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Sample records for ii collagen u-ctx-ii

  1. Water-soluble undenatured type II collagen ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Orie; Shiojima, Yoshiaki; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi; Shinozaki, Junichi; Nakane, Takahisa; Masuda, Kazuo; Bagchi, Manashi

    2013-11-01

    Earlier studies have reported the efficacy of type II collagen (C II) in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a few studies have investigated the ability of the antigenic collagen to induce oral tolerance, which is defined as active nonresponse to an orally administered antigen. We hypothesized that water-soluble undenatured C II had a similar effect as C II in RA. The present study was designed to examine the oral administration of a novel, water-soluble, undenatured C II (commercially known as NEXT-II) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In addition, the underlying mechanism of NEXT-II was also identified. After a booster dose (collagen-Freund's complete adjuvant), mice were assigned to control CIA group, or NEXT-II treatment group, to which saline and NEXT-II were administered, respectively. The arthritis index in the NEXT-II group was significantly lower compared with the CIA group. Serum IL-6 levels in the NEXT-II group were significantly lower compared with the CIA group, while serum IL-2 level was higher. Furthermore, oral administration of NEXT-II enhanced the proportion of CD4+CD25+T (Treg) cells, and gene expressions of stimulated dendritic cells induced markers for regulatory T cells such as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and CD25. These results demonstrated that orally administered water-soluble undenatured C II (NEXT-II) is highly efficacious in the suppression of CIA by inducing CD4+CD25+ Treg cells.

  2. Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: identification of abnormal type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M; Hollister, D W

    1988-12-01

    We have extended the study of a mild case of type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis to include biochemical analyses of cartilage, bone, and the collagens produced by dermal fibroblasts. Type I collagen extracted from bone and types I and III collagen produced by dermal fibroblasts were normal, as was the hexosamine ratio of cartilage proteoglycans. Hyaline cartilage, however, contained approximately equal amounts of types I and II collagen and decreased amounts of type XI collagen. Unlike the normal SDS-PAGE mobility. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE revealed extensive overmodification of all type II cyanogen bromide peptides in a pattern consistent with heterozygosity for an abnormal pro alpha 1(II) chain which impaired the assembly and/or folding of type II collagen. This interpretation implies that dominant mutations of the COL2A1 gene may cause type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis. More generally, emerging data implicating defects of type II collagen in the type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis-spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita spectrum and in the Kniest-Stickler syndrome spectrum suggest that diverse mutations of this gene may be associated with widely differing phenotypic outcome.

  3. A COL2A1 mutation in achondrogenesis type II results in the replacement of type II collagen by type I and III collagens in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, D; Cole, W G; Chow, C W; Mundlos, S; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-27

    An autosomal dominant mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a fetus with achondrogenesis type II. A transition of G2853 to A in exon 41 produced a substitution of Gly769 by Ser within the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II collagen, interrupting the mandatory Gly-X-Y triplet sequence required for the normal formation of stable triple helical type II collagen molecules, resulting in the complete absence of type II collagen in the cartilage, which had a gelatinous composition. Type I and III collagens were the major species found in cartilage tissue and synthesized by cultured chondrocytes along with cartilage type XI collagen. However, cultured chondrocytes produced a trace amount of type II collagen, which was retained within the cells and not secreted. In situ hybridization of cartilage sections showed that the chondrocytes produced both type II and type I collagen mRNA. As a result, it is likely that the chondrocytes produced type II collagen molecules, which were then degraded. The close proximity of the Gly769 substitution by Ser to the mammalian collagenase cleavage site at Gly775-Leu776 may have produced an unstable domain that was highly susceptible to proteolysis. The type I and III collagens that replaced type II collagen were unable to maintain the normal structure of the hyaline cartilage but did support chondrocyte maturation, evidenced by the expression of type X collagen in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate cartilage.

  4. Evaluation of nanoarchitectured collagen type II molecules on cartilage engineering.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shyh Ming; Chiang, Ming Yu; Lan, Cheng Wen; Niu, Gregory Cheng-Chie; Chang, Shwu Jen

    2013-02-01

    Scaffold architecture, including the geometry and dimension of scaffolds, is an important parameter in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Following the characterization of collagen type II nanoarchitectured molecules, collagen fibrils (CNFs) and collagen spheres (CNPs) prepared using a high-voltage electric field in our laboratory, we proposed to use these nanoarchitectured molecules to assess their influence on the culturing of chondrocytes in stirred bioreactors. The results demonstrate that chondrocytes rapidly formed more and larger chondrocyte pellets (spheroids) after the addition of nanoarchitectured molecules into the culture medium. The maintenance of chondrocytes with round morphology and increased glycosaminoglycan secretion indicated that these spheroids contained viable and un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. No significant increases in DNA content were detected. These results show that the introduction of these molecules did not affect chondrocyte proliferation during a 3-day culture period. After the addition of CNPs and CNFs into the culture medium, the expression levels of collagen type II and aggrecan genes in chondrocytes increased significantly as demonstrated by real-time PCR analysis. Interestingly, chondrocytes exhibited distinct collagen type II and aggrecan gene expression profiles in culture with CNPs and CNFs. The aggrecan gene expression level of the chondrocytes was 2.5-fold greater following CFN addition than following the addition of CNPs. In contrast, the collagen type II expression level of the chondrocytes was 2.2-fold greater following the addition of CNPs than following the addition of CNFs. The chondrocyte pellets rapidly restored defects in articular cartilage during a 1-month implantation period in a rabbit model.

  5. Lamprey type II collagen and Sox9 reveal an ancient origin of the vertebrate collagenous skeleton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangjun; Miyamoto, Michael M; Cohn, Martin J

    2006-02-28

    Type II collagen is the major cartilage matrix protein in the jawed vertebrate skeleton. Lampreys and hagfishes, by contrast, are thought to have noncollagenous cartilage. This difference in skeletal structure has led to the hypothesis that the vertebrate common ancestor had a noncollagenous skeleton, with type II collagen becoming the predominant cartilage matrix protein after the divergence of jawless fish from the jawed vertebrates approximately 500 million years ago. Here we report that lampreys have two type II collagen (Col2alpha1) genes that are expressed during development of the cartilaginous skeleton. We also demonstrate that the adult lamprey skeleton is rich in Col2alpha1 protein. Furthermore, we have isolated a lamprey orthologue of Sox9, a direct transcriptional regulator of Col2alpha1 in jawed vertebrates, and show that it is coexpressed with both Col2alpha1 genes during skeletal development. These results reveal that the genetic pathway for chondrogenesis in lampreys and gnathostomes is conserved through the activation of cartilage matrix molecules and suggest that a collagenous skeleton evolved surprisingly early in vertebrate evolution.

  6. Type II collagen defects in the chondrodysplasias. I. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, L W; Bautista, J; James, P L; Rimoin, D L

    1989-01-01

    The spondyloepiphyseal dysplasias (SEDs) and spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasias (SEMDs) are a heterogeneous group of skeletal dysplasias (dwarfing disorders) characterized by abnormal epiphyses, with and without varying degrees of metaphyseal irregularities, flattened vertebral bodies, and myopia. To better define the underlying cause of these disorders, we have analyzed the collagens from costal cartilage from several of these patients, using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of intact chains and cyanogen bromide (CNBr) peptides and amino acid analysis. In almost all of the patients in this study group, the type II collagen exhibited a slower electrophoretic mobility when compared with that in normal controls. The mobility of many, but not all, of the CNBr peptides was also retarded. Peptides near the amino terminus were almost always altered, while the mobility of peptides close to the carboxyl terminus were normal in all but the severely affected cases. Analysis of the CNBr peptides on an HPLC sieving column confirmed that the electrophoretically abnormal peptides were of a higher molecular weight than were control peptides. Amino acid analysis indicated that the abnormal collagens have a higher ratio of hydroxylysine to lysine than does control collagen, suggesting that overmodification may be involved in the altered mobility. Our results are consistent with a defect in the collagen helix that results in overmodification of the molecule from that point toward the amino terminus. We propose that some forms of SED and SEMD are associated with abnormalities in type II collagen that results in delayed helix formation and consequent overmodification of the collagen. Cases of SED fit onto a continuous spectrum of clinical severity that correlates positively with both the extent of alteration and the proximity of the defect to the carboxyl terminus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2741952

  7. Isolation of cDNA and genomic DNA clones encoding type II collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Young, M F; Vogeli, G; Nunez, A M; Fernandez, M P; Sullivan, M; Sobel, M E

    1984-01-01

    A cDNA library constructed from total chick embryo RNA was screened with an enriched fraction of type II collagen mRNA. Two overlapping cDNA clones were characterized and shown to encode the COOH propeptide of type II collagen. In addition, a type II collagen clone was isolated from a Charon 4A library of chick genomic fragments. Definitive identification of the clones was based on DNA sequence analysis. The 3' end of the type II collagen gene appears to be similar to that of other interstitial collagen genes. Northern hybridization data indicates that there is a marked decrease in type II collagen mRNA levels in chondrocytes treated with the dedifferentiating agent 5-bromodeoxyuridine. The major type II collagen mRNA species is 5300 bases long, similar to that of other interstitial collagen RNAs. Images PMID:6203098

  8. Definition of the native and denatured type II collagen binding site for fibronectin using a recombinant collagen system.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Yigit, Sezin; Balduini, Alessandra; Kaplan, David L; Brodsky, Barbara

    2014-02-21

    Interaction of collagen with fibronectin is important for extracellular matrix assembly and regulation of cellular processes. A fibronectin-binding region in collagen was identified using unfolded fragments, but it is not clear if the native protein binds fibronectin with the same primary sequence. A recombinant bacterial collagen is utilized to characterize the sequence requirement for fibronectin binding. Chimeric collagens were generated by inserting the putative fibronectin-binding region from human collagen into the bacterial collagen sequence. Insertion of a sufficient length of human sequence conferred fibronectin affinity. The minimum sequence requirement was identified as a 6-triplet sequence near the unique collagenase cleavage site and was the same in both triple-helix and denatured states. Denaturation of the chimeric collagen increased its affinity for fibronectin, as seen for mammalian collagens. The fibronectin binding recombinant collagen did not contain hydroxyproline, indicating hydroxyproline is not essential for binding. However, its absence may account, in part, for the higher affinity of the native chimeric protein and the lower affinity of the denatured protein compared with type II collagen. Megakaryocytes cultured on chimeric collagen with fibronectin affinity showed improved adhesion and differentiation, suggesting a strategy for generating bioactive materials in biomedical applications.

  9. Piezoelectricity in collagen type II fibrils measured by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, D.; Kilpatrick, J. I.; Hsu, T.; Habelitz, S.; Fertala, A.; Rodriguez, B. J.

    2014-08-01

    The converse piezoelectric effect in collagen type II fibrils, the main collagen constituent in cartilage, was investigated using piezoresponse force microscopy. The fibrils exhibited shear piezoelectric behavior similar to that previously reported in collagen type I fibrils and followed the same cantilever-fibril angle dependence present for type I. A uniform polarization directed from the amine to carboxyl termini, as seen for collagen type I, was observed in all type II fibrils studied. The shear piezoelectric coefficient, d15, however, for type II was roughly 28-32% of the value measured for type I fibrils. Possible explanations for the reduced piezoelectric coefficient of type II collagen are provided.

  10. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I-III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the identification of DDR binding sites on collagen III. Using sets of overlapping triple-helical peptides, the Collagen II and Collagen III Toolkits, we located several DDR2 binding sites on both collagens. The interaction of DDR1 with Toolkit peptides was more restricted, with DDR1 mainly binding to peptides containing the GVMGFO motif. Triple-helical peptides containing the GVMGFO motif induced DDR1 transmembrane signalling, and DDR1 binding and receptor activation occurred with the same amino acid requirements as previously defined for DDR2. While both DDRs exhibit the same specificity for binding the GVMGFO motif, which is present only in fibrillar collagens, the two receptors display distinct preferences for certain non-fibrillar collagens, with the basement membrane collagen IV being exclusively recognised by DDR1. Based on our recent crystal structure of a DDR2-collagen complex, we designed mutations to identify the molecular determinants for DDR1 binding to collagen IV. By replacing five amino acids in DDR2 with the corresponding DDR1 residues we were able to create a DDR2 construct that could function as a collagen IV receptor.

  11. Localization of pro-collagen type II mRNA and collagen type II in the healing tooth socket of the rat.

    PubMed

    Devlin, H; Hoyland, J; Freemont, A J; Sloan, P

    1995-03-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats (50 days old) were anaesthetized and the maxillary right molars extracted. The rats were killed at 2, 3, 6, 8 and 10 days after extraction. The maxillae were dissected and prepared for either routine histology, in situ hybridization for pro-collagen type II mRNA, or immunohistochemical detection of collagen type II. Pro-collagen type II mRNA was expressed maximally in the healing tooth socket at 8 days after the extractions, but the protein was not expressed at any time. This suggests that the translation of pro-collagen type II mRNA does not occur in osteoblasts following tooth extraction. Ossification was present in the socket at 6 days after the extractions, which is consistent with the suggestion that an early feature of osteoblastic differentiation may be the expression of type II pro-collagen mRNA.

  12. Localization of type II collagen, long form alpha 1(IX) collagen, and short form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts in the developing chick notochord and axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, R E; Solursh, M

    1992-06-01

    In this study we compare, by in situ hybridization, the spatial and temporal expression patterns of transcripts of avian type II collagen and the long and short forms of the (alpha 1) chain of type IX collagen during the development of the notochord and axial skeleton. We observed type II collagen and short form type IX collagen transcripts in the developing (stage 25-28) nonchondrogenic notochord. Conversely, long form type IX transcripts were not detectable in the notochord or perinotochordal sheath. Interestingly, all three transcripts colocalized in the developing chondrogenic vertebrae of the axial skeleton as well as in the chondrocranium and Meckel's cartilage. The expression of the short form of type IX collagen in these regions was more restricted than that of the long form. This report provides additional support for a complex regulatory pathway of cartilage marker gene expression in chondrogenic vs. nonchondrogenic tissues during avian embryogenesis.

  13. Type II collagen is transiently expressed during avian cardiac valve morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, R E; Daniels, K J; Jensen, K L; Solursh, M

    1994-08-01

    We present new evidence of the temporal and spatial expression of type II collagen in the embryonic chick heart during the very early stages of its development. In particular, we emphasize the distribution of its mRNA and protein during valve formation. Type II collagen as well as several other fibrillar collagens (types I, III, and V) are present in stage 18 endocardial cushion mesenchymal cells. At stage 23, alpha 1 (II) collagen transcripts and the cognate polypeptide colocalize in the atrioventricular valves. As development proceeds, the relative abundance of alpha 1 (II) collagen transcripts decreases during the stages studied (stages 22 to 45; day 3.5 to day 19) as assayed by RNA blotting of extracts of whole hearts. Type II collagen protein was immunologically undetectable in stage 38 (day 12) hearts, although collagens I, III, and V persisted and localize in the valve regions, in the endothelial lining of the heart, and in the epicardium. In keeping with other observations of type II collagen expression in non-chondrogenic regions of a variety of vertebrate embryos, the avian heart also exhibits transient type II collagen expression.

  14. The effect of type II collagen on MSC osteogenic differentiation and bone defect repair.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Li-Hsuan; Lai, Wen-Fu T; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Wong, Chin-Chean; Fan, Cheng-Yu; Fang, Chia-Lang; Tsai, Yu-Hui

    2014-03-01

    The function of type II collagen in cartilage is well documented and its importance for long bone development has been implicated. However, the involvement of type II collagen in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) osteogenesis has not been well investigated. This study elucidated the pivotal role of type II collagen in BMSC osteogenesis and its potential application to bone healing. Type II collagen-coated surface was found to accelerate calcium deposition, and the interaction of osteogenic medium-induced BMSCs with type II collagen-coated surface was mainly mediated through integrin α2β1. Exogenous type II collagen directly activated FAK-JNK signaling and resulted in the phosphorylation of RUNX2. In a segmental defect model in rats, type II collagen-HA/TCP-implanted rats showed significant callus formation at the reunion site, and a higher SFI (sciatic function index) scoring as comparing to other groups were also observed at 7, 14, and 21 day post-surgery. Collectively, type II collagen serves as a better modulator during early osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs by facilitating RUNX2 activation through integrin α2β1-FAK-JNK signaling axis, and enhance bone defect repair through an endochondral ossification-like process. These results advance our understanding about the cartilaginous ECM-BMSC interaction, and provide perspective for bone defect repair strategies.

  15. Diverse effects of type II collagen on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Li-Hsuan; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Huang, Huei-Mei; Leu, Sy-Jye; Yang, Charng-Bin; Tsai, Yu-Hui

    2012-06-01

    Type II collagen is known to modulate chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, MSCs from human bone marrow aspirates were used to study the modulating effects of type II collagen on MSC differentiation during the early stages of osteogenesis and adipogenesis. With osteogenic induction, MSCs cultured on the type II collagen-coated surface showed an enhanced calcium deposition level with increasing mRNA expressions of RUNX2, osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase. A synthetic integrin binding peptide, which specifically interacts with the I-domain of α(1)β(1)/α(2)β(1) integrins significantly blocks the mineralization-enhancing effect of type II collagen. MSCs attached on the type II collagen-coated plates exhibited expanded cell morphology with increasing spreading area, and the pretreatment of cells with integrin α(1)β(1) or α(2)β(1)-blocking antibody reduced the effect. The phosphorylation levels of FAK, ERK, and JNK significantly increased in the MSCs that attached on the type II collagen-coated plates. On the contrary, the mineralization-enhancing effect of type II collagen was diminished by JNK and MEK inhibitors. Furthermore, type II collagen blocked the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs, and this effect is rescued by JNK and MEK inhibitors. In conclusion, type II collagen facilitates osteogenesis and suppresses adipogenesis during early stage MSC differentiation. Such effects are integrin binding-mediated and conducted through FAK-JNK and/or FAK-ERK signaling cascades. These results inspire a novel strategy encompassing type II collagen in bone tissue engineering.

  16. Production of human type II collagen using an efficient baculovirus-silkworm multigene expression system.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qi; Yao, Lunguang; Liang, Zhisheng; Yan, Donghua; Li, Zhuo; Huang, Yadong; Sun, Jingchen

    2016-12-01

    Human type II collagen is a macromolecular protein found throughout the human body. The baculovirus expression vector system is one of the most ideal systems for the routine production and display of recombinant eukaryotic proteins in insect, larvae, and mammalian cells. We use this system to express a full-length gene, human type II collagen cDNA (4257 bp), in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells (Sf9), Bombyx mori cells, and silkworm larvae. In this study, the expression of human type II collagen gene in both insect cells and silkworm larvae was purified by nickel column chromatography, leading to 300-kDa bands in SDS-PAGE and western blotting indicative of collagen α-chains organized in a triple-helical structure. About 1 mg/larva human type II collagen is purified from silkworm skin, which shows a putative large scale of collagen production way. An activity assay of recombinant human type II collagen expressed by silkworm larvae demonstrated that the recombinant protein has considerable bioactive properties. Scanning electron microscopy of purified proteins clearly reveals randomly distributed and pitted structures. We conclude that the baculovirus-silkworm multigene expression system can be used as an efficient platform for express active human type II collagen and other complicated eukaryotic proteins.

  17. In Situ D-periodic Molecular Structure of Type II Collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2010-05-06

    Collagens are essential components of extracellular matrices in multicellular animals. Fibrillar type II collagen is the most prominent component of articular cartilage and other cartilage-like tissues such as notochord. Its in situ macromolecular and packing structures have not been fully characterized, but an understanding of these attributes may help reveal mechanisms of tissue assembly and degradation (as in osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis). In some tissues such as lamprey notochord, the collagen fibrillar organization is naturally crystalline and may be studied by x-ray diffraction. We used diffraction data from native and derivative notochord tissue samples to solve the axial, D-periodic structure of type II collagen via multiple isomorphous replacement. The electron density maps and heavy atom data revealed the conformation of the nonhelical telopeptides and the overall D-periodic structure of collagen type II in native tissues, data that were further supported by structure prediction and transmission electron microscopy. These results help to explain the observed differences in collagen type I and type II fibrillar architecture and indicate the collagen type II cross-link organization, which is crucial for fibrillogenesis. Transmission electron microscopy data show the close relationship between lamprey and mammalian collagen fibrils, even though the respective larger scale tissue architecture differs.

  18. Diabetes-induced alterations in tissue collagen and carboxymethyllysine in rat kidneys: Association with increased collagen-degrading proteinases and amelioration by Cu(II)-selective chelation.

    PubMed

    Brings, Sebastian; Zhang, Shaoping; Choong, Yee S; Hogl, Sebastian; Middleditch, Martin; Kamalov, Meder; Brimble, Margaret A; Gong, Deming; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-08-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) comprise a group of non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of proteins and are elevated in diabetic tissues. AGE-modification impairs the digestibility of collagen in vitro but little is known about its relation to collagen-degrading proteinases in vivo. N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) is a stable AGE that forms on lysyl side-chains in the presence of glucose, probably via a transition metal-catalysed mechanism. Here, rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and non-diabetic controls were treated for 8weeks with placebo or the Cu(II)-selective chelator, triethylenetetramine (TETA), commencing 8weeks after disease induction. Actions of diabetes and drug treatment were measured on collagen and collagen-degrading proteinases in kidney tissue. The digestibility and CML content of collagen, and corresponding levels of mRNAs and collagen, were related to changes in collagen-degrading-proteinases. Collagen-degrading proteinases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) were increased in diabetic rats. CTSL-levels correlated strongly and positively with increased collagen-CML levels and inversely with decreased collagen digestibility in diabetes. The collagen-rich mesangium displayed a strong increase of CTSL in diabetes. TETA treatment normalised kidney collagen content and partially normalised levels of CML and CTSL. These data provide evidence for an adaptive proteinase response in diabetic kidneys, affected by excessive collagen-CML formation and decreased collagen digestibility. The normalisation of collagen and partial normalisation of CML- and CTSL-levels by TETA treatment supports the involvement of Cu(II) in CML formation and altered collagen metabolism in diabetic kidneys. Cu(II)-chelation by TETA may represent a treatment option to rectify collagen metabolism in diabetes independent of alterations in blood glucose levels.

  19. Interaction of lubricin with type II collagen surfaces: adsorption, friction, and normal forces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Debby P; Guilak, Farshid; Jay, Gregory D; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-02-07

    One of the major constituents of the synovial fluid that is thought to be responsible for chondroprotection and boundary lubrication is the glycoprotein lubricin (PRG4); however, the molecular mechanisms by which lubricin carries out its critical functions still remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that the interaction of lubricin with type II collagen, the main component of the cartilage extracellular matrix, results in enhanced tribological and wear properties. In this study, we examined: (i) the molecular details by which lubricin interacts with type II collagen and how binding is related to boundary lubrication and adhesive interactions; and (ii) whether collagen structure can affect lubricin adsorption and its chondroprotective properties. We found that lubricin adsorbs strongly onto denatured, amorphous, and fibrillar collagen surfaces. Furthermore, we found large repulsive interactions between the collagen surfaces in presence of lubricin, which increased with increasing lubricin concentration. Lubricin attenuated the large friction and also the long-range adhesion between fibrillar collagen surfaces. Interestingly, lubricin adsorbed onto and mediated the frictional response between the denatured and native amorphous collagen surfaces equally and showed no preference on the supramolecular architecture of collagen. However, the coefficient of friction was lowest on fibrillar collagen in the presence of lubricin. We speculate that an important role of lubricin in mediating interactions at the cartilage surface is to attach to the cartilage surface and provide a protective coating that maintains the contacting surfaces in a sterically repulsive state.

  20. Expression of collagen types I and II on articular cartilage in a rat knee contracture model.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Ando, Akira; Chimoto, Eiichi; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ichiro; Sasano, Yasuyuki; Onoda, Yoshito; Suda, Hideaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to clarify the expression patterns of collagen types I and II on articular cartilage after immobilization in a rat knee contracture model in 3 specific areas (noncontact area, transitional area, contact area). The unilateral knee joints of adult male rats were rigidly immobilized at 150 degrees of flexion using screws and a rigid plastic plate. Sham-operated animals had holes drilled in the femur and the tibia and screws inserted but were not plated. The expression patterns of collagen types I and II in each area were evaluated by in situ hybridization (ISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The expression of collagen type II in the noncontact area was decreased by ISH but appeared unchanged when examined by IHC. In the transitional and contact areas, the expression of collagen type II was initially shown to have decreased and then increased at the hypertrophic chondrocytes by ISH but appeared decreased by IHC. Quantitative PCR revealed the decreased expression of type II collagen in the contact area. Immunostaining of collagen type I was increased at the noncontact area and transitional areas. Alterations of collagen types I and II expression may also affect the degeneration of articular cartilage after immobilization and the changes were different in the three areas.

  1. The anabolic effects of insulin on type II collagen synthesis of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bembenek, M.E.; Liberti, J.P.

    1984-08-15

    The anabolic effects of insulin on collagen production of freshly isolated Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes were investigated. The specific radioactivity of newly synthesized collagen was not increased by insulin, indicating that the hormone has no effect on the specific radioactivity of the aminoacyl tRNA pool. Results of further studies obtained from collagen degradation experiments demonstrated that insulin did not alter the rate of (3H)collagen degradation. Together, these results clearly indicate that insulin stimulates collagen biosynthesis. Polyacrylamide gel analysis of the newly synthesized collagen of both control and insulin-stimulated cells revealed a large-molecular-weight component which migrated with authentic alpha 1(II) collagen and was collagenase-sensitive. Additional studies showed that, although insulin increased the processing and secretion of collagen, the hormone did not cause a shift in the distribution of the extracellular and intracellular collagen pools. Finally, results of studies conducted with the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D, indicated that the anabolic effects of insulin on collagen and non-collagen proteins were mediated at a post-transcriptional site.

  2. Angiotensin II regulates collagen metabolism through modulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in diabetic skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Ren, Meng; Hao, Shaoyun; Yang, Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Chen, Lihong; Lin, Diaozhu; Li, Na; Yan, Li

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) balance in regulating collagen metabolism of diabetic skin. Skin tissues from diabetic model were collected, and the primary cultured fibroblasts were treated with Ang II receptor inhibitors before Ang II treatment. The collagen type I (Coll I) and collagen type III (Coll III) were measured by histochemistry. The expressions of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), MMP-1, TIMP-1 and propeptides of types I and III procollagens in skin tissues and fibroblasts were quantified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Collagen dysfunction was documented by changed collagen I/III ratio in streptozotocin (STZ)-injected mice compared with controls. This was accompanied by increased expression of TGF-β, TIMP-1 and propeptides of types I and III procollagens in diabetic skin tissues. In primary cultured fibroblasts, Ang II prompted collagen synthesis accompanied by increases in the expressions of TGF-β, TIMP-1 and types I and III procollagens, and these increases were inhibited by losartan, an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker, but not affected by PD123319, an Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist. These findings present evidence that Ang-II-mediated changes in the productions of MMP-1 and TIMP-1 occur via AT1 receptors and a TGF-β-dependent mechanism.

  3. Adjuvant arthritis pretreatment with type II collagen and Mycobacterium butyricum.

    PubMed

    Franch, A; Cassany, S; Castellote, C; Castell, M

    1992-11-01

    A treatment previous to adjuvant arthritis induction has been performed with type II collagen (CII) or Mycobacterium butyricum (Mb), which is the inducer of the pathology. Pretreatment was administered in two different ways: a) subcutaneously or intradermally 14 days before arthritis induction, and b) intravenously 3 days before induction. In order to relate the change in inflammation to the corresponding antigen immune response, serum antibodies and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) against CII or Mb were studied. Pretreatment with s.c. CII 14 days before induction produced slight protection against arthritis and significantly delayed its onset; systemic inflammation showed good positive correlation with anti-CII antibodies. The CII administered i.v. 3 days before arthritic challenge did not significantly modify the inflammatory process. The use of i.d. subarthritogenic doses of Mb 14 days before induction protected a high percentage of the animals from the posterior arthritic challenge; this protection was accompanied by high anti-Mb antibody titers and DTH reaction. When Mb was given i.v. 3 days before induction, a partial protection of inflammation was observed; arthritis was milder and its onset was delayed. These changes were accompanied by reduced humoral and cellular response to Mb.

  4. Tissue-specific expression of the human type II collagen gene in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lovell-Badge, R.H.; Bygrave, A.; Bradley, A.; Robertson, E.; Tilly, R.; Cheah, K.S.E.

    1987-05-01

    Type II collagen is crucial to the development of form in vertebrates as it is the major protein of cartilage. To study the factors regulating its expression the authors introduced a cosmid containing the human type II collagen gene, including 4.5 kilobases of 5' and 2.2 kilobases of 3' flanking DNA, into embryonic stem cells in vitro. The transformed cells contribute to all tissues in chimeric mice allowing the expression of the exogenous gene to be studied in vivo. Human type II collagen mRNA is restricted to tissues showing transcription from the endogenous gene and human type II collagen is found in extracellular matrix surrounding chondrocytes in cartilage. The results indicate that the cis-acting requirements for correct temporal and spatial regulation of the gene are contained with the introduced DNA.

  5. The D2 period of collagen II contains a specific binding site for the human discoidin domain receptor, DDR2.

    PubMed

    Leitinger, Birgit; Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Andrzej

    2004-12-03

    The human discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 and DDR2, are expressed widely and, uniquely among receptor tyrosine kinases, activated by the extracellular matrix protein collagen. This activation is due to a direct interaction of collagen with the DDR discoidin domain. Here, we localised a specific DDR2 binding site on the triple-helical region of collagen II. Collagen II was found to be a much better ligand for DDR2 than for DDR1. As expected, DDR2 binding to collagen II was dependent on triple-helical collagen and was mediated by the DDR2 discoidin domain. Collagen II served as a potent stimulator of DDR2 autophosphorylation, the first step in transmembrane signalling. To map the DDR2 binding site(s) on collagen II, we used recombinant collagen II variants with specific deletions of one of the four repeating D periods. We found that the D2 period of collagen II was essential for DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, whereas the D3 and D4 periods were dispensable. The DDR2 binding site on collagen II was further defined by recombinant collagen II-like proteins consisting predominantly of tandem repeats of the D2 or D4 period. The D2 construct, but not the D4 construct, mediated DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, demonstrating that the D2 period of collagen II harbours a specific DDR2 recognition site. The discovery of a site-specific interaction of DDR2 with collagen II gives novel insight into the nature of the interaction of collagen II with matrix receptors.

  6. Nonexpression of cartilage type II collagen in a case of Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, D R; Upton, M P; Shapiro, F D; Wilkinson, R H; Vawter, G F

    1986-07-01

    A lethal short-limbed dwarfism was diagnosed at autopsy as the Langer-Saldino variant of achondrogenesis by radiological, histological, and gross pathological criteria. Cartilage was obtained for biochemical and ultrastructural analyses from the ends of long bones, from ribs and from a scapula of the newborn infant. At all sites, it had an abnormal gelatinous texture and translucent appearance. Biochemical analyses of the cartilages to identify pepsin-solubilized collagen alpha-chains and collagen-specific CNBr-peptides failed to detect type II collagen at any site where it would normally be the main constituent. Instead, type I was the predominant collagen present. However, three cartilage-specific minor collagen chains identified as 1 alpha, 2 alpha, and 3 alpha chains by their electrophoretic mobility were present at about 10% of the total collagen. Cartilage-specific proteoglycans also appeared to be abundant in the tissue judging by its high hexosamine content and high ratio of galactosamine to glucosamine. The findings indicate that a chondrocyte phenotype had differentiated but without the expression of type II collagen. In addition to the skeletal abnormalities, the severe pulmonary hypoplasia was also felt to be directly related to the underlying pathology in collagen expression. The term chondrogenesis imperfecta rather than achondrogenesis should be considered a more accurate description of this and related conditions.

  7. Substance P Inhibits the Collagen Synthesis of Rat Myocardial Fibroblasts Induced by Ang II.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xinzhong; Guo, Naipeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Sheng

    2016-12-16

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the regulating effects of Substance P (SP) on the collagen synthesis of rat myocardial fibroblasts (CFBs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and its potential mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS The CFBs of a neonatal SD rat were separately cultured and divided into the control group, Ang II treatment group, and treatment groups with different concentrations of SP, Ang II +; each group was given corresponding treatment respectively. RESULTS Ang II successfully induced the collagen synthesis of CFBs. Compared with the control group, the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β, erk, and smad2/3 were higher (p<0.05). Different concentrations of SP had an effect on Ang II-induced CFBs, reduced the collagen synthesis of CFBs, and increased the expressions of SP receptors, accompanied by lowering TGF-β protein, erk protein phosphorylation level, and smad2/3 protein phosphorylation level (p<0.05). Moreover, the higher the concentrations of SP, the more obvious of an effect it exerted. Treating the Ang II + SP group with aprepitant reduced the inhibiting effects of SP on collagen synthesis. The expression changes of collagen I and collagen III detected by immunocytochemistry were exactly in accordance with the results of qPCR and Western blotting. CONCLUSIONS SP can inhibit collagen synthesis of CFBs after Ang II inducing which may adjust the downstream signaling pathways associated protein including TGF-β, erk and smad2/3. SP can block the progress of myocardial fibrosis and is dose dependent, which is expected to be a promising target for the treatment of myocardial fibrosis.

  8. Substance P Inhibits the Collagen Synthesis of Rat Myocardial Fibroblasts Induced by Ang II

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xinzhong; Guo, Naipeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the regulating effects of Substance P (SP) on the collagen synthesis of rat myocardial fibroblasts (CFBs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and its potential mechanism. Material/Methods The CFBs of a neonatal SD rat were separately cultured and divided into the control group, Ang II treatment group, and treatment groups with different concentrations of SP, Ang II +; each group was given corresponding treatment respectively. Results Ang II successfully induced the collagen synthesis of CFBs. Compared with the control group, the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β, erk, and smad2/3 were higher (p<0.05). Different concentrations of SP had an effect on Ang II-induced CFBs, reduced the collagen synthesis of CFBs, and increased the expressions of SP receptors, accompanied by lowering TGF-β protein, erk protein phosphorylation level, and smad2/3 protein phosphorylation level (p<0.05). Moreover, the higher the concentrations of SP, the more obvious of an effect it exerted. Treating the Ang II + SP group with aprepitant reduced the inhibiting effects of SP on collagen synthesis. The expression changes of collagen I and collagen III detected by immunocytochemistry were exactly in accordance with the results of qPCR and Western blotting. Conclusions SP can inhibit collagen synthesis of CFBs after Ang II inducing which may adjust the downstream signaling pathways associated protein including TGF-β, erk and smad2/3. SP can block the progress of myocardial fibrosis and is dose dependent, which is expected to be a promising target for the treatment of myocardial fibrosis. PMID:27980320

  9. [Extraction, purification and identification of type II collagen from Agkistrodon acutus].

    PubMed

    Gu, Heng-Cun; Hu, Jin-Bo; Ding, Zhi-Shan; Fan, Yong-Sheng; Ding, Xing-Hong

    2013-11-01

    The object of the research was to extract, purify and identify the type II collagen of Agkistrodon acutus. Type II collagen of A. acutus was extracted by enzyme decomposition method, and purified by ion exchange column chromatography. It was characterized by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, infrared absorption spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. The results showed that the size of C II was about 130 kDa. It absorbed at 223 nm. IR spectrum obtained showed that the triple helical domains of amino-acid sequences were characterized by the repetition of triplets Gly-X-Y. The MS spectrum graphically stated that C II extracted from cow and A. acutus have the similar peptides. The C II of A. acutus was obtained by extraction and purification. Appraisal analysis by SDS-PAGE, UV, IR and MS, C II of A. acutus was consistent with the standard C II of cow. It was proved that the extracted protein was C II.

  10. Hagfish and lancelet fibrillar collagens reveal that type II collagen-based cartilage evolved in stem vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangjun; Cohn, Martin J

    2006-11-07

    The origin of vertebrates was defined by evolution of a skeleton; however, little is known about the developmental mechanisms responsible for this landmark evolutionary innovation. In jawed vertebrates, cartilage matrix consists predominantly of type II collagen (Col2alpha1), whereas that of jawless fishes has long been thought to be noncollagenous. We recently showed that Col2alpha1 is present in lamprey cartilage, indicating that type II collagen-based cartilage evolved earlier than previously recognized. Here, we investigate the origin of vertebrate cartilage, and we report that hagfishes, the sister group to lampreys, also have Col2alpha1-based cartilage, suggesting its presence in the common ancestor of crown-group vertebrates. We go on to show that lancelets, a sister group to vertebrates, possess an ancestral clade A fibrillar collagen (ColA) gene that is expressed in the notochord. Together, these results suggest that duplication and diversification of ColA genes at the chordate-vertebrate transition may underlie the evolutionary origin of vertebrate skeletal tissues.

  11. Alveolar type II cell-fibroblast interactions, synthesis and secretion of surfactant and type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M; Bhandari, R; Hamilton, G; Chan, Y C; Powell, J T

    1993-06-01

    During alveolar development and alveolar repair close contacts are established between fibroblasts and lung epithelial cells through gaps in the basement membrane. Using co-culture systems we have investigated whether these close contacts influence synthesis and secretion of the principal surfactant apoprotein (SP-A) by cultured rat lung alveolar type II cells and the synthesis and secretion of type I collagen by fibroblasts. The alveolar type II cells remained cuboidal and grew in colonies on fibroblast feeder layers and on Matrigel-coated cell culture inserts but were progressively more flattened on fixed fibroblast monolayers and plastic. Alveolar type II cells cultured on plastic released almost all their SP-A into the medium by 4 days. Alveolar type II cells cultured on viable fibroblasts or Matrigel-coated inserts above fibroblasts accumulated SP-A in the medium at a constant rate for the first 4 days, and probably recycle SP-A by endocytosis. The amount of mRNA for SP-A was very low after 4 days of culture of alveolar type II cells on plastic, Matrigel-coated inserts or fixed fibroblast monolayers: relatively, the amount of mRNA for SP-A was increased 4-fold after culture of alveolar type II cells on viable fibroblasts. Co-culture of alveolar type II cells with confluent human dermal fibroblasts stimulated by 2- to 3-fold the secretion of collagen type I into the culture medium, even after the fibroblasts' growth had been arrested with mitomycin C. Collagen secretion, by fibroblasts, also was stimulated 2-fold by conditioned medium from alveolar type II cells cultured on Matrigel. The amount of mRNA for type I collagen increased only modestly when fibroblasts were cultured in this conditioned medium. This stimulation of type I collagen secretion diminished as the conditioned medium was diluted out, but at high dilutions further stimulation occurred, indicating that a factor that inhibited collagen secretion also was being diluted out. The conditioned medium

  12. An {alpha}1(II) Gly{sup 913} to cys substitution prevents the matrix incorporation of type II collagen which is replaced with type I and III collagens in cartilage from a patient with hypochondrogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mundlos, S.; Chan, D.; Bateman, J.F.; McGill, J.

    1996-05-03

    A heterozygous mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a patient with hypochondrogenesis. The mutation was a single nucleotide transition of G3285T that resulted in an amino acid substitution of Cys for Gly{sup 913} in the {alpha}1(II) chain of type II collagen. This amino acid change disrupted the obligatory Gly-X-Y triplet motif required for the normal formation of a stable collagen triple helix and prevented the deposition of type II collagen into the proposita`s cartilage, which contained predominantly type I and III collagens and minor amounts of type XI collagen. Biosynthetic analysis of collagens produced and secreted by the patient`s chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads was consistent with the in vivo matrix composition, demonstrating that the main products were type I and III collagens, along with type XI collagen. The synthesis of the cartilage-specific type XI collagen at similar levels to controls indicated that the isolated cartilage cells had re-differentiated to the chondrocyte phenotype. The chondrocytes also produced small amounts of type II collagen, but this was post-translationally overmodified and not secreted. These data further delineate the biochemical and phenotypic consequences of mutations in the COL2A1 gene and suggest that cartilage formation and bone development can take place in the absence of type II collagen. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Characterization of Collagen Type I and II Blended Hydrogels for Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Portalatı N, Nelda; Kilmer, Claire E; Panitch, Alyssa; Liu, Julie C

    2016-10-10

    Biomaterials that provide signals present in the native extracellular matrix have been proposed as scaffolds to support improved cartilage regeneration. This study harnesses the biological activity of collagen type II and the superior mechanical properties of collagen type I by characterizing gels made of collagen type I and II blends. The collagen blend hydrogels were able to incorporate both types of collagen and retained chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy images showed that the 3:1 ratio of collagen type I to type II gels had a lower void space percentage (36.4%) than the 1:1 gels (46.5%). The complex modulus was larger for the 3:1 gels (G* = 5.0 Pa) compared to the 1:1 gels (G* = 1.2 Pa). The 3:1 blend consistently formed gels with superior mechanical properties compared to the other blends and has the potential to be implemented as a scaffold for articular cartilage engineering.

  14. Protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta-induced annulus fibrosus type II collagen degeneration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Duan, Deyu; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Wang, Hong; Xiong, Xiaoqian

    2007-02-01

    The protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-induced annulus fibrosus (AF) type II collagen degeneration in vitro and the mechanism were investigated. Chiba's intervertebral disc (IVD) culture models in rabbits were established and 48 IVDs from 12 adult Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, niacinamide-treated group, type II collagen degneration group (IL-1beta) and treatment group (niacinamide+IL-1beta). After culture for one week, AFs were collected for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cysteine containing aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) and type II collagen immunohistochemical examination, and type II collagen reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that rate of iNOS positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 17.6%, 10.9%, 73.9% and 19.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was significantly lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). Rate of Caspase-3 positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 3.4%, 4.2%, 17.6% and 10.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). Type II collagen staining demonstrated that lamellar structure and continuity of collagen in treatment group was better reversed than in the degeneration group. RT-PCR revealed that the expression of type II collagen in treatment group was significantly stronger than that in type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). It was concluded that niacinamide could effectively inhibit IL-1beta stimulated increase of iNOS and Caspase-3 in AF, and alleviate IL-1beta-caused destruction and synthesis inhibition of type II collagen. Niacinamide is of potential for clinical treatment of IVD degeneration.

  15. Physiological regulation of extracellular matrix collagen and elastin in the arterial wall of rats by noradrenergic tone and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Dab, Houcine; Kacem, Kamel; Hachani, Rafik; Dhaouadi, Nadra; Hodroj, Wassim; Sakly, Mohsen; Randon, Jacques; Bricca, Giampiero

    2012-03-01

    The interactions between the effects of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and angiotensin II (ANG II) on vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis were determined in rats. The mRNA and protein content of collagen I, collagen III and elastin in the abdominal aorta (AA) and femoral artery (FA) was investigated in Wistar-Kyoto rats treated for 5 weeks with guanethidine, a sympathoplegic, losartan, an ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) blocker, or both. The effects of noradrenaline (NE) and ANG II on collagen III and elastin mRNA, and the receptor involved, were tested in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Guanethidine increased collagen types I and III and decreased elastin, while losartan had an opposite effect, although without effect on collagen III. The combination of treatments abrogated changes induced by simple treatment with collagen I and elastin, but increased collagen III mRNA in AA and not in FA. NE stimulated collagen III mRNA via β receptors and elastin via α1 and α2 receptors. ANG II stimulated collagen III but inhibited elastin mRNA via AT1R. Overall, SNS and ANG II exert opposite and antagonistic effects on major components of ECM in the vascular wall. This may be of relevance for the choice of a therapeutic strategy in vascular diseases.

  16. Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentham, David E.; Dynesius-Trentham, Roselynn A.; Orav, E. John; Combitchi, Daniel; Lorenzo, Carlos; Sewell, Kathryn Lea; Hafler, David A.; Weiner, Howard L.

    1993-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory synovial disease thought to involve T cells reacting to an antigen within the joint. Type II collagen is the major protein in articular cartilage and is a potential autoantigen in this disease. Oral tolerization to autoantigens suppresses animal models of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, including two models of rheumatoid arthritis. In this randomized, double-blind trial involving 60 patients with severe, active rheumatoid arthritis, a decrease in the number of swollen joints and tender joints occurred in subjects fed chicken type II collagen for 3 months but not in those that received a placebo. Four patients in the collagen group had complete remission of the disease. No side effects were evident. These data demonstrate clinical efficacy of an oral tolerization approach for rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. An immunohistochemical study on the localization of type II collagen in the developing mouse mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Kenzaki, Keiichi; Tsuchikawa, Kohzo; Kuwahara, Toru

    2011-08-01

    The present chronological investigation assessed the distribution of type II collagen expression in the developing mouse mandibular condyle using immunohistochemical staining with respect to the anatomy of the anlage of the mandibular condyle, the histological characteristics of which were disclosed in our previous investigation. We analyzed fetuses, obtained by cross breeding of ICR strain mice, between 14.0 and 19.0 days post-conception (dpc) and pups on 1, 3, and 5 days post-natal (dpn) using immunohistochemical staining with 2 anti-type II collagen antibodies. The expression of type II collagen was first detected at 15.0 dpc in the lower part of the hypertrophic chondrocyte zone; thereafter, this type II collagen-positive layer was expanded and intensified (P1 layer). At 17.0 dpc, we identified a type II collagen-negative layer (N layer) around the P1 layer and we also identified another newly formed type II collagen-positive layer (P, layer) on the outer surface of the N layer. The most typical and conspicuous 3-layered distribution was observed at 1 dpn; thereafter, there was a reduction in the intensity of expression, and with it, the demarcation between the layers was weakened by 5 dpn. The P1 layer was derived from the central region of the core cell aggregate of the anlage of the mandibular condyle and participated in endochondral bone formation. The N layer was derived from the fringe of the core cell aggregate of the anlage, formed the bone collar at the side of the condyle by intramembranous bone formation, and showed a high level of proliferative activity at the vault. The P2 layer was formed from the outgrowth of the N layer, and could be considered as the secondary cartilage. The intensive expression of type II collagen from 17.0 dpc to 3 dpn was detected in the fibrous sheath covering the condylar head, which is derived from the peripheral cell aggregate of the anlage. Since its expression in the fibrous sheath was not detected in the neighboring

  18. Bacopa monniera (L.) wettst inhibits type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Viji, V; Kavitha, S K; Helen, A

    2010-09-01

    Bacopa monniera (L.) Wettst is an Ayurvedic herb with antirheumatic potential. This study investigated the therapeutic efficacy of Bacopa monniera in treating rheumatoid arthritis using a type II collagen-induced arthritis rat model. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by immunization with bovine type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant. Bacopa monniera extract (BME) was administered after the development of arthritis from day 14 onwards. The total duration of experiment was 60 days. Paw swelling, arthritic index, inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, myeloperoxidase and serum anti-collagen IgG and IgM levels were analysed in control and experimental rats. Arthritic induction significantly increased paw edema and other classical signs of arthritis coupled to upregulation of inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, neutrophil infiltration and increased anti-collagen IgM and IgG levels in serum. BME significantly inhibited the footpad swelling and arthritic symptoms. BME was effective in inhibiting cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase activities in arthritic rats. Decreased neutrophil infiltration was evident from decreased myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological data where an improvement in joint architecture was also observed. Serum anti-collagen IgM and IgG levels were consistently decreased. Thus the study demonstrates the potential antiarthritic effect of Bacopa monniera for treating arthritis which might confer its antirheumatic activity.

  19. Chondrocytes expressing intracellular collagen type II enter the cell cycle and co-express collagen type I in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Tekari, Adel; Luginbuehl, Reto; Hofstetter, Willy; Egli, Rainer J

    2014-11-01

    For autologous chondrocyte transplantation, articular chondrocytes are harvested from cartilage tissue and expanded in vitro in monolayer culture. We aimed to characterize with a cellular resolution the synthesis of collagen type II (COL2) and collagen type I (COL1) during expansion in order to further understand why these cells lose the potential to form cartilage tissue when re-introduced into a microenvironment that supports chondrogenesis. During expansion for six passages, levels of transcripts encoding COL2 decreased to <0.1%, whereas transcript levels encoding COL1 increased 370-fold as compared to primary chondrocytes. Flow cytometry for intracellular proteins revealed that chondrocytes acquired a COL2/COL1-double positive phenotype during expansion, and the COL2 positive cells were able to enter the cell cycle. While the fraction of COL2 positive cells decreased from 70% to <2% in primary chondrocytes to passage six cells, the fraction of COL1 positive cells increased from <1% to >95%. In parallel to the decrease of the fraction of COL2 positive cells, the cells' potential to form cartilage-like tissue in pellet cultures steadily decreased. Intracellular staining for COL2 enables for characterization of chondrocyte lineage cells in more detail with a cellular resolution, and it may allow predicting the effectiveness of expanded chondrocytes to form cartilage-like tissue.

  20. Localization of types I, II, and III collagen mRNAs in developing human skeletal tissues by in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Paraffin sections of human skeletal tissues were studied in order to identify cells responsible for production of types I, II, and III collagens by in situ hybridization. Northern hybridization and sequence information were used to select restriction fragments of cDNA clones for the corresponding mRNAs to obtain probes with a minimum of cross- hybridization. The specificity of the probes was proven in hybridizations to sections of developing fingers: osteoblasts and chondrocytes, known to produce only one type of fibrillar collagen each (I and II, respectively) were only recognized by the corresponding cDNA probes. Smooth connective tissues exhibited variable hybridization intensities with types I and III collagen cDNA probes. The technique was used to localize the activity of type II collagen production in the different zones of cartilage during the growth of long bones. Visual inspection and grain counting revealed the highest levels of pro alpha 1(II) collagen mRNAs in chondrocytes of the lower proliferative and upper hypertrophic zones of the growth plate cartilage. This finding was confirmed by Northern blotting of RNAs isolated from epiphyseal (resting) cartilage and from growth zone cartilage. Analysis of the osseochondral junction revealed virtually no overlap between hybridization patterns obtained with probes specific for type I and type II collagen mRNAs. Only a fraction of the chondrocytes in the degenerative zone were recognized by the pro alpha 1(II) collagen cDNA probe, and none by the type I collagen cDNA probe. In the mineralizing zone virtually all cells were recognized by the type I collagen cDNA probe, but only very few scattered cells appeared to contain type II collagen mRNA. These data indicate that in situ hybridization is a valuable tool for identification of connective tissue cells which are actively producing different types of collagens at the various stages of development, differentiation, and growth. PMID:3558480

  1. Collagen type II in Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis: absence of major abnormalities in a less severe case.

    PubMed

    Bätge, B; Nerlich, A; Brenner, R; Yang, C; Müller, P K

    1992-02-01

    Collagen extracted either from cartilage or synthesized in vitro was analyzed to identify possible molecular defects in the cartilaginous matrix of a male fetus suffering from a mild form of type II achondrogenesis (Langer-Saldino). The tissue architecture of the patient's cartilage was markedly altered and showed numerous fibrous vascular canals which were focally stained by antibodies against collagens I and III. Collagen II was present, although heterogenously distributed throughout the cartilaginous matrix. Upon electrophoretic separation, however, the patient's femoral head cartilage showed the presence of collagens II, IX and XI only, which was similar to an age-matched control. The hydroxyproline/hydroxylysine ratio of collagen II of the patient was not significantly different from that of the control. Likewise, the compositions of collagens synthesized by cultured chondrocytes as well as fibroblasts were similar in the patient and the control. The results provide strong evidence that, in the present mild case of Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis, collagen II is expressed and regularly hydroxylated at its lysyl residues. This may indicate that cartilage components other than collagen II may be responsible for the altered tissue organization observed. Along with previous observations, our data suggest that the degree of biochemical matrix alterations may be related to the severity of the clinical phenotype.

  2. Collagen/cellulose hydrogel beads reconstituted from ionic liquid solution for Cu(II) adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jilei; Wei, Ligang; Ma, Yingchong; Li, Kunlan; Li, Minghui; Yu, Yachen; Wang, Lei; Qiu, Huihui

    2013-10-15

    A novel adsorbent, biodegradable collagen/cellulose hydrogel beads (CCHBs), was prepared by reconstitution from a 1-butyl, 3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C4mim]Cl) solution. The adsorption properties of the CCHBs for Cu(II) ion removal from aqueous solutions were investigated and compared with those of cellulose hydrogel beads (CHBs). The CCHBs have a three-dimensional macroporous structure whose amino groups are believed to be the main active binding sites of Cu(II) ions. The equilibrium adsorption capacity (qe) of the CCHBs is greatly influenced by the collagen/cellulose mass ratio, and steeply increases until the collagen/cellulose mass ratio exceeds 2/1. The maximum adsorption is obtained at pH 6. The qe of Cu(II) ions increases with increased initial concentration of the solution. Based on Langmuir isotherms, the maximum adsorption capacity (qm) of CCHB3 (collagen/cellulose mass ratio of 3/1) is 1.06 mmol/g. The CCHBs maintain good adsorption properties after the fourth cycle of adsorption-desorption.

  3. Gallium nitrate ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Sae-Gwang; Lim, Jun-Goo; Lee, Won-Jin; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwang-rae; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Gallium nitrate has been reported to reserve immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of gallium nitrate in the mouse model of developed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced by bovine type II collagen with Complete Freund's adjuvant. CIA mice were intraperitoneally treated from day 36 to day 49 after immunization with 3.5mg/kg/day, 7mg/kg/day gallium nitrate or vehicle. Gallium nitrate ameliorated the progression of mice with CIA. The clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis did not progress after treatment with gallium nitrate. Gallium nitrate inhibited the increase of CD4(+) T cell populations (p<0.05) and also inhibited the type II collagen-specific IgG2a-isotype autoantibodies (p<0.05). Gallium nitrate reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ (p<0.05) and the mRNA expression levels of these cytokine and MMPs (MMP2 and MMP9) in joint tissues. Western blotting of members of the NF-κB signaling pathway revealed that gallium nitrate inhibits the activation of NF-κB by blocking IκB degradation. These data suggest that gallium nitrate is a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune inflammatory arthritis through its inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, and these results may help to elucidate gallium nitrate-mediated mechanisms of immunosuppression in patients with RA.

  4. Preserving the longevity of long-lived type II collagen and its implication for cartilage therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tiku, Moti L; Madhan, Balaraman

    2016-07-01

    Human life expectancy has been steadily increasing at a rapid rate, but this increasing life span also brings about increases in diseases, dementia, and disability. A global burden of disease 2010 study revealed that hip and knee osteoarthritis ranked the 11th highest in terms of years lived with disability. Wear and tear can greatly influence the quality of life during ageing. In particular, wear and tear of the articular cartilage have adverse effects on joints and result in osteoarthritis. The articular cartilage uses longevity of type II collagen as the foundation around which turnover of proteoglycans and the homeostatic activity of chondrocytes play central roles thereby maintaining the function of articular cartilage in the ageing. The longevity of type II collagen involves a complex interaction of the scaffolding needs of the cartilage and its biochemical, structural and mechanical characteristics. The covalent cross-linking of heterotypic polymers of collagens type II, type IX and type XI hold together cartilage, allowing it to withstand ageing stresses. Discerning the biological clues in the armamentarium for preserving cartilage appears to be collagen cross-linking. Therapeutic methods to crosslink in in-vivo are non-existent. However intra-articular injections of polyphenols in vivo stabilize the cartilage and make it resistant to degradation, opening a new therapeutic possibility for prevention and intervention of cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis of aging.

  5. Tectorins crosslink type II collagen fibrils and connect the tectorial membrane to the spiral limbus.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Leonardo R; Salles, Felipe T; Grati, M'hamed; Manor, Uri; Kachar, Bechara

    2016-05-01

    All inner ear organs possess extracellular matrix appendices over the sensory epithelia that are crucial for their proper function. The tectorial membrane (TM) is a gelatinous acellular membrane located above the hearing sensory epithelium and is composed mostly of type II collagen, and α and β tectorins. TM molecules self-assemble in the endolymph fluid environment, interacting medially with the spiral limbus and distally with the outer hair cell stereocilia. Here, we used immunogold labeling in freeze-substituted mouse cochleae to assess the fine localization of both tectorins in distinct TM regions. We observed that the TM adheres to the spiral limbus through a dense thin matrix enriched in α- and β-tectorin, both likely bound to the membranes of interdental cells. Freeze-etching images revealed that type II collagen fibrils were crosslinked by short thin filaments (4±1.5nm, width), resembling another collagen type protein, or chains of globular elements (15±3.2nm, diameter). Gold-particles for both tectorins also localized adjacent to the type II collagen fibrils, suggesting that these globules might be composed essentially of α- and β-tectorins. Finally, the presence of gold-particles at the TM lower side suggests that the outer hair cell stereocilia membrane has a molecular partner to tectorins, probably stereocilin, allowing the physical connection between the TM and the organ of Corti.

  6. A specific collagen type II gene (COL2A1) mutation presenting as spondyloperipheral dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zabel, B.; Hilbert, K.; Spranger, J.; Winterpacht, A.; Stoeb, H.; Superti-Furga, A.

    1996-05-03

    We report on a patient with a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, spondylo-epiphyseal involvement, and brachydactyly E-like changes. This condition has been described as spondyloperipheral dysplasia and the few published cases suggest autosomal dominant inheritance with considerable clinical variability. We found our sporadic case to be due to a collagen type II defect resulting from a specific COL2A1 mutation. This mutation is the first to be located at the C-terminal outside the helical domain of COL2A1. A frameshift as consequence of a 5 bp duplication in exon 51 leads to a stop codon. The resulting truncated C-propeptide region seems to affect helix formation and produces changes of chondrocyte morphology, collagen type II fibril structure and cartilage matrix composition. Our case with its distinct phenotype adds another chondrodysplasia to the clinical spectrum of type II collagenopathies. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Physics of soft hyaluronic acid-collagen type II double network gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2015-03-01

    Many biological hydrogels are made up of multiple interpenetrating, charged components. We study the swelling, elastic diffusion, mechanical, and optical behaviors of 100 mol% ionizable hyaluronic acid (HA) and collagen type II fiber networks. Dilute, 0.05-0.5 wt% hyaluronic acid networks are extremely sensitive to solution salt concentration, but are stable at pH above 2. When swelled in 0.1M NaCl, single-network hyaluronic acid gels follow scaling laws relevant to high salt semidilute solutions; the elastic shear modulus G' and diffusion constant D scale with the volume fraction ϕ as G' ~ϕ 9 / 4 and D ~ϕ 3 / 4 , respectively. With the addition of a collagen fiber network, we find that the hyaluronic acid network swells to suspend the rigid collagen fibers, providing extra strength to the hydrogel. Results on swelling equilibria, elasticity, and collective diffusion on these double network hydrogels will be presented.

  8. MRI and histologic analysis of collagen type II sponge on repairing the cartilage defects of rabbit knee joints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Honghui; Yang, Xiaohong; Liao, Yingyang; Zeng, Xuwen; Liang, Peihong; Kang, Ning; Tan, Jianrong; Liang, Zhiping

    2011-02-01

    There are limited treatment options for cartilage defects in clinical practice because of the lack of suitable biomaterials. Here, we evaluated the effects of collagen type II sponge on the articular cartilage repairing process using a cartilage injury of a rabbit knee joint model. We showed that the home-made collagen type II sponges appeared to have a suitable pore size of 93.26 ± 38.4 μm for chondrocyte growth. MRI with H&E staining results demonstrated that the effusion absorption in the collagen type II sponge treated group was quicker than that of the control group. Moreover, sporadic cartilage signals first appeared at 6 weeks in the collagen type II sponge treated group. Safranin O staining and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that the newly formed cartilage expresses glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen matrix. Using Sirius red polarized light staining, we showed that the newly formed cartilage-like areas from the collagen type II treated group are significantly greater than those of the control group. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the home-made collagen type II sponge is able to promote cartilage repair in the cartilage injury of a rabbit knee joint model.

  9. Characterisation of freeze-dried type II collagen and chondroitin sulfate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Tamaddon, M; Walton, R S; Brand, D D; Czernuszka, J T

    2013-05-01

    Collagen type-II is the dominant type of collagen in articular cartilage and chondroitin sulfate is one of the main components of cartilage extracellular matrix. Afibrillar and fibrillar type-II atelocollagen scaffolds with and without chondroitin sulfate were prepared using casting and freeze-drying methods. The scaffolds were characterised to highlight the effects of fibrillogenesis and chondroitin sulfate addition on viscosity, pore structure, porosity and mechanical properties. Microstructure analysis showed that fibrillogenesis increased the circularity of pores significantly in collagen-only scaffolds, whereas with it, no significant change was observed in chondroitin sulfate-containing scaffolds. Addition of chondroitin sulfate to afibrillar scaffolds increased the circularity of the pores and the proportion of pores between 50 and 300 μm suitable for chondrocytes growth. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy explained the bonding between chondroitin sulfate and afibrillar collagen- confirmed with rheology results- which increased the compressive modulus 10-fold to 0.28 kPa. No bonding was observed in other scaffolds and consequently no significant changes in compressive modulus were detected.

  10. Molecular properties and fibril ultrastructure of types II and XI collagens in cartilage of mice expressing exclusively the α1(IIA) collagen isoform.

    PubMed

    McAlinden, Audrey; Traeger, Geoffrey; Hansen, Uwe; Weis, Mary Ann; Ravindran, Soumya; Wirthlin, Louisa; Eyre, David R; Fernandes, Russell J

    2014-02-01

    Until now, no biological tools have been available to determine if a cross-linked collagen fibrillar network derived entirely from type IIA procollagen isoforms, can form in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage. Recently, homozygous knock-in transgenic mice (Col2a1(+ex2), ki/ki) were generated that exclusively express the IIA procollagen isoform during post-natal development while type IIB procollagen, normally present in the ECM of wild type mice, is absent. The difference between these Col2a1 isoforms is the inclusion (IIA) or exclusion (IIB) of exon 2 that is alternatively spliced in a developmentally regulated manner. Specifically, chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly IIA mRNA isoforms while differentiated chondrocytes produce mainly IIB mRNA isoforms. Recent characterization of the Col2a1(+ex2) mice has surprisingly shown that disruption of alternative splicing does not affect overt cartilage formation. In the present study, biochemical analyses showed that type IIA collagen extracted from ki/ki mouse rib cartilage can form homopolymers that are stabilized predominantly by hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) cross-links at levels that differed from wild type rib cartilage. The findings indicate that mature type II collagen derived exclusively from type IIA procollagen molecules can form hetero-fibrils with type XI collagen and contribute to cartilage structure and function. Heteropolymers with type XI collagen also formed. Electron microscopy revealed mainly thin type IIA collagen fibrils in ki/ki mouse rib cartilage. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry of purified type XI collagen revealed a heterotrimeric molecular composition of α1(XI)α2(XI)α1(IIA) chains where the α1(IIA) chain is the IIA form of the α3(XI) chain. Since the N-propeptide of type XI collagen regulates type II collagen fibril diameter in cartilage, the retention of the exon 2-encoded IIA globular domain would structurally alter the N-propeptide of type XI collagen

  11. Collagen type II, alpha 1 protein: a bioactive component of shark cartilage.

    PubMed

    Merly, Liza; Smith, Sylvia L

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that extracts of shark cartilage induce a cytokine response in human leukocytes, but the nature of the bioactive component(s) is unknown. Extracts treated with proteases lost 80% of their cytokine-inducing property, suggesting that the active component(s) was likely a complex protein. The aim of the present study was to determine the nature of the bioactive molecule(s). Solid phase extraction followed by ion exchange chromatography and electrophoretic separation were used to partially purify a bioactive preparation from commercial shark cartilage that has been identified as a small glycoprotein. LC-MS analysis yielded peptides with 100% molecular identity with collagen type II, alpha I protein from the lesser spotted catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula. The implications for the consumption of shark cartilage as a dietary supplement are discussed given the presence of collagen type II, alpha 1 protein in extracts.

  12. Interleukin 1 suppresses expression of cartilage-specific types II and IX collagens and increases types I and III collagens in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, M B; Birkhead, J; Sandell, L J; Kimura, T; Krane, S M

    1988-01-01

    In inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, functions of chondrocytes including synthesis of matrix proteins and proteinases are altered through interactions with cells of the infiltrating pannus. One of the major secreted products of mononuclear inflammatory cells is IL-1. In this study we found that recombinant human IL-1 beta suppressed synthesis of cartilage-specific type II collagen by cultured human costal chondrocytes associated with decreased steady state levels of alpha 1 (II) and alpha 1(IX) procollagen mRNAs. In contrast, IL-1 increased synthesis of types I and III collagens and levels of alpha 1(I), alpha 2(I), and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNAs, as we described previously using human articular chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. This stimulatory effect of IL-1 was observed only when IL-1-stimulated PGE2 synthesis was blocked by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The suppression of type II collagen mRNA levels by IL-1 alone was not due to IL-1-stimulated PGE2, since addition of indomethacin did not reverse, but actually potentiated, this inhibition. Continuous exposure of freshly isolated chondrocytes from day 2 of culture to approximately half-maximal concentrations of IL-1 (2.5 pM) completely suppressed levels of type II collagen mRNA and increased levels of types I and III collagen mRNAs, thereby reversing the ratio of alpha 1(II)/alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNAs from greater than 6.0 to less than 1.0 by day 7. IL-1, therefore, can modify, at a pretranslational level, the relative amounts of the different types of collagen synthesized in cartilage and thereby could be responsible for the inappropriate repair of cartilage matrix in inflammatory conditions. Images PMID:3264290

  13. A metalloprotease secreted by the type II secretion system links Vibrio cholerae with collagen.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo R; Zielke, Ryszard A; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Mitchell, Kristie C; Withey, Jeffrey H; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to various aquatic niches and is the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The persistence of V. cholerae in natural habitats is a crucial factor in the epidemiology of cholera. In contrast to the well-studied V. cholerae-chitin connection, scarce information is available about the factors employed by the bacteria for the interaction with collagens. Collagens might serve as biologically relevant substrates, because they are the most abundant protein constituents of metazoan tissues and V. cholerae has been identified in association with invertebrate and vertebrate marine animals, as well as in a benthic zone of the ocean where organic matter, including collagens, accumulates. Here, we describe the characterization of the V. cholerae putative collagenase, VchC, encoded by open reading frame VC1650 and belonging to the subfamily M9A peptidases. Our studies demonstrate that VchC is an extracellular collagenase degrading native type I collagen of fish and mammalian origin. Alteration of the predicted catalytic residues coordinating zinc ions completely abolished the protein enzymatic activity but did not affect the translocation of the protease by the type II secretion pathway into the extracellular milieu. We also show that the protease undergoes a maturation process with the aid of a secreted factor(s). Finally, we propose that V. cholerae is a collagenovorous bacterium, as it is able to utilize collagen as a sole nutrient source. This study initiates new lines of investigations aiming to uncover the structural and functional components of the V. cholerae collagen utilization program.

  14. A Metalloprotease Secreted by the Type II Secretion System Links Vibrio cholerae with Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bo R.; Zielke, Ryszard A.; Wierzbicki, Igor H.; Mitchell, Kristie C.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to various aquatic niches and is the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The persistence of V. cholerae in natural habitats is a crucial factor in the epidemiology of cholera. In contrast to the well-studied V. cholerae-chitin connection, scarce information is available about the factors employed by the bacteria for the interaction with collagens. Collagens might serve as biologically relevant substrates, because they are the most abundant protein constituents of metazoan tissues and V. cholerae has been identified in association with invertebrate and vertebrate marine animals, as well as in a benthic zone of the ocean where organic matter, including collagens, accumulates. Here, we describe the characterization of the V. cholerae putative collagenase, VchC, encoded by open reading frame VC1650 and belonging to the subfamily M9A peptidases. Our studies demonstrate that VchC is an extracellular collagenase degrading native type I collagen of fish and mammalian origin. Alteration of the predicted catalytic residues coordinating zinc ions completely abolished the protein enzymatic activity but did not affect the translocation of the protease by the type II secretion pathway into the extracellular milieu. We also show that the protease undergoes a maturation process with the aid of a secreted factor(s). Finally, we propose that V. cholerae is a collagenovorous bacterium, as it is able to utilize collagen as a sole nutrient source. This study initiates new lines of investigations aiming to uncover the structural and functional components of the V. cholerae collagen utilization program. PMID:25561716

  15. MT1-MMP and Type II Collagen Specify Skeletal Stem Cells and Their Bone and Cartilage Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Szabova, Ludmila; Yamada, Susan S.; Wimer, Helen; Chrysovergis, Kaliopi; Ingvarsen, Signe; Behrendt, Niels; Engelholm, Lars H.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal formation is dependent on timely recruitment of skeletal stem cells and their ensuing synthesis and remodeling of the major fibrillar collagens, type I collagen and type II collagen, in bone and cartilage tissues during development and postnatal growth. Loss of the major collagenolytic activity associated with the membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) results in disrupted skeletal development and growth in both cartilage and bone, where MT1-MMP is required for pericellular collagen dissolution. We show here that reconstitution of MT1-MMP activity in the type II collagen–expressing cells of the skeleton rescues not only diminished chondrocyte proliferation, but surprisingly, also results in amelioration of the severe skeletal dysplasia associated with MT1-MMP deficiency through enhanced bone formation. Consistent with this increased bone formation, type II collagen was identified in bone cells and skeletal stem/progenitor cells of wildtype mice. Moreover, bone marrow stromal cells isolated from mice expressing MT1-MMP under the control of the type II collagen promoter in an MT1-MMP–deficient background showed enhanced bone formation in vitro and in vivo compared with cells derived from nontransgenic MT1-MMP–deficient littermates. These observations show that type II collagen is not stringently confined to the chondrocyte but is expressed in skeletal stem/progenitor cells (able to regenerate bone, cartilage, myelosupportive stroma, marrow adipocytes) and in the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineage progeny where collagenolytic activity is a requisite for proper cell and tissue function. PMID:19419317

  16. Hyperhomocysteinemia accelerates collagen accumulation in the adventitia of balloon-injured rat carotid arteries via angiotensin II type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dan; Sun, Ning-Ling

    2014-10-27

    Recent studies suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) increases collagen type I accumulation in rat vascular adventitia after balloon injury and that Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces collagen synthesis in vascular adventitial fibroblasts. Reports also indicate that Ang II type1 receptor (AT1R) activation, mediated by homocysteine (Hcy) may contribute to collagen type 1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. However, little is known about the possible mechanisms behind the relationship between Hcy and AT1R in adventitial remodeling. Thus, we investigated whether HHcy induces collagen accumulation via activation of AT1R in the adventitia. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into a control group and a 1% l-methionine-induced HHcy group. Balloon injury was performed after 12 experimental weeks and animals were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 28 days after injury. Collagen deposition and AT1R expression was measured with Western blot. Serum Hcy, adventitial collagen, and AT1R levels were higher in the HHcy group compared with the control group. Hcy time-dependently induced collagen type 1 and AT1R expression, with the highest induction observed at 48 h. Also, we observed that the AT1R blocker, valsartan, attenuated collagen type 1 and AT1R expression. HHcy exacerbates adventitial remodeling after balloon injury, and the underling mechanisms may be related to AT1R activity.

  17. Anti-type II collagen antibodies detection and avidity in patients with oligoarticular and polyarticular forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Galber R; Fonseca, João E; Fujimura, Patricia T; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Silva, Carlos H M; Mourão, Ana F; Canhão, Helena; Goulart, Luiz R; Gonçalves, João; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) refers to a heterogeneous group of illnesses that have in common the occurrence of chronic joint inflammation in children younger than 16 years of age. The diagnosis is made only on clinical assessment. The identification of antibody markers could improve the early diagnosis, optimizing the clinical management of patients. Type II collagen is one potential autoantigen that has been implicated in the process of arthritis development. The aims of our study were to investigate the occurrence of anti-type II collagen antibodies and also to determine the avidity of the antibody-antigen binding. Ninety-six patients with oligoarticular or polyarticular JIA, 13 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 61 healthy controls (HC) were tested for anti-type II collagen antibodies by ELISA and avidity ELISA. Sensitivity and specificity were determined by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Forty-two JIA patients (44%) were positive for antibodies against type II collagen. Its detection was significantly higher in JIA patients than in AS patients (p=0.006) and HCs (p<0.0001). Furthermore, anti-type II collagen antibody detection was significantly more frequent in patients with JIA of ≤6 months duration (p=0.0007). Antibodies displaying high avidity to type II collagen were associated with disease activity (p=0.004). This study demonstrates that antibodies against type II collagen are present in the serum of patients with oligoarticular and polyarticular JIA, being its presence more prevalent in patients with early disease. It also demonstrates that JIA patients with active disease present antibodies with high avidity against type II collagen.

  18. Proportion of collagen type II in the extracellular matrix promotes the differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into nucleus pulposus cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yiqing; Zhou, Xiaopeng; Liu, Dongyu; Li, Hao; Liang, Chengzhen; Li, Fangcai; Chen, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    During degeneration process, the catabolism of collagen type II and anabolism of collagen type I in nucleus pulposus (NP) may influence the bioactivity of transplanted cells. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) were cultured as a micromass or in a series of gradual proportion hydrogels of a mix of collagen types I and II. Cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were detected using CCK-8 and LDH assays respectively. The expression of differentiation-related genes and proteins, including SOX9, aggrecan, collagen type I, and collagen type II, was examined using RT-qPCR and Western blotting. Novel phenotypic genes were also detected by RT-qPCR and western blotting. Alcian blue and dimethylmethylene blue assays were used to investigate sulfate proteoglycan expression, and PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, and Smad signaling pathways were examined by Western blotting. The results showed collagen hydrogels have good biocompatibility, and cell proliferation increased after collagen type II treatment. Expressions of SOX9, aggrecan, and collagen type II were increased in a collagen type II dependent manner. Sulfate proteoglycan synthesis increased in proportion to collagen type II concentration. Only hADMSCs highly expressed NP cell marker KRT19 in collagen type II culture. Additionally, phosphorylated Smad3, which is associated with phosphorylated ERK, was increased after collagen type II-stimulation. The concentration and type of collagen affect hADMSC differentiation into NP cells. Collagen type II significantly ameliorates hADMSC differentiation into NP cells and promotes extracellular matrix synthesis. Therefore, anabolism of collagen type I and catabolism of type II may attenuate the differentiation and biosynthesis of transplanted stem cells.

  19. Hg(II) removal from aqueous solution by bayberry tannin-immobilized collagen fiber.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Liao, Xuepin; Shi, Bi

    2009-10-30

    A novel adsorbent was prepared by immobilizing barberry tannin (BT) onto collagen fiber, which was found effective to remove Hg(II) from aqueous solution. The bayberry tannin-immobilized collagen fiber (BTICF) shows high adsorption capacity to Hg(II) in a wide pH range of 4.0-9.0, and a maximum adsorption capacity (198.49 mg/g) was reached at pH 7.0 and 303 K when the initial concentration of Hg(II) was 200.0 mg/L. The adsorption isothermal and kinetic data were well fitted by the Langmuir equation and the pseudo-first-order rate equation, respectively. The adsorption mechanism of BTICF to Hg(II) was proved to follow a chelating reaction. The BTICF can be easily regenerated with 0.1M lactic acid after adsorption process and recycled at least 4 times without the loss of adsorption capacity. These facts indicate that BTICF can be used as a low-cost adsorbent for effective removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions.

  20. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS – which was released from scaffolds quickly – significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  1. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS – which was released from scaffolds quickly – significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA. PMID:28256634

  2. Prostaglandins in the perilymph of guinea pig with type II collagen induced ear diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Chiang, T.; Kitano, H.; Sudo, N.; Kim, S.Y.; Ha, S.; Woo, V.; Wolf, B.; Floyd, R.; Yoo, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have studied the prostaglandins (PGs) in the perilymph from guinea pig with type II collagen induced autoimmune ear disease. Hartly guinea pigs were immunized with type II collagen in CFA and auditory brain stem responses (ABR) were measured at 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after initial immunization perilymph was obtained and the levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. were measured by radioimmunoassays. Temporal bones were examined for the histopathologic changes. Immunized guinea pigs showed the evidence of hearing loss by ABR. The temporal bones showed the following changes: spiral ganglia degeneration, mild to moderate degree of degeneration in organ of Corti, infrequent very mild endolymphatic hydrops and labrynthitis. The perilymph from immunized animals contained about 5 times more PGE2 and about 3 times more 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. than control animals. However, between these two groups, there was no difference in the CSF and sera levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha... Thus, this study suggests that these inflammatory mediators might be involved in the pathogenesis of collagen induced autoimmune inner ear disease.

  3. Coordination study of recombinant human-like collagen and zinc (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Dai-Di

    2011-10-01

    In the present investigation, the complex of recombinant human-like collagen (r-HLC) with zinc (II) has been synthesized in aqueous solution and was analyzed by UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, thermo gravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. It can be concluded from UV-vis spectra that there exists interaction between r-HLC and zinc, and the complex is a new chemical compound different from pure r-HLC. In the complex of Zn, recombinant human-like collagen acts as ligand, linking the zinc ion via both groups of C dbnd O and N-H. Besides, the results of TG and DSC confirm that the complex was significantly different from ligand, and the former is more thermally stable in comparison with the latter. The results obtained from the current investigation are of crucial importance to understand the r-HLC-Zn complex and provide theoretical evidence for the further study.

  4. Coordination study of recombinant human-like collagen and zinc (II).

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Dai-Di

    2011-10-15

    In the present investigation, the complex of recombinant human-like collagen (r-HLC) with zinc (II) has been synthesized in aqueous solution and was analyzed by UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, thermo gravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. It can be concluded from UV-vis spectra that there exists interaction between r-HLC and zinc, and the complex is a new chemical compound different from pure r-HLC. In the complex of Zn, recombinant human-like collagen acts as ligand, linking the zinc ion via both groups of C=O and N-H. Besides, the results of TG and DSC confirm that the complex was significantly different from ligand, and the former is more thermally stable in comparison with the latter. The results obtained from the current investigation are of crucial importance to understand the r-HLC-Zn complex and provide theoretical evidence for the further study.

  5. Mice Deficient in CD38 Develop an Attenuated Form of Collagen Type II-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, Jorge; Iglesias, Marcos; Cerezo-Wallis, Daniela; Rosal-Vela, Antonio; García-Rodríguez, Sonia; Zubiaur, Mercedes; Sancho, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    CD38, a type II transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in many cells of the immune system, is involved in cell signaling, migration and differentiation. Studies in CD38 deficient mice (CD38 KO mice) indicate that this molecule controls inflammatory immune responses, although its involvement in these responses depends on the disease model analyzed. Here, we explored the role of CD38 in the control of autoimmune responses using chicken collagen type II (col II) immunized C57BL/6-CD38 KO mice as a model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We demonstrate that CD38 KO mice develop an attenuated CIA that is accompanied by a limited joint induction of IL-1β and IL-6 expression, by the lack of induction of IFNγ expression in the joints and by a reduction in the percentages of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in the spleen. Immunized CD38 KO mice produce high levels of circulating IgG1 and low of IgG2a anti-col II antibodies in association with reduced percentages of Th1 cells in the draining lymph nodes. Altogether, our results show that CD38 participates in the pathogenesis of CIA controlling the number of iNKT cells and promoting Th1 inflammatory responses. PMID:22438945

  6. Immunohistochemical study of collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in human cartilage repair tissue following autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S; Menage, J; Sandell, L J; Evans, E H; Richardson, J B

    2009-10-01

    This study has assessed the relative proportions of type I and II collagens and IIA procollagen in full depth biopsies of repair tissue in a large sample of patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Sixty five full depth biopsies were obtained from knees of 58 patients 8-60 months after treatment by ACI alone (n=55) or in combination with mosaicplasty (n=10). In addition articular cartilage was examined from eight individuals (aged 10-50) as controls. Morphology and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry for collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in the repair tissue were studied. Repair cartilage thickness was 2.89+/-1.5 mm and there was good basal integration between the repair cartilage, calcified cartilage and subchondral bone. Sixty five percent of the biopsies were predominantly fibrocartilage (mostly type I collagen and IIA procollagen), 15% were hyaline cartilage (mostly type II collagen), 17% were of mixed morphology and 3% were fibrous tissue (mostly type I collagen). Type II collagen and IIA procollagen were usually found in the lower regions near the bone and most type II collagen was present 30-60 months after treatment. The presence of type IIA procollagen in the repair tissue supports our hypothesis that this is indicative of a developing cartilage, with the ratio of type II collagen:procollagen IIA increasing from <2% in the first two years post-treatment to 30% three to five years after treatment. This suggests that cartilage repair tissue produced following ACI treatment, is likely to take some years to mature.

  7. Collagen Hydrogel Scaffold and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Accelerate Periodontal Healing of Class II Furcation Defects in Dog

    PubMed Central

    Momose, Takehito; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Yoshida, Takashi; Nishida, Erika; Murakami, Syusuke; Kosen, Yuta; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Collagen hydrogel scaffold exhibits bio-safe properties and facilitates periodontal wound healing. However, regenerated tissue volume is insufficient. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) up-regulates cell behaviors and subsequent wound healing. We evaluated whether periodontal wound healing is promoted by application of collagen hydrogel scaffold in combination with FGF2 in furcation defects in beagle dogs. Methods: Collagen hydrogel was fabricated from bovine type I collagen with an ascorbate-copper ion cross-linking system. Collagen hydrogel was mingled with FGF2 and injected into sponge-form collagen. Subsequently, FGF2 (50 µg)/collagen hydrogel scaffold and collagen hydrogel scaffold alone were implanted into class II furcation defects in dogs. In addition, no implantation was performed as a control. Histometric parameters were assessed at 10 days and 4 weeks after surgery. Result: FGF2 application to scaffold promoted considerable cell and tissue ingrowth containing numerous cells and blood vessel-like structure at day 10. At 4 weeks, reconstruction of alveolar bone was stimulated by implantation of scaffold loaded with FGF2. Furthermore, periodontal attachment, consisting of cementum-like tissue, periodontal ligament-like tissue and Sharpey’s fibers, was also repaired, indicating that FGF2-loaded scaffold guided self-assembly and then re-established the function of periodontal organs. Aberrant healing, such as ankylosis and root resorption, was not observed. Conclusion: FGF2-loaded collagen hydrogel scaffold possessed excellent biocompatibility and strongly promoted periodontal tissue engineering, including periodontal attachment re-organization. PMID:27583044

  8. Induction of tolerance against the arthritogenic antigen with type-II collagen peptide-linked soluble MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon-Kyung; Jung, Sundo; Park, Se-Ho

    2016-06-01

    In murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), self-reactive T cells can recognize peptide antigens derived from type-II collagen (CII). Activation of T cells is an important mediator of autoimmune diseases. Thus, T cells have become a focal point of study to treat autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of recombinant MHC class II molecules in the regulation of antigen-specific T cells by using a self peptide derived from CII (CII260-274; IAGFKGEQGPKGEPG) linked to mouse I-A(q) in a murine CIA model. We found that recombinant I-A(q)/CII260-274 molecules could be recognized by CII-specific T cells and inhibit the same T cells in vitro. Furthermore, the development of CIA in mice was successfully prevented by in vivo injection of recombinant I-A(q)/CII260-274 molecules. Thus, treatment with recombinant soluble MHC class II molecules in complex with an immunodominant self-peptide might offer a potential therapeutic for chronic inflammation in autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 331-336].

  9. Type II collagen and gelatin from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage: isolation, purification, physicochemical and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Jeevithan, Elango; Bao, Bin; Bu, Yongshi; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Qingbo; Wu, Wenhui

    2014-06-27

    Type II acid soluble collagen (CIIA), pepsin soluble collagen (CIIP) and type II gelatin (GII) were isolated from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage and examined for their physicochemical and antioxidant properties. GII had a higher hydroxyproline content (173 mg/g) than the collagens and cartilage. CIIA, CIIP and GII were composed of two identical α1 and β chains and were characterized as type II. Amino acid analysis of CIIA, CIIP and GII indicated imino acid contents of 150, 156 and 153 amino acid residues per 1000 residues, respectively. Differing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of CIIA, CIIP and GII were observed, which suggested that the isolation process affected the secondary structure and molecular order of collagen, particularly the triple-helical structure. The denaturation temperature of GII (32.5 °C) was higher than that of CIIA and CIIP. The antioxidant activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and the reducing power of CIIP was greater than that of CIIA and GII. SEM microstructure of the collagens depicted a porous, fibrillary and multi-layered structure. Accordingly, the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of type II collagens (CIIA, CIIP) and GII isolated from shark cartilage were found to be suitable for biomedical applications.

  10. Type II Collagen and Gelatin from Silvertip Shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) Cartilage: Isolation, Purification, Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jeevithan, Elango; Bao, Bin; Bu, Yongshi; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Qingbo; Wu, Wenhui

    2014-01-01

    Type II acid soluble collagen (CIIA), pepsin soluble collagen (CIIP) and type II gelatin (GII) were isolated from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage and examined for their physicochemical and antioxidant properties. GII had a higher hydroxyproline content (173 mg/g) than the collagens and cartilage. CIIA, CIIP and GII were composed of two identical α1 and β chains and were characterized as type II. Amino acid analysis of CIIA, CIIP and GII indicated imino acid contents of 150, 156 and 153 amino acid residues per 1000 residues, respectively. Differing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of CIIA, CIIP and GII were observed, which suggested that the isolation process affected the secondary structure and molecular order of collagen, particularly the triple-helical structure. The denaturation temperature of GII (32.5 °C) was higher than that of CIIA and CIIP. The antioxidant activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and the reducing power of CIIP was greater than that of CIIA and GII. SEM microstructure of the collagens depicted a porous, fibrillary and multi-layered structure. Accordingly, the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of type II collagens (CIIA, CIIP) and GII isolated from shark cartilage were found to be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24979271

  11. Effects of Native Type II Collagen Treatment on Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bakilan, Fulya; Armagan, Onur; Ozgen, Merih; Tascioglu, Funda; Bolluk, Ozge; Alatas, Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral native type II collagen treatment on the symptoms and biological markers of cartilage degradation, when given concomitantly with acetaminophen in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were included and randomly distributed into two groups: one treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen (group AC; n=19) and the other treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen plus 10 mg/day of native type II collagen (group AC+CII; n=20) for 3 months. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at rest and during walking, Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) pain, WOMAC function, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores, were recorded. Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO2 and Fibulin-3 levels were quantified in urine as biomarkers of disease progression. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02237989. Results: After 3 months of treatment, significant improvements compared to baseline were reported in joint pain (VAS walking), function (WOMAC) and quality of life (SF-36) in the AC+CII group, while only improvements in some subscales of the SF-36 survey and VAS walking were detected in the AC group. Comparisons between the groups revealed a significant difference in VAS walking score in favour of the AC+CII group as compared to AC group. Biochemical markers of cartilage degradation in urine did not significantly improve in any of the groups. Conclusion: All in all, these results suggest that native type II collagen treatment combined with acetaminophen is superior to only acetaminophen for symptomatic treatment of patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27551171

  12. SND-117, a sinomenine bivalent alleviates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Ren; Zhao, Yang; Bao, Bei-Hua; Li, Jian-Xin

    2015-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder that affects about 1% of the population worldwide. RA is mainly manifested by persistent synovitis and progressive joint destruction. The aim of the present study was to examine the anti-arthritis effects of SND-117, a sinomenine bivalent that is obtained from the structure modification of a clinically available anti-RA drug, sinomenine. The arthritis model (CIA) was established by immunizing DBA/1 mice with type II collagen, and the arthritis scores including inflammation, joint destruction and bone erosion were assessed after booster immunization for 3weeks. The levels of cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were analyzed by quantitative PCR and ELISA. The TNF-α induced NF-κB activation in fibroblast-like synovial cells (FLSCs) was analyzed by Western blot. SND-117 significantly relieved the inflammatory symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis, reduced bone erosion and joint destruction in CIA mice. The serum levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α of CIA mice were markedly decreased by SND-117. SND-117 also strongly inhibited the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in FLSCs upon TNF-α stimulation. These data demonstrated that SND-117 could effectively block the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis in CIA mice via inhibition of NF-κB signaling, and might provide potential clinic benefits in rheumatoid arthritis management.

  13. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus.

  14. Safety and toxicological evaluation of a novel, water-soluble undenatured type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Orie; Marone, Palma Ann; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi; Bagchi, Manashi; Shiojima, Yoshiaki

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the broad-spectrum safety of a novel, water-soluble undenatured type II collagen (NEXT-II) derived from chicken sternum cartilage. The presence of epitope in NEXT-II was confirmed by using a commercial kit. The acute oral LD₅₀ of NEXT-II was found to be greater than 5000 mg/kg bw in rats, while the single-dose acute dermal LD₅₀ was greater than 2000 mg/kg bw. The primary dermal irritation index (PDII) of NEXT-II was found to be 1.8 and classified as slightly irritating to the skin. In primary eye irritation studies, the maximum mean total score (MMTS) of NEXT-II was observed to be 7.3 and classified as minimally irritating to the eye. Long-term safety studies were conducted in dogs over a period of 150 d, and no significant changes were observed in body weight, heart rate, respiration rate and blood chemistry. NEXT-II does not induce mutagenicity in the bacterial reverse mutation test in five Salmonella typhimurium strains either with or without metabolic activation. Furthermore, two experiments were conducted to assess the potential of NEXT-II to induce mutations with and without metabolic activation at the mouse lymphoma thymidine kinase locus using the cell line L5178Y. No biologically relevant increase of mutants was observed. Also, no dose-dependent toxicity was observed. Furthermore, colony sizing showed no clastogenic effects induced by NEXT-II under the experimental conditions. These studies demonstrated the broad spectrum of safety of NEXT-II.

  15. The effect of vascular endothelial growth factor on aggrecan and type II collagen expression in rat articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan-Yin; Hao, Ya-Rong; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jian-Lin; Jia, Qi-Xue; Qiu, Bo

    2012-11-01

    The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) directly correlates with the Mankin score and the degree of cartilage destruction. The biological activity of VEGF on articular cartilage remains unknown, so this study was performed to investigate the effect of VEGF on aggrecan and type II collagen expression in vitro. We carried out this study at the Center Laboratory of Renmin Hospital at Wuhan University. Rat articular chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer. Then, the experiment was divided into 4 groups: group A (control group), without any disposal; group B, treated with 10 ng/ml VEGF; group C, treated with 10 ng/ml IL-1β; and group D, treated with 10 ng/ml VEGF + 10 ng/ml IL-1β. After 48 h, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of aggrecan and type II collagen was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-Time PCR), and protein expression of aggrecan and type II collagen was detected by Western blotting. VEGF was found to significantly inhibit the expression of aggrecan and type II collagen at the gene and protein levels. These findings suggest that VEGF may result in degeneration of articular cartilage by inhibiting the synthesis and expression of aggrecan and type II collagen.

  16. In Vitro Expression of the Extracellular Matrix Components Aggrecan, Collagen Types I and II by Articular Cartilage-Derived Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schneevoigt, J; Fabian, C; Leovsky, C; Seeger, J; Bahramsoltani, M

    2017-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of hyaline cartilage is perfectly suited to transmit articular pressure load to the subchondral bone. Pressure is transferred by a high amount of aggrecan-based proteoglycans and collagen type II fibres in particular. After any injury, the hyaline cartilage is replaced by fibrocartilage, which is low in proteoglycans and contains collagen type I predominantly. Until now, long-term results of therapeutic procedures including cell-based therapies like autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) lead to a replacement tissue meeting the composition of fibrocartilage. Therefore, it is of particular interest to discover how and to what extent isolation and in vitro cultivation of chondrocytes affect the cells and their expression of ECM components. Hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes were cultivated in vitro and observed microscopically over a time period of 35 days. The expression of collagen type I, collagen type II and aggrecan was analysed using RT-qPCR and Western blot at several days of cultivation. Chondrocytes presented a longitudinal shape for the entire cultivation period. While expression of collagen type I prevailed within the first days, only prolonged cultivation led to an increase in collagen type II and aggrecan expression. The results indicate that chondrocyte isolation and in vitro cultivation lead to a dedifferentiation at least to the stage of chondroprogenitor cells.

  17. Glatiramer acetate inhibits degradation of collagen II by suppressing the activity of interferon regulatory factor-1.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huading; Zeng, Chun; Zhao, Huiqing; Lian, Liyi; Dai, Yuhu

    2014-06-06

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is considered to be the major one contributing to the process of development of osteoarthritis (OA).Interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) is an important transcriptional factor accounting for inflammation response induced by TNF-α. The physiological function of IRF-1 in OA is still unknown. In this study, we reported that the expression levels of IRF-1 in OA chondrocytes were significantly higher compared to those in normal chondrocytes, which was reversed by treatment with Glatiramer acetate (GA), a licensed clinical drug for treating patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS). We also found that GA is able to attenuate the upregulation of IRF-1 induced by TNF-α. Matrix metalloproteinase13 (MMP-13) is one of the downstream target genes of IRF-1, which can induce the degradation of collagen II. Importantly, our results indicated that GA suppressed the expression of MMP-13 as well as the degradation of collagen II. In addition, GA also suppressed TNF-α-induced production of NO and expression of iNOS. Finally, we found that the inhibition of STAT1 activation played a critical role in the inhibitory effects of GA on the induction of IRF-1 and MMP-13. These data suggest that GA might have a potential effect in therapeutic OA.

  18. Lycium barbarum polysaccharide attenuates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Lv, Jun; Yang, Bo; Liu, Fang; Tian, Zhiqiang; Cai, Yongqing; Yang, Di; Ouyang, Jing; Sun, Fengjun; Shi, Ying; Xia, Peiyuan

    2015-01-01

    No curative treatment is yet available for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), wherein chronic synovitis progresses to cartilage and bone destruction. Considering the recently recognized anti-inflammatory properties of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP; a derivative of the goji berry), we established the collagen type II-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model to investigate the potential therapeutic effects and mechanisms of LBP. The CIA-induced changes and LBP-related effects were assessed by micro-computed tomography measurement of bone volume/tissue volume and by ELISA and western blotting detection of inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The CIA mice showed substantial bone damage, bone loss, and increased concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, PGE2, MIP-1, anti-type II collagen IgG, MMP-1, and MMP-3. LBP treatments produced significant dose-dependent improvements in CIA-induced bone damage and bone loss, and significantly reduced CIA-stimulated expression of the inflammatory mediators and MMPs. Thus, LBP therapy can preserve bone integrity in CIA mice, possibly through down-regulation of inflammatory mediators.

  19. Cilostazol prevents the degradation of collagen type II in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Kang, Weibiao; Tang, Qiang; Yao, Guanfeng; Chen, Yuchun; Cheng, Bizhen; Kong, Kangmei

    2014-08-29

    The alteration of extracellular matrix (ECM) in cartilage during the pathological development of Osteoarthritis (OA) changes the biomechanical environment of chondrocytes, which further drives the progression of the disease in the presence of inflammation. Healthy cartilage matrix mainly contains collagen type II, which is degraded by matrix metalloproteinase13 (MMP13), an important molecules responsible for joint damage in OA. Cilostazol (6-[4-(1-cyclohexyl-1H-tetrazol-5-yl)butoxy]-3,4-dihydro-2-(1H)-quinolinone) is a medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and used in the alleviation of the symptom of intermittent claudication in individuals with peripheral vascular disease. In this study, we reported that cilostazol is able to suppress the degradation of type II collagen in human chondrocytes induced by IL-1β. Mechanistically, cilostazol treatment leads to inhibiting the expression of IRF-1, thereby prevents the induction of MMP-13. Signal transducers and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) has been reported to play an essential role in regulating the activation of IRF-1. Our results indicated that cilostazol suppresses the activation of STAT1 by mitigating the phosphorylation of STAT1 at Ser727 and tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 at position 701 (Tyr701).

  20. Neocartilage formation from mesenchymal stem cells grown in type II collagen-hyaluronan composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Lin, Ting-Yu; Lin, Chen-Huan; Yen, B Linju; Tsai, Ching-Lin; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) collagen type II-hyaluronan (HA) composite scaffolds (CII-HA) which mimics the extracellular environment of natural cartilage were fabricated in this study. Rheological measurements demonstrated that the incorporation of HA increased the compression modulus of the scaffolds. An initial in vitro evaluation showed that scaffolds seeded with porcine chondrocytes formed cartilaginous-like tissue after 8 weeks, and HA functioned to promote the growth of chondrocytes into scaffolds. Placenta-derived multipotent cells (PDMC) and gingival fibroblasts (GF) were seeded on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), CII-HA films, and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) sheets for comparing their chondrogenesis differentiation potentials with those of adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADAS) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC). Among different cells, PDMC showed the greatest chondrogenic differentiation potential on both CII-HA films and SIS sheets upon TGF-β3 induction, followed by GF. This was evidenced by the up-regulation of chondrogenic genes (Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II), which was not observed for cells grown on TCPS. This finding suggested the essential role of substrate materials in the chondrogenic differentiation of PDMC and GF. Neocartilage formation was more obvious in both PDMC and GF cells plated on CII-HA composite scaffolds vs. 8-layer SIS at 28 days in vitro. Finally, implantation of PDMC/CII-HA constructs into NOD-SCID mice confirmed the formation of tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  1. Properties of radiolabeled type I, II, and III collagens related to their use as substrates in collagenase assays

    SciTech Connect

    Mookhtiar, K.A.; Mallya, S.K.; Van Wart, H.E.

    1986-11-01

    Calf skin and rat tendon type I, bovine cartilage type II, and human amnion type III collagens have been radiolabeled by reaction with (/sup 3/H)acetic anhydride, (/sup 3/H)formaldehyde, and succinimidyl 2,3-(3H)propionate. All three reactions produce collagens with high specific activities that are suitable for use as substrates in collagenase assays. The identity of the radiolabel and the labeling indices do not alter the molecular weights or thermal stabilities of the collagens or the solubilities of the collagens or gelatins in dioxane-water mixtures at 4 degrees C. However, in contrast to native or sparsely labeled collagens, those with 40 or more lysine + hydroxylysine residues labeled per molecule do not undergo fibrillogenesis in the presence of 0.2-0.4 M NaCl in the 4-35 degree C temperature range. Thus, the modification reactions not only serve to introduce the radiolabel, but also to keep the collagens soluble over a wide range of temperatures and concentrations. The TCA, TCB fragments produced on partial reaction of each collagen type with tissue collagenases can be selectively denatured by a 10-minute incubation under specific conditions and the intact collagens selectively precipitated by addition of 50% v/v dioxane. This serves as the basis for soluble collagenase assays. The effect of labeling index on the properties of the collagens has been investigated and the results establish the range of conditions over which these collagens can be used as substrates for soluble versus fibrillar collagenase assays.

  2. Expression of mRNAs coding for the alpha 1 chain of type XIII collagen in human fetal tissues: comparison with expression of mRNAs for collagen types I, II, and III

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the topographic distribution of the multiple mRNAs coding for a novel human short-chain collagen, the alpha 1 chain of type XIII collagen. To identify the tissues and cells expressing these mRNAs, human fetal tissues of 15-19 gestational wk were studied by Northern and in situ hybridizations. The distribution pattern of the type XIII collagen mRNAs was compared with that of fibrillar collagen types I, II, and III using specific human cDNA probes for each collagen type. Northern hybridization showed the bone, cartilage, intestine, skin, and striated muscle to contain mRNAs for type XIII collagen. An intense in situ hybridization signal was obtained with the type XIII collagen cDNAs in the epidermis, hair follicles, and nail root cells of the skin, whereas the fibrillar collagen mRNAs were detected in the dermis. Cells in the intestinal mucosal layer also appeared to contain high levels of alpha 1(XIII) collagen mRNAs, but contained none of the fibrillar collagen mRNAs. In the bone and striated muscle, alpha 1(XIII) collagen mRNAs were detected in the mesenchymal cells forming the reticulin fibers of the bone marrow and endomycium. The hybridization signal obtained with the alpha 1(XIII) collagen cDNA probe in cartilaginous areas of the growth plates was similar, but less intense, to that obtained with the type II collagen probe. A clear hybridization signal was also detected at the (pre)articular surfaces and at the margins of the epiphyses, whereas it was weaker in the resting chondrocytes in the middle of the epiphyses. The brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, placenta, spleen, testis, tendon, and thymus did not appear to contain alpha 1(XIII) collagen mRNAs. PMID:2768343

  3. The Rho family GEF Asef2 regulates cell migration in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices through myosin II.

    PubMed

    Jean, Léolène; Yang, Lijie; Majumdar, Devi; Gao, Yandong; Shi, Mingjian; Brewer, Bryson M; Li, Deyu; Webb, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to a variety of physiological processes, including tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Migration has been extensively studied with cells on 2-dimensional (2D) substrates, but much less is known about cell migration in 3D environments. Tissues and organs are 3D, which is the native environment of cells in vivo, pointing to a need to understand migration and the mechanisms that regulate it in 3D environments. To investigate cell migration in 3D environments, we developed microfluidic devices that afford a controlled, reproducible platform for generating 3D matrices. Using these devices, we show that the Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Asef2 inhibits cell migration in 3D type I collagen (collagen I) matrices. Treatment of cells with the myosin II (MyoII) inhibitor blebbistatin abolished the decrease in migration by Asef2. Moreover, Asef2 enhanced MyoII activity as shown by increased phosphorylation of serine 19 (S19). Furthermore, Asef2 increased activation of Rac, which is a Rho family small GTPase, in 3D collagen I matrices. Inhibition of Rac activity by treatment with the Rac-specific inhibitor NSC23766 abrogated the Asef2-promoted increase in S19 MyoII phosphorylation. Thus, our results indicate that Asef2 regulates cell migration in 3D collagen I matrices through a Rac-MyoII-dependent mechanism.

  4. Mechanical strain and collagen potentiate mitogenic activity of angiotensin II in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sudhir, K; Wilson, E; Chatterjee, K; Ives, H E

    1993-01-01

    The effects of extracellular matrix proteins and mechanical strain on the mitogenic activity of angiotensins I and II (AI and AII) were examined in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. VSM cells on various extracellular matrices were exposed to AII (1 microM) for 48 h. On plastic, AII induced only a 1.6-fold increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation, but on fibronectin- or type I collagen-coated plastic, the response to AII was enhanced from two- to fourfold. On a type I collagen-coated silicone elastomer, to which mechanical strain was applied, [3H]thymidine incorporation dramatically increased to a maximum of 53-fold. Dup 753 (10(-5) M) blocked the AII-induced increase in DNA synthesis. AI also increased DNA synthesis in VSM cells, and this response was also enhanced by mechanical strain. Mitogenic activity of AI was blocked by ramiprilat (10(-5) M), indicating that its mitogenic activity was via conversion to AII. The synergy between AII and strain was completely eliminated by neutralizing antibodies to PDGF AB (3 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, the mitogenic effect of AII in unstrained cells was also synergistic with submaximal concentrations of PDGF AB (1 ng/ml). Thus, the synergy between AII and mechanical strain probably results from synergism between AII and PDGF secreted in response to strain. PMID:8254054

  5. Contraction-induced Mmp13 and -14 expression by goat articular chondrocytes in collagen type I but not type II gels.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Agnes D; Vonk, Lucienne A; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A

    2012-10-01

    Collagen gels are promising scaffolds to prepare an implant for cartilage repair but several parameters, such as collagen concentration and composition as well as cell density, should be carefully considered, as they are reported to affect phenotypic aspects of chondrocytes. In this study we investigated whether the presence of collagen type I or II in gel lattices affects matrix contraction and relative gene expression levels of matrix proteins, MMPs and the subsequent degradation of collagen by goat articular chondrocytes. Only floating collagen I gels, and not those attached or composed of type II collagen, contracted during a culture period of 12 days. This coincided with an upregulation of both Mmp13 and -14 gene expression, whereas Mmp1 expression was not affected. The release of hydroxyproline in the culture medium, indicating matrix degradation, was increased five-fold in contracted collagen I gels compared to collagen II gels without contraction. Furthermore, blocking contraction of collagen I gels by cytochalasin B inhibited Mmp13 and -14 expression and the release of hydroxyproline. The expression of cartilage-specific ECM genes was decreased in contracted collagen I gels, with increased numbers of cells with an elongated morphology, suggesting that matrix contraction induces dedifferentiation of chondrocytes into fibroblast-like cells. We conclude that the collagen composition of the gels affects matrix contraction by articular chondrocytes and that matrix contraction induces an increased Mmp13 and -14 expression as well as matrix degradation.

  6. The Mouse MC13 Mutant Is a Novel ENU Mutation in Collagen Type II, Alpha 1

    PubMed Central

    Cionni, Megan; Menke, Chelsea; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotype-driven mutagenesis experiments are a powerful approach to identifying novel alleles in a variety of contexts. The traditional disadvantage of this approach has been the subsequent task of identifying the affected locus in the mutants of interest. Recent advances in bioinformatics and sequencing have reduced the burden of cloning these ENU mutants. Here we report our experience with an ENU mutagenesis experiment and the rapid identification of a mutation in a previously known gene. A combination of mapping the mutation with a high-density SNP panel and a candidate gene approach has identified a mutation in collagen type II, alpha I (Col2a1). Col2a1 has previously been studied in the mouse and our mutant phenotype closely resembles mutations made in the Col2a1 locus. PMID:25541700

  7. Effects of low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, So Yean; Sim, Joon-Soo; Jeong, Choon Sik; Chang, Seung Yeup; Choi, Don Woong; Toida, Toshihiko; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2004-01-01

    In order to evaluate the improvement in the treatment of chronic arthritis, we investigated chondroitin sulfate depolymerization product (low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate, LMWCS) and intact chondroitin sulfate (CS) in vitro and in vivo. LMWCS was prepared by a chemical depolymerization process induced by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of copper salts. LMWCS (300 mg/kg) and CS (1200 mg/kg) were orally administered to DBA/1J mice once daily for 14 d prior to initial immunization with type II collagen. Their elastase activities and the production of cytokines in sera were examined on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice. We also compared the paracellular transport of LMWCS and CS across Caco-2 cell monolayers and examined the inhibitory effects on elastase activities. LMWCS inhibited elastase activity slightly, but CS did not show inhibition. Hind paw edema was significantly decreased by LMWCS treatment. Levels of anti-type II collagen antibody and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in sera were also reduced by LMWCS treatment but not in case of CS, although no significant difference was observed between LMWCS and CS on interleukin-6 (IL-6) induction. The LMWCS preparation showed preventive effects on the type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and better permeability through Caco-2 cells.

  8. Angiotensin II increases fibronectin and collagen I through the β-catenin-dependent signaling in mouse collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Catherina A; Gonzalez, Alexis A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Vio, Carlos P; Prieto, Minolfa C

    2015-02-15

    The contribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) to renal and tubular fibrosis has been widely reported. Recent studies have shown that collecting duct cells can undergo mesenchymal transition suggesting that collecting duct cells are involved in interstitial fibrosis. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays an essential role in development, organogenesis, and tissue homeostasis; however, the dysregulation of this pathway has been linked to fibrosis. In this study, we investigated whether AT1 receptor activation induces the expression of fibronectin and collagen I via the β-catenin pathway in mouse collecting duct cell line M-1. ANG II (10(-7) M) treatment in M-1 cells increased mRNA, protein levels of fibronectin and collagen I, the β-catenin target genes (cyclin D1 and c-myc), and the myofibroblast phenotype. These effects were prevented by candesartan, an AT1 receptor blocker. Inhibition of the β-catenin degradation with pyrvinium pamoate (pyr; 10(-9) M) prevented the ANG II-induced expression of fibronectin, collagen I, and β-catenin target genes. ANG II treatment promoted the accumulation of β-catenin protein in a time-dependent manner. Because phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibits β-catenin degradation, we further evaluated the effects of ANG II and ANG II plus pyr on p-ser9-GSK-3β levels. ANG II-dependent upregulation of β-catenin protein levels was correlated with GSK-3β phosphorylation. These effects were prevented by pyr. Our data indicate that in M-1 collecting duct cells, the β-catenin pathway mediates the stimulation of fibronectin and collagen I in response to AT1 receptor activation.

  9. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis by oral administration of transgenic rice seeds expressing altered peptide ligands of type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Mana; Wakasa, Yuhya; Tsuboi, Hiroto; Asashima, Hiromitsu; Hirota, Tomoya; Kondo, Yuya; Matsumoto, Isao; Takaiwa, Fumio; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease associated with the recognition of self proteins secluded in arthritic joints. We previously reported that altered peptide ligands (APLs) of type II collagen (CII256-271) suppress the development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). In this study, we generated transgenic rice expressing CII256-271 and APL6 contained in fusion proteins with the rice storage protein glutelin in the seed endosperm. These transgene products successfully and stably accumulated at high levels (7-24 mg/g seeds) in protein storage vacuoles (PB-II) of mature seeds. We examined the efficacy of these transgenic rice seeds by performing oral administration of the seeds to CIA model mice that had been immunized with CII. Treatment with APL6 transgenic rice for 14 days significantly inhibited the development of arthritis (based on clinical score) and delayed disease onset during the early phase of arthritis. These effects were mediated by the induction of IL-10 from CD4(+ ) CD25(-) T cells against CII antigen in splenocytes and inguinal lymph nodes (iLNs), and treatment of APL had no effect on the production of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-2 or Foxp3(+) Treg cells. These findings suggest that abnormal immune suppressive mechanisms are involved in the therapeutic effect of rice-based oral vaccine expressing high levels of APLs of type II collagen on the autoimmune disease CIA, suggesting that the seed-based mucosal vaccine against CIA functions via a unique mechanism.

  10. Therapeutic efficacy of undenatured type-II collagen (UC-II) in comparison to glucosamine and chondroitin in arthritic horses.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R C; Canerdy, T D; Skaggs, P; Stocker, A; Zyrkowski, G; Burke, R; Wegford, K; Goad, J T; Rohde, K; Barnett, D; DeWees, W; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2009-12-01

    The present investigation evaluated arthritic pain in horses receiving daily placebo, undenatured type II collagen (UC-II) at 320, 480, or 640 mg (providing 80, 120, and 160 mg active UC-II, respectively), and glucosamine and chondroitin (5.4 and 1.8 g, respectively, bid for the first month, and thereafter once daily) for 150 days. Horses were evaluated for overall pain, pain upon limb manipulation, physical examination, and liver and kidney functions. Evaluation of overall pain was based upon a consistent observation of all subjects during a walk and a trot in the same pattern on the same surface. Pain upon limb manipulation was conducted after the walk and trot. It consisted of placing the affected joint in severe flexion for a period of 60 sec. The limb was then placed to the ground and the animal trotted off. The response to the flexion test was then noted with the first couple of strides the animal took. Flexion test was consistent with determining clinically the degree of osteoarthritis in a joint. Horses receiving placebo showed no change in arthritic condition, while those receiving 320 or 480 or 640 mg UC-II exhibited significant reduction in arthritic pain (P < 0.05). UC-II at 480 or 640 mg dose provided equal effects, and therefore, 480 mg dose was considered optimal. With this dose, reduction in overall pain was from 5.7 +/- 0.42 (100%) to 0.7 +/- 0.42 (12%); and in pain upon limb manipulation from 2.35 +/- 0.37 (100%) to 0.52 +/- 0.18 (22%). Although glucosamine and chondroitin treated group showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in pain compared with pretreated values, the efficacy was less compared with that observed with UC-II. In fact, UC-II at 480 or 640 mg dose was found to be more effective than glucosamine and chondroitin in arthritic horses. Clinical condition (body weight, body temperature, respiration rate, and pulse rate), and liver (bilirubin, GGT, and ALP) and kidney (BUN and creatinine) functions remained unchanged, suggesting that

  11. Tandem duplication within a type II collagen gene (COL2A1) exon in an individual with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E. ); Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H. Univ. of California, Los Angeles ); Murray, L.W. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors have characterized a mutation in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) that produces a form of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia. The mutation is an internal tandem duplication of 45 base pairs within exon 48 and results in the addition of 15 amino acids to the triple-helical domain of the {alpha}1 chains of type II collagen derived from the abnormal allele. Although the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa){sub n} motif that characterizes the triple-helical domain is preserved, type II collagen derived from cartilage of the affected individual contains a population with excessive posttranslational modification, consistent with a disruption in triple-helix structure. The mutation is not carried by either parent, indicating that the phenotype in the affected individual is due to a new dominant mutation. DNA sequence homology in the area of the duplication suggests that the mutation may have arisen by unequal crossover between related sequences, a proposed mechanism in the evolution and diversification of the collagen gene family.

  12. Phenotypic characterization of type II collagen-induced arthritis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Hou-Pan; Li, Xin; Yu, Rong; Zeng, Guang; Yuan, Zhen-Yi; Wang, Wei; Huang, Hui-Yong; Cai, Xiong

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a more specific, efficient and simple method for the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Different strains of rats were injected at the base of the tail with bovine type II collagen (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The onset and severity of arthritis were evaluated by clinical assessment. The established CIA model was analyzed using a comprehensive examination of clinical, hematological, histological and radiological parameters. The results demonstrated that Wistar rats were the most susceptible strain to CIA followed by Wistar Furth rats, with Sprague Dawley rats being the least susceptible. Following primary and booster immunization, female Wistar rats developed severe arthritis, with an incidence of >83% and low variability in clinical signs. The development of arthritis was accompanied by a significantly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate compared with that in the control rats. The radiographic examination revealed bone matrix resorption, considerable soft tissue swelling, periosteal new bone formation and bone erosion in the arthritic joints of the CIA rats. Histopathologically, the synovial joints of CIA rats were characterized by synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, marked cellular infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion and narrowing of the joint space. The administration of an intradermal injection of only 200 µg bovine CII emulsified in IFA at the base of the tail therefore leads to the successful development of a CIA rat model. This well-characterized CIA rat model could be specifically used to study the pathophysiology of human rheumatoid arthritis as well as to test and develop anti-arthritic agents for humans.

  13. Palmitoylethanolamide and luteolin ameliorate development of arthritis caused by injection of collagen type II in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) is an endogenous fatty acid amide belonging to the family of the N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). Recently, several studies demonstrated that PEA is an important analgesic, antiinflammatory, and neuroprotective mediator. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin formulation on the modulation of the inflammatory response in mice subjected to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods CIA was induced by an intradermally injection of 100 μl of the emulsion (containing 100 μg of bovine type II collagen (CII)) and complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) at the base of the tail. On day 21, a second injection of CII in CFA was administered. Mice subjected to CIA were administered PEA (10 mg/kg 10% ethanol, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) or co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) every 24 hours, starting from day 25 to 35. Results Mice developed erosive hind-paw arthritis when immunized with CII in CFA. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA first appeared as periarticular erythema and edema in the hindpaws. The incidence of CIA was 100% by day 28 in the CII-challenged mice, and the severity of CIA progressed over a 35-day period with a resorption of bone. The histopathology of CIA included erosion of the cartilage at the joint. Treatment with PEA or PEA + luteolin ameliorated the clinical signs at days 26 to 35 and improved histologic status in the joint and paw. The degree of oxidative and nitrosative damage was significantly reduced in PEA + luteolin-treated mice, as indicated by nitrotyrosine and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were significantly reduced by PEA + luteolin treatment. Conclusions We demonstrated that PEA co-ultramicronized with luteolin exerts an antiinflammatory effect during chronic inflammation and ameliorates CIA. PMID:24246048

  14. Oxaliplatin retains HMGB1 intranuclearly and ameliorates collagen type II-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Östberg, Therese; Wähämaa, Heidi; Palmblad, Karin; Ito, Norimasa; Stridh, Pernilla; Shoshan, Maria; Lotze, Michael T; Harris, Helena Erlandsson; Andersson, Ulf

    2008-01-01

    Introduction High mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein that acts as a pro-inflammatory mediator following extracellular release. The protein is aberrantly expressed extracellularly in the settings of clinical and experimental synovitis. Therapy based on HMGB1 antagonists has shown encouraging results in experimental arthritis and warrants further scientific exploration using independent methods. In the present study we asked whether nuclear sequestration of HMGB1 preventing HMGB1 release would be beneficial for synovitis treatment. Methods Oxaliplatin-based therapy was evaluated in collagen type II-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice by clinical scoring and immunostaining of articular tissue. Oxaliplatin is an antineoplastic platinum-based compound that generates DNA adducts which tightly bind HMGB1. Secretion and intracellular location of HMGB1 were assessed by a novel HMGB1-specific ELISPOT assay and immunofluorescent staining. Results Intraperitoneal injections of oxaliplatin in early collagen type II-induced arthritis trapped HMGB1 with a distinct biphasic response pattern. Oxaliplatin therapy showed beneficial results for approximately 1 week. Microscopic evaluation of synovitis during this period showed strong nuclear HMGB1 staining in the oxaliplatin treated animals with much lower quantities of extracellular HMGB1 when compared to control treated animals. Furthermore, cellular infiltration, as well as cartilage and bone damage, were all reduced in the oxaliplatin treated group. A dramatic and as yet unexplained clinical relapse occurred later in the oxaliplatin exposed animals, which coincided with a massive synovial tissue expression of extracellular HMGB1 in all treated animals. This rebound-like reaction was also accompanied by a significantly increased incidence of arthritis in the oxaliplatin treated group. These results indicate a distinct temporal and spatial relationship between the clinical course of disease and the

  15. Whole blood lead levels are associated with biomarkers of joint tissue metabolism in African American and White men and women: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Amanda E.; Chaudhary, Sanjay; Kraus, Virginia B.; Fang, Fang; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Schwartz, Todd A.; Shi, Xiaoyan A.; Renner, Jordan B.; Stabler, Thomas V.; Helmick, Charles G.; Caldwell, Kathleen; Poole, A. Robin; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine associations between biomarkers of joint tissue metabolism and whole blood lead (Pb), separately for men and women in an African American and Caucasian population, which may reflect an underlying pathology. Methods Participants in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project Metals Exposure Sub-study (329 men and 342 women) underwent assessment of whole blood Pb and biochemical biomarkers of joint tissue metabolism. Urinary cross-linked N telopeptide of type I collagen (uNTX-I) and C-telopeptide fragments of type II collagen (uCTX-II), and serum cleavage neoepitope of type II collagen (C2C), serum type II procollagen synthesis C-propeptide (CPII), and serum hyaluronic acid (HA) were measured using commercially available kits; the ratio of [C2C:CPII] was calculated. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured by an in-house assay. Multiple linear regression models were used to examine associations between continuous blood Pb and biomarker outcomes, adjusted for age, race, current smoking status, and body mass index. Results are reported as estimated change in biomarker level for a 5-unit change in Pb level. Results The median Pb level among men and women was 2.2 and 1.9 µg/dL, respectively. Correlations were noted between Pb levels and the biomarkers uNTX-I, uCTX-II, and COMP in women, and between Pb and uCTX-II, COMP, CPII, and the ratio [C2C:CPII] in men. In adjusted models among women, a 5-unit increase in blood Pb level was associated with a 28% increase in uCTX-II and a 45% increase in uNTX-I levels (uCTX-II: 1.28 [95%CI: 1.04–1.58], uNTX-I: 1.45 [95%CI:1.21–1.74]). Among men, levels of Pb and COMP showed a borderline positive association (8% increase in COMP for a 5-unit change in Pb: 1.08 [95% CI: 1.00–1.18])); no other associations were significant after adjustment. Conclusions Based upon known biomarker origins, the novel associations between blood Pb and biomarkers appear to be primarily reflective of relationships

  16. Changes and significance of IL-25 in chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA).

    PubMed

    Kaiwen, Wang; Zhaoliang, Su; Yinxia, Zhao; Siamak, Sandoghchian Shotorbani; Zhijun, Jiao; Yuan, Xue; Heng, Yang; Dong, Zheng; Yanfang, Liu; Pei, Shen; Shengjun, Wang; Qixiang, Shao; Xinxiang, Huang; Liwei, Lu; Huaxi, Xu

    2012-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease. It is a systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by chronic, symmetrical, multi-articular synovial arthritis. IL-25 (IL-17E) is a member of the recently emerged cytokine family (IL-17s), which is expressed in Th2 cells and bone marrow-derived mast cells. Unlike the other members of this family, IL-25 is capable of inducing Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and also promotes the release of some pro-immune factors (IL-6 and IL-8). IL-25 is also a pleiotropic factor, which constitutes a tissue-specific pathological injury and chronic inflammation. In this study, we used chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA) model in DBA/1 mice to investigate the relationship between IL-25 and other inflammatory factors, revealing the possible mechanism in CIA. Our results showed that the expression level of IL-25 was enhanced in the late stage of CIA, and IL-17 was increased in the early stage of the disease. It is well known that IL-17 has a crucial role in the development of RA pathogenesis, and IL-25 plays a significant role in humoral immune. For reasons given above, we suggested that the IL-25 inhibited IL-17 expression to some extent, while enhancing the production of IL-4. It was confirmed that IL-25 not only regulated the cellular immune, but also involved the humoral immune in rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Eye-mediated immune tolerance to Type II collagen in arthritis-prone strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Shukkur M; Kumar, Ashok; Ashour, Hossam M

    2014-12-01

    Type II collagen (CII) is a cartilage structural protein that plays important roles in joint function, arthritis and ageing. In studying the ability of CII to induce eye-mediated specific immune tolerance, we have recently proven that CII is capable of inducing anterior chamber-associated immune deviation (ACAID) in Balb/c mice. Here, we study the ability of CII to induce eye-mediated immune tolerance in strains of mice that are prone to the induction of rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, we hypothesized that CII induces ACAID in DBA/1 mice and in C57BL/6 mice through the AC route (direct injection) or the intravenous route (adoptive transfer of in vitro-generated CII-specific ACAID macrophages or of CII-specific in vitro-generated T regulatory cells). Specific immune tolerance induction was assessed using both delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and local adoptive transfer (LAT) assays. Results indicated the ability of CII to generate CII-specific ACAID-mediated immune tolerance in vivo and in vitro in both DBA/1 mice and C57BL/6 mice. These findings could be beneficial in studies of immune tolerance induction using CII.

  18. The biocompatible polysaccharide chitosan enhances the oral tolerance to type II collagen

    PubMed Central

    Porporatto, C; Canali, M M; Bianco, I D; Correa, S G

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan is a mucoadhesive polysaccharide that promotes the transmucosal absorption of peptides and proteins. At mucosal sites chitosan exhibits immunomodulatory activities and stimulates the release of regulatory cytokines. Herein we evaluated the effect of the co-administration of chitosan in the tolerance to type II collagen (CII) using an experimental model of arthritis. Rats were fed diluent (acetic acid), 1 mg CII, 1 mg chitosan or 1 mg CII + 1 mg chitosan during 5 days before immunization with CII in Freund's complete adjuvant. Systemic effects were evaluated in draining lymph nodes after antigenic challenge or during the clinical evolution of arthritis. Specific antibodies, proliferation against CII and the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin-10 were assessed. Clinical signs were observed 13–15 days after primary immunization. The CII : chitosan group presented the lowest incidence and developed moderate arthritis, with reduced levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a anti-CII, a limited proliferation in draining lymph nodes and a lower release of IFN-γ after restimulation with CII. Our results demonstrate that chitosan enhances the tolerance to an articular antigen with a decrease in the inflammatory responses and, as a consequence, an improvement in clinical signs. PMID:19076832

  19. RB1CC1 protein suppresses type II collagen synthesis in chondrocytes and causes dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Chano, Tokuhiro; Kita, Hiroko; Matsusue, Yoshitaka; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2011-12-23

    RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1 (RB1CC1) functions in various processes, such as cell growth, differentiation, senescence, apoptosis, and autophagy. The conditional transgenic mice with cartilage-specific RB1CC1 excess that were used in the present study were made for the first time by the Cre-loxP system. Cartilage-specific RB1CC1 excess caused dwarfism in mice without causing obvious abnormalities in endochondral ossification and subsequent skeletal development from embryo to adult. In vitro and in vivo analysis revealed that the dwarf phenotype in cartilaginous RB1CC1 excess was induced by reductions in the total amount of cartilage and the number of cartilaginous cells, following suppressions of type II collagen synthesis and Erk1/2 signals. In addition, we have demonstrated that two kinds of SNPs (T-547C and C-468T) in the human RB1CC1 promoter have significant influence on the self-transcriptional level. Accordingly, human genotypic variants of RB1CC1 that either stimulate or inhibit RB1CC1 transcription in vivo may cause body size variations.

  20. Mutation in collagen II alpha 1 isoforms delineates Stickler and Wagner syndrome phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Soler, Vincent; Quiette, Valencia; Powell, Caldwell; Yanovitch, Tammy; Metlapally, Ravikanth; Luo, Xiaoyan; Katsanis, Nicholas; Nading, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy with phenotypic overlap with Wagner syndrome. The common Stickler syndrome type I is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with causal mutations in collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1). Wagner syndrome is associated with mutations in versican (VCAN), which encodes for a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. A three-generation Caucasian family variably diagnosed with either syndrome was screened for sequence variants in the COL2A1 and VCAN genes. Methods Genomic DNA samples derived from saliva were collected from all family members (six affected and four unaffected individuals). Complete sequencing of COL2A1 and VCAN was performed on two affected individuals. Direct sequencing of remaining family members was conducted if the discovered variants followed segregation. Results A base-pair substitution (c.258C>A) in exon 2 of COL2A1 cosegregated with familial disease status. This known mutation occurs in a highly conserved site that causes a premature stop codon (p.C86X). The mutation was not seen in 1,142 ethnically matched control DNA samples. Conclusions Premature stop codons in COL2A1 exon 2 lead to a Stickler syndrome type I ocular-only phenotype with few or no systemic manifestations. Mutation screening of COL2A1 exon 2 in families with autosomal dominant vitreoretinopathy is important for accurate clinical diagnosis. PMID:23592912

  1. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Arthritis instantaneously causes collagen type I and type II degradation in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Landewé, R B M; Geusens, P; van der Heijde, D M F M; Boers, M; van der Linden, S J; Garnero, P

    2006-01-01

    Background Markers of collagen type I (CTX‐1) and type II (CTX‐II) degradation, reflecting bone and cartilage breakdown, appear to predict long term radiographic progression in chronic persistent arthritis. Objective To analyse longitudinally whether changes in arthritis severity are linked to immediate changes in the level of CTX‐I and CTX‐II degradation. Methods CTX‐I and CTX‐II were measured in urine samples from 105 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis who had participated in the COBRA trial at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the start of treatment. The course of the biomarkers over time was compared with the course of ESR, swollen and tender joint counts, and 28 joint disease activity score (DAS28), measured at the same time points, with adjustment for rheumatoid factor, treatment, and baseline radiographic damage, by generalised estimating equations (GEE) with first order autoregression. Results GEE showed that CTX‐I was longitudinally associated with DAS28, but not with ESR, swollen joint count, or tender joint count. CTX‐II, however, was longitudinally associated with ESR, swollen joint count and DAS28, but not with tender joint count. The longitudinal association implies that an increase in the extent of arthritis is immediately followed by an increase in collagen type II degradation, and to a lesser extent collagen type I degradation. Conclusions Cartilage degradation as measured by CTX‐II and to a lesser extent bone degradation as measured by CTX‐I closely follows indices of arthritis. Clinically perceptible arthritis is responsible for immediate damage, which will become visible on plain x rays only much later. PMID:16126801

  3. Serum Collagen Type II Cleavage Epitope and Serum Hyaluronic Acid as Biomarkers for Treatment Monitoring of Dogs with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, José M.; Rubio, Mónica; Spinella, Giuseppe; Cuervo, Belén; Sopena, Joaquín; Cugat, Ramón; Garcia-Balletbó, Montserrat; Dominguez, Juan M.; Granados, Maria; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Ceron, José J.; Carrillo, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of serum type II collagen cleavage epitope and serum hyaluronic acid as biomarkers for treatment monitoring in osteoarthritic dogs. For this purpose, a treatment model based on mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue combined with plasma rich in growth factors was used. This clinical study included 10 dogs with hip osteoarthritis. Both analytes were measured in serum at baseline, just before applying the treatment, and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. These results were compared with those obtained from force plate analysis using the same animals during the same study period. Levels of type II collagen cleavage epitope decreased and those of hyaluronic acid increased with clinical improvement objectively verified via force plate analysis, suggesting these two biomarkers could be effective as indicators of clinical development of joint disease in dogs. PMID:26886592

  4. Anti-rheumatoid arthritic effects of Saussurea involucrata on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihong; Guo, Qianying; Wang, Shuangjia; Wang, Na; Wei, Liren; Wang, Junbo

    2016-02-01

    Saussurea involucrata (SI) has long been used under the herbal name "snow lotus" for treatment of inflammation and pain-related diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the pharmacological effects of SI on collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis in rats. Rats with collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis were orally administered SI (420 mg kg(-1)) for 40 consecutive days. Histopathological examination indicated that SI alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells and synovial hyperplasia and slows joint destruction. SI intervention reduced the serum levels of RF, COMP, CRP and anti-CII IgG. Results also showed that SI is a potential therapeutic agent for alleviating the severity of the disease based on the reduced arthritic index. It was concluded that SI can ameliorate inflammation and joint destruction in CIA rats.

  5. Serum Collagen Type II Cleavage Epitope and Serum Hyaluronic Acid as Biomarkers for Treatment Monitoring of Dogs with Hip Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vilar, José M; Rubio, Mónica; Spinella, Giuseppe; Cuervo, Belén; Sopena, Joaquín; Cugat, Ramón; Garcia-Balletbó, Montserrat; Dominguez, Juan M; Granados, Maria; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Ceron, José J; Carrillo, José M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of serum type II collagen cleavage epitope and serum hyaluronic acid as biomarkers for treatment monitoring in osteoarthritic dogs. For this purpose, a treatment model based on mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue combined with plasma rich in growth factors was used. This clinical study included 10 dogs with hip osteoarthritis. Both analytes were measured in serum at baseline, just before applying the treatment, and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. These results were compared with those obtained from force plate analysis using the same animals during the same study period. Levels of type II collagen cleavage epitope decreased and those of hyaluronic acid increased with clinical improvement objectively verified via force plate analysis, suggesting these two biomarkers could be effective as indicators of clinical development of joint disease in dogs.

  6. Structure and function of collagen types

    SciTech Connect

    Mayne, R.; Burgeson, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Classical Collagens: Types I, II, and III; Type IV Collagen; Type IX Collagen; and Analysis of Collagen Structure by Molecular Biology Techniques.

  7. A mutation in the amino-terminal end of the triple helix of type II collagen causing severe osteochondrodysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Vikkula, M.; Vuorio, A.F.; Peltonen, L. ); Ritvaniemi, P.; Ala-Kokko, L. ); Kaitila, I. )

    1993-04-01

    Type II collagen is coded by a large gene (COL2A1) consisting of 54 exons on chromosome 12. During the past few years several cartilage disorders have been linked to this gene, and some specific nucleotide changes have been identified in patients. In a spondyloepiphyseal form of chondrodysplasia, the three mutations found so far are all in exon 48 in the region coding for the carboxyl-terminal end of the triple helix. Since folding of the type II collagen polypeptides to the triple helix is initiated from the carboxyl-terminal end, it has been suggested that mutations in this region typically result in severe cartilage diseases. Here the authors report a novel mutation located in the area coding for the amino-terminal part of the triple helix in a sporadic patient with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED). The mutation, a substitution of G[sup 1063] to A, which results in the conversion of Gly[sup 154] to Arg, was identified using exon-specific amplification of genomic DNA and subsequent analyses with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and single-strand conformation polymorphism. The substitution was not found in any other SED patient in Finland. This novel mutation demonstrates that amino acid substitutions in the amino-terminal part of the type II collagen triple helix can also result in SED. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Hydroxyethylene isosteres introduced in type II collagen fragments substantially alter the structure and dynamics of class II MHC A(q)/glycopeptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Cecilia; Andersson, Ida E; Berg, Lotta; Dobritzsch, Doreen; Ge, Changrong; Haag, Sabrina; Uciechowska, Urszula; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Linusson, Anna

    2015-06-14

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins are involved in initiation of immune responses to foreign antigens via presentation of peptides to receptors of CD4(+) T-cells. An analogous presentation of self-peptides may lead to autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The glycopeptide fragment CII259-273, derived from type II collagen, is presented by A(q) MHCII molecules in the mouse and has a key role in development of collagen induced arthritis (CIA), a validated model for RA. We have introduced hydroxyethylene amide bond isosteres at the Ala(261)-Gly(262) position of CII259-273. Biological evaluation showed that A(q) binding and T cell recognition were dramatically reduced for the modified glycopeptides, although static models predicted similar binding modes as the native type II collagen fragment. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations demonstrated that introduction of the hydroxyethylene isosteres disturbed the entire hydrogen bond network between the glycopeptides and A(q). As a consequence the hydroxyethylene isosteric glycopeptides were prone to dissociation from A(q) and unfolding of the β1-helix. Thus, the isostere induced adjustment of the hydrogen bond network altered the structure and dynamics of A(q)/glycopeptide complexes leading to the loss of A(q) affinity and subsequent T cell response.

  9. Both hyaluronan and collagen type II keep proteoglycan 4 (lubricin) at the cartilage surface in a condition that provides low friction during boundary lubrication.

    PubMed

    Majd, Sara Ehsani; Kuijer, Roel; Köwitsch, Alexander; Groth, Thomas; Schmidt, Tannin A; Sharma, Prashant K

    2014-12-09

    Wear resistant and ultralow friction in synovial joints is the outcome of a sophisticated synergy between the major macromolecules of the synovial fluid, e.g., hyaluronan (HA) and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), with collagen type II fibrils and other non-collagenous macromolecules of the cartilage superficial zone (SZ). This study aimed at better understanding the mechanism of PRG4 localization at the cartilage surface. We show direct interactions between surface bound HA and freely floating PRG4 using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Freely floating PRG4 was also shown to bind with surface bound collagen type II fibrils. Albumin, the most abundant protein of the synovial fluid, effectively blocked the adsorption of PRG4 with HA, through interaction with C and N terminals on PRG4, but not that of PRG4 with collagen type II fibrils. The above results indicate that collagen type II fibrils strongly contribute in keeping PRG4 in the SZ during cartilage articulation in situ. Furthermore, PRG4 molecules adsorbed very well on mimicked SZ of absorbed HA molecules with entangled collagen type II fibrils and albumin was not able to block this interaction. In this last condition PRG4 adsorption resulted in a coefficient of friction (COF) of the same order of magnitude as the COF of natural cartilage, measured with an atomic force microscope in lateral mode.

  10. C-type lectin-like domain and fibronectin-like type II domain of phospholipase A(2) receptor 1 modulate binding and migratory responses to collagen.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Soichiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Fujioka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Kazuto; Obata, Jun-ei; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2015-03-24

    Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R) mediates collagen-dependent migration. The mechanisms by which PLA2R interacts with collagen remain unclear. We produced HEK293 cells expressing full-length wild-type PLA2R or a truncated PLA2R that lacks fibronectin-like type II (FNII) domains or several regions of C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). We show that the CTLD1-2 as well as the FNII domain of PLA2R are responsible for binding to collagen and for collagen-dependent migration. Thus, multiple regions and domains of the extracellular portion of PLA2R participate in the responses to collagen. These data suggest a potentially new mechanism for PLA2R-mediated biological response beyond that of a receptor for secretory PLA2.

  11. The Ratio of Type II Collagen Breakdown to Synthesis and its Relationship with the Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cahue, September; Sharma, Leena; Dunlop, Dorothy; Ionescu, Mirela; Song, Jing; Lobanok, Tatiana; King, Lindsay; Poole, A. Robin

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether the baseline ratio of a type II collagen breakdown marker to a synthesis marker, or the level of these markers individually, is associated with the likelihood of knee OA progression between baseline and 18 months. Methods. Participants were recruited from community sources and had knee OA. Blood was drawn at baseline. Collagen synthesis was measured by commercial ELISA assay that detects c-propeptide of type II procollagen (CPII). Serum markers of collagenase cleavage of cartilage type II collagen [C2C epitope (COL2−3/4Clong mono) and C1,2C epitope (COL2−3/4Cshort)] were also assayed. Knee radiographs (semi-flexed with fluoro confirmation) were obtained at baseline and 18 months. OA progression was examined using worsening of joint space grade and worsening of Kellgren/Lawrence grade. The relationship between baseline serum markers and subsequent progression was analyzed from logistic regression. Results. Baseline levels of these markers, considered individually, were not associated with a change in the odds of progression. Belonging to the low synthesis tertile was associated with a greater likelihood of progression, approaching significance (adjusted OR 1.86, 95% CI 0.96, 3.63). A greater C2C:CPII ratio and C1,2C:CPII ratio were each associated with an increase in the odds of joint space grade progression, which approached significance (e.g. adjusted OR of C2C:CPII ratio was 3.15, 95% CI 0.91, 10.85). Conclusion. While the degradation markers individually, considered as continuous variables, did not predict OA progression, belonging to the lower synthesis marker tertile and greater degradation/synthesis marker ratios were associated with an elevation in the odds of progression albeit not achieving significance. PMID:17344068

  12. Sulfoxide stimulation of chondrogenesis in limb mesenchyme is accompanied by an increase in type II collagen enhancer activity

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.E. Jr.; Higginbotham, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    We have utilized a modification of the limb bud mesenchyme micromass culture system to screen compounds that might stimulate chondrogenesis. Two compounds in the sulfoxide family (methylphenylsulfoxide and p-chlorophenyl methyl sulfoxide) were stimulatory at 10(-2) M and 10(-3) M, respectively; whereas other sulfoxides and organic solvents were not active at these concentrations. In addition, specific growth factors (basic FGF, IGF-I, IGF-II) were not chondroinductive at concentrations that are active in other cell systems. Both sulfoxide compounds stimulated cartilage nodule formation, ({sup 35}S)sulfate incorporation, and activity of the regulatory sequences of the collagen II gene. In contrast, transforming growth factor beta-1 (10 ng/ml) stimulated sulfate incorporation but produced only a diffuse deposition of cartilage matrix and reduced the ability of the cells to utilize the regulatory sequences of the collagen II gene. The sulfoxides appear to promote the differentiation of limb bud cells to chondrocytes and thus exhibit chondroinductive activity.

  13. Effect of chondroitin sulphate C on the in vitro and in vivo chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells in crosslinked type II collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chuan; Wei, Yu-Hong; Chu, I-Ming; Yao, Chao-Ling

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluates the crosslinkage effect of chondroitin sulphate C (CSC) and type II collagen (COL II) on chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro studies, our results show that the weight ratio CSC:COL II that reaches 1.2:100 (CSC1.2/100 -COL II scaffold) can provide an optimal microenvironment for MSC chondrogenesis. When MSCs are cultured in this CSC1.2/100 -COL II scaffold, the chondrogenic gene expression of cultured cells is upregulated, while the osteogenic gene expression of these is downregulated. In addition, MSCs cultivated in the CSC1.2/100 -COL II scaffold are found to express the highest glycosaminoglycans:DNA ratio as compared to those in scaffolds of other CSC:COL II ratios. Histological and immunohistological evidence also supports the result. In the in vivo study, our results show that MSCs cultivated in the CSC1.2/100 -COL II scaffold demonstrate a better repair ability on cartilage lesions than does the COL II scaffold. After 1 month in vivo, the injected MSCs in the CSC1.2/100 -COL II scaffold show lacuna structures and stimulate the formation of type II collagen at the defective sites. Six months after transplantation, the generated cells in the CSC1.2/100 -COL II group show higher gene expressions of type II collagen and aggrecan but lower gene expression of type I collagen at the defective sites than those in the COL II group. The results strongly suggest that CSC1.2/100 -COL II scaffold can serve as a potential candidate for cartilage repair and improve the chondrogenesis of MSCs in general.

  14. The absence of type II collagen and changes in proteoglycan structure of hyaline cartilage in a case of Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Feshchenko, S P; Rebrin, I A; Sokolnik, V P; Sher, B M; Sokolov, B P; Kalinin, V N; Lazjuk, G I

    1989-04-01

    Structural analysis of hyaline cartilage extracellular matrix components from the ribs and knee joint of a stillborn female with type II achondrogenesis was carried out. The absence of type II collagen, a decrease in the amount of proteoglycans (PG), and structural changes in PG, namely, increased electrophoretic mobility of PG, lower relative content of chondroitin 4-sulfate (Ch4-S), lower molecular weight and decreased total chondroitin sulfate (ChS) sulfation, were detected. Increased amounts of type I and type III collagens, atypical for hyaline cartilage, were revealed. Among the link proteins (LPs), a large protein with a mol. wt. of 48 kDa was predominant. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the pathogenesis of achondrogenesis ("chondrogenesis imperfecta") are discussed. The data obtained suggest that the primary defect in type II achondrogenesis involves ChS or type II collagen synthesis.

  15. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-05-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  16. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-01-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  17. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  18. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Londei, M.; Savill, C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Brennan, F.; Leech, Z.A.; Feldmann, M. ); Duance, V. ); Maini, R.N. )

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Comparative therapeutic efficacy and safety of type-II collagen (UC-II), glucosamine and chondroitin in arthritic dogs: pain evaluation by ground force plate.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R C; Canerdy, T D; Lindley, J; Konemann, M; Minniear, J; Carroll, B A; Hendrick, C; Goad, J T; Rohde, K; Doss, R; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2012-10-01

    The investigation was conducted on client-owned moderately arthritic dogs with two objectives: (i) to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of type-II collagen (UC-II) alone or in combination with glucosamine hydrochloride (GLU) and chondroitin sulphate (CHO), and (ii) to determine their tolerability and safety. Dogs in four groups (n = 7-10), were treated daily for a period of 150 days with placebo (Group-I), 10 mg active UC-II (Group-II), 2000 mg GLU + 1600 mg CHO (Group-III), and UC-II + GLU + CHO (Group-IV). On a monthly basis, dogs were evaluated for observational pain (overall pain, pain upon limb manipulation, and pain after physical exertion) using different numeric scales. Pain level was also measured objectively using piezoelectric sensor-based GFP for peak vertical force and impulse area. Dogs were also examined every month for physical, hepatic (ALP, ALT and bilirubin) and renal (BUN and creatinine) functions. Based on observations, significant (p < 0.05) reduction in pain was noted in Group-II, III, and IV dogs. Using GFP, significant increases in peak vertical force (N/kg body wt) and impulse area (N s/kg body wt), indicative of a decrease in arthritis associated pain, were observed in Group-II dogs only. None of the dogs in any group showed changes in physical, hepatic or renal functions. In conclusion, based on GFP data, moderately arthritic dogs treated with UC-II (10 mg) showed a marked reduction in arthritic pain with maximum improvement by day 150. UC-II, GLU and CHO operate through different mechanisms of action, and were well tolerated over a period of 150 days.

  20. Development and application of a new Silent reporter system to quantitate the activity of enhancer elements in the type II Collagen Gene.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuo; Shinomura, Tamayuki

    2016-07-01

    Type II collagen is a major component of cartilage, which provide structural stiffness to the tissue. As a sufficient amount of type II collagen is critical for maintaining the biomechanical properties of cartilage, its expression is tightly regulated in chondrocytes. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate in detail the transcriptional mechanism that controls expression of type II collagen, in particular by two enhancer elements we recently discovered. To systematically analyze and compare enhancer activities, we developed a novel reporter assay system that exploits site-specific integration of promoter and enhancer elements to activate a transcriptionally silent reporter gene. Using this system, we found that the enhancer elements have distinct characteristics, with one exhibiting additive effects and the other exhibiting synergistic effects when repeated in tandem.

  1. Design of a multiphase osteochondral scaffold. II. Fabrication of a mineralized collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold.

    PubMed

    Harley, Brendan A; Lynn, Andrew K; Wissner-Gross, Zachary; Bonfield, William; Yannas, Ioannis V; Gibson, Lorna J

    2010-03-01

    This paper is the second in a series of papers describing the design and development of an osteochondral scaffold using collagen-glycosaminoglycan and calcium phosphate technologies engineered for the regenerative repair of articular cartilage defects. The previous paper described a technology (concurrent mapping) for systematic variation and control of the chemical composition of triple coprecipitated collagen, glycosaminoglycan, and calcium phosphate (CGCaP) nanocomposites without using titrants. This paper describes (1) fabricating porous, three-dimensional scaffolds from the CGCaP suspensions, (2) characterizing the microstructure and mechanical properties of such scaffolds, and (3) modifying the calcium phosphate mineral phase. The methods build on the previously demonstrated ability to vary the composition of a CGCaP suspension (calcium phosphate mass fraction between 0 and 80 wt %) and enable the production of scaffolds whose pore architecture (mean pore size: 50-1000 microm), CaP phase chemistry (brushite, octacalcium phosphate, apatite) and crosslinking density (therefore mechanical properties and degradation rate) can be independently controlled. The scaffolds described in this paper combine the desirable biochemical properties and pore architecture of porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds with the strength and direct bone-bonding properties of calcium phosphate biomaterials in a manner that can be tailored to meet the demands of a range of applications in orthopedics and regenerative medicine.

  2. Yeast hydrolysate protects cartilage via stimulation of type II collagen synthesis and suppression of MMP-13 production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Sun; Park, So Yeon; Park, Yooheon; Bae, Song Hwan; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2013-09-01

    Type II collagen (COL II) is one of the primary components of hyaline cartilage and plays a key role in maintaining chondrocyte function. COL II is the principal target of destruction, and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) have a major role in arthritis. In the present study, we investigated the chondroctye protection effects of specific fraction of yeast hydrolysate ((10-30 kDa molecular weight peptides). The mRNA expression of COL II was significantly increased in the YH-treated group compared to the control at concentrations above 50 µg/ml, respectively. The 200 µg/ml YH-treated group (3.43 ± 0.23 µg/ml) showed significantly reduced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) degradation relative to that in the interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-treated control group (4.72 ± 0.05 µg/ml). In the YH-treated group, MMP-13 level was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared to the IL-1β-treated group without YH treatment. However, MMP-1 and MMP-3 level were not different from that of control. Under the same conditions, we also examined mRNA levels of COL II. The mRNA expression of COL II was significantly higher in the YH-treated group than in the IL-1β-treated control group at concentrations above 100 µg/ml. In conclusion, YH stimulated COL II synthesis and significantly inhibited MMP-13 and GAG degradation caused by IL-1β treatment.

  3. Cartilage turnover reflected by metabolic processing of type II collagen: a novel marker of anabolic function in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Wang, Jianxia; Hoielt, Sabine; Chen, Pingping; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie; He, Yi; Christiansen, Thorbjørn G; Karsdal, Morten Asser; Bay-Jensen, Anne Christine

    2014-10-17

    The aim of this study was to enable measurement of cartilage formation by a novel biomarker of type II collagen formation. The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Pro-C2 was developed and characterized for assessment of the beta splice variant of type II procollagen (PIIBNP). This is expected to originate primarily from remodeling of hyaline cartilage. A mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab) was raised in mouse, targeting specifically PIIBNP (QDVRQPG) and used in development of the assay. The specificity, sensitivity, 4-parameter fit and stability of the assay were tested. Levels of PIIBNP were quantified in human serum (0.6-2.2 nM), human amniotic fluid (163-188 nM) and sera from different animal species, e.g., fetal bovine serum (851-901 nM) with general good linearity (100% (SD 7.6) recovery) and good intra- and inter-assay variation (CV% < 10). Dose (0.1 to 100 ng/mL) and time (7, 14 and 21 days) dependent release of PIIBNP were evaluated in the conditioned medium from bovine cartilage explants (BEX) and human cartilage explants (HEX) upon stimulation with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and fibroblastic growth factor-2 (FGF-2). TGF-β1 and IGF-1 in concentrations of 10-100 ng/mL significantly (p < 0.05) induced release of PIIBNP in BEX compared to conditions without treatment (WO). In HEX, IGF-1 100 ng/mL was able to induce a significant increase of PIIBNP after one week compared to WO. FGF-2 did not induce a PIIBNP release in our models. To our knowledge this is the first assay, which is able to specifically evaluate PIIBNP excretion. The Pro-C2 assay seems to provide a promising and novel marker of type II collagen formation.

  4. Computational simulation of platelet deposition and activation: II. Results for Poiseuille flow over collagen.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, E N; Burgreen, G W; Wagner, W R; Antaki, J F

    1999-01-01

    We have previously described the development of a two-dimensional computational model of platelet deposition onto biomaterials from flowing blood (Sorensen et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 27:436-448, 1999). The model requires estimation of four parameters to fit it to experimental data: shear-dependent platelet diffusivity and three platelet-deposition-related reaction rate constants. These parameters are estimated for platelet deposition onto a collagen substrate for simple parallel-plate flow of whole blood in both the presence and absence of thrombin. One set of experimental results is used as a benchmark for model-fitting purposes. The "trained" model is then validated by applying it to additional test cases from the literature for parallel-plate Poiseuille flow over collagen at both higher and lower wall shear rates, and in the presence of various anticoagulants. The predicted values agree very well with the experimental results for the training cases, and good reproduction of deposition trends and magnitudes is obtained for the heparin, but not the citrate, validation cases. The model is formulated to be easily extended to synthetic biomaterials, as well as to more complex flows.

  5. The Initiator Methionine tRNA Drives Secretion of Type II Collagen from Stromal Fibroblasts to Promote Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Cassie J; Berg, Tracy J; Birch, Joanna; Ennis, Darren; Mitchell, Louise; Cloix, Catherine; Campbell, Andrew; Sumpton, David; Nixon, Colin; Campbell, Kirsteen; Bridgeman, Victoria L; Vermeulen, Peter B; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Jones, J Louise; Haywood, Linda; Pulleine, Ellie; Yin, Huabing; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen; Blyth, Karen; McNeish, Iain; Zanivan, Sara; Reynolds, Andrew R; Norman, Jim C

    2016-03-21

    Expression of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAi(Met)) is deregulated in cancer. Despite this fact, it is not currently known how tRNAi(Met) expression levels influence tumor progression. We have found that tRNAi(Met) expression is increased in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, implicating deregulated expression of tRNAi(Met) in the tumor stroma as a possible contributor to tumor progression. To investigate how elevated stromal tRNAi(Met) contributes to tumor progression, we generated a mouse expressing additional copies of the tRNAi(Met) gene (2+tRNAi(Met) mouse). Growth and vascularization of subcutaneous tumor allografts was enhanced in 2+tRNAi(Met) mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by fibroblasts from 2+tRNAi(Met) mice supported enhanced endothelial cell and fibroblast migration. SILAC mass spectrometry indicated that elevated expression of tRNAi(Met) significantly increased synthesis and secretion of certain types of collagen, in particular type II collagen. Suppression of type II collagen opposed the ability of tRNAi(Met)-overexpressing fibroblasts to deposit pro-migratory ECM. We used the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB) to determine whether collagen synthesis contributes to the tRNAi(Met)-driven pro-tumorigenic stroma in vivo. DHB had no effect on the growth of syngeneic allografts in wild-type mice but opposed the ability of 2+tRNAi(Met) mice to support increased angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, collagen II expression predicts poor prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that increased tRNAi(Met) levels contribute to tumor progression by enhancing the ability of stromal fibroblasts to synthesize and secrete a type II collagen-rich ECM that supports endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis.

  6. Cadmium induces alpha(1)collagen (I) and metallothionein II gene and alters the antioxidant system in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    del Carmen, Escobar Ma; Souza, Verónica; Bucio, Leticia; Hernández, Elizabeth; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Zaga, Verónica; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, Ma Concepción

    2002-01-15

    The mechanism of cadmium-mediated hepatotoxicity has been the subject of numerous investigations, principally in hepatocytes. Although, some uncertainties persist, sufficient evidence has emerged to provide a reasonable account of the toxic process in parenchymal cells. However, there is no information about the effect of cadmium in other hepatic cell types, such as stellate cells (fat storing cells, Ito cells, perisinusoidal cells, parasinusoidal cells, lipocytes). Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) express a quiescent phenotype in a healthy liver and acquire an activated phenotype in liver injury. These cells play an important role in the fibrogenic process. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 24 h treatment of low Cd concentrations in glutathione content, lipid peroxidation damage, cytosolic free Ca, antioxidant enzyme activities: glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase and catalase along with the capacity of this heavy metal to induce metallothionein II and alpha(1)collagen (I) in an hepatic stellate cell line (CFSC-2G). Cd-treated cells increased lipid peroxidation and the content of cytosolic free calcium, decreased glutathione content and superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. Cd was able to induce the expression of the metallothionein II and alpha(1)collagen (I) gene, that was not described in this cell type. Cadmium may act as a pro-fibrogenic agent in the liver probably by inducing oxidative damage by enhancing lipid peroxidation and altering the antioxidant system of the cells. Although, the exact role metallothionein induction plays in this process is unknown, it probably, provides a cytosolic pool of potential binding sites to sequester ionic Cd, thereby decreasing its toxicity.

  7. Looping Mediated Interaction between the Promoter and 3′ UTR Regulates Type II Collagen Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jash, Arijita; Yun, Kangsun; Sahoo, Anupama; So, Jae-Seon; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2012-01-01

    Type II collagen is the major component of articular cartilage and is mainly synthesized by chondrocytes. Repeated sub-culturing of primary chondrocytes leads to reduction of type II collagen gene (Col2a1) expression, which mimics the process of chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Although the functional importance of Col2a1 expression has been extensively investigated, mechanism of transcriptional regulation during chondrocyte dedifferentiation is still unclear. In this study, we have investigated the crosstalk between cis-acting DNA element and transcription factor on Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the potential regulatory regions in the Col2a1 genomic locus. Among them, promoter and 3′ untranslated region (UTR) showed highly accessible chromatin architecture with enriched recruitment of active chromatin markers in primary chondrocytes. 3′ UTR has a potent enhancer function which recruits Lef1 (Lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1) transcription factor, leading to juxtaposition of the 3′ UTR with the promoter through gene looping resulting in up-regulation of Col2a1 gene transcription. Knock-down of endogenous Lef1 level significantly reduced the gene looping and subsequently down-regulated Col2a1 expression. However, these regulatory loci become inaccessible due to condensed chromatin architecture as chondrocytes dedifferentiate which was accompanied by a reduction of gene looping and down-regulation of Col2a1 expression. Our results indicate that Lef1 mediated looping between promoter and 3′ UTR under the permissive chromatin architecture upregulates Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. PMID:22815835

  8. Phenotypic expressions of a Gly154Arg mutation in type II collagen in two unrelated patients with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaitila, I.; Marttinen, E.; Koerkkoe, J.; Ala-Kokko, L.

    1996-05-03

    Type II collagenopathies consist of chondrodysplasia ranging from lethal to mild in severity. A large number of mutations has been found in the COL2A1 gene. Glycine substitutions have been the most common types of mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlations in type II collagenopathies have not been established, partly because of insufficient clinical and radiographic description of the patients. We found a glycine-to-arginine substitution at position 154 in type II collagen in two unrelated isolated propositi with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and provide a comparative clinical and radiographic analysis from birth to young adulthood for this condition. The clinical phenotype was disproportionate short stature with varus/valgus deformities of the lower limbs requiring corrective osteotomies, and lumbar lordosis. The skeletal radiographs showed an evolution from short tubular bones, delayed epiphyseal development, and mild vertebral involvement to severe metaphyseal dysplasia with dappling irregularities, and hip {open_quotes}dysplasia.{close_quotes} The metaphyseal abnormalities disappeared by adulthood. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A radiographic, morphologic, biochemical and molecular analysis of a case of achondrogenesis type II resulting from substitution for a glycine residue (Gly691-->Arg) in the type II collagen trimer.

    PubMed

    Mortier, G R; Wilkin, D J; Wilcox, W R; Rimoin, D L; Lachman, R S; Eyre, D R; Cohn, D H

    1995-02-01

    The type II collagenopathies form a continuous spectrum of clinical severity, ranging from lethal achondrogenesis type II and hypochondrogenesis, through spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and Kniest dysplasia to the Stickler syndrome and familial precocious osteoarthropathy at the mildest end of the spectrum. We have carried out a radiographic, morphologic, biochemical and molecular study in a case of achondrogenesis type II. Electron micrographs showed inclusion bodies of dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum in the chondrocytes and the presence of sparse collagen fibers in the cartilage matrix. Protein analysis of collagen from cartilage indicated posttranslational overmodification of the major cyanogen bromide peptides, and suggested a mutation near the carboxyl terminus of the type II collagen molecule. Analysis at the DNA level demonstrated that the phenotype was produced by a single base change (G-->C) that resulted in the substitution of glycine691 by arginine in the type II collagen triple helical domain. We confirm previous observations in three cases of hypochondrogenesis that glycine substitutions in the alpha 1(II) chain can result in a phenotype at the most severe end of the type II collagenopathy spectrum.

  10. Safety and immunogenicity of a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Juan, Long; Xiao, Zhao; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Current clinically available treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fail to cure the disease or unsatisfactorily halt disease progression. To overcome these limitations, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters may offer new promising strategies. Because type II collagen (CII) as a critical autoantigen in RA and native chicken type II collagen (nCCII) has been used to effectively treat RA, we previously developed a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding CCII (pcDNA-CCOL2A1) with efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard", methotrexate(MTX). Here, we systemically evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal Wistar rats. Group 1 received only a single intramuscular injection into the hind leg with pcDNA-CCOL2A1 at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg on day 0; Group 2 was injected with normal saline (NS) as a negative control. All rats were monitored daily for any systemic adverse events, reactions at the injection site, and changes in body weights. Plasma and tissues from all experimental rats were collected on day 14 for routine examinations of hematology and biochemistry parameters, anti-CII IgG antibody reactivity, and histopathology. Our results indicated clearly that at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine was safe and well-tolerated. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths occurred in the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 group compared with the NS group. Furthermore, no major alterations were observed in hematology, biochemistry, and histopathology, even at the maximum dose. In particularly, no anti-CII IgG antibodies were detected in vaccinated normal rats at 14 d after vaccination; this was relevant because we previously demonstrated that the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine, when administered at the therapeutic dosage of 300 μg/kg alone, did not induce anti-CII IgG antibody production and significantly reduced levels of anti-CII IgG antibodies in the plasma of rats with established collagen-induced arthritis

  11. Kniest dysplasia is characterized by an apparent abnormal processing of the C-propeptide of type II cartilage collagen resulting in imperfect fibril assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, A R; Pidoux, I; Reiner, A; Rosenberg, L; Hollister, D; Murray, L; Rimoin, D

    1988-01-01

    Epiphyseal and growth plate cartilages from four cases of Kniest dysplasia have been studied. In each case collagen fibril organization appeared abnormal by electron microscopy compared with age-matched normal cartilages: fibrils were much thinner, of irregular shape and did not exhibit the characteristic banding pattern. This was associated with the absence (compared with normal cartilage) of the C-propeptide of type II collagen (chondrocalcin) from the extracellular matrix of epiphyseal cartilages, although it was detected (as in normal cartilages) in the lower hypertrophic zone of the growth plate in association with calcifying cartilage. The C-propeptide was abnormally concentrated in intracellular vacuolar sites in Kniest cartilages and its total content was reduced in all cases but not in all cartilages. Moreover, it was not a part of the procollagen molecule. In contrast, type II collagen alpha-chain size was normal, indicating the formation of a triple helix. Also type II collagen content was normal and it was present in extracellular sites and only occasionally detected intracellularly. These observations suggest that the defect in Kniest dysplasia may result from the secretion of type II procollagen lacking the C-propeptide and abnormal fibril formation, and that the C-propeptide is normally required for fibril formation. Images PMID:3276736

  12. PEP-1-SIRT2-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -13 modulates type II collagen expression via ERK signaling in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are critical for the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which includes cartilage-specific collagen types I, II and XI. We previously found that PEP-1-sirtuin (SIRT)2 could induce dedifferentiation of articular chondrocytes; however, the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. We addressed this in the present study by examining the association between PEP-1-SIRT2 and the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-13 and type II collagen in rabbit articular chondrocytes. We found that PEP-1-SIRT2 increased MMP-1 and -13 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as determined by western blotting. A similar trend in MMP-1 and -13 levels was observed in cultures during expansion to four passages. Pharmacological inhibition of MMP-1 and -13 blocked the PEP-1-SIRT2-induced decrease in type II collagen level. Phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) was increased by PEP-1-SIRT2; however, treatment with the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor PD98059 suppressed PEP-1-SIRT2-induced MMP-1 and -13 expression and dedifferentiation while restoring type II collagen expression in passage 2 cells. These results suggest that PEP-1-SIRT2 promotes MMP-induced dedifferentiation via ERK signaling in articular chondrocytes.

  13. Mechanism of IFN-γ in regulating OPN/Th17 pathway during vascular collagen remodeling of hypertension induced by ANG II.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; He, Pengcheng; Liu, Yong; Chen, Jiyan; Wei, Xuebiao; Tan, Ning

    2015-01-01

    More and more researches show that hypertensive vascular remodeling is closely related to the imbalance of immune system in recent years. IFN-γ is natural protein with the function of immune regulation and has resistance effect on vascular remodeling. However, the mechanism of IFN-γ is to be defined. This paper is to explore the mechanism of IFN-γ in regulating OPN/Th17 pathway. In this research, animal models of vascular collagen remodeling were established by inducing hypertensive mice with ANG II. There was no statistical significance when the systolic blood pressures and the percentages of wall thickness/lumen diameter in both groups of WT + AngII + IFN-γ and WT + PBS were compared (P=0.219>0.05, P=0.118>0.05). The concentration of serum precollagen-type I and III and their ratio in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group were decreased after the IFN-γ being given (P<0.01). Expression of OPN within tissue in WT + Ang II group was relatively high, but lowered after treated by IFN-γ. Th17 cell ratio was decreased in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group (P<0.01). Expressions of RORα and RORγt mRNA within Th17 cell were decreased (P<0.01). The content of IL-23 in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group was increased, while IL-10 and TGF-β decreased. It has proved that IFN-γ can regulate the hypertensive vascular collagen remodeling induced by ANG II, lower the systolic pressure and reduce the pathological damage of vascular collagen remodeling and the collagen synthesis. The mechanism may that the differentiation of Th17 is inhibited by suppressing the OPN expression and regulating the secretion of inflammatory cytokines.

  14. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    PubMed

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016.

  15. Effects of linagliptin and liraglutide on glucose- and angiotensin II-induced collagen formation and cytoskeleton degradation in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-wei; Zhang, Fen-xi; Yang, Fen; Ding, Zu-feng; Agarwal, Nidhi; Guo, Zhi-kun; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors can not only lower blood glucose levels, but also alleviate cardiac remodeling after myocardial ischemia and hypertension. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor (linagliptin) and a GLP-1 activator (liraglutide) on glucose- and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced collagen formation and cytoskeleton reorganization in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro, and elucidated the related mechanisms. Methods: Cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from the hearts of 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice, and then exposed to different concentrations of glucose or Ang II for 24 h. The expression of fibrotic signals (fibronectin, collagen-1, -3 and -4), as well as ERK1/2 and NF-κB-p65 in the fibroblasts was examined using Western blotting assays. F-actin degradation was detected under inverted laser confocal microscope in fibroblasts stained with Rhodamine phalloidin. Results: Glucose (1–40 mmol/L) and Ang II (10−8–10−5 mol/L) dose-dependently increased the expression of fibronectin, collagens, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-NF-κB-p65 in cardiac fibroblasts. High concentrations of glucose (≥40 mmol/L) and Ang II (≥10−6 mol/L) caused a significant degradation of F-actin (less assembly F-actin fibers and more disassembly fibers). ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (10 μmol/L) and NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 (10 μmol/L) both markedly suppressed glucose- and angiotensin II-induced fibronectin and collagen expressions in cardiac fibroblasts. Furthermore, pretreatment with liraglutide (10–100 nmol/L) or linagliptin (3 and 30 nmol/L) significantly decreased glucose- and Ang II-induced expression of fibrotic signals, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-NF-κB-p65 in cardiac fibroblasts. Moreover, pretreatment with liraglutide (30 nmol/L) or liraglutide (100 nmol/L) markedly inhibited glucose-induced F-actin degradation, however, only liraglutide inhibited Ang II-induced F-actin degradation. Conclusion

  16. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Disturbed synthesis of type II collagen interferes with rate of bone formation and growth and increases bone resorption in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Jyrki; Sahlman, Janne; Hirvonen, Teemu; Lapveteläinen, Tuomo; Miettinen, Markku; Arnala, Ilkka; Malluche, Hartmut H; Helminen, Heikki J

    2008-03-01

    Transgenic mice carrying an internally deleted human type II collagen gene (COL2A1) were used to study bone growth and development. This mutation has previously been shown to disturb the development of collagen fibrils in articular cartilage, causing chondrodysplasia and osteoarthritis. Type II collagen expression in bones was investigated with immunohistochemistry. The development and mineralization of the skeleton and anthropometric measurements on bones were evaluated using X-rays and dynamic histomorphometry. Type II collagen was expressed in the cartilage of developing bones. The bones of transgenic mice were smaller compared with the controls. The bone mass remained almost unchanged in transgenic mice after 1 month of age, leading to differences of 47% in trabecular bone volume (P = 0.012) and 40% in trabecular thickness (P < 0.01) at the age of 3 months compared with controls. At the age of 3 months the eroded surface per bone volume was 31% greater in transgenic mice compared with controls (P < 0.05). Trabecular thickness correlated positively with body weight (R = 0.71, P < 0.001). Interestingly, body weight correlated with bone volume in control mice (R = 0.27, P < 0.01), but no correlation was observed in transgenic mice. The disturbed synthesis of cartilage-specific type II collagen in growing transgenic mice retarded bone development, increased bone resorption, and altered tissue properties. This led to a negative net bone balance and small bone size. The results support the idea that an altered synthesis of cartilage-specific molecule(s) can disturb postnatal bone development and growth.

  18. Definition of MHC and T cell receptor contacts in the HLA-DR4restricted immunodominant epitope in type II collagen and characterization of collagen-induced arthritis in HLA-DR4 and human CD4 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ellen Christina; Hansen, Bjarke Endel; Jacobsen, Helle; Madsen, Lars S.; Andersen, Claus B.; Engberg, Jan; Rothbard, Jonathan B.; McDevitt, Grete Sønderstrup; Malmström, Vivianne; Holmdahl, Rikard; Svejgaard, Arne; Fugger, Lars

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease associated with the HLA-DR4 and DR1 alleles. The target autoantigen(s) in RA is unknown, but type II collagen (CII) is a candidate, and the DR4- and DR1-restricted immunodominant T cell epitope in this protein corresponds to amino acids 261–273 (CII 261–273). We have defined MHC and T cell receptor contacts in CII 261–273 and provide strong evidence that this peptide corresponds to the peptide binding specificity previously found for RA-associated DR molecules. Moreover, we demonstrate that HLA-DR4 and human CD4 transgenic mice homozygous for the I-Abβ0 mutation are highly susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis and describe the clinical course and histopathological changes in the affected joints. PMID:9636191

  19. Efficacy of MTA and CEM Cement with Collagen Membranes for Treatment of Class II Furcation Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Habib Ollah; Taheri, Morteza; Abolfazli, Salman; Asgary, Saeed; Gharechahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the efficacy of MTA and CEM cement in Class II furcation defects in human mandibular molars. Materials and Methods: Forty furcation defects were treated in 16 patients with chronic periodontitis. The clinical parameters of probing depth (PD), vertical and horizontal clinical attachment levels (VCAL and HCAL), open vertical and horizontal furcation depths (OVFD and OHFD), and gingival margin level (GML) were measured at baseline and at 3- and 6-month (re-entry surgery) postoperatively. Data were analyzed at a significance level of P<0.05. Results: Use of MTA and CEM caused significant decreases in PD, VCAL, HCAL, OVFD and OHFD at re-entry, with no statistically significant differences between the two treatment options in soft and hard tissue parameters. Conclusion: Both treatment modalities caused significant gains in attachment levels and bone fills, proving efficacy for treatment of Class II furcation involvements. PMID:25628670

  20. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47. II. The HSP47-binding structural motif in collagens and related proteins.

    PubMed

    Koide, Takaki; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Asada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Chisato M; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Homma, Daisuke L; Otaka, Akira; Ohtani, Katsuki; Wakamiya, Nobutaka; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-04-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) plays an essential role in procollagen biosynthesis. The function of HSP47 relies on its specific interaction with correctly folded triple-helical regions comprised of Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats, and Arg residues at Yaa positions have been shown to be important for this interaction. The amino acid at the Yaa position (Yaa(-3)) in the N-terminal-adjoining triplet containing the critical Arg (defined as Arg(0)) was also suggested to be directly recognized by HSP47 (Koide, T., Asada, S., Takahara, Y., Nishikawa, Y., Nagata, K., and Kitagawa, K. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3432-3438). Based on this finding, we examined the relationship between the structure of Yaa(-3) and HSP47 binding using synthetic collagenous peptides. The results obtained indicated that the structure of Yaa(-3) determined the binding affinity for HSP47. Maximal binding was observed when Yaa(-3) was Thr. Moreover, the required relative spatial arrangement of these key residues in the triple helix was analyzed by taking advantage of heterotrimeric collagen-model peptides, each of which contains one Thr(-3) and one Arg(0). The results revealed that HSP47 recognizes the Yaa(-3) and Arg(0) residues only when they are on the same peptide strand. Taken together, the data obtained led us to define the HSP47-binding structural epitope in the collagen triple helix and also define the HSP47-binding motif in the primary structure. A motif search against human protein database predicted candidate clients for this molecular chaperone. The search result indicated that not all collagen family proteins require the chaperoning by HSP47.

  1. Weight-bearing alters the expression of collagen types I and II, BMP 2/4 and osteocalcin in the early stages of distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Radomisli, T E; Moore, D C; Barrach, H J; Keeping, H S; Ehrlich, M G

    2001-11-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of loading on the biology of newly forming bone during limb lengthening. Unilateral 2.0 mm femoral lengthenings were performed in 20 male Sprague Dawley rats. Half (n = 10) of the animals were allowed to bear weight freely, while the other half were prevented from weight-bearing via an ipsilateral through-knee amputation. The animals in each group were sacrificed after one (n = 5) or four (n = 5) days of consolidation (post-operative days seven and 10, respectively). In situ hybridization for osteocalcin and collagen I, and antibody staining for collagen II and BMP 2/4 were used to evaluate the molecular influence of loading. There was more new bone in the distraction gap of the weight-bearing animals than there was in the non-weight-bearing animals. BMP 2/4 expression, and the messages for collagen I and osteocalcin, were more abundant in tissue from the weight-bearing animals; collagen II was higher in the non-weight-bearing animals. This suggests that early regenerate tissue is capable of responding to loading, and that weight-bearing appears to stimulate intramembranous ossification. These findings support the concept of early weight-bearing after limb lengthening.

  2. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family’s phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  3. Correlating chemical changes in subchondral bone mineral due to aging or defective type II collagen by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehring, Karen A.; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2007-02-01

    We show that early indicators of osteoarthritis are observed in Raman spectroscopy by probing femur surfaces excised from mouse models of early-onset osteoarthritis. Current clinical methods to examine arthritic joints include radiological examination of the joint, but may not be capable of detecting subtle chemical changes in the bone tissue, which may provide the earliest indications of osteoarthritis. Recent research has indicated that the subchondral bone may have a more significant role in the onset of osteoarthritis than previously realized. We will report the effect of age and defective type II collagen on Raman band area ratios used to describe bone structure and function. The carbonate-to-phosphate ratio is used to assess carbonate substitution into the bone mineral and the mineral-to-matrix ratio is used to measure bone mineralization. Mineral-to-matrix ratios indicate that subchondral bone becomes less mineralized as both the wild-type and Del1 (+/-) transgenic mice age. Moreover, the mineral-to-matrix ratios show that the subchondral bone of Del1 (+/-) transgenic mice is less mineralized than that of the wild-type mice. Carbonate-to-phosphate ratios from Del1 (+/-) transgenic mice follow the same longitudinal trend as wild-type mice. The ratio is slightly higher in the transgenic mice, indicating more carbonate content in the bone mineral. Raman characterization of bone mineralization provides an invaluable insight into the process of cartilage degeneration and the relationship with subchondral bone at the ultrastructural level.

  4. The Predicted Proteomic Network Associated with the Antiarthritic Action of Qingfu Guanjieshu in Collagen-II-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting Yu; Zhou, Hua; Wong, Yuen Fan; Wu, Pui Kei; Hsiao, Wen-Luan Wendy; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Liu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Qingfu Guanjieshu (QFGJS) is an herbal preparation for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previous studies revealed that QFGJS significantly inhibited experimental arthritis and acute inflammation, accompanied by reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This study aims to identify the targeted proteins and predict the proteomic network associated with the drug action of QFGJS by using 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques. Thirty female Wistar rats were evenly grouped as normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats. The antiarthritic effect of QFGJS was examined with a 19-day treatment course, and the knee synovial tissues of animals from each group were obtained for 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis. Results showed that QFGJS significantly ameliorated collagen II-induced arthritis when administrated at 2.8 g/kg body weight for 19 days. 2D gel image analysis revealed 89 differentially expressed proteins in the synovial tissues among the normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats from over 1000 proteins of which 63 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis, and 32 proteins were included for classification of functions using Gene Ontology (GO) method. Finally, 14 proteins were analyzed using bioinformatics, and a predicted proteomic network related to the anti-arthritic effect of QFGJS was established, and Pgk1 plays a central role. PMID:23781264

  5. Upregulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Synthesis and Consequent Collagen II Expression in Leptin-stimulated Human Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shun-Fu; Hsieh, Rong-Ze; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Chang, Cheng Allen; Chiu, Fang-Yao; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Su, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play positive roles in cartilage development, but they can barely be detected in healthy articular cartilage. However, recent evidence has indicated that BMPs could be detected in osteoarthritic and damaged cartilage and their precise roles have not been well defined. Extremely high amounts of leptin have been reported in obese individuals, which can be associated with osteoarthritis (OA) development. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BMPs could be induced in human primary chondrocytes during leptin-stimulated OA development and the underlying mechanism. We found that expression of BMP-2 mRNA, but not BMP-4, BMP-6, or BMP-7 mRNA, could be increased in human primary chondrocytes under leptin stimulation. Moreover, this BMP-2 induction was mediated through transcription factor-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 activation via JAK2-ERK1/2-induced Ser727-phosphorylation. Of note, histone deacetylases (HDACs) 3 and 4 were both involved in modulating leptin-induced BMP-2 mRNA expression through different pathways: HDAC3, but not HDAC4, associated with STAT3 to form a complex. Our results further demonstrated that the role of BMP-2 induction under leptin stimulation is to increase collagen II expression. The findings in this study provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism of BMP-2 induction in leptin-stimulated chondrocytes and suggest that BMP-2 may play a reparative role in regulating leptin-induced OA development.

  6. The transformation of common office supplies into a low-cost optical biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Duk Han, Yong; Jin Chun, Hyeong; Yoon, Hyun C

    2014-09-15

    By reassembling common office supplies, an optical biosensing system was developed. A laser pointer and the solar cell from a calculator were utilized in the developed optical biosensing system as the light source and signal transducer, respectively. For intuitive signal evaluation, a multimeter was used. The following two types of conventional enzymatic colorimetric assays were employed with the optical biosensing system: (i) the Trinder׳s reaction-based enzymatic assay; and (ii) the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These colorimetric assays were performed in reaction channels made from transparent polymer and glass. By matching the maximum absorption spectra of the colored end products from the assays with the emission spectra of the laser diodes, the biochemical reaction rate was manifested as a change in the intensity of the laser beam. This change was then converted by the solar cell into voltage and displayed on the connected multimeter. To verify the detection performance of the system, glucose and an osteoarthritis biomarker (urinary collagen type II C-telopeptide fragments [uCTX-II]) were quantified. With glucose, the voltages registered were linearly correlated with the glucose concentration, from 0 to 10 mM. Using a competitive immunoassay for uCTX-II, the system exhibited a calibration curve with a dynamic detection range between 1.3 and 10 ng/mL uCTX-II. Given the advantages of the proposed biosensing system, including its high sensitivity, facile fabrication, and the high obtainability and cost-effectiveness of the components used to make it, we expect that this study will provide a basis for the production of a low-cost optical biosensor.

  7. Substitution of aspartate for glycine 103 of the type II collagen triple helical domain: Identification of the minimal mutation which can produce Kniest dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, D.J.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    Kniest dysplasia is an autosomal dominant chondrodysplasia which results from mutations in the gene for type II collagen, COL2A1. Characteristics of the disorder include a short trunk and extremities, mid-face hypoplasia, cleft palate, myopia, retinal detachment, and hearing loss. Recently, deletions of all or part of exon 12 have been identified in individuals with Kniest dysplasia, suggesting that mutations within this region of the protein may primarily result in the Kniest dysplasia phenotype. We used SSCP to analyze an amplified genomic DNA fragment containing exon 12 from 7 individuals with Kniest dysplasia. An abnormality was identified in one patient. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that the patient was heterozygous for a G to A transition that implied substitution of glycine{sup 103} of the triple helix by aspartate. The mutation was not observed in DNA from either of the proband`s parents. Protein microsequencing demonstrated expression of the abnormal allele in the proband`s cartilage, indicating that the Kniest phenotype results from the presence of abnormal type II collagen molecules in the extracellular matrix. These data demonstrate the minimal mutation which can produce Kniest dysplasia and further support the hypothesis that alteration of a domain which includes the region encoded by exon 12 in the type II collagen protein leads to this disorder. Experiments designed to identify specific effects that mutations in this region have on intermolecular interactions among abnormal type II collagen molecules and other components of the cartilage extracellular matrix may clarify the underlying pathophysiology of Kniest dysplasia.

  8. Cotransfected human chondrocytes: over-expression of IGF-I and SOX9 enhances the synthesis of cartilage matrix components collagen-II and glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Simental-Mendía, M; Lara-Arias, J; Álvarez-Lozano, E; Said-Fernández, S; Soto-Domínguez, A; Padilla-Rivas, G R; Martínez-Rodríguez, H G

    2015-12-01

    Damage to cartilage causes a loss of type II collagen (Col-II) and glycosaminoglycans (GAG). To restore the original cartilage architecture, cell factors that stimulate Col-II and GAG production are needed. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and transcription factor SOX9are essential for the synthesis of cartilage matrix, chondrocyte proliferation, and phenotype maintenance. We evaluated the combined effect of IGF-I and SOX9 transgene expression on Col-II and GAG production by cultured human articular chondrocytes. Transient transfection and cotransfection were performed using two mammalian expression plasmids (pCMV-SPORT6), one for each transgene. At day 9 post-transfection, the chondrocytes that were over-expressing IGF-I/SOX9 showed 2-fold increased mRNA expression of the Col-II gene, as well as a 57% increase in Col-II protein, whereas type I collagen expression (Col-I) was decreased by 59.3% compared with controls. The production of GAG by these cells increased significantly compared with the controls at day 9 (3.3- vs 1.8-times, an increase of almost 83%). Thus, IGF-I/SOX9 cotransfected chondrocytes may be useful for cell-based articular cartilage therapies.

  9. Accurate, quantitative assays for the hydrolysis of soluble type I, II, and III /sup 3/H-acetylated collagens by bacterial and tissue collagenases

    SciTech Connect

    Mallya, S.K.; Mookhtiar, K.A.; Van Wart, H.E.

    1986-11-01

    Accurate and quantitative assays for the hydrolysis of soluble /sup 3/H-acetylated rat tendon type I, bovine cartilage type II, and human amnion type III collagens by both bacterial and tissue collagenases have been developed. The assays are carried out at any temperature in the 1-30/sup 0/C range in a single reaction tube and the progress of the reaction is monitored by withdrawing aliquots as a function of time, quenching with 1,10-phenanthroline, and quantitation of the concentration of hydrolysis fragments. The latter is achieved by selective denaturation of these fragments by incubation under conditions described in the previous paper of this issue. The assays give percentages of hydrolysis of all three collagen types by neutrophil collagenase that agree well with the results of gel electrophoresis experiments. The initial rates of hydrolysis of all three collagens are proportional to the concentration of both neutrophil or Clostridial collagenases over a 10-fold range of enzyme concentrations. All three assays can be carried out at collagen concentrations that range from 0.06 to 2 mg/ml and give linear double reciprocal plots for both tissue and bacterial collagenases that can be used to evaluate the kinetic parameters K/sub m/ and k/sub cat/ or V/sub max/. The assay developed for the hydrolysis of rat type I collagen by neutrophil collagenase is shown to be more sensitive by at least one order of magnitude than comparable assays that use rat type I collagen fibrils or gels as substrate.

  10. Prospects and limitations of improving skeletal growth in a mouse model of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by R992C (p.R1192C) substitution in collagen II

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Cheryl; Kostas, James; Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias form a group of skeletal disorders caused by mutations in macromolecules of cartilage and bone. The severity of skeletal dysplasias ranges from precocious arthropathy to perinatal lethality. Although the pathomechanisms of these disorders are generally well defined, the feasibility of repairing established aberrant skeletal tissues that developed in the presence of mutant molecules is currently unknown. Here, we employed a validated mouse model of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) that enables temporal control of the production of the R992C (p.R1192C) collagen II mutant that causes this disease. Although in our earlier studies we determined that blocking the expression of this mutant at the early prenatal stages prevents a SED phenotype, the utility of blocking the R992C collagen II at the postnatal stages is not known. Here, by switching off the expression of R992C collagen II at various postnatal stages of skeletal development, we determined that significant improvements of cartilage and bone morphology were achieved only when blocking the production of the mutant molecules was initiated in newborn mice. Our study indicates that future therapies of skeletal dysplasias may require defining a specific time window when interventions should be applied to be successful. PMID:28182776

  11. Evaluation of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Labeled Chondrocytes Cultivated on a Type II Collagen-Chitosan/Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid Biphasic Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Su, Juin-Yih; Chen, Shi-Hui; Chen, Yu-Pin; Chen, Wei-Chuan

    2017-01-04

    Chondral or osteochondral defects are still controversial problems in orthopedics. Here, chondrocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles were cultivated on a biphasic, type II collagen-chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold in an attempt to develop cultures with trackable cells exhibiting growth, differentiation, and regeneration. Rabbit chondrocytes were labeled with magnetic nanoparticles and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron (TEM) microscopy, and gene and protein expression analyses. The experimental results showed that the magnetic nanoparticles did not affect the phenotype of chondrocytes after cell labeling, nor were protein and gene expression affected. The biphasic type II collagen-chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid scaffold was characterized by SEM, and labeled chondrocytes showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the scaffold after cultivation onto the polymer. Cellular phenotype remained unaltered but with increased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan, as indicated by cell staining, indicating chondrogenesis. Decreased SRY-related high mobility group-box gene (Sox-9) levels of cultured chondrocytes indicated that differentiation was associated with osteogenesis. These results are encouraging for the development of techniques for trackable cartilage regeneration and osteochondral defect repair which may be applied in vivo and, eventually, in clinical trials.

  12. Mapping of potent and specific binding motifs, GLOGEN and GVOGEA, for integrin α1β1 using collagen toolkits II and III.

    PubMed

    Hamaia, Samir W; Pugh, Nicholas; Raynal, Nicolas; Némoz, Benjamin; Stone, Rachael; Gullberg, Donald; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W

    2012-07-27

    Integrins are well characterized cell surface receptors for extracellular matrix proteins. Mapping integrin-binding sites within the fibrillar collagens identified GFOGER as a high affinity site recognized by α2β1, but with lower affinity for α1β1. Here, to identify specific ligands for α1β1, we examined binding of the recombinant human α1 I domain, the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12), and the rat glioma Rugli cell line to our collagen Toolkit II and III peptides using solid-phase and real-time label-free adhesion assays. We observed Mg(2+)-dependent binding of the α1 I domain to the peptides in the following rank order: III-7 (GLOGEN), II-28 (GFOGER), II-7 and II-8 (GLOGER), II-18 (GAOGER), III-4 (GROGER). PC12 cells showed a similar profile. Using antibody blockade, we confirmed that binding of PC12 cells to peptide III-7 was mediated by integrin α1β1. We also identified a new α1β1-binding activity within peptide II-27. The sequence GVOGEA bound weakly to PC12 cells and strongly to activated Rugli cells or to an activated α1 I domain, but not to the α2 I domain or to C2C12 cells expressing α2β1 or α11β1. Thus, GVOGEA is specific for α1β1. Although recognized by both α2β1 and α11β1, GLOGEN is a better ligand for α1β1 compared with GFOGER. Finally, using biosensor assays, we show that although GLOGEN is able to compete for the α1 I domain from collagen IV (IC(50) ∼3 μm), GFOGER is much less potent (IC(50) ∼90 μm), as shown previously. These data confirm the selectivity of GFOGER for α2β1 and establish GLOGEN as a high affinity site for α1β1.

  13. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  14. rFN/Cad-11-Modified Collagen Type II Biomimetic Interface Promotes the Adhesion and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zhengsheng; Kang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Kang, Xia; Wen, Can; Yan, Yanfei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Yujiang

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the cell-material interface are determining factors in the successful function of cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Currently, cell adhesion is commonly promoted through the use of polypeptides; however, due to their lack of complementary or modulatory domains, polypeptides must be modified to improve their ability to promote adhesion. In this study, we utilized the principle of matrix-based biomimetic modification and a recombinant protein, which spans fragments 7–10 of fibronectin module III (heterophilic motif ) and extracellular domains 1–2 of cadherin-11 (rFN/Cad-11) (homophilic motif ), to modify the interface of collagen type II (Col II) sponges. We showed that the designed material was able to stimulate cell proliferation and promote better chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro than both the FN modified surfaces and the negative control. Further, the Col II/rFN/Cad-11-MSCs composite stimulated cartilage formation in vivo; the chondrogenic effect of Col II alone was much less significant. These results suggested that the rFN/Cad-11-modified collagen type II biomimetic interface has dual biological functions of promoting adhesion and stimulating chondrogenic differentiation. This substance, thus, may serve as an ideal scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing repair of injured cartilage in vivo. PMID:23919505

  15. Ethyl pyruvate therapy attenuates experimental severe arthritis caused by type II collagen (CII) in the mouse (CIA).

    PubMed

    Di Paola, R; Mazzon, E; Galuppo, M; Esposito, E; Bramanti, P; Fink, M P; Cuzzocrea, S

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that ethyl pyruvate (EP), a simple aliphatic ester with anti-inflammatory effects, can reduce type II collagen-induced mouse arthritis (CIA). DBA/1J mice were used for the study, developing erosive hind paw arthritis when immunized with CII in an emulsion in complete Freund?s adjuvant (CFA). The incidence of CIA was 100 percent by day 28 in the CII-challenged mice, and the severity of CIA progressed over a 35-day period with radiographic evaluation revealing focal resorption of bone. The histopathology of CIA included erosion of the cartilage at the joint margins. EP-treatment (40 mg/kg/day i.p.) starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated the clinical signs at days 26-35 and improved histological status in the joint and paw. Immunohistochemical analysis for nitrotyrosine, poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) revealed a positive staining in inflamed joints from mice subjected to CIA, while no staining was observed for HO-1 and Nrf-2 in the same group. The degree of staining for nitrotyrosine, PAR, iNOS, was significantly reduced in CII-challenged mice treated with the EP. Immuno-positive-staining for HO-1 and Nrf-2 was observed instead, in joints obtained from the EP-treated group. Plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and the joint tissue levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α and MIP-2 were also significantly reduced by EP treatment. Thirty-five days after immunization, EP-treatment significantly increased plasma levels of IL-10. These data demonstrate that EP treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory effect during chronic inflammation and is able to ameliorate the tissue damage associated with CIA.

  16. A Novel Regulatory Mechanism of Type II Collagen Expression via a SOX9-dependent Enhancer in Intron 6.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hideyo; Oh, Chun-do; Chen, Di; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2017-01-13

    Type II collagen α1 is specific for cartilaginous tissues, and mutations in its gene are associated with skeletal diseases. Its expression has been shown to be dependent on SOX9, a master transcription factor required for chondrogenesis that binds to an enhancer region in intron 1. However, ChIP sequencing revealed that SOX9 does not strongly bind to intron 1, but rather it binds to intron 6 and a site 30 kb upstream of the transcription start site. Here, we aimed to determine the role of the novel SOX9-binding site in intron 6. We prepared reporter constructs that contain a Col2a1 promoter, intron 1 with or without intron 6, and the luciferase gene. Although the reporter constructs were not activated by SOX9 alone, the construct that contained both introns 1 and 6 was activated 5-10-fold by the SOX9/SOX5 or the SOX9/SOX6 combination in transient-transfection assays in 293T cells. This enhancement was also observed in rat chondrosarcoma cells that stably expressed the construct. CRISPR/Cas9-induced deletion of intron 6 in RCS cells revealed that a 10-bp region of intron 6 is necessary both for Col2a1 expression and SOX9 binding. Furthermore, SOX9, but not SOX5, binds to this region as demonstrated in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, although both SOX9 and SOX5 bind to a larger 325-bp fragment of intron 6 containing this small sequence. These findings suggest a novel mechanism of action of SOX5/6; namely, the SOX9/5/6 combination enhances Col2a1 transcription through a novel enhancer in intron 6 together with the enhancer in intron 1.

  17. Time course of antibodies against IgG and type II collagen in adjuvant arthritis. Role of mycobacteria administration in antibody production.

    PubMed

    Franch, A; Cassany, S; Castellote, C; Castell, M

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate, during the time course of adjuvant arthritis, the existence of antibodies directed to IgG (rheumatoid factor-like) and antibodies against type II collagen. In a second study, we also studied the relation between antibody production, arthritic process and mycobacteria administration. We have demonstrated the presence of antibodies to IgG and type II collagen by means of ELISA techniques. This reactivity appeared on day 7 post-induction, decreased later, and increased progressively from day 21 until last day studied (day 56 post-induction). We have also quantified antibodies against a soluble fraction of Mycobacterium butyricum, the inductor of the disease. Anti-mycobacteria antibodies appeared during the first seven days after induction, but from day 14, when systemic inflammation began, their levels suddenly increased. There is a positive correlation between anti-mycobacteria antibody levels and articular swelling. Anti-IgG and anti-collagen antibody production was not directly linked to arthritic process since these antibodies were synthesized when M. butyricum was administered intraperitoneally, which does not induce arthritis. Anti-mycobacteria antibody concentration was higher when arthritis induction by mycobacterial was successful than when it was unsuccessful.

  18. Characterization of type I, II, III, IV, and V collagens by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura; Cohen, David; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2000-04-01

    The relative proportions of genetically distinct collagen types in connective tissues vary with tissue type and change during disease progression, development, wound healing, aging. This study aims to 1) characterize the spectro- temporal fluorescence emission of fiber different types of collagen and 2) assess the ability of time-resolved laser- induced fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between collagen types. Fluorescence emission of commercially available purified samples was induced with nitrogen laser excitation pulses and detected with a MCP-PMT connected to a digital storage oscilloscope. The recorded time-resolved emission spectra displayed distinct fluorescence emission characteristics for each collagen type. The time domain information complemented the spectral domain intensity data for improved discrimination between different collagen types. Our results reveal that analysis of the fluorescence emission can be used to characterize different species of collagen. Also, the results suggest that time-resolved spectroscopy can be used for monitoring of connective tissue matrix composition changes due to various pathological and non-pathological conditions.

  19. An electron microscopic radioautographic study of collagen secretion in periodontal ligament fibroblasts of the mouse: II. Colchicine-treated fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, M.I.; Garant, P.R.

    1981-12-01

    Colchicine administered intravenously depolymerized microtubules and disrupted the normal organization of the Golgi apparatus in periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Radioautography with /sup 3/H-proline indicated that collagen secretion was completely inhibited during a period of approximately 4 hours following the onset of the colchicine effect. During this period of secretory inhibition, labeled collagen precursors were present within a variety of dense bodies, primarily located in a juxtanuclear location replacing the normal Golgi complex. The time course of /sup 3/H-proline labeling from 2 to 8 hours suggested that small, newly formed dense bodies fused to form larger dense bodies and pleomorphic structures (zebra bodies), within which collagen precursors appeared to undergo partial polymerization. Autophagosomes, many labeled with /sup 3/H-proline, also increased in number after colchicine administration. A gradual decline in /sup 3/H-proline label occurred from 4 to 24 hours, presumably due to exocytosis of dense bodies or by the digestion of labeled collagen precursors within autophagosomes. These results support the concept that an intact microtubular network is essential for the organized transport of collagen precursors, from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, and the eventual transport and exocytosis of collagen secretory granules.

  20. Silencing of Wnt5a prevents interleukin-1β-induced collagen type II degradation in rat chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shiping; Man, Zhentao; Li, Wei; Sun, Shui; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease, and few treatments to date have been able to delay OA progression. The degradation of collagen type II (COL2) in the cartilage matrix is an important initiating factor for OA progression; the upregulation of Wnt5a protein activates COL2 degradation. In the present study, small interfering RNA of Wnt-5a was delivered by a lentiviral vector (LV-Wnt5a-RNAi) to silence Wnt-5a mRNA and prevent COL2 degradation. To determine the function of LV-Wnt5a-RNAi, the OA chondrocyte model (OA-like chondrocytes) were constructed using interleukin (IL)-1β. Detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), Wnt-5a mRNA in the OA-like chondrocytes were upregulated in a time-dependent manner, indicating that OA-like chondrocytes were successfully constructed. The bioactivity of OA-like chondrocytes was determined using Live-Dead staining, and the result illustrated that the OA-like chondrocytes stimulated with IL-1β for 6 h remained viable, and these were used in Wnt5a silencing. The OA-like chondrocytes were divided into three groups: Group I, cultivated with common medium; group II, cultivated with common medium supplemented with empty lentiviral vector; group III, cultivated with common medium supplemented with LV-Wnt5a-RNAi. The efficiency of LV-Wnt5a-RNAi transfection was determined using fluorescence microscopy, the result of which indicated that LV-Wnt5a-RNAi could efficiently be transfected into the OA-like chondrocytes. The LV-Wnt5a-RNAi efficiency for the Wnt5a mRNA silencing was determined using RT-qPCR. The result illustrated that the mRNA of Wnt5a in group III was significantly lower in group I compared with that in group II (P<0.05), indicating that the LV-Wnt5a-RNAi could successfully silence Wnt5a mRNA. To further verify whether the silencing of Wnt5a mRNA could prevent COL2 degradation, western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses were performed. The results demonstrated that COL2 in

  1. Mixed type I and type II collagen scaffold for cartilage repair: ultrastructural study of synovial membrane response and healing potential versus microfractures (a pilot study).

    PubMed

    Enea, D; Guerra, D; Roggiani, J; Cecconi, S; Manzotti, S; Quaglino, D; Pasquali-Ronchetti, I; Gigante, A

    2013-01-01

    The association between microfracture of the subchondral plate and a coverage scaffold has emerged as a promising strategy to treat cartilage lesions in a one-step procedure. Between different types of scaffolds (e.g. collagen, hyaluronic acid, polyglycolic acid) currently studied, type I collagen scaffold is the most used for this purpose, and is currently adopted for humans. The aim of this study was to test a novel scaffold made of mixed type I and II collagen (I-IICS) in order to define the immunological reaction of the synovial tissue and the repair capabilities induced by the collagen membrane when associated with microfracture. Eight New Zealand White rabbits, aged 180 days, were operated on bilaterally on the medial femoral condyle. A circular cartilage lesion was performed up to the calcified layer of the medial femoral condyle, and the centre of the lesion was microfractured. Randomly, one of the two lesions was covered with the I-IICS (treated), and the other was left uncovered (control). The synovial membrane reaction and the quality of the cartilage tissue repair were investigated at 2, 90, 180 and 270 days macroscopically, histomorphologically and ultrastructurally. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in synovial tissue by immunocytochemistry analyses was also investigated. In the control group, at 2 days gold particles were localized mainly on synoviocyte type A, less on synoviocytes type B and on collagen bundles; in the treated group the reaction is more intense in cells in the matrix, but at 180 days controls and treated joints were very similar. The synovial membranes of the joints receiving the I-IICS did not reveal significant changes compared to the age-matched controls. Signs of inflammation were present at the 90-day time-point, and became less evident at afterwards. The degradation of the scaffolds was already evident at the 90-day time-point. The quality of the cartilage repair of the rabbits treated with the I-IICS was

  2. Abnormal response to physical activity in femurs after heterozygous inactivation of one allele of the Col2a1 gene for type II collagen in mice.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, J; Sahlman, J; Hirvonen, T; Jämsä, T; Tuukkanen, J; Kovanen, V; Kröger, H; Jurvelin, J; Arita, M; Li, S W; Prockop, D J; Hyttinen, M M; Helminen, H J; Lapveteläinen, T; Puustjärvi, K

    2005-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of heterozygous inactivation of one allele of the type II collagen gene (Col2a1) on biomechanical properties and mineral density of bone under physical loading conditions. C57BL/6-TGN mice with heterozygous knockout (HZK) inactivation of Col2a1 gene and their nontransgenic littermate controls were housed in individual cages with running wheels for 9 and 15 months. The running activity of each mouse was monitored continuously throughout the experiment. Bone mineral density (BMD) of mice femora was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT). Biomechanical properties were determined using three-point bending tests. Vertebral bone samples were prepared for quantitative polarized light microscopy and digital densitometry of proteoglycans. The concentration of total collagen and collagen cross-links were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatograpy (HPLC). The average daily running distance was shorter for the HZK mice between the age of 4 and 15 months as compared with normal runners (P < 0.05). The ultimate breaking force was 14.8% and 23.6% (9 vs. 15 months) lower in HZK-runners than in wild-type runners. BMD of the femur was 6.1% lower in HZK-runners at the age of 9 months (P < 0.05). Physical activity increased cortical BMD in wild-type runners but not in the HZK runners at the age of 9 months. The collagen network of the HZK mice was less organized. There were only minor changes in BMD and mechanical and structural properties between sedentary HZK mice and their wild-type controls. Increased physical activity induced significantly lower bone density, mechanical properties, and organization of collagen fibers in male HZK mice. However, there were no major differences in biomechanical parameters between sedentary HZK and wild-type male mice. This suggests an important guiding role of collagen type II in bone remodelling and

  3. Expression, in cartilage, of a 7-amino-acid deletion in type II collagen from two unrelated individuals with Kniest dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Bogaert, R.; Wilkin, D.; Wilcox, W. R.; Lachman, R.; Rimoin, D.; Cohn, D. H.; Eyre, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Kniest dysplasia is a heritable chondrodysplasia that severely affects skeletal growth. Recent evidence suggests that the etiology is based on mutations in COL2A1, the gene for collagen type II. We report the detection and partial characterization of an identical defect in type II collagen in two unrelated patients with Kniest dysplasia. Analysis of cyanogen bromide (CB)-digested cartilage samples from both probands by SDS-PAGE revealed an abnormal band for peptide alpha 1(II)CB12. The peptide was purified and digested with endoproteinase Asp-N. Fragments unique to the Kniest tissues were identified by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and by sequence analysis. The results established a deletion of amino acids 102-108 of the alpha 1(II) triple-helical domain, which disrupted the (gly-X-Y)n repeat needed for helix formation. This was confirmed by sequence analysis of DNA amplified from both probands, revealing the molecular basis to be a single nucleotide mutation at a CpG dinucleotide (GCG-->GTG) in the codon for alanine 102. The mutation created a new splice donor site, which would account for the absence of the last seven amino acids from the 3' end of exon 12 in alpha 1(II)CB12. Light and electron micrographs of the probands' cartilage showed the perilacunar foamy matrix ("Swiss cheese") characteristic of Kniest dysplasia and chondrocytes containing dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, which earlier studies had shown were filled with type II procollagen. These two cases strengthen the concept that Kniest dysplasia is based on mutations of COL2A1 and belongs within the broad spectrum of chondrodysplasias caused by type II collagenopathies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7977371

  4. Induction of bone loss in DBA/1J mice immunized with citrullinated autologous mouse type II collagen in the absence of adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Dusad, Anand; Duryee, Michael J; Shaw, Anita T; Klassen, Lynell W; Anderson, Daniel R; Wang, Dong; Ren, Ke; Gravallese, Ellen M; O'Dell, James R; Mikuls, Ted R; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by cartilage and bone loss resulting in pain, deformity, and loss of joint function. Anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) has been implicated in RA pathogenesis and predicts radiographical joint damage and clinical severity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess bone loss by micro-CT, histological joint damage, and ACPA levels using a mouse model of RA. Arthritis was induced by immunizing DBA/1 mice with autologous citrullinated type II mouse collagen (CIT-CII) weekly for 4 weeks. Mice immunized with autologous CII served as controls. At week 5, mice were killed, ACPA levels determined, and micro-CT performed to quantitatively analyze bone damage. Micro-CT analysis revealed significant loss of bone density, volume, and surface (p < 0.05) in bone peripheral to the inflamed joints of CIT-CII animals compared to CII controls. Histological staining demonstrated cartilage, proteoglycan, joint collagen, and bone collagen loss in the CIT-CII group compared to CII. Serum ACPA levels were increased (p = 0.03) in the CIT-CII group compared to CII, and these levels were inversely correlated with bone quantity and quality. In this study, we demonstrate that immunization with autologous CIT-CII initiates significant systemic bone and articular cartilage loss in the absence of adjuvant. Significant inverse correlations of circulating ACPA and bone quality/quantity were present. ACPA levels predict the adverse bone morphological changes in this model of early RA.

  5. An RNA-splicing mutation (G{sup +51VS20}) in the Type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Weis, M.A.; Eyre, D.R.; Gruber, H.E.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H. |

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal {alpha}1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G{yields}T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U{sub 1} small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to {alpha}1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that {alpha}-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of {alpha}1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yamaga, Mika; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis.

  7. A combination of biochemical markers of cartilage and bone turnover, radiographic damage and body mass index to predict the progression of joint destruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Jun; Garnero, Patrick; van der Heijde, Désirée; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nishimoto, Norihiro

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of biological, radiological and clinical parameters for the progression of radiographic joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). We analyzed the 145 patients with active RA for less than 5 years who were participating in the prospective 1-year randomized controlled trial of tocilizumab (SAMURAI trial) as a control arm treated with conventional DMARDs. Progression of joint damage was assessed by sequential radiographs read by two independent blinded X-ray readers and scored for bone erosion and joint space narrowing (JSN) using the van der Heijde-modified Sharp method. Multivariate analysis revealed that increased urinary levels of C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide of type II collagen (U-CTX-II), an increased urinary total pyridinoline/total deoxypyridinoline (U-PYD/DPD) ratio and low body mass index (BMI) at baseline were independently associated with a higher risk for progression of bone erosion. In addition to these three variables, the JSN score at baseline was also significantly associated with an increased risk of progression of the JSN score and total Sharp score. High baseline U-CTX-II levels, U-PYD/DPD ratio and JSN score and a low BMI are independent predictive markers for the radiographically evident joint damage in patients with RA treated with conventional DMARDs.

  8. Ambient light-based optical biosensing platform with smartphone-embedded illumination sensor.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Min; Han, Yong Duk; Chun, Hyeong Jin; Yoon, Hyun C

    2017-07-15

    We present a hand-held optical biosensing system utilizing a smartphone-embedded illumination sensor that is integrated with immunoblotting assay method. The smartphone-embedded illumination sensor is regarded as an alternative optical receiver that can replaces the conventional optical analysis apparatus because the illumination sensor can respond to the ambient light in a wide range of wavelengths, including visible and infrared. To demonstrate the biosensing applicability of our system employing the enzyme-mediated immunoblotting and accompanying light interference, various types of ambient light conditions including outdoor sunlight and indoor fluorescent were tested. For the immunoblotting assay, the biosensing channel generating insoluble precipitates as an end product of the enzymatic reaction is fabricated and mounted on the illumination sensor of the smartphone. The intensity of penetrating light arrives on the illumination sensor is inversely proportional to the amount of precipitates produced in the channel, and these changes are immediately analyzed and quantified via smartphone software. In this study, urinary C-terminal telopeptide fragment of type II collagen (uCTX-II), a biomarker of osteoarthritis diagnosis, was tested as a model analyte. The developed smartphone-based sensing system efficiently measured uCTX-II in the 0-5ng/mL concentration range with a high sensitivity and accuracy under various light conditions. These assay results show that the illumination sensor-based optical biosensor is suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT).

  9. Type II collagen antibody response is enriched in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid joints and directed to the same major epitopes as in collagen induced arthritis in primates and mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Antibodies towards type II collagen (CII) are detected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in non-human primates and rodents with collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We have previously shown that antibodies specific for several CII-epitopes are pathogenic using monoclonal antibodies from arthritic mice, although the role of different anti-CII epitopes has not been investigated in detail in other species. We therefore performed an inter-species comparative study of the autoantibody response to CII in patients with RA versus monkeys and mice with CIA. Methods Analysis of the full epitope repertoire along the disease course of CIA was performed using a library of CII triple-helical peptides. The antibody responses to the major CII epitopes were analyzed in sera and synovial fluid from RA patients, and in sera from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and mice. Results Many CII epitopes including the major C1, U1, and J1 were associated with established CIA and arginine residues played an important role in the anti-CII antibody interactions. The major epitopes were also recognized in RA patients, both in sera and even more pronounced in synovial fluid: 77% of the patients had antibodies to the U1 epitope. The anti-CII immune response was not restricted to the anti-citrulline protein antibodies (ACPA) positive RA group. Conclusion CII conformational dependent antibody responses are common in RA and are likely to originate from rheumatoid joints but did not show a correlation with ACPA response. Importantly, the fine specificity of the anti-CII response is similar with CIA in monkeys and rodents where the recognized epitopes are conserved and have a major pathogenic role. Thus, anti-CII antibodies may both contribute to, as well as be the consequence of, local joint inflammation. PMID:25005029

  10. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces type II collagen and aggrecan expression via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanhui; Tao, Hairong; Jin, Chen; Liu, Yonzhang; Lu, Xiongwei; Hu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β regulates the anabolic metabolism of articular cartilage and prevents cartilage degradation. TGF‑β1 influences cellular proliferation, differentiation and the extracellular matrix through activation of the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways. However, it has remained to be fully elucidated precisely how the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways mediate anabolic processes of articular cartilage. The present study investigated how ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling mediate TGF‑β1‑stimulated type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes. The results confirmed that TGF‑β1 stimulates type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes, and furthermore, that the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways were activated by TGF‑β1. Conversely, the TGF‑β receptor I (ALK5) kinase inhibitor SB525334 significantly impaired TGF‑β1‑induced type II collagen and aggrecan expression, coinciding with a reduction of ERK1/2 and Smad3 phosphorylation. In addition, TGF‑β1‑induced type II collagen and aggrecan expression were significantly suppressed by ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Similarly, TGF‑β1‑stimulated type II collagen and aggrecan expression were decreased in the presence of a Smad3 phosphorylation inhibitor SIS3. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways regulate type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes.

  11. Differential effect of severe and moderate social stress on blood immune and endocrine measures and susceptibility to collagen type II arthritis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Stefanski, Volker; Hemschemeier, Susanne K; Schunke, Kerstin; Hahnel, Anja; Wolff, Christine; Straub, Rainer H

    2013-03-01

    The effects of social stress on several blood immune measures and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were investigated in Wistar rats using the resident-intruder confrontation paradigm to induce stress of different intensity. Male intruders were exposed for one week to a dominant opponent either repeatedly for 4h daily (moderate stress) or continuously (severe stress). Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of collagen type II (CII) into the tail skin at the end of day 3 of confrontation. Only severe stress was associated with decreased CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the increase in granulocyte numbers and body mass loss was more pronounced under these conditions. Only severe stress reduced the susceptibility to arthritis by about 50%. Severity scores did not differ in the first five days after disease onset between all groups. Subsequent experiments focused on severely stressed rats indicated that disease progressed until day 10 only in control animals, but not in severely stressed males. Stressor exposure resulted in increased blood monocyte numbers, but these males failed to accumulate macrophages into the skin at the site of CII injection. High numbers of attacks experienced by intruders correlated with delayed disease onset in severely stressed rats. We hypothesize that severe stress persisting after disease induction exhibits beneficial effects on the susceptibility of CIA and propose that the specific endocrine and immunological profile associated with severe stress is an important factor for disease outcome--a factor which probably explains many of the conflicting data of previous stress studies on CIA.

  12. Formulation and evaluation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres loaded with an altered collagen type II peptide for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    He, Jintian; Li, Huiqi; Liu, Chao; Wang, Gaizhen; Ge, Lan; Ma, Shufen; Huang, Lijing; Yan, Shaofeng; Xu, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential of water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) and solid-in-oil-in-water (s/o/w) emulsification techniques to prepare the altered collagen type II peptide AP268-270 (ACTP)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres to make ACTP more convenient as an rheumatoid arthritis treatment. Microspheres produced by the s/o/w method had higher drug encapsulation efficiency (69.7-79.8%) than those prepared by the w/o/w method (21.8-39.3%). In vitro drug release was influenced by the microencapsulation technique, molecular weight, and composition of the polymer. After intramuscular injection of the optimal formulation to Lewis rats, the concentration of ACTP peptide in serum reached its maximum level on day 3 and then remained nearly stable for approximately 4 weeks. In a collagen-induced arthritis rat model, a single intramuscular injection of ACTP-loaded PLGA microspheres had comparable efficacy to the intravenous injection of ACTP peptide solution once every other day.

  13. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  14. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  15. Type II collagen fragment HELIX-II is a marker for early cartilage lesions but does not predict the progression of cartilage destruction in human knee joint synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaochun; Yin, Kun; Li, Pengcui; Wang, Huan; Ding, Juan; Duan, Wangping; Wei, Lei

    2013-07-01

    To determine whether there is a direct correlation between the concentration of type II collagen fragment HELIX-II in synovial fluid and the severity of cartilage damage at the knee joint, 83 patients who had undergone knee arthroscopy or total knee replacement were enrolled in this study (49% women, mean ± SD age 49.5 ± 19). The content of HELIX-II in the synovial fluid samples was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cartilage damage at the knee joint was classified during arthroscopy or direct surgical observation, using the Outerbridge cartilage damage scoring system. The maximum damage score was defined as the highest score among the six areas of the knee joint, and the cumulative score was defined as the sum of the scores of the six areas of the knee joint. The intra-assay and inter-assay variations of the HELIX-II ELISA were lower than 13 and 15%, respectively. The level of HELIX-II in the severely damaged cartilage groups (cumulative scores = 11-24 or maximum score = 2-4) was much higher than in the slightly damaged cartilage groups (cumulative scores = 0-10 or maximum score = 0-1). The level of HELIX-II in cartilage from severely damaged cartilage groups was significantly higher than in the slightly damaged groups, but no significant difference was detected in the level of HELIX-II among the severely damaged cartilage sub-groups. There was a significant correlation between the HELIX-II concentration in the synovial fluid and the cumulative (r = 0.807) and maximum scores (r = 0.794). Thus, elevated HELIX-II level is correlated with early cartilage lesions, but does not have the sensitivity to predict the progression of severity of cartilage damage in the knee joint.

  16. Regional differences of type II collagen synthesis in the human temporomandibular joint disc: immunolocalization study of carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (chondrocalcin).

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Toshirou; Hamada, Yoshiki; Iino, Mitsuyoshi; Takahashi, Tetsu; Kikuchi, Toshiyuki; Fujikawa, Kyousuke; Seto, Kannichi

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the regional differences of distribution of the carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (pCOL-II-C; chondrocalcin) as markers of cartilaginous expression in the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc. Twelve human TMJ discs without morphologic abnormalities were obtained from 12 fresh cadavers. All specimens were analysed for pCOL-II-C expression using polyclonal rabbit anti-human pCOL-II-C antibody in avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex staining. The results were demonstrated that the percentage of pCOL-II-C immunoreactive disc cells was significantly higher in the outer part (the articular surfaces) than in the inner part (the deep central areas) of the disc. These findings suggest that the tissue heterogeneity of cartilaginous expression reflects the functional demands of the remodelling process in the human TMJ disc.

  17. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  18. Collagen crosslinks in chondromalacia of the patella.

    PubMed

    Väätäinen, U; Kiviranta, I; Jaroma, H; Arokosi, J; Tammi, M; Kovanen, V

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine collagen concentration and collagen crosslinks in cartilage samples from chondromalacia of the patella. To study the extracellular matrix alterations associated to chondromalacia, we determined the concentration of collagen (hydroxyproline) and its hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline crosslinks from chondromalacia foci of the patellae in 12 patients and 7 controls from apparently normal cadavers. The structure of the collagen network in 8 samples of grades II-IV chondromalacia was examined under polarized light microscopy. The full-thickness cartilage samples taken with a surgical knife from chondromalacia lesions did not show changes in collagen, hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline concentration as compared with the controls. Polarized light microscopy showed decreased birefringence in the superficial cartilage of chondromalacia lesions, indicating disorganization or disappearance of collagen fibers in this zone. It is concluded that the collagen network shows gradual disorganization with the severity of chondromalacia lesion of the patella without changes in the concentration or crosslinks of collagen.

  19. Involvement of P2X7 receptor signaling on regulating the differentiation of Th17 cells and type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhi-Dan; Zhang, Ya-Yuan; Guo, Yi-Hong; Huang, Na; Ma, Hui-Hui; Huang, Hui; Yu, Hai-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 producing T helper (Th17) cells are major effector cells in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has emerged as a potential site in the regulation of inflammation in RA but little is known of its functional role on the differentiation of Th17 cells. This study investigates the in vitro and in vivo effects of P2X7R on Th17 cell differentiation during type II collagen (CII) induced experimental arthritis model. In CII-treated dendritic cells (DCs) and DC/CD4+ T coculture system, pretreatment with pharmacological antagonists of P2X7R (Suramin and A-438079) caused strong inhibition of production of Th17-promoting cytokines (IL-1β, TGF-β1, IL-23p19 and IL-6). Exposure to CII induced the elevation of mRNAs encoding retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α and γt, which were abolished by pretreatment with P2X7R antagonists. Furthermore, blocking P2X7R signaling abolished the CII-mediated increase in IL-17A. Blockade of P2X7R remarkably inhibited hind paw swelling and ameliorated pathological changes in ankle joint of the collagen-induced arthritis mice. Thus, we demonstrated a novel function for P2X7R signaling in regulating CII-induced differentiation of Th17 cells. P2X7R signaling facilitates the development of the sophisticated network of DC-derived cytokines that favors a Th17 phenotype. PMID:27775097

  20. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β regulates the repression of type II collagen expression during the differentiation from proliferative to hypertrophic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ushijima, Takahiro; Okazaki, Ken; Tsushima, Hidetoshi; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-01-31

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is a transcription factor that promotes hypertrophic differentiation by stimulating type X collagen and matrix metalloproteinase 13 during chondrocyte differentiation. However, the effect of C/EBPβ on proliferative chondrocytes is unclear. Here, we investigated whether C/EBPβ represses type II collagen (COL2A1) expression and is involved in the regulation of sex-determining region Y-type high mobility group box 9 (SOX9), a crucial factor for transactivation of Col2a1. Endogenous expression of C/EBPβ in the embryonic growth plate and differentiated ATDC5 cells were opposite to those of COL2A1 and SOX9. Overexpression of C/EBPβ by adenovirus vector in ATDC5 cells caused marked repression of Col2a1. The expression of Sox9 mRNA and nuclear protein was also repressed, resulting in decreased binding of SOX9 to the Col2a1 enhancer as shown by a ChIP assay. Knockdown of C/EBPβ by lentivirus expressing shRNA caused significant stimulation of these genes in ATDC5 cells. Reporter assays demonstrated that C/EBPβ repressed transcriptional activity of Col2a1. Deletion and mutation analysis showed that the C/EBPβ core responsive element was located between +2144 and +2152 bp within the Col2a1 enhancer. EMSA and ChIP assays also revealed that C/EBPβ directly bound to this region. Ex vivo organ cultures of mouse limbs transfected with C/EBPβ showed that the expression of COL2A1 and SOX9 was reduced upon ectopic C/EBPβ expression. Together, these results indicated that C/EBPβ represses the transcriptional activity of Col2a1 both directly and indirectly through modulation of Sox9 expression. This consequently promotes the phenotypic conversion from proliferative to hypertrophic chondrocytes during chondrocyte differentiation.

  1. Periplocoside A ameliorated type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice via regulation of the balance of Th17/Treg cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Xudong; Cheng, Lei; Tang, Wei; Zhao, Weimin; Yang, Yifu; Zuo, Jianping

    2017-03-01

    Periplocoside A (PSA) has been extracted from the Chinese herbal medicine Periploca sepium Bge to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) via immune regulation. We previously found that PSA exhibits immunosuppressive activity both in vitro and in vivo. Balanced regulation of helper T 17 (Th17)/regulatory T (Treg) cells is the current therapeutic direction for the treatment of RA. The present study investigated the mechanism of PSA in treating collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The therapeutic effects and potential pharmacological mechanisms of PSA were specifically clarified by examining its effects on CIA in DBA/1 mice. PSA administration significantly relieved the severity of the arthritis, and preventive administration of PSA reduced the incidence of arthritis in the mice with CIA and relieved joint damage in terms of morphology. PSA was also able to reduce the levels of anti-collagen II (CII) antibodies and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the serum. As a result, the proportion of Th17 cells decreased, and the proportion of Treg cells increased. A follow-up study of the ex vivo immunological reactions induced by a specific antigen found that PSA suppressed lymphocyte proliferation, inhibited the differentiation and reactivity of Th17 cells, and promoted the proportion of Treg cells among helper T cells. PSA also exhibited pharmacological effect in regulating the balance between Th17 and Treg cells in CIA through relevant signalling pathways. Thus, PSA played a specific role in CIA treatment. In particular, our results suggest that the therapeutic effects of PSA on RA are partially realized via the regulation of the balance of Th17/Treg cells.

  2. Evaluation of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody therapy using murine type II collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bailin; Song, Zheng; Wu, Bin; Gardner, Debra; Shealy, David; Song, Xiao-Yu; Wooley, Paul H

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that is critical for T/B-cell differentiation and maturation, immunoglobulin secretion, acute-phase protein production, and macrophage/monocyte functions. Extensive research into the biology of IL-6 has implicated IL-6 in the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of RA. An anti-murine IL-6 mAb that neutralizes mouse IL-6 activities was tested in animal model of collagen-induced arthritis. Prophylactic treatment with anti-IL-6 mAb significantly reduced the incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control mAb treated mice. The mitogenic response of B and T cells isolated from the lymph nodes of anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced compared to cells isolated from control mAb treated mice. The overall histopathology score for paws from the anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced when compared to paws from mice treated with control mAb, including both inflammatory (synovitis and pannus) and erosive (erosions and architecture) parameters. Reduced loss of cartilage matrix components was also observed in the anti-IL-6 treated mice. Collectively, these data suggest that IL-6 plays a major role in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus support the potential benefit of anti-IL-6 mAb treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:19368720

  3. Yohimbine hydrochloride ameliorates collagen type-II-induced arthritis targeting oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Neha; Ansari, Md Meraj; Khan, Haider A

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common type of chronic inflammatory disease which is triggered by dysfunction in the immune system which in turn affects synovial joints. Current treatment of RA with NSAIDs and DMRDs is limited by their side effect. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities underlying the anti-RA effect of Yohimbine hydrochloride (YCL) in collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in Wistar rats. The YCL was administered at doses of 5 and 10 mg kg(-1) body weight once daily for 28 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical parameter (articular elastase, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD), hematological parameter (ESR, WBC, C-reactive protein (CRP), immunohistochemical expression (COX2, TNF-α, and NF-κB), and histological changes in joints. YCL showed anti-RA efficacy as it significantly reduced articular elastase, LPO and catalase level and ameliorates histological changes. This is in addition to its antioxidant efficacy as YCL shown a significant increase in GSH and SOD level. Also, YCL showed effective anti-inflammatory activity as it significantly decreased the expression of COX-2, TNF-α, and NF-ĸB. The therapeutic effect of YCL against RA was also evident from lower arthritis scoring and reduced hematological parameter (ESR, WBC, and C-reactive protein level). The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant states that the protective effect of YCL on arthritis rats might be mediated via the modulation of the immune system. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 619-629, 2017.

  4. Cartilage collagen type II seromarker patterns in axial spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis: associations with disease activity, smoking and HLA-B27.

    PubMed

    Munk, Heidi Lausten; Gudmann, Natasja Staehr; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard; Ejstrup, Leif; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Loft, Anne Gitte; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie; Junker, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the possible association between type II collagen turnover seromarkers and disease profile in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Outpatients with axial SpA (n = 110) or PsA (n = 101) underwent clinical examination including disease activity measures and HLA-B27 typing. The procollagen IIA N-terminal peptide (PIIANP) and a matrix metalloproteinase-generated type II collagen fragment (C2M) were quantified in serum by ELISA. C2M was higher in SpA than in controls, 0.41 versus 0.36 ng/ml (p = 0.004), while PIIANP did not differ between patients and healthy subjects, 2252 versus 2142 ng/ml (p = 0.13). However, DMARD-naïve SpA patients had higher PIIANP, 2461 ng/ml (p = 0.01) and C2M, 0.44 ng/ml (p = 0.0007) levels than controls, and PIIANP correlated with CRP (ρ = 0.34). C2M was lower in SpA smokers, 0.36 ng/ml versus non-smokers, 0.43 ng/ml (p = 0.02), while PIIANP was higher in HLA-B27 positive, 2312 ng/ml versus negative patients, 2021 ng/ml (p = 0.03). In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did not differ between patients and controls, but PIIANP was elevated in patients not receiving DMARDs, 2726 ng/ml. In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did not differ according to smoking and HLA-B27. Cartilage degradation assessed by C2M is increased in SpA irrespective of treatment but not in PsA. Cartilage synthesis reflected by PIIANP is increased in untreated SpA and PsA. PIIANP correlates with CRP in SpA while not in PsA. In DMARD-naïve SpA but not in PsA, HLA-B27 positivity and smoking are associated with a chondro-proliferative metabolic pattern.

  5. Effects of gangliosides from deer bone extract on the gene expressions of matrix metalloproteinases and collagen type II in interleukin-1β-induced osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Hyung Joo; Lee, Hyunji; Min, Byung Jung; Jung, Sung Ug

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES We investigated the anti-osteoarthritic effects of deer bone extract on the gene expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and collagen type II (COL2) in interleukin-1β-induced osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes. MATERIALS/METHODS Primary rabbit chondrocytes were treated as follows: CON (PBS treatment), NC (IL-1β treatment), PC (IL-1β + 100 µg/mL glucosamine sulphate/chondroitin sulphate mixture), and DB (IL-1β + 100 µg/mL deer bone extract). RESULTS The results of the cell viability assay indicated that deer bone extract at doses ranging from 100 to 500 µg/mL inhibits cell death in chondrocytes induced by IL-1β. Deer bone extract was able to significantly recover the mRNA expression of COL2 that was down-regulated by IL-1β (NC: 0.79 vs. DB: 0.87, P < 0.05) and significantly decrease the mRNA expression of MMP-3 (NC: 2.24 vs. DB: 1.75) and -13 (NC: 1.28 vs. DB: 0.89) in OA chondrocytes (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS We concluded that deer bone extract induces accumulation of COL2 through the down-regulation of MMPs in IL-1β-induced OA chondrocytes. Our results suggest that deer bone extract, which contains various components related to OA, including chondroitin sulphate, may possess anti-osteoarthritic properties and be of value in inhibiting the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:27909553

  6. Neoepitopes reveal the features of type II collagen cleavage and the identity of a collagenase involved in the transformation of the epiphyses anlagen in development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunice R; Lamplugh, Lisa; Kluczyk, Beata; Leblond, Charles P; Mort, John S

    2009-06-01

    In long bone development, the evolution of the cartilaginous anlagen into a secondary ossification center is initiated by the formation of canals. The excavation to create the canals is achieved through lysis of the two major cartilage components, aggrecan, and the type II collagen (COL2) fibril. The present study examines the lysis of the fibril. Because it is known that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) cleave COL2 in vitro at the Gly(775)-Leu(776) bond, it has been reasoned that, if such cleavage is detected in relation to the canals, it can be concluded that a collagenase is involved. Furthermore, because MMPs undergo change in domain structure with activation resulting in propeptide domain loss then, if such a loss is revealed in relation to the cleavage of COL2, this MMP is likely involved. The collective findings reveal that COL2 is attacked at the afore-described susceptible peptide bond at the surface of cartilage canals and, that MMP-13 cleaves it. Developmental Dynamics 238:1547-1563, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Collagenous colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, J G; Levison, D A; Morson, B C; Dawson, A M

    1986-01-01

    Clinical and pathological aspects of six patients with collagenous colitis are presented. These patients have been observed for between four and 15 years and the evolution of the condition is documented in three (cases 1, 3 and 5). Management and possible pathogenetic mechanisms of this enigmatic condition are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3699567

  8. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis.

  9. Polarization effects in SHG of collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Paul; Cox, Guy C.; Ramshaw, John A. M.; Lukins, Philip B.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.

    2004-06-01

    The polarization dependence of the second harmonic emission of purified in-vitro reconstituted fibrils of collagen has been examined. The results confirmed the quasi-hexagonal crystalline structure within the fibrils. Interesting different polarization behaviours were seen between collagen types I and II, which can be utilized as an experimental technique for differentiation.

  10. Collagen Type II and a Thermo-Responsive Polymer of N-Isopropylacrylamide Induce Arthritis Independent of Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Klaczkowska, Dorota; Hultqvist, Malin; Hagenow, Kristin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva

    2011-01-01

    We established and characterized an arthritis mouse model using collagen type II (CII) and a thermo-responsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm). The new PNiPAAm adjuvant is TLR-independent, as all immunized TLR including MyD88-deficient mice developed an anti-CII response. Unlike other adjuvants, PNiPPAm did not skew the cytokine response (IL-1β, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17), as there was no immune deviation towards any one type of immune spectrum after immunization with CII/PNiPPAm. Hence, using PNiPAAm, we studied the actual immune response to the self-protein, CII. We observed arthritis and autoimmunity development in several murine strains having different major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes after CII/PNiPAAm immunization but with a clear MHC association pattern. Interestingly, C57Bl/6 mice did not develop CII-induced arthritis, with PNiPAAm demonstrating absolute requirement for a classical adjuvant. Presence of a gene (Ncf1) mutation in the NADPH oxidation complex has a profound influence in arthritis and using PNiPAAm we could show that the high CIA severity in Ncf1 mutated mice is independent of any classical adjuvant. Macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, and osteoclasts but not mast cells dominated the inflamed joints. Furthermore, arthritis induction in the adjuvant-free, eosinophil-dependent Vβ12 DBA/1 mice could be shown to develop arthritis independent of eosinophils using CII/PNiPAAm. Thus, biocompatible and biodegradable PNiPAAm offers unique opportunities to study actual autoimmunity independent of TLR and a particular cytokine phenotype profile. PMID:21933654

  11. Inhibitory effects of deer antler aqua-acupuncture, the pilose antler of Cervus Korean TEMMINCK var mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Kye; Kim, Kyung-Sook; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Kap-Sung; Lee, Young-Choon; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2003-07-01

    Water extract of deer antler aqua-acupunture (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, was used to investigate the efficacy of a traditional immunosuppressive and immuno-activating Korean aqua-acupuncture, on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. The onset of arthritis was observed at the 24th day after the CII-immunization in rats, and the severity of CIA was gradually developed. As compared with rats treated with saline, DAA i.p. injected at doses of more than 50 microg/kg once a day for 14 days inhibited the ability of inguinal lymph node cells to produce T cell cytokines interleukin 2 and interferon-gamma when the cells were obtained from rats 24 days after immunization and cultured in vitro with CII. Treatment with DAA also inhibited the production of macrophage cytokines interleukin-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to in vitro stimulation of lymph node and macrophage cells with CII. In addition, in order to evaluate the influence of DAA on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA, rats were immunized twice at a 3-week interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given i.p. once a day for 14 days with four different regimens. A 14-day course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the day of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA, which started on the same day as the booster immunization, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immune responses to CII. However, treatment with DAA, which was prophylactically started prior to a primary immunization, did not inhibit the development of arthritis and immune response to CII. Furthermore, DAA extract did not affect the established diseases.

  12. A Novel Functional Role of Collagen Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Madsen, Daniel H.; Ingvarsen, Signe; Melander, Maria C.; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Patthy, Laszlo; Engelholm, Lars H.; Behrendt, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Collagens make up the most abundant component of interstitial extracellular matrices and basement membranes. Collagen remodeling is a crucial process in many normal physiological events and in several pathological conditions. Some collagen subtypes contain specific carbohydrate side chains, the function of which is poorly known. The endocytic collagen receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180 plays an important role in matrix remodeling through its ability to internalize collagen for lysosomal degradation. uPARAP/Endo180 is a member of the mannose receptor protein family. These proteins all include a fibronectin type II domain and a series of C-type lectin-like domains, of which only a minor part possess carbohydrate recognition activity. At least two of the family members, uPARAP/Endo180 and the mannose receptor, interact with collagens. The molecular basis for this interaction is known to involve the fibronectin type II domain but nothing is known about the function of the lectin domains in this respect. In this study, we have investigated a possible role of the single active lectin domain of uPARAP/Endo180 in the interaction with collagens. By expressing truncated recombinant uPARAP/Endo180 proteins and analyzing their interaction with collagens with high and low levels of glycosylation we demonstrated that this lectin domain interacts directly with glycosylated collagens. This interaction is functionally important because it was found to modulate the endocytic efficiency of the receptor toward highly glycosylated collagens such as basement membrane collagen IV. Surprisingly, this property was not shared by the mannose receptor, which internalized glycosylated collagens independently of its lectin function. This role of modulating its uptake efficiency by a specific receptor is a previously unrecognized function of collagen glycosylation. PMID:21768090

  13. Mechanisms of Zn(II) binded to collagen and its effect on the capacity of eco-friendly Zn-Cr combination tanning system.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shan; Liu, Bing; Cheng, Baozhen; Lu, Fuping; Wang, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2017-01-05

    The eco-friendly combination tanning process has been developed to reduce chromium in existing researches, which is based on zinc tanning agents. This can be considered as a less-chrome substitute for current tanning process. To gain deeper understanding of the binding mechanisms of zinc-collagen interaction, which are affected by tanning pH, experiments have been carried out. Analysis in this paper reveals how chemical bonds from the collagen's main function groups combine with zinc. XPS and NIR data was analyzed for further understanding of where the zinc binding sites lie on collagen fibers at different pH. The results indicate that high pH is helpful to amino-binding sites while low pH promotes carboxyl-binding sites on collagen fibers. Furthermore, from the effect of Zinc-chrome combination tanning, we can see that the new method reduces the chromium dosage in tanning process compared to the conventional chrome tanning method.

  14. Biomimetic design of platelet adhesion inhibitors to block integrin α2β1-collagen interactions: II. Inhibitor library, screening, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Yan

    2014-04-29

    Platelet adhesion on collagen mediated by integrin α2β1 has been proven important in arterial thrombus formation, leading to an exigent demand on development of potent inhibitors for the integrin α2β1-collagen binding. In the present study, a biomimetic design strategy of platelet adhesion inhibitors was established, based on the affinity binding model of integrin proposed in part I. First, a heptapeptide library containing 8000 candidates was designed to functionally mimic the binding motif of integrin α2β1. Then, each heptapeptide in the library was docked onto a collagen molecule for the assessment of its affinity, followed by a screening based on its structure similarity to the original structure in the affinity binding model. Eight candidates were then selected for further screening by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Thereafter, three candidates chosen from MD simulations were separately added into the physiological saline containing separated integrin and collagen, to check their abilities for blocking the integrin-collagen interaction using MD simulations. Of these three candidates, significant inhibition was observed in the presence of LWWNSYY. Finally, the binding affinity of LWWNSYY for collagen was demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry. Moreover, significant inhibition of platelet adhesion in the presence of LWWNSYY has been experimentally validated. This work has thus developed an effective strategy for the biomimetic design of peptide-based platelet adhesion inhibitors.

  15. Pathogenetic difference between collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Daily treatment with cyclosporin at a dose of 25 mg/kg for 14 d gave complete suppression of the development of collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats during an observation period of 45 d. To study whether the immunologic unresponsiveness produced by cyclosporin is antigen specific, we rechallenged the cyclosporin- protected rats with either type II collagen or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) after discontinuation of cyclosporin treatment. Type II collagen-immunized, cyclosporin-protected rats did not develop arthritis in response to reimmunization with type II collagen, but, they did develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA. Similarly, CFA-injected, cyclosporin-protected rats showed a suppressed arthritogenic reaction in response to reinjection of CFA, whereas their response to a subsequent immunization with type II collagen was unaffected. On the other hand, the rats that were treated with cyclosporin without any prior antigenic challenge could develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA or type II collagen after cessation of cyclosporin treatment. These results indicate that specific immunologic unresponsiveness can be induced by cyclosporin in the two experimental models of polyarthritis, collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis, and that there is no cross-reactivity between type II collagen and the mycobacterial cell wall components. The results further indicate that immunity to type II collagen plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of collagen arthritis but that its pathogenetic role in adjuvant arthritis is insignificant. PMID:6201583

  16. CEL-2000: A therapeutic vaccine for rheumatoid arthritis arrests disease development and alters serum cytokine/chemokine patterns in the bovine collagen type II induced arthritis in the DBA mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Daniel H; Taylor, Patricia; Bendele, Alison; Carambula, Roy; Duzant, Yvonne; Lowe, Valeria; O'Neill, Sean P; Talor, Eyal; Rosenthal, Kenneth S

    2010-04-01

    The mouse model of collagen induced arthritis (CIA) effectively mimics human disease and thus is useful for testing and development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies. We developed a Ligand Epitope Antigen Presentation System (LEAPS) peptide hetero-conjugate vaccine containing an epitope of human collagen type II (CEL-2000) that acted as a therapeutic vaccine in the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. LEAPS technology converts a small peptide containing a disease specific epitope into an immunogen by attaching it to an immune or T cell binding peptide (I/TCBL). For CEL-2000, a peptide from human collagen type II (254-273) is attached to the I/TCBL peptide from human beta2 microglobulin (J). Treatment with CEL-2000 limited disease (CIA) progression, as demonstrated by reduced Arthritic Index (AI) score, and footpad swelling. Efficacy was confirmed by histopathological microscopic examination of tissues at the end of the study. CEL-2000 limited disease progression as well or better than the etanercept (Enbrel) therapeutic control with significantly better histopathological results than the etanercept treated mice. Most interestingly, CEL-2000 therapy modulated serum cytokine levels with an increase in IL-12p70 and IL-10, which are not seen with etanercept therapy, and reduced IL-17 and TNF-alpha, also seen with etanercept, among other cytokines studied. CEL-2000 was safe and well tolerated for the mice that received 5 injections given every 2weeks in a 90day study supporting its potential usage for long term therapy. These studies demonstrate that fewer treatments with CEL-2000 provide therapy at least as effective as etanercept by specifically modulating the disease producing autoimmune response.

  17. Jellyfish collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Birgit; Bernhardt, Anne; Lode, Anja; Heinemann, Sascha; Sewing, Judith; Klinger, Matthias; Notbohm, Holger; Gelinsky, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Porous scaffolds were engineered from refibrillized collagen of the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum for potential application in cartilage regeneration. The influence of collagen concentration, salinity and temperature on fibril formation was evaluated by turbidity measurements and quantification of fibrillized collagen. The formation of collagen fibrils with a typical banding pattern was confirmed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis. Porous scaffolds from jellyfish collagen, refibrillized under optimized conditions, were fabricated by freeze-drying and subsequent chemical cross-linking. Scaffolds possessed an open porosity of 98.2%. The samples were stable under cyclic compression and displayed an elastic behavior. Cytotoxicity tests with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) did not reveal any cytotoxic effects of the material. Chondrogenic markers SOX9, collagen II and aggrecan were upregulated in direct cultures of hMSCs upon chondrogenic stimulation. The formation of typical extracellular matrix components was further confirmed by quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

  18. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-05-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease.

  19. Online immunoaffinity liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry determination of a type II collagen peptide biomarker in rat urine: Investigation of the impact of collision-induced dissociation fluctuation on peptide quantitation.

    PubMed

    Berna, Michael; Schmalz, Chris; Duffin, Kevin; Mitchell, Peter; Chambers, Mark; Ackermann, Brad

    2006-09-15

    Proteolytic fragments of type II collagen, a major component of joint tissue, have recently been identified as biomarkers for osteoarthritis, a progressive disease associated with cartilage degeneration. A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) assay that utilizes online immunoaffinity chromatography and column switching was developed in our laboratory for the neoepitope of type II collagen (NET2C). During method development, peptide collision-induced dissociation (CID) was found to be a significant source of assay variation, which exceeded 10% CV, despite the fact that a stable-isotope-labeled (SIL) internal standard was used to minimize imprecision. This phenomenon was studied in detail using peptides and associated SIL internal standards of varying lengths and amino acid compositions. Variability in peptide CID necessitated the monitoring of multiple MS/MS transitions to obtain acceptable assay precision. The assay was subsequently validated to measure NET2C concentrations in rat urine over the range of 0.1 to 10 ng/mL. The interday accuracy and precision ranged from 3.9 to 13.1 (%CV) and 10.7 to 5.3 (%RE), respectively, across the range of validated concentrations. A specific application of the assay is presented in which the role of estrogen deficiency in the development and progression of osteoarthritis was investigated. In this study, the effect of estrogen on lowering NET2C concentrations in urine in ovariectomized rats was demonstrated.

  20. Structural insight for chain selection and stagger control in collagen

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Sergei P.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    Collagen plays a fundamental role in all known metazoans. In collagens three polypeptides form a unique triple-helical structure with a one-residue stagger to fit every third glycine residue in the inner core without disturbing the poly-proline type II helical conformation of each chain. There are homo- and hetero-trimeric types of collagen consisting of one, two or three distinct chains. Thus there must be mechanisms that control composition and stagger during collagen folding. Here, we uncover the structural basis for both chain selection and stagger formation of a collagen molecule. Three distinct chains (α1, α2 and α3) of the non-collagenous domain 2 (NC2) of type IX collagen are assembled to guide triple-helical sequences in the leading, middle and trailing positions. This unique domain opens the door for generating any fragment of collagen in its native composition and stagger. PMID:27897211

  1. Evaluation of humoral and cellular immune responses to a DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhao; Juan, Long; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of effective therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is finding a method for the specific inhibition of the inflammatory disease processes without the induction of generalized immunosuppression. Of note, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters that may restore immunological tolerance remains a high priority. pcDNA-CCOL2A1 is a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen(CCII). This vaccine was developed by our laboratory and has been shown to exhibit efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard" treatment, methotrexate (MTX). Here, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with anti-CII IgG antibodies, quantified the expression levels of Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, and performed flow cytometric analyses of different T-cell subsets, including Th1, Th2, Th17, Tc, Ts, Treg, and CD4(+)CD29(+)T cells to systemically evaluate humoral and cellular immune responses to pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal rats. Similar to our observations at maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, vaccination of normal rats with 300 μg/kg pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine did not induce the production of anti-CII IgG. Furthermore, no significant changes were observed in the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12(IL-23p40), monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in vaccinated normal rats relative to that in controls(P > 0.05). However, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels were significantly increased on days 10 and 14, while interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were significantly decreased on days 28 and 35 after vaccination(P < 0.05). Similarly, there were no significant differences in the

  2. Effect of oxy radicals on several types of collagen.

    PubMed

    Monboisse, J C; Poulin, G; Braquet, P; Randoux, A; Ferradini, C; Borel, J P

    1984-01-01

    Fibrils of collagen reconstituted in vitro by dialysis against sodium formate are exposed to free oxy radicals generated by three different systems: (i) xanthine oxidase + hypoxanthine, (ii) gamma-rays originating from a cobalt bomb; (iii) pulse radiolysis in a particle accelerator. A degradation of the collagen fibres is demonstrated by determination of the amount of hydroxyproline-containing peptides in the supernatant after incubation. Types I and III collagen are sensitive to the effect, whereas type V collagen is not. The effect persists when collagen is specially delipidated.

  3. Prospects and limitations of the rational engineering of fibrillar collagens

    PubMed Central

    Majsterek, Ireneusz; McAdams, Erin; Adachi, Eijiro; Dhume, Shirish T.; Fertala, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant collagens are attractive proteins for a number of biomedical applications. To date, significant progress was made in the large-scale production of nonmodified recombinant collagens; however, engineering of novel collagen-like proteins according to customized specifications has not been addressed. Herein we investigated the possibility of rational engineering of collagen-like proteins with specifically assigned characteristics. We have genetically engineered two DNA constructs encoding multi-D4 collagens defined as collagen-like proteins, consisting primarily of a tandem of the collagen II D4 periods that correspond to the biologically active region. We have also attempted to decrease enzymatic degradation of novel collagen by mutating a matrix metalloproteinase 1 cleavage site present in the D4 period. We demonstrated that the recombinant collagen α-chains consisting predominantly of the D4 period but lacking most of the other D periods found in native collagen fold into a typical collagen triple helix, and the novel procollagens are correctly processed by procollagen N-proteinase and procollagen C-proteinase. The nonmutated multi-D4 collagen had a normal melting point of 41°C and a similar carbohydrate content as that of control. In contrast, the mutant multi-D4 collagen had a markedly lower thermostability of 36°C and a significantly higher carbohydrate content. Both collagens were cleaved at multiple sites by matrix metalloproteinase 1, but the rate of hydrolysis of the mutant multi-D4 collagen was lower. These results provide a basis for the rational engineering of collagenous proteins and identifying any undesirable consequences of altering the collagenous amino acid sequences. PMID:12931004

  4. Collagen-mediated hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Manon-Jensen, T; Kjeld, N G; Karsdal, M A

    2016-03-01

    Collagens mediate essential hemostasis by maintaining the integrity and stability of the vascular wall. Imbalanced turnover of collagens by uncontrolled formation and/or degradation may result in pathologic conditions such as fibrosis. Thickening of the vessel wall because of accumulation of collagens may lead to arterial occlusion or thrombosis. Thinning of the wall because of collagen degradation or deficiency may lead to rupture of the vessel wall or aneurysm. Preventing excessive hemorrhage or thrombosis relies on collagen-mediated actions. Von Willebrand factor, integrins and glycoprotein VI, as well as clotting factors, can bind collagen to restore normal hemostasis after trauma. This review outlines the essential roles of collagens in mediating hemostasis, with a focus on collagens types I, III, IV, VI, XV, and XVIII.

  5. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies.

  6. Effects of cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Takagishi, K; Kaibara, N; Hotokebuchi, T; Arita, C; Morinaga, M; Arai, K

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice. Cyclosporin, when given prophylactically, was capable of suppressing the development of collagen induced arthritis and the immunological response to native type II collagen in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with cyclosporin, started on the same day as the booster injection with type II collagen, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immunity to collagen. These findings suggest that the time of a booster injection, three weeks after the initial immunisation, might be still within the induction phase of arthritis since reinoculation is required to produce a high incidence of arthritis in mice. In addition, therapeutic treatment with cyclosporin did not affect the clinical course of the disease or the immune response to collagen. PMID:3754714

  7. Environmental regulation of type X collagen production by cultures of limb mesenchyme, mesectoderm, and sternal chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Solursh, M; Jensen, K L; Reiter, R S; Schmid, T M; Linsenmayer, T F

    1986-09-01

    We have examined whether the production of hypertrophic cartilage matrix reflecting a late stage in the development of chondrocytes which participate in endochondral bone formation, is the result of cell lineage, environmental influence, or both. We have compared the ability of cultured limb mesenchyme and mesectoderm to synthesize type X collagen, a marker highly selective for hypertrophic cartilage. High density cultures of limb mesenchyme from stage 23 and 24 chick embryos contain many cells that react positively for type II collagen by immunohistochemistry, but only a few of these initiate type X collagen synthesis. When limb mesenchyme cells are cultured in or on hydrated collagen gels or in agarose (conditions previously shown to promote chondrogenesis in low density cultures), almost all initiate synthesis of both collagen types. Similarly, collagen gel cultures of limb mesenchyme from stage 17 embryos synthesize type II collagen and with some additional delay type X collagen. However, cytochalasin D treatment of subconfluent cultures on plastic substrates, another treatment known to promote chondrogenesis, induces the production of type II collagen, but not type X collagen. These results demonstrate that the appearance of type X collagen in limb cartilage is environmentally regulated. Mesectodermal cells from the maxillary process of stages 24 and 28 chick embryos were cultured in or on hydrated collagen gels. Such cells initiate synthesis of type II collagen, and eventually type X collagen. Some cells contain only type II collagen and some contain both types II and X collagen. On the other hand, cultures of mandibular processes from stage 29 embryos contain chondrocytes with both collagen types and a larger overall number of chondrogenic foci than the maxillary process cultures. Since the maxillary process does not produce cartilage in situ and the mandibular process forms Meckel's cartilage which does not hypertrophy in situ, environmental influences

  8. Degradation of connective tissue matrices by macrophages. II. Influence of matrix composition on proteolysis of glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen by macrophages in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.A.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Thioglycollate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages were cultured in contact with the mixture of extracellular matrix proteins produced by rat smooth muscle cells in culture. Both live macrophages and their conditioned media hydrolyzed glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen. Live macrophages also degraded extracellular connective tissue proteins secreted by endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The glycoproteins in the matrix markedly inhibited the rate of digestion of the other macromolecules, particularly elastin. When plasminogen was added to the matrix, activation of plasminogen to plasmin resulted in the hydrolysis of the glycoprotein components, which then allowed the macrophage elastase easier access to its substrate, elastin. Thus, although plasmin has no direct elastinolytic activity, its presence accelerated the rate of hydrolysis of elastin and therefore the rate of matrix degradation. These findings may be important in an understanding of disease states, such as emphysema and atherosclerosis, that are characterized by the destruction of connective tissue.

  9. Cell-collagen interactions: the use of peptide Toolkits to investigate collagen-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Farndale, Richard W; Lisman, Ton; Bihan, Dominique; Hamaia, Samir; Smerling, Christiane S; Pugh, Nicholas; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Leitinger, Birgit; de Groot, Philip G; Jarvis, Gavin E; Raynal, Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    Fibrillar collagens provide the most fundamental platform in the vertebrate organism for the attachment of cells and matrix molecules. We have identified specific sites in collagens to which cells can attach, either directly or through protein intermediaries. Using Toolkits of triple-helical peptides, each peptide comprising 27 residues of collagen primary sequence and overlapping with its neighbours by nine amino acids, we have mapped the binding of receptors and other proteins on to collagens II or III. Integrin alpha2beta1 binds to several GXX'GER motifs within the collagens, the affinities of which differ sufficiently to control cell adhesion and migration independently of the cellular regulation of the integrin. The platelet receptor, Gp (glycoprotein) VI binds well to GPO (where O is hydroxyproline)-containing model peptides, but to very few Toolkit peptides, suggesting that sequence in addition to GPO triplets is important in defining GpVI binding. The Toolkits have been applied to the plasma protein vWF (von Willebrand factor), which binds to only a single sequence, identified by truncation and amino acid substitution within Toolkit peptides, as GXRGQOGVMGFO in collagens II and III. Intriguingly, the receptor tyrosine kinase, DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2) recognizes three sites in collagen II, including its vWF-binding site, although the amino acids that support the interaction differ slightly within this motif. Furthermore, the secreted protein BM-40 (basement membrane protein 40) also binds well to this same region. Thus the availability of extracellular collagen-binding proteins may be important in regulating and facilitating direct collagen-receptor interaction.

  10. Use of a new rat chondrosarcoma cell line to delineate a 119-base pair chondrocyte-specific enhancer element and to define active promoter segments in the mouse pro-alpha 1(II) collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, K; Lefebvre, V; Zhou, G; Garofalo, S; Kimura, J H; de Crombrugghe, B

    1995-11-17

    We show that a new rat chondrosarcoma (RCS) cell line established in long-term culture from the Swarm tumor displayed a stable differentiated chondrocyte-like phenotype. Indeed, these cells produced the collagen types II, IX, and XI and alcian blue-stainable cartilage-specific proteoglycans, but no type I or type III collagen. To functionally characterize their chondrocytic nature, the cells were stably transfected with a type II collagen/beta geo chimeric gene which confers essentially perfect chondrocyte-specific expression in transgenic mice. RCS cells expressed both beta-galactosidase and G418 resistance, in comparison with similarly transfected 10T1/2 and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts which did not. These cells were then used to perform a systematic deletion analysis of the first intron of the mouse type II collagen gene (Col2a1) using transient expression experiments to determine which segments stimulated expression of a luciferase reporter gene in RCS cells but not in 10T1/2 fibroblasts. Cloning of two tandem copies of a 156-base pair (bp) intron 1 fragment (+2188 to +2343) in a construction containing a 314-bp Col2a1 promoter caused an almost 200-fold increase in promoter activity in RCS cells but no increase in 10T1/2 cells. DNase I footprint analysis over this 156-bp fragment revealed two adjacent protected regions, FP1 and FP2, located in the 3'-half of this segment, but no differences were seen with nuclear extracts of RCS cells and 10T1/2 fibroblasts. Deletion of FP2 to leave a 119-bp segment decreased enhancer activity by severalfold, but RCS cell specificity was maintained. Further deletions indicated that sequences both in the 5' part of the 119-bp fragment and in FP1 were needed simultaneously for RCS cell-specific enhancer activity. A series of deletions in the promoter region of the mouse Col2a1 gene progressively reduced activity when these promoters were tested by themselves in transient expression experiments. However, these promoter deletions were all

  11. Exosite Interactions Impact Matrix Metalloproteinase Collagen Specificities*

    PubMed Central

    Robichaud, Trista K.; Steffensen, Bjorn; Fields, Gregg B.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family selectively cleave collagens in vivo. However, the substrate structural determinants that facilitate interaction with specific MMPs are not well defined. We hypothesized that type I–III collagen sequences located N- or C-terminal to the physiological cleavage site mediate substrate selectivity among MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-13, and MMP-14/membrane-type 1 (MT1)-MMP. The enzyme kinetics for hydrolysis of three fluorogenic triple-helical peptides (fTHPs) was evaluated herein. The first fTHP contained consensus residues 769–783 from type I–III collagens, the second inserted α1(II) collagen residues 763–768 N-terminal to the consensus sequence, and the third inserted α1(II) collagen residues 784–792 C-terminal to the consensus sequence. Our analyses showed that insertion of the C-terminal residues significantly increased kcat/Km and kcat for MMP-1. MMP-13 showed the opposite behavior with a decreased kcat/Km and kcat and a greatly improved Km in response to the C-terminal residues. Insertion of the N-terminal residues enhanced kcat/Km and kcat for MMP-8 and MT1-MMP. For MMP-2, the C-terminal residues enhanced Km and dramatically decreased kcat, resulting in a decrease in the overall activity. These changes in activities and kinetic parameters represented the collagen preferences of MMP-8, MMP-13, and MT1-MMP well. Thus, interactions with secondary binding sites (exosites) helped direct the specificity of these enzymes. However, MMP-1 collagen preferences were not recapitulated by the fTHP studies. The preference of MMP-1 for type III collagen appears to be primarily based on the flexibility of the hydrolysis site of type III collagen compared with types I and II. Further characterization of exosite determinants that govern interactions of MMPs with collagenous substrates should aid the development of pharmacotherapeutics that target individual MMPs. PMID:21896477

  12. A novel functional role of collagen glycosylation: interaction with the endocytic collagen receptor uparap/ENDO180.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H; Ingvarsen, Signe; Melander, Maria C; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Patthy, Laszlo; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels

    2011-09-16

    Collagens make up the most abundant component of interstitial extracellular matrices and basement membranes. Collagen remodeling is a crucial process in many normal physiological events and in several pathological conditions. Some collagen subtypes contain specific carbohydrate side chains, the function of which is poorly known. The endocytic collagen receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180 plays an important role in matrix remodeling through its ability to internalize collagen for lysosomal degradation. uPARAP/Endo180 is a member of the mannose receptor protein family. These proteins all include a fibronectin type II domain and a series of C-type lectin-like domains, of which only a minor part possess carbohydrate recognition activity. At least two of the family members, uPARAP/Endo180 and the mannose receptor, interact with collagens. The molecular basis for this interaction is known to involve the fibronectin type II domain but nothing is known about the function of the lectin domains in this respect. In this study, we have investigated a possible role of the single active lectin domain of uPARAP/Endo180 in the interaction with collagens. By expressing truncated recombinant uPARAP/Endo180 proteins and analyzing their interaction with collagens with high and low levels of glycosylation we demonstrated that this lectin domain interacts directly with glycosylated collagens. This interaction is functionally important because it was found to modulate the endocytic efficiency of the receptor toward highly glycosylated collagens such as basement membrane collagen IV. Surprisingly, this property was not shared by the mannose receptor, which internalized glycosylated collagens independently of its lectin function. This role of modulating its uptake efficiency by a specific receptor is a previously unrecognized function of collagen glycosylation.

  13. Collagen and gelatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications.

  14. The hip joint: the fibrillar collagens associated with development and ageing in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    BLAND, YVETTE S.; ASHHURST, DOREEN E.

    2001-01-01

    The fibrillar collagens associated with the articular cartilages, joint capsule and ligamentum teres of the rabbit hip joint were characterised from the 17 d fetus to the 2-y-old adult by immunohistochemical methods. Initially the putative articular cartilage contains types I, III and V collagens, but when cavitation is complete in the 25 d fetus, type II collagen appears. In the 17 d fetus, the cells of the chondrogenous layers express type I collagen mRNA, but not that of type II collagen. Types III and V collagens are present throughout life, particularly pericellularly. Type I collagen is lost. In all respects, the articular cartilage of the hip joint is similar to that of the knee. The joint capsule contains types I, III and V collagens. In the fetus the ligamentum teres contains types I and V collagens and the cells express type I collagen mRNA; type III collagen is confined mainly to its surface and insertions. After birth, the same distribution remains, but there is more type III collagen in the ligament, proper. The attachment to the cartilage of the head of the femur is marked only by fibres of type I collagen traversing the cartilage; the attachment cannot be distinguished in preparations localising types III and V collagens. The attachment to the bone at the lip of the acetabulum is via fibres of types I and V collagens and little type III is present. The ligament is covered by a sheath of types III and V collagens. Type II collagen was not located in any part of the ligamentum teres. The distribution of collagens in the ligamentum teres is similar to that in the collateral ligaments of the knee. Its insertions are unusual because no fibrocartilage was detected. PMID:11215763

  15. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  16. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W

    2016-04-08

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites.

  17. The Type II Collagen N-propeptide, PIIBNP, inhibits cell survival and bone resorption of osteoclasts via integrin-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinya; Wang, Zhepeng; Bryan, Jennifer; Kobayashi, Chikashi; Faccio, Roberta; Sandell, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Type IIB procollagen is characteristic of cartilage, comprising 50% of the extracellular matrix. The NH2-propeptide of type IIB collagen, PIIBNP, can kill tumor cells via binding to integrins αVβ3 and αVβ5. As osteoclasts rely on αVβ3 integrins for function in bone erosion, we sought to determine whether PIIBNP could inhibit osteoclast function. Methods We undertook in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate both osteoblast and osteoclast function in the presence of recombinant PIIBNP. Adhesion of osteoclasts to PIIBNP was analyzed by staining of attached cells with crystal violet. PIIBNP-induced cell death was evaluated by cell counting Trypan Blue stained cells. The mechanism of cell death was evaluated by DNA fragmentation, TUNEL staining and western blotting to detect cleaved caspases. To determine the role of αVβ3 integrin, osteoclasts were pretreated with αV or β3 integrin specific siRNA before the treatment with PIIBNP. To explore PIIBNP function in vivo, a lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse calvaria lysis model was employed. Results Osteoclasts adhered to PIIBNP via an RGD-mediated mechanism. When osteoclasts were plated on extracellular matrix proteins, PIIBNP induced apoptosis of osteoclasts via caspase 3/8 activation. Osteoblasts and macrophages were not killed. Reduction of αV or β3 integrin levels on osteoclasts by siRNA reduced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, PIIBNP could inhibit bone resorption. Conclusion We conclude that PIIBNP can inhibit osteoclast survival and bone resorption via signal transduction through the αVβ3 integrins. Because of this property and the cell specificity, we propose that PIIBNP may play a role in vivo in protecting cartilage from osteoclast invasion and also could be a new therapeutic strategy for decreasing bone loss. PMID:21708300

  18. Collagen type IX from human cartilage: a structural profile of intermolecular cross-linking sites.

    PubMed Central

    Diab, M; Wu, J J; Eyre, D R

    1996-01-01

    Type IX collagen, a quantitatively minor collagenous component of cartilage, is known to be associated with and covalently cross-linked to type II collagen fibrils in chick and bovine cartilage. Type IX collagen molecules have also been shown to form covalent cross-links with each other in bovine cartilage. In the present study we demonstrate by structural analysis and location of cross-linking sites that, in human cartilage, type IX collagen is covalently cross-linked to type II collagen and to other molecules of type IX collagen. We also present evidence that, if the proteoglycan form of type IX collagen is present in human cartilage, it can only be a minor component of the matrix, similar to findings with bovine cartilage. PMID:8660302

  19. Binding of collagens to an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Visai, L.; Speziale, P.; Bozzini, S. )

    1990-02-01

    An enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli, B34289c, has been shown to bind the N-terminal region of fibronectin with high affinity. We now report that this strain also binds collagen. The binding of 125I-labeled type II collagen to bacteria was time dependent and reversible. Bacteria expressed a limited number of collagen receptors (2.2 x 10(4) per cell) and bound collagen with a Kd of 20 nM. All collagen types tested (I to V) as well as all tested cyanogen bromide-generated peptides (alpha 1(I)CB2, alpha 1(I)CB3, alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB4) were recognized by bacterial receptors, as demonstrated by the ability of these proteins to inhibit the binding of 125I-labeled collagen to bacteria. Of several unlabeled proteins tested in competition experiments, fibronectin and its N-terminal region strongly inhibited binding of the radiolabeled collagen to E. coli cells. Conversely, collagen competed with an 125I-labeled 28-kilodalton fibronectin fragment for bacterial binding. Collagen bound to bacteria could be displaced by excess amounts of either unlabeled fibronectin or its N-terminal fragment. Similarly, collagen could displace 125I-labeled N-terminal peptide of fibronectin bound to the bacterial cell surface. Bacteria grown at 41 degrees C or in the presence of glucose did not express collagen or fibronectin receptors. These results indicate the presence of specific binding sites for collagen on the surface of E. coli cells and furthermore that the collagen and fibronectin binding sites are located in close proximity, possibly on the same structure.

  20. Construction of collagen II/hyaluronate/chondroitin-6-sulfate tri-copolymer scaffold for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering and preliminary analysis of its physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Qing; Huang, Bo; Luo, Gang; Zhang, Chuan-Zhi; Zhuang, Ying; Zhou, Yue

    2010-02-01

    To construct a novel scaffold for nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue engineering, The porous type II collagen (CII)/hyaluronate (HyA)-chondroitin-6-sulfate (6-CS) scaffold was prepared using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linking system. The physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility of CII/HyA-CS scaffolds were evaluated. The results suggested CII/HyA-CS scaffolds have a highly porous structure (porosity: 94.8 +/- 1.5%), high water-binding capacity (79.2 +/- 2.8%) and significantly improved mechanical stability by EDC/NHS crosslinking (denaturation temperature: 74.6 +/- 1.8 and 58.1 +/- 2.6 degrees C, respectively, for the crosslinked scaffolds and the non-crosslinked; collagenase degradation rate: 39.5 +/- 3.4 and 63.5 +/- 2.0%, respectively, for the crosslinked scaffolds and the non-crosslinked). The CII/HyA-CS scaffolds also showed satisfactory cytocompatibility and histocompatibility as well as low immunogenicity. These results indicate CII/HyA-CS scaffolds may be an alternative material for NP tissue engineering due to the similarity of its composition and physico-chemical properties to those of the extracellular matrices (ECM) of native NP.

  1. Cleavage of denatured natural collagen type II by neutrophil gelatinase B reveals enzyme specificity, post-translational modifications in the substrate, and the formation of remnant epitopes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Van den Steen, Philippe E; Proost, Paul; Grillet, Bernard; Brand, David D; Kang, Andrew H; Van Damme, Jo; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2002-03-01

    During acute inflammation, leukocytes release proteolytic enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), but the physiopathological mechanisms and consequences of this process are not yet fully understood. Neutrophils, the predominant leukocyte type, produce neutrophil collagenase (MMP-8) and gelatinase B (MMP-9) but not the tissue inhibitors of MMPs. After stimulation, these cells also activate MMPs chemically. In arthritic diseases, neutrophils undergo great chemoattraction to the synovium, are activated by interleukin-8, and are stimulated to release gelatinase B in vivo. Production levels and net activities of gelatinase B were found to be absent in degenerative osteoarthritis but significantly increased in rheumatoid arthritis. The cleavage sites in cartilage type II collagen by gelatinase B were determined by a combination of reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography, Edman degradation, and mass spectrometry analysis. The analysis revealed the site specificity of proline and lysine hydroxylations and O-linked glycosylation, the cleavage specificities by gelatinase B, and the preferential absence and presence of post-translational modifications at P2' and P5', respectively. Furthermore, gelatinase B leaves the immunodominant peptides intact, which are known from studies with (autoreactive) T cells. Lysine hydroxylation was detected at a critical position for T-cell activation. These data lend support to the thesis that extracellular proteolysis and other post-translational modifications of antigenic peptides may be critical in the establishment and perpetuation of autoimmune processes.

  2. Combination of MTX and LEF attenuates inflammatory bone erosion by down-regulation of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand and interleukin-17 in type II collagen-induced arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Ding, Cong-zhu; Fang, Yun

    2013-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of combination of methotrexate (MTX) and leflunomide (LEF) on type II collagen-induced arthritis rats and its mechanism. Curative effect was confirmed on CIA rats, which were randomized and divided into model, MTX, LEF and MTX + LEF group. Weights and joint swelling scores of rats were recorded. Interleukin (IL)-17, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) concentration in serum were determined by ELISA. H&E dyeing of joint was used to estimate the inflammation and osteoclasia extent. The mechanism was investigated through fibroblast-like synoviocytes isolated from RA patients. The effect of MTX and LEF on cell viability, and RANKL and OPG expression were indicated through MTT and RT-PCR analysis, respectively. Combination therapy would be effective in treating CIA rats. Joint swelling scores and IL-17 and RANKL level in serum were decreased obviously (P < 0.05), while OPG level was elevated (P < 0.05). Anti-inflammatory and anti-osteoclasia effect would be indicated by H&E dyeing results. Moreover, FLS cell viability was inhibited by combination treatment in vitro (P < 0.05), and expression of osteoclasia-related genes (RANKL and OPG) was modified (P < 0.05). Combination therapy would relive the synovium hypertrophy through depressing cell viability and osteoclasia through decreasing RANKL and increasing OPG expression. Otherwise, combination was superior to monotherapy.

  3. The discoidin domain receptor DDR2 is a receptor for type X collagen.

    PubMed

    Leitinger, Birgit; Kwan, Alvin P L

    2006-08-01

    During endochondral ossification, collagen X is deposited in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate. Our previous results have shown that collagen X is capable of interacting directly with chondrocytes, primarily via integrin alpha2beta1. In this study, we determined whether collagen X could also interact with the non-integrin collagen receptors, discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 or DDR2. The widely expressed DDRs are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by a number of different collagen types. Collagen X was found to be a much better ligand for DDR2 than for DDR1. Collagen X bound to the DDR2 extracellular domain with high affinity and stimulated DDR2 autophosphorylation, the first step in transmembrane signalling. Expression of DDR2 in the epiphyseal plate was confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The spatial expression of DDR2 in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate is consistent with a physiological interaction of DDR2 with collagen X. Surprisingly, the discoidin domain of DDR2, which fully contains the binding sites for the fibrillar collagens I and II, was not sufficient for collagen X binding. The nature of the DDR2 binding site(s) within collagen X was further analysed. In addition to a collagenous domain, collagen X contains a C-terminal NC1 domain. DDR2 was found to recognise the triple-helical region of collagen X as well as the NC1 domain. Binding to the collagenous region was dependent on the triple-helical conformation. DDR2 autophosphorylation was induced by the collagen X triple-helical region but not the NC1 domain, indicating that the triple-helical region of collagen X contains a specific DDR2 binding site that is capable of receptor activation. Our study is the first to describe a non-fibrillar collagen ligand for DDR2 and will form the basis for further studies into the biological function of collagen X during endochondral ossification.

  4. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed these disorders were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names ... be used. These include as undifferentiated systemic rheumatic (connective tissue) diseases or overlap syndromes. Images Dermatomyositis, heliotrope eyelids ...

  5. Nanomechanics of collagen microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen constitutes one third of the human proteome, providing mechanical stability, elasticity and strength to organisms and is thus the prime construction material in biology. Collagen is also the dominating material in the extracellular matrix where its stiffness controls cell differentiation, growth and pathology. We use atomistic-based hierarchical multiscale modeling to describe this complex biological material from the bottom up. This includes the use and development of large-scale computational modeling tools to investigate several aspects related to collagen-based tissues, including source of visco-elasticity and deformation mechanisms at the nanoscale level. The key innovation of this research is that until now, collagen materials have primarily been described at macroscopic scales, without explicitly understanding the mechanical contributions at the molecular and fibrillar levels. The major impact of this research will be the development of fundamental models of collagenous tissues, important to the design of new scaffolding biomaterials for regenerative medicine as well as for the understanding of collagen-related diseases. PMID:23885342

  6. Production of collagen micro- and nanofibers for potential drug-carrier systems.

    PubMed

    Aras, Onur; Kazanci, Murat

    2015-12-01

    Two different nano- and micro-collagen fiber production methods are introduced and discussed. First one is the electrospinning method, that is very common technique to produce nanofibers from different polymeric solutions and recently collagen solutions are employed to produce nanofibers for different biomedical applications. This technique is extremely versatile method to produce nanofibers in a relatively short time, easy to control the fiber diameter and orientation with small pore sizes and a high surface area. The second method is self-assembly of collagen micro-fibers by co-extrusion method. The collagen fibers are obtained without any cross-linker, by using mainly ionic interactions. We demonstrated that self-assembled collagen fibers have well preserved their native structure (0.90 PP-II fraction), when compared with electrospun collagen fibers (0.38 PP-II fraction). However, it was only possible to produce collagen fibers with nanodimensions by using electrospinning method.

  7. Collagen-type specificity of glycoprotein VI as a determinant of platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Stephanie M; Takemura, Yukitoshi; Imamura, Yasutada; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Adachi, Eijiro; Moroi, Masaaki

    2008-02-01

    Of the two physiologically important platelet collagen receptors, glycoprotein (GP) VI is the receptor responsible for platelet activation. However, its reactivities towards different types of vascular collagen have not been directly and quantitatively analysed with collagen preparations of defined composition, although the other major platelet collagen receptor integrin alpha(2)beta(1) was shown to react with collagen types I-VI and VIII under either static or flow conditions. We analysed the collagen type specificity of GPVI binding to identify the physiological contribution of the various vascular collagens and how platelet reactivity towards the various collagens may be affected by fibril size. We used two methods to analyse the binding of recombinant GPVI (GPVI-Fc(2)) to different types of bovine collagen: binding to collagen microparticles in suspension and binding to immobilized collagen. GPVI-Fc(2) bound to type I-III collagens that can form large fibrils, but not to type V that only forms small fibrils. The apparent GPVI binding to types IV and V could be ascribed to type I collagen that was a contaminant in each of these preparations. Kinetic analyses of the binding data showed that type III collagen fibrils have both a higher Kd and Bmax than types I and II. Flow adhesion studies demonstrated that type III collagen supports the formation of larger platelet aggregates than type I. Our present results suggest that the physiological importance of type III collagen is to induce thrombus formation. Furthermore, these studies indicate that GPVI mainly binds to collagen types that can form large collagen fibrils.

  8. Development of multifunctional collagen scaffolds directed by collagen mimetic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Lan (Allen)

    Collagen is widely used for soft tissue replacement and tissue engineering scaffold. Functionalized collagen may offer new and improved applications for collagen-based biomaterials. But passively adsorbed molecules readily diffuse out from collagen matrix, and conventional chemical reactions on collagen are difficult to control and may compromise the biochemical feature of natural collagen. Hence, the aim of this dissertation is to develop a new physical collagen modification method through the non-covalent immobilization of collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) and CMP derivatives on collagen scaffolds, thereby evading the drawbacks of passive and chemical modifications. Most of the research on CMPs over the past three decades has focused on synthesizing CMPs and understanding the effects of amino acid sequence on the peptide structural stability. Although few attempts have been made to develop biomaterials based on pure CMP, CMP has never used in complex with natural collagen. We demonstrate that CMPs with varying chain lengths have strong propensity to associate with natural 2-D and 3-D collagen substrates. We also show that CMPs can recognize and bind to reconstituted type I collagen fibers as well as collagens of ex vivo human liver tissue. The practical use of CMPs conjugated with linear and multi-arm poly(ethylene glycol)s allows to control cell organization in 2-D collagen substrates. Our cell adhesion studies suggest that under certain conditions (e.g. high incubation temperature, small CMP size), the bound CMP derivatives can be released from the collagen matrix, which may provide new opportunities for manipulating cell behavior especially by dynamically controlling the amount of signaling molecules in the collagen matrix. Polyanionic charged CMP was synthesized to modulate tubulogenesis of endothelial cells by attracting VEGF with 3-D collagen gel and a new PEG hydrogel using bifunctional CMP conjugates was synthesized as physico-chemical crosslinkers for

  9. Achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro): study of collagen in the tissue and in chondrocytes cultured in agarose.

    PubMed

    Freisinger, P; Stanescu, V; Jacob, B; Cohen-Solal, L; Maroteaux, P; Bonaventure, J

    1994-02-15

    A lethal chondrodysplasia characterized by extreme micromelia was diagnosed by ultrasound examination in two sibs whose nonconsanguineous parents were healthy. Radiographic and histopathologic data indicated that the two foetuses (18 and 21 weeks old) had achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro). Quantitation of total collagen extractable from dried cartilage samples demonstrated a 50% decrease when compared to an age-related control. This decrease was essentially related to type II collagen. Nevertheless, the alpha chains and the CB peptides of type II collagen had a normal electrophoretic mobility. A significant amount of collagen type I was also detected. The electrophoretic pattern of collagens type IX and XI did not differ significantly from control sample. The extracellular matrix elaborated by patient chondrocytes cultured in agarose for 10-12 days, contained less collagen type II than normal cells. Labelling with 14C-proline of cultured cells showed the presence of procollagen and type II collagen chains with a normal electrophoretic mobility, but an alpha 2(I) chain was detectable in the patient material, indicating the presence of collagen type I which supported the tissue findings. The significance of the type II collagen reduction in the patient's cartilage is unclear but it is unlikely to be the primary defect in achondrogenesis type I.

  10. How stable is a collagen triple helix? An ab initio study on various collagen and beta-sheet forming sequences.

    PubMed

    Pálfi, Villo K; Perczel, András

    2008-07-15

    Collagen forms the well characterized triple helical secondary structure, stabilized by interchain H-bonds. Here we have investigated the stability of fully optimized collagen triple helices and beta-pleated sheets by using first principles (ab initio and DFT) calculations so as to determine the secondary structure preference depending on the amino acid composition. Models composed of a total of 18 amino acid residues were studied at six different amino acid compositions: (i) L-alanine only, (ii) glycine only, (iii) L-alanines and glycine, (iv) L-alanines and D-alanine, (v) L-prolines with glycine, (vi) L-proline, L-hydroxyproline, and glycine. The last two, v and vi, were designed to mimic the core part of collagen. Furthermore, ii, iii, and iv model the binding and/or recognition sites of collagen. Finally, i models the G-->A replacement, rare in collagen. All calculated structures show great resemblance to those determined by X-ray crystallography. Calculated triple helix formation affinities correlate well with experimentally determined stabilities derived from melting point (T(m)) data of different collagen models. The stabilization energy of a collagen triple helical structure over that of a beta-pleated sheet is 2.1 kcal mol(-1) per triplet for the [(-Pro-Hyp-Gly-)(2)](3) collagen peptide. This changes to 4.8 kcal mol(-1) per triplet of destabilization energy for the [(-Ala-Ala-Gly-)(2)](3) sequence, known to be disfavored in collagen. The present study proves that by using first principles methods for calculating stabilities of supramolecular complexes, such as collagen and beta-pleated sheets, one can obtain stability data in full agreement with experimental observations, which envisage the applicability of QM in molecular design.

  11. Oxygen Toxicity and Lung Collagenous Protein.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-28

    the a and s chains. A large portion of the applied material did not enter the gel until reduced, a behavior typical of this type of sample [20]. The...Collagen. In Crystal RG (ed) The Biochemical Basis of Pulmonary Function, Dekker, New York, pp. 215-271. 11. Hoyer JR, Spiro RG (1978) Studies on the...mono-dispersed lung cell preparations without using time consuming differential gradient centrifugation. Past methods of isolating alveolar type II cells

  12. Collagen fibrils: nanoscale ropes.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Laurent; van der Heijden, Gert; Horton, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibrils from staggered repeats of individual molecules has become "accepted" wisdom. However, for over thirty years now, such a model has failed to resolve several structural and functional questions. In a novel approach, it was found, using atomic force microscopy, that tendon collagen fibrils are composed of subcomponents in a spiral disposition-that is, their structure is similar to that of macroscale ropes. Consequently, this arrangement was modeled and confirmed using elastic rod theory. This work provides new insight into collagen fibril structure and will have wide application-from the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering and a better understanding of pathogenesis of diseases of bone and tendon, to the conservation of irreplaceable parchment-based museum exhibits.

  13. Collagen in organ development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  14. Complex Determinants in Specific Members of the Mannose Receptor Family Govern Collagen Endocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Johansson, Kristina; Madsen, Daniel H.; Porse, Astrid; Melander, Maria C.; Sørensen, Kristine R.; Nielsen, Christoffer; Bugge, Thomas H.; Behrendt, Niels; Engelholm, Lars H.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the well-conserved mannose receptor (MR) protein family have been functionally implicated in diverse biological and pathological processes. Importantly, a proposed common function is the internalization of collagen for intracellular degradation occurring during bone development, cancer invasion, and fibrosis protection. This functional relationship is suggested by a common endocytic capability and a candidate collagen-binding domain. Here we conducted a comparative investigation of each member's ability to facilitate intracellular collagen degradation. As expected, the family members uPARAP/Endo180 and MR bound collagens in a purified system and internalized collagens for degradation in cellular settings. In contrast, the remaining family members, PLA2R and DEC-205, showed no collagen binding activity and were unable to mediate collagen internalization. To pinpoint the structural elements discriminating collagen from non-collagen receptors, we constructed a series of receptor chimeras and loss- and gain-of-function mutants. Using this approach we identified a critical collagen binding loop in the suggested collagen binding region (an FN-II domain) in uPARAP/Endo180 and MR, which was different in PLA2R or DEC-205. However, we also found that an active FN-II domain was not a sufficient determinant to allow collagen internalization through these receptors. Nevertheless, this ability could be acquired by the transfer of a larger segment of uPARAP/Endo180 (the Cys-rich domain, the FN-II domain and two CTLDs) to DEC-205. These data underscore the importance of the FN-II domain in uPARAP/Endo180 and MR-mediated collagen internalization but at the same time uncover a critical interplay with flanking domains. PMID:24500714

  15. Complex determinants in specific members of the mannose receptor family govern collagen endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Johansson, Kristina; Madsen, Daniel H; Porse, Astrid; Melander, Maria C; Sørensen, Kristine R; Nielsen, Christoffer; Bugge, Thomas H; Behrendt, Niels; Engelholm, Lars H

    2014-03-14

    Members of the well-conserved mannose receptor (MR) protein family have been functionally implicated in diverse biological and pathological processes. Importantly, a proposed common function is the internalization of collagen for intracellular degradation occurring during bone development, cancer invasion, and fibrosis protection. This functional relationship is suggested by a common endocytic capability and a candidate collagen-binding domain. Here we conducted a comparative investigation of each member's ability to facilitate intracellular collagen degradation. As expected, the family members uPARAP/Endo180 and MR bound collagens in a purified system and internalized collagens for degradation in cellular settings. In contrast, the remaining family members, PLA2R and DEC-205, showed no collagen binding activity and were unable to mediate collagen internalization. To pinpoint the structural elements discriminating collagen from non-collagen receptors, we constructed a series of receptor chimeras and loss- and gain-of-function mutants. Using this approach we identified a critical collagen binding loop in the suggested collagen binding region (an FN-II domain) in uPARAP/Endo180 and MR, which was different in PLA2R or DEC-205. However, we also found that an active FN-II domain was not a sufficient determinant to allow collagen internalization through these receptors. Nevertheless, this ability could be acquired by the transfer of a larger segment of uPARAP/Endo180 (the Cys-rich domain, the FN-II domain and two CTLDs) to DEC-205. These data underscore the importance of the FN-II domain in uPARAP/Endo180 and MR-mediated collagen internalization but at the same time uncover a critical interplay with flanking domains.

  16. Design and synthesis of collagen mimetic peptide derivatives for studying triple helix assembly and collagen mimetic peptide-collagen binding interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Xiao

    2008-10-01

    Collagen is the principal tensile clement of the extra-cellular matrix in mammals and is the basic scaffold for cells and tissues. Collagen molecules are comprised of homo-trimeric helices (e.g. collagen type II and type III), ABB type hetero-trimeric helices (e.g. collagen type I, type IV, and type V), or ABC type hetero-trimeric helices (e.g. type V). Mimicry of collagen structures can help elucidate collagen triple helical conformation and provide insights into making novel collagen-like biomaterials. Our group previously reported a new physical collagen modification method, which was based on non-covalent interaction between collagen mimetic peptide (CMP: -(Pro-Hyp-Gly) x-) and natural collagen. We hypothesized that CMP binds to collagen through a process involving both strand invasion and triple helix assembly. The aim of this dissertation is to study structural formation and stability of collagen triple helix, and to investigate CMP-collagen binding interactions using two types of CMP derivatives: covalently templated CMP trimer and CMP-nanoparticle conjugates. We demonstrated that covalently templated ABB type CMP hetero-trimers could be prepared by a versatile synthetic strategy involving both solid phase and solution peptide coupling. Our thermal melting studies showed that the templated CMP hetero-trimers formed collagen-like triple helices and their folding kinetics correlated with the amino acid compositions of the individual CMP strands. We also studied the thermal melting behavior and folding kinetics of a templated hetero-trimer complex comprised of CMP and a peptide derived from collagen. This synthetic strategy can be readily extended to synthesize other ABB type hetero-trimers to investigate their local melting behavior and biological activity. We also prepared colloidally stable CMP functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au-CMPs) as a TEM marker for investigating the CMP-collagen interaction. Au-CMP showed preferential binding to collagen fiber's gap

  17. [The genetics of collagen diseases].

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J; Maroteaux, P; Frezal, J

    1986-01-01

    Heritable disorders of collagen include Ehler-Danlos syndromes (11 types are actually known), Larsen syndrome and osteogenesis imperfecta. Their clinical, genetic and biochemical features are reviewed. Marfan syndrome is closely related to heritable disorders of collagen.

  18. Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ⩾ 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

  19. Unraveling the role of Calcium ions in the mechanical properties of individual collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiangchao; Lin, Lijun; Tang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Collagen, the dominating material in the extracellular matrix, provides the strength, elasticity and mechanical stability to the organisms. The mechanical property of collagen is mainly dominated by its surrounding environments. However, the variation and origin of the mechanics of collagen fibril under different concentrations of calcium ions (χCa) remains unknown. By using the atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation, the mechanics and structure of individual type II collagen fibril were first investigated under different χCa in this study. The results demonstrate that both of the mechanical and structural properties of the collagen fibril show a prominent dependence on χCa. The mechanism of χCa-dependence of the collagen fibril was attributed to the chelation between collagen molecules and the calcium ions. Given the role of calcium in the pathology of osteoarthritis, the current study may cast new light on the understanding of osteoarthritis and other soft tissue hardening related diseases in the future. PMID:28378770

  20. Microscale Mechanical Testing of Individual Collagen Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poissant, Jeffrey

    Collagen is a key constituent for a large number of biological materials including bone, tendon, cartilage, skin and fish scales. Understanding the mechanical behavior of collagen's microscale structural components (fibers and fibrils) is therefore of utmost importance for fields such as biomimetics and biomedical engineering. However, the mechanics of collagen fibers and fibrils remain largely unexplored. The main research challenges are the small sample sizes (diameters less than 1 im) and the need to maintain physiologically relevant conditions. In this work, a microscale mechanical testing device (MMTD) capable of measuring the stress-strain response of individual collagen fibers and fibrils was developed. The MMTD consists of: (i) a transducer from a commercial nanoindenter to measure load and displacement, (ii) an optical microscope to observe the deformation of the sample in-situ and (iii) micromanipulators to isolate, position and fix samples. Collagen fibers and fibrils were extracted from fish scales using a novel dissection procedure and tested using the MMTD. A variety of tensile tests were performed including monotonic loading and cyclic tests with increasing loading rate or maximum displacement. The monotonic test results found that the elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and strain at failure range from 0.5 to 1.3 GPa, 100 to 200 MPa and 20% to 60%, respectively. The cyclic tests revealed that the largest increase in damage accumulation occurs at strains between 10% and 20%, when hydrogen bonds at the molecular level are ruptured. Further straining the fibril causes little additional damage accumulation and signals the approach of failure. The addition of water is shown to increase damage tolerance and strain to failure.

  1. Does the genetic type of collagen determine fibril structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eikenberry, E.; Brodsky, B.; Cassidy, K.

    1980-10-01

    A number of genetic types of collagen, all triple-helical but with significant variations in their amino acid sequences, have been found and the distribution of these genetic types is tissue specific. For example, tendon is composed only of type I collagen, while cartilage contains largely type II collagen. Skin contains a large amount of type I, but has a significant fraction, approx. 15%, of type III. Each of these types can form fibrils, but it is not known whether they form distinctive fibril structures that are important in determining tissue organization. We are using x-ray diffraction to analyze a variety of tissues with different collagen genetic types to compare the fibril structures and thus investigate whether genetic type is an important determinant of this structure.

  2. Intrafibrillar mineralization of polyacrylic acid-bound collagen fibrils using a two-dimensional collagen model and Portland cement-based resins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiyu; Gu, Lisha; Huang, Zihua; Sun, Qiurong; Chen, Huimin; Ling, Junqi; Mai, Sui

    2017-02-01

    The biomimetic remineralization of apatite-depleted dentin is a potential method for enhancing the durability of resin-dentin bonding. To advance this strategy from its initial proof-of-concept design, we sought to investigate the characteristics of polyacrylic acid (PAA) adsorption to desorption from type I collagen and to test the mineralization ability of PAA-bound collagen. Portland cement and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) were homogenized with a hydrophilic resin blend to produce experimental resins. The collagen fibrils reconstituted on nickel (Ni) grids were mineralized using different methods: (i) group I consisted of collagen treated with Portland cement-based resin in simulated body fluid (SBF); (ii) group II consisted of PAA-bound collagen treated with Portland cement-based resin in SBF; and (iii) group III consisted of PAA-bound collagen treated with β-TCP-doped Portland cement-based resin in deionized water. Intrafibrillar mineralization was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. We found that a carbonyl-associated peak at pH 3.0 increased as adsorption time increased, whereas a hydrogen bond-associated peak increased as desorption time increased. The experimental resins maintained an alkaline pH and the continuous release of calcium ions. Apatite was detected within PAA-bound collagen in groups II and III. Our results suggest that PAA-bound type I collagen fibrils can be mineralized using Portland cement-based resins.

  3. Characterization of high affinity binding motifs for the discoidin domain receptor DDR2 in collagen.

    PubMed

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Raynal, Nicolas; Bihan, Dominique; Hohenester, Erhard; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2008-03-14

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native triple-helical collagen. Here we have located three specific DDR2 binding sites by screening the entire triple-helical domain of collagen II, using the Collagen II Toolkit, a set of overlapping triple-helical peptides. The peptide sequence that bound DDR2 with highest affinity interestingly contained the sequence for the high affinity binding site for von Willebrand factor in collagen III. Focusing on this sequence, we used a set of truncated and alanine-substituted peptides to characterize the sequence GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as the minimal collagen sequence required for DDR2 binding. Based on a recent NMR analysis of the DDR2 collagen binding domain, we generated a model of the DDR2-collagen interaction that explains why a triple-helical conformation is required for binding. Triple-helical peptides comprising the DDR2 binding motif not only inhibited DDR2 binding to collagen II but also activated DDR2 transmembrane signaling. Thus, DDR2 activation may be effected by single triple-helices rather than fibrillar collagen.

  4. Structural properties of pepsin-solubilized collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride.

    PubMed

    Li, Conghu; Tian, Zhenhua; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2015-10-01

    The structural properties of pepsin-solubilized calf skin collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride were investigated in this paper. Compared with native collagen, acylated collagen retained the unique triple helix conformation, as determined by amino acid analysis, circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction. Meanwhile, the thermostability of acylated collagen using thermogravimetric measurements was enhanced as the residual weight increased by 5%. With the temperature increased from 25 to 115 °C, the secondary structure of native and acylated collagens using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements was destroyed since the intensity of the major amide bands decreased and the positions of the major amide bands shifted to lower wavenumber, respectively. Meanwhile, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy revealed that the most sensitive bands for acylated and native collagens were amide I and II bands, respectively. Additionally, the corresponding order of the groups between native and acylated collagens was different and the correlation degree for acylated collagen was weaker than that of native collagen, suggesting that temperature played a small influence on the conformation of acylated collagen, which might be concluded that the hydrophobic interaction improved the thermostability of collagen.

  5. Cellular heterogeneity in cultured human chondrocytes identified by antibodies specific for alpha 2(XI) collagen chains

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Collagen type XI is a component of hyaline cartilage consisting of alpha 1(XI), alpha 2(XI), and alpha 3(XI) chains; with 5-10% of the total collagen content, it is a minor but significant component next to type II collagen, but its function and precise localization in cartilaginous tissues is still unclear. Owing to the homology of the alpha 3(XI) and alpha 1(II) collagen chains, attempts to prepare specific antibodies to native type XI collagen have been unsuccessful in the past. In this study, we report on the preparation and use for immunohistochemistry of a polyclonal antibody specific for alpha 2(XI) denatured collagen chains. The antibody was prepared by immunization with the isolated alpha 2(XI) chain and reacts neither with native type XI collagen nor type I, II, V, or IX by ELISA or immunoblotting, nor with alpha 1(XI) or alpha 3(XI), but with alpha 2(XI) chains. Using this antibody, it was possible to specifically localize alpha 2(XI) in cartilage by pretreating tissue sections with 6 M urea. In double immunofluorescence staining experiments, the distribution of alpha 2(XI) as indicative for type XI collagen in fetal bovine and human cartilage was compared with that of type II collagen, using a monoclonal antibody to alpha 1(II). Type XI collagen was found throughout the matrix of hyaline cartilage. However, owing to cross- reactivity of the monoclonal anti-alpha 1(II) with alpha 3(XI), both antibodies produced the same staining pattern. Cellular heterogeneity was, however, detected in monolayer cultures of human chondrocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2670958

  6. UV damage of collagen: insights from model collagen peptides.

    PubMed

    Jariashvili, Ketevan; Madhan, Balaraman; Brodsky, Barbara; Kuchava, Ana; Namicheishvili, Louisa; Metreveli, Nunu

    2012-03-01

    Fibrils of Type I collagen in the skin are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light and there have been claims that collagen photo-degradation leads to wrinkles and may contribute to skin cancers. To understand the effects of UV radiation on collagen, Type I collagen solutions were exposed to the UV-C wavelength of 254 nm for defined lengths of time at 4°C. Circular dichroism (CD) experiments show that irradiation of collagen leads to high loss of triple helical content with a new lower thermal stability peak and SDS-gel electrophoresis indicates breakdown of collagen chains. To better define the effects of UV radiation on the collagen triple-helix, the studies were extended to peptides which model the collagen sequence and conformation. CD studies showed irradiation for days led to lower magnitudes of the triple-helix maximum at 225 nm and lower thermal stabilities for two peptides containing multiple Gly-Pro-Hyp triplets. In contrast, the highest radiation exposure led to little change in the T(m) values of (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) and (Ala-Hyp-Gly)(10) , although (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) did show a significant decrease in triple helix intensity. Mass spectroscopy indicated preferential cleavage sites within the peptides, and identification of some of the most susceptible sites of cleavage. The effect of radiation on these well defined peptides gives insight into the sequence and conformational specificity of photo-degradation of collagen.

  7. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type VI collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.

    1988-05-01

    Normal adult rabbit corneas were digested with 5% pepsin and their collagens extracted with acetic acid. Collagen extracts were fractionated by differential salt precipitation. The 2.5 M NaCl fraction was then redissolved with tris buffer and precipitated with sodium acetate. The precipitate contained a high-molecular-weight disulfide-bonded aggregate which, upon reduction with mercaptoethanol, was converted into three distinct polypeptides having molecular weights between 45 and 66 Kd. These physical characteristics, together with the susceptibility of these polypeptides to collagenase and their amino acid composition, identified the high molecular weight aggregate as type VI collagen. Corneas from neonate rabbits and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were organ cultured in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine to incorporate radiolabel into collagen. Tissues were digested with 0.02% pepsin and their collagens extracted with formic acid. The total radioactivity of the extracts and tissue residues was determined before the collagens were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis. Radioactive collagen polypeptides bands were then stained with Coomassie blue, processed for fluorography, and analyzed by densitometry. The results show that: (1) type VI collagen is synthesized by neonate corneas and healing adult corneas; (2) it is not readily solubilized from either corneal tissue by 0.02% pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction; and (3) the proportion of type VI collagen deposited in scar tissue is markedly lower than that found in neonate corneas.

  8. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type III collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.; Covington, H.I.; Macarak, E.J.

    1988-05-01

    Whole neonate rabbit corneas and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were incubated in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine. Radiolabeled collagen extracted from the corneas and scar tissue were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to determine the types and relative quantity of collagen polypeptides present and synthesized by these tissues. In addition to other collagen types, type III was found in both neonate cornea and scar tissue from adult cornea, albeit in relatively small quantities. Type III collagen in normal cornea was associated with the residue after pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction of the tissue, and the same type of collagen was extracted from scar tissue after similar treatment. Type III collagen-specific monoclonal antibody bound to developing normal corneas and healing adult tissue sections, as determined by immunofluorescence. Antibody binding was localized to the endothelium and growing Descemet's membrane in fetal and neonate corneas, and restricted to the most posterior region of the corneal scar tissue. Although monoclonal antibody to keratan sulfate, used as a marker for stromal fibroblasts, bound to most of the scar tissue, the antibody failed to bind to the posterior scar tissue positive for type III collagen. We conclude that endothelial cells from fetal and neonate rabbit cornea and endothelium-derived fibroblasts from healing wounds of adult cornea synthesize and deposit type III collagen. Moreover, this collagen appears to be incorporated into the growing Descemet's membrane of normal corneas and narrow posterior portion of the scar tissue.

  9. Collagenous colitis: an unrecognised entity.

    PubMed Central

    Bogomoletz, W V; Adnet, J J; Birembaut, P; Feydy, P; Dupont, P

    1980-01-01

    A patient is reported with chronic abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and associated radiological and endoscopic abnormalities of the sigmoid colon. Light and electron microscopic study of colorectal mucosa showed abnormal collagenous thickening of the subepithelial basement membrane. The authors felt that the clinical and morphological features justified a diagnosis of collagenous colitis. Review of the literature suggested that collagenous colitis was still an unrecognised entity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7380341

  10. Second harmonic generation in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Karen M.; Stoller, Patrick; Celliers, Peter; Rubenchik, Alexander; Bratton, Clay; Yankelevich, Diego

    2003-11-01

    Collagen possesses a strong second order nonlinear susceptibility; when it is irradiated with intense laser light, some of the reflected and transmitted light will have twice the frequency of the incident beam, a phenomenon known as second harmonic generation (SHG). Polarization modulation of an ultra-short pulse laser beam can be used to simultaneously measure collagen fiber orientation, SHG intensity, and a parameter related to the second order non-linear susceptibility. This technique has made it possible to discriminate among patterns of fibrillar orientation in many tissues. In the present study the role that organizational complexity plays in the relationship between nonlinear optical properties and collagen structure is investigated. As a component of tissues and organs, collagen"s structure and function is inextricably intertwined with that of the many other matrix components; to what extent do these noncollagenous components affect its nonlinear properties? To answer this, we investigated SHG in two different collagenous tissues, liver and cartilage; in addition we looked at the effect of progressive pathological changes in these tissues on SHG. At the other end of the spectrum, we studied collagen organized at the minimal level of complexity necessary for SHG detection: fibrils generated from solutions containing only a single type of collagen. Data obtained from these studies suggest that collagen"s strong nonlinear susceptibility, a property no other biologically significant macromolecule shares to the same degree, may serve as more than the basis of a novel imaging device for soft tissue. Collagen"s nonlinear optical properties in conjunction with its vast capacity for self-initiated conformational change--through self-assembly, site recognition, post-translational modification, and the like -make it an attractive candidate molecule for any of several demanding engineering applications, such as nanopatterning.

  11. Fourier transform infrared imaging and infrared fiber optic probe spectroscopy identify collagen type in connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Hanifi, Arash; McCarthy, Helen; Roberts, Sally; Pleshko, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types) to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in connective tissues

  12. Preparation and Biological Activity of New Collagen Composites, Part I: Collagen/Zinc Titanate Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Albu, Madalina G; Vladkova, Todorka G; Ivanova, Iliana A; Shalaby, Ahmed S A; Moskova-Doumanova, Veselina S; Staneva, Anna D; Dimitriev, Yanko B; Kostadinova, Anelya S; Topouzova-Hristova, Tanya I

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop new antimicrobial collagen/zinc titanate (ZnTiO3) biomaterials using a sol-gel cryogenic draying technology in keeping the native collagen activity. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity was demonstrated against Firmicutes (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus cereus, and Candida lusitaniae) and Gracilicutes (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Pseudomonas putida) microorganisms. The antimicrobial activity as well as the cytotoxicity were specific for the different test microorganisms (Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi) and model eukaryotic cells (osteosarcoma, fibroblast, and keratinocyte cells), respectively, and both were depending on the ZnTiO3 concentration. Three mechanisms of the antimicrobial action were supposed, including (i) mechanical demolition of the cell wall and membrane by the crystal nanoparticles of the ZnTiO3 entrapped in the collagen matrix, (ii) chelation of its metal ions, and (iii) formation of free oxygen radicals due to the interaction between the microbial cells and antimicrobial agent. It was concluded that the optimal balance between antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity could be achieved by a variation of the ZnTiO3 concentration. The antifungal and broad-spectrum antibacterial activity of the studied collagen/ZnTiO3 nanocomposites, combined with a low cytotoxicity, makes them a promising anti-infection biomaterial.

  13. Quantification of collagen distributions in rat hyaline and fibro cartilages based on second harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Liao, Chenxi; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Liu, Wenge; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a semitransparent tissue composed of proteoglycan and thicker type II collagen fibers, while fibro cartilage large bundles of type I collagen besides other territorial matrix and chondrocytes. It is reported that the meniscus (fibro cartilage) has a greater capacity to regenerate and close a wound compared to articular cartilage (hyaline cartilage). And fibro cartilage often replaces the type II collagen-rich hyaline following trauma, leading to scar tissue that is composed of rigid type I collagen. The visualization and quantification of the collagen fibrillar meshwork is important for understanding the role of fibril reorganization during the healing process and how different types of cartilage contribute to wound closure. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope was applied to image the articular and meniscus cartilage, and textural analysis were developed to quantify the collagen distribution. High-resolution images were achieved based on the SHG signal from collagen within fresh specimens, and detailed observations of tissue morphology and microstructural distribution were obtained without shrinkage or distortion. Textural analysis of SHG images was performed to confirm that collagen in fibrocartilage showed significantly coarser compared to collagen in hyaline cartilage (p < 0.01). Our results show that each type of cartilage has different structural features, which may significantly contribute to pathology when damaged. Our findings demonstrate that SHG microscopy holds potential as a clinically relevant diagnostic tool for imaging degenerative tissues or assessing wound repair following cartilage injury.

  14. Collagen and component polypeptides: Low frequency and amide vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine-Vive, F.; Merzel, F.; Johnson, M. R.; Kearley, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen is a fibrous protein, which exists widely in the human body. The biomechanical properties of collagen depend on its triple helix structure and the corresponding low frequency vibrations. We use first-principles, density functional theory methods and analytical force fields to investigate the molecular vibrations of a model collagen compound, the results being validated by comparison with published, inelastic neutron scattering data. The results from these atomistic simulations are used at higher frequency to study the Amide I and V vibrations and therefore the vibrational signature of secondary and tertiary structure formation. In addition to collagen, its component homopolymers, poly-glycine and poly-proline are also studied. The Amide V vibration of glycine is strongly modified in going from the single helix of poly-glycine II to the triple helix of collagen. The collagen models are hydrated and this work allows us to discuss the relative merits of density functional theory and force field methods when tackling complex, partially crystalline systems.

  15. Lysyl hydroxylation in collagens from hyperplastic callus and embryonic bones.

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, H W; Bodo, M; Frohn, C; Nerlich, A; Rimek, D; Notbohm, H; Müller, P K

    1992-01-01

    Tissue from two patients with osteogenesis imperfecta suffering from a hyperplastic callus was studied. Although collagen type I from the compact bone and the skin and fibroblast cultures of these patients showed normal lysyl hydroxylation, collagen types I, II, III and V from the callus tissue were markedly overhydroxylated. Furthermore, the overhydroxylation of lysine residues covered almost equally the entire alpha 1 (I) collagen chain, as demonstrated by the analysis of individual CNBr-derived peptides. In addition, collagen type I was isolated from femoral compact bone of 33 individuals who died between the 16th week of gestational age and 22 years. Lysyl hydroxylation rapidly decreased in both collagen alpha 1 (I) and alpha 2 (I) chains during fetal development, and only little in the postnatal period. The transient increase in lysyl hydroxylation and the involvement of various collagen types in callus tissue argue for a regulatory mechanism that may operate in bone repair and during fetal development. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:1546948

  16. Temperature-dependent FTIR spectra of collagen and protective effect of partially hydrolysed fucoidan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pielesz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    FTIR spectra of collagen (PC) and partially hydrolysed fucoidan (PHF) incorporated into collagen films were investigated at different temperatures between 20 °C and 100 °C. Changes within the bands of amide I, amide II and amide III may indicate stabilization of collagen by hydrogen bonds during its interaction with partially hydrolysed fucoidan. Spectroscopic studies revealed that partially hydrolysed fucoidan was bound to the collagen without affecting its triple helicity. Interactions of fucoidan with H2SO4 (mild acid hydrolysis), leading to changes of the sulphated band positions in the 800-590 cm-1 region of IR spectra were observed. The effect of partially hydrolysed fucoidan on glucose-mediated collagen glycation and cross-linking of proteins in vitro was evaluated. It was observed that partially hydrolysed fucoidan incorporated into collagen films can be used as therapeutically active biomaterials that speed up the process of wound healing and may increase the anticancer activity of fucoidan.

  17. Temperature-dependent FTIR spectra of collagen and protective effect of partially hydrolysed fucoidan.

    PubMed

    Pielesz, Anna

    2014-01-24

    FTIR spectra of collagen (PC) and partially hydrolysed fucoidan (PHF) incorporated into collagen films were investigated at different temperatures between 20°C and 100°C. Changes within the bands of amide I, amide II and amide III may indicate stabilization of collagen by hydrogen bonds during its interaction with partially hydrolysed fucoidan. Spectroscopic studies revealed that partially hydrolysed fucoidan was bound to the collagen without affecting its triple helicity. Interactions of fucoidan with H2SO4 (mild acid hydrolysis), leading to changes of the sulphated band positions in the 800-590 cm(-1) region of IR spectra were observed. The effect of partially hydrolysed fucoidan on glucose-mediated collagen glycation and cross-linking of proteins in vitro was evaluated. It was observed that partially hydrolysed fucoidan incorporated into collagen films can be used as therapeutically active biomaterials that speed up the process of wound healing and may increase the anticancer activity of fucoidan.

  18. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis.

  19. Stabilization of type I collagen against collagenases (type I) and thermal degradation using iron complex.

    PubMed

    Fathima, Nishtar Nishad; Bose, Murugan Chandra; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2006-11-01

    The widespread application of collagen as a biomaterial warrants research in understanding the stabilization of the same. In this study, interaction of iron-tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium (THP) complex with type I collagen has been investigated. DSC and hydrothermal measurement studies reveal that the shrinkage temperature of iron-THP treated rat tail tendon (RTT) collagen is 33 degrees C higher than that of native RTT collagen. Fe-THP complex also brings about high degree of enzymatic stability to type I collagen. The effect of Fe-THP on the conformation of collagen was studied using circular dichroism and it was found that no major alterations in the triple helical structure of collagen occur on treatment with Fe-THP. It is observed from viscosity experiment results that though Fe-THP complex is able to bring about long range ordering of collagen, as evident from the thermal and enzymatic stability imparted to collagen, this ordering does not lead to any aggregation of collagen. Since THPS is reducing in nature, it is expected to keep iron in the +2 state and if THP chelates to Fe(II), the hydrolytic behavior of iron can also be controlled.

  20. Influence of functionalized nanoparticles on conformational stability of type I collagen for possible biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kandamchira, Aswathy; Selvam, Sangeetha; Marimuthu, Nidhin; Janardhanan, Sreeram Kalarical; Fathima, Nishter Nishad

    2013-12-01

    Collagen-nanoparticle interactions are vital for many biomedical applications including drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using starch template according to our earlier reported procedures were functionalized by treating them with Gum Arabic (GA), a biocompatible polysaccharide, so as to enhance the interaction between nanoparticle surfaces and collagen. Viscosity, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques have been used to study the collagen-nanoparticle interactions. The relative viscosity for collagen-nanoparticle conjugate was found to increase with increase in concentration of the nanoparticle within the concentration range investigated, which is due to the aggregation of protein onto the surface of nanoparticle. The CD spectra for the collagen-nanoparticle at different concentration ratios do not have much variation in the Rpn values (ratio of positive peak intensity over negative peak intensity) after functionalization with GA. The variation of molar ellipticity values for collagen-nanoparticle is due to the glycoprotein present in GA. The collagen triple helical structure is maintained after interaction with nanoparticles. The FTIR spectra of native collagen, Coll-Fs (nanoparticle without functionalization) and Coll-FsG (nanoparticle functionalized with GA) show clearly the amide I, II, III bands, with respect to collagen. The ability of polysaccharide stabilized/functionalized nanoparticles to maintain the collagen properties would help in its biomedical applications.

  1. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  2. Structure-based development of a novel collagen inhibitor for MMP-1: re-designing the functions of a matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, James M; Yeh, Li-An

    2004-09-01

    Collagenases are a highly specific class of enzymes. In their native states, collagenases cleave only native triple helical collagen molecules at a single peptide bond between Gly775-Leu776 for Type I collagen and Gly775-Ile776 for Type II collagen. The linear sequence of collagen is about 1050 amino acids in length, where three linear peptide sequences are required to form a triple helical collagen molecule. At present, there exist no crystallographic structures of collagenase bound to native triple helical collagen; nor has it been shown that collagenase recognizes the triple helical conformation of collagen. In our study, we have used an inhibitor design structure-activity based approach to show that collagenase recognizes and cleaves triple helical collagen conformations in preference to non-triple helical collagen conformations.

  3. Comparison of three types of chondrocytes in collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Spector, Myron

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the chondrogenesis in type I and II collagen scaffolds seeded with chondrocytes from three types of cartilage, after four weeks of culture: auricular (AU), articular (AR) and meniscal (ME). Related aims were to investigate the expression of a contractile muscle actin isoform, alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), in the cells in the scaffold and to determine the presence of a lubricating glycoprotein, lubricin, in the constructs. Adult goat AU, AR and ME chondrocytes were seeded into two types of collagen scaffolds: type II collagen and type I/III collagen. After four weeks of culture, the constructs were prepared for histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), types I and II collagen, elastin, SM and lubricin. AU constructs contained substantially more tissue than the AR and ME samples. The AU constructs exhibited neocartilage, but no elastin. There were no notable differences between the type I and II collagen scaffolds. Novel findings were the expression of SMA by the AU cells in the scaffolds and the presence of lubricin in the AR and AU constructs. AU cells have the capability to produce cartilage in collagen scaffolds under conditions in which there is little histogenesis by AR and ME cells.

  4. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  5. The development of a mature collagen network in cartilage from human bone marrow stem cells in Transwell culture.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Alan D; Hardingham, Timothy E; Eyre, David R; Fernandes, Russell J

    2016-03-01

    Damaged hyaline cartilage shows a limited capacity for innate repair. Potential sources of cells to augment the clinical repair of cartilage defects include autologous chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. We have reported that culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with specific growth and differentiation factors as shallow multilayers on Transwell permeable membranes provided ideal conditions for chondrogenesis. Rigid translucent cartilaginous disks formed and expressed cartilage-specific structural proteins aggrecan and type II collagen. We report here the analysis of the collagen network assembled in these cartilage constructs and identify key features of the network as it became mature during 28 days of culture. The type II collagen was co-polymerized with types XI and IX collagens in a fibrillar network stabilized by hydroxylysyl pyridinoline cross-links as in epiphyseal and hyaline cartilages. Tandem ion-trap mass-spectrometry identified 3-hydroxylation of Proline 986 and Proline 944 of the α1(II) chains, a post-translational feature of human epiphyseal cartilage type II collagen. The formation of a type II collagen based hydroxy-lysyl pyridinoline cross-linked network typical of cartilage in 28 days shows that the Transwell system not only produces, secretes and assembles cartilage collagens, but also provides all the extracellular mechanisms to modify and generate covalent cross-links that determine a robust collagen network. This organized assembly explains the stiff, flexible nature of the cartilage constructs developed from hMSCs in this culture system.

  6. Collagen binding to Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Holderbaum, D.; Hall, G.S.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can bind soluble collagen in a specific, saturable manner. We have previously shown that some variability exists in the degree of collagen binding between different strains of heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed S. aureus which are commercially available as immunologic reagents. The present study demonstrates that live S. aureus of the Cowan 1 strain binds amounts of collagen per organism equivalent to those demonstrated previously in heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed bacteria but has an affinity over 100 times greater, with Kd values of 9.7 X 10(-11) M and 4.3 X 10(-8) M for live and heat-killed organisms, respectively. Studies were also carried out with S. aureus killed by ionizing radiation, since this method of killing the organism seemed less likely to alter the binding moieties on the surface than did heat killing. Bacteria killed by exposure to gamma radiation bound collagen in a manner essentially indistinguishable from that of live organisms. Binding of collagen to irradiated cells of the Cowan 1 strain was rapid, with equilibrium reached by 30 min at 22 degrees C, and was fully reversible. The binding was not inhibited by fibronectin, fibrinogen, C1q, or immunoglobulin G, suggesting a binding site for collagen distinct from those for these proteins. Collagen binding was virtually eliminated in trypsin-treated organisms, indicating that the binding site has a protein component. Of four strains examined, Cowan 1 and S. aureus ATCC 25923 showed saturable, specific binding, while strains Woods and S4 showed a complete lack of binding. These results suggest that some strains of S. aureus contain high-affinity binding sites for collagen. While the number of binding sites per bacterium varied sixfold in the two collagen-binding strains, the apparent affinity was similar.

  7. Associations between biomarkers of joint metabolism, hand osteoarthritis, and hand pain and function

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Imran; Perjar, Irina; Shi, Xiaoyan A.; Renner, Jordan B.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Golightly, Yvonne M.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Nelson, Amanda E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the associations between joint metabolism biomarkers and hand radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA, based on Kellgren Lawrence [KL] grade ≥2), symptoms, and function. Design Cross-sectional data were available for 663 participants (mean age 63 years, 63% white, 49% women). Three definitions of hand rOA were considered: 1) a composite measure involving at least 3 hand joints distributed bilaterally with 2 of 3 in the same joint group, including ≥1 distal interphalangeal joint, without metacarpophalangeal [MCP] swelling); 2) rOA in at least one joint of a group; and 3) number of joints with KL ≥2. We assessed hand symptoms and the 15-item AUSCAN (Likert format). We measured serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (sCOMP), hyaluronic acid (sHA),carboxy-terminal propeptide of type II collagen (sCPII), type II collagen degradation product (C2C), urinary C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide of type II collagen (uCTX-II), and urinary N-terminal crosslinked telopeptide (uNTX-1). Linear regression models were performed to assess associations between each biomarker with hand rOA, AUSCAN, and symptoms, adjusting for age, gender, race, current smoking/drinking status, BMI, and hip and knee rOA. Results In adjusted analyses, MCP (p<0.0001) and carpometacarpal rOA (p=0.003), and a higher number of hand joints with rOA (p=0.009), were associated with higher levels of sHA. Positive associations were seen between AUSCAN and hand symptoms and levels of sCOMP (p≤0.003) and sHA (p≤0.048). Conclusion Hand symptoms and higher AUSCAN scores were independently associated with higher levels of both sCOMP and sHA; hand rOA was associated only with sHA levels. PMID:24584914

  8. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  9. Collagen models as a probe in the decay of works of art: synthesis, conformation and immunological studies.

    PubMed

    Zevgiti, Stella; Sakarellos, Constantinos; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, Maria; Ioakimoglou, Eleni; Panou-Pomonis, Eugenia

    2007-02-01

    Proteinaceous substances such as collagen, casein and albumin have been widely used as binding media in a variety of works of art. Damages of these 'sensitive' materials, mainly caused of the influence of the environment, are responsible for the overall decay of works of art, and their identification is essential to understand ancient technologies, determine the extent of deterioration and help in future restoration and preservation processes. The most commonly used techniques for the identification of proteinaceous binding media are staining techniques, chromatography, spectrometry and immunological methods, although for the latter no systematic studies have been carried out until now. Aiming at contributing to the development of a reliable and reproducible immunoassay for the evaluation of the collagen-based decay of works of art, sequential polypeptides (Pro-X-Gly)n where X represents amino acid residues Val, Lys, Glu and (Hyp-Val-Gly)n were prepared as models of collagen fragments derived from artificially and naturally aged animal collagens. Conformational studies of the polypeptides by CD revealed the occurrence of polyproline II-like structures comparable with those of collagen. Polypeptides and collagen I were administered to animals, and the induced antibodies were used for the immunochemical detection and differentiation of collagen and collagen fragments. The combined application of (i) anti-collagen antibodies, which strongly interact with native collagen, but poorly recognized by artificially aged collagen and (ii) anti-polypeptide antibodies, which do not associate with native collagen, but are strongly recognized by collagen fragments in naturally or artificially aged collagen, is a valuable tool in determining the extent of decay in works of art.

  10. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering.

  11. The mRNAs for the three chains of human collagen type XI are widely distributed but not necessarily co-expressed: implications for homotrimeric, heterotrimeric and heterotypic collagen molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Lui, V C; Kong, R Y; Nicholls, J; Cheung, A N; Cheah, K S

    1995-01-01

    In cartilage collagen type XI exists as heterotrimeric molecules composed of alpha 1(XI), alpha 2(XI) and alpha 3(XI) subunits. Messenger RNAs for some of the alpha chains of collagen type XI have also been found in non-chondrogenic tissues but the chain composition of the molecule in these sites is not known. Some non-chondrogenic tissues also contain heterotrimers containing collagen alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(XI) chains. We have explored the possibility that collagen type XI could exist in differing trimeric forms in non-chondrogenic tissues and aimed to predict the subunit composition of this collagen in those tissues. The distribution and relative levels of expression of collagen alpha 1(XI), alpha 2(XI) and alpha 3(XI)/alpha 1(II) mRNAs in different human fetal tissues were studied. Expression of mRNAs for all three genes of collagen type XI is not restricted to cartilage but is widespread. However, in some non-chondrogenic tissues, the mRNAs for all three alpha chains of collagen type XI were not co-expressed, but collagen alpha 1(XI) and alpha 2(XI) mRNAs were found either singly or without collagen alpha 3(XI) transcripts. Collagen type XI may therefore exist as homotrimers and/or heterotrimers composed of two collagen alpha(XI) chains in some tissues. The distribution of mRNAs for collagen alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(I) were also studied. Co-expression of collagen type XI, alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(I) mRNAs was found for many tissues. These findings have implications for the possibility of additional chain associations for collagen types XI and V in cross-type heterotrimers within heterotypic fibrils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7487888

  12. From collagen chemistry towards cell therapy – a personal journey

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    The Fell–Muir Award requires the recipient to deliver a lecture and a review manuscript which provides a personal overview of significant scientific developments in the field of matrix biology over the period of the recipient's career. In this context, this review considers the collagen family of structural proteins and the advances in biochemical, molecular biological and genetic techniques which led to the elucidation of the structure, synthesis and function of this important group of extracellular matrix constituents. Particular attention is focussed on early research on the identification and assembly of the soluble precursors of collagen types I and II, and the identification of the precursor of basement membrane collagen type IV. In subsequent studies investigating the maintenance of the chick chondrocyte phenotype in culture, the influence of the extracellular milieu was found to influence markedly both cell morphology and collagen gene expression. These studies led to the discovery of collagen type X whose expression is restricted to hypertrophic chondrocytes at sites of endochondral ossification. Such research provided a prelude to investigations of mammalian endochondral ossification which is known to be aberrant in a variety of human chondrodysplasias and is reactivated in bone fracture repair and in osteoarthritis. The cloning of bovine and then human collagen type X genes facilitated studies in relevant human diseases and contributed to the discovery of mutations in the COL10A1 gene in families with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid. Clustering of mutations in the C-terminal domain of the type X collagen molecule has now been widely documented and investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms in animal models are beginning to suggest the prospect of novel treatment strategies. PMID:17696900

  13. Polymerized-Type I Collagen Induces Upregulation of Foxp3-Expressing CD4 Regulatory T Cells and Downregulation of IL-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells (Th17) Cells in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Macip-Rodríguez, Perla; Galindo-Feria, Angeles S.; Cruz-Robles, David; Soto-Abraham, Virgina; Escobar-Hernández, Sergio; Aguilar, Diana; Alpizar-Rodríguez, Deshiré; Férez-Blando, Karen; Llorente, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that polymerized-type I collagen (polymerized collagen) exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties. This work evaluated the effect of intramuscular administration of polymerized collagen in early and established collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and analyzed changes in Th subsets following therapy. Incidence of CIA was of 100% in mice challenged with type II collagen. Clinimorphometric analysis showed a downregulation of inflammation after administration of all treatments (P < 0.05). Histological analysis showed that the CIA-mice group had extensive bone erosion, pannus and severe focal inflammatory infiltrates. In contrast, there was a remarkable reduction in the severity of arthritis in mice under polymerized collagen, methotrexate or methotrexate/polymerized collagen treatment. Polymerized Collagen but not methotrexate induced tissue joint regeneration. Polymerized Collagen and methotrexate/polymerized collagen but not methotrexate alone induces downregulation of CD4+/IL17A+ T cells and upregulation of Tregs and CD4+/IFN-γ+ T cells. Thus, Polymerized Collagen could be an effective therapeutic agent in early and established rheumatoid arthritis by exerting downregulation of autoimmune inflammation. PMID:22028728

  14. Fibrils of different collagen types containing immobilised proteoglycans (PGs) as coatings: characterisation and influence on osteoblast behaviour.

    PubMed

    Douglas, T; Hempel, U; Mietrach, C; Heinemann, S; Scharnweber, D; Worch, H

    2007-11-01

    Collagen, the main organic component of bone, is used as a coating on titanium implants and as a scaffold material in bone tissue engineering. Surface modifications of titanium which promote osteoblast adhesion, proliferation and synthesis of collagen by osteoblasts are desirable. One biomimetic approach is the coating of titanium with collagen in fibrillar form. Other organic components of bone may be bound to fibrils and exert additional effects. In this study, the collagen types I-III were compared regarding their ability to bind the proteoglycans decorin and biglycan, which are found in bone. More collagen was bound to collagen II fibrils than to those of types I and III. Therefore, titanium surfaces were coated with fibrils of collagen type II containing biglycan or decorin or neither to investigate the effect of the proteoglycans on human primary osteoblast behaviour. In addition, the growth factor TGF-beta1 was adsorbed onto surfaces coated with fibrils of collagen type II containing biglycan or decorin or neither to investigate the influence of decorin and biglycan on the effect of TGF-beta1 on osteoblasts. Fibril-bound biglycan and decorin influence primary osteoblast behaviour by themselves. The presence of substrate-bound biglycan or decorin influences the effect of TGF-beta1. These results may be important when designing collagen-based coatings or scaffolds for tissue engineering, including those loaded with growth factors.

  15. Clinical uses of collagen shields.

    PubMed

    Poland, D E; Kaufman, H E

    1988-09-01

    Collagen shields immersed in tobramycin solution for one minute were applied to one eye each of 60 patients who had had cataract extraction, penetrating keratoplasty, or epikeratophakia or who had nonsurgical epithelial healing problems. The shields were well tolerated; one patient had the shield removed and one patient lost the shield in the early postoperative period. The surgical patients showed more rapid healing of epithelial defects after surgery with the use of the collagen shield. Patients with acute nonsurgical epithelial problems, such as contact lens abrasions and recurrent erosion, responded to the use of the collagen shield with improved healing. Patients with chronic epithelial defects responded poorly, presumably because underlying abnormalities in Bowman's layer prevented epithelial growth in the area of the defect. No infections were noted in any of the patients. The collagen shields appear to promote enhanced healing in patients with postsurgical and acute epithelial defects and to provide adequate antibiotic prophylaxis against infection in these vulnerable eyes.

  16. Association of Biomarkers With Pre–Radiographically Defined and Radiographically Defined Knee Osteoarthritis in a Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Cibere, Jolanda; Zhang, Hongbin; Garnero, Patrick; Poole, A. Robin; Lobanok, Tatiana; Saxne, Tore; Kraus, Virginia B.; Way, Amanda; Thorne, Anona; Wong, Hubert; Singer, Joel; Kopec, Jacek; Guermazi, Ali; Peterfy, Charles; Nicolaou, Savvakis; Munk, Peter L.; Esdaile, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate 10 biomarkers in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–determined, pre–radiographically defined osteoarthritis (pre-ROA) and radiographically defined OA (ROA) in a population-based cohort of subjects with symptomatic knee pain. Methods Two hundred one white subjects with knee pain, ages 40–79 years, were classified into OA subgroups according to MRI-based cartilage (MRC) scores (range 0–4) and Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grades of radiographic severity (range 0–4): no OA (MRC score 0, K/L grade <2), pre-ROA (MRC score ≥1, K/L grade <2), or ROA (MRC score ≥1, K/L grade ≥2). Urine and serum samples were assessed for levels of the following biomarkers: urinary biomarkers C-telopeptide of type II collagen (uCTX-II), type II and types I and II collagen cleavage neoepitopes (uC2C and uC1,2C, respectively), and N-telopeptide of type I collagen, and serum biomarkers sC1,2C, sC2C, C-propeptide of type II procollagen (sCPII), chondroitin sulfate 846 epitope, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, and hyaluronic acid. Multicategory logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association of OA subgroup with individual biomarker levels and biomarker ratios, adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index. Results The risk of ROA versus no OA increased with increasing levels of uCTX-II (odds ratio [OR] 3.12, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.35–7.21), uC2C (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.04–4.37), and uC1,2C (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.06–4.04), and was reduced in association with high levels of sCPII (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.30–0.94). The risk of pre-ROA versus no OA increased with increasing levels of uC2C (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.05–4.01) and uC1,2C (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.12–3.77). The ratios of type II collagen degradation markers to collagen synthesis markers were better than individual biomarkers at differentiating the OA subgroups, e.g., the ratio of [uCTXII][uC1,2C] to sCPII was associated with a risk of ROA versus no OA of 3.47 (95% CI 1.34–9.03) and a risk of pre

  17. Engineering fibrin-based tissue constructs from myofibroblasts and application of constraints and strain to induce cell and collagen reorganization.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Nicky; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2013-10-28

    Collagen content and organization in developing collagenous tissues can be influenced by local tissue strains and tissue constraint. Tissue engineers aim to use these principles to create tissues with predefined collagen architectures. A full understanding of the exact underlying processes of collagen remodeling to control the final tissue architecture, however, is lacking. In particular, little is known about the (re)orientation of collagen fibers in response to changes in tissue mechanical loading conditions. We developed an in vitro model system, consisting of biaxially-constrained myofibroblast-seeded fibrin constructs, to further elucidate collagen (re)orientation in response to i) reverting biaxial to uniaxial static loading conditions and ii) cyclic uniaxial loading of the biaxially-constrained constructs before and after a change in loading direction, with use of the Flexcell FX4000T loading device. Time-lapse confocal imaging is used to visualize collagen (re)orientation in a nondestructive manner. Cell and collagen organization in the constructs can be visualized in real-time, and an internal reference system allows us to relocate cells and collagen structures for time-lapse analysis. Various aspects of the model system can be adjusted, like cell source or use of healthy and diseased cells. Additives can be used to further elucidate mechanisms underlying collagen remodeling, by for example adding MMPs or blocking integrins. Shape and size of the construct can be easily adapted to specific needs, resulting in a highly tunable model system to study cell and collagen (re)organization.

  18. Human collagen produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  19. First analysis of a bacterial collagen-binding protein with collagen Toolkits: promiscuous binding of YadA to collagens may explain how YadA interferes with host processes.

    PubMed

    Leo, Jack C; Elovaara, Heli; Bihan, Dominique; Pugh, Nicholas; Kilpinen, Sami K; Raynal, Nicolas; Skurnik, Mikael; Farndale, Richard W; Goldman, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    The Yersinia adhesin YadA mediates the adhesion of the human enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica to collagens and other components of the extracellular matrix. Though YadA has been proposed to bind to a specific site in collagens, the exact binding determinants for YadA in native collagen have not previously been elucidated. We investigated the binding of YadA to collagen Toolkits, which are libraries of triple-helical peptides spanning the sequences of type II and III human collagens. YadA bound to many of them, in particular to peptides rich in hydroxyproline but with few charged residues. We were able to block the binding of YadA to collagen type IV with the triple-helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10), suggesting that the same site in YadA binds to triple-helical regions in network-forming collagens as well. We showed that a single Gly-Pro-Hyp triplet in a triple-helical peptide was sufficient to support YadA binding, but more than six triplets were required to form a tight YadA binding site. This is significantly longer than the case for eukaryotic collagen-binding proteins. YadA-expressing bacteria bound promiscuously to Toolkit peptides. Promiscuous binding could be advantageous for pathogenicity in Y. enterocolitica and, indeed, for other pathogenic bacteria. Many of the tightly binding peptides are also targets for eukaryotic collagen-binding proteins, and YadA was able to inhibit the interaction between selected Toolkit peptides and platelets. This leads to the intriguing possibility that YadA may interfere in vivo with host processes mediated by endogenous collagen-binding proteins.

  20. Furcation therapy with bioabsorbable collagen membrane: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, Vijay K; Gelskey, Shirley C; Mirbod, Sayed M

    2002-11-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of 2 barrier membranes, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) and collagen, in treating Class II furcation defects of mandibular molars in humans. Seventeen nonsmoking subjects with no history of systemic disease each presenting with Class II furcation defects in 2 mandibular molars were selected and underwent initial therapy. At the time of the surgery and at 8-month follow-up, soft-tissue measurements consisting of the gingival index, vertical and horizontal probing depth, recession and clinical attachment level were obtained at the midfurcation level. At the time of membrane placement and at 12-month re-entry, horizontal midfurcation probing depth and hard-tissue measurement of vertical fill (from the crown to the depth of the pocket) were also obtained. According to the surgical protocol, both membranes were completely covered with a coronally positioned flap, and in all cases healing was uneventful. Data were analyzed first by comparing baseline measurements (at surgery) with measurements at 8-month follow-up and 12-month re-entry for both e-PTFE and collagen membranes according to repeated-measures analysis of variance. The changes from surgery to follow-up and re-entry were then compared between the 2 treatment modalities with paired Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. No statistically significant differences were found between e-PTFE and collagen membranes with respect to gingival index, reduction in probing depth, gain in clinical attachment or filling of the horizontal defect. However, the improvement in vertical fill at 12-month re-entry was more substantial for the teeth treated with collagen membrane than those treated with e-PTFE (p < 0.05). Within the limits of this study, it appears that collagen is a beneficial material for regenerative therapy of Class II furcation defects in humans, yielding results that are similar to or better than (vertical fill) those for e-PTFE membrane.

  1. Paradoxical effects of cyclosporin A on collagen arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin A (CS-A) on collagen arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats is investigated. A 14-d course of CS-A treatment at doses of 15 mg/kg per day or more, begun on the same day as type II collagen immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis as well as humoral and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test responses to type II collagen, possibly by interfering with helper T cells. Additional studies demonstrated that CS-A treatment only during the induction phase of immunity proved to be successful. When CS-A treatment was started only during the immediately preclinical phase of arthritis or after the disease onset, a significant enhancement of the disease was obtained in a dose-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an augmentation of DTH skin reactions, while antibody responses were either suppressed or unaffected. These results appear to be attributable at least in part to a suppressive effect of CS-A on a population of suppressor T cells, thus resulting in a T cell-mediated helper effect. It is therefore reasonable to assume that the paradoxical effects of CS-A on collagen arthritis in rats might be caused by an altering of the sensitive balance of the two regulatory subpopulations of T cells. It is also possible that cell-mediated immune responses may play an important role in influencing the course of the disease. PMID:6644238

  2. Metal stabilization of collagen and de novo designed mimetic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Avanish S.; Xu, Fei; Pike, Douglas H.; Belure, Sandeep V.; Hasan, Nida F.; Drzewiecki, Kathryn E.; Shreiber, David I.; Nanda, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    We explore the design of metal binding sites to modulate triple-helix stability of collagen and collagen-mimetic peptides. Globular proteins commonly utilize metals to connect tertiary structural elements that are well separated in sequence, constraining structure and enhancing stability. It is more challenging to engineer structural metals into fibrous protein scaffolds, which lack the extensive tertiary contacts seen in globular proteins. In the collagen triple helix, the structural adjacency of the carboxy-termini of the three chains makes this region an attractive target for introducing metal binding sites. We engineered His3 sites based on structural modeling constraints into a series of designed homotrimeric and heterotrimeric peptides, assessing the capacity of metal binding to improve stability and in the case of heterotrimers, affect specificity of assembly. Notable enhancements in stability for both homo and heteromeric systems were observed upon addition of zinc(II) and several other metal ions only when all three histidine ligands were present. Metal binding affinities were consistent with the expected Irving-Williams series for imidazole. Unlike other metals tested, copper(II) also bound to peptides lacking histidine ligands. Acetylation of the peptide N-termini prevented copper binding, indicating proline backbone amide metal-coordination at this site. Copper similarly stabilized animal extracted Type I collagen in a metal specific fashion, highlighting the potential importance of metal homeostasis within the extracellular matrix. PMID:26225466

  3. Dermal type I collagen assessment by digital image analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Brianezi, Gabrielli; Grandi, Fabrizio; Bagatin, Ediléia; Enokihara, Mílvia Maria S. S.; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the main dermal component, and its evaluation is relevant to quantitative studies in dermatopathology. However, visual gradation (0 to 4+) has low precision and high subjectivity levels. This study aimed to develop and validate a digital morphometric analysis technique to estimate type I collagen levels in the papillary dermis. Four evaluators visually quantified (0 to 4+) the density of type I collagen in 63 images of forearm skin biopsies marked by immunohistochemistry and two evaluators analyzed the same images using digital morphometric techniques (RGB split colors (I) and color deconvolution (II)). Automated type I collagen density estimation in the papillary dermis (two techniques) were correlated with visual evaluations (Spearman's rho coefficients of 0.48 and 0.62 (p<0.01)). With regard to the inter-observer repeatability, the four evaluators who used visual classification had an intraclass correlation coefficient (for absolute agreement) of 0.53, while the other two evaluators who used digital analysis (algorithm II) had an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97. PMID:26560217

  4. Metal Stabilization of Collagen and de Novo Designed Mimetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Avanish S; Xu, Fei; Pike, Douglas H; Belure, Sandeep V; Hasan, Nida F; Drzewiecki, Kathryn E; Shreiber, David I; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-08-18

    We explore the design of metal binding sites to modulate triple-helix stability of collagen and collagen-mimetic peptides. Globular proteins commonly utilize metals to connect tertiary structural elements that are well separated in sequence, constraining structure and enhancing stability. It is more challenging to engineer structural metals into fibrous protein scaffolds, which lack the extensive tertiary contacts seen in globular proteins. In the collagen triple helix, the structural adjacency of the carboxy-termini of the three chains makes this region an attractive target for introducing metal binding sites. We engineered His3 sites based on structural modeling constraints into a series of designed homotrimeric and heterotrimeric peptides, assessing the capacity of metal binding to improve stability and in the case of heterotrimers, affect specificity of assembly. Notable enhancements in stability for both homo- and heteromeric systems were observed upon addition of zinc(II) and several other metal ions only when all three histidine ligands were present. Metal binding affinities were consistent with the expected Irving-Williams series for imidazole. Unlike other metals tested, copper(II) also bound to peptides lacking histidine ligands. Acetylation of the peptide N-termini prevented copper binding, indicating proline backbone amide metal-coordination at this site. Copper similarly stabilized animal extracted Type I collagen in a metal-specific fashion, highlighting the potential importance of metal homeostasis within the extracellular matrix.

  5. Biphasic function of focal adhesion kinase in endothelial tube formation induced by fibril-forming collagens.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Junko; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Keishi; Takeda, Teiji; Yamazaki, Masanori; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2008-10-03

    Migration and tube formation of endothelial cells are important in angiogenesis and require a coordinated response to the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) and growth factor. Since focal adhesion kinase (FAK) integrates signals from both ECM and growth factor, we investigated its role in angiogenesis. Type I and II collagens are fibril-forming collagens and stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to form tube structure. Although knockdown of FAK restrained cell motility and resulted in inhibition of tube formation, FAK degradation and tube formation occurred simultaneously after incubation with fibril-forming collagens. The compensation for the FAK degradation by a calpain inhibitor or transient over-expression of FAK resulted in disturbance of tube formation. These phenomena are specific to fibril-forming collagens and mediated via alpha2beta1 integrin. In conclusion, our data indicate that FAK is functioning in cell migration, but fibril-forming collagen-induced FAK degradation is necessary for endothelial tube formation.

  6. Interactions between collagen IX and biglycan measured by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-H.; Yeh, M.-L.; Geyer, Mark; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Huang, M.-H.; Heggeness, Michael H.; Hoeoek, Magnus; Luo, Z.-P. . E-mail: luo@bcm.tmc.edu

    2006-01-06

    The stability of the lattice-like type II collagen architecture of articular cartilage is paramount to its optimal function. Such stability not only depends on the rigidity of collagen fibrils themselves, but more importantly, on their interconnections. One known interconnection is through type IX and biglycan molecules. However, the mechanical properties of this interaction and its role in the overall stability remain unrevealed. Using atomic force microscopy, this study directly measured the mechanical strength (or the rupture force) of a single bond between collagen IX and biglycan. The results demonstrated that the rupture force of this single bond was 15 pN, which was significantly smaller than those of other known molecule interactions to date. This result suggested that type IX collagen and biglycan interaction may be the weak link in the cartilage collagen architecture, vulnerable to abnormal joint force and associated with disorders such as osteoarthritis.

  7. Treatment of Immobilized Collagen on Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) Nanoporous Membrane with Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2006-10-01

    In this work we treated type I collagen immobilized on different nanoporous membranes with microwave (MW) argon plasma. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanoporous substrates of poly(tetrafluoroethylene), with thickness varying from 35 to 70 μm and a 100 nm pore size, were employed as support for collagen immobilization. On the hydrophilic nanoporous membrane, after the MW plasma treatment, the immobilized collagen changed its morphology and showed a tendency to self-assemble in quasi-regular forms as microellipsoids. The presence of collagen immobilized on the nanoporous membrane after the MW plasma treatment was analyzed by detecting in the Raman spectrum an α-helix form, NH deformation vibration, amide II band at 1550 cm-1, a characteristic group frequency of the collagen macromolecule.

  8. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials.

  9. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications.

  10. Hydroperoxide formation in model collagens and collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Madison, S A; McCallum, J E B; Rojas Wahl, R U

    2002-02-01

    Protein hydroperoxides represent a relatively new concept in understanding biological oxidation chemistry. Here, we show with post-column-chemiluminescence that this sometimes remarkably stable and yet reactive species can be formed in collagen models and collagen type I when submitted to oxidative stress as exemplified by the Fenton reaction. These findings are supported by mass spectrometry and iodometry. Using (Proline-hydroxyproline-glycine)(10) (POG)(10), those hydroperoxides are stable for hours at room temperature and can give rise to free radicals in the presence of ferrous sulphate, as evidenced by EPR spin trapping with DMPO. Possible implications for biological systems are discussed with emphasis on collagen in the extracellular matrix in skin as a major type of connective tissue.

  11. The Role of Collagen Quaternary Structure in the Platelet:Collagen Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Brass, Lawrence F.; Bensusan, Howard B.

    1974-01-01

    We have investigated whether collagen queternary structure is required for the platelet: collagen interaction. Quaternary structure refers to the assembly of collagen monomers (tropocollagen) into polymers (native-type fibrils). Purified monomeric collagen was prepared from acetic acid extracts of fetal calfskin. Polymeric collagen was prepared by dispersion of bovine Achilles tendon collagen and by incubation of monomeric collagen at 37°C and pH 7.4. The state of polymerization was confirmed by electron microscopy. Release of platelet serotonin in the absence of platelet aggregation was used to determine the effectiveness of the platelet: collagen interaction. All forms of collagen produced serotonin release only after a lag period, but polymeric collagen gave a shorter lag period than did monomeric collagen. Monomeric collagen was also quanidinated selectively to convert collagen lysine groups to homoarginine, while leaving the arrangement of polar groups intact. Guanidination of monomeric collagen increased the rate of polymerization and reduced the lag time in serotonin release. Glucosamine (17 mM) retarded polymerization and inhibited the release of platelet serotonin by monomeric collagen but had little effect on release produced by thrombin or polymeric collagen. At the same concentration, glucosamine did not reduce the sensitivity of platelets to stimulation by collagen or block the platelet: collagen interaction. The only effect of glucosamine was on the collagen: collagen interaction. Galactosamine had a similar effect, but glucose, galactose, and N-acetylglycosamine had no effect. We conclude from this data that collagen monomers cannot effectively interact with platelets and that, therefore, collagen quaternary structure has a role in the recognition of collagen by platelets. PMID:4215825

  12. Early decrease of serum biomarkers of type II collagen degradation (Coll2-1) and joint inflammation (Coll2-1 NO₂ ) by hyaluronic acid intra-articular injections in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a research study part of the Biovisco study.

    PubMed

    Henrotin, Y; Chevalier, X; Deberg, M; Balblanc, J C; Richette, P; Mulleman, D; Maillet, B; Rannou, F; Piroth, C; Mathieu, P; Conrozier, T

    2013-06-01

    To measure the evolution of the serum levels of specific Osteoarthritis (OA) biomarker, Coll2-1 and Coll2-1 NO₂ in knee osteoarthritic patients after viscosupplementation (VS). Fifty-one patients with unilateral symptomatic knee were recruited for this prospective open label study. They received three intra-articular injections of 2 ml of hyaluronic acid (Hylan GF-20) and were followed for 3 months. Walking pain was evaluated and serum samples were taken at each visit. Coll2-1 and Coll2-1 NO₂ were measured in the serum using specific immunoassays. Variations over time of each parameter and predictive factor of response were studied. Forty-five patients were analyzed. The serum concentrations of Coll2-1 and Coll2-1 NO₂ were significantly higher in KL III/IV patients compared to KL I/II patients at baseline and decreased systematically over time after VS. Its effect was ever more pronounced in patients with KL III/IV. The serum concentration of Coll2-1 was significantly lower at baseline in responders than in non-responders. This study suggests a rapid slowdown of type II collagen degradation and joint inflammation after VS with Hylan G-20 and gives additional information for the validation of accurate biomarkers for OA. The serum level of Coll2-1 appeared to be a predictive factor for response to treatment.

  13. Changes in collagen metabolism and proteinolysis after repeated inhalation exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, J.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Rebar, A.H.; Horoda, R.A.; Henderson, R.F.

    1987-04-01

    To study the changes in collagen metabolism that occur in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, female rats were exposed to 0, 0.57, and 1.1 ppm ozone for 19 hr/day for 11 days and sacrificed 12 or 60 days after initiation of exposure. The lungs of rats sacrificed at 12 days after initiation of exposure to 1.1 ppm had interstitial pneumonia characterized by a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, type II cell hyperplasia, and fibroplasia, a proliferation of the collagen-producing cells; increased cathepsin D and macrophage elastase activity, indicating macrophage-induced proteinolysis; a reduced percentage of the increased collagen production that was ultrafilterable, indicating a decreased rate of intracellular degradation of newly produced collagen prior to its secretion; and increased lavage fluid hydroxyproline, indicating turnover of extracellular collagenous matrix. Reduced intracellular collagen degradation correlated directly with both increased net collagen production and fibroplasia in rats exposed to 1.1 ppm ozone for 11 days. These changes preceded an increased total lung collagen and the development of modest fibroplasia and fibrosis in the alveolar duct regions by 60 days after the 1.1 ppm ozone exposure was initiated.

  14. Effects of strontium on collagen content and expression of related genes in rat chondrocytes cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Lei; Shi, Xiaoxia; Yin, Liheng; Zhang, Yuming; Li, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Guowen

    2013-06-01

    Strontium stimulates cartilage matrix formation in vitro. However, the mechanisms governing these effects have not yet been extensively reported. In this study, chondrocytes were isolated from rat articular cartilage by enzymatic digestion and cultured for 24-72 h with 1-5 mM strontium. We investigated the effects of different concentrations of strontium on collagen content, type II collagen, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 expression in rat cultured articular chondrocytes in vitro. The collagen content of the chondrocytes, determined as hydroxyproline, was measured by a colorimetry method. Type II collagen, IGF-1, and MMP-13 mRNA abundance and protein expression levels were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and western blot, respectively. The results showed that collagen content from the chondrocytes extracellular matrix increased with increasing strontium concentration. Moreover, 3 and 5 mM strontium strongly stimulated protein expression and mRNA levels of type II collagen and IGF-1. Conversely, MMP-13 expression in chondrocytes decreased dose-dependently with increasing strontium concentration. These results should provide insight into the ability of strontium to promote chondrocyte extracellular matrix synthesis. Strontium could promote collagen synthesis and suppress collagen degradation via the repression of MMP-13 expression.

  15. Mandibular Cartilage Collagen Network Nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mandibular condyle cartilage (MCC) has a unique structure among articular cartilages; however, little is known about its nanoscale collagen network architecture, hampering design of regeneration therapies and rigorous evaluation of regeneration experiment outcomes in preclinical research. Helium ion microscopy is a novel technology with a long depth of field that is uniquely suited to imaging open 3D collagen networks at multiple scales without obscuring conductive coatings. Objective The objective of this research was to image, at the micro- and nanoscales, the depth-dependent MCC collagen network architecture. Design MCC was collected from New Zealand white rabbits. Images of MCC zones were acquired using helium ion, transmission electron, and light microscopy. Network fibril and canal diameters were measured. Results For the first time, the MCC was visualized as a 3D collagen fibril structure at the nanoscale, the length scale of network assembly. Fibril diameters ranged from 7 to 110 nm and varied by zone. The articular surface was composed of a fine mesh that was woven through thin layers of larger fibrils. The fibrous zone was composed of approximately orthogonal lamellae of aligned fibrils. Fibrocyte processes surrounded collagen bundles forming extracellular compartments. The proliferative, mature, and hypertrophic zones were composed of a branched network that was progressively remodeled to accommodate chondrocyte hypertrophy. Osteoid fibrils were woven around osteoblast cytoplasmic processes to create numerous canals similar in size to canaliculi of mature bone. Conclusion This multiscale investigation advances our foundational understanding of the complex, layered 3D architecture of the MCC collagen network. PMID:27375843

  16. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties.

  17. [Disc electrophoresis of collagen protein (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Reitmayr, P; Verzár, F

    1975-01-01

    The composition of proteins extracted from tendon collagen is investigated by disc electrophoresis. No qualitative differences can be demonstrated between young and old collagen. The action of formaldehyde and methionine on the tendons has no effect on the electrophoretic picture.

  18. Achondrogenesis type II, abnormalities of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Chou, J W; Campbell, D

    1987-09-01

    Immune and lectin histochemical and microchemical methods were employed to study growth cartilage from seven cases of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino). The normal architecture of the epiphyseal and growth plate cartilage was replaced by a morphologically heterogeneous tissue. Some areas were comprised of vascular canals surrounded by extensive fibrous tissue and enlarged cells that had the appearance and histochemical characteristics of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Other areas contained a mixture of cells ranging from small to the enlarged chondrocytes. The extracellular matrix in the latter areas was more abundant and had characteristics of both precartilage mesenchymal matrix and typical cartilage matrix; it contained types I and II collagen, cartilage proteoglycan, fibronectin, and peanut agglutinin binding glycoconjugate(s). Peptide mapping of cyanogen bromide cartilage collagen peptides revealed the presence of types I and II collagen. These observations could be explained by a defect in the biosynthesis of type II collagen or in chondrocyte differentiation.

  19. Vibrational neutron spectroscopy of collagen and model polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Middendorf, H D; Hayward, R L; Parker, S F; Bradshaw, J; Miller, A

    1995-01-01

    A pulsed source neutron spectrometer has been used to measure vibrational spectra (20-4000 cm-1) of dry and hydrated type I collagen fibers, and of two model polypeptides, polyproline II and (prolyl-prolyl-glycine)10, at temperatures of 30 and 120 K. the collagen spectra provide the first high resolution neutron views of the proton-dominated modes of a protein over a wide energy range from the low frequency phonon region to the rich spectrum of localized high frequency modes. Several bands show a level of fine structure approaching that of optical data. The principal features of the spectra are assigned. A difference spectrum is obtained for protein associated water, which displays an acoustic peak similar to pure ice and a librational band shifted to lower frequency by the influence of the protein. Hydrogen-weighted densities of states are extracted for collagen and the model polypeptides, and compared with published calculations. Proton mean-square displacements are calculated from Debye-Waller factors measured in parallel quasi-elastic neutron-scattering experiments. Combined with the collagen density of states function, these yield an effective mass of 14.5 a.m.u. for the low frequency harmonic oscillators, indicating that the extended atom approximation, which simplifies analyses of low frequency protein dynamics, is appropriate. PMID:8527680

  20. Biologically and diagenetically derived peptide modifications in moa collagens

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Timothy P.; Schroeter, Elena R.; Schweitzer, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    The modifications that occur on proteins in natural environments over time are not well studied, yet characterizing them is vital to correctly interpret sequence data recovered from fossils. The recently extinct moa (Dinornithidae) is an excellent candidate for investigating the preservation of proteins, their post-translational modifications (PTMs) and diagenetic alterations during degradation. Moa protein extracts were analysed using mass spectrometry, and peptides from collagen I, collagen II and collagen V were identified. We also identified biologically derived PTMs (i.e. methylation, di-methylation, alkylation, hydroxylation, fucosylation) on amino acids at locations consistent with extant proteins. In addition to these in vivo modifications, we detected novel modifications that are probably diagenetically derived. These include loss of hydroxylation/glutamic semialdehyde, carboxymethyllysine and peptide backbone cleavage, as well as previously noted deamidation. Moa collagen sequences and modifications provide a baseline by which to evaluate proteomic studies of other fossils, and a framework for defining the molecular relationship of moa to other closely related taxa. PMID:25972464

  1. Biologically and diagenetically derived peptide modifications in moa collagens.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Timothy P; Schroeter, Elena R; Schweitzer, Mary H

    2015-06-07

    The modifications that occur on proteins in natural environments over time are not well studied, yet characterizing them is vital to correctly interpret sequence data recovered from fossils. The recently extinct moa (Dinornithidae) is an excellent candidate for investigating the preservation of proteins, their post-translational modifications (PTMs) and diagenetic alterations during degradation. Moa protein extracts were analysed using mass spectrometry, and peptides from collagen I, collagen II and collagen V were identified. We also identified biologically derived PTMs (i.e. methylation, di-methylation, alkylation, hydroxylation, fucosylation) on amino acids at locations consistent with extant proteins. In addition to these in vivo modifications, we detected novel modifications that are probably diagenetically derived. These include loss of hydroxylation/glutamic semialdehyde, carboxymethyllysine and peptide backbone cleavage, as well as previously noted deamidation. Moa collagen sequences and modifications provide a baseline by which to evaluate proteomic studies of other fossils, and a framework for defining the molecular relationship of moa to other closely related taxa.

  2. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Adherence to Collagen under Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Nehal; Teeters, Mark A.; Patti, Joseph M.; Höök, Magnus; Ross, Julia M.

    1999-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common etiological agent of bacterial arthritis and acute osteomyelitis and has been shown to bind to type II collagen under static and dynamic conditions. We have previously reported the effect of shear on the adhesion of S. aureus Phillips to collagen and found that this process is shear dependent (Z. Li, M. Höök, J. M. Patti, and J. M. Ross, Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24[Suppl. 1]:S–55). In this study, we used recombinant collagen adhesin fragments as well as polyclonal antibodies generated against adhesin fragments in attempts to inhibit bacterial adhesion. A parallel-plate flow chamber was used in a dynamic adhesion assay, and quantification of adhesion was accomplished by phase contrast video microscopy coupled with digital image processing. We report that both recombinant fragments studied, M19 and M55, and both polyclonal antibodies studied, α-M17 and α-M55, inhibit adhesion to varying degrees and that these processes are shear dependent. The M55 peptide and α-M55 cause much higher levels of inhibition than M19 and α-M17, respectively, at all wall shear rates studied. Our results demonstrate the importance of using a dynamic system in the assessment of inhibitory strategies and suggest the possible use of M55 and α-M55 in clinical applications to prevent infections caused by S. aureus adhesion to collagen. PMID:9916063

  3. The materials science of collagen.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Vincent R; Yang, Wen; Meyers, Marc A

    2015-12-01

    Collagen is the principal biopolymer in the extracellular matrix of both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is produced in specialized cells (fibroblasts) and extracted into the body by a series of intra and extracellular steps. It is prevalent in connective tissues, and the arrangement of collagen determines the mechanical response. In biomineralized materials, its fraction and spatial distribution provide the necessary toughness and anisotropy. We review the structure of collagen, with emphasis on its hierarchical arrangement, and present constitutive equations that describe its mechanical response, classified into three groups: hyperelastic macroscopic models based on strain energy in which strain energy functions are developed; macroscopic mathematical fits with a nonlinear constitutive response; structurally and physically based models where a constitutive equation of a linear elastic material is modified by geometric characteristics. Viscoelasticity is incorporated into the existing constitutive models and the effect of hydration is discussed. We illustrate the importance of collagen with descriptions of its organization and properties in skin, fish scales, and bone, focusing on the findings of our group.

  4. Interleukin 17 induces cartilage collagen breakdown: novel synergistic effects in combination with proinflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, P; Henderson, N; Logan, C; Life, P; Cawston, T; Rowan, A

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether interleukin 17 (IL17), derived specifically from T cells, can promote type II collagen release from cartilage. The ability of IL17 to synergise with other proinflammatory mediators to induce collagen release from cartilage, and what effect anti-inflammatory agents had on this process, was also assessed. Methods: IL17 alone, or in combination with IL1, IL6, oncostatin M (OSM), or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), was added to bovine nasal cartilage explant cultures. Proteoglycan and collagen release were determined. Collagenolytic activity was determined by bioassay. Chondroprotective effects of IL4, IL13, transforming growth factor ß1 (TGFß1) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) were assessed by inclusion in the explant cultures. Results: IL17 alone stimulated a dose dependent release of proteoglycan and type II collagen from bovine nasal cartilage explants. Suboptimal doses of IL17 synergised potently with TNFα, IL1, OSM, and IL6 to promote collagen degradation. This collagen release was completely inhibited by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and BB-94 (a synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor), and was significantly reduced by IL4, IL13, TGFß1, and IGF1. In IL17 treated chondrocytes, mRNA expression for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 was detected. Moreover, a synergistic induction of these MMPs was seen when IL17 was combined with other proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions: IL17 can, alone and synergistically in combination with other proinflammatory cytokines, promote chondrocyte mediated MMP dependent type II collagen release from cartilage. Because levels of all these proinflammatory cytokines are raised in rheumatoid synovial fluids, this study suggests that IL17 may act as a potent upstream mediator of cartilage collagen breakdown in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:12117676

  5. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlinoi, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-07-18

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The 'cell interaction domain' is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The 'matrix interaction domain' may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging.

  6. The collagenous gastroenteritides: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Purva; McKenna, Barbara J

    2010-10-01

    Collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, and collagenous colitis share striking histologic similarities and occur together in some patients. They also share some drug and disease associations. Pediatric cases of collagenous gastritis, however, lack most of these associations. The etiologies of the collagenous gastroenteritides are not known, so it is not clear whether they are similar because they share pathogeneses, or because they indicate a common histologic response to varying injuries. The features, disease and drug associations, and the inquiries into the pathogenesis of these disorders are reviewed.

  7. Collagen I confers gamma radiation resistance.

    PubMed

    Azorin, E; González-Martínez, P R; Azorin, J

    2012-12-01

    The effect of collagen on the response of somatomammotroph tumor cells (GH3) to gamma, radiation therapy was studied in vitro. After incubating confluent GH3 cell monolayers in a serum-free, maintaining medium, either with or without collagen, the monolayers were irradiated with 137Cs, gamma radiation. Collagen reduces cell mortality via ERK1/2 activation, abolishing gamma radiation, cell death, and promotes cell invasion when acting in synergy with collagen and in association with the, MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway activation. The presence of collagen in somatomammotroph tumors, confers resistance to radiation.

  8. Collagen: a network for regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pawelec, K. M.; Best, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    The basic building block of the extra-cellular matrix in native tissue is collagen. As a structural protein, collagen has an inherent biocompatibility making it an ideal material for regenerative medicine. Cellular response, mediated by integrins, is dictated by the structure and chemistry of the collagen fibers. Fiber formation, via fibrillogenesis, can be controlled in vitro by several factors: pH, ionic strength, and collagen structure. After formation, fibers are stabilized via cross-linking. The final bioactivity of collagen scaffolds is a result of both processes. By considering each step of fabrication, scaffolds can be tailored for the specific needs of each tissue, improving their therapeutic potential. PMID:27928505

  9. Bortezomib prevents the expression of MMP-13 and the degradation of collagen type 2 in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weihua; Zhang, Weikai; Li, Feng; Guo, Fengjing; Chen, Anmin

    2014-09-26

    The structural backbone of extracellular matrix in cartilage is the collagen fibril, which is mainly composed of type II collagen. A measurable increase in type II collagen denaturation and degradation has been found in early Osteoarthritis (OA). Pro-inflammatory cytokine such as TNF-α produced in OA cartilage induced the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), which targets and degrades type II collagen. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor approved by the FDA for treatment of multiple myeloma and mantel cell lymphoma. The effects of bortezomib in OA have not been reported before. In this study, we found that bortezomib is able to suppress the degradation of type II collagen induced by TNF-α in human chondrocytes. Mechanistically, bortezomib treatment inhibits the expression of IRF-1 through blunting JAK2/STAT1 pathway, thereby prevents the induction of MMP-13 as well as the degradation of type II collagen. Our findings suggest the therapeutic potentials of bortezomib in patients with OA.

  10. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery.

  11. Collagen fibrillogenesis in the development of the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Anthony J; Isaacs, Marc D; Hughes, C; Caterson, B; Ralphs, J R

    2011-10-11

    The annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc is a complex, radial-ply connective tissue consisting of concentric lamellae of oriented collagen. Whilst much is known of the structure of the mature annulus, less is known of how its complex collagenous architecture becomes established; an understanding of which could inform future repair/regenerative strategies. Here, using a rat disc developmental series, we describe events in the establishment of the collagenous framework of the annulus at light and electron microscopic levels and examine the involvement of class I and II small leucine rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) in the matrix assembly process. We show that a period of sustained, ordered matrix deposition follows the initial cellular differentiation/orientation phase within the foetal disc. Fibrillar matrix is deposited from recesses within the plasma membrane into compartments of interstitial space within the outer annulus - the orientation of the secreted collagen reflecting the initial cellular orientation of the laminae. Medially, we demonstrate the development of a reinforcing 'cage' of collagen fibre bundles around the foetal nucleus pulpous. This derives from the fusion of collagen bundles between presumptive end-plate and inner annulus. By birth, the distinct collagenous architectures are established and the disc undergoes considerable enlargement to maturity. We show that fibromodulin plays a prominent role in foetal development of the annulus and its attachment to vertebral bodies. With the exception of keratocan, the other SLRPs appear associated more with cartilage development within the vertebral column, but all become more prominent within the disc during its growth and differentiation.

  12. Collagen duplicate genes of bone and cartilage participate during regeneration of zebrafish fin skeleton.

    PubMed

    Duran, I; Csukasi, F; Taylor, S P; Krakow, D; Becerra, J; Bombarely, A; Marí-Beffa, M

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish fin is widely used as a model for skeleton regeneration. For years, the nature of the fin skeleton has been controversial as its extracellular matrix shows hybrid characteristics of both bone and cartilage. The presence of co-orthologs genes also increases the complexity of these tissues. In this article, we have identified and described the expression of fibrillar collagens in zebrafish fin skeleton. We found that genes coding for types I, II, V, XI and XXVII collagens are duplicated, showing in several cases, different expression domains. We also identified specific genomic features, such as the presence of type XXIV collagen and the absence of type III collagen in the zebrafish genome. Our study showed that actinotrichia-forming cells and osteoblasts synthesize a wide variety of these fibrillar collagens during fin regeneration. An intertrichial domain expressing most of the collagens was located in the transition between the mesenchyme condensations of actinotrichia and lepidotrichia and may determine an important niche associated with fin skeleton morphogenesis. We also confirmed the hybrid nature of the fin exoskeleton and provided a complete description of those fibrillar collagens expressed during the formation of the fin skeleton.

  13. Phospholipase D1 decreases type I collagen levels in hepatic stellate cells via induction of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Seo, H-Y; Jang, B-K; Jung, Y-A; Lee, E-J; Kim, H-S; Jeon, J-H; Kim, J-G; Lee, I-K; Kim, M-K; Park, K-G

    2014-06-20

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are major players in liver fibrogenesis. Accumulating evidence shows that suppression of autophagy plays an important role in the development and progression of liver disease. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to yield phosphatidic acid (PA) and choline, was recently shown to modulate autophagy. However, little is known about the effects of PLD1 on the production of type I collagen that characterizes liver fibrosis. Here, we examined whether PLD1 regulates type I collagen levels in HSCs through induction of autophagy. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PLD-1 (Ad-PLD1) reduced type I collagen levels in the activated human HSC lines, hTERT and LX2. Overexpression of PLD1 in HSCs led to induction of autophagy as demonstrated by increased LC3-II conversion and formation of LC3 puncta, and decreased p62 abundance. Moreover, inhibiting the induction of autophagy by treating cells with bafilomycin or a small interfering (si)RNA for ATG7 rescued Ad-PLD1-induced suppression of type I collagen accumulation in HSCs. The effects of PLD on type I collagen levels were not related to TGF-β/Smad signaling. Furthermore, treatment of cells with PA induced autophagy and inhibited type I collagen accumulation. The present study indicates that PLD1 plays a role in regulating type I collagen accumulation through induction of autophagy.

  14. Association of ADAM12-S protein with radiographic features of knee osteoarthritis and bone and cartilage markers.

    PubMed

    Kerna, I; Kisand, K; Laitinen, P; Tamm, A E; Kumm, J; Lintrop, M; Tamm, A O

    2012-02-01

    ADAM12 (A disintegrin and metalloprotease) is one of the candidate genes demonstrating susceptibility to osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between ADAM12-S protein and radiographic knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and its correlation to several bone and cartilage biomarkers. The ADAM12-S protein was measured in 276 subjects (60% women, aged 32-60 years), including 181 individuals with and 95 without radiographic KOA features. The radiographs were obtained from both tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) joints. The serum levels of ADAM12-S protein were measured by DELFIA1/AutoDELFIA research kit. The ADAM12-S protein was found in detectable ranges in 43 subjects (16 men), without statistical difference between the two genders. In the whole group, the ADAM12-S was related to radiographic KOA grades in TF (P = 0.004) as well in PF joint (P = 0.003). We also found a correlation between ADAM12-S protein and osteophytes in TF and/or PF joints (P = 0.003). No correlations were found between serum levels of S-CTx-I (C-terminal cross-linked telopeptides of type I collagen) or S-PINP (type I procollagen N-terminal propeptide) and ADAM12-S. Similarly, in the whole group, the ADAM12-S protein was not correlated with U-CTx-II (urinary C-telopeptide fragments of type II collagen); however, in the female group, trend to positive correlation between the investigated biomarkers (P = 0.019) was observed. The ADAM12-S protein could be elevated in some KOA cases, and this elevation correlates with the grades of the disease, mostly owning to development of osteophytes. This finding suggests the possible involvement of the ADAM12-S protein in the pathogenesis of KOA.

  15. Perforin deficiency attenuates collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Kristin; Knipper, Annika; Tu-Rapp, Hoang; Koczan, Dirk; Kreutzer, Hans-Jürgen; Nizze, Horst; Mix, Eilhard; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Holmdahl, Rikard; Ibrahim, Saleh M

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an approved animal model for rheumatoid arthritis, is thought to be a T cell-dependent disease. There is evidence that CD8+ T cells are a major subset controlling the pathogenesis of CIA. They probably contribute to certain features of disease, namely tissue destruction and synovial hyperplasia. In this study we examined the role of perforin (pfp), a key molecule of the cytotoxic death pathway that is expressed mainly in CD8+ T cells, for the pathogenesis of CIA. We generated DBA/1J mice suffering from mutations of the pfp molecule, DBA/1J-pfp-/-, and studied their susceptibility to arthritis. As a result, pfp-deficient mice showed a reduced incidence (DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 64%; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 54%), a slightly delayed onset (onset of disease: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 53 ± 3.6; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 59 ± 4.9 (mean ± SEM), and milder form of the disease (maximum disease score: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 7.3 ± 1.1; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 3.4 ± 1.4 (mean ± SEM); P < 0.05). Concomitantly, peripheral T cell proliferation in response to the specific antigen bovine collagen II was increased in pfp-/- mice compared with pfp+/+ mice, arguing for an impaired killing of autoreactive T cells caused by pfp deficiency. Thus, pfp-mediated cytotoxicity is involved in the initiation of tissue damage in arthritis, but pfp-independent cytotoxic death pathways might also contribute to CIA. PMID:15987490

  16. Activation of hageman factor by collagen

    PubMed Central

    Wilner, G. D.; Nossel, H. L.; LeRoy, E. C.

    1968-01-01

    Purified acid-soluble and insoluble human collagen accelerated the clotting of plateletpoor plasma in silicone-treated tubes. The clot-promoting effect did not appear to be due to thromboplastic activity since the collagen preparations did not activate factor X in the presence of factor VII and calcium. Instead, collagen appeared to accelerate clotting by activating Hageman factor (factor XII) on the basis of the following findings: collagen increased the clot-promoting activity of partially purified Hageman factor but exerted no further effect in the presence of kaolin, a known activator of Hageman factor; clot-promoting eluates were obtained from collagen exposed to normal, hemophilic, or PTC-deficient plasma but not from collagen exposed to Hageman or PTA-deficient plasma. The collagen molecule itself appeared to be required for the clot-promoting activity since digestion with collagenase or thermal denaturation at pH 2.5 (about 35°C) resulted in very marked reduction in clot-promoting activity. Since thermal denaturation is associated with transformation of collagen structure from triple helical to random coil form, it is suggested that the native form of collagen is essential for the ability to activate Hageman factor. Blockage of the free amino groups by treatment with nitrous acid or dinitrofluorobenzene only slightly reduced the clot-promoting activity of collagen. In contrast, since addition of cationic proteins to collagen markedly reduced pro-coagulant activity it is suggested that negatively charged sites on the collagen molecule are critical for Hageman factor activation. This suggestion is supported by the finding that pepsin treatment of collagen, which removes the predominantly negatively charged telopeptides, results in significant decrease in coagulant activity. Esterification of collagen, which neutralizes 80-90% of the free carboxyl groups, reduced coagulant activity by over 90% and it is suggested that the free carboxyl groups of glutamic and

  17. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac fibroblast

  18. [Study on the effect of temperature on the conformation of cross-linked collagen by two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hui; Tian, Hui-Lin; Li, Ji-Heng; Li, Guo-Ying

    2012-06-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two dimensional correlation analysis method were applied to study a denaturing process of uncross-linked collagen and cross-linked collagen during varying temperature. It was found that the intensity of typically characteristic absorptions of collagen decreased and its peak shifted to low frequency, The amide II central absorbance peak moved to a lower frequency by about 10 cm(-1), which indicated that the inter-chain hydrogen bonds which stabilized the triple helix conformation of collagen were disrupted during thermal denaturation, resulting in a conformational change. The intensity of auto-peak at 1 515 cm(-1) was maximum, which suggested that the temperature had a big impact on amide II. In comparison with uncross-linked collagen, the intensity of cross-peaks of cross-linked collagen was weaker, which demonstrated that the effect of temperature on the structure of cross-linked collagen was smaller, and the thermal stability properties of collagen solution could be improved by cross-linking. While the order of second structure changes of cross-linked collagen was different. These fundamental data should provide available information for understanding the relationship between the structure and function of cross-linked collagen.

  19. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  20. Immunostimulation effect of jellyfish collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Goto, Yoko; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Akiyama, Koichi; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Certain edible large jellyfishes belonging to the order Rhizostomeae are consumed in large quantities in China and Japan. The exumbrella part of the edible jellyfish Stomolophus nomurai was cut and soaked in dilute hydrochloric acid solution (pH 3.0) for 12 h, and heated at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The immunostimulation effects of the jellyfish extract were examined. The jellyfish extract enhanced IgM production of human hybridoma HB4C5 cells 34-fold. IgM and IgG production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were also accelerated, 2.8- and 1.4-fold respectively. Moreover, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by human PBL was stimulated 100- and 17-fold respectively. Collagenase treatment inactivated the immunostimulation activity of the jellyfish extract. In addition, purified collagen from bovine Achilles' tendon accelerated IgM production of hybridoma cells. These facts mean that collagen has an immunostimulation effect, and that the active substance in jellyfish extract is collagen.

  1. Matrix composition of cartilaginous anlagen in achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino).

    PubMed

    Dertinger, Susanne; Söeder, Stephan; Bösch, Hubert; Aigner, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias represent in vivo models of genetic defects. Achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino), caused by a genetic defect in the major cartilage matrix protein, collagen type II, is a rare and severe skeletal dysplasia. It comprises a severe derangement of the fetal growth plate cartilage with subsequent ossification defects. In this study, we analyzed the matrix composition and cell differentiation pattern in 3 relatives with achondrogenesis type II. Most strikingly we found a strongly reduced collagen type II and moderately reduced aggrecan proteoglycan content in the dysplastic cartilage matrix. Type II collagen is, at least to some extent, replaced by collagens type I III, and VI. Ultrastructural analysis of the dysplastic cartilage matrix demonstrated a distended rER (rough endoplasmic reticulum), which is typical for this condition and most likely related to improper processing and retention of genetically altered type II collagen. Immunostaining for type IIA and X collagens suggest a severe delay in chondrocyte maturation. Thus, the genetic defect in the present cases leads most likely to a severe retention of collagen type II in the rER and, therefore, a strongly reduced collagen deposition and replacement by other interstitial collagens. However, the latter are less efficient in binding aggrecan proteoglycans in the dysplastic cartilage matrix. Additionally, a delay in chondrocyte maturation appears to be important in achondrogenesis type II.

  2. Collagen-coated microparticles in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Praveen Kumar; Srinivasan, Aishwarya

    2009-07-01

    Advantages of drug-incorporated collagen particles have been described for the controlled delivery system for therapeutic actions. The attractiveness of collagen lies in its low immunogenicity and high biocompatibility. It is also recognized by the body as a natural constituent rather than a foreign body. Our research and development efforts are focused towards addressing some of the limitations of collagen, like the high viscosity of an aqueous phase, nondissolution in neutral pH buffers, thermal instability (denaturation) and biodegradability, to make it an ideal material for drug delivery with particular reference to microparticles. These limitations could be overcome by making collagen conjugates with other biomaterials or chemically modifying collagen monomer without affecting its triple helical conformation and maintaining its native properties. This article highlights collagen microparticles' present status as a carrier in drug delivery.

  3. Collagen-Based Biomaterials for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Sayani; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    With its wide distribution in soft and hard connective tissues, collagen is the most abundant of animal proteins. In vitro, natural collagen can be formed into highly organized, three-dimensional scaffolds that are intrinsically biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic upon exogenous application, and endowed with high tensile strength. These attributes make collagen the material of choice for wound healing and tissue engineering applications. In this article, we review the structure and molecular interactions of collagen in vivo; the recent use of natural collagen in sponges, injectables, films and membranes, dressings, and skin grafts; and the on-going development of synthetic collagen mimetic peptides as pylons to anchor cytoactive agents in wound beds. PMID:24633807

  4. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    PubMed Central

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  5. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks.

    PubMed

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A; MacKintosh, Fred C

    2015-08-04

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress-strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks.

  6. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Michael S. Yu CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT 84112 REPORT DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...SUBTITLE Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0555 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...peptide (CMP) as a collagen targeting agents that will allow imaging of invasive PCa. Since CMP binds to unstructured collagens more readily, it is

  7. Dauer-independent insulin/IGF-1-signalling implicates collagen remodelling in longevity.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Collin Y; Landis, Jess N; Porter Abate, Jess; Murphy, Coleen T; Blackwell, T Keith

    2015-03-05

    Interventions that delay ageing mobilize mechanisms that protect and repair cellular components, but it is unknown how these interventions might slow the functional decline of extracellular matrices, which are also damaged during ageing. Reduced insulin/IGF-1 signalling (rIIS) extends lifespan across the evolutionary spectrum, and in juvenile Caenorhabditis elegans also allows the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO to induce development into dauer, a diapause that withstands harsh conditions. It has been suggested that rIIS delays C. elegans ageing through activation of dauer-related processes during adulthood, but some rIIS conditions confer robust lifespan extension unaccompanied by any dauer-like traits. Here we show that rIIS can promote C. elegans longevity through a program that is genetically distinct from the dauer pathway, and requires the Nrf (NF-E2-related factor) orthologue SKN-1 acting in parallel to DAF-16. SKN-1 is inhibited by IIS and has been broadly implicated in longevity, but is rendered dispensable for rIIS lifespan extension by even mild activity of dauer-related processes. When IIS is decreased under conditions that do not induce dauer traits, SKN-1 most prominently increases expression of collagens and other extracellular matrix genes. Diverse genetic, nutritional, and pharmacological pro-longevity interventions delay an age-related decline in collagen expression. These collagens mediate adulthood extracellular matrix remodelling, and are needed for ageing to be delayed by interventions that do not involve dauer traits. By genetically delineating a dauer-independent rIIS ageing pathway, our results show that IIS controls a broad set of protective mechanisms during C. elegans adulthood, and may facilitate elucidation of processes of general importance for longevity. The importance of collagen production in diverse anti-ageing interventions implies that extracellular matrix remodelling is a generally essential signature of longevity assurance

  8. Differential co-expression of long and short form type IX collagen transcripts during avian limb chondrogenesis in ovo.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, R E; Solursh, M

    1992-05-01

    Using RNA blot analysis of developmentally staged avian limb buds, we demonstrate that transcripts of several cartilage marker genes appear in limb tissue prior to overt chondrogenesis. Type II collagen mRNA, cartilage proteoglycan core protein mRNA, alpha 2(IX) collagen mRNA, and transcripts of the short form alpha 1(IX) collagen chain derived from the downstream promoter are co-expressed in limb tissue approximately 24-36 hours before the appearance of the respective polypeptides in differentiating cartilagenous tissue. Transcripts of the long form alpha 1(IX) collagen chain derived from the upstream promoter appear somewhat later in development; nearly coincident with the immunolocalization of type IX collagen in the cartilage elements of the limb. The spatial distribution of type II and type IX collagen transcripts was analyzed by in situ hybridization. Type II collagen and the long form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts co-localized in the chondrogenic elements of the developing forelimb. In contrast, short form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts which lack the 5' region encoding the NC4 globular amino-terminal domain were distributed throughout the non-chondrogenic, non-myogenic mesenchymal regions of the limb and were not detectable above background levels in the limb chondrogenic elements. The precocious appearance of several cartilage marker gene transcripts prior to chondrogenesis suggests that multiple levels of gene regulation including alternative promoter use, alternative RNA splicing, alternative polyadenylation, and other post-transcriptional as well as translational mechanisms are active prior to, and during avian limb chondrogenesis.

  9. STUDIES ON THE FORMATION OF COLLAGEN

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Jerome

    1958-01-01

    Some properties of cold neutral salt extracts of fresh guinea pig dermis have been described in terms of viscosity, electrophoresis and sedimentation patterns, partial composition, the collagen content, conditions for extraction of collagen, and the effect of certain enzymes. Viscosity of the extracts depended on the collagen in solution as demonstrated by removal of this protein by precipitation or enzymatic degradation. The intrinsic viscosity of the crude 0.45 M extract, as well as that of the isolated collagen was 14.5, identical with that for collagen dissolved by dilute acid, indicating the same high asymmetry ratio for both. Electrophoresis of the skin extracts revealed a slow moving, high, sharp, poorly diffusing boundary in addition to a pattern superficially resembling that of serum. The ultracentrifuge pattern revealed a slowly sedimenting, hypersharp boundary following a large rapidly diffusing peak. The slow moving boundaries in both patterns were abolished by collagenase or heat precipitation of the collagen fraction. Hyaluronidase had no effect on either pattern. Neutral sulfate, chloride, and phosphate extracted more collagen than did thiocyanate. Very little collagen was extracted at 37°C. as compared with that removed at 3°C. A two stage fractionation procedure employing dilute trichloroacetic acid and ethanol is described for the isolation and purification of soluble collagen from crude extracts. PMID:13491760

  10. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic study on the thermally induced structural changes of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Wu, Kun; Liu, Wentao; Shen, Lirui; Li, Guoying

    2015-04-01

    The thermal stability of collagen solution (5 mg/mL) crosslinked by glutaraldehyde (GTA) [GTA/collagen (w/w) = 0.5] was measured by differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the thermally induced structural changes were analyzed using two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectra. The denaturation temperature (Td) and enthalpy change (ΔH) of crosslinked collagen were respectively about 27 °C and 88 J/g higher than those of native collagen, illuminating the thermal stability increased. With the increase of temperature, the red-shift of absorption bands and the decreased AIII/A1455 value obtained from FTIR spectra indicated that hydrogen bonds were weakened and the unwinding of triple helix occurred for both native and crosslinked collagens; whereas the less changes in red-shifting and AIII/A1455 values for crosslinked collagen also confirmed the increase in thermal stability. Additionally, the 2D correlation analysis provided information about the thermally induced structural changes. In the 2D synchronous spectra, the intensities of auto-peaks at 1655 and 1555 cm-1, respectively assigned to amide I band (Cdbnd O stretching vibration) and amide II band (combination of Nsbnd H bending and Csbnd N stretching vibrations) in helical conformation were weaker for crosslinked collagen than those for native collagen, indicating that the helical structure of crosslinked collagen was less sensitive to temperature. Moreover, the sequence of the band intensity variations showed that the band at 1555 cm-1 moved backwards owing to the addition of GTA, demonstrating that the response of helical structure of crosslinked collagen to the increased temperature lagged. It was speculated that the stabilization of collagen by GTA was due to the reinforcement of triple helical structure.

  11. Engineering Fibrin-based Tissue Constructs from Myofibroblasts and Application of Constraints and Strain to Induce Cell and Collagen Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Nicky; Baaijens, Frank P. T.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen content and organization in developing collagenous tissues can be influenced by local tissue strains and tissue constraint. Tissue engineers aim to use these principles to create tissues with predefined collagen architectures. A full understanding of the exact underlying processes of collagen remodeling to control the final tissue architecture, however, is lacking. In particular, little is known about the (re)orientation of collagen fibers in response to changes in tissue mechanical loading conditions. We developed an in vitro model system, consisting of biaxially-constrained myofibroblast-seeded fibrin constructs, to further elucidate collagen (re)orientation in response to i) reverting biaxial to uniaxial static loading conditions and ii) cyclic uniaxial loading of the biaxially-constrained constructs before and after a change in loading direction, with use of the Flexcell FX4000T loading device. Time-lapse confocal imaging is used to visualize collagen (re)orientation in a nondestructive manner. Cell and collagen organization in the constructs can be visualized in real-time, and an internal reference system allows us to relocate cells and collagen structures for time-lapse analysis. Various aspects of the model system can be adjusted, like cell source or use of healthy and diseased cells. Additives can be used to further elucidate mechanisms underlying collagen remodeling, by for example adding MMPs or blocking integrins. Shape and size of the construct can be easily adapted to specific needs, resulting in a highly tunable model system to study cell and collagen (re)organization. PMID:24192534

  12. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic study on the thermally induced structural changes of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked collagen.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhenhua; Wu, Kun; Liu, Wentao; Shen, Lirui; Li, Guoying

    2015-04-05

    The thermal stability of collagen solution (5 mg/mL) crosslinked by glutaraldehyde (GTA) [GTA/collagen (w/w)=0.5] was measured by differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the thermally induced structural changes were analyzed using two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectra. The denaturation temperature (Td) and enthalpy change (ΔH) of crosslinked collagen were respectively about 27°C and 88 J/g higher than those of native collagen, illuminating the thermal stability increased. With the increase of temperature, the red-shift of absorption bands and the decreased AIII/A1455 value obtained from FTIR spectra indicated that hydrogen bonds were weakened and the unwinding of triple helix occurred for both native and crosslinked collagens; whereas the less changes in red-shifting and AIII/A1455 values for crosslinked collagen also confirmed the increase in thermal stability. Additionally, the 2D correlation analysis provided information about the thermally induced structural changes. In the 2D synchronous spectra, the intensities of auto-peaks at 1655 and 1555 cm(-1), respectively assigned to amide I band (CO stretching vibration) and amide II band (combination of NH bending and CN stretching vibrations) in helical conformation were weaker for crosslinked collagen than those for native collagen, indicating that the helical structure of crosslinked collagen was less sensitive to temperature. Moreover, the sequence of the band intensity variations showed that the band at 1555 cm(-1) moved backwards owing to the addition of GTA, demonstrating that the response of helical structure of crosslinked collagen to the increased temperature lagged. It was speculated that the stabilization of collagen by GTA was due to the reinforcement of triple helical structure.

  13. Molecules in Focus: Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Koch, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix towards the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  14. Monoclonal antibody against chicken type IX collagen: preparation, characterization, and recognition of the intact form of type IX collagen secreted by chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Irwin, M H; Silvers, S H; Mayne, R

    1985-09-01

    A series of monoclonal antibodies was prepared against the pepsin-resistant fragment of type IX collagen designated HMW. One of these antibodies (called 2C2) was selected for further analysis. Antibody 2C2 showed no cross-reactivity with other collagen types by inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. It recognized an epitope present in native HMW, but failed to recognize any of the three chains of HMW fractionated after denaturation followed by reduction and alkylation of interchain disulfide bridges. Electron microscopic observations after rotary shadowing showed that the location of the epitope for antibody 2C2 was close to the carboxy-terminus of HMW. Immunofluorescent staining of sections of embryonic and adult cartilage with antibody 2C2 after removal of proteoglycans by testicular hyaluronidase digestion showed that type IX collagen is distributed throughout the cartilage matrix, and is not present in other connective tissues or skeletal muscle. The intact type IX collagen molecule, which was secreted by a suspension culture of freshly isolated embryonic chick chondrocytes, was recognized by rotary shadowing in the presence of antibody 2C2 after first precipitating the procollagens from the culture medium with ammonium sulfate (30%). Two different collagenous molecules were present in the precipitate: a longer molecule of type II procollagen (average length, 335 nm) with both amino- and carboxy-propeptides still remaining uncleaved, and a shorter molecule (average length, 190 nm) which was identified as type IX collagen. Antibody 2C2 consistently bound to the shorter molecules at a site located 136 nm from a distinctive knob at one end of the molecule, and did not bind to any specific site on the type II procollagen molecules. The structure of the intact type IX collagen molecule with the location of both collagenous and noncollagenous domains was as predicted after converting the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding for one of the chains of

  15. Conformational effects of Gly-X-Gly interruptions in the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Bella, Jordi; Liu, Jingsong; Kramer, Rachel; Brodsky, Barbara; Berman, Helen M

    2006-09-15

    The collagen model peptide with sequence (Pro-Hyp-Gly)4-Pro-Gly-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)5 contains a central Gly-Pro-Gly interruption in the consensus collagen sequence. Its high-resolution crystal structure defines the molecular consequences of such an interruption for the collagen triple-helical conformation, and provides insight into possible structural and biological roles of similar interruptions in the -Gly-X-Y- repeating pattern found in non-fibrillar collagens. The peptide (denoted as the Hyp minus peptide or Hyp-) forms a rod-like triple helix structure without any bend or kink, and crystallizes in a quasi-hexagonal lattice. The two Pro-Hyp-Gly zones adopt the typical triple-helical collagen conformation with standard Rich and Crick II hydrogen bonding topology. Notably, the central zone containing the Gly-Pro-Gly interruption deviates from the standard structure in terms of hydrogen bonding topology, torsion angles, helical, and superhelical parameters. These deviations are highly localized, such that the standard features are regained within one to two residues on either side. Conformational variations and high temperature factors seen for the six chains of the asymmetric unit in the zone around the interruption point to the presence of a local region of considerable plasticity and flexibility embedded within two highly rigid and ordered standard triple-helical segments. The structure suggests a role for Gly-X-Gly interruptions as defining regions of flexibility and molecular recognition in the otherwise relatively uniform repeating collagen conformation.

  16. The influence of structural design of PLGA/collagen hybrid scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenda; Kawazoe, Naoki; Lin, Xiaoting; Dong, Jian; Chen, Guoping

    2010-03-01

    3D biodegradable porous scaffold plays a very important role in articular cartilage tissue engineering. We developed hybrid structures of 3D scaffolds that combined the advantages of natural type I collagen and synthetic PLGA knitted mesh. The mechanically strong PLGA mesh served as a skeleton while the collagen microsponges facilitated cell seeding and tissue formation. The scaffolds were divided into 3 groups: (1) THIN: collagen microsponge formed in interstices of PLGA mesh; (2) SEMI: collagen microsponge formed on one side of PLGA mesh; (3) SANDWICH: collagen sponge formed on both sides of PLGA mesh. Bovine chondrocytes were cultured in these scaffolds and transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice for 2, 4, and 8 weeks. All three groups of transplants showed homogeneous cell distribution, natural chondrocyte morphology, and abundant cartilaginous ECM deposition. Production of GAGs per DNA and the expression of type II collagen and aggrecan mRNA were much higher in the SEMI and SANDWICH groups than in the THIN group. When compared to native articular cartilage, the mechanical strength of the engineered cartilage reached 54.8%, 49.3% in Young's modulus and 68.8%, 62.7% in stiffness, respectively, in SEMI and SANDWICH. These scaffolds could be used for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage with adjustable thickness. The design of the hybrid structures provides a strategy for the preparation of 3D porous scaffolds.

  17. Nanolayered Features of Collagen-like Peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valluzzi, Regina; Bini, Elisabetta; Haas, Terry; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2003-01-01

    We have been investigating collagen-like model oligopeptides as molecular bases for complex ordered biomimetic materials. The collagen-like molecules incorporate aspects of native collagen sequence and secondary structure. Designed modifications to native primary and secondary structure have been incorporated to control the nanostructure and microstructure of the collagen-like materials produced. We find that the collagen-like molecules form a number of lyotropic rod liquid crystalline phases, which because of their strong temperature dependence in the liquid state can also be viewed as solvent intercalated thermotropic liquid crystals. The liquid crystalline phases formed by the molecules can be captured in the solid state by drying off solvent, resulting in solid nanopatterned (chemically and physically) thermally stable (to greater than 100 C) materials. Designed sequences which stabilize smectic phases have allowed a variety of nanoscale multilayered biopolymeric materials to be developed. Preliminary investigations suggest that chemical patterns running perpendicular to the smectic layer plane can be functionalized and used to localize a variety of organic, inorganic, and organometallic moieties in very simple multilayered nanocomposites. The phase behavior of collagen-like oligopeptide materials is described, emphasizing the correlation between mesophase, molecular orientation, and chemical patterning at the microscale and nanoscale. In many cases, the textures observed for smectic and hexatic phase collagens are remarkably similar to the complex (and not fully understood) helicoids observed in biological collagen-based tissues. Comparisons between biological morphologies and collagen model liquid crystalline (and solidified materials) textures may help us understand the molecular features which impart order and function to the extracellular matrix and to collagen-based mineralized tissues. Initial studies have utilized synthetic collagen-like peptides while

  18. Collagen structure: new tricks from a very old dog.

    PubMed

    Bella, Jordi

    2016-04-15

    The main features of the triple helical structure of collagen were deduced in the mid-1950s from fibre X-ray diffraction of tendons. Yet, the resulting models only could offer an average description of the molecular conformation. A critical advance came about 20 years later with the chemical synthesis of sufficiently long and homogeneous peptides with collagen-like sequences. The availability of these collagen model peptides resulted in a large number of biochemical, crystallographic and NMR studies that have revolutionized our understanding of collagen structure. High-resolution crystal structures from collagen model peptides have provided a wealth of data on collagen conformational variability, interaction with water, collagen stability or the effects of interruptions. Furthermore, a large increase in the number of structures of collagen model peptides in complex with domains from receptors or collagen-binding proteins has shed light on the mechanisms of collagen recognition. In recent years, collagen biochemistry has escaped the boundaries of natural collagen sequences. Detailed knowledge of collagen structure has opened the field for protein engineers who have used chemical biology approaches to produce hyperstable collagens with unnatural residues, rationally designed collagen heterotrimers, self-assembling collagen peptides, etc. This review summarizes our current understanding of the structure of the collagen triple helical domain (COL×3) and gives an overview of some of the new developments in collagen molecular engineering aiming to produce novel collagen-based materials with superior properties.

  19. [Collagen diseases with gastrointestinal manifestations].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Ohara, Mikiko; Imai, Kohzoh

    2004-06-01

    Collagen vascular diseases are known to present with a diverse array of gastrointestinal manifestations. These can be classified as: 1) gastrointestinal damage due to the collagen vascular disease itself; 2) adverse events caused by pharmacotherapies; or 3) gastrointestinal infections following immunosuppression due to corticosteroid (CS) administration. The first group includes lupus enteritis and protein-losing gastroenteropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), reflux esophagitis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and pneumatosis cystoids intestinalis in systemic sclerosis, amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis, bowel ulcer and bleeding in rheumatoid vasculitis and microscopic polyangiitis, and ileocecal ulcer in Behcet disease. In particular, colonic ulcers associated with SLE represent refractory lesions resistant to CS. Analysis of reported cases showing colonic lesions with SLE (22 cases in Japan) revealed that mean duration of SLE was 9.9 years and 77% of colonic lesions were observed in the rectum and sigmoid colon. Half of the patients developed intestinal perforation or penetration, and 6 of the 11 patients with perforation died. The second group includes lesions in the small and large intestine due to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and CSs, in addition to peptic ulcers. As perforation in CS-treated patients displays relatively high incidence with poor prognosis, careful attention to such complications is needed. The third group includes candidal esophagitis and cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Prompt diagnosis is required to prevent colonic bleeding and perforation due to CMV.

  20. Laser welding and collagen crosslinks

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A.; Small, W. IV; Maitland, D.J.; Heredia, N.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.

    1997-02-20

    Strength and stability of laser-welded tissue may be influenced, in part, by effects of laser exposure on collagen crosslinking. We therefore studied effects of diode laser exposure (805 nm, 1-8 watts, 30 seconds) + indocyanine green dye (ICG) on calf tail tendon collagen crosslinks. Effect of ICG dye alone on crosslink content prior to laser exposure was investigated; unexpectedly, we found that ICG-treated tissue had significantly increased DHLNL and OHP, but not HLNL. Laser exposure after ICG application reduced elevated DHLNL and OHP crosslink content down to their native levels. The monohydroxylated crosslink HLNL was inversely correlated with laser output (p<0.01 by linear regression analysis). DHLNL content was highly correlated with content of its maturational product, OHP, suggesting that precursor-product relations are maintained. We conclude that: (1)ICG alone induces DHLNL and OHP crosslink formation; (2)subsequent laser exposure reduces the ICG-induced crosslinks down to native levels; (3)excessive diode laser exposure destroys normally occurring HLNL crosslinks.

  1. A biomimetic multi-layered collagen-based scaffold for osteochondral repair.

    PubMed

    Levingstone, Tanya J; Matsiko, Amos; Dickson, Glenn R; O'Brien, Fergal J; Gleeson, John P

    2014-05-01

    Cartilage and osteochondral defects pose a significant challenge in orthopedics. Tissue engineering has shown promise as a potential method for the treatment of such defects; however, a long-lasting repair strategy has yet to be realized. This study focuses on the development of a layered construct for osteochondral repair, fabricated through a novel "iterative layering" freeze-drying technique. The process involved repeated steps of layer addition followed by freeze-drying, enabling control over material composition, pore size and substrate stiffness in each region of the construct, while also achieving a seamlessly integrated layer structure. The novel construct developed mimics the inherent gradient structure of healthy osteochondral tissue: a bone layer composed of type I collagen and hydroxyapatite (HA), an intermediate layer composed of type I collagen, type II collagen and HA and a cartilaginous region composed of type I collagen, type II collagen and hyaluronic acid. The material properties were designed to provide the biological cues required to encourage infiltration of host cells from the bone marrow while the biomechanical properties were designed to provide an environment optimized to promote differentiation of these cells towards the required lineage in each region. This novel osteochondral graft was shown to have a seamlessly integrated layer structure, high levels of porosity (>97%), a homogeneous pore structure and a high degree of pore interconnectivity. Moreover, homogeneous cellular distribution throughout the entire construct was evident following in vitro culture, demonstrating the potential of this multi-layered scaffold as an advanced strategy for osteochondral defect repair.

  2. Effect of FGF-2 on collagen tissue regeneration by human vertebral bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Soo; Park, Jung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Seok; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Ki-Joon; Jung, Byung-Joo; Shim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-Young; Park, So-Yon; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-01-15

    The effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) on collagen tissue regeneration by human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were investigated. hBMSCs were isolated from human vertebral body bone marrow during vertebral surgery and a population of hBMSCs with the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells was observed. The FGF-2 treatment (5 ng/mL) affected on the colony-forming efficiency, proliferation, and in vitro differentiation of hBMSCs. Insoluble/soluble collagen and hydroxyproline synthesis was significantly enhanced in hBMSCs expanded with FGF-2 and the treatment of FGF-2 caused a reduction in the mRNA expression of collagen type I, but an increase of collagen types II and III along with lysyl oxidase family genes. Collagen formation was also examined using an in vivo assay model by transplanting hBMSCs into immunocompromised mice (n=4) and the histologic and immunohistochemical results revealed that significantly more collagen with a well-organized structure was formed by FGF-2-treated hBMSCs at 8 weeks posttransplantation (P<0.05). The DNA microarray assay demonstrated that genes related to extracellular matrix formation were significantly upregulated. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, chemical inhibitors against extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were treated and following downstream expression was observed. Collectively, FGF-2 facilitated the collagen-producing potency of hBMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, rendering them more suitable for use in collagen regeneration in the clinical field.

  3. The Respiratory Pathogen Moraxella catarrhalis Targets Collagen for Maximal Adherence to Host Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Birendra; Alvarado-Kristensson, Maria; Johansson, Martin; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Mörgelin, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory pathogen that causes acute otitis media in children and is associated with exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The first step in M. catarrhalis colonization is adherence to the mucosa, epithelial cells, and extracellular matrix (ECM). The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of M. catarrhalis interactions with collagens from various angles. Clinical isolates (n = 43) were tested for collagen binding, followed by a detailed analysis of protein-protein interactions using recombinantly expressed proteins. M. catarrhalis-dependent interactions with collagen produced by human lung fibroblasts and tracheal tissues were studied by utilizing confocal immunohistochemistry and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. A mouse smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) model was used to estimate the adherence of M. catarrhalis in vivo. We found that all M. catarrhalis clinical isolates tested adhered to fibrillar collagen types I, II, and III and network-forming collagens IV and VI. The trimeric autotransporter adhesins ubiquitous surface protein A2 (UspA2) and UspA2H were identified as major collagen-binding receptors. M. catarrhalis wild type adhered to human tracheal tissue and collagen-producing lung fibroblasts, whereas UspA2 and UspA2H deletion mutants did not. Moreover, in the COPD mouse model, bacteria devoid of UspA2 and UspA2H had a reduced level of adherence to the respiratory tract compared to the adherence of wild-type bacteria. Our data therefore suggest that the M. catarrhalis UspA2 and UspA2H-dependent interaction with collagens is highly critical for adherence in the host and, furthermore, may play an important role in the establishment of disease. PMID:27006460

  4. Thioamides in the collagen triple helix†

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Robert W.; VanVeller, Brett

    2015-01-01

    To probe noncovalent interactions within the collagen triple helix, backbone amides were replaced with a thioamide isostere. This subtle substitution is the first in the collagen backbone that does not compromise thermostability. A triple helix with a thioamide as a hydrogen bond donor was found to be more stable than triple helices assembled from isomeric thiopeptides. PMID:25967743

  5. Oriented collagen nanocoatings for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, Laura; Dellacasa, Elena; Scaglione, Silvia; Giulianelli, Massimo; Sbrana, Francesca; Vassalli, Massimo; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2014-02-01

    Collagens are among the most widely present and important proteins composing the human total body, providing strength and structural stability to various tissues, from skin to bone. In this paper, we report an innovative approach to bioactivate planar surfaces with oriented collagen molecules to promote cells proliferation and alignment. The Langmuir-Blodgett technique was used to form a stable collagen film at the air-water interface and the Langmuir-Schaefer deposition was adopted to transfer it to the support surface. The deposition process was monitored by estimating the mass of the protein layers after each deposition step. Collagen films were then structurally characterized by atomic force, scanning electron and fluorescent microscopies. Finally, collagen films were functionally tested in vitro. To this aim, 3T3 cells were seeded onto the silicon supports either modified or not (control) by collagen film deposition. Cells adhesion and proliferation on collagen films were found to be greater than those on control both after 1 (p<0.05) and 7 days culture. Moreover, the functionalization of the substrate surface triggered a parallel orientation of cells when cultured on it. In conclusion, these data demonstrated that the Langmuir-Schaefer technique can be successfully used for the deposition of oriented collagen films for tissue engineering applications.

  6. Thioamides in the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Robert W; VanVeller, Brett; Raines, Ronald T

    2015-06-14

    To probe noncovalent interactions within the collagen triple helix, backbone amides were replaced with a thioamide isostere. This subtle substitution is the first in the collagen backbone that does not compromise thermostability. A triple helix with a thioamide as a hydrogen bond donor was found to be more stable than triple helices assembled from isomeric thiopeptides.

  7. Structure, physiology, and biochemistry of collagens.

    PubMed

    Mienaltowski, Michael J; Birk, David E

    2014-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments are connective tissues that guide motion, share loads, and transmit forces in a manner that is unique to each as well as the anatomical site and biomechanical stresses to which they are subjected. Collagens are the major molecular components of both tendons and ligaments. The hierarchical structure of tendon and its functional properties are determined by the collagens present, as well as their supramolecular organization. There are 28 different types of collagen that assemble into a variety of supramolecular structures. The assembly of specific supramolecular structures is dependent on the interaction with other matrix molecules as well as the cellular elements. Multiple suprastructural assemblies are integrated to form the functional tendon/ligament. This chapter begins with a discussion of collagen molecules. This is followed by a definition of the supramolecular structures assembled by different collagen types. The general principles involved in the assembly of collagen-containing suprastructures are presented focusing on the regulation of tendon collagen fibrillogenesis. Finally, site-specific differences are discussed. While generalizations can be made, differences exist between different tendons as well as between tendons and ligaments. Compositional differences will impact structure that in turn will determine functional differences. Elucidation of the unique physiology and pathophysiology of different tendons and ligaments will require an appreciation of the role compositional differences have on collagen suprastructural assembly, tissue organization, and function.

  8. Proton pump inhibitor induced collagen expression in colonocytes is associated with collagenous colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shiori; Kadochi, Yui; Luo, Yi; Fujiwara-Tani, Rina; Nishiguchi, Yukiko; Kishi, Shingo; Fujii, Kiyomu; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the role of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in collagenous disease, direct effect of PPI on colonocytes was examined. METHODS Collagenous colitis is a common cause of non-bloody, watery diarrhea. Recently, there has been increasing focus on the use of proton PPIs as a risk factor for developing collagenous colitis. Mouse CT26 colonic cells were treated with PPI and/or PPI-induced alkaline media. Expression of fibrosis-associated genes was examined by RT-PCR. In human materials, collagen expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS CT26 cells expressed a Na+-H+ exchanger gene (solute carrier family 9, member A2). Treatment with PPI and/or PPI-induced alkaline media caused growth inhibition and oxidative stress in CT26 cells. The treatment increased expression of fibrosis inducing factors, transforming growth factor β and fibroblast growth factor 2. The treatment also decreased expression of a negative regulator of collagen production, replication factor C1, resulting in increased expression of collagen types III and IV in association with lipid peroxide. In biopsy specimens from patients with collagenous colitis, type III and IV collagen were increased. Increase of type III collagen was more pronounced in PPI-associated collagenous colitis than in non-PPI-associated disease. CONCLUSION From these findings, the reaction of colonocytes to PPI might participate in pathogenesis of collagenous colitis. PMID:28321159

  9. Influence of collagen source on fibrillar architecture and properties of vitrified collagen membranes.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Shoumyo; Guo, Qiongyu; Garza-Madrid, Marcos; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Duan, Derek; Carbajal, Priscilla; Schein, Oliver; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Collagen vitrigel membranes are transparent biomaterials characterized by a densely organized, fibrillar nanostructure that show promise in the treatment of corneal injury and disease. In this study, the influence of different type I collagen sources and processing techniques, including acid-solubilized collagen from bovine dermis (Bov), pepsin-solubilized collagen from human fibroblast cell culture (HuCC), and ficin-solubilized collagen from recombinant human collagen expressed in tobacco leaves (rH), on the properties of the vitrigel membranes was evaluated. Postvitrification carbodiimide crosslinking (CX) was also carried out on the vitrigels from each collagen source, forming crosslinked counterparts BovXL, HuCCXL, and rHXL, respectively. Collagen membrane ultrastructure and biomaterial properties were found to rely heavily on both collagen source and crosslinking. Bov and HuCC samples showed a random fibrillar organization of collagen, whereas rH vitrigels showed remarkable regional fibril alignment. After CX, light transmission was enhanced in all groups. Denaturation temperatures after CX increased in all membranes, of which the highest increase was seen in rH (14.71°C), suggesting improved thermal stability of the collagen fibrils in the membranes. Noncrosslinked rH vitrigels may be reinforced through CX to reach levels of mechanical strength and thermal stability comparable to Bov.

  10. A novel benign solution for collagen processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, Olivier

    Collagen is the main protein constituting the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues in the body (skin, cartilage, blood vessels...). It exists many types of collagen, this work studies only fibrillar collagen (e.g. collagen type I contained in the skin) that exhibits a triple helical structure composed of 3 alpha-helical collagen chains. This particular and defined hierarchical structure is essential to the biological and mechanical properties of the collagen. Processing collagen into scaffolds to mimic the ECM is crucial for successful tissue engineering. Recently collagen was processed into fibrous and porous scaffold using electrospinning process. However the solvent (HFIP) used for electrospinning is extremely toxic for the user and expensive. This work shows that HFIP can be replaced by a benign mixture composed of water, salt and alcohol. Yet only three alcohols (methanol, ethanol and iso-propanol) enable the dissolution of large quantity of collagen in the benign mixture, with a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, and conserve the collagen hierarchical structure at least as well as the HFIP. Collagen can be electrospun from the benign mixture into sub-micron fibers with concentrations as low as 6 wt-% for a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, with at least 10wt-% of salt, and any of the three alcohols. Specific conditions yield nano size fibers. After processing from HFIP or a benign mixture, collagen is water soluble and needs to be chemically crosslink for tissue engineering application. Post-crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) results in the loss of the scaffold fibrous aspect and porosity, hence it is useless for tissue engineering. Such issue could be prevented by incorporating the crosslinker into the mixture prior to electrospinning. When EDC is used alone, collagen forms a gel in the mixture within minutes, preventing electrospinning. The addition of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in excess to EDC

  11. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury.

  12. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury. PMID:28327610

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase interactions with collagen and elastin

    PubMed Central

    Van Doren, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Most abundant in the extracellular matrix are collagens, joined by elastin that confers elastic recoil to the lung, aorta, and skin. These fibrils are highly resistant to proteolysis but can succumb to a minority of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Considerable inroads to understanding how such MMPs move to the susceptible sites in collagen and then unwind the triple helix of collagen monomers have been gained. The essential role in unwinding of the hemopexin-like domain of interstitial collagenases or the collagen binding domain of gelatinases is highlighted. Elastolysis is also facilitated by the collagen binding domain in the cases of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and remote exosites of the catalytic domain in the case of MMP-12. PMID:25599938

  14. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-15

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  15. Bioengineered collagens: emerging directions for biomedical materials.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications.

  16. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-01

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  17. Guide to collagen characterization for biomaterial studies.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Leah C; Zuena, Erin; Perez-Ramirez, Bernardo; Kaplan, David L

    2008-10-01

    The structure and remodeling of collagen in vivo is critical to the pathology and healing of many human diseases, as well as to normal tissue development and regeneration. In addition, collagen matrices in the form of fibers, coatings, and films are used extensively in biomaterial and biomedical applications. The specific properties of these matrices, both in terms of physical and chemical characteristics, have a direct impact on cellular adhesion, spreading, and proliferation rates, and ultimately on the rate and extent of new extracellular matrix formation in vitro or in vivo. In recent studies, it has also been shown that collagen matrix structure has a major impact on cell and tissue outcomes related to cellular aging and differentiation potential. Collagen structure is complex because of both diversity of source materials, chemistry, and structural hierarchy. With such significant impact of collagen features on biological outcomes, it becomes essential to consider an appropriate set of analytical tools, or guide, so that collagens attained from commercial vendors are characterized in a comparative manner as an integral part of studies focused on biological parameters. The analysis should include as a starting point: (a) structural detail-mainly focused on molecular mass, purity, helical content, and bulk thermal properties, (b) chemical features-mainly focused on surface elemental analysis and hydrophobicity, and (c) morphological features at different length scales. The application of these analytical techniques to the characterization of collagen biomaterial matrices is critical in order to appropriately correlate biological responses from different studies with experimental outcomes in vitro or in vivo. As a case study, the analytical tools employed for collagen biomaterial studies are reviewed in the context of collagen remodeling by fibroblasts. The goal is to highlight the necessity of understanding collagen biophysical and chemical features as a

  18. Mechanisms and Dynamics of Collagen Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jinhui; Friddle, Raymond; Wang, Debin; de Yoreo, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Collagen is the major structural protein of bone, dentine and it template the nucleation of biomineral phases. Both collagen conformation and architecture on substrate are critical for its function. We studied the mechanism of collagen I assembly on mica by in-situ AFM. At acidic condition, assembled architecture evolved from random fibers to co-aligned fibers and finally to bundles as the K+ concentration increased from 100 to 300mM. XPS and NEXAFS showed the concentration of K+ within the collagen layer increased and the intensity of absorption peak due to π*(C =O) resonance decreased with higher K+concentration. The magnitude of collagen-mica (C-M) and collagen-collagen (C-C) interactions were measured by dynamic force spectroscopy. The free energy ΔGb for C-M and C-C at 200mM K+were 13.7kT and 1.4kT, while ΔGb at 300mM K+ were 5.7kT and 12.3kT, respectively. The switch from co-aligned fibers to 3D bundles is driven by the reversal in the magnitude of C-C and C-M interactions. Our results indicate K+ complex with C =O of collagen and its effect on the strength of collagen-collagen bridging is the likely source of architecture control. Authors would like to acknowledge grant no. DK61673 from the National Institutes of Health. Theoretical analysis was supported by Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract no. DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  19. Liver collagen synthesis in murine schistosomiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, M A; Rojkind, M; Warren, K S; Hait, P K; Rifas, L; Seifter, S

    1977-01-01

    Collagen synthesis was measured in liver slices obtained from mice with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. Enlarged fibrotic livers from these mice contained 20 times more collagen than normal. This model of hepatic fibrosis results from an inflammatory granulomatous host response to Schistosoma mansoni ova in portal tracts, rather than from direct lover cell injury as with carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Collagen synthesis, as measured by the formation of labeled protein-bound hydroxyproline, occurred in granulomas isolated from fibrotic livers. Labeled collagen that cochromatographed with type I collagen was extracted with neutral salt solution from liver slices incubated with labeled proline. The free proline pool of the liver was doubled in infected mice; coordinately, liver slices from these animals showed maximal collagen production when the concentration of free proline in the medium was raised to 0.4 mM, the same level measured in the fibrotic livers. Under such conditions, collagen synthesis was at a rate equivalent to the formation of 5.4 nmol of protein-bound hydroxyproline per g liver in 6 h. In comparative incubations in medium containing 0.2 mM proline, fibrotic liver slices produced 16-fold more collagen than normal slices. The proline analogue, L-azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, effectively inhibited synthesis of labeled collagen by fibrotic liver slices. These studies show the synthesis of collagen in a reproducible animal model of the most prevalent form of human liver fibrosis. Difinitition of the controlling factors in this system is of interest for the general problem of fibrosis produced by immunological responses. Images PMID:845255

  20. Association between ultrasonographic findings and bone/cartilage biomarkers in patients with early-stage knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kumm, Jaanika; Tamm, Ann; Lintrop, Mare; Tamm, Agu

    2009-12-01

    Little is known regarding the association between ultrasonographic (US) findings and biomarkers of bone and cartilage in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated (1) US findings in early-stage knee OA and (2) the association between US findings and bone/cartilage biomarkers. A population cohort aged 35-55 years (n = 106) with early-stage knee OA was investigated. US examination was performed according to European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) guidelines using a 7.5-MHz probe. Biomarkers of bone resorption (CTx-I) and formation (PINP), cartilage resorption (U-CTx-II) and synthesis (S-PIIANP), and general bone and cartilage biomarkers (OC, COMP) were assessed. The most prevalent US findings were tendon calcification, synovial thickening, and suprapatellar effusion. In women, the presence of tendon calcification and Baker's cysts could predict 36% of the variability in U-CTx-II levels. The presence of osteophytes and tendon calcification predicted up to 38% of the variability of PIIANP concentration. Defects in subchondral bone, meniscal changes, and effusion predicted up to 29% of the variability in COMP levels. Tendon calcification was related to cartilage synthesis (based on PIIANP levels) in men and to cartilage degradation (based on U-CTx-II concentrations) in women. US signs of synovitis were reflected metabolically by markers of joint tissue metabolism. Tendon calcification, synovial thickening, and effusion were common US findings in early-stage knee OA. US-detectable findings were substantially responsible for the variability in bone and cartilage biomarkers, associations reflective of the active metabolism of soft tissues in early-stage OA.

  1. Changes induced by ozone and ultraviolet light in type I collagen. Bovine Achilles tendon collagen versus rat tail tendon collagen.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, E

    1985-10-15

    High-molecular-mass aggregates were made soluble from insoluble collagens of bovine Achilles tendon and rat tail tendon by limited thermal hydrolysis. These polymeric collagen aggregates were cross-linked by 390-nm-fluorescent 3-hydroxy-pyridinium residues (excited at 325 nm) in the former tendon and by unknown non-fluorescent residues in the latter. With the solubilized insoluble-collagens from both tendons, as well as with acid-soluble collagen from rat tail tendon, other 350-385-nm fluorescence intensities (excited at 300 nm) were found to be higher in monomeric chains than in dimeric and polymeric chains. Low levels of ozone inhibited fibril formation of acid-soluble collagen particularly from young rat tail tendon, reacting with tyrosine residues and the 350-385-nm fluorophores. Aldehyde groups, involved in cross-linking, were not effectively modified by ozone. beta-Components (alpha-chain dimers) were not efficiently dissociated even by higher doses of ozone compared to gamma-components (alpha-chain trimers). Polymeric chain aggregates from bovine Achilles tendon collagen, whose 3-hydroxy-pyridinium cross-links are cleaved by ozone, were more readily dissociated by ozone than those from rat tail tendon collagen. Ultraviolet (300-nm) light, which destroyed the 350-385-nm fluorophores, inhibited fibril formation less effectively than ultraviolet (275-nm) light, which is absorbed by tyrosine residues, and did not dissociate collagen polymers from rat tail tendon. On the other hand, ultraviolet (320-nm) light, absorbed by 3-hydroxy-pyridinium cross-links which were rapidly photolyzed, partially dissociated polymeric collagen aggregates from bovine Achilles tendon after subsequent heating.

  2. A novel rat tail collagen type-I gel for the cultivation of human articular chondrocytes in low cell density.

    PubMed

    Muller-Rath, R; Gavénis, K; Andereya, S; Mumme, T; Schmidt-Rohlfing, B; Schneider, U

    2007-12-01

    Collagen type-I matrix systems have gained growing importance as a cartilage repair device. However, most of the established matrix systems use collagen type-I of bovine origin seeded in high cell densities. Here we present a novel collagen type-I gel system made of rat tail collagen for the cultivation of human chondrocytes in low cell densities. Rat tail collagen type-I gel (CaReS, Arthro Kinetics, Esslingen, Germany) was seeded with human passage 2 chondrocytes in different cell densities to evaluate the optimal cell number. In vitro, the proliferation factor of low density cultures was more than threefold higher compared with high density cultures. After 6 weeks of in vitro cultivation, freshly prepared chondrocytes with an initial cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL showed a proliferation factor of 33. A cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL was chosen for in vitro and in vivo cultivation using the common nude mouse model as an in vivo system. Chondrocytes stayed viable as a Live/Dead fluorescence assay and TUNEL staining revealed. During in vitro cultivation, passage 0 cells partly dedifferentiated morphologically. In vivo, passage 0 cells maintained the chondrocyte phenotype and demonstrated an increased synthesis of collagen type-II protein and gene expression compared to passage 2 cells. Passage 2 cells did not redifferentiate in vivo. Cultivating a cell-seeded collagen gel of bovine origin as a control (AtelocollagenTM, Koken, Tokyo, Japan) did not lead to superior results with regard to cell morphology, col-II protein production and col-II gene expression. With the CaReS collagen gel system the best quality of repair tissue was obtained by seeding freshly isolated chondrocytes.

  3. Discoidin domain receptor 2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Cosmin; Iscru, Daniel F; Druhan, Lawrence J; Elton, Terry S; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2006-09-01

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) are widely expressed cell-surface receptors, which bind to and are activated by collagens, including collagen type 1. Activation of DDRs and the resulting downstream signaling is known to regulate the extracellular matrix. However, little is known about how DDRs interact with collagen and its direct impact on collagen regulation. Here, we have established that by binding to collagen, the extracellular domain (ECD) of DDR2 inhibits collagen fibrillogenesis and alters the morphology of collagen type 1 fibers. Our in vitro assays utilized DDR2-Fc fusion proteins, which contain only the ECD of DDR2. Using surface plasmon resonance, we confirmed that further oligomerization of DDR2-Fc (by means of anti-Fc antibody) greatly enhances its binding to immobilized collagen type 1. Collagen turbidity measurements and biochemical assays indicated that DDR2 delays the formation of collagen fibrils. Atomic force microscopy of soluble collagen revealed that a predominately monomeric state of collagen was present with DDR2, while control solutions had an abundance of polymeric collagen. Transmission electron microscopy of collagen fibers, showed that the native periodic banded structure of collagen fibers was weakened and nearly absent in the presence of DDR2. Further, using a cell-based assay we demonstrate that overexpression of full length DDR2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1. Our results demonstrate a novel and important functional role of the DDR2 ECD that may contribute to collagen regulation via modulation of fibrillogenesis.

  4. Nonlinear optical response of the collagen triple helix and second harmonic microscopy of collagen liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniset-Besseau, A.; De Sa Peixoto, P.; Duboisset, J.; Loison, C.; Hache, F.; Benichou, E.; Brevet, P.-F.; Mosser, G.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2010-02-01

    Collagen is characterized by triple helical domains and plays a central role in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks, basement membranes, as well as other structures of the connective tissue. Remarkably, fibrillar collagen exhibits efficient Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and SHG microscopy proved to be a sensitive tool to score fibrotic pathologies. However, the nonlinear optical response of fibrillar collagen is not fully characterized yet and quantitative data are required to further process SHG images. We therefore performed Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering (HRS) experiments and measured a second order hyperpolarisability of 1.25 10-27 esu for rat-tail type I collagen. This value is surprisingly large considering that collagen presents no strong harmonophore in its amino-acid sequence. In order to get insight into the physical origin of this nonlinear process, we performed HRS measurements after denaturation of the collagen triple helix and for a collagen-like short model peptide [(Pro-Pro-Gly)10]3. It showed that the collagen large nonlinear response originates in the tight alignment of a large number of weakly efficient harmonophores, presumably the peptide bonds, resulting in a coherent amplification of the nonlinear signal along the triple helix. To illustrate this mechanism, we successfully recorded SHG images in collagen liquid solutions by achieving liquid crystalline ordering of the collagen triple helices.

  5. Age-related crosslink in skin collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Mechanic, G.

    1986-05-01

    A stable crosslinking amino acid was isolated from mature bovine skin collagen and its structure was identified as histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C-NMR. This newly identified crosslink has a linkage between C-2 histidine and C-6 of lysine in the latter's portion of hydroxylysinonorleucine. Quantitative studies using various aged samples of cow and human skin collagen indicated that this acid-heat stable nonreducible compound was the major age-related crosslink. In case of cow skin collagen, for example, during early embryonic development (3 and 5 month old embryos) the content of HHL stayed less than 0.01 residue/mole of collagen, however from the middle of gestation period (7 month old embryo) through the maturation stage it showed rapid increase with age and reached approximately 0.5 residues/mole of collagen in the 3 year old animal. Small increments (up to 0.65 res/mole of collagen) were observed in the 9 year old cow. The amounts of the crosslink unlike pyridinoline do not decrease with aging. Similar patterns were observed in human skin collagen.

  6. Molecular structure of the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Barbara; Persikov, Anton V

    2005-01-01

    The molecular conformation of the collagen triple helix confers strict amino acid sequence constraints, requiring a (Gly-X-Y)(n) repeating pattern and a high content of imino acids. The increasing family of collagens and proteins with collagenous domains shows the collagen triple helix to be a basic motif adaptable to a range of proteins and functions. Its rodlike domain has the potential for various modes of self-association and the capacity to bind receptors, other proteins, GAGs, and nucleic acids. High-resolution crystal structures obtained for collagen model peptides confirm the supercoiled triple helix conformation, and provide new information on hydrogen bonding patterns, hydration, sidechain interactions, and ligand binding. For several peptides, the helix twist was found to be sequence dependent, and such variation in helix twist may serve as recognition features or to orient the triple helix for binding. Mutations in the collagen triple-helix domain lead to a variety of human disorders. The most common mutations are single-base substitutions that lead to the replacement of one Gly residue, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern. A single Gly substitution destabilizes the triple helix through a local disruption in hydrogen bonding and produces a discontinuity in the register of the helix. Molecular information about the collagen triple helix and the effect of mutations will lead to a better understanding of function and pathology.

  7. Propranolol-induced elevation of pulmonary collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenschmidt, R.C.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Current concepts of collagen metabolism suggest that fibroblasts tightly control collagen production. One of the possible mechanisms of control is via the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). Beta adrenergic agonists, by elevating intracellular cAMP levels, have been shown in vitro to suppress fibroblast collagen production; whereas beta adrenergic antagonists were effective in removing this suppression by blocking the rise in cAMP. In the present study with mice, the authors showed that administration of the beta adrenergic antagonists, propranolol, at a dose demonstrated to decrease the ratio of cAMP to cGMP, resulted in an elevation in total lung collagen in vivo. The increase in collagen was evident only when propranolol was administered before and during acute lung damage induced by either butylated hydroxytoluene, bleomycin or high concentrations of oxygen. There was no increase in lung collagen when propranolol administration was delayed after injury or when given to an undamaged lung. The authors propose that via beta adrenergic blockage by propranolol, fibroblasts involved in the normal reparative process may have lost a mechanism for regulatory control, resulting in excessive deposition of collagen. 38 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  8. The Mineral–Collagen Interface in Bone

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone’s remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material’s performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  9. Metal-triggered collagen peptide disk formation.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, David E; Chmielewski, Jean

    2010-06-16

    A collagen peptide was designed for metal-triggered, hierarchical assembly through a radial growth mechanism. To achieve radial assembly, H-(byp)(2) containing Pro-Hyp-Gly repeating sequences and two staggered bipyridine ligands within the peptide was synthesized. Triple helix formation resulted in the placement of six bipyridine ligands along the triple helix, and the addition of metal ions resulted in the formation of nanometer-sized collagen peptide disks. These structures were found to disassemble upon the addition of EDTA, demonstrating that radial assembly of collagen peptide triple helices could be realized with the addition of metal ions.

  10. 1991 Volvo Award in basic sciences. Collagen types around the cells of the intervertebral disc and cartilage end plate: an immunolocalization study.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S; Menage, J; Duance, V; Wotton, S; Ayad, S

    1991-09-01

    Several types of collagen are known to exist in the intervertebral disc in addition to the fibrillar collagens, Types I and II. Although they constitute only a small percentage of the total collagen content, these minor collagens may have important functions. This study was designed to investigate the presence of Types I, II, III, IV, VI, and IX collagens in the intervertebral disc and cartilage end plate by immunohistochemistry, thereby establishing their location within the tissues. Types III and VI collagen have a pericellular distribution in animal and human tissue. No staining for Type IX collagen was present in normal human disc, but in rat and bovine intervertebral disc, it was also located pericellularly. These results show that cells of the intervertebral disc and cartilage end plate sit in fibrous capsules, forming chondrons similar to those described in articular cartilage. In pathologic tissue the amount and distribution of the collagen types, and the organization of the pericellular capsule, differ from that seen in control material.

  11. Transgenic expression of an altered angiotensin type I AT1 receptor resulting in marked modulation of vascular type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Rich, Celeste; Toselli, Paul; Stone, Philip; Green, Daniel; Warburton, Rod; Hill, Nicholas; Goldstein, Ronald; Polgar, Peter

    2012-05-01

    The angiotensin II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1) was modified by replacing its third intracellular loop and C-terminal tail with the corresponding regions from the bradykinin B2 receptor. Transgenic mice were produced that overexpress this mutated receptor (AB3T). Considerably less collagen content in the intact aorta and in primary aortic smooth muscle cells (aSMCs) cultures was observed in the transgenic mice. On the other hand, elastin content remained unchanged as measured by Western blot, and insoluble amino acid quantitation. The contraction of isolated aortas also remained unaltered. The aSMCs derived from the transgenic mice showed a reduction in AngII responsive type I collagen production. In aSMCs from transgenic mice, the cascade of Akt to the mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR) to p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) was not AngII activated, while in the aSMCs from wild-type (WT) mice the cascade was AngII activated. Angiotensin activation of Smad2 and Stat3 was also reduced in the AB3T aSMCs. However, no change in the effect of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) on type I collagen production was observed. Also, the activation of ERK and JNK and G-protein linked signaling remained unaltered in response to AngII. Akt and PI3K activation inhibitors blocked AngII-stimulated type I collagen expression in WT aSMCs, whereas ERK inhibitor had no such effect. Our results point to an Akt/mTOR/p70S6K regulation of collagen production by AngII with participation of Smad2 and Stat3 cascades in this process.

  12. Collagen scaffolds loaded with collagen-binding NGF-beta accelerate ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Lin, Hang; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Wenxue; Zhao, Yannan; Xiao, Zhifeng; Dai, Jianwu

    2010-03-01

    Studies have shown that exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) accelerates ulcer healing, but the inefficient growth factor delivery system limits its clinical application. In this report, we found that the native human NGF-beta fused with a collagen-binding domain (CBD) could form a collagen-based NGF targeting delivery system, and the CBD-fused NGF-beta could bind to collagen membranes efficiently. Using the rabbit dermal ischemic ulcer model, we have found that this targeting delivery system maintains a higher concentration and stronger bioactivity of NGF-beta on the collagen membranes by promoting peripheral nerve growth. Furthermore, it enhances the rate of ulcer healing through accelerating the re-epithelialization of dermal ulcer wounds and the formation of capillary lumens within the newly formed tissue area. Thus, collagen membranes loaded with collagen-targeting human NGF-beta accelerate ulcer healing efficiently.

  13. Genes for collagen types I, IV, and V are transcribed in HeLa cells but a postinitiation block prevents the accumulation of type I mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, J.J.; Wroth, T.H.; Ackerman, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Collagen mRNA synthesis in HeLa cells was evaluated by in vitro transcription of type I collagen DNA, nuclear run-on studies, and steady-state mRNA analysis. Type I collagen mRNA was accurately initiated by HeLa cell RNQA polymerase II in nuclear extracts, and run-on analysis indicated that mRNAs for collagen types {alpha}1(I), {alpha}2(I), {alpha}1(III), {alpha}1(IV), and {alpha}2(V) were synthesized in HeLa cells. However, on assessing the steady-state levels of mRNAs of collagen types {alpha}1(I), {alpha}2(I), {alpha}1(IV), and {alpha}2(V), no type I mRNA was found in HeLa cells while types {alpha}1(IV) and {alpha}2(V) collagen mRNAs were observed. These results suggest that a postinitiation process prevents the accumulation of type I collagen mRNAs in HeLa cells. Persistence of types IV and V collagen mRNAs is consistent with the involvement of types IV and V collagen in adhesion of HeLa cells to glass or plastic.

  14. Epidermal cells adhere preferentially to type IV (basement membrane) collagen

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Epidermal cells from adult guinea pig skin attach and differentiate preferentially on substrates of type IV (basement membrane) collagen, compared to those of types I--III collagen. In contrast, guinea pig dermal fibroblasts attach equally well to all four collagen substrates. Fibronectin mediates the attachment of fibroblasts but not of epidermal cells to collagen. PMID:422650

  15. Glycation Contributes to Interaction Between Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Collagen Type I.

    PubMed

    Halling Linder, Cecilia; Enander, Karin; Magnusson, Per

    2016-03-01

    Bone is a biological composite material comprised primarily of collagen type I and mineral crystals of calcium and phosphate in the form of hydroxyapatite (HA), which together provide its mechanical properties. Bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP), produced by osteoblasts, plays a pivotal role in the mineralization process. Affinity contacts between collagen, mainly type II, and the crown domain of various ALP isozymes were reported in a few in vitro studies in the 1980s and 1990s, but have not attracted much attention since, although such interactions may have important implications for the bone mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the binding properties of human collagen type I to human bone ALP, including the two bone ALP isoforms B1 and B2. ALP from human liver, human placenta and E. coli were also studied. A surface plasmon resonance-based analysis, supported by electrophoresis and blotting, showed that bone ALP binds stronger to collagen type I in comparison with ALPs expressed in non-mineralizing tissues. Further, the B2 isoform binds significantly stronger to collagen type I in comparison with the B1 isoform. Human bone and liver ALP (with identical amino acid composition) displayed pronounced differences in binding, revealing that post-translational glycosylation properties govern these interactions to a large extent. In conclusion, this study presents the first evidence that glycosylation differences in human ALPs are of crucial importance for protein-protein interactions with collagen type I, although the presence of the ALP crown domain may also be necessary. Different binding affinities among the bone ALP isoforms may influence the mineral-collagen interface, mineralization kinetics, and degree of bone matrix mineralization, which are important factors determining the material properties of bone.

  16. Biodegradation of differently cross-linked collagen membranes: an experimental study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rothamel, Daniel; Schwarz, Frank; Sager, Martin; Herten, Monika; Sculean, Anton; Becker, Jürgen

    2005-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the biodegradation of differently cross-linked collagen membranes in rats. Five commercially available and three experimental membranes (VN) were included: (1) BioGide (BG) (non-cross-linked porcine type I and III collagens), (2) BioMend (BM), (3) BioMendExtend (BME) (glutaraldehyde cross-linked bovine type I collagen), (4) Ossix (OS) (enzymatic-cross-linked bovine type I collagen), (5) TutoDent (TD) (non-cross-linked bovine type I collagen, and (6-8) VN(1-3) (chemical cross-linked porcine type I and III collagens). Specimens were randomly allocated in unconnected subcutaneous pouches separated surgically on the back of 40 wistar rats, which were divided into five groups (2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks), including eight animals each. After 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks of healing, the rats were sacrificed and explanted specimens were prepared for histologic and histometric analysis. The following parameters were evaluated: biodegradation over time, vascularization, tissue integration, and foreign body reaction. Highest vascularization and tissue integration was noted for BG followed by BM, BME, and VN(1); TD, VN(2), and VN(3) showed prolongated, while OS exhibited no vascularization. Subsequently, biodegradation of BG, BM, BME and VN(1) was faster than TD, VN(2), and VN(3). OS showed only a minute amount of superficial biodegradation 24 weeks following implantation. Biodegradation of TD, BM, BME, VN(2), and VN(3) was associated with the presence of inflammatory cells. Within the limits of the present study, it was concluded that cross-linking of bovine and porcine-derived collagen types I and III was associated with (i) prolonged biodegradation, (ii) decreased tissue integration and vascularization, and (iii) in case of TD, BM, BME, VN(2), and VN(3) foreign body reactions.

  17. Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: morphologic and immunohistopathologic studies.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M; Keene, D R; Blank, E; Hori, H; Sakai, L Y; Sherwin, L A; Hollister, D W

    1988-12-01

    A 32-wk-gestation female with type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis has been studied. The clinical features were typical, and radiographs revealed short ribs, hypoplastic ilia, absence of ossification of sacrum, pubis, ischia, tali, calcanei, and many vertebral bodies; the long bones were short with mild metaphyseal flaring. The femoral cylinder index was 6.3. Comparison with previous cases placed the patient toward the mild end of the achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis spectrum (Whitley-Gorlin prototype IV). Light microscopy revealed hypercellular cartilage with decreased matrix traversed by numerous fibrous vascular canals. The growth plate was markedly abnormal. Ultrastructural studies revealed prominently dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum containing a fine granular material with occasional fibrils in all chondrocytes. Immunohistologic studies indicated irregular large areas of cartilage matrix staining with monoclonal antibody to human type III collagen. The relative intensity of matrix staining for type II collagen appeared diminished. More striking, however, were intense focal accumulations of type II collagen within small rounded perinuclear structures of most chondrocytes but not other cell types. These results strongly suggest intracellular retention of type II collagen within vacuolar structures, probably within the dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum observed in all chondrocytes by electron microscopy (EM), and imply the presence of an abnormal, poorly secreted type II collagen molecule. Biochemical studies (see companion paper) suggest that this patient had a new dominant lethal disorder caused by a structural abnormality of type II collagen.

  18. Nanoscale scraping and dissection of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Wenger, M P E; Horton, M A; Mesquida, P

    2008-09-24

    The main function of collagen is mechanical, hence there is a fundamental scientific interest in experimentally investigating the mechanical and structural properties of collagen fibrils on the nanometre scale. Here, we present a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based scraping technique that can dissect the outer layer of a biological specimen. Applied to individual collagen fibrils, the technique was successfully used to expose the fibril core and reveal the presence of a D-banding-like structure. AFM nanoindentation measurements of fibril shell and core indicated no significant differences in mechanical properties such as stiffness (reduced modulus), hardness, adhesion and adhesion work. This suggests that collagen fibrils are mechanically homogeneous structures. The scraping technique can be applied to other biological specimens, as demonstrated on the example of bacteria.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates myocardial collagen remodeling in association with inhibition of TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lili; Jin, Hongfang; Sun, Lujing; Chen, Siyao; Huang, Yaqian; Liu, Jia; Li, Zhenzhen; Zhao, Manman; Sun, Yan; Tang, Chaoshu; Zhao, Bin; Du, Junbao

    2015-01-20

    The study was designed to explore the role and possible mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the regulation of myocardial collagen remodeling in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). We treated nine-week-old male SHRs and age- and sex-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) with NaHS (90 μmol/kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 9 wks. At 18 wks, plasma H2S, tail arterial pressure, morphology of the heart, myocardial ultrastructure and collagen volume fraction (CVF), myocardial expressions of collagen I and III protein and procollagen I and III mRNA, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), TGF-β type I receptor (TβR-I), type II receptor (TβR-II), p-Smad2 and 3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP)-1 proteins were determined. TGF-β1-stimulated cultured cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) were used to further study the mechanisms. The results showed that compared with WKYs, SHRs showed a reduced plasma H2S, elevated tail artery pressure and increased myocardial collagen, TGF-β1, TβR-II, p-Smad2 and p-Smad3 expressions. However, NaHS markedly decreased tail artery pressure and inhibited myocardial collagen, TGF-β1, TβR-II, p-Smad2 and p-Smad3 protein expressions, but H2S had no effect on the expressions of MMP-13 and TIMP-1. Hydralazine reduced blood pressure but had no effect on myocardial collagen, MMP-13 and TIMP-1 expressions and TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. H2S prevented activation of the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway and abnormal collagen synthesis in CFs. In conclusion, the results suggested that H2S could prevent myocardial collagen remodeling in SHR. The mechanism might be associated with inhibition of collagen synthesis via TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway.

  20. In vitro Sirius Red collagen assay measures the pattern shift from soluble to deposited collagen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Zhang, Bingrong; Han, Deping; Ma, Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Hong, Jingshen; Guo, Yansong; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared two in vitro collagen production assays ([(3)H]-proline incorporation and Sirius Red) for their ability to determine the pattern shift from soluble to deposited collagen. The effect of the antifibrotic agent, triptolide (TPL), on collagen production was also studied. The results showed that: (1) 48 h after NIH 3T3 (murine embryo fibroblast) and HFL-1(human fetal lung fibroblast) were exposed to transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β), there was an increase in soluble collagen in the culture medium; (2) on day 4, soluble collagen declined, whereas deposited collagen increased; (3) Sirius Red was easier to use than [(3)H]-proline incorporation and more consistently reflected the collagen pattern shift from soluble to deposited; (4) the in vitro Sirius Red assay took less time than the in vivo assay to determine the effect of TPL. Our results suggest that: (a) the newly synthesized soluble collagen can sensitively evaluate an agent's capacity for collagen production and (b) Sirius Red is more useful than [(3)H]-proline because it is easier to use, more convenient, less time consuming, and does not require radioactive material.

  1. Marine Collagen: An Emerging Player in Biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Fazli; Ikram, Muhammad; Shehzad, Adeeb; Ghafoor, Abdul

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian collagen is a multifactorial biomaterial that is widely used for beneficial purposes in the advanced biomedical technologies. Generally, biomedical applicable collagen is extracted from the mammalian body, but it can also be derived from marine species. Recently, mammalian tissues collagen proteins are considered a great pathological risk for transmitted diseases, because purification of such protein is very challenging and needs efficient tool to avoid structure alteration. Thus, difficult extraction process and high cost decreased mammalian collagen demands for beneficial effects compared to marine collagen. In contrast, marine collagen is safe and easy to extract, however this potential source of collagen is hindered by low denaturing temperature, which is considered a main hurdle in the beneficial effects of marine collagen. Characterization and biomedical applications of marine collagen are in transition state and yet to be discovered. Therefore, an attempt was made to summarize the recent knowledge regarding different aspects of marine collagen applications in the biomedical engineering field.

  2. Thermal stability of collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yujia

    2009-01-01

    Chief among the challenges of characterizing the thermal stability of the collagen triple helix are the lack of the reversibility of the thermal transition and the presence of multiple folding-unfolding steps during the thermal transition which rarely follows the simple two-state, all-or-none mechanism. Despite of the difficulties inherited in the quantitative depiction of the thermal transition of collagen, biophysical studies combined with proteolysis and mutagenesis approaches using full-chain collagens, short synthetic peptides, and recombinant collagen fragments have revealed molecular features of the thermal unfolding of the subdomains of collagen and led to a better understanding of the diverse biological functions of this versatile protein. The subdomain of collagen generally refers to a segment of the long, rope-like triple helical molecule that can unfold cooperatively as an independent unit whose properties (their size, location, and thermal stability) are considered essential for the molecular recognition during the self-assembly of collagen and during the interactions of collagen with other macromolecules. While the unfolding of segments of the triple helix at temperatures below the apparent melting temperature of the molecule has been used to interpret much of the features of the thermal unfolding of full-chain collagens, the thermal studies of short, synthetic peptides have firmly established the molecular basis of the subdomains by clearly demonstrating the close dependence of the thermal stability of a triple helix on the constituent amino acid residues at the X and the Y positions of the characteristic Gly-X-Y repeating sequence patterns of the triple helix. Studies using recombinant collagen fragments further revealed that in the context of the long, linear molecule, the stability of a segment of the triple helix is also modulated by long-range impact of the local interactions such as the interchain salt bridges. Together, the combined approaches

  3. Collagen and keratin polypeptide models for assessing the natural and artificial protein decay of organic materials.

    PubMed

    Fotou, Evmorfia; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, Maria; Ioakeimoglou, Eleni; Tziamourani, Eleni; Malea, Ekaterini; Panayiaris, George; Panou-Pomonis, Eugenia

    2016-11-01

    Among the materials constituting the natural and cultural heritage, organic materials of proteinaceous origin as bone (collagen), parchment and woolen textiles (keratin) are the most susceptible to damage and decay because of their exposure to air pollution, inappropriate values of ambient temperature, humidity and light. Aiming at contributing to the development of a reliable and reproducible immunoassay for the evaluation of collagen and keratin decay, three polypeptide models of these proteins were designed, synthesized and studied. Polypeptide [Pro-Ser(OBzl)-Gly]n incorporates the typical motif Pro-X-Gly of collagen; polypeptide [Pro-Cys(Acm)-Gly]n is a model of the C-terminal domain of type I keratin, corresponding to the repeating unit Pro-Cys-X of keratin, while polypeptide Ac-YRSGGGFGYRSGGGFGYRS-βAla-NH2 encloses the characteristic repeating sequence GGGFGYRS of the N-terminal part of Type II keratin. These polypeptides may be considered as simplified models that mimic fragments of collagen and keratin resulting from artificial and natural ageing or decay. It is concluded that high recognition of anti-polypeptide antibodies, produced after immunizations, by the bone, parchment and textile samples is indicative of high deterioration, while high anti-collagen or anti-keratin recognition is indicative of low deterioration. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA. PMID:26629181

  5. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA.

  6. Unusual Fragmentation Pathways in Collagen Glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdivara, Irina; Perera, Lalith; Sricholpech, Marnisa; Terajima, Masahiko; Pleshko, Nancy; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Tomer, Kenneth B.

    2013-07-01

    Collagens are the most abundant glycoproteins in the body. One characteristic of this protein family is that the amino acid sequence consists of repeats of three amino acids -(X—Y—Gly)n. Within this motif, the Y residue is often 4-hydroxyproline (HyP) or 5-hydroxylysine (HyK). Glycosylation in collagen occurs at the 5-OH group in HyK in the form of two glycosides, galactosylhydroxylysine (Gal-HyK) and glucosyl galactosylhydroxylysine (GlcGal-HyK). In collision induced dissociation (CID), collagen tryptic glycopeptides exhibit unexpected gas-phase dissociation behavior compared to typical N- and O-linked glycopeptides (i.e., in addition to glycosidic bond cleavages, extensive cleavages of the amide bonds are observed). The Gal- or GlcGal- glycan modifications are largely retained on the fragment ions. These features enable unambiguous determination of the amino acid sequence of collagen glycopeptides and the location of the glycosylation site. This dissociation pattern was consistent for all analyzed collagen glycopeptides, regardless of their length or amino acid composition, collagen type or tissue. The two fragmentation pathways—amide bond and glycosidic bond cleavage—are highly competitive in collagen tryptic glycopeptides. The number of ionizing protons relative to the number of basic sites (i.e., Arg, Lys, HyK, and N-terminus) is a major driving force of the fragmentation. We present here our experimental results and employ quantum mechanics calculations to understand the factors enhancing the labile character of the amide bonds and the stability of hydroxylysine glycosides in gas phase dissociation of collagen glycopeptides.

  7. Unusual fragmentation pathways in collagen glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Perdivara, Irina; Perera, Lalith; Sricholpech, Marnisa; Terajima, Masahiko; Pleshko, Nancy; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Tomer, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant glycoproteins in the body. One characteristic of this protein family is that the amino acid sequence consists of repeats of three amino acids –(X—Y—Gly)n. Within this motif, the Y residue is often 4-hydroxyproline (HyP) or 5-hydroxylysine (HyK). Glycosylation in collagen occurs at the 5-OH group in HyK in the form of two glycosides, galactosylhydroxylysine (Gal-HyK) and glucosyl galactosylhydroxylysine (GlcGal-HyK). In collision induced dissociation (CID), collagen tryptic glycopeptides exhibit unexpected gas-phase dissociation behavior compared to typical N- and O-linked glycopeptides, i.e. in addition to glycosidic bond cleavages, extensive cleavages of the amide bonds are observed. The Gal- or GlcGal- glycan modifications are largely retained on the fragment ions. These features enable unambiguous determination of the amino acid sequence of collagen glycopeptides and the location of the glycosylation site. This dissociation pattern was consistent for all analyzed collagen glycopeptides, regardless of their length or amino acid composition, collagen type or tissue. The two fragmentation pathways – amide bond and glycosidic bond cleavage – are highly competitive in collagen tryptic glycopeptides. The number of ionizing protons relative to the number of basic sites (i.e. Arg, Lys, HyK and N-terminus) is a major driving force of the fragmentation. We present here our experimental results and employ quantum mechanics calculations, to understand the factors enhancing the labile character of the amide bonds and the stability of hydroxylysine glycosides in gas phase dissociation of collagen glycopeptides. PMID:23633013

  8. Techniques for Type I Collagen Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Jackson, LaTecia Diamond

    Tissue Engineering is a process in which cells, engineering, and material methods are used in amalgamation to improve biological functions. The purpose of tissue engineering is to develop alternative solutions to treat or cure tissues and organs that have been severely altered or damaged by diseases, congenital defects, trauma, or cancer. One of the most common and most promising biological materials for tissue engineering to develop scaffolds is Type I collagen. A major challenge in biomedical research is aligning Type I collagen to mimic biological structures, such as ligaments, tendons, bones, and other hierarchal aligned structures within the human body. The intent of this research is to examine possible techniques for organizing Type I collagen and to assess which of the techniques is effective for potential biological applications. The techniques used in this research to organize collagen are soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing, directional freezing, and direct poling. The final concentration used for both soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing and direct poling was 1 mg/ml, whereas for directional freezing the final concentration varied between 4mg/ml, 2mg/ml, and 1 mg/ml. These techniques were characterized using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Helium Ion Microscope (HIM). In this study, we have found that out of the three techniques, the soft lithography and directional freezing techniques have been successful in organizing collagen in a particular pattern, but not alignment. We concluded alignment may be dependent on the pH of collagen and the amount of acetic acid used in collagen solution. However, experiments are still being conducted to optimize all three techniques to align collagen in a unidirectional arrangement.

  9. Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Jankov II, Mirko R.; Jovanovic, Vesna; Nikolic, Ljubisa; Lake, Jonathan C.; Kymionis, Georgos; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2010-01-01

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) with riboflavin and ultraviolet-A (UVA) is a new technique of corneal tissue strengthening by using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and UVA to increase the formation of intra and interfibrillar covalent bonds by photosensitized oxidation. Keratocyte apoptosis in the anterior segment of the corneal stroma all the way down to a depth of about 300 microns has been described and a demarcation line between the treated and untreated cornea has been clearly shown. It is important to ensure that the cytotoxic threshold for the endothelium has not been exceeded by strictly respecting the minimal corneal thickness. Confocal microscopy studies show that repopulation of keratocytes is already visible 1 month after the treatment, reaching its pre-operative quantity and quality in terms of functional morphology within 6 months after the treatment. The major indication for the use of CXL is to inhibit the progression of corneal ectasias, such as keratoconus and pellucid marginal degeneration. CXL may also be effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of iatrogenic keratectasia, resulting from excessively aggressive photoablation. This treatment has also been used to treat infectious corneal ulcers with apparent favorable results. Combination with other treatments, such as intracorneal ring segment implantation, limited topography-guided photoablation and conductive keratoplasty have been used with different levels of success. PMID:20543933

  10. Eupatilin ameliorates collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juryun; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Jung, Seung Min; Park, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2015-03-01

    Eupatilin is the main active component of DA-9601, an extract from Artemisia. Recently, eupatilin was reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the anti-arthritic effect of eupatilin in a murine arthritis model and human rheumatoid synoviocytes. DA-9601 was injected into collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Arthritis score was regularly evaluated. Mouse monocytes were differentiated into osteoclasts when eupatilin was added simultaneously. Osteoclasts were stained with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and then manually counted. Rheumatoid synoviocytes were stimulated with TNF-α and then treated with eupatilin, and the levels of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expression in synoviocytes were measured by RT-PCR. Intraperitoneal injection of DA-9601 reduced arthritis scores in CIA mice. TNF-α treatment of synoviocytes increased the expression of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNAs, which was inhibited by eupatilin. Eupatilin decreased the number of osteoclasts in a concentration dependent manner. These findings, showing that eupatilin and DA-9601 inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the differentiation of osteoclasts, suggest that eupatilin and DA-9601 is a candidate anti-inflammatory agent.

  11. Spherical silver nanoparticles in the detection of thermally denatured collagens.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, Manuel; McLaughlin, Sarah; Pacioni, Natalia L; Alarcon, Emilio I

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a rapid colorimetric method to determine the concentration of denatured collagen in solution, which is based on the collagen-silver nanoparticle corona formation. Using the proposed method, the lowest detectable concentration of denatured collagen protein in a solution of pure collagen was 14.7, 8.5, and 8.6 μg mL(-1) for porcine (PCOL), rat tail (RCOL), and type I human recombinant (HCOL) collagen, respectively.

  12. The peculiar collagens of mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Waite, J H; Qin, X X; Coyne, K J

    1998-06-01

    The byssal collagens of marine mussels are extracorporeal collagens that function in byssal threads under tension. Each byssal thread resembles a shock absorber in its mechanical design: it is strong and stiff at one end and pliably elastic at the other. Primary structures of three of these collagens (preCols), deduced from cDNAs, reveal signal peptide sequences, but no N-glycosylation sites or propeptides typical of procollagens. The collagen domain (40-50 kDa) represents roughly half the mass of the mature molecules and is distinguished by its central location, abundant Gly-Gly-X repeats, and "flaws" (usually Gly deletions). Flanking the collagen domains on both sides are structural domains that resemble elastin in preCol-P, spider drag-line silk in preCol-D, and Gly-rich cell wall proteins in preCol-NG. Not surprisingly, studies of preCol distribution in byssal threads suggest preCol-P enhancement in the elastic proximal portion, while preCol-D predominates in the stiffer distal portion. PreCol-NG, in contrast, is evenly distributed. Although no data are yet available on the fibrillogenesis and cross-linking of the preCols, the quarter-stagger assembly of fibrillar interstitial collagens does not pertain since preCols lack the terminal peptides of tropocollagen. Metal-binding by histidines may mediate the initial inter- and intramolecular stabilization of preCols in the byssus.

  13. Marine Origin Collagens and Its Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tiago H.; Moreira-Silva, Joana; Marques, Ana L. P.; Domingues, Alberta; Bayon, Yves; Reis, Rui L.

    2014-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant high molecular weight proteins in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms, including mammals, and possess mainly a structural role, existing different types according with their specific organization in distinct tissues. From this, they have been elected as one of the key biological materials in tissue regeneration approaches. Also, industry is constantly searching for new natural sources of collagen and upgraded methodologies for their production. The most common sources are from bovine and porcine origin, but other ways are making their route, such as recombinant production, but also extraction from marine organisms like fish. Different organisms have been proposed and explored for collagen extraction, allowing the sustainable production of different types of collagens, with properties depending on the kind of organism (and their natural environment) and extraction methodology. Such variety of collagen properties has been further investigated in different ways to render a wide range of applications. The present review aims to shed some light on the contribution of marine collagens for the scientific and technological development of this sector, stressing the opportunities and challenges that they are and most probably will be facing to assume a role as an alternative source for industrial exploitation. PMID:25490254

  14. OSCAR-collagen signaling in monocytes plays a proinflammatory role and may contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Heidi S; Guo, Li; Keller, Pernille; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Sun, Mingyi; Guo, Wei; Ma, Chunyan; Hamilton, John A; Bjørkdahl, Olle; Berchtold, Martin W; Panina, Svetlana

    2016-04-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is an activating receptor expressed by human myeloid cells. Collagen type I (ColI) and collagen type II (ColII) serve as ligands for OSCAR. OSCAR-collagen interaction stimulates RANK-dependent osteoclastogenesis. We have recently reported that OSCAR promotes functional maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. OSCAR is upregulated on monocytes from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with active disease, and these monocytes show an increased proosteoclastogenic potential. In the current study, we have addressed a functional role for an OSCAR-collagen interaction on monocytes. We show that OSCAR-ColII signaling promoted the survival of monocytes. Moreover, ColII stimulated the release of proinflammatory cytokines by monocytes from healthy donors, which could be completely blocked by an anti-OSCAR monoclonal antibody. Mononuclear cells from the synovial fluid of RA patients plated on ColII secreted TNF-α and IL-8 in an OSCAR-dependent manner. Global RNA profiling showed that components of multiple signaling pathways relevant to RA pathogenesis are regulated at the transcriptional level by OSCAR in monocytes. Thus, OSCAR can play a proinflammatory role in monocyte-derived cells and may contribute crucially on multiple levels to RA pathogenesis.

  15. Transgenic Expression of an Altered Angiotensin type I AT1 Receptor Resulting in Marked Modulation of Vascular Type I Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Rich, Celeste; Toselli, Paul; Stone, Philip; Green, Daniel; Warburton, Rod; Hill, Nicholas; Goldstein, Ronald; Polgar, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1) was modified by replacing its third intracellular loop and C-terminal tail with the corresponding regions from the bradykinin B2 receptor. Transgenic mice were produced that overexpress this mutated receptor (AB3T). Considerably less collagen content in the intact aorta and in primary aortic smooth muscle (aSMCs) cultures was observed in the transgenic mice. On the other hand, elastin content remained unchanged as measured by western blot, and insoluble amino acid quantitation. The contraction of isolated aortas also remained unaltered. The aSMCs derived from the transgenic mice showed a reduction in angiotensin II responsive type I collagen production. In aSMCs from transgenic mice, the cascade of Akt to the mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR) to p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) was not angiotensin II activated, while in the aSMCs from wild type mice the cascade was angiotensin II activated. Angiotensin activation of Smad2 and Stat3 was also reduced in the AB3T aSMCs. However, no change in the effect of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) on type I collagen production was observed. Also, the activation of ERK and JNK and G protein linked signaling remained unaltered in response to angiotensin II. Akt and PI3K activation inhibitors blocked angiotensin II stimulated type I collagen expression in WT aSMCs, whereas ERK inhibitor had no such effect. Our results point to an Akt/ mTOR/ p70S6K regulation of collagen production by angiotensin II with participation of Smad2 and Stat3 cascades in this process. PMID:21751211

  16. Periodic knee injections of collagen tripeptide delay cartilage degeneration in rabbit experimental osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Collagen peptides have been reported to possess various biological activities for various cell types. The purposes of this study were, first, to examine the therapeutic effects of collagen tripeptide (Ctp) in rabbit osteoarthritis and, second, to explore a synergetic effect with hyaluronan (HA). Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection of the right knee in 72 Japanese white rabbits and they were divided into four groups (control, Ctp, HA and Ctp/HA). Each material was injected weekly into the knee, and knee joint samples were collected 5, 10 and 15 weeks after surgery. Macroscopic and histomorphological analyses of cartilage were conducted. Expression of type II collagen and matrix metalloproteinase-13 was also analyzed immunohistochemically. A Tukey's honestly significant difference test was used to evaluate the statistical significance of difference in the macroscopic, histological and immnohistochemical results. Results All treatment groups exhibited slightly higher resistance to the progression of osteoarthritis than the control group macroscopically 15 weeks after surgery. Histologically, intra-articular injection of Ctp significantly reduced cartilage degradation 10 weeks after surgery, and Ctp/HA significantly reduced it 5 weeks after surgery in comparison with the control. Immunohistochemically, both Ctp-treated and Ctp/HA-treated groups had significantly increased type II collagen-positive chondrocytes at the fifth week after the surgery, although the numbers of matrix metalloproteinase-13-positive chondrocytes were not affected. Conclusion Periodical injections of Ctp and Ctp/HA delayed progression of cartilage degeneration of early osteoarthritis induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection in rabbits. This effect appears to be exerted by promotion of type II collagen synthesis predominantly. PMID:23433227

  17. Interstitial Perfusion Culture with Specific Soluble Factors Inhibits Type I Collagen Production from Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes in Clinical-Grade Collagen Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Talò, Giuseppe; Lovati, Arianna B.; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Riboldi, Stefania A.; Moretti, Matteo; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor healing ability and cartilage injuries often evolve to osteoarthritis. Cell-based strategies aiming to engineer cartilaginous tissue through the combination of biocompatible scaffolds and articular chondrocytes represent an alternative to standard surgical techniques. In this context, perfusion bioreactors have been introduced to enhance cellular access to oxygen and nutrients, hence overcoming the limitations of static culture and improving matrix deposition. Here, we combined an optimized cocktail of soluble factors, the BIT (BMP-2, Insulin, Thyroxin), and clinical-grade collagen sponges with a bidirectional perfusion bioreactor, namely the oscillating perfusion bioreactor (OPB), to engineer in vitro articular cartilage by human articular chondrocytes (HACs) obtained from osteoarthritic patients. After amplification, HACs were seeded and cultivated in collagen sponges either in static or dynamic conditions. Chondrocyte phenotype and the nature of the matrix synthesized by HACs were assessed using western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Finally, the stability of the cartilaginous tissue produced by HACs was evaluated in vivo by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our results showed that perfusion improved the distribution and quality of cartilaginous matrix deposited within the sponges, compared to static conditions. Specifically, dynamic culture in the OPB, in combination with the BIT cocktail, resulted in the homogeneous production of extracellular matrix rich in type II collagen. Remarkably, the production of type I collagen, a marker of fibrous tissues, was also inhibited, indicating that the association of the OPB with the BIT cocktail limits fibrocartilage formation, favoring the reconstruction of hyaline cartilage. PMID:27584727

  18. Collagen-Binding Peptidoglycans Inhibit MMP Mediated Collagen Degradation and Reduce Dermal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Paul W.; Freeman, Lynetta; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Scarring of the skin is a large unmet clinical problem that is of high patient concern and impact. Wound healing is complex and involves numerous pathways that are highly orchestrated, leaving the skin sealed, but with abnormal organization and composition of tissue components, namely collagen and proteoglycans, that are then remodeled over time. To improve healing and reduce or eliminate scarring, more rapid restoration of healthy tissue composition and organization offers a unique approach for development of new therapeutics. A synthetic collagen-binding peptidoglycan has been developed that inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-1 and 13 (MMP-1 and MMP-13) mediated collagen degradation. We investigated the synthetic peptidoglycan in a rat incisional model in which a single dose was delivered in a hyaluronic acid (HA) vehicle at the time of surgery prior to wound closure. The peptidoglycan treatment resulted in a significant reduction in scar tissue at 21 days as measured by histology and visual analysis. Improved collagen architecture of the treated wounds was demonstrated by increased tensile strength and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of collagen fibril diameters compared to untreated and HA controls. The peptidoglycan's mechanism of action includes masking existing collagen and inhibiting MMP-mediated collagen degradation while modulating collagen organization. The peptidoglycan can be synthesized at low cost with unique design control, and together with demonstrated preclinical efficacy in reducing scarring, warrants further investigation for dermal wound healing. PMID:21779387

  19. Effect of kiwifruit juice on beef collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Sumi; Hirota, Aya; Okada, Chikako; Yorita, Taeko; Sato, Kenji; Ohtsuki, Kozo

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the difference in susceptibility to protease digestion by kiwifruit juice between collagen domains under different conditions. In addition, the effect of pre-treatment with kiwifruit juice on collagen in meat during cooking processes was examined. Kiwifruit juice can degrade denatured collagen, but it can not cleave the triple helical domain of collagen. Thus, kiwifruit juice does not have collagenase activity. On the other hand, the cross-linked subunits of acid-soluble collagen were converted to monomeric subunits by kiwifruit juice treatment at acidic pH, suggesting that the globular domains, in which cross-links preferentially occur, can be degraded by kiwifruit juice. The pre-treatment with kiwifruit juice significantly decreased the shear force of connective tissue in comparison with other pre-treatments without protease activity, but inversely increased the liberation of collagen-related peptides in the outer solution by heating processes at 50 and 70 degrees C or by a shorter heating time at 100 degrees C. This can be explained by the protease-mediated degradation of globular domains. However, this effect was not observed with a prolonged heating period at 100 degrees C, and the liberation of collagen-related peptides by pre-treatment with kiwifruit juice at 100 degrees C was less than that at 70 degrees C for all heating periods. Thus, it can be suggested that the pre-treatment with kiwifruit juice might be useful in meat softening under vacuum-cooking and grilling, but not under stewing.

  20. Probing electromechanical coupling in collagen at the nanoscale via scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, Denise

    Electromechanical coupling is ubiquitous in nature and is a functional characteristic in a large range of inorganic and organic materials, including collagen type I -- a fibrous protein abundant in mammals. Understanding the biofunctionality of electromechanical coupling in its linear form -- piezoelectricity, has been a topic of research spanning over seven decades and yet many questions still remain unanswered. Piezoelectricity in bone and connective tissues such as tendon has been investigated at the macroscopic scale since the discovery of piezoelectricity in bone in 1957 and induced currents via the piezoelectric effect have been shown to activate the healing process in tissues under tension. Biological systems consist of complex hierarchical structures which results from a high degree of organization from the macroscale down to the nanoscale. These complex structures, however, make quantitative piezoelectric measurements difficult. Therefore, there exists a need to understand these processes at the individual protein level -- i.e. at the nanoscale. In this thesis, a voltage-modulated form of atomic force microscopy called piezoresponse force microscopy is utilized to investigate the counterpart which is responsible for piezoelectricity in bone and connective tissues -- collagen. The polar properties of collagen were revealed at the nanoscale and were shown to result in a highly complex polar architecture in natural tissue, which is important for understanding tissue development. Shear piezoelectricity was discovered to persist in engineered collagen hydrogels, a study intended to highlight the importance of replicating both structural and functional properties in replacement tissues. The electromechanical properties of collagen type II were investigated which were previously unknown. Collagen type II was shown to be a shear piezoelectric, exhibiting an angle dependence of the piezoelectric signal with cantilever-fibril angle. In addition, the piezoelectric

  1. Suppression of collagen induced arthritis by idiotype coupled lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler-Anderson, C.; Gurish, M.F.; Robinson, M.E.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were initiated to evaluate the regulatory influence of idiotype (Id) networks in an experimental auto-immune disease. Collagen induced arthritis is an animal model of polyarthritis induced in susceptible mice by immunization with collagen II (CII). A humoral immune response to CII appears to be critical for the development of diseases. If subpopulations of the anti-CII abs, important for the induction of arthritis, could be identified and manipulated through the presence of a major Id, it should be possible to decrease arthritis incidence by suppressing the production of these Ids. Specifically purified anti-CII abs from arthritic DBA/1 mice were coupled to syngeneic spleen cells and administered IV prior to intradermal immunization with CII. By day 34 after 1/sup 0/ immunization, 100% of control mice and 50% of treated mice had developed arthritis. Suppression of the Id population administered to the treated group was confirmed by RIA. Sera from individual mice were tested as inhibitors of binding of /sup 125/I-labelled polyclonal DBA/1 anti-CII to a rabbit anti-Id directed against polyclonal anti-CII isolated from the sera of arthritic mice. Mean percentage of inhibition of binding of /sup 125/I-Id to rabbit anti-Id by sera from non-arthritic treated mice was found to be significantly lower than that observed in the arthritic control group (p = .045), but did not correlate with total anti-CII ab titers.

  2. Plasma clot-promoting effect of collagen in relation to collagen-platelet interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, P.A.; Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The hemostatic function of several acid-soluble collagen preparations and a fibrillar-form collagen preparation have been compared. Pepsin-treated acid-soluble collagen isolated from burro and horse aortic tissue and acid-soluble colagen isolated from human umbilical cord readily promoted platelet aggregation, but failed to activate the coagulation mechanism even after prolonged incubation with plasma at 37 C. By contrast, fibrillar-form collagen isolated from burro aorta was both an efficient stimulant for the induction of platelet aggregation and a potent clot-promoting agent. Similar results were found for all the collagen preparations irrespective of whether the studies were conducted with sheep or with burro plasma. Heat denaturation studies showed that the hemostatic functon of the fibrillar-form colagen was dependent on an intact tirple-helical structure.

  3. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging

    PubMed Central

    Borumand, Maryam; Sibilla, Sara

    2014-01-01

    With age, changes in the metabolic processes of structural components of the skin lead to visible signs of aging, such as increased dryness and wrinkle formation. The nutritional supplement, Pure Gold Collagen®, which consists of hydrolyzed collagen, hyaluronic acid, vitamins, and minerals, was developed to counteract these signs. An open-label study was conducted to investigate the effects of this nutritional supplement on skin properties. Supplementation with 50 mL of Pure Gold Collagen on a daily basis for 60 days led to a noticeable reduction in skin dryness, wrinkles, and nasolabial fold depth. In addition, a significant increase in collagen density and skin firmness was observed after 12 weeks. The data from this study suggest that Pure Gold Collagen can counteract signs of natural aging. PMID:25342893

  4. Lipoid proteinosis: an inherited disorder of collagen metabolism?

    PubMed

    Harper, J I; Duance, V C; Sims, T J; Light, N D

    1985-08-01

    The dermal collagen of a patient with lipoid proteinosis was investigated by immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. The affected skin was found to contain significantly less collagen per unit dry weight than normal dermis but showed elevated levels of type 3 collagen with respect to type I. Purification of collagen types from affected skin after pepsin digestion showed no novel forms, but a doubling in the yield of type 5 collagen. These results correlated well with those of immunohistochemistry which showed a patchy, diffuse, widely distributed type 3 collagen and an increase in types 4 and 5 collagens associated with 'onion skin' endothelial basement membrane thickening. Estimation of collagen cross-links showed an abnormal pattern with a preponderance of the keto-imine form not normally associated with skin. These results strongly suggest that lipoid proteinosis involves a primary perturbation of collagen metabolism.

  5. Fetal and postnatal development of the patella, patellar tendon and suprapatella in the rabbit; changes in the distribution of the fibrillar collagens

    PubMed Central

    BLAND, YVETTE S.; ASHHURST, DOREEN E.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the patella, its associated tendons, and suprapatella of the rabbit knee joint is described from the 17 d fetus to the mature adult. The patellar tendon (ligament) with the patella on its posterior surface is seen in the 17 d fetus and is fully developed by 1 postnatal wk. It is composed of bundles of types I and V collagens separated by endotenons of types III and V collagens. Anteriorly there is an epitenon of types III and V collagens while synovium and a fat pad cover its posterior surface. In the 25 d fetus, the patella is cartilaginous and is separated from the femoral condyles. The cartilage contains type II collagen, but types I, III and V collagens are found along the articular surface. Ossification starts 1 postnatal wk and at 6 wk only the articular cartilage remains. In addition to type II, types III and V collagens are located around the chondrocyte lacunae. The long anterior junction between the patella and its tendon is fibrocartilaginous at 1 wk, but as ossification proceeds this is replaced by bone. Types I and V collagens are found in this region. The suprapatella on the posterior surface of the quadriceps tendon is first seen 1 wk postnatally as an area of irregularly organised fibres and chondrocyte-like cells. Types I, II, III and V collagens are present from 3 wk onwards. It is compared with the fibrocartilage of other tendons that are under compression. The arrangement of the collagens in the patellar tendon is discussed in relation to its use as a replacement for injured anterior cruciate ligaments. It is suggested that the structural differences between the patellar tendon and anterior cruciate ligament preclude the translocated tendon acquiring mechanical strength similar to that of a normal cruciate ligament. The designation ‘patellar ligament’ as opposed to ‘patellar tendon’ is questioned. It is argued that the term patellar tendon reflects its structure more accurately than patellar ligament. PMID:9147220

  6. Recombinant expression of hydroxylated human collagen in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, Christoph; Baumann, Stephan; Cabalzar, Jürg; Luther, Kelvin B; Hennet, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body and thereby a structural protein of considerable biotechnological interest. The complex maturation process of collagen, including essential post-translational modifications such as prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation, has precluded large-scale production of recombinant collagen featuring the biophysical properties of endogenous collagen. The characterization of new prolyl and lysyl hydroxylase genes encoded by the giant virus mimivirus reveals a method for production of hydroxylated collagen. The coexpression of a human collagen type III construct together with mimivirus prolyl and lysyl hydroxylases in Escherichia coli yielded up to 90 mg of hydroxylated collagen per liter culture. The respective levels of prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation reaching 25 % and 26 % were similar to the hydroxylation levels of native human collagen type III. The distribution of hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine along recombinant collagen was also similar to that of native collagen as determined by mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides. The triple helix signature of recombinant hydroxylated collagen was confirmed by circular dichroism, which also showed that hydroxylation increased the thermal stability of the recombinant collagen construct. Recombinant hydroxylated collagen produced in E. coli supported the growth of human umbilical endothelial cells, underlining the biocompatibility of the recombinant protein as extracellular matrix. The high yield of recombinant protein expression and the extensive level of prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation achieved indicate that recombinant hydroxylated collagen can be produced at large scale for biomaterials engineering in the context of biomedical applications.

  7. Type II collagenopathies: Are there additional family members?

    SciTech Connect

    Freisinger, P.; Pontz, B.F.; Emmrich, P.; Stoess, H.; Bonaventure, J.

    1996-05-03

    The type II collagenopathies represent a group of chondrodysplasia sharing clinical and radiological manifestations which are expressed as a continuous spectrum of phenotypes, ranging from perinatally lethal to very mild conditions. Their common molecular bases are mutations in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1). We describe one case of lethal platyspondylic dysplasia, Torrance type, and a variant of lethal Kniest dysplasia, neither of which has been reported as a type II collagenopathy. Biochemical studies of cartilage collagens and morphological analysis of cartilage sections suggest that abnormalities of type II collagen structure and biosynthesis are the main pathogenetic factors in both cases. Thus, the phenotypic spectrum of type II collagenopathies might be greater than hitherto suspected. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Artificial extracellular matrices of collagen and sulphated hyaluronan enhance the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in the presence of dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Hintze, V; Miron, A; Möller, S; Schnabelrauch, M; Heinemann, S; Worch, H; Scharnweber, D

    2014-04-01

    In this study we investigated the potential of artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) coatings containing collagen II and two types of glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) with different degrees of sulphation to promote human bone formation in biomedical applications. To this end their impact on growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was assessed. The cell proliferation was found to be significantly retarded in the first 14 days of culture on surfaces coated with collagen II and GAGs (coll-II/GAG) as compared to tissue culture polystyrol (TCPS) and those coated with collagen II. At later time points it only tended to be retarded on coll-II/sHya3.1. Heat-inactivation of the serum significantly reduced cell numbers on collagen II and coll-II/sHya3.1. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition, on the other hand, were higher for coatings containing sHya3.1 and were not significantly changed by heat-inactivation of the serum. Expression levels of the bone matrix proteins bone sialoprotein (BSP-II) and osteopontin (OP) were also increased on aECM coatings as compared to TCPS, which further validated the differentiation of hMSCs towards the osteogenic lineage. These observations reveal that aECM coatings, in particular those containing sHya3.1, are suitable to promote the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  9. Collagen polymorphism in idiopathic chronic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, J M; Hutcheson, E T; Kang, A H

    1976-01-01

    Collagens in normal human lung and in idiopathic chronic fibrosis were investigated in terms of their covalent structure and compared for possible alterations in the diseased state. Collagens were solubilized by limited digestion with pepsin under nondenaturing conditions, and after purification they, were fractionated into types I and III. Carboxymethylcellulose and agarose chromatography of both types I and III collagens, and amino acid and carbohydrate analyses of the resulting alpha-chains indicated that the alpha 1 (I), alpha 2, and alpha 1 (III) chains of normal human lung were identical with the human skin alpha-chains in all respects examined except that the normal lung chains contained higher levels of hydroxylysine. Examination of collagens obtained from the diseased lung revealed that the content of hydroxylysine of the alpha 1 (I) and the alpha 1 (III) chains appeared to be diminished as compared to the normal lung chains. The values, expressed as residues per 1,000 residues, are 7.1 and 8.3 for the alpha 1 (I) and the alpha 1 (III) chains, respectively, as compared to 10.0 and 11.1 for the alpha-chains from the normal tissue. The chromatographic properties and amino acid and carbohydrate composition of the alpha-chains from the diseased tissue were otherwise indistinguishable from those of normal lung. In addition, isolation and characterization of the CNBr peptides of alpha 1 (I), alpha 2 and alpha 1 (III) from the diseased lung revealed no significant differences from the CNBr peptides from other human tissues reported previously. Normal and diseased lungs were also digested with CNBr, and the resultant alpha 1 (I) and alpha 1 (III) peptides were separated chromatographically. The relative quantities of these peptides indicate that type III collagen constitutes 33% of the total collagen in normal human lung, with the remainder being type I, whereas in idiopathic chronic pulmonary fibrosis, the relative content of type III collagen is markedly

  10. Collagenous colitis: new diagnostic possibilities with endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A.; Goetz, M.; Biesterfeld, S.; Galle, P. R.; Neurath, M. F.; Kiesslich, R.

    2006-02-01

    Collagenous colitis is a kind of microscopic colitis. It is characterized by chronic watery diarrhea and abdominal pain. The etiology is still unknown. So far, for the diagnose a histological evaluation was necessary with the presence of thickened subepithelial collagneous bands in the lamina propria. A new developed endoscope with a confocal laser allows analysing cellular and subcellular details of the mucosal layer at high resolution in vivo. In this case report we describe for the first time to diagnose collagenous colitis during ongoing colonoscopy by using this confocal endomicroscopy. In a 67 year old female patient with typical symptoms the characteristic histological changes could be identified in the endomicroscopic view. Biopsies could be targeted to affected areas and endomicroscopic prediction of the presence of collagenous bands could be confirmed in all targeted biopsies. First endomicroscopic experience in microscopic colitis could be confirmed in four additional patients. Future prospective studies are warranted to further evaluate these initial findings. However, collagenous colitis is frequently missed and endomicroscopy seems to be the ideal tool for accurate diagnosing collagenous colitis during ongoing endoscopy.

  11. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  12. New recommendations for measuring collagen solubility.

    PubMed

    Latorre, María E; Lifschitz, Adrian L; Purslow, Peter P

    2016-08-01

    The heat-solubility of intramuscular collagen is usually conducted in 1/4 Ringer's solution at pH7.4, despite this ionic strength and pH being inappropriate for post-rigor meat. The current work studied the percentage of soluble collagen and hydrothermal isometric tension characteristics of perimysial strips on bovine semitendinosus muscles in either 1/4 Ringer's solution, distilled water, PBS, or a solution of the same salt concentration as 1/4 Ringer's but at pH5.6. Values of % soluble collagen were lower at pH7.4 than 5.6. Increasing ionic strength reduced % soluble collagen. The maximum perimysial isometric tension was independent of the bathing medium, but the percent relaxation was higher at pH7.4 than at pH5.6, and increased with ionic strength of the media. It is recommended that future measurements of collagen solubility and tests on connective tissue components of post-rigor meat should be carried out in a solution of concentrations NaCl and KCl equivalent to those in 1/4 Ringer's, but at pH5.6, a pH relevant to post-rigor meat.

  13. Crosslink in bone collagen in Paget's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, D P

    1975-01-01

    The crosslink in bone collagen was analysed in specimens of bone obtained at necropsy from cases of Paget's disease and compared with normal bone collagen of the same age. The specimens were stored at -20 degrees C before analysis. The predominant crosslink in a normal bone collagen was hydroxylysinohydroxynorleucine (di OH-LNL) (F1), which was designated syndesine in the past; another fraction, hydroxylysinorleucine (HLNL) (F2), musch less prominent than di OH-LNL, was also noted in a normal bone collagen. Both fractions were reduced in bone tissue of advancing age. The peak corresponding to HLNL was considerably increased in Paget's disease. This abnormality was constantly seen in specimens of bone from cases of Paget's disease, but the significance of the finging could not be assessed from the present investigation. Calcitonin has been shown to produce complete remission in Paget's disease and the crosslink pattern was found to be normal in specimens examined froma calcitonin-treated patient. This shows that calcitonin has some effect on the metabolism of collagen and a normal crosslink in such a situation lends support to this idea. PMID:1127123

  14. The relative roles of collagen adhesive receptor DDR2 activation and matrix stiffness on the downregulation of focal adhesion kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Chung, Koo-Hyun; Spurlin, Tighe A; Haynes, Ross J; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2009-12-01

    Cells within tissues derive mechanical anchorage and specific molecular signals from the insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds them. Understanding the role of different cues that extracellular matrices provide cells is critical for controlling and predicting cell response to scaffolding materials. Using an engineered extracellular matrix of Type I collagen we examined how the stiffness, supramolecular structure, and glycosylation of collagen matrices influence the protein levels of cellular FAK and the activation of myosin II. Our results show that (1) cellular FAK is downregulated on collagen fibrils, but not on a non-fibrillar monolayer of collagen, (2) the downregulation of FAK is independent of the stiffness of the collagen fibrils, and (3) FAK levels are correlated with levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of the collagen adhesion receptor DDR2. Further, siRNA depletion of DDR2 blocks FAK downregulation. Our results suggest that the collagen receptor DDR2 is involved in the regulation of FAK levels in vSMC adhered to Type I collagen matrices, and that regulation of FAK levels in these cells appears to be independent of matrix stiffness.

  15. Suspected collagen disorders in the bleeding disorder clinic: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S C; Odiaman, L; Card, R T; van der Bom, J G; Poon, M-C

    2013-03-01

    Disorders of collagen are associated with a mild bleeding tendency because of the potential abnormal interaction of collagen, von Willebrand factor (VWF) and platelets required during primary haemostasis and due to generalized soft tissue fragility. Abnormal collagen may contribute to bleeding in existing mucocutaneous bleeding disorders, but the prevalence in this setting is unknown. Generalized symptomatic joint hypermobility (SJH) is common in collagen disorders and may be objectively measured. To assess the association between symptomatic joint hypermobility and mucocutaneous bleeding disorders, we performed a case-control study in which case subjects were 55 consecutive individuals who had visited our bleeding disorder clinic with a diagnosis of von Willebrand disease, low von Willebrand factor levels, mild platelet function disorder or undefined bleeding disorder. Controls were 50 subjects without a bleeding disorder, and were age and gender matched to the cases. All subjects were assessed with: (i) Beighton score for joint hypermobility, (ii) revised Brighton criteria, (iii) Condensed MCMDM1-VWD bleeding questionnaire, and (iv) haemostasis laboratory studies. The prevalence of SJH/suspected collagen disorder in the bleeding disorder clinic was 24% (13/55) compared with 2% (1/50) in the control population (OR 15, 95% CI 2-121). Seventy-seven per cent of bleeding disorder clinic SJH subjects (10/13) had a prior personal or family history of Ehlers-Danlos, Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome or Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). Symptomatic joint hypermobility was associated with increased odds of an underlying mucocutaneous bleeding disorder. These findings suggest that a collagen disorder is common and often unrecognized in the bleeding disorder clinic as a potential contributor to the bleeding symptoms.

  16. Dauer-independent insulin/IGF-1-signalling implicates collagen remodelling in longevity

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Collin Y.; Landis, Jess N.; Abate, Jess Porter; Murphy, Coleen T.; Blackwell, T. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Summary Interventions that delay ageing mobilize mechanisms that protect and repair cellular components1–3, but it is unknown how these interventions might slow the functional decline of extracellular matrices4,5, which are also damaged during ageing6,7. Reduced Insulin/IGF-1 signalling (rIIS) extends lifespan across the evolutionary spectrum, and in juvenile C. elegans also allows the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO to induce development into dauer, a diapause that withstands harsh conditions (Supplementary Discussion)1,2. It has been suggested that rIIS delays C. elegans ageing through activation of dauer-related processes during adulthood2,8,9, but some rIIS conditions confer robust lifespan extension unaccompanied by any dauer-like traits1,10,11. Here we show that rIIS can promote C. elegans longevity through an program that is genetically distinct from the dauer pathway, and requires the Nrf (NF-E2-related factor) ortholog SKN-1 acting in parallel to DAF-16. SKN-1 is inhibited by IIS and has been broadly implicated in longevity12–14, but is rendered dispensable for rIIS lifespan extension by even mild activity of dauer-related processes. When IIS is decreased under conditions that do not induce dauer traits, SKN-1 most prominently increases expression of collagens and other extracellular matrix (ECM) genes. Diverse genetic, nutritional, and pharmacological pro-longevity interventions delay an age-related decline in collagen expression. These collagens mediate adulthood ECM remodelling, and are needed for ageing to be delayed by interventions that do not involve dauer traits. By genetically delineating a dauer-independent rIIS ageing pathway, our results show that IIS controls a broad set of protective mechanisms during C. elegans adulthood, and may facilitate elucidation of processes of general importance for longevity. The importance of collagen production in diverse anti-ageing interventions implies that ECM remodelling is a generally essential

  17. Architectural Analysis of Picrosirius Red Stained Collagen in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma using Polarization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rashi; Rehani, Shweta; Mehendiratta, Monica; Kumra, Madhumani; Mathias, Yulia; Yadav, Jyoti; Sahay, Khushboo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Collagen degradation is important both for carcinogenesis and in its progression. Research regarding the co-relation of collagen with Oral Epithelial Dysplasia (OED) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is less explored. Aim To elucidate the nature of collagen in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia (OED) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) using Picrosirius Red Stain (PSR) under polarizing microscopy. Materials and Methods The study consisted of a total 40 samples which were divided into three groups. Group I included buccal mucosa as negative and irritation fibroma as positive control, group II consisted of OED and group III consisted of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). A histochemical analysis was conducted using PSR-polarization method by two independent observers. Results The control group shows predominantly reddish–orange birefringence. In OED with the advancement of grades, the colour changed from yellowish-orange colour to yellow-greenish with progressive increase in greenish hue. As OSCC regresses from well to poorly differentiated, the colour changed from reddish-orange to yellowish orange to greenish-yellow suggesting a transition from mature to immature collagen. Conclusion An observable gradual change in collagen of both OED and OSCC was noted as they were proceeding from benign to critical step. Thus, PSR is a useful tool for studying stromal changes as supporting collagen shows the transition in the form besides the alterations in epithelial cells. PMID:26816897

  18. Collagen scaffold microenvironments modulate cell lineage commitment for differentiation of bone marrow cells into regulatory dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yongxiang; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Yannan; Xiao, Zhifeng; Li, Jing; Cui, Yi; Han, Sufang; Wei, Jianshu; Chen, Bing; Han, Jin; Meng, Qingyuan; Hou, Xianglin; Luo, Jianxun; Dai, Jianwu; Jing, Zhizhong

    2017-01-01

    The microenvironment plays a pivotal role for cell survival and functional regulation, and directs the cell fate determination. The biological functions of DCs have been extensively investigated to date. However, the influences of the microenvironment on the differentiation of bone marrow cells (BMCs) into dendritic cells (DCs) are not well defined. Here, we established a 3D collagen scaffold microenvironment to investigate whether such 3D collagen scaffolds could provide a favourable niche for BMCs to differentiate into specialised DCs. We found that BMCs embedded in the 3D collagen scaffold differentiated into a distinct subset of DC, exhibiting high expression of CD11b and low expression of CD11c, co-stimulator (CD40, CD80, CD83, and CD86) and MHC-II molecules compared to those grown in 2D culture. DCs cultured in the 3D collagen scaffold possessed weak antigen uptake ability and inhibited T-cell proliferation in vitro; in addition, they exhibited potent immunoregulatory function to alleviate allo-delay type hypersensitivity when transferred in vivo. Thus, DCs differentiated in the 3D collagen scaffold were defined as regulatory DCs, indicating that collagen scaffold microenvironments probably play an important role in modulating the lineage commitment of DCs and therefore might be applied as a promising tool for generation of specialised DCs. PMID:28169322

  19. 3-D ultrastructure and collagen composition of healthy and overloaded human tendon: evidence of tenocyte and matrix buckling

    PubMed Central

    Pingel, Jessica; Lu, Yinhui; Starborg, Tobias; Fredberg, Ulrich; Langberg, Henning; Nedergaard, Anders; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Kjaer, Michael; Kadler, Karl E

    2014-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathies display focal tissue thickening with pain and ultrasonography changes. Whilst complete rupture might be expected to induce changes in tissue organization and protein composition, little is known about the consequences of non-rupture-associated tendinopathies, especially with regards to changes in the content of collagen type I and III (the major collagens in tendon), and changes in tendon fibroblast (tenocyte) shape and organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). To gain new insights, we took biopsies from the tendinopathic region and flanking healthy region of Achilles tendons of six individuals with clinically diagnosed tendinopathy who had no evidence of cholesterol, uric acid and amyloid accumulation. Biochemical analyses of collagen III/I ratio were performed on all six individuals, and electron microscope analysis using transmission electron microscopy and serial block face-scanning electron microscopy were made on two individuals. In the tendinopathic regions, compared with the flanking healthy tissue, we observed: (i) an increase in the ratio of collagen III : I proteins; (ii) buckling of the collagen fascicles in the ECM; (iii) buckling of tenocytes and their nuclei; and (iv) an increase in the ratio of small-diameter : large-diameter collagen fibrils. In summary, load-induced non-rupture tendinopathy in humans is associated with localized biochemical changes, a shift from large-to small-diameter fibrils, buckling of the tendon ECM, and buckling of the cells and their nuclei. PMID:24571576

  20. Engineering D-Amino Acid Containing Collagen Like Peptide at the Cleavage Site of Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase for Its Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Punitha; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Unni Nair, Balachandran

    2015-01-01

    Collagenase is an important enzyme which plays an important role in degradation of collagen in wound healing, cancer metastasis and even in embryonic development. However, the mechanism of this degradation has not yet been completely understood. In the field of biomedical and protein engineering, the design and development of new peptide based materials is of main concern. In the present work an attempt has been made to study the effect of DAla in collagen like peptide (imino-poor region of type I collagen) on the structure and stability of peptide against enzyme hydrolysis. Effect of replacement of DAla in the collagen like peptide has been studied using circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD). Our findings suggest that, DAla substitution leads to conformational changes in the secondary structure and favours the formation of polyproline II conformation than its L-counterpart in the imino-poor region of collagen like peptides. Change in the chirality of alanine at the cleavage site of collagenase in the imino-poor region inhibits collagenolytic activity. This may find application in design of peptides and peptidomimics for enzyme-substrate interaction, specifically with reference to collagen and other extra cellular matrix proteins. PMID:25973613

  1. Localization of pro-alpha 2(V) collagen transcripts in the tissues of the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulos, K; Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1992-10-01

    Correct assembly of fibrillar collagen networks plays a critical role in animal morphogenesis. Very little is known about the contribution of the so-called minor fibrillar collagens (types V and XI) to fibrillogenesis. Here we examined the developmental expression of the mouse pro-alpha 2(V) collagen gene (col5a2) after the cloning and sequencing of cDNAs that cover the entire length of the message. Transcripts of col5a2, detectable as early as 9 days of gestation, localize with distinct patterns in the tissues of day 12.5 and day 16.5 fetuses. The earlier developmental stage is characterized by low and diffuse col5a2 expression in the peritoneal membranes and intestinal and craniofacial mesenchymes. The later stage exhibits higher and more restricted col5a2 mRNA accumulation in primary ossified regions, perichondrium, joints, tendon, atrioventricular valve of the heart, and selected portions of the head. A parallel analysis using a cartilage-specific pro-alpha 1(II) collagen (col2a1) probe confirmed that these two collagen genes are transcribed in a mutually exclusive manner during mouse embryogenesis. On the other hand, the developmental pattern of col5a2 expression closely resembles that of the type I collagen, thus further substantiating the notion that these macromolecules cooperate in the formation of fibrillar networks in non-cartilaginous matrices.

  2. [In vitro effect of total flavones of Fructus Chorspondiatis on expression of collagen type I and type III mRNA and protein of cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts].

    PubMed

    Bao, Jun-Ping; Jin, Ming; Yang, Yu-Min; Gao, Xiao-Hui; Shu, Liang; Xing, Hui-Hui; Jia, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of total flavones of Fructus Chorspondiatis (TFFC) on the mRNA and protein expression of collagen type I and III of rat cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II), and explore its anti-myocardial fibrosis molecular mechanism. Neonatal rat CFs were prepared from Sprague-Dawley rats (1-3 d after birth). The expression of collagen type I and III mRNA and protein were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The study showed that stimulation of neonatal rat CFs with 100 nmol.L-1 of Ang II for 72 h resulted in a significant increase of the expression of collagen type I and III mRNA and protein. The changes on the expression level were blocked by TFFC. The results demonstrated that TFFC can inhibit myocardial fibrosis induced by Ang II in rats, which is probably associated with the collagen type I and III mRNA and protein levels up-regulated by Ang II, and TFFC was shown to decrease the expression levels of collagen type I and III mRNA and protein.

  3. Biomimetic silicification of demineralized hierarchical collagenous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Heonjune; Diogenes, Anibal; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Chen, Ji-hua; Arola, Dwayne D.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike man-made composite materials, natural biominerals containing composites usually demonstrate different levels of sophisticated hierarchical structures which are responsible for their mechanical properties and other metabolic functions. However, the complex spatial organizations of the organic-inorganic phases are far beyond what they be achieved by contemporary engineering techniques. Here, we demonstrate that carbonated apatite present in collagen matrices derived from fish scale and bovine bone may be replaced by amorphous silica, using an approach that simulates what is utilized by phylogenetically ancient glass sponges. The structural hierarchy of these collagen-based biomaterials is replicated by the infiltration and condensation of fluidic polymer-stabilized silicic acid precursors within the intrafibrillar milieu of type I collagen fibrils. This facile biomimetic silicification strategy may be used for fabricating silica-based, three-dimensional functional materials with specific morphological and hierarchical requirements. PMID:23586938

  4. Physical crosslinkings of edible collagen casing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhang; Zhang, Yi; Ye, Ran; Ni, Yonghao

    2015-11-01

    Although edible collagen casing has been commercially used in meat industry, the safety and effectiveness of collagen cross-linking with minimally invasive treatments are still big concerns for manufacturers. In this study, ultraviolet irradiation (UV) and dehydrothermal treatment (DHT) were used to improve the properties of casing. UV, DHT, and their combination (UV+DHT) significantly increased tensile strength and decreased elongation at break of casing, in which DHT showed the best performance. Swelling of casing was also partially inhibited by the treatments. Furthermore, UV and DHT slightly improved thermal stability of the casings. In addition, X-ray diffraction patterns showed the treatments caused different extents of denaturation of collagen. No obvious effects in thickness and light transparency except for surface roughness were observed in the treated casings. The physical treatments could potentially be used as safe and effective alternatives to chemical cross-linking for the production of collage casing.

  5. [Collagenous colitis. Morphologic and immunohistochemical study].

    PubMed

    Genova, G; Arena, N; Guddo, F; Vita, C; Reitano, R; Nagar, C; Tralongo, V

    1993-01-01

    Collagenous colitis is a clinico-pathological entity characterized by chronic diarrhoeas and deposition of collagen beneath the epithelium surface of large bowel. We revised 265 endoscopy biopsy specimens of the large bowel from 198 consecutive patients with "aspecific chronic colitis". Morphometric study showed that were not significant differences among various tracts in the same patients regarding to the thickness of basament membrane. It was more than 11.9 +/- 0.49 mu only in 13 pts (6.6%), while it was 3.96 +/- 1.4 mu in the others. Immunohistochemistry study confirmed the normality of subepithelial basement membrane and the below deposition of the large quantity of collagen IV.

  6. Effects of tensile and compressive strains on response of a chondrocytic cell line embedded in type I collagen gel.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yuji; Ishiguro, Naoki; Sokabe, Masahiro; Takigawa, Masaharu; Naruse, Keiji

    2008-01-20

    Tensile and compressive strains are commonly used in mechanobiological models. Here we report on the development of a novel three-dimensional cell-culture method, which allows both tensile and compressive loads to be applied. Preliminary results were obtained using HCS2/8 chondrocytic cells embedded in type I collagen gel. This construct was subjected to either 16% tension or 14% compression. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that both tension and compression caused significant cell deformation. The collagen gel-embedded HCS2/8 cells were subjected to static tension, dynamic tension, static compression or dynamic compression for 24h. Dynamic compression led to significantly decreased 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation compared with the control group. PCR analysis revealed upregulation of type II collagen caused by dynamic tension, upregulation of aggrecan caused by static compression, and downregulation of type II collagen and aggrecan caused by dynamic compression. Nitric oxide production was significantly increased by static tension and static compression compared with the control group. Our experimental system effectively applied several types of strain to HCS2/8 cells embedded in collagen gel. Our results suggest that the mode of mechanical strain affects the response of HCS2/8 cells.

  7. The impact of low levels of collagen IX and pyridinoline on the mechanical properties of in vitro engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dan; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhou, Xu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wen Jie; Luo, Xusong; Zhang, Lu; Jiang, Ting; Cui, Lei; Cao, Yilin

    2009-02-01

    The application of in vitro engineered cartilage has become a promising approach to repair cartilage defects. Nevertheless, the poor mechanical properties of in vitro engineered cartilage limit its potential for clinical applications. Studies have shown that the extracellular matrix (ECM) components are strongly correlated with the mechanical strength of engineered cartilage, but it remains unclear which components play a key role in determining the mechanical property of engineered cartilage. To address this issue, quantitative analyses of cartilage-specific components among native cartilage, in vivo and in vitro engineered cartilages were performed, and the correlation between various ECM molecules and Young's modulus was further analyzed. The results showed that many ECM molecules, such as highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), collagens II, IX, and pyridinoline (PYR), contributed to the mechanical strength of cartilages. Further comparison between in vitro engineered cartilage and stress-stimulated in vitro engineered cartilage, known to have stronger mechanical properties, showed that only collagen IX and PYR, but not GAG and collagen II, were the key factors determining the mechanical properties of in vitro engineered cartilage. These results indicate that in vitro environment lacks the niche for enhancing collagen crosslinking that is mediated by collagen IX and PYR during cartilage formation. Thus, the discovery provides a clue for engineering strong cartilage in vitro in the future by enhancing the levels of these two molecules.

  8. Ordered collagen membranes: production and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, G; Mogilner, I G; Tolosa, E J; Massa, N; Garavaglia, M; Grigera, J R

    2012-01-01

    A collagen membrane with microscopic order is presented. The membranes were produced with acid-soluble collagen, using two different methods to obtain orientation. The product was characterized by mean of UV and IR spectra, scanning electronic microscopy, optical microscopy and laser diffractometry. The results clearly show a high level of order in the membranes obtained by both techniques. Permeability for rifamycin, ascorbic acid and NaCl was also measured. Due to the characteristics of the membranes, they have a potential application for treatment of surface injuries.

  9. Changes in collagens and chondrocytes in the temporomandibular joint cartilage in growing rats fed a liquid diet.

    PubMed

    Uekita, Hiroki; Takahashi, Shigeru; Domon, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Taihiko

    2015-11-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of growing rats fed a soft diet is reported to be smaller in size and to have thinner condyle and glenoid fossa cartilage than rats fed a solid diet. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a soft diet on the collagens and chondrocytes in the growing TMJ cartilage. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided into a control group fed a solid diet and an experimental group fed a liquid diet for 1-8 weeks. After the experimental period, the TMJs were harvested and examined histologically, immunohistochemically for collagen types I, II, and X, and with transmission electron microscopy. The condylar cartilage in the experimental rats showed weak immunoreactions for three types of collagens compared with the controls. The ultrastructure had fewer fine collagen fibrils in the experimental rats compared with that of the controls. The glenoid fossa cartilage in the experimental rats showed narrower Alcian blue-positive areas than the control staining. The immunoreactions for three types of collagen in the experimental rats were also weaker than those of the controls. The chondrocytes in the experimental rats appeared dark, had extended thin cytoplasmic processes, and had formed gap junctions, as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Fewer fine collagen fibrils, but thick bands of collagen fibrils were observed in the glenoid fossa of the experimental cartilage. The results of the present study showed that a liquid diet had deleterious effects on the quality and quantity of collagens and chondrocytes in the TMJ cartilage in growing rats.

  10. Platelet-reactive sites in collagen. Collagens I and III possess different aggregatory sites.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, L F; Fitzsimmons, C M; Rauterberg, J; Barnes, M J

    1987-01-01

    Collagen type III possesses a highly reactive platelet-aggregatory site at a locus which in type I is essentially inactive whilst the latter collagen possesses reactive sites absent in type III. It is proposed that platelet aggregation by collagen involves the sequence GK[or R]PG(EY)GPK[or R]G(EY) or, less favourably, GPK[or R]G(EY)G(XY)GK[or R]PG(EY), one basic residue acting in combination with the second in an adjacent alpha-chain. PMID:3124815

  11. Resveratrol inhibits high glucose induced collagen upregulation in cardiac fibroblasts through regulating TGF-β1-Smad3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junhui; Zhuo, Xiaozhen; Liu, Weimin; Wan, Zhaofei; Liang, Xiao; Gao, Shanshan; Yuan, Zuyi; Wu, Yue

    2015-02-05

    Cardiac fibrosis is a common pathological process presented in a variety of diseases, including hypertension and diabetes. Cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) have been identified as the most important participants in the development of cardiac fibrosis. Exposure of cultured CFs to high glucose (HG) or angiotensin II (Ang II) resulted in increased collagen synthesis. Resveratrol (Res) is a natural polyphenol exhibiting anti-fibrosis effects in a number of different organs fibrosis process, whether Res can prevent HG and Ang II induced fibrosis response in CFs remains unclear. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of Res in HG and Ang II induced fibrosis response in CFs. We cultured rat CFs in either normal glucose (5.6 mM) or HG (25 mM) media in the presence of Res or not and the changes in collagens synthesis and TGF-β1 production were assessed by Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore, normal and diabetic mice (induced by single dose of streptozotocin (100 mg/kg) via tail vein) receiving Res (10 mg/kg) were used to explore the effects of Res on cardiac fibrosis in vivo. Masson staining and immunohistochemistry were performed to visualize cardiac collagen deposition. Results indicate that CFs exposed to HG condition shows enhanced proliferation rate. Furthermore, in the presence of HG or Ang II, CFs exhibited increased collagens synthesis and TGF-β1 production. And these effects were abolished by Res intervention. In vivo results show that diabetic mice exhibit increased collagen deposition in the cardiac compared with the normal mice. And this change was prevented by the treatment of Res. These results suggest that Res possesses a potential antifibrogenic effect in hypertension and diabetes-related cardiac fibrosis. Moreover, the action mechanism is probably associated with its ability to reduce TGF-β1 content in CFs.

  12. Probing multiscale mechanics of collagen with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Lam, Norman H.; Altindal, Tuba; Wieczorek, Andrew; Forde, Nancy R.

    2013-09-01

    How the molecular structure of the structural, extracellular matrix protein collagen correlates with its mechanical properties at different hierarchical structural levels is not known. We demonstrate the utility of optical tweezers to probe collagen's mechanical response throughout its assembly hierarchy, from single molecule force-extension measurements through microrheology measurements on solutions of collagen molecules, collagen fibrillar gels and gelatin. These experiments enable the determination of collagen's flexibility, mechanics, and timescales and strengths of interaction at different levels of hierarchy, information critical to developing models of how collagen's physiological function and stability are influenced by its chemical composition. By investigating how the viscoelastic properties of collagen are affected by the presence of telopeptides, protein domains that strongly influence fibril formation, we demonstrate that these play a role in conferring transient elasticity to collagen solutions.

  13. Role of protein kinase C delta in angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chintalgattu, Vishnu; Katwa, Laxmansa C

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for angiotensin II (AngII) and myofibroblasts (myoFb) in cardiac fibrosis. However, the role of PKC-δ in AngII mediated cardiac fibrosis is unclear. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of PKC-δ in AngII induced cardiac collagen expression and fibrosis. AngII treatment significantly (p<0.05) increased myoFb collagen expression, whereas PKC-δ siRNA treatment or rottlerin, a PKC-δ inhibitor abrogated (p<0.05) AngII induced collagen expression. MyoFb transfected with PKC-δ over expression vector showed significant increase (p<0.05) in the collagen expression as compared to control. Two-weeks of chronic AngII infused rats showed significant (p<0.05) increase in collagen expression compared to sham operated rats. This increase in cardiac collagen expression was abrogated by rottlerin treatment. In conclusion, both in vitro and in vivo data strongly suggest a role for PKC-δ in AngII induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:19540196

  14. Mutations in the COL5A1 gene are causal in the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    De Paepe, A.; Nuytinck, L.; Naeyaert, J.M.

    1997-03-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous connective-tissue disorder of which at least nine subtypes are recognized. Considerable clinical overlap exists between the EDS I and II subtypes, suggesting that both are allelic disorders. Recent evidence based on linkage and transgenic mice studies suggest that collagen V is causally involved in human EDS. Collagen V forms heterotypic fibrils with collagen I in many tissues and plays an important role in collagen I fibrillogenesis. We have identified a mutation in COL5A1, the gene encoding the pro{alpha}1(V) collagen chain, segregating with EDS I in a four-generation family. The mutation causes the substitution of the most 5{prime} cysteine residue by a serine within a highly conserved sequence of the pro{alpha}1(V) C-propeptide domain and causes reduction of collagen V by preventing incorporation of the mutant pro{alpha}1 (V) chains in the collagen V trimers. In addition, we have detected splicing defects in the COL5A1 gene in a patient with EDS I and in a family with EDS II. These findings confirm the causal role of collagen V in at least a subgroup of EDS I, prove that EDS I and II are allelic conditions, and represent a, so far, unique example of a human collagen disorder caused by substitution of a highly conserved cysteine residue in the C-propeptide domain of a fibrillar collagen. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.