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Sample records for ii core particles

  1. Charge separation, stabilization, and protein relaxation in photosystem II core particles with closed reaction center.

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, M; Sander, J; Nowaczyk, M; Müller, M G; Rögner, M; Holzwarth, A R

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence kinetics of cyanobacterial photosystem II (PSII) core particles with closed reaction centers (RCs) were studied with picosecond resolution. The data are modeled in terms of electron transfer (ET) and associated protein conformational relaxation processes, resolving four different radical pair (RP) states. The target analyses reveal the importance of protein relaxation steps in the ET chain for the functioning of PSII. We also tested previously published data on cyanobacterial PSII with open RCs using models that involved protein relaxation steps as suggested by our data on closed RCs. The rationale for this reanalysis is that at least one short-lived component could not be described in the previous simpler models. This new analysis supports the involvement of a protein relaxation step for open RCs as well. In this model the rate of ET from reduced pheophytin to the primary quinone Q(A) is determined to be 4.1 ns(-1). The rate of initial charge separation is slowed down substantially from approximately 170 ns(-1) in PSII with open RCs to 56 ns(-1) upon reduction of Q(A). However, the free-energy drop of the first RP is not changed substantially between the two RC redox states. The currently assumed mechanistic model, assuming the same early RP intermediates in both states of RC, is inconsistent with the presented energetics of the RPs. Additionally, a comparison between PSII with closed RCs in isolated cores and in intact cells reveals slightly different relaxation kinetics, with a approximately 3.7 ns component present only in isolated cores.

  2. Proton release from water oxidation by photosystem II: similar stoichiometries are stabilized in thylakoids and PSII core particles by glycerol.

    PubMed

    Haumann, M; Hundelt, M; Jahns, P; Chroni, S; Bögershausen, O; Ghanotakis, D; Junge, W

    1997-06-30

    During the four-stepped catalytic cycle of water oxidation by photosystem II (PSII) molecular oxygen is released in only one of the four reaction steps whereas the release of four protons is distributed over all steps. In principle, the pattern of proton production could be taken as indicative of the partial reactions with bound water. In thylakoids the extent and rate of proton release varies as function of the redox transition and of the pH without concomitant variations of the redox pattern. The variation has allowed to discriminate between deprotonation events of peripheral amino acids (Bohr effects) as opposed to the chemical deprotonation of a particular redox cofactor, and of water. In contrast, in thylakoids grown under intermittent light, as well as in PSII core particles the pattern of proton release is flat and independent of the pH. This has been attributed to the lack in these materials of the chlorophyll a,b-binding (CAB) proteins. We now found that a thylakoid-like, oscillatory pattern of proton release was restored simply by the addition of glycerol which modifies the protein-protein interaction. Being a further proof for the electrostatic origin of the greater portion of proton release, this effect will serve as an important tool in further studies of water oxidation.

  3. Vortex Cores of Inertial Particles.

    PubMed

    Günther, Tobias; Theisel, Holger

    2014-12-01

    The cores of massless, swirling particle motion are an indicator for vortex-like behavior in vector fields and to this end, a number of coreline extractors have been proposed in the literature. Though, many practical applications go beyond the study of the vector field. Instead, engineers seek to understand the behavior of inertial particles moving therein, for instance in sediment transport, helicopter brownout and pulverized coal combustion. In this paper, we present two strategies for the extraction of the corelines that inertial particles swirl around, which depend on particle density, particle diameter, fluid viscosity and gravity. The first is to deduce the local swirling behavior from the autonomous inertial motion ODE, which eventually reduces to a parallel vectors operation. For the second strategy, we use a particle density estimation to locate inertial attractors. With this, we are able to extract the cores of swirling inertial particle motion for both steady and unsteady 3D vector fields. We demonstrate our techniques in a number of benchmark data sets, and elaborate on the relation to traditional massless corelines. PMID:26356967

  4. Vortex Cores of Inertial Particles.

    PubMed

    Günther, Tobias; Theisel, Holger

    2014-12-01

    The cores of massless, swirling particle motion are an indicator for vortex-like behavior in vector fields and to this end, a number of coreline extractors have been proposed in the literature. Though, many practical applications go beyond the study of the vector field. Instead, engineers seek to understand the behavior of inertial particles moving therein, for instance in sediment transport, helicopter brownout and pulverized coal combustion. In this paper, we present two strategies for the extraction of the corelines that inertial particles swirl around, which depend on particle density, particle diameter, fluid viscosity and gravity. The first is to deduce the local swirling behavior from the autonomous inertial motion ODE, which eventually reduces to a parallel vectors operation. For the second strategy, we use a particle density estimation to locate inertial attractors. With this, we are able to extract the cores of swirling inertial particle motion for both steady and unsteady 3D vector fields. We demonstrate our techniques in a number of benchmark data sets, and elaborate on the relation to traditional massless corelines.

  5. The role of phosphatidylglycerol as a functional effector and membrane anchor of the D1-core peptide from photosystem II-particles of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria chalybea.

    PubMed

    Kruse, O; Schmid, G H

    1995-01-01

    The intrinsic polypeptide D1, isolated from photosystem (PS) II-particles of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria chalybea, was obtained by electroelution and fractionated extraction with organic solvents. Purification was demonstrated by Western blotting and amino acid sequencing. By carrying out D1-immunization in rabbits a polyclonal monospecific D1-antiserum was obtained. For the qualitative characterization of D1 as a lipid-binding peptide, the effect of the lipids phosphatidylglycerol (PG), monogalactosyldiacylglyceride (MGDG) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) on PSII-oxygen evolution was analysed in reconstitution experiments. In these experiments purified photosystem II (PSII)-particle preparations were treated with the enzyme phospholipase A2 and supplemented with lipid emulsions. We were able to show that the inhibition of electron transport, as the consequence of this lipase treatment, was only relieved, if phosphatidylglycerol was added to the preparation. A model was proposed, in which phosphatidylglycerol is a functional effector for the optimal conformation of D1 in the PSII core complex. Phosphatidylglycerol molecules are unusually tightly bound to the D1 peptide by hydrophobic interactions. A covalent binding seems not probable. The localisation of phosphatidylglycerol binding sites was found by trypsin treatment of D1 and analysis of the obtained oligopeptides with HPLC and immunoblotting. The binding sites could be confined to the hydrophobic amino acid section between arginine 27 and arginine 225, which is known to be the membrane anchor of D1. This has led us to the conclusion that the phospholipid phosphatidylglycerol plays an important role for anchoring the D1-peptide and for its orientation in the thylakoid membrane. Phosphatidylglycerol with its high amount of palmitic acid has in prokaryotic cyanobacteria apparently a role in stabilization and orientation. The high turn-over of D1 and the spatial separation of the synthesis- and incorporation

  6. Asymmetric Colloidal Janus Particle Formation Is Core-Size-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Landon, Preston B; Mo, Alexander H; Printz, Adam D; Emerson, Chris; Zhang, Chen; Janetanakit, Woraphong; Colburn, David A; Akkiraju, Siddhartha; Dossou, Samuel; Chong, Baxi; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2015-08-25

    Colloidal particles with asymmetric surface chemistry (Janus particles) have unique bifunctional properties. The size of these particles is an important determinant for their applications in diverse fields from drug delivery to chemical catalysis. The size of Janus particles, with a core surface coated with carboxylate and a partially encapsulating silica shell, depends upon several factors, including the core size and the concentration of carboxylate coating. The role of the carboxylate coating on the Janus particle size is well-understood; however, the role of the core size is not well defined. The role of the carboxylated polystyrene (cPS) core size on the cPS-silica Janus particle morphology (its size and shape) was examined by testing two different silica sizes and five different cPS core sizes. Results from electron microscopy (EM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis indicate that the composite cPS-silica particle acquires two distinct shapes: (i) when the size of the cPS core is much smaller than the non-cPS silica (b-SiO2) sphere, partially encapsulated Janus particles are formed, and (ii) when the cPS core is larger than or equal to the b-SiO2 sphere, a raspberry-like structure rather than a Janus particle is formed. The cPS-silica Janus particles of ∼100-500 nm size were obtained when the size of the cPS core was much smaller than the non-cPS silica (b-SiO2) sphere. These scalable nanoscale Janus particles will have wide application in a multifunctional delivery platform and catalysis. PMID:26244597

  7. Improved Thermoplastic/Iron-Particle Transformer Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Bryant, Robert G.; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    A method of fabricating improved transformer cores from composites of thermoplastic matrices and iron-particles has been invented. Relative to commercially available laminated-iron-alloy transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method weigh less and are less expensive. Relative to prior polymer-matrix/ iron-particle composite-material transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method can be made mechanically stronger and more magnetically permeable. In addition, whereas some prior cores have exhibited significant eddy-current losses, the cores fabricated by this method exhibit very small eddy-current losses. The cores made by this method can be expected to be attractive for use in diverse applications, including high-signal-to-noise transformers, stepping motors, and high-frequency ignition coils. The present method is a product of an experimental study of the relationships among fabrication conditions, final densities of iron particles, and mechanical and electromagnetic properties of fabricated cores. Among the fabrication conditions investigated were molding pressures (83, 104, and 131 MPa), and molding temperatures (250, 300, and 350 C). Each block of core material was made by uniaxial-compression molding, at the applicable pressure/temperature combination, of a mixture of 2 weight percent of LaRC (or equivalent high-temperature soluble thermoplastic adhesive) with 98 weight percent of approximately spherical iron particles having diameters in the micron range. Each molded block was cut into square cross-section rods that were used as core specimens in mechanical and electromagnetic tests. Some of the core specimens were annealed at 900 C and cooled slowly before testing. For comparison, a low-carbon-steel core was also tested. The results of the tests showed that density, hardness, and rupture strength generally increased with molding pressure and temperature, though the correlation was rather weak. The weakness of the correlation was attributed to

  8. Analytical analysis of particle-core dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri K

    2010-01-01

    Particle-core interaction is a well-developed model of halo formation in high-intensity beams. In this paper, we present an analytical solution for averaged, single particle dynamics, around a uniformly charged beam. The problem is analyzed through a sequence of canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian, which describes nonlinear particle oscillations. A closed form expression for maximum particle deviation from the axis is obtained. The results of this study are in good agreement with numerical simulations and with previously obtained data.

  9. Core-shell diodes for particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guobin; Plentz, Jonathan; Höger, Ingmar; Dellith, Jan; Dellith, Andrea; Falk, Fritz

    2016-02-01

    High performance particle detectors are needed for fundamental research in high energy physics in the exploration of the Higgs boson, dark matter, anti-matter, gravitational waves and proof of the standard model, which will extend the understanding of our Universe. Future particle detectors should have ultrahigh radiation hardness, low power consumption, high spatial resolution and fast signal response. Unfortunately, some of these properties are counter-influencing for the conventional silicon drift detectors (SDDs), so that they cannot be optimized simultaneously. In this paper, the main issues of conventional SDDs have been analyzed, and a novel core-shell detector design based on micro- and nano-structures etched into Si-wafers is proposed. It is expected to simultaneously reach ultrahigh radiation hardness, low power consumption, fast signal response and high spatial resolution down to the sub-micrometer range, which will probably meet the requirements for the most powerful particle accelerators in the near future. A prototype core-shell detector was fabricated using modern silicon nanotechnology and the functionality was tested using electron-beam-induced current measurements. Such a high performance detector will open many new applications in extreme radiation environments such as high energy physics, astrophysics, high resolution (bio-) imaging and crystallography, which will push these fields beyond their current boundaries.

  10. Optical Properties of Anisotropic Core-Shell Pyramidal Particles

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Christina M.; Hasan, Warefta; Nehl, Colleen L.; Odom, Teri W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to fabricate anisotropic core-shell particles by assembling dielectric beads within fabricated noble metal pyramidal structures. Particles with gold (Au) shells and different dielectric cores were generated, and their optical properties were characterized by single particle spectroscopy. Because of their unique geometry, these particles exhibit multiple plasmon resonances from visible to near-IR wavelengths. PMID:19290590

  11. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  12. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-18

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex(3+)) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a 'super-CG' NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex(3+). The systems of 'super-CG' NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine(3+).

  13. Entrapment of carbon dioxide with chitosan-based core-shell particles containing changeable cores.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanrui; Fu, Yinghao; Lin, Xia; Xiao, Congming

    2016-08-01

    Water-soluble chitosan-based core-shell particles that contained changeable cores were successfully applied to anchor carbon dioxide. The entrapment capacity of the particles for carbon dioxide (EC) depended on the cores. It was found that EC of the particles contained aqueous cores was higher than that of the beads with water-soluble chitosan gel cores, which was confirmed with thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, calcium ions and sodium hydroxide were introduced within the particles to examine their effect on the entrapment. EC of the particles was enhanced with sodium hydroxide when the cores were WSC gel. The incorporation of calcium ions was helpful for stabilizing carbon dioxide through the formation of calcium carbonate, which was verified with Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectrometry. This phenomenon meant the role of calcium ions for fixating carbon dioxide was significant.

  14. Entrapment of carbon dioxide with chitosan-based core-shell particles containing changeable cores.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanrui; Fu, Yinghao; Lin, Xia; Xiao, Congming

    2016-08-01

    Water-soluble chitosan-based core-shell particles that contained changeable cores were successfully applied to anchor carbon dioxide. The entrapment capacity of the particles for carbon dioxide (EC) depended on the cores. It was found that EC of the particles contained aqueous cores was higher than that of the beads with water-soluble chitosan gel cores, which was confirmed with thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, calcium ions and sodium hydroxide were introduced within the particles to examine their effect on the entrapment. EC of the particles was enhanced with sodium hydroxide when the cores were WSC gel. The incorporation of calcium ions was helpful for stabilizing carbon dioxide through the formation of calcium carbonate, which was verified with Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectrometry. This phenomenon meant the role of calcium ions for fixating carbon dioxide was significant. PMID:27174910

  15. Histone hyperacetylation can induce unfolding of the nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, R; Bazett-Jones, D P; Locklear, L; Dixon, G H

    1990-01-01

    A direct correlation exists between the level of histone H4 hyperacetylation induced by sodium butyrate and the extent to which nucleosomes lose their compact shape and become elongated (62.0% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6; overall mean in the length/width ratio = 1.83 +/- 0.48) when bound to electron microscope specimen grids at low ionic strength (1mM EDTA, 10mM Tris, pH 8.0). A marked proportion of elongated core particles is also observed in the naturally occurring hyperacetylated chicken testis chromatin undergoing spermatogenesis when analyzed at low ionic strength (36.8% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6). Core particles of elongated shape (length/width ratio over 1.6) generated under low ionic strength conditions are absent in the hypoacetylated chicken erythrocyte chromatin and represent only 2.3% of the untreated Hela S3 cell core particles containing a low proportion of hyperacetylated histones. The marked differences between control and hyperacetylated core particles are absent if the particles are bound to the carbon support film in the presence of 0.2 M NaCl, 6mM MgCl2 and 10mM Tris pH 8.0, conditions known to stabilize nucleosomes. A survey of the published work on histone hyperacetylation together with the present results indicate that histone hyperacetylation does not produce any marked disruption of the core particle 'per se', but that it decreases intranucleosomal stabilizing forces as judged by the lowered stability of the hyperacetylated core particle under conditions of shearing stress such as cationic competition by the carbon support film of the EM grid for DNA binding. Images PMID:2339060

  16. Development of a particle nanoimprinting technique by core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Nishimura, M; Fukui, Y; Fujimoto, K

    2014-02-18

    We developed a particle nanoimprinting technique assisted by the array of core-shell particles. Core-shell particles composed of a solid core of polystyrene and a soft shell were prepared by soap-free emulsion polymerization and subsequently seeded polymerization. By the Langmuir-Blodgett method, particles were arranged into a closely packed 2D array over the water surface and transferred onto a polystyrene (PS) substrate at a regular interval. The PS substrate was heated up above its glass transition temperature (Tg) by either UV irradiation using a high-pressure Hg lamp or heat treatment in a temperature-controlled incubator. It could be observed that a nanopatterned indented surface was formed through the denting of particles into the PS substrate (particle nanoindenting). By the detachment of particles from the substrate by ultrasonication in ethanol, nanoholes were produced over the surface (particle nanoimprinting). The depth and the wall of nanoholes and their interval were tunable by the shell thickness and the 2D packing ratio of core-shell particle monolayers. The contact angle decreased from 70 degrees of the pristine particle monolayer to 13 degrees by the particle nanoindenting, and again increased to 50 degrees by detaching the particles from the substrate to create the nanoholes. The use of nanoholes as zepto-litter volume vessels enabled us to produce and arrange nanocrystals, such as NaCl and CaCO3 (zepto-reactor).

  17. Development of a particle nanoimprinting technique by core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Nishimura, M; Fukui, Y; Fujimoto, K

    2014-02-18

    We developed a particle nanoimprinting technique assisted by the array of core-shell particles. Core-shell particles composed of a solid core of polystyrene and a soft shell were prepared by soap-free emulsion polymerization and subsequently seeded polymerization. By the Langmuir-Blodgett method, particles were arranged into a closely packed 2D array over the water surface and transferred onto a polystyrene (PS) substrate at a regular interval. The PS substrate was heated up above its glass transition temperature (Tg) by either UV irradiation using a high-pressure Hg lamp or heat treatment in a temperature-controlled incubator. It could be observed that a nanopatterned indented surface was formed through the denting of particles into the PS substrate (particle nanoindenting). By the detachment of particles from the substrate by ultrasonication in ethanol, nanoholes were produced over the surface (particle nanoimprinting). The depth and the wall of nanoholes and their interval were tunable by the shell thickness and the 2D packing ratio of core-shell particle monolayers. The contact angle decreased from 70 degrees of the pristine particle monolayer to 13 degrees by the particle nanoindenting, and again increased to 50 degrees by detaching the particles from the substrate to create the nanoholes. The use of nanoholes as zepto-litter volume vessels enabled us to produce and arrange nanocrystals, such as NaCl and CaCO3 (zepto-reactor). PMID:24446687

  18. PMMA/PMMA core-shell particles with ellipsoidal, fluorescent cores: accessing rotational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias K; Klinkenberg, Nele; Schuetter, Stefan; Saenger, Nicolai; Pfleiderer, Patrick; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2015-03-10

    For several decades, nonaqueous dispersions of PMMA particles have played an important role in colloid research. They have found application as colloidal model systems, which are used to probe glassy dynamics or to explore crystal nucleation. To date, most research has focused on spherical particles, in which only translational motion can be investigated. Recently, however, there has been a surge of interest in analyzing also rotational dynamics. In this contribution, we introduce a new class of core-shell particles, which can be used as rotational probes. The colloids described herein are composed of shape anisotropic, fluorescent cores covered with nonfluorescent PMMA shells. The core-shell particles are built up in four steps. In a first step, we produce fluorescent and photo-cross-linkable PMMA colloids. In the second step, these particles are thermomechanically elongated and fixed in defined ellipsoidal shapes by photo-cross-linking. Subsequently, we cover the cross-linked, fluorescent core with a nonfluorescent PMMA shell. The shape of the resulting core-shell colloids is tunable between the initial anisotropic and perfect spherical shape. For shaping, we apply a simple solvent swelling procedure. As one option, this method yields perfect PMMA spheres with ellipsoidal, fluorescent centers. We also report morphological particle characterization using various fluorescence microscopy techniques. Finally, we demonstrate that the rotational dynamics of individual colloids can be tracked and analyzed.

  19. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  20. Theoretical model of a soft particle with charged core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Dustin; Phan, Anh

    2014-03-01

    The numerical and analytical solutions of the electrostatic potentials of soft particles with an ion-permeable charged outer layer and a non-permeable charged core with constant charge densities are found using the Poisson-Boltzmann equations. The charged core is found to significantly alter the local potential within the soft particle, yet it has little effect on the potential outside its particle's boundaries. Previous experimental research into the electrical properties of the MS2 virus agree with these findings. Our results also suggest that there is only a slight change in the potential as the temperature is increased from 290 K to 310 K. The potential profile is found to be significantly affected by the ionic strength in the 1-600 mM range.

  1. Optical properties of core-mantle spheroidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somsikov, Vadim V.; Farafonov, Victor G.

    1994-12-01

    The new solution of the problem of light scattering by coated spheroids was used to calculate the optical properties of prolate and oblate particles. The solution was obtained by the method of separation of variables for confocal spheroids. We consider the silicate core ice mantle particles and present the extinction cross-sections for prolate and oblate spheroids with the refractive indices mcore equals 1.7 + Oi, 1.7 + 0.1i and mmantle equals 1.3, the aspect ratio (a/b)mantle equals 2 and various volume ratios Vcore/Vtotal. The results are plotted for different size parameters xv equals 2(pi) rv/(lambda) , where rv is the radius of equivolume sphere and (lambda) is the wavelength of incident radiation. The main conclusions are: (a) if Vcore/Vtotal equals 0.5, the optical properties of a core-mantle particle are determined mainly by its core: for prolate non-absorbing spheroids when xv 10, for oblate absorbing and non-absorbing spheroids when xv particles with xv equals 1 and 2. (c) the non-linear increase of cross- sections is obtained for oblate particles with size parameters xv equals 1 - 5. (d) the small imaginary part of the core refractive index m [Im(m) < 0.01] practically does not change the optical properties of an inhomogeneous particle. When the imaginary part reaches 0.1, the noticeable changes of cross-sections may be detected.

  2. Stability of dispersions of colloidal hematite/yttrium oxide core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Plaza, R C; Quirantes, A; Delgado, A V

    2002-08-01

    The colloidal stability of suspensions of hematite/yttria core/shell particles is investigated in this work and compared with that of the pure hematite cores. The different electrical surface characteristics of yttrium and iron oxides, as well as the diameters of both types of spherical particles, dominate the overall process of particle aggregation. The aggregation kinetics of the suspensions was followed by measuring their optical absorbance as a function of time. By previously calculating the extinction cross section of particle doublets, it was demonstrated that for both core and core/shell particles the turbidity of the suspensions should increase on aggregation. Such an increase was in fact found in the systems in spite of the ever-present tendency of the particles to settle under gravity. The authors used the initial slope of the turbidity increment time plots as a measure of the ease of aggregation between particles. Thus, they found that the essential role played by pH on the charge generation on the two oxides and the shift of one pH unit between the isoelectric points of hematite and yttria manifest in two features: (i) the stability decreases on approaching the isoelectric point from either the acid or basic side and (ii) the maximum instability is found for hematite at pH 7 and for hematite/yttria at pH 8, that is, close to the isoelectric points of alpha-Fe(2)O(3) and Y(2)O(3), respectively. The role of added electrolyte is simply to yield the suspensions of either type more unstable. Using the surface free energy of the particles, the authors could estimate their Hamaker constants in water. From these and their zeta potentials, the DLVO theory of stability was used to quantitatively explain their results.

  3. Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibers for Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J.; Spencer, James E.; Kuhlmey, Boris T.; /Sydney U.

    2011-08-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM) accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency pass-bands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2-D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially-made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of the first prototype PBG fibers specifically designed to support speed-of-light TM modes.

  4. New particle searches at Tevatron (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Kamon, T.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1996-05-01

    Various recent results of new particle searches at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. No evidence is found for supersymmetric particles (chargino, gluino), leptoquark bosons and heavy gauge bosons in {ital p{anti P}} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. Excluded mass regions for each particle are determined.

  5. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    In order to explain certain features of radioactive beta decay, Wolfgang Pauli suggested in 1930 that the nucleus emitted, in addition to a beta particle, another particle of an entirely new type. The hypothesized particle, dubbed the neutrino, would not be discovered experimentally for another 25 years. It's not easy to detect neutrinos, because…

  6. Nonthermal nuclear reactions induced by fast α particles in the solar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.

    2015-02-01

    Nonthermal nuclear effects triggered in the solar carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle by fast α particles—products of the p p chain reactions—are examined. The main attention is paid to 8.674-MeV α particles generated in the 7Li(p ,α ) α reaction. Nonthermal characteristics of these α particles and their influence on some nuclear processes are determined. It is found that the α -particle effective temperature is at a level of 1.1 MeV and exceeds the solar core temperature by 3 orders of magnitude. These fast particles are able to significantly enhance some endoergic (α ,p ) reactions neglected in standard solar model calculations. In particular, they can substantially affect the balance of the p +17O⇄α +14N reactions due to an appreciable increase of the reverse reaction rate. It is shown that in the region R =0.08 -0.25 R⊙ the reverse α +14N reaction can block the forward p +17O reaction, thus preventing closing of the CNO-II cycle, and increase the 17O abundance by a factor of 2-155 depending on R . This indicates that the fast α particles produced in the p p cycle can distort running of the CNO cycle, making it essentially different in the inner and outer core regions.

  7. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5′ splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations. PMID:27041075

  8. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5' splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations. PMID:27041075

  9. Core-shell composite particles composed of biodegradable polymer particles and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-01

    Core-shell composite particles with biodegradability and superparamagnetic behavior were prepared using a Pickering emulsion for targeted drug delivery based on magnetic guidance. The composite particles were composed of a core of biodegradable polymer and a shell of assembled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. It was found that the dispersibility of the nanoparticles is crucial for controlling the core-shell structure. The addition of a small amount of dispersant into the nanoparticle's suspension could improve the dispersibility and led to the formation of composite particles with a thin magnetic shell covering a polymeric core. The composite particles were also fabricated with a model drug loaded into the core, which was released via hydrolysis of the core under strong alkaline conditions. Because the core can also be biodegraded by lipase, this result suggests that the slow release of the drug from the composite particles should occur inside the body.

  10. Teaching Elementary Particle Physics, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    2011-03-01

    In order to explain certain features of radioactive beta decay, Wolfgang Pauli suggested in 1930 that the nucleus emitted, in addition to a beta particle, another particle of an entirely new type. The hypothesized particle, dubbed the neutrino, would not be discovered experimentally for another 25 years. It's not easy to detect neutrinos, because they respond to neither the EM force nor the strong force. For example, the mean free path (average penetration distance before it interacts) of a typical beta-decay neutrino moving through solid lead is about 1.5 light years! Enrico Fermi argued that neutrinos indicated a new force was at work. During the 1930s, he quickly adapted ideas from the developing new theory of QED to this new force, dubbed the weak force. Fermi's theory was able to predict the half-lives of beta-emitting nuclei and the range of energies of the emitted beta particles.

  11. Naked singularities as particle accelerators. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2011-03-01

    We generalize here our earlier results on particle acceleration by naked singularities. We showed recently [M. Patil and P. S. Joshi, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 82, 104049 (2010).10.1103/PhysRevD.82.104049] that the naked singularities that form due to the gravitational collapse of massive stars provide a suitable environment where particles could get accelerated and collide at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. However, we focused there only on the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse models, which were also assumed to be self-similar. In this paper, we broaden and generalize the result to all gravitational collapse models leading to the formation of a naked singularity as the final state of collapse, evolving from a regular initial data, without making any prior restrictive assumptions about the spacetime symmetries such as above. We show that, when the particles interact and collide near the Cauchy horizon, the energy of collision in the center-of-mass frame will be arbitrarily high, thus offering a window to the Planck scale physics. We also consider the issue of various possible physical mechanisms of generation of such very high-energy particles from the vicinity of naked singularity. We then construct a model of gravitational collapse to a timelike naked singularity to demonstrate the working of these ideas, where the pressure is allowed to be negative, but the energy conditions are respected. We show that a finite amount of mass-energy density has to be necessarily radiated away from the vicinity of the naked singularity as the collapse evolves. Therefore, the nature of naked singularities, both at the classical and quantum level, could play an important role in the process of particle acceleration, explaining the occurrence of highly energetic outgoing particles in the vicinity of the Cauchy horizon that participate in extreme high-energy collisions.

  12. Naked singularities as particle accelerators. II

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Mandar; Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2011-03-15

    We generalize here our earlier results on particle acceleration by naked singularities. We showed recently [M. Patil and P. S. Joshi, Phys. Rev. D 82, 104049 (2010).] that the naked singularities that form due to the gravitational collapse of massive stars provide a suitable environment where particles could get accelerated and collide at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. However, we focused there only on the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse models, which were also assumed to be self-similar. In this paper, we broaden and generalize the result to all gravitational collapse models leading to the formation of a naked singularity as the final state of collapse, evolving from a regular initial data, without making any prior restrictive assumptions about the spacetime symmetries such as above. We show that, when the particles interact and collide near the Cauchy horizon, the energy of collision in the center-of-mass frame will be arbitrarily high, thus offering a window to the Planck scale physics. We also consider the issue of various possible physical mechanisms of generation of such very high-energy particles from the vicinity of naked singularity. We then construct a model of gravitational collapse to a timelike naked singularity to demonstrate the working of these ideas, where the pressure is allowed to be negative, but the energy conditions are respected. We show that a finite amount of mass-energy density has to be necessarily radiated away from the vicinity of the naked singularity as the collapse evolves. Therefore, the nature of naked singularities, both at the classical and quantum level, could play an important role in the process of particle acceleration, explaining the occurrence of highly energetic outgoing particles in the vicinity of the Cauchy horizon that participate in extreme high-energy collisions.

  13. Thermostimulable wax@SiO2 core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Schmitt, Véronique; Backov, Rénal

    2010-02-01

    We propose a new synthesis pathway without any sacrificial template to prepare original monodisperse thermoresponsive capsules made of a wax core surrounded by a silica shell. Under heating, the inner wax expands and the shell breaks, leading to the liquid oil release. Such capsules that allow triggered deliverance provoked by an external stimulus belong to the class of smart materials. The process is based on the elaboration of size-controlled emulsions stabilized by particles (Pickering emulsions) exploiting the limited coalescence phenomenon. Then the emulsions are cooled down and the obtained suspensions are mineralized by the hydrolysis and condensation of a monomer at the wax-water interface, leading to the formation of capsules. The shell break and the liquid oil release are provoked by heating above the wax melting temperature. We characterize the obtained materials and examine the effect of processing parameters and heating history. By an appropriate choice of the wax, the temperature of release can easily be tuned. PMID:20099917

  14. Thermostimulable wax@SiO2 core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Schmitt, Véronique; Backov, Rénal

    2010-02-01

    We propose a new synthesis pathway without any sacrificial template to prepare original monodisperse thermoresponsive capsules made of a wax core surrounded by a silica shell. Under heating, the inner wax expands and the shell breaks, leading to the liquid oil release. Such capsules that allow triggered deliverance provoked by an external stimulus belong to the class of smart materials. The process is based on the elaboration of size-controlled emulsions stabilized by particles (Pickering emulsions) exploiting the limited coalescence phenomenon. Then the emulsions are cooled down and the obtained suspensions are mineralized by the hydrolysis and condensation of a monomer at the wax-water interface, leading to the formation of capsules. The shell break and the liquid oil release are provoked by heating above the wax melting temperature. We characterize the obtained materials and examine the effect of processing parameters and heating history. By an appropriate choice of the wax, the temperature of release can easily be tuned.

  15. Counterion atmosphere and hydration patterns near a nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed

    Materese, Christopher K; Savelyev, Alexey; Papoian, Garegin A

    2009-10-21

    The chromatin folding problem is an exciting and rich field for modern research. On the most basic level, chromatin fiber consists of a collection of protein-nucleic acid complexes, known as nucleosomes, joined together by segments of linker DNA. Understanding how the cell successfully compacts meters of highly charged DNA into a micrometer size nucleus while still enabling rapid access to the genetic code for transcriptional processes is a challenging goal. In this work we shed light on the way mobile ions condense around the nucleosome core particle, as revealed by an extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulation. On a hundred nanosecond time scale, the nucleosome exhibited only small conformational fluctuations. We found that nucleosomal DNA is better neutralized by the combination of histone charges and mobile ions compared with free DNA. We provide a detailed physical explanation of this effect using ideas from electrostatics in continuous media. We also discovered that sodium condensation around the histone core is dominated by an experimentally characterized acidic patch, which is thought to play a significant role in chromatin compaction by binding with basic histone tails. Finally, we found that the nucleosome is extensively permeated by over a thousand water molecules, which in turn allows mobile ions to penetrate deeply into the complex. Overall, our work sheds light on the way ionic and hydration interactions within a nucleosome may affect internucleosomal interactions in higher order chromatin fibers. PMID:19778017

  16. Blm10 facilitates nuclear import of proteasome core particles

    PubMed Central

    Weberruss, Marion H; Savulescu, Anca F; Jando, Julia; Bissinger, Thomas; Harel, Amnon; Glickman, Michael H; Enenkel, Cordula

    2013-01-01

    Short-lived proteins are degraded by proteasome complexes, which contain a proteolytic core particle (CP) but differ in the number of regulatory particles (RPs) and activators. A recently described member of conserved proteasome activators is Blm10. Blm10 contains 32 HEAT-like modules and is structurally related to the nuclear import receptor importin/karyopherin β. In proliferating yeast, RP-CP assemblies are primarily nuclear and promote cell division. During quiescence, RP-CP assemblies dissociate and CP and RP are sequestered into motile cytosolic proteasome storage granuli (PSG). Here, we show that CP sequestration into PSG depends on Blm10, whereas RP sequestration into PSG is independent of Blm10. PSG rapidly clear upon the resumption of cell proliferation and proteasomes are relocated into the nucleus. Thereby, Blm10 facilitates nuclear import of CP. Blm10-bound CP serves as an import receptor–cargo complex, as Blm10 mediates the interaction with FG-rich nucleoporins and is dissociated from the CP by Ran-GTP. Thus, Blm10 represents the first CP-dedicated nuclear import receptor in yeast. PMID:23982732

  17. FINDING THE FIRST COSMIC EXPLOSIONS. II. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Joggerst, Candace C.; Fryer, Chris L.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Heger, Alexander; Holz, Daniel E.

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the properties of Population III (Pop III) stars is prerequisite to elucidating the nature of primeval galaxies, the chemical enrichment and reionization of the early intergalactic medium, and the origin of supermassive black holes. While the primordial initial mass function (IMF) remains unknown, recent evidence from numerical simulations and stellar archaeology suggests that some Pop III stars may have had lower masses than previously thought, 15-50 M{sub Sun} in addition to 50-500 M{sub Sun }. The detection of Pop III supernovae (SNe) by JWST, WFIRST, or the TMT could directly probe the primordial IMF for the first time. We present numerical simulations of 15-40 M{sub Sun} Pop III core-collapse SNe performed with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. We find that they will be visible in the earliest galaxies out to z {approx} 10-15, tracing their star formation rates and in some cases revealing their positions on the sky. Since the central engines of Pop III and solar-metallicity core-collapse SNe are quite similar, future detection of any Type II SNe by next-generation NIR instruments will in general be limited to this epoch.

  18. Polystyrene-Core-Silica-Shell Hybrid Particles Containing Gold and Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jia; Vana, Philipp

    2016-02-18

    Polystyrene-core-silica-shell hybrid particles were synthesized by combining the self-assembly of nanoparticles and the polymer with a silica coating strategy. The core-shell hybrid particles are composed of gold-nanoparticle-decorated polystyrene (PS-AuNP) colloids as the core and silica particles as the shell. PS-AuNP colloids were generated by the self-assembly of the PS-grafted AuNPs. The silica coating improved the thermal stability and dispersibility of the AuNPs. By removing the "free" PS of the core, hollow particles with a hydrophobic cage having a AuNP corona and an inert silica shell were obtained. Also, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were encapsulated in the core, which resulted in magnetic core-shell hybrid particles by the same strategy. These particles have potential applications in biomolecular separation and high-temperature catalysis and as nanoreactors.

  19. Development of magnetic luminescent core/shell nanocomplex particles with fluorescence using Rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee Uk; Song, Yoon Seok; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A simple method was developed to synthesize Co-B/SiO{sub 2}/dye/SiO{sub 2} composite particles. ► The magnetic particle shows that highly luminescent and core/shell particles are formed. ► Such core/shell particles can be easily suspended in water. ► The magnetic particles could detect fluorescence for the application of biosensor. -- Abstract: A simple and reproducible method was developed to synthesize a novel class of Co-B/SiO{sub 2}/dye/SiO{sub 2} composite core/shell particles. Using a single cobalt core, Rhodamine 6G of organic dye molecules was entrapped in a silica shell, resulting in core/shell particles of ∼200 nm diameter. Analyses using a variety of techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibration sample magnetometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and fluorescence intensity demonstrated that dye molecules were trapped inside the core/shell particles. A photoluminescence investigation showed that highly luminescent and photostable core/shell particles were formed. Such core/shell particles can be easily suspended in water. The synthesized magnetic particles could be used to detect fluorescence on glass substrate arrays for bioassay and biosensor applications.

  20. SAGE II aerosol validation - Selected altitude measurements, including particle micromeasurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Russell, Philip B.; Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Ferry, Guy V.; Livingston, John M.; Rosen, James N.; Osborn, Mary T.; Kritz, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The validity of particulate extinction coefficients derived from limb path solar radiance measurements obtained during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II is tested. The SAGE II measurements are compared with correlative aerosol measurements taken during January 1985, August 1985, and July 1986 with impactors, laser spectrometers, and filter samplers on a U-2 aircraft, an upward pointing lidar on a P-3 aircraft, and balloon-borne optical particle counters. The data for July 29, 1986 are discussed in detail. The aerosol measurements taken on this day at an altitude of 20.5 km produce particulate extinction values which validate the SAGE II values for similar wavelengths.

  1. Type-II core/shell CdS/ZnSe nanocrystals: synthesis, electronic structures, and spectroscopic properties.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergei A; Piryatinski, Andrei; Nanda, Jagjit; Tretiak, Sergei; Zavadil, Kevin R; Wallace, William O; Werder, Don; Klimov, Victor I

    2007-09-26

    We report a two-step synthesis of highly luminescent CdS/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals (emission quantum yields up to 50%) that can produce efficient spatial separation of electrons and holes between the core and the shell (type-II localization regime). Our synthesis involves fabrication of cubic-singony CdS core particles that are subsequently overcoated with a layer of ZnSe in the presence of surfactant-ligands in a noncoordinating solvent. Studies of different growth regime of the ZnSe shell indicate that one approach to obtaining high emission efficiencies is through alloying the CdS/ZnSe interface with CdSe, which leads to the formation of an intermediate ZnCdSe layer with a graded composition. We perform theoretical modeling of these core/shell nanocrystals using effective mass approximation and applying first-order perturbation theory for treating both direct electron-hole coupling and the core/shell interface-polarization effects. Using this model we determine the range of geometrical parameters of the core/shell structures that result in a type-II localization regime. We further applied this model to evaluate the degree of electron-hole spatial separation (quantified in terms of the electron-hole overlap integral) based on measured emission wavelengths. We also discuss the potential applicability of these nanocrystals in lasing technologies and specifically the possibility of single-exciton optical gain in type-II nanostructures.

  2. Silica-silver core-shell particles for antibacterial textile application.

    PubMed

    Nischala, K; Rao, Tata N; Hebalkar, Neha

    2011-01-01

    The silica-silver core-shell particles were synthesized by simple one pot chemical method and were employed on the cotton fabric as an antibacterial agent. Extremely small (1-2 nm) silver nanoparticles were attached on silica core particles of average 270 nm size. The optimum density of the nano silver particles was found which was sufficient to show good antibacterial activity as well as the suppression in their surface plasmon resonance responsible for the colour of the core-shell particle for antibacterial textile application. The change in the density and size of the particles in the shell were monitored and confirmed by direct evidence of their transmission electron micrographs and by studying surface plasmon resonance characteristics. The colony counting method of antibacterial activity testing showed excellent results and even the least silver containing core-shell particles showed 100% activity against bacterial concentration of 10(4) colony counting units (cfu). The bonding between core-shell particles and cotton fabric was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The antibacterial activity test confirmed the firm attachment of core-shell particles to the cotton fabric as a result 10 times washed sample was as good antibacterial as that of unwashed sample. The bacterial growth was inhibited on and beneath the coated fabric, at the same time no zone of inhibition which occurs due to the migration of silver ions into the medium was observed indicating immobilization of silver nanoparticles on silica and core-shell particles on fabric by strong bonding.

  3. Trafficking of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein during Virus Particle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Counihan, Natalie A.; Rawlinson, Stephen M.; Lindenbach, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is directed to the surface of lipid droplets (LD), a step that is essential for infectious virus production. However, the process by which core is recruited from LD into nascent virus particles is not well understood. To investigate the kinetics of core trafficking, we developed methods to image functional core protein in live, virus-producing cells. During the peak of virus assembly, core formed polarized caps on large, immotile LDs, adjacent to putative sites of assembly. In addition, LD-independent, motile puncta of core were found to traffic along microtubules. Importantly, core was recruited from LDs into these puncta, and interaction between the viral NS2 and NS3-4A proteins was essential for this recruitment process. These data reveal new aspects of core trafficking and identify a novel role for viral nonstructural proteins in virus particle assembly. PMID:22028650

  4. Gold nanoparticle localization at the core surface by using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Haruma

    2005-12-01

    We report novel thermosensitive hybrid core-shell particles via in situ gold nanoparticle formation using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template. This method for the in situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles with microgel interiors offers the advantage of eliminating or significantly reducing particle aggregation. In addition, by using thermosensitive microgel structures in which the shell has thermosensitive and gel properties in water--whereas the core itself is a water-insoluble polymer--we were able to synthesize the gold nanoparticles only at the surface of the core, which had reactive sites to bind metal ions. After the gold nanoparticles were synthesized, electroless gold plating was carried out to control the thickness of the gold nanoshells. The dispersions of the obtained hybrid particles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and the dried particles were also observed by electron microscopy. Adaptation of the technique shown here will create a number of applications as optical, electronic, and biomedical functional materials. PMID:16316147

  5. An asymmetric interface between the regulatory particle and core particle of the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Park, Soyeon; Lee, Min Jae; Huck, Bettina; McAllister, Fiona; Hill, Christopher P.; Gygi, Steven P.; Finley, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The S. cerevisiae proteasome comprises a 19-subunit regulatory particle (RP) and 28-subunit core particle (CP). To be degraded, substrates must cross the CP-RP interface, a site of complex conformational changes and regulatory events. This interface includes two aligned heteromeric rings: the six ATPase (Rpt) subunits of the RP and the seven α subunits of the CP. Rpt C-termini bind intersubunit cavities of the α ring, thus directing CP gating and proteasome assembly. We used crosslinking to map the Rpt C-termini to the α subunit pockets. This reveals an unexpected asymmetry: one side of the ring shows 1:1 contacts of Rpt2–α4, Rpt6–α3, and Rpt3–α2, whereas, on the opposite side, the Rpt1, Rpt4, and Rpt5 tails each crosslink to multiple α pockets. Rpt-CP crosslinks are all sensitive to nucleotide, implying that ATP hydrolysis drives dynamic alterations at the CP-RP interface. PMID:22037170

  6. Core-shell particle model for optical transparency in glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, Andrew

    2006-07-01

    The light scattering from particles in a glass ceramic is calculated for a particle model comprising a crystalline core and a surrounding shell, created by nucleation and diffusive processes from the original homogeneous glass, with diffusing atoms limited to the core-shell volume. The scatterings from core and shell are found to cancel in first order for small particles within the approximations of the Rayleigh-Debye theory. The residual scattering varies as the inverse eighth power of wavelength and is most pronounced in the backscatter geometry.

  7. Possible resolution gain in enantioseparations afforded by core-shell particle technology.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-06-27

    Whether columns packed with core-shell particles may outperform those packed with fully porous particles for chiral separations is controversial. The potential advantages of such columns are investigated from a theoretical viewpoint. The height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) associated to the slow adsorption-desorption process typical of chiral chromatography was derived from the Laplace transform of the general rate model of chromatography for core-shell particles. The relationship between the resolution factor and the core-to-particle diameter ratio is predicted at constant selectivity. The calculations are based on a complete set of actual kinetic parameters (longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, intra-particle diffusivity, and adsorption-desorption constant) measured for a reference column packed with Lux Cellulose-1 fully porous particles. If we compare columns packed with the best procedure available in either case, the results demonstrate that those packed with core-shell particles may outperform to a degree those packed with fully porous particles. The minimum reduced HETP could decrease from 2.0 to 1.7. The maximum relative gain in resolution is about 10%, which is not negligible for critical enantioselective-separations. This gain is observed only if the packing uniformity of the core-shell particles is achieved.

  8. Search for fractionally charged particles in Kamiokande II

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, M.; Oyama, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, K.; Yamada, M. , Ibaraki 305, Japan ); Miyano, K.; Miyata, H.; Takei, H. ); Hirata, K.S.; Kajita, T.; Kihara, K.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K.; Ohara, S.; Sato, N.; Suzuki, Y.; Totsuka, Y.; Yaginuma, Y. ); Koshiba, M. ); Suda, T.; Tajima, T. ); Fukuda, Y.; Nagashima, Y.; Takita, M. ); Kaneyuki, K.; Tanimori, T. ); Beier, E.W.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Kim, S.B.; Mann, A.K.; Newcomer, F.M.; Van Berg, R.; Zhang, W. (Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (USA

    1991-05-01

    A search has been made for fractionally charged particles with {vert bar}{ital Q}{vert bar}=1/3 and {vert bar}{ital Q}{vert bar}=2/3 which might have passed through the Kamiokande II detector. No positive evidence for such particles is observed in 1009 days of observation. The 90%-C.L. upper limits obtained on the fluxes of fractionally charged particles are 2.1{times}10{sup {minus}15} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} sr{sup {minus}1} for {vert bar}{ital Q}{vert bar}=1/3 and 2.3{times}10{sup {minus}15} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} sr{sup {minus}1} for {vert bar}{ital Q}{vert bar}=2/3, improving the existing limits by two orders of magnitude.

  9. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  10. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Pierson, Elizabeth E; Keifer, David Z; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein's C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of "dark" particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  11. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Elizabeth E.; Keifer, David Z.; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein’s C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of “dark” particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  12. ESC-EEC-EPC code system for plasma core and edge equilibrium and particle orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xujing

    2013-10-01

    A new Edge Equilibrium Code (EEC), which is a new solver of the Grad-Shafranov equation complementing the existing ESC code (based on Fourier representation) is presented. EEC, being developed specifically for the near edge region with an arbitrary shape of the plasma boundary, uses adaptive flux coordinates with Hermite finite element representation. A special routine for fast solving the sparse matrix equations was created for EEC. The edge solution of EEC is matched with the core solution from ESC through a virtual boundary and the two codes communicate as two parallel processes. This approach addresses the future needs in enhancing functionality of EEC without conflicting with the interface of both codes. The code was complemented by Edge Particle Code (EPC) for massive calculation of collisional particle orbits using GPU. The resulting ESC-EEC-EPC code system acquired unmatched ability (a) in fast free and fixed boundary equilibrium calculations for arbitrary plasma shapes, (b) in using both r - z and different flux coordinates, (c) in choosing different combinations of input profiles, (d) in performing equilibrium reconstruction together with variances analysis, and (e) in assessing the diagnostics used for equilibrium reconstruction. Chinese National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program 2011GB105003, US DOE SBIR grant # 94307S10-II.

  13. Soft core fluid in a quenched matrix of soft core particles: A mobile mixture in a model gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, A. J.; Schmidt, M.; Evans, R.

    2006-01-01

    We present a density-functional study of a binary phase-separating mixture of soft core particles immersed in a random matrix of quenched soft core particles of larger size. This is a model for a binary polymer mixture immersed in a cross-linked rigid polymer network. Using the replica “trick” for quenched-annealed mixtures we derive an explicit density functional theory that treats the quenched species on the level of its one-body density distribution. The relation to a set of effective external potentials acting on the annealed components is discussed. We relate matrix-induced condensation in bulk to the behavior of the mixture around a single large particle. The interfacial properties of the binary mixture at a surface of the quenched matrix display a rich interplay between capillary condensation inside the bulk matrix and wetting phenomena at the matrix surface.

  14. Second harmonic generation in composites of ellipsoidal particles with core-shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Liu, De-Hua

    2009-01-01

    We study the enhancement of the second-harmonic generation (SHG) coefficient in a random composite consisting of ellipsoidal particles with a core-shell structure in a linear dielectric host. The material making up the ellipsoidal core is assumed to be dielectric, but with a nonlinear susceptibility for SHG. The coating material is assumed to be metallic with a linear susceptibility. The effective SHG coefficient is derived and its expression is related to various local field factors. The numerical calculations of the effective SHG response per unit volume of nonlinear material can be greatly enhanced at certain frequencies. For coated ellipsoidal particles, the core-shell structure and the particle shape allow for tuning of the resonance through the choice of material parameters and/or the ratio of the core to shell volume fraction and the depolarization factor of the particles.

  15. Topology of Type II REases revisited; structural classes and the common conserved core.

    PubMed

    Niv, Masha Y; Ripoll, Daniel R; Vila, Jorge A; Liwo, Adam; Vanamee, Eva S; Aggarwal, Aneel K; Weinstein, Harel; Scheraga, Harold A

    2007-01-01

    Type II restriction endonucleases (REases) are deoxyribonucleases that cleave DNA sequences with remarkable specificity. Type II REases are highly divergent in sequence as well as in topology, i.e. the connectivity of secondary structure elements. A widely held assumption is that a structural core of five beta-strands flanked by two alpha-helices is common to these enzymes. We introduce a systematic procedure to enumerate secondary structure elements in an unambiguous and reproducible way, and use it to analyze the currently available X-ray structures of Type II REases. Based on this analysis, we propose an alternative definition of the core, which we term the alphabetaalpha-core. The alphabetaalpha-core includes the most frequently observed secondary structure elements and is not a sandwich, as it consists of a five-strand beta-sheet and two alpha-helices on the same face of the beta-sheet. We use the alphabetaalpha-core connectivity as a basis for grouping the Type II REases into distinct structural classes. In these new structural classes, the connectivity correlates with the angles between the secondary structure elements and with the cleavage patterns of the REases. We show that there exists a substructure of the alphabetaalpha-core, namely a common conserved core, ccc, defined here as one alpha-helix and four beta-strands common to all Type II REase of known structure.

  16. Amino-functionalized core-shell magnetic mesoporous composite microspheres for Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulin; Liang, Song; Wang, Juntao; Yu, Shuili; Wang, Yilong

    2013-04-01

    Amino-functionalized Fe3O4@mesoporous SiO2 core-shell composite microspheres NH2-MS in created in multiple synthesis steps have been investigated for Pb(II) and Cd(II) adsorption. The microspheres were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption, zeta potential measurements and vibrating sample magnetometer. Batch adsorption tests indicated that NH2-MS exhibited higher adsorption affinity toward Pb(II) and Cd(II) than MS did. The Langmuir model could fit the adsorption isotherm very well with maximum adsorption capacity of 128.21 and 51.81 mg/g for Pb(II) and Cd(II), respectively, implying that adsorption processes involved monolayer adsorption. Pb(II) and Cd(II) adsorption could be well described by the pseudo second-order kinetics model, and was found to be strongly dependent on pH and humic acid. The Pb(II)- and Cd(II)-loaded microspheres were effectively desorbed using 0.01 mol/L HCl or EDTA solution. NH2-MS have promise for use as adsorbents in the removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) in wastewater treatment processes. PMID:23923794

  17. Binding of ethidium to the nucleosome core particle. 2. Internal and external binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, C.T.; Small, E.W.; van Holde, K.E. )

    1991-06-11

    The authors have previously reported that the binding of ethidium bromide to the nucleosome core particle results in a stepwise dissociation of the structure which involves the initial release of one copy each of H2A and H2B. In this report, they have examined the absorbance and fluorescence properties of intercalated and outside bound forms of ethidium bromide. From these properties, they have measured the extent of external, electrostatic binding of the dye versus internal, intercalation binding to the core particle, free from contribution by linker DNA. They have established that dissociation is induced by the intercalation mode of binding to DNA within the core particle DNA, and not by binding to the histones or by nonintercalative binding to DNA. The covalent binding of ({sup 3}H)-8-azidoethidium to the core particle clearly shows that < 1.0 adduct is formed per histone octamer over a wide range of input ratios. Simultaneously, analyses of steady-state fluorescence enhancement and fluorescence lifetime data from bound ethidium complexes demonstrate extensive intercalation binding. Combined analyses from steady-state fluorescence intensity with equilibrium dialysis or fluorescence lifetime data revealed that dissociation began when {approximately}14 ethidium molecules are bound by intercalation to each core particle and < 1.0 nonintercalated ion pair was formed per core particle.

  18. Macroporous polymer from core-shell particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zifu; Ngai, To

    2010-04-01

    Poly(styrene-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PS-co-PNIPAM) core-shell particles were synthesized and used as particulate emulsifiers in the preparation of particle-stabilized (Pickering) emulsions. Highly concentrated oil-in-water emulsions with an internal phase up to 80 vol % can be produced using PS-co-PNIPAM core-shell particles along as the emulsifiers in emulsions. The core-shell particles are adsorbed at the liquid interface, acting as a barrier against oil droplet coalescence. In addition, it is likely that excess particles simultaneously form a gel in the continuous phase to trap oil droplets in the gel matrix, in turn inhibiting creaming and phase inversion. Evaporation in air of such a core-shell particle-stabilized emulsion directly leads to porous membranes in the absence of chemical reactions. The pore walls of the final structures are densely packed with layers of the core-shell particles. This provides great flexibility to prepare functionalized porous materials for opening up new applications.

  19. Shape evolution of a core-shell spherical particle under hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Colin, Jérôme

    2012-03-01

    The morphological evolution by surface diffusion of a core-shell spherical particle has been investigated theoretically under hydrostatic pressure when the shear modulii of the core and shell are different. A linear stability analysis has demonstrated that depending on the pressure, shear modulii, and radii of both phases, the free surface of the composite particle may be unstable with respect to a shape perturbation. A stability diagram finally emphasizes that the roughness development is favored in the case of a hard shell with a soft core. PMID:22587137

  20. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This second horticulture guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Leadership, (2) Supervised Occupational Experience, (3) Plant Propagation, (4) Soil and Plant Growth Media, (5) Fertilizers, (6) Greenhouse, (7) Plant…

  1. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of new irradiation channels inside the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor core.

    PubMed

    Chham, E; El Bardouni, T; Benaalilou, K; Boukhal, H; El Bakkari, B; Boulaich, Y; El Younoussi, C; Nacir, B

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to improve the capacity of radioisotope production in the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor, which is considered as one of the most important applications of research reactors. The aim of this study is to enhance the utilization of TRIGA core in the field of neutron activation and ensure an economic use of the fuel. The main idea was to create an additional irradiation channel (IC) inside the core. For this purpose, three new core configurations are proposed, which differ according to the IC position in the core. Thermal neutron flux distribution and other neutronic safety parameters such as power peaking factors, excess reactivity, and control rods worth reactivity were calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) code and neutron cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VII evaluation. The calculated thermal flux in the central thimble (CT) and in the added IC for the reconfigured core is compared with the thermal flux in the CT of the existing core, which is taken as a reference. The results show that all the obtained fluxes in CTs are very close to the reference value, while a remarkable difference is observed between the fluxes in the new ICs and reference. This difference depends on the position of IC in the reactor core. To demonstrate that the Moroccan TRIGA reactor could safely operate at 2MW, with new configurations based on new ICs, different safety-related thermal-hydraulic parameters were investigated. The PARET model was used in this study to verify whether the safety margins are met despite the new modifications of the core. The results show that it is possible to introduce new ICs safely in the reactor core, because the obtained values of the parameters are largely far from compromising the safety of the reactor. PMID:27552124

  2. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of new irradiation channels inside the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor core.

    PubMed

    Chham, E; El Bardouni, T; Benaalilou, K; Boukhal, H; El Bakkari, B; Boulaich, Y; El Younoussi, C; Nacir, B

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to improve the capacity of radioisotope production in the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor, which is considered as one of the most important applications of research reactors. The aim of this study is to enhance the utilization of TRIGA core in the field of neutron activation and ensure an economic use of the fuel. The main idea was to create an additional irradiation channel (IC) inside the core. For this purpose, three new core configurations are proposed, which differ according to the IC position in the core. Thermal neutron flux distribution and other neutronic safety parameters such as power peaking factors, excess reactivity, and control rods worth reactivity were calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) code and neutron cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VII evaluation. The calculated thermal flux in the central thimble (CT) and in the added IC for the reconfigured core is compared with the thermal flux in the CT of the existing core, which is taken as a reference. The results show that all the obtained fluxes in CTs are very close to the reference value, while a remarkable difference is observed between the fluxes in the new ICs and reference. This difference depends on the position of IC in the reactor core. To demonstrate that the Moroccan TRIGA reactor could safely operate at 2MW, with new configurations based on new ICs, different safety-related thermal-hydraulic parameters were investigated. The PARET model was used in this study to verify whether the safety margins are met despite the new modifications of the core. The results show that it is possible to introduce new ICs safely in the reactor core, because the obtained values of the parameters are largely far from compromising the safety of the reactor.

  3. Second harmonic generation in random composites of particles with core-shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Hui, P. M.

    2006-08-01

    We study the effective second harmonic generation (SHG) coefficient in a random composite consisting of particles with a core-shell structure embedded in a linear dielectric host. The material making up the core of the particles is assumed to be nonconducting, but with a nonlinear susceptibility for SHG. The coating material is assumed to be linear and metallic. An expression for the effective SHG coefficient is obtained, in terms of various local field factors. The effective SHG response per unit volume of nonlinear material is found to be greatly enhanced at certain frequencies. For coated particles, the core-shell structure allows for tuning of the resonance through the choice of material parameters and/or the ratio of the core to shell volume fraction.

  4. Scattering of a focused Gaussian beam by an axisymmetric particle with a nonconcentric spherical core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, E. E. M.; Aly, M. E. M.

    2011-02-01

    Scattering of an on- or off-axis focused Gaussian beam by a dielectric spherical or a spheroidal particle with a nonconcentric spherical core is presented. The plane wave spectrum method is used to model the beam. The electric field intensities are calculated at any point using the T-matrix method, which is modified for the cases studied here. The calculated angular scattering intensities are shown for different cases of the core's offsets and for different cases of the beam-focusing positions with respect to the particle. The technique is applicable to a large-sized parameter particle with nonconcentric layers of different shapes illuminated with an arbitrarily shaped laser beam. Although the technique is applicable to a beam propagating in any direction and to an arbitrary shift of the core, all the calculations shown here are for an offset core and a beam propagating in the z-direction.

  5. Photovoltaic Properties of CdSe/CdS and CdS/CdSe Core-Shell Particles Synthesized by Use of Uninterrupted Precipitation Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selene Coria-Monroy, C.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.; Martínez-Alonso, Claudia; Moreno-Romero, Paola M.; Rodríguez-Castañeda, Carlos A.; Corona-Corona, Israel; Hu, Hailin

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and cadmium sulfide (CdS) are good electron acceptors for hybrid solar cells. CdSe and CdS nanoparticles can be prepared at low temperatures (60-80°C) from alkaline aqueous solutions of a cadmium salt, sodium citrate, and thiourea, as sulfur source, or sodium selenosulfate, as selenium source. Under the same experimental conditions, the reaction kinetics for CdS were faster than for CdSe. Formation of CdSe/CdS core-shell particles (type I: CdSe as core and CdS as shell) could be achieved by use of an uninterrupted one-step process by setting high and low solution temperatures for the core and shell compounds, respectively. The yield of the CdSe product was higher at a pH 8.5-9.5 whereas that of the CdS product was higher at higher pH (10-11). Therefore, formation of the "inverse" CdS/CdSe structure (type II: CdS as core and CdSe as shell) was possible in a one-step solution process by choosing a high solution pH for the core and a lower pH for the shell. Photoluminescence spectra and electron micrographs confirmed formation of the two types of core-shell particle. The photovoltaic performance of heterojunctions prepared with core-shell particles and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), also suggested formation of core-shell particles. Both the photovoltage and photocurrent density of hybrid solar cells depended on the shell compound and not on the core. It was shown that the interface of the heterojunctions plays is important in solar cell applications, and its modification could be realized by incorporating different shell compounds on core particles.

  6. Preparation of hydrogel hollow particles for cell encapsulation by a method of polyester core degradation.

    PubMed

    Rabanel, J-M; Hildgen, P

    2004-06-01

    Implantation of encapsulated cells in particles of less than 1 mm (micro-encapsulation) has been proposed as a cell synthesized bio-molecule delivery system. Encapsulation provides immuno-isolation, protecting foreign cells from host immune system while nutrients, oxygen and therapeutic products can diffuse freely across capsule walls. A new method is described for the synthesis of a new family of hollow microparticles for cell encapsulation. Unlike other micro-encapsulation methods, encapsulation in those devices will take place after capsule synthesis, by micro-injection. The microcapsules were prepared by a three-steps original procedure: first, synthesis of a core particle, followed by coating with a layer of epichlorohydrin cross-linked amylo-pectin gel and, finally, selective degradation of the core particle to create the cavity. Initial experiments make use of amylo-pectin cross-linked with trimetaphosphate as core particle material. However, selective degradation was difficult to achieve. In further essays, polyesters were used successfully for the preparation of core particles. Optimizations were carried out and the permeability and morphology of the hollow particles were investigated. The preliminary results show that the new method has the potential to become a standard procedure to obtain hydrogel hollow particles. Moreover, the permeability study seems to be in accordance with specifications for immuno-isolation.

  7. Many-particle effects at core thresholds in simple metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, P. A.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1990-04-01

    We have analyzed inelastic electron-scattering (IES) data at the Na L2,3 and K M2,3 thresholds in terms of the Mahan-Nozières-De Dominicis (MND) model. We have also obtained the absorption coefficient μ and imaginary dielectric function ɛ2 from the IES data and analyzed them in the same manner as the raw data. For K the peaking parameter α0 obtained from absorption depends upon whether IES data, μ, or ɛ2 is used. For Na, α0 does not vary significantly among the three absorption spectral functions and has a value of 0.22+/-0.03 if uncertainties in the transition density of states are included. Exchange mixing is found to be a small effect at the Na L2,3 absorption edge. We have reanalyzed published p-core soft-x-ray emission data from Na and K and account for the effects of partial phonon relaxation on α0. In both cases α0 is significantly less than for the corresponding absorption spectra with values of about 0.15. We have also reanalyzed published Na core-level x-ray photoemission spectroscopy data including surface contributions and for the appropriate exponent obtain α=0.22+/-0.02. The results above taken in concert indicate a failure in the presently accepted MND model. We suggest that previously unconsidered dynamical effects must be included.

  8. SAGE II aerosol validation: selected altitude measurements, including particle micromeasurements.

    PubMed

    Oberbeck, V R; Livingston, J M; Russell, P B; Pueschel, R F; Rosen, J N; Osborn, M T; Kritz, M A; Snetsinger, K G; Ferry, G V

    1989-06-20

    Correlative aerosol measurements taken at a limited number of altitudes during coordinated field experiments are used to test the validity of particulate extinction coefficients derived from limb path solar radiance measurements taken by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II Sun photometer. In particular, results are presented from correlative measurement missions that were conducted during January 1985, August 1985, and July 1986. Correlative sensors included impactors, laser spectrometers, and filter samplers aboard an U-2-airplane, an upward pointing lidar aboard a P-3 airplane, and balloon-borne optical particle counters (dustsondes). The main body of this paper focuses on the July 29, 1986, validation experiment, which minimized the many difficulties (e.g., spatial and temporal inhomogeneities, imperfect coincidences) that can complicate the validation process. On this day, correlative aerosol measurements taken at an altitude of 20.5 km agreed with each other within their respective uncertainties, and particulate extinction values calculated at SAGE II wavelengths from these measurements validated corresponding SAGE II values. Additional validation efforts on days when measurement and logistical conditions were much less favorable for validation are discussed in an appendix.

  9. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30-50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles.

  10. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30–50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles. PMID:25597747

  11. Importance of core electrostatic properties on the electrophoresis of a soft particle.

    PubMed

    De, Simanta; Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Gopmandal, Partha P

    2016-08-01

    The impact of the volumetric charged density of the dielectric rigid core on the electrophoresis of a soft particle is analyzed numerically. The volume charge density of the inner core of a soft particle can arise for a dendrimer structure or bacteriophage MS2. We consider the electrokinetic model based on the conservation principles, thus no conditions for Debye length or applied electric field is imposed. The fluid flow equations are coupled with the ion transport equations and the equation for the electric field. The occurrence of the induced nonuniform surface charge density on the outer surface of the inner core leads to a situation different from the existing analysis of a soft particle electrophoresis. The impact of this induced surface charge density together with the double-layer polarization and relaxation due to ion convection and electromigration is analyzed. The dielectric permittivity and the charge density of the core have a significant impact on the particle electrophoresis when the Debye length is in the order of the particle size. We find that by varying the ionic concentration of the electrolyte, the particle can exhibit reversal in its electrophoretic velocity. The role of the polymer layer softness parameter is addressed in the present analysis. PMID:27627364

  12. Importance of core electrostatic properties on the electrophoresis of a soft particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Simanta; Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Gopmandal, Partha P.

    2016-08-01

    The impact of the volumetric charged density of the dielectric rigid core on the electrophoresis of a soft particle is analyzed numerically. The volume charge density of the inner core of a soft particle can arise for a dendrimer structure or bacteriophage MS2. We consider the electrokinetic model based on the conservation principles, thus no conditions for Debye length or applied electric field is imposed. The fluid flow equations are coupled with the ion transport equations and the equation for the electric field. The occurrence of the induced nonuniform surface charge density on the outer surface of the inner core leads to a situation different from the existing analysis of a soft particle electrophoresis. The impact of this induced surface charge density together with the double-layer polarization and relaxation due to ion convection and electromigration is analyzed. The dielectric permittivity and the charge density of the core have a significant impact on the particle electrophoresis when the Debye length is in the order of the particle size. We find that by varying the ionic concentration of the electrolyte, the particle can exhibit reversal in its electrophoretic velocity. The role of the polymer layer softness parameter is addressed in the present analysis.

  13. Evaluation of storing Shippingport Core II spent blanket fuel assemblies in the T Plant PWR Core II fuel pool without active cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.R.; Lanning, D.D.; Dana, C.M.; Hedengren, D.C.

    1994-10-01

    PWR Core II fuel pool chiller-off test was conducted because it appeared possible that acceptable pool-water temperatures could be maintained without operating the chillers, thus saving hundreds of thousands of dollars in maintenance and replacement costs. Test results showed that the water-cooling capability is no longer needed to maintain pool temperature below 38{degrees}C (100{degrees}F).

  14. A low resolution model for the chromatin core particle by neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Suau, Pedro; Kneale, G.Geoff; Braddock, Gordon W.; Baldwin, John P.; Bradbury, E.Morton

    1977-01-01

    Neutron scattering studies have been applied to chromatin core particles in solution, using the contrast variation technique. On the basis of the contrast dependance of the radius of gyration and the radial distribution function it is shown that the core particle consists of a core containing most of the histone around which is wound the DNA helix,following a path with a mean radius of 4.5 nm,in association with a small proportion of the histones. Separation of the shape from the internal structure, followed by model calculations shows that the overall shape of the particle is that of a flat cylinder with dimensions ca. 11×11×6 nm. Further details of the precise folding of the DNA cannot be deduced from the data, but detailed model calculations support concurrent results from crystallographic studies25. Images PMID:593885

  15. Electric potential profile of a spherical soft particle with a charged core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Anh D.; Tracy, Dustin A.; Nguyen, T. L. Hoai; Viet, N. A.; Phan, The-Long; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-12-01

    The electrostatic potential profile of a spherical soft particle is derived by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equations on a spherical system both numerically and analytically. The soft particle is assumed to consist of an ion-permeable charged outer layer and a non-permeable charged core with constant charged density. The contribution of the core to the potential profile is calculated for different charges and dielectric constants. Our results show that the charged core heavily influences the local potential within the soft particle. By contrast, the potential distribution outside the particle in the salt solution is found to be weakly dependent on the core features. These findings are consistent with previous experiments showing the minor impact of the core of the MS2 virus on its overall electrical properties. Our studies also indicate that while a change in temperature from 290 K to 310 K only slightly varies the potential, the ionic strength in the range of 1-600 mM has a significant effect on the potential profile. Our studies would provide good understanding for experimental research in the field of biophysics and nanomedicine.

  16. Reconstitution of mononucleosomes: characterization of distinct particles that differ in the position of the histone core.

    PubMed Central

    Linxweiler, W; Hörz, W

    1984-01-01

    Reconstitution of mononucleosomes from DNA and core histones was carried out to study the positioning of histone octamers on the DNA. Using random DNA molecules in the 200 to 250 bp size range we found that the reconstitution products consisted of a mixture of three different types of particles that could be separated by low ionic strength gel electrophoresis. In one particle, DNA was complexed with histones along its entire length indicating the binding of more than one histone octamer. The second particle contained only one histone core that was always associated, however, with the terminal 145 bp of the DNA regardless of its sequence which can be ascribed to a DNA end effect. Only the third particle consisted of histone octamers bound at internal positions of the DNA and is therefore the only particle suitable for investigating the influence of the DNA sequence on the positioning of the histone cores. A defined 154 bp pBR 322 restriction fragment that contains three BspRI restriction sites was also reconstituted with core histones. The accessibility of these sites to BspRI was measured in order to delineate the utility of restriction nucleases as probes for the structure of chromatin. Two sites located close to the center of the DNA were less susceptible by at least a factor of 1000 as compared to free DNA while the susceptibility of the third site in the terminal section of the DNA decreased about 50 fold after reconstitution. Images PMID:6096828

  17. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Xingmao; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Liu, Nanguo; Xu, Huifang; Rathod, Shailendra; Shah, Pratik; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Ceriumore » m (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0 × 10 − 14  m 2 s for Ce 3+ compared to 2.5 × 10 − 13  m 2 s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.« less

  18. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  19. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  20. Tuning the Mechanical Properties of Hydrogel Core-Shell Particles by Inwards Interweaving Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Pan, Houwen Matthew; Seuss, Maximilian; Neubauer, Martin P; Trau, Dieter W; Fery, Andreas

    2016-01-20

    Mechanical properties of hydrogel particles are of importance for their interactions with cells or tissue, apart from their relevance to other applications. While so far the majority of works aiming at tuning particle mechanics relied on chemical cross-linking, we report a novel approach using inwards interweaving self-assembly of poly(allylamine) (PA) and poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PSSA) on agarose gel beads. Using this technique, shell thicknesses up to tens of micrometers can be achieved from single-polymer incubations and accurately controlled by varying the polymer concentration or incubation period. We quantified the changes in mechanical properties of hydrogel core-shell particles. The effective elastic modulus of core-shell particles was determined from force spectroscopy measurements using the colloidal probe-AFM (CP-AFM) technique. By varying the shell thickness between 10 and 24 μm, the elastic modulus of particles can be tuned in the range of 10-190 kPa and further increased by increasing the layer number. Through fluorescence quantitative measurements, the polymeric shell density was found to increase together with shell thickness and layer number, hence establishing a positive correlation between elastic modulus and shell density of core-shell particles. This is a valuable method for constructing multidensity or single-density shells of tunable thickness and is particularly important in mechanobiology as studies have reported enhanced cellular uptake of particles in the low-kilopascal range (<140 kPa). We anticipate that our results will provide the first steps toward the rational design of core-shell particles for the separation of biomolecules or systemic study of stiffness-dependent cellular uptake.

  1. Tuning the Mechanical Properties of Hydrogel Core-Shell Particles by Inwards Interweaving Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Pan, Houwen Matthew; Seuss, Maximilian; Neubauer, Martin P; Trau, Dieter W; Fery, Andreas

    2016-01-20

    Mechanical properties of hydrogel particles are of importance for their interactions with cells or tissue, apart from their relevance to other applications. While so far the majority of works aiming at tuning particle mechanics relied on chemical cross-linking, we report a novel approach using inwards interweaving self-assembly of poly(allylamine) (PA) and poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PSSA) on agarose gel beads. Using this technique, shell thicknesses up to tens of micrometers can be achieved from single-polymer incubations and accurately controlled by varying the polymer concentration or incubation period. We quantified the changes in mechanical properties of hydrogel core-shell particles. The effective elastic modulus of core-shell particles was determined from force spectroscopy measurements using the colloidal probe-AFM (CP-AFM) technique. By varying the shell thickness between 10 and 24 μm, the elastic modulus of particles can be tuned in the range of 10-190 kPa and further increased by increasing the layer number. Through fluorescence quantitative measurements, the polymeric shell density was found to increase together with shell thickness and layer number, hence establishing a positive correlation between elastic modulus and shell density of core-shell particles. This is a valuable method for constructing multidensity or single-density shells of tunable thickness and is particularly important in mechanobiology as studies have reported enhanced cellular uptake of particles in the low-kilopascal range (<140 kPa). We anticipate that our results will provide the first steps toward the rational design of core-shell particles for the separation of biomolecules or systemic study of stiffness-dependent cellular uptake. PMID:26691168

  2. Determining the size distribution of core-shell spheres and other complex particles by laser diffraction.

    PubMed

    Lagasse, R R; Richards, D Wayne

    2003-11-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the size distribution of hollow glass spheres by laser diffraction, an experiment which involves measuring angle-dependent scattering of light from particles dispersed in a liquid. The proprietary software supplied with commercial instruments is not strictly applicable to our two-layer, glass-shell, hollow-core spheres because it requires that the particles have spatially homogeneous properties. We therefore developed Fortran code to compute the scattering from core-shell spherical particles. The results show that the scattering from representative hollow glass particles diverges from homogeneous sphere scattering when the radius decreases from 10 to 3 microm. Additionally, scattering measurements on two core-shell hollow glass powders were analyzed using the exact core-shell optical model and homogeneous sphere approximations. In both cases, the size distribution determined using the exact core-shell model differs from that determined using the homogeneous-sphere approximation when the distribution covers radii smaller than about 10 microm, as expected. The size distribution based on the exact core-shell optical model was determined using a new algorithm. Although the basic equations used in the algorithm have been published previously, they are developed here in a different form, which can be implemented using Fortran and MatLab routines available commercially and in the public domain. This algorithm could be used to determine the size distribution of other kinds of particles, such as cylindrical rods, as long as their angle-dependent scattering could be computed. PMID:14554168

  3. Fast isolation of highly active photosystem II core complexes from spinach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Gai; Xu, Tian-Hua; Liu, Cheng; Yang, Chun-Hong

    2010-09-01

    Purification of photosystem II (PSII) core complexes is a time-consuming and low-efficiency process. In order to isolate pure and active PSII core complexes in large amounts, we have developed a fast method to isolate highly active monomeric and dimeric PSII core complexes from spinach leaves by using sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. By using a vertical rotor the process was completed significantly faster compared with a swing-out rotor. In order to keep the core complexes in high activity, the whole isolation procedure was performed in the presence of glycine betain and pH at 6.3. The isolated pigment-protein complexes were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, absorption spectroscopy, 77 K fluorescence spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. Our results show that this method is a better choice for quick and efficient isolation of functionally active PSII core complexes. PMID:20738723

  4. Interfacial strain effect on type-I and type-II core/shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheshlaghi, Negar; Pisheh, Hadi Sedaghat; Karim, M. Rezaul; Malkoc, Derya; Ünlü, Hilmi

    2016-09-01

    A comparative experimental and theoretical study on the calculation of capped core diameter in ZnSe/ZnS, CdSe/Cd(Zn)S type-I and ZnSe/CdS type-II core/shell nanocrystals is presented. The lattice mismatch induced interface strain between core and shell was calculated from continuum elastic theory and applied in effective mass approximation method to obtain the corresponding capped core diameter. The calculated results were compared with diameter of bare cores (CdSe and ZnSe) from transmission electron microscopy images to obtain the amount of the stretched or squeezed core after deposition of tensile or compressive shells. The result of the study showed that the core is squeezed in ZnSe/ZnS and CdSe/Cd(Zn)S after compressive shell and stretched in ZnSe/CdS after tensile shell deposition. The stretched and squeezed amount of the capped core found to be in proportion with lattice mismatch amount in the core/shell structure.

  5. Resonant optical propulsion of a particle inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Maslov, A V

    2016-07-01

    Resonant propulsion of small nonresonant particles inside metal waveguides due to the formation of resonant states by the guided modes below their cutoffs has been predicted in the past. Here it is shown that stable resonant propulsion exists in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers, which are all-dielectric structures and are a major platform for various photonic applications. Specific features of the resonant propulsion are discussed together with the fiber design issues. The results may enable power-efficient transport of particles over long distances, particle sorting, and sensitive detection.

  6. Trajectories of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-06-01

    We present here raw trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations for nucleosome with linker DNA strands as well as minimalistic nucleosome core particle model. The simulations were done in explicit solvent using CHARMM36 force field. We used this data in the research article Shaytan et al., 2016 [1]. The trajectory files are supplemented by TCL scripts providing advanced visualization capabilities. PMID:27222871

  7. Investigating ICRF Core Physics with a Hybrid Method using δf Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, T. M.; Smithe, D. N.

    2011-12-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of ICRF core physics yield a significant amount of noise that can overwhelm the low amplitude signals associated with ICRH. To overcome this noise, we employ a hybrid approach that uses a fluid model for electrons and the delta-f particle-in-cell (DFPIC) method for ions. Noise is reduced to a level well below the amplitude of the signal and time steps are permitted to go beyond the electron time scales. With this formulation we have explored minority heating scenarios in Alcator C-Mod and high harmonic heating scenarios in NSTX. We can also employ the fluid model for both electrons and ions to investigate cold plasma scenarios. Here we examine ion test particles with particular attention paid to particle paths near resonance layers. We present our technique for investigating full particle orbits from a single toroidal mode expansion.

  8. Biodegradable and magnetic core-shell composite particle prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    The present paper describes optimization of preparation conditions of a core-shell composite particle, and its heat generation by alternating magnetic fields. The composite particles are prepared with a modified emulsion solvent diffusion method, which is combined with Pickering emulsion stabilized by magnetic nanoparticles. In this method, the magnetic nanoparticles act as an emulsifier, and its amount and size are crucial to morphology of the composite particles. The magnetic nanoparticles of 8-9 nm would be strongly adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface rather than the larger nanoparticles. At the optimized concentration of the magnetic nanoparticle’s suspension for the preparation, small and uniform composite particles are obtained since the amount of the nanoparticles is enough to prevent coalescence of droplets during the formation of the composites. The heat generation by alternating magnetic fields emerged certainly. This result suggests the composite particles have a property as a heat-generating carrier for hyperthermia treatment.

  9. Structure of RCC1 chromatin factor bound to the nucleosome core particle

    SciTech Connect

    Makde, Ravindra D.; England, Joseph R.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Tan, Song

    2010-11-11

    The small GTPase Ran enzyme regulates critical eukaryotic cellular functions including nuclear transport and mitosis through the creation of a RanGTP gradient around the chromosomes. This concentration gradient is created by the chromatin-bound RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) protein, which recruits Ran to nucleosomes and activates Ran's nucleotide exchange activity. Although RCC1 has been shown to bind directly with the nucleosome, the molecular details of this interaction were not known. Here we determine the crystal structure of a complex of Drosophila RCC1 and the nucleosome core particle at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, providing an atomic view of how a chromatin protein interacts with the histone and DNA components of the nucleosome. Our structure also suggests that the Widom 601 DNA positioning sequence present in the nucleosomes forms a 145-base-pair nucleosome core particle, not the expected canonical 147-base-pair particle.

  10. Core-Shell Particles that are Unresponsive to Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leão-Neto, J. P.; Lopes, J. H.; Silva, G. T.

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that core-shell particles with a designed cloaking shell can be unresponsive to acoustic radiation force in an inviscid fluid. The core-shell particles' size is assumed to be much smaller than the incident wavelength, i.e., the long-wavelength limit. The cloaking shell should have an optimal thickness with which the radiation force is drastically attenuated or even totally suppressed. We show that absorbing shells (polymer type) do not yield neutrality under the radiation force of traveling waves. Such a restriction does not appear in the case of standing waves. In addition, we establish the conditions for the suppression of the acoustic interaction forces (secondary radiation forces) between two or more cloaked particles.

  11. Fabrication of bifunctional core-shell Fe3O4 particles coated with ultrathin phosphor layer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bifunctional monodispersed Fe3O4 particles coated with an ultrathin Y2O3:Tb3+ shell layer were fabricated using a facile urea-based homogeneous precipitation method. The obtained composite particles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quantum design vibrating sample magnetometry, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. TEM revealed uniform spherical core-shell-structured composites ranging in size from 306 to 330 nm with a shell thickness of approximately 25 nm. PL spectroscopy confirmed that the synthesized composites displayed a strong eye-visible green light emission. Magnetic measurements indicated that the composite particles obtained also exhibited strong superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. Therefore, the inner Fe3O4 core and outer Y2O3:Tb3+ shell layer endow the composites with both robust magnetic properties and strong eye-visible luminescent properties. These composite materials have potential use in magnetic targeting and bioseparation, simultaneously coupled with luminescent imaging. PMID:23962025

  12. Synthesis of poly(aminopropyl/methyl)silsesquioxane particles as effective Cu(II) and Pb(II) adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Yin, Qiangfeng; Xin, Zhong; Li, Yang; Han, Ting

    2011-11-30

    Poly(aminopropyl/methyl)silsesquioxane (PAMSQ) particles have been synthesized by a one-step hydrolytic co-condensation process using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) as precursors in the presence of base catalyst in aqueous medium. The amino functionalities of the particles could be controlled by adjusting the organosilanes feed ratio. The compositions of the amino-functionalized polysilsesquioxanes were confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy, solid-state (29)Si NMR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The strong adsorbability of Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions onto PAMSQ particles was systematically examined. The effect of adsorption time, initial metal ions concentration and pH of solutions was studied to optimize the metal ions adsorbability of PAMSQ particles. The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption process well fits the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Adsorption phenomena appeared to follow Langmuir isotherm. The PAMSQ particles demonstrate the highest Cu(II) and Pb(II) adsorption capacity of 2.29 mmol/g and 1.31 mmol/g at an initial metal ions concentration of 20mM, respectively. The PAMSQ particles demonstrate a promising application in the removal of Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:21945683

  13. Highly temperature responsive core-shell magnetic particles: synthesis, characterization and colloidal properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mahbubor; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2011-08-15

    Temperature responsive magnetic polymer submicron particles were prepared by two step seed emulsion polymerization process. First, magnetic seed polymer particles were obtained by emulsion polymerization of styrene using potassium persulfate (KPS) as an initiator and divinylbenzne (DVB) as a cross-linker in the presence of oil-in-water magnetic emulsion (organic ferrofluid droplets). Thereafter, DVB cross-linked magnetic polymer particles were used as seed in the precipitation polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) to induce thermosensitive PNIPAM shell onto the hydrophobic polymer surface of the cross-linked magnetic polymer particles. To impart cationic functional groups in the thermosensitive PNIPAM backbone, the functional monomer aminoethylmethacrylate hydrochloride (AEMH) was used to polymerize with NIPAM while N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) and 2, 2'-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (V-50) were used as a cross-linker and as an initiator respectively. The effect of seed to monomer (w/w) ratio along with seed nature on the final particle morphology was investigated. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) results demonstrated particles swelling at below volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) and deswelling above the VPTT. The perfect core (magnetic) shell (polymer) structure of the particles prepared was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The chemical composition of the particles were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of temperature, pH, ionic strength on the colloidal properties such as size and zeta potential of the micron sized thermo-sensitive magnetic particles were also studied. In addition, a short mechanistic discussion on the formation of core-shell morphology of magnetic polymer particles has also been discussed. PMID:21570083

  14. Water-soluble core/shell nanoparticles for proton therapy through particle-induced radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Maeng Jun; Kim, Kye-Ryung

    2015-02-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), therapy, and drug delivery systems. Metallic nanoparticles as therapeutic tools have been demonstrated using radio-frequency magnetic fields or near-infrared light. Recently, therapeutic applications of metallic nanomaterials combined with proton beams have been reported. Particle-induced radiation from metallic nanoparticles, which can enhance the therapeutic effects of proton therapy, was released when the nanoparticles were bombarded by a high-energy proton beam. Core/shell nanoparticles, especially Au-coated magnetic nanoparticles, have drawn attention in biological applications due to their attractive characteristics. However, studies on the phase transfer of organic-ligand-based core/shell nanoparticles into water are limited. Herein, we demonstrated that hydrophobic core/shell structured nanomaterials could be successfully dispersed in water through chloroform/surfactant mixtures. The effects of the core/shell nanomaterials and the proton irradiation on Escherichia coli (E. coli) were also explored.

  15. In-Situ Characterization of Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Interstitial, and background Particles using Single Particle Mass Spectrometer, SPLAT II

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Earle, Michael; Easter, Richard C.; Korolev, Alexei; Leaitch, W. R.; Liu, Peter; Macdonald, A. M.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Strapp, Walter

    2010-10-01

    Aerosol indirect effect remains the most uncertain aspect of climate change modeling because proper test requires knowledge of individual particles sizes and compositions with high spatial and temporal resolution. We present the first deployment of a single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) that is operated in a dual data acquisition mode to measure all the required individual particle properties with sufficient temporal resolution to definitively resolve the aerosol-cloud interaction in this exemplary case. We measured particle number concentrations, asphericity, and individual particle size, composition, and density with better than 60 seconds resolution. SPLAT II measured particle number concentrations between 70 particles cm-3and 300 particles cm-3, an average particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. Found that most particles are composed of oxygenated organics, many of which are mixed with sulfates. Biomass burn particles some with sulfates were prevalent, particularly at higher altitudes, and processed sea-salt was observed over the ocean. Analysis of cloud residuals shows that with time cloud droplets acquire sulfate by the reaction of peroxide with SO2. Based on the particle mass spectra and densities we find that the compositions of cloud condensation nuclei are similar to those of background aerosol but, contain on average ~7% more sulfate, and do not include dust and metallic particles. A comparison between the size distributions of background, activated, and interstitial particles shows that while nearly none of the activated particles is smaller than 115 nm, more than 80% of interstitial particles are smaller than 115 nm. We conclude that for this cloud the most important difference between CCN and background aerosol is particle size although having more sulfate also helps.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and application of smart magnetic core-shell polymeric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kin Man Edmond

    Magnetic gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with three different types of surface modification were prepared. They include oleate-coated gamma-Fe 2O3 (o-Fe2O3), citrate-coated gamma-Fe 2O3 (c-Fe2O3), vinyl-coated gamma-Fe 2O3 (MPS-Fe2O3) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were synthesized via three approaches: (1) decomposition and oxidation of Fe(CO)5 with oleic acid in a hot organic medium; (2) co-precipitation of FeCl2 and FeCl3 in an ammonium solution at pH 11--12, followed by surface coating with trisodium citrate; and (3) subsequent modification of the citrate-coated gamma-Fe2O3 through hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPS) using the modified Stober method, respectively. Encapsulation of these three types of magnetic nanoparticles into the poly(methyl methacrylate)/chitosan core-shell particles via graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from chitosan were attempted. Successful encapsulation of iron oxide nanoparticles into the core-shell particles was achieved when the MPS-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were subjected to the copolymerization conditions. The magnetic core-shell particles (MCS) produced, in a reasonable yield, had diameter below 200 nm with narrow size distribution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs of the particles clearly revealed well-defined core-shell nanostructures where magnetic nanoparticles located inside PMMA and coated with chitosan shell. Properties of the MCS particles including their surface charge density, colloidal stability, chemical composition, magnetization measurement and film-forming ability were investigated with zeta-potential measurement, particle size measurement, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Application of the MCS particles was explored. The MCS particles were used to stabilize with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) via

  17. Novel nucleosomal particles containing core histones and linker DNA but no histone H1.

    PubMed

    Cole, Hope A; Cui, Feng; Ocampo, Josefina; Burke, Tara L; Nikitina, Tatiana; Nagarajavel, V; Kotomura, Naoe; Zhurkin, Victor B; Clark, David J

    2016-01-29

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is assembled into regularly spaced nucleosomes, which play a central role in gene regulation by determining accessibility of control regions. The nucleosome contains ∼147 bp of DNA wrapped ∼1.7 times around a central core histone octamer. The linker histone, H1, binds both to the nucleosome, sealing the DNA coils, and to the linker DNA between nucleosomes, directing chromatin folding. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digests the linker to yield the chromatosome, containing H1 and ∼160 bp, and then converts it to a core particle, containing ∼147 bp and no H1. Sequencing of nucleosomal DNA obtained after MNase digestion (MNase-seq) generates genome-wide nucleosome maps that are important for understanding gene regulation. We present an improved MNase-seq method involving simultaneous digestion with exonuclease III, which removes linker DNA. Remarkably, we discovered two novel intermediate particles containing 154 or 161 bp, corresponding to 7 bp protruding from one or both sides of the nucleosome core. These particles are detected in yeast lacking H1 and in H1-depleted mouse chromatin. They can be reconstituted in vitro using purified core histones and DNA. We propose that these 'proto-chromatosomes' are fundamental chromatin subunits, which include the H1 binding site and influence nucleosome spacing independently of H1.

  18. Release of clay particles from an unconsolidated clay-sand core: experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauré, Marie-Hélène; Sardin, Michel; Vitorge, Pierre

    1997-04-01

    This work identifies the main phenomena that control the peptisation and transport of clay particles in a sand core. Clay can be dispersed into small particles in an aqueous solution of low ionic strength. This property is used to generate clay particles with NaCl concentration varying from 0.5 M to 0.015 M. For this purpose, a chromatographic column is initially packed with a 5% clay-sand mixture. The monitored decrease of the NaCl concentration of the feed solution allows the control of transport of the particles without plugging the porous medium. In this condition it is shown that in a column of a given length, the amount of clay particles released into solution and available to transport, depend only on NaCl concentration. Some clay particles are available to migration when the NaCl concentration of the feed concentration is between 0.16 M and 0.05 M (first domain) or between 0.035 M and 0.019 M (second domain). An empirical function, Pd([NaCl]), accounts for this particle generation. Transport is mainly dependent on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the porous medium that vary during the elution, probably owing to the particle motion inside the column. A phenomenological modelling is derived from these results, coupling the particle generation term, Pd([NaCl]), with an adapted nonequilibrium transport solute model. Similarly to the solute, particles were attributed a characteristic time of mass transfer between mobile and immobile water zones. This is sufficient to take into account the kinetic limitations of particles transport. The values of the parameters are determined by independent experiments. Finally, breakthrough curves of clay particles are predicted when a column of a given length, is flushed by a salinity gradient of NaCl in various conditions.

  19. LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate increases proteoglycan binding and promotes atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, John T.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Shah, Ramesh; Wilson, Martha D.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies in humans and animals suggest that LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate (CO) is associated with increased atherosclerosis. Diet enrichment with MUFAs enhances LDL CO content. Steroyl O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) is the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of much of the CO found in LDL, and gene deletion of SOAT2 minimizes CO in LDL and protects against atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the increased atherosclerosis associated with LDL core enrichment in CO results from an increased affinity of the LDL particle for arterial proteoglycans. ApoB-100-only Ldlr−/− mice with and without Soat2 gene deletions were fed diets enriched in either cis-MUFA or n-3 PUFA, and LDL particles were isolated. LDL:proteogylcan binding was measured using surface plasmon resonance. Particles with higher CO content consistently bound with higher affinity to human biglycan and the amount of binding was shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerosis of the LDL donor mice. The data strongly support the thesis that atherosclerosis was induced through enhanced proteoglycan binding of LDL resulting from LDL core CO enrichment. PMID:23804810

  20. Coherent coexistence of nanodiamonds and carbon onions in icosahedral core-shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Vladimir Ya. Madison, Alexey E.; Mackay, Alan L.

    2007-03-01

    In icosahedral carbon nanoparticles, the diamond-like core can undergo a reversible topological transition into and coexist coherently with the onion shells. The general approach for describing and designing complex hierarchical icosahedral structures is discussed. Structural models of icosahedral carbon nanoparticles in which the local arrangement of atoms is virtually identical to that in diamond are derived. It is shown that icosahedral diamond-like particles can be transformed into onion-like shell structures (and vice versa) by the consecutive smoothing (puckering) of atomic networks without disturbance of their topological integrity. The possibility of coherent coexistence of icosahedral diamond-like core with onion shells is shown.

  1. The core collapse supernova rate from the SDSS-II supernova survey

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-09-10

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10{sup –4}((h/0.7){sup 3}/(yr Mpc{sup 3})) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  2. EFFECTS OF TUMORS ON INHALED PHARMACOLOGIC DRUGS: II. PARTICLE MOTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Computer simulations were conducted to describe drug particle motion in human lung bifurcations with tumors. The computations used FIDAP with a Cray T90 supercomputer. The objective was to better understand particle behavior as affected by particle characteristics...

  3. Crystallography of decahedral and icosahedral particles. II - High symmetry orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Yacaman, M. J.; Heinemann, K.

    1979-01-01

    Based on the exact crystal structure of decahedral and icosahedral particles, high energy electron diffraction patterns and image profiles have been derived for various high symmetry orientations of the particles with respect to the incident beam. These results form a basis for the identification of small metal particle structures with advanced methods of transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Epoxy-acrylic core-shell particles by seeded emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Hong, Liang; Lin, Jui-Ching; Meyers, Greg; Harris, Joseph; Radler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel method for synthesizing epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes. We first prepared an aqueous dispersion of high molecular weight solid epoxy prepolymers using a mechanical dispersion process at elevated temperatures, and we subsequently used the epoxy dispersion as a seed in the emulsion polymerization of acrylic monomers comprising methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA). Advanced analytical techniques, such as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and peak force tapping atomic force microscopy (PFT-AFM), have elucidated a unique core-shell morphology of the epoxy-acrylic hybrid particles. Moreover, the formation of the core-shell morphology in the seeded emulsion polymerization process is primarily attributed to kinetic trapping of the acrylic phase at the exterior of the epoxy particles. By this new method, we are able to design the epoxy and acrylic polymers in two separate steps, and we can potentially synthesize epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes with a broad range of compositions. PMID:27078740

  5. Epoxy-acrylic core-shell particles by seeded emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Hong, Liang; Lin, Jui-Ching; Meyers, Greg; Harris, Joseph; Radler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel method for synthesizing epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes. We first prepared an aqueous dispersion of high molecular weight solid epoxy prepolymers using a mechanical dispersion process at elevated temperatures, and we subsequently used the epoxy dispersion as a seed in the emulsion polymerization of acrylic monomers comprising methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA). Advanced analytical techniques, such as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and peak force tapping atomic force microscopy (PFT-AFM), have elucidated a unique core-shell morphology of the epoxy-acrylic hybrid particles. Moreover, the formation of the core-shell morphology in the seeded emulsion polymerization process is primarily attributed to kinetic trapping of the acrylic phase at the exterior of the epoxy particles. By this new method, we are able to design the epoxy and acrylic polymers in two separate steps, and we can potentially synthesize epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes with a broad range of compositions.

  6. ZnO core spike particles and nano-networks and their wide range of applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, S.; Mishra, Y. K.; Gedamu, D.; Kaps, S.; Jin, X.; Koschine, T.; Bathnagar, A.; Adelung, R.

    2011-05-01

    In our approach we are producing a polymer composite material with ZnO core spike particles as concave fillers. The core spike particles are synthesized by a high throughput method. Using PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) as a matrix material the core spike particles achieve not only a high mechanical reinforcement but also influence other material properties in a very interesting way, making such a composite very interesting for a wide range of applications. In a very similar synthesis route a nanoscopic ZnO-network is produced. As a ceramic this network can withstand high temperatures like 1300 K. In addition this material is quite elastic. To find a material with these two properties is a really difficult task, as polymers tend to decompose already at lower temperatures and metals melt. Especially under ambient conditions, often oxygen creates a problem for metals at these temperatures. If this material is at the same time a semiconductor, it has a high potential as a multifunctional material. Ceramic or classical semiconductors like III-V or IIVI type are high temperature stable, but typically brittle. This is different on the nanoscale. Even semiconductor wires like silicon with a very small diameter do not easily built up enough stress that leads to a failure while being bent, because in a first order approximation the maximum stress of a fiber scales with its diameter.

  7. Synthesis of zirconium tungstate-zirconia core-shell composite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Khazeni, Nasser; Mavis, Bora; Guenduez, Guengoer; Colak, Uner

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}-ZrO{sub 2} core-shell particles to offer solutions for sintering problems. {yields} Core synthesis by a precursor based on tungstic acid and zirconium acetate. {yields} Shell phase by urea hydrolysis in the presence of zirconium ions. {yields} [Urea]/[ZrOCl{sub 2}] ratio controls the rate of shell precursor precipitation. -- Abstract: In this work, ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}-ZrO{sub 2} core-shell composite particles were synthesized. ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} that was used in the core is a material with negative coefficient of thermal expansion, and it was synthesized from a high-pH precursor based on use of tungstic acid and zirconium acetate. Shell layer was composed of ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystallites and precipitated from an aqueous solution by urea hydrolysis. While volume of the shell was effectively controlled by the initial zirconium ion concentration in the solutions, the rate of precipitation was a function of the ratio of initial concentrations of urea to zirconium ions. It is hypothesized that isolation of the ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} within a layer of ZrO{sub 2}, will be a key element in solving problems associated with reactivity of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} towards other components in sintering of ceramic-ceramic composites with tuned or zero thermal expansion coefficient.

  8. Code System to Calculate Mixed Cores in TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor.

    2001-08-29

    Version 00 TRIGLAV is a computer program for reactor calculations of mixed cores in a TRIGA Mark II research reactor. It can be applied for fuel element burn-up calculations, for power and flux distributions calculations and for reactivity predictions. The TRIGLAV program requires the WIMS-D4 program with the original WIMS cross-section library extended for TRIGA reactor specific nuclides. This package includes the code TRIGAC, which is a new version of TRIGAP.

  9. Differential effects of the particle core and organic extract of diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Totlandsdal, Annike Irene; Herseth, Jan Inge; Bølling, Anette Kocbach; Kubátová, Alena; Braun, Artur; Cochran, Richard E; Refsnes, Magne; Ovrevik, Johan; Låg, Marit

    2012-02-01

    Exposure to diesel engine exhaust particles (DEPs), representing a complex and variable mixture of components, has been associated with lung disease and induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and CYP1A1 expression. The aim of this study was to further characterise DEP-components accounting for these effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to either native DEPs, or corresponding methanol DEP-extract or residual DEPs, and investigated with respect to cytotoxicity and expression and release of multiple inflammation-related mediators. Both native DEPs and DEP-extract, but not residual DEPs, induced marked mRNA expression of COX-2, IL-6 and IL-8, as well as cytotoxicity and release of IL-6. However, CYP1A1 was primarily induced by the native and residual DEPs. Overall, the results of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of DEP-extracts indicated that the majority of the analysed PAHs and PAH-derivatives were extracted from the particles, but that certain PAH-derivatives, probably their carboxylic isomers, tended to be retained on the residual DEPs. Moreover, it appeared that certain components of the methanol extract may suppress CYP1A1 expression. These results provide insight into how different components of the complex DEP-mixture may be differently involved in DEP-induced pro-inflammatory responses and underscore the importance of identifying and clarifying the roles of active DEP-components in relation to different biological effects. PMID:22100492

  10. Particle transport after pellet injection in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, J. L.; McCarthy, K. J.; Panadero, N.; Satake, S.; López-Bruna, D.; Alonso, A.; Calvo, I.; Dinklage, A.; Estrada, T.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Hernández, J.; García, R.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Pastor, I.; Perfilov, S.; Sánchez, E.; Soleto, A.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Zhezhera, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2016-08-01

    We study radial particle transport in stellarator plasmas using cryogenic pellet injection. By means of perturbative experiments, we estimate the experimental particle flux and compare it with neoclassical simulations. Experimental evidence is obtained of the fact that core depletion in helical devices can be slowed-down even by pellets that do not reach the core region. This phenomenon is well captured by neoclassical predictions with DKES and FORTEC-3D.

  11. Containment performance for the core melt accidents in BWRs with Mark I and Mark II containments

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, K.R.; Yang, J.W.; Greene, G.A.; Pratt, W.T.; Hofmayer, C.

    1985-01-01

    Most previous risk assessment studies have assumed catastrophic failure of containments for severe accidents which are predicted to exceed the containment yield stress. This investigation analyzes the progression of a severe accident in order to develop realistic containment temperature and pressure loading, utilizes models for containment leakage estimates for the various loading histories, and assesses the expected failure modes and timing of releases for core melt accidents in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) with Mark I and Mark II containments. The results of the investigation indicate that leakage through the seal on the drywell head may be sufficient to prevent catastrophic failure of the containments for a wide range of hypothetical core melt scenarios. In addition, the investigation has indicated the potential for a previously inidentified failure mode (containment liner meltthrough) for Mark I containments in which a large fraction of the core is released from the vessel in a molten state. 14 refs.

  12. A Bioinspired Molecular Polyoxometalate Catalyst with Two Cobalt(II) Oxide Cores for Photocatalytic Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Feng, Yingying; Zhou, Panpan; Liu, Yan; Xu, Jingyin; Xiang, Rui; Ding, Yong; Zhao, Chongchao; Fan, Linyuan; Hu, Changwen

    2015-08-24

    To overcome the bottleneck of water splitting, the exploration of efficient, selective, and stable water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) is crucial. We report an all-inorganic, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOC based on a polyoxometalate [(A-α-SiW9 O34)2Co8(OH)6(H2O)2(CO3)3](16-) (Co8 POM). As a cobalt(II)-based cubane water oxidation catalyst, Co8POM embeds double Co(II)4O3 cores. The self-assembled catalyst is similar to the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PS II). Using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) as a photosensitizer and persulfate as a sacrificial electron acceptor, Co8POM exhibits excellent water oxidation activity with a turnover number (TON) of 1436, currently the highest among bioinspired catalysts with a cubical core, and a high initial turnover frequency (TOF). Investigation by several spectroscopy, spectrometry, and other techniques confirm that Co8POM is a stable and efficient catalyst for visible light-driven water oxidation. The results offer a useful insight into the design of water oxidation catalysts.

  13. Classical relativistic constituent particles and composite states. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Marcia J.

    1985-05-01

    A classical theory of interacting relativistic constituent and composite particles is developed further. The Lorentz-invariant Lagrangian, a function of the single unmeasurable evolution parameter s, is considered for attractive and repulsive harmonic-oscillator forces acting pairwise between constituent particles. Nonrelativistic Newtonian equations of motion can be derived by letting c-->∞ in ``equal-time'' solutions, but, in general, there is a ``surplus'' of solutions which have no nonrelativistic counterpart. These solutions are used to construct classical models of strongly interacting composite particles. Asymptotic selection rules and constituent confinement are postulated and lead to space-time conservation laws for systems of scattering composite particles. Constituent four-vectors are linear combinations of ``kinematic'' terms and ``intrinsic'' normal modes. The latter are identified with internal symmetries of the composite particles, which are labeled by sets of ``intrinsic numbers'' analogous to additive quantum numbers. Formation of two- and three-body composite particles follows an exact analogy to the color quark model, in which the meson is composed of a quark and an antiquark of the same color, and the baryon is formed from three quarks of three different colors. Scattering examples are given analogous to MM-->MM, MB-->MB, and BB-->BB. The reactions take place through constituent exchange, and total intrinsic numbers are conserved. There are other similarities to quantum field theory, such as particle-antiparticle pair creation and annihilation, fixed relative values of internal angular momenta, fixed orbital angular momentum, and many-particle systems characterized by a vacuum state (lowest energy state) and the existence of virtual composite particles as well as physically observable composite particles.

  14. Continuous syntheses of Pd@Pt and Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles using microwave-assisted core particle formation coupled with galvanic metal displacement.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Masato; Hiyoshi, Norihito; Nishioka, Masateru; Koda, Hidekazu; Sato, Koichi; Miyazawa, Akira; Suzuki, Toshishige M

    2014-08-01

    Continuous synthesis of Pd@Pt and Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles was performed using flow processes including microwave-assisted Pd (or Cu) core-nanoparticle formation followed by galvanic displacement with a Pt (or Ag) shell. The core-shell structure and the nanoparticle size were confirmed using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) observation and EDS elemental mapping. The Pd@Pt nanoparticles with a particle size of 6.5 ± 0.6 nm and a Pt shell thickness of ca. 0.25 nm were synthesized with appreciably high Pd concentration (Pd 100 mM). This shell thickness corresponds to one atomic layer thickness of Pt encapsulating the Pd core metal. The particle size of core Pd was controlled by tuning the initial concentrations of Na2[PdCl4] and PVP. Core-shell Cu@Ag nanoparticles with a particle size of 90 ± 35 nm and an Ag shell thickness of ca. 3.5 nm were obtained using similar sequential reactions. Oxidation of the Cu core was suppressed by the coating of Cu nanoparticles with the Ag shell. PMID:24948122

  15. Analysis of the binding of high mobility group protein 17 to the nucleosome core particle by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cook, G R; Minch, M; Schroth, G P; Bradbury, E M

    1989-01-25

    The binding of high mobility group (HMG) protein 17 to the nucleosome core particle has been studied in D2O solution using 1H NMR at 500 MHz. Spectra were obtained for purified HMG 17, purified nucleosome core particles, and the reconstituted HMG 17-nucleosome core particle complex at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 M NaCl. Subtraction of the core particle spectra from spectra of the core particle reconstituted with HMG 17 demonstrated those regions of HMG 17 which interact with the nucleosome at different ionic strengths; the resonance peaks of interacting groups are broadened due to their restricted mobility. At 0.1 M NaCl, the mobility of all the amino acid side chains of HMG 17 was restricted, indicating complete binding of HMG 17 to the much larger nucleosome core particle. At 0.2 M NaCl most of the amino acids were free with the exception of arginine and proline which are confined to or predominant in the basic central region of HMG 17. These amino acids were completely free only at 0.4 M NaCl. We conclude that the entire HMG 17 molecule interacts with the nucleosome core particle at physiological ionic strength. The acidic COOH-terminal region of HMG 17 is released from interaction with the core histones at an NaCl concentration between 0.1 and 0.2 M and so binds weakly at physiological ionic strength. The basic central region binds more strongly to the core particle DNA, being completely released only at much higher ionic strength, between 0.3 and 0.4 M NaCl.

  16. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  17. Extending the Capabilities of Single Particle Mass Spectrometry: II. Measurements of Aerosol Particle Density without DMA

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-01-04

    Particle density is an important and useful property that is difficult to measure because it usually 5 requires separate instruments to measure two particle attributes. As density measurements are 6 often performed on size-classified particles, they are hampered by low particle numbers, and 7 hence poor temporal resolution. We present here a new method for measuring particle densities 8 using our single particle mass spectrometer, SPLAT. This method takes advantage of the fact 9 that the detection efficiency in our single particle mass spectrometer drops off very rapidly as the 10 particle size decreases below ~125 nm creating a distinct sharp feature on the small particle side 11 of the vacuum aerodynamic size distribution. Thus, the two quantities needed to determine 12 particle density, the particle diameter and vacuum aerodynamic diameter, are known. We first 13 test this method on particles of known composition and find that the densities it yields are 14 sufficiently accurate. We then apply the method to obtain the densities of particles that were 15 characterized during an airborne field campaign. In addition, we show that the distinctive 16 features of the vacuum aerodynamic size distribution can be used to characterize the instrument 17 detection efficiency as a function of particle size. In general, the method presented here reduces 18 complexity and yields information with high temporal resolution while the instrument is 19 collecting routine data on particle size and composition.

  18. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering.

    PubMed

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate ('/' = physisorbed, '-' = chemisorbed), from molten Field's metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity. PMID:26902483

  19. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity.

  20. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity. PMID:26902483

  1. Effects of tumors on inhaled pharmacologic drugs: II. Particle motion.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Guan, X

    2001-01-01

    Computer simulations were conducted to describe drug particle motion in human lung bifurcations with tumors. The computations used FIDAP with a Cray T90 supercomputer. The objective was to better understand particle behavior as affected by particle characteristics, airflow conditions, and disease-modified airway geometries. The results indicated that increases in particle sizes, breathing intensities and tumor sizes could enhance drug deposition on the tumors. The modeling suggested that targeted drug delivery could be achieved by regulating breathing parameters and designing (selecting physical features of) aerosolized drugs. We present the theoretical work as a step towards improving aerosol therapy protocols. Since modeling describes factors affecting dose, it is complementary to considerations of the molecular aspects of drug formulation and pharmacokinetics.

  2. Development of spherical iron(II) sulfate heptahydrate-containing solid particles with sustained drug release.

    PubMed

    Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Farkas, Béla; Gregor, Tamás; Nagy, Kálmán; Pallagi, Edina

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a simple, economic procedure for the manufacturing of coated iron(II) sulfate particles by using a crystallization technique for the development of round particles, followed by coating with a lipophilic material. Several batches of iron(II) sulfate heptahydrate were produced by a cooling crystallization, with variation of the crystallization parameters. The spherical crystals were coated with stearin. The products were characterized for particle size, roundness, bulk density and in vitro drug dissolution. Crystallization was performed from deionized water with no addition of seed crystals and by cooling by applying a linear cooling rate. The developed iron(II) sulfate crystals were round with average diameter of 729+/-165 microm. The best form for the sustained release of iron(II) sulfate was the sample HTP-2 which contained 11% of stearin relative to the iron(II) sulfate. The spherical crystallization of iron(II) sulfate is simple and fast, and does not require a dangerous, expensive solvent. The round particles can coat directly with lipophilic material which results in slow release of iron(II) sulfate and protects the iron(II) from oxidation and inhibits the loss of crystal water. The coated crystals can be filled into capsules to yield the final dosage form.

  3. Nanostructured core-shell Ni deposition on SiC particles by alkaline electroless coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, M.; Karslioğlu, R.; Alp, A.; Akbulut, H.

    2011-10-01

    In this study, core-shell nanostructured nickel formation on silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic powders was achieved through the electroless deposition method using alkaline solutions. To produce a nano core-shell Ni deposition on the SiC surfaces, process parameters such as pH values, the type of reducer material, deposition temperature, stirring rate and activation procedure among others were determined. Full coverage of core-shell nickel structures on SiC surfaces was achieved with a grain size of between 100 and 300 nm, which was approximately the same deposition thickness on the SiC surfaces. The surface morphology of the coated SiC particles showed a homogenous distribution of nanostructured nickel grains characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The nanostructures of the crystalline Ni coatings were observed to be attractive for achieving both good bonding and dense structure. The thin core shell-structure of Ni on the SiC surfaces was assessed as a beneficial reinforcement for possible metal matrix composite manufacturing.

  4. Core-Shell Hydrogel Particles Harvest, Concentrate and Preserve Labile Low Abundance Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Caterina; Patanarut, Alexis; George, Tony; Bishop, Barney; Zhou, Weidong; Fredolini, Claudia; Ross, Mark M.; Espina, Virginia; Pellacani, Giovanni; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Luchini, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Background The blood proteome is thought to represent a rich source of biomarkers for early stage disease detection. Nevertheless, three major challenges have hindered biomarker discovery: a) candidate biomarkers exist at extremely low concentrations in blood; b) high abundance resident proteins such as albumin mask the rare biomarkers; c) biomarkers are rapidly degraded by endogenous and exogenous proteinases. Methodology and Principal Findings Hydrogel nanoparticles created with a N-isopropylacrylamide based core (365 nm)-shell (167 nm) and functionalized with a charged based bait (acrylic acid) were studied as a technology for addressing all these biomarker discovery problems, in one step, in solution. These harvesting core-shell nanoparticles are designed to simultaneously conduct size exclusion and affinity chromatography in solution. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a clinically relevant, highly labile, and very low abundance biomarker, was chosen as a model. PDGF, spiked in human serum, was completely sequestered from its carrier protein albumin, concentrated, and fully preserved, within minutes by the particles. Particle sequestered PDGF was fully protected from exogenously added tryptic degradation. When the nanoparticles were added to a 1 mL dilute solution of PDGF at non detectable levels (less than 20 picograms per mL) the concentration of the PDGF released from the polymeric matrix of the particles increased within the detection range of ELISA and mass spectrometry. Beyond PDGF, the sequestration and protection from degradation for a series of additional very low abundance and very labile cytokines were verified. Conclusions and Significance We envision the application of harvesting core-shell nanoparticles to whole blood for concentration and immediate preservation of low abundance and labile analytes at the time of venipuncture. PMID:19274087

  5. Electronic excitation transport in core antennae of enriched photosystem I particles from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Causgrove, T.P.; Yang, S.; Struve, W.S.

    1988-10-20

    The polarized photobleaching recovery of PSI-60 particles enriched in iron-sulfur protein and P700 was monitored with approx. 2-ps resolution at 665, 670, 675, and 681 nm. Considerable residual anisotropy appears at long times, proving that local ordering exists in the Chl a-protein core antenna of PSI-60. At these four wavelengths, the polarization decays with mean lifetimes between 2.9 and 6.6 ps. This slow time scale suggests that the depolarization accompanies electronic excitation transport between clusters of Chl a chromophores rather than between individual nearest-neighbor chromophores.

  6. Exchange coupled SrFe12O19/Fe-Co core/shell particles with different shell thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xia; Hong, Yang-Ki; Park, Jihoon; Lee, Woncheol; Lane, Alan M.

    2015-11-01

    SrFe12O19/Fe-Co core/shell particles with different shell thickness were synthesized by polyol reduction of Fe and Co ions at 180°C with SrFe12O19 particles dispersed in solvent. The core/shell structure is formed by magnetic self-assembly due to the remanent magnetization of SrFe12O19 particles. Within a limited concentration range, the shell thickness could be controlled by regulating the concentration of Fe and Co ions. Core/shell structured SrFe12O19/Fe-Co particles showed more effective exchange coupling effects between hard and soft phases than physically mixed SrFe12O19 and Fe-Co particles. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Atomistic and Coarse Grain Topologies for the Cofactors Associated with the Photosystem II Core Complex.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Djurre H; Liguori, Nicoletta; van den Berg, Tom; Arnarez, Clement; Periole, Xavier; Marrink, Siewert J

    2015-06-25

    Electron transfers within and between protein complexes are core processes of the electron transport chains occurring in thylakoid (chloroplast), mitochondrial, and bacterial membranes. These electron transfers involve a number of cofactors. Here we describe the derivation of molecular mechanics parameters for the cofactors associated with the function of the photosystem II core complex: plastoquinone, plastoquinol, heme b, chlorophyll A, pheophytin, and β-carotene. Parameters were also obtained for ubiquinol and ubiquinone, related cofactors involved in the respiratory chain. Parameters were derived at both atomistic and coarse grain (CG) resolutions, compatible with the building blocks of the GROMOS united-atom and Martini CG force fields, respectively. Structural and thermodynamic properties of the cofactors were compared to experimental values when available. The topologies were further tested in molecular dynamics simulations of the cofactors in their physiological environment, e.g., either in a lipid membrane environment or in complex with the heme binding protein bacterioferritin.

  8. Facile preparation of core@shell and concentration-gradient spinel particles for Li-ion battery cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Naito, Makio

    2015-02-01

    Core@shell and concentration-gradient particles have attracted much attention as improved cathodes for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, most of their preparation routes have employed a precisely-controlled co-precipitation method. Here, we report a facile preparation route of core@shell and concentration-gradient spinel particles by dry powder processing. The core@shell particles composed of the MnO2 core and the Li(Ni,Mn)2O4 spinel shell are prepared by mechanical treatment using an attrition-type mill, whereas the concentration-gradient spinel particles with an average composition of LiNi0.32Mn1.68O4 are produced by calcination of their core@shell particles as a precursor. The concentration-gradient LiNi0.32Mn1.68O4 spinel cathode exhibits the high discharge capacity of 135.3 mA h g-1, the wide-range plateau at a high voltage of 4.7 V and the cyclability with a capacity retention of 99.4% after 20 cycles. Thus, the facile preparation route of the core@shell and concentration-gradient particles may provide a new opportunity for the discovery and investigation of functional materials as well as for the cathode materials for LIBs.

  9. Molecularly linked 3D plasmonic nanoparticle core/satellite assemblies: SERS nanotags with single-particle Raman sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Max; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A fast, generic, and suspension-based route to highly SERS-active assemblies of noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Ag) with small core-satellite gaps and single-particle Raman sensitivity is presented. Rationally designed, heterobifunctional Raman reporters serve as molecular linkers for electrostatic conjugation of the small satellites to the large core.

  10. Site-specific aflatoxin B sub 1 adduction of sequence-positioned nucleosome core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The question of how the presence of nucleosomal packing of DNA modifies carcinogen interaction at specific sites cannot be answered by studies on whole chromatin or bulk nucleosomes because of the heterogeneity of DNA sequences in the particles. This problem was circumvented by constructing nucleosomes that are homogenous in DNA-histone contact points. A cloned DNA fragment, containing a sea urchin 5S gene which precisely positions a histone octamer was employed. By using {sup 32}P end-labeled DNA and genotoxins that allow cleavage at sites of attack, the frequency of adduction at every susceptible nucleotide can be determined on sequencing gels. The small methylating agent dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and the bulky alkylating agent afatoxin B{sub 1}-dichloride (AFB{sub 1}-Cl{sub 2}) were used to probe the influence of DNA-histone interactions on DNA alkylation patterns in sequence-positioned core particles.

  11. Experimental challenge to nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae - Very early epoch of type II SNe -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D. M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Chen, A.; Cherubini, S.; Choi, S. H.; Hahn, I. S.; He, J. J.; Khiem, Le H.; Lee, C. S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Wanajo, S.; Janka, H.-T.

    2013-05-01

    Nucleosynthesis is one of the keys in studying the mechanism of core-collapse supernovae, which is an interesting challenge for modern science. The νp-process, which is similar to an explosive hydrogen burning process, has been proposed as the most probable process in the very early epoch of type II supernovae. Here, we discuss our experimental efforts for the νp-process, the first extensive direct measurements of the (α,p) reactions on bottle-neck proto-rich nuclei in light mass regions. Other challenges for the νp-process study are also discussed.

  12. Cu-Ni nano-alloy: mixed, core-shell or Janus nano-particle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guisbiers, Grégory; Khanal, Subarna; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Roque de La Puente, Jorge; José-Yacaman, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles like Cu-Ni are particularly attractive due to their magnetic and catalytic properties; however, their properties depend strongly on the structure of the alloy i.e. mixed, core-shell or Janus. To predict the alloy structure, this paper investigates the size and shape effects as well as the surface segregation effect on the Cu-Ni phase diagram. Phase maps have been plotted to determine the mixing/demixing behavior of this alloy according the particle shape. Cu-Ni nanoalloy can form a mixed particle or a Janus one depending on the synthesis temperature. Surface segregation is also considered and reveals a nickel surface-enrichment. Finally, this paper provides a useful roadmap for experimentalists.Bimetallic nanoparticles like Cu-Ni are particularly attractive due to their magnetic and catalytic properties; however, their properties depend strongly on the structure of the alloy i.e. mixed, core-shell or Janus. To predict the alloy structure, this paper investigates the size and shape effects as well as the surface segregation effect on the Cu-Ni phase diagram. Phase maps have been plotted to determine the mixing/demixing behavior of this alloy according the particle shape. Cu-Ni nanoalloy can form a mixed particle or a Janus one depending on the synthesis temperature. Surface segregation is also considered and reveals a nickel surface-enrichment. Finally, this paper provides a useful roadmap for experimentalists. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05739b

  13. Metal isotope and density functional study of the tetracarboxylatodicopper(II) core vibrations.

    PubMed

    Drozdzewski, Piotr; Brozyna, Anna

    2005-11-01

    Vibrational spectra of tetrakis(acetato)diaquadicopper(II) complex have been deeply examined in order to provide a detailed description of dynamics of [Cu(2)O(8)C(4)] core being a typical structural unit of most copper(II) carboxylates. Low frequency bands related to significant motions of metal atoms were detected by metal isotope substitution. Observed spectra and isotope shifts were reproduced in DFT calculations. For clear presentation of computed normal vibrations, a D(4h) symmetry approximation was successfully applied. Basing on observed isotope shifts and calculation results, all skeletal vibrations have been analyzed including normal mode with the largest Cu...Cu stretching amplitude assigned to Raman band at 178 cm(-1).

  14. Sorption selectivity of birnessite particle edges: a d-PDF analysis of Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) sorption by δ-MnO2 and ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    van Genuchten, Case M; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-08-10

    Birnessite minerals (layer-type MnO2), which bear both internal (cation vacancies) and external (particle edges) metal sorption sites, are important sinks of contaminants in soils and sediments. Although the particle edges of birnessite minerals often dominate the total reactive surface area, especially in the case of nanoscale crystallites, the metal sorption reactivity of birnessite particle edges remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the sorption selectivity of birnessite particle edges by combining Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) adsorption isotherms at pH 5.5 with surface structural characterization by differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) analysis. We compared the sorption reactivity of δ-MnO2 to that of the nanomineral, 2-line ferrihydrite, which exhibits only external surface sites. Our results show that, whereas Cd(ii) and Pb(ii) both bind to birnessite layer vacancies, only Pb(ii) binds extensively to birnessite particle edges. For ferrihydrite, significant Pb(ii) adsorption to external sites was observed (roughly 20 mol%), whereas Cd(ii) sorption was negligible. These results are supported by bond valence calculations that show comparable degrees of saturation of oxygen atoms on birnessite and ferrihydrite particle edges. Therefore, we propose that the sorption selectivity of birnessite edges follows the same order of that reported previously for ferrihydrite: Ca(ii) < Cd(ii) < Ni(ii) < Zn(ii) < Cu(ii) < Pb(ii). PMID:27183472

  15. Orbital Evolution of Particles and Stable Zones at the F Ring Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whizin, Akbar; Cuzzi, J.; Hogan, R.; Dobrovolskis, A.; Colwell, J.; Scargle, J.; Dones, L.; Showalter, M.

    2012-10-01

    The F ring of Saturn is often thought of as a ‘shepherded’ ring; however, it is closer to the more massive of its two shepherd satellites, Prometheus. Pandora, the outer satellite, is near a 3:2 mean motion resonance with larger Mimas causing periodic fluctuations in its orbit. The perturbations from the Saturnian satellites result in chaotic orbits throughout the F ring region (Scargle et al 1993 DPS 25, #26.04, Winter et al 2007 MNRAS 380, L54; 2010 A&A 523, A67). We follow the approach of Cuzzi et al. (abstract this meeting) in exploring zones of relative stability in the F ring region using a N-body Bulirsch-Stoer orbital integrator that includes the 14 main satellites of Saturn. We find relatively stable zones situated among the tightly packed Prometheus and Pandora resonances that we dub “anti-resonances.” At these locations ring particles have much smaller changes in their semi-major axes and eccentricities than particles outside of anti-resonance zones. We present high radial resolution simulations where we track the orbital evolution of 6000 test particles over time in a 200km region and find that the variance of the semi-major axes of particles in anti-resonances can be less than 1km over a period of 32 years, while just 5km away in either radial direction the variance can be tens of km’s. More importantly, particles outside of these stable zones can migrate into one due to chaotic orbits, but once they enter an anti-resonance zone they remain there. The anti-resonances act as long-lived sinks for ring particles and explain the location of the F ring core even though it is not in overall torque balance with the shepherd moons.

  16. Papain digestion of crude Trichoderma reesei cellulase: Purification and properties of cellobiohydrolase I and II core proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Brown, J.P.; Evans, B.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1992-12-01

    Papain digestion of a crude Trichoderma reesei cellulose preparation followed by gel filtration on a Superdex column resulted in the separation of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) I and II core proteins (cp). They were further purified to apparent homogeneity by chromatofocusing. N-terminal protein sequencing of the CBH II cp preparation confirmed its identity. A comparison of the catalytic activity and cellulose-binding ability of these core proteins was made. The major differences between them were the findings that CBH II cp possessed a sixfold higher specific activity toward p-nitrophenylcellobioside than the native CBH II preparation and still bound to microcrystalline cellulose, unlike CBH I cp. Neither CBH I cp nor CBH II cp had activity toward carboxymethylcellulose, but both were able to hydrolyze barley b-glucan. These data suggest that removal of the cellulose-binding domain and hinge region from CBH I and II have different effects on their properties.

  17. Papain digestion of crude Trichoderma reesei cellulase: Purification and properties of cellobiohydrolase I and II core proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Brown, J.P.; Evans, B.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    Papain digestion of a crude Trichoderma reesei cellulose preparation followed by gel filtration on a Superdex column resulted in the separation of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) I and II core proteins (cp). They were further purified to apparent homogeneity by chromatofocusing. N-terminal protein sequencing of the CBH II cp preparation confirmed its identity. A comparison of the catalytic activity and cellulose-binding ability of these core proteins was made. The major differences between them were the findings that CBH II cp possessed a sixfold higher specific activity toward p-nitrophenylcellobioside than the native CBH II preparation and still bound to microcrystalline cellulose, unlike CBH I cp. Neither CBH I cp nor CBH II cp had activity toward carboxymethylcellulose, but both were able to hydrolyze barley b-glucan. These data suggest that removal of the cellulose-binding domain and hinge region from CBH I and II have different effects on their properties.

  18. Fluorescence studies of cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins: I. Spectroscopy of allophycocyanin core complexes. II. Spectroscopy of two phycobilisome core insertion mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, P.

    1988-10-01

    The work described here relates to the mechanisms governing energy transfer in the core polypeptides of the cyanobacterial phycobilisome. Two approaches are represented: measurements were made on isolated core components for which a great deal of structural information is available; and the fluorescence properties were characterized for the whole phycobilisome from two phycobilisome core insertion mutants. 130 refs.

  19. The treatment of mixing in core helium burning models - II. Constraints from cluster star counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantino, Thomas; Campbell, Simon W.; Lattanzio, John C.; van Duijneveldt, Adam

    2016-03-01

    The treatment of convective boundaries during core helium burning is a fundamental problem in stellar evolution calculations. In the first paper of this series, we showed that new asteroseismic observations of these stars imply they have either very large convective cores or semiconvection/partially mixed zones that trap g modes. We probe this mixing by inferring the relative lifetimes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and horizontal branch (HB) from R2, the observed ratio of these stars in recent HST photometry of 48 Galactic globular clusters. Our new determinations of R2 are more self-consistent than those of previous studies and our overall calculation of R2 = 0.117 ± 0.005 is the most statistically robust now available. We also establish that the luminosity difference between the HB and the AGB clump is Δ log {L}_HB^AGB = 0.455 ± 0.012. Our results accord with earlier findings that standard models predict a lower R2 than is observed. We demonstrate that the dominant sources of uncertainty in models are the prescription for mixing and the stochastic effects that can result from its numerical treatment. The luminosity probability density functions that we derive from observations feature a sharp peak near the AGB clump. This constitutes a strong new argument against core breathing pulses, which broaden the predicted width of the peak. We conclude that the two mixing schemes that can match the asteroseismology are capable of matching globular cluster observations, but only if (i) core breathing pulses are avoided in models with a semiconvection/partially mixed zone, or (ii) that models with large convective cores have a particular depth of mixing beneath the Schwarzschild boundary during subsequent early-AGB `gravonuclear' convection.

  20. One-piece micropumps from liquid crystalline core-shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Eva-Kristina; Liang, Hsin-Ling; Kapernaum, Nadia; Giesselmann, Frank; Lagerwall, Jan; Zentel, Rudolf

    2012-11-01

    Responsive polymers are low-cost, light weight and flexible, and thus an attractive class of materials for the integration into micromechanical and lab-on-chip systems. Triggered by external stimuli, liquid crystalline elastomers are able to perform mechanical motion and can be utilized as microactuators. Here we present the fabrication of one-piece micropumps from liquid crystalline core-shell elastomer particles via a microfluidic double-emulsion process, the continuous nature of which enables a low-cost and rapid production. The liquid crystalline elastomer shell contains a liquid core, which is reversibly pumped into and out of the particle by actuation of the liquid crystalline shell in a jellyfish-like motion. The liquid crystalline elastomer shells have the potential to be integrated into a microfluidic system as micropumps that do not require additional components, except passive channel connectors and a trigger for actuation. This renders elaborate and high-cost micromachining techniques, which are otherwise required for obtaining microstructures with pump function, unnecessary.

  1. Strategies for crystallizing a chromatin protein in complex with the nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed

    Makde, Ravindra D; Tan, Song

    2013-11-15

    The molecular details of how chromatin factors and enzymes interact with the nucleosome are critical to understanding fundamental genetic processes including cell division and gene regulation. A structural understanding of such processes has been hindered by the difficulty in producing diffraction-quality crystals of chromatin proteins in complex with the nucleosome. We describe here the steps used to grow crystals of the 300-kDa RCC1 chromatin factor/nucleosome core particle complex that diffract to 2.9-Å resolution. These steps include both pre- and postcrystallization strategies potentially useful to other complexes. We screened multiple variant RCC1/nucleosome core particle complexes assembled using different RCC1 homologs and deletion variants, and nucleosomes containing nucleosomal DNA with different sequences and lengths, as well as histone deletion variants. We found that using RCC1 from different species produced different crystal forms of the RCC1/nucleosome complex consistent with key crystal packing interactions mediated by RCC1. Optimization of postcrystallization soaks to dehydrate the crystals dramatically improved the diffraction quality of the RCC1/nucleosome crystal from 5.0- to 2.9-Å resolution.

  2. Purification of infective bluetongue virus particles by immuno-affinity chromatography using anti-core antibody.

    PubMed

    Chand, Karam; Biswas, Sanchay K; Mondal, Bimalendu

    2016-03-01

    An immuno-affinity chromatography technique for purification of infective bluetongue virus (BTV) has been descried using anti-core antibodies. BTV anti-core antibodies (prepared in guinea pig) were mixed with cell culture-grown BTV-1 and then the mixture was added to the cyanogens bromide-activated protein-A Sepharose column. Protein A binds to the antibody which in turn binds to the antigen (i.e. BTV). After thorough washing, antigen-antibody and antibody-protein A couplings were dissociated with 4M MgCl2, pH6.5. Antibody molecules were removed by dialysis and virus particles were concentrated by spin column ultrafiltration. Dialyzed and concentrated material was tested positive for BTV antigen by a sandwich ELISA and the infectivity of the chromatography-purified virus was demonstrated in cell culture. This method was applied for selective capture of BTV from a mixture of other viruses. As group-specific antibodies (against BTV core) were used to capture the virus, it is expected that virus of all BTV serotypes could be purified by this method. This method will be helpful for selective capture and enrichment of BTV from concurrently infected blood or tissue samples for efficient isolation in cell culture. Further, this method can be used for small scale purification of BTV avoiding ultracentrifugation. PMID:26925450

  3. Sialic Acid-Imprinted Fluorescent Core-Shell Particles for Selective Labeling of Cell Surface Glycans.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Sudhirkumar; El-Schich, Zahra; Malakpour, Atena; Wan, Wei; Dizeyi, Nishtman; Mohammadi, Reza; Rurack, Knut; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette; Sellergren, Börje

    2015-11-01

    The expression of cell surface glycans terminating with sialic acid (SA) residues has been found to correlate with various disease states there among cancer. We here report a novel strategy for specific fluorescence labeling of such motifs. This is based on sialic acid-imprinted core-shell nanoparticles equipped with nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD) fluorescent reporter groups allowing environmentally sensitive fluorescence detection at convenient excitation and emission wavelengths. Imprinting was achieved exploiting a hybrid approach combining reversible boronate ester formation between p-vinylphenylboronic acid and SA, the introduction of cationic amine functionalities, and the use of an NBD-appended urea-monomer as a binary hydrogen-bond donor targeting the SA carboxylic acid and OH functionalities. The monomers were grafted from 200 nm RAFT-modified silica core particles using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linker resulting in a shell thickness of ca. 10 nm. The particles displayed strong affinity for SA in methanol/water mixtures (K = 6.6 × 10(5) M(-1) in 2% water, 5.9 × 10(3) M(-1) in 98% water, B(max) ≈ 10 μmol g(-1)), whereas binding of the competitor glucuronic acid (GA) and other monosaccharides was considerably weaker (K (GA) = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) in 98% water). In cell imaging experiments, the particles selectively stained different cell lines in correlation with the SA expression level. This was further verified by enzymatic cleavage of SA and by staining using a FITC labeled SA selective lectin. PMID:26414878

  4. Formation of Core-Shell Particles by Interfacial Radical Polymerization Initiated by a Glucose Oxidase-Mediated Redox System.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Raveesh; Tibbitt, Mark W; Anseth, Kristi S; Bowman, Christopher N

    2013-03-12

    A unique design paradigm to form core-shell particles based on interfacial radical polymerization is described. The interfacial initiation system is comprised of an enzymatic reaction between glucose and glucose oxidase (GOx) to generate hydrogen peroxide, which, in the presence of iron (Fe(2+)), generates hydroxyl radicals that initiate polymerization. Shell formation on prefabricated polymeric cores is achieved by localizing the initiation reaction to the interface of the core and a surrounding aqueous monomer formulation into which it is immersed. The interfacially confined initiation reaction is accomplished by incorporating one or more of the initiating species in the particle core and the remainder of the complementary initiating components in the surrounding media such that interactions and the resulting initiation reaction occur at the interface. This work is focused on engineering the reaction behavior and mass transport processes to promote interfacially confined polymerization, controlling the rate of shell formation, and manipulating the structure of the core-shell particle. Specifically, incorporating GOx in the precursor solution used to fabricate cores ranging from 100 to 200 μm, and the remainder of the complementary initiating components and monomer in the bulk solution prior to interfacial polymerization yielded shells whose average thickness was 20 μm after 4 min of immersion and at a bulk iron concentration of 12.5 mM. When the locations of glucose and GOx are interchanged, the average thickness of the shell was 15 or 100 μm for bulk iron concentrations of 45 and 12.5 mM, respectively. The initial locations of glucose and GOx also determine the degree of interpenetration of the core and the shell. Specifically, for a bulk iron concentration of 45 mM, the thickness of the interpenetrating layer averaged 12 μm when GOx was initially within the core, whereas no interpenetrating layer was observed when glucose was incorporated in the core. The

  5. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization. PMID:26948023

  6. Comprehensive computer model for magnetron sputtering. II. Charged particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Francisco J. Dew, Steven K.; Field, David J.

    2014-11-01

    Discharges for magnetron sputter thin film deposition systems involve complex plasmas that are sensitively dependent on magnetic field configuration and strength, working gas species and pressure, chamber geometry, and discharge power. The authors present a numerical formulation for the general solution of these plasmas as a component of a comprehensive simulation capability for planar magnetron sputtering. This is an extensible, fully three-dimensional model supporting realistic magnetic fields and is self-consistently solvable on a desktop computer. The plasma model features a hybrid approach involving a Monte Carlo treatment of energetic electrons and ions, along with a coupled fluid model for thermalized particles. Validation against a well-known one-dimensional system is presented. Various strategies for improving numerical stability are investigated as is the sensitivity of the solution to various model and process parameters. In particular, the effect of magnetic field, argon gas pressure, and discharge power are studied.

  7. The structure of nucleosomal core particles within transcribed and repressed gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    Studitsky, V M; Belyavsky, A V; Melnikova, A F; Mirzabekov, A D

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of histones along DNA in nucleosomal core particles within transcribed heat shock gene (hsp 70) region and repressed insertion within ribosomal genes of Drosophila was analysed by using protein-DNA crosslinking methods combined with hybridization tests. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the overall nucleosomal shape and the nucleosomal DNA size. The arrangement of histones along DNA and general compactness of nucleosomes were shown to be rather similar in transcriptionally active and inactive genomic regions. On the other hand, nucleosomes within transcriptionally active chromatin are characterized by a larger size of nucleosomal DNA produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion and some peculiarity in electrophoretic mobility. Images PMID:3144704

  8. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle

    PubMed Central

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. PMID:26474902

  9. Long-rising Type II supernovae from Palomar Transient Factory and Caltech Core-Collapse Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Fremling, C.; Migotto, K.; Gal-Yam, A.; Armen, S.; Duggan, G.; Ergon, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fransson, C.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Laher, R. R.; Leloudas, G.; Leonard, D. C.; Lunnan, R.; Masci, F. J.; Moon, D.-S.; Silverman, J. M.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Supernova (SN) 1987A was a peculiar hydrogen-rich event with a long-rising (~84 d) light curve, stemming from the explosion of a compact blue supergiant star. Only a few similar events have been presented in the literature in recent decades. Aims: We present new data for a sample of six long-rising Type II SNe (SNe II), three of which were discovered and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). Our aim is to enlarge this small family of long-rising SNe II, characterizing their differences in terms of progenitor and explosion parameters. We also study the metallicity of their environments. Methods: Optical light curves, spectra, and host-galaxy properties of these SNe are presented and analyzed. Detailed comparisons with known SN 1987A-like events in the literature are shown, with particular emphasis on the absolute magnitudes, colors, expansion velocities, and host-galaxy metallicities. Bolometric properties are derived from the multiband light curves. By modeling the early-time emission with scaling relations derived from the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC) models of MESA progenitor stars, we estimate the progenitor radii of these transients. The modeling of the bolometric light curves also allows us to estimate other progenitor and explosion parameters, such as the ejected 56Ni mass, the explosion energy, and the ejecta mass. Results: We present PTF12kso, a long-rising SN II that is estimated to have the largest amount of ejected 56Ni mass measured for this class. PTF09gpn and PTF12kso are found at the lowest host metallicities observed for this SN group. The variety of early light-curve luminosities depends on the wide range of progenitor radii of these SNe, from a few tens of R⊙ (SN 2005ci) up to thousands (SN 2004ek) with some intermediate cases between 100 R⊙ (PTF09gpn) and 300 R⊙ (SN 2004em). Conclusions: We confirm that long-rising SNe II with light-curve shapes closely

  10. Multiparticle Production in Particle and Nuclear Collisions. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, T.; Kinoshita, K.; Sumiyoshi, H.; Takagi, F.

    The dominant phenomenon in high-energy particle and nuclear collisions is multiple production of hadrons. This had attracted may physicists in 1950's, the period of the first remarkable development of particle physics. Multiparticle production was already observed in cosmic-ray experiments and expected to be explained as a natural consequence of the strong Yukawa interaction. Statistical and hydrodynamical models were then proposed by Fermi, Landau and others. These theories are still surviving even today as a prototype of modern ``fire-ball'' models. After twenty years, a golden age came in this field of physics. It was closely related to the rapid development of accelerator facilities, especially, the invention of colliding-beam machines which yield high enough center-of-mass energies for studying reactions with high multiplicity. Abundant data on final states of multiparticle production have been accumulated mainly by measuring inclusive cross sections and multiplicity distributions. In super high-energy bar{p}p collisions at CERN S pmacr pS Collider, we confirmed the increasing total cross section and found violations of many scaling laws which seemed to be valid at lower energies. This suggests a fundamental complexity of the multiparticle phenomena and offers new materials for further development of theoretical investigations. In the same period, studies of constituent (quark-gluon) structure of hadrons had also been develped. Nowadays, pysicists believe that the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the fundamental law of the hadronic world. Multiparticle dynamics should also be described by QCD. We have known that the hard-jet phenomena are well explained by the perturbative QCD. On the other hand, the soft processes are considered to be non-perturbative phenomena which have not yet been solved, and related to the mechanism of the color confinement and formation of strings or color-flux tubes. Multiparticle production would offer useful information on this

  11. H II REGIONS, EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS, AND STARLESS CORES IN SHARPLESS 2-157

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Williams, Jonathan P.; Pandian, Jagadheep D. E-mail: jpw@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2012-06-20

    We present arcsecond resolution 1.4 mm observations of the high-mass star-forming region, Sharpless 2-157, that reveal the cool dust associated with the first stages of star formation. These data are compared with archival images at optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths, and complemented with new arcsecond resolution mid-infrared data. We identify a dusty young H II region, numerous infrared sources within the cluster envelope, and four starless condensations. Three of the cores lie in a line to the south of the cluster peak, but the most massive one is right at the center and associated with a jumble of bright radio and infrared sources. This presents an interesting juxtaposition of high- and low-mass star formation within the same cluster which we compare with similar observations of other high-mass star-forming regions and discuss in the context of cluster formation theory.

  12. Influence of particle size and shell thickness of core-shell packing materials on optimum experimental conditions in preparative chromatography.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Krisztián; Felinger, Attila

    2015-08-14

    The applicability of core-shell phases in preparative separations was studied by a modeling approach. The preparative separations were optimized for two compounds having bi-Langmuir isotherms. The differential mass balance equation of chromatography was solved by the Rouchon algorithm. The results show that as the size of the core increases, larger particles can be used in separations, resulting in higher applicable flow rates, shorter cycle times. Due to the decreasing volume of porous layer, the loadability of the column dropped significantly. As a result, the productivity and economy of the separation decreases. It is shown that if it is possible to optimize the size of stationary phase particles for the given separation task, the use of core-shell phases are not beneficial. The use of core-shell phases proved to be advantageous when the goal is to build preparative column for general purposes (e.g. for purification of different products) in small scale separations.

  13. Soft-core particles freezing to form a quasicrystal and a crystal-liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Archer, A J; Rucklidge, A M; Knobloch, E

    2015-07-01

    Systems of soft-core particles interacting via a two-scale potential are studied. The potential is responsible for peaks in the structure factor of the liquid state at two different but comparable length scales and a similar bimodal structure is evident in the dispersion relation. Dynamical density functional theory in two dimensions is used to identify two unusual states of this system: a crystal-liquid state, in which the majority of the particles are located on lattice sites but a minority remains free and so behaves like a liquid, and a 12-fold quasicrystalline state. Both are present even for deeply quenched liquids and are found in a regime in which the liquid is unstable with respect to modulations on the smaller scale only. As a result, the system initially evolves towards a small-scale crystal state; this state is not a minimum of the free energy, however, and so the system subsequently attempts to reorganize to generate the lower-energy larger-scale crystals. This dynamical process generates a disordered state with quasicrystalline domains and takes place even when this large scale is linearly stable, i.e., it is a nonlinear process. With controlled initial conditions, a perfect quasicrystal can form. The results are corroborated using Brownian dynamics simulations. PMID:26274178

  14. Starvation Induces Proteasome Autophagy with Different Pathways for Core and Regulatory Particles*

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Kenrick A.; Mota-Peynado, Alina De-La; Vontz, Gabrielle; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is responsible for the degradation of many cellular proteins. If and how this abundant and normally stable complex is degraded by cells is largely unknown. Here we show that in yeast, upon nitrogen starvation, proteasomes are targeted for vacuolar degradation through autophagy. Using GFP-tagged proteasome subunits, we observed that autophagy of a core particle (CP) subunit depends on the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3, although a regulatory particle (RP) subunit does not. Furthermore, upon blocking of autophagy, RP remained largely nuclear, although CP largely localized to the cytosol as well as granular structures within the cytosol. In all, our data reveal a regulated process for the removal of proteasomes upon nitrogen starvation. This process involves CP and RP dissociation, nuclear export, and independent vacuolar targeting of CP and RP. Thus, in addition to the well characterized transcriptional up-regulation of genes encoding proteasome subunits, cells are also capable of down-regulating cellular levels of proteasomes through proteaphagy. PMID:26670610

  15. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/μm to 975 KeV/gmm with particle energy (on the cells) between 94 - 603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/μm. The inactivation cross-section (αi) and the action-section for mutant induction (αm) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 μm2 and 0.09 to 5.56 × 10-3 μm2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/μm. The mutagenicity (αm/αi) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 × 10-5 with the maximum value at 150 keV/μm. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  16. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  17. Chloramphenicol Mediates Superoxide Production in Photosystem II and Enhances Its Photodamage in Isolated Membrane Particles

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Ateeq Ur; Kodru, Sandeesha; Vass, Imre

    2016-01-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is an inhibitor of protein synthesis, which is frequently used to decouple photodamage and protein synthesis dependent repair of Photosystem II during the process of photoinhibition. It has been reported earlier that CAP is able to mediate superoxide production by transferring electrons from the acceptor side of Photosystem I to oxygen. Here we investigated the interaction of CAP with Photosystem II electron transport processes by oxygen uptake and variable chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Our data show that CAP can accept electrons at the acceptor side of Photosystem II, most likely from Pheophytin, and deliver them to molecular oxygen leading to superoxide production. In addition, the presence of CAP enhances photodamage of Photosystem II electron transport in isolated membrane particles, which effect is reversible by superoxide dismutase. It is concluded that CAP acts as electron acceptor in Photosystem II and mediates its superoxide dependent photodamage. This effect has potential implications for the application of CAP in photoinhibitory studies in intact systems. PMID:27092170

  18. Magnetically self-assembled SrFe12O19/Fe-Co core/shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X; Park, J; Hong, YK; Lane, AM

    2015-02-15

    Epitaxial growth to synthesize core/shell-structured materials is limited because large lattice mismatches are common between materials. Magnetically hard/soft, core/shell-structured materials can be potentially used for rare-earth free permanent magnets, but their synthesis presents a challenge. We report a wet chemistry method to synthesize core/shell structured particles consisting of a magnetically hard SrFe12O19 core and a soft Fe-Co shell, with a lattice mismatch of similar to 100%, which cannot be achieved by conventional epitaxial growth or other alternative methods. When decreasing the size of the magnetically soft Fe-Co nanoclusters to below 5 nm, we show that they can be magnetically attracted by the hard SrFe12O19 to form core/shell structured particles. An AC demagnetization experiment demonstrates the formation mechanism of the core/shell particles, and their magnetic hysteresis loop shows potential for use as rare-earth free permanent magnets. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Nuclear structure and the fate of core collapse (Type II) supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2014-08-01

    For a long time Gerry Brown and his collaborator Hans Bethe considered the question of the final fate of a core collapse (Type II) supernova. Recalling ideas from nuclear structure on Kaon condensate and a soft equation of state of the dense nuclear matter they concluded that progenitor stars with mass as low as 17-18M⊙ (including supernova 1987A) could collapse to a small mass black hole with a mass just beyond 1.5M⊙, the upper bound they derive for a neutron star. We discuss another nuclear structure effect that determines the carbon to oxygen ratio (C/O) at the end of helium burning. This ratio also determines the fate of a Type II supernova with a carbon rich progenitor star producing a neutron star and oxygen rich collapsing to a black hole. While the C/O ratio is one of the most important nuclear inputs to stellar evolution it is still not known with sufficient accuracy. We discuss future efforts to measure with gamma-beam and TPC detector of the C12(α,γ)O16 reaction that determines the C/O ratio in stellar helium burning.

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of the psbC gene of photosystem II: isolation and functional characterization of CP43-less photosystem II core complexes.

    PubMed

    Rögner, M; Chisholm, D A; Diner, B A

    1991-06-01

    Two mutants of Synechocystis PCC 6803 lacking the psbC gene product CP43 were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. Analysis of cells and thylakoid membranes of these mutants indicates that PS II reaction centers accumulate to a concentration of about 10% of that of WT cells. PS II core complexes isolated from mutants lacking the CP43 subunit show light-driven electron transfer from the secondary electron donor Z to the primary quinone electron acceptor QA with a quantum yield similar to that of wild type, indicating that CP43 is not required for binding or function of QA. The use of mutants for the removal of CP43 thus avoids the loss of QA function associated with biochemical extraction of CP43 from intact core complexes. Both absorbance and fluorescence emission maxima of the mutant complexes show a blue shift in comparison to the WT PS II core complex, indicating that the absorbance spectrum of CP43 is red-shifted relative to that of the remainder of the core complex. The antenna size of these CP43-less complexes is about 70% of that of WT, indicating that approximately 15 chlorophyll molecules are bound by CP43. The molecular mass of the PS II complex, including the detergent shell, shifts from 310 +/- 15 kDa in WT to 285 +/- 15 kDa in the CP43-less mutants.

  1. Core-shell-structured silica/polyacrylate particles prepared by Pickering emulsion: influence of the nucleation model on particle interfacial organization and emulsion stability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This work reports a new evidence of the versatility of silica sol as a stabilizer for Pickering emulsions. The organization of silica particles at the oil-water interface is a function of the nucleation model. The present results show that nucleation model, together with monomer hydrophobicity, can be used as a trigger to modify the packing density of silica particles at the oil-water interface: Less hydrophobic methylmethacrylate, more wettable with silica particles, favors the formation of core-shell-structured composite when the composite particles are prepared by miniemulsion polymerization in which monomers are fed in batch (droplet nucleation). By contrast, hydrophobic butylacrylate promotes the encapsulating efficiency of silica when monomers are fed dropwise (homogeneous nucleation). The morphologies of polyacrylate-nano-SiO2 composites prepared from different feed ratio of methylmethacrylate/butylacrylate (with different hydrophobicity) and by different feed processes are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results from SEM and TEM show that the morphologies of the as-prepared polyacrylate/nano-SiO2 composite can be a core-shell structure or a bare acrylic sphere. The stability of resulting emulsions composed of these composite particles is strongly dependent on the surface coverage of silica particles. The emulsion stability is improved by densely silica-packed composite particles. PMID:25313299

  2. Magnetic/luminescent core/shell particles synthesized by spray pyrolysis and their application in immunoassays with internal standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosev, Dosi; Nichkova, Mikaela; Dumas, Randy K.; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Liu, Kai; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2007-02-01

    Many types of fluorescent nanoparticles have been investigated as alternatives to conventional organic dyes in biochemistry; magnetic beads also have a long history of biological applications. In this work we apply flame spray pyrolysis in order to engineer a novel type of nanoparticle that has both luminescent and magnetic properties. The particles have magnetic cores of iron oxide doped with cobalt and neodymium and luminescent shells of europium-doped gadolinium oxide (Eu:Gd2O3). Measurements by vibrating sample magnetometry showed an overall paramagnetic response of these composite particles. Luminescence spectroscopy showed spectra typical of the Eu ion in a Gd2O3 host—a narrow emission peak centred near 615 nm. Our synthesis method offers a low-cost, high-rate synthesis route that enables a wide range of biological applications of magnetic/luminescent core/shell particles. Using these particles we demonstrate a novel immunoassay format with internal luminescent calibration for more precise measurements.

  3. Determination of and evidence for non-core-shell structure of particles containing black carbon using the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, Arthur J., III; Lewis, Ernie R.; Kleinman, Lawrence; Xu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Qi

    2012-03-01

    The large uncertainty associated with black carbon (BC) direct forcing is due, in part, to the dependence of light absorption of BC-containing particles on the position of the BC within the particle. It is predicted that this absorption will be greatest for an idealized core-shell configuration in which the BC is a sphere at the center of the particle whereas much less absorption should be observed for particles in which the BC is located near or on the surface. Such microphysical information on BC-containing particles has previously been provided only by labor-intensive microscopy techniques, thus often requiring that climate modelers make assumptions about the location of the BC within the particle that are based more on mathematical simplicity than physical reality. The present paper describes a novel analysis method that utilizes the temporal behavior of the scattering and incandescence signals from individual particles containing refractory BC (rBC) measured by the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to distinguish particles with rBC near the surface from those that have structures more closely resembling the core-shell configuration. This approach permits collection of a high-time-resolution data set of the fraction of rBC-containing particles with rBC near the surface. By application of this method to a plume containing tracers for biomass burning, it was determined that this fraction was greater than 60%. Such a data set will not only provide previously unavailable information to the climate modeling community, allowing greater accuracy in calculating rBC radiative forcing, but also will yield insight into aerosol processes.

  4. Replacement of tyrosine D with phenylalanine affects the normal proton transfer pathways for the reduction of P680+ in oxygen-evolving photosystem II particles from Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Jeans, C; Schilstra, M J; Ray, N; Husain, S; Minagawa, J; Nugent, J H A; Klug, D R

    2002-12-31

    We have probed the electrostatics of P680(+) reduction in oxygenic photosynthesis using histidine-tagged and histidine-tagged Y(D)-less Photosystem II cores. We make two main observations: (i) that His-tagged Chlamydomonas cores show kinetics which are essentially identical to those of Photosystem II enriched thylakoid membranes from spinach; (ii) that the microsecond kinetics, previously shown to be proton/hydrogen transfer limited [Schilstra et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 3974-3981], are significantly different in Y(D)-less Chlamydomonas particles when compared with both the His-tagged Chlamydomonas particles and the spinach membranes. The oscillatory nature of the kinetics in both Chlamydomonas samples is normal, indicating that S-state cycling is unaffected by either the histidine-tagging or the replacement of tyrosine D with phenylalanine. We propose that the effects on the proton-coupled electron transfers of P680(+) reduction in the absence of Y(D) are likely to be due to pK shifts of residues in a hydrogen-bonded network of amino acids in the vicinity of Y(Z). Tyrosine D is 35 A from Y(Z) and yet has a significant influence on proton-coupled electron transfer events in the vicinity of Y(Z). This finding emphasizes the delicacy of the proton balance that Photosystem II has to achieve during the water splitting process. PMID:12501204

  5. Characterization of a purified photosystem II-phycobilisome particle preparation from Porphyridium cruentum

    SciTech Connect

    Chereskin, B.M.; Clement-Metral, J.D.; Gantt, E.

    1985-01-01

    Detergent preparations isolated from thylakoids of the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, in a sucrose, phosphate, citrate, magnesium chloride medium consist of phycobilisomes and possess high rates of photosystem II activity. Characterization of these particles shows that the O/sub 2/-evolving activity is stable for several hours and the pH optimum is about 6.5 to 7.2. Response of the system to light, electron donors and acceptors, and inhibitors verify that the observed activity, measured both as O/sub 2/ evolution and 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol reduction, is due to photosystem II. Furthermore, photosystem II is functionally coupled to the phycobilisome in this preparation since green light, absorbed by phycobilisomes of P. cruentum, is effective in promoting both O/sub 2/ evolution and 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol reduction. Photosystem II activity declines when light with wavelengths shorter than 665 nm is removed. Both 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and atrazine inhibit photosystem II activity in this preparation, indicating that the herbicide binding site is a component of the photosystem II-phycobilisome particle. 24 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Design of Gas-phase Synthesis of Core-Shell Particles by Computational Fluid – Aerosol Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell particles preserve the bulk properties (e.g. magnetic, optical) of the core while its surface is modified by a shell material. Continuous aerosol coating of core TiO2 nanoparticles with nanothin silicon dioxide shells by jet injection of hexamethyldisiloxane precursor vapor downstream of titania particle formation is elucidated by combining computational fluid and aerosol dynamics. The effect of inlet coating vapor concentration and mixing intensity on product shell thickness distribution is presented. Rapid mixing of the core aerosol with the shell precursor vapor facilitates efficient synthesis of hermetically coated core-shell nanoparticles. The predicted extent of hermetic coating shells is compared to the measured photocatalytic oxidation of isopropanol by such particles as hermetic SiO2 shells prevent the photocatalytic activity of titania. Finally the performance of a simpler, plug-flow coating model is assessed by comparisons to the present detailed CFD model in terms of coating efficiency and silica average shell thickness and texture. PMID:23729817

  7. Zn(II) and Cu(II) adsorption and retention onto iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles: effects of particle aggregation and salinity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron oxyhydroxides are commonly found in natural aqueous systems as nanoscale particles, where they can act as effective sorbents for dissolved metals due to their natural surface reactivity, small size and high surface area. These properties make nanoscale iron oxyhydroxides a relevant option for the remediation of water supplies contaminated with dissolved metals. However, natural geochemical processes, such as changes in ionic strength, pH, and temperature, can cause these particles to aggregate, thus affecting their sorption capabilities and remediation potential. Other environmental parameters such as increasing salinity may also impact metal retention, e.g. when particles are transported from freshwater to seawater. Results After using synthetic iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles and nanoparticle aggregates in batch Zn(II) adsorption experiments, the addition of increasing concentrations of chloride (from 0.1 M to 0.6 M) appears to initially reduce Zn(II) retention, likely due to the desorption of outer-sphere zinc surface complexes and subsequent formation of aqueous Zn-Cl complexes, before then promoting Zn(II) retention, possibly through the formation of ternary surface complexes (supported by EXAFS spectroscopy) which stabilize zinc on the surface of the nanoparticles/aggregates. In batch Cu(II) adsorption experiments, Cu(II) retention reaches a maximum at 0.4 M chloride. Copper-chloride surface complexes are not indicated by EXAFS spectroscopy, but there is an increase in the formation of stable aqueous copper-chloride complexes as chloride concentration rises (with CuCl+ becoming dominant in solution at ~0.5 M chloride) that would potentially inhibit further sorption or encourage desorption. Instead, the presence of bidentate edge-sharing and monodentate corner-sharing complexes is supported by EXAFS spectroscopy. Increasing chloride concentration has more of an impact on zinc retention than the mechanism of nanoparticle aggregation, whereas

  8. North and equatorial Pacific Ocean circulation in the CORE-II hindcast simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yu-heng; Lin, Hongyang; Chen, Han-ching; Thompson, Keith; Bentsen, Mats; Böning, Claus W.; Bozec, Alexandra; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Chow, Chun Hoe; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Farneti, Riccardo; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Ilicak, Mehmet; Jung, Thomas; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; Patara, Lavinia; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Sui, Chung-Hsiung; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Yeager, Steve G.

    2016-08-01

    We evaluate the mean circulation patterns, water mass distributions, and tropical dynamics of the North and Equatorial Pacific Ocean based on a suite of global ocean-sea ice simulations driven by the CORE-II atmospheric forcing from 1963-2007. The first three moments (mean, standard deviation and skewness) of sea surface height and surface temperature variability are assessed against observations. Large discrepancies are found in the variance and skewness of sea surface height and in the skewness of sea surface temperature. Comparing with the observation, most models underestimate the Kuroshio transport in the Asian Marginal seas due to the missing influence of the unresolved western boundary current and meso-scale eddies. In terms of the Mixed Layer Depths (MLDs) in the North Pacific, the two observed maxima associated with Subtropical Mode Water and Central Mode Water formation coalesce into a large pool of deep MLDs in all participating models, but another local maximum associated with the formation of Eastern Subtropical Mode Water can be found in all models with different magnitudes. The main model bias of deep MLDs results from excessive Subtropical Mode Water formation due to inaccurate representation of the Kuroshio separation and of the associated excessively warm and salty Kuroshio water. Further water mass analysis shows that the North Pacific Intermediate Water can penetrate southward in most models, but its distribution greatly varies among models depending not only on grid resolution and vertical coordinate but also on the model dynamics. All simulations show overall similar large scale tropical current system, but with differences in the structures of the Equatorial Undercurrent. We also confirm the key role of the meridional gradient of the wind stress curl in driving the equatorial transport, leading to a generally weak North Equatorial Counter Current in all models due to inaccurate CORE-II equatorial wind fields. Most models show a larger

  9. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  10. The Electronic Structure of CdSe/CdS Core/Shell Seeded Nanorods: Type-I or Quasi-Type-II?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure of CdSe/CdS core/shell seeded nanorods of experimentally relevant size is studied using a combination of molecular dynamics and semiempirical pseudopotential techniques with the aim to address the transition from type-I to a quasi-type-II band alignment. The hole is found to be localized in the core region regardless of its size. The overlap of the electron density with the core region depends markedly on the size of the CdSe core. For small cores, we observe little overlap, consistent with type-II behavior. For large cores, significant core-overlap of a number of excitonic states can lead to type-I behavior. When electron–hole interactions are taken into account, the core-overlap is further increased. Our calculations indicate that the observed transition from type-II to type-I is largely due to simple volume effects and not to band alignment. PMID:24215466

  11. Internal stresses in pre-stressed micron-scale aluminum core-shell particles and their improved reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2015-09-07

    Dilatation of aluminum (Al) core for micron-scale particles covered by alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) shell was measured utilizing x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation for untreated particles and particles after annealing at 573 K and fast quenching at 0.46 K/s. Such a treatment led to the increase in flame rate for Al + CuO composite by 32% and is consistent with theoretical predictions based on the melt-dispersion mechanism of reaction for Al particles. Experimental results confirmed theoretical estimates and proved that the improvement of Al reactivity is due to internal stresses. This opens new ways of controlling particle reactivity through creating and monitoring internal stresses.

  12. Internal stresses in pre-stressed micron-scale aluminum core-shell particles and their improved reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2015-09-01

    Dilatation of aluminum (Al) core for micron-scale particles covered by alumina (Al2O3) shell was measured utilizing x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation for untreated particles and particles after annealing at 573 K and fast quenching at 0.46 K/s. Such a treatment led to the increase in flame rate for Al + CuO composite by 32% and is consistent with theoretical predictions based on the melt-dispersion mechanism of reaction for Al particles. Experimental results confirmed theoretical estimates and proved that the improvement of Al reactivity is due to internal stresses. This opens new ways of controlling particle reactivity through creating and monitoring internal stresses.

  13. The Influence of Ionic Environment and Histone Tails on Columnar Order of Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Berezhnoy, Nikolay V; Liu, Ying; Allahverdi, Abdollah; Yang, Renliang; Su, Chun-Jen; Liu, Chuan-Fa; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2016-04-26

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Nucleosome-nucleosome interactions are instrumental in chromatin compaction, and understanding NCP self-assembly is important for understanding chromatin structure and dynamics. Recombinant NCPs aggregated by multivalent cations form various ordered phases that can be studied by x-ray diffraction (small-angle x-ray scattering). In this work, the effects on the supramolecular structure of aggregated NCPs due to lysine histone H4 tail acetylations, histone H2A mutations (neutralizing the acidic patch of the histone octamer), and the removal of histone tails were investigated. The formation of ordered mainly hexagonal columnar NCP phases is in agreement with earlier studies; however, the highly homogeneous recombinant NCP systems used in this work display a more compact packing. The long-range order of the NCP columnar phase was found to be abolished or reduced by acetylation of the H4 tails, acidic patch neutralization, and removal of the H3 and H2B tails. Loss of nucleosome stacking upon removal of the H3 tails in combination with other tails was observed. In the absence of the H2A tails, the formation of an unknown highly ordered phase was observed. PMID:27119633

  14. Nucleosome Core Particle Disassembly and Assembly Kinetics Studied Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Noa Plavner; Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Masoud, Rula; Toth, Katalin; Langowski, Joerg; Nir, Eyal

    2015-10-20

    The stability of the nucleosome core particle (NCP) is believed to play a major role in regulation of gene expression. To understand the mechanisms that influence NCP stability, we studied stability and dissociation and association kinetics under different histone protein (NCP) and NaCl concentrations using single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation techniques. The method enables distinction between folded, unfolded, and intermediate NCP states and enables measurements at picomolar to nanomolar NCP concentrations where dissociation and association reactions can be directly observed. We reproduced the previously observed nonmonotonic dependence of NCP stability on NaCl concentration, and we suggest that this rather unexpected behavior is a result of interplay between repulsive and attractive forces within positively charged histones and between the histones and the negatively charged DNA. Higher NaCl concentrations decrease the attractive force between the histone proteins and the DNA but also stabilize H2A/H2B histone dimers, and possibly (H3/H4)2 tetramers. An intermediate state in which one DNA arm is unwrapped, previously observed at high NaCl concentrations, is also explained by this salt-induced stabilization. The strong dependence of NCP stability on ion and histone concentrations, and possibly on other charged macromolecules, may play a role in chromosomal morphology.

  15. Fabrication of quantum dot/silica core-shell particles immobilizing Au nanoparticles and their dual imaging functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Matsudo, Hiromu; Li, Ting-ting; Shibuya, Kyosuke; Kubota, Yohsuke; Oikawa, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tomohiko; Gonda, Kohsuke

    2016-03-01

    The present work proposes preparation methods for quantum dot/silica (QD/SiO2) core-shell particles that immobilize Au nanoparticles (QD/SiO2/Au). A colloid solution of QD/SiO2 core-shell particles with an average size of 47.0 ± 6.1 nm was prepared by a sol-gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of the QDs with an average size of 10.3 ± 2.1 nm. A colloid solution of Au nanoparticles with an average size of 17.9 ± 1.3 nm was prepared by reducing Au3+ ions with sodium citrate in water at 80 °C. Introduction of amino groups to QD/SiO2 particle surfaces was performed using (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (QD/SiO2-NH2). The QD/SiO2/Au particles were fabricated by mixing the Au particle colloid solution and the QD/SiO2-NH2 particle colloid solution. Values of radiant efficiency and computed tomography for the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution were 2.23 × 107 (p/s/cm2/sr)/(μW/cm2) at a QD concentration of 8 × 10-7 M and 1180 ± 314 Hounsfield units and an Au concentration of 5.4 × 10-2 M. The QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was injected into a mouse chest wall. Fluorescence emitted from the colloid solution could be detected on the skin covering the chest wall. The colloid solution could also be X-ray-imaged in the chest wall. Consequently, the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was found to have dual functions, i.e., fluorescence emission and X-ray absorption in vivo, which makes the colloid solution suitable to function as a contrast agent for dual imaging processes.

  16. The {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets in a pinhole camera with a regular multi-pinhole diaphragm

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, N A

    2000-08-31

    The {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets using a multi-pinhole regular diaphragm is proposed. The image reconstruction technique is described. The results of the {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets obtained at the 'Iskra-4' laser facility are reported. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  17. Modeling Lost-Particle Backgrounds in PEP-II Using LPTURTLE

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.; Barlow, R.; Kozanecki, W.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2005-05-17

    Background studies during the design, construction, commissioning, operation and improvement of BaBar and PEP-II have been greatly influenced by results from a program referred to as LPTURTLE (Lost Particle TURTLE) which was originally conceived for the purpose of studying gas background for SLC. This venerable program is still in use today. We describe its use, capabilities and improvements and refer to current results now being applied to BaBar.

  18. Coagulation of quartz particles in aqueous solutions of copper(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, I.; Pugh, R.J.

    1998-12-15

    The colloidal stability of quartz suspension was determined over a wide range of pH in aqueous copper nitrate where the state of Cu(II) is changed from mainly aqua ions and monohydroxyl complexes in the acid and neutral pH to polynuclear hydroxo complexes and colloidal precipitated copper hydroxide at higher pH. Two regions of instability were observed and in both cases the particles were shown to have low electrophoretic mobility. In the neutral pH region, the uptake of Cu(II) was sufficient to reduce the mobility of the particles to zero, while in the high-pH region evidence suggested coagulation between precipitated Cu(OH){sub 2} and the quartz particles. It was shown that in all cases the coagulation was reversible and that the uptake of Cu(II) was dependent on the uncharged surface hydroxyl density. Studies of the coagulation kinetics showed that extended time scales were involved (several minutes in the neutral pH region to tens of minutes at high pH).

  19. Rheological properties of magnetorheological suspensions based on core-shell structured polyaniline-coated carbonyl iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačík, M.; Pavlínek, V.; Sáha, P.; Švrčinová, P.; Filip, P.; Stejskal, J.

    2010-11-01

    The sedimentation caused by the high density of suspended particles used in magnetorheological fluids is a significant obstacle for their wider application. In the present paper, core-shell structured carbonyl iron-polyaniline particles in silicone oil were used as a magnetorheological suspension with enhanced dispersion stability. Bare carbonyl iron particles were suspended in silicone oil to create model magnetorheological suspensions of different loading. For a magnetorheological suspension of polyaniline-coated particles the results show a decrease in the base viscosity. Moreover, the polyaniline coating has a negligible influence on the MR properties under an external magnetic field B. The change in the viscoelastic properties of magnetorheological suspensions in the small-strain oscillatory shear flow as a function of the strain amplitude, the frequency and the magnetic flux density was also investigated.

  20. On the extent of size range and power law scaling for particles of natural carbonate fault cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billi, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    To determine the size range and both type and extent of the scaling laws for particles of loose natural carbonate fault rocks, six granular fault cores from Mesozoic carbonate strata of central Italy were sampled. Particle size distributions of twelve samples were determined by combining sieving and sedimentation methods. Results show that, regardless of the fault geometry, kinematics, and tectonic history, the size of fault rock particles respects a power law distribution across approximately four orders of magnitude. The fractal dimension ( D) of the particle size distribution in the analysed samples ranges between ˜2.0 and ˜3.5. A lower bound to the power law trend is evident in all samples except in those with the highest D-values; in these samples, the smallest analysed particles (˜0.0005 mm in diameter) were also included in the power law interval, meaning that the lower size limit of the power law distribution decreases for increasing D-values and that smallest particles start to be comminuted with increasing strain (i.e. increasing fault displacement and D-values). For increasing D-values, also the largest particles tends to decrease in number, but this evidence may be affected by a censoring bias connected with the sample size. Stick-slip behaviour is suggested for the studied faults on the basis of the inferred particle size evolutions. Although further analyses are necessary to make the results of this study more generalizable, the preliminary definition of the scaling rules for fault rock particles may serve as a tool for predicting a large scale of fault rock particles once a limited range is known. In particular, data from this study may result useful as input numbers in numerical models addressing the packing of fault rock particles for frictional and hydraulic purposes.

  1. Dust optical properties in antarctic ice cores: application of the Single Particle Extinction and Scattering (SPES) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potenza, Marco; Villa, Stefano; Sanvito, Tiziano; Albani, Samuel; Delmonte, Barbara; Maggi, Valter

    2015-04-01

    From the point of view of light scattering each particle is characterized by several parameters, the size being by far the most important in determining the amount of radiated power. Nevertheless, composition, internal structure, shape do slightly affect the way light is scattered, and in turn also prevent the possibility to extract the correct size. Recovering the whole information is of paramount difficulty, if not impossibile for single particles. A trade off can be obtained by introducing the optical thickness, i.e. the product of the size and the refractive index, which determines the optical properties. Here we focus at studying the optical thickness of dust particles from the EPICA Dome C ice core. We provide for the first time a direct measurement of dust optical parameters that is the most direct information needed by climate models, and highlight important differences among samples. The SPES method is named after its capability to access both the extinction cross section and the forward scattered field amplitude for each particle. This method is well working with extremely dilute suspensions, such as Antarctic ice core samples. The SPES method is based upon combined and simultaneous measurements of the power reduction of a laser beam in presence of the particle (extinction by definition) and the interference between the intense transmitted beam and the much fainter forward scattered wave (scattering). In such a way it is possible to access both the amplitude and phase of the scattered wave, which means both the real and imaginary parts of the complex field amplitude. This makes the difference with traditional approaches. We show some preliminary results from glacial and interglacial samples from the EPICA ice core and suggest a method to extract information which is important for the light scattering properties of the ensemble of dust particles contained in each sample.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Monodisperse Metallodielectric SiO2@Pt@SiO2 Core-Shell-Shell Particles.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Alexey; Lehmann, Hauke; Finsel, Maik; Klinke, Christian; Weller, Horst; Vossmeyer, Tobias

    2016-01-26

    Metallodielectric nanostructured core-shell-shell particles are particularly desirable for enabling novel types of optical components, including narrow-band absorbers, narrow-band photodetectors, and thermal emitters, as well as new types of sensors and catalysts. Here, we present a facile approach for the preparation of submicron SiO2@Pt@SiO2 core-shell-shell particles. As shown by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the first steps of this approach allow for the deposition of closed and almost perfectly smooth platinum shells onto silica cores via a seeded growth mechanism. By choosing appropriate conditions, the shell thickness could be adjusted precisely, ranging from ∼3 to ∼32 nm. As determined by X-ray diffraction, the crystalline domain sizes of the polycrystalline metal shells were ∼4 nm, regardless of the shell thickness. The platinum content of the particles was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and for thin shells consistent with a dense metal layer of the TEM-measured thickness. In addition, we show that the roughness of the platinum shell strongly depends on the storage time of the gold seeds used to initiate reductive platinum deposition. Further, using polyvinylpyrrolidone as adhesion layer, it was possible to coat the metallic shells with very homogeneous and smooth insulating silica shells of well-controlled thicknesses between ∼2 and ∼43 nm. After depositing the particles onto silicon substrates equipped with interdigitated electrode structures, the metallic character of the SiO2@Pt particles and the insulating character of the SiO2 shells of the SiO2@Pt@SiO2 particles were successfully demonstrated by charge transport measurements at variable temperatures.

  3. North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part II: Inter-annual to decadal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Kim, Who M.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Bleck, Rainer; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Gusev, Anatoly; Heimbach, Patrick; Howard, Armando; Ilicak, Mehmet; Jung, Thomas; Karspeck, Alicia R.; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Lu, Jianhua; Madec, Gurvan; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; Nurser, A. J. George; Pirani, Anna; Romanou, Anastasia; Salas y Mélia, David; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Sun, Shan; Treguier, Anne-Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Yashayaev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Simulated inter-annual to decadal variability and trends in the North Atlantic for the 1958-2007 period from twenty global ocean - sea-ice coupled models are presented. These simulations are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The study is Part II of our companion paper (Danabasoglu et al., 2014) which documented the mean states in the North Atlantic from the same models. A major focus of the present study is the representation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the participating models. Relationships between AMOC variability and those of some other related variables, such as subpolar mixed layer depths, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Labrador Sea upper-ocean hydrographic properties, are also investigated. In general, AMOC variability shows three distinct stages. During the first stage that lasts until the mid- to late-1970s, AMOC is relatively steady, remaining lower than its long-term (1958-2007) mean. Thereafter, AMOC intensifies with maximum transports achieved in the mid- to late-1990s. This enhancement is then followed by a weakening trend until the end of our integration period. This sequence of low frequency AMOC variability is consistent with previous studies. Regarding strengthening of AMOC between about the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, our results support a previously identified variability mechanism where AMOC intensification is connected to increased deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic, driven by NAO-related surface fluxes. The simulations tend to show general agreement in their temporal representations of, for example, AMOC, sea surface temperature (SST), and subpolar mixed layer depth variabilities. In particular, the observed variability of the North Atlantic SSTs is captured well by all models. These findings indicate that simulated variability and trends are primarily dictated by the atmospheric datasets which

  4. Collapse and fragmentation of magnetic molecular cloud cores with the Enzo AMR MHD code. II. Prolate and oblate cores

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of a large suite of three-dimensional models of the collapse of magnetic molecular cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.2 in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics approximation. The cloud cores are initially either prolate or oblate, centrally condensed clouds with masses of 1.73 or 2.73 M {sub ☉}, respectively. The radial density profiles are Gaussian, with central densities 20 times higher than boundary densities. A barotropic equation of state is used to represent the transition from low density isothermal phases, to high density optically thick phases. The initial magnetic field strength ranges from 6.3 to 100 μG, corresponding to clouds that are strongly to marginally supercritical, respectively, in terms of the mass to magnetic flux ratio. The magnetic field is initially uniform and aligned with the clouds' rotation axes, with initial ratios of rotational to gravitational energy ranging from 10{sup –4} to 0.1. Two significantly different outcomes for collapse result: (1) formation of single protostars with spiral arms, and (2) fragmentation into multiple protostar systems. The transition between these two outcomes depends primarily on the initial magnetic field strength, with fragmentation occurring for mass to flux ratios greater than about 14 times the critical ratio for prolate clouds. Oblate clouds typically fragment into several times more clumps than prolate clouds. Multiple, rather than binary, system formation is the general rule in either case, suggesting that binary stars are primarily the result of the orbital dissolution of multiple protostar systems.

  5. Self-assembled HCV core virus-like particles targeted and inhibited tumor cell migration and invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Xu, Xuehe; Jin, Aihui; Jia, Qunying; Zhou, Huaibin; Kang, Shuai; Lou, Yongliang; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin

    2013-09-01

    We used a baculovirus expression system to express fusion proteins of HCV core, RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide, and IFN-α2a fragments in Sf9 cells. Western blotting and electron microscopy demonstrate that HCV core, peptides RGD, and IFN-α2a fusion proteins assemble into 30 to 40 nm nano-particles (virus-like particles, VLPs). Xenograft assays show that VLPs greatly reduced tumor volume and weight with regard to a nontreated xenograft. Migration and invasion results show that VLPs can inhibit the migration and invasion of the breast cancer cells MDA-MB231. This study will provide theoretical and experimental basis for the establishment of safe and effective tumor-targeted drug delivery systems and clinical application of VLPs carrying cell interacting cargo.

  6. Functionality of In vitro Reconstituted Group II Intron RmInt1-Derived Ribonucleoprotein Particles

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Sánchez, Maria D.; García-Rodríguez, Fernando M.; Toro, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The functional unit of mobile group II introns is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) consisting of the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the excised intron RNA. The IEP has reverse transcriptase activity but also promotes RNA splicing, and the RNA-protein complex triggers site-specific DNA insertion by reverse splicing, in a process called retrohoming. In vitro reconstituted ribonucleoprotein complexes from the Lactococcus lactis group II intron Ll.LtrB, which produce a double strand break, have recently been studied as a means of developing group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. The Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 is an efficient mobile retroelement, the dispersal of which appears to be linked to transient single-stranded DNA during replication. The RmInt1IEP lacks the endonuclease domain (En) and cannot cut the bottom strand to generate the 3′ end to initiate reverse transcription. We used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce soluble and active RmInt1 IEP and reconstituted RNPs with purified components in vitro. The RNPs generated were functional and reverse-spliced into a single-stranded DNA target. This work constitutes the starting point for the use of group II introns lacking DNA endonuclease domain-derived RNPs for highly specific gene targeting methods. PMID:27730127

  7. Synthesis of TiO{sub 2} core/RuO{sub 2} shell particles using multistep ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stopic, Srecko; Friedrich, Bernd; Schroeder, Michael; Weirich, Thomas E.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} core/RuO{sub 2} shell submicron-particles were prepared via a sequential spray pyrolysis. • Spherical particles have the mean particle diameters between 200 and 400 nm. • This method is promising for synthesis of core–shell and core–multishell materials. - Abstract: Spherical submicron-particles with TiO{sub 2} core–RuO{sub 2} shell structure have been synthesized by employing sequential ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The particles have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and different transmission electron microscopy techniques. The quality of the core–shell structure of the particles has been confirmed by comparison of the experimental data with those generated on the basis of a hard sphere core–shell model. It has been found that the mixing of the Ru-containing aerosol with the TiO{sub 2} particle stream has a significant impact on the core–shell formation. The method introduced in this study can probably be applied for preparation of core–shell and core–multishell materials that are difficult to synthesize in a single step spray pyrolysis process.

  8. Decreased Photosystem II Core Phosphorylation in a Yellow-Green Mutant of Wheat Showing Monophasic Fluorescence Induction Curve.

    PubMed Central

    Giardi, M. T.; Kucera, T.; Briantais, J. M.; Hodges, M.

    1995-01-01

    In the present work we study the regulation of the distribution of the phosphorylated photosystem II (PSII) core populations present in grana regions of the thylakoids from several plant species. The heterogeneous nature of PSII core phosphorylation has previously been reported (M.T. Giardi, F. Rigoni, R. Barbato [1992] Plant Physiol 100: 1948-1954; M.T. Giardi [1993] Planta 190: 107-113). The pattern of four phosphorylated PSII core populations in the grana regions appears to be ubiquitous in higher plants. In the dark, at least two phosphorylated PSII core populations are always detected. A mutant of wheat (Triticum durum) that shows monophasic room-temperature photoreduction of the primary quinone electron acceptor of PSII as measured by chlorophyll fluorescence increase in the presence and absence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and by fluorescence upon flash illumination in intact leaves also lacks the usual distribution of phosphorylated PSII core populations. In this mutant, the whole PSII core population pattern is changed, probably due to altered threonine kinase activity, which leads to the absence of light-induced phosphorylation of CP43 and D2 proteins. The results, correlated to previous experiments in vivo, support the idea that the functional heterogeneity observed by fluorescence is correlated in part to the PSII protein phosphorylation in the grana. PMID:12228652

  9. Kinetic evaluation of new generation of column packed with 1.3 μm core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Guillarme, Davy

    2013-09-20

    The goal of this study was to critically evaluate a new generation of columns packed with 1.3 μm core-shell particles. The practical possibilities and limitations of this column technology were assessed and performance was compared with other reference columns packed with 1.7, 2.6 and 5 μm core-shell particles. The column efficiency achieved with 1.3 μm core-shell particles was indeed impressive, Hmin value of only 1.95 μm was achieved, this would correspond to an efficiency of more than 500,000 plates/m. The separation impedance of this column was particularly low, Emin=2000, mostly due to a reduced plate height, h of 1.50. Comparing the kinetic performance of 1.3 μm core-shell particles to that of other particle dimensions tested in this study revealed that the 1.3 μm material could provide systematically the shortest analysis time in a range of below 30,000 theoretical plates (N<30,000).Despite its excellent chromatographic performance, it was evident that this column suffers from the limitations of current instrumentation in terms of upper pressure limit and extra-column band broadening: (1) even at 1,200 bar, it was not possible to reach an optimal linear velocity showing minimal plate height value, due to the low permeability of this column (Kv=1.7×10(-11)cm(2)), and (2) for these short narrow bore columns packed with 1.3 μm core shell particles, which is mandatory for performing fast-analysis and preventing the influence of frictional heat on column performance in UHPLC, it was observed that the extra-column band broadening could have a major impact on the apparent kinetic performance. In the present work, significant plate count loss was noticed for retention factors of less than 5, even with the best system on the market (σ(2)ec=2 μL(2)). PMID:23953620

  10. Production of rotavirus core-like particles in Sf9 cells using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fabiana; Dias, Mafalda M; Vidigal, João; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Patrone, Marco; Teixeira, Ana P; Alves, Paula M

    2014-02-10

    A flexible Sf9 insect cell line was recently developed leveraging the recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) technology, which competes with the popular baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) in terms of speed to produce new proteins. Herein, the ability of this cell platform to produce complex proteins, such as rotavirus core-like particles, was evaluated. A gene construct coding for a VP2-GFP fusion protein was targeted to a pre-characterized high recombination efficiency locus flanked by flipase (Flp) recognition target sites and, after three weeks in selection, an isogenic cell population was obtained. Despite the lower cell specific productivities with respect to those obtained by baculovirus infection, the titers of VP2-GFP reached in shake flask batch cultures were comparable as a result of higher cell densities. To further improve the VP2-GFP levels from stable expression, analysis of exhausted medium was undertaken to design feeding strategies enabling higher cell densities as well as increased culture duration. The implementation of the best strategy allowed reaching 20 million cells per ml in bioreactor cultures; the integrity of the rotavirus core-like particles could be confirmed by electron microscopy. Overall, we show that this Sf9-Flp cell platform represents a valuable alternative to the BEVS for producing complex recombinant proteins, such as rotavirus core-like particles. PMID:24333128

  11. Development of polymer-biomolecule core-shell particles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthiwangcharoen, Nisaraporn

    Developing efficient strategies to introduce biomolecules around polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) is critical for targeted delivery of therapeutic or diagnostic agents. Although polymeric NPs have been well established, problems such as toxicity, stability, and immunoresistance remain potential concerns. The first part of this dissertation focuses on the development of nanosized targeted drug delivery vehicle in cancer chemotherapy. The vehicle was created by the self-assembly of folate-grafted filamentous bacteriophage M13 with poly(caprolactone- b-2-vinylpyridine) while doxorubicin, the antitumor drugs, was successfully loaded in the interior of the vehicles. These particles offer unique properties of being able to selectively target tumor cells while appearing to be safe and non-toxic to normal cells. Although they have shown great prospects in many biomedical applications, less is known about the interactions between biomolecules and polymers. The next part of the dissertation focuses on the self-assembly of proteins and polymers to create polymer-protein core-shell nanoparticles (PPCS-NPs). Several proteins with different isoelectric points and molecular weights were employed to demonstrate a versatility of our assembly method while a series of esterified derivatives of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) were synthesized to evaluate the interaction between proteins and polymers. Our data indicated that the polymers containing pyridine residues can successfully assemble with proteins, and the mechanism is mainly governed by hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions. This in turn helps retaining proteins' folding conformation and functionality, which are also demonstrated in the in vitro/in vivo cellular uptake of the PPCS-NPs in endothelial cells. The last part of the dissertation focuses on the self-assembly of the bienzyme-polymer NPs. Glucose oxidase (GOX) together with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were employed to construct bienzyme

  12. YOUNG STARLESS CORES EMBEDDED IN THE MAGNETICALLY DOMINATED PIPE NEBULA. II. EXTENDED DATA SET

    SciTech Connect

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Padovani, M.; Beltran, M. T.; Sanchez-Monge, A.; Busquet, G.; Morata, O.; Masque, J. M.; Estalella, R.; Alves, F. O.; Franco, G. A. P.

    2012-11-01

    The Pipe nebula is a massive, nearby, filamentary dark molecular cloud with a low star formation efficiency threaded by a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to its main axis. It harbors more than a hundred, mostly quiescent, very chemically young starless cores. The cloud is therefore a good laboratory to study the earliest stages of the star formation process. We aim to investigate the primordial conditions and the relation among physical, chemical, and magnetic properties in the evolution of low-mass starless cores. We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to map the 1.2 mm dust continuum emission of five new starless cores, which are in good agreement with previous visual extinction maps. For the sample of nine cores, which includes the four cores studied in a previous work, we derived an A {sub V} to N{sub H{sub 2}} factor of (1.27 {+-} 0.12) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -21} mag cm{sup 2} and a background visual extinction of {approx}6.7 mag possibly arising from the cloud material. We derived an average core diameter of {approx}0.08 pc, density of {approx}10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, and mass of {approx}1.7 M {sub Sun }. Several trends seem to exist related to increasing core density: (1) the diameter seems to shrink, (2) the mass seems to increase, and (3) the chemistry tends to be richer. No correlation is found between the direction of the surrounding diffuse medium magnetic field and the projected orientation of the cores, suggesting that large-scale magnetic fields seem to play a secondary role in shaping the cores. We also used the IRAM 30 m telescope to extend the previous molecular survey at 1 and 3 mm of early- and late-time molecules toward the same five new Pipe nebula starless cores, and analyzed the normalized intensities of the detected molecular transitions. We confirmed the chemical differentiation toward the sample and increased the number of molecular transitions of the 'diffuse' (e.g., the 'ubiquitous' CO, C{sub 2}H, and CS), 'oxo-sulfurated' (e.g., SO and

  13. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Magnetic Iron Oxide@SiO₂-Au@C Particles with Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Li, Xiangcun; Qi, Xinhong; Luo, Fan; He, Gaohong

    2015-05-12

    The preparation of nonspherical magnetic core-shell nanostructures with uniform sizes still remains a challenge. In this study, magnetic iron oxide@SiO2-Au@C particles with different shapes, such as pseduocube, ellipsoid, and peanut, were synthesized using hematite as templates and precursors of magnetic iron oxide. The as-obtained magnetic particles demonstrated uniform sizes, shapes, and well-designed core-shell nanostructures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis showed that the Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) of ∼6 nm were uniformly distributed between the silica and carbon layers. The embedding of the metal nanocrystals into the two different layers prevented the aggregation and reduced the loss of the metal nanocrystals during recycling. Catalytic performance of the peanut-like particles kept almost unchanged without a noticeable decrease in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in 8 min even after 7 cycles, indicating excellent reusability of the particles. Moreover, the catalyst could be readily recycled magnetically after each reduction by an external magnetic field.

  14. Modified equilibrium-dispersive model for the interpretation of the efficiency of columns packed on core-shell particle

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2011-01-01

    A modified Equilibrium Dispersive (ED) Model is proposed for the modeling of chromatographic processes in columns packed with shell-particle adsorbents and operated under very high pressures. This new model was validated on the basis of experimental results obtained with 2.1 mm x 150 mm columns packed with superficially porous 1.7 {micro}m Kinetex-C{sub 18} particles and with classical columns packed with 1.7 {micro}m BEH-C{sub 18} fully porous particles. The influence of the heat friction on the performance of these columns was analyzed by comparing the experimental and calculated peak profiles. Moreover a theoretical analysis of the influence the solid-core conductivity on the column efficiency was discussed.

  15. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles. Part II: Utilization for excess reactivity control.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.

    2010-07-01

    In high temperature reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this paper QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial excess reactivity of high temperature reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This mechanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the initial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, more neutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic high temperature reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  16. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles : Part II Utilization for excess reactivity control.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.

    2011-01-01

    In high temperature reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this paper QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial excess reactivity of high temperature reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This mechanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the initial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, more neutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic high temperature reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  17. An unusual chemical reactivity of Sm site adenosines strongly correlates with proper assembly of core U snRNP particles.

    PubMed

    Hartmuth, K; Raker, V A; Huber, J; Branlant, C; Lührmann, R

    1999-01-01

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNP) U1, U2, U4, and U5 contain a common set of eight Sm proteins that bind to the conserved single-stranded 5'-PuAU3-6GPu-3' (Sm binding site) region of their constituent U snRNA (small nuclear RNA), forming the Sm core RNP. Using native and in vitro reconstituted U1 snRNPs, accessibility of the RNA within the Sm core RNP to chemical structure probes was analyzed. Hydroxyl radical footprinting of in vitro reconstituted U1 snRNP demonstrated that riboses within a large continuous RNA region, including the Sm binding site, were protected. This protection was dependent on the binding of the Sm proteins. In contrast with the riboses, the phosphate groups within the Sm core site were accessible to modifying reagents. The invariant adenosine residue at the 5' end, as well as an adenosine two nucleotides downstream of the Sm binding site, showed an unexpected reactivity with dimethyl sulfate. This novel reactivity could be attributed to N7-methylation of the adenosine and was not observed in naked RNA, indicating that it is an intrinsic property of the RNA- protein interactions within the Sm core RNP. Further, this reactivity was observed concomitantly with formation of the Sm subcore intermediate during Sm core RNP assembly. As the Sm subcore can be viewed as the commitment complex in this assembly pathway, these results suggest that the peculiar reactivity of the Sm site adenosine bases may be diagnostic for proper assembly of the Sm core RNP. Consistent with this idea, a strong correlation was found between the unusual N7-A methylation sensitivity of the Sm core RNP and its ability to be imported into the nucleus of Xenopus laevis oocytes. PMID:9878394

  18. Iron(ii)-triazole core-shell nanocomposites: toward multistep spin crossover materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Xia; Qiu, Dan; Xi, Sai-Fei; Ding, Zheng-Dong; Li, Zaijun; Li, Yunxing; Ren, Xuehong; Gu, Zhi-Guo

    2016-06-28

    The first SCO@SCO core-shell nanomaterials have been synthesized by the step-by-step microemulsion method. The observed gyroscopic core-shell nanocomposites exhibit three-step spin crossover behaviour with thermal hysteresis at around room temperature. This offers an efficient and novel strategy for the development of multistable SCO materials. PMID:27263855

  19. Association of Coronal Mass Ejections and Type II Radio Bursts with Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cliver, E. W.; Reames, D. V.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    We report the association of impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and metric type II radio bursts. We identified 38 impulsive SEP events using the WIND/EPACT instrument and their CME association was investigated using white light data from SOHO/LASCO. We found that (1) at least ˜ 28--39 % of impulsive SEP events were associated with CMEs, (2) only 8--13 % were associated with metric type II radio bursts. The statistical properties of the associated CMEs were investigated and compared with those of general CMEs and CMEs associated with large gradual SEP events. The CMEs associated with impulsive SEP events were significantly slower (median speed of 613 kmps) and narrower (49 deg) than those of CMEs associated with large gradual SEP events (1336 kmps, 360 deg), but faster than the general CMEs (408 kmps).

  20. Correlating Type II and III Radio Bursts with Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledbetter, K.; Winter, L. M.; Quinn, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are high-energy particles, such as protons, which are accelerated at the Sun and speed outward into the solar system. If they reach Earth, they can be harmful to satellites, ionospheric communications, and humans in space or on polar airline routes. NOAA defines an SEP event as an occasion when the flux of protons with energies higher than 10 MeV exceeds 10 pfu (particle flux units) as measured by the GOES satellites in geosynchronous orbit. The most intense SEP events are associated with shocks, driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which accelerate particles as they move through the corona. However, very few CMEs result in SEP events. To determine what factors are most important in distinguishing the shock waves that will result in SEP acceleration toward Earth, we take into account several variables and perform a principal component analysis (PCA) to examine their correlations. First, we examine Type II radio bursts, which are caused by electrons accelerating in the same CME-driven shocks that can accelerate SEPs. Using data from the WAVES instrument on the WIND satellite, these Type II radio bursts, as well as the Type III bursts that often accompany them, can be characterized by slope in 1/f space and by intensity. In addition, local Langmuir waves detected by WIND, which are caused by electrons speeding through the plasma surrounding the satellite, can be an indicator of the magnetic connectivity between the active region and Earth. Finally, X-ray flares directly preceding the Type II burst are also taken into consideration in the PCA analysis. The accompanying figure illustrates an example of the WAVES solar radio bursts along with the GOES solar proton flux >= 10 MeV during the SEP event on April 11, 2013. Using PCA to determine which of these factors are most relevant to the onset, intensity, and duration of SEP events will be valuable in future work to predict such events. In total, we present the analysis of all type

  1. Particle identification using dE/dx in the Mark II detector at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarski, A.; Coupal, D.P.; Feldman, G.J.; Hanson, G.; Nash, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Rankin, P.; Van Kooten, R.

    1989-04-01

    The central drift chamber in the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider has been instrumented with 100-MHz Flash-ADCs. Pulse digitization provides particle identification through the measurement of average ionization loss in the chamber. We present the results of a study of system performance and outline the systematic corrections that optimize resolution. The data used are from a short test run at PEP with one-third of the FADCs installed and an extensive cosmic ray sample with the fully instrumented chamber. 11 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Chemical compositions of solid particles present in the Greenland NEEM ice core over the last 110,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyabu, Ikumi; Iizuka, Yoshinori; Fischer, Hubertus; Schüpbach, Simon; Gfeller, Gideon; Svensson, Anders; Fukui, Manabu; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder; Hansson, Margareta

    2015-09-01

    This study reports the chemical composition of particles present along Greenland's North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core, back to 110,000 years before present. Insoluble and soluble particles larger than 0.45 µm were extracted from the ice core by ice sublimation, and their chemical composition was analyzed using scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. We show that the dominant insoluble components are silicates, whereas NaCl, Na2SO4, CaSO4, and CaCO3 represent major soluble salts. For the first time, particles of CaMg(CO3)2 and Ca(NO3)2•4H2O are identified in a Greenland ice core. The chemical speciation of salts varies with past climatic conditions. Whereas the fraction of Na salts (NaCl + Na2SO4) exceeds that of Ca salts (CaSO4 + CaCO3) during the Holocene (0.6-11.7 kyr B.P.), the two fractions are similar during the Bølling-Allerød period (12.9-14.6 kyr B.P.). During cold climate such as over the Younger Dryas (12.0-12.6 kyr B.P.) and the Last Glacial Maximum (15.0-26.9 kyr B.P.), the fraction of Ca salts exceeds that of Na salts, showing that the most abundant ion generally controls the salt budget in each period. High-resolution analyses reveal changing particle compositions: those in Holocene ice show seasonal changes, and those in LGM ice show a difference between cloudy bands and clear layers, which again can be largely explained by the availability of ionic components in the atmospheric aerosol body of air masses reaching Greenland.

  3. Polystyrene Core-Silica Shell Particles with Defined Nanoarchitectures as a Versatile Platform for Suspension Array Technology.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Dominik; Gawlitza, Kornelia; Rurack, Knut

    2016-04-19

    The need for rapid and high-throughput screening in analytical laboratories has led to significant growth in interest in suspension array technologies (SATs), especially with regard to cytometric assays targeting a low to medium number of analytes. Such SAT or bead-based assays rely on spherical objects that constitute the analytical platform. Usually, functionalized polymer or silica (SiO2) microbeads are used which each have distinct advantages and drawbacks. In this paper, we present a straightforward synthetic route to highly monodisperse SiO2-coated polystyrene core-shell (CS) beads for SAT with controllable architectures from smooth to raspberry- and multilayer-like shells by varying the molecular weight of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), which was used as the stabilizer of the cores. The combination of both organic polymer core and a structurally controlled inorganic SiO2 shell in one hybrid particle holds great promises for flexible next-generation design of the spherical platform. The particles were characterized by electron microscopy (SEM, T-SEM, and TEM), thermogravimetry, flow cytometry, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption, offering comprehensive information on the composition, size, structure, and surface area. All particles show ideal cytometric detection patterns and facile handling due to the hybrid structure. The beads are endowed with straightforward modification possibilities through the defined SiO2 shells. We successfully implemented the particles in fluorometric SAT model assays, illustrating the benefits of tailored surface area which is readily available for small-molecule anchoring. Very promising assay performance was shown for DNA hybridization assays with quantification limits down to 8 fmol. PMID:27018430

  4. An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations: Hydrography and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilicak, Mehmet; Drange, Helge

    2016-04-01

    We compare the simulated Arctic Ocean in fifteen global ocean-sea ice models in the framework of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments, phase II (CORE-II). Most of these models are the ocean and sea-ice components of the coupled climate models used in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) experiments. We mainly focus on the hydrography of the Arctic interior, the state of Atlantic Water layer and heat and volume transports at the gateways of the Davis Strait, the Bering Strait, the Fram Strait and the Barents Sea Opening. We found that there is a large spread in temperature in the Arctic Ocean between the models, and generally large differences compared to the observed temperature at intermediate depths. Warm bias models have a strong temperature anomaly of inflow of the Atlantic Water entering the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait. Another process that is not represented accurately in the CORE-II models is the formation of cold and dense water, originating on the eastern shelves. In the cold bias models, excessive cold water forms in the Barents Sea and spreads into the Arctic Ocean through the St. Anna Through. There is a large spread in the simulated mean heat and volume transports through the Fram Strait and the Barents Sea Opening. The models agree more on the decadal variability, to a large degree dictated by the common atmospheric forcing. We conclude that the CORE-II model study helps us to understand the crucial biases in the Arctic Ocean. The current coarse resolution state-of-the-art ocean models need to be improved in accurate representation of the Atlantic Water inflow into the Arctic and density currents coming from the shelves.

  5. Mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles during infiltration: A core-scale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdalani, Samer; Michel, Eric; di Pietro, Liliana; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Rousseau, Marine

    2007-05-01

    Understanding particle movement in soils is a major concern for both geotechnics and soil physics with regard to environmental protection and water resources management. This paper describes a model for mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles through structured soils. The approach combines a kinematic-dispersive wave model for preferential water flow with a convective-dispersive equation subject to a source/sink term for particle transport and mobilization. Particle detachment from macropore walls is considered during both the steady and transient water flow regimes. It is assumed to follow first-order kinetics with a varying detachment efficiency, which depends on the history of the detachment process. Estimates of model parameters are obtained by comparing simulations with experimental particle breakthrough curves obtained during infiltrations through undisturbed soil columns. Both water flux and particle concentrations are satisfactorily simulated by the model. Particle mobilization parameters favoring both attachment and detachment of particles are related to the incoming solution ionic strength by a Fermi-type function.

  6. Fe(I)-mediated reductive cleavage and coupling of CO2: An FeII(μ-O,μ -CO)FeII core

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Connie C.; Saouma, Caroline T.; Day, Michael W.; Peters, Jonas C.

    2008-01-01

    THF solutions of a new iron(I) source, “[PhBPCH2Cy3]Fe” ([PhBPCH2Cy3] = [PhBP(CH2P(CH2Cy)2)3]−), effect the reductive cleavage of CO2 via O-atom transfer at ambient temperature. The dominant reaction pathway is bimetallic and leads to the formation of a structurally unprecedented diiron FeII(μ-O)(μ-CO)FeII core. X-ray data are also available to suggest that bimetallic reductive CO2 coupling to generate oxalate occurs as a minor reaction pathway. These initial observations forecast a diverse reaction landscape between CO2 and iron (I) synthons. PMID:17199260

  7. 3D map of the plant photosystem II supercomplex obtained by cryoelectron microscopy and single particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Nield, J; Orlova, E V; Morris, E P; Gowen, B; van Heel, M; Barber, J

    2000-01-01

    Here we describe the first 3D structure of the photosystem II (PSII) supercomplex of higher plants, constructed by single particle analysis of images obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This large multisubunit membrane protein complex functions to absorb light energy and catalyze the oxidation of water and reduction of plastoquinone. The resolution of the 3D structure is 24 A and emphasizes the dimeric nature of the supercomplex. The extrinsic proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) are readily observed as a tetrameric cluster bound to the lumenal surface. By considering higher resolution data, obtained from electron crystallography, it has been possible to relate the binding sites of the OEC proteins with the underlying intrinsic membrane subunits of the photochemical reaction center core. The model suggests that the 33 kDa OEC protein is located towards the CP47/D2 side of the reaction center but is also positioned over the C-terminal helices of the D1 protein including its CD lumenal loop. In contrast, the model predicts that the 23/17 kDa OEC proteins are positioned at the N-terminus of the D1 protein incorporating the AB lumenal loop of this protein and two other unidentified transmembrane helices. Overall the 3D model represents a significant step forward in revealing the structure of the photosynthetic OEC whose activity is required to sustain the aerobic atmosphere on our planet.

  8. Influence of core size on the upconversion luminescence properties of spherical Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2} particles with core-shell structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Kezhi; Liu, Zhenyu; Liu, Ye; Song, Weiye; Qin, Weiping

    2013-11-14

    Spherical SiO{sub 2} particles with different sizes (30, 80, 120, and 180 nm) have been coated with Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} layers by a heterogeneous precipitation method, leading to the formation of core-shell structural Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2} particles. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, upconversion (UC) emission spectra, and fluorescent dynamical analysis. The obtained core-shell particles have perfect spherical shape with narrow size distribution. Under the excitation of 980 nm diode laser, the core-shell samples showed size-dependent upconversion luminescence (UCL) properties. The inner SiO{sub 2} cores in core-shell samples were proved to have limited effect on the total UCL intensities of Er{sup 3+} ions. The UCL intensities of core-shell particles were demonstrated much higher than the values obtained in pure Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} with the same phosphor volume. The dependence of the specific area of a UCL shell on the size of its inner SiO{sub 2} particle was calculated and analyzed for the first time. It was confirmed that the surface effect came from the outer surfaces of emitting shells is dominant in influencing the UCL property in the core-shell samples. Three-photon UC processes for the green emissions were observed in the samples with small sizes of SiO{sub 2} cores. The results of dynamical analysis illustrated that more nonradiative relaxation occurred in the core-shell samples with smaller SiO{sub 2} core sizes.

  9. Study of carbonyl iron/poly(butylcyanoacrylate) (core/shell) particles as anticancer drug delivery systems Loading and release properties.

    PubMed

    Arias, José L; Linares-Molinero, Fernando; Gallardo, Visitación; Delgado, Angel V

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a detailed investigation of the capabilities of carbonyl iron/poly(butylcyanoacrylate) (core/shell) particles for the loading and release of 5-Fluorouracil and Ftorafur. The anionic polymerization procedure, used to obtain poly(alkylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles for drug delivery, was followed in the synthesis of the composite particles, except that the polymerization medium was a carbonyl iron suspension. The influence of the two mechanisms of drug incorporation (entrapment in the polymeric network and surface adsorption) on the drug loading and release profiles were investigated by means of spectrophotometric and electrophoretic measurements. The optimum loading conditions were ascertained and used to perform drug release evaluations. Among the factors affecting drug loading, both pH and drug concentration were found to be the main determining ones. For both drugs, the release profile was found to be biphasic, since the drug adsorbed on the surface was released rather rapidly (close to 100% in 1h), whereas the drug incorporated in the polymer matrix required between 10 and 20h to be fully released. The kinetics of the drug release from the core/shell particles was mainly controlled by the pH of the release medium, the type of drug incorporation, and the amount of drug loaded.

  10. Mechanism of translesion DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase II. Comparison to DNA polymerases I and III core.

    PubMed

    Paz-Elizur, T; Takeshita, M; Goodman, M; O'Donnell, M; Livneh, Z

    1996-10-01

    Bypass synthesis by DNA polymerase II was studied using a synthetic 40-nucleotide-long gapped duplex DNA containing a site-specific abasic site analog, as a model system for mutagenesis associated with DNA lesions. Bypass synthesis involved a rapid polymerization step terminating opposite the nucleotide preceding the lesion, followed by a slow bypass step. Bypass was found to be dependent on polymerase and dNTP concentrations, on the DNA sequence context, and on the size of the gap. A side-by-side comparison of DNA polymerases I, II, and III core revealed the following. 1) Each of the three DNA polymerases bypassed the abasic site analog unassisted by other proteins. 2) In the presence of physiological-like salt conditions, only DNA polymerase II bypassed the lesion. 3) Bypass by each of the three DNA polymerases increased dramatically in the absence of proofreading. These results support a model (Tomer, G., Cohen-Fix, O. , O'Donnell, M., Goodman, M. and Livneh, Z. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 93, 1376-1380) by which the RecA, UmuD, and UmuC proteins are accessory factors rather than being absolutely required for the core mutagenic bypass reaction in induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

  11. TRIGGERING COLLAPSE OF THE PRESOLAR DENSE CLOUD CORE AND INJECTING SHORT-LIVED RADIOISOTOPES WITH A SHOCK WAVE. II. VARIED SHOCK WAVE AND CLOUD CORE PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A. E-mail: keiser@dtm.ciw.edu

    2013-06-10

    A variety of stellar sources have been proposed for the origin of the short-lived radioisotopes that existed at the time of the formation of the earliest solar system solids, including Type II supernovae (SNe), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and super-AGB stars, and Wolf-Rayet star winds. Our previous adaptive mesh hydrodynamics models with the FLASH2.5 code have shown which combinations of shock wave parameters are able to simultaneously trigger the gravitational collapse of a target dense cloud core and inject significant amounts of shock wave gas and dust, showing that thin SN shocks may be uniquely suited for the task. However, recent meteoritical studies have weakened the case for a direct SN injection to the presolar cloud, motivating us to re-examine a wider range of shock wave and cloud core parameters, including rotation, in order to better estimate the injection efficiencies for a variety of stellar sources. We find that SN shocks remain as the most promising stellar source, though planetary nebulae resulting from AGB star evolution cannot be conclusively ruled out. Wolf-Rayet (WR) star winds, however, are likely to lead to cloud core shredding, rather than to collapse. Injection efficiencies can be increased when the cloud is rotating about an axis aligned with the direction of the shock wave, by as much as a factor of {approx}10. The amount of gas and dust accreted from the post-shock wind can exceed that injected from the shock wave, with implications for the isotopic abundances expected for a SN source.

  12. Particle identification performance of the prototype aerogel RICH counter for the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, S.; Adachi, I.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kakuno, H.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kumita, T.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Šantelj, L.; Seljak, A.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Tahirovic, E.; Yusa, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a new type of particle identification device, called an aerogel ring imaging Cherenkov (ARICH) counter, for the Belle II experiment. It uses silica aerogel tiles as Cherenkov radiators. For detection of Cherenkov photons, hybrid avalanche photo-detectors (HAPDs) are used. The designed HAPD has a high sensitivity to single photons under a strong magnetic field. We have confirmed that the HAPD provides high efficiency for single-photon detection even after exposure to neutron and γ -ray radiation that exceeds the levels expected in the 10-year Belle II operation. In order to confirm the basic performance of the ARICH counter system, we carried out a beam test at the using a prototype of the ARICH counter with six HAPD modules. The results are in agreement with our expectations and confirm the suitability of the ARICH counter for the Belle II experiment. Based on the in-beam performance of the device, we expect that the identification efficiency at 3.5 GeV/c is 97.4% and 4.9% for pions and kaons, respectively. This paper summarizes the development of the HAPD for the ARICH and the evaluation of the performance of the prototype ARICH counter built with the final design components.

  13. A unified N-body and statistical treatment of stellar dynamics. I - The hybrid code. II - Applications to globular cluster cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. L. W.; Lightman, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    A unified N-body and statistical treatment of stellar dynamics is developed and applied to the late stages of core collapse and early stages of post collapse evolution in globular clusters. A 'hybrid' computer code is joined to a direct N-body code which is used to calculate exactly the behavior of particles in the inner spatial region, and the combination is used to follow particles statistically in the outer spatial region. A transition zone allows the exchange of particles and energy between the two regions. The main application results include: formation of a hard central binary system, reversal of core collapse and expansion due to the heat input from this binary, ejection of the binary from the core, and recollapse of the core; density profiles that form a one-parameter sequence during the core oscillations; and indications that these oscillations will eventually cease.

  14. Models of molecular cloud cores. II. Multitransition study of CS-34

    SciTech Connect

    Mundy, L.G.; Evans, N.J.,II; Snell, R.L.; Goldsmith, P.F.; Bally, J.

    1986-07-01

    The dense cores embedded in the M17, S140 and NGC 2024 molecular clouds are mapped in the J = 5-4, J = 3-2, and J = 2-1 transitions of CS-34, and these lines are found to be a factor of 3-4 weaker, and 25 percent narrower, than the CS lines mapped in these cores by Snell et al. (1984). The data are well fitted by spherical LGV models for the excitation, and the excellent correlation between the CS-34 and CS column densities corroborates the absence of a systematic increase in the gas density with decreasing core radius found by Snell et al. Though the CS/CS-34 column density ratio is 9-17, rather than the terrestrial value of 22.5, the column density relationship is linear. The data support of a clump model in which the column density distribution in the core is determined by the volume filling factor of clumps with high, fairly uniform gas density, and it is suggested that the dense gas in the data represents the dominant component of the core gas. 22 references.

  15. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. II. IONIZATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2012-07-20

    We study the effect that non-equilibrium chemistry in dynamical models of collapsing molecular cloud cores has on measurements of the magnetic field in these cores, the degree of ionization, and the mean molecular weight of ions. We find that OH and CN, usually used in Zeeman observations of the line-of-sight magnetic field, have an abundance that decreases toward the center of the core much faster than the density increases. As a result, Zeeman observations tend to sample the outer layers of the core and consistently underestimate the core magnetic field. The degree of ionization follows a complicated dependence on the number density at central densities up to 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} for magnetic models and 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} in non-magnetic models. At higher central densities, the scaling approaches a power law with a slope of -0.6 and a normalization which depends on the cosmic-ray ionization rate {zeta} and the temperature T as ({zeta}T){sup 1/2}. The mean molecular weight of ions is systematically lower than the usually assumed value of 20-30, and, at high densities, approaches a value of 3 due to the asymptotic dominance of the H{sup +}{sub 3} ion. This significantly lower value implies that ambipolar diffusion operates faster.

  16. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners. PMID:19653995

  17. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners.

  18. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  19. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  20. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners.

  1. An unusual 32-membered copper(II) metallomacrocube based on a Cu4O3X cubic core: photocatalytic, electrocatalytic, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sisi; Jia, Fei; Lu, Liping; Li, Zhongping; Zhang, Shuo

    2016-03-21

    The first 32-membered Cu(II) cluster with a big cubic structure consisting of eight small cubic cores exhibited a high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B (∼99%) dye within 15 min under UV light irradiation, effective electrocatalytic activity for nitrite reduction and strong antiferromagnetic interactions among the Cu(II) centers.

  2. Topological invariants for interacting topological insulators. II. Breakdown of single-particle Green's function formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuan-Yao; Wu, Han-Qing; Meng, Zi Yang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2016-05-01

    Topological phase transitions in free fermion systems can be characterized by the closing of single-particle gap and the change in topological invariants. However, in the presence of electronic interactions, topological phase transitions can be more complicated. In paper I of this series [Phys. Rev. B 93, 195163 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.195163], we have proposed an efficient scheme to evaluate the topological invariants based on the single-particle Green's function formalism. Here, in paper II, we demonstrate several interaction-driven topological phase transitions (TPTs) in two-dimensional (2D) interacting topological insulators (TIs) via large-scale quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, based on the scheme of evaluating topological invariants presented in paper I. Across these transitions, the defining symmetries of the TIs have been neither explicitly nor spontaneously broken. In the first two models, the topological invariants calculated from the Green's function formalism succeed in characterizing the topologically distinct phases and identifying interaction-driven TPTs. However, in the other two models, we find that the single-particle gap does not close and the topological invariants constructed from the single-particle Green's function acquire no change across the TPTs. Unexpected breakdown of the Green's function formalism in constructing the topological invariants is thus discovered. We thence classify the topological phase transitions in interacting TIs into two categories in practical computation: Those that have noninteracting correspondence can be characterized successfully by the topological invariants constructed from the Green's functions, while for the others that do not have noninteracting correspondence, the Green's function formalism experiences a breakdown, but more interesting and exciting phenomena, such as emergent collective critical modes at the transition, arise. Discussion on the success and breakdown of topological invariants

  3. Synthesis of Co/MFe(2)O(4) (M = Fe, Mn) Core/Shell Nanocomposite Particles.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sheng; Xie, Jin; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-01-01

    Monodispersed cobalt nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable size (8-14 nm) have been synthesized using thermal decomposition of dicobaltoctacarbonyl in organic solvent. The as-synthesized high magnetic moment (125 emu/g) Co NPs are dispersible in various organic solvents, and can be easily transferred into aqueous phase by surface modification using phospholipids. However, the modified hydrophilic Co NPs are not stable as they are quickly oxidized, agglomerated in buffer. Co NPs are stabilized by coating the MFe(2)O(4) (M = Fe, Mn) ferrite shell. Core/shell structured bimagnetic Co/MFe(2)O(4) nanocomposites are prepared with tunable shell thickness (1-5 nm). The Co/MFe(2)O(4) nanocomposites retain the high magnetic moment density from the Co core, while gaining chemical and magnetic stability from the ferrite shell. Comparing to Co NPs, the nanocomposites show much enhanced stability in buffer solution at elevated temperatures, making them promising for biomedical applications.

  4. South Dakota Statewide Core Curriculum, Career Ladder and Challenge System: Volumes I and II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1975

    The two volume final report of the South Dakota Statewide Core Curriculum, Career Ladder, and Challenge System Project, coordinating associated health and nursing education on a statewide basis to achieve a more systematic production and utilization of health manpower, is presented. Volume 1 includes five chapters: (1) and (2) outlining funding…

  5. Core II Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs. Units G-L.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This second volume of a 2-volume curriculum guide contains 12 problem areas selected as suggested areas of study to be included in a core curriculum for 10th-grade or second-year students enrolled in a metropolitan agriculture program. The 12 problem areas are divided into 5 units: Growing and Managing Horticultural Crops (4 problem areas),…

  6. Integration of Skills and Competencies in the Missouri Marketing Education Core Curriculum. Section II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhland, Sheila K.; Wilkinson, Richard F.

    This publication contains teaching activities for the Fundamentals of Marketing and Advanced Marketing curriculum. Chapter 1 presents an alignment of the marketing education core competencies within the nine curriculum units for Fundamentals of Marketing and Advanced Marketing as they relate to the basic academic skills, advanced academic skills,…

  7. Core II Materials for Rural Agriculture Programs. Units E-H.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This curriculum guide includes teaching packets for 21 problem areas to be included in a core curriculum for 10th grade students enrolled in a rural agricultural program. Covered in the four units included in this volume are crop science (harvesting farm crops and growing small grains); soil science and conservation of natural resources…

  8. Core II Materials for Rural Agricultural Programs. Units A-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This curriculum guide includes teaching packets for 21 problem areas to be included in a core curriculum for 10th-grade students enrolled in a rural agricultural program. Covered in the four units included in this volume are orientation to agricultural occupations (orientation to vocational agricultural course and developing effective study…

  9. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the core-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aznar-Siguán, G.; García-Berro, E.; Lorén-Aguilar, P.; Soker, N.; Kashi, A.

    2015-07-01

    The core-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae involves the merger of the hot core of an asymptotic giant branch star and a white dwarf, and might contribute a non-negligible fraction of all thermonuclear supernovae. Despite its potential interest, very few studies, and based on only crude simplifications, have been devoted to investigate this possible scenario, compared with the large efforts invested to study some other scenarios. Here we perform the first three-dimensional simulations of the merger phase, and find that this process can lead to the formation of a massive white dwarf, as required by this scenario. We consider two situations, according to the mass of the circumbinary disc formed around the system during the final stages of the common envelope phase. If the disc is massive enough, the stars merge on a highly eccentric orbit. Otherwise, the merger occurs after the circumbinary disc has been ejected and gravitational wave radiation has brought the stars close enough for the secondary to overflow its Roche lobe radius. Not surprisingly, the overall characteristics of the merger remnants are similar to those found for the double-degenerate scenario, independently of the very different core temperature and of the orbits of the merging stars. They consist of a central massive white dwarf, surrounded by a hot, rapidly rotating corona and a thick debris region.

  10. The optical Tamm states at the interface between a photonic crystal and a nanocomposite containing core-shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrov, S. Ya; Pankin, P. S.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the optical Tamm states (OTSs) localized at the interface between a photonic crystal (PC) and a nanocomposite consisting of spherical nanoparticles with a dielectric core and a metallic shell, which are dispersed in a transparent matrix, and is characterized by the resonance permittivity. Spectra of transmission, reflection, and absorption of normally incident light waves by the investigated structure are calculated. The spectral manifestation of the Tamm states caused by negative values of the real part of the effective permittivity in the visible spectral range is studied. It is demonstrated that, along with the significantly extended band gap of the PC, the transmission spectrum contains an additional stopband caused by nanocomposite absorption near the resonance frequency. It is shown that the OTSs can be implemented in two band gaps of the PCs, each corresponding to a certain plasmon resonance frequency of the nanocomposite. It is established that the characteristics of the Tamm state localized at the edge of the PCs significantly depend on the ratio between the particle core volume and the total particle volume.

  11. Hepatitis B virus DNA-negative dane particles lack core protein but contain a 22-kDa precore protein without C-terminal arginine-rich domain.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tatsuji; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Terada, Nobuo; Rokuhara, Akinori; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Yagi, Shintaro; Tanaka, Eiji; Kiyosawa, Kendo; Ohno, Shinichi; Maki, Noboru

    2005-06-10

    DNA-negative Dane particles have been observed in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected sera. The capsids of the empty particles are thought to be composed of core protein but have not been studied in detail. In the present study, the protein composition of the particles was examined using new enzyme immunoassays for the HBV core antigen (HBcAg) and for the HBV precore/core proteins (core-related antigens, HBcrAg). HBcrAg were abundant in fractions slightly less dense than HBcAg and HBV DNA. Three times more Dane-like particles were observed in the HBcrAg-rich fraction than in the HBV DNA-rich fraction by electron microscopy. Western blots and mass spectrometry identified the HBcrAg as a 22-kDa precore protein (p22cr) containing the uncleaved signal peptide and lacking the arginine-rich domain that is involved in binding the RNA pregenome or the DNA genome. In sera from 30 HBV-infected patients, HBcAg represented only a median 10.5% of the precore/core proteins in enveloped particles. These data suggest that most of the Dane particles lack viral DNA and core capsid but contain p22cr. This study provides a model for the formation of the DNA-negative Dane particles. The precore proteins, which lack the arginine-rich nucleotide-binding domain, form viral RNA/DNA-negative capsid-like particles and are enveloped and released as empty particles.

  12. The formation of entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations: smoothed particle hydrodynamics versus adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, C.; Read, J. I.; Hobbs, A.

    2014-06-01

    We simulate cosmological galaxy cluster formation using three different approaches to solving the equations of non-radiative hydrodynamics - classic smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), novel SPH with a higher order dissipation switch (SPHS), and an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Comparing spherically averaged entropy profiles, we find that SPHS and AMR approaches result in a well-defined entropy core that converges rapidly with increasing mass and force resolution. In contrast, the central entropy profile in the SPH approach is sensitive to the cluster's assembly history and shows poor numerical convergence. We trace this disagreement to the known artificial surface tension in SPH that appears at phase boundaries. Varying systematically numerical dissipation in SPHS, we study the contributions of numerical and physical dissipation to the entropy core and argue that numerical dissipation is required to ensure single-valued fluid quantities in converging flows. However, provided it occurs only at the resolution limit and does not propagate errors to larger scales, its effect is benign - there is no requirement to build `sub-grid' models of unresolved turbulence for galaxy cluster simulations. We conclude that entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations are physical, resulting from entropy generation in shocked gas during cluster assembly.

  13. Construction and Immunological Evaluation of Multivalent Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Core Virus-Like Particles Carrying HBV and HCV Epitopes▿

    PubMed Central

    Sominskaya, Irina; Skrastina, Dace; Dislers, Andris; Vasiljev, Denis; Mihailova, Marija; Ose, Velta; Dreilina, Dzidra; Pumpens, Paul

    2010-01-01

    A multivalent vaccine candidate against hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections was constructed on the basis of HBV core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) as carriers. Chimeric VLPs that carried a virus-neutralizing HBV pre-S1 epitope corresponding to amino acids (aa) 20 to 47 in the major immunodominant region (MIR) and a highly conserved N-terminal HCV core epitope corresponding to aa 1 to 60 at the C terminus of the truncated HBcΔ protein (N-terminal aa 1 to 144 of full-length HBc) were produced in Escherichia coli cells and examined for their antigenicity and immunogenicity. The presence of two different foreign epitopes within the HBc molecule did not interfere with its VLP-forming ability, with the HBV pre-S1 epitope exposed on the surface and the HCV core epitope buried within the VLPs. After immunization of BALB/c mice, specific T-cell activation by both foreign epitopes and a high-titer antibody response against the pre-S1 epitope were found, whereas an antibody response against the HBc carrier was notably suppressed. Both inserted epitopes also induced a specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) response, as shown by the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production profile. PMID:20410327

  14. Magnetic Braking, Ambipolar Diffusion, and the Formation of Cloud Cores and Protostars. II. A Parameter Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shantanu; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    1995-10-01

    The formulation of the problem of the formation of protostellar cores in self-gravitating, magnetically supported, rotating, isothermal model molecular clouds was presented in a previous paper, where detailed numerical simulations for two different model clouds were also discussed. In this paper, we study the effect of varying five dimensionless free parameters: the ratio ˜p of external density and central density in a reference state (which is related simply to an initial equilibrium state), the initial radial length scale l˜ref of the column density of the cloud, the central angular velocity of the reference state ˜Ωc,ref, the central neutral-ion collision time in the reference state ˜τni,ref (which is inversely proportional to the collapse retardation factor Vff ≡ τff/τni) and the exponent k in the relation between the ion and neutral densities ni ∝ nkn. In addition to the models previously presented, seven more models are investigated here. Different values (1/1000 to 1/100) of the initial magnetic-braking efficiency parameter ˜p(>0) do not significantly affect the evolution; magnetic braking remains effective during the quasistatic phase and ineffective during the (dynamic) collapse of the magnetically and thermally supercritical core. The initially very effective magnetic braking also means that the solution is insensitive to values of ˜Ωc,ref. Different values of l˜ref yield qualitatively similar evolution, with smaller cloud sizes leading to slightly smaller core sizes. Increasing the value of τni,ref leads to a more rapid evolution and larger, more rapidly rotating cores. A smaller k leads to relatively more rapid evolution in the core and a better core-envelope separation. We also give an analytical explanation of the previously presented result, that the gravitational field acting on an infalling mass shell in the central region of a nonhomologously contracting thin disk increases as 1/r3m, where rm is the Lagrangian radius of the shell.

  15. Tandem fusion of hepatitis B core antigen allows assembly of virus-like particles in bacteria and plants with enhanced capacity to accommodate foreign proteins.

    PubMed

    Peyret, Hadrien; Gehin, Annick; Thuenemann, Eva C; Blond, Donatienne; El Turabi, Aadil; Beales, Lucy; Clarke, Dean; Gilbert, Robert J C; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Holmes, Kris; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Whelan, Mike; Rosenberg, William; Lomonossoff, George P; Rowlands, David J

    2015-01-01

    The core protein of the hepatitis B virus, HBcAg, assembles into highly immunogenic virus-like particles (HBc VLPs) when expressed in a variety of heterologous systems. Specifically, the major insertion region (MIR) on the HBcAg protein allows the insertion of foreign sequences, which are then exposed on the tips of surface spike structures on the outside of the assembled particle. Here, we present a novel strategy which aids the display of whole proteins on the surface of HBc particles. This strategy, named tandem core, is based on the production of the HBcAg dimer as a single polypeptide chain by tandem fusion of two HBcAg open reading frames. This allows the insertion of large heterologous sequences in only one of the two MIRs in each spike, without compromising VLP formation. We present the use of tandem core technology in both plant and bacterial expression systems. The results show that tandem core particles can be produced with unmodified MIRs, or with one MIR in each tandem dimer modified to contain the entire sequence of GFP or of a camelid nanobody. Both inserted proteins are correctly folded and the nanobody fused to the surface of the tandem core particle (which we name tandibody) retains the ability to bind to its cognate antigen. This technology paves the way for the display of natively folded proteins on the surface of HBc particles either through direct fusion or through non-covalent attachment via a nanobody. PMID:25830365

  16. Immunity to malaria elicited by hybrid hepatitis B virus core particles carrying circumsporozoite protein epitopes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) nucleocapsid antigen (HBcAg) was investigated as a carrier moiety for the immunodominant circumsporozoite (CS) protein repeat epitopes of Plasmodium falciparum and the rodent malaria agent P. berghei. For this purpose hybrid genes coding for [NANP]4 (C75CS2) or [DP4NPN]2 (C75CS1) as internal inserts in HBcAg (between amino acids 75 and 81) were constructed and expressed in recombinant Salmonella typhimurium. The resulting hybrid HBcAg-CS polypeptides purified from S. typhimurium were particulate and displayed CS and HBc antigenicity, however, the HBc antigenicity was reduced compared to native recombinant HBcAg. Immunization of several mouse strains with HBcAg-CS1 and HBcAg-CS2 particles resulted in high titer, P.berghei- or P.falciparum-specific anti-CS antibodies representing all murine immunoglobulin G isotypes. The possible influence of carrier-specific immunosuppression was examined, and preexisting immunity to HBcAg did not significantly affect the immunogenicity of the CS epitopes within HBcAg-CS1 particles. Similarly, the choice of adjuvant did not significantly alter the immunogenicity of HBcAg-CS hybrid particles. Immunization in complete or incomplete Freund's adjuvant or alum resulted in equivalent anti-HBc and anti-CS humoral responses. Examination of T cell recognition of HBcAg-CS particles revealed that HBcAg-specific T cells were universally primed and CS-specific T cells were primed if the insert contained a CS-specific T cell recognition site. This indicates that the internal site in HBcAg is permissive for the inclusion of heterologous pathogen-specific T as well as B cell epitopes. Most importantly, 90 and 100% of BALB/c mice immunized with HBcAg-CS1 particles were protected against a P. berghei challenge infection in two independent experiments. Therefore, hybrid HBcAg-CS particles may represent a useful approach for future malaria vaccine development. PMID:7520465

  17. Enhanced group II intron retrohoming in magnesium-deficient Escherichia coli via selection of mutations in the ribozyme core

    PubMed Central

    Truong, David M.; Sidote, David J.; Russell, Rick; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile group II introns are bacterial retrotransposons thought to be evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of a catalytically active intron RNA (“ribozyme”) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote RNA splicing and intron mobility via reverse splicing of the intron RNA into new DNA sites (“retrohoming”). Although group II introns are active in bacteria, their natural hosts, they function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where lower free Mg2+ concentrations decrease their ribozyme activity and constitute a natural barrier to group II intron proliferation within nuclear genomes. Here, we show that retrohoming of the Ll.LtrB group II intron is strongly inhibited in an Escherichia coli mutant lacking the Mg2+ transporter MgtA, and we use this system to select mutations in catalytic core domain V (DV) that partially rescue retrohoming at low Mg2+ concentrations. We thus identified mutations in the distal stem of DV that increase retrohoming efficiency in the MgtA mutant up to 22-fold. Biochemical assays of splicing and reverse splicing indicate that the mutations increase the fraction of intron RNA that folds into an active conformation at low Mg2+ concentrations, and terbium-cleavage assays suggest that this increase is due to enhanced Mg2+ binding to the distal stem of DV. Our findings indicate that DV is involved in a critical Mg2+-dependent RNA folding step in group II introns and demonstrate the feasibility of selecting intron variants that function more efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations, with implications for evolution and potential applications in gene targeting. PMID:24043808

  18. Refactoring the Six-Gene Photosystem II Core in the Chloroplast of the Green Algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gimpel, Javier A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Scranton, Melissa A; Li, Daphne; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2016-07-15

    Oxygenic photosynthesis provides the energy to produce all food and most of the fuel on this planet. Photosystem II (PSII) is an essential and rate-limiting component of this process. Understanding and modifying PSII function could provide an opportunity for optimizing photosynthetic biomass production, particularly under specific environmental conditions. PSII is a complex multisubunit enzyme with strong interdependence among its components. In this work, we have deleted the six core genes of PSII in the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and refactored them in a single DNA construct. Complementation of the knockout strain with the core PSII synthetic module from three different green algae resulted in reconstitution of photosynthetic activity to 85, 55, and 53% of that of the wild-type, demonstrating that the PSII core can be exchanged between algae species and retain function. The strains, synthetic cassettes, and refactoring strategy developed for this study demonstrate the potential of synthetic biology approaches for tailoring oxygenic photosynthesis and provide a powerful tool for unraveling PSII structure-function relationships.

  19. FROM PRESTELLAR TO PROTOSTELLAR CORES. II. TIME DEPENDENCE AND DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION

    SciTech Connect

    Aikawa, Y.; Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Garrod, R. T.; Herbst, E.

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the molecular evolution and D/H abundance ratios that develop as star formation proceeds from a dense molecular cloud core to a protostellar core, by solving a gas-grain reaction network applied to a one-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic model with infalling fluid parcels. Spatial distributions of gas and ice-mantle species are calculated at the first-core stage, and at times after the birth of a protostar. Gas-phase methanol and methane are more abundant than CO at radii r {approx}< 100 AU in the first-core stage, but gradually decrease with time, while abundances of larger organic species increase. The warm-up phase, when complex organic molecules are efficiently formed, is longer-lived for those fluid parcels infalling at later stages. The formation of unsaturated carbon chains (warm carbon-chain chemistry) is also more effective in later stages; C{sup +}, which reacts with CH{sub 4} to form carbon chains, increases in abundance as the envelope density decreases. The large organic molecules and carbon chains are strongly deuterated, mainly due to high D/H ratios in the parent molecules, determined in the cold phase. We also extend our model to simulate simply the chemistry in circumstellar disks, by suspending the one-dimensional infall of a fluid parcel at constant disk radii. The species CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} and HCOOCH{sub 3} increase in abundance in 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} yr at the fixed warm temperature; both also have high D/H ratios.

  20. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated with the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.

  1. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    DOE PAGES

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated withmore » the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.« less

  2. Isocratic and gradient impedance plot analysis and comparison of some recently introduced large size core-shell and fully porous particles.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, Yoachim; Cabooter, Deirdre; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2013-10-18

    The intrinsic kinetic performance of three recently commercialized large size (≥4μm) core-shell particles packed in columns with different lengths has been measured and compared with that of standard fully porous particles of similar and smaller size (5 and 3.5μm, respectively). The kinetic performance is compared in both absolute (plot of t0 versus the plate count N or the peak capacity np for isocratic and gradient elution, respectively) and dimensionless units. The latter is realized by switching to so-called impedance plots, a format which has been previously introduced (as a plot of t0/N(2) or E0 versus Nopt/N) and has in the present study been extended from isocratic to gradient elution (where the impedance plot corresponds to a plot of t0/np(4) versus np,opt(2)/np(2)). Both the isocratic and gradient impedance plot yielded a very similar picture: the clustered impedance plot curves divide into two distinct groups, one for the core-shell particles (lowest values, i.e. best performance) and one for the fully porous particles (highest values), confirming the clear intrinsic kinetic advantage of core-shell particles. If used around their optimal flow rate, the core-shell particles displayed a minimal separation impedance that is about 40% lower than the fully porous particles. Even larger gains in separation speed can be achieved in the C-term regime.

  3. 3.9 Å structure of the nucleosome core particle determined by phase-plate cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Chua, Eugene Y D; Vogirala, Vinod K; Inian, Oviya; Wong, Andrew S W; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Plitzko, Juergen M; Danev, Radostin; Sandin, Sara

    2016-09-30

    The Volta phase plate is a recently developed electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) device that enables contrast enhancement of biological samples. Here we have evaluated the potential of combining phase-plate imaging and single particle analysis to determine the structure of a small protein-DNA complex. To test the method, we made use of a 200 kDa Nucleosome Core Particle (NCP) reconstituted with 601 DNA for which a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure is known. We find that the phase plate provides a significant contrast enhancement that permits individual NCPs and DNA to be clearly identified in amorphous ice. The refined structure from 26,060 particles has an overall resolution of 3.9 Å and the density map exhibits structural features consistent with the estimated resolution, including clear density for amino acid side chains and DNA features such as the phosphate backbone. Our results demonstrate that phase-plate cryo-EM promises to become an important method to determine novel near-atomic resolution structures of small and challenging samples, such as nucleosomes in complex with nucleosome-binding factors.

  4. 3.9 Å structure of the nucleosome core particle determined by phase-plate cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Eugene Y.D.; Vogirala, Vinod K.; Inian, Oviya; Wong, Andrew S.W.; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Plitzko, Juergen M.; Danev, Radostin; Sandin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The Volta phase plate is a recently developed electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) device that enables contrast enhancement of biological samples. Here we have evaluated the potential of combining phase-plate imaging and single particle analysis to determine the structure of a small protein–DNA complex. To test the method, we made use of a 200 kDa Nucleosome Core Particle (NCP) reconstituted with 601 DNA for which a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure is known. We find that the phase plate provides a significant contrast enhancement that permits individual NCPs and DNA to be clearly identified in amorphous ice. The refined structure from 26,060 particles has an overall resolution of 3.9 Å and the density map exhibits structural features consistent with the estimated resolution, including clear density for amino acid side chains and DNA features such as the phosphate backbone. Our results demonstrate that phase-plate cryo-EM promises to become an important method to determine novel near-atomic resolution structures of small and challenging samples, such as nucleosomes in complex with nucleosome-binding factors. PMID:27563056

  5. Pathways for energy transfer in the core light-harvesting complexes CP43 and CP47 of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    de Weerd, Frank L; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; van Amerongen, Herbert; Dekker, Jan P; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2002-03-01

    The pigment-protein complexes CP43 and CP47 transfer excitation energy from the peripheral antenna of photosystem II toward the photochemical reaction center. We measured the excitation dynamics of the chlorophylls in isolated CP43 and CP47 complexes at 77 K by time-resolved absorbance-difference and fluorescence spectroscopy. The spectral relaxation appeared to occur with rates of 0.2-0.4 ps and 2-3 ps in both complexes, whereas an additional relaxation of 17 ps was observed only in CP47. Using the 3.8-A crystal structure of the photosystem II core complex from Synechococcus elongatus (A. Zouni, H.-T. Witt, J. Kern, P. Fromme, N. Krauss, W. Saenger, and P. Orth, 2001, Nature, 409:739-743), excitation energy transfer kinetics were calculated and a Monte Carlo simulation of the absorption spectra was performed. In both complexes, the rate of 0.2-0.4 ps can be ascribed to excitation energy transfer within a layer of chlorophylls near the stromal side of the membrane, and the slower 2-3-ps process to excitation energy transfer to the calculated lowest excitonic state. We conclude that excitation energy transfer within CP43 and CP47 is fast and does not contribute significantly to the well-known slow trapping of excitation energy in photosystem II.

  6. The position of heterologous epitopes inserted in hepatitis B virus core particles determines their immunogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Schödel, F; Moriarty, A M; Peterson, D L; Zheng, J A; Hughes, J L; Will, H; Leturcq, D J; McGee, J S; Milich, D R

    1992-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (HBcAg) of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been suggested as a carrier moiety for vaccine purposes. We investigated the influence of the position of the inserted epitope within hybrid HBcAg particles on antigenicity and immunogenicity. For this purpose, genes coding for neutralizing epitopes of the pre-S region of the HBV envelope proteins were inserted at the amino terminus, the amino terminus through a precore linker sequence, the truncated carboxy terminus, or an internal site of HBcAg by genetic engineering and were expressed in Escherichia coli. All purified hybrid HBc/pre-S polyproteins were particulate. Amino- and carboxy-terminal-modified hybrid HBc particles retained HBcAg antigenicity and immunogenicity. In contrast, insertion of a pre-S(1) sequence between HBcAg residues 75 and 83 abrogated recognition of HBcAg by 5 of 6 anti-HBc monoclonal antibodies and diminished recognition by human polyclonal anti-HBc. Predictably, HBcAg-specific immunogenicity was also reduced. With respect to the inserted epitopes, a pre-S(1) epitope linked to the amino terminus of HBcAg was not surface accessible and not immunogenic. A pre-S(1) epitope fused to the amino terminus through a precore linker sequence was surface accessible and highly immunogenic. A carboxy-terminal-fused pre-S(2) sequence was also surface accessible but weakly immunogenic. Insertion of a pre-S(1) epitope at the internal site resulted in the most efficient anti-pre-S(1) antibody response. Furthermore, immunization with hybrid HBc/pre-S particles exclusively primed T-helper cells specific for HBcAg and not the inserted epitope. These results indicate that the position of the inserted B-cell epitope within HBcAg is critical to its immunogenicity. Images PMID:1370083

  7. Flow and particle dispersion in a pulmonary alveolus--part II: effect of gravity on particle transport.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Sudhaker; Prasad, Ajay K

    2010-05-01

    The acinar region of the human lung comprises about 300x10(6) alveoli, which are responsible for gas exchange between the lung and the blood. As discussed in Part I (Chhabra and Prasad, "Flow and Particle Dispersion in a Pulmonary Alveolus-Part I: Velocity Measurements and Convective Particle Transport," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132, p. 051009), the deposition of aerosols in the acinar region can either be detrimental to gas exchange (as in the case of harmful particulate matter) or beneficial (as in the case of inhalable pharmaceuticals). We measured the flow field inside an in-vitro model of a single alveolus mounted on a bronchiole and calculated the transport and deposition of massless particles in Part I. This paper focuses on the transport and deposition of finite-sized particles ranging from 0.25 microm to 4 microm under the combined influence of flow-induced advection (computed from velocity maps obtained by particle image velocimetry) and gravitational settling. Particles were introduced during the first inhalation cycle and their trajectories and deposition statistics were calculated for subsequent cycles for three different particle sizes (0.25 microm, 1 microm, and 4 microm) and three alveolar orientations. The key outcome of the study is that particles particles (d(p)=1 microm) deviate to some extent from streamlines and exhibit complex trajectories. The motion of large particles >or=4 microm is dominated by gravitational settling and shows little effect of fluid advection. Additionally, small and midsize particles deposit at about two-thirds height in the alveolus irrespective of the gravitational orientation whereas the deposition of large particles is governed primarily by the orientation of the gravity vector. PMID:20459211

  8. Self-Propelled Particles with Soft-Core Interactions: Patterns, Stability, and Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, M. R.; Chuang, Y. L.; Bertozzi, A. L.; Chayes, L. S.

    2006-03-01

    Understanding collective properties of driven particle systems is significant for naturally occurring aggregates and because the knowledge gained can be used as building blocks for the design of artificial ones. We model self-propelling biological or artificial individuals interacting through pairwise attractive and repulsive forces. For the first time, we are able to predict stability and morphology of organization starting from the shape of the two-body interaction. We present a coherent theory, based on fundamental statistical mechanics, for all possible phases of collective motion.

  9. Self-propelled particles with soft-core interactions: patterns, stability, and collapse.

    PubMed

    D' Orsogna, M R; Chuang, Y L; Bertozzi, A L; Chayes, L S

    2006-03-17

    Understanding collective properties of driven particle systems is significant for naturally occurring aggregates and because the knowledge gained can be used as building blocks for the design of artificial ones. We model self-propelling biological or artificial individuals interacting through pairwise attractive and repulsive forces. For the first time, we are able to predict stability and morphology of organization starting from the shape of the two-body interaction. We present a coherent theory, based on fundamental statistical mechanics, for all possible phases of collective motion. PMID:16605738

  10. Stellar Forensics II: A post-explosion view of the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maund, Justyn

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies have used high spatial resolution HST observations of supernova {SN} sites to directly identify the progenitors of core-collapse SNe on pre-explosion images. These studies have set constraints about the nature of massive stars and their evolution just prior to their explosion as SNe. Now, at late-times when the SNe have faded sufficiently, it is possible to return to the sites of these core-collapse SNe to search for clues about the nature of their progenitors.We request time to conduct deep, late-time, high-resolution imaging with WFC3/UVIS+IR and ACS/WFC of the sites of three core-collapse SNe 2008ax, 2008bk and 2008cn. We aim to: 1} Confirm our original identifications, made in pre-explosion images, by confirming that the progenitors are now missing; 2} Apply image subtraction techniques for this late-time imaging with our pre-explosion images to determine accurate photometry of the progenitors to constrain their temperatures and luminosities; and 3} study the stellar populations in the immediate vicinities of these SNe, previously obscured by the progenitor and the SN, to provide a measure of the progenitor's age, as well. For SN 2008ax we aim to determine the possible presence of a binary companion, as a persistent source at the SN location once the SN has faded and the progenitor has disappeared. HST provides the unique combination of high-resolution optical/IR imaging at very faint magnitudes that will facilitate this study.

  11. Mantle formation, coagulation, and the origin of cloud/core shine. II. Comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ysard, N.; Köhler, M.; Jones, A.; Dartois, E.; Godard, M.; Gavilan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Many dense interstellar clouds are observable in emission in the near-IR (J, H, and K photometric bands), commonly referred to as "Cloudshine", and in the mid-IR (Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands), the so-called "Coreshine". These C-shine observations have usually been explained in terms of grain growth but no model has yet been able to self-consistently explain the dust spectral energy distribution from the near-IR to the submm. Aims: Our new core/mantle evolutionary dust model, The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model at the IaS (THEMIS), has been shown to be valid in the far-IR and submm. We want to demonstrate its ability to reproduce the C-shine observations. Methods: Our starting point is a physically motivated core/mantle dust model. It consists of three dust populations: small poly-aromatic-rich carbon grains, bigger core/mantle grains with mantles of aromatic-rich carbon, and cores made of either amorphous aliphatic-rich carbon or amorphous silicate. Then, we assume an evolutionary path where these grains, when entering denser regions, may first form a second aliphatic-rich carbon mantle (coagulation of small grains, accretion of carbon from the gas phase), second coagulate together to form large aggregates, and third accrete gas phase molecules coating them with an ice mantle. To compute the corresponding dust emission and scattering, we use a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Results: We show that our global evolutionary dust modelling approach THEMIS allows us to reproduce C-shine observations towards dense starless clouds. Dust scattering and emission is most sensitive to the cloud central density and to the steepness of the cloud density profile. Varying these two parameters leads to changes that are stronger in the near-IR, in both the C-shine intensity and profile. Conclusions: With a combination of aliphatic-rich mantle formation and low-level coagulation into aggregates, we can self-consistently explain the observed C-shine and far

  12. Bioinformatic Analysis of Plasma Apolipoproteins A-I and A-II Revealed Unique Features of A-I/A-II HDL Particles in Human Plasma.

    PubMed

    Kido, Toshimi; Kurata, Hideaki; Kondo, Kazuo; Itakura, Hiroshige; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Urata, Takeyoshi; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Plasma concentration of apoA-I, apoA-II and apoA-II-unassociated apoA-I was analyzed in 314 Japanese subjects (177 males and 137 females), including one (male) homozygote and 37 (20 males and 17 females) heterozygotes of genetic CETP deficiency. ApoA-I unassociated with apoA-II markedly and linearly increased with HDL-cholesterol, while apoA-II increased only very slightly and the ratio of apoA-II-associated apoA-I to apoA-II stayed constant at 2 in molar ratio throughout the increase of HDL-cholesterol, among the wild type and heterozygous CETP deficiency. Thus, overall HDL concentration almost exclusively depends on HDL with apoA-I without apoA-II (LpAI) while concentration of HDL containing apoA-I and apoA-II (LpAI:AII) is constant having a fixed molar ratio of 2 : 1 regardless of total HDL and apoA-I concentration. Distribution of apoA-I between LpAI and LpAI:AII is consistent with a model of statistical partitioning regardless of sex and CETP genotype. The analysis also indicated that LpA-I accommodates on average 4 apoA-I molecules and has a clearance rate indistinguishable from LpAI:AII. Independent evidence indicated LpAI:A-II has a diameter 20% smaller than LpAI, consistent with a model having two apoA-I and one apoA-II. The functional contribution of these particles is to be investigated. PMID:27526664

  13. Bioinformatic Analysis of Plasma Apolipoproteins A-I and A-II Revealed Unique Features of A-I/A-II HDL Particles in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Toshimi; Kurata, Hideaki; Kondo, Kazuo; Itakura, Hiroshige; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Urata, Takeyoshi; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Plasma concentration of apoA-I, apoA-II and apoA-II-unassociated apoA-I was analyzed in 314 Japanese subjects (177 males and 137 females), including one (male) homozygote and 37 (20 males and 17 females) heterozygotes of genetic CETP deficiency. ApoA-I unassociated with apoA-II markedly and linearly increased with HDL-cholesterol, while apoA-II increased only very slightly and the ratio of apoA-II-associated apoA-I to apoA-II stayed constant at 2 in molar ratio throughout the increase of HDL-cholesterol, among the wild type and heterozygous CETP deficiency. Thus, overall HDL concentration almost exclusively depends on HDL with apoA-I without apoA-II (LpAI) while concentration of HDL containing apoA-I and apoA-II (LpAI:AII) is constant having a fixed molar ratio of 2 : 1 regardless of total HDL and apoA-I concentration. Distribution of apoA-I between LpAI and LpAI:AII is consistent with a model of statistical partitioning regardless of sex and CETP genotype. The analysis also indicated that LpA-I accommodates on average 4 apoA-I molecules and has a clearance rate indistinguishable from LpAI:AII. Independent evidence indicated LpAI:A-II has a diameter 20% smaller than LpAI, consistent with a model having two apoA-I and one apoA-II. The functional contribution of these particles is to be investigated. PMID:27526664

  14. Silica nanoparticles as the adjuvant for the immunisation of mice using hepatitis B core virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Skrastina, Dace; Petrovskis, Ivars; Lieknina, Ilva; Bogans, Janis; Renhofa, Regina; Ose, Velta; Dishlers, Andris; Dekhtyar, Yuri; Pumpens, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology and nanomaterials have facilitated the development of silicon dioxide, or Silica, particles as a promising immunological adjuvant for the generation of novel prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. In the present study, we have compared the adjuvanting potential of commercially available Silica nanoparticles (initial particles size of 10-20 nm) with that of aluminium hydroxide, or Alum, as well as that of complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvants for the immunisation of BALB/c mice with virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by recombinant full-length Hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein. The induction of B-cell and T-cell responses was studied after immunisation. Silica nanoparticles were able to adsorb maximally 40% of the added HBc, whereas the adsorption capacity of Alum exceeded 90% at the same VLPs/adjuvant ratio. Both Silica and Alum formed large complexes with HBc VLPs that sedimented rapidly after formulation, as detected by dynamic light scattering, spectrophotometry, and electron microscopy. Both Silica and Alum augmented the humoral response against HBc VLPs to the high anti-HBc level in the case of intraperitoneal immunisation, whereas in subcutaneous immunisation, the Silica-adjuvanted anti-HBc level even exceeded the level adjuvanted by Alum. The adjuvanting of HBc VLPs by Silica resulted in the same typical IgG2a/IgG1 ratios as in the case of the adjuvanting by Alum. The combination of Silica with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) led to the same enhancement of the HBc-specific T-cell induction as in the case of the Alum and MPL combination. These findings demonstrate that Silica is not a weaker putative adjuvant than Alum for induction of B-cell and T-cell responses against recombinant HBc VLPs. This finding may have an essential impact on the development of the set of Silica-adjuvanted vaccines based on a long list of HBc-derived virus-like particles as the biological component.

  15. Labeling the oily core of nanocapsules and lipid-core nanocapsules with a triglyceride conjugated to a fluorescent dye as a strategy to particle tracking in biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiel, Luana Almeida; Contri, Renata Vidor; Bica, Juliane Freitas; Figueiró, Fabrício; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2014-05-01

    The synthesis of novel fluorescent materials represents a very important step to obtain labeled nanoformulations in order to evaluate their biological behavior. The strategy of conjugating a fluorescent dye with triacylglycerol allows that either particles differing regarding supramolecular structure, i.e., nanoemulsions, nanocapsules, lipid-core nanocapsules, or surface charge, i.e., cationic nanocapsules and anionic nanocapsules, can be tracked using the same labeled material. In this way, a rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride was obtained to prepare fluorescent polymeric nanocapsules. Different formulations were obtained, nanocapsules (NC) or lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), using the labeled oil and Eudragit RS100, Eudragit S100, or poly(caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. The rhodamine B was coupled with the ricinolein by activating the carboxylic function using a carbodiimide derivative. Thin layer chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to identify the new product. Fluorescent nanocapsule aqueous suspensions were prepared by the solvent displacement method. Their pH values were 4.6 (NC-RS100), 3.5 (NC-S100), and 5.0 (LNC-PCL). The volume-weighted mean diameter ( D 4.3) and polydispersity values were 150 nm and 1.05 (NC-RS100), 350 nm and 2.28 (NC-S100), and 270 nm and 1.67 (LNC-PCL). The mean diameters determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) ( z-average) were around 200 nm. The zeta potential values were +5.85 mV (NC-RS100), -21.12 mV (NC-S100), and -19.25 mV (LNC-PCL). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence emission were 567 nm (NC-RS100 and LNC-PCL) and 574 nm (NC-S100). Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the cell uptake (human macrophage cell line) of the fluorescent nanocapsules in order to show the applicability of the approach. When the cells were treated with the fluorescent nanocapsules, red emission was detected

  16. Labeling the oily core of nanocapsules and lipid-core nanocapsules with a triglyceride conjugated to a fluorescent dye as a strategy to particle tracking in biological studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of novel fluorescent materials represents a very important step to obtain labeled nanoformulations in order to evaluate their biological behavior. The strategy of conjugating a fluorescent dye with triacylglycerol allows that either particles differing regarding supramolecular structure, i.e., nanoemulsions, nanocapsules, lipid-core nanocapsules, or surface charge, i.e., cationic nanocapsules and anionic nanocapsules, can be tracked using the same labeled material. In this way, a rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride was obtained to prepare fluorescent polymeric nanocapsules. Different formulations were obtained, nanocapsules (NC) or lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), using the labeled oil and Eudragit RS100, Eudragit S100, or poly(caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. The rhodamine B was coupled with the ricinolein by activating the carboxylic function using a carbodiimide derivative. Thin layer chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to identify the new product. Fluorescent nanocapsule aqueous suspensions were prepared by the solvent displacement method. Their pH values were 4.6 (NC-RS100), 3.5 (NC-S100), and 5.0 (LNC-PCL). The volume-weighted mean diameter (D4.3) and polydispersity values were 150 nm and 1.05 (NC-RS100), 350 nm and 2.28 (NC-S100), and 270 nm and 1.67 (LNC-PCL). The mean diameters determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) (z-average) were around 200 nm. The zeta potential values were +5.85 mV (NC-RS100), -21.12 mV (NC-S100), and -19.25 mV (LNC-PCL). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence emission were 567 nm (NC-RS100 and LNC-PCL) and 574 nm (NC-S100). Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the cell uptake (human macrophage cell line) of the fluorescent nanocapsules in order to show the applicability of the approach. When the cells were treated with the fluorescent nanocapsules, red emission was

  17. Labeling the oily core of nanocapsules and lipid-core nanocapsules with a triglyceride conjugated to a fluorescent dye as a strategy to particle tracking in biological studies.

    PubMed

    Fiel, Luana Almeida; Contri, Renata Vidor; Bica, Juliane Freitas; Figueiró, Fabrício; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of novel fluorescent materials represents a very important step to obtain labeled nanoformulations in order to evaluate their biological behavior. The strategy of conjugating a fluorescent dye with triacylglycerol allows that either particles differing regarding supramolecular structure, i.e., nanoemulsions, nanocapsules, lipid-core nanocapsules, or surface charge, i.e., cationic nanocapsules and anionic nanocapsules, can be tracked using the same labeled material. In this way, a rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride was obtained to prepare fluorescent polymeric nanocapsules. Different formulations were obtained, nanocapsules (NC) or lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), using the labeled oil and Eudragit RS100, Eudragit S100, or poly(caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. The rhodamine B was coupled with the ricinolein by activating the carboxylic function using a carbodiimide derivative. Thin layer chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to identify the new product. Fluorescent nanocapsule aqueous suspensions were prepared by the solvent displacement method. Their pH values were 4.6 (NC-RS100), 3.5 (NC-S100), and 5.0 (LNC-PCL). The volume-weighted mean diameter (D 4.3) and polydispersity values were 150 nm and 1.05 (NC-RS100), 350 nm and 2.28 (NC-S100), and 270 nm and 1.67 (LNC-PCL). The mean diameters determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) (z-average) were around 200 nm. The zeta potential values were +5.85 mV (NC-RS100), -21.12 mV (NC-S100), and -19.25 mV (LNC-PCL). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence emission were 567 nm (NC-RS100 and LNC-PCL) and 574 nm (NC-S100). Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the cell uptake (human macrophage cell line) of the fluorescent nanocapsules in order to show the applicability of the approach. When the cells were treated with the fluorescent nanocapsules, red emission was

  18. In-vessel core debris heat transfer experiments: COPO II-AP experiments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kymaelaeinen, O.; Helle, M.; Pessa, E.

    1998-03-01

    The COPO II-AP experiments are part of the cooperative effort by EPRI, DOE, ENEL and IVO on in-vessel retention technology. The purpose of the COPO II-AP experiments is to contribute in the understanding of the convective behavior in a molten corium pool on the reactor pressure vessel lower head in order to be able to predict the heat flux distribution from the pool, especially in an AP600-like geometry. The specific features of the COPO II-AP are the large scale of the facility (1:2 linear scale), the large temperature differences between the pool boundary and the bulk of the fluid (tens of degrees C) and the strictly isothermal pool boundaries (due to freezing). The facility is two-dimensional and uses water-zincsulfate solution as simulant for the corium. This report contains a description of the COPO II-AP facility and presents the results. The main observations on the results could be summarized as follows: (1) The average upward heat transfer coefficients from the pool were higher than predicted by the widely used correlation by Steinberner and Reineke. (2) The heat flux profile on the upper surface was relatively flat. (3) The average heat transfer coefficients downward were found to be higher than predicted by a widely used correlation by Jahn and Mayinger based on experiments in a small 2D-slice geometry. (4) The heat flux profile on the curved boundary was flatter than in experiments with lower Ra{prime}. The error bands in some of the results remained relatively wide in the experiments due to uncertainties related among others to heat losses, uniformity of the heat fluxes in the wall, and to some extent the thermal conductivity of aluminum (wall material used). Comparing to the draft version of this report of May 1996, in this final version, new data available on thermal conductivity of the aluminum cooling units has been used which has changed some of the heat flux values reported.

  19. Histone Modification via Rapid Cleavage of C4′-Oxidized Abasic Sites in Nucleosome Core Particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chuanzheng; Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Greenberg, Marc M.

    2013-01-01

    The C4′-oxidized abasic site is produced in DNA by a variety of oxidizing agents, including potent cytotoxic antitumor agents. Independent generation of this alkali-labile lesion at defined positions within nucleosome core particles reveals that the histone proteins increase strand scission between 130 and 550-fold. Strand scission proceeds via a Schiff base intermediate but the DNA protein cross-links are unstable. The oxidized abasic site is removed in its entirety from the DNA and transferred to the lysine rich tail region of the proximal histone protein in the form of a lactam. The modification is distributed over several residues within the amino terminal tail of the proximal histone. Transfer of DNA damage to histones could affect gene regulation. PMID:23531104

  20. Density functional formulation of the random-phase approximation for inhomogeneous fluids: Application to the Gaussian core and Coulomb particles.

    PubMed

    Frydel, Derek; Ma, Manman

    2016-06-01

    Using the adiabatic connection, we formulate the free energy in terms of the correlation function of a fictitious system, h_{λ}(r,r^{'}), in which interactions λu(r,r^{'}) are gradually switched on as λ changes from 0 to 1. The function h_{λ}(r,r^{'}) is then obtained from the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation and the two equations constitute a general liquid-state framework for treating inhomogeneous fluids. The two equations do not yet constitute a closed set. In the present work we use the closure c_{λ}(r,r^{'})≈-λβu(r,r^{'}), known as the random-phase approximation (RPA). We demonstrate that the RPA is identical with the variational Gaussian approximation derived within the field-theoretical framework, originally derived and used for charged particles. We apply our generalized RPA approximation to the Gaussian core model and Coulomb charges. PMID:27415213

  1. Density functional formulation of the random-phase approximation for inhomogeneous fluids: Application to the Gaussian core and Coulomb particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydel, Derek; Ma, Manman

    2016-06-01

    Using the adiabatic connection, we formulate the free energy in terms of the correlation function of a fictitious system, hλ(r ,r') , in which interactions λ u (r ,r') are gradually switched on as λ changes from 0 to 1. The function hλ(r ,r') is then obtained from the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation and the two equations constitute a general liquid-state framework for treating inhomogeneous fluids. The two equations do not yet constitute a closed set. In the present work we use the closure cλ(r ,r') ≈-λ β u (r ,r') , known as the random-phase approximation (RPA). We demonstrate that the RPA is identical with the variational Gaussian approximation derived within the field-theoretical framework, originally derived and used for charged particles. We apply our generalized RPA approximation to the Gaussian core model and Coulomb charges.

  2. Silicate core-organic refractory mantle particles as interstellar dust and as aggregated in comets and stellar disks.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J M; Li, A

    1997-01-01

    The principal observational properties of silicate core-organic refractory mantle interstellar dust grains in the infrared at 3.4 microns and at 10 microns and 20 microns are discussed in terms of the cyclic evolution of particles forming in stellar atmospheres and undergoing subsequent accretion, photoprocessing and destruction (erosion). Laboratory plus space emulation of the photoprocessing of laboratory analog ices and refractories are discussed. The aggregated interstellar dust model of comets is summarized. The same properties required to explain the temperature and infrared properties of comet coma dust are shown to be needed to account for the infrared silicate and continuum emission of the beta Pictoris disk as produced by a cloud of comets orbiting the star.

  3. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  4. Nano-magnetic particles used in biomedicine: core and coating materials.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Z; Karimi, L; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications have been developed by many researchers. Separation, immunoassay, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia are enhanced by the use of suitable magnetic nanoparticles and coating materials in the form of ferrofluids. Due to their low biocompatibility and low dispersion in water solutions, nanoparticles that are used for biomedical applications require surface treatment. Various kinds of coating materials including organic materials (polymers), inorganic metals (gold, platinum) or metal oxides (aluminum oxide, cobalt oxide) have been attracted during the last few years. Based on the recent advances and the importance of nanomedicine in human life, this paper attempts to give a brief summary on the different ferrite nano-magnetic particles and coatings used in nanomedicine. PMID:23623057

  5. Nano-magnetic particles used in biomedicine: core and coating materials.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Z; Karimi, L; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications have been developed by many researchers. Separation, immunoassay, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia are enhanced by the use of suitable magnetic nanoparticles and coating materials in the form of ferrofluids. Due to their low biocompatibility and low dispersion in water solutions, nanoparticles that are used for biomedical applications require surface treatment. Various kinds of coating materials including organic materials (polymers), inorganic metals (gold, platinum) or metal oxides (aluminum oxide, cobalt oxide) have been attracted during the last few years. Based on the recent advances and the importance of nanomedicine in human life, this paper attempts to give a brief summary on the different ferrite nano-magnetic particles and coatings used in nanomedicine.

  6. Ambipolar Diffusion and Star Formation: Formation and Contraction of Axisymmetric Cloud Cores. II. Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Robert A.; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    1993-10-01

    The problem of the formation and contraction of fragments (or cores) in magnetically supported parent molecular clouds was formulated in a previous paper. Three dimensionless free parameters appear in the evolution equations: the initial ratio of the free-fall and neutral-ion collision times (in the uniform reference state), νff,0, the exponent κ in the relation between the ion and neutral densities ni ∝ nkn, and the initial ratio of the magnetic and thermal pressures, α0. The initial central mass-to-flux ratio in units of the critical value for gravitational collapse, μ0 enters through the initial conditions. We follow both the quasistatic and dynamic phases of contraction and demonstrate that ambipolar diffusion leads to self-initiated protostar formation ("quasistatic" meaning motion with negligible acceleration). A typical cloud core forms and contracts quasi- statically on the flux-loss time scale until the central mass-to-flux ratio (dM/dΦB)c exceeds the critical value. During quasistatic contraction, the magnetic field lines are essentially "held in place" as the neutrals contract through them, and the field strength increases by less than a factor of 2. Despite subsequent dynamic contraction perpendicular to magnetic field lines, thermal pressure continues to balance gravity along field lines, thereby enforcing quasistatic contraction in this direction. We follow the contraction until the central density nc increases by a factor of 106 (typically from 3 × 102 to 3 × 108 cm-3). The envelope remains magnetically supported. The results from our parameter study show that decreasing νff,0 speeds up ambipolar diffusion, shortens the quasistatic phase of contraction, and causes (dM/dΦB)c to increase by a greater amount above the critical value. The enhancement of the central magnetic field Bc, however, is not sensitive to the value of νff,0. A smaller κ leads to progressively more rapid ambipolar diffusion as nc increases. Reducing μ0 lengthens the

  7. [Adsorption of Cu on Core-shell Structured Magnetic Particles: Relationship Between Adsorption Performance and Surface Properties].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-mei; Chen, Jing; Li, Hai-ning; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Gao-sheng

    2015-12-01

    In order to reveal the relationship between the adsorption performance of adsorbents and their compositions, structure, and surface properties, the core-shell structured Fe₃O₄/MnO2 and Fe-Mn/Mn₂2 magnetic particles were systematically characterized using multiple techniques and their Cu adsorption behaviors as well as mechanism were also investigated in details. It was found that both Fe₃O4 and Fe-Mn had spinel structure and no obvious crystalline phase change was observed after coating with MnO₂. The introduction of Mn might improve the affinity between the core and the shell, and therefore enhanced the amount and distribution uniformity of the MnO₂ coated. Consequently, Fe-Mn/MnO₂ exhibited a higher BET specific surface area and a lower isoelectric point. The results of sorption experiments showed that Fe-Mn had a higher maximal Cu adsorption capacity of 33.7 mg · g⁻¹ at pH 5.5, compared with 17.5 mg · g⁻¹ of Fe₃O4. After coating, the maximal adsorption capacity of Fe-Mn/MnO₂ was increased to 58.2 mg · g⁻¹, which was 2.6 times as high as that of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ and outperformed the majority of magnetic adsorbents reported in literature. In addition, a specific adsorption of Cu occurred at the surface of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ or Fe-Mn/MnO₂ through the formation of inner-sphere complexes. In conclusion, the adsorption performance of the magnetic particles was positively related to their compositions, structure, and surface properties. PMID:27011990

  8. [Adsorption of Cu on Core-shell Structured Magnetic Particles: Relationship Between Adsorption Performance and Surface Properties].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-mei; Chen, Jing; Li, Hai-ning; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Gao-sheng

    2015-12-01

    In order to reveal the relationship between the adsorption performance of adsorbents and their compositions, structure, and surface properties, the core-shell structured Fe₃O₄/MnO2 and Fe-Mn/Mn₂2 magnetic particles were systematically characterized using multiple techniques and their Cu adsorption behaviors as well as mechanism were also investigated in details. It was found that both Fe₃O4 and Fe-Mn had spinel structure and no obvious crystalline phase change was observed after coating with MnO₂. The introduction of Mn might improve the affinity between the core and the shell, and therefore enhanced the amount and distribution uniformity of the MnO₂ coated. Consequently, Fe-Mn/MnO₂ exhibited a higher BET specific surface area and a lower isoelectric point. The results of sorption experiments showed that Fe-Mn had a higher maximal Cu adsorption capacity of 33.7 mg · g⁻¹ at pH 5.5, compared with 17.5 mg · g⁻¹ of Fe₃O4. After coating, the maximal adsorption capacity of Fe-Mn/MnO₂ was increased to 58.2 mg · g⁻¹, which was 2.6 times as high as that of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ and outperformed the majority of magnetic adsorbents reported in literature. In addition, a specific adsorption of Cu occurred at the surface of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ or Fe-Mn/MnO₂ through the formation of inner-sphere complexes. In conclusion, the adsorption performance of the magnetic particles was positively related to their compositions, structure, and surface properties.

  9. Rapid removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions using thiol-functionalized Zn-doped biomagnetite particles.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Wang, Wei; Moon, Ji-Won; Howe, Jane; Pierce, Eric M; Liang, Liyuan

    2012-08-01

    The surfaces of Zn-doped biomagnetite nanostructured particles were functionalized with (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and used as a high-capacity and collectable adsorbent for the removal of Hg(II) from water. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the attachment of MPTMS on the particle surface. The crystallite size of the Zn-doped biomagnetite was ∼17 nm, and the thickness of the MPTMS coating was ∼5 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analyses revealed that the particles formed aggregates in aqueous solution with an average hydrodynamic size of 826 ± 32 nm. Elemental analyses indicate that the chemical composition of the biomagnetite is Zn(0.46)Fe(2.54)O(4), and the loading of sulfur is 3.6 mmol/g. The MPTMS-modified biomagnetite has a calculated saturation magnetization of 37.9 emu/g and can be separated from water within a minute using a magnet. Sorption of Hg(II) to the nanostructured particles was much faster than other commercial sorbents, and the Hg(II) sorption isotherm in an industrial wastewater follows the Langmuir model with a maximum capacity of ∼416 mg/g, indicating two -SH groups bonded to one Hg. This new Hg(II) sorbent was stable in a range of solutions, from contaminated water to 0.5 M acid solutions, with low leaching of Fe, Zn, Si, and S (<10%).

  10. The lithium isotope ratio in Population II halo dwarfs - A proposed test of the late decaying massive particle nucleosynthesis scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Lawrence; Schramm, David N.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that observations of the lithium isotope ratio in high surface temperature Population II stars may be critical to cosmological nucleosynthesis models. In particular, decaying particle scenarios as derived in some supersymmetric models may stand or fall with such observations.

  11. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II. Module 32-3, Fundamentals of Magnetic Particle Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groseclose, Richard

    This third in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II explains the principles of magnets and magnetic fields and how they are applied in magnetic particle testing, describes the theory and methods of magnetizing test specimens, describes the test equipment used, discusses the principles and…

  12. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Brooks, Dusty Marie

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  13. Modeling the water circulation in the North Atlantic in the scope of the CORE-II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, K. V.; Grankina, T. B.; Ibraev, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical experiment on the reproduction of the variability in the state of North Atlantic water in 1948-2007 with a spatial resolution of 0.25° has been performed using the global ocean model developed at Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS), and the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology (IO RAS) (the INM-IO model). The data on the state of the atmosphere, radiation fluxes, and bulk formulas of the CORE-II protocol are used as boundary conditions. Five successive 60-year calculation cycles have been performed in order to obtain the quasi-equilibrium state of a model ocean. For the last 20 years, the main elements of large-scale ocean circulation have been analyzed and compared with the WOA09 atlas data and the results of other models.

  14. The mutable nature of particle-core excitations with spin in the one-valence-proton nucleus 133Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchi, G.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Colò, G.; Bortignon, P. F.; Bottoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Blanc, A.; de France, G.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Régis, J.-M.; Simpson, G.; Soldner, T.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Fraile, L. M.; Lozeva, R.; Belvito, B.; Benzoni, G.; Bruce, A.; Carroll, R.; Cieplicka-Oryǹczak, N.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Didierjean, F.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Kröll, T.; Lalkovski, S.; Mach, H.; Mărginean, N.; Melon, B.; Mengoni, D.; Million, B.; Nannini, A.; Napoli, D.; Olaizola, B.; Paziy, V.; Podolyák, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Saed-Samii, N.; Szpak, B.; Vedia, V.

    2016-09-01

    The γ-ray decay of excited states of the one-valence-proton nucleus 133Sb has been studied using cold-neutron induced fission of 235U and 241Pu targets, during the EXILL campaign at the ILL reactor in Grenoble. By using a highly efficient HPGe array, coincidences between γ-rays prompt with the fission event and those delayed up to several tens of microseconds were investigated, allowing to observe, for the first time, high-spin excited states above the 16.6 μs isomer. Lifetimes analysis, performed by fast-timing techniques with LaBr3(Ce) scintillators, revealed a difference of almost two orders of magnitude in B(M1) strength for transitions between positive-parity medium-spin yrast states. The data are interpreted by a newly developed microscopic model which takes into account couplings between core excitations (both collective and non-collective) of the doubly magic nucleus 132Sn and the valence proton, using the Skyrme effective interaction in a consistent way. The results point to a fast change in the nature of particle-core excitations with increasing spin.

  15. DIAGNOSING THE TIME DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. II. NANOFLARE TRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Klimchuk, J. A. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2013-02-20

    The time dependence of heating in solar active regions can be studied by analyzing the slope of the emission measure distribution coolward of the peak. In a previous study we showed that low-frequency heating can account for 0% to 77% of active region core emission measures. We now turn our attention to heating by a finite succession of impulsive events for which the timescale between events on a single magnetic strand is shorter than the cooling timescale. We refer to this scenario as a 'nanoflare train' and explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. Our conclusions are (1) nanoflare trains are consistent with 86% to 100% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are properly accounted for; (2) steeper slopes are found for larger values of the ratio of the train duration {Delta} {sub H} to the post-train cooling and draining timescale {Delta} {sub C}, where {Delta} {sub H} depends on the number of heating events, the event duration and the time interval between successive events ({tau} {sub C}); (3) {tau} {sub C} may be diagnosed from the width of the hot component of the emission measure provided that the temperature bins are much smaller than 0.1 dex; (4) the slope of the emission measure alone is not sufficient to provide information about any timescale associated with heating-the length and density of the heated structure must be measured for {Delta} {sub H} to be uniquely extracted from the ratio {Delta} {sub H}/{Delta} {sub C}.

  16. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Santosh P.; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D.; Govindarajan, J.

    2013-02-15

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a= 25 cm and major radius, R= 75 cm) using a 45 Degree-Sign parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and {Delta}E/E of high-energy channel has been found to be {approx}10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature T{sub i}(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically T{sub e}(0) {approx} 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  17. Simultaneous retrieval of the complex refractive indices of the core and shell of coated aerosol particles from extinction measurements using simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Erlick, Carynelisa; Haspel, Mitch; Rudich, Yinon

    2011-08-01

    Simultaneously retrieving the complex refractive indices of the core and shell of coated aerosol particles given the measured extinction efficiency as a function of particle dimensions (core diameter and coated diameter) is much more difficult than retrieving the complex refractive index of homogeneous aerosol particles. Not only must the minimization be performed over a four-parameter space, making it less efficient, but in addition the absolute value of the difference between the measured extinction and the calculated extinction does not have an easily distinguished global minimum. Rather, there are a number of local minima to which almost all conventional retrieval algorithms converge. In this work, we develop a new (to our knowledge) retrieval algorithm that employs the numerical method known as simulated annealing with an innovative "temperature" schedule. This study is limited only to spherical particles with a concentric shell and to cases in which the diameter of both the core and the coated particle are known. We find that when the top ranking particle sizes according to their information content are combined from separate experiments to make up the particle size distribution, the simulated annealing retrieval algorithm is quite robust and by far superior to a greedy random perturbation approach often used.

  18. CALTECH CORE-COLLAPSE PROJECT (CCCP) OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: EVIDENCE FOR THREE DISTINCT PHOTOMETRIC SUBTYPES

    SciTech Connect

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Cenko, S. Bradley; Becker, Adam B.; Fox, Derek B.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Sand, David J.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Kiewe, Michael; Scheps, Raphael; Birenbaum, Gali; Chamudot, Daniel; Zhou, Jonathan

    2012-09-10

    We present R-band light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe) from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). With the exception of interacting (Type IIn) SNe and rare events with long rise times, we find that most light curve shapes belong to one of three apparently distinct classes: plateau, slowly declining, and rapidly declining events. The last class is composed solely of Type IIb SNe which present similar light curve shapes to those of SNe Ib, suggesting, perhaps, similar progenitor channels. We do not find any intermediate light curves, implying that these subclasses are unlikely to reflect variance of continuous parameters, but rather might result from physically distinct progenitor systems, strengthening the suggestion of a binary origin for at least some stripped SNe. We find a large plateau luminosity range for SNe IIP, while the plateau lengths seem rather uniform at approximately 100 days. As analysis of additional CCCP data goes on and larger samples are collected, demographic studies of core-collapse SNe will likely continue to provide new constraints on progenitor scenarios.

  19. Enhanced photoluminescence properties of methylene blue dye encapsulated in nanosized hydroxyapatite/silica particles with core-shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaolu; Li, Chengfeng; Fan, Chengyu; Feng, Xiaoxing; Cao, Bingqiang

    2013-11-01

    Organic dye of methylene blue (MB) was encapsulated in core-shell structured hydroxyapatite/silica particles (HAp/silica-MB) through a modified Stöber method with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone molecules. It was found that MB molecules were released from HAp/silica-MB at a slower rate than those from silica-MB in deionized water. In phosphate buffered saline (pH: 7.2-7.4) and acidic solutions (pH: 1.5-1.6), the penetration of ions in the interface influenced the interaction between HAp and MB molecules, which resulted in the rapid release of MB molecules from HAp/silica-MB. From the UV-Vis absorbance spectra, one could see that MB molecules in HAp/silica-MB were weakly aggregated in comparison with those in silica-MB. For HAp/silica-MB, enhanced luminescence properties were observed in the photoluminescence spectra and dual luminescence with two emission peaks were caused by the presence of monomers and dimers. Contrarily, no photoluminescence emission was detected for samples of free MB and silica-MB under the same excitation condition because of the self-quenching effect. It was the adsorption of MB molecules on HAp that had resulted in the enlargement of intramolecular distance and the reduction of self-quenching effect. These hybrid particles with enhanced luminescent properties might find wide applications in the field of bioanalysis, bioseparation, and biomedical imaging.

  20. Preparation by alkaline treatment and detailed characterisation of empty hepatitis B virus core particles for vaccine and gene therapy applications

    PubMed Central

    Strods, Arnis; Ose, Velta; Bogans, Janis; Cielens, Indulis; Kalnins, Gints; Radovica, Ilze; Kazaks, Andris; Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the most powerful protein engineering tools utilised to expose immunological epitopes and/or cell-targeting signals and for the packaging of genetic material and immune stimulatory sequences. Although HBc VLPs and their numerous derivatives are produced in highly efficient bacterial and yeast expression systems, the existing purification and packaging protocols are not sufficiently optimised and standardised. Here, a simple alkaline treatment method was employed for the complete removal of internal RNA from bacteria- and yeast-produced HBc VLPs and for the conversion of these VLPs into empty particles, without any damage to the VLP structure. The empty HBc VLPs were able to effectively package the added DNA and RNA sequences. Furthermore, the alkaline hydrolysis technology appeared efficient for the purification and packaging of four different HBc variants carrying lysine residues on the HBc VLP spikes. Utilising the introduced lysine residues and the intrinsic aspartic and glutamic acid residues exposed on the tips of the HBc spikes for chemical coupling of the chosen peptide and/or nucleic acid sequences ensured a standard and easy protocol for the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications. PMID:26113394

  1. Preparation by alkaline treatment and detailed characterisation of empty hepatitis B virus core particles for vaccine and gene therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Strods, Arnis; Ose, Velta; Bogans, Janis; Cielens, Indulis; Kalnins, Gints; Radovica, Ilze; Kazaks, Andris; Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the most powerful protein engineering tools utilised to expose immunological epitopes and/or cell-targeting signals and for the packaging of genetic material and immune stimulatory sequences. Although HBc VLPs and their numerous derivatives are produced in highly efficient bacterial and yeast expression systems, the existing purification and packaging protocols are not sufficiently optimised and standardised. Here, a simple alkaline treatment method was employed for the complete removal of internal RNA from bacteria- and yeast-produced HBc VLPs and for the conversion of these VLPs into empty particles, without any damage to the VLP structure. The empty HBc VLPs were able to effectively package the added DNA and RNA sequences. Furthermore, the alkaline hydrolysis technology appeared efficient for the purification and packaging of four different HBc variants carrying lysine residues on the HBc VLP spikes. Utilising the introduced lysine residues and the intrinsic aspartic and glutamic acid residues exposed on the tips of the HBc spikes for chemical coupling of the chosen peptide and/or nucleic acid sequences ensured a standard and easy protocol for the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications. PMID:26113394

  2. Preparation by alkaline treatment and detailed characterisation of empty hepatitis B virus core particles for vaccine and gene therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strods, Arnis; Ose, Velta; Bogans, Janis; Cielens, Indulis; Kalnins, Gints; Radovica, Ilze; Kazaks, Andris; Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the most powerful protein engineering tools utilised to expose immunological epitopes and/or cell-targeting signals and for the packaging of genetic material and immune stimulatory sequences. Although HBc VLPs and their numerous derivatives are produced in highly efficient bacterial and yeast expression systems, the existing purification and packaging protocols are not sufficiently optimised and standardised. Here, a simple alkaline treatment method was employed for the complete removal of internal RNA from bacteria- and yeast-produced HBc VLPs and for the conversion of these VLPs into empty particles, without any damage to the VLP structure. The empty HBc VLPs were able to effectively package the added DNA and RNA sequences. Furthermore, the alkaline hydrolysis technology appeared efficient for the purification and packaging of four different HBc variants carrying lysine residues on the HBc VLP spikes. Utilising the introduced lysine residues and the intrinsic aspartic and glutamic acid residues exposed on the tips of the HBc spikes for chemical coupling of the chosen peptide and/or nucleic acid sequences ensured a standard and easy protocol for the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications.

  3. Antiviral Activity of Gold/Copper Sulfide Core/Shell Nanoparticles against Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Broglie, Jessica Jenkins; Alston, Brittny; Yang, Chang; Ma, Lun; Adcock, Audrey F.; Chen, Wei; Yang, Liju

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide in a plethora of residential and commercial settings, including restaurants, schools, and hospitals. Methods for easily detecting the virus and for treating and preventing infection are critical to stopping norovirus outbreaks, and inactivation via nanoparticles (NPs) is a more universal and attractive alternative to other physical and chemical approaches. Using norovirus GI.1 (Norwalk) virus-like particles (VLPs) as a model viral system, this study characterized the antiviral activity of Au/CuS core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) against GI.1 VLPs for the rapid inactivation of HuNoV. Inactivation of VLPs (GI.1) by Au/CuS NPs evaluated using an absorbance-based ELISA indicated that treatment with 0.083 μM NPs for 10 min inactivated ~50% VLPs in a 0.37 μg/ml VLP solution and 0.83 μM NPs for 10 min completely inactivated the VLPs. Increasing nanoparticle concentration and/or VLP-NP contact time significantly increased the virucidal efficacy of Au/CuS NPs. Changes to the VLP particle morphology, size, and capsid protein were characterized using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis. The strategy reported here provides the first reported proof-of-concept Au/CuS NPs-based virucide for rapidly inactivating human norovirus. PMID:26474396

  4. Computer modeling reveals that modifications of the histone tail charges define salt-dependent interaction of the nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2009-03-18

    Coarse-grained Langevin molecular dynamics computer simulations were conducted for systems that mimic solutions of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP was modeled as a negatively charged spherical particle representing the complex of DNA and the globular part of the histones combined with attached strings of connected charged beads modeling the histone tails. The size, charge, and distribution of the tails relative to the core were built to match real NCPs. Three models of NCPs were constructed to represent different extents of covalent modification on the histone tails: (nonmodified) recombinant (rNCP), acetylated (aNCP), and acetylated and phosphorylated (paNCP). The simulation cell contained 10 NCPs in a dielectric continuum with explicit mobile counterions and added salt. The NCP-NCP interaction is decisively dependent on the modification state of the histone tails and on salt conditions. Increasing the monovalent salt concentration (KCl) from salt-free to physiological concentration leads to NCP aggregation in solution for rNCP, whereas NCP associates are observed only occasionally in the system of aNCPs. In the presence of divalent salt (Mg(2+)), rNCPs form dense stable aggregates, whereas aNCPs form aggregates less frequently. Aggregates are formed via histone-tail bridging and accumulation of counterions in the regions of NCP-NCP contacts. The paNCPs do not show NCP-NCP interaction upon addition of KCl or in the presence of Mg(2+). Simulations for systems with a gradual substitution of K(+) for Mg(2+), to mimic the Mg(2+) titration of an NCP solution, were performed. The rNCP system showed stronger aggregation that occurred at lower concentrations of added Mg(2+), compared to the aNCP system. Additional molecular dynamics simulations performed with a single NCP in the simulation cell showed that detachment of the tails from the NCP core was modest under a wide range of salt concentrations. This implies that salt-induced tail dissociation of the

  5. Contamination of the Environmental Records by Resuspended Particles to the Sediments at IMAGES Coring Sites in the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoshima, K.; Kawahata, H.; Ishizaki, Y.; Yamaoka, K.; Gupta, L. P.

    2006-12-01

    IMAGES cores have been retrieved in high sedimentation rate areas in the coastal and hemipelagic region in order to reconstruct the ultrahigh-resolution marine climate records. Lithogenics are a generally more important component to enhance the sedimentation rate than biogenic components. They may be mainly laterally transported and deposited on the IMAGES coring sites. However, our knowledge about these processes is rather limited. Therefore we deployed sediment traps just above the IMAGES sites in the northwestern North Pacific. Lithogenics were generally the major component of settling particles followed by biogenic opal (silica). Both contributed ~70 % of the total mass flux at Site Simokita. High lithogenic flux was associated with significant contribution of degraded organic material resuspended from the relative shallow seafloor, which was affected by high intensity of the Tsugaru Current. Relatively good correlation of lithogenics with carbonate and biogenic opal suggested that resuspended material contributed partly to carbonate and biogenic opal flux. Lithogenic flux showed a maximum from October to early January while the export flux showed a large maximum in April - June and a broad minimum in November - March. The total hydrolyzable amino acids (THAA) and hexosamines (THHA), the most labile organic compounds, were well correlated with OM in content (r2 = 0.86), which suggested that OM, reflecting primary production, was directly transported from the surface ocean to the seafloor sediments. Flux-corrected mean alkenone temperature of 13.8 degree was comparable to that (15.7 degree) measured in the surface sediments, which is consistent with the modern mean temperature of 15.9 degree in the surface ocean (20-30 m) in July - August. Accumulation rates of biogenic opal and lithogenics in the surface sediments were much higher than those recorded by sediment traps by ~200 % and ~510 %, respectively, while those of carbonate and OM were lower by ~22 % and

  6. Glucose sensing through Fano resonances in mesoscale silica core-gold shell particles arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincella, Francesca; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a versatile, cheap and reusable plasmonic sensor able to detect glucose in the physiological concentration range by means of a simple label-free optical detection scheme. In order to achieve the aforementioned goal we applied a self-assembly deposition technique for the large-scale arraying of mesoscale gold nanoshell particles. Different from metallic nanospheres arrays, the localized surface plasmon resonances of gold nanoshells arrays extend in both the visible and near-infrared range, making them extremely promising for their use in biological media. Furthermore, the optical response of mesoscale gold nanoshells arrays showed another remarkable characteristic, which is the presence of various Fano resonances that have the advantage of enhancing the sensitivity of the plasmonic substrate to the external media thanks to their sharp features and increased spectral contrast. The plasmonic sensor was shown to have an extended working range with a good linear response for large refractive index shifts, where a bulk refractive index sensitivity of 0.93 RIU-1 (RIU, refractive index units) was achieved experimentally. In addition, the plasmonic sensor could detect aqueous glucose solutions in the blood concentration range (0-25 mM), with a sensitivity of 0.24 M-1.

  7. Preparation and characterization of polymer electrolyte membranes based on silicon-containing core-shell structured nanocomposite latex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shuangling; Sun, Chenggang; Gao, Yushan; Cui, Xuejun

    2015-09-01

    A series of silicon-containing core-shell structured polyacrylate/2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (SiO2-CS-PA/A) nanocomposite latex particles are prepared by the emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization of acrylate monomers and various amount of 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) with colloidal nanosilica particles as seed. The chemical and morphological structures of latex particles with high monomer conversion are determined using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SiO2-CS-PA/A nanocomposite membranes are fabricated through pouring the latex onto a clean surface of glass and drying at 60 °C for 10 h and 120 °C for 2 h. The nanocomposite membranes possess good thermal and dimensional stability. In addition, in comparison to Nafion® 117, the nanocomposite membranes exhibit moderate proton conductivity, significantly better methanol barrier and selectivity. The methanol diffusion coefficient is in the range of 1.03 × 10-8 to 5.26 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 which is about two orders of magnitude lower than that of Nafion® 117 (2.36 × 10-6 cm2 s-1). The SiO2-CS-PA/A 5 membrane shows the highest selectivity value (2.34 × 105 S cm-3) which is approximately 11.0 times of that (2.13 × 104 S cm-3) of Nafion® 117. These results indicate that the nanocomposite membranes are promising candidates to be used as polymer electrolyte membranes in direct methanol fuel cells.

  8. Wrinkle-assisted linear assembly of hard-core/soft-shell particles: impact of the soft shell on the local structure.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mareen; Karg, Matthias; Fortini, Andrea; Hellweg, Thomas; Fery, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    This article addresses wrinkle assisted assembly of core-shell particles with hard cores and soft poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) shells. As core materials we chose silica as well as silver nanoparticles. The assembled structures show that the soft shells act as a separator between the inorganic cores. Anisotropic alignment is found on two length scales, macroscopically guided through the wrinkle structure and locally due to deformation of the polymer shell leading to smaller inter-core separations as compared to assembly on flat substrates without confinement. The structures were analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy. Radial distribution functions are shown, clearly highlighting the impact of confinement on nearest neighbour distances and symmetry. The observed ordering is directly compared to Monte-Carlo simulations for hard-core/soft-shell particles, showing that the observed symmetries are a consequence of the soft interaction potential and differ qualitatively from a hard-sphere situation. For the silver-poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) particles, we show UV-vis absorbance measurements revealing optical anisotropy of the generated structures due to plasmon coupling. Furthermore, the high degree of order of the assembled structures on macroscopic areas is demonstrated by laser diffraction effects. PMID:22395669

  9. Biomimetic synthesis of raspberry-like hybrid polymer-silica core-shell nanoparticles by templating colloidal particles with hairy polyamine shell.

    PubMed

    Pi, Mengwei; Yang, Tingting; Yuan, Jianjun; Fujii, Syuji; Kakigi, Yuichi; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Cheng, Shiyuan

    2010-07-01

    The nanoparticles composed of polystyrene core and poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDEA) hairy shell were used as colloidal templates for in situ silica mineralization, allowing the well-controlled synthesis of hybrid silica core-shell nanoparticles with raspberry-like morphology and hollow silica nanoparticles by subsequent calcination. Silica deposition was performed by simply stirring a mixture of the polymeric core-shell particles in isopropanol, tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and water at 25 degrees C for 2.5h. No experimental evidence was found for nontemplated silica formation, which indicated that silica deposition occurred exclusively in the PDEA shell and formed PDEA-silica hybrid shell. The resulting hybrid silica core-shell particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetry, aqueous electrophoresis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TEM studies indicated that the hybrid particles have well-defined core-shell structure with raspberry morphology after silica deposition. We found that the surface nanostructure of hybrid nanoparticles and the composition distribution of PDEA-silica hybrid shell could be well controlled by adjusting the silicification conditions. These new hybrid core-shell nanoparticles and hollow silica nanoparticles would have potential applications for high-performance coatings, encapsulation and delivery of active organic molecules.

  10. Biomimetic synthesis of raspberry-like hybrid polymer-silica core-shell nanoparticles by templating colloidal particles with hairy polyamine shell.

    PubMed

    Pi, Mengwei; Yang, Tingting; Yuan, Jianjun; Fujii, Syuji; Kakigi, Yuichi; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Cheng, Shiyuan

    2010-07-01

    The nanoparticles composed of polystyrene core and poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDEA) hairy shell were used as colloidal templates for in situ silica mineralization, allowing the well-controlled synthesis of hybrid silica core-shell nanoparticles with raspberry-like morphology and hollow silica nanoparticles by subsequent calcination. Silica deposition was performed by simply stirring a mixture of the polymeric core-shell particles in isopropanol, tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and water at 25 degrees C for 2.5h. No experimental evidence was found for nontemplated silica formation, which indicated that silica deposition occurred exclusively in the PDEA shell and formed PDEA-silica hybrid shell. The resulting hybrid silica core-shell particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetry, aqueous electrophoresis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TEM studies indicated that the hybrid particles have well-defined core-shell structure with raspberry morphology after silica deposition. We found that the surface nanostructure of hybrid nanoparticles and the composition distribution of PDEA-silica hybrid shell could be well controlled by adjusting the silicification conditions. These new hybrid core-shell nanoparticles and hollow silica nanoparticles would have potential applications for high-performance coatings, encapsulation and delivery of active organic molecules. PMID:20347275

  11. SIMMER-II: A computer program for LMFBR disrupted core analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Luck, L.B.

    1990-06-01

    SIMMER-2 (Version 12) is a computer program to predict the coupled neutronic and fluid-dynamics behavior of liquid-metal fast reactors during core-disruptive accident transients. The modeling philosophy is based on the use of general, but approximate, physics to represent interactions of accident phenomena and regimes rather than a detailed representation of specialized situations. Reactor neutronic behavior is predicted by solving space (r,z), energy, and time-dependent neutron conservation equations (discrete ordinates transport or diffusion). The neutronics and the fluid dynamics are coupled via temperature- and background-dependent cross sections and the reactor power distribution. The fluid-dynamics calculation solves multicomponent, multiphase, multifield equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation in (r,z) or (x,y) geometry. A structure field with nine density and five energy components; a liquid field with eight density and six energy components; and a vapor field with six density and on energy component are coupled by exchange functions representing a modified-dispersed flow regime with a zero-dimensional intra-cell structure model.

  12. Particle identification with the TOP and ARICH detectors at Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torassa, E.

    2016-07-01

    The SuperKEKB e+e- collider will provide 40 times higher instantaneous luminosity than the KEKB collider. The Belle II detector, located at the collision point, is the upgrade of the Belle detector. The particle identification will be improved by replacing the aerogel threshold counter with two new high performance Cherenkov detectors: the time-of-propagation (TOP) in the barrel region and the focusing aerogel (ARICH) in the forward region. The time-of-propagation sub-detector consists of quartz radiator bars and micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes. The Cherenkov photons are produced and propagated through the quartz radiator, and after multiple internal reflections they are detected by the photomultiplier tubes. Photons with different Cherenkov angles reach different photomultiplier channels and arrive at different times. The time and the position convolution is used for the reconstruction of the Cherenkov angle. The focusing aerogel consists of a double layer aerogel radiator, an expansion volume and a photon detector. The aerogel thickness and the refractive indices of the two layers are optimized to focus the two light cones at the detection surface. The key features of these two detectors, the performance studies, and the construction progress are presented.

  13. Controlled delivery of stromal derived factor-1α from poly lactic-co-glycolic acid core-shell particles to recruit mesenchymal stem cells for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Maedeh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Thian, Eng San; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2015-08-01

    Stromal derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) has shown promising results in treatment of myocardial infarction (MI), via recruitment of endogenous stem cells into the injured myocardium. However, the bioactivity of this susceptible signalling chemokine is reduced significantly during the common fabrication processes of drug delivery systems, due to the exposure to organic-aqueous interfaces or elevated temperature. In this study, we developed a novel SDF-1α delivery system using coaxial electrospraying, the technique which enables fabrication of core-shell particles with minimized contact of organic-aqueous phases. The SDF-1α incorporated PLGA particles exhibited distinct core-shell structure, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Controlled release of SDF-1α was obtained for at least 40days, and the release rate was tailored by co-encapsulation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) into the core of the particles. The SDF-1α released from PLGA/SDF-1α and PLGA/BSA-SDF-1α particles retained its chemotactic activity, and enhanced the number of migrated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by 38% and 54%, respectively, compared to basal medium used as the control. Moreover, both SDF-1α and BSA supported the proliferation of MSCs within 3days of cell culture. The SDF-1α incorporated core-shell particles developed by electrospraying technique, can be effectively employed as injectable drug delivery system for in situ cardiac regeneration. PMID:25897850

  14. A Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem for automated control of PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II accelerator shots

    SciTech Connect

    Spiller, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem (SPSS) is an integral part of the automatic control system developed for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) by the Control Monitor (C/M) Software Development Team. This system has been designed to fully utilize the accelerator by tailoring shot parameters to the needs of the experimenters. The SPSS is the key to this flexibility. Automatic systems will be required on many pulsed power machines for the fastest turnaround, the highest reliability, and most cost effective operation. These systems will require the flexibility and the ease of use that is part of the SPSS. The PBFA II control system has proved to be an effective modular system, flexible enough to meet the demands of both the fast track construction of PBFA II and the control needs of Hermes III at the Simulation Technology Laboratory. This system is expected to meet the demands of most future machine changes.

  15. Computational investigation of longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, and trans-particle mass transfer in bulk, random packings of core-shell particles with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Baranau, Vasili; Khirevich, Siarhei; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2015-08-14

    In recent years, chromatographic columns packed with core-shell particles have been widely used for efficient and fast separations at comparatively low operating pressure. However, the influence of the porous shell properties on the mass transfer kinetics in core-shell packings is still not fully understood. We report on results obtained with a modeling approach to simulate three-dimensional advective-diffusive transport in bulk random packings of monosized core-shell particles, covering a range of reduced mobile phase flow velocities from 0.5 up to 1000. The impact of the effective diffusivity of analyte molecules in the porous shell and the shell thickness on the resulting plate height was investigated. An extension of Giddings' theory of coupled eddy dispersion to account for retention of analyte molecules due to stagnant regions in porous shells with zero mobile phase flow velocity is presented. The plate height equation involving a modified eddy dispersion term excellently describes simulated data obtained for particle-packings with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient. It is confirmed that the model of trans-particle mass transfer resistance of core-shell particles by Kaczmarski and Guiochon [42] is applicable up to a constant factor. We analyze individual contributions to the plate height from different mass transfer mechanisms in dependence of the shell parameters. The simulations demonstrate that a reduction of plate height in packings of core-shell relative to fully porous particles arises mainly due to reduced trans-particle mass transfer resistance and transchannel eddy dispersion.

  16. Computational investigation of longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, and trans-particle mass transfer in bulk, random packings of core-shell particles with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Baranau, Vasili; Khirevich, Siarhei; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2015-08-14

    In recent years, chromatographic columns packed with core-shell particles have been widely used for efficient and fast separations at comparatively low operating pressure. However, the influence of the porous shell properties on the mass transfer kinetics in core-shell packings is still not fully understood. We report on results obtained with a modeling approach to simulate three-dimensional advective-diffusive transport in bulk random packings of monosized core-shell particles, covering a range of reduced mobile phase flow velocities from 0.5 up to 1000. The impact of the effective diffusivity of analyte molecules in the porous shell and the shell thickness on the resulting plate height was investigated. An extension of Giddings' theory of coupled eddy dispersion to account for retention of analyte molecules due to stagnant regions in porous shells with zero mobile phase flow velocity is presented. The plate height equation involving a modified eddy dispersion term excellently describes simulated data obtained for particle-packings with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient. It is confirmed that the model of trans-particle mass transfer resistance of core-shell particles by Kaczmarski and Guiochon [42] is applicable up to a constant factor. We analyze individual contributions to the plate height from different mass transfer mechanisms in dependence of the shell parameters. The simulations demonstrate that a reduction of plate height in packings of core-shell relative to fully porous particles arises mainly due to reduced trans-particle mass transfer resistance and transchannel eddy dispersion. PMID:26162667

  17. Monodisperse porous polymer particles containing macrocyclic ether as a new class of sorbent for SR(II) separation

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Yuxiao; Bai, Feifei; Ye, Gang; Wei, Jichao; Wang, Jianchen; Chen, Jing

    2013-07-01

    Strontium{sup 90} is one of the typical fission products that may be found in high level liquid waste (HLLW). Separation of Sr{sup 90} prior to the vitrification is beneficial to the final treatment of solid radioactive waste. In this study, a new class of sorbent for Sr(II) was developed by loading the macrocyclic ether DtBuCH18C6 into the monodisperse porous polymer particles (MPPPs). The MPPPs are well-known as a promising chromatographic material due to the uniform particle size, porous morphology, good compatibility with organic extractants, and rigid matrix. The structure and micro-morphology of the sorbent particles were characterized. The adsorption behavior towards Sr(II) in HNO{sub 3} media was investigated by both batch and column experiments. High adsorption efficiency and selective separation of Sr(II) was obtained. The sorbent particles can be recycled for at least several times before obvious lose of the adsorption ability. This kind of sorbent possesses the potential to be used for strontium separation in radioactive liquid waste.

  18. Evaluation of SAGE II and Balloon-Borne Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements: Evaluation of Aerosol Measurements from SAGE II, HALOE, and Balloonborne Optical Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark; Deshler, Terry; Moddrea, G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol measurements from the University of Wyoming balloonborne optical particle counters (OPCs), the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, and the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) were compared in the period 1982-2000, when measurements were available. The OPCs measure aerosol size distributions, and HALOE multiwavelength (2.45-5.26 micrometers) extinction measurements can be used to retrieve aerosol size distributions. Aerosol extinctions at the SAGE II wavelengths (0.386-1.02 micrometers) were computed from these size distributions and compared to SAGE II measurements. In addition, surface areas derived from all three experiments were compared. While the overall impression from these results is encouraging, the agreement can change with latitude, altitude, time, and parameter. In the broadest sense, these comparisons fall into two categories: high aerosol loading (volcanic periods) and low aerosol loading (background periods and altitudes above 25 km). When the aerosol amount was low, SAGE II and HALOE extinctions were higher than the OPC estimates, while the SAGE II surface areas were lower than HALOE and the OPCS. Under high loading conditions all three instruments mutually agree to within 50%.

  19. Acclimation of a marine microbial consortium for efficient Mn(II) oxidation and manganese containing particle production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Pan, Haixia; Xu, Jianqiang; Xu, Weiping; Liu, Lifen

    2016-03-01

    Sediment contamination with metals is a widespread concern in the marine environment. Manganese oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are extensively distributed in various environments, but a marine microbial community containing MOB is rarely reported. In this study, a consortium of marine metal-contaminated sediments was acclimated using Mn(II). The shift in community structure was determined through high-throughput sequencing. In addition, the consortium resisted several harsh conditions, such as toxic metals (1mM Cu(II) and Fe(III)), and exhibited high Mn(II) oxidation capacities even the Mn(II) concentration was up to 5mM. Meanwhile, biogenic Mn containing particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and N2 adsorption/desorption. Dye removal performance of the Mn containing particles was assayed using methylene blue, and 20.8 mg g(-1) adsorption capacity was obtained. Overall, this study revealed several new genera associated with Mn(II) oxidation and rare biogenic Na3MnPO4CO3. Results suggested the complexity of natural microbe-mediated Mn transformation.

  20. Acclimation of a marine microbial consortium for efficient Mn(II) oxidation and manganese containing particle production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Pan, Haixia; Xu, Jianqiang; Xu, Weiping; Liu, Lifen

    2016-03-01

    Sediment contamination with metals is a widespread concern in the marine environment. Manganese oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are extensively distributed in various environments, but a marine microbial community containing MOB is rarely reported. In this study, a consortium of marine metal-contaminated sediments was acclimated using Mn(II). The shift in community structure was determined through high-throughput sequencing. In addition, the consortium resisted several harsh conditions, such as toxic metals (1mM Cu(II) and Fe(III)), and exhibited high Mn(II) oxidation capacities even the Mn(II) concentration was up to 5mM. Meanwhile, biogenic Mn containing particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and N2 adsorption/desorption. Dye removal performance of the Mn containing particles was assayed using methylene blue, and 20.8 mg g(-1) adsorption capacity was obtained. Overall, this study revealed several new genera associated with Mn(II) oxidation and rare biogenic Na3MnPO4CO3. Results suggested the complexity of natural microbe-mediated Mn transformation. PMID:26606462

  1. Ru(II) Tris(3,8-Dibromo-1,10-Phenanthro1ine): A New Versatile Core for the Divergent Synthesis of Hyperbranched Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia; Yang, Jinhua; Duan, Penggao; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    We report the first synthesis of Ru(II) tris(3,8-dibromo-1,lO-phenanthroline) bishexafluorophosphate, and we demonstrate its utility as a building core for the divergent synthesis of hyperbranched systems by coupling with phenylacetylene in the preparation of Rum tris(3,8-diphenylethynyl- 1,lO-phenanthroline) dihexafluorophosphate.

  2. Particle image velocimetry measurements in a representative gas-cooled prismatic reactor core model for the estimation of bypass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conder, Thomas E.

    Core bypass flow is considered one of the largest contributors to uncertainty in fuel temperature within the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). It refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial regions between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. These flows are of concern because they reduce the desired flow rates in the coolant channels, and thereby have significant influence on the maximum fuel element and coolant exit temperatures. Thus, accurate prediction of the bypass flow is important because it directly impacts core temperature, influencing the life and efficiency of the reactor. An experiment was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to quantify the flow in the coolant channels in relation to the interstitial gaps between fuel blocks in a representative MHTGR core. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the flow fields within a simplified model, which comprised of a stacked junction of six partial fuel blocks with nine coolant tubes, separated by a 6mm gap width. The model had three sections: The upper plenum, upper block, and lower block. Model components were fabricated from clear, fused quartz where optical access was needed for the PIV measurements. Measurements were taken in three streamwise locations: in the upper plenum and in the midsection of the large and small fuel blocks. A laser light sheet was oriented parallel to the flow, while velocity fields were measured at millimeter intervals across the width of the model, totaling 3,276 PIV measurement locations. Inlet conditions were varied to incorporate laminar, transition, and turbulent flows in the coolant channels---all which produced laminar flow in the gap and non-uniform, turbulent flow in the upper plenum. The images were analyzed to create vector maps, and the data was exported for processing and compilation. The bypass flow was estimated by calculating the flow rates through the coolant

  3. Incorporation of deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides by a dNTP-binding cleft mutated reverse transcriptase in hepatitis B virus core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hee-Young; Kim, Hye-Young; Jung, Jaesung; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2008-01-05

    Our recent observation that hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA polymerase (P) might initiate minus-strand DNA synthesis without primer [Kim et al., (2004) Virology 322, 22-30], raised a possibility that HBV P protein may have the potential to function as an RNA polymerase. Thus, we mutated Phe 436, a bulky amino acid with aromatic side chain, at the putative dNTP-binding cleft in reverse transcriptase (RT) domain of P protein to smaller amino acids (Gly or Val), and examined RNA polymerase activity. HBV core particles containing RT dNTP-binding cleft mutant P protein were able to incorporate {sup 32}P-ribonucleotides, but not HBV core particles containing wild type (wt), priming-deficient mutant, or RT-deficient mutant P proteins. Since all the experiments were conducted with core particles isolated from transfected cells, our results indicate that the HBV RT mutant core particles containing RT dNTP-binding cleft mutant P protein could incorporate both deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides in replicating systems.

  4. Probing the interface of core shell particles of GaPO 4 and AlPO 4 by 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulshreshtha, S. K.; Jayakumar, O. D.; Vishwanadh, B.; Sudarsan, V.

    2011-02-01

    Hexagonal GaPO 4, pseudo-hexagonal AlPO 4 and the core shell particles of these phosphates have been prepared in ethylene glycol medium at 180 °C, followed by annealing at 900 °C for 24 h and investigated by powder X-ray diffraction and 31P Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) techniques. The 31P NMR studies of these core shell particles showed a multi-component NMR pattern consisting of five peaks originating due to the distinct structural configurations formed by the varying number of Al 3+ and Ga 3+ as the next nearest neighbors around the probe 31P nuclei of the PO 4 tetrahedron. Existence of different PO 4 structural units with varying number of Al 3+ and Ga 3+ as its next nearest neighbors around P nucleus at the interface of the core shell particles has been confirmed. These results clearly indicate the bond formation at the interface between the core and shell material for these particles.

  5. Searches for Dark Matter with IceCube and DeepCore : New constraints on theories predicting dark matter particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danninger, Matthias

    The cubic-kilometer sized IceCube neutrino observatory, constructed in the glacial ice at the South Pole, searches indirectly for dark matter via neutrinos from dark matter self-annihilations. It has a high discovery potential through striking signatures. This thesis presents searches for dark matter annihilations in the center of the Sun using experimental data collected with IceCube. The main physics analysis described here was performed for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with the 79-string configuration of the IceCube neutrino telescope. For the first time, the DeepCore sub-array was included in the analysis, lowering the energy threshold and extending the search to the austral summer. Data from 317 days live-time are consistent with the expected background from atmospheric muons and neutrinos. Upper limits were set on the dark matter annihilation rate, with conversions to limits on the WIMP-proton scattering cross section, which initiates the WIMP capture process in the Sun.These are the most stringent spin-dependent WIMP-proton cross-sections limits to date above 35 GeV for most WIMP models. In addition, a formalism for quickly and directly comparing event-level IceCube data with arbitrary annihilation spectra in detailed model scans, considering not only total event counts but also event directions and energy estimators, is presented. Two analyses were made that show an application of this formalism to both model exclusion and parameter estimation in models of supersymmetry. An analysis was also conducted that extended for the first time indirect dark matter searches with neutrinos using IceCube data, to an alternative dark matter candidate, Kaluza-Klein particles, arising from theories with extra space-time dimensions. The methods developed for the solar dark matter search were applied to look for neutrino emission during a flare of the Crab Nebula in 2010.

  6. Carbonized medlar-core particles as a new biosorbent for removal of Cu(2+) from aqueous solution and study of its surface morphology.

    PubMed

    Samadani Langeroodi, Narges; Safaei, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the use of carbonized medlar-core particles as a new biosorbent to remove Cu(2+) from aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the biosorbent. This paper reports the effects of adsorbent dose, pH, temperature and concentration of adsorbate. Batch isotherm studies were also performed to understand the ability of the adsorbent. The adsorption behavior of the Cu(2+) was studied using Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity determined from the Langmuir adsorption equation has been found as 43.478 mg.g(-1) at 298.15 K. The adsorption of Cu(2+) by medlar core in carbonized form was spontaneous and endothermic. It was also found that the biosorption of Cu(2+) followed second-order kinetics. Carbonized medlar-core particles showed great potential in aqueous solution due to the high adsorption capacity. PMID:27387002

  7. Core phenomenology. TEC report on CRBRP PRA Phase II, Task 6C. Final draft report, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1984-04-04

    As part of the determination of the risk potential associated with core-damage accident sequences for the CRBRP, a review of the core-damage phenomenology is necessary. How core damage proceeds, its effects on the primary system boundary, and the timing and energetic potential associated with core damage are important to determining the challenge to containment and the ultimate release of fission products to the environment. This chapter addresses the phenomenology related to the core-damage processes and by the use of a core-response event tree, estimates are made of the probability that certain core-response scenarios are followed.

  8. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of a new oxygen-evolving photosystem II core complex from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Tang, X S; Diner, B A

    1994-04-19

    We describe here a new procedure permitting rapid (12-13 h) isolation of a pure oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) core complex from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. This procedure involves dodecyl maltoside extraction of thylakoid membranes followed by single-step column chromatography using a weak anion-exchanger. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting show that the complex consists of five intrinsic membrane proteins (CP47, CP43, D1, D1, and cyt b559), one extrinsic protein (MSP), and one unknown protein with a molecular mass of approximately 26 kDa. A chemical and functional analysis, normalized to 2 molecules of pheophytin a, indicates that this PSII core complex contains 1 photoactive plastoquinone, QA, 4 manganese atoms, 38 chlorophyll a molecules, 1 cytochrome b559, 2 plastoquinone-9, and 9-10 beta-carotenes. The complex exhibits high rates of oxygen evolution, typically 2400-2600 mumol of O2 (mg of Chl)-1 h-1 in the presence of 2,5-dichlorobenzoquinone as an artificial electron acceptor with a pH optimum of 6.5. A strong light minus dark multiline EPR signal, arising from the S2 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), is observed at 10 K following illumination at 198 K. The determination of the absolute oxygen yield per saturating microsecond flash indicates that essentially all of the PSII centers contain functional oxygen-evolving complexes. This point is further supported by the absence of photoaccumulation, upon room temperature illumination, of the immediate oxidant of the OEC, redox-active tyrosine, YZ.. On the basis of EPR spectra, oxidized minus reduced difference spectra, and SDS-PAGE, the preparation contains on a per mole basis with PSII only trace amounts of PSI (approximately 0.04), cytochrome b6/f complex (< or = 0.01), and ATPase (< or = 0.05). All of these results indicate that this PSII preparation is to date the most highly purified oxygen-evolving core complex from Synechocystis 6803 that retains all of the reaction centers active

  9. Rapid Histone-Catalyzed DNA Lesion Excision and Accompanying Protein Modification in Nucleosomes and Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liwei; Greenberg, Marc M

    2015-09-01

    C5'-Hydrogen atoms are frequently abstracted during DNA oxidation. The oxidized abasic lesion 5'-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB) is an electrophilic product of the C5'-radical. DOB is a potent irreversible inhibitor of DNA polymerase β, and forms interstrand cross-links in free DNA. We examined the reactivity of DOB within nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles (NCPs), the monomeric component of chromatin. Depending upon the position at which DOB is generated within a NCP, it is excised from nucleosomal DNA at a rate 275-1500-fold faster than that in free DNA. The half-life of DOB (7.0-16.8 min) in NCPs is shorter than any other abasic lesion. DOB's lifetime in NCPs is also significantly shorter than the estimated lifetime of an abasic site within a cell, suggesting that the observed chemistry would occur intracellularly. Histones also catalyze DOB excision when the lesion is present in the DNA linker region of a nucleosome. Schiff-base formation between DOB and histone proteins is detected in nucleosomes and NCPs, resulting in pyrrolone formation at the lysine residues. The lysines modified by DOB are often post-translationally modified. Consequently, the histone modifications described herein could affect the regulation of gene expression and may provide a chemical basis for the cytotoxicity of the DNA damaging agents that produce this lesion.

  10. N-Terminal α7 Deletion of the Proteasome 20S Core Particle Substitutes for Yeast PI31 Function

    PubMed Central

    Yashiroda, Hideki; Toda, Yousuke; Otsu, Saori; Takagi, Kenji; Mizushima, Tsunehiro

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome core particle (CP) is a conserved protease complex that is formed by the stacking of two outer α-rings and two inner β-rings. The α-ring is a heteroheptameric ring of subunits α1 to α7 and acts as a gate that restricts entry of substrate proteins into the catalytic cavity formed by the two abutting β-rings. The 31-kDa proteasome inhibitor (PI31) was originally identified as a protein that binds to the CP and inhibits CP activity in vitro, but accumulating evidence indicates that PI31 is required for physiological proteasome activity. To clarify the in vivo role of PI31, we examined the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PI31 ortholog Fub1. Fub1 was essential in a situation where the CP assembly chaperone Pba4 was deleted. The lethality of Δfub1 Δpba4 was suppressed by deletion of the N terminus of α7 (α7ΔN), which led to the partial activation of the CP. However, deletion of the N terminus of α3, which activates the CP more efficiently than α7ΔN by gate opening, did not suppress Δfub1 Δpba4 lethality. These results suggest that the α7 N terminus has a role in CP activation different from that of the α3 N terminus and that the role of Fub1 antagonizes a specific function of the α7 N terminus. PMID:25332237

  11. Comprehensive untargeted lipidomic analysis using core-shell C30 particle column and high field orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivas, Mónica; Zhang, Qibin

    2016-04-01

    The goal of untargeted lipidomics is to have high throughput, yet comprehensive and unambiguous identification and quantification of lipids. Novel stationary phases in LC separation and new mass spectrometric instruments capable of high mass resolving power and faster scanning rate are essential to achieving this goal. In this work, 4 reversed phase LC columns coupled with a high field quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometer (Q Exactive HF) were thoroughly compared using complex lipid standard mixture and rat plasma and liver samples. A good separation of all lipids was achieved in 24min of gradient. The columns compared include C30 and C18 functionalization on either core-shell or totally porous silica particles, with size ranging from 1.7 to 2.6μm. Accucore C30 column showed the narrowest peaks and highest theoretical plate number, and excellent peak capacity and retention time reproducibility (<1% standard deviation). As a result, it resulted in 430 lipid species identified from rat plasma and rat liver samples with highest confidence. The high resolution offered by the up-front RPLC allowed discrimination of cis/trans isomeric lipid species, and the high field orbitrap mass spectrometer afforded the clear distinction of isobaric lipid species in full scan MS and the unambiguous assignment of sn-positional isomers for lysophospholipids in MS/MS. Taken together, the high efficiency LC separation and high mass resolving MS analysis are very promising tools for untargeted lipidomics analysis. PMID:26928874

  12. Cardiac Oxidative Stress and Dysfunction by Fine Concentrated Ambient Particles (CAPs) are Mediated by Angiotensin-II

    PubMed Central

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Lawrence, Joy; Millet, Emil; Gonzalez-Flecha, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation exposure to fine Concentrated Ambient Particles (CAPs) increases cardiac oxidants by mechanisms involving modulation of the sympathovagal tone on the heart. Angiotensin-II is a potent vasoconstrictor and a sympatho-excitatory peptide involved in the regulation of blood pressure. We hypothesized that increases in angiotensin-II after fine PM exposure could be involved in the development of cardiac oxidative stress. Adult rats were treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (Benazepril ®), or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB, Valsartan ®) before exposure to fine PM aerosols or filtered air. Exposures were carried out for 5 hours in the chamber of the Harvard Fine Particle Concentrator (fine PM mass concentration: 440 ± 80 μg/m3). At the end of the exposure the animals were tested for in situ chemiluminescence (CL) of the heart, TBARS and for plasma levels of angiotensin-II. Also, continuous ECG measurements were collected on a subgroup of exposed animals. PM exposure was associated with statistically significant increases in plasma angiotensin concentrations. Pretreatment with the ACE inhibitor effectively lowered angiotensin concentration, whereas ARB treatment led to increases in angiotensin above the PM-only level. PM exposure also led to significant increases in heart oxidative stress (CL, TBARs), and a shortening of the T-end to T-peak interval on the ECG that were prevented by treatment with both the ACE inhibitor and ARB. These results show that ambient fine particles can increase plasma levels of angiotensin-II and suggest a role of the renin-angiotensin system in the development of particle-related acute cardiac events. PMID:20718632

  13. Gold-polyaniline composites: Part II. Effects of nanometer sized particles

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jon A.; Josowicz, Mira A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Janata, Jiri

    2005-09-01

    The amount of electronic charge transferred between gold particles and polyaniline depends not only on the electron affinity of the two materials but also on the size of the gold particles. As measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for particles < 5 nm the binding energy of the electrons is size dependent. This nano-effect has its origin in the electrostatics of particles. It is demonstrated as a measurable shift of the binding energy of the Au4f7/2 photoelectrons emitted from Au particles embedded in a polyaniline matrix. Gold nanoparticle size was evaluated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Effect of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol on the interaction between photosystem II core complex and its antenna complexes in liposomes of thylakoid lipids.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Liu, Shuang; Hu, Zhaohui; Kuang, Tingyun; Paulsen, Harald; Yang, Chunhong

    2009-03-01

    The non-bilayer lipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) is the most abundant type of lipid in the thylakoid membrane and plays an important role in regulating the structure and function of photosynthetic membrane proteins. In this study, we have reconstituted the isolated major light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (PSII) (LHCIIb) and a preparation consisting of PSII core complexes and minor LHCII of PSII (PSIICC) into liposomes that consisted of digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG), with or without MGDG. Transmission electron microscopy and freeze-fracture studies showed unilamellar proteoliposomes, and demonstrated that most of the MGDG is incorporated into bilayer structures. The impact of MGDG on the functional interaction between LHCIIb and PSIICC was investigated by low temperature (77 K) fluorescence emission spectra and the photochemical activity of PSII. The additional incorporation of LHCIIb into liposomes containing PSIICC markedly increased oxygen evolution of PSIICC. Excitation at 480 nm of chlorophyll (Chl) b in LHCIIb stimulated a characteristic fluorescence emission of the Chl a in PSII (684.2 nm), rather than that of the Chl a in LHCIIb (680 nm) in the LHCIIb-PSIICC proteoliposomes, which indicated that the energy was transferred from LHCIIb to PSIICC in liposome membranes. Increasing the percentage of MGDG in the PSIICC-LHCIIb proteoliposomes enhanced the photochemical activity of PSII, due to a more efficient energy transfer from LHCIIb to PSIICC and, thus, an enlarged antenna cross section of PSII.

  15. Identifying the lowest electronic states of the chlorophylls in the CP47 core antenna protein of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    De Weerd, Frank L; Palacios, Miguel A; Andrizhiyevskaya, Elena G; Dekker, Jan P; Van Grondelle, Rienk

    2002-12-24

    CP47 is a pigment-protein complex in the core of photosystem II that tranfers excitation energy to the reaction center. Here we report on a spectroscopic investigation of the isolated CP47 complex. By deconvoluting the 77 K absorption and linear dichroism, red-most states at 683 and 690 nm have been identified with oscillator strengths corresponding to approximately 3 and approximately 1 chlorophyll, respectively. Both states contribute to the 4 K emission, and the Stark spectrum shows that they have a large value for the difference polarizability between their ground and excited states. From site-selective polarized triplet-minus-singlet spectra, an excitonic origin for the 683 nm state was found. The red shift of the 690 nm state is most probably due to strong hydrogen bonding to a protein ligand, as follows from the position of the stretch frequency of the chlorophyll 13(1) keto group (1633 cm(-)(1)) in the fluorescence line narrowing spectrum at 4 K upon red-most excitation. We discuss how the 683 and 690 nm states may be linked to specific chlorophylls in the crystal structure [Zouni, A., Witt, H.-T., Kern, J., Fromme, P., Krauss, N., Saenger, W., and Orth, P. (2001) Nature 409, 739-743].

  16. Fluxes of low-energy particles in quiet periods of solar activity and the MgII index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeldovich, M. A.; Logachev, Yu. I.; Kecskemety, K.; Surova, G. M.

    2009-10-01

    Low fluxes of protons with energies 0.3-10 MeV were studied during 21-23 solar cycles as a function of the MgII index using the data of the instruments CPME, EIS ( IMP8), and EPHIN ( SOHO). It has been shown that a) during quiet time of solar activity the fluxes of protons (background protons) have a positive correlation with the MgII index value throughout the solar cycle, b) specific features of variations of the MgII index during the solar minima of 1986-1987 and 1996-1997 can be considered, as well as variations of background fluxes of low energy charged particles, to be manifestations of the 22-year magnetic cycle of the Sun, and c) periods of the lowest value of the MgII index are also characterized by the smaller values of the ratio of intensities of protons and helium nuclei than in other quiet periods. A hypothesis is put forward that acceleration in a multitude of weak solar flares is one of the sources of background fluxes of low energy particles in the interplanetary space.

  17. Primordial nucleosynthesis with decaying particles. I - Entropy-producing decays. II - Inert decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a nonrelativistic particle X, which decays out of equilibrium, on primordial nucleosynthesis is investigated, including both the energy density of the X particle and the electromagnetic entropy production from its decay. The results are parametrized in terms of the X particle lifetime and the density parameter rm(X), where m(X) is the X particle mass and r is the ratio of X number density to photon number density prior to nucleosynthesis. The results rule out particle lifetimes greater than 1-10 s for large values of rm(X). The question of a decaying particle which produces no electromagnetic entropy in the course of its decay is addressed, and particles which produce both entropy and an inert component in their decay are discussed.

  18. Backreaction of Tracer Particles on Vortex Tangle in Helium II Counterflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, E.; Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Skrbek, L.

    2016-05-01

    We report computer simulations of the interaction of seeding particles with quantized vortices and with the normal fluid flow in thermal counterflow of superfluid ^4He. We show that if the number of particles is too large, the vortex tangle is significantly affected, posing problems in the interpretation of visualization experiments. The main effects are an increase in vortex line density and a change in polarization of the vortex tangle, caused by the action of the Stokes drag of the viscous normal fluid on the trapped particles. We argue that in the case of large particle number, typically used for the particle image velocimetry technique, the tangle properties might become significantly changed. On the contrary, the particle tracking velocimetry technique that uses smaller particle concentration should not be appreciably affected.

  19. Removal of mercury (II) by dithiocarbamate surface functionalized magnetite particles: application to synthetic and natural spiked waters.

    PubMed

    Figueira, P; Lopes, C B; Daniel-da-Silva, A L; Pereira, E; Duarte, A C; Trindade, T

    2011-11-01

    In order to take advantage of the high affinity between mercury and sulphur, magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) particles functionalized with dithiocarbamate groups (CS(2)(-)), were synthesized to be used as a new type of sorbent to remove Hg (II) from synthetic and natural spiked waters. The effectiveness of this type of sorbent was studied, and its potential as cleanup agent for contaminated waters was assessed. Batch stirred tank experiments were carried out by contacting a volume of solution with known amounts of functionalized Fe(3)O(4) particles, in order to study the effect of sorbent dose, salinity, and the kinetics and the equilibrium of this unit operation. A complete Hg (II) removal (ca. 99.8%) was attained with 6 mg/L of magnetic particles for an initial metal concentration of 50 μg/L. It was confirmed that highly complex matrices, such as seawater (ca. 99%) and river water (ca. 97%), do not affect the removal capacity of the functionalized magnetic particles. Concerning isotherms, no significant differences were observed between two- and three-parameter models (P = 0.05%); however, Sips isotherm provided the lowest values of SS and S(x/y), predicting a maximum sorption capacity of 206 mg/g, in the range of experimental conditions under study. The solid loadings measured in this essay surmount the majority of the values found in literature for other type of sorbents.

  20. Cross-linking density and temperature effects on the self-assembly of SiO2-PNIPAAm core-shell particles at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Nazli, Kadriye Ozlem; Pester, Christian W; Konradi, Artjom; Böker, Alexander; van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-04-26

    SiO2-PNIPAAm core-shell microgels (PNIPAAm=poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) with various internal cross-linking densities and different degrees of polymerization were prepared in order to investigate the effects of stability, packing, and temperature responsiveness at polar-apolar interfaces. The effects were investigated using interfacial tensiometry, and the particles were visualized by cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning force microscopy (SFM). The core-shell particles display different interfacial behaviors depending on the polymer shell thickness and degree of internal cross-linking. A thicker polymer shell and reduced internal cross-linking density are more favorable for the stabilization and packing of the particles at oil-water (o/w) interfaces. This was shown qualitatively by SFM of deposited, stabilized emulsion droplets and quantitatively by SFM of particles adsorbed onto a hydrophobic planar silicon dioxide surface, which acted as a model interface system. The temperature responsiveness, which also influences particle-interface interactions, was investigated by dynamic temperature protocols with varied heating rates. These measurements not only showed that the particles had an unusual but very regular and reversible interface stabilization behavior, but also made it possible to assess the nonlinear response of PNIPAAm microgels to external thermal stimuli. PMID:23554025

  1. Preparation of a core-shell magnetic ion-imprinted polymer via a sol-gel process for selective extraction of Cu(II) from herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Xiao, Deli; He, Jia; Li, Hui; He, Hua; Dai, Hao; Peng, Jun

    2014-05-21

    A novel magnetic surface ion-imprinted polymer (c-MMWCNTs-SiO2-IIP) was synthesized for the first time using magnetic CNTs/Fe3O4 composites (c-MMWCNTs) as the core, 3-ammonium propyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as the functional monomer, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the cross-linker and Cu(II) as the template. c-MMWCNTs-SiO2-IIP was evaluated for selective extraction of Cu(II) from herbal medicines via a magnetic solid phase extraction (M-SPE) procedure. One factor affecting the separation and preconcentration of the target heavy metal was pH. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the adsorption kinetics and adsorption capacity of c-MMWCNTs-SiO2-IIP toward Cu(II) were estimated. The results indicated that the adsorption mechanism corresponds to a pseudo-second order adsorption process, with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.985 and a maximum adsorption capacity of 42.2 mg g(-1). The relative selectivity factor (β) values of Cu(II)/Zn(II) and Cu(II)/Pb(II) were 38.5 and 34.5, respectively. c-MMWCNTs-SiO2-IIP, combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry, was successfully applied in the extraction and detection of Cu(II) in herbal medicine, with high recoveries ranging from 95.6% to 108.4%.

  2. The construction, characterization, Hg(II)-sensing and removal behavior of magnetic core-shell nanospheres loaded with fluorescence "Off-On" probe.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jun; Wei, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jie; Sun, Ping; Ouyang, Yuxia; Fan, Juhong; Liu, Rui

    2014-12-10

    The present paper constructed and discussed core-shell structured nanospheres grafted with rhodamine based probe for Hg(II) sensing and removal. Electron microscopy images, XRD curves, thermogravimetric analysis and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms were used to identify the core-shell structure. The inner core consisted of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which made the nanocomposite magnetically removable. The outer shell was constructed with silica molecular sieve which provided large surface area and ordered tunnels for the sensing probe, accelerating analyte adsorption and transportation. The rhodamine based sensing probe emission increased with the increasing Hg(II) concentration, showing emission "Off-On" effect, which could be explained by the structural transformation from a non-emissive one to a highly emissive one. The influence from various metal ions and pH values was also investigated, which suggested this structural transformation could only be triggered by Hg(II), showing high selectivity and linear response. The Hg(II) sensing nanocomposite could be regenerated after usage. The response time was slightly compromised and could be further improved.

  3. New insights into the complexities of shell growth and the strong influence of particle volume in nonblinking "giant" core/shell nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Mangum, Benjamin D; Casson, Joanna L; Williams, Darrick J; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A

    2012-06-13

    The growth of ultra-thick inorganic CdS shells over CdSe nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) cores gives rise to a distinct class of NQD called the "giant" NQD (g-NQD). g-NQDs are characterized by unique photophysical properties compared to their conventional core/shell NQD counterparts, including suppressed fluorescence intermittency (blinking), photobleaching, and nonradiative Auger recombination. Here, we report new insights into the numerous synthetic conditions that influence the complex process of thick-shell growth. We show the individual and collective effects of multiple reaction parameters (noncoordinating solvent and coordinating-ligand identities and concentrations, precursor/NQD ratios, precursor reaction times, etc.) on determining g-NQD shape and crystalline phase, and the relationship between these structural features and optical properties. We find that hexagonally faceted wurzite g-NQDs afford the highest ensemble quantum yields in emission and the most complete suppression of blinking. Significantly, we also reveal a clear correlation between g-NQD particle volume and blinking suppression, such that larger cores afford blinking-suppressed behavior at relatively thinner shells compared to smaller starting core sizes, which require application of thicker shells to realize the same level of blinking suppression. We show that there is a common, threshold g-NQD volume (~750 nm(3)) that is required to observe blinking suppression and that this particle volume corresponds to an NQD radiative lifetime of ~65 ns regardless of starting core size. Combining new understanding of key synthetic parameters with optimized core/shell particle volumes, we demonstrate effectively complete suppression of blinking even for long observation times of ~1 h.

  4. A recombinant hepatitis B core antigen polypeptide with the protamine-like domain deleted self-assembles into capsid particles but fails to bind nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, A; Bonelli, F; Zentilin, L; Rindi, G; Muttini, M; Milanesi, G

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned in Escherichia coli both the complete core gene of hepatitis B virus and a truncated version of it, leading to the synthesis of high levels of a core-antigen-equivalent polypeptide (r-p22) and of an e-antigen-equivalent polypeptide (r-p16), respectively. We then compared the structural and antigenic properties of the two polypeptides, as well as their ability to bind viral nucleic acids. r-p16 was found to self-assemble into capsid-like particles that appeared similar, when observed under the electron microscope, to those formed by r-p22. In r-p16 particles, disulfide bonds linked the truncated polypeptides in dimers, assembled in the particle by noncovalent interactions. In r-p22 capsids, further disulfide bonds, conceivably involving the carboxy-terminal cysteines of r-p22 polypeptides, joined the dimers together, converting the structure into a covalently closed lattice. The protamine-like domain was at least partly exposed on the surface of r-p22 particles, since it was accessible to selective proteolysis. Finally, r-p22, but not r-p16, was shown to bind native and denatured DNA as well as RNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the protamine-like domain in core polypeptides is a nucleic acid-binding domain and is dispensable for the correct folding and assembly of amino-terminal and central regions. Images PMID:2677399

  5. Particle sizes in Comet Bennett /1970 II/. [radiation pressure models for coma and tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    The particle size distribution in the coma and tail of Comet Bennett has been determined by several methods, each sensitive to a particular size range. It is confirmed that a minimum value of the particle density, size, and radiation pressure efficiency function exists at about .00003 to .00010 g/sq cm. The existence of such a cutoff is probably due to the decreasing radiation pressure efficiency for particles smaller than the wavelength of the light being scattered. An exact determination of this cutoff may allow identification of the particle type.

  6. Radiation chemistry of heavy-particle tracks. II. Fricke dosimeter system

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Magee, J.L.

    1980-12-25

    A heavy-particle-track model suggested by considerations presented in a companion paper is used in a calculation of the differential (G') and integral (G) yields of the Fricke dosimeter system for six selected particles over a wide range of energies. The particles are H, He, C, Ne, Ar, and Fm; the energy range for the first two is 10/sup -3/-10/sup 3/ MeV/n, and for the last four is 10/sup -1/-10/sup 3/ MeV/n. The calculated G' and G values are compared with experimental values as far as possible, and the heavy-particle-track model situation is discussed.

  7. An Assessment of Southern Ocean Water Masses and Sea Ice During 1988-2007 in a Suite of Interannual CORE-II Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downes, Stephanie M.; Farneti, Riccardo; Uotila, Petteri; Griffies, Stephen M.; Marsland, Simon J.; Bailey, David; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Howard, Armando; Kelley, Maxwell; Leboissetier, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    We characterise the representation of the Southern Ocean water mass structure and sea ice within a suite of 15 global ocean-ice models run with the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiment Phase II (CORE-II) protocol. The main focus is the representation of the present (1988-2007) mode and intermediate waters, thus framing an analysis of winter and summer mixed layer depths; temperature, salinity, and potential vorticity structure; and temporal variability of sea ice distributions. We also consider the interannual variability over the same 20 year period. Comparisons are made between models as well as to observation-based analyses where available. The CORE-II models exhibit several biases relative to Southern Ocean observations, including an underestimation of the model mean mixed layer depths of mode and intermediate water masses in March (associated with greater ocean surface heat gain), and an overestimation in September (associated with greater high latitude ocean heat loss and a more northward winter sea-ice extent). In addition, the models have cold and fresh/warm and salty water column biases centred near 50 deg S. Over the 1988-2007 period, the CORE-II models consistently simulate spatially variable trends in sea-ice concentration, surface freshwater fluxes, mixed layer depths, and 200-700 m ocean heat content. In particular, sea-ice coverage around most of the Antarctic continental shelf is reduced, leading to a cooling and freshening of the near surface waters. The shoaling of the mixed layer is associated with increased surface buoyancy gain, except in the Pacific where sea ice is also influential. The models are in disagreement, despite the common CORE-II atmospheric state, in their spatial pattern of the 20-year trends in the mixed layer depth and sea-ice.

  8. CHARGED-PARTICLE AND NEUTRON-CAPTURE PROCESSES IN THE HIGH-ENTROPY WIND OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Truran, J. W.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K. E-mail: truran@nova.uchicago.ed E-mail: k-l.Kratz@mpic.d E-mail: F-K.Thielemann@unibas.c

    2010-04-01

    The astrophysical site of the r-process is still uncertain, and a full exploration of the systematics of this process in terms of its dependence on nuclear properties from stability to the neutron drip-line within realistic stellar environments has still to be undertaken. Sufficiently high neutron-to-seed ratios can only be obtained either in very neutron-rich low-entropy environments or moderately neutron-rich high-entropy environments, related to neutron star mergers (or jets of neutron star matter) and the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernova explosions. As chemical evolution models seem to disfavor neutron star mergers, we focus here on high-entropy environments characterized by entropy S, electron abundance Y{sub e} , and expansion velocity V{sub exp}. We investigate the termination point of charged-particle reactions, and we define a maximum entropy S{sub final} for a given V{sub exp} and Y{sub e} , beyond which the seed production of heavy elements fails due to the very small matter density. We then investigate whether an r-process subsequent to the charged-particle freeze-out can in principle be understood on the basis of the classical approach, which assumes a chemical equilibrium between neutron captures and photodisintegrations, possibly followed by a beta-flow equilibrium. In particular, we illustrate how long such a chemical equilibrium approximation holds, how the freeze-out from such conditions affects the abundance pattern, and which role the late capture of neutrons originating from beta-delayed neutron emission can play. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of nuclear properties from different theoretical mass models on the final abundances after these late freeze-out phases and beta-decays back to stability. As only a superposition of astrophysical conditions can provide a good fit to the solar r-abundances, the question remains how such superpositions are attained, resulting in the apparently robust r-process pattern observed in low

  9. Charged-particle and neutron-capture processes in the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernovae.

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Truran, J.W.; Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Astrophysics; Univ. Mainz; Virtual Inst. for Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics; Max-Planck-Insti. fur Chemie; Univ. of Basel

    2010-04-01

    The astrophysical site of the r-process is still uncertain, and a full exploration of the systematics of this process in terms of its dependence on nuclear properties from stability to the neutron drip-line within realistic stellar environments has still to be undertaken. Sufficiently high neutron-to-seed ratios can only be obtained either in very neutron-rich low-entropy environments or moderately neutron-rich high-entropy environments, related to neutron star mergers (or jets of neutron star matter) and the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernova explosions. As chemical evolution models seem to disfavor neutron star mergers, we focus here on high-entropy environments characterized by entropy S, electron abundance Y{sub e}, and expansion velocity V{sub exp}. We investigate the termination point of charged-particle reactions, and we define a maximum entropy S{sub final} for a given V{sub exp} and Y{sub e}, beyond which the seed production of heavy elements fails due to the very small matter density. We then investigate whether an r-process subsequent to the charged-particle freeze-out can in principle be understood on the basis of the classical approach, which assumes a chemical equilibrium between neutron captures and photodisintegrations, possibly followed by a {beta}-flow equilibrium. In particular, we illustrate how long such a chemical equilibrium approximation holds, how the freeze-out from such conditions affects the abundance pattern, and which role the late capture of neutrons originating from {beta}-delayed neutron emission can play. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of nuclear properties from different theoretical mass models on the final abundances after these late freeze-out phases and {beta}-decays back to stability. As only a superposition of astrophysical conditions can provide a good fit to the solar r-abundances, the question remains how such superpositions are attained, resulting in the apparently robust r-process pattern observed in low

  10. A windmill-shaped hexacopper(II) molecule built up by template core-controlled expansion of diaquatetrakis(mu2-adeninato-N3,N9)dicopper(II) with aqua(oxydiacetato)copper(II).

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Josefa María; Alarcón-Payer, Carolina; Castiñeiras, Alfonso; Pivetta, Tiziana; Lezama, Luis; Choquesillo-Lazarte, Duane; Crisponi, Guido; Niclós-Gutiérrez, Juan

    2006-01-23

    The windmill-shaped hexanuclear copper(II) cluster {(H(2)O)(2)Cu(2)(mu(3)-(Ade)(4)[Cu(oda)(H(2)O)](4)}.6H(2)O (1-o) has been synthesized in aqueous medium by in situ core-controlled expansion of the neutral building block Cu(2)(mu(2)-N3,N9-Ade)(4)(H(2)O)(2) (2) with Cu(oda)(H(2)O) (3-o) (Ade = adeninato(1-) and oda = oxydiacetato(2-) ligands). Crystal data for 2-b (2.5H(2)O): triclinic, space group P(-)1; a = 9.374(1), b = 9.440(1), c = 10.326(1) A; alpha = 78.72(1), beta = 76.77(1), gamma = 63.51(1) degrees ; final R(1) = 0.059; T = 100(2) K. Crystal data for 1-o: monoclinic, space group P2(1)/n; a = 15.203(2), b = 10.245(1), c = 19.094(2) A; beta = 101.61(1) degrees ; final R(1) = 0.049; T = 293(2) K. The X-shaped hexanuclear molecule consists of a central core (2) and four terminal arms (3-o) linked together by bridging mu(3)-N3,N7,N9-Ade ligands. There are three crystallographic independent metal atoms (two terminals, one central). All Cu(II) atoms exhibit a 4 + 1 coordination, of which one is an aqua apical ligand. The basal coordination sets complete the CuN(4) + O or CuO(3)N + O chromophores for the central or terminal metal atoms, respectively. Thermal stability and spectral and magnetic properties were also studied. Analogous compounds to 1-o with tridentate or tripodal tetradentate ligands L(2-), instead of oda, have also been synthesized.

  11. Subunit Protein Vaccine Delivery System for Tuberculosis Based on Hepatitis B Virus Core VLP (HBc-VLP) Particles.

    PubMed

    Dhanasooraj, Dhananjayan; Kumar, R Ajay; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of modern medicine, tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogenic bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains one of the deadliest diseases. This bacterium can lay dormant in individuals and get activated when immunity goes down and has also shown considerable prowess in mutating into drug resistant forms. The global emergence of such drug resistant Mtb and the lack of efficacy of Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available so far, have resulted in a situation which cries out for a safe and effective tuberculosis vaccine.Number of different strategies has been used for developing new anti-TB vaccines and several protective antigens have been identified so far. One strategy, the use of protein subunits, has the potential to develop into a powerful tuberculosis vaccine, not only because of its efficacy and safety, but also because they are economical. The proper delivery of protein subunit vaccines with adjuvants or novel delivery systems is necessary for inducing protective immune responses. The available adjuvants or delivery systems are inadequate for generating such a response. In the present method, we have constructed a vaccine delivery system for tuberculosis based on Virus-Like Particles (VLPs). Hepatitis B Virus core antigen gene was recombinantly modified using Overlap Extension PCR (OEPCR). The final construct was designed to express HBc-VLP carrying external antigen (fusion VLP). Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen CFP-10 was used for the construction of fusion VLP. The recombinant gene for the construct was cloned into a pET expression system and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) and induced with IPTG to express the protein. The fusion protein was purified using the Histidine tag and allowed to form VLPs. The preformed VLPs were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The VLPs were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). PMID:27076312

  12. Hindered submicron mobility and long-term storage of presynaptic dense-core granules revealed by single-particle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Scalettar, B. A.; Jacobs, C.; Fulwiler, A.; Prahl, L.; Simon, A.; Hilken, L.; Lochner, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Dense-core granules (DCGs) are organelles found in neuroendocrine cells and neurons that house, transport, and release a number of important peptides and proteins. In neurons, DCG cargo can include the secreted neuromodulatory proteins tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which play a key role in modulating synaptic efficacy in the hippocampus. This function has spurred interest in DCGs that localize to synaptic contacts between hippocampal neurons, and several studies recently have established that DCGs localize to, and undergo regulated exocytosis from, postsynaptic sites. To complement this work, we have studied presynaptically-localized DCGs in hippocampal neurons, which are much more poorly understood than their postsynaptic analogs. Moreover, to enhance relevance, we visualized DCGs via fluorescence labeling of exogenous and endogenous tPA and BDNF. Using single-particle tracking, we determined trajectories of more than 150 presynaptically-localized DCGs. These trajectories reveal that mobility of DCGs in presynaptic boutons is highly hindered and that storage is long-lived. We also computed mean-squared displacement curves, which can be used to elucidate mechanisms of transport. Over shorter time windows, most curves are linear, demonstrating that DCG transport in boutons is driven predominantly by diffusion. The remaining curves plateau with time, consistent with motion constrained by a submicron-sized corral. These results have relevance to recent models of presynaptic organization and to recent hypotheses about DCG cargo function. The results also provide estimates for transit times to the presynaptic plasma membrane that are consistent with measured times for onset of neurotrophin release from synaptically-localized DCGs. PMID:21976424

  13. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols II: particle size distributions as a function of time.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Guilmette, Raymond A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing DU from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluate particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using proportional counting, and the derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements were quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 microm and a large size mode between 2 and 15 microm. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 microm shortly after perforation to around 1 microm at the end of the 2-h sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles. PMID:19204485

  14. Rapid determination of parabens in seafood sauces by high-performance liquid chromatography: A practical comparison of core-shell particles and sub-2 μm fully porous particles.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jing; Cao, Xiaoji; Cheng, Zhuo; Qin, Ye; Lu, Yanbin

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the chromatographic performance of superficially porous particles (Halo core-shell C18 column, 50 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.7 μm) was compared with that of sub-2 μm fully porous particles (Acquity BEH C18 , 50 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm). Four parabens, methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben, were used as representative compounds for calculating the plate heights in a wide flow rate range and analyzed on the basis of the Van Deemter and Knox equations. Theoretical Poppe plots were constructed for each column to compare their kinetic performance. Both phases gave similar minimum plate heights when using nonreduced coordinates. Meanwhile, the flat C-term of the core-shell column provided the possibilities for applying high flow rates without significant loss in efficiency. The low backpressure of core-shell particles allowed this kind of column, especially compatible with conventional high-performance liquid chromatography systems. Based on these factors, a simple high-performance liquid chromatography method was established and validated for the determination of parabens in various seafood sauces using the Halo core-shell C18 column for separation.

  15. Mechanochemical surface functionalisation of superparamagnetic microparticles with in situ formed crystalline metal-complexes: a fast novel core-shell particle formation method.

    PubMed

    Brede, F A; Mandel, K; Schneider, M; Sextl, G; Müller-Buschbaum, K

    2015-05-21

    An innovative mechanochemical method is reported for the in situ formation of crystalline metal-complexes on the surface of superparamagnetic nanocomposite microparticles. The process is demonstrated for coating Fe3O4 multicore-silica matrix particles with the 1,2,4-1H-triazole complex [ZnCl2(TzH)2]. The use of mechanochemistry demonstrates a flexible process to obtain functional shells on magnetic particle cores without the need for complicated surface-functionalisation reactions in solution. Simple mixing of the desired shell-precursors ZnCl2 and 1,2,4-1H-triazole (TzH) with the magnetic particles in a ball mill is sufficient to tailor the particle surfaces with novel functionalities while retaining the superparamagnetic behaviour.

  16. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part II: Benchmark comparisons of PUMA core parameters with MCNP5 and improvements due to a simple cell heterogeneity correction

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C.; Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Serra, O.; Marconi, J.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update of reactor physics calculation methods and models was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. This paper presents benchmark comparisons of core parameters of a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the PUMA reactor code with MCNP5. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, more symmetric than Atucha-II, and has some experimental data available. To validate the new models benchmark comparisons of k-effective, channel power and axial power distributions obtained with PUMA and MCNP5 have been performed. In addition, a simple cell heterogeneity correction recently introduced in PUMA is presented, which improves significantly the agreement of calculated channel powers with MCNP5. To complete the validation, the calculation of some of the critical configurations of the Atucha-I reactor measured during the experiments performed at first criticality is also presented. (authors)

  17. Experimental Studies of the Transition to He II using Hydrogen Seed Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, Matthew S.; Bewley, Gregory; Lathrop, Daniel P.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli

    2006-11-01

    Experimental studies of the phase transition to superfluidity in ^4He using H2 seed particles are presented. A gaseous mixture of hydrogen heavily diluted with helium is injected into the He I phase only a few mK above the lambda transition. The hydrogen gas solidifies into particles typically smaller than a micron, which are imaged by a CMOS camera focused on a thin laser sheet. The system is then evaporatively cooled through the lambda transition. Significant fluctuations and aggregation of the hydrogen particles are observed as the system passes through the phase transition. The fluctuating motions are characterized by particle-tracking. The aggregation is quantified by estimating the particle sizes from the intensity probability distribution function and its evolution. Systematic studies of the effects of quench rapidity and potential causes of these effects are discussed. Bewley G.P., Lathrop D.P., Sreenivasan K.R., Nature 441, 588 (2006)

  18. Mayall II=G1 in M31: Giant Globular Cluster or Core of a Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meylan, G.; Sarajedini, A.; Jablonka, P.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Bridges, T.; Rich, R. M.

    2001-08-01

    Mayall II=G1 is one of the brightest globular clusters belonging to M31, the Andromeda galaxy. Our observations with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC2) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provide photometric data for the I versus V-I and V versus V-I color-magnitude diagrams. They reach stars with magnitudes fainter than V=27 mag, with a well populated red horizontal branch at about V=25.3 mag. From model fitting, we determine a rather high mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=-0.95+/-0.09, somewhat similar to 47 Tucanae. In order to determine our true measurement errors, we have carried out artificial star experiments. We find a larger spread in V-I than can be explained by the measurement errors, and we attribute this to an intrinsic metallicity dispersion amongst the stars of G1; this may be the consequence of self-enrichment during the early stellar/dynamical evolutionary phases of this cluster. So far, only ω Centauri, the giant Galactic globular cluster, has been known to exhibit such an intrinsic metallicity dispersion, a phenomenon certainly related to the deep potential wells of these two star clusters. We determine, from the same HST/WFPC2 data, the structural parameters of G1. Its surface brightness profile provides its core radius rc=0.14"=0.52 pc, its tidal radius rt~=54''=200 pc, and its concentration c=log(rt/rc)~=2.5. Such a high concentration indicates the probable collapse of the core of G1. KECK/HIRES observations provide the central velocity dispersion σobs=25.1 km s-1, with σp(0)=27.8 km s-1 once aperture corrected. Three estimates of the total mass of this globular cluster can be obtained. The King-model mass is MK=15×106 Msolar with M/LV~=7.5, and the virial mass is MVir=7.3×106 Msolar with M/LV~=3.6. By using a King-Michie model fitted simultaneously to the surface brightness profile and the central velocity dispersion value, mass estimates range from MKM=14×106 Msolar to 17×106 Msolar. Although uncertain, all of these mass

  19. Structure-based simulation of linear optical spectra of the CP43 core antenna of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Müh, Frank; Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Renger, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The linear optical spectra (absorbance, linear dichroism, circular dichroism, fluorescence) of the CP43 (PsbC) antenna of the photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc) pertaining to the S(0) → S(1) (Q(Y)) transitions of the chlorophyll (Chl) a pigments are simulated by applying a combined quantum chemical/electrostatic method to obtain excitonic couplings and local transition energies (site energies) on the basis of the 2.9 Å resolution crystal structure (Guskov et al., Nat Struct Mol Biol 16:334-342, 2009). The electrostatic calculations identify three Chls with low site energies (Chls 35, 37, and 45 in the nomenclature of Loll et al. (Nature 438:1040-1044, 2005). A refined simulation of experimental spectra of isolated CP43 suggests a modified set of site energies within 143 cm(-1) of the directly calculated values (root mean square deviation: 80 cm(-1)). In the refined set, energy sinks are at Chls 37, 43, and 45 in agreement with earlier fitting results (Raszewski and Renger, J Am Chem Soc 130:4431-4446, 2008). The present structure-based simulations reveal that a large part of the redshift of Chl 37 is due to a digalactosyldiacylglycerol lipid. This finding suggests a new role for lipids in PSIIcc, namely the tuning of optical spectra and the creation of an excitation energy funnel towards the reaction center. The analysis of electrostatic pigment-protein interactions is used to identify amino acid residues that are of potential interest for an experimental approach to an assignment of site energies and energy sinks by site-directed mutagenesis.

  20. Size-controlled vaterite composite particles with a POSS-core dendrimer for the fabrication of calcite thin films by phase transition.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shiho; Naka, Kensuke

    2013-12-23

    Vaterite composite particles with a size-controlled sphere were obtained by a carbonate controlled-addition method by using a carboxylate-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM)-type polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-core dendrimer. An aqueous ammonium carbonate solution was added to an aqueous solution of the dendrimer and CaCl2 at different times (3 min, 30 min, and 1 h) and stirred for 1 h at 30 °C. When the complexation time of the POSS-core dendrimer-CaCl2 solution was increased from 3 min to 1 h, the average particle sizes of the spheres increased from 0.71 ± 0.08 to 1.86 ± 0.22 μm, respectively. However, the average particle sizes decreased with decreasing temperature. Particles with minimum sizes of 70 ± 6 nm were obtained when COONa to calcium ion molar ratio was 16 and the complexation time was 3 min at 20 °C. Incubation of the vaterite composite particles in distilled water for 3 days led to complete phase transition to calcite. Negative zeta potential values, ranging from -30 to -10 mV, were detected for the vaterite particles, indicating that the POSS-core dendrimers were exposed on the CaCO3 particles. The CaCO3 particle surfaces were successfully coated with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) in aqueous dispersions by adding a controlled concentration of the polymer. Alternate vaterite composite particles and polyelectroyte multilayer films were prepared by a layer-by-layer method. The obtained (PDDA/vaterite)10(PDDA) multilayer films were incubated in distilled water at 30 °C. Incubation for 5 days led to complete phase transition to calcite, as estimated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic and XRD analyses. The SEM observation of the sample after 5 days of incubation showed a granular network structure of irregularly shaped calcite particles. Although some patches and pores were present in the films, the SEM image clearly demonstrated that large-area and continuous CaCO3 films were formed.

  1. The dynamics of particle disks. II - Effects of spin degrees of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Araki, Suguru

    1988-01-01

    The present treatment of the thermal equilibria of differentially-rotating, axisymmetric disks consisting of identical, spin-possessing as well as translational DOF-possessing hard sphere particles characterizes these disks' dynamics by means of two novel parameters: (1) the tangential restitution coefficient, and (2) the dimensionless moment of inertia. It is established that rings composed of spinning particles can generally be thermally balanced within more restricted ranges of the optical depth, as well as at higher values of the normal restitution coefficient, than spinless rings. Mean spin is indefinite in the present framework of neglected finite particle-size effects.

  2. Fabrication of gold nanoparticle-polymer composite particles with raspberry, core-shell and amorphous morphologies at room temperature via electrostatic interactions and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Kanahara, Masaaki; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Yabu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-14

    Composite particles with varying morphologies composed of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and polymers were fabricated based on a combination of electrostatic interactions between the polymer particles and Au NPs and diffusion processes. The positively charged polymer particles were prepared from amino-terminated polystyrene (PS-NH2) and amino-terminated 1,2-polybutadiene (PB-NH2). Adsorption of citrate-stabilized Au NPs resulted in three different distribution states of Au NPs in the polymer particles, depending on the glass transition temperature (Tg) and molecular weight of the polymer. The adsorption of Au NPs onto PS-NH2 particles produced raspberry-like composite particle morphologies, while the NPs instead diffused into the PB-NH2 particles, since the Tg of PB-NH2 is below room temperature. The diffusion of Au NPs could be controlled by varying the molecular weight of the PB-NH2 and the diameter of the NPs, and both core-shell and amorphous distributions were successfully achieved. PMID:24651763

  3. Investigation of a new core-shell particle column for ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Biba, Mirlinda; Welch, Christopher J; Foley, Joe P

    2014-08-01

    A new core-shell particle column showed excellent performance and durability for separation of short (∼21-mer) ribonucleic acid (RNA) oligonucleotides by ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (IP-RPLC). Previously investigated core-shell C18 columns showed excellent peak shapes and separations of closely eluting impurities by IP-RPLC. However, these columns showed only modest long-term stability at the neutral pH and elevated column temperatures of ≥60°C, typically used for IP-RPLC analysis of oligonucleotides. The newly introduced SunShell C18 column provided separations comparable to the previously evaluated core-shell columns, but with significantly improved long-term column stability when operated at neutral pH and elevated column temperature.

  4. In vitro recognition of DNA base pairs by histones in histone-DNA complexes and reconstituted core particles: an ultraviolet resonance Raman study.

    PubMed Central

    Laigle, A; Chinsky, L; Turpin, P Y; Liquier, J; Taillandier, E

    1982-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of complexes between DNA and the four core histones, alone or associated, have been investigated in vitro using excitations at 300 and 257 nm, which give complementary informations about the DNA bases. H2A and H2B fractions recognize the G-C base pairs, while H3 and H4 (arginine rich fractions) recognize the A-T base pairs. The associated fractions form complexes with DNA which yield about the same DNA spectral modifications as the DNA-H4 complexes. This reveals the important role of the arginine rich fractions in the core particle formation and confirms the preferential in vitro assembly of nucleosome cores on A-T rich regions of DNA (25). PMID:7155896

  5. Core-shell magnetite-silica dithiocarbamate-derivatised particles achieve the Water Framework Directive quality criteria for mercury in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Lopes, C B; Figueira, P; Tavares, D S; Lin, Z; Daniel-da-Silva, A L; Duarte, A C; Rocha, J; Trindade, T; Pereira, E

    2013-09-01

    The sorption capacity of nanoporous titanosilicate Engelhard titanosilicate number 4 (ETS-4) and silica-coated magnetite particles derivatised with dithiocarbamate groups towards Hg(II) was evaluated and compared in spiked ultra-pure and spiked surface-river water, for different batch factors. In the former, and using a batch factor of 100 m(3)/kg and an initial Hg(II) concentrations matching the maximum allowed concentration in an effluent discharge, both materials achieve Hg(II) uptake efficiencies in excess of 99 % and a residual metal concentration lower than the guideline value for drinking water quality. For the surface-river water and the same initial concentration, the Hg(II) uptake efficiency of magnetite particles is outstanding, achieving the quality criteria established by the Water Framework Directive (concerning Hg concentration in surface waters) using a batch factor of 50 m(3)/kg, while the efficiency of ETS-4 is significantly inferior. The dissimilar sorbents' Hg(II) removal efficiency is attributed to different uptake mechanisms. This study also highlights the importance of assessing the effective capacity of the sorbents under realistic conditions in order to achieve trustable results.

  6. Achieving enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalysis using type-II NaNbO3/CdS core/shell heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Khanchandani, Sunita; Thirumal, Meganathan; Ganguli, Ashok K

    2014-08-13

    Expanding the light-harvesting range and suppressing the quick recombination of photogenerated charge carriers are of paramount significance in the field of photocatalysis. One possible approach to achieve wide absorption range is to synthesize type-II core/shell heterostructures. In addition, this system also shows great promise for fast separation of charge carriers and low charge recombination rate. Herein, following the surface functionalization method using 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a surface functionalizing agent, we report on designing NaNbO3/CdS type-II core/shell heterostructures with an absorption range extending to visible range and explore the opportunity toward degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye as a model pollutant under visible light irradiation. Characterizations including X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (DRS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy support the growth of CdS shell onto NaNbO3 nanorods. The resulting core/shell heterostructures unveiled high surface areas, enhanced light harvesting, and appreciably increased photocatalytic activity toward MB degradation compared to individual counterparts and the photocatalytic standard, Degussa P25, under visible light irradiation. The remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activity of core/shell heterostructures could be interpreted in terms of efficient charge separation owing to core/shell morphology and resulting type-II band alignment between NaNbO3 and CdS, which creates a step-like radial potential favoring the localization of one of the carriers in the core and the other in the shell. A plausible mechanism for the degradation of MB dye over NaNbO3/CdS core/shell heterostructures is also elucidated using active species scavenger studies. Our findings imply that hydroxyl radicals (OH(•)) play a crucial role in dictating the degradation

  7. Tagged Particle Diffusion in One-Dimensional Systems with Hamiltonian Dynamics-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anjan; Dhar, Abhishek; Narayan, Onuttom; Sabhapandit, Sanjib

    2015-07-01

    We study various temporal correlation functions of a tagged particle in one-dimensional systems of interacting point particles evolving with Hamiltonian dynamics. Initial conditions of the particles are chosen from the canonical thermal distribution. The correlation functions are studied in finite systems, and their forms examined at short and long times. Various one-dimensional systems are studied. Results of numerical simulations for the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain are qualitatively similar to results for the harmonic chain, and agree unexpectedly well with a simple description in terms of linearized equations for damped fluctuating sound waves. Simulation results for the alternate mass hard particle gas reveal that—in contradiction to our earlier results (Roy et al. in J Stat Phys 150(5):851-866, 2013) with smaller system sizes—the diffusion constant slowly converges to a constant value, in a manner consistent with mode coupling theories. Our simulations also show that the behaviour of the Lennard-Jones gas depends on its density. At low densities, it behaves like a hard-particle gas, and at high densities like an anharmonic chain. In all the systems studied, the tagged particle was found to show normal diffusion asymptotically, with convergence times depending on the system under study. Finite size effects show up at time scales larger than sound traversal times, their nature being system-specific.

  8. Turbulence-induced relative velocity of dust particles. II. The bidisperse case

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo; Scalo, John E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-08-10

    We extend our earlier work on turbulence-induced relative velocity between equal-size particles (Paper I, in this series) to particles of arbitrarily different sizes. The Pan and Padoan (PP10) model shows that the relative velocity between different particles has two contributions, named the generalized shear and acceleration terms, respectively. The generalized shear term represents the particles' memory of the spatial flow velocity difference across the particle distance in the past, while the acceleration term is associated with the temporal flow velocity difference on individual particle trajectories. Using the simulation of Paper I, we compute the root-mean-square relative velocity, (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2}, as a function of the friction times, τ{sub p1} and τ{sub p2}, of the two particles and show that the PP10 prediction is in satisfactory agreement with the data, confirming its physical picture. For a given τ{sub p1} below the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, T{sub L}, (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} as a function of τ{sub p2} shows a dip at τ{sub p2} ≅ τ{sub p1}, indicating tighter velocity correlation between similar particles. Defining a ratio f ≡ τ{sub p,{sub l}}/τ{sub p,{sub h}}, with τ{sub p,{sub l}} and τ{sub p,{sub h}} the friction times of the smaller and larger particles, we find that (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} increases with decreasing f due to the generalized acceleration contribution, which dominates at f ≲ 1/4. At a fixed f, our model predicts that (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} scales as τ{sub p,h}{sup 1/2} for τ{sub p,{sub h}} in the inertial range of the flow, stays roughly constant for T{sub L} ≲ τ{sub p,{sub h}} ≲ T{sub L}/f, and finally decreases as τ{sub p,h}{sup −1/2} for τ{sub p,{sub h}} >> T{sub L}/f. The acceleration term is independent of the particle distance, r, and reduces the r dependence of (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} in the bidisperse case.

  9. Direct activation of human dendritic cells by particle-bound but not soluble MHC class II ligand.

    PubMed

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Dähne, Lars; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key activators of cellular immune responses through their capacity to induce naïve T cells and sustained effector T cell responses. This capacity is a function of their superior efficiency of antigen presentation via MHC class I and class II molecules, and the expression of co-stimulatory cell surface molecules and cytokines. Maturation of DCs is induced by microbial factors via pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, pro-inflammatory cytokines or cognate interaction with CD4(+) T cells. Here we show that, unexpectedly, the PanDR helper T cell epitope PADRE, a generic T helper cell antigen presented by a large fraction of HLA-DR alleles, when delivered in particle-bound form induced maturation of human DCs. The DCs that received the particle-bound PADRE displayed all features of fully mature DCs, such as high expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, CD83, the MHC-II molecule HLA-DR, secretion of high levels of the biologically active IL-12 (IL-12p70) and induction of vigorous proliferation of naïve CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the maturation of DCs induced by particle-bound PADRE was shown to involve sphingosine kinase, calcium signaling from internal sources and downstream signaling through the MAP kinase and the p72syk pathways, and finally activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Based on our findings, we propose that particle-bound PADRE may be used as a DC activator in DC-based vaccines.

  10. Cosmic dust investigations II. Instruments for measurement of particle trajectory, velocity and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1989-07-01

    A series of experiments have been completed using accelerator dust particles in the mass range ~10-9-10-6 g and velocity range ~2-12 km/s to measure the velocity loss and degree of fragmentation for dust particles penetrating 6 and 28 μm thick polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detectors. These measurements prove that even for a ratio of PVDF foil thickness to particle diameter as large as 0.6, the velocity loss and fragmentation is far less than expected from earlier reports in the literature. For example, for 28 μm thick PVDF foils the velocity loss is ~ 20%, the fraction of particles suffering serious fragmentation is ~ 50% and the angular dispersion or ``spray angle'' of the fragments from the incident particle direction is <= 3°. For 6 μm thick foils the velocity loss is <= 5%. These experiments are based on an extension of our earlier work which showed that two PVDF foils spaced a given distance apart could provide accurate time-of-flight (TOF) information due to the fast pulse rise time of PVDF detector response. We also report on our present state of development of PVDF position-sensing detectors which identify the x, y coordinates of particle impact, using detector and electronic pulse techniques adapted from our semiconductor position-sensing cosmic-ray detectors. Typical position errors of ~ 1 mm are readily achieved. Finally, we have combined the above developments into a dust-particle telescope which accurately (~ 1° angular accuracy) measures the trajectory of the incident particle as well as its mass and incident velocity, irrespective of whether it is a charged or neutral particle. We discuss how this practical dust telescope can be combined with dust capture cells for space flight and later recovery for laboratory determination of elemental and isotopic composition of captured dust. We also describe a simpler trajectory array based on discrete mosaics of thin detectors which would measure trajectories with a mean angular error of ~ 4°. We

  11. Low power loss and field-insensitive permeability of Fe-6.5%Si powder cores with manganese oxide-coated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Junnan E-mail: rzhgong@hust.edu.cn; Wang, Xian; Xu, Xiaojun; Gong, Rongzhou E-mail: rzhgong@hust.edu.cn; Feng, Zekun; Chen, Yajie; Harris, V. G.

    2015-05-07

    Fe-6.5%Si alloy powders coated with manganese oxides using an innovative in situ process were investigated. The in-situ coating of the insulating oxides was realized with a KMnO{sub 4} solution by a chemical process. The insulating manganese oxides with mixed valance state were verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The thickness of the insulating layer on alloy particles was determined to be in a range of 20–210 nm, depending upon the KMnO{sub 4} concentration. The powder core loss and the change in permeability under a DC-bias field were measured at frequencies ranging from 50 to 100 kHz. The experiments indicated that the Fe-6.5%Si powder cores with a 210 nm-thick manganese oxide layer not only showed a low core loss of 459 mW/cm{sup 3} at 100 kHz but also showed a small reduction in permeability (μ(H)/μ(0) = 85% for μ = 42) at a DC-bias field of 80 Oe. This work has defined a novel pathway to realizing low core loss and field-insensitive permeability for Fe-Si powder cores.

  12. Maturation of the viral core enhances the fusion of HIV-1 particles with primary human T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Jiyang; Aiken, Christopher . E-mail: chris.aiken@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-03-15

    HIV-1 infection requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes in a reaction catalyzed by the viral envelope proteins gp120 and gp41. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 particle fusion with target cells is linked to maturation of the viral core by an activity of the gp41 cytoplasmic domain. Here, we show that maturation enhances the fusion of a variety of recombinant viruses bearing primary and laboratory-adapted Env proteins with primary human CD4{sup +} T cells. Overall, HIV-1 fusion was more dependent on maturation for viruses bearing X4-tropic envelope proteins than for R5-tropic viruses. Fusion of HIV-1 with monocyte-derived macrophages was also dependent on particle maturation. We conclude that the ability to couple fusion to particle maturation is a common feature of HIV-1 Env proteins and may play an important role during HIV-1 replication in vivo.

  13. Mathematical modeling of the heat treatment and combustion of a coal particle. II. drying stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkhzhargal, Kh.; Salomatov, V. V.

    2011-03-01

    This article is a continuation of the previous article in which, with the aid of mathematical modeling, the regime of radiative-convective heating of a coal particle was studied in detail and which was devoted to an analysis of the stage of coal drying, very important in the general picture of coal combustion. The process of coal drying is formulated as the nonlinear Stefan problem with a moving liquid-vapor phase change interface. The rate and time of coal particle drying, the temperature distribution inside a particle, and other parameters of the process have been found approximately analytically depending on the regime of heat supply. A parametric analysis of the influence of physical and regime factors on the dynamics of drying as an integral part of heat treatment of a fuel for its ignition and combustion has been carried out.

  14. Monte Carlo estimates of edge particle sources in TJ-II plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Bruna, D.; Popov, Tsv; de la Cal, E.

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional calculations of the electron source in plasmas of the TJ-II stellarator (Madrid, Spain) are performed using the Monte Carlo code EIRENE. When possible, the results are compared with diagnostic measurements in equivalent coordinates. Examples are shown for the Hα light evolution during a plasma collapse, CX fluxes, neutrals distributions along diagnostic chords and line radiation emissivities.

  15. "An introduction to subquantum kinetics. II. An open systems description of particles and fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laviolette, Paul A.

    1985-11-01

    A nonlinear reaction-diffusion system, designated as Model G, is described. This system is similar to the Brusselator with the exception that it includes a third reaction intermediate, variable G. It is shown that a reaction-diffusion substrate of the kind specified by Model G is able to give rise to localized steady state concentration inhomogeneities which are autonomous and self-stabilizing and which exhibit many of the properties of subatomic particles. These "dissipative structures" generate substrate concentration gradients (fields) about themselves which serve as physically realistic analogs of gravitational and electrostatic potential fields. Test particles placed in these 1/r fields are found to experience a 1/r^2 accelerating force. Thus action-at-a-distance is elucidated. The same field giving rise to "electrostatic" effects is capable of causing closely spaced particles to undergo nuclear binding. Atom formation with electron orbital quantization is also predicted to occur. The field/source and wave/particle dualisms of classical field theory, as well as the field singularity problem, are avoided. It is predicted that gravitational mass, like electrostatic charge, manifests in two polarities, with the positive and negative mass states being correlated respectively with positive and negative charge.

  16. Basics of particle therapy II biologic and dosimetric aspects of clinical hadron therapy.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James

    2010-12-01

    Besides photons and electrons, high-energy particles like protons, neutrons, ⁴He ions or heavier ions (C, Ne, etc) have been finding increasing applications in the treatment of radioresistant tumors and tumors located near critical structures. The main difference between photons and hadrons is their different biologic effect and depth-dose distribution. Generally speaking, protons are superior in dosimetric aspects whereas neutrons have advantages in biologic effectiveness because of the high linear energy transfer. In 1946 Robert Wilson first published the physical advantages in dose distribution of ion particles for cancer therapy. Since that time hadronic radiotherapy has been intensively studied in physics laboratories worldwide and clinical application have gradually come to fruition. Hadron therapy was made possible by the advances in accelerator technology, which increases the particles' energy high enough to place them at any depth within the patient's body. As a follow-up to the previous article Introduction to Hadrons, this review discusses certain biologic and dosimetric aspects of using protons, neutrons, and heavy charged particles for radiation therapy. PMID:20395789

  17. Multi-responsive hybrid particles: thermo-, pH-, photo-, and magneto-responsive magnetic hydrogel cores with gold nanorod optical triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittikulsittichai, Supparesk; Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Sarangi, Subhasis; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Vekilov, Peter G.; Brazdeikis, Audrius; Randall Lee, T.

    2016-06-01

    The research strategy described in this manuscript harnesses the attractive properties of hydrogels, gold nanorods (Aurods), and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by synthesizing one unique multi-responsive nanostructure. This novel hybrid structure consists of silica-coated magnetic particles encapsulated within a thermo-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel network on which Aurods are assembled. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that these composite particles respond to several forms of external stimuli (temperature, pH, light, and/or applied magnetic field) owing to their specific architecture. Exposure of the hybrid particles to external stimuli led to a systematic and reversible variation in the hydrodynamic diameter (swelling-deswelling) and thus in the optical properties of the hybrid particles (red-shifting of the plasmon band). Such stimuli-responsive volume changes can be effectively exploited in drug-delivery applications.The research strategy described in this manuscript harnesses the attractive properties of hydrogels, gold nanorods (Aurods), and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by synthesizing one unique multi-responsive nanostructure. This novel hybrid structure consists of silica-coated magnetic particles encapsulated within a thermo-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel network on which Aurods are assembled. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that these composite particles respond to several forms of external stimuli (temperature, pH, light, and/or applied magnetic field) owing to their specific architecture. Exposure of the hybrid particles to external stimuli led to a systematic and reversible variation in the hydrodynamic diameter (swelling-deswelling) and thus in the optical properties of the hybrid particles (red-shifting of the plasmon band). Such stimuli-responsive volume changes can be effectively exploited in drug-delivery applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Contains detailed information about the synthesis of

  18. Construction and immunological evaluation of truncated hepatitis B core particles carrying HBsAg amino acids 119–152 in the major immunodominant region (MIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Qiudong; Yi, Yao; Guo, Minzhuo; Qiu, Feng; Jia, Zhiyuan; Lu, Xuexin; Meng, Qingling; Bi, Shengli

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •The conformational HBV neutralization antigen domain was successfully displayed on the surface of truncated HBc particles. •Appropriate dialysis procedures to support the renaturing environment for the protein refolding. •Efficient purification procedures to obtain high purity and icosahedral particles of mosaic HBV antigen. •Strong immune responses not only including neutralization antibody response but also Th1 cell response were induced in mice. -- Abstract: Hepatitis B capsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli can reassemble into icosahedral particles, which could strongly enhance the immunogenicity of foreign epitopes, especially those inserted into its major immunodominant region. Herein, we inserted the entire ‘α’ antigenic determinant amino acids (aa) 119–152 of HBsAg into the truncated HBc (aa 1–144), between Asp{sup 78} and Pro{sup 79}. Prokaryotic expression showed that the mosaic HBc was mainly in the form of inclusion bodies. After denaturation with urea, it was dialyzed progressively for protein renaturation. We observed that before and after renaturation, mosaic HBc was antigenic as determined by HBsAg ELISA and a lot of viruslike particles were observed after renaturation. Thus, we further purified the mosaic viruslike particles by (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, DEAE chromatography, and Sepharose 4FF chromatography. Negative staining electron microscopy demonstrated the morphology of the viruslike particles. Immunization of Balb/c mice with mosaic particles induced the production of anti-HBs antibody and Th1 cell immune response supported by ELISPOT and CD4/CD8 proportions assay. In conclusion, we constructed mosaic hepatitis core particles displaying the entire ‘α’ antigenic determinant on the surface and laid a foundation for researching therapeutic hepatits B vaccines.

  19. Particle-in-cell simulations of magnetic reconnection in laser-plasma experiments on Shenguang-II facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui; Dong, Quanli; Zhu, Jianqiang; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2013-11-15

    Recently, magnetic reconnection has been realized in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas. Plasma bubbles with self-generated magnetic fields are created by focusing laser beams to small-scale spots on a foil. The bubbles expand into each other, which may then drive magnetic reconnection. The reconnection experiment in laser-produced plasmas has also been conducted at Shenguang-II (SG-II) laser facility, and the existence of a plasmoid was identified in the experiment [Dong et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215001 (2012)]. In this paper, by performing two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate such a process of magnetic reconnection based on the experiment on SG-II facility, and a possible explanation for the formation of the plasmoid is proposed. The results show that before magnetic reconnection occurs, the bubbles squeeze strongly each other and a very thin current sheet is formed. The current sheet is unstable to the tearing mode instability, and we can then observe the formation of plasmoid(s) in such a multiple X-lines reconnection.

  20. Physical properties and structure of fine core-shell particles used as packing materials for chromatography relationships between particle characteristics and column performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of new brands of packing materials made of fine porous-shell particles, e.g., Halo and Kinetex, has brought great improvements in potential column efficiency, demanding considerable progress in the design of chromatographic instruments. Columns packed with Halo and Kinetex particles provide minimum values of their reduced plate heights of nearly 1.5 and 1.2, respectively. These packing materials have physical properties that set them apart from conventional porous particles. The kinetic performance of 4.6 mm I.D. columns packed with these two new materials is analyzed based on the results of a series of nine independent and complementary experiments: low-temperature nitrogen adsorption (LTNA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), Coulter counter particle size distributions, pycnometry, height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP), peak parking method (PP), total pore blocking method (TPB), and local electrochemical detection across the column exit section (LED). The results of this work establish links between the physical properties of these superficially porous particles and the excellent kinetic performance of columns packed with them. It clarifies the fundamental origin of the difference in the chromatographic performances of the Halo and the Kinetex columns.

  1. Oxide-supported IrNiO(x) core-shell particles as efficient, cost-effective, and stable catalysts for electrochemical water splitting.

    PubMed

    Nong, Hong Nhan; Oh, Hyung-Suk; Reier, Tobias; Willinger, Elena; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Petkov, Valeri; Teschner, Detre; Strasser, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Active and highly stable oxide-supported IrNiO(x) core-shell catalysts for electrochemical water splitting are presented. IrNi(x)@IrO(x) nanoparticles supported on high-surface-area mesoporous antimony-doped tin oxide (IrNiO(x)/Meso-ATO) were synthesized from bimetallic IrNi(x) precursor alloys (PA-IrNi(x) /Meso-ATO) using electrochemical Ni leaching and concomitant Ir oxidation. Special emphasis was placed on Ni/NiO surface segregation under thermal treatment of the PA-IrNi(x)/Meso-ATO as well as on the surface chemical state of the particle/oxide support interface. Combining a wide array of characterization methods, we uncovered the detrimental effect of segregated NiO phases on the water splitting activity of core-shell particles. The core-shell IrNiO(x)/Meso-ATO catalyst displayed high water-splitting activity and unprecedented stability in acidic electrolyte providing substantial progress in the development of PEM electrolyzer anode catalysts with drastically reduced Ir loading and significantly enhanced durability. PMID:25611732

  2. Folic acid-functionalized magnetic ZnFe2O4 hollow microsphere core/mesoporous silica shell composite particles: synthesis and application in drug release.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dandan; Wei, Kaiwei; Liu, Qi; Yang, Yong; Guo, Xue; Rong, Hongren; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Wang, Guoxiu

    2013-07-01

    A drug delivery system was designed by deliberately combining the useful functions into one entity, which was composed of magnetic ZnFe2O4 hollow microsphere as the core, and mesoporous silica with folic acid molecules as the outer shell. Amine groups coated magnetic ZnFe2O4 hollow microsphere core/mesoporous silica shell (MZHM-MSS-NH2) composite particles were first synthesized by a one-pot direct co-condensation method. Subsequently a novel kind of folic acid-functionalized magnetic ZnFe2O4 hollow microsphere core/mesoporous silica shell (MZHM-MSS-NHFA) composite particles were synthesized by conjugating folic acid as targeted molecule to MZHM-MSS-NH2. Ibuprofen, a well-known antiphlogistic drug, was used as a model drug to assess the loading and releasing behavior of the composite microspheres. The results show that the MZHM-MSS-NHFA system has the higher capacity of drug storage and good sustained drug-release property.

  3. Coffee rings as low-resource diagnostics: detection of the malaria biomarker Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-II using a surface-coupled ring of Ni(II)NTA gold-plated polystyrene particles.

    PubMed

    Gulka, Christopher P; Swartz, Joshua D; Trantum, Joshua R; Davis, Keersten M; Peak, Corey M; Denton, Alexander J; Haselton, Frederick R; Wright, David W

    2014-05-14

    We report a novel, low-resource malaria diagnostic platform inspired by the coffee ring phenomenon, selective for Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-II (PfHRP-II), a biomarker indicative of the P. falciparum parasite strain. In this diagnostic design, a recombinant HRP-II (rcHRP-II) biomarker is sandwiched between 1 μm Ni(II)nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) gold-plated polystyrene microspheres (AuPS) and Ni(II)NTA-functionalized glass. After rcHRP-II malaria biomarkers had reacted with Ni(II)NTA-functionalized particles, a 1 μL volume of the particle-protein conjugate solution is deposited onto a functionalized glass slide. Drop evaporation produces the radial flow characteristic of coffee ring formation, and particle-protein conjugates are transported toward the drop edge, where, in the presence of rcHRP-II, particles bind to the Ni(II)NTA-functionalized glass surface. After evaporation, a wash with deionized water removes nonspecifically bound materials while maintaining the integrity of the surface-coupled ring produced by the presence of the protein biomarker. The dynamic range of this design was found to span 3 orders of magnitude, and rings are visible with the naked eye at protein concentrations as low as 10 pM, 1 order of magnitude below the 100 pM PfHRP-II threshold recommended by the World Health Organization. Key enabling features of this design are the inert and robust gold nanoshell to reduce nonspecific interactions on the particle surface, inclusion of a water wash step after drop evaporation to reduce nonspecific binding to the glass, a large diameter particle to project a large two-dimensional viewable area after ring formation, and a low particle density to favor radial flow toward the drop edge and reduce vertical settling to the glass surface in the center of the drop. This robust, antibody-free assay offers a simple user interface and clinically relevant limits of biomarker detection, two critical features required for low

  4. [The influence of spray drying process conditions on physical, chemical properties and lung inhaling performance of Panax notoginseng saponins - tanshinone II A composite particles].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Mei; Fu, Ting-Ming; Guo, Li-Wei

    2013-06-01

    This study is to report the influence of conditions in spray drying process on physical and chemical properties and lung inhaling performance of Panax notoginseng Saponins - Tanshinone II A composite particles. According to the physical and chemical properties of the two types of components within the composite particles, three solvent systems were selected including ethanol, ethanol : acetone (9 : 1, v/v) and ethanol : acetone (4 : 1, v/v), and three inlet temperature: 110 degrees C, 120 degrees C, 130 degrees C to prepare seven different composite particle samples; each sample was characterized using laser diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic vapour sorption (DVS) and atomic force microscope (AFM), and their aerodynamic behavior was evaluated by a Next Generation Impactor (NGI). The results indicate that under the conditions of using the mixed solvent system of ethanol--acetone volume ratio of 9 : 1, and the inlet temperature of 110 degrees C, the resulting composite particles showed rough surface, with more tanshinone II A distributing in the outer layer, such composite particles have the best lung inhaling performance and the fine particle fraction (FPF) close to 60%. Finally it is concluded that by adjusting the conditions in co-spray drying process, the distribution amount and existence form of tanshinone II A in the outer layer of the particles can be changed so that to enhance lung inhaling performance of the drug composite particles.

  5. Piezo-phototronic Effect Enhanced UV/Visible Photodetector Based on Fully Wide Band Gap Type-II ZnO/ZnS Core/Shell Nanowire Array.

    PubMed

    Rai, Satish C; Wang, Kai; Ding, Yong; Marmon, Jason K; Bhatt, Manish; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Weilie; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-06-23

    A high-performance broad band UV/visible photodetector has been successfully fabricated on a fully wide bandgap ZnO/ZnS type-II heterojunction core/shell nanowire array. The device can detect photons with energies significantly smaller (2.2 eV) than the band gap of ZnO (3.2 eV) and ZnS (3.7 eV), which is mainly attributed to spatially indirect type-II transition facilitated by the abrupt interface between the ZnO core and ZnS shell. The performance of the device was further enhanced through the piezo-phototronic effect induced lowering of the barrier height to allow charge carrier transport across the ZnO/ZnS interface, resulting in three orders of relative responsivity change measured at three different excitation wavelengths (385, 465, and 520 nm). This work demonstrates a prototype UV/visible photodetector based on the truly wide band gap semiconducting 3D core/shell nanowire array with enhanced performance through the piezo-phototronic effect.

  6. Mid-infrared Extinction Mapping of Infrared Dark Clouds. II. The Structure of Massive Starless Cores and Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2012-07-01

    We develop the mid-infrared extinction (MIREX) mapping technique of Butler & Tan (Paper I), presenting a new method to correct for the Galactic foreground emission based on observed saturation in independent cores. Using Spitzer GLIMPSE 8 μm images, this allows us to accurately probe mass surface densities, Σ, up to ~= 0.5 g cm-2 with 2'' resolution and mitigate one of the main sources of uncertainty associated with Galactic MIREX mapping. We then characterize the structure of 42 massive starless and early-stage cores and their surrounding clumps, selected from 10 infrared dark clouds, measuring Σcl(r) from the core/clump centers. We first assess the properties of the core/clump at a scale where the total enclosed mass as projected on the sky is M cl = 60 M ⊙. We find that these objects have a mean radius of R cl ~= 0.1 pc, mean \\bar{\\Sigma }_cl = 0.3\\:g\\:cm^{-2} and, if fitted by a power-law (PL) density profile \\rho _cl\\propto r^{-k_\\rho ,cl}, a mean value of k ρ, cl = 1.1. If we assume a core is embedded in each clump and subtract the surrounding clump envelope to derive the core properties, then we find a mean core density PL index of k ρ, c = 1.6. We repeat this analysis as a function of radius and derive the best-fitting PL plus uniform clump envelope model for each of the 42 core/clumps. The cores have typical masses of Mc ~ 100 M ⊙ and \\bar{\\Sigma }_c\\sim 0.1\\:g\\:cm^{-2}, and are embedded in clumps with comparable mass surface densities. We also consider Bonnor-Ebert density models, but these do not fit the observed Σ profiles as well as PLs. We conclude that massive starless cores exist and are well described by singular polytropic spheres. Their relatively low values of Σ and the fact that they are IR dark may imply that their fragmentation is inhibited by magnetic fields rather than radiative heating. Comparing to massive star-forming cores and clumps, there is tentative evidence for an evolution toward higher densities and steeper

  7. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a Particle Radiation Monitor II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, C. E.; Ford, P. G.; Bautz, M. W.; ODell, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  8. Setting the stage for circumstellar interaction in core-collapse supernovae. II. Wave-driven mass loss in supernova progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shiode, Joshua H.; Quataert, Eliot E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2014-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) powered by interaction with circumstellar material provide evidence for intense stellar mass loss during the final years before core collapse. We have argued that during and after core neon burning, internal gravity waves excited by core convection can tap into the core fusion power and transport a super-Eddington energy flux out to the stellar envelope, potentially unbinding ∼1 solar mass of material. In this work, we explore the internal conditions of SN progenitors using the MESA one-dimensional stellar evolution code in search of those most susceptible to wave-driven mass loss. We focus on simple, order of magnitude considerations applicable to a wide range of progenitors. Wave-driven mass loss during core neon and oxygen fusion happens preferentially in either lower mass (∼20 solar mass zero-age main sequence) stars or massive, sub-solar metallicity stars. Roughly 20% of the SN progenitors we survey can excite 10{sup 46-48} erg of energy in waves that can potentially drive mass loss within a few months to a decade of core collapse. This energy can generate circumstellar environments with 10{sup –3}-1 solar masses reaching 100 AU before explosion. We predict a correlation between the energy associated with pre-SN mass ejection and the time to core collapse, with the most intense mass loss preferentially occurring closer to core collapse. During silicon burning, wave energy may inflate 10{sup –3}-1 solar masses of the envelope to 10-100 s of solar radii. This suggests that some nominally compact SN progenitors (Type Ibc progenitors) will have a significantly different SN shock breakout signature than traditionally assumed.

  9. Probing interfacial dynamics and mechanics using submerged particle microrheology. II. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, Thomas; Dennin, Michael; Shlomovitz, Roie; Evans, Arthur A.; Levine, Alex J.

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact microrheological technique to probe the mechanics of the air/water interface is explored. Polystyrene spheres dissolved in water are trapped with an optical tweezer near the free surface of water, allowing the response functions of the particles to be measured as a function of the distance from the air/water interface. These measurements show that at the surface, the imaginary part of the response function increases by approximately 30% from the Stokes value measured in the bulk. As the particle is moved away from the surface via an optical trap, the response function returns to the bulk value. The method is tested by comparing the response function of particles near a rigid wall to the theory developed by Faxèn. A newly developed hydrodynamic theory is used to explain the results at the free interface through a calculation of the linear response function as a function of depth. These results show a range of sensitivity that can be utilized to study the microrheology of a Langmuir monolayer without distorting its structure.

  10. Preparation of monodispersed macroporous core-shell molecularly imprinted particles and their application in the determination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongliang; He, Yonghuan; Jin, Yulong; Huang, Yanyan; Liu, Guoquan; Zhao, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Porous polymers have aroused extensive attention due to their controllable porous structure in favor of mass transfer and binding capacity. In this work, the novel macroporous core-shell molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) for selective recognition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) were prepared by surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (si-ATRP). By using one-step swelling and polymerization method, the monodispersed macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) particles were synthesized and used as supporting matrix for preparing surface MIP particles (PGMA@MIP). Thanks to the inner and outer surface-located binding cavities and the macroporous structure, the PGMA@MIPs revealed desirable efficiency for template removal and mass transfer, and thus excellent accessibility and affinity toward template 2,4-D. Moreover, PGMA@MIPs exhibited much higher selectivity toward 2,4-D than PGMA@NIPs. PGMA@MIP particles were directly used to selectively enrich 2,4-D from tap water and the recoveries of 2,4-D were obtained as 90.0-93.4% with relative standard division of 3.1-3.4% (n=3). The macroporous PGMA@MIPs also possessed steady and excellent reusable performance for 2,4-D in four extraction/stripping cycles. This novel macroporous core-shell imprinted material may become a powerful tool for rapid and efficient enrichment and separation of target compounds from the complicated samples.

  11. Study of Molecular Conformation and Activity-Related Properties of Lipase Immobilized onto Core-Shell Structured Polyacrylic Acid-Coated Magnetic Silica Nanocomposite Particles.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilnejad-Ahranjani, Parvaneh; Kazemeini, Mohammad; Singh, Gurvinder; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-04-01

    A facile approach for the preparation of core-shell structured poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-coated Fe3O4 cluster@SiO2 nanocomposite particles as the support materials for the lipase immobilization is reported. Low- or high-molecular-weight (1800 and 100,000, respectively) PAA molecules were covalently attached onto the surface of amine-functionalized magnetic silica nanoacomposite particles. The successful preparation of particles were verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), zeta potential measurement, and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) techniques. Once lipase is covalently immobilized onto the particles with an average diameter of 210 ± 50 nm, resulting from high binding sites concentrations on the low- and high-molecular-weight PAA-coated particles, high lipase immobilization efficiencies (86.2% and 89.9%, respectively), and loading capacities (786 and 816 mg g(-1), respectively) are obtained. Results from circular dichroism (CD) analysis and catalytic activity tests reveal an increase in the β-sheet content of lipase molecules upon immobilization, along with an enhancement in their activities and stabilities. The lipases immobilized onto the low- and high-molecular-weight PAA-coated particles show maximum activities at 55 and 50 °C, respectively, which are ∼28% and ∼15% higher than that of the free lipase at its own optimum temperature (40 °C), respectively. The immobilized lipases exhibit excellent performance at broader temperature and pH ranges and high thermal and storage stabilities, as well as superior reusability. These prepared magnetic nanocomposite particles can be offered as suitable support materials for efficient immobilization of enzymes and improvement of the immobilized enzymes properties.

  12. Factors affecting the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-Al3Ti core-shell-structured particle-reinforced Al matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Baisong; Yi, Jianhong; Ni, Song; Shen, Rujuan; Song, Min

    2016-04-01

    This work studied the effects of matrix powder and sintering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of in situ formed Ti-Al3Ti core-shell-structured particle-reinforced pure Al-based composites. It has been shown that both factors have significant effects on the morphology of the reinforcements and densification behaviour of the composites. Due to the strong interfacial bonding and the limitation of the crack propagation in the intermetallic shell during deformation by soft Al matrix and Ti core, the composite fabricated using fine spherical-shaped Al powder and sintered at 570 °C for 5 h has the optimal combination of the overall mechanical properties. The study provides a direction for the optimum combination of high strength and ductility of the composites by adjusting the fabrication parameters.

  13. Vine—A Numerical Code for Simulating Astrophysical Systems Using Particles. II. Implementation and Performance Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Wetzstein, M.; Naab, T.

    2009-10-01

    We continue our presentation of VINE. In this paper, we begin with a description of relevant architectural properties of the serial and shared memory parallel computers on which VINE is intended to run, and describe their influences on the design of the code itself. We continue with a detailed description of a number of optimizations made to the layout of the particle data in memory and to our implementation of a binary tree used to access that data for use in gravitational force calculations and searches for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) neighbor particles. We describe the modifications to the code necessary to obtain forces efficiently from special purpose "GRAPE" hardware, the interfaces required to allow transparent substitution of those forces in the code instead of those obtained from the tree, and the modifications necessary to use both tree and GRAPE together as a fused GRAPE/tree combination. We conclude with an extensive series of performance tests, which demonstrate that the code can be run efficiently and without modification in serial on small workstations or in parallel using the OpenMP compiler directives on large-scale, shared memory parallel machines. We analyze the effects of the code optimizations and estimate that they improve its overall performance by more than an order of magnitude over that obtained by many other tree codes. Scaled parallel performance of the gravity and SPH calculations, together the most costly components of most simulations, is nearly linear up to at least 120 processors on moderate sized test problems using the Origin 3000 architecture, and to the maximum machine sizes available to us on several other architectures. At similar accuracy, performance of VINE, used in GRAPE-tree mode, is approximately a factor 2 slower than that of VINE, used in host-only mode. Further optimizations of the GRAPE/host communications could improve the speed by as much as a factor of 3, but have not yet been implemented in VINE

  14. Avoidance model for soft particles. II. Positional ordering of charged rods.

    PubMed

    Kramer, E M; Herzfeld, J

    2000-06-01

    The phase diagram of parallel, charged spherocylinders is computed. The topology of the diagram is found to be similar to the uncharged one, but there are several qualitative changes. Regions of phase coexistence are significantly narrower and positional ordering is stabilized by the electrostatic repulsions. The nematic phase occupies a very narrow zone. We suggest that soft repulsions between surfactant micelles may be responsible for the absence of a nematic phase in most surfactant systems. We also present comparisons with the observed nematic-smectic phase transition for fd and tobacco mosaic virus particles. PMID:11088380

  15. VINE-A NUMERICAL CODE FOR SIMULATING ASTROPHYSICAL SYSTEMS USING PARTICLES. II. IMPLEMENTATION AND PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Wetzstein, M.; Naab, T.

    2009-10-01

    We continue our presentation of VINE. In this paper, we begin with a description of relevant architectural properties of the serial and shared memory parallel computers on which VINE is intended to run, and describe their influences on the design of the code itself. We continue with a detailed description of a number of optimizations made to the layout of the particle data in memory and to our implementation of a binary tree used to access that data for use in gravitational force calculations and searches for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) neighbor particles. We describe the modifications to the code necessary to obtain forces efficiently from special purpose 'GRAPE' hardware, the interfaces required to allow transparent substitution of those forces in the code instead of those obtained from the tree, and the modifications necessary to use both tree and GRAPE together as a fused GRAPE/tree combination. We conclude with an extensive series of performance tests, which demonstrate that the code can be run efficiently and without modification in serial on small workstations or in parallel using the OpenMP compiler directives on large-scale, shared memory parallel machines. We analyze the effects of the code optimizations and estimate that they improve its overall performance by more than an order of magnitude over that obtained by many other tree codes. Scaled parallel performance of the gravity and SPH calculations, together the most costly components of most simulations, is nearly linear up to at least 120 processors on moderate sized test problems using the Origin 3000 architecture, and to the maximum machine sizes available to us on several other architectures. At similar accuracy, performance of VINE, used in GRAPE-tree mode, is approximately a factor 2 slower than that of VINE, used in host-only mode. Further optimizations of the GRAPE/host communications could improve the speed by as much as a factor of 3, but have not yet been implemented in VINE

  16. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  17. Lateral structuring and stability phenomena induced by block copolymers and core-shell nanogel particles at immiscible polymer/polymer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozen, Arif Omer

    We have investigated the parameters such as copolymer/nanoparticle concentration, architecture and molecular weight combined with film thickness, time and temperature in order to develop a molecular-level insight on how lateral interfacial structuring occurs at immiscible polymer/polymer interfaces. I order to develop a molecular-level understanding of how these 'smart' self-assembling materials and core-shell nanogel particles interact both intra- and inter-molecularly and form ordered structures in bulk, as well as at immiscible interfaces, we first focused on the response of core-shell polymer nanoparticles, designated CSNGs, composed of a cross-linked divinylbenzene core and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) arms as they segregate from PMMA homopolymer. We have demonstrated that these nanogel particles exhibit autophobic character when dispersed in high molecular weight homopolymer matrices and segregate to the interface with another fluid. We have further explored the migration of these new-generation nanogel particles (CSNG-Rs) segregating from PS homopolymer to PS/PMMA interfaces. Unlike the instability patterns observed with the CSNGs, which exhibit classical nucleation and growth mechanism with circular hole formation, we have observed an intriguing dewetting pattern and CSNG-Rs forming lateral aggregates and tentacle-like structures at the interface. In parallel with our core-shell particle studies, we have also explored the structuring of copolymer molecules that are far from equilibrium in bulk and complex laminate of polymer thin films. Our early triblock copolymer studies have proven that molecular asymmetry has a profound effect on order-disorder transition temperature. We focused primarily on the effect of the copolymer chemical composition (i.e., block sizes) on the dewetting behavior of PS/SM thin films on PMMA. We elucidate the interfacial segregation and concurrent micellization of diblock copolymers in a dynamically evolving environment with

  18. Three-dimensional gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation of plasmas on a massively parallel computer: Final report on LDRD Core Competency Project, FY 1991--FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, J.A.; Williams, T.J.; Cohen, B.I.; Dimits, A.M.

    1994-04-27

    One of the programs of the Magnetic fusion Energy (MFE) Theory and computations Program is studying the anomalous transport of thermal energy across the field lines in the core of a tokamak. We use the method of gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation in this study. For this LDRD project we employed massively parallel processing, new algorithms, and new algorithms, and new formal techniques to improve this research. Specifically, we sought to take steps toward: researching experimentally-relevant parameters in our simulations, learning parallel computing to have as a resource for our group, and achieving a 100 {times} speedup over our starting-point Cray2 simulation code`s performance.

  19. Association of chlorophyll with amides on plasticized polyethylene particles. II. The isomeric N-(pyridyl)myristamides

    SciTech Connect

    Kusumoto, Y.; Seely, G.R.; Senthilathipan, V.

    1982-01-01

    When chlorophyll, together with certain other amphiphilic substances, is adsorbed to particles of polyethylene plasticized by incorporation of tetradecane, it is maintained in monomeric or oligomeric forms with characteristic absorption and fluorescence spectra. The present work describes the properties of chlorophyll a on such particles in the presence of the three isomeric N-(pyridyl)myristamides, and of the similarly shaped but not basic compound myristanilide, in an effort to ascertain the structural factors governing associations of these species. Absorption and fluorescence spectra at room temperature are resolved into minimal sets of Gaussian components, and relations between the component sets are proposed. The positions of the component bands and their relative abundance are characteristic of the amide used. The 3- and 4-pyridyl isomers bind more strongly to chlorophyll, probably by ligation of the pyridine nitrogen to Mg of the pigment. The 2-pyridyl isomer and myristanilide bind more weakly, probably through the amide carbonyl group. The association of chlorophyll into species with characteristic absorption and fluorescence bands is promoted more strongly by the 3- and 4-isomers than by the 2-isomer and myristanilide, and probably involves hydrogen bonding to chlorophyll carbonyl groups. A possible manner of association of chlorophyll in the presence of N,N-dimethylmyristamide is also presented. By way of comparison, chlorophyll adsorbed with dodecylpyridinium bromide, which lacks a nucleophilic function, is mainly in the microcrystalline hydrate form absorbing near 740 nm.

  20. Conversion of batch to molten glass, II: Dissolution of quartz particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Marcial, Jose; Swearingen, Kevin J.; Henager, Samuel H.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E.

    2011-01-28

    Quartz dissolution during the batch-to-glass conversion influences the melt viscosity and ultimately the temperature at which the glass forms. Batches to make a high-alumina borosilicate glass (formulated for the vitrification of nuclear waste) were heated as 5°C min-1 and quenched from the temperatures of 400-1200°C at 100°C intervals. As a silica source, the batches contained quartz with particles ranging from 5 to 195 µm. The content of unreacted quartz in the samples was determined with x-ray diffraction. Most of fine quartz has dissolved during the early batch reactions (at temperatures <800°C), whereas coarser quartz dissolved mostly in a continuous glass phase via diffusion. The mass-transfer coefficients were assessed from the data as functions of the initial particle sizes and the temperature. A series of batch was also tested that contained nitrated components and additions of sucrose known to accelerate melting. While sucrose addition had no discernible impact on quartz dissolution, nitrate batches melted somewhat more slowly than batches containing carbonates and hydroxides in addition to nitrates.

  1. Particle simulation of radio frequency stabilization of the flute mode in a tandem mirror. II. Perpendicular antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Kadoya, Y.

    1988-10-01

    A two-and-a-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code PS2M (J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 3899 (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied perpendicularly to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field stabilizes or destabilizes the flute mode through the mechanism of the ponderomotive force acting on electrons and ions and through the mechanism of sideband coupling. In the simulations two typical examples have been shown: (i) when the sideband coupling effects (in which the electron terms are dominant) stabilize the flute modes and (ii) when the perpendicular ponderomotive force acting on the electrons destabilizes the flute modes.

  2. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  3. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. II. Relativistic Explosion Models of Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M ⊙ progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  4. MIGRATION AND GROWTH OF PROTOPLANETARY EMBRYOS. II. EMERGENCE OF PROTO-GAS-GIANT CORES VERSUS SUPER EARTH PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 15%-20% of solar type stars contain one or more gas giant planets. According to the core-accretion scenario, the acquisition of their gaseous envelope must be preceded by the formation of super-critical cores with masses 10 times or larger than that of the Earth. It is natural to link the formation probability of gas giant planets with the supply of gases and solids in their natal disks. However, a much richer population of super Earths suggests that (1) there is no shortage of planetary building block material, (2) a gas giant's growth barrier is probably associated with whether it can merge into super-critical cores, and (3) super Earths are probably failed cores that did not attain sufficient mass to initiate efficient accretion of gas before it is severely depleted. Here we construct a model based on the hypothesis that protoplanetary embryos migrated extensively before they were assembled into bona fide planets. We construct a Hermite-Embryo code based on a unified viscous-irradiation disk model and a prescription for the embryo-disk tidal interaction. This code is used to simulate the convergent migration of embryos, and their close encounters and coagulation. Around the progenitors of solar-type stars, the progenitor super-critical-mass cores of gas giant planets primarily form in protostellar disks with relatively high (≳ 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) mass accretion rates, whereas systems of super Earths (failed cores) are more likely to emerge out of natal disks with modest mass accretion rates, due to the mean motion resonance barrier and retention efficiency.

  5. Facile synthesis of core-shell/hollow anisotropic particles via control of cross-linking during one-pot dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanan; Ma, Yuhong; Liu, Lianying; Yang, Wantai

    2015-05-01

    Preparation of anisotropic particles based on seed phase separation involves multiple processes, and asymmetrical structures and surfaces cannot be produced when anisotropic shapes emerge. In conventional one-pot dispersion polymerization (Dis.P) using cross-linker, only spherical particles are prepared due to rapid and high cross-linking. Herein, monodisperse snowman-like particles with core-shell/hollow structures and partially rough surface were synthesized straightforward by a modified one-pot Dis.P, in which ethylene glycol and water (6/4, vol.) were used as medium, and ammonium persulfate (APS) aqueous solution, vinyl acetate (VA) and/or acrylic acid (AA), divinylbenzene (DVB) and styrene (St) were added at 6h. The cross-linking of growing particles was confined to exterior (forming cross-linked shell), and gel contents were low, leading to phase separation. Asymmetrical morphologies, structures, sizes and surface roughness were flexibly tuned by varying amounts of APS, VA and/or AA, water and DVB, and DVB adding speed. At low APS contents or high DVB amounts, the inhomogeneous cross-linking of head enabled its phase to separate, producing elongated head. With addition of VA and AA, phase separations inside head and body were induced, generating hollow structure. Adding DVB very slowly, nonlinear growth of third compartment occurred, forming bowed head. PMID:25626132

  6. Plasma electron hole kinematics. II. Hole tracking Particle-In-Cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2016-08-01

    The kinematics of a 1-D electron hole is studied using a novel Particle-In-Cell simulation code. A hole tracking technique enables us to follow the trajectory of a fast-moving solitary hole and study quantitatively hole acceleration and coupling to ions. We observe a transient at the initial stage of hole formation when the hole accelerates to several times the cold-ion sound speed. Artificially imposing slow ion speed changes on a fully formed hole causes its velocity to change even when the ion stream speed in the hole frame greatly exceeds the ion thermal speed, so there are no reflected ions. The behavior that we observe in numerical simulations agrees very well with our analytic theory of hole momentum conservation and the effects of "jetting."

  7. Perturbation method for classical spinning particle motion. II. Vaidya space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dinesh

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes an application of the Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon (MPD) equations in analytic perturbation form to the case of circular motion around a radially accreting or radiating black hole described by the Vaidya metric. Based on the formalism presented earlier, this paper explores the effects of mass accretion or loss of the central body on the overall dynamics of the orbiting spinning particle. This includes changes to its squared mass and spin magnitude due to the classical analog of radiative corrections from spin-curvature coupling. Various quantitative consequences are explored when considering orbital motion near the black hole’s event horizon. An analysis on the orbital stability properties due to spin-curvature interactions is examined briefly, with conclusions in general agreement with previous work performed for the case of circular motion around a Kerr black hole.

  8. Particle diffusion and localized acceleration in inhomogeneous AGN jets - II. Stochastic variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuhui; Pohl, Martin; Böttcher, Markus; Gao, Shan

    2016-05-01

    We study the stochastic variation of blazar emission under a 2D spatially resolved leptonic jet model we previously developed. Random events of particle acceleration and injection in small zones within the emission region are assumed to be responsible for flux variations. In addition to producing spectral energy distributions that describe the observed flux of Mrk 421, we further analyse the timing properties of the simulated light curves, such as the power spectral density (PSD) at different bands, flux-flux correlations, as well as the cross-correlation function between X-rays and TeV γ-rays. We find spectral breaks in the PSD at a time-scale comparable to the dominant characteristic time-scale in the system, which is usually the pre-defined decay time-scale of an acceleration event. Cooling imposes a delay, and so PSDs taken at lower energy bands in each emission component (synchrotron or inverse Compton) generally break at longer time-scales. The flux-flux correlation between X-rays and TeV γ-rays can be either quadratic or linear, depending on whether or not there are large variation of the injection into the particle acceleration process. When the relationship is quadratic, the TeV flares lag the X-ray flares, and the optical and GeV flares are large enough to be comparable to the ones in X-ray. When the relationship is linear, the lags are insignificant, and the optical and GeV flares are small.

  9. Significance of the photosystem II core phosphatase PBCP for plant viability and protein repair in thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Woodiwiss, Timothy; Knoerdel, Ryan; Zia, Ahmad; Wood, Magnus; Hoehner, Ricarda; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    PSII undergoes photodamage, which results in photoinhibition-the light-induced loss of photosynthetic activity. The main target of damage in PSII is the reaction center protein D1, which is buried in the massive 1.4 MDa PSII holocomplex. Plants have evolved a PSII repair cycle that degrades the damaged D1 subunit and replaces it with a newly synthesized copy. PSII core proteins, including D1, are phosphorylated in high light. This phosphorylation is important for the mobilization of photoinhibited PSII from stacked grana thylakoids to the repair machinery in distant unstacked stroma lamellae. It has been recognized that the degradation of the damaged D1 is more efficient after its dephosphorylation by a protein phosphatase. Recently a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C)-type PSII core phosphatase (PBCP) has been discovered, which is involved in the dephosphorylation of PSII core proteins. Its role in PSII repair, however, is unknown. Using a range of spectroscopic and biochemical techniques, we report that the inactivation of the PBCP gene affects the growth characteristic of plants, with a decreased biomass and altered PSII functionality. PBCP mutants show increased phosphorylation of core subunits in dark and photoinhibitory conditions and a diminished degradation of the D1 subunit. Our results on D1 turnover in PBCP mutants suggest that dephosphorylation of PSII subunits is required for efficient D1 degradation. PMID:24793754

  10. The Inhibitory Core of the Myostatin Prodomain: Its Interaction with Both Type I and II Membrane Receptors, and Potential to Treat Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ohsawa, Yutaka; Takayama, Kentaro; Nishimatsu, Shin-ichiro; Okada, Tadashi; Fujino, Masahiro; Fukai, Yuta; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Itoh, Fumiko; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Hayashi, Yoshio; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin, a muscle-specific transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. The N-terminal prodomain of myostatin noncovalently binds to and suppresses the C-terminal mature domain (ligand) as an inactive circulating complex. However, which region of the myostatin prodomain is required to inhibit the biological activity of myostatin has remained unknown. We identified a 29-amino acid region that inhibited myostatin-induced transcriptional activity by 79% compared with the full-length prodomain. This inhibitory core resides near the N-terminus of the prodomain and includes an α-helix that is evolutionarily conserved among other TGF-β family members, but suppresses activation of myostatin and growth and differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) that share identical membrane receptors. Interestingly, the inhibitory core co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with not only the ligand, but also its type I and type II membrane receptors. Deletion of the inhibitory core in the full-length prodomain removed all capacity for suppression of myostatin. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the inhibitory core (p29) ameliorates impaired myoblast differentiation induced by myostatin and GDF11, but not activin or TGF-β1. Moreover, intramuscular injection of p29 alleviated muscle atrophy and decreased the absolute force in caveolin 3-deficient limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C model mice. The injection suppressed activation of myostatin signaling and restored the decreased numbers of muscle precursor cells caused by caveolin 3 deficiency. Our findings indicate a novel concept for this newly identified inhibitory core of the prodomain of myostatin: that it not only suppresses the ligand, but also prevents two distinct membrane receptors from binding to the ligand. This study provides a strong rationale for the use of p29 in the amelioration of skeletal muscle atrophy in various clinical settings. PMID:26226340

  11. Characterization of the low-temperature triplet state of chlorophyll in photosystem II core complexes: Application of phosphorescence measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, Alexey A; Neverov, Konstantin V; Krasnovsky, Alexander A; Shkuropatova, Valentina A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Shkuropatov, Anatoly Ya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorescence measurements at 77 K and light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy at 95 K were applied to study of the triplet state of chlorophyll a ((3)Chl) in photosystem II (PSII) core complexes isolated from spinach. Using both methods, (3)Chl was observed in the core preparations with doubly reduced primary quinone acceptor QA. The spectral parameters of Chl phosphorescence resemble those in the isolated PSII reaction centers (RCs). The main spectral maximum and the lifetime of the phosphorescence corresponded to 955±1 nm and of 1.65±0.05 ms respectively; in the excitation spectrum, the absorption maxima of all core complex pigments (Chl, pheophytin a (Pheo), and β-carotene) were observed. The differential signal at 1667(-)/1628(+)cm(-1) reflecting a downshift of the stretching frequency of the 13(1)-keto C=O group of Chl was found to dominate in the triplet-minus-singlet FTIR difference spectrum of core complexes. Based on FTIR results and literature data, it is proposed that (3)Chl is mostly localized on the accessory chlorophyll that is in triplet equilibrium with P680. Analysis of the data suggests that the Chl triplet state responsible for the phosphorescence and the FTIR difference spectrum is mainly generated due to charge recombination in the reaction center radical pair P680(+)PheoD1(-), and the energy and temporal parameters of this triplet state as well as the molecular environment and interactions of the triplet-bearing Chl molecule are similar in the PSII core complexes and isolated PSII RCs.

  12. Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires enhanced Fenton oxidation by accelerating the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingu; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2014-08-01

    In this study we demonstrate Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires can improve Fenton oxidation efficiency by two times with rhodamine B as a model pollutant at pH > 4. Active species trapping experiments revealed that the rhodamine B oxidation enhancement was attributed to molecular oxygen activation induced by Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires. The molecular oxygen activation process could generate superoxide radicals to assist iron core for the reduction of ferric ions to accelerate the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles, which favored the H2O2 decomposition to produce more hydroxyl radicals for the rhodamine B oxidation. The combination of Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires and ferrous ions (Fe@Fe2O3/Fe(2+)) offered a superior Fenton catalyst to decompose H2O2 for producing OH. We employed benzoic acid as a probe reagent to check the generation of OH and found the OH generation rate of Fe@Fe2O3/Fe(2+) was 2-4 orders of magnitude larger than those of commonly used iron based Fenton catalysts and 38 times that of Fe(2+). The reusability and the stability of Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires were studied. Total organic carbon and ion chromatography analyses revealed the mineralization of rhodamine B and the releasing of nitrate ions. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry was used to investigate the degradation intermediates to propose the possible rhodamine B Fenton oxidation pathway in the presence of Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires. This study not only provides a new Fenton oxidation system for pollutant control, but also widen the application of molecular oxygen activation induced by nanoscale zero valent iron.

  13. Characterization of the Campylobacter jejuni Heptosyltransferase II Gene, waaF, Provides Genetic Evidence that Extracellular Polysaccharide Is Lipid A Core Independent

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Neil J.; Moran, Anthony P.; Millar, Lorna A.; Prendergast, Martina M.; Ketley, Julian M.

    2002-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni produces both lipooligosaccharide (LOS) and a higher-molecular-weight polysaccharide that is believed to form a capsule. The role of these surface polysaccharides in C. jejuni-mediated enteric disease is unclear; however, epitopes associated with the LOS are linked to the development of neurological complications. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium the waaF gene encodes a heptosyltransferase, which catalyzes the transfer of the second l-glycero-d-manno-heptose residue to the core oligosaccharide moiety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and mutation of waaF results in a truncated core oligosaccharide. In this report we confirm experimentally that C. jejuni gene Cj1148 encodes the heptosyltransferase II enzyme, WaaF. The Campylobacter waaF gene complements an S. enterica serovar Typhimurium waaF mutation and restores the ability to produce full-sized lipopolysaccharide. To examine the role of WaaF in C. jejuni, waaF mutants were constructed in strains NCTC 11168 and NCTC 11828. Loss of heptosyltransferase activity resulted in the production of a truncated core oligosaccharide, failure to bind specific ligands, and loss of serum reactive GM1, asialo-GM1, and GM2 ganglioside epitopes. The mutation of waaF did not affect the higher-molecular-weight polysaccharide supporting the production of a LOS-independent capsular polysaccharide by C. jejuni. The exact structural basis for the truncation of the core oligosaccharide was verified by comparative chemical analysis. The NCTC 11168 core oligosaccharide differs from that known for HS:2 strain CCUG 10936 in possessing an extra terminal disaccharide of galactose-β(1,3) N-acetylgalactosamine. In comparison, the waaF mutant possessed a truncated molecule consistent with that observed with waaF mutants in other bacterial species. PMID:11914340

  14. Mapping the particle acceleration in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638

    SciTech Connect

    Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    We present new deep, high-resolution radio images of the diffuse minihalo in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638. The images have been obtained with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 317, 617, and 1280 MHz and with the Very Large Array at 1.5, 4.9, and 8.4 GHz, with angular resolutions ranging from 1'' to 10''. This represents the best radio spectral and imaging data set for any minihalo. Most of the radio flux of the minihalo arises from a bright central component with a maximum radius of ∼80 kpc. A fainter tail of emission extends out from the central component to form a spiral-shaped structure with a length of ∼230 kpc, seen at frequencies 1.5 GHz and below. We find indication of a possible steepening of the total radio spectrum of the minihalo at high frequencies. Furthermore, a spectral index image shows that the spectrum of the diffuse emission steepens with increasing distance along the tail. A striking spatial correlation is observed between the minihalo emission and two cold fronts visible in the Chandra X-ray image of this cool core. These cold fronts confine the minihalo, as also seen in numerical simulations of minihalo formation by sloshing-induced turbulence. All these observations favor the hypothesis that the radio-emitting electrons in cluster cool cores are produced by turbulent re-acceleration.

  15. Synthesis of Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Fe, Mn) core/shell nanocomposite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Sheng; Xie Jin; Sun Shouheng

    2008-07-15

    Monodispersed cobalt nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable size (8-14 nm) have been synthesized using thermal decomposition of dicobaltoctacarbonyl in organic solvent. The as-synthesized high magnetic moment (125 emu/g) Co NPs are dispersible in various organic solvents, and can be easily transferred into aqueous phase by surface modification using phospholipids. However, the modified hydrophilic Co NPs are not stable as they are quickly oxidized, agglomerated in buffer. Co NPs are stabilized by coating the MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Fe, Mn) ferrite shell. Core/shell structured bimagnetic Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites are prepared with tunable shell thickness (1-5 nm). The Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites retain the high magnetic moment density from the Co core, while gaining chemical and magnetic stability from the ferrite shell. Compared to Co NPs, the nanocomposites show much enhanced stability in buffer solution at elevated temperatures, making them promising for biomedical applications. - Graphical abstract: The 10 nm/3 nm Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Fe, Mn) bimagnetic core/shell nanocomposites are synthesized from the surface coating of ferrite shell over 10 nm Co nanoparticle seeds. The nanocomposites show much enhanced chemical and magnetic stability in solid state, organic solution and aqueous phase, and are promising for biomedical applications.

  16. Occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes: analysis for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and assessment of numerical methods.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Félix Monteiro; Oliveira, Samuel Conceição

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes is analyzed for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An assessment of numerical methods is performed to solve the boundary value problem generated by the mathematical modeling of diffusion and reaction processes under steady state and isothermal conditions. Two classes of numerical methods were employed: shooting and collocation. The shooting method used the ode function from Scilab software. The collocation methods included: that implemented by the bvode function of Scilab, the orthogonal collocation, and the orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The methods were validated for simplified forms of the Michaelis-Menten equation (zero-order and first-order kinetics), for which analytical solutions are available. Among the methods covered in this article, the orthogonal collocation on finite elements proved to be the most robust and efficient method to solve the boundary value problem concerning Michaelis-Menten kinetics. For this enzyme kinetics, it was found that the dead core can occur when verified certain conditions of diffusion-reaction within the catalytic particle. The application of the concepts and methods presented in this study will allow for a more generalized analysis and more accurate designs of heterogeneous enzymatic reactors. PMID:27363415

  17. PREFACE: Proceedings of the TeV Particle Astrophysics II Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, F.; Karle, A.; Montaruli, T.

    2007-03-01

    The idea of having this workshop in Madison was born at a table on the Terrace of the Union one evening in summer 2005. Francis Halzen, Albrecht Karle and I had just attended the first TeV meeting at Fermilab. We wished to convene the community of particle physicists and "new astronomers" who were using particles to study the universe, in order to hear about their activities and the methods they were using. All of us wanted this to be a meeting between both younger and more experienced people, and both experimentalists and theorists with a common background: dealing with signals produced in the universe that are not controlled by humans. We decided to ask the organizers of the Fermilab workshop to have a second edition in Madison. The next edition is planned for summer 2007 in the Venice region of Italy. To make the meeting more productive, we planned to have a relevant number of working group sessions and open discussions chaired by invited conveners. We singled out seven main areas for discussion at the Workshop with self-explaining names, calling the afternoon sessions Working Groups in those areas: 1) Gamma Astronomy, 2) Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays, 3) Dark Matter, 4) Neutrino Astronomy, 5) New Technologies, 6) TeV Particle (i.e., connections between cosmic-ray, high-energy and accelerator physics) and 7) Gravitational Waves. The conveners had to not only organize the schedules, but also had the unfortunate task of summarizing all of the discussions which took place in their sessions for a presentation on the last day of the conference. Our web site ( http://www.icecube.wisc.edu/tev), developed by Rene Shei, allowed anybody to submit a proposal for a talk to the conveners of the appropriate Working Group(s). We felt that allowing this possibility provided an excellent chance for unknown young students to offer interesting proposals that could then be selected. These Proceedings collect the work of a large number of experts and extremely active representative

  18. Pirkle-type chiral stationary phase on core-shell and fully porous particles: Are superficially porous particles always the better choice toward ultrafast high-performance enantioseparations?

    PubMed

    Ismail, Omar H; Pasti, Luisa; Ciogli, Alessia; Villani, Claudio; Kocergin, Jelena; Anderson, Scott; Gasparrini, Francesco; Cavazzini, Alberto; Catani, Martina

    2016-09-30

    Pirkle-type Whelk-O1 chiral stationary phase (CSP) was prepared on 2.6μm superficially porous particles (SPPs). The chromatographic behavior of columns packed with this new CSP was compared with that of columns packed respectively with 1.8 and 2.5μm Whelk-O1 fully porous particles (FPPs). In the comparison, both thermodynamic and kinetic aspects were considered. Contrary to initial expectations, chiral columns packed with 2.6μm SPPs were quasi-comparable to those packed with 2.5μm FPPs, apparently due to larger contributions to band broadening from both eddy dispersion and, especially for the second eluted enantiomer, adsorption-desorption kinetics. These findings raise the question if SPPs, in spite of the undeniable advantages of their morphology to speed up mass transfer, are always the best choice for high-efficient ultrafast chiral separations. The last part of the work focuses on the use of short columns (10mm long) and very high flow rates to realize the separation of the enantiomers of trans-stilbene oxide (TSO) in normal phase mode in less than 1s.

  19. Pirkle-type chiral stationary phase on core-shell and fully porous particles: Are superficially porous particles always the better choice toward ultrafast high-performance enantioseparations?

    PubMed

    Ismail, Omar H; Pasti, Luisa; Ciogli, Alessia; Villani, Claudio; Kocergin, Jelena; Anderson, Scott; Gasparrini, Francesco; Cavazzini, Alberto; Catani, Martina

    2016-09-30

    Pirkle-type Whelk-O1 chiral stationary phase (CSP) was prepared on 2.6μm superficially porous particles (SPPs). The chromatographic behavior of columns packed with this new CSP was compared with that of columns packed respectively with 1.8 and 2.5μm Whelk-O1 fully porous particles (FPPs). In the comparison, both thermodynamic and kinetic aspects were considered. Contrary to initial expectations, chiral columns packed with 2.6μm SPPs were quasi-comparable to those packed with 2.5μm FPPs, apparently due to larger contributions to band broadening from both eddy dispersion and, especially for the second eluted enantiomer, adsorption-desorption kinetics. These findings raise the question if SPPs, in spite of the undeniable advantages of their morphology to speed up mass transfer, are always the best choice for high-efficient ultrafast chiral separations. The last part of the work focuses on the use of short columns (10mm long) and very high flow rates to realize the separation of the enantiomers of trans-stilbene oxide (TSO) in normal phase mode in less than 1s. PMID:27614732

  20. ENERGETIC PARTICLE ANISOTROPIES AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARY. II. TRANSIENT FEATURES AND RIGIDITY DEPENDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Florinski, V.; Roux, J. A. le; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.

    2015-04-10

    In the preceding paper, we showed that large second-order anisotropies of heliospheric ions measured by the Voyager 1 space probe during the August 2012 boundary crossing event could be explained by a magnetic shear across the heliopause preventing particles streaming along the magnetic field from escaping the inner heliosheath. According to Stone et al., the penetration distance of heliospheric ions into the outer heliosheath had a strong dependence on the particle’s Larmor radius. By comparing hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions with the same energy per nucleon, these authors argued that this effect must be attributed to larger cyclotron radii of heavier species rather than differences in velocity. We propose that gradient drift in a nonuniform magnetic field was the cause of both the large second-order anisotropies and the spatial differentiation based on the ion’s rigidity. A latitudinal gradient of magnetic field strength of about 10% per AU between 2012.7 and 2012.9 could have provided drift motion sufficient to match both LECP and CRS Voyager 1 observations. We explain the transient intensity dropout observed prior to the heliocliff using flux tube structures embedded in the heliosheath and magnetically connected to interstellar space. Finally, this paper reports a new indirect measurement of the plasma radial velocity at the heliopause on the basis of the time difference between two cosmic-ray telescopes measuring the same intensity dropout.

  1. Interstellar Neutral Helium in the Heliosphere from IBEX Observations. II. The Warsaw Test Particle Model (WTPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Bzowski, M.; Swaczyna, P.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a refined and optimized version of the Warsaw Test Particle Model of interstellar neutral gas in the heliosphere, specially tailored for analysis of IBEX-Lo observations. The former version of the model was used in the analysis of neutral He observed by IBEX that resulted in an unexpected conclusion that the interstellar neutral He flow vector was different than previously thought and that a new population of neutral He, dubbed the Warm Breeze, exists in the heliosphere. It was also used in the reanalysis of Ulysses observations that confirmed the original findings on the flow vector, but suggested a significantly higher temperature. The present version of the model has two strains targeted for different applications, based on an identical paradigm, but differing in the implementation and in the treatment of ionization losses. We present the model in detail and discuss numerous effects related to the measurement process that potentially modify the resulting flux of ISN He observed by IBEX, and identify those of them that should not be omitted in the simulations to avoid biasing the results. This paper is part of a coordinated series of papers presenting the current state of analysis of IBEX-Lo observations of ISN He. Details of the analysis method are presented by Swaczyna et al. and results of the analysis are presented by Bzowski et al.

  2. MASS TRANSFER IN BINARY STARS USING SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS. II. ECCENTRIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Sills, Alison E-mail: asills@mcmaster.ca

    2011-01-10

    Despite numerous efforts to better understand binary star evolution, some aspects of it remain poorly constrained. In particular, the evolution of eccentric binaries has remained elusive mainly because the Roche lobe formalism derived for circular binaries does not apply. Here we report the results of our smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in eccentric binaries using an alternate method in which we model only the outermost layers of the stars with appropriate boundary conditions. Using this technique, along with properly relaxed model stars, we characterize the mass transfer episodes of binaries with various orbital parameters. In particular, we show that these episodes can be described by Gaussians with an FWHM of {approx}0.12P{sub orb} and that the peak rates occur after periastron, at an orbital phase of {approx}0.58, independently of the eccentricity and mass of the stars. The accreted material is observed to form a rather sparse envelope around either or both stars. Although the fate of this envelope is not modeled in our simulations, we show that a constant fraction ({approx}5%) of the material transferred is ejected from the systems. We discuss this result in terms of the non-conservative mass transfer scenario. We suggest that our results could be incorporated in analytical and binary population synthesis studies to help better understand the evolution of eccentric binaries and the formation of exotic stellar populations.

  3. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  4. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as 12C and 16O . All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the 12C (α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  5. Dynamics of the detonation products of lead azide. II. Formation of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heflinger, D.; Bar, I.; Ben-Porat, T.; Erez, G.; Rosenwaks, S.

    1993-03-01

    The formation and temporal behavior of charged particles ensuing from the detonation of lead azide (LA) is studied. An ion probe tailored for measurements in the hostile environment produced following the detonation is described. The positive ions (most probably singly ionized lead atoms) and the electrons, which are simultaneously collected on separate electrodes, are embedded in the outer half of the expanding product cloud resulting from the detonation. They show similar temporal behavior and their maximum velocity is ˜4.5 km/s. The density of each of them at a distance of 2.5 cm from the LA sample is 4.3×1011-1.3×1012 cm-3 for detonation of 5-15 mg of LA, respectively. From the hydrodynamics of the expanding cloud and the density of the electrons, their temperature is estimated to be in the range 2600-3000 K. The results of the measurements are discussed in view of the mechanisms believed to govern the expansion of the product cloud following the detonation.

  6. INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL HELIUM IN THE HELIOSPHERE FROM IBEX OBSERVATIONS. II. THE WARSAW TEST PARTICLE MODEL (WTPM)

    SciTech Connect

    Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Bzowski, M.; Swaczyna, P.

    2015-10-15

    We have developed a refined and optimized version of the Warsaw Test Particle Model of interstellar neutral gas in the heliosphere, specially tailored for analysis of IBEX-Lo observations. The former version of the model was used in the analysis of neutral He observed by IBEX that resulted in an unexpected conclusion that the interstellar neutral He flow vector was different than previously thought and that a new population of neutral He, dubbed the Warm Breeze, exists in the heliosphere. It was also used in the reanalysis of Ulysses observations that confirmed the original findings on the flow vector, but suggested a significantly higher temperature. The present version of the model has two strains targeted for different applications, based on an identical paradigm, but differing in the implementation and in the treatment of ionization losses. We present the model in detail and discuss numerous effects related to the measurement process that potentially modify the resulting flux of ISN He observed by IBEX, and identify those of them that should not be omitted in the simulations to avoid biasing the results. This paper is part of a coordinated series of papers presenting the current state of analysis of IBEX-Lo observations of ISN He. Details of the analysis method are presented by Swaczyna et al. and results of the analysis are presented by Bzowski et al.

  7. TRANSALP 1989 experimental campaign—II. Simulation of a tracer experiment with Lagrangian particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anfossi, D.; Desiato, F.; Tinarelli, G.; Brusasca, G.; Ferrero, E.; Sacchetti, D.

    The capability of two 3D Lagrangian particle models (ARCO and SPRAY) in simulating the airborne dispersion in highly complex terrain is tested. The simulations are compared to the tracer experiment TRANSALP-I performed on the 19th of October 1989 in the Alpine region (Canton of Ticino, Switzerland). TRANSALP exercises were part of the EUROTRAC-TRACT Subproject. Tracer was released during one hour (11.00-12.00) near the ground at Iragna, a few kilometres upwind from the bifurcation of two valleys (Leventina and Blenio Valleys); about 40 samplers, located in the two valleys in the range of 40 km, measured 1/2 h average mean concentrations near the ground for five hours. The results of the simulations are presented and discussed. A statistical model evaluation aimed at quantifying the performance of the two models was carried out. The simulations reproduced with a reasonable degree of accuracy the general behaviour of the observed phenomena: the split of the plume between the two valleys, the space and time distribution of the concentration, the concentration maxima locations.

  8. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions. PMID:23418426

  9. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  10. THE DENSITY PROFILES OF MASSIVE, RELAXED GALAXY CLUSTERS. II. SEPARATING LUMINOUS AND DARK MATTER IN CLUSTER CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S.; Treu, Tommaso; Sand, David J.

    2013-03-01

    We present stellar and dark matter (DM) density profiles for a sample of seven massive, relaxed galaxy clusters derived from strong and weak gravitational lensing and resolved stellar kinematic observations within the centrally located brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). In Paper I of the series, we demonstrated that the total density profile derived from these data, which span three decades in radius, is consistent with numerical DM-only simulations at radii {approx}> 5-10 kpc, despite the significant contribution of stellar material in the core. Here, we decompose the inner mass profiles of these clusters into stellar and dark components. Parameterizing the DM density profile as a power law {rho}{sub DM}{proportional_to}r {sup -{beta}} on small scales, we find a mean slope ({beta}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.10(random){sup +0.14} {sub -0.13}(systematic). Alternatively, cored Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profiles with (log r {sub core}/kpc) = 1.14 {+-} 0.13{sup +0.14} {sub -0.22} provide an equally good description. These density profiles are significantly shallower than canonical NFW models at radii {approx}< 30 kpc, comparable to the effective radii of the BCGs. The inner DM profile is correlated with the distribution of stars in the BCG, suggesting a connection between the inner halo and the assembly of stars in the central galaxy. The stellar mass-to-light ratio inferred from lensing and stellar dynamics is consistent with that inferred using stellar population synthesis models if a Salpeter initial mass function is adopted. We compare these results to theories describing the interaction between baryons and DM in cluster cores, including adiabatic contraction models and the possible effects of galaxy mergers and active galactic nucleus feedback, and evaluate possible signatures of alternative DM candidates.

  11. Characterization and quantification of an in-core neutron irradiation facility at a TRIGA II research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghara, Sukesh; Charlton, William

    2006-07-01

    Experiments have been performed to characterize the neutron environment at an in-core TRIGA type nuclear research reactor. Steady-state thermal and epithermal neutron environment testing is important for many applications including, materials, electronics and biological cells. A well characterized neutron environment at a research reactor, including energy spectrum and spatial distribution, can be useful to many research communities and for educational research. This paper describes the characterization process and an application of exposing electronics to high neutron fluence.

  12. Hypocycloid-shaped hollow-core photonic crystal fiber Part II: cladding effect on confinement and bend loss.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, M; Bradley, T; Debord, B; Fourcade-Dutin, C; Ghosh, D; Vincetti, L; Gérôme, F; Benabid, F

    2013-11-18

    We report on numerical and experimental studies on the influence of cladding ring-number on the confinement and bend loss in hypocycloid-shaped Kagome hollow core photonic crystal fiber. The results show that beyond the second ring, the ring number has a minor effect on confinement loss whereas the bend loss is strongly reduced with the ring-number increase. Finally, the results show that the increase in the cladding ring-number improves the modal content of the fiber.

  13. Paleomagnetism of sedimentary cores from the Ross Sea outer shelf and continental slope (PNRA-ROSSLOPE II Project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrì, Patrizia; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Caricchi, Chiara; Colizza, Ester

    2016-04-01

    We carried out a paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of 4 gravity cores sampled in the Ross Sea continental slope of the area to the east of Pennell-Iselin banks. The cores (RS14-C1, C2, C3 and ANTA99-C20) consist of hemipelagic fine-grained (silty-clays) sediments with an IRD component. Rock magnetic and paleomagnetic measurements were carried out at 1-cm spacing on u-channel samples. The data indicate that the cored sediments carry a well-defined characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) and have a valuable potential to reconstruct dynamics and amplitude of the geomagnetic field variation at high southern latitudes (ca. 75°S) during the Holocene and the late Pleistocene. The paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data are integrated in a multidisciplinary context which includes previous geological, geophysical, oceanographic and morpho-bathimetric data obtained in the same area in the frame of the PNRA/ROSSLOPE (Past and present sedimentary dynamic in the ROSS Sea: a multidisciplinary approach to study the continental slope) Project. The main aim of the project is to investigate the relation between present and past water mass circulation and to provide a basis for paleoceanographic reconstructions and for the development of a depositional model of the modern processes active along the continental slope.

  14. Model design on calculations of microwave permeability and permittivity of Fe/SiO2 particles with core/shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Li, Z. W.; Neo, C. P.; Ding, J.

    2014-02-01

    Fe/SiO2 particles with core/shell structure were prepared by coating silica on the surface of a commercial spherical carbonyl iron via the hydrolysis process of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). The electromagnetic performance of commercial carbonyl iron and as-prepared Fe/SiO2 particles was studied theoretically and experimentally. As predicted by the theoretical calculation based on the Bruggeman formula and the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) theory, the insulating surface layer of silica was effective to reduce the permittivity parameters of pure carbonyl iron. The measured results showed good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Although there was a little decrease in the permeability of the Fe/SiO2 core/shell particles, a better impedance match especially at higher frequency range was obtained when used as a microwave absorber. The reflection loss (RL) curves show that the lowest reflection loss of Fe/Epoxy composite (-20.5 GHz) was obtained corresponding to the frequency of 8.5 GHz when the thickness of the absorber was 3 mm. A different trend was observed in Fe/SiO2/Epoxy composite. The reflection loss value got lower by decreasing the thickness of absorbers. At the thickness of 2.2 mm, a relative low reflection loss (-17 GHz) corresponding to the frequency of 13.6 GHz was obtained. Compared with the Fe/Epoxy composite, the improvement on shifting the reflection loss peak to higher frequency and on reducing the optimal thickness of absorbers was made by Fe/SiO2/Epoxy composite.

  15. Results of the Bacillus subtilis unit of the Biostack II experiment: physical characteristics and biological effects of individual cosmic HZE particles.

    PubMed

    Bucker, H; Facius, R; Hildebrand, D; Horneck, G

    1975-01-01

    The effectiveness of cosmic HZE-particles on unicellular procaryotic, organisms was studied on Bacillus subtilis spores, which were accommodated in the Biostack I and II experiments on board Apollo 16 and 17. Identification of the spores that were hit was achieved by using the Biostack sandwich construction and by precise microscopical measurements of tracks of particles. Germination, outgrowth and the rate of cellular elongation were investigated. A method was developed to determine the charge of each individual HZE particle that penetrated a spore and its energy loss in the region of hit. An attempt was made to establish a connection between these physical characteristics and the biological effects produced.

  16. A comparison of tackified, miniemulsion core-shell acrylic latex films with corresponding particle-blend films: structure-property relationships.

    PubMed

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Marchal, Jeanne; Lei, Chun-Hong; Deplace, Fanny; König, Alexander M; Creton, Costantino; Ouzineb, Keltoum; Keddie, Joseph L

    2009-09-15

    Tackifying resins (TRs) are often added to pressure-sensitive adhesive films to increase their peel strength and adhesion energy. In waterborne adhesives, the TR is dispersed in water using surfactants and then blended with colloidal polymers in water (i.e., latex). In such waterborne systems, there are problems with the colloidal stability and difficulty in applying coatings of the particle blends; the films are often hydrophilic and subject to water uptake. Here, an alternative method of making waterborne, tackified adhesives is demonstrated. The TR is incorporated within the core of colloidal polymer particles via miniemulsion polymerization. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with force spectroscopy analysis reveals there is heterogeneity in the distribution of the TR in films made from particle blends and also in films made from miniemulsion polymers. Two populations, corresponding to TR-rich and acrylic-rich components, were identified through analysis of the AFM force-displacement curves. The nanoscale maximum adhesion force and adhesion energy were found to be higher in a miniemulsion film containing 12 wt % tackifying resin in comparison to an equivalent blended film. The macroscale tack and viscoelasticity are interpreted by consideration of the nanoscale structure and properties. The incorporation of tackifying resin through a miniemulsion polymerization process not only offers clear benefits in the processing of the adhesive, but it also leads to enhanced adhesion properties.

  17. Variation of the ground spin state in homo- and hetero-octanuclear copper(II) and nickel(II) double-star complexes with a meso-helicate-type metallacryptand core.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Emilio; Dul, Marie-Claire; Lescouëzec, Rodrigue; Chamoreau, Lise-Marie; Journaux, Yves; Pasán, Jorge; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Ruiz-García, Rafael; Cano, Joan

    2010-05-28

    Homo- and heterometallic octanuclear complexes of formula Na₂{[Cu₂(mpba)₃][Cu(Me₅dien)]₆}-(ClO₄)₆·12H₂O (1), Na₂{[Cu₂(Mempba)₃][Cu(Me₅dien)]₆}(ClO₄)₆·12H₂O (2), Na₂{[Ni₂(mpba)₃]-[Cu(Me₅dien)]₆}(ClO₄)₆·12H₂O (3), Na₂{[Ni₂(Mempba)₃][Cu(Me₅dien)]₆}(ClO₄)₆·9H₂O (4), {[Ni₂(mpba)₃][Ni(dipn)(H₂O)]₆}(ClO₄)₄·12.5H₂O (5), and {[Ni₂(Mempba)₃][Ni(dipn)-(H₂O)]₆}(ClO₄)₄·12H₂O (6) [mpba = 1,3-phenylenebis(oxamate), Mempba = 4-methyl-1,3-phenylenebis(oxamate), Me₅dien = N,N,N',N'',N''-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine, and dipn = dipropylenetriamine] have been synthesized through the "complex-as-ligand/complex-as-metal" strategy. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses of 1, 3, and 5 show cationic M(II)₂M'(II)₆ entities (M, M' = Cu and Ni) with an overall double-star architecture, which is made up of two oxamato-bridged M(II)M'(II)₃ star units connected through three meta-phenylenediamidate bridges between the two central metal atoms leading to a binuclear metallacryptand core of the meso-helicate-type. Dc magnetic susceptibility data for 1-6 in the temperature range 2-300 K have been analyzed through a "dimer-of-tetramers" model [H = - J(S(1A)·S(3A) + S(1A)·S(4A) + S(1A)·S(5A) + S(2B)·S(6B) + S(2B)·S(7B) + S(2B)·S(8B)) - J'S(1A)·S(2B), with S(1A) = S(2B) = S(M) and S(3A) = S(4A) = S(5A) = S(6B) = S(7B) = S(8B) = S(M')]. The moderate to strong antiferromagnetic coupling between the M(II) and M'(II) ions through the oxamate bridge in 1-6 (-J(Cu-Cu) = 52.0-57.0 cm⁻¹, -J(Ni-Cu) = 39.1-44.7 cm⁻¹, and -J(Ni-Ni) = 26.3-26.6 cm⁻¹) leads to a non-compensation of the ground spin state for the tetranuclear M(II)M'(II)₃ star units [S(A) = S(B) = 3S(M') - S(M) = 1 (1 and 2), 1/2 (3 and 4), and 2 (5 and 6)]. Within the binuclear M(II)₂ meso-helicate cores of 1-4, a moderate to weak antiferromagnetic coupling between the M(II) ions (-J'(Cu-Cu) = 28.0-48.0 cm⁻¹ and -J

  18. Implementation of multifilter based twin-prototypes for core electron temperature measurements in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Baiao, D.; Varandas, C.; Molinero, A.; Chercoles, J.

    2010-10-15

    The design and preliminary results from a prototype of a multifilter based electron temperature diagnostic for the TJ-II stellarator are presented. The diagnostic consists of four photodiodes with filters of different thicknesses to determine the electron temperature in a wide variety of plasma compositions, thanks to the set of six different signal-pairs ratios available. The impurity transport code IONEQ, the TJ-II soft x-ray tomography, and the VUV survey diagnostics give the necessary information to assess the proposed diagnostic reliability. In parallel, a vacuum-compatible multichannel electronic board has been designed for a future linear array to determine electron temperature profiles in high-density plasmas.

  19. Copper(II) cubanes with a {Cu4O} core and well defined S = 1 ground state.

    PubMed

    Escuer, A; Mayans, J; Font-Bardia, M

    2016-01-28

    The reaction of 2-pyridinemethanol with copper 4-fluorobenzoate has yielded a family of type II cubanes with formula [Cu4(pymO)4(4-F-PhCOO)3(NO3)] (), [Cu4(pymO)4(4-F-PhCOO)4] () and [Cu4(pymO)4(4-F-PhCOO)4(H2O)] (). These systems exhibit an unexpected S = 1 ground state and their magnetic properties have been unambiguously characterized and rationalized as a function of the asymmetry of the {Cu4O4} cage and Cu-O-Cu bond angles. Analysis of the coupling constants was performed applying new interaction schemes. Magneto-structural correlations have been performed from the analysis of previously reported type II copper cubanes. PMID:26687676

  20. Mutation in the LPS outer core biosynthesis gene, galU, affects LPS interaction with the RTX toxins ApxI and ApxII and cytolytic activity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1.

    PubMed

    Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh; Cox, Andrew D; Hancock, Mark A; Mourez, Michael; Labrie, Josée; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Jacques, Mario

    2008-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and Apx toxins are major virulence factors of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, a pathogen of the respiratory tract of pigs. Here, we evaluated the effect of LPS core truncation in haemolytic and cytotoxic activities of this microorganism. We previously generated a highly attenuated galU mutant of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 that has an LPS molecule lacking the GalNAc-Gal II-Gal I outer core residues. Our results demonstrate that this mutant exhibits wild-type haemolytic activity but is significantly less cytotoxic to porcine alveolar macrophages. However, no differences were found in gene expression and secretion of the haemolytic and cytotoxic toxins ApxI and ApxII, both secreted by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. This suggests that the outer core truncation mediated by the galU mutation affects the toxins in their cytotoxic activities. Using both ELISA and surface plasmon resonance binding assays, we demonstrate a novel interaction between LPS and the ApxI and ApxII toxins via the core oligosaccharide. Our results indicate that the GalNAc-Gal II-Gal I trisaccharide of the outer core is fundamental to mediating LPS/Apx interactions. The present study suggests that a lack of binding between LPS and ApxI/II affects the cytotoxicity and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:18713318

  1. Optical response of the Cu2 S2 diamond core in Cu2II(NGuaS)2 Cl2.

    PubMed

    Witte, Matthias; Grimm-Lebsanft, Benjamin; Goos, Arne; Binder, Stephan; Rübhausen, Michael; Bernard, Martin; Neuba, Adam; Gorelsky, Serge; Gerstmann, Uwe; Henkel, Gerald; Gero Schmidt, Wolf; Herres-Pawlis, Sonja

    2016-09-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations are presented for the dicopper thiolate complex Cu2 (NGuaS)2 Cl2 [NGuaS=2-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidino) benzenethiolate] with a special focus on the bonding mechanism of the Cu2 S2 Cl2 core and the spectroscopic response. This complex is relevant for the understanding of dicopper redox centers, for example, the CuA center. Its UV/Vis absorption is theoretically studied and found to be similar to other structural CuA models. The spectrum can be roughly divided in the known regions of metal d-d absorptions and metal to ligand charge transfer regions. Nevertheless the chloride ions play an important role as electron donors, with the thiolate groups as electron acceptors. The bonding mechanism is dissected by means of charge decomposition analysis which reveals the large covalency of the Cu2 S2 diamond core mediated between Cu dz2 and S-S π and π* orbitals forming Cu-S σ bonds. Measured resonant Raman spectra are shown for 360- and 720-nm excitation wavelength and interpreted using the calculated vibrational eigenmodes and frequencies. The calculations help to rationalize the varying resonant behavior at different optical excitations. Especially the phenylene rings are only resonant for 720 nm. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27362786

  2. Glycol methacrylate (GMA) embedding for light microscopy. II. Immunohistochemical analysis of semithin sections of undecalcified marrow cores.

    PubMed

    Islam, A; Archimbaud, E; Henderson, E S; Han, T

    1988-08-01

    A routine method allows bone marrow biopsy specimens to be embedded in glycol methacrylate (GMA), a water miscible plastic, and to benefit from the advantages of good morphology with immunoperoxidase detection of a wide range of cellular antigens useful in diagnosing and classifying various haematopoietic disorders. Marrow cores were fixed in cold Bouin's solution, rinsed in cold phosphate buffer, dehydrated in cold methanol, infiltrated and embedded in cold GMA, then polymerised at 4 degrees C. Sections were cut at 2 micron thickness with a Tungsten carbide knife in a Jung's high performance microtome (Autocut). Antigenecity was preserved when drying slides at room temperature but pronase digestion was necessary to re-expose the antigens in bone marrow biopsy sections embedded in GMA. Histostik, a new adhesive, was used to coat the glass slides to prevent section loss during enzyme digestion and immunostaining procedures. This method of adapting plastic embedding to undecalcified marrow cores preserves marrow architecture and cellular details and it can serve as a useful adjunct to analyse the bone marrow from patients with myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disorders. This technique may also be applicable in non-haematological malignant conditions which affect the marrow.

  3. Possibilities of new generation columns packed with 1.3μm core-shell particles in gradient elution mode.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Guillarme, Davy

    2013-12-13

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the practical possibilities in gradient elution mode of a column packed with 1.3μm core-shell particles recently released on the market. For this purpose, two types of analytes possessing different diffusion coefficients were selected (small molecule and peptide). It appears that the new 1.3μm material was particularly well suited for fast separations, compared to other existing core-shell particle dimensions in gradient mode. The new material systematically outperforms the other existing ones for peak capacity up to 300 for small molecules and 700 (corresponding to t0=15min) for peptides. Based on these cut-off values, the advantage of column packed with 1.3μm was much more obvious for peptides vs. small molecules analysis. Further improvements in terms of column mechanical stability and system upper pressure capability could expand the limits of separation speed and efficiency to a different level. Again, because of the current pressure limitation and low permeability, a column length of more than 5-8cm is never desired for small molecules analysis in gradient elution. On the contrary, longer columns were useful for peptide analysis. As example, a column of 28cm packed with 1.3μm particles provides a peak capacity of 1000 in the case of peptides analysis. All the predicted values were experimentally confirmed using a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba and a tryptic digest of a monoclonal antibody (Panitumumab). For the plant extract, the better performance was always achieved with a 5cm long column (P=267 and 268 for the 5 and 15cm, respectively, using a gradient time of 10 and 40min, respectively). Finally, in the case of peptide mapping, a 15cm long column packed with 1.3μm particles was the best choice (P=176 and 311 for the 5 and 15cm, respectively, using a gradient time of 10 and 40min, respectively). PMID:24210304

  4. An N-terminal extension to the hepatitis B virus core protein forms a poorly ordered trimeric spike in assembled virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, Richard; Yap, Wei Boon; Ong, Swee Tin; Gatherer, Derek; Bakker, Saskia E; Tan, Wen Siang; Bhella, David

    2015-02-01

    Virus-like particles composed of the core antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBcAg) have been shown to be an effective platform for the display of foreign epitopes in vaccine development. Heterologous sequences have been successfully inserted at both amino and carboxy termini as well as internally at the major immunodominant epitope. We used cryogenic electron microscopy (CryoEM) and three-dimensional image reconstruction to investigate the structure of VLPs assembled from an N-terminal extended HBcAg that contained a polyhistidine tag. The insert was seen to form a trimeric spike on the capsid surface that was poorly resolved, most likely owing to it being flexible. We hypothesise that the capacity of N-terminal inserts to form trimers may have application in the development of multivalent vaccines to trimeric antigens. Our analysis also highlights the value of tools for local resolution assessment in studies of partially disordered macromolecular assemblies by cryoEM.

  5. Comparative performance of capillary columns made with totally porous and core-shell particles coated with a polysaccharide-based chiral selector in nano-liquid chromatography and capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Salvatore; D'Orazio, Giovanni; Farkas, Tivadar; Chankvetadze, Bezhan

    2012-12-21

    In this study two types of silica particles, one fully porous and the other superficial porous (core-shell or fused-core) were modified with a polysaccharide-type chiral selector and evaluated for the separation of enantiomers in nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The major goal of this project was to critically evaluate the contribution of the "flow through particles" to enhancing peak efficiency in CEC compared to nano-LC. The better performance of fused-core silica particles compared with silica particles of comparable size but having through pores questions the previous assumption that "flow through particles" is the major contributor to enhancing peak efficiencies observed in CEC. In addition, based on the results of this study it is suggested that contrary to previous reports on core-shell particles behaving poorly in narrow bore columns, these materials are quite suitable for CEC, at least in capillary columns of 100 μm I.D.

  6. Nanoparticles of lipid monolayer shell and biodegradable polymer core for controlled release of paclitaxel: effects of surfactants on particles size, characteristics and in vitro performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yutao; Pan, Jie; Feng, Si-Shen

    2010-08-16

    This work developed a system of nanoparticles of lipid monolayer shell and biodegradable polymer core for controlled release of anticancer drugs with paclitaxel as a model drug, in which the emphasis was given to the effects of the surfactant type and the optimization of the emulsifier amount used in the single emulsion solvent evaporation/extraction process for the nanoparticle preparation on the particle size, characters and in vitro performance. The drug loaded nanoparticles were characterized by laser light scattering (LLS) for size and size distribution, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) for surface morphology, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for surface chemistry, zetasizer for surface charge, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for drug encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release kinetics. MCF-7 breast cancer cells were employed to evaluate the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. It was found that phospholipids of short chains such as 1,2-dilauroylphosphatidylocholine (DLPC) have great advantages over the traditional emulsifier poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), which is used most often in the literature, in preparation of nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers such as poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) for desired particle size, character and in vitro cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. After incubation with MCF-7 cells at 0.250 mg/ml NP concentration, the coumarin-6 loaded PLGA NPs of DLPC shell showed more effective cellular uptake versus those of PVA shell. The analysis of IC(50), i.e. the drug concentration at which 50% of the cells are killed, demonstrated that our DLPC shell PLGA core NP formulation of paclitaxel could be 5.88-, 5.72-, 7.27-fold effective than the commercial formulation Taxol after 24, 48, 72h treatment, respectively. PMID:20472049

  7. LINE PROFILES OF CORES WITHIN CLUSTERS. II. SIGNATURES OF DYNAMICAL COLLAPSE DURING HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rowan J.; Shetty, Rahul; Klessen, Ralf S.; Beuther, Henrik; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2013-07-01

    Observations of atomic or molecular lines can provide important information about the physical state of star-forming regions. In order to investigate the line profiles from dynamical collapsing massive star-forming regions (MSFRs), we model the emission from hydrodynamic simulations of a collapsing cloud in the absence of outflows. By performing radiative transfer calculations, we compute the optically thick HCO{sup +} and optically thin N{sub 2}H{sup +} line profiles from two collapsing regions at different epochs. Due to large-scale collapse, the MSFRs have large velocity gradients, reaching up to 20 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1} across the central core. The optically thin lines typically contain multiple velocity components resulting from the superposition of numerous density peaks along the line of sight. The optically thick lines are only marginally shifted to the blue side of the optically thin line profiles, and frequently do not have a central depression in their profiles due to self-absorption. As the regions evolve, the lines become brighter and the optically thick lines become broader. The lower-order HCO{sup +} (1-0) transitions are better indicators of collapse than the higher-order (4-3) transitions. We also investigate how the beam sizes affect profile shapes. Smaller beams lead to brighter and narrower lines that are more skewed to the blue in HCO{sup +} relative to the true core velocity, but show multiple components in N{sub 2}H{sup +}. High-resolution observations (e.g., with Atacama Large Millimeter Array) can test these predictions and provide insights into the nature of MSFRs.

  8. Facile synthesis of core-shell and Janus particles via 2-D dendritic growth of gold film.

    PubMed

    Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Se-Heon; Lee, Su Yeon; Jeong, Woong Chan; Yang, Seung-Man

    2010-10-15

    We report a facile method for the electroless deposition (ELD) of gold film via two-dimensional (2-D) dendritic growth. Our scheme employs protonated amine groups, which electrostatically attract both the negatively charged reducing agent and gold-precursor. This electrostatic interaction increases the local concentrations of gold-precursor and reducing agent near the silica surface to levels high enough for gold films with a 2-D fractal morphology to form directly on the surfaces of the amine-functionalized silica nanospheres by diffusion-limited aggregation. Our one-pot reaction avoids the need for seed attachment, which is typically employed for the growth of metallic shells on nanospheres. Therefore, the proposed method significantly reduces the number of processing steps required for the production of core-shell nanospheres. The gold morphologies were systematically investigated in terms of various synthesis variables, including solution pH, reducing agent concentration, and gold precursor injection speed. In addition, we synthesized gold-capped silica nanospheres via ELD of gold on a patterned array of silica nanospheres embedded in polystyrene (PS) film followed by dissolution of the PS matrix, thus demonstrating the potential utility of the proposed method in emerging fields of materials science such as patterning of noble metals and studies of nanometer-scale optics. PMID:20678776

  9. Deletion modification enhances anthrax specific immunity and protective efficacy of a hepatitis B core particle-based anthrax epitope vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Cai, Chenguang; Zhang, Jun; Dong, Dayong; Guo, Qiang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Protective antigen (PA) is one of the major virulence factors of anthrax and is also the major constituent of the current anthrax vaccine. Previously, we found that the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA contains a dominant neutralizing epitope, the SFFD. We successfully inserted the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA into the major immunodominant region (MIR) of hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein. The resulting fusion protein, termed HBc-N144-PA-loop2 (HBcL2), can effectively produce anthrax specific protective antibodies in an animal model. However, the protective immunity caused by HBcL2 could still be improved. In this research, we removed amino acids 79-81 from the HBc MIR of the HBcL2. This region was previously reported to be the major B cell epitope of HBc, and in keeping with this finding, we observed that the short deletion in the MIR not only diminished the intrinsic immunogenicity of HBc but also stimulated a higher titer of anthrax specific immunity. Most importantly, this deletion led to the full protection of the immunized mice against a lethal dose anthrax toxin challenge. We supposed that the conformational changes which occurred after the short deletion and foreign insertion in the MIR of HBc were the most likely reasons for the improvement in the immunogenicity of the HBc-based anthrax epitope vaccine.

  10. Deletion modification enhances anthrax specific immunity and protective efficacy of a hepatitis B core particle-based anthrax epitope vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Cai, Chenguang; Zhang, Jun; Dong, Dayong; Guo, Qiang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Protective antigen (PA) is one of the major virulence factors of anthrax and is also the major constituent of the current anthrax vaccine. Previously, we found that the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA contains a dominant neutralizing epitope, the SFFD. We successfully inserted the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA into the major immunodominant region (MIR) of hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein. The resulting fusion protein, termed HBc-N144-PA-loop2 (HBcL2), can effectively produce anthrax specific protective antibodies in an animal model. However, the protective immunity caused by HBcL2 could still be improved. In this research, we removed amino acids 79-81 from the HBc MIR of the HBcL2. This region was previously reported to be the major B cell epitope of HBc, and in keeping with this finding, we observed that the short deletion in the MIR not only diminished the intrinsic immunogenicity of HBc but also stimulated a higher titer of anthrax specific immunity. Most importantly, this deletion led to the full protection of the immunized mice against a lethal dose anthrax toxin challenge. We supposed that the conformational changes which occurred after the short deletion and foreign insertion in the MIR of HBc were the most likely reasons for the improvement in the immunogenicity of the HBc-based anthrax epitope vaccine. PMID:24054942

  11. Particle distributions in approximately 10(13) - 10(16) eV air shower cores at mountain altitude and comparison with Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    Photographs of 521 shower cores in an array of current-limited spark (discharge) chambers at Sacramento Peak (2900m above sea level, 730 g /sq cm.), New Mexico, U.S.A., have been analyzed and the results compared with similar data from Leeds (80m above sea level, 1020 g sq cm.). It was found that the central density differential spectrum is consistent with a power law index of -2 up to approx. 1500/sq m where it steepens, and that shower cores become flatter on average with increasing size. Scaling model predictions for proton primaries with a approx E sup -2.71 energy spectrum account well for the altitude dependence of the data at lower densities. However, deviations at higher densities indicate a change in hadron interaction characteristics between approx few x 10 to the 14th power and 10 to the 15th power eV primary energy causing particles close to the shower axis to be spread further out.

  12. Intra- and inter-nucleosomal interactions of the histone H4 tail revealed with a human nucleosome core particle with genetically-incorporated H4 tetra-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Wakamori, Masatoshi; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Suka, Noriyuki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-11-26

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones, such as lysine acetylation of the N-terminal tails, play crucial roles in controlling gene expression. Due to the difficulty in reconstituting site-specifically acetylated nucleosomes with crystallization quality, structural analyses of histone acetylation are currently performed using synthesized tail peptides. Through engineering of the genetic code, translation termination, and cell-free protein synthesis, we reconstituted human H4-mono- to tetra-acetylated nucleosome core particles (NCPs), and solved the crystal structures of the H4-K5/K8/K12/K16-tetra-acetylated NCP and unmodified NCP at 2.4 Å and 2.2 Å resolutions, respectively. The structure of the H4-tetra-acetylated NCP resembled that of the unmodified NCP, and the DNA wrapped the histone octamer as precisely as in the unmodified NCP. However, the B-factors were significantly increased for the peripheral DNAs near the N-terminal tail of the intra- or inter-nucleosomal H4. In contrast, the B-factors were negligibly affected by the H4 tetra-acetylation in histone core residues, including those composing the acidic patch, and at H4-R23, which interacts with the acidic patch of the neighboring NCP. The present study revealed that the H4 tetra-acetylation impairs NCP self-association by changing the interactions of the H4 tail with DNA, and is the first demonstration of crystallization quality NCPs reconstituted with genuine PTMs.

  13. Porous Zr(x)Si(1-x)O₂ shell/void/TiO₂ core particles with enhancing transfer for cleaning water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqing; Zhang, Yunge

    2015-06-15

    In order to immobilize TiO2 and prevent TiO2 nanoparticles from damaging polymeric supporters, the porous Zr(x)Si(1-x)O2 shell/void/TiO2 core particles (Zr-SVTs) were fabricated by the synergistic effect between nonionic surfactant P123 ((EO)20(PO)70(EO)20) and oleic acid (CH3(CH2)7CH=CH(CH2)7COOH) and cohydrolysis between TEOS and ZrOCl2·8H2O. Zr-SVTs were characterized by FT-IR, SEM, TEM, EDX and BET. The results show Zr-SVTs exhibit well-developed spherical shape with channels (approximately 5.5 nm in diameter) in porous Zr(x)Si(1-x)O2 shells. Moreover, the preparation conditions of Zr-SVTs were studied and confirmed, and the photocatalytic activity of Zr-SVTs was studied by photodegrading methyl orange in aqueous solution and oil in sewage containing oil. Alternatively, the photocatalytic activity of Zr-SVTs presents better result compared with SiO2 shell/void/TiO2 core (SVT) without doping Zr into the SiO2 shell, which further demonstrates that the Zr(x)Si(1-x)O2 shell could promote the mass transfer inside channels of Zr-SVTs. It suggests that Zr-SVTs with higher photocatalytic activity are desirable for application in water cleaning. PMID:25780933

  14. Mechanical behaviors of the dispersion nuclear fuel plates induced by fuel particle swelling and thermal effect II: Effects of variations of the fuel particle diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shurong; Wang, Qiming; Huo, Yongzhong

    2010-02-01

    In order to predict the irradiation mechanical behaviors of plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the total burnup is divided into two stages: the initial stage and the increasing stage. At the initial stage, the thermal effects induced by the high temperature differences between the operation temperatures and the room temperature are mainly considered; and at the increasing stage, the intense mechanical interactions between the fuel particles and the matrix due to the irradiation swelling of fuel particles are focused on. The large-deformation thermo-elasto-plasticity finite element analysis is performed to evaluate the effects of particle diameters on the in-pile mechanical behaviors of fuel elements. The research results indicate that: (1) the maximum Mises stresses and equivalent plastic strains at the matrix increase with the fuel particle diameters; the effects of particle diameters on the maximum first principal stresses vary with burnup, and the considered case with the largest particle diameter holds the maximum values all along; (2) at the cladding near the interface between the fuel meat and the cladding, the Mises stresses and the first principal stresses undergo major changes with increasing burnup, and different variations exist for different particle diameter cases; (3) the maximum Mises stresses at the fuel particles rise with the particle diameters.

  15. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials.

  16. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials. PMID:26522701

  17. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials. PMID:26522701

  18. Maximizing the peak capacity using coupled columns packed with 2.6 μm core-shell particles operated at 1200 bar.

    PubMed

    Vaast, Axel; De Vos, Jelle; Broeckhoven, Ken; Verstraeten, Matthias; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Desmet, Gert

    2012-09-21

    We report on the peak capacity that can be produced by operating a state-of-the-art core-shell particle type (d(p)=2.6 μm) at its kinetic optimum at ultra-high pressures of 600 and 1200 bar. The column-length optimization needed to arrive at this kinetic optimum was realized using column coupling. Whereas the traditional operating mode (using a single 15 cm column operated at its optimum flow rate of 0.4 mL/min) offered a peak capacity of 162 in 10.8 min, a fully optimized train of 60 cm (4×15 cm) columns offered a peak capacity of 325 in 61 min when operated at 1200 bar. Even though the particles have a reputed low flow resistance and a relatively large size (>2 μm), it was found that the increase in performance that can be generated when switching from a fully optimized 600 bar operation to a fully optimized 1200 bar operation is significant (roughly 50% reduction of the analysis time for the same peak capacity and approximately a 20% increase in peak capacity if compared for the same analysis time). This has been quantified in a generic way using the kinetic plot method and is illustrated by showing the chromatograms corresponding to some of the data points of the kinetic plot curve.

  19. Tailoring the properties of sub-3 μm silica core-shell particles prepared by a multilayer-by-multilayer process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hanjiang; Brennan, John D

    2015-01-01

    Sub-3 μm silica core-shell particles (CSPs) were fabricated by a multilayer-by-multilayer method recently developed in our group. In this work, we report on methods to prepare and modify the properties of these CSPs by high temperature calcination, pore size enlargement under basic conditions, and rehydrolyzation in boiling water to make them more suitable as starting materials for preparation of HPLC columns. The chemical, physical and mechanical properties of these modified CSPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and nitrogen sorption porosimetry. CSPs obtained after these treatments were observed to have the following properties: particle diameter ∼2.7 μm, shell thickness ∼0.5 μm, surface area ∼200 m(2)/g, pore diameter ∼10 nm (and almost no mesopores), pore volume ∼0.5 cc/g, and Si-OH group surface concentration ∼4 OH/nm(2). These properties are in line with those of commercially available sub-3 μm CSP products. PMID:25310582

  20. Airborne single particle mass spectrometers (SPLAT II & miniSPLAT) and new software for data visualization and analysis in a geo-spatial context.

    PubMed

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jun; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of aerosols on climate requires knowledge of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles-two fundamental properties that determine an aerosol's optical properties and ability to serve as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. Here we present our aircraft-compatible single particle mass spectrometers, SPLAT II and its new, miniaturized version, miniSPLAT that measure in-situ and in real-time the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles with extremely high sensitivity, temporal resolution, and sizing precision on the order of a monolayer. Although miniSPLAT's size, weight, and power consumption are significantly smaller, its performance is on par with SPLAT II. Both instruments operate in dual data acquisition mode to measure, in addition to single particle size and composition, particle number concentrations, size distributions, density, and asphericity with high temporal resolution. We also present ND-Scope, our newly developed interactive visual analytics software package. ND-Scope is designed to explore and visualize the vast amount of complex, multidimensional data acquired by our single particle mass spectrometers, along with other aerosol and cloud characterization instruments on-board aircraft. We demonstrate that ND-Scope makes it possible to visualize the relationships between different observables and to view the data in a geo-spatial context, using the interactive and fully coupled Google Earth and Parallel Coordinates displays. Here we illustrate the utility of ND-Scope to visualize the spatial distribution of atmospheric particles of different compositions, and explore the relationship between individual particle compositions and their activity as cloud condensation nuclei.

  1. Ion energy and angular distributions onto polymer surfaces delivered by dielectric barrier discharge filaments in air: II. Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure streamers intersecting particles are of interest in the context of plasma aided combustion, where the particle may be a fuel aerosol droplet, or in sterilization of air, where the particle may be a bacterium. The ion energy and angular distributions (IEADs) incident on the particles, small curved dielectric surfaces, then in part determine the propensity for activating chemical reactions or, in the case of bacteria, the plasma's sterilization capability. In this paper, we discuss results from a computational investigation of IEADs on small particles (45 µm radius) produced by atmospheric pressure discharge. Streamers intersecting a particle momentarily generate a large sheath potential as the streamer passes by as the particle charges towards the plasma floating potential. During that time, ions of energies up to 3-10 eV can strike the particle. The permittivity of the particle and the streamer polarity in part determine the character of the IEAD.

  2. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  3. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs.

  4. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number A<16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.; Ohta, M.; Utsunomiya, H.

    2013-11-01

    An update of the NACRE compilation [3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number A<16, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical S-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties.

  5. Steric stabilization of nonaqueous silicon slips. I - Control of particle agglomeration and packing. II - Pressure casting of powder compacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerkar, Awdhoot V.; Henderson, Robert J. M.; Feke, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    The application of steric stabilization to control particle agglomeration and packing of silicon powder in benzene and trichloroethylene is reported. The results provide useful guidelines for controlling unfavorable particle-particle interactions during nonaqueous processing of silicon-based ceramic materials. The application of steric stabilization to the control and improvement of green processing of nonaqueous silicon slips in pressure consolidation is also demonstrated.

  6. Small-scale Magnetic Islands in the Solar Wind and Their Role in Particle Acceleration. II. Particle Energization inside Magnetically Confined Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role of heliospheric magnetic field configurations and conditions that favor the generation and confinement of small-scale magnetic islands associated with atypical energetic particle events (AEPEs) in the solar wind. Some AEPEs do not align with standard particle acceleration mechanisms, such as flare-related or simple diffusive shock acceleration processes related to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As we have shown recently, energetic particle flux enhancements may well originate locally and can be explained by particle acceleration in regions filled with small-scale magnetic islands with a typical width of ˜0.01 au or less, which is often observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The particle energization is a consequence of magnetic reconnection-related processes in islands experiencing either merging or contraction, observed, for example, in HCS ripples. Here we provide more observations that support the idea and the theory of particle energization produced by small-scale-flux-rope dynamics (Zank et al. and Le Roux et al.). If the particles are pre-accelerated to keV energies via classical mechanisms, they may be additionally accelerated up to 1-1.5 MeV inside magnetically confined cavities of various origins. The magnetic cavities, formed by current sheets, may occur at the interface of different streams such as CIRs and ICMEs or ICMEs and coronal hole flows. They may also form during the HCS interaction with interplanetary shocks (ISs) or CIRs/ICMEs. Particle acceleration inside magnetic cavities may explain puzzling AEPEs occurring far beyond ISs, within ICMEs, before approaching CIRs as well as between CIRs.

  7. Small-scale Magnetic Islands in the Solar Wind and Their Role in Particle Acceleration. II. Particle Energization inside Magnetically Confined Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role of heliospheric magnetic field configurations and conditions that favor the generation and confinement of small-scale magnetic islands associated with atypical energetic particle events (AEPEs) in the solar wind. Some AEPEs do not align with standard particle acceleration mechanisms, such as flare-related or simple diffusive shock acceleration processes related to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As we have shown recently, energetic particle flux enhancements may well originate locally and can be explained by particle acceleration in regions filled with small-scale magnetic islands with a typical width of ˜0.01 au or less, which is often observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The particle energization is a consequence of magnetic reconnection-related processes in islands experiencing either merging or contraction, observed, for example, in HCS ripples. Here we provide more observations that support the idea and the theory of particle energization produced by small-scale-flux-rope dynamics (Zank et al. and Le Roux et al.). If the particles are pre-accelerated to keV energies via classical mechanisms, they may be additionally accelerated up to 1–1.5 MeV inside magnetically confined cavities of various origins. The magnetic cavities, formed by current sheets, may occur at the interface of different streams such as CIRs and ICMEs or ICMEs and coronal hole flows. They may also form during the HCS interaction with interplanetary shocks (ISs) or CIRs/ICMEs. Particle acceleration inside magnetic cavities may explain puzzling AEPEs occurring far beyond ISs, within ICMEs, before approaching CIRs as well as between CIRs.

  8. Particle size dependence of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties of densely arranged two-dimensional assemblies of Au(core)-Ag(shell) nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Sugawa, Kosuke; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tanoue, Yoshimasa; Harumoto, Takashi; Yanagida, Sayaka; Yasumori, Atsuo; Tomita, Shohei; Otsuki, Joe

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the dependence of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of densely arranged two-dimensional assemblies of spherical Au(core)-Ag(shell) nanoparticles (Au/AgNSs) on the nanoparticle diameter. The size-controlled Au/AgNSs were synthesized using the Au nanosphere seed-mediated growth method without any bulky stabilizers. The diameters of the Au/AgNSs were 38, 53, and 90 nm and the ratio of the total diameter to the Au core diameter was adjusted to ca. 2.0. Extinction spectra of the colloidal solutions of these nanoparticles exhibited the prominent peak of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag and therefore the Au/AgNSs exhibited LSPR properties almost the same as Ag nanospheres. It was confirmed from SEM observation that the organic solvent-mediated liquid-liquid interface assembly technique easily generated densely arranged two-dimensional assemblies of the nanospheres. The extinction spectra of all the assemblies exhibited a prominent broad peak ranging from 500 nm to the near-infrared region, which is assigned to the longitudinal LSPR mode of the coupling nanospheres. The extinction intensity increased with increasing nanosphere diameter. The SERS activities of these assemblies were investigated using p-aminothiophenol as a probe molecule. The result revealed that the enhancement factor (EF) of the Raman signal dramatically increased upon increasing the particle diameter. The maximum EF obtained with a laser excitation wavelength of 785 nm was 1.90 × 10(6) for a nanosphere diameter of 90 nm. This renders the two-dimensional assemblies of the plasmonic Au/AgNSs promising for the development of highly sensitive SERS sensor platforms due to their strong electromagnetic effect.

  9. Temperature Dependence of Light-Induced Absorbance Changes Associated with Chlorophyll Photooxidation in Manganese-Depleted Core Complexes of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, A A; Shkuropatova, V A; Shkuropatov, A Ya; Shuvalov, V A

    2015-10-01

    Mid-infrared (4500-1150 cm(-1)) absorbance changes induced by continuous illumination of Mn-depleted core complexes of photosystem II (PSII) from spinach in the presence of exogenous electron acceptors (potassium ferricyanide and silicomolybdate) were studied by FTIR difference spectroscopy in the temperature range 100-265 K. The FTIR difference spectrum for photooxidation of the chlorophyll dimer P680 was determined from the set of signals associated with oxidation of secondary electron donors (β-carotene, chlorophyll) and reduction of the primary quinone QA. On the basis of analysis of the temperature dependence of the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum, it was concluded that frequencies of 13(1)-keto-C=O stretching modes of neutral chlorophyll molecules PD1 and PD2, which constitute P680, are similar to each other, being located at ~1700 cm(-1). This together with considerable difference between the stretching mode frequencies of keto groups of PD1(+) and PD2(+) cations (1724 and 1709 cm(-1), respectively) is in agreement with a literature model (Okubo et al. (2007) Biochemistry, 46, 4390-4397) suggesting that the positive charge in the P680(+) dimer is mainly localized on one of the two chlorophyll molecules. A partial delocalization of the charge between the PD1 and PD2 molecules in P680(+) is supported by the presence of a characteristic electronic intervalence band at ~3000 cm(-1). It is shown that a bleaching band at 1680 cm(-1) in the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum does not belong to P680. A possible origin of this band is discussed, taking into account the temperature dependence (100-265 K) of light-induced absorbance changes of PSII core complexes in the visible spectral region from 620 to 720 nm.

  10. Temperature Dependence of Light-Induced Absorbance Changes Associated with Chlorophyll Photooxidation in Manganese-Depleted Core Complexes of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, A A; Shkuropatova, V A; Shkuropatov, A Ya; Shuvalov, V A

    2015-10-01

    Mid-infrared (4500-1150 cm(-1)) absorbance changes induced by continuous illumination of Mn-depleted core complexes of photosystem II (PSII) from spinach in the presence of exogenous electron acceptors (potassium ferricyanide and silicomolybdate) were studied by FTIR difference spectroscopy in the temperature range 100-265 K. The FTIR difference spectrum for photooxidation of the chlorophyll dimer P680 was determined from the set of signals associated with oxidation of secondary electron donors (β-carotene, chlorophyll) and reduction of the primary quinone QA. On the basis of analysis of the temperature dependence of the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum, it was concluded that frequencies of 13(1)-keto-C=O stretching modes of neutral chlorophyll molecules PD1 and PD2, which constitute P680, are similar to each other, being located at ~1700 cm(-1). This together with considerable difference between the stretching mode frequencies of keto groups of PD1(+) and PD2(+) cations (1724 and 1709 cm(-1), respectively) is in agreement with a literature model (Okubo et al. (2007) Biochemistry, 46, 4390-4397) suggesting that the positive charge in the P680(+) dimer is mainly localized on one of the two chlorophyll molecules. A partial delocalization of the charge between the PD1 and PD2 molecules in P680(+) is supported by the presence of a characteristic electronic intervalence band at ~3000 cm(-1). It is shown that a bleaching band at 1680 cm(-1) in the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum does not belong to P680. A possible origin of this band is discussed, taking into account the temperature dependence (100-265 K) of light-induced absorbance changes of PSII core complexes in the visible spectral region from 620 to 720 nm. PMID:26567571

  11. Magnetic C-C@Fe3O4 double-shelled hollow microspheres via aerosol-based Fe3O4@C-SiO2 core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yangzhi; Li, Xiangcun; He, Gaohong; Qi, Xinhong

    2015-02-18

    Magnetic C-C@Fe3O4 hollow microspheres were prepared by using aerosol-based Fe3O4@C-SiO2 core-shell particles as templates. The magnetic double-shelled microspheres efficiently worked as carriers to load Pt nanoparticles, thus making the catalyst recyclable and reusable.

  12. Phase II studies to select the formulation of a multivalent HPV L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Luxembourg, Alain; Brown, Darron; Bouchard, Celine; Giuliano, Anna R; Iversen, Ole-Erik; Joura, Elmar A; Penny, Mary E; Restrepo, Jaime A; Romaguera, Josefina; Maansson, Roger; Moeller, Erin; Ritter, Michael; Chen, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to develop a multivalent prophylactic HPV vaccine that protects against infection and disease caused by HPV16/18 (oncogenic types in existing prophylactic vaccines) plus additional oncogenic types by conducting 3 Phase II studies comparing the immunogenicity (i.e., anti-HPV6/11/16/18 geometric mean titers [GMT]) and safety of 7 vaccine candidates with the licensed quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine (qHPV vaccine) in young women ages 16–26. In the first study (Study 1), subjects received one of 3 dose formulations of an 8-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/45/52/58 vaccine or qHPV vaccine (control). In Study 2, subjects received one of 3 dose formulations (termed low-, mid-, and high-dose formulations, respectively) of a 9-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine (9vHPV vaccine) or qHPV vaccine (control). In Study 3, subjects concomitantly received qHPV vaccine plus 5-valent HPV31/33/45/52/58 or qHPV vaccine plus placebo (control). All vaccines were administered at day 1/month 2/month 6. In studies 1 and 3, anti-HPV6/11/16/18 GMTs at month 7 were non-inferior in the experimental arms compared with the control arm; however, there was a trend for lower antibody responses for all 4 HPV types. In Study 2, this immune interference was overcome with the mid- and high-dose formulations of the 9vHPV vaccine by increasing antigen and adjuvant doses. In all 3 studies, all vaccine candidates were strongly immunogenic with respect to HPV31/33/45/52/58 and were well tolerated. Based on the totality of the results, the middle dose formulation of the 9vHPV vaccine was selected for Phase III evaluation. Each 0.5mL dose contains 30μg/40μg/60μg/40μg/20μg/20μg/20μg/20μg/20μg of HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 virus-like particles, and 500μg of amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant.ClinicalTrials.gov numbers NCT00260039, NCT00543543, and NCT00551187. PMID:25912208

  13. Phase II studies to select the formulation of a multivalent HPV L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luxembourg, Alain; Brown, Darron; Bouchard, Celine; Giuliano, Anna R; Iversen, Ole-Erik; Joura, Elmar A; Penny, Mary E; Restrepo, Jaime A; Romaguera, Josefina; Maansson, Roger; Moeller, Erin; Ritter, Michael; Chen, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to develop a multivalent prophylactic HPV vaccine that protects against infection and disease caused by HPV16/18 (oncogenic types in existing prophylactic vaccines) plus additional oncogenic types by conducting 3 Phase II studies comparing the immunogenicity (i.e., anti-HPV6/11/16/18 geometric mean titers [GMT]) and safety of 7 vaccine candidates with the licensed quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine (qHPV vaccine) in young women ages 16-26. In the first study (Study 1), subjects received one of 3 dose formulations of an 8-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/45/52/58 vaccine or qHPV vaccine (control). In Study 2, subjects received one of 3 dose formulations (termed low-, mid-, and high-dose formulations, respectively) of a 9-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine (9vHPV vaccine) or qHPV vaccine (control). In Study 3, subjects concomitantly received qHPV vaccine plus 5-valent HPV31/33/45/52/58 or qHPV vaccine plus placebo (control). All vaccines were administered at day 1/month 2/month 6. In studies 1 and 3, anti-HPV6/11/16/18 GMTs at month 7 were non-inferior in the experimental arms compared with the control arm; however, there was a trend for lower antibody responses for all 4 HPV types. In Study 2, this immune interference was overcome with the mid- and high-dose formulations of the 9vHPV vaccine by increasing antigen and adjuvant doses. In all 3 studies, all vaccine candidates were strongly immunogenic with respect to HPV31/33/45/52/58 and were well tolerated. Based on the totality of the results, the middle dose formulation of the 9vHPV vaccine was selected for Phase III evaluation. Each 0.5mL dose contains 30μg/40μg/60μg/40μg/20μg/20μg/20μg/20μg/20μg of HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 virus-like particles, and 500μg of amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant.ClinicalTrials.gov numbers NCT00260039, NCT00543543, and NCT00551187. PMID:25912208

  14. Phase II studies to select the formulation of a multivalent HPV L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luxembourg, Alain; Brown, Darron; Bouchard, Celine; Giuliano, Anna R; Iversen, Ole-Erik; Joura, Elmar A; Penny, Mary E; Restrepo, Jaime A; Romaguera, Josefina; Maansson, Roger; Moeller, Erin; Ritter, Michael; Chen, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to develop a multivalent prophylactic HPV vaccine that protects against infection and disease caused by HPV16/18 (oncogenic types in existing prophylactic vaccines) plus additional oncogenic types by conducting 3 Phase II studies comparing the immunogenicity (i.e., anti-HPV6/11/16/18 geometric mean titers [GMT]) and safety of 7 vaccine candidates with the licensed quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine (qHPV vaccine) in young women ages 16-26. In the first study (Study 1), subjects received one of 3 dose formulations of an 8-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/45/52/58 vaccine or qHPV vaccine (control). In Study 2, subjects received one of 3 dose formulations (termed low-, mid-, and high-dose formulations, respectively) of a 9-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine (9vHPV vaccine) or qHPV vaccine (control). In Study 3, subjects concomitantly received qHPV vaccine plus 5-valent HPV31/33/45/52/58 or qHPV vaccine plus placebo (control). All vaccines were administered at day 1/month 2/month 6. In studies 1 and 3, anti-HPV6/11/16/18 GMTs at month 7 were non-inferior in the experimental arms compared with the control arm; however, there was a trend for lower antibody responses for all 4 HPV types. In Study 2, this immune interference was overcome with the mid- and high-dose formulations of the 9vHPV vaccine by increasing antigen and adjuvant doses. In all 3 studies, all vaccine candidates were strongly immunogenic with respect to HPV31/33/45/52/58 and were well tolerated. Based on the totality of the results, the middle dose formulation of the 9vHPV vaccine was selected for Phase III evaluation. Each 0.5mL dose contains 30μg/40μg/60μg/40μg/20μg/20μg/20μg/20μg/20μg of HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 virus-like particles, and 500μg of amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant.ClinicalTrials.gov numbers NCT00260039, NCT00543543, and NCT00551187.

  15. Airborne Single Particle Mass Spectrometers (SPLAT II & miniSPLAT) and New Software for Data Visualization and Analysis in a Geo-Spatial Context

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jun; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of aerosols on climate requires knowledge of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles - two fundamental properties that determine an aerosol’s optical properties and ability to serve as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. Here we present miniSPLAT, our new aircraft compatible single particle mass spectrometer, that measures in-situ and in real-time size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles with extremely high sensitivity, temporal resolution, and sizing precision on the order of a monolayer. miniSPLAT operates in dual data acquisition mode to measure, in addition to single particle size and composition, particle number concentrations, size distributions, density, and asphericity with high temporal resolution. When compared to our previous instrument, SPLAT II, miniSPLAT has been significantly reduced in size, weight, and power consumption without loss in performance. We also present ND-Scope, our newly developed interactive visual analytics software package. ND-Scope is designed to explore and visualize the vast amount of complex, multidimensional data acquired by our single particle mass spectrometers, along with other aerosol and cloud characterization instruments on-board aircraft. We demonstrate that ND-Scope makes it possible to visualize the relationships between different observables and to view the data in a geo-spatial context, using the interactive and fully coupled Google Earth and Parallel Coordinates displays. Here we illustrate the utility of ND-Scope to visualize the spatial distribution of atmospheric particles of different compositions, and explore the relationship between individual particle composition and their activity as cloud condensation nuclei.

  16. Isocrystalline core/shell synthesis of high quality II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots: ligand-field spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanovic, Pavle V.; Gamelin, Daniel R.

    2002-11-01

    Ligand field electronic absorption spectroscopy has been applied as a direct probe of Co2+ dopant ions in II-VI based diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots. Synthesis of Co2+-doped CdS (Co2+:CdS) quantum dots by simple coprecipitation in inverted micelle solutions has been found to yield predominantly surface bound dopant ions, which are unstable with respect to solvation in a coordinating solvent (pyridine). The solvation kinetics are biphasic, involving two transient intermediates. In contrast, Co2+ ions are doped much more isotropically in ZnS QDs, and this difference is attributed to the similar ionic radii of Co2+ and Zn2+ ions (0.74 Å), as opposed to Cd2+ ions (0.97 Å). We have developed an isocrystalline core/shell synthetic methodology that enables us to synthesize high quality internally doped Co2+:CdS quantum dots. The effect of Co2+ binding on the surface energies of CdS and ZnS quantum dots is discussed and related to the growth mechanism of diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots.

  17. Stronger enhancer II/core promoter activities of hepatitis B virus isolates of B2 subgenotype than those of C2 subgenotype.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanli; Zhou, Xueshi; Jia, Haodi; Chen, Chaoyang; Zhao, Weifeng; Zhang, Jiming; Tong, Shuping

    2016-07-27

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C causes prolonged chronic infection and increased risk for liver cancer than genotype B. Our previous work revealed lower replication capacity of wild-type genotype C2 than B2 isolates. HBV DNA replication is driven by pregenomic RNA, which is controlled by core promoter (CP) and further augmented by enhancer I (ENI) and enhancer II (ENII). DNA fragments covering these regulatory elements were amplified from B2 and C2 isolates to generate luciferase reporter constructs. As ENII is fully embedded in CP, we inserted HBV DNA fragments in the sense orientation to determine their combined activities, and in the antisense orientation to measure enhancer activities alone. Genotype B2 isolates displayed higher ENI+ENII+CP, ENII+CP, and ENII activities, but not ENI or ENI+ENII activity, than C2 isolates. The higher ENII+CP activity was partly attributable to 4 positions displaying genotype-specific variability. Exchanging CP region was sufficient to revert the replication phenotypes of several B2 and C2 clones tested. These results suggest that a weaker ENII and/or CP at least partly accounts for the lower replication capacities of wild-type C2 isolates, which could drive the subsequent acquisition of CP mutations. Such mutations increase genome replication and are implicated in liver cancer development.

  18. Stronger enhancer II/core promoter activities of hepatitis B virus isolates of B2 subgenotype than those of C2 subgenotype

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yanli; Zhou, Xueshi; Jia, Haodi; Chen, Chaoyang; Zhao, Weifeng; Zhang, Jiming; Tong, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C causes prolonged chronic infection and increased risk for liver cancer than genotype B. Our previous work revealed lower replication capacity of wild-type genotype C2 than B2 isolates. HBV DNA replication is driven by pregenomic RNA, which is controlled by core promoter (CP) and further augmented by enhancer I (ENI) and enhancer II (ENII). DNA fragments covering these regulatory elements were amplified from B2 and C2 isolates to generate luciferase reporter constructs. As ENII is fully embedded in CP, we inserted HBV DNA fragments in the sense orientation to determine their combined activities, and in the antisense orientation to measure enhancer activities alone. Genotype B2 isolates displayed higher ENI+ENII+CP, ENII+CP, and ENII activities, but not ENI or ENI+ENII activity, than C2 isolates. The higher ENII+CP activity was partly attributable to 4 positions displaying genotype-specific variability. Exchanging CP region was sufficient to revert the replication phenotypes of several B2 and C2 clones tested. These results suggest that a weaker ENII and/or CP at least partly accounts for the lower replication capacities of wild-type C2 isolates, which could drive the subsequent acquisition of CP mutations. Such mutations increase genome replication and are implicated in liver cancer development. PMID:27461034

  19. Stronger enhancer II/core promoter activities of hepatitis B virus isolates of B2 subgenotype than those of C2 subgenotype.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanli; Zhou, Xueshi; Jia, Haodi; Chen, Chaoyang; Zhao, Weifeng; Zhang, Jiming; Tong, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C causes prolonged chronic infection and increased risk for liver cancer than genotype B. Our previous work revealed lower replication capacity of wild-type genotype C2 than B2 isolates. HBV DNA replication is driven by pregenomic RNA, which is controlled by core promoter (CP) and further augmented by enhancer I (ENI) and enhancer II (ENII). DNA fragments covering these regulatory elements were amplified from B2 and C2 isolates to generate luciferase reporter constructs. As ENII is fully embedded in CP, we inserted HBV DNA fragments in the sense orientation to determine their combined activities, and in the antisense orientation to measure enhancer activities alone. Genotype B2 isolates displayed higher ENI+ENII+CP, ENII+CP, and ENII activities, but not ENI or ENI+ENII activity, than C2 isolates. The higher ENII+CP activity was partly attributable to 4 positions displaying genotype-specific variability. Exchanging CP region was sufficient to revert the replication phenotypes of several B2 and C2 clones tested. These results suggest that a weaker ENII and/or CP at least partly accounts for the lower replication capacities of wild-type C2 isolates, which could drive the subsequent acquisition of CP mutations. Such mutations increase genome replication and are implicated in liver cancer development. PMID:27461034

  20. Modification of an Iranian clinoptilolite nano-particles by hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium cationic surfactant and dithizone for removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Anari-Anaraki, Mostafa; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2015-02-15

    Natural clinoptilolite tuff was mechanically converted to micro (MCP) and nano (NCP) particles. The MCP and NCP powders were respectively modified with hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA) and dithizone (DTZ). The raw and modified samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformation infra red (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and thermogravimetry (TG) and used for the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution. The results confirm that both ion exchange and complexation processes are responsible for removal of Pb(II) cations in the modified samples, while Pb(II) cations were only removed via an ion exchange process by the raw clinoptilolite. In this sorbent, the anionic removal property of surfactant modified zeolites (SMZs) changed to cationic removal property by an additional modification step. The best removal efficiency was observed by NCP-HDTMA-DTZ at the following experimental conditions: C(Pb(II)): 800 mg L(-1), HDTMA dosage: 0.2 mol L(-1), DTZ dosage: 5 mmol L(-1), contact time of DTZ with NCP-HDTMA: 1800 min and contact time of the sorbent with Pb(II): 360 min. The NCP-HDTMA-DTZ sorbent showed good efficiency for the removal of lead in the presence of different multivalent cations. Adsorption isotherms of Pb(II) ions obey the Langmuir equation that indicate the monolayer sorption of Pb(II). The adsorption kinetics based on the pseudo-second-order rate equation indicates that the rate limiting step involving a chemical reaction. The negative ΔH and ΔG indicate an exothermic and spontaneous process. PMID:25460715

  1. Modification of an Iranian clinoptilolite nano-particles by hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium cationic surfactant and dithizone for removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Anari-Anaraki, Mostafa; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2015-02-15

    Natural clinoptilolite tuff was mechanically converted to micro (MCP) and nano (NCP) particles. The MCP and NCP powders were respectively modified with hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA) and dithizone (DTZ). The raw and modified samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformation infra red (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and thermogravimetry (TG) and used for the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution. The results confirm that both ion exchange and complexation processes are responsible for removal of Pb(II) cations in the modified samples, while Pb(II) cations were only removed via an ion exchange process by the raw clinoptilolite. In this sorbent, the anionic removal property of surfactant modified zeolites (SMZs) changed to cationic removal property by an additional modification step. The best removal efficiency was observed by NCP-HDTMA-DTZ at the following experimental conditions: C(Pb(II)): 800 mg L(-1), HDTMA dosage: 0.2 mol L(-1), DTZ dosage: 5 mmol L(-1), contact time of DTZ with NCP-HDTMA: 1800 min and contact time of the sorbent with Pb(II): 360 min. The NCP-HDTMA-DTZ sorbent showed good efficiency for the removal of lead in the presence of different multivalent cations. Adsorption isotherms of Pb(II) ions obey the Langmuir equation that indicate the monolayer sorption of Pb(II). The adsorption kinetics based on the pseudo-second-order rate equation indicates that the rate limiting step involving a chemical reaction. The negative ΔH and ΔG indicate an exothermic and spontaneous process.

  2. Health effects of acute exposure to air polllution. Part II: Healthy subjects exposed to cencentrated ambient particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of short-term exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs*) on lung function and on inflammatory parameters in blood and airways of healthy human subjects. Particles were concentrated from the ambient air in Chapel Hill, Nor...

  3. Core-shell nanostructures from single poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) macromolecules: stabilization and visualization.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Lyudmila M; Kostylev, Maxim; Tsvetkova, Irina; Tomaszewski, John; Stein, Barry; Makhaeva, Elena E; Okhapkin, Ivan; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2005-03-29

    Formation of core-shell poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PVCL) single-molecule nanostructures due to interaction of PVCL with metal ions was studied using transmission electron microscopy, 13C NMR, and light scattering. This study demonstrates that addition of CoCl2 to PVCL in its globular conformation yields unimolecular core-shell polymer particles with the core decorated with Co(II) ions. The crucial condition for formation of well-defined unimolecular nanostructures is the presence of stable globular aggregates in aqueous solution. Moreover, the metal ions should have a sufficiently high coordination number (higher than 2) to provide a cross-linking and stabilization of the core.

  4. 1.1 μm superficially porous particles for liquid chromatography: part II: column packing and chromatographic performance.

    PubMed

    Blue, Laura E; Jorgenson, James W

    2015-02-01

    The predicted advantages of superficially porous particles over totally porous particles are decreased eddy dispersion, longitudinal diffusion, and resistance to mass transfer contributions to the theoretical plate height. While sub-2 micron superficially porous particles are commercially available, further improvements in performance are predicted by decreasing the particle diameter and decreasing the porous layer thickness. 1.1 μm superficially porous particles with 187Å pores have been synthesized using a layer-by-layer method tuned for production of smaller diameter particles. Following synthesis, these particles were packed into 30 μm i.d. capillary columns and their chromatographic performance evaluated using electrochemical detection. Based on the initial studies, the column efficiency did not meet theory, but was similar to the commercially available products tested. It is believed that the column packing process plays a critical role in the sub-par column performance. To determine if column efficiency could be predicted by solvent-particle interactions, in-solution optical microscopy and sedimentation velocity of particles in various slurry solvents were investigated and compared to column performance. Aggregating slurry solvents, such as methanol were found to produce columns with increased efficiency. The hmin for a column packed with an acetone slurry and a methanol slurry at 3mg/mL were found to be 6.3 and 3.5, respectively. Increasing the slurry concentration to 25mg/mL further improved the efficiency, producing a column with an hmin of 2.6. These efficiency results were accurately predicted by in-solution optical microscopy.

  5. Spouted bed electrowinning of zinc: Part II. Investigations of the dynamics of particles in large thin spouted beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, A.; Evans, J. W.; Salas-Morales, Juan Carlos

    1997-02-01

    The behavior of particles in thin spouted beds, mostly equipped with draft tubes, has been investigated. Three apparatuses have been used: a laboratory-scale cylindrical bed, a 2-m-tall “flat” (rectangular cross section) bed and a 2-m-wide flat bed, the last equipped with multiple draft tubes. Most of the results were obtained on the tall bed. Minimum spouting flow rate, pressure distribution, particle velocities, and solid circulation rates were determined as a function of bed geometry (including draft tube dimensions and position). Observations were made of the direction of liquid flow in the bed outside the draft tube and of the occurrence of zones in the bed where the particles appeared stationary. The wide bed was used to determine that there is a maximum separation between draft tubes beyond which particles cannot be kept in motion across the whole width of the bed.

  6. General coalescence conditions for the exact wave functions. II. Higher-order relations for many-particle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, Yusaku I. E-mail: h.nakatsuji@qcri.or.jp; Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi E-mail: h.nakatsuji@qcri.or.jp

    2014-06-07

    We derived the necessary conditions that must be satisfied by the non-relativistic time-independent exact wave functions for many-particle systems at a two-particle coalescence (or cusp) point. Some simple conditions are known to be Kato's cusp condition (CC) and Rassolov and Chipman's CC. In a previous study, we derived an infinite number of necessary conditions that two-particle wave functions must satisfy at a coalescence point. In the present study, we extend these conditions to many-particle systems. They are called general coalescence conditions (GCCs), and Kato's CC and Rassolov and Chipman's CC are included as special conditions. GCCs can be applied not only to Coulombic systems but also to any system in which the interaction between two particles is represented in a power series of inter-particle distances. We confirmed the correctness of our derivation of the GCCs by applying the exact wave function of a harmonium in electron-electron and electron-nucleus coalescence situations. In addition, we applied the free complement (FC) wave functions of a helium atom to the GCCs to examine the accuracy of the FC wave function in the context of a coalescence situation.

  7. Facile synthesis of copper(II)-decorated magnetic particles for selective removal of hemoglobin from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun; Ma, Xiangdong; Yao, Xin; Jia, Li

    2015-12-11

    In this report, the Cu(2+)-immobilized magnetic particles were prepared by a facile route and they were used as adsorbents for removal of high abundance of hemoglobin in blood based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified magnetic particles (EDTA-Fe3O4) were first synthesized through a one-pot solvothermal method and then charged with copper ions. The as-prepared Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and zeta potential. Factors affecting the adsorption of bovine hemoglobin on Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles (including contact time, solution pH, ionic strength and initial concentration of protein) were investigated. The adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the adsorption equilibrium could be achieved in 60min. The adsorption isotherm data could be well described by a Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity was 1250mgg(-1). The as-prepared particles showed high efficiency and excellent selectivity for removal of hemoglobin from bovine and human blood. The removal process integrated the selectivity of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and the convenience of magnetic separation. The results demonstrated that Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles had potential application in removal of abundant histidine-rich proteins in biomedical diagnosis analysis.

  8. Facile synthesis of copper(II)-decorated magnetic particles for selective removal of hemoglobin from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun; Ma, Xiangdong; Yao, Xin; Jia, Li

    2015-12-11

    In this report, the Cu(2+)-immobilized magnetic particles were prepared by a facile route and they were used as adsorbents for removal of high abundance of hemoglobin in blood based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified magnetic particles (EDTA-Fe3O4) were first synthesized through a one-pot solvothermal method and then charged with copper ions. The as-prepared Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and zeta potential. Factors affecting the adsorption of bovine hemoglobin on Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles (including contact time, solution pH, ionic strength and initial concentration of protein) were investigated. The adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the adsorption equilibrium could be achieved in 60min. The adsorption isotherm data could be well described by a Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity was 1250mgg(-1). The as-prepared particles showed high efficiency and excellent selectivity for removal of hemoglobin from bovine and human blood. The removal process integrated the selectivity of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and the convenience of magnetic separation. The results demonstrated that Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles had potential application in removal of abundant histidine-rich proteins in biomedical diagnosis analysis. PMID:26596870

  9. Effect of protein modification by malondialdehyde on the interaction between the oxygen-evolving complex 33 kDa protein and photosystem II core proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yasuo; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2010-04-01

    Previously we observed that the oxygen-evolving complex 33 kDa protein (OEC33) which stabilizes the Mn cluster in photosystem II (PSII), was modified with malondialdehyde (MDA), an end-product of peroxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the modification increased in heat-stressed plants (Yamauchi et al. 2008). In this study, we examined whether the modification of OEC33 with MDA affects its binding to the PSII complex and causes inactivation of the oxygen-evolving complex. Purified OEC33 and PSII membranes that had been removed of extrinsic proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex (PSIIOEE) of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were separately treated with MDA. The binding was diminished when both OEC33 and PSIIOEE were modified, but when only OEC33 or PSIIOEE was treated, the binding was not impaired. In the experiment using thylakoid membranes, release of OEC33 from PSII and corresponding loss of oxygen-evolving activity were observed when thylakoid membranes were treated with MDA at 40 degrees C but not at 25 degrees C. In spinach leaves treated at 40 degrees C under light, maximal efficiency of PSII photochemistry (F(v)/F(m) ratio of chlorophyll fluorescence) and oxygen-evolving activity decreased. Simultaneously, MDA contents in heat-stressed leaves increased, and OEC33 and PSII core proteins including 47 and 43 kDa chlorophyll-binding proteins were modified with MDA. In contrast, these changes were to a lesser extent at 40 degrees C in the dark. These results suggest that MDA modification of PSII proteins causes release of OEC33 from PSII and it is promoted in heat and oxidative conditions.

  10. Development of a candidate influenza vaccine based on virus-like particles displaying influenza M2e peptide into the immunodominant region of hepatitis B core antigen: Broad protective efficacy of particles carrying four copies of M2e.

    PubMed

    Tsybalova, Liudmila M; Stepanova, Liudmila A; Kuprianov, Victor V; Blokhina, Elena A; Potapchuk, Marina V; Korotkov, Alexander V; Gorshkov, Andrey N; Kasyanenko, Marina A; Ravin, Nikolai V; Kiselev, Oleg I

    2015-06-26

    A long-term objective when designing influenza vaccines is to create one with broad cross-reactivity that will provide effective control over influenza, no matter which strain has caused the disease. Here we summarize the results from an investigation into the immunogenic and protective capacities inherent in variations of a recombinant protein, HBc/4M2e. This protein contains four copies of the ectodomain from the influenza virus protein M2 (M2e) fused within the immunodominant loop of the hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBc). Variations of this basic design include preparations containing M2e from the consensus human influenza virus; the M2e from the highly pathogenic avian A/H5N1 virus and a combination of two copies from human and two copies from avian influenza viruses. Intramuscular delivery in mice with preparations containing four identical copies of M2e induced high IgG titers in blood sera and bronchoalveolar lavages. It also provoked the formation of memory T-cells and antibodies were retained in the blood sera for a significant period of time post immunization. Furthermore, these preparations prevented the death of 75-100% of animals, which were challenged with lethal doses of virus. This resulted in a 1.2-3.5 log10 decrease in viral replication within the lungs. Moreover, HBc particles carrying only "human" or "avian" M2e displayed cross-reactivity in relation to human (A/H1N1, A/H2N2 and A/H3N2) or A/H5N1 and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, respectively; however, with the particles carrying both "human" and "avian" M2e this effect was much weaker, especially in relation to influenza virus A/H5N1. It is apparent from this work that to quickly produce vaccine for a pandemic it would be necessary to have several variations of a recombinant protein, containing four copies of M2e (each one against a group of likely influenza virus strains) with these relevant constructs housed within a comprehensive collection Escherichia coli-producers and maintained ready for use.

  11. A biomathematical model of particle clearance and retention in the lungs of coal miners. II. Evaluation of variability and uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Kuempel, E D; Tran, C L; Smith, R J; Bailer, A J

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the sources of variability and uncertainty in a previously developed human lung dosimetry model. That three-compartment model describes the retention and clearance kinetics of respirable particles in the gas-exchange region of the lungs. It was calibrated using exposure histories and lung dust burden data in U.S. coal miners. A multivariate parameter estimation and optimization method was developed for fitting the dosimetry model to these human data. Models with various assumptions about overloading of alveolar clearance and interstitialization (sequestration) of particles were evaluated. Variability in the estimated clearance rate coefficients was assessed empirically by fitting the model to groups' and to each miner's data. Distributions of lung and lymph node particle burdens were computed at working lifetime exposures, using the variability in the estimated individual clearance rate coefficients. These findings confirm those of the earlier analysis; i.e., the best-fitting exposure-dose model to these data has substantial interstitialization/sequestration of particles and no dose-dependent decline in alveolar clearance. Among miners with different characteristics for smoking, disease, and race, the group median estimated alveolar clearance rate coefficients varied by a factor of approximately 4. Adjustment for these group differences provided some improvement in the dosimetry model fit to all miners (up to 25% reduction in MSE), although unexplained interindividual differences made up the largest source of variability. The predicted mean lung and lymph node particle burdens at age 75 after exposure to respirable coal mine dust at 2 mg/m(2) for a 45-year working lifetime were 12 g (5th and 95th percentiles, 3.0-26 g) and 1.9 g (0.26-5.3), respectively. This study provides quantitative information on variability in particle retention and clearance kinetics in humans. It is useful for risk assessment by providing

  12. New trend in the LC separation analysis of pharmaceuticals--high performance separation by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with core-shell particle C18 columns--.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Nagamatsu, Kumi

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a mini-review of the recent results in the ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation of pharmaceuticals by our group. High performance UHPLC separation employing core-shell particle C18 columns was demonstrated. High performance (high theoretical plate number of approximately 20000/10 cm, low theoretical plate height of 5 μm) was obtained without any specific devices in the conventional HPLC apparatus, only through changing detector sampling times and the inner diameter of the connecting tube. High theoretical plate numbers with low column back pressure obtained by the core-shell particle columns enabled fast separation of the analytes. Methanol, which gives high column pressure drops in the reversed-phase mode HPLC compared with acetonitrile, can be used without any trouble. One analysis of the purity testing of diltiazem hydrochloride was performed within 100 s. One analysis in the photostability testing of mecobalamin (vitamin B12 analogue) was successful within 180 s.

  13. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-4, Operation of Magnetic Particle Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groseclose, Richard

    This fourth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the specific technique variables and options which are available to the test technician, provides instructions for selecting and operating the appropriate test equipment, describes physical criteria for detectable discontinuities,…

  14. Experiments on the enhancement of compressible mixing via streamwise vorticity. II - Vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naughton, J. W.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of streamwise vorticity on compressible axisymmetric mixing layers is examined using vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics analysis. Experimental results indicate that the particles faithfully represent the dynamics of the turbulent swirling flow. A comparison of the previously determined mixing layer growth rates with the present vortex strength data reveals that the increase of turbulent mixing up to 60 percent scales with the degree of swirl. The mixing enhancement appears to be independent of the compressibility level of the mixing layer.

  15. The effect of particle precipitation events on the neutral and ion chemistry of the middle atmosphere. II - Odd hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Rusch, D. W.; Gerard, J.-C.; Reid, G. C.; Crutzen, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    A one dimensional time-dependent model of the neutral and ion chemistry of the middle atmosphere has been used to examine the production of odd hydrogen (H, OH, and HO2) during charged particle precipitation. At altitudes above about 65 km, odd hydrogen production depends on the ionization rate, and the atomic oxygen and water vapor densities. Odd hydrogen production is shown to exhibit diurnal and other time dependent variations during such an event at these altitudes, and the assumption that two odd hydrogen particles are always produced per ionization is reexamined.

  16. Effects of particle drift on cosmic ray transport. II - Analytical solution to the modulation problem with no latitudinal diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isenberg, P. A.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical solution to a model of the modulation of galactic cosmic rays in the presence of particle drifts is presented and discussed. The solution assumes an energy-independent radial diffusion coefficient proportional to distance and no latitudinal diffusion, and includes energy-independent particle drift velocities similar to those expected in a Parker spiral magnetic field with an equatorial current sheet. The solutions clearly demonstrate the large effects of drifts on the modulated cosmic-ray intensity. For values of the radial diffusion coefficient and particle drift velocity which are plausible for 1-GV-rigidity protons, the logarithmic radial gradient in the inner solar system is reduced by more than a factor of 5 over the value calculated in the absence of drifts. It is found that even for much smaller values of particle drift velocity and radial diffusion coefficient, such as might be expected for protons with energies of the order of 10 MeV, the effects of the drifts can be substantial.

  17. Protein-Protein Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Analysis of Nucleosome Core Particles Containing H2A and H2A.Z

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Duane A.; Stratton, Jessica J.; Gloss, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    A protein-protein Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) system, employing probes at multiple positions, was designed to specifically monitor the dissociation of the H2A-H2B dimer from the nucleosome core particle (NCP). Tryptophan donors and Cys-AEDANS acceptors were chosen because, in comparison to fluorophores used in previous NCP FRET studies, they: 1) are smaller and less hydrophobic which should minimize perturbations of histone and NCP structure; and 2) have an R0 of 20 Å, which is much less than the dimensions of the NCP (~50 Å width and ~100 Å diameter). CD and FL equilibrium protein unfolding titrations indicate that the donor and acceptor moieties have minimal effects on the stability of the H2A-H2B dimer and (H3-H4)2 tetramer. NCPs containing the various FRET pairs were reconstituted with the 601 artificial positioning DNA sequence. Equilibrium NaCl-induced dissociation of the modified NCPs showed that the 601 sequence stabilized the NCP to dimer dissociation as compared to previous studies using weaker positioning sequences. This finding implies a significant role for the H2A-H2B dimers in determining the DNA sequence dependence of NCP stability. The free energy of dissociation determined from reversible and well-defined sigmoidal transitions revealed two distinct phases reflecting the dissociation of each H2A-H2B dimer, confirming cooperativity in dimer dissociation. While cooperativity in the association/dissociation of the H2A-H2B dimers has been suggested previously, these data allow its quantitative description. The protein-protein FRET system was then used to study the effects of the histone variant H2A.Z on NCP stability; previous studies have reported both destabilizing and stabilizing effects. Comparison of the H2A and H2A.Z FRET NCP dissociation transitions suggest a slight increase in stability but a significant increase in cooperativity for dimer dissociation from H2A.Z NCPs. Thus, the utility of this protein-protein FRET system to

  18. Protein-protein Förster resonance energy transfer analysis of nucleosome core particles containing H2A and H2A.Z.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Duane A; Stratton, Jessica J; Gloss, Lisa M

    2007-08-24

    A protein-protein Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) system, employing probes at multiple positions, was designed to specifically monitor the dissociation of the H2A-H2B dimer from the nucleosome core particle (NCP). Tryptophan donors and Cys-AEDANS acceptors were chosen because, compared to previous NCP FRET fluorophores, they: (1) are smaller and less hydrophobic, which should minimize perturbations of histone and NCP structure; and (2) have an R0 of 20 A, which is much less than the dimensions of the NCP (approximately 50 A width and approximately 100 A diameter). Equilibrium protein unfolding titrations indicate that the donor and acceptor moieties have minimal effects on the stability of the H2A-H2B dimer and (H3-H4)2 tetramer. NCPs containing the various FRET pairs were reconstituted with the 601 DNA positioning element. Equilibrium NaCl-induced dissociation of the modified NCPs showed that the 601 sequence stabilized the NCP to dimer dissociation relative to weaker positioning sequences. This finding implies a significant role for the H2A-H2B dimers in determining the DNA sequence dependence of NCP stability. The free energy of dissociation determined from reversible and well-defined sigmoidal transitions revealed two distinct phases reflecting the dissociation of individual H2A-H2B dimers, confirming cooperativity as suggested previously; these data allow quantitative description of the cooperativity. The FRET system was then used to study the effects of the histone variant H2A.Z on NCP stability; previous studies have reported both destabilizing and stabilizing effects. H2A.Z FRET NCP dissociation transitions suggest a slight increase in stability but a significant increase in cooperativity of the dimer dissociations. Thus, the utility of this protein-protein FRET system to monitor the effects of histone variants on NCP dynamics has been demonstrated, and the system appears equally well-suited for dissection of the kinetic processes of dimer

  19. Mixed Matrix PVDF Membranes With in Situ Synthesized PAMAM Dendrimer-Like Particles: A New Class of Sorbents for Cu(II) Recovery from Aqueous Solutions by Ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Kotte, Madhusudhana Rao; Kuvarega, Alex T; Cho, Manki; Mamba, Bhekie B; Diallo, Mamadou S

    2015-08-18

    Advances in industrial ecology, desalination, and resource recovery have established that industrial wastewater, seawater, and brines are important and largely untapped sources of critical metals and elements. A Grand Challenge in metal recovery from industrial wastewater is to design and synthesize high capacity, recyclable and robust chelating ligands with tunable metal ion selectivity that can be efficiently processed into low-energy separation materials and modules. In our efforts to develop high capacity chelating membranes for metal recovery from impaired water, we report a one-pot method for the preparation of a new family of mixed matrix polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes with in situ synthesized poly(amidoamine) [PAMAM] particles. The key feature of our new membrane preparation method is the in situ synthesis of PAMAM dendrimer-like particles in the dope solutions prior to membrane casting using low-generation dendrimers (G0 and G1-NH2) with terminal primary amine groups as precursors and epichlorohydrin (ECH) as cross-linker. By using a combined thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) and nonsolvent induced phase separation (NIPS) casting process, we successfully prepared a new family of asymmetric PVDF ultrafiltration membranes with (i) neutral and hydrophilic surface layers of average pore diameters of 22-45 nm, (ii) high loadings (∼48 wt %) of dendrimer-like PAMAM particles with average diameters of ∼1.3-2.4 μm, and (iii) matrices with sponge-like microstructures characteristics of membranes with strong mechanical integrity. Preliminary experiments show that these new mixed matrix PVDF membranes can serve as high capacity sorbents for Cu(II) recovery from aqueous solutions by ultrafiltration.

  20. Mixed Matrix PVDF Membranes With in Situ Synthesized PAMAM Dendrimer-Like Particles: A New Class of Sorbents for Cu(II) Recovery from Aqueous Solutions by Ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Kotte, Madhusudhana Rao; Kuvarega, Alex T; Cho, Manki; Mamba, Bhekie B; Diallo, Mamadou S

    2015-08-18

    Advances in industrial ecology, desalination, and resource recovery have established that industrial wastewater, seawater, and brines are important and largely untapped sources of critical metals and elements. A Grand Challenge in metal recovery from industrial wastewater is to design and synthesize high capacity, recyclable and robust chelating ligands with tunable metal ion selectivity that can be efficiently processed into low-energy separation materials and modules. In our efforts to develop high capacity chelating membranes for metal recovery from impaired water, we report a one-pot method for the preparation of a new family of mixed matrix polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes with in situ synthesized poly(amidoamine) [PAMAM] particles. The key feature of our new membrane preparation method is the in situ synthesis of PAMAM dendrimer-like particles in the dope solutions prior to membrane casting using low-generation dendrimers (G0 and G1-NH2) with terminal primary amine groups as precursors and epichlorohydrin (ECH) as cross-linker. By using a combined thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) and nonsolvent induced phase separation (NIPS) casting process, we successfully prepared a new family of asymmetric PVDF ultrafiltration membranes with (i) neutral and hydrophilic surface layers of average pore diameters of 22-45 nm, (ii) high loadings (∼48 wt %) of dendrimer-like PAMAM particles with average diameters of ∼1.3-2.4 μm, and (iii) matrices with sponge-like microstructures characteristics of membranes with strong mechanical integrity. Preliminary experiments show that these new mixed matrix PVDF membranes can serve as high capacity sorbents for Cu(II) recovery from aqueous solutions by ultrafiltration. PMID:26222014

  1. Nacre II:. AN Update and Extension of the Nacre Compilation of Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2013-03-01

    The status of a new evaluation of astrophysical nuclear reaction rates, referred as NACRE- II, is reported. It includes 19 radiative capture and 15 transfer reactions on targets with mass numbers A < 16. This work is meant to supersede the NACRE compilation. Post-NACRE experimental data are taken into account. Extrapolations of the astrophysical S-factor to largely sub-Coulomb energies are based on the use of the potential model and of the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) for capture and transfer reactions, respectively. Adopted rates and their lower and upper limits are provided. Here, we illustrate with some results the general procedure followed in the construction of NACRE-II.

  2. NACRE II: An Update of the NACRE Compilation of Atarget<16 Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2011-10-01

    We report on the status of a new evaluation of the rates in astrophysical conditions of 19 capture and 15 transfer reactions on stable targets with mass numbers A<16, referred as NACRE-II. This work is meant to supersede the NACRE compilation. Post-NACRE experimental data are taken into account. Extrapolations of the astrophysical S-factor to largely sub-Coulomb energies are based on the use of the potential model and of the distorted wave Born approximation for capture and transfer reactions, respectively. Adopted rates and their lower and upper limits are provided. Here, we illustrate the general procedure followed in the NACRE-II construction with two examples.

  3. Evidence for the Heavy Baryon Resonance State Lambda b*0 Observed with the CDF II Detector, and Studies of New Particle Tracking Technologies Using the LANSCE Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palni, Prabhakar

    To discover and probe the properties of new particles, we need to collide highly energetic particles. The Tevatron at Fermilab has collided protons and anti-protons at very high energies. These collisions produce short lived and stable particles, some known and some previously unknown. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions and discover new elementary particles. To study the interaction between high energy charged particles and the detector materials often requires development of new instruments. Thus this dissertation involves a measurement at a contemporary experiment and development of technologies for related future experiments that will build on the contemporary one. Using data from proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96TeV recorded by the