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Sample records for ii calderon process

  1. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2001-07-23

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit level. During the past quarter approval for the re-direction took place and work was initiated at both levels.

  2. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2002-01-22

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit (PDU) level.

  3. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2005-10-14

    The commercialization path of the Calderon technology for making a feedstock for steelmaking with assistance from DOE initially focused on making coke and work was done which proved that the Calderon technology is capable of making good coke for hard driving blast furnaces. U.S. Steel which participated in such demonstration felt that the Calderon technology would be more meaningful in lowering the costs of making steel by adapting it to the making of iron--thus obviating the need for coke. U.S. Steel and Calderon teamed up to jointly work together to demonstrate that the Calderon technology will produce in a closed system iron units from iron concentrate (ore) and coal competitively by eliminating pelletizing, sintering, coking and blast furnace operation. If such process steps could be eliminated, a huge reduction in polluting emissions and greenhouse gases (including CO{sub 2}) relating to steelmaking would ensue. Such reduction will restructure the steel industry away from the very energy-intensive steelmaking steps currently practiced and drastically reduce costs of making steel. The development of a technology to lower U.S. steelmaking costs and become globally competitive is a priority of major importance. Therefore, the development work which Calderon is conducting presently under this Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy becomes more crucial than ever. During the 3rd quarter of 2005 which the present report covers, virtually all the effort to advance the Calderon technology to make iron units was concentrated towards forming a team with a steelmaker who needs both iron units in the form of hot metal and a substitute for natural gas (SNG), both being major contributors to higher costs in steelmaking. Calderon felt that a very good candidate would be Steel Dynamics (SDI) by virtue that it operates a rotary hearth facility in Butler, Indiana that uses large amounts of natural gas to reduce briquettes made from ore and coal that they subsequently melt

  4. CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    1999-09-22

    This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; (4) conducting a blast furnace test to demonstrate the compatibility of the coke produced; and (5) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Detailed workings of the team; Proposal to FETC for Phase II; Permitting and Environmental Work; and Engineering Progress.

  5. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2002-04-25

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work performed to-date is encouraging by virtue that product was produced with the lowest cost raw material (ore concentrate), and the energy source being exclusively coal. The product was melted and cast. The equipment has been debugged and preparations are taking place towards the integration of the process to produce directly molten iron and/or molten steel. Also it is planned to conclude the 72 hours test at reasonably continuous steady state during next quarter.

  6. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2002-07-30

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  7. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2003-01-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  8. Phase II Calderon Process to Produce Direct Reduced Iron Research and Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2003-06-30

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  9. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2003-04-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  10. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2002-10-29

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  11. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2004-04-27

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  12. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2004-10-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  13. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2005-07-29

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  14. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon; Reina Calderon

    2004-01-27

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  15. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2003-10-22

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  16. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2006-04-19

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  17. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2006-01-30

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  18. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2005-01-25

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  19. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2005-01-26

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  20. Phase II Calderon Process to Produce Direct Reduced Iron Research and Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2007-03-31

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase 1 was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  1. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2004-07-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  2. CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    1998-12-23

    This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; and (4) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Conducting bench-scale tests to produce coke and acceptable tar from the process to satisfy Koppers, a prospective stakeholder; Consolidation of the project team players to execute the full size commercial cokemaking reactor demonstration; and Progress made in advancing the design of the full size commercial cokemaking reactor.

  3. CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    1999-06-23

    This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; (4) conducting a blast furnace test to demonstrate the compatibility of the coke produced; and (5) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Detailed studies of LTV's site for the installation of the commercial Demonstration Unit with site specific layouts; Environmental Work; Firm commitments for funding from the private sector; and Federal funding to complement the private contribution.

  4. CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    1999-03-19

    This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; and (4) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Consolidation of the team of stakeholders; Move the site for the commercial demonstration to LTV Steel, Cleveland, Ohio; Permitting for new site; Site specific engineering; Cost update of the project as it relates to the Cleveland location; FETC update; DCAA audit; and Updated endorsement of Calderon process by Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA, Region 5.

  5. Calderon coal gasification Process Development Unit design and test program

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, A.; Madison, E.; Probert, P.

    1992-11-01

    The Process Development Unit (PDU) was designed and constructed to demonstrate the novel Calderon gasification/hot gas cleanup process. in the process, run-of-mine high sulfur coal is first pyrolyzed to recover a rich gas (medium Btu gas), after which the resulting char is subjected to airblown gasification to yield a lean gas (low Btu gas). The process incorporates a proprietary integrated system for the conversion of coal to gases and for the hot cleanup of the gases which removes both particulate and sulfur components of the gaseous products. The yields are: a syngas (CO and H{sub 2} mix) suitable for further conversion to liquid fuel (e.g. methanol/gasoline), and a lean gas suitable to fuel the combustion turbine of a combined cycle power generation plant with very low levels of NO{sub x} (15 ppmv). The fused slag (from the gasified char ash content) and the sulfur recovered during the hot gas cleanup will be sold as by-products. The small quantity of spent sorbent generated will be combined with the coal feed as a fluxing agent for the slag. The small quantity of wastewater from slag drainings and steam generation blowdown will be mixed with the coal feed for disposal. The Calderon gasification/hot gas cleanup, which is a completely closed system, operates at a pressure suitable for combined cycle power generation.

  6. Calderon coal gasification Process Development Unit design and test program

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, A.; Madison, E.; Probert, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Process Development Unit (PDU) was designed and constructed to demonstrate the novel Calderon gasification/hot gas cleanup process. in the process, run-of-mine high sulfur coal is first pyrolyzed to recover a rich gas (medium Btu gas), after which the resulting char is subjected to airblown gasification to yield a lean gas (low Btu gas). The process incorporates a proprietary integrated system for the conversion of coal to gases and for the hot cleanup of the gases which removes both particulate and sulfur components of the gaseous products. The yields are: a syngas (CO and H[sub 2] mix) suitable for further conversion to liquid fuel (e.g. methanol/gasoline), and a lean gas suitable to fuel the combustion turbine of a combined cycle power generation plant with very low levels of NO[sub x] (15 ppmv). The fused slag (from the gasified char ash content) and the sulfur recovered during the hot gas cleanup will be sold as by-products. The small quantity of spent sorbent generated will be combined with the coal feed as a fluxing agent for the slag. The small quantity of wastewater from slag drainings and steam generation blowdown will be mixed with the coal feed for disposal. The Calderon gasification/hot gas cleanup, which is a completely closed system, operates at a pressure suitable for combined cycle power generation.

  7. Calderon cokemaking process/demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 set new emission standards for hazardous air pollutants from coke ovens. Congress, recognizing that the coke industry faces technological and financial difficulties in meeting these new, stringent emission standards, required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and DOE to conduct a joint six-year research and development program to assist the industry in developing and commercializing new technologies and work practices that would significantly reduce hazardous coke oven emissions. DOE`s purpose for sponsoring the proposed demonstration project is to provide the coke industry with a new option for the economical production of high quality coke that significantly reduces the quantity of pollutants entering the environment.

  8. Proposed MIDAS II processing array

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, J.

    1982-03-01

    MIDAS (Modular Interactive Data Analysis System) is a ganged processor scheme used to interactively process large data bases occurring as a finite sequence of similar events. The existing device uses a system of eight ganged minicomputer central processor boards servicing a rotating group of 16 memory blocks. A proposal for MIDAS II, the successor to MIDAS, is to use a much larger number of ganged processors, one per memory block, avoiding the necessity of switching memories from processor to processor. To be economic, MIDAS II must use a small, relatively fast and inexpensive microprocessor, such as the TMS 9995. This paper analyzes the use of the TMS 9995 applied to the MIDAS II processing array, emphasizing computational, architectural and physical characteristics which make the use of the TMS 9995 attractive for this application.

  9. The SRC-II process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, B. K.; Jackson, D. M.

    1981-03-01

    The Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-II) process which produces low-sulfur distillate fuel oil from coal is discussed. The process dissolves coal in a process-derived solvent at elevated temperature and pressure in the presence of hydrogen, separates the undissolved mineral residue, then recovers the original solvent by vacuum distillation. The distillate fuel oil produced is for use largely as a nonpolluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam and is expected to be competitive with petroleum fuels during the 1980s. During this period, the SRC-II fuel oil is expected to be attractive compared with combustion of coal with flue gas desulfurization in U.S. East Coast oil-burning power plants, as well as in small and medium-sized industrial boilers. The substantial quantities of methane, light hydrocarbons and naphtha produced by the process have value as feedstocks for preparation of pipeline gas, ethylene and high-octane unleaded gasoline, and can replace petroleum fractions in many applications. The liquid and gas products from a future large-scale plant, such as the 6000 t/day plant planned for Morgantown, West Virginia, are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.25 to $4.75/GJ.

  10. Blebbistatin and blebbistatin-inactivated myosin II inhibit myosin II-independent processes in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Shi; Liu, Xiong; Korn, Edward D.

    2005-01-01

    Blebbistatin, a cell-permeable inhibitor of class-II myosins, was developed to provide a tool for studying the biologic roles of myosin II. Consistent with this use, we find that blebbistatin inhibits three myosin II-dependent processes in Dictyostelium (growth in suspension culture, capping of Con A receptors, and development to fruiting bodies) and does not inhibit growth on plates, which does not require myosin II. As expected, macropinocytosis (myosin I-dependent), contractile vacuole activity (myosin V-dependent), and phagocytosis (myosin VII-dependent), none of which requires myosin II, are not inhibited by blebbistatin in myosin II-null cells, but, unexpectedly, blebbistatin does inhibit macropinocytosis and phagocytosis by cells expressing myosin II. Expression of catalytically inactive myosin II in myosin II-null cells also inhibits macropinocytosis and phagocytosis. Both blebbistatin-inhibited myosin II and catalytically inactive myosin II form cytoplasmic aggregates, which may be why they inhibit myosin II-independent processes, but neither affects the distribution of actin filaments in vegetative cells or actin and myosin distribution in dividing or polarized cells. Blebbistatin also inhibits cell streaming and plaque expansion in myosin II-null cells. Our results are consistent with myosin II being the only Dictyostelium myosin that is inhibited by blebbistatin but also show that blebbistatin-inactivated myosin II inhibits some myosin II-independent processes and that blebbistatin inhibits other activities in the absence of myosin II. PMID:15671182

  11. Yeast and yeast-like diversity in the southernmost glacier of Europe (Calderone Glacier, Apennines, Italy).

    PubMed

    Branda, Eva; Turchetti, Benedetta; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Pecci, Massimo; Smiraglia, Claudio; Buzzini, Pietro

    2010-06-01

    The present study reports the characterization of psychrophilic yeast and yeast-like diversity in cold habitats (superficial and deep sediments, ice cores and meltwaters) of the Calderone Glacier (Italy), which is the southernmost glacier in Europe. After incubation at 4 and 20 degrees C, sediments contained about 10(2)-10(3) CFU of yeasts g(-1). The number of viable yeast cells in ice and meltwaters was several orders of magnitude lower. The concomitant presence of viable bacteria and filamentous fungi has also been observed. In all, 257 yeast strains were isolated and identified by 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 and internal transcribed spacers (1 and 2) sequencing as belonging to 28 ascomycetous and basidiomycetous species of 11 genera (Candida, Cystofilobasidium, Cryptococcus, Dioszegia, Erythrobasidium, Guehomyces, Mastigobasidium, Mrakia, Mrakiella, Rhodotorula and Sporobolomyces). Among them, the species Cryptococcus gastricus accounted for almost 40% of the total isolates. In addition, 12 strains were identified as belonging to the yeast-like species Aureobasidium pullulans and Exophiala dermatitidis, whereas 15 strains, presumably belonging to new species, yet to be described, were also isolated. Results herein reported indicate that the Calderone Glacier, although currently considered a vanishing ice body due to the ongoing global-warming phenomenon, still harbors viable psychrophilic yeast populations. Differences of yeast and yeast-like diversity between the glacier under study and other worldwide cold habitats are also discussed.

  12. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes II Table II-2 to Subpart II Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt....

  13. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes II Table II-2 to Subpart II Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt....

  14. Biochemical Engineering. Part II: Process Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes types of industrial techniques involving biochemical products, specifying the advantages and disadvantages of batch and continuous processes, and contrasting biochemical and chemical engineering. See SE 506 318 for Part I. (AL)

  15. Interpersonal processes in dentistry. Part II.

    PubMed

    Dunstone, S

    1990-06-01

    This paper relates an investigation of dentists' perceptions of their patients to a literature review of the interpersonal processes involved in professional helping. Although the concerns of dentists were markedly similar to those of other helping professionals there was a difference in priority possibly reflecting situational factors. The priority of the dentists' concerns were patient likeability, manageability and prognosis. It has been found that, for other helping professionals, four person-perception processes that occur in everyday life often lead to unfavourable perceptions of clients and work against the motivation to help them. Significant evidence of three of these four processes was found in the constructs described by the dentists. The three processes were: (a) attraction to similarity, (b) personalistic tendency in attributions, and (c) perceptual consequences of the patient's resistance to influence. The fourth process, a tendency to sample negative aspects of patients' behaviour, was not in evidence; on the contrary there was a significant tendency to sample positive aspects of the patients' behaviour by this sample of dentists. PMID:2203333

  16. Interpersonal processes in dentistry. Part II.

    PubMed

    Dunstone, S

    1990-06-01

    This paper relates an investigation of dentists' perceptions of their patients to a literature review of the interpersonal processes involved in professional helping. Although the concerns of dentists were markedly similar to those of other helping professionals there was a difference in priority possibly reflecting situational factors. The priority of the dentists' concerns were patient likeability, manageability and prognosis. It has been found that, for other helping professionals, four person-perception processes that occur in everyday life often lead to unfavourable perceptions of clients and work against the motivation to help them. Significant evidence of three of these four processes was found in the constructs described by the dentists. The three processes were: (a) attraction to similarity, (b) personalistic tendency in attributions, and (c) perceptual consequences of the patient's resistance to influence. The fourth process, a tendency to sample negative aspects of patients' behaviour, was not in evidence; on the contrary there was a significant tendency to sample positive aspects of the patients' behaviour by this sample of dentists.

  17. Comparing Binaural Pre-processing Strategies II

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongmei; Krawczyk-Becker, Martin; Marquardt, Daniel; Herzke, Tobias; Coleman, Graham; Adiloğlu, Kamil; Bomke, Katrin; Plotz, Karsten; Gerkmann, Timo; Doclo, Simon; Kollmeier, Birger; Hohmann, Volker; Dietz, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Several binaural audio signal enhancement algorithms were evaluated with respect to their potential to improve speech intelligibility in noise for users of bilateral cochlear implants (CIs). 50% speech reception thresholds (SRT50) were assessed using an adaptive procedure in three distinct, realistic noise scenarios. All scenarios were highly nonstationary, complex, and included a significant amount of reverberation. Other aspects, such as the perfectly frontal target position, were idealized laboratory settings, allowing the algorithms to perform better than in corresponding real-world conditions. Eight bilaterally implanted CI users, wearing devices from three manufacturers, participated in the study. In all noise conditions, a substantial improvement in SRT50 compared to the unprocessed signal was observed for most of the algorithms tested, with the largest improvements generally provided by binaural minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming algorithms. The largest overall improvement in speech intelligibility was achieved by an adaptive binaural MVDR in a spatially separated, single competing talker noise scenario. A no-pre-processing condition and adaptive differential microphones without a binaural link served as the two baseline conditions. SRT50 improvements provided by the binaural MVDR beamformers surpassed the performance of the adaptive differential microphones in most cases. Speech intelligibility improvements predicted by instrumental measures were shown to account for some but not all aspects of the perceptually obtained SRT50 improvements measured in bilaterally implanted CI users. PMID:26721921

  18. Composting process design criteria. II. Detention time

    SciTech Connect

    Haug, R.T.

    1986-09-01

    Attention has always been directed to detention time as a criteria for design and operation of composting systems. Perhaps this is a logical outgrowth of work on liquid phase systems, where detention time is a fundamental parameter of design. Unlike liquid phase systems, however, the interpretation of detention time and actual values required for design have not been universally accepted in the case of composting. As a case in point, most compost systems incorporate facilities for curing the compost product. However, curing often is considered after the fact or as an add on with little relationship to the first stage, high-rate phase, whether reactor (in-vessel), static pile, or windrow. Design criteria for curing and the relationships between the first-stage, high-rate and second-stage, curing phases of a composting system have been unclear. In Part 2 of this paper, the concepts of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solids residence time (SRT) are applied to the composting process. Definitions and design criteria for each are proposed. Based on these criteria, the first and second-stages can be designed and integrated into a complete composting system.

  19. CO II laser free-form processing of hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Martin; Klasing, Manfred; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-07-01

    Drilling and surface processing of bone and tooth tissue belongs to standard medical procedures (bores and embeddings for implants, trepanation etc.). Small circular bores can be generally quickly produced with mechanical drills. However problems arise at angled drilling, the need to execute drilling procedures without damaging of sensitive soft tissue structures underneath the bone or the attempt to mill small non-circular cavities in hard tissue with high precision. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The processing of bone is done with a CO II laser (10.6 μm) with pulse durations of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled fast galvanic laser beam scanner and a fine water-spray, which helps keeping the ablation process effective and without thermal side-effects. Laser "milling" of non-circular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth can be especially interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser processing of these cavities without thermal damage and with minimised tapering. It included the exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines, etc.), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, and optimal water spray position. The optimised results give evidence for the applicability of pulsed CO II lasers for biologically tolerable effective processing of deep cavities in hard tissue.

  20. Fabrication process for the PEP II RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, R.M.; Rimmer, R.A.; Schwarz, H.

    1997-06-05

    This paper presents the major steps used in the fabrication of the 26 RF Cavities required for the PEP-II B-factory. Several unique applications of conventional processes have been developed and successfully implemented: electron beam welding (EBW), with minimal porosity, of .75 inch (19 mm) copper cross-sections; extensive 5-axis milling of water channels; electroplating of .37 inch (10 mm) thick OFE copper; tuning of the cavity by profiling beam noses prior to final joining with the cavity body; and machining of the cavity interior, are described here.

  1. Treating Attention in Mild Aphasia: Evaluation of Attention Process Training-II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Laura L.; Keeton, R. Jessica; Karcher, Laura

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether attention processing training-II [Sohlberg, M. M., Johnson, L., Paule, L., Raskin, S. A., & Mateer, C. A. (2001). "Attention Process Training-II: A program to address attentional deficits for persons with mild cognitive dysfunction" (2nd ed.). Wake Forest, NC: Lash & Associates.; APT-II], when applied in the context of…

  2. The RNA polymerase II CTD coordinates transcription and RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hsin, Jing-Ping; Manley, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit consists of multiple heptad repeats (consensus Tyr1–Ser2–Pro3–Thr4–Ser5–Pro6–Ser7), varying in number from 26 in yeast to 52 in vertebrates. The CTD functions to help couple transcription and processing of the nascent RNA and also plays roles in transcription elongation and termination. The CTD is subject to extensive post-translational modification, most notably phosphorylation, during the transcription cycle, which modulates its activities in the above processes. Therefore, understanding the nature of CTD modifications, including how they function and how they are regulated, is essential to understanding the mechanisms that control gene expression. While the significance of phosphorylation of Ser2 and Ser5 residues has been studied and appreciated for some time, several additional modifications have more recently been added to the CTD repertoire, and insight into their function has begun to emerge. Here, we review findings regarding modification and function of the CTD, highlighting the important role this unique domain plays in coordinating gene activity. PMID:23028141

  3. Process for forming shaped group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Peng, Xiaogang; Manna, Liberato

    2001-01-01

    A process for the formation of shaped Group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  4. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  5. Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume II. Evaluation of the processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    This Volume II presents engineering feasibility evaluations of the eleven processes for solidification of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HHLW) described in Volume I of this report. Each evaluation was based in a systematic assessment of the process in respect to six principal evaluation criteria: complexity of process; state of development; safety; process requirements; development work required; and facility requirements. The principal criteria were further subdivided into a total of 22 subcriteria, each of which was assigned a weight. Each process was then assigned a figure of merit, on a scale of 1 to 10, for each of the subcriteria. A total rating was obtained for each process by summing the products of the subcriteria ratings and the subcriteria weights. The evaluations were based on the process descriptions presented in Volume I of this report, supplemented by information obtained from the literature, including publications by the originators of the various processes. Waste form properties were, in general, not evaluated. This document describes the approach which was taken, the developent and application of the rating criteria and subcriteria, and the evaluation results. A series of appendices set forth summary descriptions of the processes and the ratings, together with the complete numerical ratings assigned; two appendices present further technical details on the rating process.

  6. Employability Planning Process. STIP II (Skill Training Improvement Programs Round II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Community Coll. District, CA.

    Four reports are presented detailing procedures for improving the employability of students enrolled in the Los Angeles Community College District's Skill Training Improvement Programs (STIP II). Each report was submitted by one of the four STIP II programs: Los Angeles Southwest College's program for computer programming; the programs for…

  7. Principles of Information Processing. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Gloria

    This course curriculum is intended for community college instructors and administrators to use in implementing a principles of information processing course. A student's course syllabus provides this information: credit hours, catalog description, prerequisites, required texts, instructional process, objectives, student evaluation, and class…

  8. Tin(II) ketoacidoximates: synthesis, X-ray structures and processing to tin(II) oxide.

    PubMed

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash; Davaasuren, Bambar; Alshankiti, Buthainah Ameen; Rothenberger, Alexander

    2015-12-14

    Tin(II) ketoacidoximates of the type [HON=CRCOO]2Sn (R = Me 1, CH2Ph 2) and (MeON=CMeCOO)3Sn](-) NH4(+)·2H2O 3 were synthesized by reacting pyruvate- and hydroxyl- or methoxylamine RONH2 (R = H, Me) with tin(II) chloride dihydrate SnCl2·2H2O. The single crystal X-ray structure reveals that the geometry at the Sn atom is trigonal bipyramidal in 1, 2 and trigonal pyramidal in 3. Inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed in 1-3. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis shows that the decomposition of 1-3 to SnO occurs at ca. 160 °C. The evolved gas analysis during TG indicates complete loss of the oximato ligand in one step for 1 whereas a small organic residue is additionally removed at temperatures >400 °C for 2. Above 140 °C, [HON=C(Me)COO]2Sn (1) decomposes in air to spherical SnO particles of size 10-500 nm. Spin coating of 1 on Si or a glass substrate followed by heating at 200 °C results in a uniform film of SnO. The band gap of the produced SnO film and nanomaterial was determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to be in the range of 3.0-3.3 eV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates surface oxidation of the SnO film to SnO2 in ambient atmosphere.

  9. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  10. SEEP II, Shelf Edge Exchange Processes-II: Chlorophyll a fluorescence, temperature, and beam attenuation measurements from moored fluorometers

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, W.H.; Wirick, C.D.

    1992-02-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. The first SEEP experiment (SEEP I) was across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 and consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array. The second experiment (SEEP II) focused specifically of the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic Bight off the Delmarva peninsula. This report presents data collected during SEEP II. The SEEP II experiment consisted of a series of ten cruises and mooring arrays as well as over-flights by NASA aircraft. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Hydrographic data were collected on all cruises except SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07 during which benthic processes were investigated. Mooring arrays were deployed during three cruises in the Spring, Summer and Winter of 1988. Brookhaven National Laboratory deployed sixteen fluorometer instrument packages on their moorings with sensors to measure: the in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton, temperature, subsurface light, dissolved oxygen, and water transparency. Data from the fluorometer, temperature, and transmissometer sensors are reported herein.

  11. Data Processing (Advanced Business Programming) Volume II. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litecky, Charles R.; Lamkin, Tim

    This curriculum guide for an advanced course in data processing is for use as a companion publication to a textbook or textbooks; references to appropriate textbooks are given in most units. Student completion of assignments in Volume I, available separately (see ED 220 604), is a prerequisite. Topics covered in the 18 units are introduction,…

  12. Planck 2015 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. For the first time, we present LFI maps in Stokes Q and U polarization. We refer to other related papers where more detailed descriptions of the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.

  13. Filament winding cylinders. II - Validation of the process model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calius, Emilio P.; Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to validate the model developed by Lee and Springer for simulating the manufacturing process of filament wound composite cylinders. First, results calculated by the Lee-Springer model were compared to results of the Calius-Springer thin cylinder model. Second, temperatures and strains calculated by the Lee-Springer model were compared to data. The data used in these comparisons were generated during the course of this investigation with cylinders made of Hercules IM-6G/HBRF-55 and Fiberite T-300/976 graphite-epoxy tows. Good agreement was found between the calculated and measured stresses and strains, indicating that the model is a useful representation of the winding and curing processes.

  14. Extracellular polymeric substances for Zn (II) binding during its sorption process onto aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dong; Li, Mengting; Wang, Xiaodong; Han, Fei; Li, Lusheng; Guo, Jie; Ai, Lijie; Fang, Lulu; Liu, Ling; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction between extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and Zn (II) during the sorption process of Zn (II) onto aerobic granular sludge. Batch results showed that the adsorption rate of Zn (II) onto aerobic granular sludge was better fitted with pseudo-second order kinetics model, and the adsorption isotherm data agreed well with Freundlich equation. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) for Zn (II) binding during sorption process was investigated by using a combination of three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM), synchronous fluorescence spectra, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Results implied that the main composes of EPS, including polysaccharide (PS) and protein (PN), decreased from 5.92±0.13 and 23.55±0.76 mg/g SS to 4.11±0.09 and 9.55±0.68 mg/g SS after the addition of different doses of Zn (II). 3D-EEM showed that the intensities of PN-like substances and humic-like substances were obviously decreased during the sorption process. According to synchronous fluorescence spectra, the quenching mechanism between PN-like substances and Zn (II) was mainly caused by a static quenching process. Additionally, 2D-COS indicated that PN-like substances were more susceptible to Zn (II) binding than humic-like substances. It was also found that the main functional groups for complexation of Zn (II) and EPS were OH groups, N-H groups and C=O stretching vibration. The findings of this study are significant to reveal the fate of heavy metal during its sorption process onto aerobic granular sludge through EPS binding, and provide useful information on the interaction between EPS and heavy metal.

  15. Language and the psychoanalytic process: psychoanalysis and Vygotskian psychology. II.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A; Weinstein, L

    1992-01-01

    This paper follows our previous one, where we described a psychoanalytic conception of language, thought, and internalization that is informed by the thinking of Lev Vygotsky. Here, several aspects of the analytic process which allow for the understanding of ineffable experiences in the analysand's history and the analytic situation are investigated: specifically, primal repression, metaphor, and the role of speech in free association. It is suggested that Freud's notion of primal repression be revived and redefined as one aspect of the descriptive unconscious. Some implications of primal repression for transference and resistance are explored. The metaphoric in its broad sense is examined as one example of how early dynamic experiences embedded in the process of language acquisition can be reached within the clinical situation. It is proposed that an understanding of free association is enhanced by awareness of distinctions between inner, egocentric, and social speech. The basic rule can be interpreted as an invitation for the analysand to use inner speech in collaboration with the analyst as best he or she can. Further, the aliveness and degree of superficiality of the analysis can be seen as a function of the analyst's ability to appreciate the properties of inner speech and foster the conditions in the analysis that allow for its unfolding. PMID:1401719

  16. The Odin satellite. II. Radiometer data processing and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olberg, M.; Frisk, U.; Lecacheux, A.; Olofsson, A. O. H.; Baron, P.; Bergman, P.; Florin, G.; Hjalmarson, Å..; Larsson, B.; Murtagh, D.; Olofsson, G.; Pagani, L.; Sandqvist, Aa.; Teyssier, D.; Torchinsky, S. A.; Volk, K.

    2003-05-01

    The radiometer on-board the Odin satellite comprises four different sub-mm receivers covering the 486-581 GHz frequency range and one fixed frequency 119 GHz receiver. Two auto-correlators and one acousto-optical spectrometer serve as backends. This article gives an overview over the processing of the data delivered by these instruments and discusses calibration issues. Odin is a Swedish-led satellite project funded jointly by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the National Technology Agency of Finland (Tekes) and the Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES, France). Odin is operated by the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC), the project's prime industrial contractor.

  17. Synthesis and processing of intelligent cost-effective structures phase II (SPICES II): smart materials aircraft applications evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, James P.; Jacobs, Steven W.; Baumann, Erwin W.

    1998-06-01

    The second phase of the synthesis and processing of intelligent cost effective structures (SPICES II) program sought to identify high payoff areas for both naval and aerospace military systems and to evaluate military systems and to evaluate the benefits of smart materials incorporation based on their ability to redefine the mission scenario of the candidate platforms in their respective theaters of operation. The SPICES II consortium, consisting of The Boeing Company, Electric Boat Corporation, United Technologies Research Center, and Pennsylvania State University, surveyed the state-of-the-art in smart structures and evaluated potential applications to military aircraft, marine and propulsion systems components and missions. Eleven baseline platforms comprising a wide variety of missions were chosen for evaluation. Each platform was examined in its field of operation for areas which can be improved using smart materials insertion. Over 250 smart materials applications were proposed to enhance the platforms. The applications were examined and, when possible, quantitatively analyzed for their effect on mission performance. The applications were then ranked for payoff, risk, and time frame for development and demonstration. Details of the efforts made in the SPICES II program pertaining to smart structure applications on military and transport aircraft will be presented. A brief discussion of the core technologies will be followed by presentation of the criteria used in ranking each application. Thereafter, a selection of the higher ranking proposed concepts are presented in detail.

  18. Complete Element Abundances of Nine Stars in the r-process Galaxy Reticulum II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Alexander P.; Frebel, Anna; Simon, Joshua D.; Chiti, Anirudh

    2016-10-01

    We present chemical abundances derived from high-resolution Magellan/Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectra of the nine brightest known red giant members of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II (Ret II). These stars span the full metallicity range of Ret II (‑3.5 < [Fe/H] < ‑2). Seven of the nine stars have extremely high levels of r-process material ([Eu/Fe] ∼ 1.7), in contrast to the extremely low neutron-capture element abundances found in every other ultra-faint dwarf galaxy studied to date. The other two stars are the most metal-poor stars in the system ([Fe/H] < ‑3), and they have neutron-capture element abundance limits similar to those in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We confirm that the relative abundances of Sr, Y, and Zr in these stars are similar to those found in r-process halo stars, but they are ∼0.5 dex lower than the solar r-process pattern. If the universal r-process pattern extends to those elements, the stars in Ret II display the least contaminated known r-process pattern. The abundances of lighter elements up to the iron peak are otherwise similar to abundances of stars in the halo and in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. However, the scatter in abundance ratios is large enough to suggest that inhomogeneous metal mixing is required to explain the chemical evolution of this galaxy. The presence of low amounts of neutron-capture elements in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies may imply the existence of additional r-process sites besides the source of r-process elements in Ret II. Galaxies like Ret II may be the original birth sites of r-process enhanced stars now found in the halo. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  19. Intersection of RNA Processing and the Type II Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway in Yeast Mitochondria▿

    PubMed Central

    Schonauer, Melissa S.; Kastaniotis, Alexander J.; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Dieckmann, Carol L.

    2008-01-01

    Distinct metabolic pathways can intersect in ways that allow hierarchical or reciprocal regulation. In a screen of respiration-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion strains for defects in mitochondrial RNA processing, we found that lack of any enzyme in the mitochondrial fatty acid type II biosynthetic pathway (FAS II) led to inefficient 5′ processing of mitochondrial precursor tRNAs by RNase P. In particular, the precursor containing both RNase P RNA (RPM1) and tRNAPro accumulated dramatically. Subsequent Pet127-driven 5′ processing of RPM1 was blocked. The FAS II pathway defects resulted in the loss of lipoic acid attachment to subunits of three key mitochondrial enzymes, which suggests that the octanoic acid produced by the pathway is the sole precursor for lipoic acid synthesis and attachment. The protein component of yeast mitochondrial RNase P, Rpm2, is not modified by lipoic acid in the wild-type strain, and it is imported in FAS II mutant strains. Thus, a product of the FAS II pathway is required for RNase P RNA maturation, which positively affects RNase P activity. In addition, a product is required for lipoic acid production, which is needed for the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which feeds acetyl-coenzyme A into the FAS II pathway. These two positive feedback cycles may provide switch-like control of mitochondrial gene expression in response to the metabolic state of the cell. PMID:18779316

  20. Diagnostic techniques in thermal plasma processing (Part II). Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Boulos, M.; Fauchais, P.; Pfender, E.

    1986-02-01

    Techniques for diagnostics for thermal plasmas are discussed. These include both optical techniques and in-flight measurements of particulate matter. In the core of the plasma, collisional excitation of the various chemical species is so strong that the population of the corresponding quantum levels becomes high enough for net emission from the plasma. In that case, the classical methods of emission spectroscopy may be applied. But in the regions where the temperatures are below 4000/sup 0/K (these regions are of primary importance for plasma processing), the emission from the plasma is no longer sufficient for emission spectroscopy. In this situation, the population of excited levels must be increased by the absorption of the light from an external source. Such sources, as for example pulsed tunable dye lasers, are now commercially available. The use of such new devices leads to various techniques such as laser induced fluorescence (LIF) or Coherent Anti Stockes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) that can be used for analyzing plasmas. Particle velocity measurements can be achieved by photography and laser Doppler anemometry. Particle flux measurements are typically achieved by collecting particles on a substrate. Particle size measurements are based on intensity of scattered light. (WRF)

  1. Process maps for plasma spray. Part II: Deposition and properties

    SciTech Connect

    XIANGYANG,JIANG; MATEJICEK,JIRI; KULKARNI,ANAND; HERMAN,HERBERT; SAMPATH,SANJAY; GILMORE,DELWYN L.; NEISER JR.,RICHARD A

    2000-03-28

    This is the second paper of a two part series based on an integrated study carried out at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of the study is the fundamental understanding of the plasma-particle interaction, droplet/substrate interaction, deposit formation dynamics and microstructure development as well as the deposit property. The outcome is science-based relationships, which can be used to link processing to performance. Molybdenum splats and coatings produced at 3 plasma conditions and three substrate temperatures were characterized. It was found that there is a strong mechanical/thermal interaction between droplet and substrate, which builds up the coatings/substrate adhesion. Hardness, thermal conductivity, and modulus increase, while oxygen content and porosity decrease with increasing particle velocity. Increasing deposition temperature resulted in dramatic improvement in coating thermal conductivity and hardness as well as increase in coating oxygen content. Indentation reveals improved fracture resistance for the coatings prepared at higher deposition temperature. Residual stress was significantly affected by deposition temperature, although not significant by particle energy within the investigated parameter range. Coatings prepared at high deposition temperature with high-energy particles suffered considerably less damage in wear tests. Possible mechanisms behind these changes are discussed within the context of relational maps which are under development.

  2. Photoinduced energy- and electron-transfer processes in dinuclear Ru(II)-Os(II), Ru(II)-Os(III), and Ru(III)-Os(II) trisbipyridine complexes containing a shape-persistent macrocyclic spacer.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Margherita; Marchioni, Filippo; Ferrer Ribera, Belén; Balzani, Vincenzo; Opris, Dorina M; Schlüter, A Dieter

    2006-01-16

    The PF6- salt of the dinuclear [(bpy)2Ru(1)Os(bpy)2]4+ complex, where 1 is a phenylacetylene macrocycle which incorporates two 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) chelating units in opposite sites of its shape-persistent structure, was prepared. In acetonitrile solution, the Ru- and Os-based units display their characteristic absorption spectra and electrochemical properties as in the parent homodinuclear compounds. The luminescence spectrum, however, shows that the emission band of the Ru(II) unit is almost completely quenched with concomitant sensitization of the emission of the Os(II) unit. Electronic energy transfer from the Ru(II) to the Os(II) unit takes place by two distinct processes (k(en) = 2.0x10(8) and 2.2x10(7) s(-1) at 298 K). Oxidation of the Os(II) unit of [(bpy)2Ru(1)Os(bpy)2]4+ by Ce(IV) or nitric acid leads quantitatively to the [(bpy)2Ru(II)(1)Os(III)(bpy)2]5+ complex which exhibits a bpy-to-Os(III) charge-transfer band at 720 nm (epsilon(max) = 250 M(-1) cm(-1)). Light excitation of the Ru(II) unit of [(bpy)2Ru(II)(1)Os(III)(bpy)2]5+ is followed by electron transfer from the Ru(II) to the Os(III) unit (k(el,f) = 1.6x10(8) and 2.7x10(7) s(-1)), resulting in the transient formation of the [(bpy)2Ru(III)(1)Os(II)(bpy)2]5+ complex. The latter species relaxes to the [(bpy)2Ru(II)(1)Os(III)(bpy)2]5+ one by back electron transfer (k(el,b) = 9.1x10(7) and 1.2x10(7) s(-1)). The biexponential decays of the [(bpy)2*Ru(II)(1)Os(II)(bpy)2]4+, [(bpy)2*Ru(II)(1)Os(III)(bpy)2]5+, and [(bpy)2Ru(III)(1)Os(II)(bpy)2]5+ species are related to the presence of two conformers, as expected because of the steric hindrance between hydrogen atoms of the pyridine and phenyl rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those previously reported for other Ru-Os polypyridine complexes shows that the macrocyclic ligand 1 is a relatively poor conducting bridge.

  3. Coordination of RNA Polymerase II Pausing and 3' End Processing Factor Recruitment with Alternative Polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Fusby, Becky; Kim, Soojin; Erickson, Benjamin; Kim, Hyunmin; Peterson, Martha L; Bentley, David L

    2015-01-01

    Most mammalian genes produce transcripts whose 3' ends are processed at multiple alternative positions by cleavage/polyadenylation (CPA). Poly(A) site cleavage frequently occurs cotranscriptionally and is facilitated by CPA factor binding to the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylated on Ser2 residues of its heptad repeats (YS2PTSPS). The function of cotranscriptional events in the selection of alternative poly(A) sites is poorly understood. We investigated Pol II pausing, CTD Ser2 phosphorylation, and processing factor CstF recruitment at wild-type and mutant IgM transgenes that use alternative poly(A) sites to produce mRNAs encoding the secreted and membrane-bound forms of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain. The results show that the sites of Pol II pausing and processing factor recruitment change depending on which poly(A) site is utilized. In contrast, the extent of Pol II CTD Ser2 phosphorylation does not closely correlate with poly(A) site selection. We conclude that changes in properties of the transcription elongation complex closely correlate with utilization of different poly(A) sites, suggesting that cotranscriptional events may influence the decision between alternative modes of pre-mRNA 3' end processing. PMID:26527620

  4. Atomic diffusion processes in heteroepitaxial metallic systems using SLKMC-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Syed Islamuddin; Karim, Altaf

    We have examined the diffusion of small islands of Cu on Ag(111) surface using a self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (SLKMC-II) method with an improved pattern recognition scheme. Due to strain generated at the interface between metals with different bulk lattice constants, interesting single atom, multi-atom and concerted diffusion processes are automatically revealed in the simulations. Here we will report various processes for small islands in the case of Cu/Ag(111) system. Key processes responsible for island diffusion and their energetics together with trends in effective energy barriers as well as diffusion constants for small islands will also be provided. In addition to 2-D diffusion processes, as an application of SLKMC-II to the 3-dimensional heteroepitaxial systems, we will also report energy barriers of some of the 3-dimensional processes including down the A- and B-steps and exchange processes

  5. Zn(II)-coordination modulated ligand photophysical processes – the development of fluorescent indicators for imaging biological Zn(II) ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhao; Simmons, J. Tyler; Sreenath, Kesavapillai

    2014-01-01

    Molecular photophysics and metal coordination chemistry are the two fundamental pillars that support the development of fluorescent cation indicators. In this article, we describe how Zn(II)-coordination alters various ligand-centered photophysical processes that are pertinent to developing Zn(II) indicators. The main aim is to show how small organic Zn(II) indicators work under the constraints of specific requirements, including Zn(II) detection range, photophysical requirements such as excitation energy and emission color, temporal and spatial resolutions in a heterogeneous intracellular environment, and fluorescence response selectivity between similar cations such as Zn(II) and Cd(II). In the last section, the biological questions that fluorescent Zn(II) indicators help to answer are described, which have been motivating and challenging this field of research. PMID:25071933

  6. TRINITY II: A post-processing program for two-dimensional finite element analysis data

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, J.H.; Gartling, D.K.

    1988-05-01

    TRINITY II is a program for post-processing data from two-dimensional finite element analyses. The program provides graphical display of mesh and solution data as well as data manipulation, file editing and selective printing of data. TRINITY II accepts data from any analysis code that employs the EXODUS file format; post-processing can be done interactively or in batch mode using any graphics device supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. The capabilities and use of the program are described. 4 refs.

  7. The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. [KENTORT II process--50-lb/hr

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Vego, A.; Taulbee, D.; Stehn, J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II). The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zone for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The work performed during this year involved projects that will contribute physical and chemical data for the final design of the 50-lb/hr retort. A cold-flow model of the 50-lb/hr retort was built and tested. The unit demonstrated stable operation and proper fluidization of all beds. Good control of solid recirculation up to the maximum design rate for each loop (200 and 500 lb/hr, respectively) was achieved simultaneously. Basically, the cold-flow model is completely operational and translation of the cold-flow design parameters to the design of the retort is ready to begin. In another aspect of the program, a study of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors passed over processed shales was initiated. The addition of a mass spectrometer to the system to monitor total carbon, nitrogen and sulfur evolution in real-time was successful. Coking activities of processed shales were ranked as follows: combusted shale > gasified shale > pyrolyzed shale. Arrangements for conducting an evaluation of KENTORT-derived oil for asphalt applications were finalized and testing was initiated.

  8. A Photo Storm Report Mobile Application, Processing/Distribution System, and AWIPS-II Display Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmore, S. P.; Bikos, D.; Szoke, E.; Miller, S. D.; Brummer, R.; Lindsey, D. T.; Hillger, D.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing use of mobile phones equipped with digital cameras and the ability to post images and information to the Internet in real-time has significantly improved the ability to report events almost instantaneously. In the context of severe weather reports, a representative digital image conveys significantly more information than a simple text or phone relayed report to a weather forecaster issuing severe weather warnings. It also allows the forecaster to reasonably discern the validity and quality of a storm report. Posting geo-located, time stamped storm report photographs utilizing a mobile phone application to NWS social media weather forecast office pages has generated recent positive feedback from forecasters. Building upon this feedback, this discussion advances the concept, development, and implementation of a formalized Photo Storm Report (PSR) mobile application, processing and distribution system and Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II (AWIPS-II) plug-in display software.The PSR system would be composed of three core components: i) a mobile phone application, ii) a processing and distribution software and hardware system, and iii) AWIPS-II data, exchange and visualization plug-in software. i) The mobile phone application would allow web-registered users to send geo-location, view direction, and time stamped PSRs along with severe weather type and comments to the processing and distribution servers. ii) The servers would receive PSRs, convert images and information to NWS network bandwidth manageable sizes in an AWIPS-II data format, distribute them on the NWS data communications network, and archive the original PSRs for possible future research datasets. iii) The AWIPS-II data and exchange plug-ins would archive PSRs, and the visualization plug-in would display PSR locations, times and directions by hour, similar to surface observations. Hovering on individual PSRs would reveal photo thumbnails and clicking on them would display the

  9. Prosomatostatin II processing is initiated in the trans-Golgi network of anglerfish pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Bourdais, J; Devilliers, G; Girard, R; Morel, A; Benedetti, L; Cohen, P

    1990-08-16

    Anglerfish prosomatostatin II, the precursor of somatostatin-28 II, is produced in different cells from prosomatostatin I, by a cleavage at Arg73. Antibodies were raised against the carboxy-terminal [64-72] portion of the precursor II upstream from somatostatin-28 II sequence. These antibodies recognized only this epitope when unmasked from the entire precursor, allowing the detection of the [1-72] domain which was isolated from pancreatic islets extracts. The antibodies were used to monitor the peptide bond cleavage occurring at the carboxy terminus of Arg73 to generate somatostatin-28 II. Immunocytochemistry revealed labeling both in the vesicles budding from the trans-Golgi network and in the dense core granules. Together, these data support the conclusions that i) prohormone processing is initiated in the Golgi apparatus of the pancreatic islet cells; ii) the "non-hormonal" [1-72] amino-terminal domain of the precursor may be involved in some intra and/or extra-cellular function(s). PMID:1975170

  10. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE II) 2003 ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 6th annual meeting of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes, was held in Cetraro, Italy, from May 11 to 15, 2003. This was also the first meeting of its Phase II study. 24 country representatives attended this meeting. This meeting was very ably run by th...

  11. Ar II Emission Processes and Emission Rate Coefficients in ASTRAL Helicon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Gardner, A.; Kamar, O.; Kesterson, A.; Loch, S.; Munoz, J.; Ballance, C.

    2008-11-01

    Emission processes for Ar II line emission are described for low temperature plasmas (Te < 10 eV). It is found that Ar II emission results primarily from Ar ion ground state excitation rather than from any Ar neutral state. This suggests that Ar II emission results from stepping processes which includes ionization and then excitation of the neutral Ar atom filling the vacuum chamber. The Ar II emission rate coefficients are measured in the ASTRAL helicon plasma source using a 0.33 m monochromator and a CCD camera. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 1E11 -- 1E13 cm-3 and Te = 2 - 10 eV, B-field <= 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure Te and ne. In this experiment, Ar II transitions are monitored as a function of Te while ne is kept constant. Experimental emission rates are obtained as a function of Te and compared to theoretical predictions. Theoretical predictions make use of the ADAS suite of codes as well as recent R-matrix electron-impact excitation calculations that includes pseudo-states contributions. Our collisional-radiative formalism assumes that the excited levels are in quasi-static equilibrium with the ground and metastable populations.

  12. Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume II. Waste form data, process descriptions, and costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Thornhill, R.E.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains supporting information for the comparative assessment of the transuranic waste forms and processes summarized in Volume I. Detailed data on the characterization of the waste forms selected for the assessment, process descriptions, and cost information are provided. The purpose of this volume is to provide additional information that may be useful when using the data in Volume I and to provide greater detail on particular waste forms and processes. Volume II is divided into two sections and two appendixes. The first section provides information on the preparation of the waste form specimens used in this study and additional characterization data in support of that in Volume I. The second section includes detailed process descriptions for the eight processes evaluated. Appendix A lists the results of MCC-1 leach test and Appendix B lists additional cost data. 56 figures, 12 tables.

  13. Composition, apparatus, and process, for sorption of gaseous compounds of group II-VII elements

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; McManus, James V.; Luxon, Bruce A.

    1991-08-06

    Scavenger compositions are disclosed, which have utility for effecting the sorptive removal of hazardous gases containing Group II-VII elements of the Periodic Table, such as are widely encountered in the manufacture of semiconducting materials and semiconductor devices. Gas sorption processes including the contacting of Group II-VII gaseous compounds with such scavenger compositions are likewise disclosed, together with critical space velocity contacting conditions pertaining thereto. Further described are gas contacting apparatus, including mesh structures which may be deployed in gas contacting vessels containing such scavenger compositions, to prevent solids from being introduced to or discharged from the contacting vessel in the gas stream undergoing treatment. A reticulate heat transfer structure also is disclosed, for dampening localized exothermic reaction fronts when gas mixtures comprising Group II-VII constituents are contacted with the scavenger compositions in bulk sorption contacting vessels according to the invention.

  14. Processing of O.F.E. copper beam chambers for PEP-II high energy ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, E.; Hoyt, M.; Kirby, R.; Perkins, C.; Wright, D.; Farvid, A.

    1995-08-01

    Using laboratory scale and full size PEP-II vacuum chambers, chemical cleaning, glow discharge and thermal process effects were evaluated using surface analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These processes were optimized to reduce surface carbon and thereby minimize photodesorption gas loads. The relation of surface carbon to ion dose was investigated and compared for pure argon, 5% oxygen in argon, and pure hydrogen plasmas. Argon incorporation was noted only when the copper was oxidized in the mixed gas. Surfaces, stable in ambient atmosphere, were obtained having surface carbon values less than 10%. These optimized recipes will be used in processing copper vacuum chambers for the PEP-II B-Factory.

  15. The role of mAKAPβ in the process of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huixin; Liu, Baoxin; Hou, Lei; The, Erlinda; Li, Gang; Wang, Dongzhi; Jie, Qiqiang; Che, Wenliang; Wei, Yidong

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is the central product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and this octapeptide contributes to the pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling. mAKAPβ is an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) that has the function of binding to the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) and confining the holoenzyme to discrete locations within the cell. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of mAKAPβ in AngII‑induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and the possible mechanisms involved. Cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats were treated with AngII. Subsequently, the morphology of the cardiomyocytes was observed and the expression of mAKAPβ and cardiomyocyte hypertrophic markers was measured. mAKAPβ‑shRNA was constructed for RNA interference; the expression of mAKAPβ and hypertrophic markers, the cell surface area and the [3H]Leucine incorporation rate in the AngII‑treated rat cardiomyocytes were detected following RNA interference. Simultaneously, changes in the expression levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK)2 in the cardiomyocytes were assessed. The cell size of the AngII-treated cardiaomyocytes was significantly larger than that of the untreated cardiomyocytes. The expression of hypertrophic markers and p-ERK2, the cell surface area and the [3H]Leucine incorporation rate were all significantly increased in the AngII‑treated cells. However, the expression of mAKAPβ remained unaltered in this process. RNA interference simultaneously inhibited the protein expression of mAKAPβ and p‑ERK2, and the hypertrophy of the cardiomyocytes induced by AngII was attenuated. These results demonstrate that AngII induces hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes, and mAKAPβ is possibly involved in this process. The effects of mAKAPβ on AngII‑induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy may be associated with p-ERK2 expression.

  16. Temperature-induced conformational changes in prosomatostatin-II: implications for processing.

    PubMed

    Mitra, J; Tang, X; Almo, S C; Shields, D

    1998-08-15

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a 14-residue peptide hormone synthesized in the hypothalamus and pancreatic islets. SRIF-14 and an N-terminally extended form, SRIF-28, are generated by the proteolytic processing of an approx. 102-residue precursor prosomatostatin (proSRIF) at a single set of paired basic residues (Arg-Lys) and at a monobasic (Arg) site respectively. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that the propeptide of SRIF mediates intracellular sorting; we suggested that this information resides in the prohormone structure. To identify putative sorting domains we have investigated structural features of recombinant anglerfish proSRIF-II purified from Escherichia coli. Two species of proSRIF-II were obtained: a monomeric form and a disulphide-linked dimer. CD analyses revealed that monomeric proSRIF-II lacks appreciable periodic secondary structure; however, on slow heating (2 degrees C/min) and cooling, it assumed a predominantly alpha-helical conformation. When subjected to a second heating-and-cooling cycle, the alpha-helical conformation was maintained. In contrast, the dimeric form of proSRIF-II was predominantly alpha-helical and its helicity did not increase in response to heating and recooling. Our results suggest that proSRIF-II might exist in several different folding intermediate states. PMID:9693130

  17. Temperature-induced conformational changes in prosomatostatin-II: implications for processing.

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, J; Tang, X; Almo, S C; Shields, D

    1998-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a 14-residue peptide hormone synthesized in the hypothalamus and pancreatic islets. SRIF-14 and an N-terminally extended form, SRIF-28, are generated by the proteolytic processing of an approx. 102-residue precursor prosomatostatin (proSRIF) at a single set of paired basic residues (Arg-Lys) and at a monobasic (Arg) site respectively. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that the propeptide of SRIF mediates intracellular sorting; we suggested that this information resides in the prohormone structure. To identify putative sorting domains we have investigated structural features of recombinant anglerfish proSRIF-II purified from Escherichia coli. Two species of proSRIF-II were obtained: a monomeric form and a disulphide-linked dimer. CD analyses revealed that monomeric proSRIF-II lacks appreciable periodic secondary structure; however, on slow heating (2 degrees C/min) and cooling, it assumed a predominantly alpha-helical conformation. When subjected to a second heating-and-cooling cycle, the alpha-helical conformation was maintained. In contrast, the dimeric form of proSRIF-II was predominantly alpha-helical and its helicity did not increase in response to heating and recooling. Our results suggest that proSRIF-II might exist in several different folding intermediate states. PMID:9693130

  18. Decolorization of kraft bleaching effluent by advanced oxidation processes using copper (II) as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Yeber, María C; Oñate, Katherine P; Vidal, Gladys

    2007-04-01

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), TiO2/UV/O2 and TiO2/UV/Cu (II), were used to remove color from a Kraft bleaching effluent. The optimal decoloration rate was determined by multivariate analysis, obtaining a mathematical model to evaluate the effect among variables. TiO2 and Cu (II) concentrations and the reaction times were optimized. The experimental design resulted in a quadratic matrix of 30 experiments. Additionally, the pH influence on the color removal was determined by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that color removal was 94% at acidic pH (3.0) in the presence of Cu (11) as an electron acceptor. Under this condition, the biodegradation of the effluent increased from 0.3 to 0.6. Moreover, 70% of COD (chemical oxygen demand) was removed, and the ecotoxicity, measured by Daphnia magna, was reduced. Photocatalytic oxidation to remove the color contained in the Kraft mill bleaching effluent was effective under the following conditions: short reaction time, acidic pH values, and without the addition of oxygen due to the presence of Cu (II) in the effluent. Moreover, residual Cu (II) was a minimum (0.05.mg L(-1)) and was not toxic to the next biological stage. The experimental design methodology indicated that a quadratic polynomial model may be used to representthe efficiencyfor degradation of the Kraft bleach pulp effluent by a photocatalytic process. PMID:17438808

  19. Decolorization of kraft bleaching effluent by advanced oxidation processes using copper (II) as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Yeber, María C; Oñate, Katherine P; Vidal, Gladys

    2007-04-01

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), TiO2/UV/O2 and TiO2/UV/Cu (II), were used to remove color from a Kraft bleaching effluent. The optimal decoloration rate was determined by multivariate analysis, obtaining a mathematical model to evaluate the effect among variables. TiO2 and Cu (II) concentrations and the reaction times were optimized. The experimental design resulted in a quadratic matrix of 30 experiments. Additionally, the pH influence on the color removal was determined by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that color removal was 94% at acidic pH (3.0) in the presence of Cu (11) as an electron acceptor. Under this condition, the biodegradation of the effluent increased from 0.3 to 0.6. Moreover, 70% of COD (chemical oxygen demand) was removed, and the ecotoxicity, measured by Daphnia magna, was reduced. Photocatalytic oxidation to remove the color contained in the Kraft mill bleaching effluent was effective under the following conditions: short reaction time, acidic pH values, and without the addition of oxygen due to the presence of Cu (II) in the effluent. Moreover, residual Cu (II) was a minimum (0.05.mg L(-1)) and was not toxic to the next biological stage. The experimental design methodology indicated that a quadratic polynomial model may be used to representthe efficiencyfor degradation of the Kraft bleach pulp effluent by a photocatalytic process.

  20. Macroautophagy in Endogenous Processing of Self- and Pathogen-Derived Antigens for MHC Class II Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Duraes, Fernanda V.; Niven, Jennifer; Dubrot, Juan; Hugues, Stéphanie; Gannagé, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Although autophagy is a process that has been studied for several years its link with antigen presentation and T cell immunity has only recently emerged. Autophagy, which means “self-eating,” is important to maintain cell homeostasis and refers to a collection of mechanisms that delivers intracellular material for degradation into lysosomes. Among them, macroautophagy pathway has many implications in different biological processes, including innate and adaptive immunity. In particular, macroautophagy can provide a substantial source of intracellular antigens for loading onto MHC class II molecules using the alternative MHC class II pathway. Through autophagosomes, endogenous self-antigens as well as antigens derived from intracellular pathogens can be delivered to MHC class II compartment and presented to CD4+ T cells. The pathway will, therefore, impact both peripheral T cell tolerance and the pathogen specific immune response. This review will describe the contribution of autophagy to intracellular presentation of endogenous self- or pathogen-derived antigens via MHC class II and its consequences on CD4+ T cell responses. PMID:26441964

  1. NMR investigation of dynamic processes in complexes of nickel(II) and zinc(II) with iminodiacetate, n-methyliminodiacetate and n-ethyliminodiacetate

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M.R.

    1985-11-01

    Analysis of oxygen-17 bulk water relaxation rates with an aqueous solution of 1:1 Ni(II):ida reveals that two rate-limiting processes are involved with solvent exchange. Analysis of carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation rates of the bis-ligand complexes with zinc(II) are used to determine molecular tumbling rates and methyl rotation rates. The carbon-13 transverse relaxation rates for the carbons in the bis-ligand complex with Ni(II) are adequately fitted to the Solomon-Bloembergen equation. Three carboxylate carbon peaks are seen with the /sup 13/C spectrum of the 1:2 Ni(II):ida complex, which coalesce into a single peak above about 360 K. The mechanism and rate of ligand exchange are determined for the complexes Zn(II)L/sub 2//sup -2/ (L = mida, eida) in aqueous solution by total lineshape analysis of the proton spectrum at 500 MHz.

  2. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. Volume II. Sections V-XIV. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This report documents the completion of development work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process by The Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Co. The work was initiated in 1966 under Office of Coal Research, US Department of Interior, Contract No. 14-01-0001-496 and completed under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-79ET10104. This report discusses work leading to the development of the SRC-I and SRC-II processes, construction of the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant for the successful development of these processes, and results from the operation of this pilot plant. Process design data generated on a 1 ton-per-day Process Development Unit, bench-scale units and through numerous research projects in support of the design of major demonstration plants are also discussed in summary form and fully referenced in this report.

  3. Constitutive negative regulation in the processing of the anti-Müllerian hormone receptor II.

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, Tal; di Clemente, Nathalie; Amsalem, Ayelet R; Pepinsky, R Blake; Picard, Jean-Yves; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Cate, Richard L; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    The levels and intracellular localization of wild-type transforming growth factor β superfamily (TGFβ-SF) receptors are tightly regulated by endocytic trafficking, shedding and degradation. In contrast, a main regulatory mechanism of mutation-bearing receptors involves their intracellular retention. Anti-Müllerian hormone receptor II (AMHRII, also known as AMHR2) is the type-II receptor for anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), a TGFβ-SF ligand that mediates Müllerian duct regression in males. Here, we studied AMHRII processing and identified novel mechanisms of its constitutive negative regulation. Immunoblot analysis revealed that a significant portion of AMHRII was missing most of its extracellular domain (ECD) and, although glycosylated, was unfolded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Exogenous expression of AMHRII, but not of type-II TGF-β receptor (TβRII, also known as TGFR2), resulted in its disulfide-bond-mediated homo-oligomerization and intracellular retention, and in a decrease in its AMH-binding capacity. At the plasma membrane, AMHRII differed from TβRII, forming high levels of non-covalent homomeric complexes, which exhibited a clustered distribution and restricted lateral mobility. This study identifies novel mechanisms of negative regulation of a type-II TGFβ-SF receptor through cleavage, intracellular retention and/or promiscuous disulfide-bond mediated homo-oligomerization.

  4. Numerical Analyses on Transient Thermal Process of Gas - Cooled Current Leads in BEPC II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Yao, Z. L.; Wang, L.; Jia, L. X.

    2004-06-01

    A pair of high current leads will be used for the superconducting detector solenoid magnet and six pairs of low current leads will be used for the superconducting interaction quadruple magnets in the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPC II). This paper reports the numerical analyses on the thermal processes in the current leads, including the power charging process and overloaded current case as well as the transient characteristic of the leads once the helium cooling is interrupted. The design parameters of the current leads are studied for the stable and unstable conditions.

  5. [New methods of type II tympanoplasty in erosion of the long incus process].

    PubMed

    Maassen, M M; Lüdtke, R; Lehner, R; Reischl, G; Zenner, H P

    1997-03-01

    Reliable methods of reconstruction of the ossicular chain in the situation of an isolated errosion of the long process of the incus using a tympanoplasty type II have not been available until recently. Instead, the tympanoplasty type III has been generally performed with the interposition of an autologous incus. In this presentation, we are describing two methods for reconstruction of the ossicular chain between the in-situ residing incus and the stapes on the other side so that the direct connection eventually will result in a tympanoplasty type II. In the first case, we used ionomeric cement in a way that features two characteristics: the direct connection between the stapes and the long process of the incus could be achieved as well as an articulation that was created on the head of the stapes. Hence, a too stiff connection between the head of the stapes and the long process of the incus could be avoided. In addition, a new method for precise microapplication of cooled bone cement (IONOCAP LV) with a syringe will be presented. In the second method titanium-gold-angle prostheses have been crimped to the long process of the incus and positioned onto the head of the stapes in the way of an articulation. So far, comparison of the audiological results of those two methods of a tympanoplasty type II reveal in average better results than postoperative conductive hearing thresholds of the conventional tympanoplasty type III. If the achieved results can be reproduced on a larger number of patients, the expected audiological results are likely to resemble those of stapes surgery. PMID:9417436

  6. Use of ELVIS II platform for random process modelling and analysis of its probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu. S.; Nugmanov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of probability density function estimation for a random process is one of the most common in practice. There are several methods to solve this problem. Presented laboratory work uses methods of the mathematical statistics to detect patterns in the realization of random process. On the basis of ergodic theory, we construct algorithm for estimating univariate probability density distribution function for a random process. Correlational analysis of realizations is applied to estimate the necessary size of the sample and the time of observation. Hypothesis testing for two probability distributions (normal and Cauchy) is used on the experimental data, using χ2 criterion. To facilitate understanding and clarity of the problem solved, we use ELVIS II platform and LabVIEW software package that allows us to make the necessary calculations, display results of the experiment and, most importantly, to control the experiment. At the same time students are introduced to a LabVIEW software package and its capabilities.

  7. Post-translational processing of preprosomatostatin-II examined using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andrews, P C; Nichols, R; Dixon, J E

    1987-09-15

    The products and an intermediate of preprosomatostatin-II processing in the anglerfish islet were purified and subjected to structural analysis. The peptides isolated identify the site of signal cleavage (between Ser-24 and Gln-25). The prohormone is further processed at Arg-97 and, to a lesser extent, at the two adjacent basic amino acid residues Lys-61 and Arg-62. A 28-residue somatostatin is also generated which can be hydroxylated at Lys-23. A proteolytic processing site which would form the 14-residue somatostatin does not appear to be used to a significant degree. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FABMS) was used to demonstrate that the amino-terminal residues of peptides 25-60, and 25-90 are pyroglutamic acid, a modification which precludes Edman degradation of these peptides. Analysis of the peptides and tryptic peptide maps by FABMS allowed confirmation of the sites of prohormone conversion and indicated that terminal basic residues were removed during processing. Three amino acid residues were also found to differ from the amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA and were localized to specific regions by FABMS analysis. Residues found to differ from the cDNA (cDNA in parentheses) were: Asp-77 (Thr), Val-78 (Phe), and Gly-90 (Glu). Mass assignments were confirmed by running a single cycle of Edman degradation prior to FABMS. The peptides noted above were also examined by Edman sequence analysis. The sequence of a cDNA clone to preprosomatostatin-II was re-examined in light of the observed differences at the protein level. This study emphasizes the utility of FABMS in prohormone processing studies and in identification of post-translational processing events. PMID:2887572

  8. Shelf edge exchange processes-II SEEP2-06, R/V Endeavor cruise 186

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984. Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the six cruises.

  9. Relationships between type I and type II chondrules: Implications on chondrule formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Johan; Libourel, Guy; Soulié, Camille

    2015-07-01

    In unequilibrated chondrites, the ferromagnesian silicates in chondrules exhibit wide ranges of mg# = Mg/(Mg + Fe), allowing to sub-divide porphyritic chondrules into either type I (mg# > 0.9) or type II (mg# < 0.9). Although both chondrule types formed under oxidizing conditions relative to the canonical solar nebula, it is generally inferred that type II chondrules formed in more oxidizing conditions than type I. In order to check whether this redox difference was established during chondrule formation, or reflects differences in their precursors, we have undertaken a set of experiments aimed at heating type I olivine-rich (A) chondrule proxy, i.e. forsterite + Fe metal + Ca-Mg-Si-Al glass mixtures, under oxidizing conditions. We show that high temperature (isothermal) oxidation of type IA-like assemblages is a very efficient and rapid process (e.g. few tens of minutes) to form textures similar to type IIA chondrules. Due to the rapid dissolution of Fe metal blebs, a FeO increase in the melt and in combination with the dissolution of magnesian olivine allows the melt to reach ferroan olivine saturation. Crystallization of ferroan olivine occurs either as new crystal in the mesostasis or as overgrowths on the remaining unresorbed forsterite grains (relicts). Interruption of this process at any time before its completion by rapid cooling allows to reproduce the whole range of textures and chemical diversity observed in type A chondrules, i.e. from type I to type II. Several implications on chondrule formation processes can be inferred from the presented experiments. Type I chondrules or fragments of type I chondrules are very likely the main precursor material involved in the formation of most type II chondrules. Formation of porphyritic olivine type II chondrules is very likely the result of processes generating crystal growth by chemical disequilibrium at high temperature rather than processes generating crystallization only by cooling rates. This questions the

  10. Custom instruction for NIOS II processor FFT implementation for image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajana, Sindhuja; Meyer-Baese, Uwe; Botella, Guillermo

    2016-05-01

    Image processing can be considered as signal processing in two dimensions (2D). Filtering is one of the basic image processing operation. Filtering in frequency domain is computationally faster when compared to the corresponding spatial domain operation as the complex convolution process is modified as multiplication in frequency domain. The popular 2D transforms used in image processing are Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). The common values for resolution of an image are 640x480, 800x600, 1024x768 and 1280x1024. As it can be seen, the image formats are generally not a power of 2. So power of 2 FFT lengths are not required and these cannot be built using shorter Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) blocks. Split radix based FFT algorithms like Good-Thomas FFT algorithm simplifies the implementation logic required for such applications and hence can be implemented in low area and power consumption and also meet the timing constraints thereby operating at high frequency. The Good-Thomas FFT algorithm which is a Prime Factor FFT algorithm (PFA) provides the means of computing DFT with least number of multiplication and addition operations. We will be providing an Altera FPGA based NIOS II custom instruction implementation of Good-Thomas FFT algorithm to improve the system performance and also provide the comparison when the same algorithm is completely implemented in software.

  11. SCALE UP OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR THE EBR-II SPENT FUEL TREATMENT PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew C. Morrison; Kenneth J. Bateman; Michael F. Simpson

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT SCALE UP OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR THE EBR-II SPENT FUEL TREATMENT PROCESS Matthew C. Morrison, Kenneth J. Bateman, Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 The ceramic waste process is the intended method for disposing of waste salt electrolyte, which contains fission products from the fuel-processing electrorefiners (ER) at the INL. When mixed and processed with other materials, the waste salt can be stored in a durable ceramic waste form (CWF). The development of the CWF has recently progressed from small-scale testing and characterization to full-scale implementation and experimentation using surrogate materials in lieu of the ER electrolyte. Two full-scale (378 kg and 383 kg) CWF test runs have been successfully completed with final densities of 2.2 g/cm3 and 2.1 g/cm3, respectively. The purpose of the first CWF was to establish material preparation parameters. The emphasis of the second pre-qualification test run was to evaluate a preliminary multi-section CWF container design. Other considerations were to finalize material preparation parameters, measure the material height as it consolidates in the furnace, and identify when cracking occurs during the CWF cooldown process.

  12. DMA and DMB are the only genes in the class II region of the human MHC needed for class II-associated antigen processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ceman, S.; Rudersdorf, R.A.; Petersen, J.M.

    1995-03-15

    Previous studies have shown that homozygous mutations between the LMP2 and DNA loci in the human MHC cause class II molecules to be abnormally conformed and unstable in the presence of SDS at low temperature, and impede class II-associated Ag processing and presentation. These abnormalities result from impaired ability to form intracellular class II/peptide complexes that predominate in normal cells. We show in this work that this defect results from deficient expression of either the DMA or the DMB gene. Human B-LCL.174 (DR3) cells, which have a deletion of all known expressible genes in the class II region, express transgene-encoded HLA-DR3, but have the abnormalities. Transfer of cosmid HA14, which contains the DMA and DMB genes, into .174 (DR3) cells restored normal DR3 conformation, stability in 0.4% SDS at 0{degrees}, and ability to process and present tetanus toxoid, but only when both DMA and DMB mRNAs were present. The requirement for both genetic expressions in engendering normal phenotypes was confirmed by transferring the cloned genes into .174 (DR3) cells separately or together. Because normal phenotypes were fully restored in transferent cells expressing DMA plus DMB, other genes in the {approximately} 1-mb homozygous class II region deletion in .174 (DR3) cells either do not participate in or are dispensable for apparently normal production of intracellular class II/peptide complexes. The properties of DM-deficient EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) suggest ways of identifying humans in whom DM deficiency contributes to congenital immunodeficiency and malignancy. 67 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Hydrometallurgical process for zinc recovery from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD). Part II: Downstream processing and zinc recovery by electrowinning.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, P E; Oustadakis, P; Katsiapi, A; Agatzini-Leonardou, S

    2010-07-15

    The characterization and the agitation leaching of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) by diluted sulphuric acid have been studied in Part I, as a separate article. The aim of the present research work (Part II) is the development of a purification process of the leach liquor for the recovery of high-purity zinc by electrowinning. The proposed hydrometallurgical process consists of the following four (4) unit operations: (1) Removal of iron as easily filterable crystalline basic sulphate salt of the jarosite type, at atmospheric pressure, by chemical precipitation at pH: 3.5 and 95 degrees C. (2) Zinc solvent extraction by Cyanex 272 at pH: 3.5, T: 40 degrees C, with 25% extractant concentration. (3) Stripping of the loaded organic phase by zinc spent electrolyte (62.5 g/L Zn(2+)) at T: 40 degrees C with diluted H(2)SO(4) (3 mol/L). (4) Zinc electrowinning from sulphate solutions (at 38 degrees C) using Al as cathode and Pb as anode. The acidity of the electrolyte was fixed at 180 g/L H(2)SO(4), while the current density was kept constant at 500 A/m(2). PMID:20434263

  14. Hydrometallurgical process for zinc recovery from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD). Part II: Downstream processing and zinc recovery by electrowinning.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, P E; Oustadakis, P; Katsiapi, A; Agatzini-Leonardou, S

    2010-07-15

    The characterization and the agitation leaching of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) by diluted sulphuric acid have been studied in Part I, as a separate article. The aim of the present research work (Part II) is the development of a purification process of the leach liquor for the recovery of high-purity zinc by electrowinning. The proposed hydrometallurgical process consists of the following four (4) unit operations: (1) Removal of iron as easily filterable crystalline basic sulphate salt of the jarosite type, at atmospheric pressure, by chemical precipitation at pH: 3.5 and 95 degrees C. (2) Zinc solvent extraction by Cyanex 272 at pH: 3.5, T: 40 degrees C, with 25% extractant concentration. (3) Stripping of the loaded organic phase by zinc spent electrolyte (62.5 g/L Zn(2+)) at T: 40 degrees C with diluted H(2)SO(4) (3 mol/L). (4) Zinc electrowinning from sulphate solutions (at 38 degrees C) using Al as cathode and Pb as anode. The acidity of the electrolyte was fixed at 180 g/L H(2)SO(4), while the current density was kept constant at 500 A/m(2).

  15. RNA polymerase II pauses and associates with pre-mRNA processing factors at both ends of genes

    PubMed Central

    Glover-Cutter, Kira; Kim, Soojin; Espinosa, Joaquin; Bentley, David L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated co-transcriptional recruitment of pre-mRNA processing factors to human genes. Capping factors associate with paused RNA pol II at the 5′ ends of quiescent genes. They also track throughout actively transcribed genes, and accumulate with paused polymerase in the 3′ flanking region. 3′ processing factors CstF and CPSF are maximally recruited 0.5-1.5 kb downstream of poly(A) sites where they coincide with capping factors, Spt5, and Ser2 hyperphosphorylated, paused pol II. 3′ end processing factors also localize at transcription start sites, and this early recruitment is enhanced after polymerase arrest with DRB. These results suggest that promoters may help specify recruitment of 3′ end processing factors. We propose a dual pausing model where elongation arrests near the transcription start site and in the 3′ flank to allow co-transcriptional processing by factors recruited to the pol II ternary complex. PMID:18157150

  16. Biosorption of Lead(II) by Arthrobacter sp. 25: Process Optimization and Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yu; Wang, Xin; Zang, Tingting; Hu, Yang; Hu, Xiaojing; Ren, Guangming; Xu, Xiuhong; Qu, Juanjuan

    2016-08-28

    In the present work, Arthrobacter sp. 25, a lead-tolerant bacterium, was assayed to remove lead(II) from aqueous solution. The biosorption process was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken design. The relationships between dependent and independent variables were quantitatively determined by second-order polynomial equation and 3D response surface plots. The biosorption mechanism was explored by characterization of the biosorbent before and after biosorption using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of 9.6 mg/g was obtained at the initial lead ion concentration of 108.79 mg/l, pH value of 5.75, and biosorbent dosage of 9.9 g/l (fresh weight), which was close to the theoretically expected value of 9.88 mg/g. Arthrobacter sp. 25 is an ellipsoidalshaped bacterium covered with extracellular polymeric substances. The biosorption mechanism involved physical adsorption and microprecipitation as well as ion exchange, and functional groups such as phosphoryl, hydroxyl, amino, amide, carbonyl, and phosphate groups played vital roles in adsorption. The results indicate that Arthrobacter sp. 25 may be potentially used as a biosorbent for low-concentration lead(II) removal from wastewater. PMID:27197671

  17. NONLINEAR WAVE INTERACTIONS AS EMISSION PROCESS OF TYPE II RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ganse, Urs; Kilian, Patrick; Spanier, Felix; Vainio, Rami

    2012-06-01

    The emission of fundamental and harmonic frequency radio waves of type II radio bursts are assumed to be products of three-wave interaction processes of beam-excited Langmuir waves. Using a particle-in-cell code, we have performed simulations of the assumed emission region, a coronal mass ejection foreshock with two counterstreaming electron beams. Analysis of wavemodes within the simulation shows self-consistent excitation of beam-driven modes, which yield interaction products at both fundamental and harmonic emission frequencies. Through variation of the beam strength, we have investigated the dependence of energy transfer into electrostatic and electromagnetic modes, confirming the quadratic dependence of electromagnetic emission on electron beam strength.

  18. Nuclear Distribution of RNA Polymerase II and mRNA Processing Machinery in Early Mammalian Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Bogolyubova, Irina O.; Bogolyubov, Dmitry S.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial distribution of components of nuclear metabolism provides a significant impact on regulation of the processes of gene expression. While distribution of the key nuclear antigens and their association with the defined nuclear domains were thoroughly traced in mammalian somatic cells, similar data for the preimplantation embryos are scanty and fragmental. However, the period of cleavage is characterized by the most drastic and dynamic nuclear reorganizations accompanying zygotic gene activation. In this minireview, we try to summarize the results of studies concerning distribution of major factors involved in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription, pre-mRNA splicing mRNA export that have been carried out on early embryos of mammals. PMID:24868542

  19. Feasibility of closed Fe(II)/Fe(III) system for product-reflux in Nitrox process

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, M.; Ishida, T.

    1981-03-10

    A concept of closed reflux system for stable isotope fractionation by chemical exchange method has been introduced. In a closed system a chemical agent used to convert one chemical species of an isotopic exchange reaction into the other at the product end is regenerated on site by means of an electrochemical or thermal process. It offers a convenience of eliminating the needs for transporting chemicals to and from the site and an advantage of allowing leniency in the degree of completeness of the reflux reaction. Feasibility of use of Fe(II) salt solutions in a closed reflux system for the Nitrox process for /sup 15/N fractionation has been studied. Two of such systems, FeSO/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and Fe(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ in HClO/sub 4/, are adopted for packed column operation. For both systems, the rate of reduction of nitric acid increases with increasing acid concentration, the solubility of the salts decreases with the increasing acid concentration, and the reflux reaction can be made to go to completion. Evaluation of such a closed reflux system will have to include that of performance of regenerative process.

  20. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume II. Appendix, Task I, literature survey

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This activity was begun with the assembly of information from Parsons' files and from contacts in the development and commercial fields. A further more extensive literature search was carried out using the Energy Data Base and the American Petroleum Institute Data Base. These are part of the DOE/RECON system. Approximately 6000 references and abstracts were obtained from the EDB search. These were reviewed and the especially pertinent documents, approximately 300, were acquired in the form of paper copy or microfiche. A Fuel Properties form was developed for listing information pertinent to gas turbine liquid fuel properties specifications. Fuel properties data for liquid fuels from selected synfuel processes, deemed to be successful candidates for near future commercial plants were tabulated on the forms. The processes selected consisted of H-Coal, SRC-II and Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction processes plus Paraho and Tosco shale oil processes. Fuel properties analyses for crude and distillate syncrude process products are contained in Section 2. Analyses representing synthetic fuels given refinery treatments, mostly bench scale hydrotreating, are contained in Section 3. Section 4 discusses gas turbine fuel specifications based on petroleum source fuels as developed by the major gas turbine manufacturers. Section 5 presents the on-site gas turbine fuel treatments applicable to petroleum base fuels impurities content in order to prevent adverse contaminant effects. Section 7 relates the environmental aspects of gas turbine fuel usage and combustion performance. It appears that the near future stationary industrial gas turbine fuel market will require that some of the synthetic fuels be refined to the point that they resemble petroleum based fuels.

  1. Adsorption of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) on hexagonal templated zirconia obtained thorough a sol-gel process: the effects of nanostructure on adsorption features.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Robson F; do Nascimento, Ana A S; Bezerra, Cícero W B

    2004-09-01

    Using zirconium tetrabutoxide, diaminedecane, and diamineoctane as precursors, a templated hexagonal zirconia matrix is synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption capacity of such a matrix toward Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions is studied. The adsorption affinity of the synthesized hexagonal templated zirconia toward the cations is Cu(II)>Zn(II) >Ni(II)>Co(II). It is also verified that the adsorption of the cations follows a Langmuir and not a Freundlich isotherm. All obtained isotherms are of type I, according to the IUPAC classification. The observed adsorption affinity sequence can be explained by taking into account the velocity constant for the substitution of water molecules into the cation coordination spheres, as well as the Irving-Williams series.

  2. Adsorption of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) on hexagonal templated zirconia obtained thorough a sol-gel process: the effects of nanostructure on adsorption features.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Robson F; do Nascimento, Ana A S; Bezerra, Cícero W B

    2004-09-01

    Using zirconium tetrabutoxide, diaminedecane, and diamineoctane as precursors, a templated hexagonal zirconia matrix is synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption capacity of such a matrix toward Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions is studied. The adsorption affinity of the synthesized hexagonal templated zirconia toward the cations is Cu(II)>Zn(II) >Ni(II)>Co(II). It is also verified that the adsorption of the cations follows a Langmuir and not a Freundlich isotherm. All obtained isotherms are of type I, according to the IUPAC classification. The observed adsorption affinity sequence can be explained by taking into account the velocity constant for the substitution of water molecules into the cation coordination spheres, as well as the Irving-Williams series. PMID:15276032

  3. Role of oxidants in enhancing dewaterability of anaerobically digested sludge through Fe (II) activated oxidation processes: hydrogen peroxide versus persulfate

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kang; Zhou, Xu; Liu, Yiqi; Gong, Yanyan; Zhou, Beibei; Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    Improving dewaterability of sludge is important for the disposal of sludge in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This study, for the first time, investigated the Fe(II) activated oxidization processes in improving anaerobically digested sludge (ADS) dewaterability. The combination of Fe(II) (0–100 mg/g total solids (TS)) and persulfate (0–1,000 mg/g TS) under neutral pH as well as the combination of Fe(II) (0–100 mg/g TS) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) (0–1,000 mg/g TS) under pH 3.0 were used to examine and compare their effect on the ADS dewaterability enhancement. The highest ADS dewaterability enhancement was attained at 25 mg Fe(II)/g TS and 50 mg HP/g TS, when the CST (CST: the capillary suction time, a sludge dewaterability indicator) was reduced by 95%. In contrast, the highest CST reduction in Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning was 90%, which was obtained at 50 mg Fe(II)/g TS and 250 mg persulfate/g TS. The results showed that Fe(II)-HP conditioning was comparable with Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning in terms of highest CST reduction. Economic analysis suggested that the Fe(II)-HP conditioning was more promising for improving ADS dewaterability compared with Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning, with the saving being up to $65,000 per year in a WWTP with a population equivalent of 100,000. PMID:27109500

  4. Chemical and biological effects of heavy distillate recycle in the SRC-II process

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Anderson, R.P.; Freel, J.

    1983-12-01

    Recent work from the Merriam Laboratory continuous coal liquefaction units shows that heavy distillate from the SRC-II process can be recycled to extinction, and hence a distillate product boiling entirely below 310/sup 0/C (590/sup 0/F) (or other selected boiling points) is feasible. In these runs distillate yield was not reduced; gas make was unaffected; and hydrogen consumption was increased only slightly, in keeping with the generally higher hydrogen content of lighter end products. Total distillate yield (C/sub 5/-590/sup 0/F) was 56 wt %, MAF coal in runs with subbituminous coal from the Amax Belle Ayr mine. Product endpoint is well below 371/sup 0/C (700/sup 0/F), the temperature above which coal distillates appear to become genotoxic; and the product was shown to be free of mutagenic activity in the Ames test. Chemical analyses showed both the < 270/sup 0/C (< 518/sup 0/F) and the < 310/sup 0/C (< 590/sup 0/F) distillates to be essentially devoid of several reference polycyclic compounds known to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Tests for tumorigenic or carcinogenic activity were not carried out on these materials. However, a comparison of chemical data from the Merriam heavy distillate samples with data on the other SRC-II distillates where carcinogenesis or tumorigenesis data is available leads to the expectation that < 371/sup 0/C (< 700/sup 0/F) materials from the Merriam Laboratory will have greatly reduced tumorigenic and carcinogenic activity in skin painting tests. Other studies suggest the product should be more readily upgraded than full-range (C/sub 5/-900/sup 0/F) distillate.

  5. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Manganese II. Hepatic Processing after Ingestion and Inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Dorman, David C.; Nong, Andy; Covington, Tammie R.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current concerns regarding inhalation exposure to Mn, a component from oxidation of the gasoline antiknock agent MMT, have stimulated interest in developing kinetic tools for describing the inhalation and combined inhalation/oral route kinetics of Mn. Here we integrate kinetic approaches for (i) bulk tissue Mn kinetics and (ii) hepato-intestinal control of oral-route Mn uptake into a integrated model structure connecting systemic and oral Mn. Linkages were developed between the hepato-intestinal and systemic tissues in order to evaluate differences in hepatic processing of orally absorbed Mn and systemic Mn. The integrated, unified model described the uptake, net absorption and elimination of ingested manganese and the elimination kinetics of iv administered (systemic) manganese by treating Mn arriving at the liver from systemic versus portal blood differently. Hepatic extraction of orally absorbed Mn in rats predicted through simulation of the oral uptake data was 19 %, 54 % and 78 % at dietary exposures of 1.5 ppm, 11.2 ppm and 100 ppm, respectively. In contrast, hepatic extraction of systemic Mn predicted through simulation of elimination kinetics iv tracer Mn was much less, 0.004%, 0.005%, or 0.009% at dietary levels of 2, 10 and 100 ppm, respectively. These differences in hepatic processing of blood Mn derived from different dose-routes need to be accounted for in more complete PK models for Mn that are intended to support human health risk assessments.

  6. Membrane/distillation hybrid process research and development. Final report, phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Mazanec, T.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report covers work conducted under the grant awarded to BP by DOE in late 1991 entitled {open_quotes}Membrane/Distillation Hybrid Process Research and Development.{close_quotes} The program was directed towards development and commercialization of the BP process for separation of vapor phase olefins from non-olefins via facilitated transport using an aqueous facilitator. The program has come to a very successful conclusion, with formation of a partnership between BP and Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) to market and commercialize the technology. The focus of this report is the final portion of the program, during which engineering re-design, facilitator optimization, economic analysis, and marketing have been the primary activities. At the end of Phase II BP was looking to partner with an engineering firm to advance the selective olefin recovery (SOR) technology from the lab/demo stage to full commercialization. In August 1995 BP and SWEC reached an agreement to advance the technology by completing additional Phase III work with DOE and beginning marketing activities.

  7. Shelf Edge Exchange Processes, II: SEEP2-08, R/V ENDEAVOR cruise 188

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 (Behrens and Flagg, 1986). Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. This project consisted of a series of ten cruises, a mooring array, and a series of over-flights by NASA aircraft. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the cruises, six of which were primarily mooring deployment or recovery cruises. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Two cruises (SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07) were dedicated to investigating benthic processes and hydrographic data were not collected.

  8. Ultrafast excitation energy transfer and exciton-exciton annihilation processes in isolated light harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC II) from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, T.; Wasielewski, M.R. ); Irrgang, K.D.; Renger, G. )

    1994-11-17

    Excitation energy transfer and exciton-exciton annihilation in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of spinach photosystem II (LHC II) has been studied by two-color absorption difference spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution. After selectively exciting Chl b at 645 nm, the transient absorption changes were monitored at wavelengths where either Chl b (655 nm) or Chl a (680 nm) dominates the absorption of LHC II. From the good correspondence of the lifetimes obtained from a numerical analysis of the very fast relaxation in the Chl b absorption band (160 [+-] 20 fs) and the rise kinetics in the Chl a absorption band (145 [+-] 20 fs), it is suggested that the Chl b [yields] Chl a excitation energy transfer occurs on a time scale of about 150 fs. In addition, at both probe wavelengths (655 and 680 nm) lifetimes of 3-7 ps were observed which likely arise from excitation energy transfer processes connected with spectral shifting. The kinetic curves of the transient absorption changes at 680 nm show a remarkable intensity dependence which is ascribed to exciton-exciton annihilation. Since at a probe wavelength of 655 nm no intensity effect on the kinetics was observed, it is concluded that annihilation processes preferably occur among excited singlet states of Chl a molecules. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Multivesicular bodies in intestinal epithelial cells: responsible for MHC class II-restricted antigen processing and origin of exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Büning, Jürgen; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Tafazzoli, Kianush; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Strobel, Stephan; Apostolaki, Maria; Kollias, George; Heath, Joan K; Ludwig, Diether; Gebert, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    In normal conditions intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) constitutively stimulate regulatory CD4+ T cells. However, in Crohn's disease (CD), this major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted antigen presentation results in stimulation of proinflammatory CD4+ T cells. We hypothesized that these alternative functions might be mediated by differential sorting and processing of antigens into distinct MHC II-enriched compartments (MIICs). Accordingly, we analysed the endocytic pathways of lumenally applied ovalbumin (OVA) in IECs of the jejunum and ileum of wild-type (WT) and TNFΔARE/WT mice that develop a CD-resembling ileitis. Using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we found that messenger RNA levels of interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-17 and interleukin-10 were significantly up-regulated in the inflamed ileum of TNFΔARE/WT mice, confirming CD-like inflammation. Fluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy revealed the presence of MHC II and invariant chain throughout the late endocytic compartments, with most molecules concentrated in the multivesicular bodies (MVB). OVA was targeted into MVB and, in contrast to other MIICs, accumulated in these structures within 120 min of exposure. The IEC-specific A33 antigen localized to internal vesicles of MVB and A33/class II-bearing exosomes were identified in intercellular spaces. Remarkably, the expression pattern of MHC II/invariant chain molecules and the trafficking of OVA were independent of mucosal inflammation and the specific region in the small intestine. MVB seem to be principally responsible for class II-associated antigen processing in IECs and to constitute the origin of MHC II-loaded exosomes. The distinctive functions of IECs in antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells might arise as a result of differential processing within the MVB identified here. PMID:18710406

  10. Role of DDL processes during electrolytic reduction of Cu(II) in a low oxygen environment.

    PubMed

    Brosky, Rebekah T; Pamukcu, Sibel

    2013-11-15

    Heavy metals typically accumulate in reduced bottom sediments after being discharged into waterways by industrial and municipal processes. A laboratory experiment was conducted in order to determine if abundance of clay in the bottom sediments of a Cu-contaminated aqueous ecosystem could enhance electrolytic reduction of the heavy metal. Cu(NO3)2 · 2.5H2O was added to simulate a moderately contaminated system with 650 μg Cu/ml kaolinite clay-water slurry. A constant electrical potential of 1.0 V/cm was applied across platinum wire electrodes inserted into the continuously stirred system for four days while the system ORP(2) was monitored and periodic sub-samples were taken for analysis. The electrical as well as the chemical results indicate that the quantity of Cu(II) being reduced to Cu(I), especially within the aqueous phase, is increased within the first 48 h of experimentation by the presence of kaolinite clay up to 0.05 mg clay/l slurry.

  11. Critical Infrastructure Protection II, The International Federation for Information Processing, Volume 290.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, Mauricio; Shenoi, Sujeet

    The information infrastructure -- comprising computers, embedded devices, networks and software systems -- is vital to day-to-day operations in every sector: information and telecommunications, banking and finance, energy, chemicals and hazardous materials, agriculture, food, water, public health, emergency services, transportation, postal and shipping, government and defense. Global business and industry, governments, indeed society itself, cannot function effectively if major components of the critical information infrastructure are degraded, disabled or destroyed. Critical Infrastructure Protection II describes original research results and innovative applications in the interdisciplinary field of critical infrastructure protection. Also, it highlights the importance of weaving science, technology and policy in crafting sophisticated, yet practical, solutions that will help secure information, computer and network assets in the various critical infrastructure sectors. Areas of coverage include: - Themes and Issues - Infrastructure Security - Control Systems Security - Security Strategies - Infrastructure Interdependencies - Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation This book is the second volume in the annual series produced by the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) Working Group 11.10 on Critical Infrastructure Protection, an international community of scientists, engineers, practitioners and policy makers dedicated to advancing research, development and implementation efforts focused on infrastructure protection. The book contains a selection of twenty edited papers from the Second Annual IFIP WG 11.10 International Conference on Critical Infrastructure Protection held at George Mason University, Arlington, Virginia, USA in the spring of 2008.

  12. Photoinduced processes within compact dyads based on triphenylpyridinium-functionalized bipyridyl complexes of ruthenium(II).

    PubMed

    Lainé, Philippe P; Ciofini, Ilaria; Ochsenbein, Philippe; Amouyal, Edmond; Adamo, Carlo; Bedioui, Fethi

    2005-06-01

    As an alternative to conventional charge-separation functional molecular models based on long-range ET within redox cascades, a "compact approach" has been examined. To this end, spacer elements usually inserted between main redox-active units within polyad systems have been removed, allowing extended rigidity but at the expense of enhanced intercomponent electronic communication. The molecular assemblies investigated here are of the P-(theta (1))-A type, where the theta (1) twist angle is related to the degree of conjugation between the photosensitizer (P, of {Ru(bpy)(3)}(2+) type) and the electron-acceptor (A). 4-N- and 4-N-,4'-N-(2,4,6-triphenylpyridinio)-2,2'-bipyridine ligands (A(1)-bpy and A(2)-bpy, respectively) have been synthesized to give complexes with Ru(II), 1-bpy and 2-bpy, respectively. Combined solid-state analysis (X-ray crystallography), solution studies ((1)H NMR, cyclic voltammetry) and computational structural optimization allowed verifying that theta (1) angle approaches 90 degrees within 1-bpy and 2-bpy in solution. Also, anticipated existence of strong intercomponent electronic coupling has been confirmed by investigating electronic absorption properties and electrochemical behavior of the compounds. The capability of 1-bpy and 2-bpy to undergo PET process was evaluated by carrying out their photophysical study (steady state emission and time-resolved spectroscopy at both 293 and 77 K). The conformational dependence of photoinduced processes within P-(theta (1))-A systems has been established by comparing the photophysical properties of 1-bpy (and 2-bpy) with those of an affiliated species reported in the literature, 1-phen. A complementary theoretical analysis (DFT) of the change of spin density distribution within model [1-bpy(theta (1))](-) mono-reduced species as a function of theta (1) has been undertaken and the possibility of conformationally switching emission properties of P was derived. PMID:15822134

  13. Stress Induces Changes in the Phosphorylation of Trypanosoma cruzi RNA Polymerase II, Affecting Its Association with Chromatin and RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal heptapeptide repeats of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) controls several transcription-related events in eukaryotes. Trypanosomatids lack these typical repeats and display an unusual transcription control. RNA Pol II associates with the transcription site of the spliced leader (SL) RNA, which is used in the trans-splicing of all mRNAs transcribed on long polycistronic units. We found that Trypanosoma cruzi RNA Pol II associated with chromatin is highly phosphorylated. When transcription is inhibited by actinomycin D, the enzyme runs off from SL genes, remaining hyperphosphorylated and associated with polycistronic transcription units. Upon heat shock, the enzyme is dephosphorylated and remains associated with the chromatin. Transcription is partially inhibited with the accumulation of housekeeping precursor mRNAs, except for heat shock genes. DNA damage caused dephosphorylation and transcription arrest, with RNA Pol II dissociating from chromatin although staying at the SL. In the presence of calyculin A, the hyperphosphorylated form detached from chromatin, including the SL loci. These results indicate that in trypanosomes, the unusual RNA Pol II is phosphorylated during the transcription of SL and polycistronic operons. Different types of stresses modify its phosphorylation state, affecting pre-RNA processing. PMID:24813189

  14. Kinetic and equilibrium studies for the adsorption process of cadmium(II) and copper(II) onto Pseudomonas aeruginosa using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry method.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Tang, Biyu; Liu, Xiaoying; Zeng, Xiandong; Duan, Haiyan; Luo, Shenglian; Wei, Wanzhi

    2009-08-15

    A novel method for the simultaneous determination of cadmium(II) and copper(II) during the adsorption process onto Pseudomonas aeruginosa was developed. The concentration of the free metal ions was successfully detected by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) on the mercaptoethane sulfonate (MES) modified gold electrode, while the P. aeruginosa was efficiently avoided approaching to the electrode surface by the MES monolayer. And the anodic stripping peaks of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) appear at -0.13 and 0.34V respectively, at the concentration range of 5-50 microM, the peak currents of SWASV present linear relationships with the concentrations of cadmium and copper respectively. As the determination of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) was in real time and without pretreatment, the kinetic characteristics of the adsorption process were studied and all the corresponding regression parameters were obtained by fitting the electrochemical experimental data to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Moreover, Langmuir and Freundlich models well described the biosorption isotherms. And there were some differences in the amount of metal ion adsorbed at equilibrium (q(e)) and other kinetics parameters when the two ions coexisted were compared with the unaccompanied condition, which were also discussed in this paper. The proposed electrode system provides excellent platform for the simultaneous determination of trace metals in complex biosorption process.

  15. A signal processing approach for enriched region detection in RNA polymerase II ChIP-seq data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA polymerase II (PolII) is essential in gene transcription and ChIP-seq experiments have been used to study PolII binding patterns over the entire genome. However, since PolII enriched regions in the genome can be very long, existing peak finding algorithms for ChIP-seq data are not adequate for identifying such long regions. Methods Here we propose an enriched region detection method for ChIP-seq data to identify long enriched regions by combining a signal denoising algorithm with a false discovery rate (FDR) approach. The binned ChIP-seq data for PolII are first processed using a non-local means (NL-means) algorithm for purposes of denoising. Then, a FDR approach is developed to determine the threshold for marking enriched regions in the binned histogram. Results We first test our method using a public PolII ChIP-seq dataset and compare our results with published results obtained using the published algorithm HPeak. Our results show a high consistency with the published results (80-100%). Then, we apply our proposed method on PolII ChIP-seq data generated in our own study on the effects of hormone on the breast cancer cell line MCF7. The results demonstrate that our method can effectively identify long enriched regions in ChIP-seq datasets. Specifically, pertaining to MCF7 control samples we identified 5,911 segments with length of at least 4 Kbp (maximum 233,000 bp); and in MCF7 treated with E2 samples, we identified 6,200 such segments (maximum 325,000 bp). Conclusions We demonstrated the effectiveness of this method in studying binding patterns of PolII in cancer cells which enables further deep analysis in transcription regulation and epigenetics. Our method complements existing peak detection algorithms for ChIP-seq experiments. PMID:22536865

  16. Selective inhibition of glycoprotein-processing enzymes. Differential inhibition of glucosidases I and II in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, G P; Pan, Y T; Tropea, J E; Mitchell, M; Liu, P; Elbein, A D

    1988-11-25

    In this study, we compared the effects of 2,6-dideoxy-2,6-imino-7-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-D-glycero-L-gulohep titol (MDL) to those of the glucosidase I inhibitor, castanospermine, on the purified processing enzymes glucosidases I and II. WE also compared the effects of these two inhibitors on glycoprotein processing in cell culture using influenza virus-infected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells as a model system. With the purified processing enzymes, castanospermine was a better inhibitor of glucosidase I than of glucosidase II, whereas MDL is more effective against glucosidase II than glucosidase I. In cell culture at the appropriate dose, MDL also preferentially affected glucosidase II. Thus, at 250 micrograms/ml MDL, the major [3H]glucose-labeled (or [3H]mannose-labeled) glycopeptide from the viral hemagglutinin was susceptible to endoglucosaminidase H, and the oligosaccharide liberated by this treatment was characterized as a Glc2Man7-9GlcNAc on the basis of size, resistance to digestion by glucosidase I (but sensitivity to glucosidase II), methylation analysis, and Smith degradation studies. These data indicate that at appropriate concentrations of MDL (250 micrograms/ml), one can selectively inhibit glucosidase II in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. However, at higher concentrations of inhibitor (500 micrograms/ml), both enzymes are apparently affected. Since MDL did not greatly inhibit the synthesis of lipid-linked saccharides or the synthesis of protein or RNA, it should be a useful tool for studies on the biosynthesis and role of N-linked oligosaccharides in glycoprotein function. PMID:3053707

  17. Flibe Coolant Cleanup and Processing in the HYLIFE-II Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W

    2001-03-23

    In the HYLIFE-II chamber design, a thick flowing blanket of molten-salt (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) called flibe is used to protect structures from radiation damage. Since it is directly exposed to the fusion target, the flibe will absorb the target debris. Removing the materials left over from target explosions at the rate of {approx}6/s and then recycling some of these materials poses a challenge for the inertial fusion energy power plant. The choice of target materials derives from multi-disciplinary criteria such as target performance, fabricability, safety and environment, corrosion, and cost of recycle. Indirect-drive targets require high-2 materials for the hohlraum. Gold and gadolinium are favorite target materials for laboratory experiments but cost considerations may preclude their use in power plants or at least requires cost effective recycle because a year's supply of gold and gadolinium is estimated at 520 M$ and 40 M$. Environmental and waste considerations alone require recycle of this material. Separation by volatility appears to be the most attractive (e.g., Hg and Xe); centrifugation (e.g., Pb) is acceptable with some problems (e.g., materials compatibility) and chemical separation is the least attractive (e.g. Gd and Hf). Mercury, hafnium and xenon might be substituted with equal target performance and have advantages in removal and recycle due to their high volatility, except for hafnium. Alternatively, lead, tungsten and xenon might be used due to the ability to use centrifugation and gaseous separation. Hafnium or tantalum form fluorides, which will complicate materials compatibility, corrosion and require sufficient volatility of the fluoride for separation. Further complicating the coolant cleanup and processing is the formation of free fluorine due to nuclear transformation of lithium and beryllium in the flibe, which requires chemical control of the fluoride level to minimize corrosion. The study of the choice of target materials and the

  18. Cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic processes coupled by myosin II in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chabaud, Mélanie; Heuzé, Mélina L.; Bretou, Marine; Vargas, Pablo; Maiuri, Paolo; Solanes, Paola; Maurin, Mathieu; Terriac, Emmanuel; Le Berre, Maël; Lankar, Danielle; Piolot, Tristan; Adelstein, Robert S.; Zhang, Yingfan; Sixt, Michael; Jacobelli, Jordan; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    The immune response relies on the migration of leukocytes and on their ability to stop in precise anatomical locations to fulfil their task. How leukocyte migration and function are coordinated is unknown. Here we show that in immature dendritic cells, which patrol their environment by engulfing extracellular material, cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic. This antagonism results from transient enrichment of myosin IIA at the cell front, which disrupts the back-to-front gradient of the motor protein, slowing down locomotion but promoting antigen capture. We further highlight that myosin IIA enrichment at the cell front requires the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, by controlling myosin IIA localization, Ii imposes on dendritic cells an intermittent antigen capture behaviour that might facilitate environment patrolling. We propose that the requirement for myosin II in both cell migration and specific cell functions may provide a general mechanism for their coordination in time and space. PMID:26109323

  19. Unraveling the Decomposition Process of Lead(II) Acetate: Anhydrous Polymorphs, Hydrates, and Byproducts and Room Temperature Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Casado, Francisco J; Ramos-Riesco, Miguel; Rodríguez-Cheda, José A; Cucinotta, Fabio; Matesanz, Emilio; Miletto, Ivana; Gianotti, Enrica; Marchese, Leonardo; Matěj, Zdeněk

    2016-09-01

    Lead(II) acetate [Pb(Ac)2, where Ac = acetate group (CH3-COO(-))2] is a very common salt with many and varied uses throughout history. However, only lead(II) acetate trihydrate [Pb(Ac)2·3H2O] has been characterized to date. In this paper, two enantiotropic polymorphs of the anhydrous salt, a novel hydrate [lead(II) acetate hemihydrate: Pb(Ac)2·(1)/2H2O], and two decomposition products [corresponding to two different basic lead(II) acetates: Pb4O(Ac)6 and Pb2O(Ac)2] are reported, with their structures being solved for the first time. The compounds present a variety of molecular arrangements, being 2D or 1D coordination polymers. A thorough thermal analysis, by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), was also carried out to study the behavior and thermal data of the salt and its decomposition process, in inert and oxygenated atmospheres, identifying the phases and byproducts that appear. The complex thermal behavior of lead(II) acetate is now solved, finding the existence of another hydrate, two anhydrous enantiotropic polymorphs, and some byproducts. Moreover, some of them are phosphorescent at room temperature. The compounds were studied by TGA, DSC, X-ray diffraction, and UV-vis spectroscopy. PMID:27548299

  20. Biogeochemical processes at the fringe of a landfill leachate pollution plume: potential for dissolved organic carbon, Fe(II), Mn(II), NH 4, and CH 4 oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breukelen, Boris M.; Griffioen, Jasper

    2004-09-01

    Various redox reactions may occur at the fringe of a landfill leachate plume, involving oxidation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CH 4, Fe(II), Mn(II), and NH 4 from leachate and reduction of O 2, NO 3 and SO 4 from pristine groundwater. Knowledge on the relevance of these processes is essential for the simulation and evaluation of natural attenuation (NA) of pollution plumes. The occurrence of such biogeochemical processes was investigated at the top fringe of a landfill leachate plume (Banisveld, the Netherlands). Hydrochemical depth profiles of the top fringe were captured via installation of a series of multi-level samplers at 18, 39 and 58 m downstream from the landfill. Ten-centimeter vertical resolution was necessary to study NA within a fringe as thin as 0.5 m. Bromide appeared an equally well-conservative tracer as chloride to calculate dilution of landfill leachate, and its ratio to chloride was high compared to other possible sources of salt in groundwater. The plume fringe rose steadily from a depth of around 5 m towards the surface with a few meters in the period 1998-2003. The plume uplift may be caused by enhanced exfiltration to a brook downstream from the landfill, due to increased precipitation over this period and an artificial lowering of the water level of the brook. This rise invoked cation exchange including proton buffering, and triggered degassing of methane. The hydrochemical depth profile was simulated in a 1D vertical reactive transport model using PHREEQC-2. Optimization using the nonlinear optimization program PEST brought forward that solid organic carbon and not clay minerals controlled retardation of cations. Cation exchange resulted in spatial separation of Fe(II), Mn(II) and NH 4 fronts from the fringe, and thereby prevented possible oxidation of these secondary redox species. Degradation of DOC may happen in the fringe zone. Re-dissolution of methane escaped from the plume and subsequent oxidation is an explanation for absence

  1. OCCIDENTAL VERTICAL MODIFIED IN SITU PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF OIL FROM OIL SHALE. PHASE II

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Reid M.

    1980-09-01

    The progress presented in this report covers the period June 1, 1980 through August 31, 1980 under the work scope for.Phase II of the DOE/Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) Cooperative Agreement. The major activities at OOSI 1s Logan Wash site during the quarter were: mining the voids at all levels for Retorts 7, 8 and 8x; completing Mini-Retort (MR) construction; continuing surface facility construction; tracer testing the MR 1 s; conducting Retorts 7 & 8 related Rock Fragmentation tests; setting up and debugging the Sandia B-61 trailer; and preparing the Phase II instrumentation plan.

  2. Antigen processing of glycoconjugate vaccines; the polysaccharide portion of the pneumococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine co-localizes with MHC II on the antigen processing cell surface.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zengzu; Schreiber, John R

    2009-05-21

    Pneumococcal (Pn) polysaccharides (PS) are T-independent (TI) antigens and do not induce immunological memory or antibodies in infants. Conjugation of PnPS to the carrier protein CRM(197) induces PS-specific antibody in infants, and memory similar to T-dependent (Td) antigens. Conjugates have improved immunogenicity via antigen processing and presentation of carrier protein with MHC II and recruitment of T cell help, but the fate of the PS attached to the carrier is unknown. To determine the location of the PS component of PnPS-CRM(197) in the APC, we separately labeled PS and protein and tracked their location. The PS of types 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) was specifically labeled by Alexa Fluor 594 hydrazide (red). The CRM(197) was separately labeled red in a reaction that did not label PS. Labeled antigens were incubated with APC which were fixed, permeabilized and incubated with anti-MHC II antibody labeled green by Alexa Fluor 488, followed by confocal microscopy. Labeled CRM(197) was presented on APC surface and co-localized with MHC II (yellow). Labeled unconjugated 14 or 19F PS did not go to the APC surface, but PS labeled 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) was internalized and co-localized with MHC II. Monoclonal antibody to type 14 PS bound to intracellular type 14 PS and PS-CRM(197). Brefeldin A and chloroquine blocked both CRM(197) and PS labeled 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) from co-localizing with MHC II. These data suggest that the PS component of the CRM(197) glycoconjugate enters the endosome, travels with CRM(197) peptides to the APC surface and co-localizes with MHC II.

  3. Carbonaceous material obtained from exhausted coffee by an aqueous solution combustion process and used for cobalt (II) and cadmium (II) sorption.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Gómez, J; López-González, H; Olguín, M T; Bulbulian, S

    2015-06-01

    New carbonaceous materials were obtained using a fast aqueous solution combustion process from mixtures of exhausted coffee, ammonium nitrate (oxidizer) and urea (fuel) heated at 600, 700, 800 or 900 °C. The resulting powders were effective adsorbents for removing Co(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solutions. Exhausted coffee was also calcined at different temperatures and compared. The products were characterized, and the obtained carbons had BET specific surface areas of 114.27-390.85 m(2)/g and pore diameters of 4.19 to 2.44 nm when the temperature was increased from 600 to 800 °C. Cobalt and cadmium adsorption by the carbonaceous materials was correlated with the maximum adsorption capacities and specific surface areas of the materials. The method reported here is advantageous because it only required 5 min of reaction to improve the textural properties of carbon obtained from exhausted coffee, which play an important role in the material's cobalt and cadmium adsorption capacities. PMID:25841193

  4. Carbonaceous material obtained from exhausted coffee by an aqueous solution combustion process and used for cobalt (II) and cadmium (II) sorption.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Gómez, J; López-González, H; Olguín, M T; Bulbulian, S

    2015-06-01

    New carbonaceous materials were obtained using a fast aqueous solution combustion process from mixtures of exhausted coffee, ammonium nitrate (oxidizer) and urea (fuel) heated at 600, 700, 800 or 900 °C. The resulting powders were effective adsorbents for removing Co(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solutions. Exhausted coffee was also calcined at different temperatures and compared. The products were characterized, and the obtained carbons had BET specific surface areas of 114.27-390.85 m(2)/g and pore diameters of 4.19 to 2.44 nm when the temperature was increased from 600 to 800 °C. Cobalt and cadmium adsorption by the carbonaceous materials was correlated with the maximum adsorption capacities and specific surface areas of the materials. The method reported here is advantageous because it only required 5 min of reaction to improve the textural properties of carbon obtained from exhausted coffee, which play an important role in the material's cobalt and cadmium adsorption capacities.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of the dissolution process of a cellulose triacetate-II nano-sized crystal in DMSO.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Daichi; Ueda, Kazuyoshi; Yamane, Chihiro; Miyamoto, Hitomi; Horii, Fumitaka

    2011-12-27

    An understanding of the dissolution process of cellulose derivatives is important not only for basic research but also for industrial purposes. We investigated the dissolution process of cellulose triacetate II (CTA II) nano-sized crystal in DMSO solvent using molecular dynamics simulations. The nano-sized crystal consists of 18 CTA chains. During the 9 ns simulation, it was observed that one chain (C01) located at the corner of the lozenge crystal was solvated by the DMSO molecules and moved away from the remaining cluster into the DMSO solvent. The analysis showed that the breakage of the interaction between the H1, H3, and H5 hydrogens of the pyranose ring and the acetyl carbonyl oxygen in the C01 and C02 adjacent chains would be crucial for the dissolution of CTA. The DMSO molecules solvating around these atoms would prevent the re-crystallization of the CTA molecules and facilitate further dissolution. PMID:22063502

  6. Effects of parasitic beam-beam interaction during the injection process at the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Y.H.

    1992-06-01

    This paper is concerned with beam-beam effects during the injection process at the proposed asymmetric SLAC/LBL/LLNL B-Factory, PEP-II. It is shown that the parasitic beam-beam interaction can lead to a significant blowup in the vertical size of the injected beam. Simulation results for the horizontal and the vertical injection schemes are presented, and their performances are studied.

  7. Abiotic process for Fe(II) oxidation and green rust mineralization driven by a heterotrophic nitrate reducing bacteria (Klebsiella mobilis).

    PubMed

    Etique, Marjorie; Jorand, Frédéric P A; Zegeye, Asfaw; Grégoire, Brian; Despas, Christelle; Ruby, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Green rusts (GRs) are mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides with a high reactivity toward organic and inorganic pollutants. GRs can be produced from ferric reducing or ferrous oxidizing bacterial activities. In this study, we investigated the capability of Klebsiella mobilis to produce iron minerals in the presence of nitrate and ferrous iron. This bacterium is well-known to reduce nitrate using an organic carbon source as electron donor but is unable to enzymatically oxidize Fe(II) species. During incubation, GR formation occurred as a secondary iron mineral precipitating on cell surfaces, resulting from Fe(II) oxidation by nitrite produced via bacterial respiration of nitrate. For the first time, we demonstrate GR formation by indirect microbial oxidation of Fe(II) (i.e., a combination of biotic/abiotic processes). These results therefore suggest that nitrate-reducing bacteria can potentially contribute to the formation of GR in natural environments. In addition, the chemical reduction of nitrite to ammonium by GR is observed, which gradually turns the GR into the end-product goethite. The nitrogen mass-balance clearly demonstrates that the total amount of ammonium produced corresponds to the quantity of bioreduced nitrate. These findings demonstrate how the activity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in ferrous environments may provide a direct link between the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and iron. PMID:24605878

  8. Abiotic process for Fe(II) oxidation and green rust mineralization driven by a heterotrophic nitrate reducing bacteria (Klebsiella mobilis).

    PubMed

    Etique, Marjorie; Jorand, Frédéric P A; Zegeye, Asfaw; Grégoire, Brian; Despas, Christelle; Ruby, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Green rusts (GRs) are mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides with a high reactivity toward organic and inorganic pollutants. GRs can be produced from ferric reducing or ferrous oxidizing bacterial activities. In this study, we investigated the capability of Klebsiella mobilis to produce iron minerals in the presence of nitrate and ferrous iron. This bacterium is well-known to reduce nitrate using an organic carbon source as electron donor but is unable to enzymatically oxidize Fe(II) species. During incubation, GR formation occurred as a secondary iron mineral precipitating on cell surfaces, resulting from Fe(II) oxidation by nitrite produced via bacterial respiration of nitrate. For the first time, we demonstrate GR formation by indirect microbial oxidation of Fe(II) (i.e., a combination of biotic/abiotic processes). These results therefore suggest that nitrate-reducing bacteria can potentially contribute to the formation of GR in natural environments. In addition, the chemical reduction of nitrite to ammonium by GR is observed, which gradually turns the GR into the end-product goethite. The nitrogen mass-balance clearly demonstrates that the total amount of ammonium produced corresponds to the quantity of bioreduced nitrate. These findings demonstrate how the activity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in ferrous environments may provide a direct link between the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and iron.

  9. Oxalate enhanced mechanism of hydroxyl-Fe-pillared bentonite during the degradation of Orange II by UV-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianxin; Zhu, Lizhong

    2011-01-30

    An enhanced method of hydroxyl-Fe-pillared bentonite (H-Fe-P-B) during the degradation of Orange II was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of degradation intermediates with heterogeneous catalyst in UV-Fenton system. Based on the degradation mechanism of Orange II, oxalate enhanced mechanism of H-Fe-P-B in heterogeneous UV-Fenton system was developed. The results showed that additional oxalate could increase the Fe leaching of H-Fe-P-B during heterogeneous UV-Fenton process, which led to higher mineralization efficiency of Orange II and lower energy consumption of treatment. When the concentrations of additional sodium oxalate increased up to 0.1 mmol L(-1), 0.2 mmol L(-1) and 0.4 mmol L(-1), the rate of Orange II degradation could increase 30%, 46% and 63%, respectively. The iron ions leached from catalyst could be adsorbed back to the catalyst again after the organic intermediates were mineralized completely. Then the catalyst of H-Fe-P-B could be reused and additional pollution caused by iron ions could be avoided.

  10. Features of quasistable laminar flows of He II and an additional dissipative process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsenko, I. A.; Klokol, K. A.; Sokolov, S. S.; Sheshin, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    Quasistable laminar flow of He II at a temperature of 140 mK is studied experimentally. The liquid flow was excited by a vibrating quartz tuning fork with a resonance frequency of about 24 kHz. It was found that for velocities of the tuning fork oscillations from 0.046 to 0.16 m/s, the He II flow can be both quasistable laminar and turbulent. Transitions between these flow regimes were observed. When the velocity of the tuning fork oscillations increases more rapidly, the velocity at which the quasistable flow becomes unstable and undergoes a transition to a turbulent flow is higher. Mechanisms for the dissipation of the energy of the oscillating tines of the tuning fork in the quasistable laminar flow regime are analyzed. It is found that there is an additional mechanism for dissipation of the energy of the oscillating tuning fork beyond internal friction in the quartz. This mechanism is associated with mutual friction owing to scattering of thermal excitations of He II on quantized vortices and leads to a cubic dependence of the exciting force on the fluid velocity.

  11. Vapor transport epitaxy: an advanced growth process for III-V and II-VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurary, Alexander; Tompa, Gary S.; Nelson, Craig R.; Stall, Richard A.; Lu, Yicheng; Liang, Shaohua

    1992-09-01

    The Vapor Transport Epitaxy (VTE) thin film deposition technique for the deposition of III - V and II - VI compound semiconductors and material results are reviewed. The motivation for development of the VTE technique is the elimination of several problems common to molecular beam epitaxy/chemical beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition systems. In VTE, vapors from sources feed through throttling valves into a common manifold which is located directly below the inverted wafer. A high degree of film uniformity is achieved by controlling the flux distribution from the common manifold. The technique operates in the 10-4 - 10-6 Torr range using elemental, metalorganic or gaseous precursors. The system is configurated for 2 inch diameter wafers but the geometry may easily be scaled for larger diameters. Using elemental sources, we have demonstrated oval defect free growth of GaAs on GaAs (100) and (111) 2 degree(s) off substrates, through several microns of thickness at growth rates up to ten microns per hour. GaAs films which were grown without the manifold exhibit classic oval defects. The deposition rate of ZnSe films as a function of elemental flux, VI/II ratio, and growth temperature are described. The ZnSe films exhibited smooth surface morphologies on GaAs (100) 2 degree(s) off substrates. X- ray analysis shows that III - V and II - VI films exhibited crystallinities comparable to films produced by molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition techniques.

  12. EASY-II: a system for modelling of n, d, p, γ and α activation and transmutation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sublet, Jean-Christophe; Eastwood, James; Morgan, Guy; Koning, Arjan; Rochman, Dimitri

    2014-06-01

    EASY-II is designed as a functional replacement for the previous European Activation System, EASY-2010. It has extended nuclear data and new software, FISPACT-II, written in object-style Fortran to provide new capabilities for predictions of activation, transmutation, depletion and burnup. The new FISPACT-II code has allowed us to implement many more features in terms of energy range, up to GeV; incident particles: alpha, gamma, proton, deuteron and neutron; and neutron physics: self-shielding effects, temperature dependence, pathways analysis, sensitivity and error estimation using covariance data. These capabilities cover most application needs: nuclear fission and fusion, accelerator physics, isotope production, waste management and many more. In parallel, the maturity of modern general-purpose libraries such as TENDL-2012 encompassing thousands of target nuclides, the evolution of the ENDF format and the capabilities of the latest generation of processing codes PREPRO-2012, NJOY2012 and CALENDF-2010 have allowed the FISPACT-II code to be fed with more robust, complete and appropriate data: cross-sections with covariance, probability tables in the resonance ranges, kerma, dpa, gas and radionuclide production and 24 decay types. All such data for the five most important incident particles are placed in evaluated data files up to an incident energy of 200 MeV. The resulting code and data system, EASY-II, includes many new features and enhancements. It has been extensively tested, and also benefits from the feedback from wide-ranging validation and verification activities performed with its predecessor

  13. Naturally processed HLA class II peptides reveal highly conserved immunogenic flanking region sequence preferences that reflect antigen processing rather than peptide-MHC interactions.

    PubMed

    Godkin, A J; Smith, K J; Willis, A; Tejada-Simon, M V; Zhang, J; Elliott, T; Hill, A V

    2001-06-01

    MHC class II heterodimers bind peptides 12-20 aa in length. The peptide flanking residues (PFRs) of these ligands extend from a central binding core consisting of nine amino acids. Increasing evidence suggests that the PFRs can alter the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes. We have previously noted that eluted peptide pool sequence data derived from an MHC class II Ag reflect patterns of enrichment not only in the core binding region but also in the PFRS: We sought to distinguish whether these enrichments reflect cellular processes or direct MHC-peptide interactions. Using the multiple sclerosis-associated allele HLA-DR2, pool sequence data from naturally processed ligands were compared with the patterns of enrichment obtained by binding semicombinatorial peptide libraries to empty HLA-DR2 molecules. Naturally processed ligands revealed patterns of enrichment reflecting both the binding motif of HLA-DR2 (position (P)1, aliphatic; P4, bulky hydrophobic; and P6, polar) as well as the nonbound flanking regions, including acidic residues at the N terminus and basic residues at the C terminus. These PFR enrichments were independent of MHC-peptide interactions. Further studies revealed similar patterns in nine other HLA alleles, with the C-terminal basic residues being as highly conserved as the previously described N-terminal prolines of MHC class II ligands. There is evidence that addition of C-terminal basic PFRs to known peptide epitopes is able to enhance both processing as well as T cell activation. Recognition of these allele-transcending patterns in the PFRs may prove useful in epitope identification and vaccine design.

  14. A new combined process for efficient removal of Cu(II) organic complexes from wastewater: Fe(III) displacement/UV degradation/alkaline precipitation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhe; Gao, Guandao; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weiming; Lv, Lu

    2015-12-15

    Efficient removal of heavy metals complexed with organic ligands from water is still an important but challenging task now. Herein, a novel combined process, i.e., Fe(III)-displacement/UV degradation/alkaline precipitation (abbreviated as Fe(III)/UV/OH) was developed to remove copper-organic complexes from synthetic solution and real electroplating effluent, and other processes including alkaline precipitation, Fe(III)/OH, UV/OH were employed for comparison. By using the Fe(III)/UV/OH process, some typical Cu(II) complexes, such as Cu(II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), Cu(II)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), Cu(II)-citrate, Cu(II)-tartrate, and Cu(II)-sorbate, each at 19.2 mg Cu/L initially, were efficiently removed from synthetic solution with the residual Cu below 1 mg/L. Simultaneously, 30-48% of total organic carbon was eliminated with exception of Cu(II)-sorbate. Comparatively, the efficiency of other processes was much lower than the Fe(III)/UV/OH process. With Cu(II)-citrate as the model complex, the optimal conditions for the combined process were obtained as: initial pH for Fe(III) displacement, 1.8-5.4; molar ratio of [Fe]/[Cu], 4:1; UV irradiation, 10 min; precipitation pH, 6.6-13. The mechanism responsible for the process involved the liberation of Cu(II) ions from organic complexes as a result of Fe(III) displacement, decarboxylation of Fe(III)-ligand complexes subjected to UV irradiation, and final coprecipitation of Cu(II) and Fe(II)/Fe(III) ions. Up to 338.1 mg/L of Cu(II) in the electroplating effluent could be efficiently removed by the process with the residual Cu(II) below 1 mg/L and the removal efficiency of ∼99.8%, whereas direct precipitation by using NaOH could only result in total Cu(II) removal of ∼8.6%. In addition, sunlight could take the place of UV to achieve similar removal efficiency with longer irradiation time (90 min).

  15. APPLEPIPS /Apple Personal Image Processing System/ - An interactive digital image processing system for the Apple II microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, E.; Rose, J.; Quattromani, M.

    1981-01-01

    Recent developments related to microprocessor-based personal computers have made low-cost digital image processing systems a reality. Image analysis systems built around these microcomputers provide color image displays for images as large as 256 by 240 pixels in sixteen colors. Descriptive statistics can be computed for portions of an image, and supervised image classification can be obtained. The systems support Basic, Fortran, Pascal, and assembler language. A description is provided of a system which is representative of the new microprocessor-based image processing systems currently on the market. While small systems may never be truly independent of larger mainframes, because they lack 9-track tape drives, the independent processing power of the microcomputers will help alleviate some of the turn-around time problems associated with image analysis and display on the larger multiuser systems.

  16. A comparative study of fixation techniques for type II fractures of the odontoid process.

    PubMed

    Graziano, G; Jaggers, C; Lee, M; Lynch, W

    1993-12-01

    Primary screw fixation of a Type II odontoid fracture or non-union is an attractive alternative to posterior atlanto-axial arthrodesis in that normal cervical motion can be maintained. Eight cervical cadaver spines, ranging in age from 17-90 years, were used for study. Type II fractures of the dens were created using an osteotome. Simulated fractures were fixed using one or two 3.5-mm bone screws. After testing each screw fixation technique, the screws were removed and a posterior C1-C2 brooks sublaminar wiring was performed using four 18-gauge wires with wooden blocks to simulate bone graft. No significant differences were found between bending and torsional stiffnesses for the one-screw and two-screw specimens. No significant differences were found between one- and two-screw fixation when compared with primary C1-C2 wiring in torsion. One- or two-screw fixation was as stiff as primary C1-C2 wiring in bending. One or two screws offers similar stability for fixation for a dens fracture. One- and two-screw fixation is at least as stiff as primary C1-C2 wiring in torsion and one- or two-screw fixation is stiffer than primary C1-C2 wiring in bending. PMID:8303437

  17. Photoinhibition induced alterations in energy transfer process in phycobilisomes of PS II in the cyanobacterium, Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Duvvuri Prasanna; Murthy, Sistla D S

    2007-09-30

    Exposure of algae or plants to irradiance from above the light saturation point of photosynthesis is known as high light stress. This high light stress induces various responses including photoinhibition of the photosynthetic apparatus. The degree of photoinhibition could be clearly determined by measuring the parameters such as absorption and fluorescence of chromoproteins. In cyanobacteria and red algae, most of the photosystem (PS) II associated light harvesting is performed by a membrane attached complex called the phycobilisome (PBS). The effects of high intensity light (1000-4000 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)) on excitation energy transfer from PBSs to PS II in a cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis were studied by measuring room temperature PC fluorescence emission spectra. High light (3000 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)) stress had a significant effect on PC fluorescence emission spectra. On the other hand, light stress induced an increase in the ratio of PC fluorescence intensity of PBS indicating that light stress inhibits excitation energy transfer from PBS to PS II. The high light treatment to 3000 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) caused disappearance of 31.5 kDa linker polypeptide which is known to link PC discs together. In addition we observed the similar decrease in the other polypeptide contents. Our data concludes that the Spirulina cells upon light treatment causes alterations in the phycobiliproteins (PBPs) and affects the energy transfer process within the PBSs.

  18. Shelf edge exchange processes-II SEEP2-06, R/V Endeavor cruise 186. Hydrographic data report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984. Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the six cruises.

  19. HTGR high temperature process heat design and cost status report. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-01

    Information is presented concerning the 850/sup 0/C IDC reactor vessel; primary cooling system; secondary helium system; steam generator; heat cycle evaluations for the 850/sup 0/C IDC plant; 950/sup 0/C DC reactor vessel; 950/sup 0/C DC steam generator; direct and indirect cycle reformers; methanation plant; thermochemical pipeline; methodology for screening candidate synfuel processes; ECCG process; project technical requirements; process gas explosion assessment; HTGR program economic guidelines; and vendor respones.

  20. Microscopic Modeling of Intersubband Optical Processes in Type II Semiconductor Quantum Wells: Linear Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Kolokolov, Kanstantin I.; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Linear absorption spectra arising from intersubband transitions in semiconductor quantum well heterostructures are analyzed using quantum kinetic theory by treating correlations to the first order within Hartree-Fock approximation. The resulting intersubband semiconductor Bloch equations take into account extrinsic dephasing contributions, carrier-longitudinal optical phonon interaction and carrier-interface roughness interaction which is considered with Ando s theory. As input for resonance lineshape calculation, a spurious-states-free 8-band kp Hamiltonian is used, in conjunction with the envelop function approximation, to compute self-consistently the energy subband structure of electrons in type II InAs/AlSb single quantum well structures. We demonstrate the interplay of nonparabolicity and many-body effects in the mid-infrared frequency range for such heterostructures.

  1. Intracellular insulin processing is altered in monocytes from patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Trischitta, V.; Benzi, L.; Brunetti, A.; Cecchetti, P.; Marchetti, P.; Vigneri, R.; Navalesi, R.

    1987-05-01

    We studied total cell-associated A14-(/sup 125/I)insulin radioactivity (including surface-bound and internalized radioactivity), insulin internalization, and its intracellular degradation at 37 C in monocytes from nonobese type II untreated diabetic patients (n = 9) and normal subjects (n = 7). Total cell-associated radioactivity was decreased in diabetic patients (2.65 +/- 1.21% (+/- SD) vs. 4.47 +/- 1.04% of total radioactivity. Insulin internalization was also reduced in diabetic patients (34.0 +/- 6.8% vs. 59.0 +/- 11.3% of cell-associated radioactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography six intracellular forms of radioactivity derived from A14-(/sup 125/I) insulin were identified; 10-20% of intracellular radioactivity had approximately 300,000 mol wt and was identified as radioactivity bound to the insulin receptor, and the remaining intracellular radioactivity included intact A14-(/sup 125/I)insulin, (/sup 125/I)iodide, or (/sup 125/I)tyrosine, and three intermediate compounds. A progressive reduction of intact insulin and a corresponding increase in iodine were found when the incubation time was prolonged. Intracellular insulin degradation was reduced in monocytes from diabetic patients; intracellular intact insulin was 65.6 +/- 18.1% vs. 37.4 +/- 18.0% of intracellular radioactivity after 2 min and 23.6 +/- 22.3% vs. 3.9 +/- 2.3% after 60 min in diabetic patients vs. normal subjects, respectively. In conclusion, 1) human monocytes internalize and degrade insulin in the intracellular compartment in a stepwise time-dependent manner; and 2) in monocytes from type II diabetic patients total cell-associated radioactivity, insulin internalization, and insulin degradation are significantly reduced. These defects may be related to the cellular insulin resistance present in these patients.

  2. A field evaluation of subsurface and surface runoff. II. Runoff processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilgrim, D.H.; Huff, D.D.; Steele, T.D.

    1978-01-01

    Combined use of radioisotope tracer, flow rate, specific conductance and suspended-sediment measurements on a large field plot near Stanford, California, has provided more detailed information on surface and subsurface storm runoff processes than would be possible from any single approach used in isolation. Although the plot was surficially uniform, the runoff processes were shown to be grossly nonuniform, both spatially over the plot, and laterally and vertically within the soil. The three types of processes that have been suggested as sources of storm runoff (Horton-type surface runoff, saturated overland flow, and rapid subsurface throughflow) all occurred on the plot. The nonuniformity of the processes supports the partial- and variable-source area concepts. Subsurface storm runoff occurred in a saturated layer above the subsoil horizon, and short travel times resulted from flow through macropores rather than the soil matrix. Consideration of these observations would be necessary for physically realistic modeling of the storm runoff process. ?? 1978.

  3. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  4. r-process in Type II supernovae and the role of direct capture

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuki, K.; Burrows, A.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Typel, S.; Langanke, K.; Matos, M.

    2010-06-01

    We have calculated r-process nucleosynthesis based on acoustic wave driven supernova simulation. The environment includes extremely high entropy cases which has not been studied in previous studies. Plenty of actinide and third peak elements are formed in an averaged abundance, while elements around the first and second peaks are overproduced. We also studied the effect of direct capture in r-process. The direct capture furthers r-process and make freeze out earlier. It will change the final abundance drastically. We recalculated r-process nucleosynthesis of the simulation considering the direct capture reaction. While we could not see a significant difference in averaged abundances, significant differences appeared in several individual yields.

  5. Maximum limit to the number of myosin II motors participating in processive sliding of actin.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Khushboo; Puliyakodan, Mohammed Shabeel; Pandey, Vikas; Nath, Sunil; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analysed processive sliding and breakage of actin filaments at various heavy meromyosin (HMM) densities and ATP concentrations in IVMA. We observed that with addition of ATP solution, the actin filaments fragmented stochastically; we then determined mean length and velocity of surviving actin filaments post breakage. Average filament length decreased with increase in HMM density at constant ATP, and increased with increase in ATP concentration at constant HMM density. Using density of HMM molecules and length of actin, we estimated the number of HMM molecules per actin filament (N) that participate in processive sliding of actin. N is solely a function of ATP concentration: 88 ± 24 and 54 ± 22 HMM molecules (mean ± S.D.) at 2 mM and 0.1 mM ATP respectively. Processive sliding of actin filament was observed only when N lay within a minimum lower limit (Nmin) and a maximum upper limit (Nmax) to the number of HMM molecules. When N < Nmin the actin filament diffused away from the surface and processivity was lost and when N > Nmax the filament underwent breakage eventually and could not sustain processive sliding. We postulate this maximum upper limit arises due to increased number of strongly bound myosin heads. PMID:27554800

  6. Maximum limit to the number of myosin II motors participating in processive sliding of actin

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Khushboo; Puliyakodan, Mohammed Shabeel; Pandey, Vikas; Nath, Sunil; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analysed processive sliding and breakage of actin filaments at various heavy meromyosin (HMM) densities and ATP concentrations in IVMA. We observed that with addition of ATP solution, the actin filaments fragmented stochastically; we then determined mean length and velocity of surviving actin filaments post breakage. Average filament length decreased with increase in HMM density at constant ATP, and increased with increase in ATP concentration at constant HMM density. Using density of HMM molecules and length of actin, we estimated the number of HMM molecules per actin filament (N) that participate in processive sliding of actin. N is solely a function of ATP concentration: 88 ± 24 and 54 ± 22 HMM molecules (mean ± S.D.) at 2 mM and 0.1 mM ATP respectively. Processive sliding of actin filament was observed only when N lay within a minimum lower limit (Nmin) and a maximum upper limit (Nmax) to the number of HMM molecules. When N < Nmin the actin filament diffused away from the surface and processivity was lost and when N > Nmax the filament underwent breakage eventually and could not sustain processive sliding. We postulate this maximum upper limit arises due to increased number of strongly bound myosin heads. PMID:27554800

  7. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. II. Reactor-scale analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Dateo, Christopher E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, developed at Rice University, has been reported to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10-100 atm). Computational modeling is used here to develop an understanding of the HiPco process. A detailed kinetic model of the HiPco process that includes of the precursor, decomposition metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth was developed in the previous article (Part I). Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. The diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by the Boudouard reaction with metal catalysts. Based on the detailed model simulations, a reduced kinetic model was also developed in Part I for use in reactor-scale flowfield calculations. Here this reduced kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance. Carbon nanotube growth is examined with respect to several process variables (peripheral jet temperature, reactor pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration) with the use of the axisymmetric model, and the computed results are compared with existing experimental data. The model yields most of the qualitative trends observed in the experiments and helps to understanding the fundamental processes in HiPco carbon nanotube production.

  8. Phase II of the demonstration of the Koppelman series C process. Topical report, February 1995--February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.

    1998-12-31

    A pilot plant using the Koppelman Series C Process was designed, constructed, and operated near Gillette, Wyoming, as part of Phase I of this project. Construction was completed in late fall of 1993, and the shakedown was completed in early 1994. The initial series of tests performed to prove the process and to characterize the effluents was conducted during the first half of 1994. The results of those tests are described in the final report for Phase I. This report describes the activities conducted during Phase II of the project the objective of which was to move the process, which was proven during Phase I, a step closer to commercialization. Specifically, the work was planned to lower the cost of the process by developing a high-capacity processor, increasing the already high efficiency of the process by using a feed coal preheated, increasing the bulk density of the product by using mixed particle size extrudate, and preparing a preliminary scoping design for the water treatment plant for a 500,000 ton per year commercial plant.

  9. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications.

    PubMed

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  10. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications

    PubMed Central

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  11. Reaction efficiency of diffusion-controlled processes on finite aperiodic planar arrays. II. Potential effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza-López, Roberto A.; Brzezinski, Jack; Low, Daniel; Gomez, Ulysses; Raju, Swaroop; Ramirez, Craig; Kozak, John J.

    2009-08-01

    We continue our study of diffusion-reaction processes on finite aperiodic lattices, viz., the Penrose lattice and a Girih tiling. Focusing on bimolecular reactions, we mobilize the theory of finite Markov processes to document the effect of attractive forces on the reaction efficiency. Considering both a short-range square-well potential and a longer-range 1/ r S ( S = 4, 6) potential, we find that irreversible reactive encounters between reactants on a Girih platelet are kinetically advantaged relative to processes on a Penrose platelet. This result generalizes the conclusion reached in our earlier study [Roberto A. Garza-López, Aaron Kaufman, Reena Patel, Joseph Chang, Jack Brzezinski, John J. Kozak, Chem. Phys. Lett. 459 (2008) 137] where entropic factors (only) were assessed.

  12. Measuring IL-1β Processing by Bioluminescence Sensors II: The iGLuc System.

    PubMed

    Bartok, Eva; Kampes, Maria; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multimeric protein complexes that proteolytically activate caspase-1, which subsequently matures cytokines of the IL-1 family and initiates the induction of pyroptotic cell death. Although this process is central both to pathogen defense and sterile inflammatory processes, there is currently no standard readout available for inflammasome activation which would be suitable for high-throughput applications. We have recently developed a new method for measuring inflammasome activation via the use of a novel proteolytic reporter iGLuc, an IL-1β Gaussia luciferase (iGLuc) fusion protein. Here, we provide detailed protocols for the use of iGLuc in transiently transfected or stably transduced cell lines. Using these protocols, IL-1β maturation as the result of inflammasome activation or other processes can be indirectly measured via the gain of Gaussia luciferase activity of cleaved iGLuc, allowing for rapid inflammasome reconstitution assays and high-throughput screening of inflammasome activity. PMID:27221484

  13. River Water Quality Model no. 1 (RWQM1): II. Biochemical process equations.

    PubMed

    Reichert, P; Borchardt, D; Henze, M; Rauch, W; Shanahan, P; Somlyódy, L; Vanrolleghem, P

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, biochemical process equations are presented as a basis for water quality modelling in rivers under aerobic and anoxic conditions. These equations are not new, but they summarise parts of the development over the past 75 years. The primary goals of the presentation are to stimulate communication among modellers and field-oriented researchers of river water quality and of wastewater treatment, to facilitate practical application of river water quality modelling, and to encourage the use of elemental mass balances for the derivation of stoichiometric coefficients of biochemical transformation processes. This paper is part of a series of three papers. In the first paper, the general modelling approach is described; in the present paper, the biochemical process equations of a complex model are presented; and in the third paper, recommendations are given for the selection of a reasonable submodel for a specific application.

  14. Automatic spent fuel ID-number reader (II) image-processing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, K.; Mizuguchi, H.; Miyazawa, T. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an image-processing technique for automatic spent fuel ID-number reader system. As a result, efficiency and reliability of the reader system is improved. To obtain reliable ID-number identification-capability, there are many items to be considered. Some of the important ones are appropriate lighting, high speed processors and suitable algorithm. After developing the technique on the items, the applicability of the image-processing technique for the reader system is verified. ID-numbers are accurately identified, and the time required for one ID-number reading is obtained in about 2 seconds. The result is one tenth of the conventional visual identification.

  15. Thermal-capillary analysis of Czochralski and liquid encapsulated Czochralski crystal growth. II - Processing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derby, J. J.; Brown, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The pseudosteady-state heat transfer model developed in a previous paper is augmented with constraints for constant crystal radius and melt/solid interface deflection. Combinations of growth rate, and crucible and bottom-heater temperatures are tested as processing parameters for satisfying the constrained thermal-capillary problem over a range of melt volumes corresponding to the sequence occuring during the batchwise Czochralski growth of a small-diameter silicon crystal. The applicability of each processing strategy is judged by the range of existence of the solution, in terms of melt volume and the values of the axial and radial temperature gradients in the crystal.

  16. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part I - Observations, Part II - Control Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the first in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. Part I of this document deals with physical observations which should be performed during each routine control test. Part II…

  17. THE STRUCTURE AND PROCESS OF SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS. VOLUME II, BETWEEN CITIZENS AND SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARTER, RICHARD F.; CHAFFEE, STEVEN H.

    FROM A 1964 NATIONAL QUOTA-PROBABILITY SAMPLE OF INTERVIEWS WITH 1,500 CITIZENS 21 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER, MAJOR VARIABLES WERE DEFINED RELATING TO COMMUNICATION BETWEEN PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND THEIR COMMUNITIES. PRIMARY CONTENT OF THE COMMUNICATION PROCESS STUDIED WAS FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR SCHOOLS. FOR PURPOSES OF CORRELATIONAL ANALYSIS, RESPONDENTS…

  18. Computational models of music perception and cognition II: Domain-specific music processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwins, Hendrik; Grachten, Maarten; Herrera, Perfecto; Hazan, Amaury; Marxer, Ricard; Serra, Xavier

    2008-09-01

    In Part I [Purwins H, Herrera P, Grachten M, Hazan A, Marxer R, Serra X. Computational models of music perception and cognition I: The perceptual and cognitive processing chain. Physics of Life Reviews 2008, in press, doi:10.1016/j.plrev.2008.03.004], we addressed the study of cognitive processes that underlie auditory perception of music, and their neural correlates. The aim of the present paper is to summarize empirical findings from music cognition research that are relevant to three prominent music theoretic domains: rhythm, melody, and tonality. Attention is paid to how cognitive processes like category formation, stimulus grouping, and expectation can account for the music theoretic key concepts in these domains, such as beat, meter, voice, consonance. We give an overview of computational models that have been proposed in the literature for a variety of music processing tasks related to rhythm, melody, and tonality. Although the present state-of-the-art in computational modeling of music cognition definitely provides valuable resources for testing specific hypotheses and theories, we observe the need for models that integrate the various aspects of music perception and cognition into a single framework. Such models should be able to account for aspects that until now have only rarely been addressed in computational models of music cognition, like the active nature of perception and the development of cognitive capacities from infancy to adulthood.

  19. Diagenetic processes near the sediment-water interface of Long Island Sound. II. Fe and Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, R.C.

    1980-12-01

    The chemical diagenesis of iron and mangnese in the near-shore sediments of Long Island Sound are examined. Particular emphasis is place on quantifying the physical and biological transport-reaction processes controlling both the distribution of these metals within the upper few decimeters of a deposit and the exchange of their soluble forms with overlying water.

  20. Design Considerations for the Construction and Operation of Flour Milling Facilities. Part II: Process Design Considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flour milling facilities have been the cornerstone of agricultural processing for centuries. Like most agri-industrial production facilities, flour milling facilities have a number of unique design requirements. Design information, to date, has been limited. In an effort to summarize state of the ...

  1. Transport induced by mean-eddy interaction: II. Analysis of transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Kayo; Wiggins, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    We present a framework for the analysis of transport processes resulting from the mean-eddy interaction in a flow. The framework is based on the Transport Induced by the Mean-Eddy Interaction (TIME) method presented in a companion paper (Ide and Wiggins, 2014) [1]. The TIME method estimates the (Lagrangian) transport across stationary (Eulerian) boundaries defined by chosen streamlines of the mean flow. Our framework proceeds after first carrying out a sequence of preparatory steps that link the flow dynamics to the transport processes. This includes the construction of the so-called "instantaneous flux" as the Hovmöller diagram. Transport processes are studied by linking the signals of the instantaneous flux field to the dynamical variability of the flow. This linkage also reveals how the variability of the flow contributes to the transport. The spatio-temporal analysis of the flux diagram can be used to assess the efficiency of the variability in transport processes. We apply the method to the double-gyre ocean circulation model in the situation where the Rossby-wave mode dominates the dynamic variability. The spatio-temporal analysis shows that the inter-gyre transport is controlled by the circulating eddy vortices in the fast eastward jet region, whereas the basin-scale Rossby waves have very little impact.

  2. Update: Validation, Edits, and Application Processing. Phase II and Error-Prone Model Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Susan; And Others

    An update to the Validation, Edits, and Application Processing and Error-Prone Model Report (Section 1, July 3, 1980) is presented. The objective is to present the most current data obtained from the June 1980 Basic Educational Opportunity Grant applicant and recipient files and to determine whether the findings reported in Section 1 of the July…

  3. Development and demonstration of a lignite-pelletizing process. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The current work began with scale-up of laboratory equipment to commercial size equipment. For this purpose, BCI used an existing pilot plant that had been assembled to pelletize and indurate taconite ore. BCI determined therewith that lignite pellets can be produced continuously on a pilot scale using the basic process developed in the laboratory. The resulting pellets were found to be similar to the laboratory pellets at equivalent binder compositions. Tests of product made during a 5-ton test run are reported. A 50-ton demonstration test run was made with the pilot plant. Pellet production was sustained for a two-week period. The lignite pelletizing process has, therefore, been developed to the point of demonstration in a 50-ton test. BCI has completed and cost estimated a conceptually designed 4000 TPD facility. BCI believes it has demonstrated a technically feasible process to agglomerate lignite by using an asphalt emulsion binder. Product quality is promising. Capital and operating costs appear acceptable to justify continuing support and development. The next step should focus on three areas: production development, process refinement, and cost reduction. For further development, BCI recommends consideration of a 5 to 10 ton/h pilot plant or a 20 to 40 ton/h module of a full sized plant, the lower first cost of the former being offset by the ability to incorporate the latter into a future production unit. Other specific recommendations are made for future study that could lead to process and cost improvements: Binder Formulation, disc Sizing, Drier Bed Depth, and Mixing Approach. Pellet use other than power plant fuel is considered.

  4. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. II. Reactor-scale analysis.

    PubMed

    Gökçen, Tahir; Dateo, Christopher E; Meyyappan, M

    2002-10-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, developed at Rice University, has been reported to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10-100 atm). Computational modeling is used here to develop an understanding of the HiPco process. A detailed kinetic model of the HiPco process that includes of the precursor, decomposition metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth was developed in the previous article (Part I). Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. The diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by the Boudouard reaction with metal catalysts. Based on the detailed model simulations, a reduced kinetic model was also developed in Part I for use in reactor-scale flowfield calculations. Here this reduced kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance. Carbon nanotube growth is examined with respect to several process variables (peripheral jet temperature, reactor pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration) with the use of the axisymmetric model, and the computed results are compared with existing experimental data. The model yields most of the qualitative trends observed in the experiments and helps to understanding the fundamental processes in HiPco carbon nanotube production. PMID:12908292

  5. Thermal evolution and sintering of chondritic planetesimals. II. Improved treatment of the compaction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Henke, Stephan; Trieloff, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Context. Reconstruction of the thermal history of individual meteorites which can be assigned to the same parent body allows us to derive general characteristics of the parent body, such as its size and formation time, which hold important clues on the planetary formation process. This requires us to construct a detailed model of the heating of such a body by short lived radioactives, in particular by 26Al, and its cooling by heat conduction, which may then be compared to the reconstructed cooling histories of the meteorites. Aims: The heat conductivity of the material from which planetesimals are composed depends critically on the porosity of the chondritic material. This changes during the process of compaction (also called sintering) of the material at elevated temperatures and pressures. Therefore, compaction of an initially granular material is a key process determining the thermal history of the parent bodies of meteorites. The most realistic modelling of sintering of chondritic material is required. Methods: The modelling of the compaction process is improved by applying concepts originally developed for the modelling of hot isostatic pressing in metallurgical processes, and by collecting data available from geosciences for the materials of interest. It is extended to a binary mixture of granular components of very different diameters - matrix and chondrules - as observed in chondrites. Results: By comparison with some published data on sintering experiments it is shown that the algorithm to follow the decrease of porosity of granular material during progressive sintering allows a sufficiently accurate modelling of the compaction of silicate material. The dependence of the compaction process on the nature of the precursor material, either matrix-dominated or chondrule-dominated, is discussed. It is shown that the characteristic temperature at which sintering occurs is different for matrix or chondrule-dominated precursor material. We apply the new method for

  6. Pretreatment of furfural industrial wastewater by Fenton, electro-Fenton and Fe(II)-activated peroxydisulfate processes: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Yang, C W; Wang, D; Tang, Q

    2014-01-01

    The Fenton, electro-Fenton and Fe(II)-activated peroxydisulfate (PDS) processes have been applied for the treatment of actual furfural industrial wastewater in this paper. Through the comparative study of the three processes, a suitable pretreatment technology for actual furfural wastewater treatment was obtained, and the mechanism and dynamics process of this technology is discussed. The experimental results show that Fenton technology has a good and stable effect without adjusting pH of furfural wastewater. At optimal conditions, which were 40 mmol/L H₂O₂ initial concentration and 10 mmol/L Fe²⁺ initial concentration, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate can reach 81.2% after 90 min reaction at 80 °C temperature. The PDS process also has a good performance. The COD removal rate could attain 80.3% when Na₂S₂O₈ initial concentration was 4.2 mmol/L, Fe²⁺ initial concentration was 0.1 mol/L, the temperature remained at 70 °C, and pH value remained at 2.0. The electro-Fenton process was not competent to deal with the high-temperature furfural industrial wastewater and only 10.2% COD was degraded at 80 °C temperature in the optimal conditions (2.25 mA/cm² current density, 4 mg/L Na₂SO₄, 0.3 m³/h aeration rate). For the Fenton, electro-Fenton and PDS processes in pretreatment of furfural wastewater, their kinetic processes follow the pseudo first order kinetics law. The pretreatment pathways of furfural wastewater degradation are also investigated in this study. The results show that furfural and furan formic acid in furfural wastewater were preferentially degraded by Fenton technology. Furfural can be degraded into low-toxicity or nontoxic compounds by Fenton pretreatment technology, which could make furfural wastewater harmless and even reusable.

  7. Implementation of the DYMAC system at the new Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Malanify, J.J.; Amsden, D.C.

    1982-08-01

    The DYnamic Materials ACcountability System - called DYMAC - performs accountability functions at the new Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility where it began operation when the facility opened in January 1978. A demonstration program, DYMAC was designed to collect and assess inventory information for safeguards purposes. It accomplishes 75% of its design goals. DYMAC collects information about the physical inventory through deployment of nondestructive assay instrumentation and video terminals throughout the facility. The information resides in a minicomputer where it can be immediately sorted and displayed on the video terminals or produced in printed form. Although the capability now exists to assess the collected data, this portion of the program is not yet implemented. DYMAC in its present form is an excellent tool for process and quality control. The facility operator relies on it exclusively for keeping track of the inventory and for complying with accountability requirements of the US Department of Energy.

  8. Data co-processing for extreme scale analysis level II ASC milestone (4745).

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, David; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Oldfield, Ron A.; Fabian, Nathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Exascale supercomputing will embody many revolutionary changes in the hardware and software of high-performance computing. A particularly pressing issue is gaining insight into the science behind the exascale computations. Power and I/O speed con- straints will fundamentally change current visualization and analysis work ows. A traditional post-processing work ow involves storing simulation results to disk and later retrieving them for visualization and data analysis. However, at exascale, scien- tists and analysts will need a range of options for moving data to persistent storage, as the current o ine or post-processing pipelines will not be able to capture the data necessary for data analysis of these extreme scale simulations. This Milestone explores two alternate work ows, characterized as in situ and in transit, and compares them. We nd each to have its own merits and faults, and we provide information to help pick the best option for a particular use.

  9. A SLAM II simulation model for analyzing space station mission processing requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Space station mission processing is modeled via the SLAM 2 simulation language on an IBM 4381 mainframe and an IBM PC microcomputer with 620K RAM, two double-sided disk drives and an 8087 coprocessor chip. Using a time phased mission (payload) schedule and parameters associated with the mission, orbiter (space shuttle) and ground facility databases, estimates for ground facility utilization are computed. Simulation output associated with the science and applications database is used to assess alternative mission schedules.

  10. Small deviations from local equilibrium for a process which exhibits hydrodynamical behavior. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Masi, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ianiro, N.; Presutti, E.

    1982-09-01

    The symmetric simple exclusion process on ℤ with sources at ± L, L ɛ ℕ is considered. The stationary measure μL is studied in the limit as L diverges. The first order correction to its limit is proven to be of order 1 / L and it is explicitly computed. The result is in agreement with the analysis of the model from the hydrodynamical point of view initiated in Ref.1.

  11. Emergence of patterns in random processes. II. Stochastic structure in random events.

    PubMed

    Newman, William I

    2014-06-01

    Random events can present what appears to be a pattern in the length of peak-to-peak sequences in time series and other point processes. Previously, we showed that this was the case in both individual and independently distributed processes as well as for Brownian walks. In addition, we introduced the use of the discrete form of the Langevin equation of statistical mechanics as a device for connecting the two limiting sets of behaviors, which we then compared with a variety of observations from the physical and social sciences. Here, we establish a probabilistic framework via the Smoluchowski equation for exploring the Langevin equation and its expected peak-to-peak sequence lengths, and we introduce a concept we call "stochastic structure in random events," or SSRE. We extend the Brownian model to include antipersistent processes via autoregressive (AR) models. We relate the latter to describe the behavior of Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, and we devise a further test for the validity of the Langevin and AR models. Given our analytic results, we show how the Langevin equation can be adapted to describe population cycles of three to four years observed among many mammalian species in biology.

  12. On the Processing of Martensitic Steels in Continuous Galvanizing Lines: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taejin; Kwak, Jaihyun; de Cooman, B. C.

    2012-01-01

    The conventional continuous hot-dip galvanizing (GI) and galvannealing (GA) processes can be applied to untransformed austenite to produce Zn and Zn-alloy coated low-carbon ultra-high-strength martensitic steel provided specific alloying additions are made. The most suitable austenite decomposition behavior results from the combined addition of boron, Cr, and Mo, which results in a pronounced transformation bay during isothermal transformation. The occurrence of this transformation bay implies a considerable retardation of the austenite decomposition in the temperature range below the bay, which is close to the stages in the continuous galvanizing line (CGL) thermal cycle related to the GI and GA processes. After the GI and GA processes, a small amount of granular bainite, which consists of bainitic ferrite and discrete islands of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituents embedded in martensite matrix, is present in the microstructure. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the steel after the GI and GA cycle was over 1300 MPa, and the stress-strain curve was continuous without any yielding phenomena.

  13. Emergence of patterns in random processes. II. Stochastic structure in random events.

    PubMed

    Newman, William I

    2014-06-01

    Random events can present what appears to be a pattern in the length of peak-to-peak sequences in time series and other point processes. Previously, we showed that this was the case in both individual and independently distributed processes as well as for Brownian walks. In addition, we introduced the use of the discrete form of the Langevin equation of statistical mechanics as a device for connecting the two limiting sets of behaviors, which we then compared with a variety of observations from the physical and social sciences. Here, we establish a probabilistic framework via the Smoluchowski equation for exploring the Langevin equation and its expected peak-to-peak sequence lengths, and we introduce a concept we call "stochastic structure in random events," or SSRE. We extend the Brownian model to include antipersistent processes via autoregressive (AR) models. We relate the latter to describe the behavior of Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, and we devise a further test for the validity of the Langevin and AR models. Given our analytic results, we show how the Langevin equation can be adapted to describe population cycles of three to four years observed among many mammalian species in biology. PMID:25019731

  14. Conversion of paper sludge to ethanol, II: process design and economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhiliang; Lynd, Lee R

    2007-01-01

    Process design and economics are considered for conversion of paper sludge to ethanol. A particular site, a bleached kraft mill operated in Gorham, NH by Fraser Papers (15 tons dry sludge processed per day), is considered. In addition, profitability is examined for a larger plant (50 dry tons per day) and sensitivity analysis is carried out with respect to capacity, tipping fee, and ethanol price. Conversion based on simultaneous saccharification and fermentation with intermittent feeding is examined, with ethanol recovery provided by distillation and molecular sieve adsorption. It was found that the Fraser plant achieves positive cash flow with or without xylose conversion and mineral recovery. Sensitivity analysis indicates economics are very sensitive to ethanol selling price and scale; significant but less sensitive to the tipping fee, and rather insensitive to the prices of cellulase and power. Internal rates of return exceeding 15% are projected for larger plants at most combinations of scale, tipping fee, and ethanol price. Our analysis lends support to the proposition that paper sludge is a leading point-of-entry and proving ground for emergent industrial processes featuring enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass.

  15. Emergence of patterns in random processes. II. Stochastic structure in random events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William I.

    2014-06-01

    Random events can present what appears to be a pattern in the length of peak-to-peak sequences in time series and other point processes. Previously, we showed that this was the case in both individual and independently distributed processes as well as for Brownian walks. In addition, we introduced the use of the discrete form of the Langevin equation of statistical mechanics as a device for connecting the two limiting sets of behaviors, which we then compared with a variety of observations from the physical and social sciences. Here, we establish a probabilistic framework via the Smoluchowski equation for exploring the Langevin equation and its expected peak-to-peak sequence lengths, and we introduce a concept we call "stochastic structure in random events," or SSRE. We extend the Brownian model to include antipersistent processes via autoregressive (AR) models. We relate the latter to describe the behavior of Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, and we devise a further test for the validity of the Langevin and AR models. Given our analytic results, we show how the Langevin equation can be adapted to describe population cycles of three to four years observed among many mammalian species in biology.

  16. Analysis of the permitting processes associated with exploration of Federal OCS leases. Final report. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Under contract to the Office of Leasing Policy Development (LPDO), Jack Faucett Associates is currently undertaking the description and analysis of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) regulatory process to determine the nature of time delays that affect OCS production of oil and gas. This report represents the results of the first phase of research under this contract, the description and analysis of regulatory activity associated with exploration activities on the Federal OCS. Volume 1 contains the following three sections: (1) study results; (2) Federal regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases which involved the US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, US Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, and National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration; and (3) state regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases of Alaska, California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina and Texas. Volume II contains appendices of US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, the Coastal Zone Management Act, and Alaska. The major causes of delay in the regulatory process governing exploration was summarized in four broad categories: (1) the long and tedious process associated with the Environmental Protection Agency's implementation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; (2) thelack of mandated time periods for the completion of individual activities in the permitting process; (3) the lack of overall coordination of OCS exploratory regulation; and (4) the inexperience of states, the Federal government and industry relating to the appropriate level of regulation for first-time lease sale areas.

  17. Brucella abortus Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Antigen Processing through Interleukin-6 Secretion via Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    PubMed Central

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Samartino, Clara García; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection. PMID:17984211

  18. Innovation through developing consumers communities. Part II: Digitalizing the innovation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avasilcai, S.; Galateanu (Avram, E.

    2015-11-01

    The current research recognises the concept of innovation as the main driver for organisational growth and profitability. The companies seek to develop new ways to engage consumers and customers into co - creation value through the product design, development and distribution processes. However the main concern is manifested for new and creative ways of customization products based on consumers’ requirements and needs. Thus the need for innovative virtual instruments arose as the demand from social communities for personalised products or services increased. Basically companies should develop own innovative platforms, where consumers can participate, with ideas, concepts or other relevant contributions, and interact with designers or engineers for product development. This paper aims to present the most important features of platform development within BMW Group as a concept and as innovative instrument. From this point of view it is important to enhance past experiences of the company in the field of co - creation projects. There will be highlighted the dual consumers’ character as co - creator and co - evaluator based on their involvement in the proposed and developed projects and platform structure. The significant impact on platform functioning it has the diversity of company's concerns for Research & Development and innovation activities. From this point of view there will be assessed the platform structure, the main proposed themes and the evaluation process. The main outcome is to highlight the significance of platform development as innovative tool for consumers’ communities’ enhancement. Based on the analysis of “BMW Co-Creation Lab”, there will be revealed the main consumers concerns in terms of safety, comfort and appearance of the products. Thus it is important to understand the evaluation process of gathered ideas and intellectual property policy. The importance of platform development and implementation will be highlighted by company

  19. Paraho environmental data. Part I. Process characterization. Par II. Air quality. Part III. Water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Heistand, R.N.; Atwood, R.A.; Richardson, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    From 1973 to 1978, Development Engineering, Inc. (DEI), a subsidiary of Paraho Development Corporation, demostrated the Paraho technology for surface oil shale retorting at Anvil Points, Colorado. A considerable amount of environmentally-related research was also conducted. This body of data represents the most comprehensive environmental data base relating to surface retorting that is currently available. In order to make this information available, the DOE Office of Environment has undertaken to compile, assemble, and publish this environmental data. The compilation has been prepared by DEI. This report includes the process characterization, air quality, and water quality categories.

  20. Automated image processing of Landsat II digital data for watershed runoff prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasso, R. R.; Jensen, J. R.; Estes, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Digital image processing of Landsat data from a 230 sq km area was examined as a possible means of generating soil cover information for use in the watershed runoff prediction of Kern County, California. The soil cover information included data on brush, grass, pasture lands and forests. A classification accuracy of 94% for the Landsat-based soil cover survey suggested that the technique could be applied to the watershed runoff estimate. However, problems involving the survey of complex mountainous environments may require further attention

  1. Experimental investigation and numerical modeling of carbonation process in reinforced concrete structures Part II. Practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saetta, Anna V.; Vitaliani, Renato V

    2005-05-01

    The mathematical-numerical method developed by the authors to predict the corrosion initiation time of reinforced concrete structures due to carbonation process, recalled in Part I of this work, is here applied to some real cases. The final aim is to develop and test a practical method for determining the durability characteristics of existing buildings liable to carbonation, as well as estimating the corrosion initiation time of a building at the design stage. Two industrial sheds with different ages and located in different areas have been analyzed performing both experimental tests and numerical analyses. Finally, a case of carbonation-induced failure in a prestressed r.c. beam is presented.

  2. The polysialyltransferase ST8Sia II/STX: posttranslational processing and role of autopolysialylation in the polysialylation of neural cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    Close, B E; Wilkinson, J M; Bohrer, T J; Goodwin, C P; Broom, L J; Colley, K J

    2001-11-01

    The presence of alpha2,8-linked polysialic acid on the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is known to modulate cell interactions during development and oncogenesis. Two enzymes, the alpha2,8-polysialyltransferases ST8Sia IV()/PST and ST8Sia II()/STX are responsible for the polysialylation of NCAM. We previously reported that both ST8Sia IV/PST and ST8Sia II/STX enzymes are themselves modified by alpha2,8-linked polysialic acid chains, a process called autopolysialylation. In the case of ST8Sia IV/PST, autopolysialylation is not required for enzymatic activity. However, whether the autopolysialylation of ST8Sia II/STX is required for its ability to polysialylate NCAM is unknown. To understand how autopolysialylation impacts ST8Sia II/STX enzymatic activity, we employed a mutagenesis approach. We found that ST8Sia II/STX is modified by six Asn-linked oligosaccharides and that polysialic acid is distributed among the oligosaccharides modifying Asn 89, 219, and 234. Coexpression of a nonautopolysialylated ST8Sia II/STX mutant with NCAM demonstrated that autopolysialylation is not required for ST8Sia II/STX polysialyltransferase activity. In addition, catalytically active, nonautopolysialylated ST8Sia II/STX does not polysialylate any endogenous COS-1 cell proteins, highlighting the protein specificity of polysialylation. Furthermore, immunoblot analysis of NCAM polysialylation by autopolysialylated and nonautopolysialylated ST8Sia II/STX suggests that the NCAM is polysialylated to a higher degree by autopolysialylated ST8Sia II/STX. Therefore, we conclude that autopolysialylation of ST8Sia II/STX, like that of ST8Sia IV/PST, is not required for, but does enhance, NCAM polysialylation.

  3. Effects of Technological Processes on the Tenacity and Inactivation of Norovirus Genogroup II in Experimentally Contaminated Foods▿

    PubMed Central

    Mormann, Sascha; Dabisch, Mareike; Becker, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Contaminated food is a significant vehicle for human norovirus transmission. The present study determined the effect of physicochemical treatments on the tenacity of infective human norovirus genogroup II in selected foods. Artificially contaminated produce was subjected to a number of processes used by the food industry for preservation and by the consumer for storage and preparation. Virus recovery was carried out by using ultrafiltration and was monitored by using bacteriophage MS2 as an internal process control. Norovirus was quantified by using monoplex one-step TaqMan real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and an external standard curve based on recombinant RNA standards. An RNase pretreatment step was used to avoid false-positive PCR results caused by accessible RNA, which allowed detection of intact virus particles. Significant reductions in titers were obtained with heat treatments usually applied by consumers for food preparation (baking, cooking, roasting). Generally, processes used for preservation and storage, such as cooling, freezing, acidification (≥pH 4.5), and moderate heat treatments (pasteurization), appear to be insufficient to inactivate norovirus within a food matrix or on the surface of food. Besides data for persistence in processed food, comparable data for individual matrix-specific protective effects, recovery rates, and inhibitory effects on the PCRs were obtained in this study. The established procedure might be used for other noncultivable enteric RNA viruses that are connected to food-borne diseases. The data obtained in this study may also help optimize the process for inactivation of norovirus in food by adjusting food processing technologies and may promote the development of risk assessment systems in order to improve consumer protection. PMID:19933338

  4. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Anno, Fabio; de Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [

    F. Dell’Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)
    ], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  5. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [F. Dell'Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  6. Optical radiation hazards of laser welding processes. Part II: CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, R J; Moss, C E

    1989-08-01

    There has been an extensive growth within the last five years in the use of high-powered lasers in various metalworking processes. The two types of lasers used most frequently for laser welding/cutting processes are the Neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and the carbon dioxide (CO2) systems. When such lasers are operated in an open beam configuration, they are designated as a Class IV laser system. Class IV lasers are high-powered lasers that may present an eye and skin hazard under most common exposure conditions, either directly or when the beam has been diffusely scattered. Significant control measures are required for unenclosed (open beam), Class IV laser systems since workers may be exposed to scattered or reflected beams during the operation, maintenance, and service of these lasers. In addition to ocular and/or skin exposure hazards, such lasers also may present a multitude of nonlaser beam occupational concerns. Radiant energy measurements are reported for both the scattered laser radiation and the plasma-related plume radiations released during typical high-powered CO2 laser-target interactions. In addition, the application of the nominal hazard zone (NHZ) and other control measures also are discussed with special emphasis on Class IV industrial CO2 laser systems. PMID:2508455

  7. Application of the SULF-X process to coal conversion and utilization. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Bramer, H.C.; New, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Pittsburgh Environmental and Energy Systems, Inc. contracted with the Department of Energy to demonstrate the efficacy of an iron sulfide flue gas treatment system (FGT) for removing sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) and to correlate process variables to system performance. Laboratory and bench-scale testing was conducted with the SULF-X process, using both synthesized gas and actual flue gas from a coal-fired furnace. Laboratory tests resulted in 95% SO/sub 2/ removal and up to 95% NO/sub x/ removal. The bench-scale system demonstrated similar SO/sub 2/ removal efficiencies, but achieved only 39% NO/sub x/ removal due to relatively high oxygen concentrations in the flue gas and insufficient liquid-gas interfacial area within the absorber. Elemental sulfur was recovered during the regeneration steps. Total capital investment for the SULF-X system was estimated to be $91 to $103 per kilowatt (electric), compared to $90/kw for sodium solution scrubbing, $78 to $83/kw for magnesia slurry scrubbing and $74/kw for limestone slurry scrubbing. Annual operating costs for the SULF-X system were estimated to be 5.44 to 6.90 mills per kilowatt-hour, compared to 4.96 to 5.22 for sodium, 3.68 to 3.99 for magnesia and 3.73 to 4.25 for limestone. 6 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

  8. Visual information processing II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 14-16, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O. (Editor); Juday, Richard D. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Various papers on visual information processing are presented. Individual topics addressed include: aliasing as noise, satellite image processing using a hammering neural network, edge-detetion method using visual perception, adaptive vector median filters, design of a reading test for low-vision image warping, spatial transformation architectures, automatic image-enhancement method, redundancy reduction in image coding, lossless gray-scale image compression by predictive GDF, information efficiency in visual communication, optimizing JPEG quantization matrices for different applications, use of forward error correction to maintain image fidelity, effect of peanoscanning on image compression. Also discussed are: computer vision for autonomous robotics in space, optical processor for zero-crossing edge detection, fractal-based image edge detection, simulation of the neon spreading effect by bandpass filtering, wavelet transform (WT) on parallel SIMD architectures, nonseparable 2D wavelet image representation, adaptive image halftoning based on WT, wavelet analysis of global warming, use of the WT for signal detection, perfect reconstruction two-channel rational filter banks, N-wavelet coding for pattern classification, simulation of image of natural objects, number-theoretic coding for iconic systems.

  9. Preparation of a core-shell magnetic ion-imprinted polymer via a sol-gel process for selective extraction of Cu(II) from herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Xiao, Deli; He, Jia; Li, Hui; He, Hua; Dai, Hao; Peng, Jun

    2014-05-21

    A novel magnetic surface ion-imprinted polymer (c-MMWCNTs-SiO2-IIP) was synthesized for the first time using magnetic CNTs/Fe3O4 composites (c-MMWCNTs) as the core, 3-ammonium propyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as the functional monomer, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the cross-linker and Cu(II) as the template. c-MMWCNTs-SiO2-IIP was evaluated for selective extraction of Cu(II) from herbal medicines via a magnetic solid phase extraction (M-SPE) procedure. One factor affecting the separation and preconcentration of the target heavy metal was pH. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the adsorption kinetics and adsorption capacity of c-MMWCNTs-SiO2-IIP toward Cu(II) were estimated. The results indicated that the adsorption mechanism corresponds to a pseudo-second order adsorption process, with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.985 and a maximum adsorption capacity of 42.2 mg g(-1). The relative selectivity factor (β) values of Cu(II)/Zn(II) and Cu(II)/Pb(II) were 38.5 and 34.5, respectively. c-MMWCNTs-SiO2-IIP, combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry, was successfully applied in the extraction and detection of Cu(II) in herbal medicine, with high recoveries ranging from 95.6% to 108.4%.

  10. The Formation of the First Stars. II. Radiative Feedback Processes and Implications for the Initial Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2008-07-01

    We consider the radiative feedback processes that operate during the formation of the first stars. (1) Photodissociation of H2 in the local dark matter minihalo occurs early in the growth of the protostar but does not affect subsequent accretion. (2) Lyα radiation pressure acting at the boundary of the H II region that the protostar creates in the accreting envelope reverses infall in the polar directions when the star reaches ~20-30 M⊙ but cannot prevent infall from other directions. (3) Expansion of the H II region beyond the gravitational escape radius for ionized gas occurs at masses ~50-100 M⊙. However, accretion from the equatorial regions can continue since the neutral accretion disk shields a substantial fraction of the accretion envelope from direct ionizing flux. (4) At higher stellar masses, ~140 M⊙ in the fiducial case, photoevaporation-driven mass loss from the disk, together with declining accretion rates, halts the increase in the protostellar mass. We identify this process as the mechanism that determines the mass of Population III.1 stars (i.e., stars with primordial composition that have not been affected by prior star formation). The initial mass function of these stars is set by the distribution of entropy and angular momentum. The Appendix gives approximate solutions to a number of problems relevant to the formation of the first stars: the effect of Rayleigh scattering on line profiles in media of very large optical depth, the intensity of Lyα radiation in very opaque media, radiative acceleration in terms of the gradient of a modified radiation pressure, the flux of radiation in a shell with an arbitrary distribution of opacity, and the vertical structure of an accretion disk supported by gas pressure with constant opacity.

  11. Optimized breeding strategies for multiple trait integration: II. Process efficiency in event pyramiding and trait fixation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ting; Sun, Xiaochun; Mumm, Rita H

    2014-01-01

    Multiple trait integration (MTI) is a multi-step process of converting an elite variety/hybrid for value-added traits (e.g. transgenic events) through backcross breeding. From a breeding standpoint, MTI involves four steps: single event introgression, event pyramiding, trait fixation, and version testing. This study explores the feasibility of marker-aided backcross conversion of a target maize hybrid for 15 transgenic events in the light of the overall goal of MTI of recovering equivalent performance in the finished hybrid conversion along with reliable expression of the value-added traits. Using the results to optimize single event introgression (Peng et al. Optimized breeding strategies for multiple trait integration: I. Minimizing linkage drag in single event introgression. Mol Breed, 2013) which produced single event conversions of recurrent parents (RPs) with ≤8 cM of residual non-recurrent parent (NRP) germplasm with ~1 cM of NRP germplasm in the 20 cM regions flanking the event, this study focused on optimizing process efficiency in the second and third steps in MTI: event pyramiding and trait fixation. Using computer simulation and probability theory, we aimed to (1) fit an optimal breeding strategy for pyramiding of eight events into the female RP and seven in the male RP, and (2) identify optimal breeding strategies for trait fixation to create a 'finished' conversion of each RP homozygous for all events. In addition, next-generation seed needs were taken into account for a practical approach to process efficiency. Building on work by Ishii and Yonezawa (Optimization of the marker-based procedures for pyramiding genes from multiple donor lines: I. Schedule of crossing between the donor lines. Crop Sci 47:537-546, 2007a), a symmetric crossing schedule for event pyramiding was devised for stacking eight (seven) events in a given RP. Options for trait fixation breeding strategies considered selfing and doubled haploid approaches to achieve homozygosity

  12. Recent developments in modeling of hot rolling processes: Part II - Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Gerhard; Bambach, Markus; Seuren, Simon; Henke, Thomas; Lohmar, Johannes

    2013-05-01

    This publication gives a short overview of current developments in modeling and simulation of hot rolling processes of metals at the Institute of Metal Forming of RWTH Aachen University. It is based on the fundamentals treated in Part I also contained in this conference issue. It features applications in the field of fast on-line models, where a fast multi-stage rolling model and an analytical approach for predicting the through-thickness shear distribution are presented. In addition, a new concept for sensitivity analysis by automatic differentiation is introduced and discussed. Finally, applications of rolling simulations in the field of integrated computational materials engineering are presented with a focus on TWIP and linepipe steels as well as aluminum.

  13. Post-processing V&V level II ASC milestone (2360) results.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Elmer; Karelitz, David B.; Brunner, Thomas A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Weirs, V. Gregory; Shead, Timothy M.

    2007-09-01

    The 9/30/2007 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2360) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include loading of edge and face data on an Exodus mesh, run-time computation of an exact solution to a verification problem, delivery of results data from the server to the client, computation of an integral-based error metric, simultaneous loading of simulation and test data, and comparison of that data using visual and quantitative methods. The capabilities were tested extensively by performing a typical ALEGRA HEDP verification task. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including completion of a verification task on a 13 million element mesh.

  14. Noble gases in presolar diamonds II: Component abundances reflect thermal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    Using the isotopic compositions derived in Huss and Lewis, 1994a, abundances of the P3, HL, and P6 noble-gas components were determined for 15 diamonds separates from primitive chondrites of 8 chondrite classes. Within a meteorite class, the relative abundances of these components correlate with the petrologic subtype of the host meteorite, indicating that metamorphism is primarily responsible for the variations. Relative abundances of P3, HL, and P6 among diamond samples can be understood in terms of thermal processing of a single mixture of diamonds like those now found in CI and CM2 chondrites. With relatively gentle heating, primitive diamonds first lose their low-temperature P3 gases and a 'labile' fraction of the HL component. Mass loss associated with release of these components produces an increase in the HL and P6 content of the remaining diamond relative to unprocessed diamond. Higher temperatures initiate destruction of the main HL carrier, while the HL content of the surviving diamonds remains essentially constant. At the same time, the P6 carrier begins to preferentially lose light noble gases. Meteorites that have experienced metamorphic temperatures greater than or = 650 C have lost essentially all of their presolar diamond through chemical reactions with surrounding minerals. The P3 abundance seems to be a function only of the maximum temperature experienced by the diamonds and thus is independent of the nature of the surrounding environment. If all classes inherited the same mixture of primitive diamonds, then P3 abundances would tie together the metamorphic scales in different meteorite classes. However, if the P3 abundance indicates a higher temperature than do other thermometers applicable to the host meteorite, then the P3 abundance may contain information about heating prior to accretion. Diamonds in the least metamorphosed EH, CV, and CO chondrites seem to carry a record of pre-accretionary thermal processing.

  15. Simulation, planning, and optimization of redox processes involving the catalytic disproportionation of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ by manganese(II) complexes with glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Batyr, D.G.; Isak, V.G.; Kil'mininov, S.V.; Kharitonov, Yu.Ya.

    1987-11-01

    The applicability of the use of a method for the simulation, planning, and optimization of chemical processes has been demonstrated in the example case of the manganese(II)-glycine-hydrogen peroxide redox system. Theoretical calculations based on experimental data have made it possible to present a mechanism for the catalase-mediated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of coordination compounds of manganese(II) with glycine.

  16. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, II: Electron transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The previously obtained in (Zhdanov and Stepanenko, 2016) general transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma are employed for analysis of electron transport properties in molecular and atomic plasmas. We account for both elastic and inelastic interaction channels of electrons with atoms and molecules of plasma and also the processes of electron impact ionization of neutral particles and three-body ion-electron recombination. The system of scalar transport equations for electrons is discussed and the expressions for non-equilibrium corrections to electron ionization and recombination rates and the diagonal part of the electron pressure tensor are derived. Special attention is paid to analysis of electron energy relaxation during collisions with plasma particles having internal degrees of freedom and the expression for the electron coefficient of inelastic energy losses is deduced. We also derive the expressions for electron vector and tensorial transport fluxes and the corresponding transport coefficients for partially ionized reactive plasma, which represent a generalization of the well-known results obtained by Devoto (1967). The results of numerical evaluation of contribution from electron inelastic collisions with neutral particles to electron transport properties are presented for a series of molecular and atomic gases.

  17. R-matrix Floquet theory of molecular multiphoton processes: II. Multiphoton ionization of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Glass, D. H.; Higgins, K.; Burke, P. G.

    2001-06-01

    Multiphoton ionization rates for H2 immersed in an intense linearly polarized laser field are calculated using the recently developed R-matrix Floquet theory of molecular multiphoton processes. We assume that the H2 molecule is aligned along the laser polarization direction and we adopt the fixed-nuclei approximation, in which the motion of the target electrons is calculated in the laser field and in the field of the nuclei, which are assumed to be fixed in space. An accurate multi-state wavefunction is employed to calculate one-, two- and four-photon ionization rates for H2 at several internuclear separations over a range of frequencies and intensities. Analysis of the ionization rates reveals the important role played both by resonances corresponding to Rydberg bound states converging to the H2+ ion ground state and by doubly excited states converging to the H2+ ion first excited state. These resonances give rise to resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization peaks in many of the ionization rates studied in this paper, and their possible role in controlling the vibrational population of the final H2+ ion is discussed.

  18. [Retrospective Cytogenetic Dose Evaluation. II. Computer Data Processing in Persons Irradiated in Different Radiation Accidents].

    PubMed

    Nugis, V Yu; Khvostunov, I K; Goloub, E V; Kozlova, M G; Nadejinal, N M; Galstian, I A

    2015-01-01

    The method for retrospective dose assessment based on the analysis of cell distribution by the number of dicentrics and unstable aberrations using a special computer program was earlier developed based on the data about the persons irradiated as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. This method was applied for the same purpose for data processing of repeated cytogenetic studies of the patients exposed to γ-, γ-β- or γ-neutron radiation in various situations. As a whole, this group was followed up in more distant periods (17-50 years) after exposure than Chernobyl patients (up to 25 years). The use for retrospective dose assessment of the multiple regression equations obtained for the Chernobyl cohort showed that the equation, which includes computer recovered estimate of the dose and the time elapsed after irradiation, was generally unsatisfactory (r = 0.069 at p = 0.599). Similar equations with recovered estimate of the dose and frequency of abnormal chromosomes in a distant period or with all three parameters as variables gave better results (r = 0.686 at p = 0.000000001 and r = 0.542 at p = 0.000008, respectively). PMID:26863777

  19. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars. Part II: Data Quality Control and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Jo, Ieng; Borque, Paloma; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Lamer, Katia; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Johnson, Karen L.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2014-03-01

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the HS-RHI SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

  20. Binaural processing model based on contralateral inhibition. II. Dependence on spectral parameters.

    PubMed

    Breebaart, J; van de Par, S; Kohlrausch, A

    2001-08-01

    This and two accompanying articles [Breebaart et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 1074-1088 (2001); 110, 1105-1117 (2001)] describe a computational model for the signal processing in the binaural auditory system. The model consists of several stages of monaural and binaural preprocessing combined with an optimal detector. In the present article the model is tested and validated by comparing its predictions with experimental data for binaural discrimination and masking conditions as a function of the spectral parameters of both masker and signal. For this purpose, the model is used as an artificial observer in a three-interval, forced-choice adaptive procedure. All model parameters were kept constant for all simulations described in this and the subsequent article. The effects of the following experimental parameters were investigated: center frequency of both masker and target, bandwidth of masker and target, the interaural phase relations of masker and target, and the level of the masker. Several phenomena that occur in binaural listening conditions can be accounted for. These include the wider effective binaural critical bandwidth observed in band-widening NoS(pi) conditions, the different masker-level dependence of binaural detection thresholds for narrow- and for wide-band maskers, the unification of IID and ITD sensitivity with binaural detection data, and the dependence of binaural thresholds on frequency. PMID:11519577

  1. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of processed soft denture liners: Part II--Effect of aging.

    PubMed

    Wagner, W C; Kawano, F; Dootz, E R; Koran, A

    1995-09-01

    The proper functioning of soft denture liners depends to a great extent on their mechanical properties. As with many polymers these materials are affected by aging. Twelve soft denture liners were processed by a laboratory according to the manufacturers' directions. Five specimens of each material were tested without aging. Five additional specimens of each material were subjected to 900 hours of accelerated aging in a Weather-Ometer instrument. These were tested with a dynamic viscoelastometer at three frequencies and two temperatures, and data for 37 degrees C and 1 Hz was obtained. Two of the ethyl methacrylate resins demonstrated the largest increases in storage (E') and loss moduli (E") after aging. These materials also showed the greatest overall E' and E". One denture liner material exhibited 673% and 488% increases in E' and E", and other materials showed smaller increases. The effects of aging on the damping factor (tan delta) were varied and five materials showed increased tan delta. Only two ethyl methacrylate resins developed lower tan delta. All the silicone and polyphosphazine rubbers showed small changes after aging and had the lowest tan delta values. Significance of differences between materials and treatments was tested with ANOVA, Scheffé intervals, and t-tests at a = 0.05. The ethyl methacrylate soft denture liners were affected the most by accelerated aging, and the silicones and polyphosphazine were least affected. The ethyl methacrylate resins also had the greatest values of E', E", and tan delta after aging.

  2. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part II: Inverse models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian network model has been developed to simulate a relatively simple problem of wave propagation in the surf zone (detailed in Part I). Here, we demonstrate that this Bayesian model can provide both inverse modeling and data-assimilation solutions for predicting offshore wave heights and depth estimates given limited wave-height and depth information from an onshore location. The inverse method is extended to allow data assimilation using observational inputs that are not compatible with deterministic solutions of the problem. These inputs include sand bar positions (instead of bathymetry) and estimates of the intensity of wave breaking (instead of wave-height observations). Our results indicate that wave breaking information is essential to reduce prediction errors. In many practical situations, this information could be provided from a shore-based observer or from remote-sensing systems. We show that various combinations of the assimilated inputs significantly reduce the uncertainty in the estimates of water depths and wave heights in the model domain. Application of the Bayesian network model to new field data demonstrated significant predictive skill (R2 = 0.7) for the inverse estimate of a month-long time series of offshore wave heights. The Bayesian inverse results include uncertainty estimates that were shown to be most accurate when given uncertainty in the inputs (e.g., depth and tuning parameters). Furthermore, the inverse modeling was extended to directly estimate tuning parameters associated with the underlying wave-process model. The inverse estimates of the model parameters not only showed an offshore wave height dependence consistent with results of previous studies but the uncertainty estimates of the tuning parameters also explain previously reported variations in the model parameters.

  3. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Part II. Data Quality Control and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Jo, Ieng; Borque, Paloma; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Lamer, Katia; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Johnson, Karen; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2013-10-04

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the Hemispherical Sky – Range Height Indicator SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

  4. Adaptation and cognition. II. Experimental study of the homospatial process in artistic creativity.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, A; Sobel, R S

    1981-07-01

    In a previously reported experimental study from an ongoing program of research on the creative process, the type of cognition designated as homospatial thinking was shown to function in the creation of literary metaphor. Homospatial thinking consists of actively conceiving two or more discrete entities occupying the same space, a conception leading to the articulation of new identities. Under experimental conditions involving facilitation of homospatial thinking through presentation of superimposed visual images, and control presentation of the same images separated and side by side, the superimposed presentation stimulated significantly more creative literary metaphors. In the currently reported experiment, the effect of such stimuli on creation in the visual arts was assessed. Forty-three artist subjects were randomly assigned either to a control group viewing three sets of slide photographs paired side by side on a projection screen or to an experimental group viewing the identical pairs of slide images superimposed on each other. Each subject created a pastel drawing stimulated by each of the three slide pairs. Resulting drawings were categorized according to the type of composition produced and quality of all drawings were independently rated by two internationally prominent artists. The primary results were that drawings produced in the superimposed slide condition which contained elements from both slides intermingled together were rated significantly more creative than a single element composition and also more creative than similar composition drawings stimulated by the separated slide condition (p less than .05). Production of a final drawing in which individual components are recognizable and intermingled together in response to the superimposed stimulus condition indicates the operation of homospatial thinking involving elements occupying the same space. Consequently, the results indicate a relationship between homospatial thinking and creative visual

  5. Processes governing phytoplankton blooms in estuaries. II: The role of horizontal transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, L.V.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Cloern, J.E.; Thompson, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    The development and distribution of phytoplankton blooms in estuaries are functions of both local conditions (i.e. the production-loss balance for a water column at a particular spatial location) and large-scale horizontal transport. In this study, the second of a 2-paper series, we use a depth-averaged hydrodynamic-biological model to identify transport-related mechanisms impacting phytoplankton biomass accumulation and distribution on a system level. We chose South San Francisco Bay as a model domain, since its combination of a deep channel surrounded by broad shoals is typical of drowned-river estuaries. Five general mechanisms involving interaction of horizontal transport with variability in local conditions are discussed. Residual (on the order of days to weeks) transport mechanisms affecting bloom development and location include residence time/export, import, and the role of deep channel regions as conduits for mass transport. Interactions occurring on tidal time scales, i.e. on the order of hours) include the phasing of lateral oscillatory tidal flow relative to temporal changes in local net phytoplankton growth rates, as well as lateral sloshing of shoal-derived biomass into deep channel regions during ebb and back into shallow regions during flood tide. Based on these results, we conclude that: (1) while local conditions control whether a bloom is possible, the combination of transport and spatial-temporal variability in local conditions determines if and where a bloom will actually occur; (2) tidal-time-scale physical-biological interactions provide important mechanisms for bloom development and evolution. As a result of both subtidal and tidal-time-scale transport processes, peak biomass may not be observed where local conditions are most favorable to phytoplankton production, and inherently unproductive areas may be regions of high biomass accumulation.

  6. Species assembly in model ecosystems, II: Results of the assembly process.

    PubMed

    Capitán, José A; Cuesta, José A; Bascompte, Jordi

    2011-01-21

    In the companion paper of this set (Capitán and Cuesta, 2010) we have developed a full analytical treatment of the model of species assembly introduced in Capitán et al. (2009). This model is based on the construction of an assembly graph containing all viable configurations of the community, and the definition of a Markov chain whose transitions are the transformations of communities by new species invasions. In the present paper we provide an exhaustive numerical analysis of the model, describing the average time to the recurrent state, the statistics of avalanches, and the dependence of the results on the amount of available resource. Our results are based on the fact that the Markov chain provides an asymptotic probability distribution for the recurrent states, which can be used to obtain averages of observables as well as the time variation of these magnitudes during succession, in an exact manner. Since the absorption times into the recurrent set are found to be comparable to the size of the system, the end state is quickly reached (in units of the invasion time). Thus, the final ecosystem can be regarded as a fluctuating complex system where species are continually replaced by newcomers without ever leaving the set of recurrent patterns. The assembly graph is dominated by pathways in which most invasions are accepted, triggering small extinction avalanches. Through the assembly process, communities become less resilient (e.g., have a higher return time to equilibrium) but become more robust in terms of resistance against new invasions.

  7. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Flashing of SRC-II slurry in the vacuum column on Process Development Unit P-99. Interim report, February-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J. A.; Mathias, S. T.

    1980-10-01

    This report presents the results of 73 tests on the vacuum flash system of Process Development Unit P-99 performed during processing of three different coals; the second batch, fourth shipment (low ash batch) of Powhatan No. 5 Mine (LR-27383), Powhatan No. 6 Mine (LR-27596) and Ireland Mine (LR-27987). The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data for use in confirming and improving the design of the vacuum distillation column for the 6000 ton/day SRC-II Demonstration Plant. The 900/sup 0/F distillate content of the bottoms and the percent of feed flashed overhead were correlated with flash zone operating conditions for each coal, and the observed differences in performance were attributed to differences in the feed compositions. Retrogressive reactions appeared to be occurring in the 900/sup 0/F+ pyridine soluble material leading to an increase in the quantity of pyridine insoluble organic matter. Stream physical properties determined include specific gravity, viscosity and melting point. Elemental, distillation and solvent analyses were used to calculate component material balances. The Technology and Materials Department has used these results in a separate study comparing experimental K-values and vapor/liquid split with CHAMP computer program design predictions.

  8. Comparison of in-vitro and in-vivo studies with coal liquids from the SRC-II process

    SciTech Connect

    Mahlum, D.D.; Frazier, M.E.; Pelroy, R.A.; Renne, R.A.

    1983-09-01

    Coal liquids obtained from the SRC-II process and fractions prepared from these liquids have been assayed in a number of in vivo and in vitro systems for biological activity. The in vitro systems includes: (1) the standard Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay, (2) the S. typhimurium fluctuation test; (3) forward mutation assay in S. typhimurium (8-Ag) test; (4) prophage induction (INDUCTEST); (5) Syrian hamster ovary (SHE) cell transformation assay; and (6) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutation assay. In addition, both initiation/promotion (I/P) and chronic skin-painting assays were used as measures of tumorigenesis. In general, materials shown to be carcinogenic in the chronic skin-painting assay were also positive in the other assays. The failure of the Ames assay to respond to the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fraction of SRC-II heavy distillate (HD) was a notable exception. Quantitatively, the Ames assay was more sensitive to nitrogen-containing compounds (particularly primary aromatic amines) and less sensitive to mixtures of PAH. The mammalian systems, both in vitro and in vivo, showed greater responses to the neutral PAH than to the nitrogen-containing compounds. Activity in all biological systems increased with increasing boiling point of the material tested. The I/P assay ranked the materials studied in the same order as did the chronic skin-painting assay; however, the results of the two assays diverged quantitatively, particularly for certain distillate cuts. Despite the lack of quantitative agreement between the in vitro microbial and in vivo skin-painting assays, the in vitro assays remain valuable screening tools for complex mixtures. Sufficient information now exists to qualify the use of the in vitro assays for complex mixtures and to increase their reliability.

  9. Shelf Edge Exchange Processes, II: SEEP2-08, R/V ENDEAVOR cruise 188. Hydrographic data report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 (Behrens and Flagg, 1986). Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. This project consisted of a series of ten cruises, a mooring array, and a series of over-flights by NASA aircraft. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the cruises, six of which were primarily mooring deployment or recovery cruises. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Two cruises (SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07) were dedicated to investigating benthic processes and hydrographic data were not collected.

  10. Cathepsin S, but not cathepsin L, participates in the MHC class II-associated invariant chain processing in large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuhua; Ao, Jingqun; Mu, Yinnan; Yang, Zhijun; Li, Ting; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-12-01

    Two cysteine proteases, cathepsin S (CatS) and cathepsin L (CatL), have been identified as the key enzymes involved in the processing of invariant chain (Ii chain) in mammals. However, little is known about the roles of fish cathepsins in the Ii chain processing. In this study, large yellow croaker cathepsin S (LycCatS) and L (LycCatL) were identified and characterized. Based on the sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, both LycCatS and LycCatL are highly conserved to their counterparts in teleost. These two cathepsins were constitutively expressed in all tissues and immune-related cells tested, although at different levels. Both recombinant LycCatS (rLycCatS) and LycCatL (rLycCatL) possess the typical cysteine protease activity. Like other mammalian endopeptidase cathepsins, rLycCatS and rLycCatL could be autocatalytically activated to remove propeptides and release active mature peptides. On the other hand, the autocatalytic activation of rLycCatL could be inhibited by recombinant large yellow croaker Ii chain (rLyc-TR-Ii), but the autocatalytic activation of rLycCatS was not affected by rLyc-TR-Ii. Furthermore, the activated rLycCatS can efficiently process rLyc-TR-Ii in a stepwise manner in vitro, while the activated rLycCatL can not. These data indicate that cathepsin S may be the main cathepsin involved in the Ii chain processing in bony fish.

  11. Cathepsin S, but not cathepsin L, participates in the MHC class II-associated invariant chain processing in large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuhua; Ao, Jingqun; Mu, Yinnan; Yang, Zhijun; Li, Ting; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-12-01

    Two cysteine proteases, cathepsin S (CatS) and cathepsin L (CatL), have been identified as the key enzymes involved in the processing of invariant chain (Ii chain) in mammals. However, little is known about the roles of fish cathepsins in the Ii chain processing. In this study, large yellow croaker cathepsin S (LycCatS) and L (LycCatL) were identified and characterized. Based on the sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, both LycCatS and LycCatL are highly conserved to their counterparts in teleost. These two cathepsins were constitutively expressed in all tissues and immune-related cells tested, although at different levels. Both recombinant LycCatS (rLycCatS) and LycCatL (rLycCatL) possess the typical cysteine protease activity. Like other mammalian endopeptidase cathepsins, rLycCatS and rLycCatL could be autocatalytically activated to remove propeptides and release active mature peptides. On the other hand, the autocatalytic activation of rLycCatL could be inhibited by recombinant large yellow croaker Ii chain (rLyc-TR-Ii), but the autocatalytic activation of rLycCatS was not affected by rLyc-TR-Ii. Furthermore, the activated rLycCatS can efficiently process rLyc-TR-Ii in a stepwise manner in vitro, while the activated rLycCatL can not. These data indicate that cathepsin S may be the main cathepsin involved in the Ii chain processing in bony fish. PMID:26475363

  12. Effect of bicuculline and angiotensin II fragment 3-7 on learning and memory processes in rats chronically treated with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kuziemka-Leska, M; Car, H; Wiśniewski, K

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the possible influence of bicuculline, the antagonist of GABA-A receptor on behavioral activity (recall, acquisition of conditioned reflexes) of angiotension II fragment 3-7 (A II 3-7) in rats chronically treated with ethanol. Long term (9 weeks) ethanol intoxication profoundly impaired learning and memory processes in all testes used. The GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline (0.5 mg/kg ip) did not influence exploratory and motor activity in the control rats, but we observed tendency (without significance) to decrease the locomotor activity, in the alcohol-intoxicated groups of animals, when the drug was injected together with A II 3-7 (2 microgram icv). Bicuculline did not influence retrieval process in passive avoidance recall in both investigated groups, and when the drug was given together with AII 3-7 significantly enhanced its action in the control group and in rats chronically treated with ethanol. Bicuculline significantly improved acquisition in the active avoidance test in the control and alcohol-intoxicated groups. Bicuculline injected together with A II 3-7 significantly decreased its action in the control group. Coadministration of bicuculline with A II 3-7 did not significantly change the activity of A II 3-7 in the acquisition of active avoidance test in the alcohol-intoxicated groups of rats.

  13. Inside the removal of lead(II) from aqueous solutions by De-Oiled Allspice Husk in batch and continuous processes.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Olivares, J; Pérez-Alonso, C; Barrera-Díaz, C; López, G; Balderas-Hernández, P

    2010-09-15

    A new adsorbent material for removing lead ions from aqueous solutions has been investigated. The residue of the allspice extraction process (De-Oiled Allspice Husk) was used on the removal of Pb(II) from water solutions. The lead sorption capacity of De-Olied Allspice Husk (DOAH) was studied in batch and continuous processes. It was found that percentage removals of Pb(II) depend on the pH and the initial lead concentrations. The Pb(II) uptake process was maximum at pH 5 in a range concentrations of 5-25 mg L(-1). The overall sorption process was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model under conditions of pH 5 (0.1 g adsorbent per 100 mL of contaminated solution) 0.001 mass/volume ratio and 25 degrees C. The sorption capacity of lead(II) onto DOAH in batch process was 5.00, 8.02, 11.59, 15.23 and 20.07 mg g(-1), when the concentration solutions were 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg L(-1) respectively. These values are lower than obtained in continuous process, where lead was removed by 95% and the experimental results were appropriately fitted by the Yoon-Nelson model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provides information regarding the interactions between lead ions and the adsorbent surface indicating that the formation of 2 complexes depends on the functional groups associated.

  14. A one-pot, three-step process for the diastereoselective synthesis of aminobicyclo[4.3.0]nonanes using consecutive palladium(II)- and ruthenium(II)-catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Mohamed A B; Grafton, Mark W; Wilson, Claire; Sutherland, Andrew

    2016-03-28

    A diastereoselective synthesis of highly substituted aminobicyclo[4.3.0]nonanes has been attained using a one-pot multi-bond forming process. A four-step synthetic route was developed for the efficient synthesis of a series of C-7 substituted hept-2-en-6-yn-1-ols. These compounds were then investigated as substrates for a one-pot, three-step tandem process involving a palladium(ii)-catalysed Overman rearrangement, a ruthenium(ii)-catalysed ring closing enyne metathesis reaction followed by a hydrogen bond directed Diels-Alder reaction. The optimisation of the one-pot process has allowed the rapid preparation of a library of aminobicyclo[4.3.0]nonanes with significant molecular complexity and up to four stereogenic centres.

  15. A one-pot, three-step process for the diastereoselective synthesis of aminobicyclo[4.3.0]nonanes using consecutive palladium(II)- and ruthenium(II)-catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Mohamed A B; Grafton, Mark W; Wilson, Claire; Sutherland, Andrew

    2016-03-28

    A diastereoselective synthesis of highly substituted aminobicyclo[4.3.0]nonanes has been attained using a one-pot multi-bond forming process. A four-step synthetic route was developed for the efficient synthesis of a series of C-7 substituted hept-2-en-6-yn-1-ols. These compounds were then investigated as substrates for a one-pot, three-step tandem process involving a palladium(ii)-catalysed Overman rearrangement, a ruthenium(ii)-catalysed ring closing enyne metathesis reaction followed by a hydrogen bond directed Diels-Alder reaction. The optimisation of the one-pot process has allowed the rapid preparation of a library of aminobicyclo[4.3.0]nonanes with significant molecular complexity and up to four stereogenic centres. PMID:26932788

  16. Photoinduced electron donor/acceptor processes in colloidal II-VI semiconductor quantum dots and nitroxide free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Poulami

    Electron transfer (ET) processes are one of the most researched topics for applications ranging from energy conversion to catalysis. An exciting variation is utilizing colloidal semiconductor nanostructures to explore such processes. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a novel class of light harvesting, emitting and charge-separation materials for applications such as solar energy conversion. Detailed knowledge of the quantitative dissociation of the photogenerated excitons and the interfacial charge- (electron/hole) transfer is essential for optimization of the overall efficiency of many such applications. Organic free radicals are the attractive counterparts for studying ET to/from QDs because these undergo single-electron transfer steps in reversible fashion. Nitroxides are an exciting class of stable organic free radicals, which have recently been demonstrated to be efficient as redox mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells, making them even more interesting for the aforementioned studies. This dissertation investigates the interaction between nitroxide free radicals TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), 4-amino-TEMPO (4-amino- 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and II-VI semiconductor (CdSe and CdTe) QDs. The nature of interaction in these hybrids has been examined through ground-state UV-Vis absorbance, steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, transient absorbance, upconversion photoluminescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The detailed analysis of the PL quenching indicates that the intrinsic charge transfer is ultrafast however, the overall quenching is still limited by the lower binding capacities and slower diffusion related kinetics. Careful analysis of the time resolved PL decay kinetics reveal that the decay rate constants are distributed and that the trap states are involved in the overall quenching process. The ultrafast hole transfer from CdSe QDs to 4-Amino TEMPO observed

  17. The Hamburg/ESO R-process Enhanced Star survey (HERES). IX. Constraining pure r-process Ba/Eu abundance ratio from observations of r-II stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L.; Christlieb, N.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The oldest stars born before the onset of the main s-process are expected to have a pure r-process Ba/Eu abundance ratio. Aims: We revised barium and europium abundances of selected very metal-poor (VMP) and strongly r-process enhanced (r-II) stars to evaluate an empirical r-process Ba/Eu ratio. Methods: Our calculations were based on non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for Ba ii and Eu ii in the classical 1D MARCS model atmospheres. Homogeneous stellar abundances were determined from the Ba ii subordinate and resonance lines by applying a common Ba isotope mixture. We used high-quality VLT/UVES spectra and observational material from the literature. Results: For most investigated stars, NLTE leads to a lower Ba, but a higher Eu abundance. The resulting elemental ratio of the NLTE abundances amounts to, on average, log(Ba/Eu) = 0.78±0.06. This is a new constraint to pure r-process production of Ba and Eu. The obtained Ba/Eu abundance ratio of the r-II stars supports the corresponding solar system r-process ratio as predicted by recent Galactic chemical evolution calculations of Bisterzo, Travaglio, Gallino, Wiescher, and Käppeler. We present the NLTE abundance corrections for the Ba ii and Eu ii lines in the grid of VMP model atmospheres. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (Proposal numbers 170.D-0010, and 280.D-5011).Tables 7 and 8 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Evidence of CuI/CuII Redox Process by X-ray Absorption and EPR Spectroscopy: Direct Synthesis of Dihydrofurans from b-Ketocarbonyl Derivatives and Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Hong; Liao, Zhixiong; Zhang, Guanghui; Zhang, Guoting; Fan, Chao; Zhang, Xu; Bunel, Emilio E.; Pao, Chih-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The CuI/CuII and CuI/CuIII catalytic cycles have been subject to intense debate in the field of copper-catalyzed oxidative coupling reactions. A mechanistic study on the CuI/CuII redox process, by X-ray absorption (XAS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, has elucidated the reduction mechanism of CuII to CuI by 1,3-diketone and detailed investigation revealed that the halide ion is important for the reduction process. The oxidative nature of the thereby-formed CuI has also been studied by XAS and EPR spectroscopy. This mechanistic information is applicable to the copper-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of b-ketocarbonyl derivatives to dihydrofurans. This protocol provides an ideal route to highly substituted dihydrofuran rings from easily available 1,3-dicarbonyls and olefins. Copper

  19. Antigen processing by epidermal Langerhans cells correlates with the level of biosynthesis of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and expression of invariant chain

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Two prior studies with a small number of T cell lines have shown that the presentation of native protein antigens by epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) is regulated. When freshly isolated, LC are efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC), but after a period of culture LC are inefficient or even inactive. The deficit in culture seems to be a selective loss in antigen processing, since cultured LC are otherwise rich in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II products and are active APC for alloantigens and mitogens, which do not require processing. We have extended the analysis by studying presentation to bulk populations of primed lymph node and a T-T hybrid. Only freshly isolated LC can be pulsed with the protein antigens myoglobin and conalbumin, but once pulsed, antigen is retained in an immunogenic form for at least 2 d. The acquisition of antigen, presumably as MHC-peptide complexes, is inhibited if the fresh LC are exposed to foreign protein in the presence of chloroquine or cycloheximide. The latter, in contrast, improves the efficacy of antigen pulsing in anti-Ig- stimulated B blasts. In additional studies of mechanism, we noted that both fresh and cultured LC endocytose similar amounts of an antigen, rhodamineovalbumin, into perinuclear granules. However, freshly isolated LC synthesize high levels class II MHC molecules and express higher amounts of the class II-associated invariant chain. Fresh LC are at least 5-10 times more active than many other cells types in the level of biosynthesis of MHC class II products. These findings provide a physiologic model in which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules appear to be the principal vehicle for effective antigen processing by APC of the dendritic cell lineage. Another APC, the B lymphoblast, does not appear to require newly synthesized MHC class II molecules for presentation. PMID:2121888

  20. Process optimization for Ni(II) removal from wastewater by calcined oyster shell powders using Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hsing Yuan; Li, Jun Yan

    2015-09-15

    Waste oyster shells cause great environmental concerns and nickel is a harmful heavy metal. Therefore, we applied the Taguchi method to take care of both issues by optimizing the controllable factors for Ni(II) removal by calcined oyster shell powders (OSP), including the pH (P), OSP calcined temperature (T), Ni(II) concentration (C), OSP dose (D), and contact time (t). The results show that their percentage contribution in descending order is P (64.3%) > T (18.9%) > C (8.8%) > D (5.1%) > t (1.7%). The optimum condition is pH of 10 and OSP calcined temperature of 900 °C. Under the optimum condition, the Ni(II) can be removed almost completely; the higher the pH, the more the precipitation; the higher the calcined temperature, the more the adsorption. The latter is due to the large number of porosities created at the calcination temperature of 900 °C. The porosities generate a large amount of cavities which significantly increase the surface area for adsorption. A multiple linear regression equation obtained to correlate Ni(II) removal with the controllable factors is: Ni(II) removal(%) = 10.35 × P + 0.045 × T - 1.29 × C + 19.33 × D + 0.09 × t - 59.83. This equation predicts Ni(II) removal well and can be used for estimating Ni(II) removal during the design stage of Ni(II) removal by calcined OSP. Thus, OSP can be used to remove nickel effectively and the formula for removal prediction is developed for practical applications.

  1. [The Belgian Nursing Minimum Data Set II (B-NMDS II) and its transfer to German hospitals: results of the first investigation phase, the translation and adaption process of the instrument].

    PubMed

    Eberl, Inge; Bartholomeyczik, Sabine

    2010-10-01

    The introduction of the DRG system in Germany showed again that there is a maintaining need in hospitals for a valid and reliable instrument that provides comparable data for necessary nursing care, costs, personnel requirements, and the quality of nursing care. The instrument should be suitable as well for nursing practice as for national health reports. It should provide founded statements for the different participants in the health system. The NMDS seems to be an instrument that could provide these complex data. Since 2006, a research project has been carried out to investigate the transfer of the Belgian B-NMDS II to German hospitals. The project is divided into two phases. The first phase comprises the translation and adaptation process of the B-NMDS II. In the second phase the data collection in the hospitals and the data analysis will be performed. In this article the methodical procedure of the first investigation phase is specified. The translation and adaptation process of the B-NMDS II is executed in a multi-level procedure.

  2. Transport and intracellular distribution of MHC class II molecules and associated invariant chain in normal and antigen-processing mutant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Riberdy, J M; Avva, R R; Geuze, H J; Cresswell, P

    1994-06-01

    We have compared the intracellular transport and subcellular distribution of MHC class II-invariant chain complexes in a wild-type HLA-DR3 homozygous cell line and a mutant cell line, T2.DR3. The latter has a defect in antigen processing and accumulates HLA-DR3 molecules associated with an invariant chain-derived peptide (CLIP) rather than the normal complement of peptides derived from endocytosed proteins. We find that in the wild-type cells, CLIP is transiently associated with HLA-DR3 molecules, suggesting that the peptide is a normal class II-associated intermediate generated during proteolysis of the invariant chain. In the mutant cell line proteolysis of the invariant chain is less efficient, and HLA-DR3/CLIP complexes are generated much more slowly. Examination of the mutant cell line by immunoelectronmicroscopy shows that class II-invariant chain complexes accumulate intracellularly in large acidic vesicles which contain lysosomal markers, including beta-hexosaminidase, cathepsin D, and the lysosomal membrane protein CD63. The markers in these vesicles are identical to those seen in the class II-containing vesicles (MIICs) seen in the wild-type cells but the morphology is drastically different. The vesicles in the mutant cells are endocytic, as measured by the internalization of BSA-gold conjugates. The implication of these findings for antigen processing in general and the nature of the mutation in particular are discussed.

  3. Oil and gas yields from devonian oil shale in the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II process demonstration unit: Initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Robl, R.L.; Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.

    1993-12-31

    The broad objective of this program is to perform the research necessary to design, construct, test, and optimize the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. Many of our objectives have already been realized. The retort has been successfully constructed and the shakedown phase is essentially complete. In addition, much of the coking and cracking kinetics experiments have been completed which will provide important information for the operation of the retort. We are now entering the testing phase for the retort which has the following objectives: Determine any relationships between the retorting conditions and the yield and characteristics of the products, and compare the results to those from the bench-scale shale oil cracking and coking experiments; study and develop alternative applications for the products from the KENTORT II process. In particular, asphalt performance tests will be conducted on the heavy fraction of oil produced during the testing phase.

  4. All-vapor processing of P-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor and ohmic contacts thereof

    SciTech Connect

    McCandless, Brian E.

    2000-03-01

    An all dry method for producing solar cells is provided comprising first heat-annealing a II-VI semiconductor; enhancing the conductivity and grain size of the annealed layer; modifying the surface and depositing a tellurium layer onto the enhanced layer; and then depositing copper onto the tellurium layer so as to produce a copper tellurium compound on the layer.

  5. All-vapor processing of p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor and ohmic contacts thereof

    DOEpatents

    McCandless, Brian E.

    2001-06-26

    An all dry method for producing solar cells is provided comprising first heat-annealing a II-VI semiconductor; enhancing the conductivity and grain size of the annealed layer; modifying the surface and depositing a tellurium layer onto the enhanced layer; and then depositing copper onto the tellurium layer so as to produce a copper tellurium compound on the layer.

  6. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  7. Mass tag-assisted identification of naturally processed HLA class II-presented meningococcal peptides recognized by CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Meiring, Hugo D; Kuipers, Betsy; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A M; Poelen, Martien C M; Timmermans, Hans; Baart, Gino; Brugghe, Humphrey; van Schie, Joost; Boog, Claire J P; de Jong, Ad P J M; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2005-05-01

    The meningococcal class I outer membrane protein porin A plays an important role in the development of T cell-dependent protective immunity against meningococcal serogroup B infection and is therefore a major component of candidate meningococcal vaccines. T cell epitopes from porin A are poorly characterized because of weak in vitro memory T cell responses against purified Ag and strain variation. We applied a novel strategy to identify relevant naturally processed and MHC class II-presented porin A epitopes, based on stable isotope labeling of Ag. Human immature HLA-DR1-positive dendritic cells were used for optimal uptake and MHC class II processing of (14)N- and (15)N-labeled isoforms of the neisserial porin A serosubtype P1.5-2,10 in bacterial outer membrane vesicles. HLA-DR1 bound peptides, obtained after 48 h of Ag processing, contained typical spectral doublets in mass spectrometry that could easily be assigned to four porin A regions, expressed at diverging densities ( approximately 30-4000 copies/per cell). Epitopes from two of these regions are recognized by HLA-DR1-restricted CD4(+) T cell lines and are conserved among different serosubtypes of meningococcal porin A. This mass tag-assisted approach provides a useful methodology for rapid identification of MHC class II presented bacterial CD4(+) T cell epitopes relevant for vaccine development.

  8. Group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors contribute to different aspects of visual response processing in the rat superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Cirone, Jennifer; Salt, Thomas E

    2001-01-01

    Neurones in the superior colliculus (SC) respond to novel sensory stimuli and response habituation is a key feature of this. It is known that both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors participate in visual responses of superficial SC neurones. A feature of Group II and Group III mGlu receptors is that they may modulate specific neural pathways, possibly via presynaptic mechanisms. However, less is known about how this may relate to functions of systems in whole animals. We have therefore investigated whether these receptors affect specific attributes of visual responses in the superficial SC. Recordings were made from visually responsive neurones in anaesthetised rats, and agonists and antagonists of Group II and III mGlu receptors were applied iontophoretically at the recording site. We found that application of the Group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) produced an increase in visual response habituation, whilst Group III antagonists decreased habituation. These effects were independent of the response habituation mediated via GABAB receptors. In contrast, modulation of Group II mGlu receptors with the specific agonist LY354740 or the antagonist LY341495 did not affect response habituation, although these compounds did modulate visual responses. This suggests a specific role for Group III mGlu receptors in visual response habituation. The magnitude of Group II effects was smaller during presentation of low contrast stimuli compared with high contrast stimuli. This suggests that activation of Group II receptors may be activity dependent and that these receptors can translate this into a functional effect in adapting to high contrast stimuli. PMID:11433000

  9. Serum "big insulin-like growth factor II" from patients with tumor hypoglycemia lacks normal E-domain O-linked glycosylation, a possible determinant of normal propeptide processing.

    PubMed Central

    Daughaday, W H; Trivedi, B; Baxter, R C

    1993-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) gene is overexpressed in many mesenchymal tumors and can lead to non-islet-cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH). ProIGF-II consists of the 67 aa of IGF-II with a carboxyl 89-aa extension, the E domain. A derivative of proIGF-II containing only the first 21 aa of the E domain [proIGF-II-(E1-21)] has been isolated by others from normal serum and has O-linked glycosylation. We found that the "big IGF-II" of normal serum, as detected by an RIA directed against residues 1-21 of the E domain of proIGF-II, was reduced in size by treatment with neuraminidase and O-glycosidase. The big IGF-II, which is greatly increased in NICTH sera, was unaffected by neuraminidase and O-glycosidase treatment. We have also shown that big IGF-II from normal serum is retained by jacalin lectin columns and that big IGF-II from NICTH serum was not retained, indicating that it lacked O-glycosylation. Normal O-linked glycosylation may be required for proper peptidase processing of proIGF-II. The lack of normal O-linked glycosylation by tumors may explain the predominance of big IGF-II in NICTH sera. In normal serum, most of the IGF-II is present in a 150-kDa ternary complex with IGF-II binding protein (IGFBP) 3 and alpha subunit. In NICTH serum, however, the complexes carrying big IGF-II are < 50 kDa. We investigated whether big IGF-II of NICTH was responsible for this abnormality. Tumor big IGF-II and IGF-II were equally effective in forming the 150-kDa complex with purified IGFBP-3 and 125I-labeled alpha subunit. Both 125I-labeled IGF-II and 125I-labeled proIGF-II-(E1-21), when incubated with normal serum, formed the 150-kDa complex as detected by Superose 12 exclusion chromatography. We conclude that the nonglycosylated big IGF-II of NICTH serum can form normal complexes with serum IGFBPs. The defective binding in NICTH is attributable to defective IGFBP-3 binding. PMID:7685912

  10. [The influence of spray drying process conditions on physical, chemical properties and lung inhaling performance of Panax notoginseng saponins - tanshinone II A composite particles].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Mei; Fu, Ting-Ming; Guo, Li-Wei

    2013-06-01

    This study is to report the influence of conditions in spray drying process on physical and chemical properties and lung inhaling performance of Panax notoginseng Saponins - Tanshinone II A composite particles. According to the physical and chemical properties of the two types of components within the composite particles, three solvent systems were selected including ethanol, ethanol : acetone (9 : 1, v/v) and ethanol : acetone (4 : 1, v/v), and three inlet temperature: 110 degrees C, 120 degrees C, 130 degrees C to prepare seven different composite particle samples; each sample was characterized using laser diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic vapour sorption (DVS) and atomic force microscope (AFM), and their aerodynamic behavior was evaluated by a Next Generation Impactor (NGI). The results indicate that under the conditions of using the mixed solvent system of ethanol--acetone volume ratio of 9 : 1, and the inlet temperature of 110 degrees C, the resulting composite particles showed rough surface, with more tanshinone II A distributing in the outer layer, such composite particles have the best lung inhaling performance and the fine particle fraction (FPF) close to 60%. Finally it is concluded that by adjusting the conditions in co-spray drying process, the distribution amount and existence form of tanshinone II A in the outer layer of the particles can be changed so that to enhance lung inhaling performance of the drug composite particles.

  11. Dissociable Stages of Problem Solving (II): First Evidence for Process-Contingent Temporal Order of Activation in Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruh, Nina; Rahm, Benjamin; Unterrainer, Josef M.; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2012-01-01

    In a companion study, eye-movement analyses in the Tower of London task (TOL) revealed independent indicators of functionally separable cognitive processes during problem solving, with processes of building up an internal representation of the problem preceding actual planning processes. These results imply that processes of internalization and…

  12. Experimental and theoretical analyses of penetration processes of externally applied rotating helical magnetic perturbation fields in TEXTOR and HYBTOK-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Y.; de Bock, M. F. M.; Finken, K. H.; Jakubowski, M.; Jaspers, R.; Koslowski, H. R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Lehnen, M.; Liang, Y.; Loewenbrueck, K.; Matsunaga, G.; Reiser, D.; Samm, U.; Sewell, G.; Takamura, S.; Unterberg, B.; Wolf, R. C.; Zimmermann, O.; TEXTOR-team

    2007-05-01

    Penetration processes of rotating helical magnetic perturbation field into tokamak plasmas have been investigated by the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) in TEXTOR. Experimental observations of the field penetration and field amplification are performed and the data are interpreted by theoretical analyses based on a linearized two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED-field is accompanied by a change in the plasma fluid rotation. The theoretical model is also applied to the DED experiment in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. It is confirmed that the theoretical analyses can explain the observed radial profiles of the DED-field in the plasma by inserting small magnetic pick-up coils in HYBTOK-II.

  13. Using the Iterative Input variable Selection (IIS) algorithm to assess the relevance of ENSO teleconnections patterns on hydro-meteorological processes at the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, Ludovica; Carbonin, Daniele; Galelli, Stefano; Castelletti, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Population growth, water scarcity and climate change are three major factors making the understanding of variations in water availability increasingly important. Therefore, reliable medium-to-long range forecasts of streamflows are essential to the development of water management policies. To this purpose, recent modelling efforts have been dedicated to seasonal and inter-annual streamflow forecasts based on the teleconnection between "at-site" hydro-meteorological processes and low frequency climate fluctuations, such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This work proposes a novel procedure for first detecting the impact of ENSO on hydro-meteorological processes at the catchment scale, and then assessing the potential of ENSO indicators for building medium-to-long range statistical streamflow prediction models. Core of this procedure is the adoption of the Iterative Input variable Selection (IIS) algorithm that is employed to find the most relevant forcings of streamflow variability and derive predictive models based on the selected inputs. The procedure is tested on the Columbia (USA) and Williams (Australia) Rivers, where ENSO influence has been well-documented, and then adopted on the unexplored Red River basin (Vietnam). Results show that IIS outcomes on the Columbia and Williams Rivers are consistent with the results of previous studies, and that ENSO indicators can be effectively used to enhance the streamflow forecast models capabilities. The experiments on the Red River basin show that the ENSO influence is less pronounced, inducing little effects on the basin hydro-meteorological processes.

  14. Flavonoid content in ethanolic extracts of selected raw and traditionally processed indigenous foods consumed by vulnerable groups of Kenya: antioxidant and type II diabetes-related functional properties.

    PubMed

    Kunyanga, Catherine N; Imungi, Jasper K; Okoth, Michael W; Biesalski, Hans K; Vadivel, Vellingiri

    2011-08-01

    The present study evaluated the flavonoid content, antioxidant as well as type II diabetes-related enzyme inhibition activities of ethanolic extract of certain raw and traditionally processed indigenous food ingredients including cereals, legumes, oil seeds, tubers, vegetables and leafy vegetables, which are commonly consumed by vulnerable groups in Kenya. The vegetables exhibited higher flavonoid content (50-703 mg/100 g) when compared with the grains (47-343 mg/100 g). The ethanolic extract of presently studied food ingredients revealed 33-93% DPPH radical scavenging capacity, 486-6,389 mmol Fe(II)/g reducing power, 19-43% α-amylase inhibition activity and 14-68% α-glucosidase inhibition activity. Among the different food-stuffs, the drumstick and amaranth leaves exhibited significantly higher flavonoid content with excellent functional properties. Roasting of grains and cooking of vegetables were found to be suitable processing methods in preserving the functional properties. Hence, such viable processing techniques for respective food samples will be considered in the formulation of functional supplementary foods for vulnerable groups in Kenya.

  15. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

  16. The Chlorophyll a Fluorescence Modulated by All-Trans-β-Carotene in the Process of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyu; Zhang, Ye; Gong, Nan; Li, Zuowei; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Modulating the chlorophyll a (Chl-a) fluorescence by all-trans-β-Carotene (β-Car) in the polarity and non-polarity solutions was investigated. The fluorescence intensity of Chl-a decreased as the concentration of β-Car increased. The excited electronic levels of Chl-a and β-Car became much closer owing to the solvent effect, which led to the electron transfer between both two molecules. A electron-separated pair Chl(-)·Chl⁺ that is not luminous was formed due to electron transfer. The solution of Chl-a and β-car in C₃H₆O was similar to the internal environment of chloroplast. We conclude that the polar solvent is good for the fluorescent modulation in photosystem II. PMID:27338363

  17. The Chlorophyll a Fluorescence Modulated by All-Trans-β-Carotene in the Process of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyu; Zhang, Ye; Gong, Nan; Li, Zuowei; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Modulating the chlorophyll a (Chl-a) fluorescence by all-trans-β-Carotene (β-Car) in the polarity and non-polarity solutions was investigated. The fluorescence intensity of Chl-a decreased as the concentration of β-Car increased. The excited electronic levels of Chl-a and β-Car became much closer owing to the solvent effect, which led to the electron transfer between both two molecules. A electron-separated pair Chl−·Chl+ that is not luminous was formed due to electron transfer. The solution of Chl-a and β-car in C3H6O was similar to the internal environment of chloroplast. We conclude that the polar solvent is good for the fluorescent modulation in photosystem II. PMID:27338363

  18. An Information Processing Approach to Performance Assessment: II. An Investigation of Encoding and Retrieval Processes in Memory. Technical Report No. 2, November 16, 1977 through November 30, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, Kathleen; Rose, Andrew M.

    An information processing approach was applied to the development and validation of a test battery intended for personnel selection, classification, and guidance; and design of training programs. The approach specifies that tests should measure specific cognitive processes and basic abilities, rather than prior experience. Tests should be short,…

  19. Dissociable stages of problem solving (II): first evidence for process-contingent temporal order of activation in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Nina; Rahm, Benjamin; Unterrainer, Josef M; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P

    2012-10-01

    In a companion study, eye-movement analyses in the Tower of London task (TOL) revealed independent indicators of functionally separable cognitive processes during problem solving, with processes of building up an internal representation of the problem preceding actual planning processes. These results imply that processes of internalization and planning should also be distinguishable in time and space with respect to concomitant brain activation patterns. To investigate this possibility, here we conducted analyses of fMRI data for left and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) during problem solving in the TOL task by accounting for the trial-by-trial variability of onsets and durations of the different cognitive processing stages. Comparisons between stimulus-locked and response-locked modeling approaches affirmed that activation in left dlPFC was elicited particularly during early processes of internalization, comprising the extraction of goal information and the generation of an internal problem representation, whereas activation in right dlPFC was predominantly attributable to later processes of mental transformations on this representation, that is planning proper. Thus, present data corroborate the proposal that often observed bilateral dlPFC activation patterns during complex cognitive tasks such as problem solving may reflect functionally and, to some extent, even temporally separable processes with opposing lateralizations.

  20. Process-based modeling of temperature and water profiles in the seedling recruitment zone: Part II. Seedling emergence timing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predictions of seedling emergence timing for spring wheat are facilitated by process-based modeling of the microsite environment in the shallow seedling recruitment zone. Hourly temperature and water profiles within the recruitment zone for 60 days after planting were simulated from the process-base...

  1. Stochastic state-space temperature regulation of biochar production Part II: Application to manure processing via pyrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: The concept of a designer biochar that targets the improvement of a specific soil property imposes the need for production processes to generate biochars with both high consistency and quality. These important production parameters can be affected by variations in process temperature tha...

  2. r-PROCESS Nucleosynthesis in Type-II Supernova Model with Neutron Star Mass ~ 1.4M⊙

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, Mariko

    2002-09-01

    It is generally believed that the r-process occurs under explosive conditions at high neutron density, high temperature, and high entropy. It has been discussed, for sometime, that core-collapse supernovae could provide the most likely environment for such r-process nucleosynthesis. So far, the models of neutrino-driven winds from very massive (M≥ 1.7M⊙) and compact neutron star have proved to get successful r-process abundance pattern. A short expansion time is required to obtain a high neutron-to-seed ratio at moderate entropy. This expansion time is obtained by adopting a high neutron star gravitational mass, M~ 2M⊙, and a neutron star radius of R~ 10 km. However, such a large mass is sometimes criticized from observational viewpoints although several established EOSs for neutron star matter are known to stabilize massive core as far as M≤ 2.2M⊙. Nucleosynthesis in the r-process is strongly dependent on the gravitational mass of the proto-neutron star, and for this reason it is taken to be an adjustable parameter to give good r-process yields. In this paper, we study the effects of the outer boundary conditions of neutrino-driven winds on the r-process nucleosynthesis. We can get a reasonable agreement with the solar system r-process abundance pattern even by adopting the 'standard' 1.4M⊙ mass model for the proto-neutron star.

  3. Effects of Scalar and Pseudoscalar Higgs Bosons in the Process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} bb-bar{nu}{nu}-bar at the LEP II Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A.A.; Chalov, A.E.

    2005-12-01

    The possibility of setting constraints on the couplings of the scalar or pseudoscalar Higgs boson to b quarks on the basis of data on the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} bb-bar{nu}{nu}-bar at the LEP II collider is investigated. The mixing of the scalar and the hypothetical pseudoscalar Higgs boson in the Hbb-bar vertex is parametrized in the form (m{sub b}/v)(a + i{gamma}{sub 5}b). An analysis of the differential distributions for the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} bb-bar{nu}{nu}-bar reveals that the contribution of the fusion subprocess WW {yields} H in the channel involving an electron neutrino enhances the sensitivity of data to the parameters under analysis. It is shown that the LEP II data at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV and {integral} Ldt = 600 pb{sup -1} per experiment would make it possible to constrain the parameters {delta}a=a - 1 and b as follows: -0.75 {<=} {delta}a {<=} 1.4 at b = 0 and free {delta}a and -0.97 {<=} b {<=} 0.97 at {delta}a = 0 and free b.

  4. Recent trends and current practices for secondary processing of zinc and lead. Part II: zinc recovery from secondary sources.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Kamala Kanta; Agrawal, Archana; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2004-08-01

    Almost all metallurgical processes are associated with the generation of wastes and residues that may be hazardous or non-hazardous in nature depending upon the criteria specified by institutions such as the US Environment Protection Agency, etc. Wastes containing heavy and toxic metals such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel, lead, copper, mercury, zinc, etc., that are present beyond permissible limits deemed to be treated or disposed of, and non-hazardous wastes can be utilized for metal recovery or safe disposal. Zinc is in growing demand all over the world. In India, a major amount of zinc is imported and therefore processing of zinc secondaries will assist in satisfying the gap between demand and supply to some extent. This report mainly focuses on the current practices and recent trends on the secondary processing of zinc. Attempts made by various laboratories to develop ecofriendly processes for the recovery of zinc from secondary raw materials are also described and discussed.

  5. High-Efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery, STTR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Timothy

    2011-01-07

    This is the final report of DoE STTR Phase II project, “High-efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery”. The objective of this STTR project is to develop a cost-effective processing approach to produce bulk high-performance thermoelectric (TE) nanocomposites, which will enable the development of high-power, high-power-density TE modulus for waste heat recovery and industrial refrigeration. The use of this nanocomposite into TE modules are expected to bring about significant technical benefits in TE systems (e.g. enhanced energy efficiency, smaller sizes and light weight). The successful development and applications of such nanocomposite and the resultant TE modules can lead to reducing energy consumption and environmental impacts, and creating new economic development opportunities.

  6. A step-by-step overview of the dynamic process of epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II for presentation to helper T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade

    2016-01-01

    T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) expressed on cytotoxic or helper T cells can only see their specific target antigen as short sequences of peptides bound to the groove of proteins of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, and class II respectively. In addition to the many steps, several participating proteins, and multiple cellular compartments involved in the processing of antigens, the MHC structure, with its dynamic and flexible groove, has perfectly evolved as the underlying instrument for epitope selection. In this review, I have taken a step-by-step, and rather historical, view to describe antigen processing and determinant selection, as we understand it today, all based on decades of intense research by hundreds of laboratories. PMID:27347387

  7. "An Economic Process for Coal Liquefaction to Liquid Fuels" SBIR Phase II -- Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, Partha Sarathi

    2009-02-19

    The current commercial processes for direct coal liquefaction utilize expensive backmix-flow reactor system and conventional catalysts resulting in incomplete and retrogressive reactions that produce low distillate liquid yield and high gas yield, with high hydrogen consumption. The new process we have developed, which uses a less expensive reactor system and highly active special catalysts, resulted in high distillate liquid yield, low gas yield and low hydrogen consumption. The new reactor system using the special catalyst can be operated smoothly for direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Due to high hydrogenation and hydrocracking activities of the special catalysts, moderate temperatures and high residence time in each stage of the reactor system resulted in high distillate yield in the C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F range with no 650{degrees}F{sup +} product formed except for the remaining unconverted coal residue. The C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F distillate is more valuable than the light petroleum crude. Since there is no 650{degrees}F{sup +} liquid product, simple reforming and hydrotreating of the C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F product will produce the commercial grade light liquid fuels. There is no need for further refinement using catalytic cracking process that is currently used in petroleum refining. The special catalysts prepared and used in the experimental runs had surface area between 40-155 m{sup 2}/gm. The liquid distillate yield in the new process is >20 w% higher than that in the current commercial process. Coal conversion in the experimental runs was moderate, in the range of 88 - 94 w% maf-coal. Though coal conversion can be increased by adjustment in operating conditions, the purpose of limiting coal conversion to moderate amounts in the process was to use the remaining unconverted coal for hydrogen production by steam reforming. Hydrogen consumption was in the range of 4.0 - 6.0 w% maf-coal. A preliminary economic analysis of the new coal liquefaction process was

  8. Phase II of the demonstration of the Koppelman Series C Process. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.

    1998-12-31

    A pilot plant using the Koppelman Series C Process was designed, constructed, and operated near Gillette, Wyoming, as part of Phase I of this project. Construction was completed in late fall of 1993, and the shakedown was completed in early 1994. The initial series of tests performed to prove the process and to characterize the effluents was conducted during the first half of 1994. The results of those tests are described the final report for Phase I (Merriam 1994). This report describes the activities conducted during Phase U of the project the objective of which was to move the process, which was proven during Phase I, a step closer to commercialization. Specifically, the work was planned to lower the cost of the process by developing a high-capacity processor, increasing the already high efficiency of the process by using a feed coal preheater, increasing the bulk density of the product by using mixed particle size extrudate, and preparing a preliminary scoping design for the water treatment plant for a 500,000 ton per year commercial plant.

  9. The Process and Product of T & I High School Level Vocational Education in the United States. Volume II-The Process Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eninger, M.U.

    The primary objective of this study was to provide a description of the process variables of trade and industrial education, such as curriculum, facilities, guidance and placement services, teachers and instructional methods, advisory committees and community relations, and administration. Data were collected from a stratified random sample of 100…

  10. The effect of aging and pH on Pb(II) sorption processes at the calcite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rouff, Ashaki A; Elzinga, Evert J; Reeder, Richard J; Fisher, Nicholas S

    2006-03-15

    The effect of aging on Pb(II) retention in 1 microM Pb, calcite suspensions at pH 7.3, 8.2, and 9.4, under room-temperature conditions, was explored via a combination of batch sorption-desorption experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Short-term experiments, up to 12 days, reveal the predominance of an adsorption mechanism at pH 8.2, as confirmed by XAS analysis. Linear-combination fitting of XANES spectra indicates a dual sorption mechanism, with approximately 95% adsorbed and appromicately 5% coprecipitated, and approcimately 75% adsorbed and approsimately 25% coprecipitated Pb at pH 7.3 and 9.4, respectively. For long-term sorption, 60-270 days, slow continuous uptake occurs at pH 7.3 and 8.2, determined by EXAFS to be due to an adsorption mechanism. At pH 9.4, no further uptake occurs with aging, and the solid-phase distribution of Pb is commensurate with that for short-term experiments, suggesting that coprecipitated metal may alterthe calcite surface precluding further Pb sorption. Desorption experiments indicate that at pH 7.3 and 8.2 long-term sorption products-constituted primarily of Pb inner-sphere adsorption complexes-are reversibly bound. For aged pH 9.4 samples, significant sorption irreversibility indicates that the coprecipitated component is not readily exchangeable with the aqueous phase, and thus coprecipitation may be effective for long-term metal sequestration. PMID:16570599

  11. Process technological effects of deletion and amplification of hydrophobins I and II in transformants of Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Bailey, M J; Askolin, S; Hörhammer, N; Tenkanen, M; Linder, M; Penttilä, M; Nakari-Setälä, T

    2002-05-01

    Transformants of the Trichoderma reeseistrains QM9414 and Rut-C30 were constructed in which the genes for the two major hydrophobin proteins, hydrophobins I (HFBI) and II (HFBII), were deleted or amplified by molecular biological techniques. Growth parameters and foam production of the transformant strains were compared with the corresponding properties of the parent strains by cultivation in laboratory bioreactors under conditions of catabolite repression (glucose medium) or induction of cellulolytic enzymes and other secondary metabolites (cellulose and lactose media). All the transformed strains exhibited vegetative growth properties similar to those of their parent. The Delta hfb2 (but not the Delta hfb1) transformant showed reduced tendency to foam, whereas both strains overproducing hydrophobins foamed extensively, particularly in the case of HFBII. Enzyme production on cellulose medium was unaltered in the Delta hfb2 transformant VTT D-99676, but both the Delta hfb2 and HFBII-overproducing transformants exhibited somewhat decreased enzyme production properties on lactose medium. Production of HFBI by the multi-copy transformant VTT D-98692 was almost 3-fold that of the parent strain QM9414. Overproduction of HFBII by the transformant VTT D-99745, obtained by transformation with three additional copies of the hfb2 gene under the cbh1 promoter, was over 5-fold compared to production by the parent strain Rut-C30. The Delta hfb2transformant VTT D-99676 produced a greatly increased number of spores on lactose medium compared with the parent strain, whereas the HFBII-overproducing transformant VTT D-99745 produced fewer spores.

  12. Progression of natural attenuation processes at a crude oil spill site: II. Controls on spatial distribution of microbial populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, B.A.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Godsy, E.M.; Warren, E.; Essaid, H.I.; Tuccillo, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    A multidisciplinary study of a crude-oil contaminated aquifer shows that the distribution of microbial physiologic types is strongly controlled by the aquifer properties and crude oil location. The microbial populations of four physiologic types were analyzed together with permeability, pore-water chemistry, nonaqueous oil content, and extractable sediment iron. Microbial data from three vertical profiles through the anaerobic portion of the contaminated aquifer clearly show areas that have progressed from iron-reduction to methanogenesis. These locations contain lower numbers of iron reducers, and increased numbers of fermenters with detectable methanogens. Methanogenic conditions exist both in the area contaminated by nonaqueous oil and also below the oil where high hydrocarbon concentrations correspond to local increases in aquifer permeability. The results indicate that high contaminant flux either from local dissolution or by advective transport plays a key role in determining which areas first become methanogenic. Other factors besides flux that are important include the sediment Fe(II) content and proximity to the water table. In locations near a seasonally oscillating water table, methanogenic conditions exist only below the lowest typical water table elevation. During 20 years since the oil spill occurred, a laterally continuous methanogenic zone has developed along a narrow horizon extending from the source area to 50-60 m downgradient. A companion paper [J. Contam. Hydrol. 53, 369-386] documents how the growth of the methanogenic zone results in expansion of the aquifer volume contaminated with the highest concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Exploring Innovation Processes from a Complexity Perspective. Part II. Experiences from the Subsea Increased Oil Recovery Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aasen, Tone Merethe Berg; Johannessen, Stig

    2007-01-01

    In this second part of the papers, exploring innovation processes from a complexity perspective, we present an empirical example to strengthen further the relevance of the approach. The example draws on a longitudinal research initiative conducted in cooperation with the Norwegian petroleum company Statoil ASA. We conducted our research into the…

  14. Part I. improve flame retardant textile. Part II. novel approach layer-by-layer processing for flame retardant textile.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, new approaches for flame retardant textile by using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and layer-by-layer processing will be discussed. Due to its environmentally benign character, the scCO2 is considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical rea...

  15. Part I. Improved flame retardant textiles. Part II. Novel approach to layer-by-layer processing for flame retardant textiles.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, new approaches for flame retardant textile by using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and layer-by-layer processing will be discussed. Due to its environmentally benign character, the scCO2 is considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical re...

  16. Predictive modeling of infrared radiative heating in tomato dry-peeling process: Part II. Model validation and sensitivity analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A predictive mathematical model was developed to simulate heat transfer in a tomato undergoing double sided infrared (IR) heating in a dry-peeling process. The aims of this study were to validate the developed model using experimental data and to investigate different engineering parameters that mos...

  17. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Metals Processing Specialist, Blocks I and II, Classroom Course 13-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These curriculum materials are the first section of a four-part, secondary-postsecondary-level course in metals processing. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Block I, Introduction to Oxyacetylene Welding,…

  18. Business Education and Training: A Value-Laden Process. Volume II: The Developing Professional: Maintaining Values in "Practical" Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Samuel M., Ed.; Fenton, Mark B., Ed.

    This volume contains 19 papers that explore value conflicts in all professions: "Changing Student Teacher Values with Respect to Business and Industry" (Ralph P. Williams, Elizabeth J. Foster); "Admissions Processes into Canadian Master of Social Work Programs in the 1990s" (John R. Graham, Beatrice Traub-Werner); "Organizational Paradigms and…

  19. Final Report of NATO/SPS Pilot Study on Clean Products and Processes (Phase I and II)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early in 1998 the NATO Committee for Challenges to Modern Society (SPS) (Science for Peace and Security) approved the Pilot Study on Clean Products and Processes for an initial period of five years. The pilot was to provide a forum for member country representatives to discuss t...

  20. Spatiotemporal distribution of cortical processing of first and second languages in bilinguals. II. Effects of phonologic and semantic priming.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Hillel; Abbasi, Dalal Abu-Amneh; Bleich, Naomi; Mittelman, Nomi; Starr, Arnold

    2013-11-01

    This study determined the effects of phonology and semantics on the distribution of cortical activity to the second of a pair of words in first and second language (mixed pairs). The effects of relative proficiency in the two languages and linguistic setting (monolinguistic or mixed) are reported in a companion paper. Ten early bilinguals and 14 late bilinguals listened to mixed pairs of words in Arabic (L1) and Hebrew (L2) and indicated whether both words in the pair had the same or different meanings. The spatio-temporal distribution of current densities of event-related potentials were estimated for each language and according to semantic and phonologic relationship (same or different) compared with the first word in the pair. During early processing (<300 ms), brain activity in temporal and temporoparietal auditory areas was enhanced by phonologic incongruence between words in the pair and in Wernicke's area by both phonologic and semantic priming. In contrast, brain activities during late processing (>300 ms) were enhanced by semantic incongruence between the two words, particularly in temporal areas and in left hemisphere Broca's and Wernicke's areas. The latter differences were greater when words were in L2. Surprisingly, no significant effects of relative proficiency on processing the second word in the pair were found. These results indicate that the distribution of brain activity to the second of two words presented bilingually is affected differently during early and late processing by both semantic and phonologic priming by- and incongruence with the immediately preceding word.

  1. Explosive Nucleosynthesis in Magnetohydrodynamical Jets from Collapsars. II --- Heavy-Element Nucleosynthesis of s, p, r-Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Fujimoto, S.; Kotake, K.; Yamada, S.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis in a massive star of 70 M_{⊙} with solar metallicity in the main sequence stage. The helium core mass after hydrogen burning corresponds to 32 M_{⊙}. Nucleosynthesis calculations have been performed during the stellar evolution and the jetlike supernova explosion of a collapsar model. We focus on the production of elements heavier than iron group nuclei. Nucleosynthesis calculations have been accomplished consistently from hydrostatic to dynamic stages by using large nuclear reaction networks, where the weak s-, p-, and r-processes are taken into account. We confirm that s-elements of 60 < A < 90 are highly overproduced relative to the solar abundances in the hydrostatic nucleosynthesis. During oxygen burning, p-elements of A > 90 are produced via photodisintegrations of seed s-elements. However, the produced p-elements are disintegrated in later stages except for ^{180}Ta. In the explosive nucleosynthesis, elements of 90 < A < 160 are significantly overproduced relative to the solar values owing to the r-process, which is very different from the results of spherical explosion models. Only heavy p-elements (N > 50) are overproduced via the p-process because of the low peak temperatures in the oxygen- and neon-rich layers. Compared with the previous study of r-process nucleosynthesis calculations in the collapsar model of 40 M_{⊙} by Fujimoto et al. [S. Fujimoto, M. Hashimoto, K. Kotake and S. Yamada, Astrophys. J. 656 (2007), 382; S. Fujimoto, N. Nishimura and M. Hashimoto, Astrophys. J. 680 (2008), 1350], our jet model cannot contribute to the third peak of the solar r-elements and intermediate p-elements, which have been much produced because of the distribution of the lowest part of electron fraction in the ejecta. Averaging the overproduction factors over the progenitor masses with the use of Salpeter's IMF, we suggest that the 70 M_{⊙} star could contribute to the solar weak s}-elements of 60 < A < 90 and neutron

  2. Electron-beam-enhanced oxidation processes in II-VI compound semiconductors observed by high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, N.; Wessels, B.W.

    1990-02-01

    Enhanced oxidation of ZnS and ZnSe semiconductor surfaces has been observed in situ during electron irradiation in a high-resolution electron microscope. The phase present at the surface region has been identified as ZnO by optical diffractogram and selected area electron diffraction techniques. For ZnS oxidation, both hexagonal ZnO having a random orientation and cubic ZnO in perfect epitaxial relationship with the bulk ZnS were observed. Enhanced oxidation of ZnSe to ZnO has also been observed under electron beam irradiation. However, only the hexagonal form was observed. The oxidation rates for both ZnS and ZnSe depended on electron flux but was independent of orientation. A model in which the oxidation process is limited by diffusion through the oxide film is proposed. By electron irradiation the diffusion rate is enhanced presumably by a nonthermal process.

  3. Improving the two-step remediation process for CCA-treated wood: Part II. Evaluating bacterial nutrient sources.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Remediation processes for recovery and reuse of chromated-copper-arsenate- (CCA) treated wood are not gaining wide acceptance because they are more expensive than landfill disposal. One reason is the high cost of the nutrient medium used to culture the metal-tolerant bacterium, Bacillus licheniformis, which removes 70-100% of the copper, chromium, and arsenic from CCA-treated southern yellow pine (CCA-SYP) in a two-step process involving oxalic acid extraction and bacterial culture. To reduce this cost, the nutrient concentration in the culture medium and the ratio of wood to nutrient medium were optimized. Maximum metal removal occurred when B. licheniformis was cultured in 1.0% nutrient medium and at a wood to nutrient medium ratio of 1:10. Also, malted barley, an abundant by-product of brewing, was evaluated as an alternative nutrient medium. Tests were done to determine absorption of metals by barley, and the results indicate that the barley acted as a biosorbent, removing heavy metals from the liquid culture after their release from CCA to SYP. For comparison, tests were also performed with no nutrient medium. Following bacterial remediation, 17% copper and 15% arsenic were removed from an aqueous slurry of CCA-SYP (no medium). When oxalic acid extraction preceded the aqueous bacterial culture, 21% copper, 54% chromium, and 63% arsenic were removed. The two-step process (oxalic acid extraction and bacterial culture with nutrient medium) appears to be an effective, yet costly, way to remove metals. PMID:15081069

  4. Coal hydrogasification process development. Volume II. Peat studies. Second annual technical progress report, government fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, K.M.; Rosemary, J.K.

    1980-10-20

    This report describes work performed on a program directed towards investigating the effects of peat hydrogasification in an entrained flow reactor. The program was conducted in three phases: peat dense-phase feed system flow studies, hydrogasification entrained flow reactor testing, and preliminary peat process economic evaluations. The peat dense-phase feeding studies included low-pressure (below 150 psig) testing at nominal solid peat flow rates of 1 ton/hr and analytical modeling efforts. The hydrogasification reactor testing was performed at peat flow rates of over 1000 lb/hr and reactor temperatures to 1900/sup 0/F in hydrogen atmospheres from 500 to 1000 psig. A simple analytical kinetic model was developed to predict total carbon conversion as a function of reactor operating variables and its agreement with experimental data was found to be excellent. Finally, preliminary process economics were established for three variations of the Cities Service/Rockwell (CS/R) Flash Hydropyrolysis Process with the cost of high-Btu gas ranging from $3.43 to $4.06 per million Btu.

  5. Far-infrared measurements of N/O in H II regions - Evidence for enhanced CN process nucleosynthesis in the inner Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. F.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Werner, M. W.; Watson, D. M.; Genzel, R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the far-infrared lines of forbidden O III 51.8 microns, 88.4 microns, and forbidden N III 57.3 microns are presented for 13 H II regions covering a wide range in Galactocentric distance. These lines are used to measure the variation of N(2+)/O(2+) with Galactic radius from the center out to 12 kpc. It is argued that this ratio is indicative of the elemental ratio N/O. It is shown that the line flux ratio 57.3 microns forbidden N III/51.7 microns forbidden O III is nearly equal to the N(2+)/O(2+) abundance ratio and is only weakly dependent on nebular conditions. The derived N(2+)/O(2+) values show an inverse correlation with distance from the Galactic center. N(2+)/O(2+) tends to increase as the H II region electron temperature decreases, a behavior consistent with a model of Galactic enrichment in which N-14 is secondary to primary O-16, a scenario that is the natural result of CN processing.

  6. Pain Medication Management Processes Used by Oncology Outpatients and Family Caregivers Part II: Home and Lifestyle Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Karen L.; Plano Clark, Vicki L.; West, Claudia M.; Dodd, Marylin J.; Rabow, Michael W.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Context Despite the increasing complexity of medication regimens for persistent cancer pain, little is known about how oncology outpatients and their family caregivers manage pain medications at home. Objectives To describe the day-to-day management of pain medications from the perspectives of oncology outpatients and their family caregivers who participated in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a psycho-educational intervention called the Pro-Self © Plus Pain Control Program. In this article, we focus on pain medication management in the context of highly individualized home environments and lifestyles. Methods This qualitative study was conducted as part of a RCT in which an embedded mixed methods research design was used. Audio-recorded dialogue among patients, family caregivers, and intervention nurses was analyzed using qualitative research methods. Results Home and lifestyle contexts for managing pain medications included highly individualized home environments, work and recreational activities, personal routines, and family characteristics. Pain medication management processes particularly relevant in these contexts included understanding, organizing, storing, scheduling, remembering, and taking the medications. With the exception of their interactions with the intervention nurses, most study participants had little involvement with clinicians as they worked through these processes. Conclusion Pain medication management is an ongoing multidimensional process, each step of which has to be mastered by patients and family caregivers when cancer treatment and supportive care is provided on an outpatient basis. Realistic patient- and family-centered skill-building interventions are needed to achieve effective and safe pain medication management in the contexts of individual home environments and lifestyles. PMID:24709364

  7. Multimodal processing of emotional information in 9-month-old infants II: prenatal exposure to maternal anxiety.

    PubMed

    Otte, R A; Donkers, F C L; Braeken, M A K A; Van den Bergh, B R H

    2015-04-01

    The ability to read emotional expressions from human face and voice is an important skill in our day-to-day interactions with others. How this ability develops may be influenced by atypical experiences early in life. Here, we investigated multimodal processing of fearful and happy face/voice pairs in 9-month-olds prenatally exposed to maternal anxiety, using event-related potentials (ERPs). Infants were presented with emotional vocalisations (happy/fearful) preceded by emotional facial expressions (happy/fearful). The results revealed larger P350 amplitudes in response to fearful vocalisations when infants had been exposed to higher levels of anxiety, regardless of the type of visual prime, which may indicate increased attention to fearful vocalisations. A trend for a positive association between P150 amplitudes and maternal anxiety scores during pregnancy may suggest these infants are more easily aroused by and extract features more thoroughly from fearful vocalisations as well. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to maternal anxiety is related to more extensive processing of fear-related stimuli. PMID:25839110

  8. Enzymatic saccharification of woody biomass micro/nanofibrillated by continuous extrusion process II: effect of hot-compressed water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Inoue, Seiichi; Teramoto, Yoshikuni; Endo, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    An extrusion process involving a twin-screw extruder was used for the micro/nanofibrillation of Douglas fir and Eucalyptus treated with hot-compressed water (HCW). Partial removal of hemicellulose and lignin by HCW treatment effectively improved the fibrillation by extrusion. Only HCW treatment produced glucose less than 5 weight percent (wt.%) in Douglas fir in a temperature range of 140-180 degrees C by enzymatic hydrolysis. Glucose production yields of 18 and 26 wt.% were obtained by HCW treatment at 170 and 180 degrees C, respectively, in Eucalyptus. Use of extrusion after HCW treatment drastically improved monosaccharide production yield in both woods. In the case of Douglas fir, the obtained values were 5 times higher than those obtained by HCW treatment alone. Total monosaccharide production yields were higher in Eucalyptus than in Douglas fir. The extruded production had a fine fibrous morphology on a sub-micro/nanoscopic scale. This result shows the great potential of the extrusion process after HCW treatment as a cost-effective pretreatment for enzymatic saccharification of woody biomass.

  9. Cohesive zone laws for void growth — II. Numerical field projection of elasto-plastic fracture processes with vapor pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Huck Beng; Hong, Soonsung; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2009-08-01

    Modeling ductile fracture processes using Gurson-type cell elements has achieved considerable success in recent years. However, incorporating the full mechanisms of void growth and coalescence in cohesive zone laws for ductile fracture still remains an open challenge. In this work, a planar field projection method, combined with equilibrium field regularization, is used to extract crack-tip cohesive zone laws of void growth in an elastic-plastic solid. To this end, a single row of void-containing cell elements is deployed directly ahead of a crack in an elastic-plastic medium subjected to a remote K-field loading; the macroscopic behavior of each cell element is governed by the Gurson porous material relation, extended to incorporate vapor pressure effects. A thin elastic strip surrounding this fracture process zone is introduced, from which the cohesive zone variables can be extracted via the planar field projection method. We show that the material's initial porosity induces a highly convex traction-separation relationship — the cohesive traction reaches the peak almost instantaneously and decreases gradually with void growth, before succumbing to rapid softening during coalescence. The profile of this numerically extracted cohesive zone law is consistent with experimentally determined cohesive zone law in Part I for multiple micro-crazing in HIPS. In the presence of vapor pressure, both the cohesive traction and energy are dramatically lowered; the shape of the cohesive zone law, however, remains highly convex, which suggests that diffusive damage is still the governing failure mechanism.

  10. Fabrication of high-resolution 4,8(2) -type archimedean nanolattices composed of solution processable spin cross-over Fe(II) metallosupramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Venkataramudu, Uppari; Chandrasekhar, Naisa; Basak, Supratim; Prasad, Muvva D; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the synthesis of two highly soluble Fe(II) metallosupramolecular polymers with two counter anions from a novel back-to-back coupled hybrid ligand. The spin cross-over (SCO) temperature of polymers with BF4 and ClO4 counter anions is T1/2 = 313 K and T1/2 = 326 K, respectively. By following the top-down approach, one of the polymers (with ClO4 counter anion) is successfully solution processed using a lithographically controlled wetting technique to create laser readable high-resolution Archimedean (4,8(2) ) nanolattices (consist of diamagnetic octagons and SCO squares). The thickness and top area of each SCO square are ≈75 nm and ≈2 × 2 μm(2) , respectively.

  11. Fabrication of high-resolution 4,8(2) -type archimedean nanolattices composed of solution processable spin cross-over Fe(II) metallosupramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Venkataramudu, Uppari; Chandrasekhar, Naisa; Basak, Supratim; Prasad, Muvva D; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the synthesis of two highly soluble Fe(II) metallosupramolecular polymers with two counter anions from a novel back-to-back coupled hybrid ligand. The spin cross-over (SCO) temperature of polymers with BF4 and ClO4 counter anions is T1/2 = 313 K and T1/2 = 326 K, respectively. By following the top-down approach, one of the polymers (with ClO4 counter anion) is successfully solution processed using a lithographically controlled wetting technique to create laser readable high-resolution Archimedean (4,8(2) ) nanolattices (consist of diamagnetic octagons and SCO squares). The thickness and top area of each SCO square are ≈75 nm and ≈2 × 2 μm(2) , respectively. PMID:25594848

  12. Fractionally distilled SRC-I, SRC-II, EDS, H-Coal and ITSL direct coal liquefaction process materials: a comparative summary of chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.; Dauble, D.D.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-07-01

    This document reports and compares the results compiled from chemical analyses and biological testing of coal liquefaction process materials which were fractionally distilled, after production, into various comparable boiling-point range cuts. Comparative analyses were performed on solvent refined coal (SRC)-I, SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS an integrated two-stage liquefaction (ITSL) distillate materials. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative, chemical and biological assessments. Where possible, results obtained from the distillate cuts are compared to those from coal liquefaction materials with limited boiling ranges. Work reported here was conducted by investigators in the Biology and Chemistry Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, WA. 38 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  13. Challenges and recent developments in hearing aids. Part II. Feedback and occlusion effect reduction strategies, laser shell manufacturing processes, and other signal processing technologies.

    PubMed

    Chung, King

    2004-01-01

    This is the second part of a review on the challenges and recent developments in hearing aids. Feedback and the occlusion effect pose great challenges in hearing aid design and usage. Yet, conventional solutions to feedback and the occlusion effect often create a dilemma: the solution to one often leads to the other. This review discusses the advanced signal processing strategies to reduce feedback and some new approaches to reduce the occlusion effect. Specifically, the causes of three types of feedback (acoustic, mechanical, and electromagnetic) are discussed. The strategies currently used to reduce acoustic feedback (i.e., adaptive feedback reduction algorithms using adaptive gain reduction, notch filtering, and phase cancellation strategies) and the design of new receivers that are built to reduce mechanical and electromagnetic feedback are explained. In addition, various new strategies (i.e., redesigned sound delivery devices and receiver-in-the-ear-canal hearing aid configuration) to reduce the occlusion effect are reviewed. Many manufacturers have recently adopted laser shell-manufacturing technologies to overcome problems associated with manufacturing custom hearing aid shells. The mechanisms of selected laser sintering and stereo lithographic apparatus and the properties of custom shells produced by these two processes are reviewed. Further, various new developments in hearing aid transducers, telecoils, channel-free amplification, open-platform programming options, rechargeable hearing aids, ear-level frequency modulated (FM) receivers, wireless Bluetooth FM systems, and wireless programming options are briefly explained and discussed. Finally, the applications of advanced hearing aid technologies to enhance other devices such as cochlear implants, hearing protectors, and cellular phones are discussed. PMID:15735871

  14. Challenges and Recent Developments in Hearing Aids: Part II. Feedback and Occlusion Effect Reduction Strategies, Laser Shell Manufacturing Processes, and Other Signal Processing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Chung, King

    2004-01-01

    This is the second part of a review on the challenges and recent developments in hearing aids. Feedback and the occlusion effect pose great challenges in hearing aid design and usage. Yet, conventional solutions to feedback and the occlusion effect often create a dilemma: the solution to one often leads to the other. This review discusses the advanced signal processing strategies to reduce feedback and some new approaches to reduce the occlusion effect. Specifically, the causes of three types of feedback (acoustic, mechanical, and electromagnetic) are discussed. The strategies currently used to reduce acoustic feedback (i.e., adaptive feedback reduction algorithms using adaptive gain reduction, notch filtering, and phase cancellation strategies) and the design of new receivers that are built to reduce mechanical and electromagnetic feedback are explained. In addition, various new strategies (i.e., redesigned sound delivery devices and receiver-in-the-ear-canal hearing aid configuration) to reduce the occlusion effect are reviewed. Many manufacturers have recently adopted laser shell-manufacturing technologies to overcome problems associated with manufacturing custom hearing aid shells. The mechanisms of selected laser sintering and stereo lithographic apparatus and the properties of custom shells produced by these two processes are reviewed. Further, various new developments in hearing aid transducers, telecoils, channel-free amplification, open-platform programming options, rechargeable hearing aids, ear-level frequency modulated (FM) receivers, wireless Bluetooth FM systems, and wireless programming options are briefly explained and discussed. Finally, the applications of advanced hearing aid technologies to enhance other devices such as cochlear implants, hearing protectors, and cellular phones are discussed. PMID:15735871

  15. In vivo digestion of bovine milk fat globules: effect of processing and interfacial structural changes. II. Upper digestive tract digestion.

    PubMed

    Gallier, Sophie; Zhu, Xiang Q; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Ye, Aiqian; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of milk processing on the in vivo upper digestive tract digestion of milk fat globules. Fasted rats were serially gavaged over a 5h period with cream from raw, pasteurised, or pasteurised and homogenised milk. Only a few intact dietary proteins and peptides were present in the small intestinal digesta. Significantly (P<0.05) more longer chain (C≥10) fatty acids were present in the digesta of rats gavaged with raw (448 mg g(-1) digesta dry matter (DDM)) and homogenised creams (528 mg g(-1) DDM), as compared to pasteurised and homogenised cream (249 mg g(-1) DDM). Microscopy techniques were used to investigate the structural changes during digestion. Liquid-crystalline lamellar phases surrounding the fat globules, fatty acid soap crystals and lipid-mucin interactions were evident in all small intestinal digesta. Overall, the pasteurised and homogenised cream appeared to be digested to a greater extent. PMID:23871080

  16. Development of remedial process options: Phase II, Feasibility study: Installation Restoration Program, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Cronk, T.A.; Smuin, D.R.; Schlosser, R.M.

    1991-11-01

    This technical memorandum develops process options which are appropriate for environmental restoration activities at Naval Air Station Fallon (NAS Fallon), Nevada. Introduction of contaminants to the environment has resulted from deliberate disposal activities (both through dumping and landfilling) and accidental spills and leaks associated with normal activities at NAS Fallon over its lifetime of operation. Environmental sampling results indicate that the vast majority of contaminants of concern are petroleum hydrocarbon related. These contaminants include JP-4, JP-5, leaded and unleaded gasoline, waste oils and lubricants, hydraulic fluids, and numerous solvents and cleaners. The principal exposure pathways of concern associated with NAS Fallon contaminants appear to be the surface flows and shallow drainage systems to which the base contributes. Available data indicate NAS Fallon IR Program sites are not contributing excessive contamination to surface flows emanating from the base. Contaminants appear to be contained in a relatively immobile state in the shallow subsurface with little or no contaminant migration off site.

  17. Thermal decomposition of crystalline Ni(II)-Cr(III) layered double hydroxide: a structural study of the segregation process.

    PubMed

    Sileo, Elsa E; Jobbagy, Matías; Paiva-Santos, Carlos O; Regazzoni, Alberto E

    2005-05-26

    A structural study of the thermal evolution of Ni(0.69)Cr(0.31)(OH)(2)(CO(3))(0.155) x nH(2)O into NiO and tetragonal NiCr(2)O(4) is reported. The characteristic structural parameters of the two coexisting crystalline phases, as well as their relative abundance, were determined by Rietveld refinement of powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns. The results of the simulations allowed us to elucidate the mechanism of the demixing process of the oxides. It is demonstrated that nucleation of a metastable nickel chromite within the common oxygen framework of the parent Cr(III)-doped bunsenite is the initial step of the cationic redistribution. The role that trivalent cations play in the segregation of crystalline spinels is also discussed. PMID:16852228

  18. Meixner Class of Non-commutative Generalized Stochastic Processes with Freely Independent Values II. The Generating Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bożejko, Marek; Lytvynov, Eugene

    2011-03-01

    Let T be an underlying space with a non-atomic measure σ on it. In [ Comm. Math. Phys. 292, 99-129 (2009)] the Meixner class of non-commutative generalized stochastic processes with freely independent values, {ω=(ω(t))_{tin T}} , was characterized through the continuity of the corresponding orthogonal polynomials. In this paper, we derive a generating function for these orthogonal polynomials. The first question we have to answer is: What should serve as a generating function for a system of polynomials of infinitely many non-commuting variables? We construct a class of operator-valued functions {Z=(Z(t))_{tin T}} such that Z( t) commutes with ω( s) for any {s,tin T}. Then a generating function can be understood as {G(Z,ω)=sum_{n=0}^infty int_{T^n}P^{(n)}(ω(t_1),dots,ω(t_n))Z(t_1)dots Z(t_n)} {σ(dt_1) dots σ(dt_n)} , where {P^{(n)}(ω(t_1),dots,ω(t_n))} is (the kernel of the) n th orthogonal polynomial. We derive an explicit form of G( Z, ω), which has a resolvent form and resembles the generating function in the classical case, albeit it involves integrals of non-commuting operators. We finally discuss a related problem of the action of the annihilation operators {partial_t,t in T} . In contrast to the classical case, we prove that the operators ∂ t related to the free Gaussian and Poisson processes have a property of globality. This result is genuinely infinite-dimensional, since in one dimension one loses the notion of globality.

  19. Neural processing of gravito-inertial cues in humans. II. Influence of the semicircular canals during eccentric rotation.

    PubMed

    Merfeld, D M; Zupan, L H; Gifford, C A

    2001-04-01

    All linear accelerometers, including the otolith organs, respond equivalently to gravity and linear acceleration. To investigate how the nervous system resolves this ambiguity, we measured perceived roll tilt and reflexive eye movements in humans in the dark using two different centrifugation motion paradigms (fixed radius and variable radius) combined with two different subject orientations (facing-motion and back-to-motion). In the fixed radius trials, the radius at which the subject was seated was held constant while the rotation speed was changed to yield changes in the centrifugal force. In variable radius trials, the rotation speed was held constant while the radius was varied to yield a centrifugal force that nearly duplicated that measured during the fixed radius condition. The total gravito-inertial force (GIF) measured by the otolith organs was nearly identical in the two paradigms; the primary difference was the presence (fixed radius) or absence (variable radius) of yaw rotational cues. We found that the yaw rotational cues had a large statistically significant effect on the time course of perceived tilt, demonstrating that yaw rotational cues contribute substantially to the neural processing of roll tilt. We also found that the orientation of the subject relative to the centripetal acceleration had a dramatic influence on the eye movements measured during fixed radius centrifugation. Specifically, the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) measured in our human subjects was always greater when the subject faced the direction of motion than when the subjects had their backs toward the motion during fixed radius rotation. This difference was consistent with the presence of a horizontal translational VOR response induced by the centripetal acceleration. Most importantly, by comparing the perceptual tilt responses to the eye movement responses, we found that the translational VOR component decayed as the subjective tilt indication aligned with the tilt of

  20. [Legal issues of physician-assisted euthanasia. Part II--Help in the dying process, direct and indirect active euthanasia].

    PubMed

    Laux, Johannes; Röbel, Andreas; Parzeller, Markus

    2013-01-01

    In Germany, physician-assisted euthanasia involves numerous risks for the attending physician under criminal and professional law. In the absence of clear legal provisions, four different categories of euthanasia have been developed in legal practice and the relevant literature: help in the dying process, direct active euthanasia, indirect active euthanasia and passive euthanasia. The so-called "help during the dying process" by administering medically indicated analgesic drugs without a life-shortening effect is exempt from punishment if it corresponds to the will of the patient. If the physician omits to give such analgesic drugs although the patient demands them, this is deemed a punishable act of bodily injury. The same applies if the physician administers analgesics against the will of the patient. Medically indicated pain treatment which has a potential or certain life-shortening effect (indirect active euthanasia) is permitted under certain conditions: if there are no alternative and equally suitable treatment options without the risk of shortening the patient's life, if the patient has given his consent to the treatment and if the physician does not act with the intention to kill. The deliberate killing of a dying or terminally ill patient for the purpose of ending his suffering (direct active euthanasia) is prohibited. This includes both deliberately killing a patient against or without his will (by so-called "angels of death") and the killing of a patient who expressly and earnestly demands such an act from his physician (killing on request/on demand). Physician-assisted suicide is generally not liable to punishment in Germany. Nevertheless, the action may be subject to punishment if the physician omits to rescue the life of an unconscious suicide victim. "Palliative sedation" is regarded as a special case. It may become necessary if certain symptoms in the terminal stage of a fatal disease unbearable for the patient cannot be controlled by any other

  1. Analysis of heat-induced disassembly process of three different monomeric forms of the major light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajie; Liu, Cheng; Yang, Chunhong

    2012-03-01

    The temperature-dependent disassembly process of three monomeric isoforms, namely Lhcb1, Lhcb2, and Lhcb3, of the major light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl) a/b complexes of photosystem II (LHCIIb) were characterized by observing the changes of absorption spectra, circular dichroism (CD), and dissociation processes of the bound pigments to the in vitro reconstituted complexes subjected to high temperatures. Our results suggest that the three isoforms of LHCIIb undergo conformational rearrangements, structural changes, and dissociations of the bound pigments when the ambient temperature increases from 20 to 90°C. The conformation of the complexes changed sensitively to the changing temperatures because the absorption peaks in the Soret region (436 and 471 nm) and the Qy region (650-660 and 680 nm) decreased immediately upon elevating the ambient temperatures. Analyzing temperature-dependent denaturing and pigment dissociation process, we can divide the disassembly process into three stages: The first stage, appeared from 20°C to around 50-60°C, was characterized by the diminishment of the absorption around 650-660 and 680 nm, accompanied by the blue-shift of the peak at 471 nm and disappearance of the absorbance at 436 nm, which is related to changes in the transition energy of the Chl b cluster, and the red-most Chl a cluster in the LHCIIb. The second stage, beginning at about 50-60°C, was signified by the diminishment of the CD signal between (+)483 nm and (-)490 nm, which implied the disturbance of dipole-dipole interaction of pigments, and the onset of the pigment dissociation. The last stage, beginning at about 70-80°C, indicates the complete dissociation of the pigments from the complex. The physiological aspects of the three stages in the denaturing process are also discussed.

  2. Quality by design, part II: application of NIR spectroscopy to monitor the coating process for a pharmaceutical sustained release product.

    PubMed

    Tabasi, Simin Hassannejad; Fahmy, Raafat; Bensley, Dennis; O'Brien, Charles; Hoag, Stephen W

    2008-09-01

    Ammonio methacrylate copolymers are commercially available as Eudragit RL/RS; they differ in the degree of quaternary ammonium group substitution, which gives them different permeabilities. These closely related polymers can be combined in various ratios to control release rate; consequently, release rate is controlled by the polymer composition and coating thickness. Therefore, predicting drug release from methacrylate copolymers using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be technically difficult. Thus, the objective of this study is to use NIRS to develop multivariate calibration models to predict tablet coat thickness and release rate for tablets coated with varying polymer ratios. A series of sustained release orbifloxacin formulations were developed with varying polymer ratios. Partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict coat thickness; samples from these formulations were pooled and a combined calibration was generated. To assess dissolution, tablets were coated using Eudragit RL and RS with ratios of 0:5, 1:4, 2:3, 3:2, 4:1, and 5:0. The amount released at set time-points was used to build PLS models. For the first time, NIRS has been successfully used to monitor Eudragit polymer coat thickness and drug release from tablets coated with various RL:RS ratios, which demonstrates the potential of NIRS as tool for coating process. PMID:18481308

  3. Quality by design, part II: application of NIR spectroscopy to monitor the coating process for a pharmaceutical sustained release product.

    PubMed

    Tabasi, Simin Hassannejad; Fahmy, Raafat; Bensley, Dennis; O'Brien, Charles; Hoag, Stephen W

    2008-09-01

    Ammonio methacrylate copolymers are commercially available as Eudragit RL/RS; they differ in the degree of quaternary ammonium group substitution, which gives them different permeabilities. These closely related polymers can be combined in various ratios to control release rate; consequently, release rate is controlled by the polymer composition and coating thickness. Therefore, predicting drug release from methacrylate copolymers using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be technically difficult. Thus, the objective of this study is to use NIRS to develop multivariate calibration models to predict tablet coat thickness and release rate for tablets coated with varying polymer ratios. A series of sustained release orbifloxacin formulations were developed with varying polymer ratios. Partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict coat thickness; samples from these formulations were pooled and a combined calibration was generated. To assess dissolution, tablets were coated using Eudragit RL and RS with ratios of 0:5, 1:4, 2:3, 3:2, 4:1, and 5:0. The amount released at set time-points was used to build PLS models. For the first time, NIRS has been successfully used to monitor Eudragit polymer coat thickness and drug release from tablets coated with various RL:RS ratios, which demonstrates the potential of NIRS as tool for coating process.

  4. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood. It leads to problems with blood clotting (coagulation). Factor II is also known as prothrombin. ... blood clots form. This process is called the coagulation cascade. It involves special proteins called coagulation, or ...

  5. The Evolution of Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud. II. Thermal Processing of Circumstellar Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seale, Jonathan P.; Looney, Leslie W.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopy of the CO2 ice absorption feature at 15.2 μm toward 41 high-mass young stellar objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). As the shape of the CO2 absorption profile is a measure of both the composition and thermal history of the ice, we have performed a decomposition of the spectral profiles to determine the nature of the CO2 ice. We fit the absorption profiles to laboratory analogues of ice spectra with two different methods: (1) a five-component fit with polar and apolar ices and (2) a two-component fit with a polar and an annealed H2O:CH3OH:CO2 ice mixture. Many of the LMC sources have a pronounced double peak in their CO2 feature profiles analogous to that seen from pure CO2 or annealed CO2 laboratory ice mixtures; these represent the first direct detections of the characteristic double peak in an extragalactic environment. Fits to annealed laboratory ices suggest that the ices around massive LMC young stellar objects (YSOs) have been warmed and thermally processed. We find that a majority of the CO2 is embedded in a polar ice matrix; however, the observations suggest that a lower fraction of CO2 is locked in polar ices in the LMC compared to the Milky Way, which is in agreement with the proposed lower LMC abundance of water ice. In addition, we find that the ices are best fit with laboratory ice mixtures composed of less than 50% methanol, and most absorption spectra can be fit by ices with no methanol. Finally, we corroborate mounting evidence of an enhanced CO2 ice abundance in the LMC relative to the Milky Way, and determine a CO2/H2O ratio of 0.33 ± 0.01 by combining the column densities of these observations with those in the literature.

  6. Development of a Commercial Process for the Production of Silicon Carbide Fibrils - Draft Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nixdorf, RD

    2002-10-24

    The current work continues a project completed in 1999 by ReMaxCo Technologies in which a novel, microwave based, VLS Silicon Carbide Fibrils concept was verified. This project continues the process development of a pilot scale commercial reactor. Success will lead to sufficient quantities of fibrils to expand work by ORNL and others on heat exchanger tube development. A semi-continuous, microwave heated, vacuum reactor was designed, fabricated and tested in these experiments. Cylindrical aluminum oxide reaction boats are coated, on the inner surface, with a catalyst and placed into the reactor under a light vacuum. A series of reaction boats are then moved, one at a time, through the reactor. Each boat is first preheated with resistance heaters to 850 C to 900 C. Each reaction boat is then moved, in turn, to the microwave heated section. The catalyst is heated to the required temperature of 1200 C to 1300 C while a mixture of MTS (methyl trichlorosilane) and hydrogen are introduced into the annulus of the boat. The MTS is dissociated to allow the carbon and silicon components to be dissolved into the catalyst. The catalyst saturates and precipitates silicon carbide onto the surface of the reaction boat to grow the Fibrils. The reaction continues as long as the MTS is introduced into the reactor. The major obstacle that had to be overcome during this project was the performance of the reactor. The original design of the reactor focused the microwaves in such a manner that they missed the catalyst/Fibrils growth zone. The microwaves did react with the insulation and the reactor was heated by heating the insulation. Modifications were made to the reactor to focus the microwaves on the catalyst. SiC Fibrils were produced using both MTS and Starfire SP4000 as feed-gas precursors. Both precursors produced fibrils at temperatures of less than 1000 C. The new Starfire SP4000 produced fibrils as low as 800 C, without the use of hydrogen and without producing the hazardous

  7. Copper(II)-mediated thermolysis of alginates: a model kinetic study on the influence of metal ions in the thermochemical processing of macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Rowbotham, J S; Dyer, P W; Greenwell, H C; Selby, D; Theodorou, M K

    2013-02-01

    Thermochemical processing methods such as pyrolysis are of growing interest as a means of converting biomass into fuels and commodity chemicals in a sustainable manner. Macroalgae, or seaweed, represent a novel class of feedstock for pyrolysis that, owing to the nature of the environments in which they grow coupled with their biochemistry, naturally possess high metal contents. Although the impact of metals upon the pyrolysis of terrestrial biomass is well documented, their influence on the thermochemical conversion of marine-derived feeds is largely unknown. Furthermore, these effects are inherently difficult to study, owing to the heterogeneous character of natural seaweed samples. The work described in this paper uses copper(II) alginate, together with alginic acid and sodium alginate as model compounds for exploring the effects of metals upon macroalgae thermolysis. A thermogravimetric analysis-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study revealed that, unusually, Cu(2+) ions promote the onset of pyrolysis in the alginate polymer, with copper(II) alginate initiating rapid devolatilization at 143°C, 14°C lower than alginic acid and 61°C below the equivalent point for sodium alginate. Moreover, this effect was mirrored in a sample of wild Laminaria digitata that had been doped with Cu(2+) ions prior to pyrolysis, thus validating the use of alginates as model compounds with which to study the thermolysis of macroalgae. These observations indicate the varying impact of different metal species on thermochemical behaviour of seaweeds and offer an insight into the pyrolysis of brown macroalgae used in phytoremediation of metal-containing waste streams. PMID:24427515

  8. Copper(II)-mediated thermolysis of alginates: a model kinetic study on the influence of metal ions in the thermochemical processing of macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    Rowbotham, J. S.; Dyer, P. W.; Greenwell, H. C.; Selby, D.; Theodorou, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Thermochemical processing methods such as pyrolysis are of growing interest as a means of converting biomass into fuels and commodity chemicals in a sustainable manner. Macroalgae, or seaweed, represent a novel class of feedstock for pyrolysis that, owing to the nature of the environments in which they grow coupled with their biochemistry, naturally possess high metal contents. Although the impact of metals upon the pyrolysis of terrestrial biomass is well documented, their influence on the thermochemical conversion of marine-derived feeds is largely unknown. Furthermore, these effects are inherently difficult to study, owing to the heterogeneous character of natural seaweed samples. The work described in this paper uses copper(II) alginate, together with alginic acid and sodium alginate as model compounds for exploring the effects of metals upon macroalgae thermolysis. A thermogravimetric analysis–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study revealed that, unusually, Cu2+ ions promote the onset of pyrolysis in the alginate polymer, with copper(II) alginate initiating rapid devolatilization at 143°C, 14°C lower than alginic acid and 61°C below the equivalent point for sodium alginate. Moreover, this effect was mirrored in a sample of wild Laminaria digitata that had been doped with Cu2+ ions prior to pyrolysis, thus validating the use of alginates as model compounds with which to study the thermolysis of macroalgae. These observations indicate the varying impact of different metal species on thermochemical behaviour of seaweeds and offer an insight into the pyrolysis of brown macroalgae used in phytoremediation of metal-containing waste streams. PMID:24427515

  9. Phase II-inducing, polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity of corn (Zea mays L.) from phenotypes of white, blue, red and purple colors processed into masa and tortillas.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Martinez, Leticia X; Parkin, Kirk L; Garcia, Hugo S

    2011-03-01

    White, blue, red and purple corns (Zea mays L.) were lime-cooked to obtain masa for tortillas. The total phenolics and anthocyanins content, antioxidant activity expressed as total reducing power (TRP), peroxyl radical bleaching (PRAC), total antioxidant activity (TAA) and quinone reductase (QR) induction in the murine hepatoma (Hepa 1 c1c7 cell line) as a biological marker for phase II detoxification enzymes were investigated. Among the extracts prepared from raw corn varieties the highest concentration of total phenolics, anthocyanins, antioxidant index and induction of QR-inducing activity were found in the Veracruz 42 (Ver 42) genotype. The nixtamalization process (masa) reduced total phenolics, anthocyanins and antioxidant activities and the ability for QR induction when was compared to raw grain. Processing masa into tortillas also negatively affected total phenolics, anthocyanin concentration, antioxidant activities, and QR induction in the colored corn varieties. The blue variety and its corresponding masa and tortillas did not induce QR. Ver 42 genotype and their products (masa and tortilla) showed the greatest antioxidant activity and capacity to induce QR.

  10. Phase II-inducing, polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity of corn (Zea mays L.) from phenotypes of white, blue, red and purple colors processed into masa and tortillas.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Martinez, Leticia X; Parkin, Kirk L; Garcia, Hugo S

    2011-03-01

    White, blue, red and purple corns (Zea mays L.) were lime-cooked to obtain masa for tortillas. The total phenolics and anthocyanins content, antioxidant activity expressed as total reducing power (TRP), peroxyl radical bleaching (PRAC), total antioxidant activity (TAA) and quinone reductase (QR) induction in the murine hepatoma (Hepa 1 c1c7 cell line) as a biological marker for phase II detoxification enzymes were investigated. Among the extracts prepared from raw corn varieties the highest concentration of total phenolics, anthocyanins, antioxidant index and induction of QR-inducing activity were found in the Veracruz 42 (Ver 42) genotype. The nixtamalization process (masa) reduced total phenolics, anthocyanins and antioxidant activities and the ability for QR induction when was compared to raw grain. Processing masa into tortillas also negatively affected total phenolics, anthocyanin concentration, antioxidant activities, and QR induction in the colored corn varieties. The blue variety and its corresponding masa and tortillas did not induce QR. Ver 42 genotype and their products (masa and tortilla) showed the greatest antioxidant activity and capacity to induce QR. PMID:21327968

  11. A program system for ab initio MO calculations on vector and parallel processing machines II. SCF closed-shell and open-shell iterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohmer, Marie-Madeleine; Demuynck, Jean; Bénard, Marc; Wiest, Roland; Bachmann, Christian; Henriet, Charles; Ernenwein, René

    1990-08-01

    This series of three papers presents a program system for ab initio molecular orbital calculations on vector and parallel computers. Part II is devoted to SCF iterations on closed-shell and open-shell configurations starting from a file of two-electron integrals on the basis of contracted Gaussians (CGTOs). In a preliminary step, the two-electron integrals ( pq‖ rs) are reordered according to increasing values of index pq = p( p-1)/2+ q. Then, in the first SCF iteration step, a file of semi-ordered P supermatrix elements (or P and Q supermatrix elements in the open-shell case) is generated from the file of semi-ordered integrals. This file is processed at each iteration step in an efficient vector loop to generate the electron repulsion matrix. Convergence is automatically controlled through level-shifting techniques. The most time-consuming parts are the integral sorting and the generation of the P supermatrix, which are carried out only once. Subsequent SCF iteration steps respectively require 0.9 s and 1.7 s for the process of 10 7 supermatrix elements by the closed-shell and the open-shell programs on a CRAY-2 processor.

  12. Expression of cyclin D{sub 1} during endotoxin-induced aleveolar type II cell hyperplasia in rat lung and the detection of apoptotic cells during the remodeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Tesfaigzi, J.; Wood, M.B.; Johnson, N.F.

    1995-12-01

    Our studies have shown that endotoxin intratracheally instilled into the rat lung induces proliferation of alveolar type II cells. In that study, the alveolar type II cells. In that study, the alveolar type II cell hyperplasia occurred 2 d after instillation of endotoxin and persisted for a further 2 d. After hyperplasia, the lung remodeled and returned to a normal state within 24-48 h. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the remodeling process of this transient hyperplasia may be useful to identify molecular changes that are altered in neoplasia. The purpose of the present study was to corroborate induction of epithelial cell hyperplasia by endotoxin and to delineate mechanisms involved in tissue remodeling after endotoxin-induced alveolar type II cell hyperplasia. In conclusion, immonostaining with cyclin D1 and cytokeratin shows that endotoxin induced epithelial cell proliferation and resulted in hyperplasia in the lung which persisted through 4 d post-instillation.

  13. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Z.; Stier, P.; Johnson, C. E.; Mann, G. W.; Bellouin, N.; Bauer, S. E.; Bergman, T.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kokkola, H.; Liu, X.; Luo, G.; van Noije, T.; Pringle, K. J.; von Salzen, K.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2015-09-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors, we investigate the effects of individual processes in one particular model (HadGEM3-UKCA), and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global mean profile and zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. Convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulphate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea-salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number, while the profiles of larger particles are controlled by the same processes as the component mass profiles, plus the size distribution of

  14. What Controls the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol? Relationships Between Process Sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and Inter-Model Variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN >3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN>100 nm) are controlled by the

  15. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Kokkola, Harri; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; van Noije, Twan; Pringle, Kirsty J.; von Salzen, Knut; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN > 3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN > 100 nm) are controlled by the

  16. A Microstructure Evolution Model for the Processing of Single-Crystal Alloy CMSX-4 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Bansal, Rohan; Gambone, Justin J.; Das, Suman

    2014-12-01

    Part I [Metall. Mater. Trans. B, 2014, DOI:10.1007/s11663-014-0117-9] presented a comprehensive thermal, fluid flow, and solidification model that can predict the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for the processing of CMSX-4 alloy powder through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE). SLE is an additive manufacturing technology aimed at the creation of equiaxed, directionally solidified and single-crystal (SX) deposits of nickel-based superalloys using a fast-scanning laser beam. Part II here further explores the Marangoni convection-based model to predict the solidification microstructure as a function of the conditions at the trailing edge of the melt pool formed during the SLE process. Empirical values for several microstructural characteristics such as the primary dendrite arm spacing (PDAS), the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) criterion and the oriented-to-misoriented transition (OMT) criterion are obtained. Optical microscopy provides visual information on the various microstructural characteristics of the deposited material such as melt depth, CET location, OMT location, PDAS, etc. A quantitative and consistent investigation of this complex set of characteristics is both challenging and unprecedented. A customized image-analysis technique based on active contouring is developed to automatically extract these data from experimental micrographs. Quantitative metallography verifies that even for the raster scan pattern in SLE and the corresponding line heat source assumption, the PDAS follows the growth relation w ~ G -0.5 V -0.25 ( w = PDAS, G = temperature gradient and V = solidification velocity) developed for marginal stability under constrained growth. Models for the CET and OMT are experimentally validated, thereby providing powerful predictive capabilities for controlling the microstructure of SX alloys processed through SLE.

  17. X-ray-based measurement of composition during electron beam melting of AISI 316 stainless steel: Part II. Evaporative processes and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, M.; Lee, P. D.; Mitchell, A.; Cockcroft, S. L.; Wang, T.

    2003-03-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector mounted on a laboratory scale electron beam furnace (30 kW) was employed to assess the potential use of X-rays as a means of on-line composition monitoring during electron beam (E B) melting of alloys. The design and construction of the collimation and protection systems used for the EDX are described in Part I. In Part II, a mathematical simulation of the heat, mass, and momentum transfer was performed for comparison to the EDX and vapor deposition results. The predicted flow patterns and evaporation rates are used to explain the differences between the two experimental methods. For the EDX spectra measured, the X-rays generated were from the center of the hearth where fluid flow rising from the bulk of the pool is sufficient to maintain the bulk composition despite the high evaporative flux from the surface. The flow moves radially outward from the center of the pool, with the volatile species being depleted. The vapor deposition technique measures the entire region, giving an average surface composition, and it therefore differs from the EDX results, which gave a near bulk composition. This combined study using in-situ EDX measurements and numerical simulations both provided an insight into the phenomena controlling the evaporation in an EB-heated system and demonstrated the viability of using EDX to measure the bulk composition during EB melting processes.

  18. Exogenous heat shock protein 70 binds macrophage lipid raft microdomain and stimulates phagocytosis, processing, and MHC-II presentation of antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruibo; Kovalchin, Joseph T; Muhlenkamp, Peggy; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y

    2006-02-15

    The extracellular presence of endotoxin-free heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) enhances the rate and capacity of macrophage-mediated phagocytosis at 6 times the basal rate. It is protein-specific, dose- and time-dependent and involves the internalization of inert microspheres, Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and fungi. Structurally, exogenous HSP70 binds the macrophage plasma membrane, specifically on its lipid raft-microdomain. Disruption of lipid rafts, HSP70-LR interaction, or denaturing HSP70 abrogates the HSP-mediated increase in phagocytosis. Further, HSP70-mediated phagocytosis directly enhances the processing and presentation of internalized antigens via the endocytic MHC class-II pathway to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Modulating the HSP70-LR interaction presents an opportunity to intervene at the level of host-pathogen interface: a therapeutic tool for emerging infections, especially when conventional treatment with antibiotics is ineffective (antibiotic resistance) or unavailable (rapidly spreading, endemic). These results identify a new role for HSP70, a highly conserved molecule in stimulating phagocytosis: a primordial macrophage function, thereby influencing both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  19. Catalytic degradation of recalcitrant pollutants by Fenton-like process using polyacrylonitrile-supported iron (II) phthalocyanine nanofibers: Intermediates and pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhexin; Chen, Yi; Gu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Lu, Wangyang; Xu, Tiefeng; Chen, Wenxing

    2016-04-15

    Iron (II) phthalocyanine (FePc) molecules were isolated in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers by electrospinning to prevent the formation of dimers and oligomers. Carbamazepine (CBZ) and Rhodamine B (RhB) degradation was investigated during a Fenton-like process with FePc/PAN nanofibers. Classical quenching tests with isopropanol and electron paramagnetic resonance tests with 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-oxide as spin-trapping agent were performed to determine the formation of active species during hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) decomposition by FePc/PAN nanofibers. After eight recycles for CBZ degradation over the FePc/PAN nanofibers/H2O2 system, the removal ratios of CBZ remained at 99%. Seven by-products of RhB and twelve intermediates of CBZ were identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Pathways of CBZ and RhB degradation were proposed based on the identified intermediates. As the reaction proceeded, all CBZ and RhB aromatic nucleus intermediates decreased and were transformed to small acids, but also to potentially toxic epoxide-containing intermediates and acridine, because of the powerful oxidation ability of •OH in the catalytic system. PMID:26949842

  20. Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-01

    This document presents guidance for implementing the process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) will use for assuming perpetual responsibility for a closed uranium mill tailings site. The transition process specifically addresses sites regulated under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) but is applicable in principle to the transition of sites under other regulatory structures, such as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program.

  1. Tyrosinaemia II.

    PubMed

    Colditz, P B; Yu, J S; Billson, F A; Rogers, M; Molloy, H F; O'Halloran, M; Wilcken, B

    1984-08-18

    Four cases of tyrosinaemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome) are reported. This syndrome consists of corneal erosions, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, and sometimes mental retardation. Presentation with photophobia and dendritic corneal ulceration or circumscribed palmoplantar keratoderma should alert the physician to the possible diagnosis of tyrosinaemia II. Early diagnosis is important, as the clinical picture can be modified by dietary restriction.

  2. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  3. Optical study and ruthenizer (II) N3 dye-sensitized solar cell application of ZnO nanorod-arrays synthesized by combine two-step process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Mohammad Ramzan; Haque, Fozia Z.

    2015-10-01

    Highly dense ZnO nanorod-arrays were successfully synthesized with uniform c-axis growth by using combine two-step process: sol-gel spin coating followed by the aqueous solution growth method. Structural and optical properties of ZnO nanorod-arrays were investigated. The X-ray diffraction results revealed that ZnO nanorod arrays exhibit wurtzite hexagonal crystal structure with a dominant (002) peak with high crystallinity. Nanorods of 3-4 μm length and 500 nm diameter, with surface roughness ˜20 nm were observed. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopic results revealed the presence of E 2 peak ˜438 cm-1 which again corroborated the existence of wurtzite crystal structures assigned to ZnO. The optical transmittance spectrum indicated that the transmittance of more than 80% was observed in the visible and infrared (IR) regions with the optical band-gap energy ˜3.35 eV. Photoluminescence spectrum showed peaks in ultra-violet (382.0 nm) and green region (524.9 nm), which specified good-quality crystallite formation containing high density of surface defects, zinc interstitials and oxygen-vacancies. Ruthenizer (II) N3-dye loaded sensitized solar cell test illustrated that the uniform ZnO nanorod-arrays as working electrode with a short circuit current density of 3.99 mA/cm2, fill factor ˜50% and overall power conversion efficiency (η) ˜1.36% might be a promising electrode material of dye sensitized solar cell application.

  4. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  5. Characterization of cellulose I/II hybrid fibers isolated from energycane bagasse during the delignification process: Morphology, crystallinity and percentage estimation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yiying; Han, Jingquan; Han, Guangping; Zhang, Quanguo; French, Alfred D; Wu, Qinglin

    2015-11-20

    Cellulose I, cellulose II and cellulose I/II hybrid fibers were prepared from energycane bagasse using NaOH and NaClO2 treatments. The definitive defibrillation effect with an average width of 12±5μm was observed for the fibers treated with 20wt% NaOH for 10h and NaClO2 for 2h. The ribbon shaped cellulose I fibers were converted to a swollen state with a rougher surface by 20wt% NaOH treatment for 10h. The percentage of cellulose I decreased from 100% to 5%, and the corresponding CI values increased from 58.2% to 68.8% during the conversion from cellulose I to II. After further NaClO2 treatment, the CI values were decreased because of partial destruction of hydrogen bond network. XRD, NMR and FTIR results present the same trend in the degree of crystallization for all the samples.

  6. N2O production in the Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO reduction process: the effects of carbon source and pH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Ji; Chen, Jianmeng

    2015-07-01

    Chemical absorption-biological reduction (BioDeNOx), which uses Fe(II)(EDTA) as a complexing agent for promoting the mass transfer efficiency of NO from gas to water, is a promising technology for removing nitric oxide (NO) from flue gases. The carbon source and pH are important parameters for Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO (the production of absorption) reduction and N2O emissions from BioDeNOx systems. Batch tests were performed to evaluate the effects of four different carbon sources (i.e., methanol, ethanol, sodium acetate, and glucose) on Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO reduction and N2O emissions at an initial pH of 7.2 ± 0.2. The removal efficiency of Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO was 93.9%, with a theoretical rate of 0.77 mmol L(-1) h(-1) after 24 h of operation. The highest N2O production was 0.025 mmol L(-1) after 3 h when glucose was used as the carbon source. The capacities of the carbon sources to enhance the activity of the Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO reductase enzyme decreased in the following order based on the C/N ratio: glucose > ethanol > sodium acetate > methanol. Over the investigated pH range of 5.5-8.5, the Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO removal efficiency was highest at a pH of 7.5, with a theoretical rate of 0.88 mmol L(-1) h(-1). However, the N2O production was lowest at a pH of 8.5. The primary effect of pH on denitrification resulted from the inhibition of nosZ in acidic conditions.

  7. RNAP II processivity is a limiting step for HIV-1 transcription independent of orientation to and activity of endogenous neighboring promoters.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek Michaels, Katarzyna; Wolschendorf, Frank; Schiralli Lester, Gillian M; Natarajan, Malini; Kutsch, Olaf; Henderson, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Since HIV-1 has a propensity to integrate into actively expressed genes, transcriptional interference from neighboring host promoters has been proposed to contribute to the establishment and maintenance HIV-1 latency. To gain insights into how endogenous promoters influence HIV-1 transcription we utilized a set of inducible T cell lines and characterized whether there were correlations between expression of endogenous genes, provirus and long terminal repeat architecture. We show that neighboring promoters are active but have minimal impact on HIV-1 transcription, in particular, expression of the endogenous gene did not prevent expression of HIV-1 following induction of latent provirus. We also demonstrate that releasing paused RNAP II by diminishing negative elongation factor (NELF) is sufficient to reactivate transcriptionally repressed HIV-1 provirus regardless of the integration site and orientation of the provirus suggesting that NELF-mediated RNAP II pausing is a common mechanism of maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  8. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  9. Studying Ca ii K Line Profile Shapes and Dynamic Processes in the Solar Chromosphere at the Base of a Coronal Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryeva, S. A.; Turova, I. P.; Ozhogina, O. A.

    2016-08-01

    We study Ca ii K profiles in structural features of the quiet chromosphere and plages using observations of two time series for two regions at the base of a coronal hole. One of the regions that we study has a low-brightness area where the reversal-free profile shape remains the same even over a spatial extent of about 16 arcsec. Such a profile shape is typical of low-temperature areas.

  10. Reduction of Pertechnetate By Acetohydroxamic Acid: Formation of [tc**II(NO)(AHA)(2)(H(2)O)]**+ And Implications for the UREX Process

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, C.-M.S.; Lukens, W.W.; Poineau, F.; Czerwinski, K.R.

    2009-05-18

    Reductive nitrosylation and complexation of ammonium pertechnetate by acetohydroxamic acid has been achieved in aqueous nitric and perchloric acid solutions. The kinetics of the reaction depend on the relative concentrations of the reaction components and are accelerated at higher temperatures. The reaction does not occur unless conditions are acidic. Analysis of the X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic data is consistent with a pseudo-octahedral geometry and the linear Tc-N-O bond typical of technetium nitrosyl compounds, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy is consistent with a d{sup 5} Tc(II) nitrosyl complex. The nitrosyl source is generally AHA, but it may be augmented by some products of the reaction with nitric acid. The resulting low-valency trans-aquonitrosyl(diacetohydroxamic)-technetium(II) complex ([Tc{sup II}(NO)(AHA){sub 2}H{sub 2}O]{sup +}, 1) is highly soluble in water, extremely hydrophilic, and is not extracted by tri-n-butylphosphate in a dodecane diluent. Its extraction properties are not pH-dependent: potentiometric-spectrophotometric titration studies indicate a single species from pH 4 down to -0.6 (calculated). This molecule is resistant to oxidation by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, even at high pH, and can undergo substitution to form other technetium nitrosyl complexes. The potential formation of 1 during reprocessing may strongly impact the fate of technetium in the nuclear fuel cycle.

  11. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  12. BORE II

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  13. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  14. Photochemistry of transition-metal phthalocyanines. Monophotonic and sequential biphotonic photochemical processes of copper(II) tetrakis(N-octadecylsulfamoyl)phthalocyanine in nonaqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, D.R.; Ferraudi, G.

    1982-08-01

    The photochemistry of dimeric and monomeric copper(II) tetrakis(N-octadecylsulfamoyl)phthalocyanine in chloroform has been investigated by steady-state, flash and laser flash photolysis. The decay of a low-lying ..pi pi..* triplet-doublet with k approx. = 2 x 10/sup 7/ s/sup -1/ was observed in laser flash photolysis. Similar observations were carried out with related complexes. Moreover, long-lived transformations were assigned to the formation of a copper(III) phthalocyanine. Product yields were determined as a function of the excitation wavelength and light intensity. Excitations on the Q band, lambda approx. = 600 nm, with high intensities from a focused dye laser induce a photochemistry otherwise observed for excitations at lambda less than or equal to 350 nm. Mechanisms involving short-lived n..pi..* states and two-photon photochemistry involving a low-lying and long-lived ..pi pi..* triplet-doublet are discussed. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Studying Ca uc(ii) K Line Profile Shapes and Dynamic Processes in the Solar Chromosphere at the Base of a Coronal Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryeva, S. A.; Turova, I. P.; Ozhogina, O. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study Ca uc(ii) K profiles in structural features of the quiet chromosphere and plages using observations of two time series for two regions at the base of a coronal hole. One of the regions that we study has a low-brightness area where the reversal-free profile shape remains the same even over a spatial extent of about 16 arcsec. Such a profile shape is typical of low-temperature areas. The analysis of the spectral composition of oscillations has revealed that all the chromospheric structures feature various combinations of periods: 3, 4, 5, and long. One rarely finds only a single period. In same-type structures, we cannot single out a dominant highest-power period; such may be any of the above periods. Periodic brightenings of the violet peak in the Ca uc(ii) K wing occur in both internetwork and network areas. Moreover, they do not arise from purely 3-min oscillations. The integrated spectral power of oscillations throughout the whole area cut out by the spectrograph slit decreases with height from the temperature minimum region to the lower and middle chromosphere in 4.0 - 5.2 (4-min oscillations), 2.4 - 4.0 (5-min oscillations) and 1.1 - 16.0 mHz frequency bands. The oscillation power in the low-frequency band demonstrates a reverse tendency. The oscillation power in 5.2 - 6.8 mHz (3-min oscillations) decreases from the lower to middle chromosphere. This is the case for both regions at the base of a coronal hole. The integrated spectral power distribution in different chromospheric structures is complicated. Low-frequency oscillations are enhanced more often in peripheral areas of structures. Our observations do not corroborate the belief that 3-min oscillations prevail in internetwork and 5-min oscillations in network areas.

  16. Investigation of proposed process sequence for the array automated assembly task. Phase I and II. Final report, October 1, 1977-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Mardesich, N.; Garcia, A.; Eskenas, K.

    1980-08-01

    A selected process sequence for the low cost fabrication of photovoltaic modules was defined during this contract. Each part of the process sequence was looked at regarding its contribution to the overall dollars per watt cost. During the course of the research done, some of the initially included processes were dropped due to technological deficiencies. The printed dielectric diffusion mask, codiffusion of the n+ and p+ regions, wraparound front contacts and retention of the diffusion oxide for use as an AR coating were all the processes that were removed for this reason. Other process steps were retained to achieve the desired overall cost and efficiency. Square wafers, a polymeric spin-on PX-10 diffusion source, a p+ back surface field and silver front contacts are all processes that have been recommended for use in this program. The printed silver solderable pad for making contact to the aluminum back was replaced by an ultrasonically applied tin-zinc pad. Also, the texturized front surface was dropped as inappropriate for the sheet silicon likely to be available in 1986. Progress has also been made on the process sequence for module fabrication. A shift from bonding with a conformal coating to laminating with ethylene vinyl acetate and a glass superstrate is recommended for further module fabrication. The finalized process sequence is described.

  17. Phase II modification of the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER) for Kentucky: The sinkhole-drainage process, point-and-click basin delineation, and results of karst test-basin simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Charles J.; Williamson, Tanja N.; Newson, Jeremy K.; Ulery, Randy L.; Nelson, Hugh L.; Cinotto, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes Phase II modifications made to the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER), which applies the process-based TOPMODEL approach to simulate or predict stream discharge in surface basins in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The previous (Phase I) version of WATER did not provide a means of identifying sinkhole catchments or accounting for the effects of karst (internal) drainage in a TOPMODEL-simulated basin. In the Phase II version of WATER, sinkhole catchments are automatically identified and delineated as internally drained subbasins, and a modified TOPMODEL approach (called the sinkhole drainage process, or SDP-TOPMODEL) is applied that calculates mean daily discharges for the basin based on summed area-weighted contributions from sinkhole drain-age (SD) areas and non-karstic topographically drained (TD) areas. Results obtained using the SDP-TOPMODEL approach were evaluated for 12 karst test basins located in each of the major karst terrains in Kentucky. Visual comparison of simulated hydrographs and flow-duration curves, along with statistical measures applied to the simulated discharge data (bias, correlation, root mean square error, and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficients), indicate that the SDPOPMODEL approach provides acceptably accurate estimates of discharge for most flow conditions and typically provides more accurate simulation of stream discharge in karstic basins compared to the standard TOPMODEL approach. Additional programming modifications made to the Phase II version of WATER included implementation of a point-and-click graphical user interface (GUI), which fully automates the delineation of simulation-basin boundaries and improves the speed of input-data processing. The Phase II version of WATER enables the user to select a pour point anywhere on a stream reach of interest, and the program will automatically delineate all upstream areas that contribute drainage to that point. This capability enables

  18. Studies on the development of infant foods from plant protein sources. Part II. Effect of processing conditions on the chemical and nutritive properties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum).

    PubMed

    Khaleque, A; Elías, L G; Braham, J E; Bressani, R

    1985-09-01

    In order to improve the taste, flavor and nutritional quality of chickpea (Cicer arietinum), various processing conditions were studied. The decorticated samples were processed under various conditions, either by presoaking or non-soaking in water or sodium carbonate solution. The proteins were also isolated from water or carbonate-presoaked chickpea and subjected to various processing. Carbonate-presoaked samples gave slightly lower protein and ash values. No major changes in other constituents were observed. Subjective analysis of the intensity of characteristic chickpea flavor in processed samples was carried out, indicating some improvement in the carbonate-presoaked samples. Carbonate-treated samples exhibited a lighter color. The carbonate presoaking procedure had no adverse effect on the availability of lysine and nitrogen solubility index (NSI), as compared to the water-presoaking procedure. The time required to inactivate trypsin inhibitors in carbonate-presoaked chickpea at boiling temperature, was half that required in the case of water-presoaked ones. Under the conditions used in treating chickpea with sodium carbonate, no beneficial effect was observed in reducing the tannin content. No significant differences were observed in net protein ratio (NPR) among the various processed chickpea samples, even though in some cases isolated protein gave significantly lower NPR values. Digestibility values were higher for isolated protein than for whole chickpea samples.

  19. Technology support for initiation of high-throughput processing of thin-film CdTe PV modules. Phase II technical report, March 14, 1996--March 13, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Sasala, R.; Powell, R.; Dorer, G.

    1997-09-01

    Research at Solar Cells Inc. is focused on developing processes which will lead to high volume and low cost manufacturing of solar cells and to increase the performance of their present technology. The process research has focused on developing vapor transport deposition of the semiconductors, eliminating wet chemistry steps while minimizing the chloride treatment time, forming a low-loss back contact using only dry processing, and an improved interconnection technique. The performance improvement work has focused on the increase of the photocurrent by a combination of more transparent glass substrates and a thinner CdS window layer deposited on an i-SnO{sub 2} buffer layer. SCI record 13.0% 1 cm{sup 2} devices have been fabricated using these techniques. Stability monitoring continues and shows minimal degradation for over 20,000 hours of continuous light soak at 0.8 sun illumination.

  20. Managing Algorithmic Skeleton Nesting Requirements in Realistic Image Processing Applications: The Case of the SKiPPER-II Parallel Programming Environment's Operating Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudarcher, Rémi; Duculty, Florent; Serot, Jocelyn; Jurie, Frédéric; Derutin, Jean-Pierre; Dhome, Michel

    2005-12-01

    SKiPPER is a SKeleton-based Parallel Programming EnviRonment being developed since 1996 and running at LASMEA Laboratory, the Blaise-Pascal University, France. The main goal of the project was to demonstrate the applicability of skeleton-based parallel programming techniques to the fast prototyping of reactive vision applications. This paper deals with the special features embedded in the latest version of the project: algorithmic skeleton nesting capabilities and a fully dynamic operating model. Throughout the case study of a complete and realistic image processing application, in which we have pointed out the requirement for skeleton nesting, we are presenting the operating model of this feature. The work described here is one of the few reported experiments showing the application of skeleton nesting facilities for the parallelisation of a realistic application, especially in the area of image processing. The image processing application we have chosen is a 3D face-tracking algorithm from appearance.

  1. The role of physiological elements in the future therapies of rheumatoid arthritis. II. The relevance of energy redistribution in the process of chronic inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The reasons for development of chronic inflammation are complex and not fully understood. One of the factors affecting the prolongation of inflammation is changes in cell metabolism, occurring at the center of the inflammatory process. In chronic inflammation there is an imbalance between the processes of storage and consumption of energy reserves. Hypoxia that is a consequence of edema results in transition of white blood cells to anaerobic metabolism. Neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages produce active oxygen metabolites which on one hand facilitate the elimination of pathogens, and on the other hand, can cause damage to healthy cells located in the inflamed tissue. In this paper, we discuss the importance of disturbed redistribution of energy as one of the main reasons for transformation of the acute inflammatory process into the chronic one. PMID:27407224

  2. Agricultural Handling and Processing Industries; Data Pertinent to an Evaluation of Overtime Exemptions Available under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Volume II, Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wage and Labor Standards Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Definitions of terms used in the Fair Labor Standards Act and statistical tables compiled from a survey of agricultural processing firms comprise this appendix, which is the second volume of a two volume report. Volume I is available as VT 012 247. (BH)

  3. Quantum fields and poisson processes II: Interaction of boson-boson and boson-fermion fields with a cut-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, J.; Gaveau, B.; Rideau, G.

    1985-05-01

    Quantum field evolutions are written as expectation values with respect to Poisson processes in two simple models: interaction of two boson fields (with conservation of the number of particles in one field) and interaction of a boson with a fermion field. The introduction of a cut-off ensures that the expectation values are well-defined.

  4. Focus On Impact for a Profit-Driven Medical Practice. Part II: Six Processes You Can Use to Maximize and Capitalize on the Uniqueness of Your Practice.

    PubMed

    Lipton-Dibner, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the second part of the proven Focus on Impact strategic model for practice growth. It spotlights six specific processes you can use to maximize and capitalize on the uniqueness of your practice to increase revenues, enhance patient care and service, improve executive team alignment and intra- and interdepartmental teamwork, and dramatically reduce conflict and stress among practice personnel. PMID:26856027

  5. Neural Network Processing of Natural Language: II. Towards a Unified Model of Corticostriatal Function in Learning Sentence Comprehension and Non-Linguistic Sequencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominey, Peter Ford; Inui, Toshio; Hoen, Michel

    2009-01-01

    A central issue in cognitive neuroscience today concerns how distributed neural networks in the brain that are used in language learning and processing can be involved in non-linguistic cognitive sequence learning. This issue is informed by a wealth of functional neurophysiology studies of sentence comprehension, along with a number of recent…

  6. Project SOUL: Computer Training Program for High School Students from Disadvantaged Areas. Part II, The Keypunch and Data Processing Courses. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolever, James

    "Project SOUL" is a summer program in which disadvantaged high school students are given computer training. This section describes the content of the Keypunch and Data Processing Courses conducted in 1970. One or both of these descriptions include course objectives, course outline, teaching guide, and methods of instruction and evaluation. (MK)

  7. Use of a Process Analysis Tool for Diagnostic Study on Fine Particulate Matter Predictions in the U.S.-Part II: Analysis and Sensitivity Simulations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following the Part I paper that described an application of the U.S. EPA Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to the 1999 Southern Oxidants Study episode, this paper presents results from process analysis (PA) using the PA tool embedded in CMAQ and s...

  8. Introducing CAML II

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaia II, Tom; Boyes, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Channel Access Markup Language (CAML) is a XML based markup language and implementation for displaying EPICS channel access controls within a web browser. The CAML II project expanded upon the work of CAML I adding more features and greater integration with other web technologies. The most dramatic new feature introduced in CAML II is the introduction of a namespace so CAML controls can be embedded within XHTML documents. A repetition template with macro substitution allows for rapid coding of arbitrary XHTML repetitions. Enhancements have been made to several controls including more powerful plotting options. Advanced formatting options were introduced for text controls. Virtual process variables allow for custom calculations. An EDL to CAML translator eases the transition from EDM screens to CAML pages.

  9. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part II. Application to electron beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.; Klokkehaug, S.

    2000-03-01

    In the present investigation, a process model for electron beam (EB) welding of different grades of duplex stainless steels (i.e. SAF 2205 and 2507) has been developed. A number of attractive features are built into the original finite element code, including (1) a separate module for prediction of the penetration depth and distribution of the heat source into the plate, (2) adaptive refinement of the three-dimensional (3-D) element mesh for quick and reliable solution of the differential heat flow equation, and (3) special subroutines for calculation of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evolution. The process model has been validated by comparison with experimental data obtained from in situ thermocouple measurements and optical microscope examinations. Subsequently, its aptness to alloy design and optimization of welding conditions for duplex stainless steels is illustrated in different numerical examples and case studies pertaining to EB welding of tubular joints.

  10. A thermodynamic model of nickel smelting and direct high-grade nickel matte smelting processes: Part II. distribution behaviors of Ni, Cu, Co, Fe, As, Sb, and Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Pengfu; Neuschütz, Dieter

    2001-04-01

    A thermodynamic model has been developed to predict the distribution behavior of Ni, Cu, Co, Fe, S, As, Sb, and Bi in nickel smelting and direct high-grade nickel matte smelting processes. The model has been validated by numerous experimental data and industrial data with a wide range of operating conditions. The effect of operating conditions on the distributions of Ni, Cu, Co, As, Sb, and Bi among the gas, matte, and slag phases has been investigated. It was found that the distribution behavior of Ni, Co, Cu, As, Sb, and Bi in the nickel smelting furnace depends on process parameters such as the smelting temperature, matte grade, oxygen enrichment, Fe/SiO2 ratio in the slag, Cu/Ni ratio in charge, and oil/air ratio. The parameters also have an influence on the behavior of Fe3O4 in the slag.

  11. Enhanced humification by carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag--II. Process characterization and the role of inorganic components in the formation of humic-like substances.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guangxia; Yue, Dongbei; Fukushima, Masami; Fukuchi, Shigeki; Nishimoto, Ryo; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-06-01

    Enhanced humification by abiotic catalysts is a potentially promising supplementary composting method for stabilizing organic carbon from biowastes. In this study, the role of steel slag in the transformation of humic precursors was directly characterized by measuring the variance in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), spectroscopic parameters (E(600)), and the concentration and molecular weight change of humic-like substances (HLS) during the process. In addition, a mechanistic study of the process was explored. The results directly showed that steel slag greatly accelerated the formation of HLS. The findings indicate that Fe(III)-and Mn(IV)-oxides in steel slag act as oxidants and substantially enhance the polycondensation of humic precursors. Moreover, the reaction appears to suppress the release of metals from steel slag to a certain extent under acidic conditions. This can be attributed to the cover of HLS on the external surface of steel slag, which is significant for its environmentally sound reuse.

  12. Analysis of glass and glass melts during the vitrification of fly and bottom ashes by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy. Part II. Process analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panne, U.; Clara, M.; Haisch, C.; Niessner, R.

    1998-12-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) is employed for in situ and on-line process analysis of major glass constituents during a vitrification process for fly and bottom ashes from waste incineration. The system is based on an Nd:YAG laser for plasma ignition, while the elemental emissions from the plasma are detected time-resolved by an intensified multichannel analyzer. The perpendicular, single axis, imaging optics allow a remote sensing of the composition of the hot glass melt. Taking into account the plasma characteristics for calibration, good agreement between the LIPS analysis and the established reference analysis is achieved for the concentration ratios of SiO 2, Al 2O 3, and CaO. In addition, LIPS is applied to the analysis of aerosols generated by homogeneous nucleation during the heating-up of the investigated fly ashes. A distinctive temperature dependence of the heavy metal concentration of the aerosols is observed.

  13. Disentangling the Physical Processes Responsible for the Kinetic Complexity in Interfacial Electron Transfer of Excited Ru(II) Polypyridyl Dyes on TiO2.

    PubMed

    Zigler, David F; Morseth, Zachary A; Wang, Li; Ashford, Dennis L; Brennaman, M Kyle; Grumstrup, Erik M; Brigham, Erinn C; Gish, Melissa K; Dillon, Robert J; Alibabaei, Leila; Meyer, Gerald J; Meyer, Thomas J; Papanikolas, John M

    2016-04-01

    Interfacial electron transfer at titanium dioxide (TiO2) is investigated for a series of surface bound ruthenium-polypyridyl dyes whose metal-to-ligand charge-transfer state (MLCT) energetics are tuned through chemical modification. The 12 complexes are of the form Ru(II)(bpy-A)(L)2(2+), where bpy-A is a bipyridine ligand functionalized with phosphonate groups for surface attachment to TiO2. Functionalization of ancillary bipyridine ligands (L) enables the potential of the excited state Ru(III/)* couple, E(+/)*, in 0.1 M perchloric acid (HClO4(aq)) to be tuned from -0.69 to -1.03 V vs NHE. Each dye is excited by a 200 fs pulse of light in the visible region of the spectrum and probed with a time-delayed supercontiuum pulse (350-800 nm). Decay of the MLCT excited-state absorption at 376 nm is observed without loss of the ground-state bleach, which is a clear signature of electron injection and formation of the oxidized dye. The dye-dependent decays are biphasic with time constants in the 3-30 and 30-500 ps range. The slower injection rate constant for each dye is exponentially distributed relative to E(+/)*. The correlation between the exponentially diminishing density of TiO2 sub-band acceptor levels and injection rate is well described using Marcus-Gerischer theory, with the slower decay components being assigned to injection from the thermally equilibrated state and the faster components corresponding to injection from higher energy states within the (3)MLCT manifold. These results and detailed analyses incorporating molecular photophysics and semiconductor density of states measurements indicate that the multiexponential behavior that is often observed in interfacial injection studies is not due to sample heterogeneity. Rather, this work shows that the kinetic heterogeneity results from competition between excited-state relaxation and injection as the photoexcited dye relaxes through the (3)MLCT manifold to the thermally equilibrated state, underscoring the

  14. Disentangling the Physical Processes Responsible for the Kinetic Complexity in Interfacial Electron Transfer of Excited Ru(II) Polypyridyl Dyes on TiO2.

    PubMed

    Zigler, David F; Morseth, Zachary A; Wang, Li; Ashford, Dennis L; Brennaman, M Kyle; Grumstrup, Erik M; Brigham, Erinn C; Gish, Melissa K; Dillon, Robert J; Alibabaei, Leila; Meyer, Gerald J; Meyer, Thomas J; Papanikolas, John M

    2016-04-01

    Interfacial electron transfer at titanium dioxide (TiO2) is investigated for a series of surface bound ruthenium-polypyridyl dyes whose metal-to-ligand charge-transfer state (MLCT) energetics are tuned through chemical modification. The 12 complexes are of the form Ru(II)(bpy-A)(L)2(2+), where bpy-A is a bipyridine ligand functionalized with phosphonate groups for surface attachment to TiO2. Functionalization of ancillary bipyridine ligands (L) enables the potential of the excited state Ru(III/)* couple, E(+/)*, in 0.1 M perchloric acid (HClO4(aq)) to be tuned from -0.69 to -1.03 V vs NHE. Each dye is excited by a 200 fs pulse of light in the visible region of the spectrum and probed with a time-delayed supercontiuum pulse (350-800 nm). Decay of the MLCT excited-state absorption at 376 nm is observed without loss of the ground-state bleach, which is a clear signature of electron injection and formation of the oxidized dye. The dye-dependent decays are biphasic with time constants in the 3-30 and 30-500 ps range. The slower injection rate constant for each dye is exponentially distributed relative to E(+/)*. The correlation between the exponentially diminishing density of TiO2 sub-band acceptor levels and injection rate is well described using Marcus-Gerischer theory, with the slower decay components being assigned to injection from the thermally equilibrated state and the faster components corresponding to injection from higher energy states within the (3)MLCT manifold. These results and detailed analyses incorporating molecular photophysics and semiconductor density of states measurements indicate that the multiexponential behavior that is often observed in interfacial injection studies is not due to sample heterogeneity. Rather, this work shows that the kinetic heterogeneity results from competition between excited-state relaxation and injection as the photoexcited dye relaxes through the (3)MLCT manifold to the thermally equilibrated state, underscoring the

  15. Investigation of proposed process sequence for the array automated assembly task: Phase II. Quarterly technical progress report for quarter ending December 29, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Mardesich, N.; Bunyan, S.; Sipperly, B.

    1980-02-01

    A sulfur hexaflouride plasma etch was investigated as a possible surface treatment to improve the performance of the cell, the Radiation Technology Infrared Furnace was qualified for use in the process sequence, and work was initiated on junction clean up by laser scribing through the junction. An evaluation of the minority carrier diffusion length of silicon crystals received from various vendors was also included in this quarters activities. Results are presented and discussed.

  16. Recovery of 238PuO2 by Molten Salt Oxidation Processing of 238PuO2 Contaminated Combustibles (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remerowski, Mary Lynn; Dozhier, C.; Krenek, K.; VanPelt, C. E.; Reimus, M. A.; Spengler, D.; Matonic, J.; Garcia, L.; Rios, E.; Sandoval, F.; Herman, D.; Hart, R.; Ewing, B.; Lovato, M.; Romero, J. P.

    2005-02-01

    Pu-238 heat sources are used to fuel radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) used in space missions. The demand for this fuel is increasing, yet there are currently no domestic sources of this material. Much of the fuel is material reprocessed from other sources. One rich source of Pu-238 residual material is that from contaminated combustible materials, such as cheesecloth, ion exchange resins and plastics. From both waste minimization and production efficiency standpoints, the best solution is to recover this material. One way to accomplish separation of the organic component from these residues is a flameless oxidation process using molten salt as the matrix for the breakdown of the organic to carbon dioxide and water. The plutonium is retained in the salt, and can be recovered by dissolution of the carbonate salt in an aqueous solution, leaving the insoluble oxide behind. Further aqueous scrap recovery processing is used to purify the plutonium oxide. Recovery of the plutonium from contaminated combustibles achieves two important goals. First, it increases the inventory of Pu-238 available for heat source fabrication. Second, it is a significant waste minimization process. Because of its thermal activity (0.567 W per gram), combustibles must be packaged for disposition with much lower amounts of Pu-238 per drum than other waste types. Specifically, cheesecloth residues in the form of pyrolyzed ash (for stabilization) are being stored for eventual recovery of the plutonium.

  17. Nucleated polymerization with secondary pathways II. Determination of self-consistent solutions to growth processes described by non-linear master equations

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Samuel I. A.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleated polymerisation processes are involved in many growth phenomena in nature, including the formation of cytoskeletal filaments and the assembly of sickle hemoglobin and amyloid fibrils. Closed form rate equations have, however, been challenging to derive for these growth phenomena in cases where secondary nucleation processes are active, a difficulty exemplified by the highly non-linear nature of the equation systems that describe monomer dependent secondary nucleation pathways. We explore here the use of fixed point analysis to provide self-consistent solutions to such growth problems. We present iterative solutions and discuss their convergence behaviour. We establish a range of closed form results for linear growth processes, including the scaling behaviours of the maximum growth rate and of the reaction end-point. We further show that a self-consistent approach applied to the master equation of filamentous growth allows the determination of the evolution of the shape of the length distribution including the mean, the standard deviation and the mode. Our results demonstrate the power of fixed-point approaches in finding closed form self-consistent solutions to growth problems characterised by highly non-linear master equations. PMID:21842955

  18. Adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions by cross-linking chitosan/rectorite nano-hybrid composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lixuan; Chen, Yufei; Zhang, Qiuyun; Guo, Xingmei; Peng, Yanni; Xiao, Huijuan; Chen, Xiaocheng; Luo, Jiwen

    2015-10-01

    Chitosan/rectorie (CTS/REC) nano-hybrid composite microsphere was prepared by changing the proportion of CTS/REC with 2:1, 3:1 and 4:1. Compared with the pure cross-linking chitosan microsphere, the nano-hybrid composite microsphere was proved to have better sorption capacity of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II), especially 2:1(CTS/REC-1). The adsorption behavior of the microsphere of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) was investigated in single and binary metal systems. In single system, the equilibrium studies showed that the adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) followed the Langmuir model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The negative values of (ΔG) suggested that the adsorption process was spontaneous. In binary system, the combined action of the metals was found to be antagonistic and the metal sorption followed the order of Cu(II)>Cd(II)>Ni(II). The regeneration studies indicated that EDTA desorbed Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) from cross-linking microspheres better than HCl. The FT-IR and XPS spectra showed that coordination bonds were formed between Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) and the nitrogen atoms of cross-linking CTS/REC nano-hybrid composite microspheres. PMID:26076634

  19. Using a profiling process to insure program quality: Volume II - support materials. Final progress report, May 15, 1991--November 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kaser, J.S.; Roody, D.S.; Raizen, S.A.

    1996-11-01

    Between 1990 and 1995 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Center for Improving Science Education (National Center) developed a system for ongoing evaluation of K-12 educational programs in the DOE-supported national energy Laboratories. As part of the formative evaluation component of this collaborative endeavor, field staff in the Laboratories began creating profiles of their programs. However, many individuals within DOE Headquarters were not familiar with this profiling process and were unprepared to use the valuable information that the profiles generated. This manual was produced to orient Headquarters staff to profiling. It focuses on how Headquarters staff can use the profiling process to help their funded programs establish and/or maintain high quality. Its purpose, then, is not to train Headquarters staff to become proficient in profiling, but to show them how to draw on the Laboratories` use of profiling to bring about program improvement. Profiling is the process of systematically examining and describing a program`s elements against a set of components that define Effective Practice. The instrument used to capture the data for analysis is called a template, and most of this manual focuses on the templates and how to read and interpret them. However, since it is important to understand these data in context, the authors also describe what should accompany each template in a complete profiling packet and offer guidelines for reviewing complete packets and providing feedback to program managers. This document consists of Support Materials for the manual: exercise answer keys; templates; guidelines for reviewing templates; a complete profiling packet; guidelines for the trainer.

  20. Rotation and shape changes in {sup 151}Tb and {sup 196}Pb: Probes of nuclear structure and tunneling process in warm nuclei. II. Microscopic Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Montanari, D.; Pignanelli, M.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Million, B.; Vigezzi, E.; Wieland, O.; Mason, P.; Matsuo, M.; Shimizu, Y. R.; Curien, D.; Duchene, G.; Robin, J.; Bednarczyk, P.; Kmiecik, M.

    2009-06-15

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the {gamma} decay of superdeformed nuclei has been developed. It is based on microscopic calculations for the energy levels, E2 decay probabilities, collective mass parameters, and potential energy barriers. The use of microscopically calculated quantities largely reduces the parameters of the simulation, allowing one to focus on the basic ingredients of the physical processes. Calculations are performed for the warm rotating superdeformed nuclei {sup 151}Tb and {sup 196}Pb, for which high statistics Euroball IV data are available. The dependence on the simulation parameters is investigated, together with the basic features of the microscopic calculations.

  1. Distributive Processing by the Iron(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Catalytic Domains of the TET Enzymes Is Consistent with Epigenetic Roles for Oxidized 5-Methylcytosine Bases.

    PubMed

    Tamanaha, Esta; Guan, Shengxi; Marks, Katherine; Saleh, Lana

    2016-08-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)C) residues in nucleic acids to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine ((5hm)C), 5-formylcytosine ((5f)C), and 5-carboxycytosine ((5ca)C). These nucleotide bases have been implicated as intermediates on the path to active demethylation, but recent reports have suggested that they might have specific regulatory roles in their own right. In this study, we present kinetic evidence showing that the catalytic domains (CDs) of TET2 and TET1 from mouse and their homologue from Naegleria gruberi, the full-length protein NgTET1, are distributive in both chemical and physical senses, as they carry out successive oxidations of a single (5m)C and multiple (5m)C residues along a polymethylated DNA substrate. We present data showing that the enzyme neither retains (5hm)C/(5f)C intermediates of preceding oxidations nor slides along a DNA substrate (without releasing it) to process an adjacent (5m)C residue. These findings contradict a recent report by Crawford et al. ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016 , 138 , 730 ) claiming that oxidation of (5m)C by CD of mouse TET2 is chemically processive (iterative). We further elaborate that this distributive mechanism is maintained for TETs in two evolutionarily distant homologues and posit that this mode of function allows the introduction of (5m)C forms as epigenetic markers along the DNA. PMID:27362828

  2. Study on the foaming of CaO-SiO2-FeO slags: Part II. Dimensional analysis and foaming in iron and steelmaking processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kimihisa; Fruehan, R. J.

    1989-08-01

    An empirical equation for the foaming index Σ of a CaO-SiO2-FeO slag was obtained by dimensional analysis. The effect of second-phase particles on slag foaming was well described by calculating the viscosity of the mixture using the modified Einstein equation. The anticipated foaming in basic oxygen furnace (BOF), electric arc furnace (EAF), and bath-smelting processes was estimated using the parameter Σ for various operating conditions and slag compositions. For BOF operations, it is predicted that foaming is most extreme in the middle of the blow, and a stable foam in EAF is achieved with less basic slags with low FeO contents. For bath smelting, foam heights of 5 m are possible, and a higher degree of prereduction prior to smelting will reduce foaming (because of smaller gas evolution) and possibly increase production rates. Running the process at a higher pressure will also reduce foam heights, because the volume of gas generated is less.

  3. Beyond capacity limitations II: Effects of lexical processes on word recall in verbal working memory tasks in children with and without specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Mainela-Arnold, Elina; Evans, Julia L.; Coady, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the impact of lexical processes on target word recall in sentence span tasks in children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method Participants were 42 children (ages 8;2–12;3), 21 with SLI and 21 typically developing peers matched on age and nonverbal IQ. Children completed a sentence span task where target words to be recalled varied in word frequency and neighborhood density. Two measures of lexical processes were examined, the number of non-target competitor words activated during a gating task (lexical cohort competition) and word definitions. Results Neighborhood density had no effect on word recall for either group. However, both groups recalled significantly more high than low frequency words. Lexical cohort competition and specificity of semantic representations accounted for unique variance in the number of target word recalled in the SLI and CA groups combined. Conclusions Performance on verbal working memory span tasks for both SLI and CA children is influenced by word frequency, lexical cohorts, and semantic representations. Future studies need to examine the extent to which verbal working memory capacity is a cognitive construct independent of extant language knowledge representations. PMID:20705747

  4. Distributive Processing by the Iron(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Catalytic Domains of the TET Enzymes Is Consistent with Epigenetic Roles for Oxidized 5-Methylcytosine Bases.

    PubMed

    Tamanaha, Esta; Guan, Shengxi; Marks, Katherine; Saleh, Lana

    2016-08-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)C) residues in nucleic acids to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine ((5hm)C), 5-formylcytosine ((5f)C), and 5-carboxycytosine ((5ca)C). These nucleotide bases have been implicated as intermediates on the path to active demethylation, but recent reports have suggested that they might have specific regulatory roles in their own right. In this study, we present kinetic evidence showing that the catalytic domains (CDs) of TET2 and TET1 from mouse and their homologue from Naegleria gruberi, the full-length protein NgTET1, are distributive in both chemical and physical senses, as they carry out successive oxidations of a single (5m)C and multiple (5m)C residues along a polymethylated DNA substrate. We present data showing that the enzyme neither retains (5hm)C/(5f)C intermediates of preceding oxidations nor slides along a DNA substrate (without releasing it) to process an adjacent (5m)C residue. These findings contradict a recent report by Crawford et al. ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016 , 138 , 730 ) claiming that oxidation of (5m)C by CD of mouse TET2 is chemically processive (iterative). We further elaborate that this distributive mechanism is maintained for TETs in two evolutionarily distant homologues and posit that this mode of function allows the introduction of (5m)C forms as epigenetic markers along the DNA.

  5. Type II preliminary pilot plant evaluation of a coal liquefaction residue-water slurry using vacuum tower bottoms from the Exxon donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Colpitts, S.G.; Robin, A.M.

    1982-03-01

    About 16 tons of vacuum tower bottoms (residue) from the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) Process from the liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal were successfully gasified at Texaco's Montebello Research Laboratory. The EDS residue was ground, slurried with water, and fed at ambient temperatures to the gasifier. The gasifier operated smoothly at 1000 psig for almost 17 hours. It was manually shut down after all of the slurry charge had been gasified. A 99.9 percent conversion of the carbon in the feed to syngas was achieved yielding 36.0 SCF of dry syngas per pound of residue charged. The oxygen requirement was 0.9 pounds of oxygen per pound of residue. The dry syngas contained about 80.8 (vol) percent carbon monoxide plus hydrogen. A comparison of the gasification efficiency of EDS residue-water slurry with the gasification efficiency of molten EDS residue revealed that the molten process was more efficient. The molten system had a greater volume percent carbon monoxide plus hydrogen in the product syngas than the residue-water slurry, 88.0% versus 80.9%, and required less oxygen for gasification, 0.80 versus 0.90 pounds of oxygen per pound of residue.

  6. Comparison among the methods for hydrogen peroxide measurements to evaluate advanced oxidation processes: Application of a spectrophotometric method using copper(II) ion and 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaka, Koji; Yamada, Harumi; Matsui, Saburo; Echigo, Shinya; Shishida, Kenichi

    1998-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the range of several tens to several hundreds of micromoles per liter is usually added to the process water in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In this study, a spectrophotometric method using copper(II) ion and 2,9-dimethyl-1, 10-phenanthroline (DMP) for measuring H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration was compared with other methods [i.e., spectrophotometric methods using titanium oxalate and N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD) and a fluorometric method using p-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid (POHPAA)]. Particular attention was paid to sensitivities and effects of coexisting substances. The most sensitive method was the fluorometric method, followed in order by DPD, DMP, and the titanium oxalate colorimetric method; their detection limits in 1-cm cells were 0.16, 0.77, 0.80, and 29 {micro}M, respectively. Therefore, the DMP method was found to be reasonably sensitive when applied to AOPs. In the DMP method, copper(II)-DMP complexes react with humic acid, and colored chemicals are produced. However, the slopes of the calibration curves of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} containing up to 10 mg of C L{sup {minus}1} from humic acid did not change significantly as compared to that in ultrapure water. The effect of chlorine on the DMP method was not observed up to at least 23 {micro}M (0.8 mg of Cl L{sup {minus}1}) of free chlorine, although the DPD and fluorometric methods are known to be interfered by chlorine. From this study, it was concluded that the DMP method is suitable to be used in AOPs.

  7. RISTA II trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John R.

    1998-11-01

    Northrop Grumman Corporation has developed an advanced 2nd generation IR sensor system under the guidance of the US Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) as part of an Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) called Counter Mobile Rocket Launcher (CMRL). Designed to support rapid counter fire against mobile targets from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), the sensor system, called reconnaissance IR surveillance target acquisition (RISTA II), consists of a 2nd generation FLIR/line scanner, a digital data link, a ground processing facility, and an aided target recognizer (AiTF). The concept of operation together with component details was reported at the passive sensors IRIS in March, 1996. The performance testing of the RISTA II System was reported at the National IRIS in November, 1997. The RISTA II sensor has subsequently undergone performance testing on a Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 for a manned reconnaissance application in August and October, 1997, at Volkel Airbase, Netherlands. That testing showed performance compatible with the medium altitude IR sensor performance. The results of that testing, together with flight test imagery, will be presented.

  8. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, SUCCiOlC acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration

  9. Dust in Jupiter's magnetosphere. I - Physical processes. II - Origin of the ring. III - Time variations. IV - Effect on magnetospheric electrons and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Gruen, E.; Johnson, T. V.

    1980-01-01

    The physical processes acting on charged microscopic dust grains in the Jovian atmosphere involve electromagnetic forces which dominate dust particle dynamics and diffusion across field lines resulting from random charge fluctuations of the dust grains. A model of the Jovian ring hypothesizes that the 'visible' ring particles are produced by erosive collisions between an assumed population of kilometer-sized parent bodies and submicron-sized magnetospheric dust particles. Fluctuations in the ring topology and intensity are determined over various time scales, showing that the ring is a quasipermanent and quasistable characteristic of the Jovian system. Finally, the interaction of the Jovian energetic belt electrons and the Jovian plasma with an ambient dust population is examined; the distribution of dust ejected from Io in the inner magnetosphere and losses of magnetospheric ions and electrons due to direct collisions with charged dust particles are calculated.

  10. Type II preliminary pilot-plant evaluation of a coal-liquefaction residue - water slurry using vaccum-tower bottoms from the H-Coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.M.; Robin, A.M.

    1982-09-01

    About 6.7 tons of vacuum tower bottoms (residue) which were obtained during the liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal from the H-Coal liquefaction process pilot plant at Catlettsburg, Kentucky were successfully gasified at Texaco's Montebello Research Laboratory. The single 9.5-hour run with H-Coal liquefaction residue-water slurry was completed at 750 to 760 psig gasifier pressure. The run consisted of two test periods, each at a different gasifier temperature. Over 99.6 percent conversion of carbon in the feed to syngas was achieved yielding 32.9 to 33.7 standard cubic feet of dry syngas per pound of residue charged. The oxygen requirement was about 1.0 pound of oxygen per pound of residue. The dry syngas contained 78.5 to 79.7 (vol.) percent carbon monoxide plus hydrogen.

  11. [Problems during processing and storage of meat in cans. II. Chemical changes in canned meat with long storage time (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Günther, H O

    1975-05-30

    By sensory analysis and according to results of objective chemical investigations meat cans sterilized at 120 degrees C for long storage times were at best evaluated, if they were processed after the 4th and 7th day after slaughter. At first the 4th day; after 2 days the 7th day were preferred. 2. For comparison meat cans with long storage time of 5 and 9 years were analyzed in the same manner. In taste these were empty, strawy, and partly bitter. Frozen meat which was processed according to old procedures (long stored without any shock freezing), was regarded, extremely unagrellable. The attributs were adstringend and soapy. 3. Gelfiltration of diffusates showed a separation in 2 main peaks. The first from fractions 90--130 had a typical aroma of a heated meat, after hydrolysis glucose was detected as main sugar component. The 2th peak from fractions 170--230 tasted more sweet with parfumlike odor, after hydrolysis ribose was detected besides other substances stained by anisidine phthalate. 4. During storage substances of peak 1 were reduced in contrast to peak 2 substances. The latter seemed to be responsible for the aroma and taste at beginning of eating, but no fixation at the tongue could be observed in contrast to the substances of the peak 1. 5. Staining of separated peptides--by electrochromatography--with ninydrin received from the diffusates of the meat cans showed some brown coloured peptides, which disappeared during storage. This was in good correlation with the results of sensory analysis.

  12. Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

    1983-03-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

  13. Evolution and nucleosynthesis of extremely metal-poor and metal-free low- and intermediate-mass stars. II. s-process nucleosynthesis during the core He flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. W.; Lugaro, M.; Karakas, A. I.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Models of primordial and hyper-metal-poor stars that have masses similar to the Sun are known to experience an ingestion of protons into the hot core during the core helium flash phase at the end of their red giant branch evolution. This produces a concurrent secondary flash powered by hydrogen burning that gives rise to further nucleosynthesis in the core. Aims: We aim to model the nucleosynthesis occurring during the proton ingestion event to ascertain if any significant neutron-capture nucleosynthesis occurs. Methods: We perform post-process nucleosynthesis calculations on a one-dimensional stellar evolution calculation of a star with mass 1 M_⊙ and a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -6.5 that suffers a proton ingestion episode. Our network includes 320 nuclear species and 2366 reactions and treats mixing and burning simultaneously. Results: We find that the mixing and burning of protons into the hot convective core leads to the production of 13C, which then burns via the 13C(α, n)16O reaction, releasing a large number of free neutrons. During the first two years of neutron production the neutron poison 14N abundance is low, allowing the prodigious production of heavy elements such as strontium, barium, and lead via slow neutron captures (the s process). These nucleosynthetic products are later carried to the stellar surface and ejected via stellar winds. We compare our results with observations of the hyper-metal-poor halo star HE 1327-2326, which shows a strong Sr overabundance. Conclusions: Our model provides the possibility of self-consistently explaining the Sr overabundance in HE 1327-2326 together with its C, N, and O overabundances (all within a factor of ˜ ~4) if the material were heavily diluted, for example, via mass transfer in a wide binary system. The model produces at least 18 times too much Ba than observed, but this may be within the large modelling uncertainties. In this scenario, binary systems of low mass must have formed in the early

  14. I. Gas adsorption properties and porosity of transition metal-based cyanogels. II. Novel energy transfer processes in organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Rahul Shrikant

    The gas adsorption properties and porosity of cyanide-bridged transition metal-based gels are investigated in the first part of this dissertation. The cyanide bridges, connecting two transition metal centers, are characteristic of these gels; hence, these gels are termed cyanogels. Aerogel versus xerogel structures have a profound effect, both, on the thermodynamics and kinetics of gas adsorption on these cyanogels. Carbon dioxide is selectively adsorbed on palladium-cobalt-based cyanogels; the adsorption is fully reversible on both types of gels discussed. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the gas adsorption processes on these gels are analyzed here. From the ease and reproducibility of the CO2 desorption and the associated enthalpy values, it is concluded that CO2 is physisorbed on these gels. Both the adsorption and desorption processes are first-order in the gels. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on the palladium-cobalt cyanogels is also investigated. Unlike CO 2 physisorption, carbon monoxide is chemisorbed on these gels. An uptake of CO brings about a profound change in the xerogel morphology. The palladium-cobalt-based aerogels possess both micro- and mesoporosity; the xerogels are predominantly microporous with a narrow microporosity. The aerogel surfaces are found to be fractal as analyzed by gas adsorption. Unlike the aerogels, the xerogels do not possess surface fractality. The mechanism of adsorption of different gases on these gels is analyzed based on the gel morphologies. These transition metal-based gels are promising for a variety of applications such as heterogeneous catalysts, gas filters and magnetic materials. The porosity of these gels can be exploited to make gel-embedded filters to separate mixtures of gases based on the their differential adsorption propensities. The reversible adsorption of CO2 can be harnessed practically by using these gels as CO2 storage reservoirs. In the second part of this dissertation, the first, balanced, white

  15. Evaluation of the applicability of nonlinear programming algorithms to a typical commercial process flow-sheeting simulator (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient methodology for using commercial flowsheeting programs with advanced mathematical programming algorithms was developed for the optimization of operating plants. The methodology was demonstrated and validated using ChemShare Corporation's DESIGN/2000 simulation of the Freeport Chemical Company's plant for sulfuric acid manufacture and three nonlinear programming techniques: successive linear programming, successive quadratic programming, and the generalized reduced-gradient method. The application of this methodology begins with the development of a feasible base-case simulation. Partial derivatives of the economic model and constraint equations are computed using fully converged simulations. This information is used to formulate an optimization problem that can be solved with the NLP algorithms giving improved values of the economic model. A line search is constructed through the point found from the nonlinear programming algorithm to find the best feasible point to repeat the procedure. The procedure is repeated using the ChemShare simulation program and the NLP code until convergence criteria are met. This method was applied to three flowsheeting problems; a plant-scale-contact sulfuric acid process model, a packed-bed-reactor design model, and an adiabatic-flash problem.

  16. Chromium (VI) and zinc (II) waste water co-treatment by forming layered double hydroxides: mechanism discussion via two different processes and application in real plating water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Li, Yang; Zhou, Jizhi; Chen, Dan; Qian, Guangren

    2012-02-29

    Two processes, adsorption after synthesis (AAS) and adsorption during synthesis (ADS) were compared in CrO4(2-) and Zn2+/CrO4(2-) removal. Kinetic results showed that ADS was a better method than AAS, since Cr content was 0.65/0.81 mmol/g in Cr-ADS/ZnCr-ADS, but it was only 0.37/0.56 mmol/g in Cr-AAS/ZnCr-AAS. Then, a low-cost mixture was proposed to function as ADS raw materials in treating real plating waters. This mixture first got an isothermal saturation of 1.1 mmol/g in simulated CrO4(2-) water. When Zn2+ was co-treated, it was increased to 1.3 mmol/g. At the same time, a Zn2+ removal of 1.5 mmol/g was attained. Furthermore, real plating water co-treatment reached equilibrium in 6h and obtained 1.4/0.9 mmol/g for Zn2+/CrO4(2-), respectively. According to XRD analysis, this co-treatment enhancement resulted from the formation of Zn and Cr contained layered double hydroxide.

  17. Intact inhibitory control processes in abstinent drug abusers (II): a high-density electrical mapping study in former cocaine and heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Morie, Kristen P; Garavan, Hugh; Bell, Ryan P; De Sanctis, Pierfilippo; Krakowski, Menachem I; Foxe, John J

    2014-07-01

    Response inhibition deficits are well-documented in drug users, and are related to the impulsive tendencies characteristic of the addictive phenotype. Addicts also show significant motivational issues that may accentuate these inhibitory deficits. We investigated the extent to which these inhibitory deficits are present in abstinence. Salience of the task stimuli was also manipulated on the premise that emotionally-valenced inputs might impact inhibitory efficacy by overcoming the blunted responses to everyday environmental inputs characteristic of this population. Participants performed response inhibition tasks consisting of both neutral and emotionally valenced stimuli while high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. Electrophysiological responses (N2/P3 components) to successful inhibitions in abstinent abusers (N = 20) and non-using participants (N = 21) were compared. In contrast to previous work in current users, our abstinent cohort showed no detectable behavioral or electrophysiological differences in their inhibitory responses, and no differences on self-reports of impulsivity, despite their long histories of chronic use (mean = 10.3 years). The current findings are consistent with a recovery of inhibitory control processes as a function of abstinence. Abstinent former users, however, did show a reduced modulation, relative to controls, of their ERPs to valenced input while performing successful inhibitions, although contrary to our hypothesis, the use of valenced inputs had no impact on inhibitory performance. Reduced ERP modulation to emotionally valenced inputs may have implications for relapse in emotional contexts outside the treatment center. PMID:23507565

  18. Non-thermal processes in standard big bang nucleosynthesis: II. Two-body disintegration of D, 7Li, 7Be nuclei by fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.; Nakamura, Makoto; Nakao, Yasuyuki

    2009-05-01

    Continuing the analysis of non-thermal effects in standard big bang nucleosynthesis (JCAP05(2008)010), we examine the role of suprathermal nuclear reactions induced in the early universe plasma by energetic nucleons of various origins. The processes of present interest are break-ups of D, 7Li, 7Be nuclei induced by 14-MeV neutrons generated in the plasma via the T(d, n)4He reaction. It is shown that this reaction forms the ensemble of fast neutrons whose fraction in the plasma neutron component is at the level of 0.01 %. In spite of the small percentage, such neutrons can effectively destroy the loosely bound D, 7Li, 7Be nuclei. It is found that at temperatures T9 < 0.8 the n-induced non-thermal break-ups of D and 7Li dominate over other reactions occurring in the n+D and n+7Li systems. However, the non-thermal neutronic effects prove to be insufficiently strong to modify the standard picture of nucleosynthesis. The D, 3He, 4He abundances are obtained to remain unchanged, and only a little effect is marked for primordial 7Li. The 0.01 % fraction of plasma neutrons (fast DT neutrons) reduces the 7Li abundance by 0.02 %.

  19. [The Mechanisms of Orientation Sensitivity of Human Vision System. Part II: Neural Patterns of Early Processing of Information about Line Orientation].

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, E S; Gerasimenko, N Yu; Krylova, M A; Izyurov, I V; Slavutskaya, A V

    2015-01-01

    The high density EEG was registered in 41 healthy subjects (20 males, 21 females) in the cardinal (horizontal and vertical) and oblique (45 and 135 deg) line orientation identification task. The analysis of the adaptive amplitude maximum (4 ms averaging) of P1 and N1 evoked potentials in the symmetrical occipital, parietal and inferior temporal areas and dipole source modelling showed the anisotropy of cortical responses in the 80-150 ms interval. The amplitude is higher on the oblique orientations as comparison with cardinal ones. The temporal and regional features of cortical answers were discovered. The earlier selective response (~90 ms latency) is registered.in the parietal areas, while the later (~145 ms latency) is found in the occipital ones. We discovered a number of sex-related differences in the early stages of line orientation detection. In males, the amplitude of components is higher; they have broader area of localisation of their dipole sources: in addition to the occipital and parietal regions, cortex of the temporal regions is involved. Theobtained data are discussed in the context of the idea of effective neural coding (Barlow, 1959) and the features of spatial information processing in the visual system of males and females. PMID:26237944

  20. Development of an ultra-high-temperature process for the enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose: II. Oligosaccharide formation by two thermostable beta-glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Petzelbauer, I; Zeleny, R; Reiter, A; Kulbe, K D; Nidetzky, B

    2000-07-20

    During lactose conversion at 70 degrees C, when catalyzed by beta-glycosidases from the archea Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsbetaGly) and Pyrococcus furiosus (CelB), galactosyl transfer to acceptors other than water competes efficiently with complete hydrolysis of substrate. This process leads to transient formation of a range of new products, mainly disaccharides and trisaccharides, and shows a marked dependence on initial substrate concentration and lactose conversion. Oligosaccharides have been analyzed quantitatively by using capillary electrophoresis and high performance anion-exchange chromatography. At 270 g/L initial lactose, they accumulate at a maximum concentration of 86 g/L at 80% lactose conversion. With both enzymes, the molar ratio of trisaccharides to disaccharides is maximal at an early stage of reaction and decreases directly proportional to increasing substrate conversion. Overall, CelB produces about 6% more hydrolysis byproducts than SsbetaGly. However, the product spectrum of SsbetaGly is richer in trisaccharides, and this agrees with results obtained from the steady-state kinetics analyses of galactosyl transfer catalyzed by SsbetaGly and CelB. The major transgalactosylation products of SsbetaGly and CelB have been identified. They are beta-D-Galp-(1-->3)-Glc and beta-D-Galp-(1-->6)-Glc, and beta-D-Galp-(1-->3)-lactose and beta-D-Galp-(1-->6)-lactose, and their formation and degradation have been shown to be dependent upon lactose conversion. Both enzymes accumulate beta(1-->6)-linked glycosides, particularly allolactose, at a late stage of reaction. Because a high oligosaccharide concentration prevails until about 80% lactose conversion, thermostable beta-glycosidases are efficient for oligosaccharide production from lactose. Therefore, they prove to be stable and versatile catalysts for lactose utilization. PMID:10861393

  1. Pseudo-rotation mechanism for fast olefin exchange and substitution processes at orthometalated C,N-complexes of platinum(II).

    PubMed

    Otto, Stefanus; Samuleev, Pavel V; Polyakov, Vladimir A; Ryabov, Alexander D; Elding, Lars I

    2004-11-01

    Bridge splitting in chloroform of the orthometalated chloro-bridged complex [Pt(micro-Cl)(2-Me(2)NCH(2)C(6)H(4))](2)(1), with ethene, cyclooctene, allyl alcohol and phosphine according to 1+ 2L --> 2[PtCl(2-Me(2)NCH(2)C(6)H(4))(L)], where L = C(2)H(4)(3a), C(8)H(14), (3b), CH(2)CHCH(2)OH (3c), and PPh(3)(4a and 4b) gives monomeric species with L coordinated trans or cis to aryl. With olefins the thermodynamically stable isomer with L coordinated cis to aryl is formed directly without an observable intermediate. With phosphine and pyridine, the kinetically controlled trans-product isomerizes slowly to the more stable cis-isomer. Bridge splitting by olefins is slow and first-order in 1 and L, with largely negative DeltaS(++). Substitution of ethene cis to aryl by cyclooctene and allyl alcohol to form 3b and 3c, and substitution of cot from 3b by allyl alcohol to form 3c are first order in olefin and complex, ca. six orders of magnitude faster than bridge cleavage due to a large decrease in DeltaH(++), and with largely negative DeltaS(++). Cyclooctene exchange at 3b is first-order with respect to free cyclooctene and platinum complex. All experimental data for olefin substitution and exchange are compatible with a concerted substitution/isomerization process via a turnstile twist pseudo-rotation in a short-lived labile five-coordinated intermediate, involving initial attack on the labile coordination position trans to the sigma-bonded aryl. Bridge-cleavage reactions of the analogous bridged complexes occur similarly, but are much slower because of their ground-state stabilization and steric hindrance.

  2. Dynamics of ozone and nitrogen oxides at Summit, Greenland. II. Simulating snowpack chemistry during a spring high ozone event with a 1-D process-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Keenan A.; Kramer, Louisa J.; Doskey, Paul V.; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Seok, Brian; Van Dam, Brie; Helmig, Detlev

    2015-09-01

    Observed depth profiles of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) in snowpack interstitial air at Summit, Greenland were best replicated by a 1-D process-scale model, which included (1) geometrical representation of snow grains as spheres, (2) aqueous-phase chemistry confined to a quasi-liquid layer (QLL) on the surface of snow grains, and (3) initialization of the species concentrations in the QLL through equilibrium partitioning with mixing ratios in snowpack interstitial air. A comprehensive suite of measurements in and above snowpack during a high O3 event facilitated analysis of the relationship between the chemistry of snowpack and the overlying atmosphere. The model successfully reproduced 2 maxima (i.e., a peak near the surface of the snowpack at solar noon and a larger peak occurring in the evening that extended down from 0.5 to 2 m) in the diurnal profile of NO2 within snowpack interstitial air. The maximum production rate of NO2 by photolysis of nitrate (NO3-) was approximately 108 molec cm-3 s-1, which explained daily observations of maxima in NO2 mixing ratios near solar noon. Mixing ratios of NO2 in snowpack interstitial air were greatest in the deepest layers of the snowpack at night and were attributed to thermal decomposition of peroxynitric acid, which produced up to 106 molec NO2 cm-3 s-1. Highest levels of NO in snowpack interstitial air were confined to upper layers of the snowpack and observed profiles were consistent with photolysis of NO2. Production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from NO3- photolysis was estimated to be two orders of magnitude larger than NO production and supports the hypothesis that NO3- photolysis is the primary source of NOx within sunlit snowpack in the Arctic. Aqueous-phase oxidation of formic acid by O3 resulted in a maximum consumption rate of ∼106-107 molec cm-3 s-1 and was the primary removal mechanism for O3.

  3. The cytosol-synthesized subunit II (Cox2) precursor with the point mutation W56R is correctly processed in yeast mitochondria to rescue cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Torres, Valentín; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; García-Villegas, Rodolfo; Pérez-Martínez, Xochitl; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González-Halphen, Diego

    2012-12-01

    Deletion of the yeast mitochondrial gene COX2 encoding subunit 2 (Cox2) of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) results in loss of respiration (Δcox2 strain). Supekova et al. (2010) [1] transformed a Δcox2 strain with a vector expressing Cox2 with a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) and the point mutation W56R (Cox2(W56R)), restoring respiratory growth. Here, the CcO carrying the allotopically-expressed Cox2(W56R) was characterized. Yeast mitochondria from the wild-type (WT) and the Δcox2+Cox2(W56R) strains were subjected to Blue Native electrophoresis. In-gel activity of CcO and spectroscopic quantitation of cytochromes revealed that only 60% of CcO is present in the complemented strain, and that less CcO is found associated in supercomplexes as compared to WT. CcOs from the WT and the mutant exhibited similar subunit composition, although activity was 20-25% lower in the enzyme containing Cox2(W56R) than in the one with Cox2(WT). Tandem mass spectrometry confirmed that W(56) was substituted by R(56) in Cox2(W56R). In addition, Cox2(W56R) exhibited the same N-terminus than Cox2(WT), indicating that the MTS of Oxa1 and the leader sequence of 15 residues were removed from Cox2(W56R) during maturation. Thus, Cox2(W56R) is identical to Cox2(WT) except for the point mutation W56R. Mitochondrial Cox1 synthesis is strongly reduced in Δcox2 mutants, but the Cox2(W56R) complemented strain led to full restoration of Cox1 synthesis. We conclude that the cytosol-synthesized Cox2(W56R) follows a rate-limiting process of import, maturation or assembly that yields lower steady-state levels of CcO. Still, the allotopically-expressed Cox2(W56R) restores CcO activity and allows mitochondrial Cox1 synthesis to advance at WT levels.

  4. Proteolytic degradation of topoisomerase II (Top2) enables the processing of Top2·DNA and Top2·RNA covalent complexes by tyrosyl-DNA-phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2).

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Schellenberg, Matthew J; Huang, Shar-Yin N; Abdelmalak, Monica; Marchand, Christophe; Nitiss, Karin C; Nitiss, John L; Williams, R Scott; Pommier, Yves

    2014-06-27

    Eukaryotic type II topoisomerases (Top2α and Top2β) are homodimeric enzymes; they are essential for altering DNA topology by the formation of normally transient double strand DNA cleavage. Anticancer drugs (etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone) and also Top2 oxidation and DNA helical alterations cause potentially irreversible Top2·DNA cleavage complexes (Top2cc), leading to Top2-linked DNA breaks. Top2cc are the therapeutic mechanism for killing cancer cells. Yet Top2cc can also generate recombination, translocations, and apoptosis in normal cells. The Top2 protein-DNA covalent complexes are excised (in part) by tyrosyl-DNA-phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2/TTRAP/EAP2/VPg unlinkase). In this study, we show that irreversible Top2cc induced in suicidal substrates are not processed by TDP2 unless they first undergo proteolytic processing or denaturation. We also demonstrate that TDP2 is most efficient when the DNA attached to the tyrosyl is in a single-stranded configuration and that TDP2 can efficiently remove a tyrosine linked to a single misincorporated ribonucleotide or to polyribonucleotides, which expands the TDP2 catalytic profile with RNA substrates. The 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of TDP2 bound to a substrate bearing a 5'-ribonucleotide defines a mechanism through which RNA can be accommodated in the TDP2 active site, albeit in a strained conformation.

  5. Competitive Fe(II)-Zn(II) uptake on a synthetic montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Soltermann, Daniela; Marques Fernandes, Maria; Baeyens, Bart; Miehé-Brendlé, Jocelyne; Dähn, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of Fe(II) with clay minerals is of particular relevance in global geochemical processes controlling metal and nutrient cycles and the fate of contaminants. In this context, the influence of competitive sorption effects between Fe(II) and other relevant transition metals on their uptake characteristics and mobility remains an important issue. Macroscopic sorption experiments combined with surface complexation modeling and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy were applied to elucidate competitive sorption processes between divalent Fe and Zn at the clay mineral-water interface. Sorption isotherms were measured on a synthetic iron-free montmorillonite (IFM) under anoxic conditions (O2 <0.1 ppm) for the combinations of Zn(II)/Fe(II) and Fe(II)/Zn(II), where the former metal in each pair represents the trace metal (<10(-7) M) and the latter the competing metal at higher concentrations (10(-7) to 10(-3) M). Results of the batch sorption and EXAFS measurements indicated that Fe(II) is competing with trace Zn(II) for the same type of strong sites if Fe(II) is present in excess, whereas no competition between trace Fe(II) and Zn(II) was observed if Zn(II) is present at high concentrations. The noncompetitive behavior suggests the existence of sorption sites which have a higher affinity for Fe(III), where surface-induced oxidation of the sorbed Fe(II) to Fe(III) occurred, and which are not accessible for Zn(II). The understanding of this competitive uptake mechanism between Fe(II) and Zn(II) is of great importance to assess the bioavailability and mobility of transition metals in the natural environment. PMID:24289476

  6. Reproduction (II): Human Control of Reproductive Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jost, Alfred

    1970-01-01

    Describes methods of intervening in reproduction of animals and humans (artificial insemination, contraception, ovular and blastodisc transplants, pre selection of sex, cloning) and discusses the social implications of their use with humans. (AL)

  7. Electroanalytical investigation on the interaction between 6-mercaptopurine and zinc(II), lead(II), and cadmium(II) ions in nonaqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Cinquantini, A; Cini, R; Zanello, P

    1980-04-01

    Different electroanalytical techniques have been employed in the study of the interaction between 6-mercaptopurine and zinc(II), lead(II), and cadmium(II) ions in ethanol, dimethylformamide, and dimethylsulfoxide. The stoichiometry of the formed complexes was determined as well as their instability constants. The kinetic parameters of the electrode processes have been also evaluated.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles impregnated on apple pomace to enhanced adsorption of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chand, Piar; Pakade, Yogesh B

    2015-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were synthesized, characterized, and impregnated onto apple pomace surface (HANP@AP) for efficient removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions from water. HANP@AP was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and surface area analysis. Batch sorption studies were carried out to investigate the influence of different parameters as amount of dose (g), pH, time (min), and initial concentration (mg L(-1)) on adsorption process. Experimental kinetic data followed pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium data well fitted to Langmuir adsorption model with maximum adsorption capacities of 303, 250, and 100 mg g(-1) for Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions, respectively. Competitive adsorption of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions in presences of each other was studied to evaluate the removal efficiency of HANP@AP against multi metal-loaded water. HANP@AP was successfully applied to real industrial wastewater with 100 % removal of all three metal ions even at high concentration. HANP@AP could be recycled for four, four, and three cycles in case of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II), respectively. The study showed that HANP@AP is fast, cost effective, and environmental friendly adsorbent for removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions from real industrial wastewater.

  9. PEP-II Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Gaydosh, Michael

    2003-05-14

    The PEP-II Asymmetric B-factory consists of two independent storage rings, one located atop the other in the 2200m-circumference PEP tunnel. The high-energy ring, which stores a 9-GeV electron beam, is an upgrade of the existing PEP collider. It re-utilizes all of the PEP magnets and incorporates a state-of-the-art copper vacuum chamber and a new RF system capable of supporting a one-amp stored beam. The low-energy ring, which stores 3.1-GeV positrons, is new construction. Injection is achieved by extracting electrons and positrons at collision energies from the SLC and transporting them each in a dedicated bypass line. The low-emittance SLC beams will be used for the injection process.

  10. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II.

  11. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II.

  12. Angiotensin II disrupts inhibitory avoidance memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Juliana S; Bevilaqua, Lia R; Zinn, Carolina G; Kerr, Daniel S; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2006-08-01

    The brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in learning and memory, but the actual role of angiotensin II (A(II)) and its metabolites in this process has been difficult to comprehend. This has been so mainly due to procedural issues, especially the use of multi-trial learning paradigms and the utilization of pre-training intracerebroventricular infusion of RAS-acting compounds. Here, we specifically analyzed the action of A(II) in aversive memory retrieval using a hippocampal-dependent, one-trial, step-down inhibitory avoidance task (IA) in combination with stereotaxically localized intrahippocampal infusion of drugs. Rats bilaterally implanted with infusion cannulae aimed to the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus were trained in IA and tested for memory retention 24 h later. We found that when given into CA1 15 min before IA memory retention test, A(II), but not angiotensin IV or angiotensin(1-7) induced a dose-dependent and reversible amnesia without altering locomotor activity, exploratory behavior or anxiety state. The effect of A(II) was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by the A(II)-type 2 receptor (AT(2)) antagonist PD123319 but not by the A(II)-type 1 receptor (AT(1)) antagonist losartan. By themselves, neither PD123319 nor losartan had any effect on memory expression. Our data indicate that intra-CA1 A(II) hinders retrieval of avoidance memory through a process that involves activation of AT(2) receptors.

  13. [Study on hemolytic mechanism of polyphyllin II].

    PubMed

    Ning, Li-hua; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Yao-xiang; Li, Xin-ping

    2015-09-01

    To study the hemolytic effect of polyphyllin II (PP II) mediated by anion channel protein and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), in order to initially reveal its hemolytic mechanism in vitro. In the experiment, the spectrophotometric method was adopted to detect the hemolysis of PP II in vitro and the effect of anion channel-related solution and blocker, glucose channel-related inhibitor and multi-target drugs dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and diazepam on the hemolysis of PP II. The scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope were used to observe the effect of PP II on erythrocyte (RBC) morphology. The results showed that PP II -processed blood cells were severely deformed into spherocytes, acanthocyturia and vesicae. According to the results of the PP II hemolysis experiment in vitro, the anion hypertonic solution LiCl, NaHCO3, Na2SO4 and PBS significantly inhibited the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.05), while blockers NPPB and DIDS remarkably promoted it (P < 0.01). Hyperosmotic sodium chloride, fructose and glucose at specific concentrations notably antagonized the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.05). The glucose channel inhibitor Cytochalasin B and verapamil remarkably antagonized the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.01). The hemolysis induced by PP II could also be antagonized by 1 gmol x L(1) diazepam and 100 μmol x L(-1) DHEA pretreated for 1 min (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the hemolytic mechanism of PP II in vitro may be related to the increase in intracellular osmotic pressure and rupture of erythrocytes by changing the anion channel transport activity, with GLUT1 as the major competitive interaction site. PMID:26983211

  14. FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-26

    FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) II ... stratocumulus systems, the radiative properties of these clouds and their interactions. Relevant Documents:  FIRE Project Guide FIRE II - Cirrus Home Page FIRE II - Cirrus Mission Summaries ...

  15. Solvent Refined Coal-II (SRC-II) detailed environmental plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This document describes environmental research which will: aid in the development of an environmentally acceptable SRC-II process; and provide data for environmental assessment of the process. The SRC-II process is described, criteria for selection of samples to undergo environmental analyses are given, and approximate timelines are presented for obtaining pertinent samples. At this time, the SRC-II process is at the pilot-plant stage of development and a demonstration facility is scheduled to begin operation in 1984. Since design criteria may change, the environmental research described in this document is organized in four phases which correlate with and will provide information early in process development. Phase I research (screening) evaluates samples from existing SRC-II facilities (pilot, process demonstration unit (PDU), bench) which may bracket potential demonstration/commercial practice in terms of physical and chemical criteria. The samples are being subjected to a battery of short-term biomedical and ecological assays. Chemical fractionation and analysis are being performed to determine compounds and compound classes of potential concern. Phase II (baseline) research will evaluate SRC-II materials which are considered most representative of potential demonstration/commercial practice. These materials will be subjected to longer-term, more-extensive biological and ecological analyses relative to effects and environmental fate. Phase III research will examine effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential environmental properties of SRC-II materials. Phase IV research (onsite monitoring) will develop methods and initiate environmental monitoring for effects at the SRC-II demonstration facility and potential commercial sites. This document also describes industrial hygiene programs which must occur throughout SRC-II process development.

  16. Application Programming in AWIPS II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, Matt; McGrath, Kevin; Burks, Jason; Carcione, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Since its inception almost 8 years ago, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has integrated NASA data into the National Weather Service's decision support system (DSS) the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). SPoRT has, in some instances, had to shape and transform data sets into various formats and manipulate configurations to visualize them in AWIPS. With the advent of the next generation of DSS, AWIPS II, developers will be able to develop their own plugins to handle any type of data. Raytheon is developing AWIPS II to be a more extensible package written mainly in Java, and built around a Service Oriented Architecture. A plugin architecture will allow users to install their own code modules, and (if all the rules have been properly followed) they will work hand-in-hand with AWIPS II as if it were originally built in. Users can bring in new datasets with existing plugins, tweak plugins to handle a nuance or desired new functionality, or create an entirely new visualization layout for a new dataset. SPoRT is developing plugins to ensure its existing NASA data will be ready for AWIPS II when it is delivered, and to prepare for the future of new instruments on upcoming satellites.

  17. Competitive adsorption of copper(II), cadmium(II), lead(II) and zinc(II) onto basic oxygen furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yongjie; Hou, Haobo; Zhu, Shujing

    2009-02-15

    Polluted and contaminated water can often contain more than one heavy metal species. It is possible that the behavior of a particular metal species in a solution system will be affected by the presence of other metals. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) onto basic oxygen furnace slag (BOF slag) in single- and multi-element solution systems as a function of pH and concentration, in a background solution of 0.01M NaNO(3). In adsorption edge experiments, the pH was varied from 2.0 to 13.0 with total metal concentration 0.84mM in the single element system and 0.21mM each of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) in the multi-element system. The value of pH(50) (the pH at which 50% adsorption occurs) was found to follow the sequence Zn>Cu>Pb>Cd in single-element systems, but Pb>Cu>Zn>Cd in the multi-element system. Adsorption isotherms at pH 6.0 in the multi-element systems showed that there is competition among various metals for adsorption sites on BOF slag. The adsorption and potentiometric titrations data for various slag-metal systems were modeled using an extended constant-capacitance surface complexation model that assumed an ion-exchange process below pH 6.5 and the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes at higher pH. Inner-sphere complexation was more dominant for the Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) systems.

  18. Type II universal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  19. Angiotensin II receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek; Yee, Daniel K; Fluharty, Steven J

    2007-05-01

    Angiotensin II plays a key role in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. To correct body fluid deficits that occur during hypovolaemia, an animal needs to ingest both water and electrolytes. Thus, it is not surprising that angiotensin II, which is synthesized in response to hypovolaemia, acts centrally to increase both water and NaCl intake. Here, we review findings relating to the properties of angiotensin II receptors that give rise to changes in behaviour. Data are described to suggest that divergent signal transduction pathways are responsible for separable behavioural responses to angiotensin II, and a hypothesis is proposed to explain how this divergence may map onto neural circuits in the brain.

  20. Thiol-functionalized polysilsesquioxane as efficient adsorbent for adsorption of Hg(II) and Mn(II) from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Yuzhong Qu, Rongjun; Liu, Xiguang; Mu, Lei; Bu, Baihui; Sun, Yuting; Chen, Hou; Meng, Yangfeng; Meng, Lina; Cheng, Lin

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • PMPSQ was promising adsorbent for the removal of Hg(II) and Mn(II). • The adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model. • The adsorption isotherms can be described by the monolayer Langmuir model. • The adsorption was controlled by film diffusion and chemical ion-exchange mechanism. - Abstract: Thiol-functionalized polysilsesquioxane was synthesized and used for the adsorption of Hg(II) and Mn(II) from aqueous solution. Results showed that the optimal pH was about 6 and 5 for Hg(II) and Mn(II), respectively. Adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption equilibriums were established within 100 min and followed pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption isotherms revealed that the adsorption capacities increased with the increasing of temperature. The adsorption was found to be well described by the monolayer Langmuir isotherm model and took place by chemical ion-exchange mechanism. The thermodynamic properties indicated the adsorption processes were spontaneous and endothermic nature. Selectively adsorption showed that PMPSQ can selectively adsorb Hg(II) from binary ion systems in the presence of the coexistent ions Mn(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). Based on the results, it is concluded that PMPSQ had comparable high adsorption efficiency and could be potentially used for the removal of Hg(II) and Mn(II) from aqueous solution.

  1. Kinetics of homogeneous and surface-catalyzed mercury(II) reduction by iron(II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amirbahman, Aria; Kent, Douglas B.; Curtis, Gary P.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Production of elemental mercury, Hg(0), via Hg(II) reduction is an important pathway that should be considered when studying Hg fate in environment. We conducted a kinetic study of abiotic homogeneous and surface-catalyzed Hg(0) production by Fe(II) under dark anoxic conditions. Hg(0) production rate, from initial 50 pM Hg(II) concentration, increased with increasing pH (5.5–8.1) and aqueous Fe(II) concentration (0.1–1 mM). The homogeneous rate was best described by the expression, rhom = khom [FeOH+] [Hg(OH)2]; khom = 7.19 × 10+3 L (mol min)−1. Compared to the homogeneous case, goethite (α-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) increased and γ-alumina (γ-Al2O3) decreased the Hg(0) production rate. Heterogeneous Hg(0) production rates were well described by a model incorporating equilibrium Fe(II) adsorption, rate-limited Hg(II) reduction by dissolved and adsorbed Fe(II), and rate-limited Hg(II) adsorption. Equilibrium Fe(II) adsorption was described using a surface complexation model calibrated with previously published experimental data. The Hg(0) production rate was well described by the expression rhet = khet [>SOFe(II)] [Hg(OH)2], where >SOFe(II) is the total adsorbed Fe(II) concentration; khet values were 5.36 × 10+3, 4.69 × 10+3, and 1.08 × 10+2 L (mol min)−1 for hematite, goethite, and γ-alumina, respectively. Hg(0) production coupled to reduction by Fe(II) may be an important process to consider in ecosystem Hg studies.

  2. A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the process ZH → ℓ+-b$\\bar{b}$ in 4.1 fb-1 of CDF II data

    SciTech Connect

    Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki

    2010-05-01

    parameter in the theory. Experimental evidence suggests that the Higgs mass has a value between 114.4 and 186 GeV/c2. Particles with a mass in this range can be produced in collisions of less massive particles accelerated to near the speed of light. Currently, one of only a few machines capable of achieving collision energies large enough to potentially produce a standard model Higgs boson is the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider located at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. This dissertation describes the effort to observe the standard model Higgs in Tevatron collisions recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) II experiment in the ZH →ℓ+-b$\\bar{b}$ production and decay channel. In this process, the Higgs is produced along with a Z boson which decays to a pair of electrons or muons (Z →ℓ+-), while the Higgs decays to a bottom anti-bottom quark pair (H → b$\\bar{b}$). A brief overview of the standard model and Higgs theory is presented in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 explores previous searches for the standard model Higgs at the Tevatron and elsewhere. The search presented in this dissertation expands upon the techniques and methods developed in previous searches. The fourth chapter contains a description of the Tevatron collider and the CDF II detector. The scope of the discussion in Chapter 4 is limited to the experimental components relevant to the current ZH →ℓ+-b$\\bar{b}$ search. Chapter 5 presents the details of object reconstruction; the methods used to convert detector signals into potential electrons, muons or quarks. Chapter six describes the data sample studied for the presence of a ZH →ℓ+-b$\\bar{b}$ signal and details the techniques used to model the data. The model accounts for both signal and non-signal processes (backgrounds) which are expected to contribute to the observed event sample. Chapters 7

  3. The Stark II reality.

    PubMed

    Memel, Sherwin L; Grosvenor, John C

    2003-02-01

    The long awaited final regulations in Phase I of a two-phase rulemaking process under the Stark II law were published on January 4, 2001. The Phase I final rules govern interpretation of the Stark law as it is applied to referrals by a physician for designated categories of health services to entities in which the referring physician has a financial interest. These new regulations are of particular concern to specialists, such as orthopaedic surgeons, whose practices are oriented to ancillary services that are considered designated health services, such as radiology, physical therapy and durable medical equipment, and where the availability of clear guidance is essential to ensure that medically necessary care is provided in a manner that complies with law. However, rather than the "brightline" guidance that the healthcare community sought, the new regulations create uncertainty in areas that had not existed before. The new regulations require physicians to evaluate the full range of their business and professional relationships to avoid the risk of nonpayment of claims, civil money penalties, or program exclusion after the effective date of the new regulations. PMID:12567126

  4. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  5. World War II Homefront.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  6. DNA methyltransferase inhibitor CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zirong; Jin, Guorong; Lin, Shuibin; Lin, Xiumei; Gu, Yumei; Zhu, Yujuan; Hu, Chengbin; Zhang, Qingjiong; Wu, Lizi; Shen, Huangxuan

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors and structural proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibited proliferation and migration of C2C12 myoblasts. -- Abstract: CDA-II (cell differentiation agent II), isolated from healthy human urine, is a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. Previous studies indicated that CDA-II played important roles in the regulation of cell growth and certain differentiation processes. However, it has not been determined whether CDA-II affects skeletal myogenesis. In this study, we investigated effects of CDA-II treatment on skeletal muscle progenitor cell differentiation, migration and proliferation. We found that CDA-II blocked differentiation of murine myoblasts C2C12 in a dose-dependent manner. CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors, such as Myogenin and Mef2c, and structural proteins, such as myosin heavy chain (Myh3), light chain (Mylpf) and MCK. Moreover, CDA-II inhibited C1C12 cell migration and proliferation. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that CDA-II inhibits growth and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells, suggesting that the use of CDA-II might affect skeletal muscle functions.

  7. Amino-functionalized core-shell magnetic mesoporous composite microspheres for Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulin; Liang, Song; Wang, Juntao; Yu, Shuili; Wang, Yilong

    2013-04-01

    Amino-functionalized Fe3O4@mesoporous SiO2 core-shell composite microspheres NH2-MS in created in multiple synthesis steps have been investigated for Pb(II) and Cd(II) adsorption. The microspheres were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption, zeta potential measurements and vibrating sample magnetometer. Batch adsorption tests indicated that NH2-MS exhibited higher adsorption affinity toward Pb(II) and Cd(II) than MS did. The Langmuir model could fit the adsorption isotherm very well with maximum adsorption capacity of 128.21 and 51.81 mg/g for Pb(II) and Cd(II), respectively, implying that adsorption processes involved monolayer adsorption. Pb(II) and Cd(II) adsorption could be well described by the pseudo second-order kinetics model, and was found to be strongly dependent on pH and humic acid. The Pb(II)- and Cd(II)-loaded microspheres were effectively desorbed using 0.01 mol/L HCl or EDTA solution. NH2-MS have promise for use as adsorbents in the removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) in wastewater treatment processes. PMID:23923794

  8. Cu(II) and Zn(II) adsorption capacity of three different clay liner materials.

    PubMed

    Musso, T B; Parolo, M E; Pettinari, G; Francisca, F M

    2014-12-15

    Sorption of Cu(II) and Zn(II) on three natural clays meeting the international requirements for use as liners was evaluated by means of batch tests. The purpose of this research was to determine the retention capacities of the clays for metal cations commonly present in urban solid waste leachates. The pH and ionic strength conditions were set at values frequently found in real leachates. The changes observed in the XRD patterns and FTIR spectra upon adsorption can be considered an evidence of clay-metal electrostatic interaction. The Langmuir model was found to best describe the sorption processes, offering maximum sorption capacities from 8.16 to 56.89 mg/g for Cu(II) and from 49.59 to 103.83 mg/g for Zn(II). All samples remove more Zn(II) than Cu(II), which may be related to the different geometry of the hydrated Cu(II) cation. The total amount of metal sorption was strongly influenced by the total specific surface area, the presence of carbonates and the smectite content of the clays. In addition to their known quality as physical barriers, the adsorbed amounts obtained indicate the suitability of the tested clays to contribute to the retardation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) transport through clay liners.

  9. Copper(II) and lead(II) sorption from aqueous solution by non-living Spirogyra neglecta.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alpana; Kumar, Dhananjay; Gaur, J P

    2007-12-01

    Dried biomass of Spirogyra neglecta rapidly sorbed the test metals and the process became saturated in 10-20min. Maximum sorption of Pb(II) [116.1mgg(-1)] and Cu(II) [115.3mgg(-1)] occurred at 0.1gl(-1) biomass and 100mgl(-1) metal concentration in the solution. Sorption of Cu(II) and Pb(II) occurred optimally at pH 4.5 and 5.0, respectively. Lead(II) and Cu(II) sorption were lesser from binary metal solution than from single metal solution. Lead(II) more severely inhibited Cu(II) sorption than vice versa thus reflecting greater affinity of Pb(II) for the biomass. NaOH pretreatment slightly enhanced the metal removal ability of the biomass. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles, Pb(II) and Cu(II) sorption decreased by 11% and 27%, respectively, at the end of the fifth cycle due inter alia to 10-15% loss of biomass. Nevertheless, Spirogyra appears to be a good sorbent for removing metals Cu(II) and Pb(II) from wastewaters.

  10. Angiotensin II: Immunohistochemical Study in Sardinian Pterygium

    PubMed Central

    Demurtas, P.; Corrias, M.; Zucca, I.; Piras, F.; Sirigu, P.; Perra, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    The Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the principal effector peptide of the RAS system. It has a pleiotropic effect and, beside its physiological role, it has the property to stimulate angiogenesis and activate multiple signalling pathways related to cell proliferation. The purpose of the study was to determinate the Ang II expression and localization in Sardinian pterygium and normal conjunctiva by immunohistochemistry, and its possible involvement in the development and progression of the disease. Twenty-three pterygiums and eleven normal conjunctiva specimens obtained from Sardinian patients, were processed for paraffin embedding and assessed for the immunohistochemi-cal revelation of Ang II. Significant Ang II expression was identified in pterygium and conjunctiva. Particularly, thirteen pterygium specimens (n=13) displayed exclusively moderate to strong nuclear staining; some specimens (n=5) showed exclusively a moderate cytoplasmic immunoreactivity, and few specimens (n=2) displayed moderate to strong immunoreactivity in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Only 3 specimens were negative. Statistical significance difference in respect of nuclear and cytoplasmic localization was observed between normal conjunctiva and pterygium (P=0.020). The results showed a predominant intranuclear localization of Ang II in pterygium epithelial cells, in spite of conjunctiva that mainly showed cytoplasmic localization. These findings suggest a possible role for Ang II in the development and/or progression of pterygium mediated by the activation of local RAS system. PMID:25308851

  11. Denitrification of the polar winter stratosphere: Implications of SAM II (Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II) cloud formation temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, P. ); Toon, O.B. )

    1990-03-01

    The authors use the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II (SAM II) extinction profiles and the associated temperature profiles to determine the amount of denitrification of the winter polar stratospheres. The authors see clear evidence of the denitrification process in the Antarctic data. There are indications in the Arctic data that denitrification mechanisms may be at work there also. At the latitudes observed by the SAM II satellite system, denitrification begins before the formation of extensive ice clouds and may be due to sedimentation of nitric acid particles. However, they cannot exclude the possibility of denitrification by type II PSC's at latitudes not observed by SAM II.

  12. Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II

    MedlinePlus

    Sipple syndrome; MEN II; Pheochromocytoma - MEN II; Thyroid cancer - pheochromocytoma; Parathyroid cancer - pheochromocytoma ... The cause of MEN II is a defect in a gene called RET. This defect causes many tumors to appear in the same ...

  13. 1998-1999 Patterns of Care Study process survey of national practice patterns using breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the management of Stage I-II breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Moughan, Jennifer; White, Julia; Winchester, David P.; Owen, Jean; Wilson, J. Frank

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study survey process evaluation has been an effective means of assessing the evaluation and treatment practices used by radiation oncologists in the United States for Stage I-II breast cancer. The current 1998-1999 report updates the previous 1989 and 1993-1994 analyses and reflects the recent changes in surgery and systemic therapy observed nationally in the management of early-stage disease. Methods and Materials: A weighted sample size of 71,877 patient records of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (RT) was obtained from a stratified two-stage sampling of 353 patient records. These cases were centrally reviewed from academic and private radiation oncology practices across the United States. The data collected included patient characteristics, clinical and pathologic factors, and surgical and RT details. The results were compared with those of previous Patterns of Care Study survey reports. Results: Of the patients in the current survey, 97% had undergone mammography before biopsy. A review of the primary tumor pathologic findings indicated improved quantification of an intraductal component from 7.0% in 1993-1994 to 20.4% in 1998-1999 (p = 0.01). The tumor characteristics were better defined, with estrogen and progesterone receptor measurement performed in 91.4% and 91.3% in the 1998-1999 survey vs. 83.7% and 80.3% in the 1989 survey, respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002, respectively). Axillary dissection was performed in 82.2% in the present survey compared with 93.6% in the 1993-1994 survey (p = 0.0004); sentinel node biopsy was performed in 20.1% of the present cases. The use of CT for planning was increased in the current survey, with 22.9% cases CT planned vs. 9% in 1993-1994 (p = 0.10). In the present survey, 100% had received whole breast RT. When a supraclavicular field was added, the dose was prescribed to a specified depth in 67.5% of cases, most commonly 3 cm. When an axillary field was added

  14. Reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by magnetite.

    PubMed

    Wiatrowski, Heather A; Das, Soumya; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Ilton, Eugene S; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

    2009-07-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a highly toxic element, and its contamination of groundwater presents a significant threat to terrestrial ecosystems. Understanding the geochemical processes that mediate mercury transformations in the subsurface is necessary to predict its fate and transport. In this study, we investigated the redox transformation of mercuric Hg (Hg[II]) in the presence of the Fe(II)/Fe(III) mixed valence iron oxide mineral magnetite. Kinetic and spectroscopic experiments were performed to elucidate reaction rates and mechanisms. The experimental data demonstrated that reaction of Hg(II) with magnetite resulted in the loss of Hg(II) and the formation of volatile elemental Hg (Hg[0]). Kinetic experiments showed that Hg(II) reduction occurred within minutes, with reaction rates increasing with increasing magnetite surface area (0.5 to 2 m2/L) and solution pH (4.8 to 6.7), and decreasing with increasing chloride concentration (10(-6) to 10(-2) mol/L). Mössbauer spectroscopic analysis of reacted magnetite samples revealed a decrease in Fe(II) content, corresponding to the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in the magnetite structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy detected the presence of Hg(II) on magnetite surfaces, implying that adsorption is involved in the electron transfer process. These results suggest that Hg(II) reaction with solid-phase Fe(II) is a kinetically favorable pathway for Hg(II) reduction in magnetite-hearing environmental systems.

  15. SCORPION II persistent surveillance system update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coster, Michael; Hunt, Cassandra

    2011-06-01

    This paper highlights the most recently added features and benefits available in the latest generation of Northrop Grumman SCORPION II persistent surveillance and target recognition systems. By leveraging smaller, lighter, and more power efficient SCORPION II sensor and universal gateway components, with foliage penetrating ad-hoc network communications, persistent field programmable systems that are easier to conceal can be optimized for both image capture and data exfiltration. In addition to the SCORPION II suite of sensor components, a growing list of over sixty different sensor and camera types from a variety of manufacturers have been integrated with the SCORPION Gateway family. In addition to updating several different COP systems, SCORPION and SCORPION II data can be directly processed using a common sensor status graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for viewing and analysis of images and sensor data from hundreds of SCORPION system gateways on single or multiple displays.

  16. Desolvation-Driven 100-Fold Slow-down of Tunneling Relaxation Rate in Co(II)-Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets through a Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Process

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Wu, Jie-Yi; Huang, Guo-Zhang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Jia, Jian-Hua; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are regarded as a class of promising materials for spintronic and ultrahigh-density storage devices. Tuning the magnetic dynamics of single-molecule magnets is a crucial challenge for chemists. Lanthanide ions are not only highly magnetically anisotropic but also highly sensitive to the changes in the coordination environments. We developed a feasible approach to understand parts of the magneto-structure correlations and propose to regulate the relaxation behaviors via rational design. A series of Co(II)-Dy(III)-Co(II) complexes were obtained using in situ synthesis; in this system of complexes, the relaxation dynamics can be greatly improved, accompanied with desolvation, via single-crystal to single-crystal transformation. The effective energy barrier can be increased from 293 cm−1 (422 K) to 416 cm−1 (600 K), and the tunneling relaxation time can be grown from 8.5 × 10−4 s to 7.4 × 10−2 s. These remarkable improvements are due to the change in the coordination environments of Dy(III) and Co(II). Ab initio calculations were performed to better understand the magnetic dynamics. PMID:26573326

  17. Desolvation-Driven 100-Fold Slow-down of Tunneling Relaxation Rate in Co(II)-Dy(III) Single-Molecule Magnets through a Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Wu, Jie-Yi; Huang, Guo-Zhang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Jia, Jian-Hua; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-11-17

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are regarded as a class of promising materials for spintronic and ultrahigh-density storage devices. Tuning the magnetic dynamics of single-molecule magnets is a crucial challenge for chemists. Lanthanide ions are not only highly magnetically anisotropic but also highly sensitive to the changes in the coordination environments. We developed a feasible approach to understand parts of the magneto-structure correlations and propose to regulate the relaxation behaviors via rational design. A series of Co(II)-Dy(III)-Co(II) complexes were obtained using in situ synthesis; in this system of complexes, the relaxation dynamics can be greatly improved, accompanied with desolvation, via single-crystal to single-crystal transformation. The effective energy barrier can be increased from 293 cm(-1) (422 K) to 416 cm(-1) (600 K), and the tunneling relaxation time can be grown from 8.5 × 10(-4) s to 7.4 × 10(-2) s. These remarkable improvements are due to the change in the coordination environments of Dy(III) and Co(II). Ab initio calculations were performed to better understand the magnetic dynamics.

  18. Zeeman effect of As II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Andrew, K. L.

    1972-01-01

    Spectrograms of As electrodeless-discharge tubes operated in a field of 24,025 G have given Zeeman patterns for 232 As II spectral lines from 2361 to 10,556 A and yielded 80 Lande g factors, of which more than half are new. There is agreement between these and the g values calculated by least-squares fitting for single configurations or for multiconfigurations, where configuration interaction is noticeable. All of the measured g values as well as the energy levels are used in the fitting process.

  19. Indirect Oxidation of Co(II) in the Presence of the Marine Mn(II)-Oxidizing Bacterium Bacillus Sp. Strain SG-1

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.J.; Webb, S.M.; Bargar, J.R.; Tebo, B.M.; /Scripps Inst. Oceanography /SLAC, SSRL /Oregon Health Sci. U.

    2009-04-29

    Cobalt(II) oxidation in aquatic environments has been shown to be linked to Mn(II) oxidation, a process primarily mediated by bacteria. This work examines the oxidation of Co(II) by the spore-forming marine Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Bacillus sp. strain SG-1, which enzymatically catalyzes the formation of reactive nanoparticulate Mn(IV) oxides. Preparations of these spores were incubated with radiotracers and various amounts of Co(II) and Mn(II), and the rates of Mn(II) and Co(II) oxidation were measured. Inhibition of Mn(II) oxidation by Co(II) and inhibition of Co(II) oxidation by Mn(II) were both found to be competitive. However, from both radiotracer experiments and X-ray spectroscopic measurements, no Co(II) oxidation occurred in the complete absence of Mn(II), suggesting that the Co(II) oxidation observed in these cultures is indirect and that a previous report of enzymatic Co(II) oxidation may have been due to very low levels of contaminating Mn. Our results indicate that the mechanism by which SG-1 oxidizes Co(II) is through the production of the reactive nanoparticulate Mn oxide.

  20. Network II Database

    1994-11-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Rail and Barge Network II Database is a representation of the rail and barge system of the United States. The network is derived from the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) rail database.

  1. Recycling flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum for removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yubo; Li, Qiao; Sun, Xiuyun; Ren, Zhiyuan; He, Fei; Wang, Yalun; Wang, Lianjun

    2015-11-01

    The present study aims to verify the feasibility of directly reusing the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum generated from coal-fired power plants to adsorptively remove Pb(II) and Cd(II) from wastewater. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test was conducted to evaluate the leachability of toxic heavy metals from FGD gypsum. The adsorption behaviors of FGD gypsum for Pb(II) and Cd(II) such as pH impact, sorption kinetics, sorption isotherms and sorption thermodynamics were studied in a series of batch experiments. The pH studies indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) had their best adsorption amounts both at the pH values from 5.0 to 7.0. The kinetic analysis displayed that the adsorption processes both followed the pseudo-second order model well, and the FGD gypsum provided a higher sorption rate for Pb(II). Equilibrium studies showed that the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) could be properly described by Langmuir isotherms model, and the predicted maximum adsorption capacities were even greater than some specially prepared adsorbents. The thermodynamic investigation confirmed that the removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous medium could carry out spontaneously, and the higher temperature favored the processes. The instrument analysis techniques were also employed to deeply understand the mechanism involved in Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal by FGD gypsum. Overall, good sorption performance together with cost-effective characteristic makes FGD gypsum potentially attractive material for the Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal in industrial wastewater.

  2. Recycling flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum for removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yubo; Li, Qiao; Sun, Xiuyun; Ren, Zhiyuan; He, Fei; Wang, Yalun; Wang, Lianjun

    2015-11-01

    The present study aims to verify the feasibility of directly reusing the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum generated from coal-fired power plants to adsorptively remove Pb(II) and Cd(II) from wastewater. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test was conducted to evaluate the leachability of toxic heavy metals from FGD gypsum. The adsorption behaviors of FGD gypsum for Pb(II) and Cd(II) such as pH impact, sorption kinetics, sorption isotherms and sorption thermodynamics were studied in a series of batch experiments. The pH studies indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) had their best adsorption amounts both at the pH values from 5.0 to 7.0. The kinetic analysis displayed that the adsorption processes both followed the pseudo-second order model well, and the FGD gypsum provided a higher sorption rate for Pb(II). Equilibrium studies showed that the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) could be properly described by Langmuir isotherms model, and the predicted maximum adsorption capacities were even greater than some specially prepared adsorbents. The thermodynamic investigation confirmed that the removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous medium could carry out spontaneously, and the higher temperature favored the processes. The instrument analysis techniques were also employed to deeply understand the mechanism involved in Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal by FGD gypsum. Overall, good sorption performance together with cost-effective characteristic makes FGD gypsum potentially attractive material for the Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal in industrial wastewater. PMID:26162902

  3. Adsorption characteristics of Cu(II) and Pb(II) onto expanded perlite from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ahmet; Tuzen, Mustafa; Citak, Demirhan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-09-01

    The adsorption characteristics of Cu(II) and Pb(II) onto expanded perlite (EP) from aqueous solution were investigated with respect to the changes in pH of solution, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature of solution. For the adsorption of both metal ions, the Langmuir isotherm model fitted to equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm model. Using the Langmuir model equation, the monolayer adsorption capacity of EP was found to be 8.62 and 13.39 mg/g for Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions, respectively. Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm model was also applied to the equilibrium data and the mean free energies of adsorption were found as 10.82 kJ/mol for Cu(II) and 9.12 kJ/mol for Pb(II) indicating that the adsorption of both metal ions onto EP was taken place by chemical ion-exchange. Thermodynamic functions, the change of free energy (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) of adsorption were also calculated for each metal ions. These parameters showed that the adsorption of Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions onto EP was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic at 20-50 degrees C. Experimental data were also evaluated in terms of kinetic characteristics of adsorption and it was found that adsorption process for both metal ions followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  4. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  5. PEP-II Status

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.; Bertsche, K.; Browne, M.; Cai, Y.; Cheng, W.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Donald, M.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.; Fisher, A.S.; Fox, J.; Heifets, S.; Himel, T.; Iverson, R.; Kulikov, A.; Novokhatski, A.; Pacak, V.; Pivi, M.; Rivetta, C.; Ross, M.; /SLAC /Saclay /Frascati

    2008-07-25

    PEP-II and BaBar have just finished run 7, the last run of the SLAC B-factory. PEP-II was one of the few high-current e+e- colliding accelerators and holds the present world record for stored electrons and stored positrons. It has stored 2.07 A of electrons, nearly 3 times the design current of 0.75 A and it has stored 3.21 A of positrons, 1.5 times more than the design current of 2.14 A. High-current beams require careful design of several systems. The feedback systems that control instabilities, the RF system stability loops, and especially the vacuum systems have to handle the higher power demands. We present here some of the accomplishments of the PEP-II accelerator and some of the problems we encountered while running high-current beams.

  6. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  7. About APPLE II Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-01

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180° requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  8. Mod II engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Albert E.; Huang, Shyan-Cherng

    1987-01-01

    The testing of a prototype of an automotive Stirling engine, the Mod II, is discussed. The Mod II is a one-piece cast block with a V-4 single-crankshaft configuration and an annular regenerator/cooler design. The initial testing of Mod II concentrated on the basic engine, with auxiliaries driven by power sources external to the engine. The performance of the engine was tested at 720 C set temperature and 820 C tube temperature. At 720 C, it is observed that the power deficiency is speed dependent and linear, with a weak pressure dependency, and at 820 C, the power deficiency is speed and pressure dependent. The effects of buoyancy and nozzle spray pattern on the heater temperature spread are investigated. The characterization of the oil pump and the operating cycle and temperature spread tests are proposed for further evaluation of the engine.

  9. The Eutelsat II programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgio, Claude; Dumesnil, Jean-Jacques

    Eutelsat II is designed to provide Europe with Ku-band communication and TV services with 16 active channels of 50 W power output. In-orbit reconfigurable antenna feed networks permit customized transmission offering either medium-gain over the whole of Europe or high-gain over tailored geographic areas, allowing TV reception on dishes as small as 60 cm. The payload design makes use of only two antennas, each comprising a dual dish reflector and two reconfigurable primary feed arrays. This paper gives an overview of the Eutelsat II mission, and presents a technical description of the satellite, the program schedule, and future prospects.

  10. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  11. First Concrete Poured for NSLS-II Ring Building

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-20

    The first bits of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) ring building are now taking shape after the concrete-pouring process for the new, world-class facility began on Monday, July 20. Once complete, the 400,000 square-foot building will hou

  12. Potential Energy Surface Database of Group II Dimer

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 143 NIST Potential Energy Surface Database of Group II Dimer (Web, free access)   This database provides critical atomic and molecular data needed in order to evaluate the feasibility of using laser cooled and trapped Group II atomic species (Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) for ultra-precise optical clocks or quantum information processing devices.

  13. Short-term BOD (BODst) as a parameter for on-line monitoring of biological treatment process; Part II: instrumentation of integrated flow injection analysis (FIA) system for BODst estimation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Olsson, Gustaf; Mattiasson, Bo

    2004-10-15

    An instrument with integrated flow injection analysis (FIA) system has been developed for on-line monitoring a process for conversion of biomass under field condition. The instrument consists of a newly designed biosensor for easy renewal of the bio-receptor without disassembling the sensor, a FIA controller for controlling the analysis operations, and a computer-based data acquisition system for data recording and processing. The instrument performed a sequence operations automatically including preparation of sample in the desired concentration, sample loading, sample injection, signal recording, data processing, and self-cleaning of the system. This makes the instrument being an interesting and promising device for on-line process monitoring.

  14. DO GIANT PLANETS SURVIVE TYPE II MIGRATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2013-09-10

    Planetary migration is one of the most serious problems to systematically understand the observations of exoplanets. We clarify that the theoretically predicted type II, migration (like type I migration) is too fast, by developing detailed analytical arguments in which the timescale of type II migration is compared with the disk lifetime. In the disk-dominated regime, the type II migration timescale is characterized by a local viscous diffusion timescale, while the disk lifetime is characterized by a global diffusion timescale that is much longer than the local one. Even in the planet-dominated regime where the inertia of the planet mass reduces the migration speed, the timescale is still shorter than the disk lifetime except in the final disk evolution stage where the total disk mass decays below the planet mass. This suggests that most giant planets plunge into the central stars within the disk lifetime, and it contradicts the exoplanet observations that gas giants are piled up at r {approx}> 1 AU. We examine additional processes that may arise in protoplanetary disks: dead zones, photoevaporation of gas, and gas flow across a gap formed by a type II migrator. Although they make the type II migration timescale closer to the disk lifetime, we show that none of them can act as an effective barrier for rapid type II migration with the current knowledge of these processes. We point out that gas flow across a gap and the fraction of the flow accreted onto the planets are uncertain and they may have the potential to solve the problem. Much more detailed investigation for each process may be needed to explain the observed distribution of gas giants in extrasolar planetary systems.

  15. Process parameters for decolorization and biodegradation of orange II (Acid Orange 7) in dye-simulated minimal salt medium and subsequent textile effluent treatment by Bacillus cereus (MTCC 9777) RMLAU1.

    PubMed

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant

    2013-11-01

    In this study, Bacillus cereus isolate from tannery effluent was employed for orange II dye decolorization in simulated minimal salt broth and textile effluent. Most of the physicochemical parameters of textile effluent were above the permissible limits. The strain was highly tolerant to dye up to 500 mg l(-1). Increasing dye concentration exerted inhibitory effect on the bacterial growth and decolorization. The maximum decolorization of initial 100 mg dye l(-1) was achieved at optimum pH 8.0 and 33 °C under static culture conditions during 96-h incubation. Supplementation with optimized glucose (0.4%, w/v) and ammonium sulfate (0.1%, w/v) with 3.0% B. cereus inoculum further enhanced dye decolorization to highest 68.5% within 96-h incubation. A direct correlation was evident between bacterial growth and dye decolorization. Under above optimized conditions, 24.3% decolorization of unsterilized real textile effluent by native microflora was achieved. The effluent decolorization enhanced substantially to 37.1% with B. cereus augmentation and to 40.5% when supplemented with glucose and ammonium sulfate without augmentation. The maximum decolorization of 52.5% occurred when textile effluent was supplemented with optimized exogenous carbon and nitrogen sources along with B. cereus augmentation. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified sulfanilic acid as orange II degradation product. Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy of metabolic products indicated the presence of amino and hydroxyl functional groups. This strain may be suitably employed for in situ decolorization of textile industrial effluent under broad environmental conditions.

  16. Complexation and coordination selectivities of the tetradentate ligand 7-[(2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenyl) azo]-8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid with Fe(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and VO(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hu; Kai, Fumiaki; Hirohata, Masaaki; Nakamura, Masaaki; Matsuzaki, Susumu; Komori, Kenji; Tsunematsu, Yuriko

    1993-12-31

    The new title tetradentate ligand (SPAHQS), containing both phenylazo and 8-quinolinol fragments, was prepared. Proton-dissociation processes of the ligand and complexing equilibria with Fe(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and VO(IV) were analyzed spectrophotometrically. Coordination modes of SPAHQS with these metal ions have been investigated by means of polarography and Raman spectroscopy in aqueous solution. It was established that the coordination selectivity of SPAHQS for such metal ions is mainly dependent on steric factors in the chelate ring formed, not on HSAB properties. 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Cobalt(II) Oxidation by the Marine Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Bacillus sp. Strain SG-1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon; Tebo, Bradley M.

    1994-01-01

    results suggest that some microorganisms may directly oxidize Co(II) and such biological activities may exert some control on the behavior of Co in nature. SG-1 spores may also have useful applications in metal removal, recovery, and immobilization processes. Images PMID:16349360

  18. SLUDGE BATCH 6 PHASE II FLOWSHEET SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Best, D.

    2010-03-30

    Two Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) runs were used to demonstrate that a fairly wide window of acid stoichiometry was available for processing SB6 Phase II flowsheet simulant (Tank 40 simulant) while still meeting the dual goals of acceptable nitrate destruction and controlled hydrogen generation. Phase II was an intermediate flowsheet study for the projected composition of Tank 40 after transfer of SB6/Tank 51 sludge to the heel of SB5. The composition was based on August 2009 projections. A window of about 50% in total acid was found between acceptable nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation.

  19. College Algebra II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Carl; And Others

    Presented are student performance objectives, a student progress chart, and assignment sheets with objective and diagnostic measures for the stated performance objectives in College Algebra II. Topics covered include: differencing and complements; real numbers; factoring; fractions; linear equations; exponents and radicals; complex numbers,…

  20. Listen & Learn II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Building Resources, Spruce Grove (Alberta).

    Six community builders in Edmonton, Alberta, planned, developed, and implemented Listen and Learn II, a reflective research project in asset-based community building, over a 6-month period in 1998. They met regularly over 2 months to plan the research and design a method that was open to participation at any stage, encouraged exchange of…

  1. Instant Insanity II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Tom; Young, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    "Instant Insanity II" is a sliding mechanical puzzle whose solution requires the special alignment of 16 colored tiles. We count the number of solutions of the puzzle's classic challenge and show that the more difficult ultimate challenge has, up to row permutation, exactly two solutions, and further show that no…

  2. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the American…

  3. Periodontics II: Course Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordick, Bruce

    A proposal is presented for Periodontics II, a course offered at the Community College of Philadelphia to give the dental hygiene/assisting student an understanding of the disease states of the periodontium and their treatment. A standardized course proposal cover form is given, followed by a statement of purpose for the course, a list of major…

  4. The TOPAZ II space reactor response under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, S.S.

    1993-12-31

    The TOPAZ II is a single-cell thermionic space reactor power system developed by the Russians during the period of time from {approximately}1969 to 1989. The TOPAZ II has never been flight demonstrated, but the system was extensively tested on the ground. As part of the development and test program, the response of the TOPAZ II under accident conditions was analyzed and characterized. The US TOPAZ II team has been working closely with the Russian specialists to understand the TOPAZ II system, its operational characteristics, and its response under potential accident conditions. The purpose of the technical exchange is to enable a potential launch of a TOPAZ II by the US. The information is required to integrate the system with a US spacecraft and to support the safety review process. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the system and its response under actual and postulated accident conditions.

  5. SHIELD II: WSRT HI Spectral Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Alex Jonah Robert; Cannon, John M.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from WSRT HI spectral line observations of 22 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from HST, SDSS, and WIYN. In most cases the HI and stellar populations are cospatial; projected rotation velocities range from less than 10 km/s to roughly 30 km/s.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  6. SHIELD II: VLA HI Spectral Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eojin; Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We present new results from low-resolution D-configuration VLA HI spectral line observations of 6 galaxies in the SHIELD II sample. We explore the morphology and kinematics by comparing images of the HI surface densities and the intensity weighted velocity fields with optical images from SDSS and WIYN. These data allow us to localize the HI gas and to study the bulk neutral gas kinematics.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  7. Angiotensin II: role in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Córdova, Gonzalo; Salas, José Diego

    2012-09-01

    Skeletal muscle, the main protein reservoir in the body, is a tissue that exhibits high plasticity when exposed to changes. Muscle proteins can be mobilized into free amino acids when skeletal muscle wasting occurs, a process called skeletal muscle atrophy. This wasting is an important systemic or local manifestation under disuse conditions (e.g., bed rest or immobilization), in starvation, in older adults, and in several diseases. The molecular mechanisms involved in muscle wasting imply the activation of specific signaling pathways which ultimately manage muscle responses to modulate biological events such as increases in protein catabolism, oxidative stress, and cell death by apoptosis. Many factors have been involved in the generation and maintenance of atrophy in skeletal muscle, among them angiotensin II (Ang-II), the main peptide of renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Together with Ang-II, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and the Ang-II receptor type 1 (AT-1 receptor) are expressed in skeletal muscle, forming an important local axis that can regulate its function. In many of the conditions that lead to muscle wasting, there is an impairment of RAS in a global or local fashion. At this point, there are several pieces of evidence that suggest the participation of Ang-II, ACE, and AT-1 receptor in the generation of skeletal muscle atrophy. Interestingly, the Ang-II participation in muscle atrophy is strongly ligated to the regulation of hypertrophic activity of factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). In this article, we reviewed the current state of Ang-II and RAS function on skeletal muscle wasting and its possible use as a therapeutic target to improve skeletal muscle function under atrophic conditions.

  8. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  9. Current status of experimental breeder reactor-II [EBR-II] shutdown planning

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, M. D.; Griffin, C. D.; Michelbacher, J. A.; Earle, O. K.

    2000-05-08

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor--II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory--West (ANL-W) in Idaho, was shutdown in September, 1994 as mandated by the US Department of Energy. This sodium cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and was to be placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for ultimate decommissioning. The deactivation of a liquid metal reactor presents unique concerns. The first major task associated with the project was the removal of all fueled assemblies. In addition, sodium must be drained from systems and processed for ultimate disposal. Residual quantities of sodium remaining in systems must be deactivated or inerted to preclude future hazards associated with pyrophoricity and generation of potentially explosive hydrogen gas. A Sodium Process Facility was designed and constructed to react the elemental sodium from the EBR-II primary and secondary systems to sodium hydroxide for disposal. This facility has a design capacity to allow the reaction of the complete inventory of sodium at ANL-W in less than two years. Additional quantities of sodium from the Fermi-1 reactor are also being treated at the Sodium Process Facility. The sodium environment and the EBR-II configuration, combined with the radiation and contamination associated with thirty years of reactor operation, posed problems specific to liquid metal reactor deactivation. The methods being developed and implemented at EBR-II can be applied to other similar situations in the US and abroad.

  10. Five coordinate M(II)-diphenolate [M = Zn(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II)] Schiff base complexes exhibiting metal- and ligand-based redox chemistry.

    PubMed

    Franks, Mark; Gadzhieva, Anastasia; Ghandhi, Laura; Murrell, David; Blake, Alexander J; Davies, E Stephen; Lewis, William; Moro, Fabrizio; McMaster, Jonathan; Schröder, Martin

    2013-01-18

    Five-coordinate Zn(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) complexes containing pentadentate N(3)O(2) Schiff base ligands [1A](2-) and [1B](2-) have been synthesized and characterized. X-ray crystallographic studies reveal five coordinate structures in which each metal ion is bound by two imine N-donors, two phenolate O-donors, and a single amine N-donor. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies suggest that the N(3)O(2) coordination spheres of [Cu(1A)] and [Cu(1B)] are retained in CH(2)Cl(2) solution and solid-state superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometric studies confirm that [Ni(1A)] and [Ni(1B)] adopt high spin (S = 1) configurations. Each complex exhibits two reversible oxidation processes between +0.05 and +0.64 V vs [Fc](+)/[Fc]. The products of one- and two-electron oxidations have been studied by UV/vis spectroelectrochemistry and by EPR spectroscopy which confirm that each oxidation process for the Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes is ligand-based with sequential formation of mono- and bis-phenoxyl radical species. In contrast, the one-electron oxidation of the Ni(II) complexes generates Ni(III) products. This assignment is supported by spectroelectrochemical and EPR spectroscopic studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and the single crystal X-ray structure of [Ni(1A)][BF(4)] which contains Ni in a five-coordinate distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry.

  11. Biosorption of Fe(II) and Mn(II) Ions from Aqueous Solution by Rice Husk Ash

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiaying; Jiang, Zhao; Shan, Dexin; Lu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Rice husk ash (RHA), an agricultural waste, was used as biosorbent for the removal of Iron(II) and Manganese(II) ions from aqueous solutions. The structural and morphological characteristics of RHA and its elemental compositions before and after adsorption of Fe(II) and Mn(II) were determined by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the influence of initial pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and initial concentration on the removal of Fe(II) and Mn(II) ions. Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) models were applied to describe the biosorption isotherm of the metal ions by RHA. The correlation coefficient (R2) of Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models equals 0.995 and 0.901 for Fe(II), 0.9862 and 0.8924 for Mn(II), respectively, so the Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm model. The mean free energy values evaluated from the D-R model indicated that the biosorption of Fe(II) and Mn(II) onto RHA was physical in nature. Experimental data also showed that the biosorption processes of both metal ions complied with the pseudo-second-order kinetics. PMID:24982918

  12. Belle-II Experiment Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David; Bell, Greg; Carlson, Tim; Cowley, David; Dart, Eli; Erwin, Brock; Godang, Romulus; Hara, Takanori; Johnson, Jerry; Johnson, Ron; Johnston, Bill; Dam, Kerstin Kleese-van; Kaneko, Toshiaki; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Kuhr, Thomas; McCoy, John; Miyake, Hideki; Monga, Inder; Nakamura, Motonori; Piilonen, Leo; Pordes, Ruth; Ray, Douglas; Russell, Richard; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Jim; Sevior, Martin; Singh, Surya; Suzuki, Soh; Sasaki, Takashi; Williams, Jim

    2013-05-28

    The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of ~400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1 ab-1 of integrated luminosity, corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle-II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and neworking requirements of the Belle-II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle-II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration's work.

  13. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  14. PIP-II Status and Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Stephen; Derwent, Paul; Lebedev, Valeri; Mishra, Shekhar; Mitchell, Donald; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.

    2015-06-01

    Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II) is the centerpiece of Fermilab's plan for upgrading the accelerator complex to establish the leading facility in the world for particle physics research based on intense proton beams. PIP-II has been developed to provide 1.2 MW of proton beam power at the start of operations of the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), while simultaneously providing a platform for eventual extension of LBNE beam power to >2MW and enabling future initiatives in rare processes research based on high duty factor/higher beam power operations. PIP-II is based on the construction of a new 800 MeV superconducting linac, augmented by improvements to the existing Booster, Recycler, and Main Injector complex. PIP-II is currently in the development stage with an R&D program underway targeting the front end and superconducting RF acceleration technologies. This paper will describe the status of the PIPII conceptual development, the associated technology R&D programs, and the strategy for project implementation.

  15. EPACT II: project and methods.

    PubMed

    Juillerat, Pascal; Froehlich, Florian; Felley, Christian; Pittet, Valérie; Mottet, Christian; Gonvers, Jean-Jacques; Michetti, Pierre; Vader, John-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Building on the first European Panel on the Appropriateness of Crohn's Disease Treatment (EPACT I) which was held in Lausanne at the beginning of March 2004, a new panel will be convened in Switzerland (EPACT II, November to December 2007) to update this work. A combined evidence- and panel-based method (RAND) will be applied to assess the appropriateness of therapy for Crohn's disease (CD). In preparation for the meeting of experts, reviews of evidence-based literature were prepared for major clinical presentations of CD. During the meeting, an international multidis- ciplinary panel that includes gastroenterologists, surgeons and general practitioners weigh the strength of evidence and apply their clinical experience when assessing the appropriateness of therapy for 569 specific indications (clinical scenarios). This chapter describes in detail the process of updating the literature review and the systematic approach of the RAND Appropriateness Method used during the expert panel meeting. PMID:18239398

  16. RADTRAN II user guide

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, M M; Wilmot, E L; Taylor, J M

    1983-02-01

    RADTRAN II is a flexible analytical tool for calculating both the incident-free and accident impacts of transporting radioactive materials. The consequences from incident-free shipments are apportioned among eight population subgroups and can be calculated for several transport modes. The radiological accident risk (probability times consequence summed over all postulated accidents) is calculated in terms of early fatalities, early morbidities, latent cancer fatalities, genetic effects, and economic impacts. Groundshine, inhalation, direct exposure, resuspension, and cloudshine dose pathways are modeled to calculate the radiological health risks from accidents. Economic impacts are evaluated based on costs for emergency response, cleanup, evacuation, income loss, and land use. RADTRAN II can be applied to specific scenario evaluations (individual transport modes or specified combinations), to compare alternative modes or to evaluate generic radioactive material shipments. Unit-risk factors can easily be evaluated to aid in performing generic analyses when several options must be compared with the amount of travel as the only variable.

  17. Results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J.S.

    1994-10-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66{sub -13}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73{sub -16}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup 5} (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69{sub -11}{sup +11} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  18. TARN II project

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, T.

    1985-04-01

    On the basis of the achievement of the accelerator studies at present TARN, it is decided to construct the new ring TARN II which will be operated as an accumulator, accelerator, cooler and stretcher. It has the maximum magnetic rigidity of 7 Txm corresponding to the proton energy 1.3 GeV and the ring diameter is around 23 m. Light and heavy ions from the SF cyclotron will be injected and accelerated to the working energy where the ring will be operated as a desired mode, for example a cooler ring mode. At the cooler ring operation, the strong cooling devices such as stochastic and electron beam coolings will work together with the internal gas jet target for the precise nuclear experiments. TARN II is currently under the contruction with the schedule of completion in 1986. In this paper general features of the project are presented.

  19. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  20. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  1. Synthesis, structural elucidation and carbon dioxide adsorption on Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate (II) Prussian blue analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lugo, F.; Polanco, R.

    2016-11-01

    In the course of the last years hexacyanoferrates have been widely studied; even though, the adsorption properties of Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate(II) (labelled here Zn-HII) have not been thoroughly considered. In addition, soft porous crystals, i.e., adsorbents that display structural flexibility have been, as well, extensively studied, however this property has not been reported for Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate(II). In this regard, the key questions addressed here were the synthesis and structural characterization of Zn-HII together with the investigation of their low (up to 1 bar) and high pressure (up to 30 bar) adsorption properties, to found if these materials show structural flexibility. Then, to attain the anticipated goals, structural characterizations were made with: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), simultaneously, with the investigation of the adsorption of carbon dioxide. As a result of the research process we concluded that the Zn-HII displayed Fm barm space group framework. Besides, the carbon dioxide adsorption investigation demonstrated the presence of the framework expansion effect together with an extremely high adsorption heat, properties that could be useful for the use of Zn(II) hexacyanoferrate(II) as an excellent adsorbent.

  2. Non-muscle myosin II takes centre stage in cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Ma, Xuefei; Adelstein, Robert S.; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2010-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II (NM II) is an actin-binding protein that has actin cross-linking and contractile properties and is regulated by the phosphorylation of its light and heavy chains. The three mammalian NM II isoforms have both overlapping and unique properties. Owing to its position downstream of convergent signalling pathways, NM II is central in the control of cell adhesion, cell migration and tissue architecture. Recent insight into the role of NM II in these processes has been gained from loss-of-function and mutant approaches, methods that quantitatively measure actin and adhesion dynamics and the discovery of NM II mutations that cause monogenic diseases. PMID:19851336

  3. Al-TiC Composites Fabricated by a Thermally Activated Reaction Process in an Al Melt Using Al-Ti-C-CuO Powder Mixtures: Part II. Microstructure Control and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Hee; Lee, Jung-Moo; Kim, Su-Hyeon

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the processing parameters is important to minimize such undesirable microstructural features in Al/TiC composites as unreacted C, incomplete reaction products of Al3Ti and TiC aggregates, which originate from the pellet microstructure upon the combustion reaction of an Al-Ti-C-CuO pellet in an Al melt. In particular, the mean particle size of elemental powders is a key factor linked to the formation of TiC aggregates, which is significantly suppressed with smaller initial particles of Ti and C by mixing them homogenously by ball milling. Al-Cu-Mg alloys reinforced with up to 12 vol pct TiC are fabricated by the developed process, followed by extrusion. The composites after heat treatment exhibit high elastic modulus and an ultimate tensile strength of 93 GPa and 461 MPa, respectively, with a low coefficient of thermal expansion of 17.11 ppm/K.

  4. Selectivity improvement in the solvent refined coal process. I - Detailed first-stage reaction studies - Coal mineral catalysis. II - Detailed second-stage reaction studies - Hydrotreating of coal liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, D.; Tarrer, A. R.; Guin, J. A.; Curtis, C. W.; Clinton, J. H.

    1980-08-01

    A two stage process is investigated for the production of a low-sulfur solid SRC-I (solvent refined coal) type boiler fuel with a minimum consumption of hydrogen. The first stage involves the scavenging action of coal minerals. Mineral additives (e.g., iron oxide and iron) increase selectivity for hydrodesulfurization over hydrogenation in coal liquefaction reactions. Mineral residues from SRC processes show insignificant desulfurization activity, but through oxidation, their sulfurization activity increases to significant levels without an increase in hydrogenation activity. The sulfur removal activity of an additive depends on its surface area. The second stage involves hydrotreating the dissolver effluent for maximum sulfur removal, with a minimum consumption of hydrogen. The effect of a wide range of variables on hydrotreating of a coal liquid in the presence of a commercial Co-Mo-Al catalyst is evaluated. The variables include catalyst loading, hydrogen partial pressure, reaction temperature and time.

  5. Reply to ``Comment on `Photoionization of helium atoms irradiated with intense vacuum ultraviolet free-electron laser light. Part II. Theoretical modeling of multiphoton and single-photon processes' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, A. R. B.; Laarmann, T.; Schulz, J.; Wabnitz, H.; Möller, T.

    2006-08-01

    We cannot agree with the Comment by Maquet [Phys. Rev. A. 74, 027401 (2006)]. It seems that Maquet are thinking in terms of classical fields. In our recent paper we have presented a study of the two-photon rate of He making use of quantized fields. This approach becomes a natural choice if we have in mind processes at high photon energy. In this description of the problem the squared vector potential A•A term is essential.

  6. Assessment of canyon wall failure process from multibeam bathymetry and Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) observations, U.S. Atlantic continental margin: Chapter 10 in Submarine mass movements and their consequences: 7th international symposium part II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaytor, Jason D.; Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Ten Brink, Uri; Baxter, Christopher D. P.; Quattrini, Andrea M.; Brothers, Daniel S.; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Mountjoy, Joshu; Bull, Suzanne; Hubble, Tom; Krastel, Sebastian; Lane, Emily; Micallef, Aaron; Moscardelli, Lorena; Mueller, Christof; Pecher, Ingo; Woelz, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, canyons along the northern U.S. Atlantic continental margin have been the focus of intensive research examining canyon evolution, submarine geohazards, benthic ecology and deep-sea coral habitat. New high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) dives in the major shelf-breaching and minor slope canyons, provided the opportunity to investigate the size of, and processes responsible for, canyon wall failures. The canyons cut through thick Late Cretaceous to Recent mixed siliciclastic and carbonate-rich lithologies which impart a primary control on the style of failures observed. Broad-scale canyon morphology across much of the margin can be correlated to the exposed lithology. Near vertical walls, sedimented benches, talus slopes, and canyon floor debris aprons were present in most canyons. The extent of these features depends on canyon wall cohesion and level of internal fracturing, and resistance to biological and chemical erosion. Evidence of brittle failure over different spatial and temporal scales, physical abrasion by downslope moving flows, and bioerosion, in the form of burrows and surficial scrape marks provide insight into the modification processes active in these canyons. The presence of sessile fauna, including long-lived, slow growing corals and sponges, on canyon walls, especially those affected by failure provide a critical, but as yet, poorly understood chronological record of geologic processes within these systems.

  7. Removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions from aqueous solution by thiosemicarbazide modified chitosan.

    PubMed

    Li, Manlin; Zhang, Zengqiang; Li, Ronghua; Wang, Jim J; Ali, Amjad

    2016-05-01

    The removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions from aqueous solution by thiosemicarbazide modified chitosan (TCS) was studied in this article. The synthesized TCS was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), element analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS). Moreover, the influence of solution pH, contact time, initial heavy metal concentration, and solution temperature on the adsorption process was examined, and the adsorbent reusability and adsorption mechanisms were also studied. The results showed that TCS adsorbed greater amount of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions than the raw chitosan. The adsorption amounts of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions were affected by increasing solution pH and temperature. The maximum adsorption capacities of the TCS for Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions were found to be 325.2 and 257.2 mg/g, respectively. The endothermic adsorption fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetics equation and the adsorption isotherms could be well described by Langmuir model. The metal ions adsorption mechanism was concluded to be mainly dominated by complexation reaction process. The desorption study indicated that the target adsorbent was easy to be regenerated. PMID:26879912

  8. NSLS II Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M.; Doom, L.; Hseuh, H.; Longo, C.; Settepani, P.; Wilson, K.; Hu, J.

    2009-09-13

    National Synchrotron Light Source II, being constructed at Brookhaven, is a 3-GeV, 500 mA, 3rd generation synchrotron radiation facility with ultra low emittance electron beams. The storage ring vacuum system has a circumference of 792 m and consists of over 250 vacuum chambers with a simulated average operating pressure of less than 1 x 10{sup -9} mbar. A summary of the update design of the vacuum system including girder supports of the chambers, gauges, vacuum pumps, bellows, beam position monitors and simulation of the average pressure will be shown. A brief description of the techniques and procedures for cleaning and mounting the chambers are given.

  9. Delta II Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Final preparations for lift off of the DELTA II Mars Pathfinder Rocket are shown. Activities include loading the liquid oxygen, completing the construction of the Rover, and placing the Rover into the Lander. After the countdown, important visual events include the launch of the Delta Rocket, burnout and separation of the three Solid Rocket Boosters, and the main engine cutoff. The cutoff of the main engine marks the beginning of the second stage engine. After the completion of the second stage, the third stage engine ignites and then cuts off. Once the third stage engine cuts off spacecraft separation occurs.

  10. Run II luminosity progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gollwitzer, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron Collider Run II program continues at the energy and luminosity frontier of high energy particle physics. To the collider experiments CDF and D0, over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity has been delivered to each. Upgrades and improvements in the Antiproton Source of the production and collection of antiprotons have led to increased number of particles stored in the Recycler. Electron cooling and associated improvements have help make a brighter antiproton beam at collisions. Tevatron improvements to handle the increased number of particles and the beam lifetimes have resulted in an increase in luminosity.

  11. On structural patterns in H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, W.A. )

    1989-05-01

    High-resolution photographs of H II regions show that a large number of stars embedded in the nebulosities appear to be surrounded by emply spaces. This phenomenon seems to be quite common but has escaped attention up to now. The effect is not a photographic one, nor does it arise in the half-tone reproduction processes employed in publications, but no satisfactory explanation is apparent. 9 refs.

  12. SAGE II aerosol data validation and initial data use - An introduction and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    The process of validating data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and the initial use of the validated data are reviewed. The instruments developed for the SAGE II, the influence of the eruption of El Chichon on the global stratospheric aerosol, and various data validation experiments are discussed. Consideration is given to methods for deriving aerosol physical and optical properties from SAGE II extinction data and for inferring particle size distribution moments from SAGE II spectral extinction values.

  13. The lantibiotic nisin induces lipid II aggregation, causing membrane instability and vesicle budding.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Katharina M; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-03-10

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane.

  14. Insights into Buforin II Membrane Translocation from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Buforin II is a histone-derived antimicrobial peptide that readily translocates across lipid membranes without causing significant membrane permeabilization. Previous studies showed that mutating the sole proline of buforin II dramatically decreases its translocation. As well, researchers have proposed that the peptide crosses membranes in a cooperative manner through forming transient toroidal pores. This paper reports molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the structure of buforin II upon membrane entry and evaluate whether the peptide is able to form toroidal pore structures. These simulations showed a relationship between protein-lipid interactions and increased structural deformations of the buforin N-terminal region promoted by proline. Moreover, simulations with multiple peptides show how buforin II can embed deeply into membranes and potentially form toroidal pores. Together, these simulations provide structural insight into the translocation process for buforin II in addition to providing more general insight into the role proline can play in antimicrobial peptides. PMID:23022591

  15. Emergency preparedness and the licensing process for commercial nuclear power reactors. Part II. Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, July 8, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Part II of the hearing record covers testimony given in Santa Ana, California by several panels made up of regulatory commissioners, local and state agencies, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, nuclear engineers, and intervenors. At issue was how the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) treats emergency preparedness in the licensing process and how well utilities and governmental bodies comply with preparedness rules. The purpose was to identify and deal with problems in meeting preparedness requirements, particularly with changes made since the Three Mile Island accident. The testimony focused on licensing issues at the San Onofre reactor site, which is in an earthquake-prone area, although other western plants were also discussed. An appendix with additional statements, reports, and correspondence follows the testimony of the 12 witnesses.

  16. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  17. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Process Efficiency improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Griebenow, B.

    1996-03-01

    In response to decreasing funding levels available to support activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and a desire to be cost competitive, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company have increased their emphasis on cost-saving measures. The ICPP Effectiveness Improvement Initiative involves many activities to improve cost effectiveness and competitiveness. This report documents the methodology and results of one of those cost cutting measures, the Process Efficiency Improvement Activity. The Process Efficiency Improvement Activity performed a systematic review of major work processes at the ICPP to increase productivity and to identify nonvalue-added requirements. A two-phase approach was selected for the activity to allow for near-term implementation of relatively easy process modifications in the first phase while obtaining long-term continuous improvement in the second phase and beyond. Phase I of the initiative included a concentrated review of processes that had a high potential for cost savings with the intent of realizing savings in Fiscal Year 1996 (FY-96.) Phase II consists of implementing long-term strategies too complex for Phase I implementation and evaluation of processes not targeted for Phase I review. The Phase II effort is targeted for realizing cost savings in FY-97 and beyond.

  18. Structure of Photosystems I and II.

    PubMed

    Fromme, Petra; Grotjohann, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the major process that converts solar energy into chemical energy on Earth. Two and a half billion years ago, the ancestors of cyanobacteria were able to use water as electron source for the photosynthetic process, thereby evolving oxygen and changing the atmosphere of our planet Earth. Two large membrane protein complexes, Photosystems I and II, catalyze the primary step in this energy conversion, the light-induced charge separation across the photosynthetic membrane. This chapter describes and compares the structure of two Photosystems and discusses their function in respect to the mechanism of light harvesting, electron transfer and water splitting.

  19. Mod II Stirling engine overviews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, Roger A.

    1988-01-01

    The Mod II engine is a second-generation automotive Stirling engine (ASE) optimized for part-power operation. It has been designed specifically to meet the fuel economy and exhaust emissions objectives of the ASE development program. The design, test experience, performance, and comparison of data to analytical performance estimates of the Mod II engine to date are reviewed. Estimates of Mod II performance in its final configuration are also given.

  20. Apple Image Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A software system design is proposed and demonstrated with pilot-project software. The system permits the Apple II microcomputer to be used for personalized computer-assisted instruction in the digital image processing of LANDSAT images. The programs provide data input, menu selection, graphic and hard-copy displays, and both general and detailed instructions. The pilot-project results are considered to be successful indicators of the capabilities and limits of microcomputers for digital image processing education.

  1. Synthesis of amino functionalized magnetic graphenes composite material and its application to remove Cr(VI), Pb(II), Hg(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) from contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyao; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin; Yang, Jian; Hu, Lihua; Yan, Liangguo; Xu, Weiying

    2014-08-15

    In the present study, a kind of graphenes magnetic material (Fe3O4-GS) was prepared by compositing graphene sheet with ferroferric oxide, and shown to be effective for removing Cr(VI), Pb(II), Hg(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized sorbent was characterized by SEM, TEM, FTIR, XRD, XPS and BET, respectively. The pHZPC value of the sorbent was estimated to be 3.5 by alkaline-titration methods. Fe3O4-GS can be simply recovered from water with magnetic separation at low magnetic field within one minute. The sorption capacities of the metals were 17.29, 27.95, 23.03, 27.83 and 22.07 mg g(-1) for Cr(VI), Pb(II), Hg(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II), respectively. Kinetic data showed good correlation with pseudo-second-order equation and the Freundlich model was found to fit for the isotherm data of all the heavy metal ions. It was found that the metals sorption was accomplished mainly via chelation or ion exchange. The results of thermodynamic studies illustrate that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. PMID:25016452

  2. Synthesis of amino functionalized magnetic graphenes composite material and its application to remove Cr(VI), Pb(II), Hg(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) from contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyao; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin; Yang, Jian; Hu, Lihua; Yan, Liangguo; Xu, Weiying

    2014-08-15

    In the present study, a kind of graphenes magnetic material (Fe3O4-GS) was prepared by compositing graphene sheet with ferroferric oxide, and shown to be effective for removing Cr(VI), Pb(II), Hg(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized sorbent was characterized by SEM, TEM, FTIR, XRD, XPS and BET, respectively. The pHZPC value of the sorbent was estimated to be 3.5 by alkaline-titration methods. Fe3O4-GS can be simply recovered from water with magnetic separation at low magnetic field within one minute. The sorption capacities of the metals were 17.29, 27.95, 23.03, 27.83 and 22.07 mg g(-1) for Cr(VI), Pb(II), Hg(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II), respectively. Kinetic data showed good correlation with pseudo-second-order equation and the Freundlich model was found to fit for the isotherm data of all the heavy metal ions. It was found that the metals sorption was accomplished mainly via chelation or ion exchange. The results of thermodynamic studies illustrate that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  3. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  4. Mass loss and a possible Population II lithium dip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearborn, David S. P.; Schramm, David N.; Hobbs, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the recent observation of a subplateau lithium abundance for a high-surface-temperature Population II star relative to the Population II lithium plateau can be explained by main-sequence mass loss. This explanation is identical to a previously proposed explanation for the Population I lithium dip and predicts a similar dip for Population II. It is assumed that the main-sequence mass loss in both cases is associated with the instability strip intersecting the main sequence. This mass-loss process can also decrease globular cluster ages by about 1 Gyr.

  5. Copper(II)-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry) Reactions: Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Murugavel, Govindarasu; Sadhu, Pradeep; Punniyamurthy, Tharmalingam

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled copper(II) complexes are described as effective catalysts for nitroaldol (Henry) reactions on water. The protocol involves a heterogeneous process and the catalysts can be recovered and recycled without loss of activity. Further, C2-symmetric N,N'-substituted chiral copper(II) salan complexes are found to be more effective catalysts than chiral copper(II) salen complexes for reactions in homogeneous catalysis, with high enantioselectivities. The reactions involve bifunctional catalysis, bearing the properties of a Brønsted base, as well as a Lewis acid, to effect the reaction in the absence of external additives.

  6. A search for technetium (Tc II) in barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, Irene R.; Little, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched without success for the lines of Tc II at 2647.02, 2610.00 and 2543.24 A in IUE spectra of the barium stars HR 5058, Omicron Vir, and Zeta Cap. The lack of Tc II implies that the observed s-process enhancements were produced more than half a million years ago and supports the suggestion that the spectral peculiarities of barium stars are probably related to the binary nature of the stars.

  7. BIKMAS-II: A Knowledge Management System for Biomedical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    López-Alonso, V.; Moreno, L.; Lopez-Campos, G.; Maojo, V.; Martín-Sanchez, F.

    2002-01-01

    We present here BIKMAS II - Biomedical Informatics Knowledge Management System- a system that allows to efficiently process and filter scientific information. The system aids and assists in some common tasks carried out in a Biomedical research unit. We have designed BIKMAS-II as a modular system that can be easily adapted to the different information sources and biomedical domains and that has been implemented with an algorithm to discard, to store and to select what to do with the information.

  8. Group II p21-activated kinases as therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yang-Guang; Ning, Ke; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are central players in various oncogenic signaling pathways. The six PAK family members are classified into group I (PAK1-3) and group II (PAK4-6). Focus is currently shifting from group I PAKs to group II PAKs. Group II PAKs play important roles in many fundamental cellular processes, some of which have particular significance in the development and progression of cancer. Because of their important functions, group II PAKs have become popular potential drug target candidates. However, few group II PAKs inhibitors have been reported, and most do not exhibit satisfactory kinase selectivity and “drug-like” properties. Isoform- and kinase-selective PAK inhibitors remain to be developed. This review describes the biological activities of group II PAKs, the importance of group II PAKs in the development and progression of gastrointestinal cancer, and small-molecule inhibitors of group II PAKs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26811660

  9. I. Textural/Structural tuning and nanoparticle stabilization of copper-containing nanocomposite materials. II. Generation of reducing agents for automotive exhaust gas purification via the processing of hydrocarbons in a PACT (plasma and catalysis integrated technologies) reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yu

    This research consists of two parts. The first part deals with the preparation and properties of copper-containing nanocomposite materials. For studies of textural tuning, structural tuning, or material sintering, copper/aluminum and copper/zinc nanocomposites were prepared via various inorganic synthesis methods including conventional coprecipitation methods and a novel urea-gelation/thermal-modification method that produces narrow distributions of pore sizes, high surface areas, and significantly higher specific metal loadings. Solid-solid reaction analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis were developed for the determination of the mixing homogeneities of the copper/aluminum nanocomposites. A sintering experiment at 250-600°C for 350 h under methanol-steam reforming conditions was carried out to compare the stability of supported Cu0 nanoparticles. The mixing homogeneities of CuO/Al2O3 nanocomposites significantly affected the thermal stability of their reduced Cu0 crystallites. Creation of relatively narrow distributions of pore sizes with relatively small major pore diameters (e.g., 3.5 nm) can also be used for the stabilization of supported Cu0 nanoparticles. The supported nanoparticles with a relatively small initial size cannot ensure good thermal stability. A "hereditary" character on the homogeneity of copper/aluminum nanocomposites was revealed. Stepwise reduction and reoxidation were studied for the structural tuning and purification of Cu-Al-O spinels with isotropic and gradual unit-cell contractions. The second part of the research deals with the processing of hydrocarbons. Conversion of a model hydrocarbon (n-hexane or n-octane) in an AC discharge PACT (plasma and catalysis integrated technologies) reactor was verified to be an effective method to instantly produce reducing agents (e.g., hydrogen or/and light alkanes and alkenes), at room temperature and atmospheric pressure for automotive exhaust gas purification. Effects of

  10. Mono- and binuclear cyclometallated palladium(II) complexes containing bridging (N,O-) and terminal (N-) imidate ligands: air stable, thermally robust and recyclable catalysts for cross-coupling processes.

    PubMed

    Fairlamb, Ian J S; Kapdi, Anant R; Lee, Adam F; Sánchez, Gregorio; López, Gregorio; Serrano, José Luis; García, Luis; Pérez, José; Pérez, Eduardo

    2004-12-01

    Novel dinuclear cyclometallated palladium complexes [{Pd(mu-NCO)(C circumflex accent N)}(2)], containing asymmetric imidato -NCO- bridging units have been synthesised [C circumflex accent N = 7,8-benzoquinolyl; -NCO- = succinimidate (1c), phthalimidate (1a-3a) or maleimidate (3c)]. The reaction of these complexes, and the previously reported analogous imidate precursors containing a phenylazophenyl (1a-3a) or 2-pyridylphenyl (1b-3b) backbone, with tertiary phosphines provides novel mononuclear N-bonded imidate derivatives of the general formula [Pd(C circumflex accent N)(imidate)(L)][L = PPh(3), P(4-F-C(6)H(4))(3) or P(4-MeO-C(6)H(4))(3)]. The single crystal structures of [Pd(azb)(phthalimidate)(P(4-MeO-C(6)H(4))(3))](9a) and [Pd(bzq)(phthalimidate)(PPh(3))](7c) have been established. Dinuclear complexes (1a-3a, 1b-3b, 1c-3c) demonstrate outstanding thermal stability in the solid-state, as shown by thermoanalytical techniques. A marked influence of bridging imidate groups on the initial decomposition temperature is observed. The dinuclear and mononuclear derivatives are shown to be active catalysts/precatalysts for the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of aryl bromides with aryl boronic acids, and the Sonogashira reactions of aryl halides with phenyl acetylene (in the presence and absence of Cu(I) salts). The conversions appear to be dependent, to some extent, on the type of imidate ligand, suggesting a role for these pseudohalides in the catalytic cycle in both cross-coupling processes. Lower catalyst loadings in 'copper-free' Sonogashira cross-couplings favour higher turnover frequencies. We have further determined that these catalysts may be recycled using a poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO)/methanol solvent medium in Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling. Once the reaction is complete, product extraction into a hexane/diethyl ether mixture (1 : 1, v/v) gives cross-coupled products in good yields (with purity > 95%). The polar phase can then be re-used several times

  11. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.

  12. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysismore » variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.« less

  13. Revisiting the photosystem II repair cycle

    PubMed Central

    Theis, Jasmine; Schroda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability of photosystem (PS) II to catalyze the light-driven oxidation of water comes along with its vulnerability to oxidative damage, in particular of the D1 core subunit. Photodamaged PSII undergoes repair in a multi-step process involving (i) reversible phosphorylation of PSII core subunits; (ii) monomerization and lateral migration of the PSII core from grana to stroma thylakoids; (iii) partial disassembly of PSII; (iv) proteolytic degradation of damaged D1; (v) replacement of damaged D1 protein with a new copy; (vi) reassembly of PSII monomers and migration back to grana thylakoids for dimerization and supercomplex assembly. Here we review the current knowledge on the PSII repair cycle. PMID:27494214

  14. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.

  15. Revisiting the photosystem II repair cycle.

    PubMed

    Theis, Jasmine; Schroda, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The ability of photosystem (PS) II to catalyze the light-driven oxidation of water comes along with its vulnerability to oxidative damage, in particular of the D1 core subunit. Photodamaged PSII undergoes repair in a multi-step process involving (i) reversible phosphorylation of PSII core subunits; (ii) monomerization and lateral migration of the PSII core from grana to stroma thylakoids; (iii) partial disassembly of PSII; (iv) proteolytic degradation of damaged D1; (v) replacement of damaged D1 protein with a new copy; (vi) reassembly of PSII monomers and migration back to grana thylakoids for dimerization and supercomplex assembly. Here we review the current knowledge on the PSII repair cycle. PMID:27494214

  16. 40 CFR 63.1315 - Continuous process vents provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1315 Continuous process..., whenever a process change, as defined in § 63.115(e), is made that causes a Group 2 continuous process vent... accordance with § 63.1310(i)(2)(ii) or (i)(2)(iii), as applicable. (ii) Whenever a process change, as...

  17. Removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Mohd F. Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Shuib, Anis Suhaila Borhan, Azry

    2014-10-24

    An attempt was made to investigate the potential of rice husk-based activated carbon as an alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via treatment of rice husk with NaOH followed by the carbonization process at 400°C for 2 hours. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). These samples were also analyzed for their carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and silica contents using CHN elemental analyzer and FESEM/EDX. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were 255 m{sup 2}/g and 0.17 cm{sup 2}/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution were carried out at a fixed initial concentration of metal ion (150 ppm) with variation amount of adsorbent (rice husk-based activated carbon) as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of each metal ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Isotherm and kinetic model analyses suggested that the experimental data of adsorption studies fitted well with Langmuir, Freundlich and second-order kinetic models.

  18. Utilizing clouds for Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobie, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the use of cloud computing resources for the Belle II experiment. A number of different methods are used to exploit the private and opportunistic clouds. Clouds are making significant contributions to the generation of Belle II MC data samples and it is expected that their impact will continue to grow over the coming years.

  19. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  20. [Modified Class II tunnel preparation].

    PubMed

    Rimondini, L; Baroni, C

    1991-05-15

    Tunnel preparations for restoration of Class II carious lesions in primary molars preserve the marginal ridge and minimize sacrifice of healthy tooth substructure. Materials with improved bonding to tooth structure and increase potential for fluoride release allow Class II restorations without "extension for prevention". PMID:1864420

  1. Technology II: Implementation Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    The California Community Colleges (CCC) are facing a number of challenges, including the explosive use of the Internet, the digital divide, the need for integrating technology into teaching and learning, the impact of Tidal Wave II, and the need to ensure that technology is accessible to persons with disabilities. The CCCs' Technology II Strategic…

  2. ACRIM II Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-12-30

    ACRIM II Data and Information Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance ... and Order:   ASDC Order Tool FTP Web Access:  Data Pool Parameters:  Total Solar Irradiance ... ACRIM II Instrument Page ACRIM III Data Sets Readme Files:  Readme File Image ...

  3. Software Development at Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Thomas; Hauth, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Belle II is a next generation B-factory experiment that will collect 50 times more data than its predecessor Belle. This requires not only a major upgrade of the detector hardware, but also of the simulation, reconstruction, and analysis software. The challenges of the software development at Belle II and the tools and procedures to address them are reviewed in this article.

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema

    Steve Dierker

    2016-07-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Dierker

    2008-03-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  6. Processing-structure-property studies of: (I) submicron polymeric fibers produced by electrospinning and (II) films of linear low density polyethylenes as influenced by the short chain branch length in copolymers of ethylene/1-butene, ethylene/1-hexene and ethylene/1-octene synthesized by a single site metallocene catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pankaj

    The overall theme of the research discussed in this dissertation has been to explore processing-structure-property relationships for submicron polymeric fibers produced by electrospinning (Part I) and to ascertain whether or not the length of the short chain branch has any effect on the physical properties of films of linear low-density polyethylenes (LLDPEs) (Part II). The research efforts discussed in Part I of this dissertation relate to some fundamental as well as more applied investigations involving electrospinning. These include investigating the effects of solution rheology on fiber formation and developing novel methodologies to fabricate polymeric mats comprising of high specific surface submicron fibers of more than one polymer, high chemical resistant substrates produced by in situ photo crosslinking during electrospinning, superparamagnetic flexible substrates by electrospinning a solution of an elastomeric polymer containing ferrite nanoparticles of Mn-Zn-Ni and substrates for filtration applications. Bicomponent electrospinning of poly(vinyl chloride)-polyurethane and poly(vinylidiene fluoride)-polyurethane was successfully performed. In addition, filtration properties of single and bicomponent electrospun mats of polyacrylonitrile and polystyrene were investigated. Results indicated lower aerosol penetration or higher filtration efficiencies of the filters based on submicron electrospun fibers in comparison to the conventional filter materials. In addition, Part II of this dissertation explores whether or not the length of the short chain branch affects the physical properties of blown and compression molded films of LLDPEs that were synthesized by a single site metallocene catalyst. Here, three resins based on copolymers of ethylene/1-butene, ethylene/1-hexene, and ethylene/1-octene were utilized that were very similar in terms of their molecular weight and distribution, melt rheology, density, crystallinity and short chain branching content and

  7. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    SciTech Connect

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P.

    1997-12-31

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D&D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively {open_quotes}solder{close_quotes} components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible.

  8. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  9. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  10. [Oculocutaneous type II tyrosinosis].

    PubMed

    Podglajen-Wecxsteen, O; Delaporte, E; Piette, F; le Flohic, X; Bergoend, H

    1993-01-01

    Richner-Hanhart syndrome, also called oculo-cutaneous tyrosinosis type II, is a recessive autosomal genodermatosis consecutive to a disorder of tyrosine metabolism. It presents as a varying association of palmo-plantar keratosis, bilateral keratitis and mental retardation. The authors report a new case which is atypical in that palmoplantar keratosis made a late appearance. The diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of hypertyrosinaemia, hypertyrosinuria and urinary excretion of phenolic acids, and the absence of hepato-renal lesion. Needle biopsy of the liver, which demonstrates the deficiency of soluble cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase, is not indispensable to the diagnosis and was not performed in our patient. Treatment consisted of a dietary measure: a controlled phenylalanine and tyrosine intake to obtain a tyrosinaemia below 10 mg/100 ml. This resulted in a favourable and durable course of the oculo-cutaneous lesions. In case of isolated skin lesion, retinoids can be prescribed either alone of combined with a diet, making it less strict.

  11. Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

    2005-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

  12. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction data characterization of Escherichia coli ribonuclease II (RNase II)

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, Colin E.; Amblar, Mónica; Barbas, Ana; Cairrão, Fátima; Coelho, Ricardo; Romão, Célia; Arraiano, Cecília M.; Carrondo, Maria A.; Frazão, Carlos

    2006-07-01

    Diffraction data from E. coli RNase II crystals of wild type and of an inactive mutant and its SeMet-derivative form were obtained to 2.44 and 2.74 Å resolution, providing a set of preliminary phases. An improved purification protocol allowed higher reproducibility in the crystallization of the mutant form. RNA degradation is important in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. The processing, degradation and quality control of RNA is performed by many different classes of ribonucleases. Ribonuclease II (RNase II) is a 643-amino-acid enzyme that degrades single-stranded RNA from its 3′-end, releasing ribonucleoside 5′-monophosphates. RNase II was expressed both as the wild type and as a D209N mutant form. The latter was also produced as an SeMet derivative. The various protein forms were crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. Wild-type RNase II was crystallized in two crystal forms, both of which belonged to space group P2{sub 1}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.44 and 2.75 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.8, b = 125.7, c = 66.2 Å, β = 111.9° and a = 119.6, b = 57.2, c = 121.2 Å, β = 99.7°, respectively. The RNase II D209N mutant gave crystals that belonged to space group P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 86.3, c = 279.2 Å, and diffracted to 2.74 Å. Diffraction data from the mutant and its SeMet derivative enabled the determination of a partial Se-atom substructure by SIRAS.

  13. Lifetimes, spectra, and quenching of the excited states of polypyridine complexes of iron(II), ruthenium(II), and osmium(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, C.; Chou, M.; Netzel, T.L.; Okumura, M.; Sutin, N.

    1980-02-13

    The lifetimes of the excited states formed by 530-nm excitation of polypyridine complexes of iron(II) (FeL/sub 3//sup 2 +/) and osmium(II) (OsL/sub 3//sup 2 +/) have been determined by laser flash-photolysis techniques. The FeL/sub 3//sup 2 +/ lifetimes, measured in water at room temperature using picosecond absorption spectrometry, are as follows (L,tau +- sigma(ns)):2,2',2''-terpyridine (2.54 +- 0.13); 2,2'-bipyridine (0.81 +- 0.07); 4,4'-dimethyl(2,2'-bipyridine) (0.76 +- 0.04); 1,10-phenanthroline (0.80 +- 0.07); 4,7-(diphenyl sulfonate)-1,10-phenanthroline (0.43 +- 0.03). Lifetimes for the analogous complexes of osmium(II) lie in the range 10-100 ns under the same conditions. Unlike the excited states of Ru(bpy)/sub 3//sup 2 +/ and Os(bpy)/sub 3//sup 2 +/ (lambda/sub max/430-460 nm, epsilon approx. 5 x 10/sup 3/ M/sup -1/ cm-/sup 1/), the excited state of Fe(bpy)/sub 3//sup 2 +/ does not luminesce or absorb significantly in the visible (epsilon < 10/sup 3/ M/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/ at lambda greater than or equal to 350 nm) but does exhibit intense absorption below approx. 325 nm. Rate constants for the quenching of the excited states of polypyridine complexes of osmium(II) and ruthenium(II) by ground-state polypyridine complexes of iron(II), ruthenium(II), and osmium(II) are reported and are ascribed to either electron-transfer or energy-transfer processes. The excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)iron(II) and of bis(2,2',2''-terpyridine)iron(II) undergo reaction with Fe/sub aq//sup 3 +/ (0.5 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 25/sup 0/C) with a rate constant less than or equal to 1 x 10/sup 7/ M-/sup 1/ s/sup -1/. Based on a comparison of its properties with those of the luminescent charge-transfer excited states of ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) polypyridine complexes the excited state of FeL/sub 3//sup 2 +/ is identified as a ligand-field state.

  14. Oscillator strength measurements in samarium(II), neodymium(II) and praseodymium(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruohong

    A knowledge of the abundances of lanthanide ions in stellar photospheres is valuable in astrophysics, especially for chemically peculiar stars. However, the determination of elemental abundances is often limited by inadequate knowledge of oscillator strengths. Combining independently measured values of radiative lifetimes and branching fractions is an effective and precise method to measure oscillator strengths. It avoids absolute intensity measurements, requiring a knowledge of the absolute number density of particles and absolute measurements of intensity, and furthermore decreases the systematic error greatly. In the previous work of our group, the lifetimes of Sm II, Nd II and Pr II were obtained. In this thesis work, we measured the corresponding branching fractions of these lanthanide ions using a fast-ion-beam laser-induced- fluorescence technique. The power of this technique is that ions are selectively excited by a laser, which ensures that every branch comes from a single upper level and gets rid of spectral blends. Besides, the low ion-beam density ensures that the systematic errors due to collisions and radiation trapping are negligible. Combining the branching fractions with our previously measured lifetimes, we obtained 608, 430 and 260 oscillator strength values for Sm II, Nd II and Pr II transitions, respectively, over the wavelength range 350-850 nm. These transitions originate from 69 upper levels in the range 21 655 cm -1 -29 388 cm -1 for Sm II, 46 upper levels in the range 22 697 cm -1 -29 955 cm -1 for Nd II, and 32 levels in the range 22 040 cm -1 -28 577 cm -1 for Pr II. Of the 260 measured oscillator strength values of Pr II, 183 have been determined accurately for the first time. The uncertainties arise principally from systematic uncertainties of the efficiency calibration of the optical detection system (7.1%), with smaller statistical contributions (1.5%). Comparisons are made to prior measurements.

  15. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  16. Biosatellite II mission.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, O E

    1969-01-01

    Biosatellite B was launched from Cape Kennedy, Florida, on a two-stage DELTA launch vehicle at 6:04 p.m. on 7 September, 1967. Approximately nine minutes later the 435 kg spacecraft biological laboratory was placed into a satisfactory 315 km near-circular earth orbit, successfully separated from the launch vehicle's second stage and was designated Biosatellite II. The scientific payload consisting of thirteen selected general biology and radiation experiments were subjected to planned, carefully controlled environmental conditions during 45 hours of earth-orbital flight. The decision was made to abbreviate the scheduled 3-day mission by approximately one day because of a threatening tropical storm in the recovery area, and a problem of communication with the spacecraft from the tracking stations. Highest priority was placed on recovery which was essential to obtain the scientific results on all the experiments. The operational phase of the mission came to a successful conclusion with the deorbit of the recovery capsule, deployment of the parachute system and air recovery by the United States Air Force. The 127 kg recovery capsule was returned to biology laboratories at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, for disassembly and immediate inspection and analysis of the biological materials by the experimenters. It was evident immediately that the quality of the biology was excellent and this fact gave promise of a high return of scientific data. The environmental conditions provided to the experimental material in the spacecraft, provisions for experimental controls, and operational considerations are presented as they relate to interpretation of the experimental results. PMID:11949687

  17. Photosystem II: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, A W; Faller, P

    2003-01-01

    Based on the current model of its structure and function, photosystem II (PSII) seems to have evolved from an ancestor that was homodimeric in terms of its protein core and contained a special pair of chlorophylls as the photo-oxidizable cofactor. It is proposed that the key event in the evolution of PSII was a mutation that resulted in the separation of the two pigments that made up the special chlorophyll pair, making them into two chlorophylls that were neither special nor paired. These ordinary chlorophylls, along with the two adjacent monomeric chlorophylls, were very oxidizing: a property proposed to be intrinsic to monomeric chlorophylls in the environment provided by reaction centre (RC) proteins. It seems likely that other (mainly electrostatic) changes in the environments of the pigments probably tuned their redox potentials further but these changes would have been minor compared with the redox jump imposed by splitting of the special pair. This sudden increase in redox potential allowed the development of oxygen evolution. The highly oxidizing homodimeric RC would probably have been not only inefficient in terms of photochemistry and charge storage but also wasteful in terms of protein or pigments undergoing damage due to the oxidative chemistry. These problems would have constituted selective pressures in favour of the lop-sided, heterodimeric system that exists as PSII today, in which the highly oxidized species are limited to only one side of the heterodimer: the sacrificial, rapidly turned-over D1 protein. It is also suggested that one reason for maintaining an oxidizable tyrosine, TyrD, on the D2 side of the RC, is that the proton associated with its tyrosyl radical, has an electrostatic role in confining P(+) to the expendable D1 side. PMID:12594932

  18. Biosatellite II mission.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, O E

    1969-01-01

    Biosatellite B was launched from Cape Kennedy, Florida, on a two-stage DELTA launch vehicle at 6:04 p.m. on 7 September, 1967. Approximately nine minutes later the 435 kg spacecraft biological laboratory was placed into a satisfactory 315 km near-circular earth orbit, successfully separated from the launch vehicle's second stage and was designated Biosatellite II. The scientific payload consisting of thirteen selected general biology and radiation experiments were subjected to planned, carefully controlled environmental conditions during 45 hours of earth-orbital flight. The decision was made to abbreviate the scheduled 3-day mission by approximately one day because of a threatening tropical storm in the recovery area, and a problem of communication with the spacecraft from the tracking stations. Highest priority was placed on recovery which was essential to obtain the scientific results on all the experiments. The operational phase of the mission came to a successful conclusion with the deorbit of the recovery capsule, deployment of the parachute system and air recovery by the United States Air Force. The 127 kg recovery capsule was returned to biology laboratories at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, for disassembly and immediate inspection and analysis of the biological materials by the experimenters. It was evident immediately that the quality of the biology was excellent and this fact gave promise of a high return of scientific data. The environmental conditions provided to the experimental material in the spacecraft, provisions for experimental controls, and operational considerations are presented as they relate to interpretation of the experimental results.

  19. Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Blood Donors; Blood Transfusion; HIV Infections; HIV-1; HIV-2; HTLV-I; HTLV-II; Retroviridae Infections; Hepatitis, Viral, Human; Hepatitis B; Hepacivirus; West Nile Virus

  20. New instruments at IPNS: POSY II and SAD II

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Felcher, G.P.; Kleb, R.; Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1988-09-29

    Three new instruments are currently in varying degrees of development/construction at IPNS. One of these, the Glass, Liquid, and Amorphous Materials Diffractometer (GLAD) is the subject of a separate paper in these Proceedings, and so will not be discussed further here. The other two, a second neutron reflectometer (POSY II) and a second small-angle diffractometer (SAD II) are described briefly below. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.