Science.gov

Sample records for ignition energy mie

  1. Investigation on minimum ignition energy of mixtures of α-pinene-benzene/air.

    PubMed

    Coudour, B; Chetehouna, K; Rudz, S; Gillard, P; Garo, J P

    2015-01-01

    Minimum ignition energies (MIE) of α-pinene-benzene/air mixtures at a given temperature for different equivalence ratios and fuel proportions are experimented in this paper. We used a cylindrical chamber of combustion using a nanosecond pulse at 1,064 nm from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Laser-induced spark ignitions were studied for two molar proportions of α-pinene/benzene mixtures, respectively 20-80% and 50-50%. The effect of the equivalence ratio (Φ) has been investigated for 0.7, 0.9, 1.1 and 1.5 and ignition of fuel/air mixtures has been experimented for two different incident laser energies: 25 and 33 mJ. This study aims at observing the influence of different α-pinene/benzene proportions on the flammability of the mixture to have further knowledge of the potential of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and smoke mixtures to influence forest fires, especially in the case of the accelerating forest fire phenomenon (AFF). Results of ignition probability and energy absorption are based on 400 laser shots for each studied fuel proportions. MIE results as functions of equivalence ratio compared to data of pure α-pinene and pure benzene demonstrate that the presence of benzene in α-pinene-air mixture tends to increase ignition probability and reduce MIE without depending strongly on the α-pinene/benzene proportion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Laser ignition of liquid petroleum gas at elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktionov, E.; Pasechnikov, N.; Telekh, V.

    2017-11-01

    Recent development of laser spark plugs for internal combustion engines have shown lack of data on laser ignition of fuel mixtures at multi-bar pressures needed for laser pulse energy and focusing optimisation. Methane and hydrogen based mixtures are comparatively well investigated, but propane and butane based ones (LPG), which are widely used in vehicles, are still almost unstudied. Optical breakdown thresholds in gases decrease with pressure increase up to ca. 100 bar, but breakdown is not a sufficient condition for combustion ignition. So minimum ignition energy (MIE) becomes more important for combustion core onset, and its dependency on mixture composition and pressure has several important features. For example, unlike breakdown threshold, is poorly dependent on laser pulse length, at least in pico- and to microsecond range. We have defined experimentally the dependencies of minimum picosecond laser pulse energies (MIE related value) needed for ignition of LPG based mixtures of 1.0 to 1.6 equivalence ratios and pressure of 1.0 to 3.5 bar. In addition to expected values decrease, low-energy flammability range broadening has been found at pressure increase. Laser ignition of LPG in Wankel rotary engine is reported for the first time.

  3. Improved Photo-Ignition of Carbon Nanotubes/Ferrocene Using a Lipophilic Porphyrin under White Power LED Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Primiceri, Patrizio; de Fazio, Roberto; Carlucci, Antonio Paolo; Mazzetto, Selma Elaine

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and characterize the photo-ignition process of dry multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) mixed with ferrocene (FeCp2) powder, using an LED (light-emitting diode) as the light source, a combination that has never been used, to the best of our knowledge. The ignition process was improved by adding a lipophilic porphyrin (H2Pp) in powder to the MWCNTs/FeCp2 mixtures—thus, a lower ignition threshold was obtained. The ignition tests were carried out by employing a continuous emission and a pulsed white LED in two test campaigns. In the first, two MWCNT typologies, high purity (HP) and industrial grade (IG), were used without porphyrin, obtaining, for both, similar ignition thresholds. Furthermore, comparing ignition thresholds obtained with the LED source with those previously obtained with a Xenon (Xe) lamp, a significant reduction was observed. In the second test campaign, ignition tests were carried out by means of a properly driven and controlled pulsed XHP70 LED source. The minimum ignition energy (MIE) of IG-MWCNTs/FeCp2 samples was determined by varying the duration of the light pulse. Experimental results show that ignition is obtained with a pulse duration of 110 ms and a MIE density of 266 mJ/cm2. The significant reduction of the MIE value (10–40%), observed when H2Pp in powder form was added to the MWCNTs/FeCp2 mixtures, was ascribed to the improved photoexcitation and charge transfer properties of the lipophilic porphyrin molecules. PMID:29342878

  4. Improved Photo-Ignition of Carbon Nanotubes/Ferrocene Using a Lipophilic Porphyrin under White Power LED Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Paolo; Primiceri, Patrizio; de Fazio, Roberto; Carlucci, Antonio Paolo; Mazzetto, Selma Elaine; Mele, Giuseppe

    2018-01-13

    The aim of this work is to investigate and characterize the photo-ignition process of dry multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) mixed with ferrocene (FeCp₂) powder, using an LED (light-emitting diode) as the light source, a combination that has never been used, to the best of our knowledge. The ignition process was improved by adding a lipophilic porphyrin (H₂Pp) in powder to the MWCNTs/FeCp₂ mixtures-thus, a lower ignition threshold was obtained. The ignition tests were carried out by employing a continuous emission and a pulsed white LED in two test campaigns. In the first, two MWCNT typologies, high purity (HP) and industrial grade (IG), were used without porphyrin, obtaining, for both, similar ignition thresholds. Furthermore, comparing ignition thresholds obtained with the LED source with those previously obtained with a Xenon (Xe) lamp, a significant reduction was observed. In the second test campaign, ignition tests were carried out by means of a properly driven and controlled pulsed XHP70 LED source. The minimum ignition energy (MIE) of IG-MWCNTs/FeCp₂ samples was determined by varying the duration of the light pulse. Experimental results show that ignition is obtained with a pulse duration of 110 ms and a MIE density of 266 mJ/cm². The significant reduction of the MIE value (10-40%), observed when H₂Pp in powder form was added to the MWCNTs/FeCp₂ mixtures, was ascribed to the improved photoexcitation and charge transfer properties of the lipophilic porphyrin molecules.

  5. Minimum ignition energy of nano and micro Ti powder in the presence of inert nano TiO₂ powder.

    PubMed

    Chunmiao, Yuan; Amyotte, Paul R; Hossain, Md Nur; Li, Chang

    2014-06-15

    The inerting effect of nano-sized TiO2 powder on ignition sensitivity of nano and micro Ti powders was investigated with a Mike 3 apparatus. "A little is not good enough" is also suitable for micro Ti powders mixed with nano-sized solid inertants. MIE of the mixtures did not significantly increase until the TiO2 percentage exceeded 50%. Nano-sized TiO2 powders were ineffective as an inertant when mixed with nano Ti powders, especially at higher dust loadings. Even with 90% nano TiO2 powder, mixtures still showed high ignition sensitivity because the statistic energy was as low as 2.1 mJ. Layer fires induced by ignited but unburned metal particles may occur for micro Ti powders mixed with nano TiO2 powders following a low level dust explosion. Such layer fires could lead to a violent dust explosion after a second dispersion. Thus, additional attention is needed to prevent metallic layer fires even where electric spark potential is low. In the case of nano Ti powder, no layer fires were observed because of less flammable material involved in the mixtures investigated, and faster flame propagation in nanoparticle clouds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ignition methods and apparatus using microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    DeFreitas, Dennis Michael; Migliori, Albert

    1997-01-01

    An ignition apparatus for a combustor includes a microwave energy source that emits microwave energy into the combustor at a frequency within a resonant response of the combustor, the combustor functioning as a resonant cavity for the microwave energy so that a plasma is produced that ignites a combustible mixture therein. The plasma preferably is a non-contact plasma produced in free space within the resonant cavity spaced away from with the cavity wall structure and spaced from the microwave emitter.

  7. Heat energy of various ignition sparks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsbee, F B; Loeb, L B; Fonseca, E L

    1920-01-01

    This report describes a method developed at the Bureau of Standards for measuring the total energy liberated as heat in a spark gap by an ignition system. Since this heat energy is obtained from the electromagnetic energy stored in the windings of the magneto or coil, it is a measure of the effectiveness of the device as an electric generator. Part 2 gives the results of measurements in absolute units of the total heat supplied to a spark gap by ignition systems of different types operating at various speeds, under conditions substantially equivalent to those in the cylinder of a high-compression aviation engine.

  8. D-Dimensional Dirac Equation for Energy-Dependent Pseudoharmonic and Mie-type Potentials via SUSYQM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. N., Ikot; Hassanabadi, H.; Maghsoodi, E.; Zarrinkamar, S.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the approximate solution of the Dirac equation for energy-dependent pseudoharmonic and Mie-type potentials under the pseudospin and spin symmetries using the supersymmetry quantum mechanics. We obtain the bound-state energy equation in an analytical manner and comment on the system behavior via various figures and tables.

  9. Shock Ignition Target Design for Inertial Fusion Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Shock ignition target design for inertial fusion energy Andrew J. Schmitt,1, a) Jason W. Bates,1 Steven P. Obenschain,1 Steven T. Zalesak,2 and David...2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Shock ignition target design for inertial fusion energy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  10. Experimental investigation on the impacts of ignition energy and position on ignition processes in supersonic flows by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Bin; Wang, Zhenguo; Yang, Leichao; Li, Xipeng; Zhu, Jiajian

    2017-08-01

    Cavity ignition of a model scramjet combustor fueled by ethylene was achieved through laser induced plasma, with inflow conditions of Ma = 2.92, total temperature T0 = 1650 K and stagnation pressure P0 = 2.6 MPa. The overall equivalent ratio was kept at 0.152 for all the tests. The ignition processes at different ignition energies and various ignition positions were captured by CH∗ and OH∗ chemiluminescence imaging. The results reveal that the initial flame kernel is carried to the cavity leading edge by the recirculation flow, and resides there for ∼100 μs before spreading downstream. The ignition time can be reduced, and the possibility of successful ignition for single laser pulse can be promoted by enhancing ignition energy. The scale and strength of the initial flame kernel is influenced by both the ignition energy and position. In present study, the middle part of the cavity is the best position for ignition, as it keeps a good balance between the strength of initial flame kernel and the impacts of strain rate in recirculation flow.

  11. Experimental investigations of the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of inert and combustible dust cloud mixtures.

    PubMed

    Addai, Emmanuel Kwasi; Gabel, Dieter; Krause, Ulrich

    2016-04-15

    The risks associated with dust explosions still exist in industries that either process or handle combustible dust. This explosion risk could be prevented or mitigated by applying the principle of inherent safety (moderation). This is achieved by adding an inert material to a highly combustible material in order to decrease the ignition sensitivity of the combustible dust. The presented paper deals with the experimental investigation of the influence of adding an inert dust on the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of the combustible/inert dust mixtures. The experimental investigation was done in two laboratory scale equipment: the Hartmann apparatus and the Godbert-Greenwald furnace for the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature test respectively. This was achieved by mixing various amounts of three inert materials (magnesium oxide, ammonium sulphate and sand) and six combustible dusts (brown coal, lycopodium, toner, niacin, corn starch and high density polyethylene). Generally, increasing the inert materials concentration increases the minimum ignition energy as well as the minimum ignition temperatures until a threshold is reached where no ignition was obtained. The permissible range for the inert mixture to minimize the ignition risk lies between 60 to 80%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ignitor with stable low-energy thermite igniting system

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Michael D.; Munger, Alan C.

    1991-02-05

    A stable compact low-energy igniting system in an ignitor utilizes two components, an initiating charge and an output charge. The initiating charge is a thermite in ultra-fine powder form compacted to 50-70% of theoretical maximum density and disposed in a cavity of a header of the ignitor adjacent to an electrical ignition device, or bridgewire, mounted in the header cavity. The initiating charge is ignitable by operation of the ignition device in a hot-wire mode. The output charge is a thermite in high-density consoladated form compacted to 90-99% of theoretical maximum density and disposed adjacent to the initiating charge on an opposite end thereof from the electrical ignition device and ignitable by the initiating charge. A sleeve is provided for mounting the output charge to the ignitor header with the initiating charge confined therebetween in the cavity.

  13. Spark ignition of flowing gases I : energies to ignite propane-air mixtures in pressure range of 2 to 4 inches mercury absolute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swett, Clyde C , Jr

    1949-01-01

    Ignition studies of flowing gases were made to obtain information applicable to ignition problems in gas-turbine and ram-jet aircraft propulsion systems operating at altitude conditions.Spark energies required for ignition of a flowing propane-air mixture were determined for pressure of 2 to 4 inches mercury absolute, gas velocities of 5.0 to 54.2 feet per second, fuel-air ratios of 0.0607 to 0.1245, and spark durations of 1.5 to 24,400 microseconds. The results showed that at a pressure of 3 inches mercury absolute the minimum energy required for ignition occurred at fuel-air ratios of 0.08 to 0.095. The energy required for ignition increased almost linearly with increasing gas velocity. Shortening the spark duration from approximately 25,000 to 125 microseconds decreased the amount of energy required for ignition. A spark produced by the discharge of a condenser directly into the spark gap and having a duration of 1.5 microseconds required ignition energies larger than most of the long-duration sparks.

  14. Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Edward I.

    2016-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear bum in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm3-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIP's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY20l0 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

  15. On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zheng; Burke, M. P.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01

    Spherical flame initiation from an ignition kernel is studied theoretically and numerically using different fuel/oxygen/helium/argon mixtures (fuel: hydrogen, methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling spherical flame initiation and its correlation with the minimum ignition energy. It is found that the critical flame radius is different from the flame thickness and the flame ball radius and that their relationship depends strongly on the Lewis number. Three different flame regimes in terms of the Lewis number are observed and a new criterion for the critical flame radius is introduced. For mixtures with Lewis numbermore » larger than a critical Lewis number above unity, the critical flame radius is smaller than the flame ball radius but larger than the flame thickness. As a result, the minimum ignition energy can be substantially over-predicted (under-predicted) based on the flame ball radius (the flame thickness). The results also show that the minimum ignition energy for successful spherical flame initiation is proportional to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis number effect) is found to play an important role in both spherical flame initiation and flame kernel evolution after ignition. It is shown that the critical flame radius and the minimum ignition energy increase significantly with the Lewis number. Therefore, for transportation fuels with large Lewis numbers, blending of small molecule fuels or thermal and catalytic cracking will significantly reduce the minimum ignition energy.« less

  16. Scaling of Energy Deposition in Fast Ignition Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, R. B.; Welch, Dale

    2005-10-01

    We examine the scaling to ignition of the energy deposition of laser generated electrons in compressed fast ignition cores. Relevant cores have densities of several hundred g/cm^3, with a few keV initial temperature. As the laser intensities increase approaching ignition systems, on the order of a few 10^21W/cm^2, the hot electron energies expected to approach 100MeV[1]. Most certainly anomalous processes must play a role in the energy transfer, but the exact nature of these processes, as well as a practical way to model them, remain open issues. Traditional PIC explicit methods are limited to low densities on current and anticipated computing platforms, so the study of relevant parameter ranges has received so far little attention. We use LSP[2] to examine a relativistic electron beam (presumed generated from a laser plasma interaction) of legislated energy and angular distribution is injected into a 3D block of compressed DT. Collective effects will determine the stopping, most likely driven by magnetic field filamentation. The scaling of the stopping as a function of block density and temperature, as well as hot electron current and laser intensity is presented. Sub-grid models may be profitably used and degenerate effects included in the solution of this problem. Sandia is operated by Sandia Corporation, for the USDOE. [1] A. Pukhov, et. al., Phys. Plas. 6, p2847 (1999) [2] D. R. Welch et al., Comput. Phys.Commun. 164, p183 (2004).

  17. A low-ignition energy, SCB, thermite igniter

    SciTech Connect

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.; Wackerbarth, D.E.

    1996-06-01

    The authors describe threshold ignition studies for semiconductor bridge, SCB, ignition of aluminum/copper oxide (Al/CuO) thermite as a function of the capacitor discharge unit (CDU) firing set discharge capacitance, the charge holder material and the morphology of the CuO. All of the tests were carried out with the devices cooled to 0 F ({minus}18 C). They compared ignition thresholds using a brass charge holder and a G10 charge holder; G10 is a non-conducting, fiber-glass-epoxy composite material. They determined that at 50 V on the discharge capacitor, the thresholds were 30.1 {micro}F and 2.0 {micro}F respectively. The tests revealed that differentmore » CuO morphologies affected the function time (interval between start of the firing set current and the output of the thermite device) but did not significantly affect the threshold sensitivity.« less

  18. Integral low-energy thermite igniter

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, A.; Haws, L.D.; Mohler, J.H.

    1983-05-13

    In a thermite igniter/heat source comprising a container holding an internal igniter load, there is provided the improvement wherein the container consists essentially of consumable consolidated thermite having a low gas output upon combustion, whereby upon ignition, substantially all of the container and said load is consumed with low gas production.

  19. Integral low-energy thermite igniter

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, Albert; Haws, Lowell D.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1984-08-14

    In a thermite igniter/heat source comprising a container holding an internal igniter load, there is provided the improvement wherein the container consists essentially of consumable consolidated thermite having a low gas output upon combustion, whereby upon ignition, substantially all of the container and said load is consumed with low gas production.

  20. Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.A.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Blewer, R.S.

    1990-12-11

    A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose. 2 figs.

  1. Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David A.; Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Blewer, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose.

  2. Clouds Near Mie Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-13

    Mie Crater, a large basin formed by asteroid or comet impact in Utopia Planitia, lies at the center of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) red wide angle image. The crater is approximately 104 km (65 mi) across. To the east and southeast (toward the lower right) of Mie, in this 5 December 2003 view, are clouds of dust and water ice kicked up by local dust storm activity. It is mid-winter in the northern hemisphere of Mars, a time when passing storms are common on the northern plains of the red planet. Sunlight illuminates this image from the lower left; Mie Crater is located at 48.5°N, 220.3°W. Viking 2 landed west/southwest of Mie Crater, off the left edge of this image, in September 1976. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04930

  3. Prospects of lean ignition with the quarter wave coaxial cavity igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertl, Franz Andreas Johannes

    New ignition sources are needed to operate the next generation of lean high efficiency internal combustion engines. A significant environmental and economic benefit could be obtained from these lean engines. Toward this goal, the quarter wave coaxial cavity resonator, QWCCR, igniter was examined. A detailed theoretical analysis of the resonator was performed relating geometric and material parameters to performance characteristics, such as resonator quality factor and developed tip electric field. The analysis provided for the construction and evaluation of a resonator for ignition testing. The evaluation consisted of ignition tests with liquefied-petroleum-gas (LPG) air mixtures of varying composition. The combustion of these mixtures was contained in a closed steel vessel with a precombustion pressure near one atmosphere. The resonator igniter was fired in this vessel with a nominal 150 W microwave pulse of varying duration, to determine ignition energy limits for various mixtures. The mixture compositions were determined by partial pressure measurement and the ideal gas law. Successful ignition was determined through observation of the combustion through a view port. The pulse and reflected microwave power were captured in real time with a high-speed digital storage oscilloscope. Ignition energies and power levels were calculated from these measurements. As a comparison, these ignition experiments were also carried out with a standard non-resistive spark plug, where gap voltage and current were captured for energy calculations. The results show that easily ignitable mixtures around stoichiometric and slightly rich compositions are ignitable with the QWCCR using the similar kinds of energies as the conventional spark plug in the low milli-Joule range. Energies for very lean mixtures could not be determined reliably for the QWCCR for this prototype test, but could be lower than that for a conventional spark. Given the capability of high power, high energy delivery

  4. The National Ignition Facility: the path to a carbon-free energy future.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Christopher J

    2012-08-28

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centres on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

  5. Ignition dynamics and activation energies of metallic thermites: From nano- to micron-scale particulate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Emily M.; Pantoya, Michelle L.

    2005-08-01

    Ignition behaviors associated with nano- and micron-scale particulate composite thermites were studied experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experimental analysis utilized a CO2 laser ignition apparatus to ignite the front surface of compacted nickel (Ni) and aluminum (Al) pellets at varying heating rates. Ignition delay time and ignition temperature as a function of both Ni and Al particle size were measured using high-speed imaging and microthermocouples. The apparent activation energy was determined from this data using a Kissinger isoconversion method. This study shows that the activation energy is significantly lower for nano- compared with micron-scale particulate media (i.e., as low as 17.4 compared with 162.5kJ /mol, respectively). Two separate Arrhenius-type mathematical models were developed that describe ignition in the nano- and the micron-composite thermites. The micron-composite model is based on a heat balance while the nanocomposite model incorporates the energy of phase transformation in the alumina shell theorized to be an initiating step in the solid-solid diffusion reaction and uniquely appreciable in nanoparticle media. These models were found to describe the ignition of the Ni /Al alloy for a wide range of heating rates.

  6. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to a Carbon-Free Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, C J

    2011-03-16

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centers on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

  7. Investigation of the fundamentals of low-energy nanosecond pulse ignition: Final CRADA Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Thomas; Scarcelli, Riccardo; Zhang, Anqi

    A detailed investigation of the fundamentals of low-energy nanosecond pulse ignition was performed with the objective to overcome the barrier presented by limited knowledge and characterization of nonequilibrium plasma ignition for realistic internal combustion engine applications (be it in the automotive or power generation field) and shed light on the mechanisms which improve the performance of the advanced TPS ignition system compared to conventional state-of-the-art hardware. Three main tasks of the research included experimental evaluation on a single-cylinder automotive gasoline engine, experimental evaluation on a single-cylinder stationary natural gas engine and energy quantification using x-ray diagnostics.

  8. Evaluation of laser-driven ion energies for fusion fast-ignition research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosaki, S.; Yogo, A.; Koga, K.; Okamoto, K.; Shokita, S.; Morace, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H.; Nishimura, H.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate laser-driven ion acceleration using kJ-class picosecond (ps) laser pulses as a fundamental study for ion-assisted fusion fast ignition, using a newly developed Thomson-parabola ion spectrometer (TPIS). The TPIS has a space- and weight-saving design, considering its use in an laser-irradiation chamber in which 12 beams of fuel implosion laser are incident, and, at the same time, demonstrates sufficient performance with its detectable range and resolution of the ion energy required for fast-ignition research. As a fundamental study on laser-ion acceleration using a ps pulse laser, we show proton acceleration up to 40 MeV at 1 × 10^{19} W cm^{-2}. The energy conversion efficiency from the incident laser into protons higher than 6 MeV is 4.6%, which encourages the realization of fusion fast ignition by laser-driven ions.

  9. Asymptotic quantum inelastic generalized Lorenz Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, G.

    2007-10-01

    The (electromagnetic) generalized Lorenz-Mie theory describes the interaction between an electromagnetic arbitrary shaped beam and a homogeneous sphere. It is a generalization of the Lorenz-Mie theory which deals with the simpler case of a plane wave illumination. In a recent paper, we consider (i) elastic cross-sections in electromagnetic generalized Lorenz-Mie theory and (ii) elastic cross-sections in an associated quantum generalized Lorenz-Mie theory. We demonstrated that the electromagnetic problem is equivalent to a superposition of two effective quantum problems. We now intend to generalize this result from elastic cross-sections to inelastic cross-sections. A prerequisite is to build an asymptotic quantum inelastic generalized Lorenz-Mie theory, which is presented in this paper.

  10. Simulations of electron transport and ignition for direct-drive fast-ignition targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Anderson, K. S.; Betti, R.; Gotcheva, V.; Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.

    2008-11-01

    The performance of high-gain, fast-ignition fusion targets is investigated using one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of implosion and two-dimensional (2D) hybrid fluid-particle simulations of hot-electron transport, ignition, and burn. The 2D/3D hybrid-particle-in-cell code LSP [D. R. Welch et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 134 (2001)] and the 2D fluid code DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] are integrated to simulate the hot-electron transport and heating for direct-drive fast-ignition targets. LSP simulates the transport of hot electrons from the place where they are generated to the dense fuel core where their energy is absorbed. DRACO includes the physics required to simulate compression, ignition, and burn of fast-ignition targets. The self-generated resistive magnetic field is found to collimate the hot-electron beam, increase the coupling efficiency of hot electrons with the target, and reduce the minimum energy required for ignition. Resistive filamentation of the hot-electron beam is also observed. The minimum energy required for ignition is found for hot electrons with realistic angular spread and Maxwellian energy-distribution function.

  11. The A in SAFT: developing the contribution of association to the Helmholtz free energy within a Wertheim TPT1 treatment of generic Mie fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufal, Simon; Lafitte, Thomas; Haslam, Andrew J.; Galindo, Amparo; Clark, Gary N. I.; Vega, Carlos; Jackson, George

    2015-05-01

    An accurate representation of molecular association is a vital ingredient of advanced equations of state (EOSs), providing a description of thermodynamic properties of complex fluids where hydrogen bonding plays an important role. The combination of the first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT1) of Wertheim for associating systems with an accurate description of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the monomer fluid forms the basis of the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT) family of EOSs. The contribution of association to the free energy in SAFT and related EOSs is very sensitive to the nature of intermolecular potential used to describe the monomers and, crucially, to the accuracy of the representation of the thermodynamic and structural properties. Here we develop an accurate description of the association contribution for use within the recently developed SAFT-VR Mie framework for chain molecules formed from segments interacting through a Mie potential [T. Lafitte, A. Apostolakou, C. Avendaño, A, Galindo, C. S. Adjiman, E. A. Müller, and G. Jackson, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 154504 (2013)]. As the Mie interaction represents a soft-core potential model, a method similar to that adopted for the Lennard-Jones potential [E. A. Müller and K. E. Gubbins, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 34, 3662 (1995)] is employed to describe the association contribution to the Helmholtz free energy. The radial distribution function (RDF) of the Mie fluid (which is required for the evaluation of the integral at the heart of the association term) is determined for a broad range of thermodynamic conditions (temperatures and densities) using the reference hyper-netted chain (RHNC) integral-equation theory. The numerical data for the association kernel of Mie fluids with different association geometries are then correlated for a range of thermodynamic states to obtain a general expression for the association contribution which can be applied for varying values of the Mie

  12. Topological solitons in 8-spinor mie electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P., E-mail: soliton4@mail.ru

    2013-10-15

    We investigate the effective 8-spinor field model suggested earlier as the generalization of nonlinear Mie electrodynamics. We first study in pure spinorial model the existence of topological solitons endowed with the nontrivial Hopf invariant Q{sub H}, which can be interpreted as the lepton number. Electromagnetic field being included as the perturbation, we estimate the energy and the spin of the localized charged configuration.

  13. Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R L

    2011-10-17

    The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is {approx}0.5 cm diameter by {approx}1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays formore » symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a {approx}2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The

  14. An electrical analogy to Mie scattering

    PubMed Central

    Caridad, José M.; Connaughton, Stephen; Ott, Christian; Weber, Heiko B.; Krstić, Vojislav

    2016-01-01

    Mie scattering is an optical phenomenon that appears when electromagnetic waves, in particular light, are elastically scattered at a spherical or cylindrical object. A transfer of this phenomenon onto electron states in ballistic graphene has been proposed theoretically, assuming a well-defined incident wave scattered by a perfectly cylindrical nanometer scaled potential, but experimental fingerprints are lacking. We present an experimental demonstration of an electrical analogue to Mie scattering by using graphene as a conductor, and circular potentials arranged in a square two-dimensional array. The tabletop experiment is carried out under seemingly unfavourable conditions of diffusive transport at room-temperature. Nonetheless, when a canted arrangement of the array with respect to the incident current is chosen, cascaded Mie scattering results robustly in a transverse voltage. Its response on electrostatic gating and variation of potentials convincingly underscores Mie scattering as underlying mechanism. The findings presented here encourage the design of functional electronic metamaterials. PMID:27671003

  15. On thermonuclear ignition criterion at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Wang, Yi-Ming

    2014-10-15

    Sustained thermonuclear fusion at the National Ignition Facility remains elusive. Although recent experiments approached or exceeded the anticipated ignition thresholds, the nuclear performance of the laser-driven capsules was well below predictions in terms of energy and neutron production. Such discrepancies between expectations and reality motivate a reassessment of the physics of ignition. We have developed a predictive analytical model from fundamental physics principles. Based on the model, we obtained a general thermonuclear ignition criterion in terms of the areal density and temperature of the hot fuel. This newly derived ignition threshold and its alternative forms explicitly show the minimum requirementsmore » of the hot fuel pressure, mass, areal density, and burn fraction for achieving ignition. Comparison of our criterion with existing theories, simulations, and the experimental data shows that our ignition threshold is more stringent than those in the existing literature and that our results are consistent with the experiments.« less

  16. Soliton configurations in generalized Mie electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P., E-mail: soliton4@mail.ru

    2011-07-15

    The generalization of the Mie electrodynamics within the scope of the effective 8-spinor field model is suggested, with the Lagrangian including Higgs-like potential and higher degrees of the invariant A{sub Micro-Sign }A{sup Micro-Sign }. Using special Brioschi 8-spinor identity, we show that the model includes the Skyrme and the Faddeev models as particular cases. We investigate the large-distance asymptotic of static solutions and estimate the electromagnetic contribution to the energy of the localized charged configuration.

  17. Asymptotic quantum elastic generalized Lorenz Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, G.

    2006-10-01

    The (electromagnetic) generalized Lorenz-Mie theory describes the interaction between an electromagnetic arbitrary shaped beam and a homogeneous sphere. It is a generalization of the Lorenz-Mie theory which deals with the simpler case of a plane-wave illumination. In a recent paper, we established that, if we restrict ourselves to the study of cross-sections, both for elastic and inelastic scatterings, a macroscopic sphere in Lorenz-Mie theory is formally equivalent to a quantum-like radial potential. To generalize this result, a prerequisite is to possess an asymptotic quantum generalized Lorenz-Mie theory expressing cross-sections in the case of a quantum radial potential interacting with a sub-class of quantum arbitrary wave-packets. Such a theory, restricted however to elastic scattering, is presented in this paper.

  18. Effect of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics in laser ignition of natural gas and air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Riley, M. J. W.; Borman, A.; Dowding, C.; Kirk, A.; Bickerton, R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser induced spark ignition offers the potential for greater reliability and consistency in ignition of lean air/fuel mixtures. This increased reliability is essential for the application of gas turbines as primary or secondary reserve energy sources in smart grid systems, enabling the integration of renewable energy sources whose output is prone to fluctuation over time. This work details a study into the effect of flow velocity and temperature on minimum ignition energies in laser-induced spark ignition in an atmospheric combustion test rig, representative of a sub 15 MW industrial gas turbine (Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln, UK). Determination of minimum ignition energies required for a range of temperatures and flow velocities is essential for establishing an operating window in which laser-induced spark ignition can operate under realistic, engine-like start conditions. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 532 nm wavelength and 4 ns pulse length. Analysis of the influence of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics is presented in terms of required photon flux density, a useful parameter to consider during the development laser ignition systems.

  19. Mie and debye scattering in dusty plasmas

    PubMed

    Guerra; Mendonca

    2000-07-01

    We calculate the total field scattered by a charged sphere immersed in a plasma using a unified treatment that includes the usual Mie scattering and the scattering by the Debye cloud around the particle. This is accomplished by use of the Dyadic Green function to determine the field radiated by the electrons of the Debye cloud, which is then obtained as a series of spherical vector wave functions similar to that of the Mie field. Thus we treat the Debye-Mie field as a whole and study its properties. The main results of this study are (1) the Mie (Debye) field dominates at small (large) wavelengths and in the Rayleigh limit the Debye field is constant; (2) the total cross section has an interference term between the Debye and Mie fields, important in some regimes; (3) this term is negative for negative charge of the grain, implying a total cross section smaller than previously thought; (4) a method is proposed to determine the charge of the grain (divided by a certain suppression factor) and the Debye length of the plasma; (5) a correction to the dispersion relation of an electromagnetic wave propagating in a plasma is derived.

  20. Spark Ignition of Monodisperse Fuel Sprays. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danis, Allen M.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Namer, Izak

    1987-01-01

    A study of spark ignition energy requirements was conducted with a monodisperse spray system allowing independent control of droplet size, equivalent ratio, and fuel type. Minimum ignition energies were measured for n-heptane and methanol sprays characterized at the spark gap in terms of droplet diameter, equivalence ratio (number density) and extent of prevaporization. In addition to sprays, minimum ignition energies were measured for completely prevaporized mixtures of the same fuels over a range of equivalence ratios to provide data at the lower limit of droplet size. Results showed that spray ignition was enhanced with decreasing droplet size and increasing equivalence ratio over the ranges of the parameters studied. By comparing spray and prevaporized ignition results, the existence of an optimum droplet size for ignition was indicated for both fuels. Fuel volatility was seen to be a critical factor in spray ignition. The spray ignition results were analyzed using two different empirical ignition models for quiescent mixtures. Both models accurately predicted the experimental ignition energies for the majority of the spray conditions. Spray ignition was observed to be probabilistic in nature, and ignition was quantified in terms of an ignition frequency for a given spark energy. A model was developed to predict ignition frequencies based on the variation in spark energy and equivalence ratio in the spark gap. The resulting ignition frequency simulations were nearly identical to the experimentally observed values.

  1. Complete Mie-Gruneisen Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-06-28

    The Mie-Gruneisen equation of state (EOS) is frequently used in hydro simulations to model solids at high pressure (up to a few Mb). It is an incomplete EOS characterized by a Gruneisen coefficient, {Lambda} = -V({partial_derivative}{sub e}P){sub V}, that is a function of only V. Expressions are derived for isentropes and isotherms. This enables the extension to a complete EOS. Thermodynamic consistency requires that the specific heat is a function of a single scaled temperature. A complete extension is uniquely determined by the temperature dependence of the specific heat at a fixed reference density. In addition we show that ifmore » the domain of the EOS extends to T = 0 and the specific heat vanishes on the zero isotherm then {Lambda} a function of only V is equivalent to a specific heat with a single temperature scale. If the EOS domain does not include the zero isotherm, then a specific heat with a single temperature scale leads to a generalization of the Mie-Gruneisen EOS in which the pressure is linear in both the specific energy and the temperature. Such an EOS has previously been used to model liquid nitromethane.« less

  2. Mie resonances to tailor random lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, P. D.; Ibisate, M.; Sapienza, R.; Wiersma, D. S.; López, C.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we present an optical characterization of photonic glass-based random lasers. We show how the resonant behavior of diffuse light transport through such systems can tailor the lasing emission when a gain medium is added to the glass. A DNA-based organic dye is used as gain medium. The resonances in the transport mean-free path influence the lasing wavelength of the random laser. The laser wavelength is therefore controlled by the sphere diameter. Furthermore, the existence of Mie resonances reduces the necessary pump energy to reach the lasing threshold.

  3. Comparison of field and laboratory forest fuel ignition energies and extrapolation to high-yield weapons

    Treesearch

    F.M. Sauer

    1956-01-01

    Comparisons are made between Ignition energies of forest fuels, including newspaper, determined during Operations BUSTER, SNAPPER and UPSHOT-KNOTHOLE and laboratory exposures made utilizing the Forest Service thermal source. Agreement is excellent for fuels exposed normal to the radiant flux when fuel moisture content is considered. Ignition of fuels exposed at...

  4. Microwave-assisted ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, J.K.; Booty, M.R.; Kriegsmann, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    In recent years, microwave heating has been proposed as an alternative to ignite materials during the process of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. The microwave heating and ignition of a combustible material is modeled and analyzed in the small Biot number and large activation energy regimes. Both the temporal and spatial evolution of the temperature within the material are described. The ignition characteristics are determined by a localized equation for the perturbation to the inert temperature, which is shown to exhibit thermal runaway behavior. Analysis of this local equation provides explicit ignition conditions in terms of the physical parameters in the problem.

  5. 41 CFR Appendix B to Chapter 301 - Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance B Appendix B to Chapter 301 Public Contracts.... 301, App. B Appendix B to Chapter 301—Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From...

  6. 41 CFR Appendix B to Chapter 301 - Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance B Appendix B to Chapter 301 Public Contracts.... 301, App. B Appendix B to Chapter 301—Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From...

  7. 41 CFR Appendix B to Chapter 301 - Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance B Appendix B to Chapter 301 Public Contracts.... 301, App. B Appendix B to Chapter 301—Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From...

  8. 41 CFR Appendix B to Chapter 301 - Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From the M&IE Allowance B Appendix B to Chapter 301 Public Contracts.... 301, App. B Appendix B to Chapter 301—Allocation of M&IE Rates To Be Used in Making Deductions From...

  9. Chemistry of Aviation Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knepper, Bryan; Hwang, Soon Muk; DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    2004-01-01

    Minimum ignition energies of various methanol/air mixtures were measured in a temperature controlled constant volume combustion vessel using a spark ignition method with a spark gap distance of 2 mm. The minimum ignition energies decrease rapidly as the mixture composition (equivalence ratio, Phi) changes from lean to stoichiometric, reach a minimum value, and then increase rather slowly with Phi. The minimum of the minimum ignition energy (MIE) and the corresponding mixture composition were determined to be 0.137 mJ and Phi = 1.16, a slightly rich mixture. The variation of minimum ignition energy with respect to the mixture composition is explained in terms of changes in reaction chemistry.

  10. Influence of nitromethane concentration on ignition energy and explosion parameters in gaseous nitromethane/air mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Wei; Lin, Da-Chao; He, Ning; Duan, Yun

    2011-01-30

    The aim of this paper is to provide new experimental data of the minimum ignition energy (MIE) of gaseous nitromethane/air mixtures to discuss the explosion pressure and the flame temperature as a function of nitromethane concentration. Observations on the influence of nitromethane concentration on combustion pressure and temperature through the pressure and temperature measure system show that peak temperature (the peak of combustion temperature wave) is always behind peak pressure (the peak of the combustion pressure wave) in arrival time, the peak combustion pressure of nitromethane increases in the range of its volume fraction 10-40% as the concentration of nitromethane increases, and it slightly decreases in the range of 40-50%. The maximum peak pressure is equal to 0.94 MPa and the minimum peak pressure 0.58 MPa. Somewhat similar to the peak pressure, the peak combustion temperature increases with the volume fraction of nitromethane in the range of 10-40%, and slightly decreases in 40-50%. The maximum peak temperature is 1340 °C and the minimum 860 °C. The combustion temperature rise rate increases with the concentration of nitromethane in 10-30%, while decreases in 30-50% and its maximum value of combustion temperature rise rate in 10-50% is 4200 °C/s at the volume fraction of 30%. Influence of the concentration of nitromethane on the combustion pressure rise rate is relatively complicated, and the maximum value of rise rate of combustion pressure wave in 10-50% is 11 MPa/s at the concentration 20%. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Shock ignition: a new approach to high gain inertial confinement fusion on the national ignition facility.

    PubMed

    Perkins, L J; Betti, R; LaFortune, K N; Williams, W H

    2009-07-24

    Shock ignition, an alternative concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, is explored as a new approach to high gain, inertial confinement fusion targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results indicate thermonuclear yields of approximately 120-250 MJ may be possible with laser drive energies of 1-1.6 MJ, while gains of approximately 50 may still be achievable at only approximately 0.2 MJ drive energy. The scaling of NIF energy gain with laser energy is found to be G approximately 126E (MJ);{0.510}. This offers the potential for high-gain targets that may lead to smaller, more economic fusion power reactors and a cheaper fusion energy development path.

  12. Scaling laws for ignition at the National Ignition Facility from first principles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas J T; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven H

    2013-10-01

    We have developed an analytical physics model from fundamental physics principles and used the reduced one-dimensional model to derive a thermonuclear ignition criterion and implosion energy scaling laws applicable to inertial confinement fusion capsules. The scaling laws relate the fuel pressure and the minimum implosion energy required for ignition to the peak implosion velocity and the equation of state of the pusher and the hot fuel. When a specific low-entropy adiabat path is used for the cold fuel, our scaling laws recover the ignition threshold factor dependence on the implosion velocity, but when a high-entropy adiabat path is chosen, the model agrees with recent measurements.

  13. Hypocalcémie

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jeremy; Khan, Aliya

    2012-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille une approche fondée sur des données probantes pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de l’hypocalcémie. Qualité des données On a fait une recherche documentaire dans MEDLINE et EMBASE pour cerner des articles parus de 2000 à 2010 portant sur le diagnostic et la prise en charge de l’hypocalcémie. Les niveaux des données (de I à III) sont indiqués, le cas échéant et, dans la plupart des études, les données se situent aux niveaux II et III. On a aussi examiné les références des ouvrages appropriés pour trouver des articles pertinents. Message principal L’hypocalcémie est habituellement attribuable à des taux insuffisants d’hormones parathyroïdes ou de vitamine D ou à une résistance à ces hormones. Le traitement consiste surtout à administrer des suppléments de calcium et de vitamine D par voie orale, ainsi que de magnésium s’il y a carence. On peut intensifier davantage le traitement avec des diurétiques thiazidiques, des chélateurs de phosphore et un régime à faible teneur en sel et en phosphore quand on traite une hypocalcémie secondaire à une hypoparathyroïdie. Une carence en calcium aiguë et dangereuse pour la vie exige un traitement au moyen de calcium intraveineux. Les recommandations thérapeutiques actuelles se fondent largement sur l’opinion d’experts cliniciens et de rapports de cas publiés, car il n’y a pas suffisamment de données probantes disponibles tirées d’études cliniques contrôlées. Au nombre des complications des thérapies actuelles, on peut mentionner l’hypercalciurie, la néphrocalcinose, l’insuffisance rénale et la calcification des tissus mous. La thérapie actuelle est limitée par les fluctuations du calcium sérique. Quoique ces complications soient bien reconnues, les effets sur le bien-être général, l’humeur, la fonction cognitive et la qualité de vie, ainsi que les risques de complications, n’ont pas été ad

  14. Evaluation of the Revolver Ignition Design at the National Ignition Facility Using Polar-Direct-Drive Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenty, P. W.; Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Campbell, E. M.; Molvig, K.; Schmitt, M.

    2017-10-01

    The direct-drive ignition design Revolver employs a triple-shell target using a beryllium ablator, a copper driver, and an eventual gold pusher. Symmetric numerical calculations indicate that each of the three shells exhibit low convergence ( 3to 5) resulting in a modest gain (G 4) for 1.7 MJ of incident laser energy. Studies are now underway to evaluate the robustness of this design employing polar direct drive (PDD) at the National Ignition Facility. Integral to these calculations is the leveraging of illumination conditioning afforded by research done to demonstrate ignition for a traditional PDD hot-spot target design. Two-dimensional simulation results, employing nonlocal electron-thermal transport and cross-beam energy transport, will be presented that indicate ignition using PDD. A study of the allowed levels of long-wavelength perturbations (target offset and power imbalance) not precluding ignition will also be examined. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Low profile thermite igniter

    DOEpatents

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1991-03-05

    A thermite igniter/heat source comprising a housing, high-density thermite, and low-density thermite. The housing has a relatively low profile and can focus energy by means of a torch-like ejection of hot reaction products and is externally ignitable.

  16. Definition of Ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, A. R.; Betti, R.

    2017-10-01

    Defining ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is an unresolved problem. In ICF, a distinction must be made between the ignition of the hot spot and the propagation of the burn wave in the surrounding dense fuel. Burn propagation requires that the hot spot is robustly ignited and the dense shell exhibits enough areal density. Since most of the energy gain comes from burning the dense shell, in a scale of increasing yields, hot-spot ignition comes before high gains. Identifying this transition from hot-spot ignition to burn-wave propagation is key to defining ignition in general terms applicable to all fusion approaches that use solid DT fuel. Ad hoc definitions such as gain = 1 or doubling the temperature are not generally valid. In this work, we show that it is possible to identify the onset of ignition through a unique value of the yield amplification defined as the ratio of the fusion yield including alpha-particle deposition to the fusion yield without alphas. Since the yield amplification is a function of the fractional alpha energy fα =EαEα 2Ehs 2Ehs (a measurable quantity), it appears possible not only to define ignition but also to measure the onset of ignition by the experimental inference of the fractional alpha energy and yield amplification. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Services under Award Number DE-FC02-04ER54789 and National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. The national ignition facility: Path to ignition in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. I.; Bonanno, R. E.; Haynam, C. A.; Kauffman, R. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Patterson, R. W., Jr.; Sawicki, R. H.; van Wonterghem, B. M.

    2006-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam laser facility presently under construction at LLNL. When completed, NIF will be a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW ultraviolet laser system. Its missions are to obtain fusion ignition and to perform high energy density experiments in support of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. Four of the NIF beams have been commissioned to demonstrate laser performance and to commission the target area including target and beam alignment and laser timing. During this time, NIF demonstrated on a single-beam basis that it will meet its performance goals and demonstrated its precision and flexibility for pulse shaping, pointing, timing and beam conditioning. It also performed four important experiments for Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density Science. Presently, the project is installing production hardware to complete the project in 2009 with the goal to begin ignition experiments in 2010. An integrated plan has been developed including the NIF operations, user equipment such as diagnostics and cryogenic target capability, and experiments and calculations to meet this goal. This talk will provide NIF status, the plan to complete NIF, and the path to ignition.

  18. The national ignition facility: path to ignition in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. I.; Bonanno, R. E.; Haynam, C. A.; Kauffman, R. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Patterson, R. W., Jr.; Sawicki, R. H.; van Wonterghem, B. M.

    2007-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam laser facility presently under construction at LLNL. When completed, NIF will be a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW ultraviolet laser system. Its missions are to obtain fusion ignition and to perform high energy density experiments in support of the US nuclear weapons stockpile. Four of the NIF beams have been commissioned to demonstrate laser performance and to commission the target area including target and beam alignment and laser timing. During this time, NIF demonstrated on a single-beam basis that it will meet its performance goals and demonstrated its precision and flexibility for pulse shaping, pointing, timing and beam conditioning. It also performed four important experiments for Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density Science. Presently, the project is installing production hardware to complete the project in 2009 with the goal to begin ignition experiments in 2010. An integrated plan has been developed including the NIF operations, user equipment such as diagnostics and cryogenic target capability, and experiments and calculations to meet this goal. This talk will provide NIF status, the plan to complete NIF, and the path to ignition.

  19. Low profile thermite igniter

    SciTech Connect

    Halcomb, D.L.; Mohler, J.H.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a thermite igniter/heat source comprising a housing, high-density thermite, and low-density thermite. The housing has a relatively low profile and can focus energy by means of a torch-like ejection of hot reaction products and is externally ignitable.

  20. How to Ignite an Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Plasma Torch without Any Additional Igniters

    PubMed Central

    Leins, Martina; Gaiser, Sandra; Schulz, Andreas; Walker, Matthias; Schumacher, Uwe; Hirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This movie shows how an atmospheric pressure plasma torch can be ignited by microwave power with no additional igniters. After ignition of the plasma, a stable and continuous operation of the plasma is possible and the plasma torch can be used for many different applications. On one hand, the hot (3,600 K gas temperature) plasma can be used for chemical processes and on the other hand the cold afterglow (temperatures down to almost RT) can be applied for surface processes. For example chemical syntheses are interesting volume processes. Here the microwave plasma torch can be used for the decomposition of waste gases which are harmful and contribute to the global warming but are needed as etching gases in growing industry sectors like the semiconductor branch. Another application is the dissociation of CO2. Surplus electrical energy from renewable energy sources can be used to dissociate CO2 to CO and O2. The CO can be further processed to gaseous or liquid higher hydrocarbons thereby providing chemical storage of the energy, synthetic fuels or platform chemicals for the chemical industry. Applications of the afterglow of the plasma torch are the treatment of surfaces to increase the adhesion of lacquer, glue or paint, and the sterilization or decontamination of different kind of surfaces. The movie will explain how to ignite the plasma solely by microwave power without any additional igniters, e.g., electric sparks. The microwave plasma torch is based on a combination of two resonators — a coaxial one which provides the ignition of the plasma and a cylindrical one which guarantees a continuous and stable operation of the plasma after ignition. The plasma can be operated in a long microwave transparent tube for volume processes or shaped by orifices for surface treatment purposes. PMID:25938699

  1. A Comparative Study of Cycle Variability of Laser Plug Ignition vs Classical Spark Plug Ignition in Combustion Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, Bogdan

    2017-10-01

    Over the past 30 years numerous studies and laboratory experiments have researched the use of laser energy to ignite gas and fuel-air mixtures. The actual implementation of this laser application has still to be fully achieved in a commercial automotive application. Laser Plug Ignition as a replacement for Spark Plug Ignition in the internal combustion engines of automotive vehicles, offers several potential benefits such as extending lean burn capability, reducing the cyclic variability between combustion cycles and decreasing the total amount of ignition costs, and implicitly weight and energy requirements. The paper presents preliminary results of cycle variability study carried on a SI Engine equipped with laser Plug Ignition system. Versus classic ignition system, the use of the laser Plug Ignition system assures the reduction of the combustion process variability, reflected in the lower values of the coefficient of variability evaluated for indicated mean effective pressure, maximum pressure, maximum pressure angle and maximum pressure rise rate. The laser plug ignition system was mounted on an experimental spark ignition engine and tested at the regime of 90% load and 2800 rev/min, at dosage of λ=1.1. Compared to conventional spark plug, laser ignition assures the efficiency at lean dosage.

  2. Research on the Electro-explosive Behaviors and the Ignition Performances of Energetic Igniters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Jia, Xin; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Bin; Shen, Ruiqi

    2018-01-01

    This article describes the electro-explosive behaviors and the ignition performances of energetic igniters based on the combination of polysilicon film with Al/CuO nanoenergetic multilayer films (nEMFs).The ultra-high-speed framing camera images show that melting first occurs at the V-type angles and then expands to the entire bridge. The Al/CuO nEMF is heated and fired from below, forced to form lots of flyers with different sizes, ejected with the expansion of polysilicon plasma, and reacts exothermically to release a large quantity of energy. Furthermore, temperature diagnosis results demonstrate higher temperature products of energetic igniters. Ignition experiment at a standoff of 1.5 mm results show that the average firing voltage and the variance of energetic igniters are 28.50 V and 0.96, whereas those of polysilicon igniters are 32.05 V and 1.94.

  3. Ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays from tidally-ignited white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves Batista, Rafael; Silk, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    Ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) can be accelerated by tidal disruption events of stars by black holes. We suggest a novel mechanism for UHECR acceleration wherein white dwarfs (WDs) are tidally compressed by intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), leading to their ignition and subsequent explosion as a supernova. Cosmic rays accelerated by the supernova may receive an energy boost when crossing the accretion-powered jet. The rate of encounters between WDs and IMBHs can be relatively high, as the number of IMBHs may be substantially augmented once account is taken of their likely presence in dwarf galaxies. Here we show that this kind of tidal disruption event naturally provides an intermediate composition for the observed UHECRs, and suggest that dwarf galaxies and globular clusters are suitable sites for particle acceleration to ultrahigh energies.

  4. Analysis of the National Ignition Facility Ignition Hohlraum Energetics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R J; Rosen, M D; Michel, P A

    2010-11-22

    A series of forty experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] to study energy balance and implosion symmetry in reduced- and full-scale ignition hohlraums was shot at energies up to 1.3 MJ. This paper reports the findings of the analysis of the ensemble of experimental data obtained that has produced an improved model for simulating ignition hohlraums. Last year the first observation in a NIF hohlraum of energy transfer between cones of beams as a function of wavelength shift between those cones was reported [P. Michel, et al, Phys ofmore » Plasmas, 17, 056305, (2010)]. Detailed analysis of hohlraum wall emission as measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) has allowed the amount of energy transferred versus wavelength shift to be quantified. The change in outer beam brightness is found to be quantitatively consistent with LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 2, 51 (1975)] simulations using the predicted energy transfer when possible saturation of the plasma wave mediating the transfer is included. The effect of the predicted energy transfer on implosion symmetry is also found to be in good agreement with gated x-ray framing camera images. Hohlraum energy balance, as measured by x-ray power escaping the LEH, is quantitatively consistent with revised estimates of backscatter and incident laser energy combined with a more rigorous non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium atomic physics model with greater emissivity than the simpler average-atom model used in the original design of NIF targets.« less

  5. Geometrical optics model of Mie resonances

    PubMed

    Roll; Schweiger

    2000-07-01

    The geometrical optics model of Mie resonances is presented. The ray path geometry is given and the resonance condition is discussed with special emphasis on the phase shift that the rays undergo at the surface of the dielectric sphere. On the basis of this model, approximate expressions for the positions of first-order resonances are given. Formulas for the cavity mode spacing are rederived in a simple manner. It is shown that the resonance linewidth can be calculated regarding the cavity losses. Formulas for the mode density of Mie resonances are given that account for the different width of resonances and thus may be adapted to specific experimental situations.

  6. Ion Fast Ignition-Establishing a Scientific Basis for Inertial Fusion Energy --- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Richard Burnite; Foord, Mark N.; Wei, Mingsheng

    The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy reactors. FI differs from conventional ?central hot spot? (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using a laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10?s of nanoseconds) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 picoseconds) high intensity pulse to ignite a small volume within the dense fuel. The compressed fuel is opaque to laser light. The ignition laser energy must be converted to a jet ofmore » energetic charged particles to deposit energy in the dense fuel. The original concept called for a spray of laser-generated hot electrons to deliver the energy; lack of ability to focus the electrons put great weight on minimizing the electron path. An alternative concept, proton-ignited FI, used those electrons as intermediaries to create a jet of protons that could be focused to the ignition spot from a more convenient distance. Our program focused on the generation and directing of the proton jet, and its transport toward the fuel, none of which were well understood at the onset of our program. We have developed new experimental platforms, diagnostic packages, computer modeling analyses, and taken advantage of the increasing energy available at laser facilities to create a self-consistent understanding of the fundamental physics underlying these issues. Our strategy was to examine the new physics emerging as we added the complexity necessary to use proton beams in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) application. From the starting point of a proton beam accelerated from a flat, isolated foil, we 1) curved it to focus the beam, 2) attached the foil to a superstructure, 3) added a side sheath to protect it from the surrounding plasma, and finally 4) studied the proton beam behavior as it passed through a protective end cap into plasma. We built up, as we

  7. Overview of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Edward

    2010-11-01

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is now operational. NIF has conducted 192-beam implosion experiments with energies as high as 1.2 MJ and has also demonstrated the unprecedented energy and pulse shaping control required for ignition experiments. The successful commissioning of the NIF laser is the first step in demonstrating inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition in the laboratory. The NIF ignition program is executed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)---a partnership between Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, LLNL, General Atomics, the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Sandia National Laboratories, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and other national and international partners. The NIC relies on a novel integrated experimental and computational program to tune the target to the conditions required for indirect-drive ignition. This approach breaks the tuning process into four phases. The first two phases involve tuning of the hohlraum and capsule to produce the correct radiation drive, symmetry, and shock timing conditions. The third phase consists of layered cryogenic implosions conducted with a 50%/49%/1% mixture of tritium, hydrogen, and deuterium (THD) respectively. The reduced yield from these THD targets allows the full diagnostic suite to be employed and the presence of the required temperature and fuel areal density to be verified. The final step is DT ignition implosions with expected gains of 10-20. DT ignition experiments will be conducted with Elaser ˜1.2 MJ. Laser energies of 1.8 MJ should be available for subsequent experiments. This talk will review the multi-phase tuning approach to the ignition effort, including the physics issues associated with the various steps, and current and future plans for the NIF ignition program.

  8. A sustained-arc ignition system for internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.

    1977-01-01

    A sustained-arc ignition system was developed for internal combustion engines. It produces a very-long-duration ignition pulse with an energy in the order of 100 millijoules. The ignition pulse waveform can be controlled to predetermined actual ignition requirements. The design of the sustained-arc ignition system is presented in the report.

  9. Complete Mie-Gruneisen Equation of State (update)

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2016-03-14

    The Mie-Gruneisen equation of state (EOS) is frequently used in hydro simulations to model solids at high pressure (up to a few Mb). It is an incomplete EOS characterized by a Gr¨uneisen coefficient, = -V (@eP)V , that is a function of only V . Expressions are derived for isentropes and isotherms. This enables the extension to a complete EOS. Thermodynamic consistency requires that the specific heat is a function of a single scaled-temperature. A complete extension is uniquely determined by the temperature dependence of the specific heat at a fixed reference density. In addition we show that if themore » domain of the EOS extends to T = 0 and the specific heat vanishes on the zero isotherm then a function of only V is equivalent to a specific heat with a single temperature scale. If the EOS domain does not include the zero isotherm, then a specific heat with a single temperature scale leads to a generalization of the Mie-Gr¨uneisen EOS in which the pressure is linear in both the specific energy and the temperature. This corresponds to the limiting case of two temperature scales with one of the scales in the high temperature limit. Such an EOS has previously been used to model liquid nitromethane.« less

  10. 14 CFR 25.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any... simultaneous demands of the engine ignition system and the greatest demands of any electrical system components that draw electrical energy from the same source. (c) The design of the engine ignition system must...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any... simultaneous demands of the engine ignition system and the greatest demands of any electrical system components that draw electrical energy from the same source. (c) The design of the engine ignition system must...

  12. 14 CFR 29.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine ignition systems. 29.1165 Section 29... Engine ignition systems. (a) Each battery ignition system must be supplemented with a generator that is automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine ignition systems. 29.1165 Section 29... Engine ignition systems. (a) Each battery ignition system must be supplemented with a generator that is automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any...

  14. 14 CFR 29.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine ignition systems. 29.1165 Section 29... Engine ignition systems. (a) Each battery ignition system must be supplemented with a generator that is automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine ignition systems. 25.1165 Section 25... Engine ignition systems. (a) Each battery ignition system must be supplemented by a generator that is automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any...

  16. The potential of imposed magnetic fields for enhancing ignition probability and fusion energy yield in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, L. J.; Ho, D. D.-M.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Rhodes, M. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Blackfield, D. T.; Hawkins, S. A.

    2017-06-01

    We examine the potential that imposed magnetic fields of tens of Tesla that increase to greater than 10 kT (100 MGauss) under implosion compression may relax the conditions required for ignition and propagating burn in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. This may allow the attainment of ignition, or at least significant fusion energy yields, in presently performing ICF targets on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) that today are sub-marginal for thermonuclear burn through adverse hydrodynamic conditions at stagnation [Doeppner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055001 (2015)]. Results of detailed two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic-burn simulations applied to NIF capsule implosions with low-mode shape perturbations and residual kinetic energy loss indicate that such compressed fields may increase the probability for ignition through range reduction of fusion alpha particles, suppression of electron heat conduction, and potential stabilization of higher-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Optimum initial applied fields are found to be around 50 T. Given that the full plasma structure at capsule stagnation may be governed by three-dimensional resistive magneto-hydrodynamics, the formation of closed magnetic field lines might further augment ignition prospects. Experiments are now required to further assess the potential of applied magnetic fields to ICF ignition and burn on NIF.

  17. Ignition of Propellants Through Nanostructured Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    the solid oxidizer, potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and boron–potassium nitrate (BKNO3) were used. While technically BKNO3 is not merely an oxidizer...unpurified SWCNT) EDS Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy Fe iron FPS frames per second GO graphene oxide KMnO4 potassium permanganate MIE

  18. 41 CFR 301-11.102 - What is the applicable M&IE rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the applicable M... Lodgings-Plus Per Diem § 301-11.102 What is the applicable M&IE rate? For days of travel which Your applicable M&IE rate is Require lodging The M&IE rate applicable for the TDY location or stopover point. Do...

  19. Progress on LMJ targets for ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherfils-Clérouin, C.; Boniface, C.; Bonnefille, M.; Fremerye, P.; Galmiche, D.; Gauthier, P.; Giorla, J.; Lambert, F.; Laffite, S.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Malinie, G.; Masse, L.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Poggi, F.; Seytor, P.; Wagon, F.; Willien, J. L.

    2010-08-01

    Targets designed to produce ignition on the Laser MegaJoule are presented. The LMJ experimental plans include the attempt of ignition and burn of an ICF capsule with 160 laser beams, delivering up to 1.4MJ and 380TW. New targets needing reduced laser energy with only a small decrease in robustness have then been designed for this purpose. Working specifically on the coupling efficiency parameter, i.e. the ratio of the energy absorbed by the capsule to the laser energy, has led to the design of a rugby-shaped cocktail hohlraum. 1D and 2D robustness evaluations of these different targets shed light on critical points for ignition, that can be traded off by tightening some specifications or by preliminary experimental and numerical tuning experiments.

  20. Gustav Mie and the evolving subject of light scattering by particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.

    2009-03-01

    The year 2008 marks the centenary of the seminal paper by Gustav Mie on light scattering by homogeneous spherical particles. With more than 3,800 citations, Mie's paper has been among the most influential physics publications of the twentieth century. It has affected profoundly the development of a great variety of science disciplines including atmospheric radiation, meteorological optics, remote sensing, aerosol physics, nanoscience, astrophysics, and biomedical optics. Mie's paper represented a fundamental advancement over the earlier publications by Ludvig Lorenz in that it was explicitly based on the Maxwell equations, gave the final solution in a convenient and closed form suitable for practical computations, and imparted physical reality to the abstract concept of electromagnetic scattering. The Mie solution anticipated such general concepts as far-field scattering and the Sommerfeld-Silver-Müller boundary conditions at infinity as well as paved the way to such important extensions as the separation of variables method for spheroids and the T-matrix method. Among illustrative uses of the Mie solution are the explanation of the spectacular optical displays caused by cloud and rain droplets, the detection of sulfuric acid particles in the atmosphere of Venus from Earth-based polarimetry, and optical particle characterization based on measurements of morphology-dependent resonances. Yet there is no doubt that the full practical potential of the Mie theory is still to be revealed.

  1. Combustion-wave ignition for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Larry C.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion wave ignition concept was experimentally studied in order to verify its suitability for application in baffled sections of a large booster engine combustion chamber. Gaseous oxygen/gaseous methane (GOX/GH4) and gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GOX/GH2) propellant combinations were evaluated in a subscale combustion wave ignition system. The system included four element tubes capable of carrying ignition energy simultaneously to four locations, simulating four baffled sections. Also, direct ignition of a simulated Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) was performed. Tests were conducted over a range of mixture ratios and tube geometries. Ignition was consistently attained over a wide range of mixture ratios. And at every ignition, the flame propagated through all four element tubes. For GOX/GH4, the ignition system ignited the MCC flow at mixture ratios from 2 to 10 and for GOX/GH2 the ratios is from 2 to 13. The ignition timing was found to be rapid and uniform. The total ignition delay when using the MCC was under 11 ms, with the tube-to-tube, as well as the run-to-run, variation under 1 ms. Tube geometries were found to have negligible effect on the ignition outcome and timing.

  2. Leucémie aigue érythroblastique: à propos de sept observations

    PubMed Central

    Tlamçani, Imane; Benjelloun, Salma; Yahyaoui, Ghita; Amrani, Moncef Hassani

    2014-01-01

    La leucémie aigue érythroblastique (LAM-M6) est une entité rare, représente 3 à 4% de l'ensemble des leucémies aigues. Il en existe deux types: l’érythroleucémie et la leucémie érythroïde pure. Elle se manifeste le plus souvent par des signes de cytopénie et d'infiltration des tissus extra-hématopoïétiques, elle est plus fréquente chez les adultes que chez les enfants et est de mauvais pronostic. Le but de notre travail est de mettre en évidence les particularités épidémiologiques, diagnostiques et évolutives de cette pathologie rare au sein du CHU HASSAN II de Fès. Nous rapportons le cas de sept patients diagnostiqués leucémie aigue érythroblastique LAM-M6 au laboratoire d'hématologie du CHU Hassan II de Fès entre Janvier 2009 et Aout 2013. Le diagnostic de leucémie aigue érythroblastique a été retenu sur un examen cytologique du frottis sanguin et du médullogramme ainsi que l'examen immunophénotypique. Il s'agit de deux adultes et cinq enfants, la plupart ont présenté une altération de l’état général, des signes de cytopénie et un syndrome tumoral. L’étude cytologique du frottis sanguin et du médullogramme ainsi que les résultats de l'immunophénotypage ont conduit au diagnostic de l’érythroleucémie chez six de nos patients et de leucémie érythroïde pure chez un seul patient. L’évolution a été différente pour ces patients. Le pronostic est grave d'où l'intérêt d'un diagnostic rapide et d'une prise en charge adéquate. PMID:26113895

  3. Promoted ignition of oxygen regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, Barry E.; Langford, Richard K.; Meyer, Gene R.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted of the ignition-containment capability of 12 oxygen regulators contaminated by various levels of hydrocarbon oils and subjected to promoted ignition. The regulators inlets were pressurized to 15.2 MPa with gaseous oxygen, and the oil was ignited by an electrical arc located upstream of the test article inlet port; the flame was allowed to propagate with the oxygen flow throughout the regulator internal cavities. The resulting reactions, which ranged in character from complete containment of the promoted ignition for one two-stage regulator to extensive burning and explosive energy release for several other (both single- and double-stage) regulators, indicate the need to prevent oil from being introduced into regulators.

  4. Promoted ignition of oxygen regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Barry E.; Langford, Richard K.; Meyer, Gene R.

    An investigation has been conducted of the ignition-containment capability of 12 oxygen regulators contaminated by various levels of hydrocarbon oils and subjected to promoted ignition. The regulators inlets were pressurized to 15.2 MPa with gaseous oxygen, and the oil was ignited by an electrical arc located upstream of the test article inlet port; the flame was allowed to propagate with the oxygen flow throughout the regulator internal cavities. The resulting reactions, which ranged in character from complete containment of the promoted ignition for one two-stage regulator to extensive burning and explosive energy release for several other (both single- and double-stage) regulators, indicate the need to prevent oil from being introduced into regulators.

  5. Effects of Fuel Laminar Flame Speed Compared to Engine Tumble Ratio, Ignition Energy, and Injection Strategy on Lean and EGR Dilute Spark Ignition Combustion

    DOE PAGES

    Kolodziej, Christopher P.; Pamminger, Michael; Sevik, James; ...

    2017-03-28

    Previously we show that fuels with higher laminar flame speed also have increased tolerance to EGR dilution. In this work, the effects of fuel laminar flame speed on both lean and EGR dilute spark ignition combustion stability were examined. Fuels blends of pure components (iso-octane, n-heptane, toluene, ethanol, and methanol) were derived at two levels of laminar flame speed. Each fuel blend was tested in a single-cylinder spark-ignition engine under both lean-out and EGR dilution sweeps until the coefficient of variance of indicated mean effective pressure increased above thresholds of 3% and 5%. The relative importance of fuel laminar flamemore » speed to changes to engine design parameters (spark ignition energy, tumble ratio, and port vs. direct injection) was also assessed. Our results showed that fuel laminar flame speed can have as big an effect on lean or EGR dilute engine operation as engine design parameters, with the largest effects seen during EGR dilute operation and when changes were made to cylinder charge motion.« less

  6. Effects of Fuel Laminar Flame Speed Compared to Engine Tumble Ratio, Ignition Energy, and Injection Strategy on Lean and EGR Dilute Spark Ignition Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodziej, Christopher P.; Pamminger, Michael; Sevik, James

    Previously we show that fuels with higher laminar flame speed also have increased tolerance to EGR dilution. In this work, the effects of fuel laminar flame speed on both lean and EGR dilute spark ignition combustion stability were examined. Fuels blends of pure components (iso-octane, n-heptane, toluene, ethanol, and methanol) were derived at two levels of laminar flame speed. Each fuel blend was tested in a single-cylinder spark-ignition engine under both lean-out and EGR dilution sweeps until the coefficient of variance of indicated mean effective pressure increased above thresholds of 3% and 5%. The relative importance of fuel laminar flamemore » speed to changes to engine design parameters (spark ignition energy, tumble ratio, and port vs. direct injection) was also assessed. Our results showed that fuel laminar flame speed can have as big an effect on lean or EGR dilute engine operation as engine design parameters, with the largest effects seen during EGR dilute operation and when changes were made to cylinder charge motion.« less

  7. Progress on LMJ targets for ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherfils-Clérouin, C.; Boniface, C.; Bonnefille, M.; Dattolo, E.; Galmiche, D.; Gauthier, P.; Giorla, J.; Laffite, S.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Malinie, G.; Masse, L.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Poggi, F.; Seytor, P.; Wagon, F.; Willien, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Targets designed to produce ignition on the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) are being simulated in order to set specifications for target fabrication. The LMJ experimental plans include the attempt of ignition and burn of an ICF capsule with 160 laser beams, delivering up to 1.4 MJ and 380 TW. New targets needing reduced laser energy with only a small decrease in robustness have then been designed for this purpose. Working specifically on the coupling efficiency parameter, i.e. the ratio of the energy absorbed by the capsule to the laser energy, has led to the design of a rugby-ball shaped cocktail hohlraum; with these improvements, a target based on the 240-beam A1040 capsule can be included in the 160-beam laser energy-power space. Robustness evaluations of these different targets shed light on critical points for ignition, which can trade off by tightening some specifications or by preliminary experimental and numerical tuning experiments.

  8. The physics basis for ignition using indirect-drive targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindl, John D.; Amendt, Peter; Berger, Richard L.; Glendinning, S. Gail; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Haan, Steven W.; Kauffman, Robert L.; Landen, Otto L.; Suter, Laurence J.

    2004-02-01

    The 1990 National Academy of Science final report of its review of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program recommended completion of a series of target physics objectives on the 10-beam Nova laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the highest-priority prerequisite for proceeding with construction of an ignition-scale laser facility, now called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These objectives were chosen to demonstrate that there was sufficient understanding of the physics of ignition targets that the laser requirements for laboratory ignition could be accurately specified. This research on Nova, as well as additional research on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester, is the subject of this review. The objectives of the U.S. indirect-drive target physics program have been to experimentally demonstrate and predictively model hohlraum characteristics, as well as capsule performance in targets that have been scaled in key physics variables from NIF targets. To address the hohlraum and hydrodynamic constraints on indirect-drive ignition, the target physics program was divided into the Hohlraum and Laser-Plasma Physics (HLP) program and the Hydrodynamically Equivalent Physics (HEP) program. The HLP program addresses laser-plasma coupling, x-ray generation and transport, and the development of energy-efficient hohlraums that provide the appropriate spectral, temporal, and spatial x-ray drive. The HEP experiments address the issues of hydrodynamic instability and mix, as well as the effects of flux asymmetry on capsules that are scaled as closely as possible to ignition capsules (hydrodynamic equivalence). The HEP program also addresses other capsule physics issues associated with ignition, such as energy gain and energy loss to the fuel during implosion in the absence of alpha-particle deposition. The results from the Nova and Omega experiments approach the NIF requirements for most of the important ignition capsule parameters, including

  9. Ignition delays, heats of combustion, and reaction rates of aluminum alkyl derivatives used as ignition and combustion enhancers for supersonic combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Thomas W., III; Schwab, S. T.; Harlowe, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    The subject of this paper is the design of supersonic combustors which will be required in order to achieve the needed reaction rates in a reasonable sized combustor. A fuel additive approach, which is the focus of this research, is the use of pyrophorics to shorten the ignition delay time and to increase the energy density of the fuel. Pyrophoric organometallic compounds may also provide an ignition source and flame stabilization mechanism within the combustor, thus permitting use of hydrocarbon fuels in supersonic combustion systems. Triethylaluminum (TEA) and trimethylaluminum (TMA) were suggested for this application due to their high energy density and reactivity. The objective here is to provide comparative data for the ignition quality, the energy content, and the reaction rates of several different adducts of both TEA and TMA. The results of the experiments indicate the aluminum alkyls and their more stable derivatives reduce the ignition delay and total reaction time to JP-10 jet fuel. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of ignition delay and total reaction time of the blends of the adducts are significantly lower than in neat JP-10.

  10. Quality assesment of mie 2009 sarajevo conference presentations.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Kulasin, Igor; Muhamedagic, Belma; Valjevac, Salih

    2010-01-01

    XXII European Congress of Medical Informatics (MIe 2009) took place in Sarajevo from August 30th to September 2nd 2009. Assessment of quality of papers presented at MIe 2009 was a process of observation, measurement, comparison and evaluation of the quality of orally presented papers. For this study, and for the first time since EFMI founding (1976) and MIE congresses, the authors introduced a specially created quality assessment form with five relevant paper quality variables (methodological approach, international influence, scientific content, language quality, technical features) which the first author of this article used in peer-review process of papers submitted for publication in the journal Acta Informatica Medica (as Editor-in-Chief for last 18 years). The survey was conducted on the principle of random sampling of participants of MIE 2009 Conference in Sarajevo, where specially trained interviewers (final year students of medicine and engineering at the University of Sarajevo) interviewed 33 session's chairs and 110 participants/listeners of MIE 2009 paper presentations in 33 sessions (of total 40). Data was collected, entered into a specially created database, analyzed and presented. From the total of 150 oral presentations at the MIE 2009, 110 oral presentations were graded by both chairs and participants/ listeners. Grading results were compared and we found that in 60% of cases (66 papers) session chairs gave higher ratings than other participants of the congress. The highest rating was 10, and the lowest 3. Only 3 of the papers received all four grades 10 from the session chairs. The most common grade given by chairs of the session was 8 (26.36%), followed by 7 (20%), 9 (19.32%), 6 (13.18%), 10 and 5 (7.50%), 4 (5%) and 3 (1.14%). Significant differences in quality assessment of papers done by chairs and those done by other participants/listeners are observed. This work should demonstrate the importance of introducing universal (uniform) scale for

  11. Ignition in an Atomistic Model of Hydrogen Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Alaghemandi, Mohammad; Newcomb, Lucas B; Green, Jason R

    2017-03-02

    Hydrogen is a potential substitute for fossil fuels that would reduce the combustive emission of carbon dioxide. However, the low ignition energy needed to initiate oxidation imposes constraints on the efficiency and safety of hydrogen-based technologies. Microscopic details of the combustion processes, ephemeral transient species, and complex reaction networks are necessary to control and optimize the use of hydrogen as a commercial fuel. Here, we report estimates of the ignition time of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures over a wide range of equivalence ratios from extensive reactive molecular dynamics simulations. These data show that the shortest ignition time corresponds to a fuel-lean mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.5, where the number of hydrogen and oxygen molecules in the initial mixture are identical, in good agreement with a recent chemical kinetic model. We find two signatures in the simulation data precede ignition at pressures above 200 MPa. First, there is a peak in hydrogen peroxide that signals ignition is imminent in about 100 ps. Second, we find a strong anticorrelation between the ignition time and the rate of energy dissipation, suggesting the role of thermal feedback in stimulating ignition.

  12. Electron Shock Ignition of Inertial Fusion Targets

    DOE PAGES

    Shang, W. L.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; ...

    2017-11-07

    Here, it is shown that inertial fusion targets designed with low implosion velocities can be shock ignited using laser–plasma interaction generated hot electrons (hot-e) to obtain high-energy gains. These designs are robust to multimode asymmetries and are predicted to ignite even for significantly distorted implosions. Electron shock ignition requires tens of kilojoules of hot-e, which can only be produced on a large laser facility like the National Ignition Facility, with the laser to hot-e conversion efficiency greater than 10% at laser intensities ~10 16 W/cm 2.

  13. Electron Shock Ignition of Inertial Fusion Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, W. L.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; Woo, K.; Hao, L.; Ren, C.; Christopherson, A. R.; Bose, A.; Theobald, W.

    2017-11-01

    It is shown that inertial confinement fusion targets designed with low implosion velocities can be shock-ignited using laser-plasma interaction generated hot electrons (hot-e 's) to obtain high energy gains. These designs are robust to multimode asymmetries and are predicted to ignite even for significantly distorted implosions. Electron shock ignition requires tens of kilojoules of hot-e 's which can be produced only at a large laser facility like the National Ignition Facility, with the laser-to-hot-e conversion efficiency greater than 10% at laser intensities ˜1016 W /cm2 .

  14. Electron Shock Ignition of Inertial Fusion Targets.

    PubMed

    Shang, W L; Betti, R; Hu, S X; Woo, K; Hao, L; Ren, C; Christopherson, A R; Bose, A; Theobald, W

    2017-11-10

    It is shown that inertial confinement fusion targets designed with low implosion velocities can be shock-ignited using laser-plasma interaction generated hot electrons (hot-e's) to obtain high energy gains. These designs are robust to multimode asymmetries and are predicted to ignite even for significantly distorted implosions. Electron shock ignition requires tens of kilojoules of hot-e's which can be produced only at a large laser facility like the National Ignition Facility, with the laser-to-hot-e conversion efficiency greater than 10% at laser intensities ∼10^{16}  W/cm^{2}.

  15. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scalesmore » and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8 MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6 × 10{sup 13} and ∼0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.« less

  16. LOX/Methane Main Engine Igniter Tests and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.; Ajmani, Kumund

    2008-01-01

    The LOX/methane propellant combination is being considered for the Lunar Surface Access Module ascent main engine propulsion system. The proposed switch from the hypergolic propellants used in the Apollo lunar ascent engine to LOX/methane propellants requires the development of igniters capable of highly reliable performance in a lunar surface environment. An ignition test program was conducted that used an in-house designed LOX/methane spark torch igniter. The testing occurred in Cell 21 of the Research Combustion Laboratory to utilize its altitude capability to simulate a space vacuum environment. Approximately 750 ignition test were performed to evaluate the effects of methane purity, igniter body temperature, spark energy level and frequency, mixture ratio, flowrate, and igniter geometry on the ability to obtain successful ignitions. Ignitions were obtained down to an igniter body temperature of approximately 260 R with a 10 torr back-pressure. The data obtained is also being used to anchor a CFD based igniter model.

  17. Temperature analysis of laser ignited metalized material using spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Ishaan; Sharma, Pallavi; Daipuriya, Ritu; Singh, Manpreet

    2018-05-01

    The temperature measurement of the laser ignited aluminized Nano energetic mixture using spectroscopy has a great scope in in analysing the material characteristic and combustion analysis. The spectroscopic analysis helps to do in depth study of combustion of materials which is difficult to do using standard pyrometric methods. Laser ignition was used because it consumes less energy as compared to electric ignition but ignited material dissipate the same energy as dissipated by electric ignition and also with the same impact. Here, the presented research is primarily focused on the temperature analysis of energetic material which comprises of explosive material mixed with nano-material and is ignited with the help of laser. Spectroscopy technique is used here to estimate the temperature during the ignition process. The Nano energetic mixture used in the research does not comprise of any material that is sensitive to high impact.

  18. A corresponding-states framework for the description of the Mie family of intermolecular potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramrattan, N. S.; Avendaño, C.; Müller, E. A.; Galindo, A.

    2015-05-01

    The Mie (λr, λa) intermolecular pair potential has been suggested as an alternative to the traditional Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential for modelling real systems both via simulation and theory as its implementation leads to an accuracy and flexibility in the determination of thermophysical properties that cannot be obtained when potentials of fixed range are considered. An additional advantage of using variable-range potentials is noted in the development of coarse-grained models where, as the superatoms become larger, the effective potentials are seen to become softer. However, the larger number of parameters that characterise the Mie potential (λr, λa, σ, ɛ) can hinder a rational study of the particular effects that each individual parameter have on the observed thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria, and higher degeneracy of models is observed. Here a three-parameter corresponding states model is presented in which a cohesive third parameter α is proposed following a perturbation expansion and assuming a mean-field limit. It is shown that in this approximation the free energy of any two Mie systems sharing the same value of α will be the same. The parameter α is an explicit function of the repulsive and attractive exponents and consequently dictates the form of the intermolecular pair potential. Molecular dynamics simulations of a variety of Mie systems over a range of values of α are carried out and the solid-liquid, liquid-vapour and vapour-solid phase boundaries for the systems considered are presented. Using the simulation data, we confirm that systems of the same α exhibit conformal phase behaviour for the fluid-phase properties as well as for the solid-fluid boundary, although larger differences are noted in the solid region; these can be related to the approximations in the definition of the parameter. Furthermore, it is found that the temperature range over which the vapour-liquid envelope of a given Mie system is stable follows a linear

  19. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  20. Shock ignition targets: gain and robustness vs ignition threshold factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atzeni, Stefano; Antonelli, Luca; Schiavi, Angelo; Picone, Silvia; Volponi, Gian Marco; Marocchino, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    Shock ignition is a laser direct-drive inertial confinement fusion scheme, in which the stages of compression and hot spot formation are partly separated. The hot spot is created at the end of the implosion by a converging shock driven by a final ``spike'' of the laser pulse. Several shock-ignition target concepts have been proposed and relevant gain curves computed (see, e.g.). Here, we consider both pure-DT targets and more facility-relevant targets with plastic ablator. The investigation is conducted with 1D and 2D hydrodynamic simulations. We determine ignition threshold factors ITF's (and their dependence on laser pulse parameters) by means of 1D simulations. 2D simulations indicate that robustness to long-scale perturbations increases with ITF. Gain curves (gain vs laser energy), for different ITF's, are generated using 1D simulations. Work partially supported by Sapienza Project C26A15YTMA, Sapienza 2016 (n. 257584), Eurofusion Project AWP17-ENR-IFE-CEA-01.

  1. Laser spark distribution and ignition system

    DOEpatents

    Woodruff, Steven [Morgantown, WV; McIntyre, Dustin L [Morgantown, WV

    2008-09-02

    A laser spark distribution and ignition system that reduces the high power optical requirements for use in a laser ignition and distribution system allowing for the use of optical fibers for delivering the low peak energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. An optical distributor distributes and delivers optical pumping energy from an optical pumping source to multiple combustion chambers incorporating laser oscillators or laser amplifiers for inducing a laser spark within a combustion chamber. The optical distributor preferably includes a single rotating mirror or lens which deflects the optical pumping energy from the axis of rotation and into a plurality of distinct optical fibers each connected to a respective laser media or amplifier coupled to an associated combustion chamber. The laser spark generators preferably produce a high peak power laser spark, from a single low power pulse. The laser spark distribution and ignition system has application in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

  2. Mie scattering off coated microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelissen, Radboud; Koene, Elmer; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Versluis, Michel

    2002-11-01

    The acoustic behavior of coated microbubbles depends on parameters of the shell coating, which are in turn dependent on bubble size. More intimate knowledge of this size dependence is required for an improved modeling of a distribution of coated microbubbles such as found in ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). Here a setup is designed to simultaneously measure the optical and acoustic response of an ultrasound-driven single bubble contained in a capillary or levitated by the pressure field of a focused transducer. Optical detection is done by Mie scattering through an inverted microscope. Acoustical detection of the single bubble by a receiving transducer is made possible because of the large working distance of the microscope. For Mie scattering investigation of excited bubbles, two regimes can be distinguished, which require different detection techniques: Conventional wide-angle detection through the microscope objective is sufficient for bubbles of radius exceeding 10 mum. For smaller bubbles, two narrow-aperture detectors are used to reconstruct the bubble dynamics from the complex angle-dependence of the scattered light.

  3. Influence of permittivity on gradient force exerted on Mie spheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Li, Kaikai; Li, Xiao

    2018-04-01

    In optical trapping, whether a particle could be stably trapped into the focus region greatly depends on the strength of the gradient force. Individual theoretical study on gradient force exerted on a Mie particle is rare because the mathematical separation of the gradient force and the scattering force in the Mie regime is difficult. Based on the recent forces separation work by Du et al. [Sci. Rep.7, 18042 (2017)SRCEC32045-232210.1038/s41598-017-17874-1], we investigate the influence of permittivity (an important macroscopic physical quantity) on the gradient force exerted on a Mie particle by cooperating numerical calculation using fast Fourier transform and analytical analysis using multipole expansion. It is revealed that gradient forces exerted on small spheres are mainly determined by the electric dipole moment except for certain permittivity with which the real part of polarizability of the electric dipole approaches zero, and gradient forces exerted on larger spheres are complex because of the superposition of the multipole moments. The classification of permittivity corresponding to different varying tendencies of gradient forces exerted on small spheres or larger Mie particles are illustrated. Absorption of particles favors the trapping of small spheres by gradient force, while it is bad for the trapping of larger particles. Moreover, the absolute values of the maximal gradient forces exerted on larger Mie particles decline greatly versus the varied imaginary part of permittivity. This work provides elaborate investigation on the different varying tendencies of gradient forces versus permittivity, which favors more accurate and free optical trapping.

  4. Relation Between Inflammables and Ignition Sources in Aircraft Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scull, Wilfred E

    1950-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to determine the relation between aircraft ignition sources and inflammables. Available literature applicable to the problem of aircraft fire hazards is analyzed and, discussed herein. Data pertaining to the effect of many variables on ignition temperatures, minimum ignition pressures, and minimum spark-ignition energies of inflammables, quenching distances of electrode configurations, and size of openings incapable of flame propagation are presented and discussed. The ignition temperatures and the limits of inflammability of gasoline in air in different test environments, and the minimum ignition pressure and the minimum size of openings for flame propagation of gasoline - air mixtures are included. Inerting of gasoline - air mixtures is discussed.

  5. Relation between inflammables and ignition sources in aircraft environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scull, Wilfred E

    1951-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to determine the relation between aircraft ignition sources and inflammables. Available literature applicable to the problem of aircraft fire hazards is analyzed and discussed. Data pertaining to the effect of many variables on ignition temperatures, minimum ignition pressures, minimum spark-ignition energies of inflammables, quenching distances of electrode configurations, and size of openings through which flame will not propagate are presented and discussed. Ignition temperatures and limits of inflammability of gasoline in air in different test environments, and the minimum ignition pressures and minimum size of opening for flame propagation in gasoline-air mixtures are included; inerting of gasoline-air mixtures is discussed.

  6. A Survey of Studies on Ignition and Burn of Inertially Confined Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atzeni, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    A survey of studies on ignition and burn of inertial fusion fuels is presented. Potentials and issues of different approaches to ignition (central ignition, fast ignition, volume ignition) are addressed by means of simple models and numerical simulations. Both equimolar DT and T-lean mixtures are considered. Crucial issues concerning hot spot formation (implosion symmetry for central ignition; igniting pulse parameters for fast ignition) are briefly discussed. Recent results concerning the scaling of the ignition energy with the implosion velocity and constrained gain curves are also summarized.

  7. Ultraviolet Rayleigh-Mie lidar for daytime-temperature profiling of the troposphere.

    PubMed

    Hua, Dengxin; Uchida, Masaru; Kobayashi, Takao

    2005-03-01

    A UV Rayleigh-Mie scattering lidar has been developed for daytime measurement of temperature and aerosol optical properties in the troposphere. The transmitter is a narrowband, injection-seeded, pulsed, third-harmonic Nd:YAG laser at an eye-safe wavelength of 355 nm. Two Fabry-Perot etalons (FPEs) with a dual-pass optical layout filter the molecular Rayleigh scattering components spectrally for retrieval of the temperature and provide a high rejection rate for aerosol Mie scattering in excess of 43 dB. The Mie signal is filtered with a third FPE filter for direct profiling of aerosol optical properties. The Mie scattering component in the Rayleigh signals, which will have influence on temperature measurements, is corrected by using a measure of aerosol scattering because of the relative insufficiency of Mie rejection of Rayleigh filters in the presence of dense aerosols or clouds, and the Mie rejection capability of system is thus improved. A narrowband interference filter is incorporated with the FPEs to block solar radiation. Also, the small field of view (0.1 mrad) of the receiver and the UV wavelength used enhance the ability of the lidar to suppress the solar background signal in daytime measurement. The system is relatively compact, with a power-aperture product of 0.18 W m(-2), and has a high sensitivity to temperature change (0.62%/K). Lidar measurements taken under different weather conditions (winter and summer) are demonstrated. Good agreement between the lidar and the radiosonde measurements was obtained in terms of lapse rates and inversions. Statistical temperature errors of less than 1 K up to a height of 2 km are obtainable, with an averaging time of approximately 12 min for daytime measurements.

  8. 41 CFR 301-11.101 - What allowance will I be paid for M&IE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... paid for M&IE? 301-11.101 Section 301-11.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... Lodgings-Plus Per Diem § 301-11.101 What allowance will I be paid for M&IE? (a) Except as provided in... allowance is More than 12 but less than 24 hours 75 percent of the applicable M&IE rate for each calendar...

  9. 41 CFR 301-11.101 - What allowance will I be paid for M&IE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... paid for M&IE? 301-11.101 Section 301-11.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... Lodgings-Plus Per Diem § 301-11.101 What allowance will I be paid for M&IE? (a) Except as provided in... allowance is More than 12 but less than 24 hours 75 percent of the applicable M&IE rate for each calendar...

  10. Retrieving the aerosol complex refractive index using PyMieScatt: A Mie computational package with visualization capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumlin, Benjamin J.; Heinson, William R.; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.

    2018-01-01

    The complex refractive index m = n + ik of a particle is an intrinsic property which cannot be directly measured; it must be inferred from its extrinsic properties such as the scattering and absorption cross-sections. Bohren and Huffman called this approach "describing the dragon from its tracks", since the inversion of Lorenz-Mie theory equations is intractable without the use of computers. This article describes PyMieScatt, an open-source module for Python that contains functionality for solving the inverse problem for complex m using extensive optical and physical properties as input, and calculating regions where valid solutions may exist within the error bounds of laboratory measurements. Additionally, the module has comprehensive capabilities for studying homogeneous and coated single spheres, as well as ensembles of homogeneous spheres with user-defined size distributions, making it a complete tool for studying the optical behavior of spherical particles.

  11. Review of Work Done with Professor Nussenzveig Regarding the Mie Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, W.

    2003-01-01

    Prof. Nussenzveig has dedicated part of his career to a surprising and unusual pursuit harking back to the heyday of classical physics: Mie theory, or the scattering of electromagnetic radiation by a homogeneous sphere. M e theory was not put forward until around 1908 (nearly simultaneously by Debye in a different form) and was quickly forgotten in the rush to the then-new quantum mechanics. It remained somewhat of a backwater until Prof. Nussenzveig brought it back by adapting complex angular momentum ideas from Regge pole theory, which had originally been invented for quantum mechanics. Since 1960, he has made fundamental contributions to actually understanding (as opposed to merely calculating) Mie theory. I became involved with this work in 1978 by inviting Prof. Nussenzveig to visit me at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Since then we have written several papers together on approximate methods for Mie cross-sections, bubble scattering, and other subjects. This lecture will review that work, ending with his recent work on Mie resonances. The emphasis will be on the applications in atmospheric sciences.

  12. Spark Ignition Characteristics of a L02/LCH4 Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of non-toxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost effective mission scenarios. One promising "green" alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane/liquid oxygen. To demonstrate performance and prove feasibility of this propellant combination, a 100lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed and tested under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project. Since high ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination, a test program was performed to explore ignition performance and reliability versus delivered spark energy. The sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also examined. Three different exciter units were used with the engine s augmented (torch) igniter. Propellant temperature was also varied within the liquid range. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks (in quiescent, room air). The escalating pressure and flow environment increases spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter s ability to deliver a spark. Reduced spark energies of these sparks result in more erratic ignitions and adversely affect ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1-6mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55-75mJ were required for reliable ignition. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition coincided with propellant introduction to the igniter and engine. Shifts of ignition timing were manifested by changes in the characteristics of the resulting ignition.

  13. Spark Ignition Characteristics of a LO2/LCH4 Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of non-toxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost effective mission scenarios. One promising "green" alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane/liquid oxygen. To demonstrate performance and prove feasibility of this propellant combination, a 100lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed and tested under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project. Since high ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination, a test program was performed to explore ignition performance and reliability versus delivered spark energy. The sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also examined. Three different exciter units were used with the engine's augmented (torch) igniter. Propellant temperature was also varied within the liquid range. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks (in quiescent, room air). The escalating pressure and flow environment increases spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter.s ability to deliver a spark. Reduced spark energies of these sparks result in more erratic ignitions and adversely affect ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1-6mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55-75mJ were required for reliable ignition. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition coincided with propellant introduction to the igniter and engine. Shifts of ignition timing were manifested by changes in the characteristics of the resulting ignition.

  14. Direct Drive Fusion Energy Shock Ignition Designs for Sub-MJ Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    FUSION ENERGY SHOCK IGNITION DESIGNS FOR SUB-MJ LASERS Andrew J. Schmitt, J. W. Bates, S. P. Obenschain, and S. T. Zalesak Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 20375 andrew.schmitt@nrl.navy.mil D. E. Fyfe LCP&FD, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 20375 R. Betti Fusion Science Center and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester NY New approaches in target design have increased the pos- sibility that useful fusion power can be generated with sub-MJ lasers. We have performed many 1D and 2D

  15. Preventing Accidental Ignition of Upper-Stage Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, John; Morgan, Herbert; Cooper, Michael; Murbach, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a proposal to reduce the risk of accidental ignition of certain upper-stage rocket motors or other high energy hazardous systems. At present, mechanically in-line initiators are used for initiation of many rocket motors and/or other high-energy hazardous systems. Electrical shorts and/or mechanical barriers, which are the basic safety devices in such systems, are typically removed as part of final arming or pad preparations while personnel are present. At this time, static discharge, test equipment malfunction, or incorrect arming techniques can cause premature firing. The proposal calls for a modular out-of-line ignition system incorporating detonating-cord elements, identified as the donor and the acceptor, separated by an air gap. In the safe configuration, the gap would be sealed with two shields, which would prevent an accidental firing of the donor from igniting the system. The shields would be removed to enable normal firing, in which shrapnel generated by the donor would reliably ignite the acceptor to continue the ordnance train. The acceptor would then ignite a through bulkhead initiator (or other similar device), which would ignite the motor or high-energy system. One shield would be remotely operated and would be moved to the armed position when a launch was imminent or conversely returned to the safe position if the launch were postponed. In the event of failure of the remotely operated shield, the other shield could be inserted manually to safe the system.

  16. Converging shock flows for a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Scott D.; Schmidt, Emma M.; Boyd, Zachary M.; Lilieholm, Jennifer F.; Baty, Roy S.

    2018-04-01

    Previous work has shown that the one-dimensional (1D) inviscid compressible flow (Euler) equations admit a wide variety of scale-invariant solutions (including the famous Noh, Sedov, and Guderley shock solutions) when the included equation of state (EOS) closure model assumes a certain scale-invariant form. However, this scale-invariant EOS class does not include even simple models used for shock compression of crystalline solids, including many broadly applicable representations of Mie-Grüneisen EOS. Intuitively, this incompatibility naturally arises from the presence of multiple dimensional scales in the Mie-Grüneisen EOS, which are otherwise absent from scale-invariant models that feature only dimensionless parameters (such as the adiabatic index in the ideal gas EOS). The current work extends previous efforts intended to rectify this inconsistency, by using a scale-invariant EOS model to approximate a Mie-Grüneisen EOS form. To this end, the adiabatic bulk modulus for the Mie-Grüneisen EOS is constructed, and its key features are used to motivate the selection of a scale-invariant approximation form. The remaining surrogate model parameters are selected through enforcement of the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an infinitely strong shock in a Mie-Grüneisen material. Finally, the approximate EOS is used in conjunction with the 1D inviscid Euler equations to calculate a semi-analytical Guderley-like imploding shock solution in a metal sphere and to determine if and when the solution may be valid for the underlying Mie-Grüneisen EOS.

  17. Wavelength Detuning Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Scheme for Direct-Drive: Modeling and Evidence from National Ignition Facility Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been shown to significantly reduce the laser absorption and implosion speed in direct-drive implosion experiments on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Mitigating CBET assists in achieving ignition-relevant hot-spot pressures in deuterium-tritium cryogenic OMEGA implosions. In addition, reducing CBET permits lower, more hydrodynamically stable, in-flight aspect ratio ignition designs with smaller nonuniformity growth during the acceleration phase. Detuning the wavelengths of the crossing beams is one of several techniques under investigation at the University of Rochester to mitigate CBET. This talk will describe these techniques with an emphasis on wavelength detuning. Recent experiments designed and predicted using multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET on the NIF have exploited the wavelength arrangement of the NIF beam geometry to demonstrate CBET mitigation through wavelength detuning in polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions. Shapes and trajectories inferred from time-resolved x-ray radiography of the imploding shell, scattered-light spectra, and hard x-ray spectra generated by suprathermal electrons all indicate a reduction in CBET. These results and their implications for direct-drive ignition will be presented and discussed. In addition, hydrodynamically scaled ignition-relevant designs for OMEGA implosions exploiting wavelength detuning will be presented. Changes required to the OMEGA laser to permit wavelength detuning will be discussed. Future plans for PDD on the NIF including more-uniform implosions with CBET mitigation will be explored. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Overview: Development of the National Ignition Facility and the Transition to a User Facility for the Ignition Campaign and High Energy Density Scientific Research

    DOE PAGES

    Moses, E. I.; Lindl, J. D.; Spaeth, M. L.; ...

    2017-03-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been operational since March 2009 and has been transitioning to a user facility supporting ignition science, high energy density stockpile science, national security applications, and fundamental science. The facility has achieved its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3ω light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC), established by the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration in 2005, was responsible for transitioning NIF from a construction project to a national user facility. Besidesmore » the operation and optimization of the use of the NIF laser, the NIC program was responsible for developing capabilities including target fabrication facilities; cryogenic layering capabilities; over 60 optical, X-ray, and nuclear diagnostic systems; experimental platforms; and a wide range of other NIF facility infrastructure. This study provides a summary of some of the key experimental results for NIF to date, an overview of the NIF facility capabilities, and the challenges that were met in achieving these capabilities. Finally, they are covered in more detail in the papers that follow.« less

  19. Overview: Development of the National Ignition Facility and the Transition to a User Facility for the Ignition Campaign and High Energy Density Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E. I.; Lindl, J. D.; Spaeth, M. L.

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been operational since March 2009 and has been transitioning to a user facility supporting ignition science, high energy density stockpile science, national security applications, and fundamental science. The facility has achieved its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3ω light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC), established by the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration in 2005, was responsible for transitioning NIF from a construction project to a national user facility. Besidesmore » the operation and optimization of the use of the NIF laser, the NIC program was responsible for developing capabilities including target fabrication facilities; cryogenic layering capabilities; over 60 optical, X-ray, and nuclear diagnostic systems; experimental platforms; and a wide range of other NIF facility infrastructure. This study provides a summary of some of the key experimental results for NIF to date, an overview of the NIF facility capabilities, and the challenges that were met in achieving these capabilities. Finally, they are covered in more detail in the papers that follow.« less

  20. Two-phase SLIPI for instantaneous LIF and Mie imaging of transient fuel sprays.

    PubMed

    Storch, Michael; Mishra, Yogeshwar Nath; Koegl, Matthias; Kristensson, Elias; Will, Stefan; Zigan, Lars; Berrocal, Edouard

    2016-12-01

    We report in this Letter a two-phase structured laser illumination planar imaging [two-pulse SLIPI (2p-SLIPI)] optical setup where the "lines structure" is spatially shifted by exploiting the birefringence property of a calcite crystal. By using this optical component and two cross-polarized laser pulses, the shift of the modulated pattern is not "time-limited" anymore. Consequently, two sub-images with spatially mismatched phases can be recorded within a few hundred of nanoseconds only, freezing the motion of the illuminated transient flow. In comparison with previous setups for instantaneous imaging based on structured illumination, the current optical design presents the advantage of having a single optical path, greatly simplifying its complexity. Due to its virtue of suppressing the effects from multiple light scattering, the 2p-SLIPI technique is applied here in an optically dense multi-jet direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) ethanol spray. The fast formation of polydispersed droplets and appearance of voids after fuel injection are investigated by simultaneous detection of Mie scattering and liquid laser-induced fluorescence. The results allow for significantly improved analysis of the spray structure.

  1. Ignition Delay Associated with a Strained Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerk, T. J.; Karagozian, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Ignition processes associated with two adjacent fuel-oxidizer interferences bounding a strained fuel strip are explored here using single-step activation energy asymptotics. Calculations are made for constant as well as temporally decaying strain fields. There possible models of ignition are determined: one in which the two interfaces ignite independently as diffusion flames; one in which the two interfaces ignite dependently and in which ignition occurs to form a single , premixed flame at very high strain rates before ignition is completely prevented. In contrast to a single, isolated interface in which ignition can be prevented by overmatching heat production with heat convection due to strain, ignition of a strained fuel strip can also be prevented if the finite extend of fuel is diluted by oxidizer more quickly than heat production can cause a positive feedback thermal runaway. These behaviors are dependent on the relative sizes of timescales associated with species and heat diffusion, with convection due to strain, and with the chemical reaction. The result here indicate that adjacent, strained species interfaces may ignite quite differently in nature from ignition of a single, strained intrface and that their interdependence should be considered as the interfaces are brought closer together in complex strain fields. Critical strain rates leading to complete ignition delay are found to be considerably smaller for the fuel strip than those for single interfaces as the fuel strip is made thin in comparison to diffusion and chemical length scales.

  2. Ignition and combustion of lunar propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Rodney L.; Roberts, Ted A.; Krier, Herman

    1993-01-01

    The ignition and combustion of Al, Mg, and Al/Mg alloy particles in 99 percent O2/1 percent N2 mixtures is investigated at high temperatures and pressures for rocket engine applications. The 20 micron particles contain 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 weight percent Mg alloyed with Al, and are ignited in oxygen using the reflected shock in a shock tube near the endwall. Using this technique, the ignition delay and combustion times of the particles are measured at temperatures up to 3250 K as a function of Mg content for oxygen pressures of 8.5, 17, and 34 atm. An ignition model is developed which employs a simple lumped capacitance energy equation and temperature and pressure dependent particle and gas properties. Good agreement is achieved between the measured and predicted trends in the ignition delay times. For the particles investigated, the contribution of heterogeneous reaction to the heating of the particle is found to be significant at lower temperatures, but may be neglected as gas temperatures above 3000 K. As little as 10 percent Mg reduces the ignition delay time substantially at all pressures tested. The particle ignition delay times decrease with increasing Mg content, and this reduction becomes less pronounced as oxidizer temperature and pressure are increased.

  3. Gain curves and hydrodynamic modeling for shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, M.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.

    2010-05-01

    Ignition of a precompressed thermonuclear fuel by means of a converging shock is now considered as a credible scheme to obtain high gains for inertial fusion energy. This work aims at modeling the successive stages of the fuel time history, from compression to final thermonuclear combustion, in order to provide the gain curves of shock ignition (SI). The leading physical mechanism at work in SI is pressure amplification, at first by spherical convergence, and by collision with the shock reflected at center during the stagnation process. These two effects are analyzed, and ignition conditions are provided as functions of the shock pressure and implosion velocity. Ignition conditions are obtained from a non-isobaric fuel assembly, for which we present a gain model. The corresponding gain curves exhibit a significantly lower ignition threshold and higher target gains than conventional central ignition.

  4. Non-diffusive ignition of a gaseous reactive mixture following time-resolved, spatially distributed energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassoy, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic asymptotic methods are applied to the compressible conservation and state equations for a reactive gas, including transport terms, to develop a rational thermomechanical formulation for the ignition of a chemical reaction following time-resolved, spatially distributed thermal energy addition from an external source into a finite volume of gas. A multi-parameter asymptotic analysis is developed for a wide range of energy deposition levels relative to the initial internal energy in the volume when the heating timescale is short compared to the characteristic acoustic timescale of the volume. Below a quantitatively defined threshold for energy addition, a nearly constant volume heating process occurs, with a small but finite internal gas expansion Mach number. Very little added thermal energy is converted to kinetic energy. The gas expelled from the boundary of the hot, high-pressure spot is the source of mechanical disturbances (acoustic and shock waves) that propagate away into the neighbouring unheated gas. When the energy addition reaches the threshold value, the heating process is fully compressible with a substantial internal gas expansion Mach number, the source of blast waves propagating into the unheated environmental gas. This case corresponds to an extremely large non-dimensional hot-spot temperature and pressure. If the former is sufficiently large, a high activation energy chemical reaction is initiated on the short heating timescale. This phenomenon is in contrast to that for more modest levels of energy addition, where a thermal explosion occurs only after the familiar extended ignition delay period for a classical high activation reaction. Transport effects, modulated by an asymptotically small Knudsen number, are shown to be negligible unless a local gradient in temperature, concentration or velocity is exceptionally large.

  5. Ignition and pusher adiabat

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, B. L.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; ...

    2018-05-18

    In the last five years, large amounts of high quality experimental data in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) were produced at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). From the NIF data, we have significantly advanced our scientific understanding of the physics of thermonuclear (TN) ignition in ICF and identified the critical physical issues important to achieve ignition, such as implosion energetics, pusher adiabat, tamping effects in fuel confinement, and confinement time. In this article, we will present recently developed TN ignition theory and implosion scaling laws [1, 2] characterizing the thermodynamic properties of the hot spot and the TN ignition metrics atmore » NIF. We compare our theoretical predictions with NIF data with good agreement between theory and experiments. We will also demonstrate the fundamental effects of the pusher adiabat on the energy partition between the cold shell and the hot deuterium-tritium and on the neutron yields of ICF capsules. Applications [3–5] to NIF experiments and physical explanations of the discrepancies among theory, data and simulations will be presented. In our theory, the actual adiabat of the cold DT fuel can be inferred from neutron image data of a burning capsule. With the experimentally inferred hot spot mix, the CH mix in the cold fuel could be estimated, as well as the preheat. Finally, possible path forwards to reach high yields are discussed.« less

  6. Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J. G.; Seka, W.; Epstein, R.; Short, R. W.; Follett, R. K.; Regan, S. P.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Michel, P.; Chapman, T.; Hohenberger, M.

    2017-10-01

    Laser-plasma interaction (LPI) instabilities, such as stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and two-plasmon decay, can be detrimental for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion because of target preheat by the high-energy electrons they generate. The radiation-hydrodynamic code DRACO was used to design planar-target experiments at the National Ignition Facility that generated plasma and interaction conditions relevant to ignition direct-drive designs (IL 1015W/cm2 , Te > 3 keV, density gradient scale lengths of Ln 600 μm). Laser-energy conversion efficiency to hot electrons of 0.5% to 2.5% with temperature of 45 to 60 keV was inferred from the experiment when the laser intensity at the quarter-critical surface increased from 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2 . LPI was dominated by SRS, as indicated by the measured scattered-light spectra. Simulations of SRS using the LPI code LPSE have been performed and compared with predictions of theoretical models. Implications for ignition-scale direct-drive experiments will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. Laser Ignition Technology for Bi-Propellant Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.; Early, Jim; Trinh, Huu; Dennis, Jay; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The fiber optically coupled laser ignition approach summarized is under consideration for use in igniting bi-propellant rocket thrust chambers. This laser ignition approach is based on a novel dual pulse format capable of effectively increasing laser generated plasma life times up to 1000 % over conventional laser ignition methods. In the dual-pulse format tinder consideration here an initial laser pulse is used to generate a small plasma kernel. A second laser pulse that effectively irradiates the plasma kernel follows this pulse. Energy transfer into the kernel is much more efficient because of its absorption characteristics thereby allowing the kernel to develop into a much more effective ignition source for subsequent combustion processes. In this research effort both single and dual-pulse formats were evaluated in a small testbed rocket thrust chamber. The rocket chamber was designed to evaluate several bipropellant combinations. Optical access to the chamber was provided through small sapphire windows. Test results from gaseous oxygen (GOx) and RP-1 propellants are presented here. Several variables were evaluated during the test program, including spark location, pulse timing, and relative pulse energy. These variables were evaluated in an effort to identify the conditions in which laser ignition of bi-propellants is feasible. Preliminary results and analysis indicate that this laser ignition approach may provide superior ignition performance relative to squib and torch igniters, while simultaneously eliminating some of the logistical issues associated with these systems. Further research focused on enhancing the system robustness, multiplexing, and window durability/cleaning and fiber optic enhancements is in progress.

  8. Progress towards ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M. J.; Patel, P. K.; Lindl, J. D.

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory includes a precision laser system now capable of delivering 1.8 MJ at 500 TW of 0.35-μm light to a target. NIF has been operational since March 2009. A variety of experiments have been completed in support of NIF's mission areas: national security, fundamental science, and inertial fusion energy. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support its missions with nearly 60 X-ray, optical, and nuclear diagnostic systems. A primary goal of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) on the NIF was to implode a low-Z capsule filled with ∼0.2 mgmore » of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel via laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion and demonstrate fusion ignition and propagating thermonuclear burn with a net energy gain of ∼5–10 (fusion yield/input laser energy). This requires assembling the DT fuel into a dense shell of ∼1000 g/cm{sup 3} with an areal density (ρR) of ∼1.5 g/cm{sup 2}, surrounding a lower density hot spot with a temperature of ∼10 keV and a ρR ∼0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, or approximately an α-particle range. Achieving these conditions demand precise control of laser and target parameters to allow a low adiabat, high convergence implosion with low ablator fuel mix. We have demonstrated implosion and compressed fuel conditions at ∼80–90% for most point design values independently, but not at the same time. The nuclear yield is a factor of ∼3–10× below the simulated values and a similar factor below the alpha dominated regime. This paper will discuss the experimental trends, the possible causes of the degraded performance (the off-set from the simulations), and the plan to understand and resolve the underlying physics issues.« less

  9. Calculations of the Performance of a Compression-Ignition Engine-Compressor Turbine Combination I : Performance of a Highly Supercharged Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J. C.; Mendelson, Alexander

    1945-01-01

    Small high-speed single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were tested to determine their performance characteristics under high supercharging. Calculations were made on the energy available in the exhaust gas of the compression-ignition engines. The maximum power at any given maximum cylinder pressure was obtained when the compression pressure was equal to the maximum cylinder pressure. Constant-pressure combustion was found possible at an engine speed of 2200 rpm. Exhaust pressures and temperatures were determined from an analysis of indicator cards. The analysis showed that, at rich mixtures with the exhaust back pressure equal to the inlet-air pressure, there is excess energy available for driving a turbine over that required for supercharging. The presence of this excess energy indicates that a highly supercharged compression-ignition engine might be desirable as a compressor and combustion chamber for a turbine.

  10. Two-Dimensional Simulations of Electron Shock Ignition at the Megajoule Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, W.; Betti, R.

    2016-10-01

    Shock ignition uses a late strong shock to ignite the hot spot of an inertial confinement fusion capsule. In the standard shock-ignition scheme, an ignitor shock is launched by the ablation pressure from a spike in laser intensity. Recent experiments on OMEGA have shown that focused beams with intensity up to 6 ×1015 W /cm2 can produce copious amounts of hot electrons. The hot electrons are produced by laser-plasma instabilities (LPI's) and can carry up to 15 % of the instantaneous laser power. Megajoule-scale targets will likely produce even more hot electrons because of the large plasma scale length. We show that it is possible to design ignition targets with low implosion velocities that can be shock ignited using LPI-generated hot electrons to obtain high energy gains. These designs are robust to low-mode asymmetries and they ignite even for highly distorted implosions. Electron shock ignition requires tens of kilojoules of hot electrons, which can only be produced on a large laser facility like the National Ignition Facility. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. Low power arcjet thruster pulse ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarmiento, Charles J.; Gruber, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the pulse ignition characteristics of a 1 kW class arcjet using an inductive energy storage pulse generator with a pulse width modulated power converter identified several thruster and pulse generator parameters that influence breakdown voltage including pulse generator rate of voltage rise. This work was conducted with an arcjet tested on hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixtures to simulate fully decomposed hydrazine. Over all ranges of thruster and pulser parameters investigated, the mean breakdown voltages varied from 1.4 to 2.7 kV. Ignition tests at elevated thruster temperatures under certain conditions revealed occasional breakdowns to thruster voltages higher than the power converter output voltage. These post breakdown discharges sometimes failed to transition to the lower voltage arc discharge mode and the thruster would not ignite. Under the same conditions, a transition to the arc mode would occur for a subsequent pulse and the thruster would ignite. An automated 11 600 cycle starting and transition to steady state test demonstrated ignition on the first pulse and required application of a second pulse only two times to initiate breakdown.

  12. Shock ignition of thermonuclear fuel with high areal density.

    PubMed

    Betti, R; Zhou, C D; Anderson, K S; Perkins, L J; Theobald, W; Solodov, A A

    2007-04-13

    A novel method by C. Zhou and R. Betti [Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 140 (2005)] to assemble and ignite thermonuclear fuel is presented. Massive cryogenic shells are first imploded by direct laser light with a low implosion velocity and on a low adiabat leading to fuel assemblies with large areal densities. The assembled fuel is ignited from a central hot spot heated by the collision of a spherically convergent ignitor shock and the return shock. The resulting fuel assembly features a hot-spot pressure greater than the surrounding dense fuel pressure. Such a nonisobaric assembly requires a lower energy threshold for ignition than the conventional isobaric one. The ignitor shock can be launched by a spike in the laser power or by particle beams. The thermonuclear gain can be significantly larger than in conventional isobaric ignition for equal driver energy.

  13. Differentiation of a murine intestinal epithelial cell line (MIE) toward the M cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Takashi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Takakura, Ikuro; Itani, Wataru; Watanabe, Kouichi; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Rose, Michael T; McConochie, Huw R; Okano, Hideyuki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Aso, Hisashi

    2008-08-01

    M cells are a kind of intestinal epithelial cell in the follicle-associated epithelium of Peyer's patches. These cells can transport antigens and microorganisms into underlying lymphoid tissues. Despite the important role of M cells in mucosal immune responses, the origin and mechanisms of differentiation as well as cell death of M cells remain unclear. To clarify the mechanism of M cell differentiation, we established a novel murine intestinal epithelial cell line (MIE) from the C57BL/6 mouse. MIE cells grow rapidly and have a cobblestone morphology, which is a typical feature of intestinal epithelial cells. Additionally, they express cytokeratin, villin, cell-cell junctional proteins, and alkaline phosphatase activity and can form microvilli. Their expression of Musashi-1 antigen indicates that they may be close to intestinal stem cells or transit-amplifying cells. MIE cells are able to differentiate into the M cell lineage following coculture with intestinal lymphocytes, but not with Peyer's patch lymphocytes (PPL). However, PPL costimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 MAbs caused MIE cells to display typical features of M cells, such as transcytosis activity, the disorganization of microvilli, and the expression of M cell markers. This transcytosis activity of MIE cells was not induced by T cells isolated from PPL costimulated with the same MAbs and was reduced by the depletion of the T cell population from PPL. A mixture of T cells treated with MAbs and B cells both from PPL led MIE cells to differentiate into M cells. We report here that MIE cells have the potential ability to differentiate into M cells and that this differentiation required activated T cells and B cells.

  14. Molded composite pyrogen igniter for rocket motors. [solid propellant ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.; Lucy, M. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A lightweight pyrogen igniter assembly including an elongated molded plastic tube adapted to contain a pyrogen charge was designed for insertion into a rocket motor casing for ignition of the rocket motor charge. A molded plastic closure cap provided for the elongated tube includes an ignition charge for igniting the pyrogen charge and an electrically actuated ignition squib for igniting the ignition charge. The ignition charge is contained within a portion of the closure cap, and it is retained therein by a noncorrosive ignition pellet retainer or screen which is adapted to rest on a shoulder of the elongated tube when the closure cap and tube are assembled together. A circumferentially disposed metal ring is provided along the external circumference of the closure cap and is molded or captured within the plastic cap in the molding process to provide, along with O-ring seals, a leakproof rotary joint.

  15. Statistical Mechanical Model for Adsorption Coupled with SAFT-VR Mie Equation of State.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luís F M; Economou, Ioannis G; Castier, Marcelo

    2017-10-24

    We extend the SAFT-VR Mie equation of state to calculate adsorption isotherms by considering explicitly the residual energy due to the confinement effect. Assuming a square-well potential for the fluid-solid interactions, the structure imposed by the fluid-solid interface is calculated using two different approaches: an empirical expression proposed by Travalloni et al. ( Chem. Eng. Sci. 65 , 3088 - 3099 , 2010 ), and a new theoretical expression derived by applying the mean value theorem. Adopting the SAFT-VR Mie ( Lafitte et al. J. Chem. Phys. , 139 , 154504 , 2013 ) equation of state to describe the fluid-fluid interactions, and solving the phase equilibrium criteria, we calculate adsorption isotherms for light hydrocarbons adsorbed in a carbon molecular sieve and for carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water adsorbed in a zeolite. Good results are obtained from the model using either approach. Nonetheless, the theoretical expression seems to correlate better the experimental data than the empirical one, possibly implying that a more reliable way to describe the structure ensures a better description of the thermodynamic behavior.

  16. The National Ignition Facility and Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harri, J. G.; Paisner, J. A.; Lowdermilk, W. H.; Boyes, J. D.; Kumpan, S. A.; Sorem, M. S.

    1994-09-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. The National Ignition Facility construction project will require the best of our construction industries and its success will depend on the best products offered by hundreds of the nation's high technology companies. Three-fourths of the construction costs will be invested in industry. This article reviews the design, cost and schedule, and required industrial involvement associated with the construction project.

  17. 8-Spinors and structure of solitons in generalized Mie electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P., E-mail: soliton4@mail.ru

    2013-02-15

    A generalization of Mie electrodynamics is considered. It includes a 8-spinor field and higher powers of the Mie invariant A{sub {mu}}A{sup {mu}}. Particular topological properties of 8-spinors are indicated and are associated with the existence of the remarkable Brioschi identity of eight squares, which permits deriving a natural 8-spinor unification of the Skyrme model of baryons and the Faddeev model of leptons, these particles being treated as topological solitons. Two types of soliton configurations admitted by the model are constructed. These are charged static and neutral lightlike (luxons) ones.

  18. Enhancement of Chiroptical Signals by Circular Differential Mie Scattering of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yoo, SeokJae; Park, Q-Han

    2015-09-25

    We enhance the weak optical signals of small chiral molecules via circular differential Mie scattering (CDMS) of nanoparticles immersed in them. CDMS is the preferential Mie scattering of left- and right-handed circularly polarized light by nanoparticles whose sizes are about the same as the wavelength of light. Solving the Mie scattering theory for chiral media, we find that the CDMS signal of the particle is linearly proportional to the chirality parameter κ of the molecules. This linear amplitude enhancement by CDMS of the particle holds, even for large particles, which have a retardation effect. We also demonstrate that the CDMS of a nanoparticle is sensitive to changes of molecular concentration, and that the nanoparticle can be utilized as a chiroptical biosensor detecting the concentration of analyte. We expect that the enhancement of molecular chiroptical signals by CDMS will pave the way for novel chiroptical spectroscopy using nanostructures.

  19. Novel Laser Ignition Technique Using Dual-Pulse Pre-Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrache, Ciprian

    Recent advances in the development of compact high power laser sources and fiber optic delivery of giant pulses have generated a renewed interest in laser ignition. The non-intrusive nature of laser ignition gives it a set of unique characteristics over the well-established capacitive discharge devices (or spark plugs) that are currently used as ignition sources in engines. Overall, the use of laser ignition has been shown to have a positive impact on engine operation leading to a reduction in NOx emission, fuel saving and an increased operational envelope of current engines. Conventionally, laser ignition is achieved by tightly focusing a high-power q-switched laser pulse until the optical intensity at the focus is high enough to breakdown the gas molecules. This leads to the formation of a spark that serves as the ignition source in engines. However, there are certain disadvantages associated with this ignition method. This ionization approach is energetically inefficient as the medium is transparent to the laser radiation until the laser intensity is high enough to cause gas breakdown. As a consequence, very high energies are required for ignition (about an order of magnitude higher energy than capacitive plugs at stoichiometric conditions). Additionally, the fluid flow induced during the plasma recombination generates high vorticity leading to high rates of flame stretching. In this work, we are addressing some of the aforementioned disadvantages of laser ignition by developing a novel approach based on a dual-pulse pre-ionization scheme. The new technique works by decoupling the effect of the two ionization mechanisms governing plasma formation: multiphoton ionization (MPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI). An UV nanosecond pulse (lambda = 266 nm) is used to generate initial ionization through MPI. This is followed by an overlapped NIR nanosecond pulse (lambda = 1064 nm) that adds energy into the pre-ionized mixture into a controlled manner until the

  20. 14 CFR 25.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any... that draw electrical energy from the same source. (c) The design of the engine ignition system must...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any... that draw electrical energy from the same source. (c) The design of the engine ignition system must...

  2. Laser ignition of an experimental combustion chamber with a multi-injector configuration at low pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Michael; Manfletti, Chiara; Kroupa, Gerhard; Oschwald, Michael

    2017-09-01

    In search of reliable and light-weight ignition systems for re-ignitable upper stage engines, a laser ignition system was adapted and tested on an experimental combustion chamber for propellant injection into low combustion chamber pressures at 50-80 mbar. The injector head pattern consisted of five coaxial injector elements. Both, laser-ablation-driven ignition and laser-plasma-driven ignition were tested for the propellant combination liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. The 122 test runs demonstrated the reliability of the ignition system for different ignition configurations and negligible degradation due to testing. For the laser-plasma-driven scheme, minimum laser pulse energies needed for 100% ignition probability were found to decrease when increasing the distance of the ignition location from the injector faceplate with a minimum of 2.6 mJ. For laser-ablation-driven ignition, the minimum pulse energy was found to be independent of the ablation material tested and was about 1.7 mJ. The ignition process was characterized using both high-speed Schlieren and OH* emission diagnostics. Based on these findings and on the increased fiber-based pulse transport capabilities recently published, new ignition system configurations for space propulsion systems relying on fiber-based pulse delivery are formulated. If the laser ignition system delivers enough pulse energy, the laser-plasma-driven configuration represents the more versatile configuration. If the laser ignition pulse power is limited, the application of laser-ablation-driven ignition is an option to realize ignition, but implies restrictions concerning the location of ignition.

  3. A polar-drive shock-ignition design for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. S.; Betti, R.; McKenty, P. W.; Collins, T. J. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Theobald, W.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Lafon, M.; Marozas, J. A.; Nora, R.; Skupsky, S.; Shvydky, A.

    2013-05-01

    Shock ignition [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 155001 (2007)] is being pursued as a viable option to achieve ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Shock-ignition target designs use a high-intensity laser spike at the end of a low-adiabat assembly pulse to launch a spherically convergent strong shock to ignite the hot spot of an imploding capsule. A shock-ignition target design for the NIF is presented. One-dimensional simulations indicate an ignition threshold factor of 4.1 with a gain of 58. A polar-drive beam-pointing configuration for shock-ignition experiments on the NIF at 750 kJ is proposed. The capsule design is shown to be robust to the various one- and two-dimensional effects and nonuniformities anticipated on the NIF. The target is predicted to ignite with a gain of 38 when including all anticipated levels of nonuniformity and system uncertainty.

  4. Laser induced spark ignition of methane-oxygen mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santavicca, D. A.; Ho, C.; Reilly, B. J.; Lee, T.-W.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an experimental study of laser induced spark ignition of methane-oxygen mixtures are presented. The experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure and 296 K under laminar pre-mixed and turbulent-incompletely mixed conditions. A pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser was used as the ignition source. Laser sparks with energies of 10 mJ and 40 mJ were used, as well as a conventional electrode spark with an effective energy of 6 mJ. Measurements were made of the flame kernel radius as a function of time using pulsed laser shadowgraphy. The initial size of the spark ignited flame kernel was found to correlate reasonably well with breakdown energy as predicted by the Taylor spherical blast wave model. The subsequent growth rate of the flame kernel was found to increase with time from a value less than to a value greater than the adiabatic, unstretched laminar growth rate. This behavior was attributed to the combined effects of flame stretch and an apparent wrinkling of the flame surface due to the extremely rapid acceleration of the flame. The very large laminar flame speed of methane-oxygen mixtures appears to be the dominant factor affecting the growth rate of spark ignited flame kernels, with the mode of ignition having a small effect. The effect of incomplete fuel-oxidizer mixing was found to have a significant effect on the growth rate, one which was greater than could simply be accounted for by the effect of local variations in the equivalence ratio on the local flame speed.

  5. Classical plasma dynamics of Mie-oscillations in atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kull, H.-J.; El-Khawaldeh, A.

    2018-04-01

    Mie plasmons are of basic importance for the absorption of laser light by atomic clusters. In this work we first review the classical Rayleigh-theory of a dielectric sphere in an external electric field and Thomson’s plum-pudding model applied to atomic clusters. Both approaches allow for elementary discussions of Mie oscillations, however, they also indicate deficiencies in describing the damping mechanisms by electrons crossing the cluster surface. Nonlinear oscillator models have been widely studied to gain an understanding of damping and absorption by outer ionization of the cluster. In the present work, we attempt to address the issue of plasmon relaxation in atomic clusters in more detail based on classical particle simulations. In particular, we wish to study the role of thermal motion on plasmon relaxation, thereby extending nonlinear models of collective single-electron motion. Our simulations are particularly adopted to the regime of classical kinetics in weakly coupled plasmas and to cluster sizes extending the Debye-screening length. It will be illustrated how surface scattering leads to the relaxation of Mie oscillations in the presence of thermal motion and of electron spill-out at the cluster surface. This work is intended to give, from a classical perspective, further insight into recent work on plasmon relaxation in quantum plasmas [1].

  6. Ignition threshold for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J., E-mail: hay@princeton.edu; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543

    2015-11-15

    An optically thin p-{sup 11}B plasma loses more energy to bremsstrahlung than it gains from fusion reactions, unless the ion temperature can be elevated above the electron temperature. In thermal plasmas, the temperature differences required are possible in small Coulomb logarithm regimes, characterized by high density and low temperature. Ignition could be reached more easily if the fusion reactivity can be improved with nonthermal ion distributions. To establish an upper bound for the potential utility of a nonthermal distribution, we consider a monoenergetic beam with particle energy selected to maximize the beam-thermal reactivity. Comparing deuterium-tritium (DT) and p-{sup 11}B, themore » minimum Lawson criteria and minimum ρR required for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) volume ignition are calculated with and without the nonthermal feature. It turns out that channeling fusion alpha energy to maintain such a beam facilitates ignition at lower densities and ρR, improves reactivity at constant pressure, and could be used to remove helium ash. On the other hand, the reactivity gains that could be realized in DT plasmas are significant, the excess electron density in p-{sup 11}B plasmas increases the recirculated power cost to maintain a nonthermal feature and thereby constrains its utility to ash removal.« less

  7. Ignitability test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1989-01-01

    To overcome serious weaknesses in determining the performance of initiating devices, a novel 'ignitability test method', representing actual design interfaces and ignition materials, has been developed. Ignition device output consists of heat, light, gas an burning particles. Past research methods have evaluated these parameters individually. This paper describes the development and demonstration of an ignitability test method combining all these parameters, and the quantitative assessment of the ignition performance of two widely used percussion primers, the M42C1-PA101 and the M42C2-793. The ignition materials used for this evaluation were several powder, granule and pellet sizes of black powder and boron-potassium nitrate. This test method should be useful for performance evaluation of all initiator types, quality assurance, evaluation of ignition interfaces, and service life studies of initiators and ignition materials.

  8. Laser ignition of engines: a realistic option!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinrotter, M.; Srivastava, D. K.; Iskra, K.; Graf, J.; Kopecek, H.; Klausner, J.; Herdin, G.; Wintner, E.

    2006-01-01

    Due to the demands of the market to increase efficiencies and power densities of gas engines, existing ignition schemes are gradually reaching their limits. These limitations initially triggered the development of laser ignition as an effective alternative, first only for gas engines and now for a much wider range of internal combustion engines revealing a number of immediate advantages like no electrode erosion or flame kernel quenching. Furthermore and most noteworthy, already the very first engine tests about 5 years ago had resulted in a drastic reduction of NO x emissions. Within this broad range investigation, laser plasmas were generated by ns Nd-laser pulses and characterized by emission and Schlieren diagnostic methods. High-pressure chamber experiments with lean hydrogen-methane-air mixtures were successfully performed and allowed the determination of essential parameters like minimum pulse energies at different ignition pressures and temperatures as well as at variable fuel air compositions. Multipoint ignition was studied for different ignition point locations. In this way, relevant parameters were acquired allowing to estimate future laser ignition systems. Finally, a prototype diode-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was tested successfully at a gasoline engine allowing to monitor the essential operation characteristics. It is expected that laser ignition involving such novel solid-state lasers will allow much lower maintenance efforts.

  9. Ignition, Burning, and Extinction of a Strained Fuel Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selerland, T.; Karagozian, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    Flame structure and ignition and extinction processes associated with a strained fuel strip are explored numerically using detailed transport and complex kinetics for a propane-air reaction. Ignition modes are identified that are similar to those predicted by one-step activation energy asymptotics, i.e., modes in which diffusion flames can ignite as independent or dependent interfaces, and modes in which single premixed or partially premixed flames ignite. These ignition modes are found to be dependent on critical combinations of strain rate, fuel strip thickness, and initial reactant temperatures. Extinction in this configuration is seen to occur due to fuel consumption by adjacent flames, although viscosity is seen to have the effect of delaying extinction by reducing the effective strain rate and velocity field experienced by the flames.

  10. Generation of Mie size microdroplet aerosols with applications in laser-driven fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, A P; Semonin, O; Bruce, S; Chan, C; Maindi, M; Donnelly, T D; Maurer, M; Bang, W; Churina, I; Osterholz, J; Kim, I; Bernstein, A C; Ditmire, T

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a tunable source of Mie scale microdroplet aerosols that can be used for the generation of energetic ions. To demonstrate this potential, a terawatt Ti:Al2O3 laser focused to 2 x 10(19) W/cm2 was used to irradiate heavy water (D2O) aerosols composed of micron-scale droplets. Energetic deuterium ions, which were generated in the laser-droplet interaction, produced deuterium-deuterium fusion with approximately 2 x 10(3) fusion neutrons measured per joule of incident laser energy.

  11. Low-Power Laser Ignition of Aluminum/Metal Oxide Nanothermites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    ignition energy needed for a specific thermite reaction. Low ignition delays (less than 15 ms) were obtained at approximately 300 mW laser power output for...both Al/MoO3 and Al/Bi2O3 thermites . Finally, a forward-looking infrared camera was used to estimate the ignition and burning temperatures of the Al...context would also be beneficial as a substitute for the various formulations containing lead or other toxic substances. In a thermite type reaction, a

  12. Ignition study of a petrol/CNG single cylinder engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Saleem, Z.; Mirza, A. A.

    2005-11-01

    Benefits of laser ignition over the electrical ignition system for Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) engines have fuelled automobile industry and led to an extensive research on basic characteristics to switch over to the emerging technologies. This study was undertaken to determine the electrical and physical characteristics of the electric spark ignition of single cylinder petrol/CNG engine to determine minimum ignition requirements and timeline of ignition events to use in subsequent laser ignition study. This communication briefly reviews the ongoing research activities and reports the results of this experimental study. The premixed petrol and CNG mixtures were tested for variation of current and voltage characteristics of the spark with speed of engine. The current magnitude of discharge circuit was found to vary linearly over a wide range of speed but the stroke to stroke fire time was found to vary nonlinearly. The DC voltage profiles were observed to fluctuate randomly during ignition process and staying constant in rest of the combustion cycle. Fire to fire peaks of current amplitudes fluctuated up to 10% of the peak values at constant speed but increased almost linearly with increase in speed. Technical barriers of laser ignition related to threshold minimum ignition energy, inter-pulse durations and firing sequence are discussed. Present findings provide a basic initiative and background information for designing suitable timeline algorithms for laser ignited leaner direct injected CNG engines.

  13. A trial of ignition innovation of gasoline engine by nanosecond pulsed low temperature plasma ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Taisuke; Urushihara, Tomonori; Gundersen, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Application of nanosecond pulsed low temperature plasma as an ignition technique for automotive gasoline engines, which require a discharge under conditions of high back pressure, has been studied experimentally using a single-cylinder engine. The nanosecond pulsed plasma refers to the transient (non-equilibrated) phase of a plasma before the formation of an arc discharge; it was obtained by applying a high voltage with a nanosecond pulse (FWHM of approximately 80 or 25 ns) between coaxial cylindrical electrodes. It was confirmed that nanosecond pulsed plasma can form a volumetric multi-channel streamer discharge at an energy consumption of 60 mJ cycle-1 under a high back pressure of 1400 kPa. It was found that the initial combustion period was shortened compared with the conventional spark ignition. The initial flame visualization suggested that the nanosecond pulsed plasma ignition results in the formation of a spatially dispersed initial flame kernel at a position of high electric field strength around the central electrode. It was observed that the electric field strength in the air gap between the coaxial cylindrical electrodes was increased further by applying a shorter pulse. It was also clarified that the shorter pulse improved ignitability even further.

  14. Active Tuning of Spontaneous Emission by Mie-Resonant Dielectric Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Justus; Bucher, Tobias; Chong, Katie E; Komar, Andrei; Choi, Duk-Yong; Neshev, Dragomir N; Kivshar, Yuri S; Pertsch, Thomas; Staude, Isabelle

    2018-06-13

    Mie-resonant dielectric metasurfaces offer comprehensive opportunities for the manipulation of light fields with high efficiency. Additionally, various strategies for the dynamic tuning of the optical response of such metasurfaces were demonstrated, making them important candidates for reconfigurable optical devices. However, dynamic control of the light-emission properties of active Mie-resonant dielectric metasurfaces by an external control parameter has not been demonstrated so far. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the dynamic tuning of spontaneous emission from a Mie-resonant dielectric metasurface that is situated on a fluorescent substrate and embedded into a liquid crystal cell. By switching the liquid crystal from the nematic state to the isotropic state via control of the cell temperature, we induce a shift of the spectral position of the metasurface resonances. This results in a change of the local photonic density of states, which, in turn, governs the enhancement of spontaneous emission from the substrate. Specifically, we observe spectral tuning of both the electric and magnetic dipole resonances, resulting in a 2-fold increase of the emission intensity at λ ≈ 900 nm. Our results demonstrate a viable strategy to realize flat tunable light sources based on dielectric metasurfaces.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Inertial confinement fusion: The quest for ignition and energy gain using indirect drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, C.

    1999-06-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is an alternative way to control fusion which is based on scaling down a thermonuclear explosion to a small size, applicable for power production, a kind of thermonuclear internal combustion engine. This book extends many interesting topics concerning the research and development on ICF of the last 25 years. It provides a systematic development of the physics basis and also various experimental data on radiation driven implosion. This is a landmark treatise presented at the right time. It is based on the article ``Development of the indirect-drive approach to inertial confinement fusion and the target physics basis for ignition and gain'' by J.D. Lindl, published in Physics of Plasmas, Vol. 2, November 1995, pp. 3933-4024. As is well known, in the United States of America research on the target physics basis for indirect drive remained largely classified until 1994. The indirect drive approaches were closely related to nuclear weapons research at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories. In Japan and other countries, inertial confinement fusion research for civil energy has been successfully performed to achieve DT fuel pellet compression up to 1000 times normal density, and indirect drive concepts, such as the `Cannon Ball' scheme, also prevailed at several international conferences. In these circumstances the international fusion community proposed the Madrid Manifesto in 1988, which urged openness of ICF information to promote international collaboration on civil energy research for the future resources of the human race. This proposal was also supported by some of the US scientists. The United States Department of Energy revised its classification guidelines for ICF six years after the Madrid Manifesto. This first book from the USA treating target physics issues, covering topics from implosion dynamics to hydrodynamic stability, ignition physics, high-gain target design and the scope for energy applications is

  16. Ignition criterion for heterogeneous energetic materials based on hotspot size-temperature threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, A.; Kim, S.; Horie, Y.; Zhou, M.

    2013-02-01

    A criterion for the ignition of granular explosives (GXs) and polymer-bonded explosives (PBXs) under shock and non-shock loading is developed. The formulation is based on integration of a quantification of the distributions of the sizes and locations of hotspots in loading events using a cohesive finite element method (CFEM) developed recently and the characterization by Tarver et al. [C. M. Tarver et al., "Critical conditions for impact- and shock-induced hot spots in solid explosives," J. Phys. Chem. 100, 5794-5799 (1996)] of the critical size-temperature threshold of hotspots required for chemical ignition of solid explosives. The criterion, along with the CFEM capability to quantify the thermal-mechanical behavior of GXs and PBXs, allows the critical impact velocity for ignition, time to ignition, and critical input energy at ignition to be determined as functions of material composition, microstructure, and loading conditions. The applicability of the relation between the critical input energy (E) and impact velocity of James [H. R. James, "An extension to the critical energy criterion used to predict shock initiation thresholds," Propellants, Explos., Pyrotech. 21, 8-13 (1996)] for shock loading is examined, leading to a modified interpretation, which is sensitive to microstructure and loading condition. As an application, numerical studies are undertaken to evaluate the ignition threshold of granular high melting point eXplosive, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,2,3,5-tetrazocine (HMX) and HMX/Estane PBX under loading with impact velocities up to 350 ms-1 and strain rates up to 105 s-1. Results show that, for the GX, the time to criticality (tc) is strongly influenced by initial porosity, but is insensitive to grain size. Analyses also lead to a quantification of the differences between the responses of the GXs and PBXs in terms of critical impact velocity for ignition, time to ignition, and critical input energy at ignition. Since the framework permits

  17. Thermal Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Philipp Andreas

    Accidental ignition of flammable gases is a critical safety concern in many industrial applications. Particularly in the aviation industry, the main areas of concern on an aircraft are the fuel tank and adjoining regions, where spilled fuel has a high likelihood of creating a flammable mixture. To this end, a fundamental understanding of the ignition phenomenon is necessary in order to develop more accurate test methods and standards as a means of designing safer air vehicles. The focus of this work is thermal ignition, particularly auto-ignition with emphasis on the effect of heating rate, hot surface ignition and flame propagation, and puffing flames. Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels is traditionally separated into slow reaction, cool flame, and ignition regimes based on pressure and temperature. Standard tests, such as the ASTM E659, are used to determine the lowest temperature required to ignite a specific fuel mixed with air at atmospheric pressure. It is expected that the initial pressure and the rate at which the mixture is heated also influences the limiting temperature and the type of combustion. This study investigates the effect of heating rate, between 4 and 15 K/min, and initial pressure, in the range of 25 to 100 kPa, on ignition of n-hexane air mixtures. Mixtures with equivalence ratio ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 were investigated. The problem is also modeled computationally using an extension of Semenov's classical auto-ignition theory with a detailed chemical mechanism. Experiments and simulations both show that in the same reactor either a slow reaction or an ignition event can take place depending on the heating rate. Analysis of the detailed chemistry demonstrates that a mixture which approaches the ignition region slowly undergoes a significant modification of its composition. This change in composition induces a progressive shift of the explosion limit until the mixture is no longer flammable. A mixture that approaches the ignition region

  18. Gold nanoparticle-polydimethylsiloxane films reflect light internally by optical diffraction and Mie scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R.; Forcherio, Gregory T.; Roper, D. Keith

    2015-08-01

    Optical properties of polymer films embedded with plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are important in many implementations. In this work, optical extinction by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films containing gold (Au) NPs was enhanced at resonance compared to AuNPs in suspensions, Beer-Lambert law, or Mie theory by internal reflection due to optical diffraction in 16 nm AuNP-PDMS films and Mie scattering in 76 nm AuNP-PDMS films. Resonant extinction per AuNP for 16 nm AuNPs with negligible resonant Mie scattering was enhanced up to 1.5-fold at interparticle separation (i.e., Wigner-Seitz radii) comparable to incident wavelength. It was attributable to diffraction through apertures formed by overlapping electric fields of adjacent, resonantly excited AuNPs at Wigner-Seitz radii equal to or less than incident wavelengths. Resonant extinction per AuNP for strongly Mie scattering 76 nm AuNPs was enhanced up to 1.3-fold at Wigner-Seitz radii four or more times greater than incident wavelength. Enhanced light trapping from diffraction and/or scattering is relevant to optoelectronic, biomedical, and catalytic activity of substrates embedded with NPs.

  19. The second virial coefficient of bounded Mie potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.; Pereira de Vasconcelos, T.

    2017-12-01

    The second virial coefficient (SVC) of bounded generalizations of the Mie m:n potential ϕ (r ) =λ [1 /(aq+rq ) m /q-1 /(aq+rq ) n /q ] , where λ, a, q, m, and n are constants (a ≥ 0), is explored. The particle separation distance is r. This potential could be used as an effective interaction between polymeric dispersed colloidal particles of various degrees of interpenetrability. The SVC is negative for all temperatures for a, greater than a critical value, ac, which coincides with the range of a, where the system is thermodynamically unstable. The Boyle temperature and the temperature at which the SVC is a maximum diverge to +∞ as a → ac from below. Various series expansion expressions for the SVC are derived following on from those derived for the Mie potential itself (i.e., a = 0) in the study of Heyes et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 084505 (2016)]. Formulas based on an expansion of the exponential in the Mayer function definition of the SVC are formally convergent, but pose numerical problems for the useful range of a < 1. High temperature expansion (HTE) formulas extending those in the previous publication are derived, which in contrast converge rapidly for the full a range. The HTE formulas derived in this work could be useful in guiding the choice of nucleation and growth experimental conditions for dispersed soft polymeric particles. Inter alia, the SVC of the inverse power special case of the Bounded Mie potential, i .e ., ϕ (r ) =1 /(aq+rq ) m /q, are also derived.

  20. Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.; Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Lee, J. J.; Döppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-11-01

    In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostic-a multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20-500 keV range-has been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ˜300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U Kβ). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (˜90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

  1. Photothermally Activated Motion and Ignition Using Aluminum Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-17

    In comparison with alternative sources such as spark ignition,19 laser igni- tion,20 plasma ignition,21 plasma -assisted combustion,22 and combustion...energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements of motion-only and afterignition products confirm significant Al oxidation occurs through sintering ...significant Al oxidation occurs through sintering and bursting after the flash exposure. Simulations suggest local heat generation is enhanced by LSPR. The

  2. Experimental Investigation of Augmented Spark Ignition of a LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of nontoxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost-effective mission scenarios. One promising green alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane (LCH4) with liquid oxygen (LO2). A 100 lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development project and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center Altitude Combustion Stand in a low pressure environment. High ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination; so this ignition margin test program examined ignition performance versus delivered spark energy. Sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also explored. Three different exciter units were used with the engine s augmented (torch) igniter. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks. This suggests that rising pressure and flow rate increase spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter s ability to complete each spark. The reduced spark energies of such quenched deliveries resulted in more erratic ignitions, decreasing ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1 to 6 mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55 to 75 mJ were required for reliable ignition. Delayed spark application and reduced spark repetition rate both correlated with late and occasional failed ignitions. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition therefore coincides with propellant introduction to the igniter.

  3. Cyclic variations of fuel-droplet distribution during the early intake stroke of a lean-burn stratified-charge spark-ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleiferis, P. G.; Hardalupas, Y.; Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Ishii, K.; Urata, Y.

    2005-11-01

    Lean-burn spark-ignition engines exhibit higher efficiency and lower specific emissions in comparison with stoichiometrically charged engines. However, as the air-to-fuel (A/F) ratio of the mixture is made leaner than stoichiometric, cycle-by-cycle variations in the early stages of in-cylinder combustion, and subsequent indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP), become more pronounced and limit the range of lean-burn operation. Viable lean-burn engines promote charge stratification, the mixture near the spark plug being richer than the cylinder volume averaged value. Recent work has shown that cycle-by-cycle variations in the early stages of combustion in a stratified-charge engine can be associated with variations in both the local value of A/F ratio near the spark plug around ignition timing, as well as in the volume averaged value of the A/F ratio. The objective of the current work was to identify possible sources of such variability in A/F ratio by studying the in-cylinder field of fuel-droplet distribution during the early intake stroke. This field was visualised in an optical single-cylinder 4-valve pentroof-type spark-ignition engine by means of laser-sheet illumination in planes parallel to the cylinder head gasket 6 and 10 mm below the spark plug. The engine was run with port-injected isooctane at 1500 rpm with 30% volumetric efficiency and air-to-fuel ratio corresponding to both stoichiometric firing (A/F=15, Φ =1.0) and mixture strength close to the lean limit of stable operation (A/F=22, Φ =0.68). Images of Mie intensity scattered by the cloud of fuel droplets were acquired on a cycle-by-cycle basis. These were studied in order to establish possible correlations between the cyclic variations in size, location and scattered-light intensity of the cloud of droplets with the respective variations in IMEP. Because of the low level of Mie intensity scattered by the droplets and because of problems related to elastic scattering on the walls of the combustion

  4. Omnidirectional and broadband absorption enhancement from trapezoidal Mie resonators in semiconductor metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pala, Ragip A.; Butun, Serkan; Aydin, Koray

    2016-09-19

    Light trapping in planar ultrathin-film solar cells is limited due to a small number of optical modes available in the thin-film slab. A nanostructured thin-film design could surpass this limit by providing broadband increase in the local density of states in a subwavelength volume and maintaining efficient coupling of light. Here we report a broadband metasurface design, enabling efficient and broadband absorption enhancement by direct coupling of incoming light to resonant modes of subwavelength scale Mie nanoresonators defined in the thin-film active layer. Absorption was investigated both theoretically and experimentally in prototypes consisting of lithographically patterned, two-dimensional periodic arrays ofmore » silicon nanoresonators on silica substrates. A crossed trapezoid resonator shape of rectangular cross section is used to excite broadband Mie resonances across visible and near-IR spectra. Our numerical simulations, optical absorption measurements and photocurrent spectral response measurements demonstrate that crossed trapezoidal Mie resonant structures enable angle-insensitive, broadband absorption. A short circuit current density of 12.0 mA/cm 2 is achieved in 210 nm thick patterned Si films, yielding a 4-fold increase compared to planar films of the same thickness. As a result, it is suggested that silicon metasurfaces with Mie resonator arrays can provide useful insights to guide future ultrathin-film solar cell designs incorporating nanostructured thin active layers.« less

  5. Localized Plasmon resonance in metal nanoparticles using Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque, J. S.; Blandón, J. S.; Riascos, H.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, scattering light by colloidal metal nanoparticles with spherical shape was studied. Optical properties such as diffusion efficiencies of extinction and absorption Q ext and Q abs were calculated using Mie theory. We employed a MATLAB program to calculate the Mie efficiencies and the radial dependence of electric field intensities emitted for colloidal metal nanoparticles (MNPs). By UV-Vis spectroscopy we have determined the LSPR for Cu nanoparticles (CuNPs), Ni nanoparticles (NiNPs) and Co nanoparticles (CoNPs) grown by laser ablation technique. The peaks of resonances appear in 590nm, 384nm and 350nm for CuNPs, NiNPs and CoNPs respectively suspended in water. Changing the medium to acetone and ethanol we observed a shift of the resonance peaks, these values agreed with our simulations results.

  6. A Statistical Representation of Pyrotechnic Igniter Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuyue; Cooper, Marcia

    2017-06-01

    The output of simplified pyrotechnic igniters for research investigations is statistically characterized by monitoring the post-ignition external flow field with Schlieren imaging. Unique to this work is a detailed quantification of all measurable manufacturing parameters (e.g., bridgewire length, charge cavity dimensions, powder bed density) and associated shock-motion variability in the tested igniters. To demonstrate experimental precision of the recorded Schlieren images and developed image processing methodologies, commercial exploding bridgewires using wires of different parameters were tested. Finally, a statistically-significant population of manufactured igniters were tested within the Schlieren arrangement resulting in a characterization of the nominal output. Comparisons between the variances measured throughout the manufacturing processes and the calculated output variance provide insight into the critical device phenomena that dominate performance. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Dark Matter Ignition of Type Ia Supernovae.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-10-02

    Recent studies of low redshift type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) indicate that half explode from less than Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs, implying ignition must proceed from something besides the canonical criticality of Chandrasekhar mass SN Ia progenitors. We show that 1-100 PeV mass asymmetric dark matter, with imminently detectable nucleon scattering interactions, can accumulate to the point of self-gravitation in a white dwarf and collapse, shedding gravitational potential energy by scattering off nuclei, thereby heating the white dwarf and igniting the flame front that precedes SN Ia. We combine data on SN Ia masses with data on the ages of SN Ia-adjacent stars. This combination reveals a 2.8σ inverse correlation between SN Ia masses and ignition ages, which could result from increased capture of dark matter in 1.4 vs 1.1 solar mass white dwarfs. Future studies of SN Ia in galactic centers will provide additional tests of dark-matter-induced type Ia ignition. Remarkably, both bosonic and fermionic SN Ia-igniting dark matter also resolve the missing pulsar problem by forming black holes in ≳10  Myr old pulsars at the center of the Milky Way.

  8. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  9. Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Myatt, J. F.; Epstein, R.; Seka, W.; Hohenberger, M.; Short, R. W.; Shaw, J. G.; Regan, S. P.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-plasma interaction instabilities, such as two-plasmon decay (TPD) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), can be detrimental for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion because of target preheat by generated high-energy electrons. The radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO has been used to design planar-target experiments that generate plasma and interaction conditions relevant to direct-drive-ignition designs (IL 1015 W / cm 2 , Te > 3 KeV density gradient scale lengths of Ln 600 μm) . The hot-electron temperature of 40to50keV and the fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons of 0.5to were inferred based on comparing the simulated and experimentally observed x-ray emission when the laser intensity at the quarter-critical surface increased from 6 to 15 ×1014 W / cm 2 . The measured SRS energy was sufficient to explain the observed total energy in hot electrons. Implications for ignition-scale direct-drive experiments and hot-electron preheat mitigation using mid- Z ablators will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.; Mruzek, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

  11. Cavity Ignition in Supersonic Flow by Spark Discharge and Pulse Detonation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-18

    the super- sonic flow at takeover flight speeds (Mach num- bers ɝ) prohibit auto - ignition . Therefore energy addition techniques typically need to be...locate/proci of the Combustion InstituteCavity ignition in supersonic flow by spark discharge and pulse detonation Timothy M. Ombrello a,⇑, Campbell D...45430, USA c Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., Dayton, OH 45459, USA Available online 18 August 2014Abstract Ignition of an ethylene fueled cavity

  12. Microgravity ignition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motevalli, Vahid; Elliott, William; Garrant, Keith; Marcotte, Ryan

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a flight-ready apparatus of the microgravity ignition experiment for the GASCAN 2 program. The microgravity ignition experiment is designed to study how a microgravity environment affects the time to ignition of a sample of alpha-cellulose paper. A microgravity environment will result in a decrease in the heat transferred from the sample due to a lack of convection currents, which would decrease time to ignition. A lack of convection current would also cause the oxygen supply at the sample not to be renewed, which could delay or even prevent ignition. When this experiment is conducted aboard GASCAN 2, the dominant result of the lack of ignition will be determined. The experiment consists of four canisters containing four thermocouples and a sensor to detect ignition of the paper sample. This year the interior of the canister was redesigned and a mathematical model of the heat transfer around the sample was developed. This heat transfer model predicts an ignition time of approximately 5.5 seconds if the decrease of heat loss from the sample is the dominant factor of the lack of convection currents.

  13. Optical nanoscopy with contact Mie-particles: Resolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, Alexey V.; Astratov, Vasily N.

    2017-06-01

    The theoretical limits of resolution available in microspherical nanoscopy are explored using incoherent point emitters in the air. The images are calculated using a two-dimensional model and solving the Maxwell equations which account for the wave effects on the sub-wavelength scale of the emitter-microsphere interaction. Based on our results, we propose to use small dielectric particles with diameters λ ≲ D ≲ 2 λ made of a high-refractive-index material n ˜2 for imaging sub-wavelength objects. It is shown that such particles form virtual images below and real images above them. At wavelengths of the Mie resonances, these images have slightly better than ˜λ/4 resolution that can be attributed to the image magnification in close proximity to the object and contributions of its near field. The resonant super-resolution imaging of various point-like objects, such as dye molecules, fluorophores, or nanoplasmonic particles, can be realized by using narrow bandpass optical filters spectrally aligned with the Mie resonances.

  14. Hydrogen and Ethene Plasma Assisted Ignition by NS discharge at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2015-09-01

    The kinetics of ignition in lean H2:O2:Ar and C2H4:O2:Ar mixtures has been studied experimentally and numerically after a high-voltage nanosecond discharge. The ignition delay time behind a reflected shock wave was measured with and without the discharge. It was shown that the initiation of the discharge with a specific deposited energy of 10 - 30 mJ/cm3 leads to an order of magnitude decrease in the ignition delay time. Discharge processes and following chain chemical reactions with energy release were simulated. The generation of atoms, radicals and excited and charged particles was numerically simulated using the measured time - resolved discharge current and electric field in the discharge phase. The calculated densities of the active particles were used as input data to simulate plasma-assisted ignition. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated ignition delay times and the experimental data. It follows from the analysis of the calculated results that the main mechanism of the effect of gas discharge on the ignition of hydrocarbons is the electron impact dissociation of O2 molecules in the discharge phase. Detailed kinetic mechanism for plasma assisted ignition of hydrogen and ethene is elaborated and verified.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Plasma assisted ignition and combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2006-08-01

    In recent decades particular interest in applications of nonequilibrium plasma for the problems of plasma-assisted ignition and plasma-assisted combustion has been observed. A great amount of experimental data has been accumulated during this period which provided the grounds for using low temperature plasma of nonequilibrium gas discharges for a number of applications at conditions of high speed flows and also at conditions similar to automotive engines. The paper is aimed at reviewing the data obtained and discusses their treatment. Basic possibilities of low temperature plasma to ignite gas mixtures are evaluated and historical references highlighting pioneering works in the area are presented. The first part of the review discusses plasmas applied to plasma-assisted ignition and combustion. The paper pays special attention to experimental and theoretical analysis of some plasma parameters, such as reduced electric field, electron density and energy branching for different gas discharges. Streamers, pulsed nanosecond discharges, dielectric barrier discharges, radio frequency discharges and atmospheric pressure glow discharges are considered. The second part depicts applications of discharges to reduce the ignition delay time of combustible mixtures, to ignite transonic and supersonic flows, to intensify ignition and to sustain combustion of lean mixtures. The results obtained by different authors are cited, and ways of numerical modelling are discussed. Finally, the paper draws some conclusions on the main achievements and prospects of future investigations in the field.

  16. Observation of cooperative Mie scattering from an ultracold atomic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, H.; Stehle, C.; Slama, S.

    Scattering of light at a distribution of scatterers is an intrinsically cooperative process, which means that the scattering rate and the angular distribution of the scattered light are essentially governed by bulk properties of the distribution, such as its size, shape, and density, although local disorder and density fluctuations may have an important impact on the cooperativity. Via measurements of the radiation pressure force exerted by a far-detuned laser beam on a very small and dense cloud of ultracold atoms, we are able to identify the respective roles of superradiant acceleration of the scattering rate and of Mie scattering inmore » the cooperative process. They lead, respectively, to a suppression or an enhancement of the radiation pressure force. We observe a maximum in the radiation pressure force as a function of the phase shift induced in the incident laser beam by the cloud's refractive index. The maximum marks the borderline of the validity of the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation from a regime, where Mie scattering is more complex. Our observations thus help to clarify the intricate relationship between Rayleigh scattering of light at a coarse-grained ensemble of individual scatterers and Mie scattering at the bulk density distribution.« less

  17. Plasma Igniter for Reliable Ignition of Combustion in Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam; Eskridge, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A plasma igniter has been developed for initiating combustion in liquid-propellant rocket engines. The device propels a hot, dense plasma jet, consisting of elemental fluorine and fluorine compounds, into the combustion chamber to ignite the cold propellant mixture. The igniter consists of two coaxial, cylindrical electrodes with a cylindrical bar of solid Teflon plastic in the region between them. The outer electrode is a metal (stainless steel) tube; the inner electrode is a metal pin (mild steel, stainless steel, tungsten, or thoriated-tungsten). The Teflon bar fits snugly between the two electrodes and provides electrical insulation between them. The Teflon bar may have either a flat surface, or a concave, conical surface at the open, down-stream end of the igniter (the igniter face). The igniter would be mounted on the combustion chamber of the rocket engine, either on the injector-plate at the upstream side of the engine, or on the sidewalls of the chamber. It also might sit behind a valve that would be opened just prior to ignition, and closed just after, in order to prevent the Teflon from melting due to heating from the combustion chamber.

  18. Contactless electric igniter for vehicle to lower exhaust emission and fuel consumption.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Su, Jye-Chau

    2014-01-01

    An electric igniter for engine/hybrid vehicles is presented. The igniter comprises a flyback converter, a voltage-stacked capacitor, a PIC-based controller, a differential voltage detector, and an ignition coil, of which structure is non-contact type. Since the electric igniter adopts a capacitor to accumulate energy for engine ignition instead of traditional contacttype approach, it enhances the igniting performance of a spark plug effectively. As a result, combustion efficiency is promoted, fuel consumption is saved, and exhaust emission is reduced. The igniter not only is good for fuel efficiency but also can reduce HC and CO emission significantly, which therefore is an environmentally friendly product. The control core of the igniter is implemented on a single chip, which lowers discrete component count, reduces system volume, and increases reliability. In addition, the ignition timing can be programmed so that a timing regulator can be removed from the proposed system, simplifying its structure. To verify the feasibility and functionality of the igniter, key waveforms are measured and real-car experiments are performed as well.

  19. Contactless Electric Igniter for Vehicle to Lower Exhaust Emission and Fuel Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jye-Chau

    2014-01-01

    An electric igniter for engine/hybrid vehicles is presented. The igniter comprises a flyback converter, a voltage-stacked capacitor, a PIC-based controller, a differential voltage detector, and an ignition coil, of which structure is non-contact type. Since the electric igniter adopts a capacitor to accumulate energy for engine ignition instead of traditional contacttype approach, it enhances the igniting performance of a spark plug effectively. As a result, combustion efficiency is promoted, fuel consumption is saved, and exhaust emission is reduced. The igniter not only is good for fuel efficiency but also can reduce HC and CO emission significantly, which therefore is an environmentally friendly product. The control core of the igniter is implemented on a single chip, which lowers discrete component count, reduces system volume, and increases reliability. In addition, the ignition timing can be programmed so that a timing regulator can be removed from the proposed system, simplifying its structure. To verify the feasibility and functionality of the igniter, key waveforms are measured and real-car experiments are performed as well. PMID:24672372

  20. A High-efficiency, Small, Solid-state Laser for Pyrotechnic Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.; Menichelli, V. J.

    1973-01-01

    A completely self-contained, small, neodymium laser has been designed and demonstrated for use in a pyrotechnic ignition system. A nominal 16 J of laser energy (1.06 micron wavelength, 1-ms duration) was achieved in a rectangular 10.5-X 15.1-X 25.4-cm package weighting 5.14 kg. This high energy-to-weight ratio is encouraging for laser applications in which specific energy efficiency (energy per unit weight or volume) is important. The laser design concepts are described, and some results on pyrotechnic ignition are given. Some details on a laser currently under construction, which will be 1/8 the size of the above laser, are included.

  1. Ignition and combustion of bulk metals in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, Melvyn C.; Daily, J. W.; Abbud-Madrid, Angel

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge of the oxidation, ignition, and combustion of bulk metals is important for fire safety in the production, management, and utilization of liquid and gaseous oxygen for ground based and space applications. This report summarizes research under NASA support to investigate the ignition and combustion characteristics of bulk metals under varying gravity conditions. Metal ignition and combustion have not been studied previously under these conditions and the results are important not only for improved fire safety but also to increase knowledge of basic ignition and combustion mechanisms. The studies completed to date have led to the development of a clean and reproducible ignition source and diagnostic techniques for combustion measurements and have provided normal gravity combustion data on ten different pure metals. Metal specimens were ignited using a xenon short-arc lamp and measurements were made of the radiant energy flux, surface temperature history, spectroscopy of surface and gas products, and surface morphology and chemistry. Elevated gravity was provided by the University of Colorado Geotechnical Centrifuge.

  2. Polar-Drive Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.

    2014-10-01

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-drive (PD) concept has been proposed. It requires direct-drive-specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments testing the performance of ignition-relevant PD implosions at the NIF have been performed. The goal of these early experiments was to develop a stable, warm implosion platform to investigate laser deposition and laser-plasma instabilities at ignition-relevant plasma conditions, and to develop and validate ignition-relevant models of laser deposition and heat conduction. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Warm, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~ 350 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 60 to 180 TW and peak on-target intensities from 4 ×1014 to 1 . 2 ×1015 W/cm2. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including the level of hot-electron preheat, and implosion symmetry and shell trajectory inferred via self-emission imaging and backlighting. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray trace to model oblique beams, and a model for cross-beam energy transfer (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Low fuel convergence path to ignition on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, M. J.; Molvig, Kim; Gianakon, T. A.; Woods, C. N.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Schmidt, D. W.; Dodd, E. S.; Zylstra, Alex; Scheiner, B.; McKenty, P.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D.; Betti, R.; Michel, T.

    2017-10-01

    A novel concept for achieving ignition on the NIF is proposed that obviates current issues plaguing single-shell high-convergence capsules. A large directly-driven Be shell is designed to robustly implode two nested internal shells by efficiently converting 1.7MJ of laser energy from a 6 ns, low intensity laser pulse, into a 1 ns dynamic pressure pulse to ignite and burn a central liquid DT core after a fuel convergence of only 9. The short, low intensity laser pulse mitigates LPI allowing more uniform laser drive of the target and eliminates hot e-, preheat and laser zooming issues. Preliminary rad-hydro simulations predict ignition initiation with 90% maximum inner shell velocity, before deceleration Rayleigh-Taylor growth can cause significant pusher shell mix into the compressed DT fuel. The gold inner pusher shell reduces pre-ignition radiation losses from the fuel allowing ignition to occur at 2.5keV. Further 2D simulations show that the short pulse design results in a spatially uniform kinetic drive that is tolerant to variations in laser cone power. A multi-pronged effort, in collaboration with LLE, is progressing to optimize this design for NIF's PDD laser configuration. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract DE-FG02-051ER54810.

  4. Thermoplasmonic Ignition of Metal Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Mehmet; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Raza, Søren; Schoen, David; Zheng, Xiaolin; Kik, Pieter G; Brongersma, Mark L

    2018-03-14

    Explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics are energetic materials that can store and quickly release tremendous amounts of chemical energy. Aluminum (Al) is a particularly important fuel in many applications because of its high energy density, which can be released in a highly exothermic oxidation process. The diffusive oxidation mechanism (DOM) and melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM) explain the ways powders of Al nanoparticles (NPs) can burn, but little is known about the possible use of plasmonic resonances in NPs to manipulate photoignition. This is complicated by the inhomogeneous nature of powders and very fast heating and burning rates. Here, we generate Al NPs with well-defined sizes, shapes, and spacings by electron beam lithography and demonstrate that their plasmonic resonances can be exploited to heat and ignite them with a laser. By combining simulations with thermal-emission, electron-, and optical-microscopy studies, we reveal how an improved control over NP ignition can be attained.

  5. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  6. Study on coal char ignition by radiant heat flux.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkikh, A. G.; Slyusarskiy, K. V.

    2017-11-01

    The study on coal char ignition by CO2-continuous laser was carried out. The coal char samples of T-grade bituminous coal and 2B-grade lignite were studied via CO2-laser ignition setup. Ignition delay times were determined at ambient condition in heat flux density range 90-200 W/cm2. The average ignition delay time value for lignite samples were 2 times lower while this difference is larger in high heat flux region and lower in low heat flux region. The kinetic constants for overall oxidation reaction were determined using analytic solution of simplified one-dimensional heat transfer equation with radiant heat transfer boundary condition. The activation energy for lignite char was found to be less than it is for bituminous coal char by approximately 20 %.

  7. Laser-assisted ignition and combustion characteristics of consolidated aluminum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saceleanu, Florin; Wen, John Z.; Idir, Mahmoud; Chaumeix, Nabiha

    2016-11-01

    Aluminum (Al) nanoparticles have drawn much attention due to their high energy density and tunable ignition properties. In comparison with their micronscale counterpart, Al nanoparticles possess large specific surface area and low apparent activation energy of combustion, which reduce ignition delay significantly. In this paper, ignition and subsequently burning of consolidated Al nanoparticle pellets are performed via a continuous wave (CW) argon laser in a closed spherical chamber filled with oxygen. Pellets are fabricated using two types of nanoparticle sizes of 40-60 and 60-80 nm, respectively. A photodiode is used to measure the ignition delay, while a digital camera captures the location of the flame front. It is found that for the 40-60-nm nanoparticle pellets, ignition delay reduces with increasing the oxygen pressure or using the higher laser power. Analysis of the flame propagation rate suggests that oxygen diffusion is an important mechanism during burning of these porous nanoparticle pellets. The combustion characteristics of the Al pellets are compared to a simplified model of the diffusion-controlled oxidation mechanism. While experimental measurements of pellets of 40-60 nm Al particles agree with the computed diffusion-limiting mechanism, a shifted behavior is observed from the pellets of 60-80 nm Al particles, largely due to the inhomogeneity of their porous structures.

  8. Broadband optical absorption by tunable Mie resonances in silicon nanocone arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Z. Y.; Zhang, R. J.; Wang, S. Y.; ...

    2015-01-15

    Nanostructure arrays such as nanowire, nanopillar, and nanocone arrays have been proposed to be promising antireflection structures for photovoltaic applications due to their great light trapping ability. In this paper, the optical properties of Si nanopillar and nanocone arrays in visible and infrared region were studied by both theoretical calculations and experiments. The results show that the Mie resonance can be continuously tuned across a wide range of wavelength by varying the diameter of the nanopillars. However, Si nanopillar array with uniform diameter exhibits only discrete resonance mode, thus can't achieve a high broadband absorption. On the other hand, themore » Mie resonance wavelength in a Si nanocone array can vary continuously as the diameters of the cross sections increase from the apex to the base. Therefore Si nanocone arrays can strongly interact with the incident light in the broadband spectrum and the absorbance by Si nanocone arrays is higher than 95% over the wavelength from 300 to 2000 nm. In addition to the Mie resonance, the broadband optical absorption of Si nanocone arrays is also affected by Wood-Rayleigh anomaly effect and metal impurities introduced in the fabrication process.« less

  9. Broadband optical absorption by tunable Mie resonances in silicon nanocone arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. Y.; Zhang, R. J.; Wang, S. Y.; Lu, M.; Chen, X.; Zheng, Y. X.; Chen, L. Y.; Ye, Z.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructure arrays such as nanowire, nanopillar, and nanocone arrays have been proposed to be promising antireflection structures for photovoltaic applications due to their great light trapping ability. In this paper, the optical properties of Si nanopillar and nanocone arrays in visible and infrared region were studied by both theoretical calculations and experiments. The results show that the Mie resonance can be continuously tuned across a wide range of wavelength by varying the diameter of the nanopillars. However, Si nanopillar array with uniform diameter exhibits only discrete resonance mode, thus can't achieve a high broadband absorption. On the other hand, the Mie resonance wavelength in a Si nanocone array can vary continuously as the diameters of the cross sections increase from the apex to the base. Therefore Si nanocone arrays can strongly interact with the incident light in the broadband spectrum and the absorbance by Si nanocone arrays is higher than 95% over the wavelength from 300 to 2000 nm. In addition to the Mie resonance, the broadband optical absorption of Si nanocone arrays is also affected by Wood-Rayleigh anomaly effect and metal impurities introduced in the fabrication process. PMID:25589290

  10. Tunable multiband directional electromagnetic scattering from spoof Mie resonant structure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong-Wei; Chen, Hua-Jun; Xu, Hua-Feng; Fan, Ren-Hao; Li, Yang

    2018-06-11

    We demonstrate that directional electromagnetic scattering can be realized in an artificial Mie resonant structure that supports electric and magnetic dipole modes simultaneously. The directivity of the far-field radiation pattern can be switched by changing wavelength of the incident light as well as tailoring the geometric parameters of the structure. In addition, we further design a quasiperiodic spoof Mie resonant structure by alternately inserting two materials into the slits. The results show that multi-band directional light scattering is realized by exciting multiple electric and magnetic dipole modes with different frequencies in the quasiperiodic structure. The presented design concept is suitable for microwave to terahertz region and can be applied to various advanced optical devices, such as antenna, metamaterial and metasurface.

  11. Thermodynamics of high temperature, Mie-Gruneisen solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, Don S.; Lund, Carl M.

    1999-12-01

    We construct a set of equations of state for condensed matter at temperatures well above the Debye temperature. These equations incorporate the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state and generic properties of high temperature solids. They are simple enough to provide an alternative to the ideal gas and the van der Waals equations of state for illustrating thermodynamic concepts. (c) 1999 American Association of Physics Teachers.

  12. Ignition of a Deuterium Micro-Detonation with a Gigavolt Super Marx Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2009-09-01

    The Centurion-Halite experiment demonstrated the feasibility of igniting a deuterium-tritium micro-explosion with an energy of not more than a few megajoule, and the Mike test, the feasibility of a pure deuterium explosion with an energy of more than 106 MJ. In both cases the ignition energy was supplied by a fission bomb explosive. While an energy of a few megajoule, to be released in the time required of less than 10-9 s, can be supplied by lasers and intense particle beams, this is not enough to ignite a pure deuterium explosion. Because the deuterium-tritium reaction depends on the availability of lithium, the non-fission ignition of a pure deuterium fusion reaction would be highly desirable. It is shown that this goal can conceivably be reached with a "Super Marx Generator", where a large number of "ordinary" Marx generators charge (magnetically insulated) fast high voltage capacitors of a second stage Marx generator, called a "Super Marx Generator", ultimately reaching gigavolt potentials with an energy output in excess of 100 MJ. An intense 107 Ampere-GeV proton beam drawn from a "Super Marx Generator" can ignite a deuterium thermonuclear detonation wave in a compressed deuterium cylinder, where the strong magnetic field of the proton beam entraps the charged fusion reaction products inside the cylinder. In solving the stand-off problem, the stiffness of a GeV proton beam permits to place the deuterium target at a comparatively large distance from the wall of a cavity confining the deuterium micro-explosion.

  13. Laser ignition of a multi-injector LOX/methane combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Michael; Manfletti, Chiara; Hardi, Justin; Suslov, Dmitry; Kroupa, Gerhard; Oschwald, Michael

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports the results of a test campaign of a laser-ignited combustion chamber with 15 shear coaxial injectors for the propellant combination LOX/methane. 259 ignition tests were performed for sea-level conditions. The igniter based on a monolithic ceramic laser system was directly attached to the combustion chamber and delivered 20 pulses with individual pulse energies of {33.2 ± 0.8 mJ } at 1064 nm wavelength and 2.3 ns FWHM pulse length. The applicability, reliability, and reusability of this ignition technology are demonstrated and the associated challenges during the start-up process induced by the oxygen two-phase flow are formulated. The ignition quality and pressure dynamics are evaluated using 14 dynamic pressure sensors distributed both azimuthally and axially along the combustion chamber wall. The influence of test sequencing on the ignition process is briefly discussed and the relevance of the injection timing of the propellants for the ignition process is described. The flame anchoring and stabilization process, as monitored using an optical probe system close to the injector faceplate connected to photomultiplier elements, is presented. For some of the ignition tests, non-uniform anchoring was detected with no influence onto the anchoring at steady-state conditions. The non-uniform anchoring can be explained by the inhomogeneous, transient injection of the two-phase flow of oxygen across the faceplate. This characteristic is verified by liquid nitrogen cold flow tests that were recorded by high-speed imaging. We conclude that by adapting the ignition sequence, laser ignition by optical breakdown of the propellants within the shear layer of a coaxial shear injector is a reliable ignition technology for LOX/methane combustors without significant over-pressure levels.

  14. Laser ignition of a multi-injector LOX/methane combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Michael; Manfletti, Chiara; Hardi, Justin; Suslov, Dmitry; Kroupa, Gerhard; Oschwald, Michael

    2018-02-01

    This paper reports the results of a test campaign of a laser-ignited combustion chamber with 15 shear coaxial injectors for the propellant combination LOX/methane. 259 ignition tests were performed for sea-level conditions. The igniter based on a monolithic ceramic laser system was directly attached to the combustion chamber and delivered 20 pulses with individual pulse energies of {33.2 ± 0.8 mJ } at 1064 nm wavelength and 2.3 ns FWHM pulse length. The applicability, reliability, and reusability of this ignition technology are demonstrated and the associated challenges during the start-up process induced by the oxygen two-phase flow are formulated. The ignition quality and pressure dynamics are evaluated using 14 dynamic pressure sensors distributed both azimuthally and axially along the combustion chamber wall. The influence of test sequencing on the ignition process is briefly discussed and the relevance of the injection timing of the propellants for the ignition process is described. The flame anchoring and stabilization process, as monitored using an optical probe system close to the injector faceplate connected to photomultiplier elements, is presented. For some of the ignition tests, non-uniform anchoring was detected with no influence onto the anchoring at steady-state conditions. The non-uniform anchoring can be explained by the inhomogeneous, transient injection of the two-phase flow of oxygen across the faceplate. This characteristic is verified by liquid nitrogen cold flow tests that were recorded by high-speed imaging. We conclude that by adapting the ignition sequence, laser ignition by optical breakdown of the propellants within the shear layer of a coaxial shear injector is a reliable ignition technology for LOX/methane combustors without significant over-pressure levels.

  15. Demonstration of high-energy 2 omega (526.5 nm) operation on the National Ignition Facility Laser System.

    PubMed

    Heestand, G M; Haynam, C A; Wegner, P J; Bowers, M W; Dixit, S N; Erbert, G V; Henesian, M A; Hermann, M R; Jancaitis, K S; Knittel, K; Kohut, T; Lindl, J D; Manes, K R; Marshall, C D; Mehta, N C; Menapace, J; Moses, E; Murray, J R; Nostrand, M C; Orth, C D; Patterson, R; Sacks, R A; Saunders, R; Shaw, M J; Spaeth, M; Sutton, S B; Williams, W H; Widmayer, C C; White, R K; Whitman, P K; Yang, S T; Van Wonterghem, B M

    2008-07-01

    A single beamline of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been operated at a wavelength of 526.5 nm (2 omega) by frequency converting the fundamental 1053 nm (1 omega) wavelength with an 18.2 mm thick type-I potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) second-harmonic generator (SHG) crystal. Second-harmonic energies of up to 17.9 kJ were measured at the final optics focal plane with a conversion efficiency of 82%. For a similarly configured 192-beam NIF, this scales to a total 2 omega energy of 3.4 MJ full NIF equivalent (FNE).

  16. Direct electrical arc ignition of hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judson, Michael I., Jr.

    Hybrid rockets motors provide distinct safety advantages when compared to traditional liquid or solid propellant systems, due to the inherent stability and relative inertness of the propellants prior to established combustion. As a result of this inherent propellant stability, hybrid motors have historically proven difficult to ignite. State of the art hybrid igniter designs continue to require solid or liquid reactants distinct from the main propellants. These ignition methods however, reintroduce to the hybrid propulsion system the safety and complexity disadvantages associated with traditional liquid or solid propellants. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of a novel direct electrostatic arc ignition method for hybrid motors. A series of small prototype stand-alone thrusters demonstrating this technology were successfully designed and tested using Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic and Gaseous Oxygen (GOX) as propellants. Measurements of input voltage and current demonstrated that arc-ignition will occur using as little as 10 watts peak power and less than 5 joules total energy. The motor developed for the stand-alone small thruster was adapted as a gas generator to ignite a medium-scale hybrid rocket motor using nitrous oxide /and HTPB as propellants. Multiple consecutive ignitions were performed. A large data set as well as a collection of development `lessons learned' were compiled to guide future development and research. Since the completion of this original groundwork research, the concept has been developed into a reliable, operational igniter system for a 75mm hybrid motor using both gaseous oxygen and liquid nitrous oxide as oxidizers. A development map of the direct spark ignition concept is presented showing the flow of key lessons learned between this original work and later follow on development.

  17. Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P.

    2012-08-29

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF.more » NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.« less

  18. Mie Lidar for Aerosols and Clouds Monitoring at Otlica Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Stanič, S.; Bergant, K.; Filipčič, A.; Veberič, D.; Forte, B.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosol and cloud densities are the most important atmospheric parameters, which significantly influence the atmospheric conditions. The study of their spatial and temporal properties can provide detailed information about the transport processes of the air masses. In recent years, lidar techniques for remote sensing of the atmospheric parameters have been greatly improved. Like the lidar systems of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina (35.2S, 69.1W, 1400 m a.s.l.), the Mie lidar built at Otlica Observatory (45.93N, 13.91E, 945 m a.s.l.) in Slovenia employs the same hardware, including the transmitter, the receiver, and the DAQ system. Due to its high-power laser, large-diameter telescope, and photon-counting data-acquisition technique, the Mie lidar has the potential ability to measure the tropospheric and stratospheric atmospheric conditions, and is suitable for monitoring the changes of the cirrus clouds and atmospheric boundary layer. We have been performing routine atmospheric monitoring experiments with the Otlica Mie lidar since September 2008. Using the techniques of event-averaging, noise-elimination, and data-gluing, the far end of lidar probing range is extended from 30 km up to 40 km. The extinction profiles are calculated using the Klett method and the time-height-intensity plots were made. They clearly show the evolution of atmospheric conditions, especially the motion of the cirrus clouds above Otlica.

  19. Igniter adapter-to-igniter chamber deflection test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Testing was performed to determine the maximum RSRM igniter adapter-to-igniter chamber joint deflection at the crown of the inner joint primary seal. The deflection data was gathered to support igniter inner joint gasket resiliency predictions which led to launch commit criteria temperature determinations. The proximity (deflection) gage holes for the first test (Test No. 1) were incorrectly located; therefore, the test was declared a non-test. Prior to Test No. 2, test article configuration was modified with the correct proximity gage locations. Deflection data were successfully acquired during Test No. 2. However, the proximity gage deflection measurements were adversely affected by temperature increases. Deflections measured after the temperature rise at the proximity gages were considered unreliable. An analysis was performed to predict the maximum deflections based on the reliable data measured before the detectable temperature rise. Deflections to the primary seal crown location were adjusted to correspond to the time of maximum expected operating pressure (2,159 psi) to account for proximity gage bias, and to account for maximum attach and special bolt relaxation. The maximum joint deflection for the igniter inner joint at the crown of the primary seal, accounting for all significant correction factors, was 0.0031 in. (3.1 mil). Since the predicted (0.003 in.) and tested maximum deflection values were sufficiently close, the launch commit criteria was not changed as a result of this test. Data from this test should be used to determine if the igniter inner joint gasket seals are capable of maintaining sealing capability at a joint displacement of (1.4) x (0.0031 in.) = 0.00434 inches. Additional testing should be performed to increase the database on igniter deflections and address launch commit criteria temperatures.

  20. Assessing the prospects for achieving double-shell ignition on the National Ignition Facility using vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The goal of demonstrating ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has motivated a revisit of double-shell (DS) [1] targets as a complementary path to the baseline cryogenic single-shell approach [2]. Benefits of DS targets include room-temperature deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel preparation, minimal hohlraum-plasma-mediated laser backscatter, low threshold-ignition temperatures (4 keV) for relaxed hohlraum x-ray flux asymmetry tolerances [3], and loose shock timing requirements. On the other hand, DS ignition presents several challenges, including room-temperature containment of high-pressure DT (790 atm) in the inner shell; strict concentricity requirements on the two shells; development of nanoporous, low-density, metallic foams for structural support of the inner shell and hydrodynamic instability mitigation; and effective control of perturbation growth on the high-Atwood number interface between the DT fuel and the high-Z inner shell. Recent progress in DS ignition target designs using vacuum hohlraums is described, offering the potential for low levels of laser backscatter from stimulated Raman and Brillouin processes. In addition, vacuum hohlraums have the operational advantages of room temperature fielding and fabrication simplicity, as well as benefiting from extensive benchmarking on the Nova and Omega laser facilities. As an alternative to standard cylindrical hohlraums, a rugby-shaped geometry is also introduced that may provide energetics and symmetry tuning benefits for more robust DS designs with yields exceeding 10 MJ for 2 MJ of 3w laser energy. The recent progress in hohlraum designs and required advanced materials development are scheduled to culminate in a prototype demonstration of a NIF-scale ignition-ready DS in 2007. [1] P. Amendt et al., PoP 9, 2221 (2002). [2] J.D. Lindl et al., PoP 11, 339 (2004). [3] M.N. Chizhkov et al., Laser Part. Beams 23, 261 (2005). In collaboration with C. Cerjan, A. Hamza, J. Milovich and H. Robey.

  1. Simulations of High-Gain Shock-Ignited Inertial-Confinement-Fusion Implosions Using Less Than 1 MJ of Direct KrF Laser Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    transport, and thermonuclear burn. Using FAST, three classes of shock-ignited targets were designed that achieve one-dimensional fusion - energy gains in the...MJ) G a in Figure 1: Results of one-dimensional simulations showing the fusion energy gain as a function of KrF laser energy for three classes of...rises smoothly (according to a double power (a) Spike width: 160 ps (b) Spike power: 1530 TW Figure 4: Examples of fusion - energy gain contours for a shock

  2. Superior broadband antireflection from buried Mie resonator arrays for high-efficiency photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Sihua; Zeng, Yang; Huang, Zengguang; Shen, Wenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Establishing reliable and efficient antireflection structures is of crucial importance for realizing high-performance optoelectronic devices such as solar cells. In this study, we provide a design guideline for buried Mie resonator arrays, which is composed of silicon nanostructures atop a silicon substrate and buried by a dielectric film, to attain a superior antireflection effect over a broadband spectral range by gaining entirely new discoveries of their antireflection behaviors. We find that the buried Mie resonator arrays mainly play a role as a transparent antireflection structure and their antireflection effect is insensitive to the nanostructure height when higher than 150 nm, which are of prominent significance for photovoltaic applications in the reduction of photoexcited carrier recombination. We further optimally combine the buried Mie resonator arrays with micron-scale textures to maximize the utilization of photons, and thus have successfully achieved an independently certified efficiency of 18.47% for the nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large-size wafer (156 mm × 156 mm). PMID:25746848

  3. Laser ignition - Spark plug development and application in reciprocating engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Nicolaie; Bärwinkel, Mark; Heinz, Peter; Brüggemann, Dieter; Dearden, Geoff; Croitoru, Gabriela; Grigore, Oana Valeria

    2018-03-01

    Combustion is one of the most dominant energy conversion processes used in all areas of human life, but global concerns over exhaust gas pollution and greenhouse gas emission have stimulated further development of the process. Lean combustion and exhaust gas recirculation are approaches to improve the efficiency and to reduce pollutant emissions; however, such measures impede reliable ignition when applied to conventional ignition systems. Therefore, alternative ignition systems are a focus of scientific research. Amongst others, laser induced ignition seems an attractive method to improve the combustion process. In comparison with conventional ignition by electric spark plugs, laser ignition offers a number of potential benefits. Those most often discussed are: no quenching of the combustion flame kernel; the ability to deliver (laser) energy to any location of interest in the combustion chamber; the possibility of delivering the beam simultaneously to different positions, and the temporal control of ignition. If these advantages can be exploited in practice, the engine efficiency may be improved and reliable operation at lean air-fuel mixtures can be achieved, making feasible savings in fuel consumption and reduction in emission of exhaust gasses. Therefore, laser ignition can enable important new approaches to address global concerns about the environmental impact of continued use of reciprocating engines in vehicles and power plants, with the aim of diminishing pollutant levels in the atmosphere. The technology can also support increased use of electrification in powered transport, through its application to ignition of hybrid (electric-gas) engines, and the efficient combustion of advanced fuels. In this work, we review the progress made over the last years in laser ignition research, in particular that aimed towards realizing laser sources (or laser spark plugs) with dimensions and properties suitable for operating directly on an engine. The main envisaged

  4. Localized microwave pulsed plasmas for ignition and flame front enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, James Bennett

    Modern combustor technologies require the ability to match operational parameters to rapidly changing demands. Challenges include variable power output requirements, variations in air and fuel streams, the requirement for rapid and well-controlled ignition, and the need for reliability at low fuel mixture fractions. Work on subcritical microwave coupling to flames and to weakly ionized laser-generated plasmas has been undertaken to investigate the potential for pulsed microwaves to allow rapid combustion control, volumetric ignition, and leaner combustion. Two strategies are investigated. First, subcritical microwaves are coupled to femtosecond laser-generated ionization to ignite methane/air mixtures in a quasi-volumetric fashion. Total energy levels are comparable to the total minimum ignition energies for laser and spark discharges, but the combined strategy allows a 90 percent reduction in the required laser energy. In addition, well-defined multi-dimensional ignition patterns are designated with multiple laser passes. Second, microwave pulse coupling to laminar flame fronts is achieved through interaction with chemiionization-produced electrons in the reaction zone. This energy deposition remains well-localized for a single microwave pulse, resulting in rapid temperature rises of greater than 200 K and maintaining flame propagation in extremely lean methane/air mixtures. The lean flammability limit in methane/air mixtures with microwave coupling has been decreased from an equivalence ratio 0.6 to 0.3. Additionally, a diagnostic technique for laser tagging of nitrogen for velocity measurements is presented. The femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) technique utilizes a 120 fs laser to dissociate nitrogen along a laser line. The relatively long-lived emission from recombining nitrogen atoms is imaged with a delayed and fast-gated camera to measure instantaneous velocities. The emission strength and lifetime in air and pure nitrogen allow

  5. Dynamic high energy density plasma environments at the National Ignition Facility for nuclear science research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerjan, Ch J.; Bernstein, L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cassata, W. S.; Brune, C. R.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gharibyan, N.; Grim, G.; Hagmann, Chr; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Henry, E. A.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D. H.; Khater, H. Y.; Kim, Y.; Kritcher, A.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Merrill, F.; Moody, K.; Neumayer, P.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sayre, D.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B.; Stoeffl, W.; Tommasini, R.; Yeamans, Ch; Velsko, C.; Wiescher, M.; Couder, M.; Zylstra, A.; Schneider, D.

    2018-03-01

    The generation of dynamic high energy density plasmas in the pico- to nano-second time domain at high-energy laser facilities affords unprecedented nuclear science research possibilities. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the primary goal of inertial confinement fusion research has led to the synergistic development of a unique high brightness neutron source, sophisticated nuclear diagnostic instrumentation, and versatile experimental platforms. These novel experimental capabilities provide a new path to investigate nuclear processes and structural effects in the time, mass and energy density domains relevant to astrophysical phenomena in a unique terrestrial environment. Some immediate applications include neutron capture cross-section evaluation, fission fragment production, and ion energy loss measurement in electron-degenerate plasmas. More generally, the NIF conditions provide a singular environment to investigate the interplay of atomic and nuclear processes such as plasma screening effects upon thermonuclear reactivity. Achieving enhanced understanding of many of these effects will also significantly advance fusion energy research and challenge existing theoretical models.

  6. Dual-Laser-Pulse Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Early, James W.; Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.

    2006-01-01

    A dual-pulse laser (DPL) technique has been demonstrated for generating laser-induced sparks (LIS) to ignite fuels. The technique was originally intended to be applied to the ignition of rocket propellants, but may also be applicable to ignition in terrestrial settings in which electric igniters may not be suitable.

  7. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Thomas, C A

    2010-10-01

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87× during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  8. Ultrasonically triggered ignition at liquid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Simon, Lars Hendrik; Meyer, Lennart; Wilkens, Volker; Beyer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is considered to be an ignition source according to international standards, setting a threshold value of 1mW/mm(2) [1] which is based on theoretical estimations but which lacks experimental verification. Therefore, it is assumed that this threshold includes a large safety margin. At the same time, ultrasound is used in a variety of industrial applications where it can come into contact with explosive atmospheres. However, until now, no explosion accidents have been reported in connection with ultrasound, so it has been unclear if the current threshold value is reasonable. Within this paper, it is shown that focused ultrasound coupled into a liquid can in fact ignite explosive atmospheres if a specific target positioned at a liquid's surface converts the acoustic energy into a hot spot. Based on ignition tests, conditions could be derived that are necessary for an ultrasonically triggered explosion. These conditions show that the current threshold value can be significantly augmented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. National Ignition Facility under fire over ignition failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The 3.5bn National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California is no nearer to igniting a sustainable nuclear fusion burn - four years after its initial target date - according to a report by the US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  10. Dropping the hammer: Examining impact ignition and combustion using pre-stressed aluminum powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Kevin J.; Warzywoda, Juliusz; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Levitas, Valery I.

    2017-09-01

    Pre-stressing aluminum (Al) particles by annealing and quenching Al powder alters particle mechanical properties and has also been linked to an increase in particle reactivity. Specifically, energy propagation in composites consisting of aluminum mixed with copper oxide (Al + CuO) exhibits a 24% increase in flame speed when using pre-stressed aluminum (PS Al) compared to Al of the same particle size. However, no data exist for the reactivity of PS Al powders under impact loading. In this study, a drop weight impact tester with pressure cell was designed and built to examine impact ignition sensitivity and combustion of PS Al when mixed with CuO. Both micron and nanometer scale powders (i.e., μAl and nAl, respectively) were pre-stressed, then combined with CuO and analyzed. Three types of ignition and combustion events were identified: ignition with complete combustion, ignition with incomplete combustion, and no ignition or combustion. The PS nAl + CuO demonstrated a lower impact ignition energy threshold for complete combustion, differing from nAl + CuO samples by more than 3.5 J/mg. The PS nAl + CuO also demonstrated significantly more complete combustion as evidenced by pressure history data during ignition and combustion. Additional material characterization provides insight on hot spot formation in the incomplete combustion samples. The most probable reasons for higher impact-induced reactivity of pre-stressed particles include (a) delayed but more intense fracture of the pre-stressed alumina shell due to release of energy of internal stresses during fracture and (b) detachment of the shell from the core during impact due to high tensile stresses in the Al core leading to much more pronounced fracture of unsupported shells and easy access of oxygen to the Al core. The μAl + CuO composites did not ignite, even under pre-stressed conditions.

  11. Mie-Metamaterials-Based Thermal Emitter for Near-Field Thermophotovoltaic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yanpei; Zhang, Sinong; Cui, Yali; Zheng, Yi

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we theoretically analyze the performance characteristics of a near-field thermophotovoltaic system consisting a Mie-metamaterial emitter and GaSb-based photovoltaic cell at separations less than the thermal wavelength. The emitter consists of a tungsten nanoparticle-embedded thin film of SiO2 deposited on bulk tungsten. Numerical results presented here are obtained using formulae derived from dyadic Green’s function formalism and Maxwell-Garnett-Mie theory. We show that via the inclusion of tungsten nanoparticles, the thin layer of SiO2 acts like an effective medium that enhances selective radiative heat transfer for the photons above the band gap of GaSb. We analyze thermophotovoltaic (TPV) performance for various volume fractions of tungsten nanoparticles and thicknesses of SiO2. PMID:28773241

  12. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  13. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, Roy; Kakwani, Ramesh M.; Valdmanis, Edgars; Woods, Melvins E.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

  14. Dual coil ignition system

    SciTech Connect

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  15. 14 CFR 29.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any... that draw from the same source. (c) The design of the engine ignition system must account for— (1) The...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any... that draw from the same source. (c) The design of the engine ignition system must account for— (1) The...

  17. NIF Target Designs and OMEGA Experiments for Shock-Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. S.

    2012-10-01

    Shock ignition (SI)footnotetextR. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 155001 (2007). is being pursued as a viable option to achieve ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Shock-ignition target designs require the addition of a high-intensity (˜5 x 10^15 W/cm^2) laser spike at the end of a low-adiabat assembly pulse to launch a spherically convergent strong shock to ignite the imploding capsule. Achieving ignition with SI requires the laser spike to generate an ignitor shock with a launching pressure typically in excess of ˜300 Mbar. At the high laser intensities required during the spike pulse, stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin scattering (SBS) could reflect a significant fraction of the incident light. In addition, SRS and the two-plasmon-decay instability can accelerate hot electrons into the shell and preheat the fuel. Since the high-power spike occurs at the end of the pulse when the areal density of the shell is several tens of mg/cm^2, shock-ignition fuel layers are shielded against hot electrons with energies below 150 keV. This paper will present data for a set of OMEGA experiments that were designed to study laser--plasma interactions during the spike pulse. In addition, these experiments were used to demonstrate that high-pressure shocks can be produced in long-scale-length plasmas with SI-relevant intensities. Within the constraints imposed by the hydrodynamics of strong shock generation and the laser--plasma instabilities, target designs for SI experiments on the NIF will be presented. Two-dimensional radiation--hydrodynamic simulations of SI target designs for the NIF predict ignition in the polar-drive beam configuration at sub-MJ laser energies. Design robustness to various 1-D effects and 2-D nonuniformities has been characterized. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  18. Symmetry of spherically converging shock waves through reflection, relating to the shock ignition fusion energy scheme.

    PubMed

    Davie, C J; Evans, R G

    2013-05-03

    We examine the properties of perturbed spherically imploding shock waves in an ideal fluid through the collapse, bounce, and development into an outgoing shock wave. We find broad conservation of the size and shape of ingoing and outgoing perturbations when viewed at the same radius. The outgoing shock recovers the velocity of the unperturbed shock outside the strongly distorted core. The results are presented in the context of the robustness of the shock ignition approach to inertial fusion energy.

  19. Early-Time Symmetry Tuning in the Presence of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in ICF Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Michel, P.; ...

    2013-12-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we have successfully tuned the early time (~2 ns) lowest order Legendre mode (P 2) of the incoming radiation drive asymmetry of indirectly driven ignition capsule implosions by varying the inner power cone fraction. The measured P 2/P 0 sensitivity vs come fraction is similar to calculations, but a significant -15 to -20% P 2/P 0 offset was observed. This can be explained by a considerable early time laser energy transfer from the outer to the inner beams during the laser burn-through of the Laser Entrance Hole (LEH) windows and hohlraum fill gas whenmore » the LEH plasma is still dense and relatively cold.« less

  20. Derivation of Z-R equation using Mie approach for a 77 GHz radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldo, Silvano; Lucianaz, Claudio; Allegretti, Marco; Perona, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    The ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute) defines the frequency band around 77 GHz as dedicated to automatic cruise control long-range radars. This work aims to demonstrate that, with specific assumption and the right theoretical background it is also possible to use a 77 GHz as a mini weather radar and/or a microwave rain gauge. To study the behavior of a 77 GHz meteorological radar, since the raindrop size are comparable to the wavelength, it is necessary to use the general Mie scattering theory. According to the Mie formulation, the radar reflectivity factor Z is defined as a function of the wavelength on the opposite of Rayleigh approximation in which is frequency independent. Different operative frequencies commonly used in radar meteorology are considered with both the Rayleigh and Mie scattering theory formulation. Comparing them it is shown that with the increasing of the radar working frequency the use of Rayleigh approximation lead to an always larger underestimation of rain. At 77 GHz such underestimation is up to 20 dB which can be avoided with the full Mie theory. The crucial derivation of the most suited relation between the radar reflectivity factor Z and rainfall rate R (Z-R equation) is necessary to achieve the best Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) possible. Making the use of Mie scattering formulation from the classical electromagnetic theory and considering different radar working frequencies, the backscattering efficiency and the radar reflectivity factor have been derived from a wide range of rain rate using specific numerical routines. Knowing the rain rate and the corresponding reflectivity factor it was possible to derive the coefficients of the Z-R equation for each frequency with the least square method and to obtain the best coefficients for each frequency. The coefficients are then compared with the ones coming from the scientific literature. The coefficients of a 77 GHz weather radar are then obtained. A

  1. Effects of Laser Frequency and Multiple Beams on Hot Electron Generation in Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royle, Ryan B.

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is one approach to harnessing fusion power for the purpose of energy production in which a small deuterium-tritium capsule is imploded to about a thousand times solid density with ultra-intense lasers. In the fast ignition (FI) scheme, a picosecond petawatt laser pulse is used to deposit ˜10 kJ of energy in ˜10 ps into a small hot-spot at the periphery of the compressed core, igniting a fusion burn wave. FI promises a much higher energy gain over the conventional central hot-spot ignition scheme in which ignition is achieved through compression alone. Sufficient energy coupling between ignition laser and implosion core is critical for the feasibility of the FI scheme. Laser-core energy coupling is mediated by hot electrons which absorb laser energy near the critical density and propagate to the dense core, depositing their energy primarily through collisions. The hot electron energy distribution plays a large role in achieving efficient energy coupling since electrons with energy much greater than a few MeV will only deposit a small fraction of their energy into the hot-spot region due to reduced collisional cross section. It is understood that it may be necessary to use the second or third harmonic of the 1.05 mum Nd glass laser to reduce the average hot electron energy closer to the few-MeV range. Also, it is likely that multiple ignition beams will be used to achieve the required intensities. In this study, 2D particle-in-cell simulations are used to examine the effects of frequency doubling and tripling of a 1 mum laser as well as effects of using various dual-beam configurations. While the hot-electron energy spectrum is indeed shifted closer to the few-MeV range for higher frequency beams, the overall energy absorption is reduced, canceling the gain from higher efficiency. For a fixed total laser input energy, we find that the amount of hot electron energy able to be deposited into the core hot-spot is fairly insensitive to

  2. Ignitability test method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Bailey, James W. (Inventor); Schimmel, Morry L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for testing ignitability of an initiator includes a body having a central cavity, an initiator holder for holding the initiator over the central cavity of the body, an ignition material holder disposed in the central cavity of the body and having a cavity facing the initiator holder which receives a measured quantity of ignition material to be ignited by the initiator. It contains a chamber in communication with the cavity of the ignition material and the central cavity of the body, and a measuring system for analyzing pressure characteristics generated by ignition of the ignition material by the initiator. The measuring system includes at least one transducer coupled with an oscillograph for recording pressure traces generated by ignition.

  3. The national ignition facility high-energy ultraviolet laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8 MJ, 500 TW, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-m diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. When completed, NIF will be the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing an international center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's 192 energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 10 8 K and 10 11 Bar, conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars, planets and in nuclear weapons. NIF is now entering the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of the NIF laser system have generated 106 kJ of infrared light and over 10 kJ at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are also being installed in preparation for experiments to begin in late 2003. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, the significant laser and optical systems breakthroughs that were developed, the results of recent laser commissioning shots, and plans for commissioning diagnostics for experiments on NIF.

  4. The effect of kerosene injection on ignition probability of local ignition in a scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Heng; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu

    2017-03-01

    The spark ignition of kerosene is investigated in a scramjet combustor with a flight condition of Ma 4, 17 km. Based plentiful of experimental data, the ignition probabilities of the local ignition have been acquired for different injection setups. The ignition probability distributions show that the injection pressure and injection location have a distinct effect on spark ignition. The injection pressure has both upper and lower limit for local ignition. Generally, the larger mass flow rate will reduce the ignition probability. The ignition position also affects the ignition near the lower pressure limit. The reason is supposed to be the cavity swallow effect on upstream jet spray near the leading edge, which will make the cavity fuel rich. The corner recirculation zone near the front wall of the cavity plays a significant role in the stabilization of local flame.

  5. Simultaneous dual mode combustion engine operating on spark ignition and homogenous charge compression ignition

    DOEpatents

    Fiveland, Scott B.; Wiggers, Timothy E.

    2004-06-22

    An engine particularly suited to single speed operation environments, such as stationary power generators. The engine includes a plurality of combustion cylinders operable under homogenous charge compression ignition, and at least one combustion cylinder operable on spark ignition concepts. The cylinder operable on spark ignition concepts can be convertible to operate under homogenous charge compression ignition. The engine is started using the cylinders operable under spark ignition concepts.

  6. Ignition and pusher adiabat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, B.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Yi, S. A.; Batha, S. H.; Wysocki, F.

    2018-07-01

    In the last five years, large amounts of high quality data on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments were produced at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). From this data we have significantly advanced our scientific understanding of the physics of thermonuclear (TN) ignition and identified critical issues that must be addressed to achieve a burning hotspot, such as implosion energetics, pusher adiabat, tamping effects, and confinement time. In this paper we present a review of recently developed TN ignition and implosion scaling theory (Cheng et al 2013 Phys. Rev. E 88 041101; Cheng et al 2014 Phys. Plasmas 21 10270) that characterizes the thermodynamic properties of the hotspot and the ignition criteria for ICF. We compare our theoretical predictions with NIF data and find good agreement between theory and experiments. We demonstrate the fundamental effects of the pusher adiabat on the energy partition between the cold shell and the hot deuterium–tritium (DT) gas, and thus on the integrated performance of ICF capsules. Theoretical analysis of NIF experiments (Cheng et al 2015 Phys. Plasmas 22 082704; Melvin et al 2015 Phys. Plasmas 22 022708; Cheng et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 120702) and physical explanations of the discrepancies between theory, data, and simulations are presented. It is shown that the true experimental adiabat of the cold DT fuel can be inferred from neutron image data of a capsule implosion. We show that the ablator mix and preheat in the cold fuel can be estimated from the experimentally inferred hotspot mix. Finally, possible paths forward to reach higher yields at NIF implied by the theory are discussed.

  7. Prévalence des dyslipidémies au laboratoire de biochimie du CHU Aristide le Dantec de Dakar, Sénégal

    PubMed Central

    Cissé, Fatou; Agne, Fatou Diallo; Diatta, Alassane; Mbengue, Abdou Salam; Ndiaye, Arame; Samba, Abdourahmane; Thiam, Souleymane; Doupa, Dominique; Sarr, Gaston Ndéné; Sall, Niama Diop; Touré, Méissa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction L'objectif de cette étude était d'évaluer la prévalence des dyslipidémies chez les patients reçus au laboratoire de Biochimie de l'Hôpital Aristide Le Dantec pour le dosage d'un paramètre lipidique au cours de l'année 2013. Méthodes Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective portant sur 1356 patients âgés de 10 à 94 ans reçus au laboratoire de Biochimie du CHU Le Dantec de janvier à décembre 2013. Etaient inclus dans l'étude, tous les patients ayant au moins un paramètre du bilan lipidique dont les résultats étaient enregistrés dans le registre du laboratoire. Le cholestérol total, le cholestérol HDL, le cholestérol LDL ainsi que les triglycérides ont été dosés grâce à des méthodes enzymatiques sur un automate de Biochimie de type Cobas Integra 400 (Roche Diagnostics). Résultats La prévalence des dyslipidémies dans notre population d'étude est de 39,30%. Les prévalences de l'hypercholestérolémie, l'hypoHDLémie, l'hyperLDLémie, l'hypertriglycéridémie et l'hyperlipidémie mixte étaient respectivement : 30,89% ; 7,30% ; 31,19% ; 0,51% ; 7,22%. Les sujets de 40 à 59 ans semblaient être plus exposés et on note une prédominance féminine en ce qui concerne l'hypercholestérolémie (54,17% vs 45,82%), l'hypoHDLémie (54,54% vs45, 45%), et l'hyperlipidémie mixte (51,08% vs 48,97%). Enfin les dyslipidémies étaient fortement corrélées à l'HTA et l'obésité. Conclusion La forte prévalence des dyslipidémies retrouvée dans notre étude démontre l'intérêt d'étudier la prévalence des facteurs de risque cardio-vasculaires en particulier les dyslipidémies dans la population sénégalaise. PMID:28292030

  8. ACS Science Data Buffer Check/Self-Tests for CS Buffer RAM and MIE RAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzano, V.

    2001-07-01

    The ACS Science Buffer RAM is checked for bit flips during SAA passages. This is followed by a Control Section {CS} self-test consisting of writing/reading a specified bit pattern from each memory location in Buffer RAM and a similar test for MIE RAM. The MIE must be placed in BOOT mode for its self-test. The CS Buffer RAM self-test as well as the bit flip tests are all done with the CS in Operate.

  9. ACS Science Data Buffer Check/Self-Tests for CS Buffer RAM and MIE RAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Alan

    2005-07-01

    The ACS Science Buffer RAM is checked for bit flips during SAA passages. Thisis followed by a Control Section {CS} self-test consisting of writing/reading a specified bit pattern from each memory location in Buffer RAM and a similar test for MIE RAM. The MIE must be placed in BOOT mode for its self-test. The CS Buffer RAM self-test as well as the bit flip tests are all done with the CS in Operate.

  10. Some Notes on Sparks and Ignition of Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Franklin A.

    2000-01-01

    This report compliments a concurrent analysis of the electromagnetic field threat to the fuel system of a transport aircraft. The accompanying effort assessed currents, voltages and power levels that may be induced upon fuel tank wiring from radio transmitters (inside and outside the aircraft). In addition to this, it was also essential to determine how much voltage, current, or power is required to create a fuel-vapor ignition hazard. The widely accepted minimum guideline for aircraft fuel-vapor ignition is the application of a 0.2 millijoule energy level. However, when considering radio frequency (RF) sources, this guideline is seriously inadequate. This report endeavors to bridge the gap between a traditional understanding of electrical breakdown, heating and combustion; and supplement the knowledge with available information regarding aircraft fuel-vapor ignition by RF sources

  11. Light trapping for solar fuel generation with Mie resonances.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Thomann, Isabell; Park, Junghyun; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Vasudev, Alok P; Brongersma, Mark L

    2014-03-12

    The implementation of solar fuel generation as a clean, terawatt-scale energy source is critically dependent on the development of high-performance, inexpensive photocatalysts. Many candidate materials, including for example α-Fe2O3 (hematite), suffer from very poor charge transport with minority carrier diffusion lengths that are significantly shorter (nanometer scale) than the absorption depth of light (micrometer scale near the band edge). As a result, most of the photoexcited carriers recombine rather than participate in water-splitting reactions. For this reason, there is a tremendous opportunity for photon management. Plasmon-resonant nanostructures have been employed to effectively enhance light absorption in the near-surface region of photocatalysts, but this approach suffers from intrinsic optical losses in the metal. Here, we circumvent this issue by driving optical resonances in the active photocatalyst material itself. We illustrate that judiciously nanopatterned photocatalysts support optical Mie and guided resonances capable of substantially enhancing the photocarrier generation rate within 10-20 nm from the water/photocatalyst interface.

  12. 14 CFR 27.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... master ignition control. (b) Each group of ignition switches, except ignition switches for turbine engines for which continuous ignition is not required, and each master ignition control must have a means... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1145 Ignition...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... master ignition control. (b) Each group of ignition switches, except ignition switches for turbine engines for which continuous ignition is not required, and each master ignition control must have a means... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1145 Ignition...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... master ignition control. (b) Each group of ignition switches, except ignition switches for turbine engines for which continuous ignition is not required, and each master ignition control must have a means... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1145 Ignition...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... master ignition control. (b) Each group of ignition switches, except ignition switches for turbine engines for which continuous ignition is not required, and each master ignition control must have a means... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1145 Ignition...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... master ignition control. (b) Each group of ignition switches, except ignition switches for turbine engines for which continuous ignition is not required, and each master ignition control must have a means... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1145 Ignition...

  17. Miniature laser ignited bellows motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfro, Steven L.; Beckman, Tom M.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature optically ignited actuation device has been demonstrated using a laser diode as an ignition source. This pyrotechnic driven motor provides between 4 and 6 lbs of linear force across a 0.090 inch diameter surface. The physical envelope of the device is 1/2 inch long and 1/8 inch diameter. This unique application of optical energy can be used as a mechanical link in optical arming systems or other applications where low shock actuation is desired and space is limited. An analysis was performed to determine pyrotechnic materials suitable to actuate a bellows device constructed of aluminum or stainless steel. The aluminum bellows was chosen for further development and several candidate pyrotechnics were evaluated. The velocity profile and delivered force were quantified using an non-intrusive optical motion sensor.

  18. Ignition characterization of LOX/hydrocarbon propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawver, B. R.; Rousar, D. C.; Wong, K. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of the ignition characteristics of the gaseous oxygen (Gox)/Ethanol propellant combination are presented. Ignition characterization was accomplished through the analysis, design, fabrication and testing of a spark initiated torch igniter and prototype 620 lbF thruster/igniter assembly. The igniter was tested over a chamber pressure range of 74 to 197 psia and mixture ratio range of 0.778 to 3.29. Cold (-92 to -165 F) and ambient (44 to 80 F) propellant temperatures were used. Spark igniter ignition limits and thruster steady state and pulse mode, performance, cooling and stability data are presented. Spark igniter ignition limits are presented in terms of cold flow pressure, ignition chamber diameter and mixture ratio. Thruster performance is presented in terms of vacuum specific impulse versus engine mixture ratio. Gox/Ethanol propellants were shown to be ignitable over a wide range of mixture ratios. Cold propellants were shown to have a minor effect on igniter ignition limits. Thruster pulse mode capability was demonstrated with multiple pulses of 0.08 sec duration and less.

  19. Ignitability test method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Bailey, James W. (Inventor); Schimmel, Morry L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for testing ignitability of an initiator includes a body with a central cavity, initiator holder for holding the initiator over the central cavity of the body, an ignition material holder disposed in the central cavity of the body and a cavity facing the initiator holder which receives a measured quantity of ignition material to be ignited by the initiator and a chamber in communication with the cavity of the ignition material holder and the central cavity of the body. A measuring system for analyzing pressure characteristics is generated by ignition material by the initiator. The measuring system includes at least one transducer coupled to an oscillograph for recording pressure traces generated by ignition.

  20. National direct-drive program on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Campbell, E. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Gatu-Johnson, M.

    2017-01-01

    A major advantage of the laser direct-drive (DD) approach to ignition is the increased fraction of laser drive energy coupled to the hot spot and relaxed hot-spot requirements for the peak pressure and convergence ratios relative to the indirect-drive approach at equivalent laser energy. With the goal of a successful ignition demonstration using DD, the recently established national strategy has several elements and involves multiple national and international institutions. These elements include the experimental demonstration on OMEGA cryogenic implosions of hot-spot conditions relevant for ignition at MJ-scale energies available at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and developing an understanding of laser-plasma interactions and laser coupling using DD experiments on the NIF. DD designs require reaching central stagnation pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The current experiments on OMEGA have achieved inferred peak pressures of 56 Gbar (Regan et al 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 117 025001). Extensive analysis of the cryogenic target experiments and two- and three-dimensional simulations suggest that power balance, target offset, and target quality are the main limiting factors in target performance. In addition, cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been identified as the main mechanism reducing laser coupling. Reaching the goal of demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence on OMEGA includes improving laser power balance, target position, and target quality at shot time. CBET must also be significantly reduced and several strategies have been identified to address this issue.

  1. Determining Acceptable Limits of Fast-Electron Preheat in Polar-Drive-Ignition Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Ye, C.

    2014-10-01

    In direct-drive-ignition designs, preheat by fast electrons created by the two-plasmon-decay instability at the quarter-critical density surface can increase the adiabat in the fuel layer and prevent ignition. Since eliminating the preheat entirely is not possible, it is necessary to understand the levels of preheat our targets can withstand before ignition is precluded. The current polar-drive point design is used as the basis for examining the effects of increasing the levels of fast electrons using the one-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics code LILAC. Once ignition failure is obtained, the design is then reoptimized using Telios, a downhill simplex method program, to recover ignition. This cycle is repeated until the design can no longer be reoptimized to produce ignition. Mappings of these final results provide insight into ignition failure caused by preheat and what specific target parameters serve to best stave off the effects of the preheat. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Dynamic high energy density plasma environments at the National Ignition Facility for nuclear science research

    DOE PAGES

    Cerjan, Ch J.; Bernstein, L.; Hopkins, L. Berzak; ...

    2017-08-16

    We present the generation of dynamic high energy density plasmas in the pico- to nano-second time domain at high-energy laser facilities affords unprecedented nuclear science research possibilities. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the primary goal of inertial confinement fusion research has led to the synergistic development of a unique high brightness neutron source, sophisticated nuclear diagnostic instrumentation, and versatile experimental platforms. These novel experimental capabilities provide a new path to investigate nuclear processes and structural effects in the time, mass and energy density domains relevant to astrophysical phenomena in a unique terrestrial environment. Some immediate applications include neutron capturemore » cross-section evaluation, fission fragment production, and ion energy loss measurement in electron-degenerate plasmas. More generally, the NIF conditions provide a singular environment to investigate the interplay of atomic and nuclear processes such as plasma screening effects upon thermonuclear reactivity. Lastly, achieving enhanced understanding of many of these effects will also significantly advance fusion energy research and challenge existing theoretical models.« less

  3. Dynamic high energy density plasma environments at the National Ignition Facility for nuclear science research

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, Ch J.; Bernstein, L.; Hopkins, L. Berzak

    We present the generation of dynamic high energy density plasmas in the pico- to nano-second time domain at high-energy laser facilities affords unprecedented nuclear science research possibilities. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the primary goal of inertial confinement fusion research has led to the synergistic development of a unique high brightness neutron source, sophisticated nuclear diagnostic instrumentation, and versatile experimental platforms. These novel experimental capabilities provide a new path to investigate nuclear processes and structural effects in the time, mass and energy density domains relevant to astrophysical phenomena in a unique terrestrial environment. Some immediate applications include neutron capturemore » cross-section evaluation, fission fragment production, and ion energy loss measurement in electron-degenerate plasmas. More generally, the NIF conditions provide a singular environment to investigate the interplay of atomic and nuclear processes such as plasma screening effects upon thermonuclear reactivity. Lastly, achieving enhanced understanding of many of these effects will also significantly advance fusion energy research and challenge existing theoretical models.« less

  4. Carbon footprint of automotive ignition coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Huey-Ling; Chen, Chih-Ming; Sun, Chin-Huang; Lin, Hung-Di

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, environmental issues, such as climate change and global warming due to the excessive development of industry, have attracted increasing attention of citizens worldwide. It is known that CO2 accounts for the largest proportion of greenhouse gases. Therefore, how to reduce CO2 emissions during the life cycle of a product to lessen its impact on environment is an important topic in the industrial society. Furthermore, it is also of great significance to cut down the required energy so as to lower its production costs during the manufacturing process nowadays. This study presents the carbon footprint of an automotive ignition coil and its partial materials are defined to explore their carbon emissions and environmental impact. The model IPCC GWP100a calculates potential global greenhouse effect by converting them into CO2 equivalents. In this way, the overall carbon footprint of an ignition coil can be explored. By using IPCC GWP100a, the results display that the shell has the most carbon emissions. The results can help the industry reduce the carbon emissions of an ignition coil product.

  5. Test System to Study the Ignition of Metals by Polymers in Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoffstall, Michael S.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new test system that uses Laser energy to ignite a polymer promoter has been developed at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. It will facilitate the study of the spread of fire from a burning polymer material to the metal surrounding it. The system can be used to answer questions regarding the effects of configuration on ignition and combustion. The data obtained from this test could also be used to develop mathematical models for analyzing the effects of configuration on ignition and combustion. The system features a 10,000-psi (69-MPa) test chamber with sight glass windows on either end and a 25-watt carbon dioxide Laser for an ignition source. The test system can be used with gaseous oxygen, nitrogen or any mixture of the two gases. To minimize the effect of preheating the metallic, the polymer is ignited with a minimal amount of Laser energy. Igniting the polymer in this fashion also simplifies the thermodynamic analysis of the ignition and propagation reactions. The system is very robust, versatile and straightforward to use. Depending on the test pressure and configuration, the test system operator can perform as many as 20 tests per day. Test results verify that ignition and combustion of the metallic sample is not only dependent on pressure, material type and temperature, but configuration of both the polymer promoter and metallic sample. Both 6061 aluminum and 316 stainless steel 0.25-inch (6.35-mm) diameter rods with a standard 0-ring groove were tested with Buna-N, Silicone, Teflon and Viton 0-rings. The system ignited all four types of 0-rings in oxygen at pressures ranging from ambient to 10,000 psi (69 MPa). However, neither the stainless steel nor the aluminum rods on which the O-rings were mounted ignited in any test conditions. Future testing may be done on the 0.25-inch (6.35-mm) rod and O-ring configuration to evaluate the lack of ignition in these tests. Future configurations may include a plug of polymer in the base of the sample and replicas

  6. Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Zholents, Alexander; Zolotorev, Max

    2001-01-01

    An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

  7. Spectral solution of the inverse Mie problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Andrey V.; Konokhova, Anastasiya I.; Yastrebova, Ekaterina S.; Gilev, Konstantin V.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Maltsev, Valeri P.; Yurkin, Maxim A.

    2017-10-01

    We developed a fast method to determine size and refractive index of homogeneous spheres from the power Fourier spectrum of their light-scattering patterns (LSPs), measured with the scanning flow cytometer. Specifically, we used two spectral parameters: the location of the non-zero peak and zero-frequency amplitude, and numerically inverted the map from the space of particle characteristics (size and refractive index) to the space of spectral parameters. The latter parameters can be reliably resolved only for particle size parameter greater than 11, and the inversion is unique only in the limited range of refractive index with upper limit between 1.1 and 1.25 (relative to the medium) depending on the size parameter and particular definition of uniqueness. The developed method was tested on two experimental samples, milk fat globules and spherized red blood cells, and resulted in accuracy not worse than the reference method based on the least-square fit of the LSP with the Mie theory. Moreover, for particles with significant deviation from the spherical shape the spectral method was much closer to the Mie-fit result than the estimated uncertainty of the latter. The spectral method also showed adequate results for synthetic LSPs of spheroids with aspect ratios up to 1.4. Overall, we present a general framework, which can be used to construct an inverse algorithm for any other experimental signals.

  8. Cooling Effect Analysis of Suppressing Coal Spontaneous Ignition with Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Shuanwei; Wang, Jianguo; Hao, Gaihong

    2018-05-01

    Suppression of spontaneous ignition of coal stockpiles was an important issue for safe utilization of coal. The large thermal energy from coal spontaneous ignition can be viewed as the latent energy source to further utilize for saving energy purpose. Heat pipe was the more promising way to diffuse effectively concentrated energy of the coal stockpile, so that retarding coal spontaneous combustion was therefore highly desirable. The cooling mechanism of the coal with heat pipe was pursued. Based on the research result, the thermal energy can be transported from the coal seam to the surface continuously with the use of heat pipe. Once installed the heat pipes will work automatically as long as the coal oxidation reaction was happened. The experiment was indicated that it can significantly spread the high temperature of the coal pile.

  9. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen/oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a unique monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant inlet temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of a catalytic igniter. The test results showed that the gaseous hydrogen/oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using both the granular and monolithic catalysts are presented. The capabilities of a facility constructed to conduct the igniter testing and the advantages of a catalytic igniter over other ignition systems for gaseous hydrogen and oxygen are also discussed.

  10. Integrating micro-ignitors with Al/Bi2O3/graphene oxide composite energetic films to realize tunable ignition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoxia; Cheng, Shengxian; Hu, Yan; Ye, Yinghua; Shen, Ruiqi

    2018-03-01

    The integration of composite energetic films (CEFs) with various types of initiators can effectively adjust their performance and represents potential applications in microscale energy-demanding systems. In this study, the Al/Bi2O3/graphene oxide (GO) CEFs were successfully integrated into copper micro-ignitors by electrophoretic deposition, a low-cost and time-saving method. The effects of the Al/Bi2O3/GO CEFs with different GO contents on exothermic performance and ignition properties of micro-ignitors were then systematically investigated in terms of heat release, activation energy, ignition duration, the maximum height of the ignition product, and ignition delay time. The results showed that the addition of GO promoted more heat releases and higher activation energies of Al/Bi2O3/GO CEFs. The addition of ≤3.5 wt. % GO prolonged the ignition duration from 450 μs to 950 μs and increased the maximum height of the ignition product from about 40 mm to 60 mm. However, the micro-ignitors with more than 3.5 wt. % GO cannot be ignited, which suggested that GO played a contradictory role in the ignition properties of micro-ignitors and the controlled GO content was a prerequisite for improved ignition performance. The ignition delay time gradually extended from 10.7 μs to 27.6 μs with increases in the GO contents of Al/Bi2O3 CEFs, revealing that an increase in the weight ratio of GO leads to lower ignition sensitivity of micro-ignitors.

  11. Planar Two-Plasmon-Decay Experiments at Polar-Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Scale Lengths at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Seka, W.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Hohenberger, M.; Epstein, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Turnbull, D. P.; Ralph, J. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Moody, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    Results from the first experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to probe two-plasmon -decay (TPD) hot-electron production at scale lengths relevant to polar-direct-drive (PDD) ignition are reported. The irradiation on one side of a planar CH foil generated a plasma at the quarter-critical surface with a predicted density gradient scale length of Ln ~ 600 μm , a measured electron temperature of Te ~ 3 . 5 to 4.0 keV, an overlapped laser intensity of I ~ 6 ×1014 W/cm2, and a predicted TPD threshold parameter of η ~ 4 . The hard x-ray spectrum and the Kα emission from a buried Mo layer were measured to infer the hot-electron temperature and the fraction of total laser energy converted to TPD hot electrons. Optical emission at ω/2 correlated with the time-dependent hard x-ray signal confirms that TPD is responsible for the hot-electron generation. The effect of laser beam angle of incidence on TPD hot-electron generation was assessed, and the data show that the beam angle of incidence did not have a strong effect. These results will be used to benchmark simulations of TPD hot-electron production at conditions relevant to PDD ignition-scale implosions. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. Laser induced breakdown in gas mixtures. Experimental and statistical investigation on n-decane ignition: Pressure, mixture composition and equivalence ratio effects.

    PubMed

    Mokrani, Nabil; Gillard, Philippe

    2018-03-26

    This paper presents a physical and statistical approach to laser-induced breakdown in n-decane/N 2  + O 2 mixtures as a function of incident or absorbed energy. A parametric study, with pressure, fuel purity and equivalence ratio, was conducted to determine the incident and absorbed energies involved in producing breakdown, followed or not by ignition. The experiments were performed using a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (1064 nm) inside a cylindrical 1-l combustion chamber in the range of 1-100 mJ of incident energy. A stochastic study of breakdown and ignition probabilities showed that the mixture composition had a significant effect on ignition with large variation of incident or absorbed energy required to obtain 50% of breakdown. It was observed that the combustion products absorb more energy coming from the laser. The effect of pressure on the ignition probabilities of lean and near stoichiometric mixtures was also investigated. It was found that a high ignition energy E50% is required for lean mixtures at high pressures (3 bar). The present study provides new data obtained on an original experimental setup and the results, close to laboratory-produced laser ignition phenomena, will enhance the understanding of initial conditions on the breakdown or ignition probabilities for different mixtures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ignition Prediction of Pressed HMX based on Hotspot Analysis Under Shock Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seokpum; Miller, Christopher; Horie, Yasuyuki; Molek, Christopher; Welle, Eric; Zhou, Min

    The ignition behavior of pressed HMX under shock pulse loading with a flyer is analyzed using a cohesive finite element method (CFEM) which accounts for large deformation, microcracking, frictional heating, and thermal conduction. The simulations account for the controlled loading of thin-flyer shock experiments with flyer velocities between 1.7 and 4.0 km/s. The study focuses on the computational prediction of ignition threshold using James criterion which involves loading intensity and energy imparted to the material. The predicted thresholds are in good agreement with measurements from shock experiments. In particular, it is found that grain size significantly affects the ignition sensitivity of the materials, with smaller sizes leading to lower energy thresholds required for ignition. In addition, significant stress attenuation is observed in high intensity pulse loading as compared to low intensity pulse loading, which affects density of hotspot distribution. The microstructure-performance relations obtained can be used to design explosives with tailored attributes and safety envelopes.

  14. Experimental evidence of impact ignition: 100-fold increase of neutron yield by impactor collision.

    PubMed

    Azechi, H; Sakaiya, T; Watari, T; Karasik, M; Saito, H; Ohtani, K; Takeda, K; Hosoda, H; Shiraga, H; Nakai, M; Shigemori, K; Fujioka, S; Murakami, M; Nagatomo, H; Johzaki, T; Gardner, J; Colombant, D G; Bates, J W; Velikovich, A L; Aglitskiy, Y; Weaver, J; Obenschain, S; Eliezer, S; Kodama, R; Norimatsu, T; Fujita, H; Mima, K; Kan, H

    2009-06-12

    We performed integrated experiments on impact ignition, in which a portion of a deuterated polystyrene (CD) shell was accelerated to about 600 km/s and was collided with precompressed CD fuel. The kinetic energy of the impactor was efficiently converted into thermal energy generating a temperature of about 1.6 keV. We achieved a two-order-of-magnitude increase in the neutron yield by optimizing the timing of the impact collision, demonstrating the high potential of impact ignition for fusion energy production.

  15. Polarimetric infrared imaging simulation of a synthetic sea surface with Mie scattering.

    PubMed

    He, Si; Wang, Xia; Xia, Runqiu; Jin, Weiqi; Liang, Jian'an

    2018-03-01

    A novel method to simulate the polarimetric infrared imaging of a synthetic sea surface with atmospheric Mie scattering effects is presented. The infrared emission, multiple reflections, and infrared polarization of the sea surface and the Mie scattering of aerosols are all included for the first time. At first, a new approach to retrieving the radiative characteristics of a wind-roughened sea surface is introduced. A two-scale method of sea surface realization and the inverse ray tracing of light transfer calculation are combined and executed simultaneously, decreasing the consumption of time and memory dramatically. Then the scattering process that the infrared light emits from the sea surface and propagates in the aerosol particles is simulated with a polarized light Monte Carlo model. Transformations of the polarization state of the light are calculated with the Mie theory. Finally, the polarimetric infrared images of the sea surface of different environmental conditions and detection parameters are generated based on the scattered light detected by the infrared imaging polarimeter. The results of simulation examples show that our polarimetric infrared imaging simulation can be applied to predict the infrared polarization characteristics of the sea surface, model the oceanic scene, and guide the detection in the oceanic environment.

  16. 14 CFR 23.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control and shut off each ignition circuit... the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c) Each group of ignition switches, except...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control and shut off each ignition circuit... the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c) Each group of ignition switches, except...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control and shut off each ignition circuit... the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c) Each group of ignition switches, except...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control and shut off each ignition circuit... the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c) Each group of ignition switches, except...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control and shut off each ignition circuit... the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c) Each group of ignition switches, except...

  1. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics: charting the path to thermonuclear ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, R. L.; Regan, S. P.; Loucks, S. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Craxton, R. S.; Collins, T. J. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K. A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Keck, R. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J. P.; Li, C. K.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McKenty, P. W.; Myatt, J.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Séguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2005-10-01

    Significant theoretical and experimental progress continues to be made at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), charting the path to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition. Direct drive offers the potential for higher-gain implosions than x-ray drive and is a leading candidate for an inertial fusion energy power plant. LLE's direct-drive ICF ignition target designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are based on hot-spot ignition. A cryogenic target with a spherical DT-ice layer, within or without a foam matrix, enclosed by a thin plastic shell, will be directly irradiated with ~1.5 MJ of laser energy. Cryogenic and plastic/foam (surrogate-cryogenic) targets that are hydrodynamically scaled from these ignition target designs are imploded on the 60-beam, 30 kJ, UV OMEGA laser system to validate the key target physics issues, including energy coupling, hydrodynamic instabilities and implosion symmetry. Prospects for direct-drive ignition on the NIF are extremely favourable, even while it is in its x-ray-drive irradiation configuration, with the development of the polar-direct-drive concept. A high-energy petawatt capability is being constructed at LLE next to the existing 60-beam OMEGA compression facility. This OMEGA EP (extended performance) laser will add two short-pulse, 2.6 kJ beams to the OMEGA laser system to backlight direct-drive ICF implosions and study fast-ignition physics with focused intensities up to 6 × 1020 W cm-2.

  2. 14 CFR 25.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control each engine ignition circuit on each engine. (b) There must be means to quickly shut off all ignition by the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control each ignition circuit on each engine. (b) There must be means to quickly shut off all ignition by the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control each engine ignition circuit on each engine. (b) There must be means to quickly shut off all ignition by the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control each ignition circuit on each engine. (b) There must be means to quickly shut off all ignition by the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control each engine ignition circuit on each engine. (b) There must be means to quickly shut off all ignition by the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control each ignition circuit on each engine. (b) There must be means to quickly shut off all ignition by the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control each engine ignition circuit on each engine. (b) There must be means to quickly shut off all ignition by the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control each ignition circuit on each engine. (b) There must be means to quickly shut off all ignition by the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control each engine ignition circuit on each engine. (b) There must be means to quickly shut off all ignition by the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1145 - Ignition switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1145 Ignition switches. (a) Ignition switches must control each ignition circuit on each engine. (b) There must be means to quickly shut off all ignition by the grouping of switches or by a master ignition control. (c...

  12. Spark ignited turbulent flame kernel growth. Annual report, January--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Santavicca, D.A.

    1994-06-01

    An experimental study of the effect of spark power on the growth rate of spark-ignited flame kernels was conducted in a turbulent flow system at 1 atm, 300 K conditions. All measurements were made with premixed, propane-air at a fuel/air equivalence ratio of 0.93, with 0%, 8% or 14% dilution. Two flow conditions were studied: a low turbulence intensity case with a mean velocity of 1.25 m/sec and a turbulence intensity of 0.33 m/sec, and a high turbulence intensity case with a mean velocity of 1.04 m/sec and a turbulence intensity of 0.88 m/sec. The growth of the spark-ignited flamemore » kernel was recorded over a time interval from 83 {mu}sec to 20 msec following the start of ignition using high speed laser shadowgraphy. In order to evaluate the effect of ignition spark power, tests were conducted with a long duration (ca 4 msec) inductive discharge ignition system with an average spark power of ca 14 watts and two short duration (ca 100 nsec) breakdown ignition systems with average spark powers of ca 6 {times} 10{sup 4} and ca 6 {times} 10{sup 5} watts. The results showed that increased spark power resulted in an increased growth rate, where the effect of short duration breakdown sparks was found to persist for times of the order of milliseconds. The effectiveness of increased spark power was found to be less at high turbulence and high dilution conditions. Increased spark power had a greater effect on the 0--5 mm burn time than on the 5--13 mm burn time, in part because of the effect of breakdown energy on the initial size of the flame kernel. And finally, when spark power was increased by shortening the spark duration while keeping the effective energy the same there was a significant increase in the misfire rate, however when the spark power was further increased by increasing the breakdown energy the misfire rate dropped to zero.« less

  13. Exploring microwave resonant multi-point ignition using high-speed schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Guixin; Xie, Hong; Deng, Lei; Wang, Zhi

    2018-03-01

    Microwave plasma offers a potential method to achieve rapid combustion in a high-speed combustor. In this paper, microwave resonant multi-point ignition and its control method have been studied via high-speed schlieren imaging. The experiment was conducted with the microwave resonant ignition system and the schlieren optical system. The microwave pulse in 2.45 GHz with 2 ms width and 3 kW peak power was employed as an ignition energy source to produce initial flame kernels in the combustion chamber. A reflective schlieren method was designed to illustrate the flame development process with a high-speed camera. The bottom of the combustion chamber was made of a quartz glass coated with indium tin oxide, which ensures sufficient microwave reflection and light penetration. Ignition experiments were conducted at 2 bars of stoichiometric methane-air mixtures. Schlieren images show that flame kernels were generated at more than one location simultaneously and flame propagated with different speeds in different flame kernels. Ignition kernels were discussed in three types according to their appearances. Pressure curves and combustion duration also show that multi-point ignition plays a significant role in accelerating combustion.

  14. Exploring microwave resonant multi-point ignition using high-speed schlieren imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Guixin; Xie, Hong; Deng, Lei; Wang, Zhi

    2018-03-01

    Microwave plasma offers a potential method to achieve rapid combustion in a high-speed combustor. In this paper, microwave resonant multi-point ignition and its control method have been studied via high-speed schlieren imaging. The experiment was conducted with the microwave resonant ignition system and the schlieren optical system. The microwave pulse in 2.45 GHz with 2 ms width and 3 kW peak power was employed as an ignition energy source to produce initial flame kernels in the combustion chamber. A reflective schlieren method was designed to illustrate the flame development process with a high-speed camera. The bottom of the combustion chamber was made of a quartz glass coated with indium tin oxide, which ensures sufficient microwave reflection and light penetration. Ignition experiments were conducted at 2 bars of stoichiometric methane-air mixtures. Schlieren images show that flame kernels were generated at more than one location simultaneously and flame propagated with different speeds in different flame kernels. Ignition kernels were discussed in three types according to their appearances. Pressure curves and combustion duration also show that multi-point ignition plays a significant role in accelerating combustion.

  15. The national ignition facility and atomic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, David H.

    1998-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is under construction, capping over 25 years of development of the inertial confinement fusion concept by providing the facility to obtain fusion ignition in the laboratory for the first time. The NIF is a 192 beam glass laser to provide energy controlled in space and time so that a millimeter-scale capsule containing deuterium and tritium can be compressed to fusion conditions. Light transport, conversion of light in frequency, interaction of light with matter in solid and plasma forms, and diagnostics of extreme material conditions on small scale all use atomic data in preparing for use of the NIF. The NIF will provide opportunity to make measurements of atomic data in extreme physical environments related to fusion energy, nuclear weapon detonation, and astrophysics. The first laser beams of NIF should be operational in 2001 and the full facility completed at the end of 2003. NIF is to provide 1.8 megajoule of blue light on fusion targets and is intended to achieve fusion ignition by about the end of 2007. Today's inertial fusion development activities use atomic data to design and predict fusion capsule performance and in non-fusion applications to analyze radiation transport and radiation effects on matter. Conditions investigated involve radiation temperature of hundreds of eV, pressures up to gigabars and time scales of femptoseconds.

  16. An Exploratory Investigation of the Influence of Igniter Chemistry on Ignition in Porous Bed Gun Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    nitrocellulose igniter materials using the Ignition Energetics Characterization Device (IECD). The results presented herein represent Phase II eperimental ...auxiliary test cham- bcz is a combustion gas diagnostic section designed to permit determination of the composition and enthalpy level of the gases...removal/assembly and propellant loading. 2.2 Igniter Characteristics 2.2.1 Baseline Igniter The igniter system, Figure 2.3, is designed to provide overall

  17. Laser-induced stimulated Raman scattering in the forward direction of a droplet - Comparison of Mie theory with geometrical optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Vandana; Jarzembski, Maurice A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper uses Mie theory to treat electromagnetic scattering and to evaluate field enhancement in the forward direction of a small droplet irradiated by a high-energy beam and compares the results of calculations with the field-enhancement evaluation obtained via geometrical optics treatment. Results of this comparison suggest that the field enhancement located at the critical ring region encircling the axis in the forward direction of the droplet can support laser-induced Raman scattering. The results are supported by experimental observations of the interaction of a 120-micron-diam water droplet with a high-energy Nd:YAG laser beam.

  18. Premature ignition of a rocket motor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Darlene Ruth

    During preparation for a rocket sled track (RST) event, there was an unexpected ignition of the zuni rocket motor (10/9/08). Three Sandia staff and a contractor were involved in the accident; the contractor was seriously injured and made full recovery. The data recorder battery energized the low energy initiator in the rocket.

  19. Proton Beam Fast Ignition Fusion: Synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The proton beam generation and focusing in fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is studied. The spatial and energy spread of the proton beam generated in a laser-solid interaction is increased due to the synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The focal spot radius can reach 100 μm, which is nearly an order of magnitude larger than the optimal value. The energy spread decreases the beam deposition energy in the focal spot. Under these conditions, ignition of a precompressed DT fuel is achieved with the beam powers much higher than the values presently in consideration. Work supported in part by NIKOLA TESLA Laboratories (Stefan University), La Jolla, CA.

  20. 75 FR 47520 - Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition and Spark Ignition Internal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Extension of... for stationary compression ignition and spark ignition internal combustion engines. In this [[Page... combustion engines. After publication of the proposed rule, EPA received requests from the American Petroleum...

  1. Mie Scattering of Growing Molecular Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular contamination of optical surfaces from outgassed material has been shown in many cases to proceed from acclimation centers and to produce many roughly hemispherical "islands" of contamination on the surface. The mathematics of the hemispherical scattering is simplified by introducing a Virtual source below the plane of the optic, in this case a mirror, allowing the use of Mie theory to produce a solution for the resulting sphere .in transmission. Experimentally, a fixed wavelength in the vacuum ultraviolet was used as the illumination source and scattered light from the polished and coated glass mirrors was detected at a fixed angle as the contamination islands grew in time.

  2. Development and Testing of a Methane/Oxygen Catalytic Microtube Ignition System for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to develop a catalytic ignition advanced torch system with a unique catalyst microtube design that could serve as a low energy alternative or redundant system for the ignition of methane and oxygen rockets. Development and testing of iterations of hardware was carried out to create a system that could operate at altitude and produce a torch. A unique design was created that initiated ignition via the catalyst and then propagated into external staged ignition. This system was able to meet the goals of operating across a range of atmospheric and altitude conditions with power inputs on the order of 20 to 30 watts with chamber pressures and mass flow rates typical of comparable ignition systems for a 100 lbf engine.

  3. Development and Testing of a Methane/Oxygen Catalytic Microtube Ignition System for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Schneider, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to develop a catalytic ignition advanced torch system with a unique catalyst microtube design that could serve as a low energy alternative or redundant system for the ignition of methane and oxygen rockets. Development and testing of iterations of hardware was carried out to create a system that could operate at altitude and produce a torch. A unique design was created that initiated ignition via the catalyst and then propagated into external staged ignition. This system was able to meet the goals of operating across a range of atmospheric and altitude conditions with power inputs on the order of 20 to 30 watts with chamber pressures and mass flow rates typical of comparable ignition systems for a 100 Ibf engine.

  4. Pseudospin symmetry of the Dirac equation for a Möbius square plus Mie type potential with a Coulomb-like tensor interaction via SUSYQM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, N. Ikot; Zarrinkamar, S.; Eno, J. Ibanga; Maghsoodi, E.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the approximate solution of the Dirac equation for a combination of Möbius square and Mie type potentials under the pseudospin symmetry limit by using supersymmetry quantum mechanics. We obtain the bound-state energy equation and the corresponding spinor wave functions in an approximate analytical manner. We comment on the system via various useful figures and tables.

  5. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition

    DOE PAGES

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J.; Albright, Brian James; ...

    2016-06-24

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8 × 10 14 W/cm 2) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μg of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well “upstream” from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. As a result, laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (~10%).

  6. Ignition Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) Utilizing a Camera Flash for Distributed Ignition of Liquid Sprays (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    acoustic phenomenon. Our results indicate that the shorter pulse width (with lower energy/pulse) required ~30-35 mJ/pulse to initiate ignition of... acoustic behavior and some other novel phenomena associated with radiation absorption by SWCNTs. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...pressure level (SPL) from the photo acoustic phenomenon. Our results indicate that the shorter pulse width (with lower energy/pulse) required ~30-35

  7. Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    DOEpatents

    Duffy, Kevin P [Metamora, IL; Kieser, Andrew J [Morton, IL; Rodman, Anthony [Chillicothe, IL; Liechty, Michael P [Chillicothe, IL; Hergart, Carl-Anders [Peoria, IL; Hardy, William L [Peoria, IL

    2008-05-27

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

  8. Ignition and combustion of bulk metals at normal, elevated and reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, Melvyn C.; Daily, John W.; Abbud-Madrid, Angel

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the oxidation, ignition, and combustion of bulk metals is important for fire safety in the production, management, and utilization of liquid and gaseous oxygen for ground based and space applications. This proposal outlines studies in continuation of research initiated earlier under NASA support to investigate the ignition and combustion characteristics of bulk metals under varying gravity conditions. Metal ignition and combustion have not been studied previously under these conditions and the results are important not only for improved fire safety but also to increase knowledge of basic ignition and combustion mechanisms. The studies completed to date have led to the development of a clean and reproducible ignition source and diagnostic techniques for combustion measurements and have provided normal, elevated, and reduced gravity combustion data on a variety of different pure metals. The research conducted under this grant will use the apparatus and techniques developed earlier to continue the elevated and low gravity experiments, and to develop the overall modeling of the ignition and combustion process. Metal specimens are to be ignited using a xenon short-arc lamp and measurements are to be made of the ignition energy, surface temperature history, burning rates, spectroscopy of surface and gas products, and surface morphology and chemistry. Elevated gravity will be provided by the University of Colorado Geotechnical Centrifuge and microgravity will be obtained in NASA's DC-9 Reduced Gravity aircraft.

  9. Auto-ignition of methane-air mixtures flowing along an array of thin catalytic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño, C.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the heterogeneous ignition of a methane-air mixture flowing along an infinite array of catalytic parallel plates has been studied by inclusion of gas expansion effects and the finite heat conduction on the plates. The system of equations considers the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the energy equations of the plates. The gas expansion effects which arise from temperature changes have been considered. The heterogeneous kinetics considers the adsorption and desorption reactions for both reactants. The limits of large and small longitudinal thermal conductance of the plate material are analyzed and the critical conditions for ignition are obtained in closed form. The governing equations are solved numerically using finite differences. The results show that ignition is more easily produced as the longitudinal wall thermal conductance increases, and the effects of the gas expansion on the catalytic ignition process are rather small due to the large value of the activation energy of the desorption reaction of adsorbed oxygen atoms.

  10. Influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium–tritium plasma containing inactive impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru; Sherman, V. E.

    2016-08-15

    The degree of influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium–tritium (DT) plasma has been theoretically studied as dependent on the content of inactive impurities in plasma. The analytic criterion of plasma ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is modified taking into account the absorption of intrinsic radiation from plasma in the ignition region. The influence of radiative processes on the DT plasma ignition has been analytically and numerically studied for plasma that contains a significant fraction of inactive impurities either as a result of DT fuel mixing with ICF target ablator material or as a result ofmore » using light metal DT-hydrides as solid noncryogenic fuel. It has been shown that the effect of the absorption of intrinsic radiation leads to lower impurity-induced increase in the ignition energy as compared to that calculated in the approximation of optically transparent ignition region.« less

  11. Facile Thermal and Optical Ignition of Silicon Nanoparticles and Micron Particles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sidi; Parimi, Venkata Sharat; Deng, Sili; Lingamneni, Srilakshmi; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2017-10-11

    Silicon (Si) particles are widely utilized as high-capacity electrodes for Li-ion batteries, elements for thermoelectric devices, agents for bioimaging and therapy, and many other applications. However, Si particles can ignite and burn in air at elevated temperatures or under intense illumination. This poses potential safety hazards when handling, storing, and utilizing these particles for those applications. In order to avoid the problem of accidental ignition, it is critical to quantify the ignition properties of Si particles such as their sizes and porosities. To do so, we first used differential scanning calorimetry to experimentally determine the reaction onset temperature of Si particles under slow heating rates (∼0.33 K/s). We found that the reaction onset temperature of Si particles increased with the particle diameter from 805 °C at 20-30 nm to 935 °C at 1-5 μm. Then, we used a xenon (Xe) flash lamp to ignite Si particles under fast heating rates (∼10 3 to 10 6 K/s) and measured the minimum ignition radiant fluence (i.e., the radiant energy per unit surface area of Si particle beds required for ignition). We found that the measured minimum ignition radiant fluence decreased with decreasing Si particle size and was most sensitive to the porosity of the Si particle bed. These trends for the Xe flash ignition experiments were also confirmed by our one-dimensional unsteady simulation to model the heat transfer process. The quantitative information on Si particle ignition included in this Letter will guide the safe handling, storage, and utilization of Si particles for diverse applications and prevent unwanted fire hazards.

  12. High-energy (>70 keV) x-ray conversion efficiency measurement on the ARC laser at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Hermann, M. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Martinez, D. A.; Di Nicola, P.; Tommasini, R.; Landen, O. L.; Alessi, D.; Bowers, M.; Browning, D.; Brunton, G.; Budge, T.; Crane, J.; Di Nicola, J.-M.; Döppner, T.; Dixit, S.; Erbert, G.; Fishler, B.; Halpin, J.; Hamamoto, M.; Heebner, J.; Hernandez, V. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Homoelle, D.; Honig, J.; Hsing, W.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; LaFortune, K.; Lawson, J.; Nagel, S. R.; Negres, R. A.; Novikova, L.; Orth, C.; Pelz, L.; Prantil, M.; Rushford, M.; Shaw, M.; Sherlock, M.; Sigurdsson, R.; Wegner, P.; Widmayer, C.; Williams, G. J.; Williams, W.; Whitman, P.; Yang, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with a pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 30 ps, and energies up to 1.5 kJ per beamlet. Currently, four beamlets have been commissioned. In the first set of 6 commissioning target experiments, the individual beamlets were fired onto gold foil targets with energy up to 1 kJ per beamlet at 20-30 ps pulse length. The x-ray energy distribution and pulse duration were measured, yielding energy conversion efficiencies of 4-9 × 10-4 for x-rays with energies greater than 70 keV. With greater than 3 J of such x-rays, ARC provides a high-precision x-ray backlighting capability for upcoming inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics experiments on NIF.

  13. An Application Of High-Speed Photography To The Real Ignition Course Of Composite Propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusheng, Zhang; Gongshan, Cheng; Yong, Zhang; Fengchun, Li; Fanpei, Lei

    1989-06-01

    That the actual solid rocket motor behavior and delay time of the ignition of Ap/HTPB composite propellant ignited by high energy pyrotechics contained condensed particles have been investigated is the key of this paper. In experiments, using high speed camera, the pressure transducer, the photodiode and synchro circuit control system designed by us synchronistically observe and record all course and details of the ignition. And pressure signal, photodiode signal and high speed photography frame are corresponded one by one.

  14. The impact of physicochemical property interactions of iso -octane/ethanol blends on ignition timescales

    DOE PAGES

    Barraza-Botet, Cesar L.; Luecke, Jon; Zigler, Bradley T.; ...

    2018-03-20

    This work presents new measurements of liquid fuel ignition delay times of iso-octane and ethanol fuel blends obtained from an ignition quality tester at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL IQT), which are compared to previous ignition delay data from the University of Michigan rapid compression facility (UM RCF), at the same experimental conditions. Pressure-time histories were used to determine liquid fuel ignition delays at global stoichiometric non-premixed conditions for iso-octane, ethanol and iso-octane/ethanol blends of 25, 50, 75% by volume in mixtures of 10% oxygen diluted in nitrogen. Temperatures ranging from 880 to 970 K were studied at amore » pressure of 10 atm. By comparing total ignition delay times from the NREL IQT with chemical ignition delay times from the UM RCF, the contributions of physical phenomena were quantified as representative time scales for spray injection, breakup and evaporation processes, and for gas-phase turbulent mixing. Regression analyses were developed for ignition time scales as function of blend level and charge temperature. Non-dimensional analyses were also carried out to determine the relative effects of physical time scales with respect to chemical ignition delay times.« less

  15. The impact of physicochemical property interactions of iso -octane/ethanol blends on ignition timescales

    SciTech Connect

    Barraza-Botet, Cesar L.; Luecke, Jon; Zigler, Bradley T.

    This work presents new measurements of liquid fuel ignition delay times of iso-octane and ethanol fuel blends obtained from an ignition quality tester at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL IQT), which are compared to previous ignition delay data from the University of Michigan rapid compression facility (UM RCF), at the same experimental conditions. Pressure-time histories were used to determine liquid fuel ignition delays at global stoichiometric non-premixed conditions for iso-octane, ethanol and iso-octane/ethanol blends of 25, 50, 75% by volume in mixtures of 10% oxygen diluted in nitrogen. Temperatures ranging from 880 to 970 K were studied at amore » pressure of 10 atm. By comparing total ignition delay times from the NREL IQT with chemical ignition delay times from the UM RCF, the contributions of physical phenomena were quantified as representative time scales for spray injection, breakup and evaporation processes, and for gas-phase turbulent mixing. Regression analyses were developed for ignition time scales as function of blend level and charge temperature. Non-dimensional analyses were also carried out to determine the relative effects of physical time scales with respect to chemical ignition delay times.« less

  16. The first experiments on the national ignition facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, O. L.; Glenzer, S.; Froula, D.; Dewald, E.; Suter, L. J.; Schneider, M.; Hinkel, D.; Fernandez, J.; Kline, J.; Goldman, S.; Braun, D.; Celliers, P.; Moon, S.; Robey, H.; Lanier, N.; Glendinning, G.; Blue, B.; Wilde, B.; Jones, O.; Schein, J.; Divol, L.; Kalantar, D.; Campbell, K.; Holder, J.; McDonald, J.; Niemann, C.; MacKinnon, A.; Collins, R.; Bradley, D.; Eggert, J.; Hicks, D.; Gregori, G.; Kirkwood, R.; Niemann, C.; Young, B.; Foster, J.; Hansen, F.; Perry, T.; Munro, D.; Baldis, H.; Grim, G.; Heeter, R.; Hegelich, B.; Montgomery, D.; Rochau, G.; Olson, R.; Turner, R.; Workman, J.; Berger, R.; Cohen, B.; Kruer, W.; Langdon, B.; Langer, S.; Meezan, N.; Rose, H.; Still, B.; Williams, E.; Dodd, E.; Edwards, J.; Monteil, M.-C.; Stevenson, M.; Thomas, B.; Coker, R.; Magelssen, G.; Rosen, P.; Stry, P.; Woods, D.; Weber, S.; Alvarez, S.; Armstrong, G.; Bahr, R.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Bower, D.; Celeste, J.; Chrisp, M.; Compton, S.; Cox, J.; Constantin, C.; Costa, R.; Duncan, J.; Ellis, A.; Emig, J.; Gautier, C.; Greenwood, A.; Griffith, R.; Holdner, F.; Holtmeier, G.; Hargrove, D.; James, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Landon, M.; Lee, D.; Malone, R.; May, M.; Montelongo, S.; Moody, J.; Ng, E.; Nikitin, A.; Pellinen, D.; Piston, K.; Poole, M.; Rekow, V.; Rhodes, M.; Shepherd, R.; Shiromizu, S.; Voloshin, D.; Warrick, A.; Watts, P.; Weber, F.; Young, P.; Arnold, P.; Atherton, L.; Bardsley, G.; Bonanno, R.; Borger, T.; Bowers, M.; Bryant, R.; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S.; Cooper, F.; Dixit, S.; Erbert, G.; Eder, D.; Ehrlich, B.; Felker, B.; Fornes, J.; Frieders, G.; Gardner, S.; Gates, C.; Gonzalez, M.; Grace, S.; Hall, T.; Haynam, C.; Heestand, G.; Henesian, M.; Hermann, M.; Hermes, G.; Huber, S.; Jancaitis, K.; Johnson, S.; Kauffman, B.; Kelleher, T.; Kohut, T.; Koniges, A. E.; Labiak, T.; Latray, D.; Lee, A.; Lund, D.; Mahavandi, S.; Manes, K. R.; Marshall, C.; McBride, J.; McCarville, T.; McGrew, L.; Menapace, J.; Mertens, E.; Munro, D.; Murray, J.; Neumann, J.; Newton, M.; Opsahl, P.; Padilla, E.; Parham, T.; Parrish, G.; Petty, C.; Polk, M.; Powell, C.; Reinbachs, I.; Rinnert, R.; Riordan, B.; Ross, G.; Robert, V.; Tobin, M.; Sailors, S.; Saunders, R.; Schmitt, M.; Shaw, M.; Singh, M.; Spaeth, M.; Stephens, A.; Tietbohl, G.; Tuck, J.; van Wonterghem, B.; Vidal, R.; Wegner, P.; Whitman, P.; Williams, K.; Winward, K.; Work, K.; Wallace, R.; Nobile, A.; Bono, M.; Day, B.; Elliott, J.; Hatch, D.; Louis, H.; Manzenares, R.; O'Brien, D.; Papin, P.; Pierce, T.; Rivera, G.; Ruppe, J.; Sandoval, D.; Schmidt, D.; Valdez, L.; Zapata, K.; MacGowan, B.; Eckart, M.; Hsing, W.; Springer, P.; Hammel, B.; Moses, E.; Miller, G.

    2006-06-01

    A first set of shock propagation, laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics.

  17. Quest for impact ignition and its future prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Masakatsu; Azechi, H.; Watari, T.; Sakaiya, T.; Ohtani, K.; Takeda, K.; Shiraga, H.; Shigemori, K.; Fujioka, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Johzaki, T.; Gardner, J.; Bates, J.; Velikovich, A.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Weaver, J.; Obenschain, S.

    2009-11-01

    Since the impact ignition has been proposed [1], we have achieved such crucial milestones under the operation of Gekko XII (ILE) and NIKE (NRL) laser systems as super-high-velocity acceleration of foils ranging 700-1000 km/s and hundred-fold increase in neutron yield by impact collision [2]. For the latter achievement, the kinetic energy of the impactor was efficiently converted into thermal energy generating a temperature of 1.6 keV. The use of Bromine-doped plastic target are key measure to suppress Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and thus to achieve effective collisions. Based on these preliminary results, we have done two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to demonstrate that ignition occurs when impactor with a velocity beyond 1500 km/s and a density of 50 g/cm3 collides with main fuel with a density of 400 g/cm3, when the maximum impactor kinetic energy is 10 kJ.[4pt] [1] M. Murakami and H. Nagatomo, Nucl. Inst. & Meth. Phys. Res. A544, 67 (2005).[0pt] [2] H. Azechi, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 235002 (2009).

  18. Heating a plasma by a broadband stream of fast electrons: Fast ignition, shock ignition, and Gbar shock wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru; Nicolai, Ph.; Ribeyre, X.

    2015-09-15

    An exact analytic solution is found for the steady-state distribution function of fast electrons with an arbitrary initial spectrum irradiating a planar low-Z plasma with an arbitrary density distribution. The solution is applied to study the heating of a material by fast electrons of different spectra such as a monoenergetic spectrum, a step-like distribution in a given energy range, and a Maxwellian spectrum, which is inherent in laser-produced fast electrons. The heating of shock- and fast-ignited precompressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets as well as the heating of a target designed to generate a Gbar shock wave for equation ofmore » state (EOS) experiments by laser-produced fast electrons with a Maxwellian spectrum is investigated. A relation is established between the energies of two groups of Maxwellian fast electrons, which are responsible for generation of a shock wave and heating the upstream material (preheating). The minimum energy of the fast and shock igniting beams as well as of the beam for a Gbar shock wave generation increases with the spectral width of the electron distribution.« less

  19. Effects of variable specific heat on energy transfer in a high-temperature supersonic channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaopeng; Dou, Hua-Shu; Zhu, Zuchao

    2018-05-01

    An energy transfer mechanism in high-temperature supersonic turbulent flow for variable specific heat (VSH) condition through turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), mean kinetic energy (MKE), turbulent internal energy (TIE) and mean internal energy (MIE) is proposed. The similarities of energy budgets between VSH and constant specific heat (CSH) conditions are investigated by introducing a vibrational energy excited degree and considering the effects of fluctuating specific heat. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of temporally evolving high-temperature supersonic turbulent channel flow is conducted at Mach number 3.0 and Reynolds number 4800 combined with a constant dimensional wall temperature 1192.60 K for VSH and CSH conditions to validate the proposed energy transfer mechanism. The differences between the terms in the two kinetic energy budgets for VSH and CSH conditions are small; however, the magnitude of molecular diffusion term for VSH condition is significantly smaller than that for CSH condition. The non-negligible energy transfer is obtained after neglecting several small terms of diffusion, dissipation and compressibility related. The non-negligible energy transfer involving TIE includes three processes, in which energy can be gained from TKE and MIE and lost to MIE. The same non-negligible energy transfer through TKE, MKE and MIE is observed for both the conditions.

  20. Simulations of inertial confinement fusion driven by a novel synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Tatchyn, Roman O.

    2004-01-01

    The advantages and challenges of using a powerful x-ray source for the fast ignition of compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets have been considered. The requirements for such a source together with the optics to focus the x-rays onto compressed DT cores lead to a conceptual design based on Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) and long wigglers to produce x-ray pulses with the appropriate phase space properties. A comparative assessment of the parameters of the igniter system indicates that the technologies for building it, although expensive, are physically achievable. Our x-ray fast ignition (XFI) scheme requires substantially smaller energy for the initiation of nuclear fusion reactions than other methods.

  1. Ignition process in Diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentzel, W

    1936-01-01

    This report analyzes the heating and vaporization process of fuel droplets in a compression-ignition engine on the basis of the theory of similitude - according to which, the period for heating and complete vaporization of the average size fuel drop is only a fraction of the actually observed ignition lag. The result is that ignition takes place in the fuel vapor air mixture rather than on the surface of the drop. The theoretical result is in accord with the experimental observations by Rothrock and Waldron. The combustion shock occurring at lower terminal compression temperature, especially in the combustion of coal-tar oil, is attributable to a simultaneous igniting of a larger fuel-vapor volume formed prior to ignition.

  2. The US ICF Ignition Program and the Inertial Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lindl, J D; Hammel, B A; Logan, B G

    2003-07-02

    There has been rapid progress in inertial fusion in the past few years. This progress spans the construction of ignition facilities, a wide range of target concepts, and the pursuit of integrated programs to develop fusion energy using lasers, ion beams and z-pinches. Two ignition facilities are under construction (NIF in the U.S. and LMJ in France) and both projects are progressing toward an initial experimental capability. The LIL prototype beamline for LMJ and the first 4 beams of NIF will be available for experiments in 2003. The full 192 beam capability of NIF will be available in 2009 andmore » ignition experiments are expected to begin shortly after that time. There is steady progress in the target science and target fabrication in preparation for indirect drive ignition experiments on NIF. Advanced target designs may lead to 5-10 times more yield than initial target designs. There has also been excellent progress on the science of ion beam and z-pinch driven indirect drive targets. Excellent progress on direct-drive targets has been obtained on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester. This includes improved performance of targets with a pulse shape predicted to result in reduced hydrodynamic instability. Rochester has also obtained encouraging results from initial cryogenic implosions. There is widespread interest in the science of fast ignition because of its potential for achieving higher target gain with lower driver energy and relaxed target fabrication requirements. Researchers from Osaka have achieved outstanding implosion and heating results from the Gekko XII Petawatt facility and implosions suitable for fast ignition have been tested on the Omega laser. A broad based program to develop lasers and ions beams for IFE is under way with excellent progress in drivers, chambers, target fabrication and target injection. KrF and Diode Pumped Solid-State lasers (DPSSL) are being developed in conjunction with drywall chambers and direct drive

  3. Photonic metasurface made of array of lens-like SiGe Mie resonators formed on (100) Si substrate via dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poborchii, Vladimir; Shklyaev, Alexander; Bolotov, Leonid; Uchida, Noriyuki; Tada, Tetsuya; Utegulov, Zhandos N.

    2017-12-01

    Metasurfaces consisting of arrays of high-index Mie resonators concentrating/redirecting light are important for integrated optics, photodetectors, and solar cells. Herein, we report the optical properties of low-Ge-content SiGe lens-like Mie resonator island arrays fabricated via dewetting during Ge deposition on a Si(100) surface at approximately 900 °C. We observe enhancement of the Si interaction with light owing to the efficient island-induced light concentration in the submicron-depth Si layer, which is mediated by both near-field Mie resonance leaking into the substrate and far-field light focusing. Such metasurfaces can improve the Si photodetector and solar-cell performance.

  4. 14 CFR 33.37 - Ignition system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ignition system. 33.37 Section 33.37... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.37 Ignition system. Each spark ignition engine must have a dual ignition system with at least two spark plugs for each...

  5. A Comparison of Several Methods of Measuring Ignition Lag in a Compression-ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A

    1934-01-01

    The ignition lag of a fuel oil in the combustion chamber of a high speed compression-ignition engine was measured by three different methods. The start of injection of the fuel as observed with a Stoborama was taken as the start of the period of ignition lag in all cases. The end of the period of ignition lag was determined by observation of the appearance of incandescence in the combustion chamber, by inspection of a pressure-time card for evidence of pressure rise, and by analysis of the indicator card for evidence of the combustion of a small but definite quantity of fuel. A comparison of the values for ignition lags obtained by these three methods indicates that the appearance of incandescence is later than other evidences of the start of combustion, that visual inspection of a pressure-time diagram gives consistent and usable values with a minimum requirement of time and/or apparatus, and that analysis of the indicator card is not worth while for ignition lag alone.

  6. Comparisons between geometrical optics and Lorenz-Mie theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungut, A.; Grehan, G.; Gouesbet, G.

    1981-01-01

    Both the Lorenz-Mie and geometrical optics theories are used in calculating the scattered light patterns produced by transparent spherical particles over a wide range of diameters, between 1.0 and 100 microns, and for the range of forward scattering angles from zero to 20 deg. A detailed comparison of the results shows the greater accuracy of the geometrical optics theory in the forward direction. Emphasis is given to the simultaneous sizing and velocimetry of particles by means of pedestal calibration methods.

  7. Microgravity ignition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motevalli, Vahid; Elliott, William; Garrant, Keith

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a flight ready apparatus of the microgravity ignition experiment for the GASCan 2 program. This involved redesigning, testing, and making final modifications to the existing apparatus. The microgravity ignition experiment is intended to test the effect of microgravity on the time to ignition of a sample of alpha-cellulose paper. An infrared heat lamp is used to heat the paper sample within a sealed canister. The interior of the canister was redesigned to increase stability and minimize conductive heat transfer to the sample. This design was fabricated and tested and a heat transfer model of the paper sample was developed.

  8. 14 CFR 23.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Controls and Accessories § 23.1165 Engine ignition systems. (a) Each battery ignition system must be... ignition. (e) Each turbine engine ignition system must be independent of any electrical circuit that is not... commuter category airplanes, each turbine engine ignition system must be an essential electrical load. [Doc...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Controls and Accessories § 23.1165 Engine ignition systems. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 75759... discharge of any battery used for engine ignition. (e) Each turbine engine ignition system must be... ignition systems. (f) In addition, for commuter category airplanes, each turbine engine ignition system...

  10. Transient electromagnetic scattering by a radially uniaxial dielectric sphere: Debye series, Mie series and ray tracing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Mohsen

    Transient electromagnetic scattering by a radially uniaxial dielectric sphere is explored using three well-known methods: Debye series, Mie series, and ray tracing theory. In the first approach, the general solutions for the impulse and step responses of a uniaxial sphere are evaluated using the inverse Laplace transformation of the generalized Mie series solution. Following high frequency scattering solution of a large uniaxial sphere, the Mie series summation is split into the high frequency (HF) and low frequency terms where the HF term is replaced by its asymptotic expression allowing a significant reduction in computation time of the numerical Bromwich integral. In the second approach, the generalized Debye series for a radially uniaxial dielectric sphere is introduced and the Mie series coefficients are replaced by their equivalent Debye series formulations. The results are then applied to examine the transient response of each individual Debye term allowing the identification of impulse returns in the transient response of the uniaxial sphere. In the third approach, the ray tracing theory in a uniaxial sphere is investigated to evaluate the propagation path as well as the arrival time of the ordinary and extraordinary returns in the transient response of the uniaxial sphere. This is achieved by extracting the reflection and transmission angles of a plane wave obliquely incident on the radially oriented air-uniaxial and uniaxial-air boundaries, and expressing the phase velocities as well as the refractive indices of the ordinary and extraordinary waves in terms of the incident angle, optic axis and propagation direction. The results indicate a satisfactory agreement between Debye series, Mie series and ray tracing methods.

  11. High-energy (> 70 KeV) x-ray conversion efficiency measurement on the ARC laser at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Hui; Hermann, M. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; ...

    2017-03-16

    Here, the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with a pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 30 ps, and energies up to 1.5 kJ per beamlet. Currently, four beamlets have been commissioned. In the first set of 6 commissioning target experiments, the individual beamlets were fired onto gold foil targets with energy up to 1 kJ per beamlet at 20–30 ps pulse length. The x-ray energy distribution and pulse duration were measured, yielding energy conversion efficiencies of 4–9 × 10 –4 for x-rays with energies greater thanmore » 70 keV. With greater than 3 J of such x-rays, ARC provides a high-precision x-ray backlighting capability for upcoming inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics experiments on NIF.« less

  12. Ohmic ignition with high engineering beta based on the RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarff, J. S.; Anderson, J. K.; Chapman, B. E.; McCollam, K. J.

    2017-10-01

    The RFP configuration allows the possibility of ohmic ignition for fusion energy, eliminating the need for auxiliary heating by rf or neutral beam injection. Complex plasma-facing antennas and NBI sources are therefore not required, simplifying the difficult fusion materials challenge. While all toroidal configurations require a volume-average 〈 B 〉 >= 5 T, the field strength at the magnet in the RFP is only Bcoil 3T since plasma current generates almost all of the field. Engineering beta is therefore maximized. We summarize access to ohmic ignition by examining a Lawson-like power balance for an RFP fusion plasma comparable to the ARIES-AT advanced tokamak, which generates neutron wall loading Pn / A 5 MW/m2. The required energy confinement for ohmic ignition in an RFP is similar to that for a tokamak. Confinement in MST is comparable to a same-size, same-field tokamak plasma, but 〈 B 〉 in MST is only 1/20th that required for fusion. While transport could ultimately be dominated by micro turbulence, extrapolation of stochastic transport using Lundquist number scaling for MHD tearing indicates standard RFP confinement (not enhanced by current profile control) could be sufficient to access ohmic ignition. This bolsters the possibility for steady-state inductive sustainment using oscillating field current drive. The high beta and classical energetic ion confinement measured in MST also bolster the RFP's fusion potential. Work supported by U.S. DoE.

  13. X-Ray Radiography Measurements of the Thermal Energy in Spark Ignition Plasma at Variable Ambient Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Matusik, Katarzyna E.; Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; ...

    2017-04-09

    The sparking behavior in an internal combustion engine affects the fuel efficiency, engine-out emissions, and general drivability of a vehicle. As emissions regulations become progressively stringent, combustion strategies, including exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), lean-burn, and turbocharging are receiving increasing attention as models of higher efficiency advanced combustion engines with reduced emissions levels. Because these new strategies affect the working environment of the spark plug, ongoing research strives to understand the influence of external factors on the spark ignition process. Due to the short time and length scales involved and the harsh environment, experimental quantification of the deposited energy from themore » sparking event is difficult to obtain. We present the results of x-ray radiography measurements of spark ignition plasma generated by a conventional spark plug. Our measurements were performed at the 7-BM beamline of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The synchrotron x-ray source enables time-resolved measurements of the density change due to glow discharge in the spark gap with 153 ns temporal and 5 μm spatial resolutions. We also explore the effects of charging time, EGR-relevant gas compositions, and gas pressure on the sparking behavior. We also quantify the influence of the measurement technique on the obtained results.« less

  14. Modes of Ignition of Powder Layers of Nanocomposite Thermites by Electrostatic Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monk, I.; Schoenitz, M.; Dreizin, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Nanocomposite powders with aluminum as a fuel and oxides of molybdenum, copper, bismuth, and iron as oxidizers were prepared by arrested reactive milling. The powders were placed in 0.5-mm-thick layers and ignited by electrostatic discharge (ESD) in air. In different tests, time-resolved light emission was recorded at 568 nm or in the range of 373-641 nm. The amount of material consumed was recorded as well. Time-resolved temperatures were determined. Two distinct ignition regimes were observed. Prompt ignition occurred within 10 µs of the electric discharge, comparable to what had previously been observed for corresponding powder monolayers. This ignition mode was observed for composites with Bi2O3 and Fe2O3 ignited with a 12-kV discharge, whereas it only occurred at higher spark voltage (20 kV) and energy for CuO and MoO3 composites. Delayed ignition, occurring after 0.1-1 ms following the discharge, was observed for all composites with consistently stronger light emission. Analysis of quenched, partially burned particles showed that the original nanostructure was preserved after prompt ignition but not after delayed ignition. It is proposed that prompt ignition represents direct ESD initiation of composite particles rapidly and adiabatically preheated to high temperatures while keeping the nanostructure intact, resulting in a heterogeneous reaction consuming most of the aluminum. Delayed ignition occurs when particles preheated to lower temperatures start oxidizing at much lower rates, leading to cloud combustion, in which thermal interaction between individual aerosolized burning particles is substantial. During this process, the nanostructure may be lost. Temperature measurements show that nanocomposites with CuO and MoO3 burned superadiabatically with flame temperatures exceeding thermodynamic predictions.

  15. Enhancing Ignition Probability and Fusion Yield in NIF Indirect Drive Targets with Applied Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, L. John; Logan, B. Grant; Ho, Darwin; Zimmerman, George; Rhodes, Mark; Blackfield, Donald; Hawkins, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Imposed magnetic fields of tens of Tesla that increase to greater than 10 kT (100 MGauss) under capsule compression may relax conditions for ignition and propagating burn in indirect-drive ICF targets. This may allow attainment of ignition, or at least significant fusion energy yields, in presently-performing ICF targets on the National Ignition Facility that today are sub-marginal for thermonuclear burn through adverse hydrodynamic conditions at stagnation. Results of detailed 2D radiation-hydrodynamic-burn simulations applied to NIF capsule implosions with low-mode shape perturbations and residual kinetic energy loss indicate that such compressed fields may increase the probability for ignition through range reduction of fusion alpha particles, suppression of electron heat conduction and stabilization of higher-mode RT instabilities. Optimum initial applied fields are around 50 T. Off-line testing has been performed of a hohlraum coil and pulsed power supply that could be integrated on NIF; axial fields of 58T were obtained. Given the full plasma structure at capsule stagnation may be governed by 3-D resistive MHD, the formation of closed magnetic field lines might further augment ignition prospects. Experiments are now required to assess the potential of applied magnetic fields to NIF ICF ignition and burn. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Intermittent laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation in shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, R.; Li, J.; Ren, C.

    We study laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation in the ignition phase of shock ignition through 1D and 2D particle-in-cell simulations in the regime of long density scale length and moderately high laser intensity. These long-term simulations show an intermittent bursting pattern of laser-plasma instabilities, resulting from a coupling of the modes near the quarter-critical-surface and those in the lower density region via plasma waves and laser pump depletion. The majority of the hot electrons are found to be from stimulated Raman scattering and of moderate energies. However, high energy electrons of preheating threat can still be generated from themore » two-plasmon-decay instability.« less

  17. Positron Radiography of Ignition-Relevant ICF Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui; Field, John; Landen, Nino; Strozzi, David

    2017-10-01

    X-ray and neutron radiography are currently used to infer residual ICF shell and fuel asymmetries and areal density non-uniformities near and at peak compression that can impede ignition. Charged particles offer an alternative probe source that, in principle, are capable of radiographing the shell shape and areal density at arbitrary times, even in the presence of large x-ray self-emission. Laser-generated positrons are evaluated as a source to radiograph ICF capsules where current ultraintense laser facilities are capable of producing 2 ×1012 relativistic positrons in a narrow energy bandwidth and short duration. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that both the areal density and shell radius can be reconstructed for ignition-relevant capsules conditions between 0.002-2 g/cm2, and that this technique might be better suited to direct-drive. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the LDRD Program under project tracking code 17-ERD-010.

  18. Investigation of the Ignition and Burning of Materials in Space Cabin Atmospheres. Part 2: Ignition of a Combustible Mixture by a Hot Body with the Effects of Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    The ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a hot cylinder under the effect of a gravity field for steady state conditions is examined. For this purpose a horizontal cylinder is considered with gravity as a parameter together with a finite chemical reacting flow generated by free convection with the additional effect of diffusion. Both mass transfer and zero mass transfer cases are considered. By defining an ignition criterion the surface temperature and species are obtained from the analysis as a function of the gravity field. It is supposed that at the point of ignition the heat evolved in the gas is sufficiently high to attain a sustained combustion without any energy from the hot cylinder.

  19. Catalytic ignition model in a monolithic reactor with in-depth reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, Ta-Ching; Tien, James S.

    1990-01-01

    Two transient models have been developed to study the catalytic ignition in a monolithic catalytic reactor. The special feature in these models is the inclusion of thermal and species structures in the porous catalytic layer. There are many time scales involved in the catalytic ignition problem, and these two models are developed with different time scales. In the full transient model, the equations are non-dimensionalized by the shortest time scale (mass diffusion across the catalytic layer). It is therefore accurate but is computationally costly. In the energy-integral model, only the slowest process (solid heat-up) is taken as nonsteady. It is approximate but computationally efficient. In the computations performed, the catalyst is platinum and the reactants are rich mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. One-step global chemical reaction rates are used for both gas-phase homogeneous reaction and catalytic heterogeneous reaction. The computed results reveal the transient ignition processes in detail, including the structure variation with time in the reactive catalytic layer. An ignition map using reactor length and catalyst loading is constructed. The comparison of computed results between the two transient models verifies the applicability of the energy-integral model when the time is greater than the second largest time scale of the system. It also suggests that a proper combined use of the two models can catch all the transient phenomena while minimizing the computational cost.

  20. Multi-Component, Multi-Point Interferometric Rayleigh/Mie Doppler Velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Lee, Joseph W.; Bivolaru, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An interferometric Rayleigh scattering system was developed to enable the measurement of multiple, orthogonal velocity components at several points within very-high-speed or high-temperature flows. The velocity of a gaseous flow can be optically measured by sending laser light into the gas flow, and then measuring the scattered light signal that is returned from matter within the flow. Scattering can arise from either gas molecules within the flow itself, known as Rayleigh scattering, or from particles within the flow, known as Mie scattering. Measuring Mie scattering is the basis of all commercial laser Doppler and particle imaging velocimetry systems, but particle seeding is problematic when measuring high-speed and high-temperature flows. The velocimeter is designed to measure the Doppler shift from only Rayleigh scattering, and does not require, but can also measure, particles within the flow. The system combines a direct-view, large-optic interferometric setup that calculates the Doppler shift from fringe patterns collected with a digital camera, and a subsystem to capture and re-circulate scattered light to maximize signal density. By measuring two orthogonal components of the velocity at multiple positions in the flow volume, the accuracy and usefulness of the flow measurement increase significantly over single or nonorthogonal component approaches.

  1. Auto-ignitions of a methane/air mixture at high and intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschevich, V. V.; Martynenko, V. V.; Penyazkov, O. G.; Sevrouk, K. L.; Shabunya, S. I.

    2016-09-01

    A rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube (ST) have been employed to study ignition delay times of homogeneous methane/air mixtures at intermediate-to-high temperatures. Both facilities allow measurements to be made at temperatures of 900-2000 K, at pressures of 0.38-2.23 MPa, and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. In ST experiments, nitrogen served as a diluent gas, whereas in RCM runs the diluent gas composition ranged from pure nitrogen to pure argon. Recording pressure, UV, and visible emissions identified the evolution of chemical reactions. Correlations of ignition delay time were generated from the data for each facility. At temperatures below 1300 K, a significant reduction of average activation energy from 53 to 15.3 kcal/mol was obtained. Moreover, the RCM data showed significant scatter that dramatically increased with decreasing temperature. An explanation for the abnormal scatter in the data was proposed based on the high-speed visualization of auto-ignition phenomena and experiments performed with oxygen-free and fuel-free mixtures. It is proposed that the main reason for such a significant reduction of average activation energy is attributable to the premature ignition of ultrafine particles in the reactive mixture.

  2. Technology Development of a Fiber Optic-Coupled Laser Ignition System for Multi-Combustor Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Early, Jim; Osborne, Robin; Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the progress of technology development of a laser ignition system at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The first two years of the project focus on comprehensive assessments and evaluations of a novel dual-pulse laser concept, flight- qualified laser system, and the technology required to integrate the laser ignition system to a rocket chamber. With collaborations of the Department of Energy/Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), MSFC has conducted 26 hot fire ignition tests with lab-scale laser systems. These tests demonstrate the concept feasibility of dual-pulse laser ignition to initiate gaseous oxygen (GOX)/liquid kerosene (RP-1) combustion in a rocket chamber. Presently, a fiber optic- coupled miniaturized laser ignition prototype is being implemented at the rocket chamber test rig for future testing. Future work is guided by a technology road map that outlines the work required for maturing a laser ignition system. This road map defines activities for the next six years, with the goal of developing a flight-ready laser ignition system.

  3. Visual detection of nucleic acids based on Mie scattering and the magnetophoretic effect.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zichen; Chen, Shan; Ho, John Kin Lim; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Chen, Ting-Hsuan

    2015-12-07

    Visual detection of nucleic acid biomarkers is a simple and convenient approach to point-of-care applications. However, issues of sensitivity and the handling of complex bio-fluids have posed challenges. Here we report on a visual method detecting nucleic acids using Mie scattering of polystyrene microparticles and the magnetophoretic effect. Magnetic microparticles (MMPs) and polystyrene microparticles (PMPs) were surface-functionalised with oligonucleotide probes, which can hybridise with target oligonucleotides in juxtaposition and lead to the formation of MMPs-targets-PMPs sandwich structures. Using an externally applied magnetic field, the magnetophoretic effect attracts the sandwich structure to the sidewall, which reduces the suspended PMPs and leads to a change in the light transmission via the Mie scattering. Based on the high extinction coefficient of the Mie scattering (∼3 orders of magnitude greater than that of the commonly used gold nanoparticles), our results showed the limit of detection to be 4 pM using a UV-Vis spectrometer or 10 pM by direct visual inspection. Meanwhile, we also demonstrated that this method is compatible with multiplex assays and detection in complex bio-fluids, such as whole blood or a pool of nucleic acids, without purification in advance. With a simplified operation procedure, low instrumentation requirement, high sensitivity and compatibility with complex bio-fluids, this method provides an ideal solution for visual detection of nucleic acids in resource-limited settings.

  4. X-ray driven implosions at ignition relevant velocities on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Hicks, D. G.

    2013-05-15

    Backlit convergent ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are indirect drive implosions that study the inflight dynamics of an imploding capsule. Side-on, backlit radiography provides data used by the National Ignition Campaign to measure time-dependent properties of the capsule ablator including its center of mass radius, velocity, and unablated mass. Previously, Callahan [D. A. Callahan et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056305 (2012)] and Hicks [D. H. Hicks et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 122702 (2012)] reported backlit convergent ablator experiments demonstrating velocities approaching those required for ignition. This paper focusesmore » on implosion performance data in the “rocket curve” plane, velocity vs. ablator mass. These rocket curve data, along with supporting numerical simulations, show that the nominal 195 μm-thick ignition capsule would reach the ignition velocity goal V = 370 km/s with low ablator mass remaining–below the goal of M = 0.25 mg. This finding led to experiments with thicker capsule ablators. A recent symmetry capsule experiment with a 20 μm thicker capsule driven by 520 TW, 1.86 MJ laser pulse (along with a companion backlit convergent ablator experiment) appears to have demonstrated V≥350 km/s with ablator mass remaining above the ignition goal.« less

  5. Transport and spatial energy deposition of relativistic electrons in copper-doped fast ignition plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Jarrott, L. C.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; ...

    2017-10-24

    Fast electron transport and spatial energy deposition are investigated in integrated cone-guided Fast Ignition experiments by measuring fast electron induced copper K-shell emission using a copper tracer added to deuterated plastic shells with a geometrically reentrant gold cone. Experiments were carried out at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics on the OMEGA/OMEGA-EP Laser where the plastic shells were imploded using 54 of the 60 OMEGA60 beams (3ω, 20 kJ), while the high intensity OMEGA-EP (BL2) beam (1 ω, 10 ps, 500 J, I peak > 10 19 W/cm 2) was focused onto the inner cone tip. Here, a retrograde analysis usingmore » the hybrid-PIC electron transport code, ZUMA, is performed to examine the sensitivity of the copper Kα spatial profile on the laser-produced fast electrons, facilitating the optimization of new target point designs and laser configurations to improve the compressed core areal density by a factor of 4 and the fast electron energy coupling by a factor of 3.5.« less

  6. Ignition and combustion of aluminum/magnesium alloy particles in O2 at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Ted A.; Burton, Rodney L.; Krier, Herman

    1993-01-01

    The ignition and combustion of Al, Mg, and Al/Mg alloy particles in 99 percent O2/1 percent N2 mixtures is investigated at high temperatures and pressures for rocket engine applications. The 20-micron particles contain 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 wt pct Mg alloyed with Al, and are ignited in oxygen using the reflected shock in a single-pulse shock tube near the endwall. Using this technique, the ignition delay and combustion times of the particles are measured at temperatures up to 3250 K as a function of Mg content for oxygen pressures of 8.5, 17, and 34 atm. An ignition model is developed that employs a simple lumped capacitance energy equation and temperature and pressure dependent particle and gas properties. Good agreement is achieved between the measured and predicted trends in the ignition delay times.

  7. Evaluation and Characterization Study of Dual Pulse Laser-Induced Spark (DPLIS) for Rocket Engine Ignition System Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Robin; Wehrmeyer, Joseph; Trinh, Huu; Early, James

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the progress of technology development of a laser ignition system at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Laser ignition has been used at MSFC in recent test series to successfully ignite RP1/GOX propellants in a subscale rocket chamber, and other past studies by NASA GRC have demonstrated the use of laser ignition for rocket engines. Despite the progress made in the study of this ignition method, the logistics of depositing laser sparks inside a rocket chamber have prohibited its use. However, recent advances in laser designs, the use of fiber optics, and studies of multi-pulse laser formats3 have renewed the interest of rocket designers in this state-of the-art technology which offers the potential elimination of torch igniter systems and their associated mechanical parts, as well as toxic hypergolic ignition systems. In support of this interest to develop an alternative ignition system that meets the risk-reduction demands of Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT), characterization studies of a dual pulse laser format for laser-induced spark ignition are underway at MSFC. Results obtained at MSFC indicate that a dual pulse format can produce plasmas that absorb the laser energy as efficiently as a single pulse format, yet provide a longer plasma lifetime. In an experiments with lean H2/air propellants, the dual pulse laser format, containing the same total energy of a single laser pulse, produced a spark that was superior in its ability to provide sustained ignition of fuel-lean H2/air propellants. The results from these experiments are being used to optimize a dual pulse laser format for future subscale rocket chamber tests. Besides the ignition enhancement, the dual pulse technique provides a practical way to distribute and deliver laser light to the combustion chamber, an important consideration given the limitation of peak power that can be delivered through optical fibers. With this knowledge, scientists and engineers at Los

  8. [Exposure to electrocution by automotive ignition system in the work environment of car service employees].

    PubMed

    Fryśkowski, Bernard; Swiatek-Fryśkowska, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Automotive ignition system diagnostic procedures involve a specific kind of action due to the presence of high voltage pulses rated of roughly several dozen kilovolts. Therefore, the repairers employed at car service coming into direct contact with electrical equipment of ignition systems are exposed to risk of electric shock. Typically, the electric discharge energy of automotive ignition systems is not high enough to cause fibrillation due to the electric effect on the heart. Nevertheless, there are drivers and car service employees who use electronic cardiac pacemakers susceptible to high voltage pulses. The influence of high-voltage ignition systems on the human body, especially in case of electric injury, has not been comprehensively elucidated. Therefore, relatively few scientific papers address this problem. The aim of this paper is to consider the electrical injury danger from automotive ignition systems, especially in people suffering from cardiac diseases. Some examples of the methods to reduce electric shock probability during diagnostic procedures of spark-ignition combustion engines are presented and discussed.

  9. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transportmore » power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve.« less

  10. Comparative simulation analysis on the ignition threshold of atmospheric He and Ar dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Congwei; Chang, Zhengshi; Chen, Sile; Ma, Hengchi; Mu, Haibao; Zhang, Guan-Jun

    2017-09-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is widely applied in many fields, and the discharge characteristics of insert gas have been the research focus for years. In this paper, fluid models of atmospheric Ar and He DBDs driven by 22 kHz sinusoidal voltage are built to analyze their ignition processes. The contributions of different electron sources in ignition process are analyzed, including the direct ionization of ground state atom, stepwise ionization of metastable particles, and secondary electron emission from dielectric wall, and they play different roles in different discharge stages. The Townsend direct ionization coefficient of He is higher than Ar with the same electrical field intensity, which is the direct reason for the different ignition thresholds between He and Ar. Further, the electron energy loss per free electron produced in Ar and He DBDs is discussed. It is found that the total electron energy loss rate of Ar is higher than He when the same electrical field is applied. The excitation reaction of Ar consumes the major electron energy but cannot produce free electrons effectively, which is the essential reason for the higher ignition threshold of Ar. The computation results of He and Ar extinction voltages can be explained in the view of electron energy loss, as well as the experimental results of different extinction voltages between Ar/NH3 and He DBDs.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Study on Effect of Sample Orientation on Auto-Ignition and Piloted Ignition of Poly(methyl methacrylate)

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Fei; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Kun; Wu, Zhi-Bo; Yang, Li-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the effect of seven different sample orientations from 0° to 90° on pilot and non-pilot ignition of PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) exposed to radiation has been studied with experimental and numerical methods. Some new and significant conclusions are drawn from the study, including a U-shape curve of ignition time and critical mass flux as sample angle increases for pilot ignition conditions. However, in auto-ignition, the ignition time and critical mass flux increases with sample angle α. Furthermore, a computational fluid dynamic model have been built based on the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS6) code to investigate the mechanisms controlling the dependence on sample orientation of the ignition of PMMA under external radiant heating. The results of theoretical analysis and modeling results indicate the decrease of total incident heat flux at sample surface plays the dominant role during the ignition processes of auto-ignition, but the volatiles gas flow has greater influence for piloted ignition conditions. PMID:28793421

  12. Ignition transient analysis of solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1990-01-01

    To predict pressure-time and thrust-time behavior of solid rocket motors, a one-dimensional numerical model is developed. The ignition phase of solid rocket motors (time less than 0.4 sec) depends critically on complex interactions among many elements, such as rocket geometry, heat and mass transfer, flow development, and chemical reactions. The present model solves the mass, momentum, and energy equations governing the transfer processes in the rocket chamber as well as the attached converging-diverging nozzle. A qualitative agreement with the SRM test data in terms of head-end pressure gradient and the total thrust build-up is obtained. Numerical results show that the burning rate in the star-segmented head-end section and the erosive burning are two important parameters in the ignition transient of the solid rocket motor (SRM).

  13. Plasma Properties of an Exploding Semiconductor Igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuirk, J. S.; Thomas, K. A.; Shaffer, E.; Malone, A. L.; Baginski, T.; Baginski, M. E.

    1997-11-01

    Requirements by the automotive industry for low-cost, pyrotechnic igniters for automotive airbags have led to the development of several semiconductor devices. The properties of the plasma produced by the vaporization of an exploding semiconductor are necessary in order to minimize the electrical energy requirements. This work considers two silicon-based semiconductor devices: the semiconductor bridge (SCB) and the semiconductor junction igniter both consisting of etched silicon with vapor deposited aluminum structures. Electrical current passing through the device heats a narrow junction region to the point of vaporization creating an aluminum and silicon low-temperature plasma. This work will investigate the electrical characteristics of both devices and infer the plasma properties. Furthermore optical spectral measurements will be taken of the exploding devices to estimate the temperature and density of the plasma.

  14. National Ignition Facility Laser System Performance

    DOE PAGES

    Spaeth, Mary L.; Manes, Kenneth R.; Bowers, M.; ...

    2017-03-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is the culmination of more than 40 years of work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory dedicated to the delivery of laser systems capable of driving experiments for the study of high-energy-density physics. Although NIF was designed to support a number of missions, it was clear from the beginning that its biggest challenge was to meet the requirements for pursuit of inertial confinement fusion. Meeting the Project Completion Criteria for NIF in 2009 and for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) in 2012 included meeting the NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria that were established formore » the project in 1994. Finally, during NIC and as NIF transitioned to a user facility, its goals were expanded to include requirements defined by the broader user community as well as by laser system designers and operators.« less

  15. The status of Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX) and prospects for inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azechi, H.; FIREX Project Team

    2016-05-01

    Here we report recent progress for the fast ignition inertial confinement fusion demonstration. The fraction of low energy (< 1 MeV) component of the relativistic electron beam (REB), which efficiently heats the fuel core, increases by a factor of 4 by enhancing pulse contrast of heating laser and removing preformed plasma sources. Kilo-tesla magnetic field is studied to guide the diverging REB to the fuel core. The transport simulation of the REB accelerated by the heating laser in the externally applied and compressed magnetic field indicates that the REB can be guided efficiently to the fuel core. The integrated simulation shows > 4% of the heating efficiency and > 4 keV of ion temperature are achievable by using GEKKO-XII and LFEX, properly designed cone-fuel and an external magnetic field.

  16. D-Cluster Converter Foil for Laser-Accelerated Deuteron Beams: Towards Deuteron-Beam-Driven Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, George H.

    Fast Ignition (FI) uses Petawatt laser generated particle beam pulse to ignite a small volume called a pre-compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target, and is the favored method to achieve the high energy gain per target burn needed for an attractive ICF power plant. Ion beams such as protons, deuterons or heavier carbon ions are especially appealing for FI as they have relative straight trajectory, and easier to focus on the fuel capsule. But current experiments have encountered problems with the 'converter-foil' which is irradiated by the Petawatt laser to produce the ion beams. The problems include depletion of themore » available ions in the convertor foils, and poor energy efficiency (ion beam energy/ input laser energy). We proposed to develop a volumetrically-loaded ultra-high-density deuteron deuterium cluster material as the basis for converter-foil for deuteron beam generation. The deuterons will fuse with the ICF DT while they slow down, providing an extra 'bonus' energy gain in addition to heating the hot spot. Also, due to the volumetric loading, the foil will provide sufficient energetic deuteron beam flux for 'hot spot' ignition, while avoiding the depletion problem encountered by current proton-driven FI foils. After extensive comparative studies, in Phase I, high purity PdO/Pd/PdO foils were selected for the high packing fraction D-Cluster converter foils. An optimized loading process has been developed to increase the cluster packing fraction in this type of foil. As a result, the packing fraction has been increased from 0.1% to 10% - meeting the original Phase I goal and representing a significant progress towards the beam intensities needed for both FI and pulsed neutron applications. Fast Ignition provides a promising approach to achieve high energy gain target performance needed for commercial Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This is now a realistic goal for near term in view of the anticipated ICF target burn at the National

  17. Ignition of Combustible Dust Clouds by Strong Capacitive Electric Sparks of Short Discharge Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhoff, Rolf K.

    2017-10-01

    It has been known for more than half a century that the discharge times of capacitive electric sparks can influence the minimum ignition energies of dust clouds substantially. Experiments by various workers have shown that net electric-spark energies for igniting explosive dust clouds in air were reduced by a factor of the order of 100 when spark discharge times were increased from a few μs to 0.1-1 ms. Experiments have also shown that the disturbance of the dust cloud by the shock/blast wave emitted by "short" spark discharges is a likely reason for this. The disturbance increases with increasing spark energy. In this paper a hitherto unpublished comprehensive study of this problem is presented. The work was performed about 50 years ago, using sparks of comparatively high energies (strong sparks). Lycopodium was used as test dust. The experiments were conducted in a brass vessel of 1 L volume. A transient dust cloud was generated in the vessel by a blast of compressed air. Synchronization of appearance of dust cloud and spark discharge was obtained by breaking the spark gap down by the dust cloud itself. This may in fact also be one possible synchronization mechanism in accidental industrial dust explosions initiated by electrostatic sparks. The experimental results for various spark energies were expressed as the probability of ignition, based on 100 replicate experiments, as a function of the nominal dust concentration. All probabilities obtained were 0%ignition source increased with the spark energy, that the minimum time of contact between the spark and the dust cloud for ignition to occur was a function of spark energy and nominal dust concentration, and that the stochastic element was the statistical distribution of the time interval between spark appearance and re-establishment of contact between spark channel and dust

  18. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  19. Three-Dimensional Measurement of the Helicity-Dependent Forces on a Mie Particle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lulu; Di Donato, Andrea; Ginis, Vincent; Kheifets, Simon; Amirzhan, Arman; Capasso, Federico

    2018-06-01

    Recently, it was shown that a Mie particle in an evanescent field ought to experience optical forces that depend on the helicity of the totally internally reflected beam. As yet, a direct measurement of such helicity-dependent forces has been elusive, as the widely differing force magnitudes in the three spatial dimensions place stringent demands on a measurement's sensitivity and range. In this study, we report the simultaneous measurement of all components of this polarization-dependent optical force by using a 3D force spectroscopy technique with femtonewton sensitivity. The vector force fields are compared quantitatively with our theoretical calculations as the polarization state of the incident light is varied and show excellent agreement. By plotting the 3D motion of the Mie particle in response to the switched force field, we offer visual evidence of the effect of spin momentum on the Poynting vector of an evanescent optical field.

  20. Three-Dimensional Measurement of the Helicity-Dependent Forces on a Mie Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lulu; Di Donato, Andrea; Ginis, Vincent; Kheifets, Simon; Amirzhan, Arman; Capasso, Federico

    2018-06-01

    Recently, it was shown that a Mie particle in an evanescent field ought to experience optical forces that depend on the helicity of the totally internally reflected beam. As yet, a direct measurement of such helicity-dependent forces has been elusive, as the widely differing force magnitudes in the three spatial dimensions place stringent demands on a measurement's sensitivity and range. In this study, we report the simultaneous measurement of all components of this polarization-dependent optical force by using a 3D force spectroscopy technique with femtonewton sensitivity. The vector force fields are compared quantitatively with our theoretical calculations as the polarization state of the incident light is varied and show excellent agreement. By plotting the 3D motion of the Mie particle in response to the switched force field, we offer visual evidence of the effect of spin momentum on the Poynting vector of an evanescent optical field.

  1. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  2. Inhomogeneities in particle composition of single, levitated aerosol particles observed by Mie resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Ulrich; Lienhard, Daniel; Bastelberger, Sandra; Steimer, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    Recent observations have indicated that organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere may exist in an amorphous semi-solid or even solid (i.e. glassy) state, e.g. [1]. The influence of highly viscous and glassy states on the timescale of aerosol particle equilibration with respect to water vapor have been investigated for some model systems of atmospheric aerosol, e.g. [2,3]. In particular, it has been shown that the kinetics of the water absorption/desorption process is controlled entirely by liquid-phase diffusion of water molecules for a highly viscous aerosol particle. A liquid phase diffusion model based on numerically solving the non-linear diffusion equation predicts strong internal gradients in water concentration when condensed phase diffusion impedes the water uptake from the gas phase [2]. Here we observe and quantify the internal concentration gradients in single, levitated, micron size aerosol particles of aqueous shikimic acid using elastic Mie resonance spectroscopy. A single, aqueous particle is levitated in an electro-dynamic balance (for details see [2]), dried for several days at room temperature, cooled to the target temperature and exposed to a rapid change in relative humidity. In addition to measuring the elastically backscattered light of a "white light" LED source and recording the full spectrum with a spectrograph as in [2], we use a tunable diode laser (TDL) to scan high resolution TE- and TM spectra. This combination allows observing various Mie resonance mode orders simultaneously. Since we perform the experiment at low temperatures and low humidities the changes in the Mie-spectra due to water uptake are sufficiently slow to resolve the kinetics. Experimental Mie resonance spectra are inverted to concentration profiles of water within the particle by applying the numerical diffusion model [2] in conjunction with Mie calculations of multilayered spheres [4]. [1] A. Virtanen et al. (2010): An amorphous solid state of biogenic secondary

  3. Ignition of a combustible half space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olmstead, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    A half space of combustible material is subjected to an arbitrary energy flux at the boundary where convection heat loss is also allowed. An asymptotic analysis of the temperature growth reveals two conditions necessary for ignition to occur. Cases of both large and order unity Lewis number are shown to lead to a nonlinear integral equation governing the thermal runaway. Some global and asymptotic properties of the integral equation are obtained.

  4. Propellant-Flow-Actuated Rocket Engine Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollen, Mark

    2013-01-01

    A rocket engine igniter has been created that uses a pneumatically driven hammer that, by specialized geometry, is induced into an oscillatory state that can be used to either repeatedly impact a piezoelectric crystal with sufficient force to generate a spark capable of initiating combustion, or can be used with any other system capable of generating a spark from direct oscillatory motion. This innovation uses the energy of flowing gaseous propellant, which by means of pressure differentials and kinetic motion, causes a hammer object to oscillate. The concept works by mass flows being induced through orifices on both sides of a cylindrical tube with one or more vent paths. As the mass flow enters the chamber, the pressure differential is caused because the hammer object is supplied with flow on one side and the other side is opened with access to the vent path. The object then crosses the vent opening and begins to slow because the pressure differential across the ball reverses due to the geometry in the tube. Eventually, the object stops because of the increasing pressure differential on the object until all of the kinetic energy has been transferred to the gas via compression. This is the point where the object reverses direction because of the pressure differential. This behavior excites a piezoelectric crystal via direct impact from the hammer object. The hammer strikes a piezoelectric crystal, then reverses direction, and the resultant high voltage created from the crystal is transferred via an electrode to a spark gap in the ignition zone, thereby providing a spark to ignite the engine. Magnets, or other retention methods, might be employed to favorably position the hammer object prior to start, but are not necessary to maintain the oscillatory behavior. Various manifestations of the igniter have been developed and tested to improve device efficiency, and some improved designs are capable of operation at gas flow rates of a fraction of a gram per second (0

  5. Heating efficiency evaluation with mimicking plasma conditions of integrated fast-ignition experiment.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Zhang, Zhe; Morace, Alessio; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Kojima, Sadaoki; Sakata, Shohei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Hattori, Shoji; Hosoda, Tatsuya; Lee, Seung Ho; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Youichiro; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Mima, Kunioki; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yamanoi, Kohei; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Tokita, Shigeki; Nakata, Yoshiki; Kawanaka, Junji; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to evaluate the energy-coupling efficiency from heating laser to a fuel core in the fast-ignition scheme of laser-driven inertial confinement fusion. Although the efficiency is determined by a wide variety of complex physics, from intense laser plasma interactions to the properties of high-energy density plasmas and the transport of relativistic electron beams (REB), here we simplify the physics by breaking down the efficiency into three measurable parameters: (i) energy conversion ratio from laser to REB, (ii) probability of collision between the REB and the fusion fuel core, and (iii) fraction of energy deposited in the fuel core from the REB. These three parameters were measured with the newly developed experimental platform designed for mimicking the plasma conditions of a realistic integrated fast-ignition experiment. The experimental results indicate that the high-energy tail of REB must be suppressed to heat the fuel core efficiently.

  6. Ignition in convective-diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotache, Catalin Grig

    The main goal of this work is understanding the controlling mechanisms and responses of forced ignition in an environment where chemistry and transport phenomena are intimately coupled. To analyze systematically this interaction the well-characterized counterflow configuration is selected whereupon a cold fuel jet impinges on a heated air jet, and ignites as the air temperature is raised gradually. In this configuration the ignition response is studied experimentally and numerically with extensive variations of the fuel dilution, flow strain rate, and ambient pressure, for hydrogen and Csb1{-}Csb4 paraffins. Experimentally, the temperatures are measured by thermocouple and Raman spectroscopy, while flow strain rates are determined through laser Doppler velocimetry. The experimental envelope comprises pressures of 0.1-8.0 atm, fuel concentrations from 0 to 100%, and strain rates between 50 and 700 ssp{-1}. Computations are performed using various detailed kinetic and transport models, whose adequacy is assessed by comparison with the experimental results. Through computational simulations, the controlling ignition mechanisms are isolated and analyzed. Simplified kinetic models are derived and evaluated, by using sensitivity/flux analyses and the Computational Singular Perturbation (CSP) method. The investigation demonstrates that the coupling chemistry-transport can produce unexpected responses, even for the arguably simplest Hsb2-air kinetic system. Here, up to three stable steady-states are identified experimentally for identical boundary conditions, corresponding to the distinct regimes of frozen flow, mild oxidation, and flaming combustion, respectively. These states can be accessed in a dual-staged ignition sequence, with radical runaway followed by thermokinetic ignition. The pattern, however, depends on the imposed parameters. Specifically, three ignition limits are found when pressure is varied; the first two are characterized by radical runaway only

  7. Effect of viscoplasticity on ignition sensitivity of an HMX based PBX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, D. Barrett; Zhou, Min

    2017-01-01

    The effect of viscoplastic deformation of the energetic component (HMX) on the mechanical, thermal, and ignition responses of a two-phase (HMX and Estane) PBX is analyzed. PBX microstructures are subjected to impact loading from a constant velocity piston traveling at a rate of 50 to 200 m/s. The analysis uses a 2D cohesive finite element framework, the focus of which is to evaluate the relative ignition sensitivity of the materials to determine the effect of the viscoplasticity of HMX on the responses. To delineate this effect, two sets of calculations are carried out; one set assumes the HMX grains are fully hyperelastic, and the other set assumes the HMX grains are elastic-viscoplastic. Results show that PBX specimens with elastic-viscoplastic HMX grains experience lower average and peak temperature rises, and as a result, show lower numbers of hotspots. An ignition criterion based on a criticality threshold obtained from chemical kinetics is used to quantify the ignition behavior of the materials. The criterion focuses on hotspot size and temperature to determine if a hotspot will undergo thermal runaway. It is found that the viscoplasticity of HMX increases the minimum load duration, mean load duration, threshold loading velocity, and total input energy required for ignition.

  8. Fundamental Interactions in Gasoline Compression Ignition Engines with Fuel Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolk, Benjamin Matthew

    Transportation accounted for 28% of the total U.S. energy demand in 2011, with 93% of U.S. transportation energy coming from petroleum. The large impact of the transportation sector on global climate change necessitates more-efficient, cleaner-burning internal combustion engine operating strategies. One such strategy that has received substantial research attention in the last decade is Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). Although the efficiency and emissions benefits of HCCI are well established, practical limits on the operating range of HCCI engines have inhibited their application in consumer vehicles. One such limit is at high load, where the pressure rise rate in the combustion chamber becomes excessively large. Fuel stratification is a potential strategy for reducing the maximum pressure rise rate in HCCI engines. The aim is to introduce reactivity gradients through fuel stratification to promote sequential auto-ignition rather than a bulk-ignition, as in the homogeneous case. A gasoline-fueled compression ignition engine with fuel stratification is termed a Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engine. Although a reasonable amount of experimental research has been performed for fuel stratification in GCI engines, a clear understanding of how the fundamental in-cylinder processes of fuel spray evaporation, mixing, and heat release contribute to the observed phenomena is lacking. Of particular interest is gasoline's pressure sensitive low-temperature chemistry and how it impacts the sequential auto-ignition of the stratified charge. In order to computationally study GCI with fuel stratification using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and chemical kinetics, two reduced mechanisms have been developed. The reduced mechanisms were developed from a large, detailed mechanism with about 1400 species for a 4-component gasoline surrogate. The two versions of the reduced mechanism developed in this work are: (1) a 96-species version and (2

  9. Compact Fast Ignition experiments using Joule-class tailored drive pulses under counterbeam configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yoshitaka; Hanayama, Ryohei; Ishii, Katsuhiro; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Sekine, Takashi; Takeuchi, Yasuki; Kurita, Takashi; Katoh, Yoshinori; Satoh, Nakahiro; Kurita, Norio; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Komeda, Osamu; Hioki, Tatsumi; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Miura, Eisuke; Iwamoto, Akifumi; Sakagami, Hitoshi

    2017-10-01

    Fast ignition (FI) is a form of inertial confinement fusion in which the ignition step and the compression step are separate processes resulting in a reduction of the symmetry requirement for hot spot generation. One of the problems of FI so far are the accessibility of an ignition laser pulse into the assembled core in which the driver energy is converted into relativistic electrons produced in the laser-plasma interaction. We have experimentally demonstrated that a tailored-pulse-assembled core with a diameter of 70 μ m, originally a deuterated polystyrene spherical shell of 500 μ m diameter, is flashed by directly counter irradiating 0.8 J/110 fs laser pulses [Y. MORI et al., PRL 2016]. This result indicates that once the assembled core is squeezed into the target center, the heating lasers can access the core's; edges and deposit their energy into the core. In this talk, we will discuss the heating effects in relation to formation of the assembled core.

  10. Numerical Analysis of the Interaction between Thermo-Fluid Dynamics and Auto-Ignition Reaction in Spark Ignition Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saijyo, Katsuya; Nishiwaki, Kazuie; Yoshihara, Yoshinobu

    The CFD simulations were performed integrating the low-temperature oxidation reaction. Analyses were made with respect to the first auto-ignition location in the case of a premixed-charge compression auto-ignition in a laminar flow field and in the case of the auto-ignition in an end gas during an S. I. Engine combustion process. In the latter simulation, the spatially-filtered transport equations were solved to express fluctuating temperatures in a turbulent flow in consideration of strong non-linearity to temperature in the reaction equations. It is suggested that the first auto-ignition location does not always occur at higher-temperature locations and that the difference in the locations of the first auto-ignition depends on the time period during which the local end gas temperature passes through the region of shorter ignition delay, including the NTC region.

  11. The National Ignition Facility: alignment from construction to shot operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, S. C.; Bliss, E.; Di Nicola, P.; Kalantar, D.; Lowe-Webb, R.; McCarville, T.; Nelson, D.; Salmon, T.; Schindler, T.; Villanueva, J.; Wilhelmsen, K.

    2010-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility in Livermore, California, completed it's commissioning milestone on March 10, 2009 when it fired all 192 beams at a combined energy of 1.1 MJ at 351nm. Subsequently, a target shot series from August through December of 2009 culminated in scale ignition target design experiments up to 1.2 MJ in the National Ignition Campaign. Preparations are underway through the first half of of 2010 leading to DT ignition and gain experiments in the fall of 2010 into 2011. The top level requirement for beam pointing to target of 50μm rms is the culmination of 15 years of engineering design of a stable facility, commissioning of precision alignment, and precise shot operations controls. Key design documents which guided this project were published in the mid 1990's, driving systems designs. Precision Survey methods were used throughout construction, commissioning and operations for precision placement. Rigorous commissioning processes were used to ensure and validate placement and alignment throughout commissioning and in present day operations. Accurate and rapid system alignment during operations is accomplished by an impressive controls system to align and validate alignment readiness, assuring machine safety and productive experiments.

  12. STUDENT AWARD FINALIST: Oxygen Pathways in Streamer Discharge for Transient Plasma Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, S. J.; Bowman, S.; Singleton, D.; Watrous, J.; Carter, C.; Lempert, W.; Gundersen, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    The use of streamers for the ignition of fuels, also known as transient plasma ignition (TPI), has been shown in a variety of engines to improve combustion through decreased ignition delay, increased lean burn capability and increased energy release relative to conventional spark ignition. The mechanisms behind these improvements, however, remain poorly understood. Temperature measurements by optical emission spectroscopy demonstrate that ignition by TPI is a nonthermal process, and thus is almost entirely dependent on the production and presence of electron impact-created active species in the discharge afterglow. Of particular interest are active oxygen species due to their relatively long lifetimes at high pressures and the pivotal role they play in combustion reactions. In order to elucidate the oxygen pathways, here we report the investigation of the temporal evolution of the populations of atomic oxygen and ozone by use of two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) and UV absorption, respectively. Experimental results are presented and compared to kinetic modeling of the streamers. Future experiments are proposed to better understand the physics behind TPI. Supported by NSF, AFOSR, NumerEx-ONR, AFRL-WPAFB.

  13. Planar Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Scale Lengths at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Seka, W.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Hohenberger, M.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Masse, L.; Goyon, C.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    The first experiments at the National Ignition Facility to probe laser-plasma interactions and the hot electron production at scale lengths relevant to direct-drive ignition are reported. The irradiation on one side of planar CH foils generated a plasma at the quarter-critical surface with predicted density scale lengths of Ln 600 μm, measured electron temperatures of Te 3.5 to 4.0 keV, and overlapped laser intensities of I 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2. Optical emission from stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and at ω/2 are correlated with the time-dependent hard x-ray signal. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons increased from 0.5 % to 2.3 % as the laser intensity increased from 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2, while the hot electron temperature was nearly constant around 40 to 50 keV. Only a sharp red-shifted feature is observed around ω/2, and both refracted and sidescattered SRS are detected, suggesting that multibeam SRS contributes to, and may even dominate, hot-electron production. These results imply a diminished presence of two-plasmon decay relative to SRS at these conditions, which has implications for hot-electron preheat mitigation strategies for direct-drive ignition. This work is supported by the DOE NNSA under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Fundamental Studies of Ignition Process in Large Natural Gas Engines Using Laser Spark Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Azer Yalin; Bryan Willson

    Past research has shown that laser ignition provides a potential means to reduce emissions and improve engine efficiency of gas-fired engines to meet longer-term DOE ARES (Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems) targets. Despite the potential advantages of laser ignition, the technology is not seeing practical or commercial use. A major impediment in this regard has been the 'open-path' beam delivery used in much of the past research. This mode of delivery is not considered industrially practical owing to safety factors, as well as susceptibility to vibrations, thermal effects etc. The overall goal of our project has been to develop technologies andmore » approaches for practical laser ignition systems. To this end, we are pursuing fiber optically coupled laser ignition system and multiplexing methods for multiple cylinder engine operation. This report summarizes our progress in this regard. A partial summary of our progress includes: development of a figure of merit to guide fiber selection, identification of hollow-core fibers as a potential means of fiber delivery, demonstration of bench-top sparking through hollow-core fibers, single-cylinder engine operation with fiber delivered laser ignition, demonstration of bench-top multiplexing, dual-cylinder engine operation via multiplexed fiber delivered laser ignition, and sparking with fiber lasers. To the best of our knowledge, each of these accomplishments was a first.« less

  15. Hydrogen-oxygen catalytic ignition and thruster investigation. Volume 1: Catalytic ignition and low pressure thruster evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental and analytical program was conducted to evaluate catalytic igniter operational limits, igniter scaling criteria, and delivered performance of cooled, flightweight gaseous hydrogen-oxygen reaction control thrusters. Specific goals were to: (1) establish operating life and environmental effects for both Shell 405-ABSG and Engelhard MFSA catalysts, (2) provide generalized igniter design guidelines for high response without flashback, and (3) to determine overall performance of thrusters at chamber pressures of 15 and 300 psia (103 and 2068 kN/sq m) and thrust levels of 30 and 1500 lbf, respectively. The experimental results have demonstrated the feasibility of reliable, high response catalytic ignition and the effectiveness of ducted chamber cooling for a high performance flightweight thruster. This volume presents the results of the catalytic igniter and low pressure thruster evaluations are presented.

  16. Aerospace Laser Ignition/Ablation Variable High Precision Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor); Edwards, David L. (Inventor); Campbell, Jason J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A laser ignition/ablation propulsion system that captures the advantages of both liquid and solid propulsion. A reel system is used to move a propellant tape containing a plurality of propellant material targets through an ignition chamber. When a propellant target is in the ignition chamber, a laser beam from a laser positioned above the ignition chamber strikes the propellant target, igniting the propellant material and resulting in a thrust impulse. The propellant tape is advanced, carrying another propellant target into the ignition chamber. The propellant tape and ignition chamber are designed to ensure that each ignition event is isolated from the remaining propellant targets. Thrust and specific impulse may by precisely controlled by varying the synchronized propellant tape/laser speed. The laser ignition/ablation propulsion system may be scaled for use in small and large applications.

  17. Manufacturing of Igniters for NHB 8060.1 Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this WJI is to incorporate a standard procedure to prepare, certify, and ship standard NHB 8060.1B and NHB 8060.1C igniters for flammability testing and to update LJI-320-35-18. The operations are divided into five parts as follows: A. Preparing the igniter mix; B. Extruding the igniters; C. Curing, cutting, and weighing the igniters; D. Certifying the igniters and E. Packaging, storing, and shipping the igniters

  18. Prévalence et facteurs associés à l’anémie en grossesse à l’Hôpital Général de Douala

    PubMed Central

    Tchente, Charlotte Nguefack; Tsakeu, Eveline Ngouadjeu Dongho; Nguea, Arlette Géraldine; Njamen, Théophile Nana; Ekane, Gregory Halle; Priso, Eugene Belley

    2016-01-01

    Introduction L’anémie est un problème de santé publique, prédominant chez les enfants et les femmes en âge de procréer. L’objectif de l’étude était de déterminer la prévalence et les facteurs associés à l’anémie chez les femmes enceintes à l’Hôpital Général de Douala. Méthodes Il s’agissait d’une étude transversale qui s’est déroulée de juillet 2012 à juillet 2013. Toutes les femmes enceintes consentantes se présentant pour consultation prénatale et ayant réalisées une numération formule sanguine (NFS) étaient incluses. Les caractéristiques sociodémographiques, les antécédents obstétricaux et les résultats de la NFS étaient enregistrés sur une fiche technique pré-testée. L’anémie était définie selon les critères de l’OMS. Après quelques statistiques descriptives, nous avons effectué une analyse bivariée à l’aide du test de Chi 2 et la probabilité exacte de Fisher pour rechercher les facteurs associés à l’anémie. Une valeur de p< 0,05 était considérée significative. Résultats Au total 415 gestantes ont été recrutées. La prévalence de l’anémie était de 39,8%. L’âge moyen était de 29,89±4,835ans. Le taux moyen d’hémoglobine était de 10,93±1,23.L’anémie normochrome normocytaire (53,3%) était prédominante. L’anémie était sévère dans 2,4% des cas. L’anémie en grossesse était significativement associée aux antécédents de pathologies chroniques (P=0,02) et d’anémie gravidique antérieure (P=0,003). L’anémie était plus observée au 3ème trimestre (P=0,04) et l’allaitement maternel était protecteur (P=0,02). Conclusion La prévalence de l’anémie chez la femme enceinte reste élevée. Un accent doit être mis sur une meilleureprise en charge des pathologies chroniques chez les gestantes et sur leur suivi en post natal afin de corriger l’anémie avant la grossesse ultérieure. PMID:28292095

  19. Hohlraum-Driven Ignition-Like Double-Shell Implosion Experiments on Omega: Analysis and Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P; Robey, H F; Park, H-S

    2003-08-22

    An experimental campaign to study hohlraum-driven ignition-like double-shell target performance using the Omega laser facility has begun. These targets are intended to incorporate as many ignition-like properties of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) double-shell ignition design [1,2] as possible, given the energy constraints of the Omega laser. In particular, this latest generation of Omega double-shells is nominally predicted to produce over 99% of the (clean) DD neutron yield from the compressional or stagnation phase of the implosion as required in the NIF ignition design. By contrast, previous double-shell experience on Omega [3] was restricted to cases where a significantmore » fraction of the observed neutron yield was produced during the earlier shock convergence phase where the effects of mix are deemed negligibly small. These new targets are specifically designed to have optimized fall-line behavior for mitigating the effects of pusher-fuel mix after deceleration onset and, thereby, providing maximum neutron yield from the stagnation phase. Experimental results from this recent Omega ignition-like double-shell implosion campaign show favorable agreement with two-dimensional integrated hohlraum simulation studies when enhanced (gold) hohlraum M-band (2-5 keV) radiation is included at a level consistent with observations.« less

  20. The Effect of Particle Properties on Hot Particle Spot Fire Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Casey David

    experiences losses to the cooling particle and must generate a larger amount of heat for ignition to occur. Because cooling is so important, the initial bulk energy is more useful than impact temperature for predicting ignition by smaller particles. Along those lines, the additional heat of melting available to molten particles helps to resist particle cooling; as such, molten aluminum particles 3.5 -- 7 mm in diameter can ignite at lower temperatures than solid particles of the same size with similar thermal properties. Decreasing volumetric heat capacity does increase minimum ignition temperature somewhat, but this effect is reduced for larger particles. Emissivity does not appear to have a significant effect on ignition propensity, suggesting that, over the timescales of ignition, radiation heat transfer is small relative to other modes of particle heat loss.

  1. Monocrystalline solar cells performance coated by silver nanoparticles: Effect of NPs sizes from point of view Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnoby, Rasha M.; Mourad, M. Hussein; Elnaby, Salah L. Hassab; Abou Kana, Maram T. H.

    2018-05-01

    Solar based cells coated by nanoparticles (NPs) acknowledge potential utilizing as a part of photovoltaic innovation. The acquired silicon solar cells (Si-SCs) coated with different sizes of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as well as uncoated were fabricated in our lab. The sizes and optical properties of prepared NPs were characterized by spectroscopic techniques and Mie theory respectively. The reflectivity of Si-SCs showed reduction of this property as the size of NPs increased. Electrical properties as open circuit current, fill factor and output power density were assessed and discussed depending on point of view of Mie theory for the optical properties of NPs. Also, photostabilities of SCs were assessed using diode laser of wavelength 450 nm and power 300 mW. Coated SCs with the largest Ag NPs size showed the highest Photostability due to its highest scattering efficiency according to Mie theory concept.

  2. Optimum hot electron production with low-density foams for laser fusion by fast ignition.

    PubMed

    Lei, A L; Tanaka, K A; Kodama, R; Kumar, G R; Nagai, K; Norimatsu, T; Yabuuchi, T; Mima, K

    2006-06-30

    We propose a foam cone-in-shell target design aiming at optimum hot electron production for the fast ignition. A thin low-density foam is proposed to cover the inner tip of a gold cone inserted in a fuel shell. An intense laser is then focused on the foam to generate hot electrons for the fast ignition. Element experiments demonstrate increased laser energy coupling efficiency into hot electrons without increasing the electron temperature and beam divergence with foam coated targets in comparison with solid targets. This may enhance the laser energy deposition in the compressed fuel plasma.

  3. On the path to fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabak, M.

    2016-10-01

    There is a need to develop alternate energy sources in the coming century because fossil fuels will become depleted and their use may lead to global climate change. Inertial fusion can become such an energy source, but significant progress must be made before its promise is realized. The high-density approach to inertial fusion suggested by Nuckolls et al. leads reaction chambers compatible with civilian power production. Methods to achieve the good control of hydrodynamic stability and implosion symmetry required to achieve these high fuel densities will be discussed. Fast Ignition, a technique that achieves fusion ignition by igniting fusion fuel after it is assembled, will be described along with its gain curves. Fusion costs of energy for conventional hotspot ignition will be compared with those of Fast Ignition and their capital costs compared with advanced fission plants. Finally, techniques that may improve possible Fast Ignition gains by an order of magnitude and reduce driver scales by an order of magnitude below conventional ignition requirements are described.

  4. Development of an ejecta particle size measurement diagnostic based on Mie scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, Martin Michael; Buttler, William Tillman; Frayer, Daniel K.

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of extracting the size of particles ejected from shocked metal surfaces (ejecta) from the angular distribution of light scattered by a cloud of such particles. The basis of the technique is the Mie theory of scattering, and implicit in this approach are the assumptions that the scattering particles are spherical and that single scattering conditions prevail. The meaning of this latter assumption, as far as experimental conditions are concerned, will become clear later. The solution to Maxwell’s equations for spherical particles illuminated by a plane electromagnetic wave was derived bymore » Gustav Mie more than 100 years ago, but several modern treatises discuss this solution in great detail. The solution is a complicated series expansion of the scattered electric field, as well as the field within the particle, from which the total scattering and absorption cross sections as well as the angular distribution of scattered intensity can be calculated numerically. The detailed nature of the scattering is determined by the complex index of refraction of the particle material as well as the particle size parameter, x, which is the product of the wavenumber of the incident light and the particle radius, i.e. x = 2rπ= λ. Figure 1 shows the angular distribution of scattered light for different particle size parameters and two orthogonal incident light polarizations as calculated using the Mie solution. It is obvious that the scattering pattern is strongly dependent on the particle size parameter, becoming more forward-directed and less polarizationdependent as the particle size parameter increases. This trend forms the basis for the diagnostic design.« less

  5. Promotion of methane ignition by the laser heating of suspended nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakon, A. V.; Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.; Mikheyeva, E. Yu; Musikhin, S. A.; Selyakov, I. N.

    2018-01-01

    The influence of laser heated iron and carbon nanoparticles on ignition of 20 vol% stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture in argon was studied experimentally in shock tube reactor. The concentration of nanoparticles 0.3-2.0 ppm was measured by laser light extinction. The particles were heated by Nd:Yag laser pulse operated at wavelength 1064 nm. The ignition delay times were registered by increase of OH chemiluminescence and pressure rise. The temperatures of laser heated particles and their sizes were measured by laser induced incandescence technique. The significant decrease of ignition delay times were found at addition of iron particles heated by laser pulse to the combustible mixture at the temperatures less than 1400 K. Analysis performed has shown that the effect supposedly involves catalytic reactions of methane decomposition on the surface of heated particles and allowed estimating their effective activation energy.

  6. Effects of the injected trigger pulse focusing and timing on the ignition and gain of dense static, or imploding DT fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Angelo; Pais, Vicente A.

    1998-07-01

    We discuss two issues relevant for the feasibility of the scheme in which a heavy ion pulse is used to ignite a DT fuel spherically compressed, by laser induced ablation, along a low adiabat (no self-ignition). The discussed issues are (i) the degree of synchronism between the laser driven implosion and the trigger pulse; (ii) the requirements on focusing for the trigger beam. The numerical simulation have been made by using cylindrical heavy ion beams with gaussian radial distribution, truncated where the intensity is {1}/{e-4} of the maximum. The parameter ( dbeam), used to measure the focusing, is the diameter of the circle where the intensity is {1}/{e} of the maximum (energy content ≈ 64% of the total energy). Requirements on focusing have been first explored by simulating (2D) the irradiation of static DT cylinders at 200 g/cm 3 by coaxially impinging 15 GeV Bi ions. The ignition conditions have been studied for pulses having 10 ps or 50 ps duration. For both the cases, the ignition energy ( Emin) is constant for spot radii smaller than 50 μm. In the range 50-140 μm the ignition energy increases linearly (3 × Emin at 140 μm, with Emin = 40 kJ for 10 ps pulses, Emin = 100 kJ for 50 ps pulses). The study on synchronism has been performed by simulating (2D) the irradiation, by a heavy ion beam, of a laser imploded spherical DT shell (initial aspect ratio 10). The trigger beam was started at different times near the stagnation, and the initial fuel state (field of velocity, density, temperature, etc.) was that computed by a 1D simulation. It has been found that ignition, and almost constant thermonuclear energy release, can be obtained by triggering within a temporal window of the order of 1 ns, around the stagnation. The interplay between focusing and synchronization for the ignition of the spherical imploding fuel has also been studied. The heavy ion pulse duration was maintained constant at 50 ps (FWHM). Ignition conditions have been studied for trigger

  7. 14 CFR 33.37 - Ignition system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ignition system. 33.37 Section 33.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.37 Ignition system. Each spark ignition engine must have a...

  8. Investigation of Al/CuO multilayered thermite ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicollet, Andréa; Lahiner, Guillaume; Belisario, Andres; Souleille, Sandrine; Djafari-Rouhani, Mehdi; Estève, Alain; Rossi, Carole

    2017-01-01

    The ignition of the Al/CuO multilayered material is studied experimentally to explore the effects of the heating surface area, layering, and film thickness on the ignition characteristics and reaction performances. After the description of the micro-initiator devices and ignition conditions, we show that the heating surface area must be properly calibrated to optimize the nanothermite ignition performances. We demonstrated experimentally that a heating surface area of 0.25 mm2 is sufficient to ignite a multilayered thermite film of 1.6 mm wide by a few cm long, with a success rate of 100%. A new analytical and phenomenological ignition model based on atomic diffusion across layers and thermal exchange is also proposed. This model considers that CuO first decomposes into Cu2O, and then the oxygen diffuses across the Cu2O and Al2O3 layers before reaching the Al layer, where it reacts to form Al2O3. The theoretical results in terms of ignition response times confirm the experimental observation. The increase of the heating surface area leads to an increase of the ignition response time and ignition power threshold (go/no go condition). We also provide evidence that, for any heating surface area, the ignition time rapidly decreases when the electrical power density increases until an asymptotic value. This time point is referred to as the minimum response ignition time, which is a characteristic of the multilayered thermite itself. At the stoichiometric ratio (Al thickness is half of the CuO thickness), the minimum ignition response time can be easily tuned from 59 μs to 418 ms by tuning the heating surface area. The minimum ignition response time increases when the bilayer thickness increases. This work not only provides a set of micro-initiator design rules to obtain the best ignition conditions and reaction performances but also details a reliable and robust MicroElectroMechanical Systems process to fabricate igniters and brings new understanding of phenomena

  9. Laser ignition application in a space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Larry C.; Culley, Dennis E.

    1993-01-01

    A laser ignition system is proposed for the Combustion Experiment Module on an orbiting spacecraft. The results of a design study are given using the scheduled 'Flame Ball Experiment' as the design guidelines. Three laser ignition mechanisms and wavelengths are evaluated. A prototype laser is chosen and its specifications are given, followed by consideration of the beam optical arrangement, the ignition power requirement, the laser ignition system weight, size, reliability, and laser cooling and power consumption. Electromagnetic interference to the onboard electronics caused by the laser ignition process is discussed. Finally, ground tests are suggested.

  10. Hohlraum energetics scaling to 520 TW on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Callahan, D. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Bennedetti, R.; Berger, R. L.; Bradley, D.; Dewald, E. L.; Bass, I.; Bennett, C.; Bowers, M.; Brunton, G.; Bude, J.; Burkhart, S.; Condor, A.; Di Nicola, J. M.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Erbert, G.; Folta, J.; Grim, G.; Glenn, S.; Hamza, A.; Haan, S. W.; Heebner, J.; Henesian, M.; Hermann, M.; Hicks, D. G.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jancaitis, K.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D.; Khan, S. F.; Kirkwood, R.; Kyrala, G. A.; LaFortune, K.; Landen, O. L.; Lagin, L.; Larson, D.; Pape, S. Le; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Michel, P. A.; Miller, P.; Montincelli, M.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Nostrand, M.; Olson, R. E.; Pak, A.; Park, H. S.; Patel, J. P.; Pelz, L.; Ralph, J.; Regan, S. P.; Robey, H. F.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, J. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaw, M.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Suratwala, T.; Suter, L. J.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Wegner, P.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C.; Wilkens, H.; Williams, E. A.; Edwards, M. J.; Remington, B. A.; MacGowan, B. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Lindl, J. D.; Atherton, L. J.; Batha, S. H.; Moses, E.

    2013-05-01

    Indirect drive experiments have now been carried out with laser powers and energies up to 520 TW and 1.9 MJ. These experiments show that the energy coupling to the target is nearly constant at 84% ± 3% over a wide range of laser parameters from 350 to 520 TW and 1.2 to 1.9 MJ. Experiments at 520 TW with depleted uranium hohlraums achieve radiation temperatures of ˜330 ± 4 eV, enough to drive capsules 20 μm thicker than the ignition point design to velocities near the ignition goal of 370 km/s. A series of three symcap implosion experiments with nearly identical target, laser, and diagnostics configurations show the symmetry and drive are reproducible at the level of ±8.5% absolute and ±2% relative, respectively.

  11. Ignition and combustion characteristics of metallized propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turns, Stephen R.; Mueller, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations focusing on secondary atomization and ignition characteristics of aluminum/liquid hydrocarbon slurry propellants were conducted. Experimental efforts included the application of a laser-based, two-color, forward-scatter technique to simultaneously measure free-flying slurry droplet diameters and velocities for droplet diameters in the range of 10-200 microns. A multi-diffusion flame burner was used to create a high-temperature environment into which a dilute stream of slurry droplets could be introduced. Narrowband measurements of radiant emission were used to determine if ignition of the aluminum in the slurry droplet had occurred. Models of slurry droplet shell formation were applied to aluminum/liquid hydrocarbon propellants and used to ascertain the effects of solids loading and ultimate particle size on the minimum droplet diameter that will permit secondary atomization. For a 60 weight-percent Al slurry, the limiting critical diameter was predicted to be 34.7 microns which is somewhat greater than the 20-25 micron limiting diameters determined in the experiments. A previously developed model of aluminum ignition in a slurry droplet was applied to the present experiments and found to predict ignition times in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. A model was also developed that predicts the mechanical stress in the droplet shell and a parametric study was conducted. A one-dimensional model of a slurry-fueled rocket combustion chamber was developed. This model includes the processes of liquid hydrocarbon burnout, secondary atomization, aluminum ignition, and aluminum combustion. Also included is a model for radiant heat transfer from the hot aluminum oxide particles to the chamber walls. Exercising this model shows that only a modest amount of secondary atomization is required to reduce residence times for aluminum burnout, and thereby maintain relatively short chamber lengths. The model also predicts

  12. Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures.

  13. Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.

    1998-05-26

    Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures. 18 figs.

  14. Short pulse, high resolution, backlighters for point projection high-energy radiography at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R.; Bailey, C.; Bradley, D. K.

    High-resolution, high-energy X-ray backlighters are very active area of research for radiography experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)], in particular those aiming at obtaining Compton-scattering produced radiographs from the cold, dense fuel surrounding the hot spot. We report on experiments to generate and characterize point-projection-geometry backlighters using short pulses from the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) [Crane et al., J. Phys. 244, 032003 (2010); Di Nicola et al., Proc. SPIE 2015, 93450I-12], at the NIF, focused on Au micro-wires. We show the first hard X-ray radiographs, at photon energies exceeding 60 keV,more » of static objects obtained with 30 ps-long ARC laser pulses, and the measurements of strength of the X-ray emission, the pulse duration and the source size of the Au micro-wire backlighters. For the latter, a novel technique has been developed and successfully applied.« less

  15. Short pulse, high resolution, backlighters for point projection high-energy radiography at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, R.; Bailey, C.; Bradley, D. K.; Bowers, M.; Chen, H.; Di Nicola, J. M.; Di Nicola, P.; Gururangan, G.; Hall, G. N.; Hardy, C. M.; Hargrove, D.; Hermann, M.; Hohenberger, M.; Holder, J. P.; Hsing, W.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D.; Khan, S.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Lawson, J.; Martinez, D.; Masters, N.; Nafziger, J. R.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Okui, J.; Palmer, D.; Sigurdsson, R.; Vonhof, S.; Wallace, R. J.; Zobrist, T.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution, high-energy X-ray backlighters are very active area of research for radiography experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)], in particular those aiming at obtaining Compton-scattering produced radiographs from the cold, dense fuel surrounding the hot spot. We report on experiments to generate and characterize point-projection-geometry backlighters using short pulses from the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) [Crane et al., J. Phys. 244, 032003 (2010); Di Nicola et al., Proc. SPIE 2015, 93450I-12], at the NIF, focused on Au micro-wires. We show the first hard X-ray radiographs, at photon energies exceeding 60 keV, of static objects obtained with 30 ps-long ARC laser pulses, and the measurements of strength of the X-ray emission, the pulse duration and the source size of the Au micro-wire backlighters. For the latter, a novel technique has been developed and successfully applied.

  16. Short pulse, high resolution, backlighters for point projection high-energy radiography at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Tommasini, R.; Bailey, C.; Bradley, D. K.; ...

    2017-05-09

    High-resolution, high-energy X-ray backlighters are very active area of research for radiography experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)], in particular those aiming at obtaining Compton-scattering produced radiographs from the cold, dense fuel surrounding the hot spot. We report on experiments to generate and characterize point-projection-geometry backlighters using short pulses from the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) [Crane et al., J. Phys. 244, 032003 (2010); Di Nicola et al., Proc. SPIE 2015, 93450I-12], at the NIF, focused on Au micro-wires. We show the first hard X-ray radiographs, at photon energies exceeding 60 keV,more » of static objects obtained with 30 ps-long ARC laser pulses, and the measurements of strength of the X-ray emission, the pulse duration and the source size of the Au micro-wire backlighters. For the latter, a novel technique has been developed and successfully applied.« less

  17. Ignition of Cellulosic Paper at Low Radiant Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Alan

    1996-01-01

    The ignition of cellulosic paper by low level thermal radiation is investigated. Past work on radiative ignition of paper is briefly reviewed. No experimental study has been reported for radiative ignition of paper at irradiances below 10 Watts/sq.cm. An experimental study of radiative ignition of paper at these low irradiances is reported. Experimental parameters investigated and discussed include radiant power levels incident on the sample, the method of applying the radiation (focussed vs. diffuse Gaussian source), the presence and relative position of a separate pilot ignition source, and the effects of natural convection (buoyancy) on the ignition process in a normal gravity environment. It is observed that the incident radiative flux (in W/sq.cm) has the greatest influence on ignition time. For a given flux level, a focussed Gaussian source is found to be advantageous to a more diffuse, lower amplitude, thermal source. The precise positioning of a pilot igniter relative to gravity and to the fuel sample affects the ignition process, but the precise effects are not fully understood. Ignition was more readily achieved and sustained with a horizontal fuel sample, indicating the buoyancy plays a role in the ignition process of cellulosic paper. Smoldering combustion of doped paper samples was briefly investigated, and results are discussed.

  18. 14 CFR 33.69 - Ignitions system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.69 Ignitions system. Each..., except that only one igniter is required for fuel burning augmentation systems. [Amdt. 33-6, 39 FR 35466... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ignitions system. 33.69 Section 33.69...

  19. 14 CFR 33.69 - Ignitions system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.69 Ignitions system. Each..., except that only one igniter is required for fuel burning augmentation systems. [Amdt. 33-6, 39 FR 35466... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ignitions system. 33.69 Section 33.69...

  20. 14 CFR 33.69 - Ignitions system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.69 Ignitions system. Each..., except that only one igniter is required for fuel burning augmentation systems. [Amdt. 33-6, 39 FR 35466... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ignitions system. 33.69 Section 33.69...

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF AN RH -DENUDED MIE ACTIVE SAMPLING SYSTEM AND TARGETED AEROSOL CALIBRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The MIE pDR 1200 nephelometer provides time resolved aerosol concentrations during personal and fixed-site sampling. Active (pumped) operation allows defining an upper PM2.5 particle size, however, this dramatically increases the aerosol mass passing through the phot...

  2. Demonstration of Ignition Radiation Temperatures in Indirect-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Adams, P. A.; Alfonso, J. B.; Alger, E. T.; Alherz, Z.; Alvarez, L. F.; Alvarez, S. S.; Amick, P. V.; Andersson, K. S.; Andrews, S. D.; Antonini, G. J.; Arnold, P. A.; Atkinson, D. P.; Auyang, L.; Azevedo, S. G.; Balaoing, B. N. M.; Baltz, J. A.; Barbosa, F.; Bardsley, G. W.; Barker, D. A.; Barnes, A. I.; Baron, A.; Beeler, R. G.; Beeman, B. V.; Belk, L. R.; Bell, J. C.; Bell, P. M.; Berger, R. L.; Bergonia, M. A.; Bernardez, L. J.; Berzins, L. V.; Bettenhausen, R. C.; Bezerides, L.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Bishop, C. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bopp, D. R.; Borgman, J. A.; Bower, J. R.; Bowers, G. A.; Bowers, M. W.; Boyle, D. T.; Bradley, D. K.; Bragg, J. L.; Braucht, J.; Brinkerhoff, D. L.; Browning, D. F.; Brunton, G. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burns, S. R.; Burns, K. E.; Burr, B.; Burrows, L. M.; Butlin, R. K.; Cahayag, N. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Cardinale, P. S.; Carey, R. W.; Carlson, J. W.; Casey, A. D.; Castro, C.; Celeste, J. R.; Chakicherla, A. Y.; Chambers, F. W.; Chan, C.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Chang, C.; Chapman, R. F.; Charron, K.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, M. J.; Churby, A. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Cline, B. D.; Clowdus, L. C.; Cocherell, D. G.; Coffield, F. E.; Cohen, S. J.; Costa, R. L.; Cox, J. R.; Curnow, G. M.; Dailey, M. J.; Danforth, P. M.; Darbee, R.; Datte, P. S.; Davis, J. A.; Deis, G. A.; Demaret, R. D.; Dewald, E. L.; di Nicola, P.; di Nicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Dobson, D. B.; Doppner, T.; Driscoll, J. D.; Dugorepec, J.; Duncan, J. J.; Dupuy, P. C.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eckart, M. J.; Edson, S. L.; Edwards, G. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Edwards, O. D.; Edwards, P. W.; Ellefson, J. C.; Ellerbee, C. H.; Erbert, G. V.; Estes, C. M.; Fabyan, W. J.; Fallejo, R. N.; Fedorov, M.; Felker, B.; Fink, J. T.; Finney, M. D.; Finnie, L. F.; Fischer, M. J.; Fisher, J. M.; Fishler, B. T.; Florio, J. W.; Forsman, A.; Foxworthy, C. B.; Franks, R. M.; Frazier, T.; Frieder, G.; Fung, T.; Gawinski, G. N.; Gibson, C. R.; Giraldez, E.; Glenn, S. M.; Golick, B. P.; Gonzales, H.; Gonzales, S. A.; Gonzalez, M. J.; Griffin, K. L.; Grippen, J.; Gross, S. M.; Gschweng, P. H.; Gururangan, G.; Gu, K.; Haan, S. W.; Hahn, S. R.; Haid, B. J.; Hamblen, J. E.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hardy, D. L.; Hart, D. R.; Hartley, R. G.; Haynam, C. A.; Heestand, G. M.; Hermann, M. R.; Hermes, G. L.; Hey, D. S.; Hibbard, R. L.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hipple, D. L.; Hitchcock, J. D.; Hodtwalker, D. L.; Holder, J. P.; Hollis, J. D.; Holtmeier, G. M.; Huber, S. R.; Huey, A. W.; Hulsey, D. N.; Hunter, S. L.; Huppler, T. R.; Hutton, M. S.; Izumi, N.; Jackson, J. L.; Jackson, M. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, M. C.; Johnson, T.; Johnston, M. P.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Kauffman, R. L.; Keating, G. A.; Kegelmeyer, L. M.; Kenitzer, S. L.; Kimbrough, J. R.; King, K.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Klingmann, J. L.; Knittel, K. M.; Kohut, T. R.; Koka, K. G.; Kramer, S. W.; Krammen, J. E.; Krauter, K. G.; Krauter, G. W.; Krieger, E. K.; Kroll, J. J.; La Fortune, K. N.; Lagin, L. J.; Lakamsani, V. K.; Landen, O. L.; Lane, S. W.; Langdon, A. B.; Langer, S. H.; Lao, N.; Larson, D. W.; Latray, D.; Lau, G. T.; Le Pape, S.; Lechleiter, B. L.; Lee, Y.; Lee, T. L.; Li, J.; Liebman, J. A.; Lindl, J. D.; Locke, S. F.; Loey, H. K.; London, R. A.; Lopez, F. J.; Lord, D. M.; Lowe-Webb, R. R.; Lown, J. G.; Ludwigsen, A. P.; Lum, N. W.; Lyons, R. R.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Magat, M. D.; Maloy, D. T.; Malsbury, T. N.; Markham, G.; Marquez, R. M.; Marsh, A. A.; Marshall, C. D.; Marshall, S. R.; Maslennikov, I. L.; Mathisen, D. G.; Mauger, G. J.; Mauvais, M.-Y.; McBride, J. A.; McCarville, T.; McCloud, J. B.; McGrew, A.; McHale, B.; Macphee, A. G.; Meeker, J. F.; Merill, J. S.; Mertens, E. P.; Michel, P. A.; Miller, M. G.; Mills, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Miramontes, R.; Montesanti, R. C.; Montoya, M. M.; Moody, J.; Moody, J. D.; Moreno, K. A.; Morris, J.; Morriston, K. M.; Nelson, J. R.; Neto, M.; Neumann, J. D.; Ng, E.; Ngo, Q. M.; Olejniczak, B. L.; Olson, R. E.; Orsi, N. L.; Owens, M. W.; Padilla, E. H.; Pannell, T. M.; Parham, T. G.; Patterson, R. W., Jr.; Pavel, G.; Prasad, R. R.; Pendlton, D.; Penko, F. A.; Pepmeier, B. L.; Petersen, D. E.; Phillips, T. W.; Pigg, D.; Piston, K. W.; Pletcher, K. D.; Powell, C. L.; Radousky, H. B.; Raimondi, B. S.; Ralph, J. E.; Rampke, R. L.; Reed, R. K.; Reid, W. A.; Rekow, V. V.; Reynolds, J. L.; Rhodes, J. J.; Richardson, M. J.; Rinnert, R. J.; Riordan, B. P.; Rivenes, A. S.; Rivera, A. T.; Roberts, C. J.; Robinson, J. A.; Robinson, R. B.; Robison, S. R.; Rodriguez, O. R.; Rogers, S. P.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, G. F.; Runkel, M.; Runtal, A. S.; Sacks, R. A.; Sailors, S. F.; Salmon, J. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Saunders, R. L.; Schaffer, J. R.; Schindler, T. M.; Schmitt, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Segraves, K. S.; Shaw, M. J.; Sheldrick, M. E.; Shelton, R. T.; Shiflett, M. K.; Shiromizu, S. J.; Shor, M.; Silva, L. L.; Silva, S. A.; Skulina, K. M.; Smauley, D. A.; Smith, B. E.; Smith, L. K.; Solomon, A. L.; Sommer, S.; Soto, J. G.; Spafford, N. I.; Speck, D. E.; Springer, P. T.; Stadermann, M.; Stanley, F.; Stone, T. G.; Stout, E. A.; Stratton, P. L.; Strausser, R. J.; Suter, L. J.; Sweet, W.; Swisher, M. F.; Tappero, J. D.; Tassano, J. B.; Taylor, J. S.; Tekle, E. A.; Thai, C.; Thomas, C. A.; Thomas, A.; Throop, A. L.; Tietbohl, G. L.; Tillman, J. M.; Town, R. P. J.; Townsend, S. L.; Tribbey, K. L.; Trummer, D.; Truong, J.; Vaher, J.; Valadez, M.; van Arsdall, P.; van Prooyen, A. J.; Vergel de Dios, E. O.; Vergino, M. D.; Vernon, S. P.; Vickers, J. L.; Villanueva, G. T.; Vitalich, M. A.; Vonhof, S. A.; Wade, F. E.; Wallace, R. J.; Warren, C. T.; Warrick, A. L.; Watkins, J.; Weaver, S.; Wegner, P. J.; Weingart, M. A.; Wen, J.; White, K. S.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Williams, E. A.; Williams, W. H.; Willis, L.; Wilson, E. F.; Wilson, B. A.; Witte, M. C.; Work, K.; Yang, P. S.; Young, B. K.; Youngblood, K. P.; Zacharias, R. A.; Zaleski, T.; Zapata, P. G.; Zhang, H.; Zielinski, J. S.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Niemann, C.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; van Wonterghem, B. M.; Atherton, L. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate the hohlraum radiation temperature and symmetry required for ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. Cryogenic gas-filled hohlraums with 2.2 mm-diameter capsules are heated with unprecedented laser energies of 1.2 MJ delivered by 192 ultraviolet laser beams on the National Ignition Facility. Laser backscatter measurements show that these hohlraums absorb 87% to 91% of the incident laser power resulting in peak radiation temperatures of TRAD=300eV and a symmetric implosion to a 100μm diameter hot core.

  3. National Ignition Facility: Experimental plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    As part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE), and EG&G formed an NIF Target Diagnostics Working Group. The purpose of the Target Diagnostics Working Group is to prepare conceptual designs of target diagnostics for inclusion in the facility CDR and to determine how these specifications impact the CDR. To accomplish this, a subgroup has directed its efforts at constructing an approximate experimental plan for the ignition campaign of the NIF CDR. The results of this effort are contained in this document, the Experimental Plan for achieving fusion ignition in the NIF. This group initially concentrated on the flow-down requirements of the experimental campaign leading to ignition, which will dominate the initial efforts of the NIF. It is envisaged, however, that before ignition, there will be parallel campaigns supporting weapons physics, weapons effects, and other research. This plan was developed by analyzing the sequence of activities required to finally fire the laser at the level of power and precision necessary to achieve the conditions of an ignition hohlraum target, and to then use our experience in activating and running Nova experiments to estimate the rate of completing these activities.

  4. Enhancement of Raman scattering in dielectric nanostructures with electric and magnetic Mie resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frizyuk, Kristina; Hasan, Mehedi; Krasnok, Alex; Alú, Andrea; Petrov, Mihail

    2018-02-01

    Resonantly enhanced Raman scattering in dielectric nanostructures has been recently proven to be an efficient tool for nanothermometry and for the experimental determination of their mode composition. In this paper we develop a rigorous analytical theory based on the Green's function approach to calculate the Raman emission from crystalline high-index dielectric nanoparticles. As an example, we consider silicon nanoparticles which have a strong Raman response due to active optical phonon modes. We relate enhancement of Raman signal emission to the Purcell effect due to the excitation of Mie modes inside the nanoparticles. We also employ our numerical approach to calculate inelastic Raman emission in more sophisticated geometries, which do not allow a straightforward analytical form of the Green's function. The Raman response from a silicon nanodisk has been analyzed with the proposed method, and the contribution of various Mie modes has been revealed.

  5. Hydro-scaling of DT implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Pravesh; Spears, Brian; Clark, Dan

    2017-10-01

    Recent implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) exceed 50 kJ in fusion yield and exhibit yield amplifications of >2.5-3x due to alpha-particle self-heating of the hot-spot. Two methods to increase the yield are (i) to improve the implosion quality, or stagnation pressure, at fixed target scale (by increasing implosion velocity, reducing 3D effects, etc.), and (ii) to hydrodynamically scale the capsule and absorbed energy. In the latter case the stagnation pressure remains constant, but the yield-in the absence of alpha-heating-increases as Y S 4 . 5 , where the capsule radius is increased by S, and the absorbed energy by S3 . With alpha-heating the increase with scale is considerably stronger. We present projections in the performance of current DT experiments, and the extrapolations to ignition, based on applying hydro-scaling theory and accounting for the effect of alpha-heating. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Energy conservation - A test for scattering approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquista, C.; Holland, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    The roles of the extinction theorem and energy conservation in obtaining the scattering and absorption cross sections for several light scattering approximations are explored. It is shown that the Rayleigh, Rayleigh-Gans, anomalous diffraction, geometrical optics, and Shifrin approximations all lead to reasonable values of the cross sections, while the modified Mie approximation does not. Further examination of the modified Mie approximation for the ensembles of nonspherical particles reveals additional problems with that method.

  7. The Nova Upgrade Facility for ICF ignition and gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowdermilk, W. H.; Campbell, E. M.; Hunt, J. T.; Murray, J. R.; Storm, E.; Tobin, M. T.; Trenholme, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Research on Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is motivated by its potential defense and civilian applications, including ultimately the generation of electric power. The U.S. ICF Program was reviewed recently by the National Academy of Science (NAS) and the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC). Both committees issued final reports in 1991 which recommended that first priority in the ICF program be placed on demonstrating fusion ignition and modest gain (G less than 10). The U.S. Department of Energy and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have proposed an upgrade of the existing Nova Laser Facility at LLNL to accomplish these goals. Both the NAS and FPAC have endorsed the upgrade of Nova as the optimal path to achieving ignition and gain. Results from Nova Upgrade Experiments will be used to define requirements for driver and target technology both for future high-yield military applications, such as the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) proposed by the Department of Energy, and for high-gain energy applications leading to an ICF engineering test facility. The central role and modifications which Nova Upgrade would play in the national ICF strategy are described.

  8. Mécanismes et traitement de l’anémie aiguë chez le brûlé grave

    PubMed Central

    Siah, S.; El Khatib, K.; Messaoudi, N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Les brûlés graves présentent souvent, au cours de la phase aiguë, des anémies plus au moins profondes pouvant nécessiter des transfusions. L’anémie du brûlé a deux origines principales: le saignement péri-opératoire (des stratégies doivent être mises en place pour le réduire) et l’anémie de réanimation (que l’on peut en partie réduire en évitant les bilans inutiles) chez un patient ayant des troubles de l’hématopoïèse. Le traitement, chez ces patients à l’hématopoïèse altérée, repose sur la transfusion. Celle-ci n’est pas dénuée d’effets secondaires et une stratégie transfusionnelle restrictive doit être appliquée. PMID:28149231

  9. A Concept Exploration Program in Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion — Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Richarad Burnite; Freeman, Richard R.; Van Woekom, L. D.

    The Fast Ignition (FI) approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) holds particular promise for fusion energy because the independently generated compression and ignition pulses allow ignition with less compression, resulting in (potentially) higher gain. Exploiting this concept effectively requires an understanding of the transport of electrons in prototypical geometries and at relevant densities and temperatures. Our consortium, which included General Atomics (GA), The Ohio State University (OSU), the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), University of California, Davis (UC-Davis), and Princeton University under this grant (~$850K/yr) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under a companion grant, won awards in 2000,more » renewed in 2005, to investigate the physics of electron injection and transport relevant to the FI concept, which is crucial to understand electron transport in integral FI targets. In the last two years we have also been preparing diagnostics and starting to extend the work to electron transport into hot targets. A complementary effort, the Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program for Fast Ignition, was funded starting in 2006 to integrate this understanding into ignition schemes specifically suitable for the initial fast ignition attempts on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF), and during that time these two programs have been managed as a coordinated effort. This result of our 7+ years of effort has been substantial. Utilizing collaborations to access the most capable laser facilities around the world, we have developed an understanding that was summarized in a Fusion Science & Technology 2006, Special Issue on Fast Ignition. The author lists in the 20 articles in that issue are dominated by our group (we are first authors in four of them). Our group has published, or submitted 67 articles, including 1 in Nature, 2 Nature Physics, 10 Physical Review Letters, 8 Review of Scientific Instruments, and has been

  10. Initial Findings on Hydrodynamic Scaling Extrapolations of National Ignition Facility BigFoot Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nora, R.; Field, J. E.; Peterson, J. Luc; Spears, B.; Kruse, M.; Humbird, K.; Gaffney, J.; Springer, P. T.; Brandon, S.; Langer, S.

    2017-10-01

    We present an experimentally corroborated hydrodynamic extrapolation of several recent BigFoot implosions on the National Ignition Facility. An estimate on the value and error of the hydrodynamic scale necessary for ignition (for each individual BigFoot implosion) is found by hydrodynamically scaling a distribution of multi-dimensional HYDRA simulations whose outputs correspond to their experimental observables. The 11-parameter database of simulations, which include arbitrary drive asymmetries, dopant fractions, hydrodynamic scaling parameters, and surface perturbations due to surrogate tent and fill-tube engineering features, was computed on the TRINITY supercomputer at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This simple extrapolation is the first step in providing a rigorous calibration of our workflow to provide an accurate estimate of the efficacy of achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Development of Augmented Spark Impinging Igniter System for Methane Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Osborne, Robin J.; Greene, Sandra E.

    2017-01-01

    The Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar CATALYST) program is establishing multiple no-funds-exchanged Space Act Agreement (SAA) partnerships with U.S. private sector entities. The purpose of this program is to encourage the development of robotic lunar landers that can be integrated with U.S. commercial launch capabilities to deliver payloads to the lunar surface. As part of the efforts in Lander Technologies, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid methane (LCH4) engine technology to share with the Lunar CATALYST partners. Liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants are attractive owing to their relatively high specific impulse for chemical propulsion systems, modest storage requirements, and adaptability to NASA's Journey to Mars plans. Methane has also been viewed as a possible propellant choice for lunar missions, owing to the performance benefits and as a technology development stepping stone to Martian missions. However, in the development of methane propulsion, methane ignition has historically been viewed as a high risk area in the development of such an engine. A great deal of work has been conducted in the past decade devoted to risk reduction in LOX/CH4 ignition. This paper will review and summarize the history and results of LOX/CH4 ignition programs conducted at NASA. More recently, a NASA-developed Augmented Spark Impinging (ASI) igniter body, which utilizes a conventional spark exciter system, is being tested with LOX/CH4 to help support internal and commercial engine development programs, such as those in Lunar CATALYST. One challenge with spark exciter systems, especially at altitude conditions, is the ignition lead that transmits the high voltage pulse from the exciter to the spark igniter (spark plug). The ignition lead can be prone to corona discharge, reducing the energy delivered by the spark and potentially causing non-ignition events. For the current work, a

  12. Structure ignition assessment model (SIAM)\\t

    Treesearch

    Jack D. Cohen

    1995-01-01

    Major wildland/urban interface fire losses, principally residences, continue to occur. Although the problem is not new, the specific mechanisms are not well known on how structures ignite in association with wildland fires. In response to the need for a better understanding of wildland/urban interface ignition mechanisms and a method of assessing the ignition risk,...

  13. Dopant-induced ignition of helium nanoplasmas—a mechanistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Schomas, Dominik; Mudrich, Marcel

    2017-12-01

    Helium (He) nanodroplets irradiated by intense near-infrared laser pulses form a nanoplasma by avalanche-like electron impact ionizations (EIIs) even at lower laser intensities where He is not directly field ionized, provided that the droplets contain a few dopant atoms which provide seed electrons for the EII avalanche. In this theoretical paper on calcium and xenon doped He droplets we elucidate the mechanism which induces ionization avalanches, termed ignition. We find that the partial loss of seed electrons from the activated droplets starkly assists ignition, as the Coulomb barrier for ionization of helium is lowered by the electric field of the dopant cations, and this deshielding of the cation charges enhances their electric field. In addition, the dopant ions assist the acceleration of the seed electrons (slingshot effect) by the laser field, supporting EIIs of He and also causing electron loss by catapulting electrons away. The dopants’ ability to lower the Coulomb barriers at He as well as the slingshot effect decrease with the spatial expansion of the dopant, causing a dependence of the dopants’ ignition capability on the dopant mass. Here, we develop criteria (impact count functions) to assess the ignition capability of dopants, based on (i) the spatial overlap of the seed electron cloud with the He atoms and (ii) the overlap of their kinetic energy distribution with the distribution of Coulomb barrier heights at He. The relatively long time delays between the instants of dopant ionization and ignition (incubation times) for calcium doped droplets are determined to a large extent by the time it takes to deshield the dopant ions.

  14. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. The beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being recombined with the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones.

  15. Ignition characterization of the GOX/ethanol propellant combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawver, B. R.; Rousar, D. C.; Boyd, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study to define the ignition characteristics and thruster pulse mode capabilities of the GOX/ethanol propellant combination. Ignition limits were defined in terms of mixture ratio and cold flow pressure using a spark initiated torch igniter. Igniter tests were run over a wide range of cold flow pressure, propellant temperature and mixture ratio. The product of cold flow pressure and igniter chamber diameter was used to correlate mixture ratio regimes of ignition and nonignition. Engine ignition reliability and pulse mode capability were demonstrated using a 620 lbF thruster with an integrated torch igniter. The nominal chamber pressure and mixture ratio were 150 psia and 1.8, respectively, thruster tests were run over a wide range of chamber pressures and mixture ratios. The feasibility of thruster pulse mode operation with the non-hypergolic GOX/ethanol propellant combination was demonstrated.

  16. Analytical and experimental study of resonance ignition tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stabinsky, L.

    1973-01-01

    The application of the gas-dynamic resonance concept was investigated in relation to ignition of rocket propulsion systems. Analytical studies were conducted to delineate the potential uses of resonance ignition in oxygen/hydrogen bipropellant and hydrazine monopropellant rocket engines. Experimental studies were made to: (1) optimize the resonance igniter configuration, and (2) evaluate the ignition characteristics when operating with low temperature oxygen and hydrogen at the inlet to the igniter.

  17. Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

  18. Fluid-Plasma-Combustion Coupling Effects on the Ignition of a Fuel Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Luca; Freund, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the effect of plasma-combustion coupling on the ignition and flame supported by a DBD interacting with a jet of H2 in a air cross-flow. We propose that plasma-combustion coupling is due to the strong temperature-dependence of specific collisional energy loss as predicted by the Boltzmann equation, and that e- transport can be modeled by assuming a form for the E-field pulse in microstreamers. We introduce a two-way coupling based on the Boltzmann equation and the charged species conservation. The addition of this mechanism to a hydrogen combustion scheme leads to an improvement of the ignition prediction and of the understanding of the effect of the plasma on the flow. The key points of the analysis are 1) explanation of the mechanism for the two-stage ignition and quenching observed experimentally, 2) explanation of the existence of a power threshold above which the plasma is beneficial to the ignition probability, 3) understanding of the increase in power absorbed by the plasma in burning conditions and the reduction in power absorbed with an increase in the cross velocity, 4) explanation of the non-symmetric emissions and the increase in luminescence at the rotovibrational H2O band. The model is validated in part against air-H2 flow experiments. This material is based in part upon work supported by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under Award Number DE-NA0002374.

  19. Predicting plasmonic coupling with Mie-Gans theory in silver nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, M.

    2013-09-01

    Plasmonic coupling is observed in the self-aligned arrays of silver nanoparticles grown on ripple-patterned substrate. Large differences observed in the plasmon resonance wavelength, measured and calculated using Mie-Gans theory, predict that strong plasmonic coupling exists in the nanoparticles arrays. Even though plasmonic coupling exists both along and across the arrays, but it is found to be much stronger along the arrays due to shorter interparticle gap and particle elongation. This effect is responsible for observed optical anisotropy in such arrays. Measured red-shift even in the transverse plasmon resonance mode with the increasing nanoparticles aspect ratio in the arrays, deviate from the prediction of Mie-Gans theory. This essentially means that plasmonic coupling is dominating over the shape anisotropy. Plasmon resonance tuning is presented by varying the plasmonic coupling systematically with nanoparticles aspect ratio and ripple wavelength. Plasmon resonance red-shifts with the increasing aspect ratio along the ripple, and blue-shifts with the increasing ripple wavelength across the ripple. Therefore, reported bottom-up approach for fabricating large area-coupled nanoparticle arrays can be used for various field enhancement-based plasmonic applications.

  20. Fundamentals of negative refractive index optical trapping: forces and radiation pressures exerted by focused Gaussian beams using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A.; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), this paper reveals, for the first time in the literature, the principal characteristics of the optical forces and radiation pressure cross-sections exerted on homogeneous, linear, isotropic and spherical hypothetical negative refractive index (NRI) particles under the influence of focused Gaussian beams in the Mie regime. Starting with ray optics considerations, the analysis is then extended through calculating the Mie coefficients and the beam-shape coefficients for incident focused Gaussian beams. Results reveal new and interesting trapping properties which are not observed for commonly positive refractive index particles and, in this way, new potential applications in biomedical optics can be devised. PMID:21258549

  1. Fundamentals of negative refractive index optical trapping: forces and radiation pressures exerted by focused Gaussian beams using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2010-11-04

    Based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), this paper reveals, for the first time in the literature, the principal characteristics of the optical forces and radiation pressure cross-sections exerted on homogeneous, linear, isotropic and spherical hypothetical negative refractive index (NRI) particles under the influence of focused Gaussian beams in the Mie regime. Starting with ray optics considerations, the analysis is then extended through calculating the Mie coefficients and the beam-shape coefficients for incident focused Gaussian beams. Results reveal new and interesting trapping properties which are not observed for commonly positive refractive index particles and, in this way, new potential applications in biomedical optics can be devised.

  2. Frictional Ignition Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Steve; Rosales, Keisa; Robinson, Michael J.; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The space flight community has been investigating lightweight composite materials for use in propellant tanks for both liquid and gaseous oxygen for space flight vehicles. The use of these materials presents some risks pertaining to ignition and burning hazards in the presence of oxygen. Through hazard analysis process, some ignition mechanisms have been identified as being potentially credible. One of the ignition mechanisms was reciprocal friction; however, test data do not exist that could be used to clear or fail these types of materials as "oxygen compatible" for the reciprocal friction ignition mechanism. Therefore, testing was performed at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to provide data to evaluate this ignition mechanism. This paper presents the test system, approach, data results, and findings of the reciprocal friction testing performed on composite sample materials being considered for propellant tanks.

  3. The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High Energy Density Experimental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuest, Craig R.

    2001-03-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is 192-beam, 1.8 Megajoule, 500 Terawatt, 351 nm laser for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency to provide an experimental test bed for the US Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country’s nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program for NIF will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% of the shots will be dedicated to basic science research. Additionally, most of the shots on NIF will be conducted in unclassified configurations that will allow participation from the greater scientific community in planned applied physics experiments. This presentation will provide a look at the status of the construction project as well as a description of the scientific uses of NIF. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. Diagnosing and controlling mix in National Ignition Facility implosion experiments a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, B. A.; Scott, H. A.; Regan, S. P.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Epstein, R.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Koch, J. A.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Peterson, K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Suter, L. J.; Wilson, D. C.

    2011-05-01

    High mode number instability growth of "isolated defects" on the surfaces of National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] capsules can be large enough for the perturbation to penetrate the imploding shell, and produce a jet of ablator material that enters the hot-spot. Since internal regions of the CH ablator are doped with Ge, mixing of this material into the hot-spot results in a clear signature of Ge K-shell emission. Evidence of jets entering the hot-spot has been recorded in x-ray images and spectra, consistent with simulation predictions [Hammel et al., High Energy Density Phys. 6, 171 (2010)]. Ignition targets have been designed to minimize instability growth, and capsule fabrication improvements are underway to reduce "isolated defects." An experimental strategy has been developed where the final requirements for ignition targets can be adjusted through direct measurements of mix and experimental tuning.

  5. Physical characteristics of welding arc ignition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Linan; Song, Yonglun; Xiao, Tianjiao; Ran, Guowei

    2012-07-01

    The existing research of welding arc mainly focuses on the stable combustion state and the research on the mechanism of welding arc ignition process is quite lack. The tungsten inert gas(TIG) touch arc ignition process is observed via a high speed camera and the high time resolution spectral diagnosis system. The changing phenomenon of main ionized element provided the electrons in the arc ignition is found. The metallic element is the main contributor to provide the electrons at the beginning of the discharging, and then the excitated shielding gas element replaces the function of the metallic element. The electron density during the period of the arc ignition is calculated by the Stark-broadened lines of Hα. Through the discussion with the repeatability in relaxation phenomenon, the statistical regularity in the arc ignition process is analyzed. The similar rules as above are observed through the comparison with the laser-assisted arc ignition experiments and the metal inert gas(MIG) arc ignition experiments. This research is helpful to further understanding on the generation mechanism of welding arc ignition and also has a certain academic and practical significance on enriching the welding physical theoretical foundation and improving the precise monitoring on automatic arc welding process.

  6. Laser Ignition Microthruster Experiments on KKS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masakatsu; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masashi; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    A laser ignition microthruster has been developed for microsatellites. Thruster performances such as impulse and ignition probability were measured, using boron potassium nitrate (B/KNO3) solid propellant ignited by a 1 W CW laser diode. The measured impulses were 60 mNs ± 15 mNs with almost 100 % ignition probability. The effect of the mixture ratios of B/KNO3 on thruster performance was also investigated, and it was shown that mixture ratios between B/KNO3/binder = 28/70/2 and 38/60/2 exhibited both high ignition probability and high impulse. Laser ignition thrusters designed and fabricated based on these data became the first non-conventional microthrusters on the Kouku Kousen Satellite No. 1 (KKS-1) microsatellite that was launched by a H2A rocket as one of six piggyback satellites in January 2009.

  7. X-33 Combustion-Wave Ignition System Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Larry C.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, in cooperation with Rocketdyne, the Boeing Company, tested a novel rocket engine ignition system, called the combustion-wave ignition system, in its Research Combustion Laboratory. This ignition system greatly simplifies ignition in rocket engines that have a large number of combustors. The particular system tested was designed and fabricated by Rocketdyne for the national experimental spacecraft, X-33, which uses Rocketdyne s aerospike rocket engines. The goal of the tests was to verify the system design and define its operational characteristics. Results will contribute to the eventual successful flight of X-33. Furthermore, the combustion-wave ignition system, after it is better understood and refined on the basis of the test results and, later, flight-proven onboard X-33, could become an important candidate engine ignition system for our Nation s next-generation reusable launch vehicle.

  8. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalysts are presented.

  9. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalyst are presented.

  10. Determination of parameters used to prevent ignition of stored materials and to protect against explosions in food industries.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Alvaro; García-Torrent, Javier; Aguado, Pedro J

    2009-08-30

    There are always risks associated with silos when the stored material has been characterized as prone to self-ignition or explosion. Further research focused on the characterization of agricultural materials stored in silos is needed due to the lack of data found in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the ignitability and explosive parameters of several agricultural products commonly stored in silos in order to assess the risk of ignition and dust explosion. Minimum Ignition Temperature, with dust forming a cloud and deposited in a layer, Lower Explosive Limit, Minimum Ignition Energy, Maximum Explosion Pressure and Maximum Explosion Pressure Rise were determined for seven agricultural materials: icing sugar, maize, wheat and barley grain dust, alfalfa, bread-making wheat and soybean dust. Following characterization, these were found to be prone to producing self-ignition when stored in silos under certain conditions.

  11. Impact Ignition of Low Density Mechanically Activated and Multilayer Foil Ni/Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beason, Matthew; Mason, B.; Son, Steven; Groven, Lori

    2013-06-01

    Mechanical activation (MA) via milling of reactive materials provides a means of lowering the ignition threshold of shock initiated reactions. This treatment provides a finely mixed microstructure with wide variation in the resulting scales of the intraparticle microstructure that makes model validation difficult. In this work we consider nanofoils produced through vapor deposition with well defined periodicity and a similar degree of fine scale mixing. This allows experiments that may be easier to compare with computational models. To achieve this, both equimolar Ni/Al powder that has undergone MA using high energy ball milling and nanofoils milled into a powder using low energy ball milling were used. The Asay Shear impact experiment was conducted on both MA Ni/Al and Ni/Al nanofoil-based powders at low densities (<60%) to examine their impact response and reaction behavior. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used to verify the microstructure of the materials. The materials' mechanical properties were evaluated using nano-indentation. Onset temperatures were evaluated using differential thermal analysis/differential scanning calorimetry. Impact ignition thresholds, burning rates, temperature field, and ignition delays are reported. Funding from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Grant Number HDTRA1-10-1-0119. Counter-WMD basic research program, Dr. Suhithi M. Peiris, program director is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Mechanism of plasma-assisted ignition for H2 and C1-C5 hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Aleksandrov, Nikolay

    2016-09-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma demonstrates ability to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and appears to be an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation GTEs, piston engines, ramjets, scramjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. To use nonequilibrium plasma for ignition and combustion in real energetic systems, one must understand the mechanisms of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion and be able to numerically simulate the discharge and combustion processes under various conditions. A new, validated mechanism for high-temperature hydrocarbon plasma assisted combustion was built and allows to qualitatively describe plasma-assisted combustion close and above the self-ignition threshold. The principal mechanisms of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion have been established and validated for a wide range of plasma and gas parameters. These results provide a basis for improving various energy-conversion combustion systems, from automobile to aircraft engines, using nonequilibrium plasma methods.

  13. Development and demonstration of flueric sounding rocket motor ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchese, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program is described which established a flueric rocket motor ignition system concept incorporating a pneumatic match with a simple hand pump as the only energy source. An evaluation was made of this concept to determine the margins of the operating range and capabilities of every component of the system. This evaluation included a determination of power supply requirements, ignitor geometry and alinement, ignitor/propellant interfacing and materials and the effects of ambient temperatures and pressure. It was demonstrated that an operator using a simple hand pump for 30 seconds could ignite BKNO3 at a standoff distance of 100 m (330 ft) with the only connection to the ignitor being a piece of plastic pneumatic tubing.

  14. Computational prediction of probabilistic ignition threshold of pressed granular Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seokpum; Miller, Christopher; Horie, Yasuyuki; Molek, Christopher; Welle, Eric; Zhou, Min

    2016-09-01

    The probabilistic ignition thresholds of pressed granular Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine explosives with average grain sizes between 70 μm and 220 μm are computationally predicted. The prediction uses material microstructure and basic constituent properties and does not involve curve fitting with respect to or prior knowledge of the attributes being predicted. The specific thresholds predicted are James-type relations between the energy flux and energy fluence for given probabilities of ignition. Statistically similar microstructure sample sets are computationally generated and used based on the features of micrographs of materials used in actual experiments. The predicted thresholds are in general agreement with measurements from shock experiments in terms of trends. In particular, it is found that grain size significantly affects the ignition sensitivity of the materials, with smaller sizes leading to lower energy thresholds required for ignition. For example, 50% ignition threshold of the material with an average grain size of 220 μm is approximately 1.4-1.6 times that of the material with an average grain size of 70 μm in terms of energy fluence. The simulations account for the controlled loading of thin-flyer shock experiments with flyer velocities between 1.5 and 4.0 km/s, constituent elasto-viscoplasticity, fracture, post-fracture contact and friction along interfaces, bulk inelastic heating, interfacial frictional heating, and heat conduction. The constitutive behavior of the materials is described using a finite deformation elasto-viscoplastic formulation and the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. The ignition thresholds are determined via an explicit analysis of the size and temperature states of hotspots in the materials and a hotspot-based ignition criterion. The overall ignition threshold analysis and the microstructure-level hotspot analysis also lead to the definition of a macroscopic ignition parameter (J) and a microscopic

  15. Design and performance simulation of 532 nm Rayleigh-Mie Doppler lidar system for 5-50 km wind measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fahua; Wang, Bangxin; Shi, Wenjuan; Zhuang, Peng; Zhu, Chengyun; Xie, Chenbo

    2018-04-01

    A novel design of the 532 nm Rayleigh-Mie Doppler lidar receiving system is carried out. The use of polarization isolation technology to effectively improve the receiving system optical reception efficiency, suppress the background noise, not only improves the system wind field detection accuracy, while achieving a high-accuracy temperature measurement. The wind speed and temperature measurement principle of the system are discussed in detail, and the triple Fabry-Perot etalon parameters are optimized. Utilizing the overall design parameters of the system, the system detection performance is simulated. The simulation results show that from 5 to 50 km altitude with vertical resolution of 0.1 km@5 ∼20 km, 0.5 km@20 ∼40 km, 1 km@40 ∼50 km, by using the laser with single pulse energy of 600 mJ, repetition frequency of 50 Hz and the receiving telescope with aperture of 0.8 m, with 2min integration time and in ±50 m/s radial wind speed range, the radial wind speed measurement accuracies of our designed lidar in the day and night are better than 2.6 m/s and 0.9 m/s respectively, and its performance is obviously superior to that of traditional system 5.6 m/s and 1.4 m/s wind speed accuracies; with 10min integration time and in 210 ∼280 K temperature range, the temperature measurement accuracies of the system in the day and night are better than 3.4 K and 1.2 K respectively; since the wind speed sensitivities of the Mie and Rayleigh scattering signals are not exactly the same, in ±50 m/s radial wind speed range, the wind speed bias induced by Mie signal is less than 1 m/s in the temperature range of 210-290 K and in the backscatter ratio range of 1-1.5 for pair measurement.

  16. Ignition of a granular propellant bed

    SciTech Connect

    Wildegger-Gaissmaier, A.E.; Johnston, I.R.

    1996-08-01

    An experimental and theoretical study is reported on the ignition process of a low vulnerability ammunition (LOVA) propellant bed in a 127-mm (5-in) bore gun charge. The theoretical investigation was with a two-phase flow interior ballistics code and the model predictions showed the marked influence the igniter system can have on pressure wave development, flame spreading, and the overall interior ballistics performance. A number of different igniter systems were investigated in an empty and propellant-filled gun simulator. Pressure, flame spreading, and high-speed film records were used to analyze the ignition/combustion event. The model predictions for flame spreading were confirmed qualitativelymore » by the experimental data. Full-scale instrumented gun firings were conducted with the optimized igniter design. Pressure waves were not detected in the charge during the firings. Model predictions on overall interior ballistics performance agreed well with the firing data.« less

  17. Burner ignition system

    DOEpatents

    Carignan, Forest J.

    1986-01-21

    An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

  18. Wafer scale formation of monocrystalline silicon-based Mie resonators via silicon-on-insulator dewetting.

    PubMed

    Abbarchi, Marco; Naffouti, Meher; Vial, Benjamin; Benkouider, Abdelmalek; Lermusiaux, Laurent; Favre, Luc; Ronda, Antoine; Bidault, Sébastien; Berbezier, Isabelle; Bonod, Nicolas

    2014-11-25

    Subwavelength-sized dielectric Mie resonators have recently emerged as a promising photonic platform, as they combine the advantages of dielectric microstructures and metallic nanoparticles supporting surface plasmon polaritons. Here, we report the capabilities of a dewetting-based process, independent of the sample size, to fabricate Si-based resonators over large scales starting from commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates. Spontaneous dewetting is shown to allow the production of monocrystalline Mie-resonators that feature two resonant modes in the visible spectrum, as observed in confocal scattering spectroscopy. Homogeneous scattering responses and improved spatial ordering of the Si-based resonators are observed when dewetting is assisted by electron beam lithography. Finally, exploiting different thermal agglomeration regimes, we highlight the versatility of this technique, which, when assisted by focused ion beam nanopatterning, produces monocrystalline nanocrystals with ad hoc size, position, and organization in complex multimers.

  19. Early-time radiation flux symmetry optimization and its effect on gas-filled hohlraum ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, J. L.; Dewald, E. L.; Pak, A.; Michel, P.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is tied to our ability to control and minimize deviations from sphericity of the capsule implosion. Low-mode asymmetries of the hot spot result from the combined effect of radiation drive asymmetries throughout the laser pulse and initial roughness on the capsule surface. In this paper, we report on simulations and experiments designed to assess, measure, and correct the drive asymmetries produced by the early-time (≈first 2 ns or "picket") period of the laser pulse. The drive asymmetry during the picket is commonly thought to introduce distortions in the hot-spot shape at ignition time. However, a more subtle effect not previously considered is that it also leads to an asymmetry in shock velocity and timing, thereby increasing the fuel adiabat and reducing the margin for ignition. It is shown via hydrodynamic simulations that minimizing this effect requires that the early-time asymmetry be kept below 7.5% in the second Legendre mode (P2), thus keeping the loss of performance margin below ≈10% for a layered implosion. Asymmetries during the picket of the laser pulse are measured using the instantaneous self-emission of a high-Z re-emission sphere in place of an ignition capsule in a hohlraum with large azimuthal diagnostic windows. Three dimensional simulations using the code HYDRA (to capture the effect of non-azimuthal hohlraum features) coupled to a cross-beam energy transfer model [Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010)] are used to establish the surrogacy of the re-emit target and to assess the early-time drive symmetry. Calculations using this model exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in the relative input powers between the different cones of NIF beams as measured for the "Rev5" CH target [Haan et al., Phys Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] and reported by Dewald et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235001 (2013)]. The same methodology applied to recently improved implosions using different

  20. Forced Ignition Study Based On Wavelet Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, E.; Valorani, M.; Paolucci, S.; Zikoski, Z.

    2011-05-01

    The control of ignition in a rocket engine is a critical problem for combustion chamber design. Therefore it is essential to fully understand the mechanism of ignition during its earliest stages. In this paper the characteristics of flame kernel formation and initial propagation in a hydrogen-argon-oxygen mixing layer are studied using 2D direct numerical simulations with detailed chemistry and transport properties. The flame kernel is initiated by adding an energy deposition source term in the energy equation. The effect of unsteady strain rate is studied by imposing a 2D turbulence velocity field, which is initialized by means of a synthetic field. An adaptive wavelet method, based on interpolating wavelets is used in this study to solve the compressible reactive Navier- Stokes equations. This method provides an alternative means to refine the computational grid points according to local demands of the physical solution. The present simulations show that in the very early instants the kernel perturbed by the turbulent field is characterized by an increased burning area and a slightly increased rad- ical formation. In addition, the calculations show that the wavelet technique yields a significant reduction in the number of degrees of freedom necessary to achieve a pre- scribed solution accuracy.

  1. Laser-plasma interactions in direct-drive ignition plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froula, D. H.; Michel, D. T.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Hu, S. X.; Yaakobi, B.; Myatt, J. F.; Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R.; Glebov, V. Yu; Goncharov, V. N.; Kessler, T. J.; Maximov, A. V.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Solodov, A. A.; Sorce, C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2012-12-01

    Direct-drive ignition is most susceptible to multiple-beam laser-plasma instabilities, as the single-beam intensities are low (Is ˜ 1014 W cm-2) and the electron temperature in the underdense plasma is high (Te ≃ 3.5 keV). Cross-beam energy transfer is driven by multiple laser beams and can significantly reduce the hydrodynamic efficiency in direct-drive experiments on OMEGA (Boehly et al 1997 Opt. Commun. 133 495). Reducing the radii of the laser beams significantly increases the hydrodynamic efficiency at the cost of an increase in the low-mode modulations. Initial 2D hydrodynamic simulations indicate that zooming, transitioning the laser-beam radius prior to the main drive, does not increase low-mode nonuniformities. The combination of zooming and dynamic bandwidth reduction will provide a 30% effective increase in the drive energy on OMEGA direct-drive implosions. It was shown that two-plasmon decay (TPD) can be driven by multiple laser beams and both planar and spherical experiments were performed to study the hot electrons generated by TPD. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons scales with the hot-electron temperature for all geometries and over a wide range of intensities. At ignition-relevant intensities, the fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons is measured to decrease by an order of magnitude when the ablator material is changed from carbon-hydrogen to aluminum. The TPD results are compared with a multiple-beam linear theory and a nonlinear Zakharov model.

  2. Effects of alpha stopping power modelling on the ignition threshold in a directly-driven inertial confinement fusion capsule

    DOE PAGES

    Temporal, Mauro; Canaud, Benoit; Cayzac, Witold; ...

    2017-05-25

    The alpha-particle energy deposition mechanism modifies the ignition conditions of the thermonuclear Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions, and constitutes a key issue in achieving high gain in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been performed with the code Multi-IFE to simulate the implosion of a capsule directly irradiated by a laser beam. The diffusion approximation for the alpha energy deposition has been used to optimize three laser profiles corresponding to different implosion velocities. A Monte-Carlo package has been included in Multi-IFE to calculate the alpha energy transport, and in this case the energy deposition uses both the LP and themore » BPS stopping power models. Homothetic transformations that maintain a constant implosion velocity have been used to map out the transition region between marginally-igniting and high-gain configurations. Furthermore, the results provided by the two models have been compared and it is found that – close to the ignition threshold – in order to produce the same fusion energy, the calculations performed with the BPS model require about 10% more invested energy with respect to the LP model.« less

  3. 41 CFR 301-11.102 - What is the applicable M&IE rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 24 hours or more, and you are traveling to a new TDY site or stopover point at midnight The M&IE rate applicable to the new TDY site or stopover point. Travel is 24 hours or more, and you are returning to your...&IE rate? 301-11.102 Section 301-11.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel...

  4. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In the embodiment of the invention claimed herein, the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being combined with either the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser.

  5. Effect of Oxygen Concentration on Autogenous Ignition Temperature and Pneumatic Impact Ignitability of Nonmetallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Extensive test data exist on the ignitability of nonmetallic materials in pure oxygen, but these characteristics are not as well understood for lesser oxygen concentrations. In this study, autogenous ignition temperature testing and pneumatic impact testing were used to better understand the effects of oxygen concentration on ignition of nonmetallic materials. Tests were performed using oxygen concentrations of 21, 34, 45, and 100 %. The following materials were tested: PTFE Teflon(Registered Trademark), Buna-N, Silicone, Zytel(Registered Trademark) 42, Viton(registered Trademark) A, and Vespel(Registered Trademark) SP-21.

  6. Unified Mie and fractal scattering by cells and experimental study on application in optical characterization of cellular and subcellular structures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Wu, Tao T; Qu, Jianan Y

    2008-01-01

    A unified Mie and fractal model for light scattering by biological cells is presented. This model is shown to provide an excellent global agreement with the angular dependent elastic light scattering spectroscopy of cells over the whole visible range (400 to 700 nm) and at all scattering angles (1.1 to 165 deg) investigated. Mie scattering from the bare cell and the nucleus is found to dominate light scattering in the forward directions, whereas the random fluctuation of the background refractive index within the cell, behaving as a fractal random continuous medium, is found to dominate light scattering at other angles. Angularly dependent elastic light scattering spectroscopy aided by the unified Mie and fractal model is demonstrated to be an effective noninvasive approach to characterize biological cells and their internal structures. The acetowhitening effect induced by applying acetic acid on epithelial cells is investigated as an example. The changes in morphology and refractive index of epithelial cells, nuclei, and subcellular structures after the application of acetic acid are successfully probed and quantified using the proposed approach. The unified Mie and fractal model may serve as the foundation for optical detection of precancerous and cancerous changes in biological cells and tissues based on light scattering techniques.

  7. Thermodynamic scaling of the shear viscosity of Mie n-6 fluids and their binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Delage-Santacreu, Stephanie; Galliero, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.galliero@univ-pau.fr; Hoang, Hai

    2015-05-07

    In this work, we have evaluated the applicability of the so-called thermodynamic scaling and the isomorph frame to describe the shear viscosity of Mie n-6 fluids of varying repulsive exponents (n = 8, 12, 18, 24, and 36). Furthermore, the effectiveness of the thermodynamic scaling to deal with binary mixtures of Mie n-6 fluids has been explored as well. To generate the viscosity database of these fluids, extensive non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for various thermodynamic conditions. Then, a systematic approach has been used to determine the gamma exponent value (γ) characteristic of the thermodynamic scaling approach formore » each system. In addition, the applicability of the isomorph theory with a density dependent gamma has been confirmed in pure fluids. In both pure fluids and mixtures, it has been found that the thermodynamic scaling with a constant gamma is sufficient to correlate the viscosity data on a large range of thermodynamic conditions covering liquid and supercritical states as long as the density is not too high. Interestingly, it has been obtained that, in pure fluids, the value of γ is directly proportional to the repulsive exponent of the Mie potential. Finally, it has been found that the value of γ in mixtures can be deduced from those of the pure component using a simple logarithmic mixing rule.« less

  8. The National Ignition Facility: Transition to a User Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Lagin, L.; Larson, D.; Keane, C.; MacGowan, B.; Patterson, R.; Spaeth, M.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Wegner, P.; Kauffman, R.

    2016-03-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been operational since March 2009 and has been transitioning to a user facility supporting ignition science, high energy density science (HEDS), national security applications, and fundamental science. The facility has achieved its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3ω light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The facility is on track to perform over 200 target shots this year in support of all of its user communities. The facility has nearly 60 diagnostic systems operational and has shown flexibility in laser pulse shape and performance to meet the requirements of its multiple users. Progress continues on its goal of demonstrating thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. It has performed over 40 indirect-drive experiments with cryogenic-layered capsules. New platforms are being developed for HEDS and fundamental science. Equation-of-state and material strength experiments have been done on a number of materials with pressures of over 50 MBars obtained in diamond, conditions never previously encountered in the laboratory and similar to those found in planetary interiors. Experiments are also in progress investigating radiation transport, hydrodynamic instabilities, and direct drive implosions. NIF continues to develop as an experimental facility. Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) is now being installed on NIF for producing high-energy radiographs of the imploded cores of ignition targets and for short pulse laser-plasma interaction experiments. One NIF beam is planned for conversion to two picosecond beams in 2014. Other new diagnostics such as x-ray Thomson scattering, low energy neutron spectrometer, and multi-layer reflecting x-ray optics are also planned. Incremental improvements in laser performance such as improved optics damage performance, beam balance, and back reflection control are being pursued.

  9. Very Low Thrust Gaseous Oxygen-hydrogen Rocket Engine Ignition Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, Roy A.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental program was performed to determine the minimum energy per spark for reliable and repeatable ignition of gaseous oxygen (GO2) and gaseous hydrogen (GH2) in very low thrust 0.44 to 2.22-N (0.10 to 0.50-lb sub f) rocket engines or spacecraft and satellite attitude control systems (ACS) application. Initially, the testing was conducted at ambient conditions, with the results subsequently verified under vacuum conditions. An experimental breadboard electrical exciter that delivered 0.2 to 0.3 mj per spark was developed and demonstrated by repeated ignitions of a 2.22-N (0.50-lb sub f) thruster in a vacuum chamber with test durations up to 30 min.

  10. Dual-pulse laser ignition of ethylene-air mixtures in a supersonic combustor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Leichao; An, Bin; Liang, Jianhan; Li, Xipeng; Wang, Zhenguo

    2018-04-02

    To reduce the energy of an individual laser pulse, dual-pulse laser ignitions (LIs) at various pulse intervals were investigated in a Mach 2.92 scramjet engine fueled with ethylene. For comparison, experiments on a single-pulse LI were also performed. Schlieren visualization and high-speed photography were employed to observe the ignition processes simultaneously. The results indicate that the energy of an individual laser pulse can be reduced by half via a dual-pulse LI method as compared with a single-pulse LI with the same total energy. The reduction of the individual laser pulse energy degrades the requirements on the laser source and the beam delivery system, which facilitates the practical application of LI in hypersonic vehicles. A pulse interval shorter than 40 μs is suggested for dual-pulse LI in the present study. Because of the intense heat loss and radical dissipation in high-speed flows, the pulse interval for dual-pulse LI should be short enough to narrow the spatial distribution of the initial flame kernel.

  11. Investigation of the Ignition and Burning of Materials in Space Cabin Atmospheres. Part 1: Ignition and Burning of Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical study of the theory of ignition and burning of a plastic material immersed in an atmosphere of a space cabin which may be subjected to gravity force changes is considered. The hazardous condition in a space cabin environment where the changes of gravity may effect the combustion process is evaluated. The model considered the analysis of the coupled gas and solid phases and is based on the premise that material heating leads to the formation of pyrolysis gases from the decomposed solid which then react with the ambient oxidizer to further the combustion process. Moreover, free convection plays a dominant role in transporting these hot gases to the virgin material. A time-dependent study of the coupled gas-solid model as required for ignition processes with emphasis on the surface energy interchange of the gas and solid phases has been made. Detailed distribution of species composition and temperature patterns provide a spatial and time map of the evolving gases from the material combustion.

  12. Group contribution methodology based on the statistical associating fluid theory for heteronuclear molecules formed from Mie segments.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Vasileios; Lafitte, Thomas; Avendaño, Carlos; Adjiman, Claire S; Jackson, George; Müller, Erich A; Galindo, Amparo

    2014-02-07

    A generalization of the recent version of the statistical associating fluid theory for variable range Mie potentials [Lafitte et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 154504 (2013)] is formulated within the framework of a group contribution approach (SAFT-γ Mie). Molecules are represented as comprising distinct functional (chemical) groups based on a fused heteronuclear molecular model, where the interactions between segments are described with the Mie (generalized Lennard-Jonesium) potential of variable attractive and repulsive range. A key feature of the new theory is the accurate description of the monomeric group-group interactions by application of a high-temperature perturbation expansion up to third order. The capabilities of the SAFT-γ Mie approach are exemplified by studying the thermodynamic properties of two chemical families, the n-alkanes and the n-alkyl esters, by developing parameters for the methyl, methylene, and carboxylate functional groups (CH3, CH2, and COO). The approach is shown to describe accurately the fluid-phase behavior of the compounds considered with absolute average deviations of 1.20% and 0.42% for the vapor pressure and saturated liquid density, respectively, which represents a clear improvement over other existing SAFT-based group contribution approaches. The use of Mie potentials to describe the group-group interaction is shown to allow accurate simultaneous descriptions of the fluid-phase behavior and second-order thermodynamic derivative properties of the pure fluids based on a single set of group parameters. Furthermore, the application of the perturbation expansion to third order for the description of the reference monomeric fluid improves the predictions of the theory for the fluid-phase behavior of pure components in the near-critical region. The predictive capabilities of the approach stem from its formulation within a group-contribution formalism: predictions of the fluid-phase behavior and thermodynamic derivative properties of

  13. Low Convergence path to Fusion I: Ignition physics and high margin design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, M. J.; McCall, G. H.; Betti, R.; Foula, D. H.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multi-shell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (280 TW/cm2) to achieve robust ignition. These Revolver targets consist of three concentric metal shells, enclosing a volume of 10s of µg of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. The inner shell pusher, nominally of gold, is compressed to over 2000 g/cc, effectively trapping the radiation and enabling ignition at low temperature (2.5 keV) and relatively low implosion velocity (20 cm/micro-sec) at a fuel convergence of 9. Ignition is designed to occur well ``upstream'' from stagnation, with implosion velocity at 90% of maximum, so that any deceleration phase mix will occur only after ignition. Mix, in all its non-predictable manifestations, will effect net yield in a Revolver target - but not the achievement of ignition and robust burn. Simplicity of the physics is the dominant principle. There is no high gain requirement. These basic physics elements can be combined into a simple analytic model that generates a complete target design specification given the fuel mass and the kinetic energy needed in the middle (drive) shell (of order 80 kJ). This research supported by the US DOE/NNSA, performed in part at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  14. The National Ignition Facility: an experimental platform for studying behavior of matter under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Edward

    2011-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As the world's largest and most energetic laser system, NIF serves as the national center for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration to achieve thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and to explore the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from all of its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm3-sized target, NIF can reach the conditions required to initiate fusion reactions. NIF can also provide access to extreme scientific environments: temperatures about 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions have never been created before in a laboratory and exist naturally only in interiors of the planetary and stellar environments as well as in nuclear weapons. Since August 2009, the NIF team has been conducting experiments in support of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)—a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, General Atomics, the University of Rochester, Sandia National Laboratories, as well as a number of universities and international collaborators. The results from these initial experiments show promise for the relatively near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.2 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 10%. Cryogenic target capability and additional diagnostics are being installed in preparation for layered target deuterium-tritium implosions to be conducted later in 2010. Important national security and basic science experiments have

  15. Catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide monopropellant for hybrid motor ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an inexpensive and readily available non-toxic rocket motor oxidizer. It is the most commonly used oxidizer for hybrid bipropellant rocket systems, and several bipropellant liquid rocket designs have also used nitrous oxide. In liquid form, N2O is highly stable, but in vapor form it has the potential to decompose exothermically, releasing up to 1865 Joules per gram of vapor as it dissociates into nitrogen and oxygen. Consequently, it has long been considered as a potential "green" replacement for existing highly toxic and dangerous monopropellants. This project investigates the feasibility of using the nitrous oxide decomposition reaction as a monopropellant energy source for igniting liquid bipropellant and hybrid rockets that already use nitrous oxide as the primary oxidizer. Because nitrous oxide is such a stable propellant, the energy barrier to dissociation is quite high; normal thermal decomposition of the vapor phase does not occur until temperatures are above 800 C. The use of a ruthenium catalyst decreases the activation energy for this reaction to allow rapid decomposition below 400 C. This research investigates the design for a prototype device that channels the energy of dissociation to ignite a laboratory scale hybrid rocket motor.

  16. Extension of the SAFT-VR Mie EoS To Model Homonuclear Rings and Its Parametrization Based on the Principle of Corresponding States.

    PubMed

    Müller, Erich A; Mejía, Andrés

    2017-10-24

    The statistical associating fluid theory of variable range employing a Mie potential (SAFT-VR-Mie) proposed by Lafitte et al. (J. Chem Phys. 2013, 139, 154504) is one of the latest versions of the SAFT family. This particular version has been shown to have a remarkable capability to connect experimental determinations, theoretical calculations, and molecular simulations results. However, the theoretical development restricts the model to chains of beads connected in a linear fashion. In this work, the capabilities of the SAFT-VR Mie equation of state for modeling phase equilibria are extended for the case of planar ring compounds. This modification proposed replaces the Helmholtz energy of chain formation by an empirical contribution based on a parallelism to the second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory for hard sphere trimers. The proposed expression is given in terms of an extra parameter, χ, that depends on the number of beads, m s , and the geometry of the ring. The model is used to describe the phase equilibrium for planar ring compounds formed of Mie isotropic segments for the cases of m s equals to 3, 4, 5 (two configurations), and 7 (two configurations). The resulting molecular model is further parametrized, invoking a corresponding states principle resulting in sets of parameters that can be used indistinctively in theoretical calculations or in molecular simulations without any further refinements. The extent and performance of the methodology has been exemplified by predicting the phase equilibria and vapor pressure curves for aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, hexafluorobenzene, toluene), heterocyclic molecules (2,5-dimethylfuran, sulfolane, tetrahydro-2H-pyran, tetrahydrofuran), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, pyrene, anthracene, pentacene, and coronene). An important aspect of the theory is that the parameters of the model can be used directly in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to calculate equilibrium phase properties and

  17. Computational Prediction of Shock Ignition Thresholds and Ignition Probability of Polymer-Bonded Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yaochi; Kim, Seokpum; Horie, Yasuyuki; Zhou, Min

    2017-06-01

    A computational approach is developed to predict the probabilistic ignition thresholds of polymer-bonded explosives (PBXs). The simulations explicitly account for microstructure, constituent properties, and interfacial responses and capture processes responsible for the development of hotspots and damage. The specific damage mechanisms considered include viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, fracture, post-fracture contact, frictional heating, and heat conduction. The probabilistic analysis uses sets of statistically similar microstructure samples to mimic relevant experiments for statistical variations of material behavior due to inherent material heterogeneities. The ignition thresholds and corresponding ignition probability maps are predicted for PBX 9404 and PBX 9501 for the impact loading regime of Up = 200 --1200 m/s. James and Walker-Wasley relations are utilized to establish explicit analytical expressions for the ignition probability as a function of load intensities. The predicted results are in good agreement with available experimental measurements. The capability to computationally predict the macroscopic response out of material microstructures and basic constituent properties lends itself to the design of new materials and the analysis of existing materials. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA).

  18. Optical levitation experiments to assess the validity of the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory.

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, F; Gréhan, G; Gouesbet, G

    1992-05-20

    Experimental near-forward-scattering diagrams obtained with one particle in optical levitation are recorded and compared with scattering diagrams computed by using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory. Comparisons concern the particular case of an off-axis location of the particle. Agreement between experimental and computed diagrams is found to be satisfactory.

  19. Ignition system monitoring assembly

    DOEpatents

    Brushwood, John Samuel

    2003-11-04

    An ignition system monitoring assembly for use in a combustion engine is disclosed. The assembly includes an igniter having at least one positioning guide with at least one transmittal member being maintained in a preferred orientation by one of the positioning guides. The transmittal member is in optical communication with a corresponding target region, and optical information about the target region is conveyed to the reception member via the transmittal member. The device allows real-time observation of optical characteristics of the target region. The target region may be the spark gap between the igniter electrodes, or other predetermined locations in optical communication with the transmittal member. The reception member may send an output signal to a processing member which, in turn, may produce a response to the output signal.

  20. 14 CFR 23.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine ignition systems. 23.1165 Section 23... Controls and Accessories § 23.1165 Engine ignition systems. (a) Each battery ignition system must be... allow continued engine operation if any battery becomes depleted. (b) The capacity of batteries and...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine ignition systems. 23.1165 Section 23... Controls and Accessories § 23.1165 Engine ignition systems. (a) Each battery ignition system must be... allow continued engine operation if any battery becomes depleted. (b) The capacity of batteries and...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1165 - Engine ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine ignition systems. 23.1165 Section 23... Controls and Accessories § 23.1165 Engine ignition systems. (a) Each battery ignition system must be... allow continued engine operation if any battery becomes depleted. (b) The capacity of batteries and...

  3. Observation of stimulated Mie-Bragg scattering from large-size-gold-nanorod suspension in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guang S.; Yong, Ken-Tye; Zhu, Jing; Prasad, P. N.

    2012-04-01

    Highly directional backward stimulated scattering has been observed from large-size-gold nanorods suspended in water, pumped with ˜816 nm and ˜10 ns laser pulses. In comparison with other known stimulated scattering effects, the newly observed effect exhibits the following features. (i) The scattering centers are impurity particles with a size comparable in order of magnitude to the incident wavelength. (ii) There is no frequency shift between the pump wavelength and the stimulated scattering wavelength. (iii) The pump threshold can be significantly lower than that of stimulated Brillouin scattering in pure water. The nonfrequency shift can be explained by the formation of a standing-wave Bragg grating induced by the interference between the forward pump beam and the backward Mie-scattering beam. The low pump threshold results from stronger initial Mie-scattering (seed) signals and the intensity-dependent refractive-index change of the scattering medium enhanced by metallic nanoparticles.

  4. Control of Early Flame Kernel Growth by Multi-Wavelength Laser Pulses for Enhanced Ignition

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitrache, Ciprian; VanOsdol, Rachel; Limbach, Christopher M.; ...

    2017-08-31

    The present contribution examines the impact of plasma dynamics and plasma-driven fluid dynamics on the flame growth of laser ignited mixtures and shows that a new dual-pulse scheme can be used to control the kernel formation process in ways that extend the lean ignition limit. We do this by performing a comparative study between (conventional) single-pulse laser ignition (λ = 1064 nm) and a novel dual-pulse method based on combining an ultraviolet (UV) pre-ionization pulse (λ = 266 nm) with an overlapped near-infrared (NIR) energy addition pulse (λ = 1064 nm). We employ OH* chemiluminescence to visualize the evolution ofmore » the early flame kernel. For single-pulse laser ignition at lean conditions, the flame kernel separates through third lobe detachment, corresponding to high strain rates that extinguish the flame. In this work, we investigate the capabilities of the dual-pulse to control the plasma-driven fluid dynamics by adjusting the axial offset of the two focal points. In particular, we find there exists a beam waist offset whereby the resulting vorticity suppresses formation of the third lobe, consequently reducing flame stretch. With this approach, we demonstrate that the dual-pulse method enables reduced flame speeds (at early times), an extended lean limit, increased combustion efficiency, and decreased laser energy requirements.« less

  5. Control of Early Flame Kernel Growth by Multi-Wavelength Laser Pulses for Enhanced Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrache, Ciprian; VanOsdol, Rachel; Limbach, Christopher M.

    The present contribution examines the impact of plasma dynamics and plasma-driven fluid dynamics on the flame growth of laser ignited mixtures and shows that a new dual-pulse scheme can be used to control the kernel formation process in ways that extend the lean ignition limit. We do this by performing a comparative study between (conventional) single-pulse laser ignition (λ = 1064 nm) and a novel dual-pulse method based on combining an ultraviolet (UV) pre-ionization pulse (λ = 266 nm) with an overlapped near-infrared (NIR) energy addition pulse (λ = 1064 nm). We employ OH* chemiluminescence to visualize the evolution ofmore » the early flame kernel. For single-pulse laser ignition at lean conditions, the flame kernel separates through third lobe detachment, corresponding to high strain rates that extinguish the flame. In this work, we investigate the capabilities of the dual-pulse to control the plasma-driven fluid dynamics by adjusting the axial offset of the two focal points. In particular, we find there exists a beam waist offset whereby the resulting vorticity suppresses formation of the third lobe, consequently reducing flame stretch. With this approach, we demonstrate that the dual-pulse method enables reduced flame speeds (at early times), an extended lean limit, increased combustion efficiency, and decreased laser energy requirements.« less

  6. Control of Early Flame Kernel Growth by Multi-Wavelength Laser Pulses for Enhanced Ignition.

    PubMed

    Dumitrache, Ciprian; VanOsdol, Rachel; Limbach, Christopher M; Yalin, Azer P

    2017-08-31

    The present contribution examines the impact of plasma dynamics and plasma-driven fluid dynamics on the flame growth of laser ignited mixtures and shows that a new dual-pulse scheme can be used to control the kernel formation process in ways that extend the lean ignition limit. We perform a comparative study between (conventional) single-pulse laser ignition (λ = 1064 nm) and a novel dual-pulse method based on combining an ultraviolet (UV) pre-ionization pulse (λ = 266 nm) with an overlapped near-infrared (NIR) energy addition pulse (λ = 1064 nm). We employ OH* chemiluminescence to visualize the evolution of the early flame kernel. For single-pulse laser ignition at lean conditions, the flame kernel separates through third lobe detachment, corresponding to high strain rates that extinguish the flame. In this work, we investigate the capabilities of the dual-pulse to control the plasma-driven fluid dynamics by adjusting the axial offset of the two focal points. In particular, we find there exists a beam waist offset whereby the resulting vorticity suppresses formation of the third lobe, consequently reducing flame stretch. With this approach, we demonstrate that the dual-pulse method enables reduced flame speeds (at early times), an extended lean limit, increased combustion efficiency, and decreased laser energy requirements.

  7. Effects of season on ignition of live wildland fuels using the forced ignition and flame spread test apparatus

    Treesearch

    S. McAllister; D. R. Weise

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of what variables affect the ignition of live wildland fuels is crucial to predicting crown fire spread, the most poorly understood type of wildland fire. Ignition tests were performed over the course of an entire year for ten species (three species in year one, seven in year two) to evaluate seasonal changes in flammability. Ignition delay and mass...

  8. Microwave Bandpass Filter Based on Mie-Resonance Extraordinary Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaolong; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Dezhao; Xun, Shuang; Ouyang, Mengzhu; Fan, Wentao; Guo, Yunsheng; Wu, Ye; Huang, Shanguo; Bi, Ke; Lei, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Microwave bandpass filter structure has been designed and fabricated by filling the periodically metallic apertures with dielectric particles. The microwave cannot transmit through the metallic subwavelength apertures. By filling the metallic apertures with dielectric particles, a transmission passband with insertion loss 2 dB appears at the frequency of 10–12 GHz. Both simulated and experimental results show that the passband is induced by the Mie resonance of the dielectric particles. In addition, the passband frequency can be tuned by the size and the permittivity of the dielectric particles. This approach is suitable to fabricate the microwave bandpass filters. PMID:27992440

  9. Doped δ-bismuth oxides to investigate oxygen ion transport as a metric for condensed phase thermite ignition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xizheng; Zhou, Wenbo; DeLisio, Jeffery B; Egan, Garth C; Zachariah, Michael R

    2017-05-24

    Nanothermites offer high energy density and high burn rates, but are mechanistically only now being understood. One question of interest is how initiation occurs and how the ignition temperature is related to microscopic controlling parameters. In this study, we explored the potential role of oxygen ion transport in Bi 2 O 3 as a controlling mechanism for condensed phase ignition reaction. Seven different doped δ-Bi 2 O 3 were synthesized by aerosol spray pyrolysis. The ignition temperatures of Al/doped Bi 2 O 3 , C/doped Bi 2 O 3 and Ta/doped Bi 2 O 3 were measured by temperature-jump/time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled with a high-speed camera respectively. These results were then correlated to the corresponding oxygen ion conductivity (directly proportional to ion diffusivity) for these doped Bi 2 O 3 measured by impedance spectroscopy. We find that ignition of thermite with doped Bi 2 O 3 as oxidizer occurs at a critical oxygen ion conductivity (∼0.06 S cm -1 ) of doped Bi 2 O 3 in the condensed-phase so long as the aluminum is in a molten state. These results suggest that oxygen ion transport limits the condensed state Bi 2 O 3 oxidized thermite ignition. We also find that the larger oxygen vacancy concentration and the smaller metal-oxide bond energy in doped Bi 2 O 3 , the lower the ignition temperature. The latter suggests that we can consider the possibility of manipulating microscopic properties within a crystal, to tune the resultant energetic properties.

  10. Remote fire stack igniter. [with solenoid-controlled valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, W. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An igniter is described mounted on a vent stack with an upper, flame cage near the top of the stack to ignite emissions from the stack. The igniter is a tube with a lower, open, flared end having a spark plug near the lower end and a solenoid-controlled valve which supplies propane fuel from a supply tank. Propane from the tank is supplied at the top under control of a second, solenoid-controlled valve. The valve controlling the lower supply is closed after ignition at the flame cage. The igniter is economical, practical, and highly reliable.

  11. Capsule Performance Optimization in the National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Haan, S W

    2009-10-13

    A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the Omega facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting themore » key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.« less

  12. Capsule performance optimization in the national ignition campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Haan, S. W.; Edwards, J.

    2010-08-01

    A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [1] to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the Omega facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

  13. Influence of several factors on ignition lag in a compression-ignition engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Voss, Fred

    1932-01-01

    This investigation was made to determine the influence of fuel quality, injection advance angle, injection valve-opening pressure, inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed on the time lag of auto-ignition of a Diesel fuel oil in a single-cylinder compression-ignition engine as obtained from an analysis of indicator diagrams. Three cam-operated fuel-injection pumps, two pumps cams, and an automatic injection valve with two different nozzles were used. Ignition lag was considered to be the interval between the start of injection of the fuel as determined with a Stroborama and the start of effective combustion as determined from the indicator diagram, the latter being the point where 4.0 x 10(exp-6) pound of fuel had been effectively burned. For this particular engine and fuel it was found that: (1) for a constant start and the same rate of fuel injection up the point of cut-off, a variation in fuel quantity from 1.2 x 10(exp-4) to 4.1 x 10(exp-4) pound per cycle has no appreciable effect on the ignition lag; (2) injection advance angle increases or decreases the lag according to whether density, temperature, or turbulence has the controlling influence; (3) increase in valve-opening pressure slightly increases the lag; and (4) increase of inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed reduces the lag.

  14. The study of theoretical and experimental feasibilities of the rocket fuel components ignition by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Vadim S.; Guterman, Vitaly Y.; Ivanov, Anatoly V.

    2004-06-01

    The report presents the theoretical and experimental results obtained during the first year of the ISTC project No. 1926. The energy and temporal characteristics of the laser radiation necessary to ignite the working components mixture in a rocket engine combustion chamber have been predicted. Two approaches have been studied: the optical gas fuel laser-induced breakdown; the laser-initiated plasma torch on target surface. The possibilities and conditions of the rocket fuel components ignition by a laser beam in the differently designed combustion chambers have been estimated and studied. The comparative analysis shows that both the optical spark and light focusing on target techniques can ignite the mixture.

  15. Ignition and combustion phenomena in Diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sass, F

    1928-01-01

    Evidences were found that neither gasification nor vaporization of the injected fuel occurs before ignition; also that the hydrogen coefficient has no significance. However the knowledge of the ignition point and of the "time lag" is important. After ignition, the combustion proceeds in a series of reactions, the last of which at least are now known.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Under Conventional Diesel, Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion Regimes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-15

    in a Light Duty Engine Under Conventional Diesel, Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition , and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition ...Conventional Diesel (CDC), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion...LTC) regimes, including reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI), partially premixed combustion (PPC), and homogenous charge compression

  17. Validating Hydrodynamic Growth in National Ignition Facility Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. Luc

    2014-10-01

    The hydrodynamic growth of capsule imperfections can threaten the success of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Therefore, it is important to design implosions that are robust to hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the numerical simulation of interacting Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov growth in these implosions is sensitive to modeling uncertainties such as radiation drive and material equations of state, the effects of which are especially apparent at high mode number (small perturbation wavelength) and high convergence ratio (small capsule radius). A series of validation experiments were conducted at the National Ignition Facility to test the ability to model hydrodynamic growth in spherically converging ignition-relevant implosions. These experiments on the Hydro-Growth Radiography platform constituted direct measurements of the growth of pre-imposed imperfections up to Legendre mode 160 and a convergence ratio of greater than four using two different laser drives: a ``low-foot'' drive used during the National Ignition Campaign and a larger adiabat ``high-foot'' drive that is modeled to be relatively more robust to ablation front hydrodynamic growth. We will discuss these experiments and how their results compare to numerical simulations and analytic theories of hydrodynamic growth, as well as their implications for the modeling of future designs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Early-time radiation flux symmetry optimization and its effect on gas-filled hohlraum ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Milovich, J. L., E-mail: milovich1@llnl.gov; Dewald, E. L.; Pak, A.

    2016-03-15

    Achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is tied to our ability to control and minimize deviations from sphericity of the capsule implosion. Low-mode asymmetries of the hot spot result from the combined effect of radiation drive asymmetries throughout the laser pulse and initial roughness on the capsule surface. In this paper, we report on simulations and experiments designed to assess, measure, and correct the drive asymmetries produced by the early-time (≈first 2 ns or “picket”) period of the laser pulse. The drive asymmetry during the picket is commonly thought to introduce distortions in the hot-spot shape at ignition time.more » However, a more subtle effect not previously considered is that it also leads to an asymmetry in shock velocity and timing, thereby increasing the fuel adiabat and reducing the margin for ignition. It is shown via hydrodynamic simulations that minimizing this effect requires that the early-time asymmetry be kept below 7.5% in the second Legendre mode (P{sub 2}), thus keeping the loss of performance margin below ≈10% for a layered implosion. Asymmetries during the picket of the laser pulse are measured using the instantaneous self-emission of a high-Z re-emission sphere in place of an ignition capsule in a hohlraum with large azimuthal diagnostic windows. Three dimensional simulations using the code HYDRA (to capture the effect of non-azimuthal hohlraum features) coupled to a cross-beam energy transfer model [Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010)] are used to establish the surrogacy of the re-emit target and to assess the early-time drive symmetry. Calculations using this model exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in the relative input powers between the different cones of NIF beams as measured for the “Rev5” CH target [Haan et al., Phys Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] and reported by Dewald et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235001 (2013)]. The same methodology applied to recently improved

  19. Three- and two-dimensional simulations of counter-propagating shear experiments at high energy densities at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Ping; Zhou, Ye; MacLaren, Stephan A.; ...

    2015-11-06

    Three- and two-dimensional numerical studies have been carried out to simulate recent counter-propagating shear flow experiments on the National Ignition Facility. A multi-physics three-dimensional, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulation code is used. Using a Reynolds Averaging Navier-Stokes model, we show that the evolution of the mixing layer width obtained from the simulations agrees well with that measured from the experiments. A sensitivity study is conducted to illustrate a 3D geometrical effect that could confuse the measurement at late times, if the energy drives from the two ends of the shock tube are asymmetric. Implications for future experiments are discussed.

  20. Ignition of combustible fluids by heated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Joseph Michael

    The ignition of flammable fluids leaking onto hot machinery components is a common cause of fires and property loss to society. For example, the U.S. Air Force has over 100 engine fires per year. There is a comparable number in the civilian air fleet. Many of these fires are due to ruptured fuel, oil or hydraulic lines impinging on hot engine components. Also, over 500,000 vehicle fires occur each year on U.S. roads. Many of these are due to leaking fluids onto hot exhaust manifolds or other exhaust components. The design of fire protection systems for aircraft and road vehicles must take into account the problems of hot surface ignition as well as re-ignition that can occur once the fire is initially extinguished. The lack of understanding of ignition and re-ignition results in heavy, high-capacity fire extinguishers to address the fire threat. It is desired to better understand the mechanisms that control this phenomenon, and exploit this understanding in producing machinery designs that can mitigate this threat. The purpose of this effort is to gain a fundamental understanding of ignition by heated surfaces. This is done by performing experimental measurements on the impingement of vertical streams of combustible fluids onto horizontal heated surfaces, and then determine the mechanisms that control the process, in terms of physical, controllable parameters (such as fuel type, flow rate and surface temperature). An initial exhaustive review of the literature revealed a small sample of pertinent findings of previous investigators, focused on droplet ignition. Boiling modes present during contact with the heated surface were also shown to control evaporation rates and ignition delays, in addition to surface temperatures and fluid properties. An experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to create the scenario of interest in a controllable fashion, with a 20 cm horizontal heated plate with variable heating supply. Fuels were applied as streams ranging from

  1. The ePLAS Code for Ignition Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Rodney J

    2012-09-20

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) presents unique opportunities for the extraction of clean energy from Fusion. Intense lasers and particle beams can create and interact with such plasmas, potentially yielding sufficient energy to satisfy all our national needs. However, few models are available to help aid the scientific community in the study and optimization of such interactions. This project enhanced and disseminated the computer code ePLAS for the early understanding and control of Ignition in ICF. ePLAS is a unique simulation code that tracks the transport of laser light to a target, the absorption of that light resulting in the generationmore » and transport of hot electrons, and the heating and flow dynamics of the background plasma. It uses an implicit electromagnetic field-solving method to greatly reduce computing demands, so that useful target interaction studies can often be completed in 15 minutes on a portable 2.1 GHz PC. The code permits the rapid scoping of calculations for the optimization of laser target interactions aimed at fusion. Recent efforts have initiated the use of analytic equations of state (EOS), K-alpha image rendering graphics, allocatable memory for source-free usage, and adaption to the latest Mac and Linux Operating Systems. The speed and utility of ePLAS are unequaled in the ICF simulation community. This project evaluated the effects of its new EOSs on target heating, compared fluid and particle models for the ions, initiated the simultaneous use of both ion models in the code, and studied long time scale 500 ps hot electron deposition for shock ignition. ePLAS has been granted EAR99 export control status, permitting export without a license to most foreign countries. Beta-test versions of ePLAS have been granted to several Universities and Commercial users. The net Project was aimed at achieving early success in the laboratory ignition of thermonuclear targets and the mastery of controlled fusion power for the nation.« less

  2. Three- and Two- Dimensional Simulations of Re-shock Experiments at High Energy Densities at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Stephan; Huntington, Channing; Nagel, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    We present simulations of recent high-energy-density (HED) re-shock experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments study the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability growth that occurs after successive shocks transit a sinusoidally-perturbed interface between materials of different densities. The shock tube is driven at one or both ends using indirect-drive laser cavities or hohlraums. X-ray area-backlit imaging is used to visualize the growth at different times. Our simulations are done with the three-dimensional, radiation hydrodynamics code ARES, developed at LLNL. We show the instabilitygrowth rate, inferred from the experimental radiographs, agrees well with our 2D and 3D simulations. We also discuss some 3D geometrical effects, suggested by our simulations, which could deteriorate the images at late times, unless properly accounted for in the experiment design. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE- AC52-06NA27279. LLNL-ABS-680789.

  3. Radial inhomogeneities in particle composition of single, levitated aerosol particles observed by Mie resonance spectroscopy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, U. K.; Steimer, S.; Lienhard, D.; Bastelberger, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent observations have indicated that organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere may exist in an amorphous semi-solid or even solid (i.e. glassy) state, e.g. [1]. The influence of highly viscous and glassy states on the timescale of aerosol particle equilibration with respect to water vapor have been investigated for some model systems of atmospheric aerosol, e.g. [2,3]. In particular, it has been shown that the kinetics of the water absorption/desorption process is controlled entirely by liquid-phase diffusion of water molecules for a highly viscous aerosol particle. A liquid phase diffusion model based on numerically solving the non-linear diffusion equation predicts strong internal gradients in water concentration when condensed phase diffusion impedes the water uptake from the gas phase [2]. Here we observe and quantify the internal concentration gradients in single, levitated, micron size aerosol particles of aqueous MBTCA (3-methyl-1,2,3-Butanetricarboxylic acid) and shikimic acid using elastic Mie resonance spectroscopy. A single, aqueous particle is levitated in an electro-dynamic balance (for details see [2]), dried for several days at room temperature, cooled to the target temperature and exposed to a rapid change in relative humidity. In addition to measuring the elastically backscattered light of a 'white light ' LED source and recording the full spectrum with a spectrograph as in [2], we use a tunable diode laser (TDL) to scan high resolution TE- and TM spectra. This combination allows observing various Mie resonance mode orders simultaneously. Since we perform the experiment at low temperatures and low humidities the changes in the Mie-spectra due to water uptake are sufficiently slow to resolve the kinetics. Experimental Mie resonance spectra are inverted to concentration profiles of water within the particle by applying the numerical diffusion model [2] in conjunction with Mie calculations of multilayered spheres [4]. Potential implications for

  4. Ignition of Hydrogen Balloons by Model-Rocket-Engine Igniters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Nicholas T.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an alternative method for exploding hydrogen balloons as a classroom demonstration. Uses the method of igniting the balloons via an electronic match. Includes necessary materials to conduct the demonstration and discusses potential hazards. (SOE)

  5. A Hybrid Ion/Electron Beam Fast Ignition Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, B. J.

    2009-11-01

    Fast ignition (FI) inertial confinement fusion is an approach to high-gain inertial fusion, whereby a dense core of deuterium/tritium fuel is assembled via direct or indirect drive and then a hot spot within the core is heated rapidly (over a time scale of order 10 ps) to ignition conditions by beams of fast charged particles. These particle beams are generated outside the capsule by the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with solid density targets. Most study of FI to date has focused on the use of electron [Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1696 (1994)] or ion [Fern'andez et al., Nuclear Fusion 49, 065004 (2009)] beams, however a hybrid approach involving both may have advantages. This paper will describe recent work in this arena. Work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Dept. of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, Los Alamos National Laboratory. This work was supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD).

  6. First Observation of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions Using Wavelength Detuning at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Marozas, J A; Hohenberger, M; Rosenberg, M J; Turnbull, D; Collins, T J B; Radha, P B; McKenty, P W; Zuegel, J D; Marshall, F J; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Seka, W; Campbell, E M; Goncharov, V N; Bowers, M W; Di Nicola, J-M G; Erbert, G; MacGowan, B J; Pelz, L J; Yang, S T

    2018-02-23

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) results from two-beam energy exchange via seeded stimulated Brillouin scattering, which detrimentally reduces ablation pressure and implosion velocity in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Mitigating CBET is demonstrated for the first time in inertial-confinement implosions at the National Ignition Facility by detuning the laser-source wavelengths (±2.3  Å UV) of the interacting beams. We show that, in polar direct-drive, wavelength detuning increases the equatorial region velocity experimentally by 16% and alters the in-flight shell morphology. These experimental observations are consistent with design predictions of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that indicate a 10% increase in the average ablation pressure.

  7. First Observation of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions Using Wavelength Detuning at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.; Hohenberger, M.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Turnbull, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Zuegel, J. D.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Campbell, E. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Bowers, M. W.; Di Nicola, J.-M. G.; Erbert, G.; MacGowan, B. J.; Pelz, L. J.; Yang, S. T.

    2018-02-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) results from two-beam energy exchange via seeded stimulated Brillouin scattering, which detrimentally reduces ablation pressure and implosion velocity in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Mitigating CBET is demonstrated for the first time in inertial-confinement implosions at the National Ignition Facility by detuning the laser-source wavelengths (±2.3 Å UV) of the interacting beams. We show that, in polar direct-drive, wavelength detuning increases the equatorial region velocity experimentally by 16% and alters the in-flight shell morphology. These experimental observations are consistent with design predictions of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that indicate a 10% increase in the average ablation pressure.

  8. Space Shuttle SRM Ignition System. [Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolieau, C. W.; Baker, J. S.; Folkman, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the Space Shuttle SRM Ignition System, which consists of a large solid propellant main igniter, a small solid propellant initiating igniter and an electromechanical safety and arming device containing two NASA Standard Initiators and a B-KNO3 pyrotechnic booster charge. In development motors, the igniter also has a valve through which CO2 is injected for post-firing quench of the SRM. The igniter has redundant, testable seals at all pressurized joints and three major reusable components; the case, the adapter, and the S&A device. Two development problem areas are discussed. One problem area was transverse mode combustion instability in the main igniter with maximum amplitude of 340 psi peak-to-peak at a frequency of 1500 Hz, which was reduced by a propellant grain configuration change and a change from a 2% aluminum content propellant to a formulation containing 10% aluminum. The other problem area was an excessively rapid rise of thrust in the SRM, which was reduced by reducing the igniter mass flow rate. This mass flow rate reduction was accomplished by removing portions of the grain starpoints in the head end.

  9. Etude de l'anémie chez les enfants séropositifs au VIH naïfs au traitement antirétroviral à Lubumbashi, République Démocratique du Congo

    PubMed Central

    Mwadianvita, Costa Kazadi; Ilunga, Eric Kasamba; Djouma, Jackson; Wembonyama, Cecile Watu; Mutomb, Florence Mujing A; Ekwalanga, Michel Balaka; Kabongo, Joe; Mundongo, Henri; Mupoya, Kalombo; Wembonyama, Stanis; Kalenga Mwenze, Prosper; Nkoy, Albert Mwembo-Tambwe A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Beaucoup d'enfants infectés par le VIH arrivent à la consultation dans un état d'anémie. Notre objectif était d’évaluer la prévalence et le typage de l'anémie chez ces enfants. Méthodes C'est une étude transversale réalisée dans 3 centres de prise en charge des Personnes Vivant avec le VIH à Lubumbashi de Mai 2010 à Mai 2011. La population d’étude était de 152 enfants, âgés de 6 à 180 mois, naïfs au traitement antirétroviral. Les statistiques descriptives usuelles ont été utilisées. Résultats La prévalence globale de l'anémie (définie comme l'hémoglobine < 11g/dl) était de 69,1% (n=105) et 11,4% avaient une anémie sévère (Hg < 7,0 g/dl). Parmi eux, 16% ont été transfusés au moins 1 fois. L'anémie sévère était positivement associée au stade clinique de la maladie (p=0,02). L'anémie microcytaire était majoritaire dans les deux tranches d’âge. Elle était plus hypochrome chez les enfants en âge préscolaire soit 9,5% et plus normochrome en âge scolaire soit 15,2%. L'anémie normocytaire était plus normochrome dans les deux tranches d’âge soit 12,4% en âge préscolaire et 6,7% en âge scolaire. L'anémie macrocytaire était rare. Conclusion Environ sept enfants sur dix, âgés de moins de 15 ans infectés par le VIH naïfs au traitement antirétroviral dans notre milieu sont anémiques. L'anémie est corrélée à la sévérité de la maladie. Il est important d'associer une prise en charge nutritionnelle et corriger l'anémie avant une trithérapie antirétrovirale. PMID:25018796

  10. Comparison of the Recently proposed Super Marx Generator Approach to Thermonuclear Ignition with the DT Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid Concept (LIFE) by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2009-05-01

    The recently proposed Super Marx pure deuterium micro-detonation ignition concept [1] is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser DT fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE) [2]. A typical example of the LIFE concept is a fusion gain 30, and a fission gain of 10, making up for a total gain of 300, with about 10 times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means a substantial release of fission products, as in fusion-less pure fission reactors. In the Super Marx approach for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-detonation gains of the same magnitude can in theory be reached. If the theoretical prediction can be supported by more elaborate calculations, the Super Marx approach is likely to make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear micro-explosions. [1] ``Ignition of a Deuterium Micro-Detonation with a Gigavolt Super Marx Generator,'' Winterberg, F., Journal of Fusion Energy, Springer, 2008. http://www.springerlink.com/content/r2j046177j331241/fulltext.pdf. [2] ``LIFE: Clean Energy from Nuclear Waste,'' https://lasers.llnl.gov/missions/energy&_slash;for&_slash;the&_slash;future/life/

  11. Numerical study of the ignition behavior of a post-discharge kernel injected into a turbulent stratified cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaravel, Thomas; Labahn, Jeffrey; Ihme, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    The reliable initiation of flame ignition by high-energy spark kernels is critical for the operability of aviation gas turbines. The evolution of a spark kernel ejected by an igniter into a turbulent stratified environment is investigated using detailed numerical simulations with complex chemistry. At early times post ejection, comparisons of simulation results with high-speed Schlieren data show that the initial trajectory of the kernel is well reproduced, with a significant amount of air entrainment from the surrounding flow that is induced by the kernel ejection. After transiting in a non-flammable mixture, the kernel reaches a second stream of flammable methane-air mixture, where the successful of the kernel ignition was found to depend on the local flow state and operating conditions. By performing parametric studies, the probability of kernel ignition was identified, and compared with experimental observations. The ignition behavior is characterized by analyzing the local chemical structure, and its stochastic variability is also investigated.

  12. Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.

    2013-07-15

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ∼50%. The compressed fieldmore » is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.« less

  13. Hydrocarbon-Seeded Ignition System for Small Spacecraft Thrusters Using Ionic Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Merkley, Daniel P.; Eilers, Shannon D.; Taylor, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    "Green" propellants based on Ionic-liquids (ILs) like Ammonium DiNitramide and Hydroxyl Ammonium Nitrate have recently been developed as reduced-hazard replacements for hydrazine. Compared to hydrazine, ILs offer up to a 50% improvement in available density-specific impulse. These materials present minimal vapor hazard at room temperature, and this property makes IL's potentially advantageous for "ride-share" launch opportunities where hazards introduced by hydrazine servicing are cost-prohibitive. Even though ILs present a reduced hazard compared to hydrazine, in crystalline form they are potentially explosive and are mixed in aqueous solutions to buffer against explosion. Unfortunately, the high water content makes IL-propellants difficult to ignite and currently a reliable "coldstart" capability does not exist. For reliable ignition, IL-propellants catalyst beds must be pre-heated to greater than 350 C before firing. The required preheat power source is substantial and presents a significant disadvantage for SmallSats where power budgets are extremely limited. Design and development of a "micro-hybrid" igniter designed to act as a "drop-in" replacement for existing IL catalyst beds is presented. The design requires significantly lower input energy and offers a smaller overall form factor. Unlike single-use "squib" pyrotechnic igniters, the system allows the gas generation cycle to be terminated and reinitiated on demand.

  14. Capsule performance optimization in the National Ignition Campaigna)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, O. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hoffman, N.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kyrala, G. A.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Robey, H. F.; Spears, B. K.; Thomas, C. A.; Weber, S. V.; Wilson, D. C.; Marinak, M. M.; Suter, L. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Atherton, J.; Edwards, J.; Haan, S. W.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2010-05-01

    A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition by laser-driven hohlraums [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the OMEGA facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

  15. Capsule performance optimization in the National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.

    2010-05-15

    A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition by laser-driven hohlraums [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the OMEGA facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition designmore » and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.« less

  16. Development of dual-wavelength Mie polarization Raman lidar for aerosol and cloud vertical structure probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenzhu; Liu, Dong; Wang, Yingjian; Wang, Bangxin; Zhong, Zhiqing; Xie, Chenbo; Wu, Decheng; Bo, Guangyu; Shao, Jie

    2014-11-01

    A Dual-wavelength Mie Polarization Raman Lidar has been developed for cloud and aerosol optical properties measurement. This idar system has built in Hefei and passed the performance assessment in 2012, and then moved to Jinhua city to carry out the long-term continuous measurements of vertical distribution of regional cloud and aerosol. A double wavelengths (532 and 1064 nm) Nd-YAG laser is employed as emitting source and four channels are used for detecting back-scattering signals from atmosphere aerosol and cloud including 1064 nm Mie, 607 nm N2 Raman, two 532 nm Orthogonal Polarization channels. The temporal and spatial resolutions for this system, which is operating with a continuing mode (24/7) automatically, are 30s and 7.5m, respectively. The measured data are used for investigating the aerosol and cloud vertical structure and cloud phase from combining of cloud signal intensity, polarization ratio and color ratio.

  17. Effect of oxygen on the ignition of liquid fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahl, H

    1929-01-01

    The ignition temperature, ignition lag, and ignition strength of simple and homogeneous fuels in combustion air of small oxygen content differ from what they are in air of greater oxygen content. In the case of small oxygen content, these fuels behave as if mixed unevenly. In the case of air with a definite oxygen content, the simple fuels have two ignition points, between which ignition takes place within a certain temperature range. The phenomena are explained by pyrogenous decomposition, comparison of the individual heat quantities, and the effect of the walls.

  18. Ignition patterns & prescribed fire behavior in southern pine stands

    Treesearch

    Ragnar W. Johansen

    1987-01-01

    As an aid to forest managers who use or contemplate using aerial ignition techniques in their prescribed burning programs, a study was designed to evaluate the magnitude of the differences that could occur depending on whether lines of fire were used (ignited by a helitorch) or a spot-fire technique was used (ignited by aerial ignition devices). Six experimental fires...

  19. Effects of Nonsphericity on the Behavior of Lorenz-Mie Resonances in Scattering Characteristics of Liquid-Cloud Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    By using the results of highly accurate T-matrix computations for randomly oriented oblate and prolate spheroids and Chebyshev particles with varying degrees of asphericity, we analyze the effects of a deviation of water-droplet shapes from that of a perfect sphere on the behavior of Lorenz-Mie morphology-dependent resonances of various widths. We demonstrate that the positions and profiles of the resonances can change significantly with increasing asphericity. The absolute degree of asphericity required to suppress a Lorenz-Mie resonance is approximately proportional to the resonance width. Our results imply that numerical averaging of scattering characteristics of real cloud droplets over sizes may rely on a significantly coarser size-parameter resolution than that required for ideal, perfectly spherical particles.

  20. Linearized T-Matrix and Mie Scattering Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurr, R.; Wang, J.; Zeng, J.; Mishchenko, M. I.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new linearization of T-Matrix and Mie computations for light scattering by non-spherical and spherical particles, respectively. In addition to the usual extinction and scattering cross-sections and the scattering matrix outputs, the linearized models will generate analytical derivatives of these optical properties with respect to the real and imaginary parts of the particle refractive index, and (for non-spherical scatterers) with respect to the ''shape'' parameter (the spheroid aspect ratio, cylinder diameter/height ratio, Chebyshev particle deformation factor). These derivatives are based on the essential linearity of Maxwell's theory. Analytical derivatives are also available for polydisperse particle size distribution parameters such as the mode radius. The T-matrix formulation is based on the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies FORTRAN 77 code developed in the 1990s. The linearized scattering codes presented here are in FORTRAN 90 and will be made publicly available.

  1. Impacts of Implosion Asymmetry And Hot Spot Shape On Ignition Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, S. Austin; Batha, Steve

    2017-10-01

    Implosion symmetry plays a critical role in achieving high areal density and internal energy at stagnation during hot spot formation in ICF capsules. Asymmetry causes hot spot irregularity and stagnation de-synchronization that results in lower temperatures and areal densities of the hot fuel. These degradations significantly affect the alpha heating process in the DT fuel as well as on the thermonuclear performance of the capsules. In this work, we explore the physical factors determining the shape of the hot spot late in the implosion and the effects of shape on Î+/-particle transport. We extend our ignition theory [1-4] to include the hot spot shape and quantify the effects of the implosion asymmetry on both the ignition criterion and capsule performance. We validate our theory with the NIF existing experimental data Our theory shows that the ignition criterion becomes more restrictive with the deformation of the hot spot. Through comparison with the NIF data, we demonstrate that the shape effects on the capsules' performance become more explicit as the self-heating and yield of the capsules increases. The degradation of the thermonuclear burn by the hot spot shape for high yield shots to date can be as high as 20%. Our theory is in good agreement with the NIF data. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  2. Effects of alpha stopping power modelling on the ignition threshold in a directly-driven inertial confinement fusion capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, Mauro; Canaud, Benoit; Cayzac, Witold; Ramis, Rafael; Singleton, Robert L.

    2017-05-01

    The alpha-particle energy deposition mechanism modifies the ignition conditions of the thermonuclear Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions, and constitutes a key issue in achieving high gain in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been performed with the code Multi-IFE [R. Ramis, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Comput. Phys. Commun. 203, 226 (2016)] to simulate the implosion of a capsule directly irradiated by a laser beam. The diffusion approximation for the alpha energy deposition has been used to optimize three laser profiles corresponding to different implosion velocities. A Monte-Carlo package has been included in Multi-IFE to calculate the alpha energy transport, and in this case the energy deposition uses both the LP [C.K. Li, R.D. Petrasso, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3059 (1993)] and the BPS [L.S. Brown, D.L. Preston, R.L. Singleton Jr., Phys. Rep. 410, 237 (2005)] stopping power models. Homothetic transformations that maintain a constant implosion velocity have been used to map out the transition region between marginally-igniting and high-gain configurations. The results provided by the two models have been compared and it is found that - close to the ignition threshold - in order to produce the same fusion energy, the calculations performed with the BPS model require about 10% more invested energy with respect to the LP model.

  3. 14 CFR 33.37 - Ignition system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ignition system. 33.37 Section 33.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.37 Ignition system...

  4. 14 CFR 33.69 - Ignitions system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.69 Ignitions system. Each engine must be equipped with an ignition system for starting the engine on the ground and in flight. An...

  5. 14 CFR 33.69 - Ignitions system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.69 Ignitions system. Each engine must be equipped with an ignition system for starting the engine on the ground and in flight. An...

  6. Approach to ignition of tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmar, D.J.

    1981-02-01

    Recent transport modeling results for JET, INTOR, and ETF are reviewed and analyzed with respect to existing uncertainties in the underlying physics, the self-consistency of the very large numerical codes, and the margin for ignition. The codes show ignition to occur in ETF/INTOR-sized machines if empirical scaling can be extrapolated to ion temperatures (and beta values) much higher than those presently achieved, if there is no significant impurity accumulation over the first 7 s, and if the known ideal and resistive MHD instabilities remain controllable for the evolving plasma profiles during ignition startup.

  7. Design and simulation of 532nm Rayleigh-Mie Doppler wind Lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhuang; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Bangxin; Shen, Fahua; Tan, Min; Li, Lu; Zhang, Zhanye

    2018-02-01

    Wind is one of the most significant parameter in weather forecast and the research of climate.It is essential for the weather forecast seasonally to yearly ,atmospheric dynamics,study of thermodynamics and go into the water, chemistry and aerosol which are have to do with global climate statusto measure three-dimensional troposphericwind field accurately.Structure of the doppler wind lidar system which based on Fabry-Perot etalon is introduced detailedly. In this section,the key parameters of the triple Fabry-Perot etalon are optimized and this is the key point.The results of optimizing etalon are as follows:the FSR is 8GHz,the FWHM is1GHz,3.48 GHz is the separation distance between two edge channels,and the separation distance between locking channel and the left edge channel is 1.16 GHz. In this condition,the sensitivity of wind velocity of Mie scattering and Rayleigh scattering is both 0.70%/(m/s) when the temperature is 255K in the height of 5Km and there is no wind. The simulation to this system states that in+/-50m/s radial wind speed range, the wind speed bias induced by Mie signal is less than 0.15m/s from 5 to 50km altitude.

  8. Fundamental ignition study for material fire safety improvement, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Zung, L. B.

    1970-01-01

    The investigation of preignition, ignition, and combustion characteristics of Delrin (acetate terminated polyformaldehyde) and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) resins in air and oxygen are presented. The determination of ignition limits and their dependence on temperature and the oxidizing media, as well as the analyses of the volatiles produced, were studied. Tests were conducted in argon, an inert medium in which only purely pyrolytic reactions can take place, using the stagnation burner arrangement designed and constructed for this purpose. A theoretical treatment of the ignition and combination phenomena was devised. In the case of Delrin the ignition and ignition delays are apparently independent of the gas (air, oxygen) temperatures. The results indicate that hydrogen is the ignition triggering agent. Teflon ignition limits were established in oxygen only.

  9. Indirect drive ignition at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Edwards, M. J.; Hurricane, O. A.

    This article reviews scientific results from the pursuit of indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and describes the program's forward looking research directions. In indirect drive on the NIF, laser beams heat an x-ray enclosure called a hohlraum that surrounds a spherical pellet. X-ray radiation ablates the surface of the pellet, imploding a thin shell of deuterium/tritium (DT) that must accelerate to high velocity (v > 350 km s -1) and compress by a factor of several thousand. Since 2009, substantial progress has been made in understanding the major challenges to ignition: Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability seededmore » by target imperfections; and low-mode asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray drive, exacerbated by laser-plasma instabilities (LPI). Requirements on velocity, symmetry, and compression have been demonstrated separately on the NIF but have not been achieved simultaneously. We now know that the RT instability, seeded mainly by the capsule support tent, severely degraded DT implosions from 2009–2012. Experiments using a 'high-foot' drive with demonstrated lower RT growth improved the thermonuclear yield by a factor of 10, resulting in yield amplification due to alpha particle heating by more than a factor of 2. However, large time dependent drive asymmetry in the LPI-dominated hohlraums remains unchanged, preventing further improvements. High fidelity 3D hydrodynamic calculations explain these results. In conclusion, future research efforts focus on improved capsule mounting techniques and on hohlraums with little LPI and controllable symmetry. In parallel, we are pursuing improvements to the basic physics models used in the design codes through focused physics experiments.« less

  10. Indirect drive ignition at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Meezan, N. B.; Edwards, M. J.; Hurricane, O. A.; ...

    2016-10-27

    This article reviews scientific results from the pursuit of indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and describes the program's forward looking research directions. In indirect drive on the NIF, laser beams heat an x-ray enclosure called a hohlraum that surrounds a spherical pellet. X-ray radiation ablates the surface of the pellet, imploding a thin shell of deuterium/tritium (DT) that must accelerate to high velocity (v > 350 km s -1) and compress by a factor of several thousand. Since 2009, substantial progress has been made in understanding the major challenges to ignition: Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability seededmore » by target imperfections; and low-mode asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray drive, exacerbated by laser-plasma instabilities (LPI). Requirements on velocity, symmetry, and compression have been demonstrated separately on the NIF but have not been achieved simultaneously. We now know that the RT instability, seeded mainly by the capsule support tent, severely degraded DT implosions from 2009–2012. Experiments using a 'high-foot' drive with demonstrated lower RT growth improved the thermonuclear yield by a factor of 10, resulting in yield amplification due to alpha particle heating by more than a factor of 2. However, large time dependent drive asymmetry in the LPI-dominated hohlraums remains unchanged, preventing further improvements. High fidelity 3D hydrodynamic calculations explain these results. In conclusion, future research efforts focus on improved capsule mounting techniques and on hohlraums with little LPI and controllable symmetry. In parallel, we are pursuing improvements to the basic physics models used in the design codes through focused physics experiments.« less

  11. Research on measurement of aviation magneto ignition strength and balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; He, Zhixiang; Zhang, Dingpeng

    2017-12-01

    Aviation magneto ignition system failure accounted for two-thirds of the total fault aviation piston engine and above. At present the method used for this failure diagnosis is often depended on the visual inspections in the civil aviation maintenance field. Due to human factors, the visual inspections cannot provide ignition intensity value and ignition equilibrium deviation value among the different spark plugs in the different cylinder of aviation piston engine. So air magneto ignition strength and balance testing has become an aviation piston engine maintenance technical problem needed to resolve. In this paper, the ultraviolet sensor with detection wavelength of 185~260nm and driving voltage of 320V DC is used as the core of ultraviolet detection to detect the ignition intensity of Aviation magneto ignition system and the balance deviation of the ignition intensity of each cylinder. The experimental results show that the rotational speed within the range 0 to 3500 RPM test error less than 0.34%, ignition strength analysis and calculation error is less than 0.13%, and measured the visual inspection is hard to distinguish between high voltage wire leakage failure of deviation value of 200 pulse ignition strength balance/Sec. The method to detect aviation piston engine maintenance of magneto ignition system fault has a certain reference value.

  12. Moisture Content Influences Ignitability of Slash Pine Litter

    Treesearch

    Winfred H. Blackmarr

    1972-01-01

    The influence of moisture content on the ignitability of slash pine litter was measured by dropping lighted matches onto fuel beds conditioned to different levels of moisture content.The percentage of matches igniting the fuel bed was used to indicate ignition probability at each moisture content. The "critical range" of fuel moisture contents within which...

  13. Deuteron Beam Driven Fast Ignition of a Pre-Compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Fuel Capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoling; Miley, George; Flippo, Kirk; Hora, Heinrich; Gaillard, Sandrine; Offermann, Dustin

    2012-10-01

    We proposed to utilize a new ``Deuterium Cluster'' type structure for the laser interaction foil to generate an energetic deuteron beam as the fast igniter to ignite inertial confinement fusion fuel capsule. The benefit of deuteron beam driven fast ignition is that its deposition in the target fuel will not only provide heating but also fuse with fuel as they slow down in the target. The preliminary results from recent laser-deuteron acceleration experiment at LANL were encouraging. Also, in most recent calculations, we found that a 12.73% extra energy gain from deuteron beam-target fusion could be achieved when quasi-Maxwellian deuteron beam was assumed, and when a ρrb = 4.5 g/cm2 was considered, where ρ is the fuel density, and rb is the ion beam focusing radius on the target. These results provide some insight into the contribution of the extra heat produced by deuteron beam-target fusion to the hot spot ignition process. If the physics works as anticipated, this novel type of interaction foil can efficiently generate energetic deuterons during intense laser pulses. The massive yield of deuterons should turn out to be the most efficient way of igniting the DT fuel, making the dream of near-term commercialization of FI fusion more achievable.

  14. Metasurface Mirrors for External Control of Mie Resonances.

    PubMed

    van de Groep, Jorik; Brongersma, Mark L

    2018-06-13

    The ability to control and structurally tune the optical resonances of semiconductor nanostructures has far-reaching implications for a wide range of optical applications, including photodetectors, (bio)sensors, and photovoltaics. Such control is commonly obtained by tailoring the nanostructure's geometry, material, or dielectric environment. Here, we combine insights from the field of coherent optics and metasurface mirrors to effectively turn Mie resonances on and off with high spatial control and in a polarization-dependent fashion. We illustrate this in an integrated device by manipulating the photocurrent spectra of a single-nanowire photodetector placed on a metasurface mirror. This approach can be generalized to control spectral, angle-dependent, absorption, and scattering properties of semiconductor nanostructures with an engineered metasurface and without a need to alter their geometric or materials properties.

  15. 33 CFR 183.440 - Secondary circuits of ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements § 183.440 Secondary circuits of ignition systems. (a) Each conductor in a secondary circuit of an ignition system must meet SAE Standard J557. (b) The connection of each ignition conductor to a spark plug...

  16. 33 CFR 183.440 - Secondary circuits of ignition systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Requirements § 183.440 Secondary circuits of ignition systems. (a) Each conductor in a secondary circuit of an ignition system must meet SAE Standard J557. (b) The connection of each ignition conductor to a spark plug...

  17. Far-Field Lorenz-Mie Scattering in an Absorbing Host Medium: Theoretical Formalism and FORTRAN Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Yang, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we make practical use of the recently developed first-principles approach to electromagnetic scattering by particles immersed in an unbounded absorbing host medium. Specifically, we introduce an actual computational tool for the calculation of pertinent far-field optical observables in the context of the classical Lorenzâ€"Mie theory. The paper summarizes the relevant theoretical formalism, explains various aspects of the corresponding numerical algorithm, specifies the input and output parameters of a FORTRAN program available at https://www.giss.nasa.gov/staff/mmishchenko/Lorenz-Mie.html, and tabulates benchmark results useful for testing purposes. This public-domain FORTRAN program enables one to solve the following two important problems: (i) simulate theoretically the reading of a remote well-collimated radiometer measuring electromagnetic scattering by an individual spherical particle or a small random group of spherical particles; and (ii) compute the single-scattering parameters that enter the vector radiative transfer equation derived directly from the Maxwell equations.

  18. Far-field Lorenz-Mie scattering in an absorbing host medium: Theoretical formalism and FORTRAN program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Yang, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we make practical use of the recently developed first-principles approach to electromagnetic scattering by particles immersed in an unbounded absorbing host medium. Specifically, we introduce an actual computational tool for the calculation of pertinent far-field optical observables in the context of the classical Lorenz-Mie theory. The paper summarizes the relevant theoretical formalism, explains various aspects of the corresponding numerical algorithm, specifies the input and output parameters of a FORTRAN program available at https://www.giss.nasa.gov/staff/mmishchenko/Lorenz-Mie.html, and tabulates benchmark results useful for testing purposes. This public-domain FORTRAN program enables one to solve the following two important problems: (i) simulate theoretically the reading of a remote well-collimated radiometer measuring electromagnetic scattering by an individual spherical particle or a small random group of spherical particles; and (ii) compute the single-scattering parameters that enter the vector radiative transfer equation derived directly from the Maxwell equations.

  19. Development and Testing of a Green Monopropellant Ignition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Merkley, Daniel P.; Eilers, Shannon D.; Judson, Michael I.; Taylor, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will detail the development and testing of a "green" monopropellant booster ignition system. The proposed booster ignition technology eliminates the need for a pre-heated catalyst bed, a high wattage power source, toxic pyrophoric ignition fluids, or a bi-propellant spark ignitor. The design offers the simplicity of a monopropellant feed system features non-hazardous gaseous oxygen (GOX) as the working fluid. The approach is fundamentally different from all other "green propellant" solutions in the aerospace in the industry. Although the proposed system is more correctly a "hybrid" rocket technology, since only a single propellant feed path is required, it retains all the simple features of a monopropellant system. The technology is based on the principle of seeding an oxidizing flow with a small amount of hydrocarbon.1 The ignition is initiated electrostatically with a low-wattage inductive spark. Combustion gas byproducts from the hydrocarbon-seeding ignition process can exceed 2400 C and the high exhaust temperature ensures reliable main propellant ignition. The system design is described in detail in the Hydrocarbon-Seeded Ignition System Design subsection.

  20. Catalytic igniters and their use to ignite lean hydrogen-air mixtures

    DOEpatents

    McLean, William J.; Thorne, Lawrence R.; Volponi, Joanne V.

    1988-01-01

    A catalytic igniter which can ignite a hydrogen-air mixture as lean as 5.5% hydrogen with induction times ranging from 20 s to 400 s, under conditions which may be present during a loss-of-liquid-coolant accident at a light water nuclear reactor comprises (a) a perforate catalytically active substrate, such as a platinum coated ceramic honeycomb or wire mesh screen, through which heated gases produced by oxidation of the mixture can freely flow and (b) a plurality of thin platinum wires mounted in a thermally conductive manner on the substrate and positioned thereon so as to be able to receive heat from the substrate and the heated gases while also in contact with unoxidized gases.