements, has increased. Immune-modulating treatments are effective, indicating the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism. We aimed to detect the anti-neuronal autoantibodies in such encephalitis, using immunohistochemical assessment of patient sera. The sera from patients showing involuntary movements had immunoreactivity for basal ganglia neurons. Further epitopes for ABGA will be investigated in basal ganglia disorders other than SC, TS, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:23568985

  16. Optimising testing for phospholipid antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Helbert, M; Bodger, S; Cavenagh, J; D'Cruz, D; Thomas, J; MacCallum, P

    2001-01-01

    Aim—To compare anticardiolipin (ACL) and anti-ß2 glycoprotein 1 (ß2gp1) enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and to incorporate these results into a meta-analysis of published data. Method—Three representative commercial ACL ELISAs and an in house ß2gp1 assay were optimised and then assessed on 124 sera from normal donors, patients with infection, or patients with APS. A Medline search was screened for papers meeting defined criteria to conduct a meta-analysis. The performance of the assays used in this study was included. Results—A non-quantitative ACL assay performed at least as well as the anti-ß2gp1 assay in the diagnosis of APS. Meta-analysis confirmed that neither assay is perfect, although the anti-ß2gp1 assay had a higher specificity and lower sensitivity than the ACL assay. Conclusions—The pooled data suggest that the ACL assay is used to investigate thrombosis without overt underlying pathology and that the improved specificity of the anti-ß2gp1 assay is exploited where infection, connective tissue disease, or atheroma are present. Key Words: antiphospholipid syndrome • anticardiolipin antibodies • anti-ß2 glycoprotein 1 • sensitivity PMID:11533076

  17. Antibody Response to Hypervariable Region 1 Interferes with Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies to Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-yong; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Wang, Wenyan; Lau, Patrick; Zuiani, Adam; Rey, Felix A.; Krey, Thomas; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) (amino acids [aa] 384 to 410) on the E2 glycoprotein of hepatitis C virus contributes to persistent infection by evolving escape mutations that attenuate binding of inhibitory antibodies and by blocking access of broadly neutralizing antibodies to their epitopes. A third proposed mechanism of immune antagonism is that poorly neutralizing antibodies binding to HVR1 interfere with binding of other superior neutralizing antibodies. Epitope mapping of human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) that bind to an adjacent, conserved domain on E2 encompassing aa 412 to 423 revealed two subsets, designated HC33 HMAbs. While both subsets have contact residues within aa 412 to 423, alanine-scanning mutagenesis suggested that one subset, which includes HC33.8, has an additional contact residue within HVR1. To test for interference of anti-HVR1 antibodies with binding of antibodies to aa 412 to 423 and other E2 determinants recognized by broadly neutralizing HMAbs, two murine MAbs against HVR1 (H77.16) and aa 412 to 423 (H77.39) were studied. As expected, H77.39 inhibited the binding of all HC33 HMAbs. Unexpectedly, H77.16 also inhibited the binding of both subsets of HC33 HMAbs. This inhibition also was observed against other broadly neutralizing HMAbs to epitopes outside aa 412 to 423. Combination antibody neutralization studies by the median-effect analysis method with H77.16 and broadly reactive HMAbs revealed antagonism between these antibodies. Structural studies demonstrated conformational flexibility in this antigenic region, which supports the possibility of anti-HVR1 antibodies hindering the binding of broadly neutralizing MAbs. These findings support the hypothesis that anti-HVR1 antibodies can interfere with a protective humoral response against HCV infection. IMPORTANCE HVR1 contributes to persistent infection by evolving mutations that escape from neutralizing antibodies to HVR1 and by shielding broadly neutralizing antibodies from

  18. Antisperm antibodies and in vitro fertilization failure.

    PubMed

    Pexieder, T; Boillat, E; Janecek, P

    1985-12-01

    A new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based test (Zer, Jerusalem) has allowed us to show the presence of antisperm antibodies (1:32 to 1:64) in the blood of 14 (33%) of 32 patients undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) under gonadotropin stimulation. Observation of the morphology of fertilization in eight patients with and seven patients without antisperm antibodies has shown a significant association (P less than or equal to 0.025, Fisher exact probability test) among the cumulus/corona coagulation, the absence of fertilization, and the presence of these antibodies. Cumulus/oocyte complex washing and/or enzymatic cumulus removal are considered as elective interventions in the case of antisperm immunity. Each patient entering an IVF-ET program should have the antisperm antibody assay performed as a preliminary screening.

  19. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite available antivirals and vaccines, influenza infections continue to be a major cause of mortality worldwide. Vaccination generally induces an effective, but strain-specific antibody response. As the virus continually evolves, new vaccines have to be administered almost annually when a novel strain becomes dominant. Furthermore, the sporadic emerging resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors among circulating strains suggests an urgent need for new therapeutic agents. Recently, several cross-reactive antibodies have been described, which neutralize an unprecedented spectrum of influenza viruses. These broadly neutralizing antibodies generally target conserved functional regions on the major influenza surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). The characterization of their neutralization breadth and epitopes on HA could stimulate the development of new antibody-based antivirals and broader influenza vaccines. PMID:23583287

  20. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease.

  1. Gut Microbial Metabolites Fuel Host Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myunghoo; Qie, Yaqing; Park, Jeongho; Kim, Chang H

    2016-08-10

    Antibody production is a metabolically demanding process that is regulated by gut microbiota, but the microbial products supporting B cell responses remain incompletely identified. We report that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), produced by gut microbiota as fermentation products of dietary fiber, support host antibody responses. In B cells, SCFAs increase acetyl-CoA and regulate metabolic sensors to increase oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, and fatty acid synthesis, which produce energy and building blocks supporting antibody production. In parallel, SCFAs control gene expression to express molecules necessary for plasma B cell differentiation. Mice with low SCFA production due to reduced dietary fiber consumption or microbial insufficiency are defective in homeostatic and pathogen-specific antibody responses, resulting in greater pathogen susceptibility. However, SCFA or dietary fiber intake restores this immune deficiency. This B cell-helping function of SCFAs is detected from the intestines to systemic tissues and conserved among mouse and human B cells, highlighting its importance. PMID:27476413

  2. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  3. Brain-Reactive Antibodies and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, B.; Honig, G.; Mader, S.; Brimberg, L.; Volpe, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases currently affect 5–7% of the world's population; in most diseases there are circulating autoantibodies. Brain-reactive antibodies are present in approximately 2–3% of the general population but do not usually contribute to brain pathology. These antibodies penetrate brain tissue only early in development or under pathologic conditions. This restriction on their pathogenicity and the lack of correlation between serum titers and brain pathology have, no doubt, contributed to a delayed appreciation of the contribution of autoantibodies in diseases of the central nervous system. Nonetheless, it is increasingly clear that antibodies can cause damage in the brain and likely initiate or aggravate multiple neurologic conditions; brain-reactive antibodies contribute to symptomatology in autoimmune disease, infectious disease, and malignancy. PMID:23516983

  4. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  5. Host versus flu: antibodies win a round?

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Christopher B; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2013-01-01

    Structural and functional analyses of three neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus H2 HA may explain why this HA subtype has disappeared from circulation in the human population and point to a potential new avenue for antiflu therapeutics. PMID:23463305

  6. Antibodies against the calcium-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Mei; Jensen, K.G.; Sjolund, R.D. ); Krause, K.H.; Campbell, K.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Plant microsomes contain a protein clearly related to a calcium-binding protein, calsequestrin, originally found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, responsible for the rapid release and uptake of Ca{sup 2+} within the cells. The location and role of calsequestrin in plant cells is unknown. To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to plant calsequestrin, mice were immunized with a microsomal fraction from cultured cells of Streptanthus tortuosus (Brassicaceae). Two clones cross-reacted with one protein band with a molecular weight equal to that of calsequestrin (57 kilodaltons) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. This band is able to bind {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} and can be recognized by a polyclonal antibody against the canine cardiac muscle calsequestrin. Rabbit skeletal muscle calsequestrin cross-reacted with the plant monoclonal antibodies. The plant monoclonal antibodies generated here are specific to calsequestrin protein.

  7. Analyzing antibody-Fc-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk; Ravetch, Jeffrey V

    2008-01-01

    Cellular receptors for immunoglobulins (Fc-receptors; FcR) are central mediators of antibody-triggered effector functions. Immune complex (IC) binding to FcRs results in a variety of reactions such as the release of inflammatory mediators, antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis of ICs. Analyzing antibody-FcR (Ab-FcR) interactions in vitro is essential to determine the effector mechanisms, binding characteristics and affinity parameters that will impact and predict antibody activity in vivo. The methods described in this chapter include the generation of ICs and soluble FcR variants, as well as ELISA and FACS-based assays to study Ab-FcR interactions.

  8. Antibody Fc: Linking Adaptive and Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody Fc: Linking Adaptive and Innate Immunity, edited by Margaret E. Ackerman and Falk Nimmerjahn and published by Academic Press, provides a highly detailed examination of the involvement of the antibody Fc in mechanisms critical to both innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite a recent increase in format diversity, most marketed antibodies are full-length IgG molecules and the majority of the commercial clinical pipeline of antibody therapeutics is composed of Fc-containing IgG molecules, which underscores the importance of understanding how the Fc domain affects biological responses. The book is divided into six sections that include a total of 20 chapters. In order of their appearance, the sections provide extensive coverage of effector mechanisms, effector cells, Fc receptors, variability of the Fc domain, genetic associations, and evolving areas.

  9. Chemical biology: How to minimalize antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    The success of antibodies as pharmaceuticals has triggered interest in crafting much smaller mimics. A crucial step forward has been taken with the chemical synthesis of small molecules that recruit immune cells to attack cancer cells.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies: their importance to surgeons.

    PubMed

    Estabrook, A; Mesa-Tejada, R

    1989-01-01

    A tremendous technological advance occurred in 1975 when a method was developed to fuse two cells producing a "hybridoma" which secretes a single clone of antibody, having one immunoglobulin (Ig) class, one structure, one affinity, and one specificity for an antigenic determinant. Because monoclonal antibodies are more precise reagents than conventional antisera they open new doors to diagnosis and therapy of disease, and they are useful tools in research. The pathologist uses monoclonals in immunocytochemistry to determine tumor type; the surgeon uses monoclonals for immunosuppression in renal transplantation; the immunologist uses monoclonals to decipher cellular and humoral interactions that could not be appreciated with polyclonal reagents. This review outlines the background of monoclonal antibodies and some of their clinically important uses, both in vitro and in vivo. We also project into the future and describe chimeric antibodies and their possible uses.

  11. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T.; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  12. HIV-specific CD4-induced Antibodies Mediate Broad and Potent Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activity and are Commonly Detected in Plasma from HIV-infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Katherine L.; Cortez, Valerie; Dingens, Adam S.; Gach, Johannes S.; Rainwater, Stephanie; Weis, Julie F.; Chen, Xuemin; Spearman, Paul; Forthal, Donald N.; Overbaugh, Julie

    2015-01-01

    HIV-specific antibodies (Abs) can reduce viral burden by blocking new rounds of infection or by destroying infected cells via activation of effector cells through Fc–FcR interaction. This latter process, referred to as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), has been associated with viral control and improved clinical outcome following both HIV and SIV infections. Here we describe an HIV viral-like particle (VLP)-based sorting strategy that led to identification of HIV-specific memory B cells encoding Abs that mediate ADCC from a subtype A-infected Kenyan woman at 914 days post-infection. Using this strategy, 12 HIV-envelope-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were isolated and three mediated potent ADCC activity when compared to well-characterized ADCC mAbs. The ADCC-mediating Abs also mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), which provides a net measure of Fc receptor-triggered effects against replicating virus. Two of the three ADCC-mediating Abs targeted a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope also bound by the mAb C11; the third antibody targeted the N-terminus of V3. Both CD4i Abs identified here demonstrated strong cross-clade breadth with activity against 10 of 11 envelopes tested, including those from clades A, B, C, A/D and C/D, whereas the V3-specific antibody showed more limited breadth. Variants of these CD4i, C11-like mAbs engineered to interrupt binding to FcγRs inhibited a measurable percentage of the donor's ADCC activity starting as early as 189 days post-infection. C11-like antibodies also accounted for between 18–78% of ADCC activity in 9 chronically infected individuals from the same cohort study. Further, the two CD4i Abs originated from unique B cells, suggesting that antibodies targeting this epitope can be commonly produced. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that CD4i, C11-like antibodies develop within the first 6 months of infection and they can arise from unique B-cell lineages in the

  13. Autoimmune encephalitis: Clinical diagnosis versus antibody confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Cyril, Asha Caroline; Nair, Sruthi S.; Mathai, Annamma; Kannoth, Sudheeran; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune encephalitis is a heterogeneous disorder which is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. The diagnosis of these disorders is based on the detection of autoantibodies and characteristic clinical profiles. Aims: We aimed to study the antibody profile in encephalitis patients with suspected autoimmune etiology presenting to a tertiary care center. Settings and Design: The subjects were selected by screening all patients with clinical profile suggesting autoimmune encephalitis admitted in the neuromedical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: Patients who fulfilled modified Zuliani et al.'s, criteria for autoimmune encephalitis were identified during the period December 2009–June 2013. Blood samples from these subjects were screened for six neuronal antibodies. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test was applied to compare the antibody positive and negative patients. Results: Out of 1,227 patients screened, 39 subjects (14 males: 25 females) were identified with a mean age of 15.95 years and 19 cases were assessed in the acute and 20 in the convalescent phase of the illness. Seizure (87.8 %) was the most common presenting symptom; status epilepticus occurred in 23 (60.5%) patients during the course of the illness. Fourteen (35.9%) patients were N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-positive and all were negative for the other antibodies tested. Conclusions: One-third of patients presenting with acute noninfective encephalitis would be positive for NMDAR antibodies with the remaining two-thirds with clinically suspected autoimmune encephalitis being antibody-negative. There are few markers in the clinical and investigative profiles to distinguish antibody-positive and -negative patients. PMID:26713011

  14. Indirect hemagglutination test for chlamydial antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, V J; Thacker, W L; Engelman, H M

    1972-07-01

    An indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test is described for chlamydial antibodies in psittacosis diagnostic sera; for this test tanned sheep erythrocytes sensitized with a deoxycholate extract of Chlamydia psittaci grown in Vero cell monolayers were used. Adaptation of the IHA test to the Microtiter system decreased sensitivity; nevertheless, the Microtiter-IHA test was more sensitive than the complement fixation test. Lymphogranuloma venereum antibodies also were detected by using antigen extracted from C. psittaci. PMID:4626906

  15. Broadening Horizons: New Antibodies Against Influenza.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Katherine J L; Boyd, Scott D

    2016-07-28

    Seasonal influenza vaccine formulation efforts struggle to keep up with viral antigenic variation. Two studies now report engineered or naturally occurring human antibodies targeting the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) stem, with exceptional neutralizing breadth (Joyce et al., 2016; Kallewaard et al., 2016). Antibodies with similar structural features are elicited in multiple subjects, suggesting that modified vaccine regimens could provide broad protection. PMID:27471961

  16. History and Practice: Antibodies in Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hey, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Antibodies and passive antibody therapy in the treatment of infectious diseases is the story of a treatment concept which dates back more than 120 years, to the 1890s, when the use of serum from immunized animals provided the first effective treatment options against infections with Clostridium tetani and Corynebacterium diphtheriae. However, after the discovery of penicillin by Fleming in 1928, and the subsequent introduction of the much cheaper and safer antibiotics in the 1930s, serum therapy was largely abandoned. However, the broad and general use of antibiotics in human and veterinary medicine has resulted in the development of multi-resistant strains of bacteria with limited to no response to existing treatments and the need for alternative treatment options. The combined specificity and flexibility of antibody-based treatments makes them very valuable tools for designing specific antibody treatments to infectious agents. These attributes have already caused a revolution in new antibody-based treatments in oncology and inflammatory diseases, with many approved products. However, only one monoclonal antibody, palivizumab, for the prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus, is approved for infectious diseases. The high cost of monoclonal antibody therapies, the need for parallel development of diagnostics, and the relatively small markets are major barriers for their development in the presence of cheap antibiotics. It is time to take a new and revised look into the future to find appropriate niches in infectious diseases where new antibody-based treatments or combinations with existing antibiotics, could prove their value and serve as stepping stones for broader acceptance of the potential for and value of these treatments.

  17. Immunology. RNA editing AIDs antibody diversification?

    PubMed

    Neuberger, M S; Scott, J

    2000-09-01

    How do B cells generate the enormous diversity of antibodies that are able to recognize and bind to whichever antigen a B cell might happen to encounter in the body? Several genetic mechanisms that manipulate different combinations of immunoglobulin genes are known. In their Perspective, Neuberger and Scott, highlight another genetic mechanism called RNA editing now shown to be involved in the production of antibody diversity.

  18. Therapeutic monoclonal antibody for sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Sandro R.

    2012-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis that affects both humans and animals worldwide. This subcutaneous mycosis had been attributed to a single etiological agent, Sporothrix schenckii. S. schenckii exhibits considerable genetic variability, and recently, it was suggested that this taxon consists of a complex of species. Sporotrichosis is caused by traumatic inoculation of the fungus, which is a ubiquitous environmental saprophyte that can be isolated from soil and plant debris. The infection is limited to cutaneous forms, but recently, more severe clinical forms of this mycosis have been described, especially among immunocompromised individuals. The immunological mechanisms involved in the prevention and control of sporotrichosis are not well understood. Some studies suggest that cell-mediated immunity plays an important role in protecting the host against S. schenckii. In contrast, the role of the humoral immune response in protection against this fungus has not been studied in detail. In a previous study, we showed that antigens secreted by S. schenckii induced a specific humoral response in infected animals, primarily against a 70-kDa molecule, indicating a possible role of specific antibodies against this molecule in infection control. In another study by our group, we produced a mAb against a 70-kDa glycoprotein of S. schenckii to better understand the effect of the passive immunization of mice infected with S. schenckii. The results showed a significant reduction in the number of CFUs in various mice organs when the mAb was injected before or during S. schenckii infection. Similar results were observed when T-cell-deficient mice were used. The drugs of choice in the treatment of sporotrichosis require long periods, and relapses are frequently observed, primarily in immunocompromised patients. The strong protection induced by the mAb against a 70-kDa glycoprotein makes it a strong candidate as a therapeutic vaccine against sporotrichosis. PMID

  19. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinct strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.

  20. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinctmore » strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.« less

  1. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinct strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. If less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains. PMID:26324897

  2. A novel strategy for generating monoclonal antibodies from single, isolated lymphocytes producing antibodies of defined specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, J S; Leslie, K B; Olsen, O A; Salmon, R A; Schrader, J W

    1996-01-01

    We report a novel approach to the generation of monoclonal antibodies based on the molecular cloning and expression of immunoglobulin variable region cDNAs generated from single rabbit or murine lymphocytes that were selected for the production of specific antibodies. Single cells secreting antibodies for a specific peptide either from gp116 of the human cytomegalovirus or from gp120 of HIV-1 or for sheep red blood cells were selected using antigen-specific hemolytic plaque assays. Sheep red blood cells were coated with specific peptides in a procedure applicable to any antigen that can be biotinylated. Heavy- and light-chain variable region cDNAs were rescued from single cells by reverse transcription-PCR and expressed in the context of human immunoglobulin constant regions. These chimeric murine and rabbit monoclonal antibodies replicated the target specificities of the original antibody-forming cells. The selected lymphocyte antibody method exploits the in vivo mechanisms that generate high-affinity antibodies. This method can use lymphocytes from peripheral blood, can exploit a variety of procedures that identify individual lymphocytes producing a particular antibody, and is applicable to the generation of monoclonal antibodies from many species, including humans. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8755564

  3. Immunization of cats against feline infectious peritonitis with anti-idiotypic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Escobar, J C; Kochik, S A; Skaletsky, E; Rosenberg, J S; Beardsley, T R

    1992-01-01

    Anti-idiotypic antibodies (Ab2s) generated against neutralizing antibodies (Ab1s) specific for feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) were shown to be specific for paratope-associated idiotopes of the Ab1s and not against isotypic determinants. In a study to determine the efficacy of an anti-idiotypic vaccine against feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), cats that were immunized with a pool of monoclonal Ab2s developed Ab3s that recognized the variable regions of the Ab2s as well as the natural antigen. In cats challenged with a lethal dose of virus the control group followed a predictable course of infection ultimately succumbing to FIP. Two immunized cats survived virus challenge and a third cat lived twice as long as the controls. The fourth immunized cat showed no evidence of protection. The ability to induce levels of protection against FIP lends support to the concept of using anti-idiotypic antibodies as a prophylactic vaccine.

  4. Immunotherapy-responsive limbic encephalitis with antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Markakis, Ioannis; Alexopoulos, Harry; Poulopoulou, Cornelia; Akrivou, Sofia; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Katsiva, Vassiliki; Lyrakos, Georgios; Gekas, Georgios; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2014-08-15

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) has been recently identified as a target of humoral autoimmunity in a small subgroup of patients with non-paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (NPLE). We present a patient with NPLE and positive anti-GAD antibodies who showed significant improvement after long-term immunotherapy. A 48-year old female was admitted with a two-year history of anterograde amnesia and seizures. Brain MRI revealed bilateral lesions of medial temporal lobes. Screening for anti-neuronal antibodies showed high anti-GAD titers in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with strong evidence of intrathecal production. The patient received treatment with prednisolone and long-term plasma exchange. During a 12-month follow-up, she exhibited complete seizure remission and an improvement in memory and visuo-spatial skills. Anti-GAD antibodies may serve as a useful marker to identify a subset of NPLE patients that respond to immunoregulatory treatment.

  5. PASSIVE ANTIBODY AND THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Raymond A.; Schierman, Louis W.

    1971-01-01

    The isoimmune response of fowl inoculated with RBC coated with antibody was investigated. Anti-B antiserum from a single animal was used to coat different donor type RBC. With each donor type RBC the immune response to the coated determinants is suppressed. Enhancement of the immune response to noncoated determinants occurs when they are products of an allelic gene or belong to a different blood group system. Coating some B antigen determinants suppresses the response to noncoated determinants of the same antigen, i.e., determinants which are products of the same B gene. Varying the quantity of passive antibody revealed that the degree of suppression and the degree of enhancement are negatively correlated. These findings support the concept that antibody-coated determinants function as carrier for noncoated determinants, provided a certain physical association exists between them. A further interpretation of these studies is that in certain situations an antibody to one antigen may interfere with events which lead to an immune response to a different antigen. The possibility, that the protection afforded by ABO incompatibility against Rh isoimmunization is because of a similar phenomenon, is discussed. A hypothesis is presented which states that where the immune response to certain antigens behaves as a dominantly inherited trait, and is associated with histocompatibility type, the nonresponder animals possess an antibody (perhaps cell bound) which interferes with the response to determinants for which it does not have specificity. Responders are assumed to lack this antibody because it has specificity for their major histocompatibility antigens. PMID:4106486

  6. Production, characterization, and use of serpin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kummer, J Alain; Strik, Merel C M; Bladergroen, Bellinda A; Hack, C Erik

    2004-02-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) constitute a still expanding superfamily of structural similar proteins, which are localized extracellularly and intracellularly. Serpins play a central role in the regulation of a wide variety of (patho) physiological processes including coagulation, fibrinolysis, inflammation, development, tumor invasion, and apoptosis. Serpins have a unique mechanism of inhibition that involves a profound change in conformational state upon interaction with their protease. This conformational change enables the production of monoclonal antibodies specific for native, complexed, and inactivated serpins. Antibodies, and assays based on these antibodies, have been helpful in elucidating the (patho) physiological function of serpins in the last decade. Serpin-specific antibodies can be used for: (1) structure-function studies such as detection of conformational changes; (2) identification of target-proteases; (3) the detection and quantification of serpin and serpin-protease complexes in bodily fluids by immunoassays such as ELISA, RIA or FACS; (4) detection of serpins in tissues by immunohistochemistry; and (5) possible therapeutical interventions. This review summarizes the techniques we have used to obtain and screen antibodies against extra- and intracellular serpins, as well as the use of these antibodies for some of the above-mentioned purposes.

  7. Boosting antibody developability through rational sequence optimization

    PubMed Central

    Seeliger, Daniel; Schulz, Patrick; Litzenburger, Tobias; Spitz, Julia; Hoerer, Stefan; Blech, Michaela; Enenkel, Barbara; Studts, Joey M; Garidel, Patrick; Karow, Anne R

    2015-01-01

    The application of monoclonal antibodies as commercial therapeutics poses substantial demands on stability and properties of an antibody. Therapeutic molecules that exhibit favorable properties increase the success rate in development. However, it is not yet fully understood how the protein sequences of an antibody translates into favorable in vitro molecule properties. In this work, computational design strategies based on heuristic sequence analysis were used to systematically modify an antibody that exhibited a tendency to precipitation in vitro. The resulting series of closely related antibodies showed improved stability as assessed by biophysical methods and long-term stability experiments. As a notable observation, expression levels also improved in comparison with the wild-type candidate. The methods employed to optimize the protein sequences, as well as the biophysical data used to determine the effect on stability under conditions commonly used in the formulation of therapeutic proteins, are described. Together, the experimental and computational data led to consistent conclusions regarding the effect of the introduced mutations. Our approach exemplifies how computational methods can be used to guide antibody optimization for increased stability. PMID:25759214

  8. Standardization of anti-DNA antibody assays.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S

    2013-07-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and represent important biomarkers for clinical and research purposes. These antibodies are part of a family of antibodies to nucleosomes and bind to conserved sites widely present on DNA. While the value of anti-DNA as a biomarker is well established, the assay for these antibodies has involved a variety of DNA sources and systems to detect DNA-anti-DNA interactions. The influence of these variations on antibody detection has complicated assay standardization. As an antigen, DNA has unique features since it is a highly charged polymer that has structural heterogeneity. This heterogeneity can affect antigenicity which can vary on the basis of DNA origin, size, conformation and mobility. In addition, as a polymer, DNA can promote patterns of antibody binding based on monogamous or bivalent interaction which require an extended polynucleotide structure. Understanding the nature of DNA as an antigen can facilitate interpretation of serological tests and underpin efforts at better standardization.

  9. Discovery of functional antibodies targeting ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Gardener, Matthew J; Williams, Wendy A

    2015-04-01

    Ion channels play critical roles in physiology and disease by modulation of cellular functions such as electrical excitability, secretion, cell migration, and gene transcription. Ion channels represent an important target class for drug discovery that has been largely addressed, to date, using small-molecule approaches. A significant opportunity exists to target these channels with antibodies and alternative formats of biologics. Antibodies display high specificity and affinity for their target antigen, and they have the potential to target ion channels very selectively. Nevertheless, isolating antibodies to this target class is challenging due to the difficulties in expression and purification of ion channels in a format suitable for antibody drug discovery in addition to the complexity of screening for function. In this article, we will review the current state of ion channel biologics discovery and the progress that has been made. We will also highlight the challenges in isolating functional antibodies to these targets and how these challenges may be addressed. Finally, we also illustrate successful approaches to isolating functional monoclonal antibodies targeting ion channels by way of a number of case studies drawn from recent publications.

  10. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  11. Antinuclear antibodies in patients on anticonvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Reyes, P. A.; Díes, H.; Shwadsky, S.

    1972-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies to calf thymus nuclei, NP, DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen were investigated in sera from 170 patients on various programmes of prolonged anticonvulsant treatment. Findings were compared to those on 214 tuberculous patients on isoniazid, 109 SLE patients and 66 healthy subjects. Patients on anticonvulsants had a significantly higher incidence of ANA to DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen than the controls but had a lower incidence of ANA to all antigens, except sNP, than the SLE patients. Patients on isoniazid did not have DNA antibodies, but had antibodies to whole nuclei and to NP which were practically absent in the anticonvulsant group. Of all patients on anticonvulsants only those receiving hydantoins had ANA to Sm antigen, while those receiving only primidone had antibodies to sNP but no antibodies to DNA. Alteration of sNP with isoniazid did not result in an increased incidence of ANA in the anticonvulsant group as it does in isoniazid treated subjects. It is concluded that the SLE-activating properties of diverse anticonvulsants probably resides in their potential to induce ANA. Although all anticonvulsants elicit ANA directed primarily to sNP, each may do so by different mechanisms or by altering different sites in the sNP molecule. The mechanisms by which anticonvulsant and isoniazid intake results in ANA probably differ. Presence of DNA antibodies in some patients on anticonvulsants may indicate that their convulsions were due to SLE. PMID:4117275

  12. Fetal arthrogryposis and maternal serum antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Paola; Clover, Linda; Wallerstein, Robert; Stewart, Helen; Genzel-Boroviczeny, Orsolya; Dean, Andrew; Vincent, Angela

    2006-08-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenital (AMC) describes multiple joint contractures resulting from lack of movement in utero. Antibodies directed at the fetal isoform of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) have been reported in a small number of asymptomatic mothers of AMC babies. We examined sera from 179 mothers of AMC babies and 20 parous and non-parous controls to look for antibodies to AChR or undefined muscle or neuronal proteins. We found positive AChR antibodies in only three sera (1.5%) from asymptomatic AMC mothers. However, there was reactivity with muscle or with neuronal antigens in 33% of the sera, and reactivity to undefined neuronal antigens was more common in sera from mothers of AMC babies with CNS involvement (p=0.001) than those without. The offspring of mothers with AChR antibodies may benefit from treatment during pregnancy. Other maternal antibodies require further study, but these observations add to the emerging literature on maternal antibodies associated with developmental intrauterine disorders.

  13. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-Influenza Virus Antibodies: Enhancement of Neutralizing Potency in Polyclonal Mixtures and IgA Backbones

    PubMed Central

    He, Wenqian; Mullarkey, Caitlin E.; Duty, J. Andrew; Moran, Thomas M.; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current influenza virus vaccines rely upon the accurate prediction of circulating virus strains months in advance of the actual influenza season in order to allow time for vaccine manufacture. Unfortunately, mismatches occur frequently, and even when perfect matches are achieved, suboptimal vaccine efficacy leaves several high-risk populations vulnerable to infection. However, the recent discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that target the hemagglutinin (HA) stalk domain has renewed hope that the development of “universal” influenza virus vaccines may be within reach. Here, we examine the functions of influenza A virus hemagglutinin stalk-binding antibodies in an endogenous setting, i.e., as polyclonal preparations isolated from human sera. Relative to monoclonal antibodies that bind to the HA head domain, the neutralization potency of monoclonal stalk-binding antibodies was vastly inferior in vitro but was enhanced by several orders of magnitude in the polyclonal context. Furthermore, we demonstrated a surprising enhancement in IgA-mediated HA stalk neutralization relative to that achieved by antibodies of IgG isotypes. Mechanistically, this could be explained in two ways. Identical variable regions consistently neutralized virus more potently when in an IgA backbone compared to an IgG backbone. In addition, HA-specific memory B cells isolated from human peripheral blood were more likely to be stalk specific when secreting antibodies of IgA isotypes compared to those secreting IgG. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that HA stalk-binding antibodies perform optimally when in a polyclonal context and that the targeted elicitation of HA stalk-specific IgA should be an important consideration during “universal” influenza virus vaccine design. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses remain one of the most worrisome global public health threats due to their capacity to cause pandemics. While seasonal vaccines fail to protect against the

  14. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  15. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  16. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  18. Persistence of Antibodies against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Iblan, Ibrahim; Rha, Brian; Alqasrawi, Sultan; Haddadin, Aktham; Al Nsour, Mohannad; Alsanouri, Tarek; Ali, Sami Sheikh; Harcourt, Jennifer; Miao, Congrong; Tamin, Azaibi; Gerber, Susan I.; Haynes, Lia M.; Al Abdallat, Mohammad Mousa

    2016-01-01

    To determine how long antibodies against Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus persist, we measured long-term antibody responses among persons serologically positive or indeterminate after a 2012 outbreak in Jordan. Antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies, were detectable in 6 (86%) of 7 persons for at least 34 months after the outbreak. PMID:27332149

  19. Engineering the variable region of therapeutic IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Hiroyuki; Kuramochi, Taichi; Sampei, Zenjiro; Ishii, Shinya; Hattori, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    Since the first generation of humanized IgG1 antibodies reached the market in the late 1990s, IgG antibody molecules have been extensively engineered. The success of antibody therapeutics has introduced severe competition in developing novel therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, especially for promising or clinically validated targets. Such competition has led researchers to generate so-called second or third generation antibodies with clinical differentiation utilizing various engineering and optimization technologies. Parent IgG antibodies can be engineered to have improved antigen binding properties, effector functions, pharmacokinetics, pharmaceutical properties and safety issues. Although the primary role of the antibody variable region is to bind to the antigen, it is also the main source of antibody diversity and its sequence affects various properties important for developing antibody therapeutics. Here we review recent research activity in variable region engineering to generate superior antibody therapeutics. PMID:21406966

  20. Heterologous flavivirus infection-enhancing antibodies in sera of Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Fagbami, A; Halstead, S B; Marchette, N; Larsen, K

    1988-01-01

    Human sera collected from Nigerians were examined for plaque reduction neutralizing and infection-enhancing antibodies against dengue 2, yellow fever, and West Nile viruses. Neutralization tests showed that 17 of 19 sera contained flavivirus neutralizing antibody; 11 were positive to all 3 viruses, 5 to dengue and yellow fever, and 1 to dengue virus only. Two sera had no detectable neutralizing antibody to any of the flaviviruses. Enhancement assays showed that 17 flavivirus neutralizing antibody-positive sera contained infection-enhancing antibodies to dengue 2, and 16 had antibody to yellow fever. Although 11 sera were positive for West Nile neutralizing antibody, 17 enhanced this virus. Heterologous infection-enhancing antibody titers were lower than the homologous ones. Broadly reacting sera and those with high neutralizing antibody titers produced the highest infection-enhancing antibody titers.

  1. [Current situations and the future prospect of monoclonal antibody products].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody products and monoclonal antibody-based biopharmaceuticals have shown considerable effectiveness in the treatment for variety of diseases; cancer, auto-immune/auto-inflammation diseases and so on. Significant advance in monoclonal antibody products for cancer treatments was made with antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), and antibodies for blockade of immune checkpoints. Already 3 ADCs and 2 anti-immune-checkpoint antibodies products have been approved, and these monoclonal antibody-related product pipelines reach over 30. On the other hand, EU approved first monoclonal-antibody biosimilar, RemsimaTM (infliximab), suggesting that other monoclonal-antibody biosmilars will follow to the market. In this paper, several new issues about monoclonal antibody products will be discussed. PMID:25707201

  2. Prevalence of antibody to hepatitits B surface antigen among staff in an Edinburgh hospital.

    PubMed

    Burrell, C J; Tonkin, R W; Proudfoot, E; Leadbetter, G; Cowan, P; Lockerbie, L; Gore, S; Lutz, W; Marmion, B P

    1977-02-01

    Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen was detected by radioimmunoprecipitation in 74 (5-5%) of 1336 staff members in a large general hospital in Edinburgh, in 14 (2-9%) of 480 volunteer blood donors in the area, and in 12 (6-1%) of 197 pregnant women attending for the first time at the ante-natal clinic in the hospital. Rates of antibody prevalence rose with age in the sample of hospital staff and in that of the blood donors, particularly among males. On the other hand, in the ante-natal patients antibody prevalence declined with age. The rates in hospital staff were higher than those in blood donors of comparable age and sex, and high titres of antibody were more common in the staff group. However, no association was found between antibody prevalence and a history of clinical hepatitis, blood transfusion, or recognized contact with cases of hepatitis. Staff who had previously worked in an infectious disease hospital did not show increased antibody prevalence, indicating that simple isolation measures have been adequate to minimize exposure to hepatitis B. No particular prevalence of infection was seen in physicians and surgeons, in the nursing staff, or in workers in clinical diagnostic laboratories, hospital administration or other areas. One group clearly showing increased antibody prevalence was staff currently working, or who had worked, in the Haemodialysis Unit; this correlated with the outbreak of dialysis-associated hepatitis in 1969--70. However, no evidence suggested that significant dissemination of infection had occurred to other defined groups of hospital staff. Elevated rates were also observed in a small sample of kitchen and portering staff, and in obstetric medical and nursing staff; the latter observation indicate a need for further investigation to identify unsuspected exposure to hepatitis B virus.

  3. RA8, A human anti-CD25 antibody against human treg cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Robyn; Flanagan, Meg; Miller, Keith D.; Nien, Yu-Chih; Hu, Peisheng; Gray, Dixon; Khawli, Leslie A.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2007-06-01

    Although anti-CD25 antibodies exist for clinical use in patients, there is a need for the development of a human Treg antibody that will abrogate the immunosuppressive function of this small but critical T cell subtype. Based upon mounting evidence that the level of Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with clinical prognosis and stage in man, it appears that Treg cells play an important role in the tumor's ability to overcome host immune responses. In mice, the rat anti-mouse CD25 antibody PC61 causes depletion of CD25-bearing Treg cells both peripherally in lymphatic tissues and in the tumor microenvironment, without inducing symptoms of autoimmunity. A similar antibody, though with the ability to delete Treg cells specifically, would be an important new tool for reversing tumor escape associated with Treg immunosuppression in man. To begin to generate such a reagent, we now describe the development of a human anti-CD25 antibody using a novel yeast display library. The target antigen CD25-Fc was constructed and used for five rounds of selection using a non-immune yeast display library that contained as many as 109 single chain variable fragments (scFv). Two unique clones with low KD values (RA4 and RA8) were then selected to construct fully human anti-CD25 antibodies (IgG1/kappa) for stable expression. One antibody, RA8, showed excellent binding to human CD25+ cell lines and to human Treg cells and appears to be an excellent candidate for the generation of a human reagent that may be used in man for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  4. Antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax blood-stage and sporozoite antigens in the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Alistair R. D.; Boel, Machteld E.; McGready, Rose; Ataide, Ricardo; Drew, Damien; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Beeson, James G.; Nosten, François; Simpson, Julie A.; Fowkes, Freya J. I.

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy a variety of immunological changes occur to accommodate the fetus. It is unknown whether these changes continue to affect humoral immunity postpartum or how quickly they resolve. IgG levels were measured to P. falciparum and P. vivax antigens in 201 postpartum and 201 controls over 12 weeks. Linear mixed-effects models assessed antibody maintenance over time and the effect of microscopically confirmed Plasmodium spp. infection on antibody levels, and whether this was different in postpartum women compared with control women. Postpartum women had reduced Plasmodium spp. antibody levels compared to controls at baseline. Over 12 weeks, mean antibody levels in postpartum women increased to levels observed in control women. Microscopically confirmed P. falciparum and P. vivax infections during follow-up were associated with an increase in species-specific antibodies with similar magnitudes of boosting observed in postpartum and control women. Antibodies specific for pregnancy-associated, VAR2CSA-expressing parasites did not rapidly decline postpartum and did not boost in response to infection in either postpartum or control women. After pregnancy, levels of malaria-specific antibodies were reduced, but recovered to levels seen in control women. There was no evidence of an impaired ability to mount a boosting response in postpartum women. PMID:27558000

  5. Novel humanized anti-CD3 antibodies induce a predominantly immunoregulatory profile in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hernandez M; Vieira, Pedro M M M; Costa, Patricia L N; Pimentel, Bárbara M S; Moro, Ana M; Kalil, Jorge; Maranhão, Andrea Q; Coelho, Verônica; Brigido, Marcelo M

    2009-08-15

    Strategies to minimize the immunogenicity and toxicity of murine anti-CD3 antibodies (e.g. OKT3) are of special interest for organ transplantation and for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In the present work, we have developed two humanized anti-CD3 antibodies. These molecules were shown to bind to human CD3, though less efficiently, and display less mitogenic activity than OKT3. These results prompted us to investigate whether this reduced mitogenic potential was associated with the development of anti-inflammatory properties. Indeed, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), the humanized antibody versions induced a predominantly anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, in contrast with the pro-inflammatory profile induced by OKT3. Neither OKT3 nor the humanized versions induced the expression of IL-4, IL-2 or TGF-beta. Both humanized antibodies induced significantly lower production of IFN-gamma and IL-5 and slightly higher production of IL-10 than OKT3. This immunomodulatory profile was most evident by the 80-fold higher ratio of IL-10/IFN-gamma production in PBMCs cultured in the presence of the humanized antibodies, compared to those stimulated with OKT3. Furthermore, these humanized anti-CD3 antibodies induced a late FOXP3 gene expression while OKT3 led to a more transient expression of FOXP3. Taken our results, we suggest that these humanized anti-CD3 antibodies may promote the development of T cells with immunoregulatory activity.

  6. Antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax blood-stage and sporozoite antigens in the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    McLean, Alistair R D; Boel, Machteld E; McGready, Rose; Ataide, Ricardo; Drew, Damien; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Beeson, James G; Nosten, François; Simpson, Julie A; Fowkes, Freya J I

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy a variety of immunological changes occur to accommodate the fetus. It is unknown whether these changes continue to affect humoral immunity postpartum or how quickly they resolve. IgG levels were measured to P. falciparum and P. vivax antigens in 201 postpartum and 201 controls over 12 weeks. Linear mixed-effects models assessed antibody maintenance over time and the effect of microscopically confirmed Plasmodium spp. infection on antibody levels, and whether this was different in postpartum women compared with control women. Postpartum women had reduced Plasmodium spp. antibody levels compared to controls at baseline. Over 12 weeks, mean antibody levels in postpartum women increased to levels observed in control women. Microscopically confirmed P. falciparum and P. vivax infections during follow-up were associated with an increase in species-specific antibodies with similar magnitudes of boosting observed in postpartum and control women. Antibodies specific for pregnancy-associated, VAR2CSA-expressing parasites did not rapidly decline postpartum and did not boost in response to infection in either postpartum or control women. After pregnancy, levels of malaria-specific antibodies were reduced, but recovered to levels seen in control women. There was no evidence of an impaired ability to mount a boosting response in postpartum women. PMID:27558000

  7. Suitability of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α7 and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor 3 Antibodies for Immune Detection: Evaluation in Murine Skin.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Frank R; Raghavan, Badrinarayanan; Paddenberg, Renate; Kummer, Wolfgang; Tumala, Susanne; Lochnit, Günter; Gieler, Uwe; Peters, Eva M J

    2015-05-01

    Recent evidence reveals a crucial role for acetylcholine and its receptors in the regulation of inflammation, particularly of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (Chrna7) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 3 (Chrm3). Immunohistochemistry is a key tool for their cellular localization in functional tissues. We evaluated nine different commercially available antibodies on back skin tissue from wild-type (Wt) and gene-deficient (KO) mice. In the immunohistochemical analysis, we focused on key AChR-ligand sensitive skin cells (mast cells, nerve fibers and keratinocytes). All five antibodies tested for Chrm3 and the first three Chrna7 antibodies stained positive in both Wt and respective KO skin. With the 4th antibody (ab23832) nerve fibers were unlabeled in the KO mice. By western blot analysis, this antibody detected bands in both Wt and Chrna7 KO skin and brain. qRT-PCR revealed mRNA amplification with a primer set for the undeleted region in both Wt and KO mice, but none with a primer set for the deleted region in KO mice. By 2D electrophoresis, we found β-actin and β-enolase cross reactivity, which was confirmed by double immunolabeling. In view of the present results, the tested antibodies are not suitable for immunolocalization in skin and suggest thorough control of antibody specificity is required if histomorphometry is intended. PMID:25673288

  8. Anti-phospholipase A₂ receptor antibodies in recurrent membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kattah, A; Ayalon, R; Beck, L H; Sethi, S; Sandor, D G; Cosio, F G; Gandhi, M J; Lorenz, E C; Salant, D J; Fervenza, F C

    2015-05-01

    About 70% of patients with primary membranous nephropathy (MN) have circulating anti-phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) antibodies that correlate with disease activity, but their predictive value in post-transplant (Tx) recurrent MN is uncertain. We evaluated 26 patients, 18 with recurrent MN and 8 without recurrence, with serial post-Tx serum samples and renal biopsies to determine if patients with pre-Tx anti-PLA2R are at increased risk of recurrence as compared to seronegative patients and to determine if post-Tx changes in anti-PLA2R correspond to the clinical course. In the recurrent group, 10/17 patients had anti-PLA2R at the time of Tx versus 2/7 patients in the nonrecurrent group. The positive predictive value of pre-Tx anti-PLA2R for recurrence was 83%, while the negative predictive value was 42%. Persistence or reappearance of post-Tx anti-PLA2R was associated with increasing proteinuria and resistant disease in 6/18 cases; little or no proteinuria occurred in cases with pre-Tx anti-PLA2R and biopsy evidence of recurrence in which the antibodies resolved with standard immunosuppression. Some cases with positive pre-Tx anti-PLA2R were seronegative at the time of recurrence. In conclusion, patients with positive pre-Tx anti-PLA2R should be monitored closely for recurrent MN. Persistence or reappearance of antibody post-Tx may indicate a more resistant disease.

  9. Gm allotypes and HLA in rheumatoid arthritis patients with circulating antibodies to native type II collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, P A; Grennan, D M; Klimiuk, P S; Clague, R B; deLange, G G; Collins, I; Dyer, P A

    1987-01-01

    HLA antigens and immunoglobulin heavy chain allotypes (Gm) were determined in 166 unrelated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 44 of whom had circulating antibodies to native type II collagen. Collagen antibody positive patients showed an association with HLA-DR3 and DR7 (68% compared with 39% of collagen antibody negative RA, p less than 0.005), and with the Gm phenotype, Gm(zafngb). This contrasted with the collagen antibody negative RA patients where there was an association with HLA-DR4 and, in DR4 positive disease only, with the Gm allotype, G1m(x). The Gm(zafngb) phenotype was found in 26% of DR3 or DR7 positive patients overall and only 9% of RA patients negative for these DR antigens (p less than 0.005), suggesting an interaction between HLA-DR3/7 and Gm(zafngb). The differing Gm associations for collagen antibody positive and negative RA provide further evidence for genetic heterogeneity in susceptibility to RA. PMID:3496057

  10. Physical Activity and Natural Anti-VIP Antibodies: Potential Role in Breast and Prostate Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Veljkovic, Milena; Dopsaj, Violeta; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Branch, Donald R.; Veljkovic, Nevena; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, Maria M.; Veljkovic, Veljko; Glisic, Sanja; Colombatti, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Background There is convincing evidence from numerous clinical and epidemiological studies that physical activity can reduce the risk for breast and prostate cancer. The biological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain elusive. Herein we suggest a role for naturally produced antibodies reactive with the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the suppression of breast and prostate cancer, which we believe could offer a possible molecular mechanism underlying control of these cancers by physical exercise. Methodology and Results We found that sera from individuals having breast and prostate cancers have decreased titers of VIP natural antibodies as demonstrated by a lower reactivity against peptide NTM1, having similar informational and structural properties as VIP. In contrast, sera collected from elite athletes, exhibited titers of natural NTM1-reactive antibodies that are significantly increased, suggesting that physical activity boosts production of these antibodies. Significance Presented results suggest that physical exercise stimulates production of natural anti-VIP antibodies and likely results in suppression of VIP. This, in turn, may play a protective role against breast and prostate cancers. Physical exercise should be further investigated as a potential tool in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:22140573

  11. Production of Anti-platelet Factor 4/Heparin Complex Antibodies After Cardiovascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Takefumi; Motohashi, Shinya; Wanaka, Keiko; Walenga, Jeanine M

    2015-03-01

    To study the production of anti-platelet factor 4 (anti-PF4)/heparin complex antibodies of Ig (immunoglobulin) G/IgA/IgM using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; heparin-induced thrombocytopenia [HIT] antibodies) in 79 patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery, we employed Δoptical density (OD) as a marker of HIT-antibody production. The ΔODs were calculated from the differences in the ODs using ELISA. Patient were classified into 3 ΔOD ranges: ΔOD ≥ 1.0, ΔOD ≥ 0.4 to <1.0, and ΔOD < 0.4. The underlying disease, time course of the postoperative platelet count, D-dimer level, postoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), use of cardiopulmonary bypass and postoperative thrombocytosis were not considered for the 3 ΔOD classifications. None of the 6 patients with ΔOD ≥ 1 .0 and a positive functional assay was diagnosed with HIT due to the absence of HIT-derived thrombocytopenia. In conclusion, HIT-antibody production increased until day 7 after heparin cessation and reached a trace level on day 14. It was demonstrated that HIT-antibody production is in remission unless there is any evidence of a further increase during the second week postsurgery.

  12. IgM and IgG antibodies to hepatitis C virus in patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia.

    PubMed Central

    L'Abbate, A; Cutrupi, S; Rognetta, M; Fabiano, C; Craxi, A

    1993-01-01

    To assess the relationship between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and essential mixed cryoglobulinaemia (EMC), sera from 23 patients with EMC were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies to HCV antigens and for HCV RNA. Quantitative HCV antibody studies were performed on serum and purified cryoglobulin fractions. HCV antibodies of both IgG and IgM class were found in 22 (96%) patients. Ten of these were also HCV-RNA positives. Higher titres of anti-HCV IgM were present in the 11 patients with evidence of liver damage. Anti-HCV IgG antibodies were shown to be concentrated in the IgG fraction of cryoglobulins in all eight patients studied. These results strongly suggest a role for HCV in the pathogenesis of EMC. PMID:7693384

  13. The meaning of anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Molina, Gabriela; Leal-Alegre, Gustavo; Michel-Peregrina, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Anti-SSA/Ro and anti-La/SSB are the hallmark antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), being present in 60-70%. These antibodies have been associated with an earlier disease onset, glandular dysfunction and extraglandular manifestations as well as with other B cells activation markers. In addition an immunogenetic background is important for the autoantibody formation, having a stronger association with HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR3. Anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies are useful in the diagnosis of pSS and help to identify more "active" patients, however their association with response to treatment is unclear. Herein we review the evidence regarding the association of these antibodies with HLA background, demographic, clinical, glandular dysfunction, other serologic features and response to treatment in patients with pSS.

  14. Antibodies to Trichomonas vaginalis surface glycolipid

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Corcuera, F D; Singh, B N; Gray, G C; Stamper, P D; Davuluri, M; Schlangen, K; Corbeil, R R; Corbeil, L B

    2015-01-01

    Background Human trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease, yet immune responses are not well studied. Methods Since the Trichomonas vaginalis lipophosphoglycan (TvLPG) is an important virulence factor, a bank of eight monoclonal antibodies was generated to define the antigen in clinical isolates. The TvLPG-specific antibody response of women who were culture positive (n=33) or negative (n=33) for T vaginalis infection was determined by isotype-specific ELISA. Results The bank of monoclonal antibodies reacted with conserved surface TvLPG epitopes in 27 isolates from pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. Conserved TvLPG epitopes were shown to be surface exposed by immunofluorescence. Sera collected from the same patients at the same time were assayed for specific antibodies. Serum and vaginal secretions from 33 T vaginalis-positive women had statistically higher IgG anti-TvLPG levels than age-matched and race-matched negative controls in the same clinical study (p<0.01). Vaginal IgA anti-TvLPG levels of the women with trichomoniasis were almost significantly higher than controls (p=0.055). Infected women with normal pregnancies had significantly higher vaginal IgG anti-TvLPG values than infected women with adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Conclusions These antibody responses show that infected women can respond to the conserved TvLPG antigen. Since antibodies to trichomonad surface LPG protect in a bovine model of trichomoniasis, the role of these antibodies in the human disease should be investigated. PMID:23785040

  15. Neutralization of HIV by Milk Expressed Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaocong; Pollock, Daniel; Duval, Mark; Lewis, Christopher; Joseph, Kristin; Meade, Harry; Cavacini, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Background In some areas of the world mother-to-child transmission of HIV remains a significant problem in part due to widespread breastfeeding which is essential due to scarce supply of a safe replacement, protection conferred by breast milk against many enteric illnesses, and cultural norms. We propose that sustained, adequate levels of protective antibodies in breast milk will prevent transmission of HIV. Methods The HIV neutralizing human monoclonal antibody b12 (IgG1) has been expressed as an IgA2 in CHO cells and shown to retain full immunoreactivity and neutralizing activity as the parental IgG1. The expression plasmids containing the b12 heavy and light chains were also used to construct milk specific expression vectors using the GTC goat β-casein expression vector to direct expression of linked genes to the mammary gland with subsequent secretion into the milk. Female transgenic mice were generated and following parturition, their milk was tested for antibody immunoreactivity with gp120 and neutralization of HIV. Results When compared to CHO derived b12 IgA2 (or IgG1), immunoreactivity was retained. When tested for neutralization, milk derived b12 IgA2 was at least comparable to CHO derived antibody and in some cases superior to CHO derived antibody. Furthermore, milk that expressed b12 IgA2 was significantly more effective at mediating antibody dependent cell killing. Conclusions These results suggest it is possible to achieve functional HIV-specific mAb in the milk of transgenic mice and further investigations are warranted to explore ways for inducing this type of antibody response in the breast milk of HIV infected women. PMID:23269241

  16. Patient With Homer-3 Antibodies and Cerebellitis

    PubMed Central

    Höftberger, Romana; Sabater, Lidia; Ortega, Angel; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    Importance Homer proteins are a family of scaffolding proteins of the postsynaptic density. Homer-3 colocalizes and modulates the activity of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5). Cerebellitis has been reported in association with antibodies to mGluR1. We describe the second patient with cerebellitis and Homer-3 antibodies and report a novel, highly specific immunoblot assay. Observations A 38-year-old man had acute onset of headache, nausea, vomiting, and confusion. He developed a pancerebellar syndrome during the ensuing week. Extensive studies did not reveal any tumor. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed a white blood cell count of 60/µL (to convert to ×109 per liter, multiply by 0.001). Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings were normal. For 2 years, the patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulins and steroids, with partial improvement of the cerebellar ataxia. The patient was negative for onconeural (Hu, Yo, Ri, CV2, Tr, amphiphysin, and Ma2), glutamic acid decarboxylase, and mGluR1 antibodies. Immunohistochemistry on rat brain revealed immunostaining of the cerebellar molecular layer. Homer-3 antibodies were demonstrated by immunoblot of recombinant Homer-3. The clinical features of this patient and a previously described patient with Homer-3 antibodies are similar to those of patients with mGluR1 antibodies. Conclusions and Relevance We report the second case of autoimmune cerebellar ataxia associated with Homer-3 antibodies. The presence of Homer-3 autoantibodies should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with subacute cerebellar ataxia of unknown cause. PMID:23400636

  17. A multi-Fc-species system for recombinant antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Moutel, Sandrine; El Marjou, Ahmed; Vielemeyer, Ole; Nizak, Clément; Benaroch, Philippe; Dübel, Stefan; Perez, Franck

    2009-01-01

    Background Genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic projects often suffer from a lack of functional validation creating a strong demand for specific and versatile antibodies. Antibody phage display represents an attractive approach to select rapidly in vitro the equivalent of monoclonal antibodies, like single chain Fv antibodies, in an inexpensive and animal free way. However, so far, recombinant antibodies have not managed to impose themselves as efficient alternatives to natural antibodies. Results We developed a series of vectors that allow one to easily fuse single chain Fv antibodies to Fc domains of immunoglobulins, improving their sensitivity and facilitating their use. This series enables the fusion of single chain Fv antibodies with human, mouse or rabbit Fc so that a given antibody is no longer restricted to a particular species. This opens up unlimited multiplexing possibilities and gives additional value to recombinant antibodies. We also show that this multi-Fc species production system can be applied to natural monoclonal antibodies cloned as single chain Fv antibodies and we converted the widely used 9E10 mouse anti-Myc-tag antibody into a human and a rabbit antibody. Conclusion Altogether, this new expression system, that brings constant quality, sensitivity and unique versatility, will be important to broaden the use of recombinant and natural monoclonal antibodies both for laboratory and diagnosis use. PMID:19245715

  18. Higher cytotoxicity of divalent antibody-toxins than monovalent antibody-toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Won, JaeSeon; Nam, PilWon; Lee, YongChan; Choe, MuHyeon

    2009-04-24

    Recombinant antibody-toxins are constructed via the fusion of a 'carcinoma-specific' antibody fragment to a toxin. Due to the high affinity and high selectivity of the antibody fragments, antibody-toxins can bind to surface antigens on cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells [L.H. Pai, J.K. Batra, D.J. FitzGerald, M.C. Willingham, I. Pastan, Anti-tumor activities of immunotoxins made of monoclonal antibody B3 and various forms of Pseudomonas exotoxin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 3358-3362]. In this study, we constructed the antibody-toxin, Fab-SWn-PE38, with SWn (n = 3, 6, 9) sequences containing n-time repeated (G{sub 4}S) between the Fab fragment and PE38 (38 kDa truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A). The SWn sequence also harbored one cysteine residue that could form a disulfide bridge between two Fab-SWn-PE38 monomers. We assessed the cytotoxicity of the monovalent (Fab-SWn-PE38), and divalent ([Fab-SWn-PE38]{sub 2}) antibody-toxins. The cytotoxicity of the dimer against the CRL1739 cell line was approximately 18.8-fold higher than that of the monomer on the ng/ml scale, which was approximately 37.6-fold higher on the pM scale. These results strongly indicate that divalency provides higher cytotoxicity for an antibody-toxin.

  19. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity.

  20. The antibody mining toolbox: an open source tool for the rapid analysis of antibody repertoires.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Kiss, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput screening methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. The high cost and the need for bioinformatics experts and powerful computer clusters, however, have limited the general use of deep sequencing in antibody selections. Here, we describe the AbMining ToolBox, an open source software package for the straightforward analysis of antibody libraries sequenced by the three main next generation sequencing platforms (454, Ion Torrent, MiSeq). The ToolBox is able to identify heavy chain CDR3s as effectively as more computationally intense software, and can be easily adapted to analyze other portions of antibody variable genes, as well as the selection outputs of libraries based on different scaffolds. The software runs on all common operating systems (Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), on standard personal computers, and sequence analysis of 1-2 million reads can be accomplished in 10-15 min, a fraction of the time of competing software. Use of the ToolBox will allow the average researcher to incorporate deep sequence analysis into routine selections from antibody display libraries. PMID:24423623

  1. Lethal 17D yellow fever encephalitis in mice. I. Passive protection by monoclonal antibodies to the envelope proteins of 17D yellow fever and dengue 2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Brandriss, M W; Schlesinger, J J; Walsh, E E; Briselli, M

    1986-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to the envelope proteins (E) of the 17D vaccine strain of yellow fever virus (17D YF) and to dengue 2 virus were examined for their ability to confer passive protection against lethal 17D YF encephalitis in mice. All 13 IgG anti-17D YF antibodies, regardless of neutralizing capacity, conferred solid protection when given in a relatively high dose prior to intracerebral inoculation of virus. Three antibodies with high in vitro neutralizing titres were all protective at a low dose as were several non-neutralizing antibodies. One flavivirus group-reactive antibody to dengue 2 virus conferred similar protection at low dose. Protection was also observed when antibodies were given several days after virus inoculation when peak infectious virus titres and histopathological evidence of infection were present in brains. The ability of a non-neutralizing antibody to protect could not be attributed to complement-dependent lysis of virus-infected cells and did not correlate with avidity or with proximity of its binding site to a critical neutralizing epitope of the E protein. Some antibodies, characterized as non-neutralizing by plaque reduction assay on Vero cells, inhibited the growth of virus in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line, suggesting one possible mechanism of protection. These results may be relevant to the design of prospective flavivirus vaccines and support the possibility of conferring broadened protection among flaviviruses by stimulating the antibody response to appropriate epitopes of the E protein.

  2. Analysis of viral clearance unit operations for monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Miesegaes, George; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2010-06-01

    Demonstration of viral clearance is a critical step in assuring the safety of biotechnology products. We generated a viral clearance database that contains product information, unit operation process parameters, and viral clearance data from monoclonal antibody and antibody-related regulatory submissions to FDA. Here we present a broad overview of the database and resulting analyses. We report that the diversity of model viruses tested expands as products transition to late-phase. We also present averages and ranges of viral clearance results by Protein A and ion exchange chromatography steps, low pH chemical inactivation, and virus filtration, focusing on retro- and parvoviruses. For most unit operations, an average log reduction value (LRV, a measure of clearance power) for retrovirus of >4 log(10) were measured. Cases where clearance data fell outside of the anticipated range (i.e., outliers) were rationally explained. Lastly, a historical analysis did not find evidence of any improvement trend in viral clearance over time. The data collectively suggest that many unit operations in general can reliably clear viruses.

  3. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options. PMID:27606347

  4. Tregalizumab – A Monoclonal Antibody to Target Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    König, Martin; Rharbaoui, Faiza; Aigner, Silke; Dälken, Benjamin; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a subpopulation of CD4+ T cells, which are essential for the maintenance of immunological tolerance. The absence or dysfunction of Tregs can lead to autoimmunity and allergies. The restoration of functional Tregs and/or Treg cell numbers represents a novel and attractive approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, e.g., rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The CD4 cell surface receptor is a target for modulation of T cell function. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CD4 have previously been tested for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, including RA. Furthermore, in model systems, anti-CD4 antibodies are able to induce tolerance and mediate immunomodulatory effects through a variety of mechanisms. Despite the availability of innovative and effective therapies for RA, many patients still have persistently active disease or experience adverse events that can limit use. A growing body of evidence suggests that Treg modulation could offer a new therapeutic strategy in RA and other autoimmune disorders. Here, we describe tregalizumab (BT-061), which is a novel, non-depleting IgG1 mAb that binds to a unique epitope of CD4. Tregalizumab represents the first humanized anti-CD4 mAb that selectively induces Treg activation. PMID:26834751

  5. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options.

  6. Encephalitis and antibodies to synaptic and neuronal cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Eric; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    The identification of encephalitis associated with antibodies against cell surface and synaptic proteins, although recent, has already had a substantial impact in clinical neurology and neuroscience. The target antigens are receptors and proteins that have critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity, including the NMDA receptor, the AMPA receptor, the GABAB receptor, and the glycine receptor. Other autoantigens, such as leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 and contactin-associated protein-like 2, form part of trans-synaptic complexes and neuronal cell adhesion molecules involved in fine-tuning synaptic transmission and nerve excitability. Syndromes resulting from these immune responses resemble those of pharmacologic or genetic models in which the antigens are disrupted. For some immune responses, there is evidence that the antibodies alter the structure and function of the antigen, suggesting a direct pathogenic effect. These disorders are important because they can affect children and young adults, are severe and protracted, occur with or without tumor association, and respond to treatment but may relapse. This review provides an update on these syndromes and autoantigens with special emphasis on clinical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21747075

  7. Which Antibody Functions are Important for an HIV Vaccine?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    HIV antibody (Ab) functions capable of preventing mucosal cell-free or cell-to-cell HIV transmission are critical for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. In addition to CD4+ T cells, other potential HIV-target cell types including antigen-presenting cells (APCs) (dendritic cells, macrophages) residing at mucosal sites are infected. Moreover, the interactions between APCs and HIV lead to HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Recently discovered broadly neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are able to neutralize a broad spectrum of HIV strains, inhibit cell-to-cell transfer, and efficiently protect from infection in the experimentally challenged macaque model. However, the 31% protection observed in the RV144 vaccine trial in the absence of detectable NAbs in blood samples pointed to the possible role of additional Ab inhibitory functions. Increasing evidence suggests that IgG Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated inhibition of Abs present at the mucosal site may play a role in protection against HIV mucosal transmission. Moreover, mucosal IgA Abs may be determinant in protection against HIV sexual transmission. Therefore, defining Ab inhibitory functions that could lead to protection is critical for further HIV vaccine design. Here, we review different inhibitory properties of HIV-specific Abs and discuss their potential role in protection against HIV sexual transmission. PMID:24995008

  8. Tumor size: effect on monoclonal antibody uptake in tumor models

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, P.L.; Halpern, S.E.; Dillman, R.O.; Shawler, D.L.; Johnson, D.E.; Chen, A.; Krishnan, L.; Frincke, J.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of radiolabeled monoclonal antitumor antibodies (MoAbs) into human tumors growing in nude mice. The colon tumors ranged in size from 0.03-1.6 g, the melanoma from 0.1 to 6.7 g, and the lymphoma from 0.06 to 10.2 g. Indium-111 was primarily used as the radiolabel, however, both 125I and 111In were used as tracers for the MoAb in one experiment. The per g radiopharmaceutical uptake by tumors was inversely proportional to tumor size when tumor specific MoAb was administered. This finding was independent of the radiolabel and was demonstrable when the mice bore two tumors of differing size. When the MoAb was not specific for the tumor, the data were less well defined and a statistically significant correlation with size did not occur. These data are strong evidence for a decrease in per g uptake of labeled tumor specific antibodies as tumors increase in size.

  9. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  10. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  11. Platform for high-throughput antibody selection using synthetically-designed antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Batonick, Melissa; Holland, Erika G; Busygina, Valeria; Alderman, Dawn; Kay, Brian K; Weiner, Michael P; Kiss, Margaret M

    2016-09-25

    Synthetic humanized antibody libraries are frequently generated by random incorporation of changes at multiple positions in the antibody hypervariable regions. Although these libraries have very large theoretical diversities (>10(20)), the practical diversity that can be achieved by transformation of Escherichia coli is limited to about 10(10). To constrain the practical diversity to sequences that more closely mimic the diversity of natural human antibodies, we generated a scFv phage library using entirely pre-defined complementarity determining regions (CDR). We have used this library to select for novel antibodies against four human protein targets and demonstrate that identification of enriched sequences at each of the six CDRs in early selection rounds can be used to reconstruct a consensus antibody with selectivity for the target.

  12. Metabolic engineering of monoclonal antibody carbohydrates for antibody-drug conjugation.

    PubMed

    Okeley, Nicole M; Toki, Brian E; Zhang, Xinqun; Jeffrey, Scott C; Burke, Patrick J; Alley, Stephen C; Senter, Peter D

    2013-10-16

    The role that carbohydrates play in antibody function and pharmacokinetics has made them important targets for modification. The terminal fucose of the N-linked glycan structure, which has been shown to be involved in modulation of antibody-directed cellular cytotoxicity, is a particularly interesting location for potential modification through incorporation of alternative sugar structures. A library of fucose analogues was evaluated for their ability to incorporate into antibody carbohydrates in place of the native fucose. A number of efficiently incorporated molecules were identified, demonstrating the ability of fucosyltransferase VIII to utilize a variety of non-natural sugars as substrates. Among these structures was a thiolated analogue, 6-thiofucose, which was incorporated into the antibody carbohydrate with good efficiency. This unnatural thio-sugar could then be used for conjugation using maleimide chemistry to produce antibody-drug conjugates with pronounced cytotoxic activities and improved homogeneity compared to drug attachment through hinge disulfides.

  13. The Structure of Natural and Recombinant Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) isotypes A, D, E, G, and M are glycoproteins which are mainly composed of a "Y"-shaped Ig monomer (~150 kDa), consisting of two light and two heavy chains. Both light and heavy chains contain variable (N-terminal) and constant regions (C-terminal). Each light chain consists of one variable domain and one constant domain, whereas each heavy chain has one variable domain and three constant domains. However, heavy-chain antibodies consisting of only heavy chains and lacking the light chains are found in camelids and cartilaginous fishes. Unlike other immunoglobulins, the heavy chain of avian antibody IgY (~180 kDa) consists of four constant domains. The single-chain variable fragment (scFv; ~25 kDa) of an antibody contains variable regions of antibody heavy and light chains. The fragment antigen-binding (Fab; ~50 kDa) region has the full antibody light chain but the heavy chain is composed of a variable region and one constant domain.

  14. Antibody mapping of functional domains in vinculin.

    PubMed Central

    Westmeyer, A; Ruhnau, K; Wegner, A; Jockusch, B M

    1990-01-01

    We have analyzed the functional domain structure of vinculin, a protein involved in linking microfilaments to the cytoplasmic face of cell membranes in animal cells. For this purpose, we used several monoclonal antibodies raised against chicken gizzard vinculin whose epitopes could be assigned to discrete regions in the vinculin sequence by immunoblotting of proteolytic fragments combined with N-terminal amino acid sequencing. Two of these antibodies induced the disruption of stress fibers and changed the number of morphology of focal contacts after microinjection in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Based on the location of its epitope in comparison with vinculin domains previously identified by other groups, we propose that one of these antibodies (15B7) interferes with the binding of vinculin to talin, the most peripheral of the microfilament proteins. The second antibody (14C10) binds within a region comprising three internal repeats and might therefore distort the inner architecture of vinculin. A third antibody (As3) inhibited the binding of F-actin to vinculin in an in vitro assay but had no effect on the microfilament system in cells. These data emphasize the role of vinculin as a key protein in microfilament-membrane linkage and support previous work on a direct interaction between vinculin and actin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:1694125

  15. Homogeneity of Antibody Responses in Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Samanich, K.; Belisle, J. T.; Laal, S.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of the present study were twofold: (i) to compare the repertoires of antigens in culture filtrates of in vitro-grown Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are recognized by antibodies from noncavitary and cavitary tuberculosis (TB) patients and (ii) to determine the extent of variation that exists between the antigen profiles recognized by individual TB patients. Lipoarabinomannan-free culture filtrate proteins of M. tuberculosis were fractionated by one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the Western blots were probed with sera from non-human immunodeficiency virus (non-HIV)-infected cavitary and noncavitary TB patients and from HIV-infected, noncavitary TB patients. In contrast to earlier studies based on recombinant antigens of M. tuberculosis which suggested that antibody responses in TB patients were heterogeneous (K. Lyashchenko et al., 1998, Infect. Immun. 66:3936–3940, 1998), our studies with native culture filtrate proteins show that the antibody responses in TB patients show significant homogeneity in being directed against a well-defined subset of antigens. Thus, there is a well-defined subset of culture filtrate antigens that elicits antibodies during noncavitary and cavitary disease. In addition, another set of antigens is recognized primarily by cavitary TB patients. The mapping with individual patient sera presented here suggests that serodiagnostic tests based on the subset of antigens recognized during both noncavitary and cavitary TB will enhance the sensitivity of antibody detection in TB patients, especially in difficult-to-diagnose, smear-negative, noncavitary TB patients. PMID:11402004

  16. Antibody Phage Display Libraries: Contributions to Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Barbosa, Carmela; de Macedo Brigido, Marcelo; Maranhao, Andrea Queiroz

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of phage display technology, dating back to 1985, antibody libraries displayed on filamentous phage surfaces have been used to identify specific binders for many different purposes, including the recognition of tumors. Phage display represents a high-throughput technique for screening billions of random fusion antibodies against virtually any target on the surface or inside cancer cells, or even soluble markers found in patient serum. Many phage display derived binders targeting important tumor markers have been identified. Selection directed to tumoral cells’ surfaces lead to the identification of unknown tumoral markers. Also the improvement of methods that require smaller amounts of cells has opened the possibility to use this approach on patient samples. Robust techniques combining an antibody library displayed on the phage surface and protein microarray allowed the identification of auto antibodies recognized by patient sera. Many Ab molecules directly or indirectly targeting angiogenesis have been identified, and one of them, ramucirumab, has been tested in 27 phase I–III clinical trials in a broad array of cancers. Examples of such antibodies will be discussed here with emphasis on those used as probes for molecular imaging and other clinical trials. PMID:22754305

  17. Modeling antibody hypervariable loops: a combined algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, A C; Cheetham, J C; Rees, A R

    1989-01-01

    To be of any value, a predicted model of an antibody combining site should have an accuracy approaching that of antibody structures determined by x-ray crystallography (1.6-2.7 A). A number of modeling protocols have been proposed, which fall into two main categories--those that adopt a knowledge-based approach and those that attempt to construct the hypervariable loop regions of the antibody ab initio. Here we present a combined algorithm requiring no arbitrary decisions on the part of the user, which has been successfully applied to the modeling of the individual loops in two systems: the anti-lysozyme antibody HyHel-5, the crystal structure of which is as a complex with lysozyme [Sheriff, S., Silverton, E. W., Padlan, E. A., Cohen, G. H., Smith-Gill, S. J., Finzel, B. C. & Davies, D. R. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 8075-8079], and the free antigen binding fragment (Fab) of the anti-lysozyme peptide antibody, Gloop2. This protocol may be used with a high degree of confidence to model single-loop replacements, insertions, deletions, and side-chain replacements. In addition, it may be used in conjunction with other modeling protocols as a method by which to model particular loops whose conformations are predicted poorly by these methods. PMID:2594766

  18. 4th European Antibody Congress 2008

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth European Antibody meeting, organized by Terrapin Ltd., was held in Geneva, a center of the European biopharmaceutical industry. Merck-Serono, NovImmune, Pierre Fabre and Therapeomic are located nearby, as are R&D centers of Boehringer-Ingelheim, Novartis, Roche and Sanofi-Aventis. Over 40 speakers and more than 200 delegates attended the event. Companies represented included Abbott, Ablynx, Adnexus/ BMS, Astra-Zeneca/ CAT/ Medimmune, BiogenIdec, BioRad, Centocor (Johnson & Johnson), Crucell/DSM, Domantis, Dyax, Genmab, Genzyme, Glycart/ Roche, Haptogen, Immunogen, Kyowa-Kirin, LFB, Medarex, Merck-Serono, Micromet, Novartis, Pierre Fabre Laboratories, Roche, Sanofi-Aventis, Seattle-Genetics, Transgene, UCB Celltech and Wyeth. Other attendees included those based in academe or government (University of Amsterdam, University of Zurich, Univeristy Hospital-Lyon, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, INSERM, Tufts University, US National Institutes of Health), consultants, and patent attorneys (Edwards, Angell, Palmer & Dodge). The meeting was very interactive and included exchanges during the many scheduled networking times (exhibitions, speed-networking, lunches and evening receptions). The first day of the three day conference was dedicated to advances in understanding antibody structure-function relationships. Challenges and opportunities in antibody development were the focus of the second day and the third day featured discussion of innovative antibodies and antibody alternatives. PMID:20061813

  19. Identification of antibody glycosylation structures that predict monoclonal antibody Fc-effector function

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Amy W.; Crispin, Max; Pritchard, Laura; Robinson, Hannah; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Yu, Xiaojie; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Scanlan, Chris; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Alter, Galit

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine monoclonal antibody (mAb) features that predict fragment crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector functions against HIV. Design Monoclonal antibodies, derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells or Epstein–Barr virus-immortalized mouse heteromyelomas, with specificity to key regions of the HIV envelope including gp120-V2, gp120-V3 loop, gp120-CD4+ binding site, and gp41-specific antibodies, were functionally profiled to determine the relative contribution of the variable and constant domain features of the antibodies in driving robust Fc-effector functions. Methods Each mAb was assayed for antibody-binding affinity to gp140SF162, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and for the ability to bind to FcgRIIa, FcgRIIb and FcgRIIIa receptors. Antibody glycan profiles were determined by HPLC. Results Neither the specificity nor the affinity of the mAbs determined the potency of Fc-effector function. FcgRIIIa binding strongly predicted ADCC and decreased galactose content inversely correlated with ADCP, whereas N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing structures exhibited enhanced ADCP. Additionally, the bi-antenary glycan arm onto which galactose was added predicted enhanced binding to FcgRIIIa and ADCC activity, independent of the specificity of the mAb. Conclusions Our studies point to the specific Fc-glycan structures that can selectively promote Fc-effector functions independently of the antibody specificity. Furthermore, we demonstrated antibody glycan structures associated with enhanced ADCP activity, an emerging Fc-effector function that may aid in the control and clearance of HIV infection. PMID:25160934

  20. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies. PMID:25048123