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Sample records for ii dehydroquinase inhibitors

  1. Comparative binding energy COMBINE analysis for understanding the binding determinants of type II dehydroquinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Peón, Antonio; Coderch, Claire; Gago, Federico; González-Bello, Concepción

    2013-05-01

    Herein we report comparative binding energy (COMBINE) analyses to derive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models that help rationalize the determinants of binding affinity for inhibitors of type II dehydroquinase (DHQ2), the third enzyme of the shikimic acid pathway. Independent COMBINE models were derived for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DHQ2, which is an essential enzyme in both these pathogenic bacteria that has no counterpart in human cells. These studies quantify the importance of the hydrogen bonding interactions between the ligands and the water molecule involved in the DHQ2 reaction mechanism. They also highlight important differences in the ligand interactions with the interface pocket close to the active site that could provide guides for future inhibitor design.

  2. Structure of type II dehydroquinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Reiling, Scott; Kelleher, Alan; Matsumoto, Monica M.; Robinson, Gonteria; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes opportunistic infections and is resistant to most antibiotics. Ongoing efforts to generate much-needed new antibiotics include targeting enzymes that are vital for P. aeruginosa but are absent in mammals. One such enzyme, type II dehydroquinase (DHQase), catalyzes the interconversion of 3-dehydroquinate and 3-dehydroshikimate, a necessary step in the shikimate pathway. This step is vital for the proper synthesis of phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine and other aromatic metabolites. The recombinant expression, purification and crystal structure of catalytically active DHQase from P. aeruginosa (PaDHQase) are presented. Cubic crystals belonging to space group F23, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 125.39 Å, were obtained by vapor diffusion in sitting drops and the structure was refined to an R factor of 16% at 1.74 Å resolution. PaDHQase is a prototypical type II DHQase with the classical flavodoxin-like α/β topology. PMID:25372814

  3. Inhibition of Shikimate Kinase and Type II Dehydroquinase for Antibiotic Discovery: Structure-Based Design and Simulation Studies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bello, Concepcion

    2016-01-01

    The loss of effectiveness of current antibiotics caused by the development of drug resistance has become a severe threat to public health. Current widely used antibiotics are surprisingly targeted at a few bacterial functions - cell wall, DNA, RNA, and protein biosynthesis - and resistance to them is widespread and well identified. There is therefore great interest in the discovery of novel drugs and therapies to tackle antimicrobial resistance, in particular drugs that target other essential processes for bacterial survival. In the past few years a great deal of effort has been focused on the discovery of new inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, also known as the shikimic acid pathway, in which chorismic acid is synthesized. The latter compound is the synthetic precursor of L-Phe, L-Tyr, L-Phe, and other important aromatic metabolites. These enzymes are recognized as attractive targets for the development of new antibacterial agents because they are essential in important pathogenic bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Helicobacter pylori, but do not have any counterpart in human cells. This review is focused on two key enzymes of this pathway, shikimate kinase and type II dehydroquinase. An overview of the use of structure-based design and computational studies for the discovery of selective inhibitors of these enzymes will be provided. A detailed view of the structural changes caused by these inhibitors in the catalytic arrangement of these enzymes, which are responsible for the inhibition of their activity, is described. PMID:26303426

  4. Mechanistic basis of the inhibition of type II dehydroquinase by (2S)- and (2R)-2-benzyl-3-dehydroquinic acids.

    PubMed

    Lence, Emilio; Tizón, Lorena; Otero, José M; Peón, Antonio; Prazeres, Verónica F V; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L; Fox, Gavin C; van Raaij, Mark J; Lamb, Heather; Hawkins, Alastair R; González-Bello, Concepción

    2013-03-15

    The structural changes caused by the substitution of the aromatic moiety in (2S)-2-benzyl-3-dehydroquinic acids and its epimers in C2 by electron-withdrawing or electron-donating groups in type II dehydroquinase enzyme from M. tuberculosis and H. pylori has been investigated by structural and computational studies. Both compounds are reversible competitive inhibitors of this enzyme, which is essential in these pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structures of M. tuberculosis and H. pylori in complex with (2S)-2-(4-methoxy)benzyl- and (2S)-2-perfluorobenzyl-3-dehydroquinic acids have been solved at 2.0, 2.3, 2.0, and 1.9 Å, respectively. The crystal structure of M. tuberculosis in complex with (2R)-2-(benzothiophen-5-yl)methyl-3-dehydroquinic acid is also reported at 1.55 Å. These crystal structures reveal key differences in the conformation of the flexible loop of the two enzymes, a difference that depends on the presence of electron-withdrawing or electron-donating groups in the aromatic moiety of the inhibitors. This loop closes over the active site after substrate binding, and its flexibility is essential for the function of the enzyme. These differences have also been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations in an effort to understand the significant inhibition potency differences observed between some of these compounds and also to obtain more information about the possible movements of the loop. These computational studies have also allowed us to identify key structural factors of the H. pylori loop that could explain its reduced flexibility in comparison to the M. tuberculosis loop, specifically by the formation of a key salt bridge between the side chains of residues Asp18 and Arg20.

  5. Insights into substrate binding and catalysis in bacterial type I dehydroquinase.

    PubMed

    Maneiro, María; Peón, Antonio; Lence, Emilio; Otero, José M; Van Raaij, Mark J; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R; González-Bello, Concepción

    2014-09-15

    Structural, biochemical and computational studies to study substrate binding and the role of the conserved residues of the DHQ1 (type I dehydroquinase) enzyme active site are reported in the present paper. The crystal structure of DHQ1 from Salmonella typhi in complex with (2R)-2-methyl-3-dehydroquinic acid, a substrate analogue, was solved at 1.5 Å. The present study reveals a previously unknown key role for conserved Glu46, Phe145 and Met205 and Gln236, Pro234 and Ala233 residues, with the latter three being located in the flexible substrate-covering loop. Gln236 was shown to be responsible for the folding of this loop and for the dramatic reduction of its flexibility, which triggers active site closure. Glu46 was found to be key in bringing the substrate close to the lysine/histidine catalytic pocket to initiate catalysis. The present study could be useful in the rational design of inhibitors of this challenging and recognized target for the development of novel herbicides and antimicrobial agents.

  6. DNA methyltransferase inhibitor CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zirong; Jin, Guorong; Lin, Shuibin; Lin, Xiumei; Gu, Yumei; Zhu, Yujuan; Hu, Chengbin; Zhang, Qingjiong; Wu, Lizi; Shen, Huangxuan

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors and structural proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibited proliferation and migration of C2C12 myoblasts. -- Abstract: CDA-II (cell differentiation agent II), isolated from healthy human urine, is a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. Previous studies indicated that CDA-II played important roles in the regulation of cell growth and certain differentiation processes. However, it has not been determined whether CDA-II affects skeletal myogenesis. In this study, we investigated effects of CDA-II treatment on skeletal muscle progenitor cell differentiation, migration and proliferation. We found that CDA-II blocked differentiation of murine myoblasts C2C12 in a dose-dependent manner. CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors, such as Myogenin and Mef2c, and structural proteins, such as myosin heavy chain (Myh3), light chain (Mylpf) and MCK. Moreover, CDA-II inhibited C1C12 cell migration and proliferation. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that CDA-II inhibits growth and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells, suggesting that the use of CDA-II might affect skeletal muscle functions.

  7. Novel EGFR inhibitors attenuate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kesong; Tian, Xinqiao; Qian, Yuanyuan; Skibba, Melissa; Zou, Chunpeng; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Jingying; Xu, Zheng; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an important risk factor for heart failure. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this current study was to examine the role of EGFR in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we observed that both Ang II and EGF could increase the phospohorylation of EGFR and protein kinase B (AKT)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and then induce cell hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. Both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic silencing significantly reduced Ang II-induced EGFR signalling pathway activation, hypertrophic marker overexpression, and cell hypertrophy. In addition, our results showed that Ang II-induced EGFR activation is mediated by c-Src phosphorylation. In vivo, Ang II treatment significantly led to cardiac remodelling including cardiac hypertrophy, disorganization and fibrosis, accompanied by the activation of EGFR signalling pathway in the heart tissues, while all these molecular and pathological alterations were attenuated by the oral administration with EGFR inhibitors. In conclusion, the c-Src-dependent EGFR activation may play an important role in Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and inhibition of EGFR by specific molecules may be an effective strategy for the treatment of Ang II-associated cardiac diseases. PMID:26762600

  8. New Found Hope for Antibiotic Discovery: Lipid II Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ng, Vivian; Chan, Weng C

    2016-08-26

    Research into antibacterial agents has recently gathered pace in light of the disturbing crisis of antimicrobial resistance. The development of modern tools offers the opportunity of reviving the fallen era of antibacterial discovery through uncovering novel lead compounds that target vital bacterial cell components, such as lipid II. This paper provides a summary of the role of lipid II as well as an overview and insight into the structural features of macrocyclic peptides that inhibit this bacterial cell wall component. The recent discovery of teixobactin, a new class of lipid II inhibitor has generated substantial research interests. As such, the significant progress that has been achieved towards its development as a promising antibacterial agent is discussed. PMID:27388768

  9. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  10. Structural analysis of Golgi alpha-mannosidase II inhibitors identified from a focused glycosidase inhibitor screen.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Douglas A; Tarling, Chris A; Withers, Stephen G; Rose, David R

    2008-09-23

    The N-glycosylation pathway is a target for pharmaceutical intervention in a number of pathological conditions including cancer. Golgi alpha-mannosidase II (GMII) is the final glycoside hydrolase in the pathway and has been the target for a number of synthetic efforts aimed at providing more selective and effective inhibitors. Drosophila GMII (dGMII) has been extensively studied due to the ease of obtaining high resolution structural data, allowing the observation of substrate distortion upon binding and after formation of a trapped covalent reaction intermediate. However, attempts to find new inhibitor leads by high-throughput screening of large commercial libraries or through in silico docking were unsuccessful. In this paper we provide a kinetic and structural analysis of five inhibitors derived from a small glycosidase-focused library. Surprisingly, four of these were known inhibitors of beta-glucosidases. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the dGMII:inhibitor complexes highlights the ability of the zinc-containing GMII active site to deform compounds, even ones designed as conformationally restricted transition-state mimics of beta-glucosidases, into binding entities that have inhibitory activity. Although these deformed conformations do not appear to be on the expected conformational itinerary of the enzyme, and are thus not transition-state mimics of GMII, they allow positioning of the three vicinal hydroxyls of the bound gluco-inhibitors into similar locations to those found with mannose-containing substrates, underlining the importance of these hydrogen bonds for binding. Further, these studies show the utility of targeting the acid-base catalyst using appropriately positioned positively charged nitrogen atoms, as well as the challenges associated with aglycon substitutions.

  11. CHZ868, a Type II JAK2 Inhibitor, Reverses Type I JAK Inhibitor Persistence and Demonstrates Efficacy in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sara C.; Keller, Matthew D.; Chiu, Sophia; Koppikar, Priya; Guryanova, Olga A.; Rapaport, Franck; Xu, Ke; Manova, Katia; Pankov, Dmitry; O’Reilly, Richard J.; Kleppe, Maria; McKenney, Anna Sophia; Shih, Alan H.; Shank, Kaitlyn; Ahn, Jihae; Papalexi, Eftymia; Spitzer, Barbara; Socci, Nick; Viale, Agnes; Mandon, Emeline; Ebel, Nicolas; Andraos, Rita; Rubert, Joëlle; Dammassa, Ernesta; Romanet, Vincent; Dölemeyer, Arno; Zender, Michael; Heinlein, Melanie; Rampal, Rajit; Weinberg, Rona Singer; Hoffman, Ron; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Murakami, Masato; Baffert, Fabienne; Gaul, Christoph; Radimerski, Thomas; Levine, Ross L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Although clinically tested JAK inhibitors reduce splenomegaly and systemic symptoms, molecular responses are not observed in most myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) patients. We previously demonstrated that MPN cells become persistent to type I JAK inhibitors that bind the active conformation of JAK2. We investigated if CHZ868, a type II JAK inhibitor, would demonstrate activity in JAK inhibitor persistent cells, murine MPN models, and MPN patient samples. JAK2- and MPL-mutant cell lines were sensitive to CHZ868, including type I JAK inhibitor persistent cells. CHZ868 showed significant activity in murine MPN models and induced reductions in mutant allele burden not observed with type I JAK inhibitors. These data demonstrate that type II JAK inhibition is a viable therapeutic approach for MPN patients. PMID:26175413

  12. Substrate-Guided Design of Selective FXIIa Inhibitors Based on the Plant-Derived Momordica cochinchinensis Trypsin Inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II) Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Joakim E; Mahatmanto, Tunjung; Abdul Ghani, Hafiza; de Veer, Simon J; Schroeder, Christina I; Harris, Jonathan M; Craik, David J

    2016-08-11

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases. Inhibition of factor XIIa (FXIIa) provides thrombus protection without bleeding complications. Here, we defined the extended substrate specificity of FXIIa and its close homologue factor Xa and used these data, together with inhibitor-based and structure-guided methods, to engineer selective FXIIa inhibitors based on Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II. PMID:27434175

  13. Substrate-Guided Design of Selective FXIIa Inhibitors Based on the Plant-Derived Momordica cochinchinensis Trypsin Inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II) Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Joakim E; Mahatmanto, Tunjung; Abdul Ghani, Hafiza; de Veer, Simon J; Schroeder, Christina I; Harris, Jonathan M; Craik, David J

    2016-08-11

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases. Inhibition of factor XIIa (FXIIa) provides thrombus protection without bleeding complications. Here, we defined the extended substrate specificity of FXIIa and its close homologue factor Xa and used these data, together with inhibitor-based and structure-guided methods, to engineer selective FXIIa inhibitors based on Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II.

  14. GDP dissociation inhibitor domain II required for Rab GTPase recycling.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, P M; Burd, C G

    2001-03-16

    Rab GTPases are localized to distinct subsets of organelles within the cell, where they regulate SNARE-mediated membrane trafficking between organelles. One factor required for Rab localization and function is Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI), which is proposed to recycle Rab after vesicle fusion by extracting Rab from the membrane and loading Rab onto newly formed transport intermediates. GDI is composed of two domains; Rab binding is mediated by Domain I, and the function of Domain II is not known. In this study, Domain II of yeast GDI, encoded by the essential GDI1/SEC19 gene, was targeted in a genetic screen to obtain mutants that might lend insight into the function of this domain. In one gdi1 mutant, the cytosolic pools of all Rabs tested were depleted, and Rab accumulated on membranes, suggesting that this mutant Gdi1 protein has a general defect in extraction of Rab from membranes. In a second gdi1 mutant, the endosomal/vacuolar Rabs Vps21/Ypt51p and Ypt7p accumulated in the cytosol bound to Gdi1p, but localization of Ypt1p and Sec4p were not significantly affected. Using an in vitro assay which reconstitutes Gdi1p-mediated membrane loading of Rab, this mutant Gdi1p was found to be defective in loading of Vps21p but not Ypt1p. Loading of Vps21p by loading-defective Gdi1p was restored when acceptor membranes prepared from a deletion strain lacking Vps21p were used. These results suggest that membrane-associated Rab may regulate recruitment of GDI-Rab from the cytosol, possibly by regulating a GDI-Rab receptor. We conclude that Domain II of Gdi1p is essential for Rab loading and Rab extraction, and confirm that each of these activities is required for Gdi1p function in vivo.

  15. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent.

  16. Design of highly potent urea-based, exosite-binding inhibitors selective for glutamate carboxypeptidase II.

    PubMed

    Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Jančařík, Andrej; Bařinková, Jitka; Navrátil, Václav; Starková, Jana; Šrámková, Karolína; Konvalinka, Jan; Majer, Pavel; Šácha, Pavel

    2015-05-28

    We present here a structure-aided design of inhibitors targeting the active site as well as exosites of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), a prostate cancer marker, preparing potent and selective inhibitors that are more than 1000-fold more active toward GCPII than its closest human homologue, glutamate carboxypeptidase III (GCPIII). Additionally, we demonstrate that the prepared inhibitor conjugate can be used for sensitive and selective imaging of GCPII in mammalian cells. PMID:25923815

  17. Pharmacophore modeling studies of type I and type II kinase inhibitors of Tie2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing-Qing; Xie, Huan-Zhang; Ren, Ji-Xia; Li, Lin-Li; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2009-02-01

    In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of type I and type II kinase inhibitors of Tie2 have been developed with the aid of HipHop and HypoRefine modules within Catalyst program package. The best HipHop pharmacophore model Hypo1_I for type I kinase inhibitors contains one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one hydrogen-bond donor, one general hydrophobic, one hydrophobic aromatic, and one ring aromatic feature. And the best HypoRefine model Hypo1_II for type II kinase inhibitors, which was characterized by the best correlation coefficient (0.976032) and the lowest RMSD (0.74204), consists of two hydrogen-bond donors, one hydrophobic aromatic, and two general hydrophobic features, as well as two excluded volumes. These pharmacophore models have been validated by using either or both test set and cross validation methods, which shows that both the Hypo1_I and Hypo1_II have a good predictive ability. The space arrangements of the pharmacophore features in Hypo1_II are consistent with the locations of the three portions making up a typical type II kinase inhibitor, namely, the portion occupying the ATP binding region (ATP-binding-region portion, AP), that occupying the hydrophobic region (hydrophobic-region portion, HP), and that linking AP and HP (bridge portion, BP). Our study also reveals that the ATP-binding-region portion of the type II kinase inhibitors plays an important role to the bioactivity of the type II kinase inhibitors. Structural modifications on this portion should be helpful to further improve the inhibitory potency of type II kinase inhibitors. PMID:19138543

  18. Pharmacophore modeling studies of type I and type II kinase inhibitors of Tie2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing-Qing; Xie, Huan-Zhang; Ren, Ji-Xia; Li, Lin-Li; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2009-02-01

    In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of type I and type II kinase inhibitors of Tie2 have been developed with the aid of HipHop and HypoRefine modules within Catalyst program package. The best HipHop pharmacophore model Hypo1_I for type I kinase inhibitors contains one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one hydrogen-bond donor, one general hydrophobic, one hydrophobic aromatic, and one ring aromatic feature. And the best HypoRefine model Hypo1_II for type II kinase inhibitors, which was characterized by the best correlation coefficient (0.976032) and the lowest RMSD (0.74204), consists of two hydrogen-bond donors, one hydrophobic aromatic, and two general hydrophobic features, as well as two excluded volumes. These pharmacophore models have been validated by using either or both test set and cross validation methods, which shows that both the Hypo1_I and Hypo1_II have a good predictive ability. The space arrangements of the pharmacophore features in Hypo1_II are consistent with the locations of the three portions making up a typical type II kinase inhibitor, namely, the portion occupying the ATP binding region (ATP-binding-region portion, AP), that occupying the hydrophobic region (hydrophobic-region portion, HP), and that linking AP and HP (bridge portion, BP). Our study also reveals that the ATP-binding-region portion of the type II kinase inhibitors plays an important role to the bioactivity of the type II kinase inhibitors. Structural modifications on this portion should be helpful to further improve the inhibitory potency of type II kinase inhibitors.

  19. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites.

  20. Structures of adamalysin II with peptidic inhibitors. Implications for the design of tumor necrosis factor alpha convertase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-Rüth, F. X.; Meyer, E. F.; Kress, L. F.; Politi, V.

    1998-01-01

    Crotalus adamanteus snake venom adamalysin II is the structural prototype of the adamalysin or ADAM family comprising proteolytic domains of snake venom metalloproteinases, multimodular mammalian reproductive tract proteins, and tumor necrosis factor alpha convertase, TACE, involved in the release of the inflammatory cytokine, TNFalpha. The structure of adamalysin II in noncovalent complex with two small-molecule right-hand side peptidomimetic inhibitors (Pol 647 and Pol 656) has been solved using X-ray diffraction data up to 2.6 and 2.8 A resolution. The inhibitors bind to the S'-side of the proteinase, inserting between two protein segments, establishing a mixed parallel-antiparallel three-stranded beta-sheet and coordinate the central zinc ion in a bidentate manner via their two C-terminal oxygen atoms. The proteinase-inhibitor complexes are described in detail and are compared with other known structures. An adamalysin-based model of the active site of TACE reveals that these small molecules would probably fit into the active site cleft of this latter metalloproteinase, providing a starting model for the rational design of TACE inhibitors. PMID:9521103

  1. Novel Type II Fatty Acid Biosynthesis (FAS II) Inhibitors as Multistage Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Florian C.; Glinca, Serghei; Sattler, Julia M.; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Afanador, Gustavo A.; Prigge, Sean T.; Lanzer, Michael; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Klebe, Gerhard; Schlitzer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a potentially fatal disease caused by Plasmodium parasites and poses a major medical risk in large parts of the world. The development of new, affordable antimalarial drugs is of vital importance as there are increasing reports of resistance to the currently available therapeutics. In addition, most of the current drugs used for chemoprophylaxis merely act on parasites already replicating in the blood. At this point, a patient might already be suffering from the symptoms associated with the disease and could additionally be infectious to an Anopheles mosquito. These insects act as a vector, subsequently spreading the disease to other humans. In order to cure not only malaria but prevent transmission as well, a drug must target both the blood- and pre-erythrocytic liver stages of the parasite. P. falciparum (Pf) enoyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) is a key enzyme of plasmodial type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS II). It has been shown to be essential for liver-stage development of Plasmodium berghei and is therefore qualified as a target for true causal chemoprophylaxis. Using virtual screening based on two crystal structures of PfENR, we identified a structurally novel class of FAS inhibitors. Subsequent chemical optimization yielded two compounds that are effective against multiple stages of the malaria parasite. These two most promising derivatives were found to inhibit blood-stage parasite growth with IC50 values of 1.7 and 3.0 µm and lead to a more prominent developmental attenuation of liver-stage parasites than the gold-standard drug, primaquine. PMID:23341167

  2. Catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II suppress the androgen receptor signaling and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Haolong; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-08-21

    Although the new generation of androgen receptor (AR) antagonists like enzalutamide (ENZ) prolong survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), AR-driven tumors eventually recur indicating that additional therapies are required to fully block AR function. Since DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II) was demonstrated to be essential for AR to initiate gene transcription, this study tested whether catalytic inhibitors of Topo II can block AR signaling and suppress ENZ-resistant CRPC growth. Using multiple prostate cancer cell lines, we showed that catalytic Topo II inhibitors, ICRF187 and ICRF193 inhibited transcription activities of the wild-type AR, mutant ARs (F876L and W741C) and the AR-V7 splice variant. ICRF187 and ICRF193 decreased AR recruitment to target promoters and reduced AR nuclear localization. Both ICRF187 and ICRF193 also inhibited cell proliferation and delayed cell cycling at the G2/M phase. ICRF187 inhibited tumor growth of castration-resistant LNCaP and 22RV1 xenografts as well as ENZ-resistant MR49F xenografts. We conclude that catalytic Topo II inhibitors can block AR signaling and inhibit tumor growth of CRPC xenografts, identifying a potential co-targeting approach using these inhibitors in combination with AR pathway inhibitors in CRPC.

  3. Photobleaching reveals complex effects of inhibitors on transcribing RNA polymerase II in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fromaget, Maud; Cook, Peter R. . E-mail: peter.cook@path.ox.ac.uk

    2007-08-15

    RNA polymerase II transcribes most eukaryotic genes. Photobleaching studies have revealed that living Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the catalytic subunit of the polymerase tagged with the green fluorescent protein contain a large rapidly exchanging pool of enzyme, plus a smaller engaged fraction; genetic complementation shows this tagged polymerase to be fully functional. We investigated how transcriptional inhibitors - some of which are used therapeutically - affect the engaged fraction in living cells using fluorescence loss in photobleaching; all were used at concentrations that have reversible effects. Various kinase inhibitors (roscovitine, DRB, KM05283, alsterpaullone, isoquinolinesulfonamide derivatives H-7, H-8, H-89, H-9), proteasomal inhibitors (lactacystin, MG132), and an anti-tumour agent (cisplatin) all reduced the engaged fraction; an intercalator (actinomycin D), two histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A, sodium butyrate), and irradiation with ultra-violet light all increased it. The polymerase proves to be both a sensitive sensor and effector of the response to these inhibitors.

  4. Potent microRNA suppression by RNA Pol II-transcribed ‘Tough Decoy’ inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Rasmus O.; Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Sørensen, Camilla Darum; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression and modulators of diverse biological pathways. Analyses of miRNA function as well as therapeutic managing of miRNAs rely on cellular administration of miRNA inhibitors which may be achieved by the use of viral vehicles. This study explores the miRNA-suppressive capacity of inhibitors expressed intracellularly from lentivirus-derived gene vectors. Superior activity of two decoy-type inhibitors, a “Bulged Sponge” with eight miRNA recognition sites and a hairpin-shaped “Tough Decoy” containing two miRNA recognition sites, is demonstrated in a side-by-side comparison of seven types of miRNA inhibitors transcribed as short RNAs from an RNA Pol III promoter. We find that lentiviral vectors expressing Tough Decoy inhibitors are less vulnerable than Bulged Sponge-encoding vectors to targeting by the cognate miRNA and less prone, therefore, to reductions in transfer efficiency. Importantly, it is demonstrated that Tough Decoy inhibitors retain their miRNA suppression capacity in the context of longer RNA transcripts expressed from an RNA Pol II promoter. Such RNA Pol II-transcribed Tough Decoy inhibitors are new tools in managing of miRNAs and may have potential for temporal and spatial regulation of miRNA activity as well as for therapeutic targeting of miRNAs that are aberrantly expressed in human disease. PMID:23249752

  5. Different effects of eubacterial and eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors on chloroplasts ofEuglena gracilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajčovič, Juraj; Ebringer, Libor

    1990-03-01

    Inhibitors of eubacterial and eukaryotic DNA topoisomerases type II exhibited different effects on chloroplasts of the flagellateEuglena gracilis. Antibacterial agents (cinoxacin, nalidixic and oxolinic acids, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin) from the group of quinolones and coumarins (coumermycin A1, clorobiocin and novobiocin) — all inhibitors of prokaryotic DNA topoisomerase II — were very potent eliminators of chloroplasts fromE. gracilis. In contrast, antitumor drugs (adriamycin, etoposide, teniposide and mitoxantrone) — antagonists of the eukaryotic counterpart — did not affect these semiautonomous photosynthetic organelles. These findings point out again the close evolutionary relationships between eubacteria and chloroplasts and are in agreement with the hypothesis of an endosymbiotic origin of chloroplasts.

  6. Structure-Based Design of Type II Inhibitors Applied to Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A novel Type II kinase inhibitor chemotype has been identified for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) using structure-based ligand design. The strategy involved structural characterization of an induced DFG-out pocket by protein–ligand X-ray crystallography and incorporation of a slender linkage capable of bypassing a large gate-keeper residue, thus enabling design of molecules accessing both hinge and induced pocket regions. Optimization of an initial hit led to the identification of a low-nanomolar, cell-penetrant Type II inhibitor suitable for use as a chemical probe for MELK. PMID:25589926

  7. Ultrasensitivity part II: multisite phosphorylation, stoichiometric inhibitors, and positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, James E; Ha, Sang Hoon

    2014-11-01

    In this series of reviews, we are examining ultrasensitive responses, the switch-like input-output relationships that contribute to signal processing in a wide variety of signaling contexts. In the first part of this series, we explored one mechanism for generating ultrasensitivity, zero-order ultrasensitivity, where the saturation of two converting enzymes allows the output to switch from low to high over a tight range of input levels. In this second installment, we focus on three conceptually distinct mechanisms for ultrasensitivity: multisite phosphorylation, stoichiometric inhibitors, and positive feedback. We also examine several related mechanisms and concepts, including cooperativity, reciprocal regulation, coherent feed-forward regulation, and substrate competition, and provide several examples of signaling processes where these mechanisms are known or are suspected to be applicable. PMID:25440716

  8. Angiotensin II regulates collagen metabolism through modulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in diabetic skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Ren, Meng; Hao, Shaoyun; Yang, Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Chen, Lihong; Lin, Diaozhu; Li, Na; Yan, Li

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) balance in regulating collagen metabolism of diabetic skin. Skin tissues from diabetic model were collected, and the primary cultured fibroblasts were treated with Ang II receptor inhibitors before Ang II treatment. The collagen type I (Coll I) and collagen type III (Coll III) were measured by histochemistry. The expressions of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), MMP-1, TIMP-1 and propeptides of types I and III procollagens in skin tissues and fibroblasts were quantified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Collagen dysfunction was documented by changed collagen I/III ratio in streptozotocin (STZ)-injected mice compared with controls. This was accompanied by increased expression of TGF-β, TIMP-1 and propeptides of types I and III procollagens in diabetic skin tissues. In primary cultured fibroblasts, Ang II prompted collagen synthesis accompanied by increases in the expressions of TGF-β, TIMP-1 and types I and III procollagens, and these increases were inhibited by losartan, an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker, but not affected by PD123319, an Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist. These findings present evidence that Ang-II-mediated changes in the productions of MMP-1 and TIMP-1 occur via AT1 receptors and a TGF-β-dependent mechanism.

  9. Photosystem II inhibitor resistance in the Columbia Basin of Washington state

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato and mint (peppermint and spearmint) are commonly produced in the irrigated regions of the Pacific Northwest and both crops rely heavily on photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor herbicides metribuzin (potato) and terbacil (mint) for weed management. Seed was collected in 2010 from Powell amaranth, r...

  10. Structural characterization of P1'-diversified urea-based inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II.

    PubMed

    Pavlicek, Jiri; Ptacek, Jakub; Cerny, Jiri; Byun, Youngjoo; Skultetyova, Lubica; Pomper, Martin G; Lubkowski, Jacek; Barinka, Cyril

    2014-05-15

    Urea-based inhibitors of human glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) have advanced into clinical trials for imaging metastatic prostate cancer. In parallel efforts, agents with increased lipophilicity have been designed and evaluated for targeting GCPII residing within the neuraxis. Here we report the structural and computational characterization of six complexes between GCPII and P1'-diversified urea-based inhibitors that have the C-terminal glutamate replaced by more hydrophobic moieties. The X-ray structures are complemented by quantum mechanics calculations that provide a quantitative insight into the GCPII/inhibitor interactions. These data can be used for the rational design of novel glutamate-free GCPII inhibitors with tailored physicochemical properties.

  11. Carborane-containing urea-based inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II: Synthesis and structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Youn, Sihyun; Kim, Kyung Im; Ptacek, Jakub; Ok, Kiwon; Novakova, Zora; Kim, YunHye; Koo, JaeHyung; Barinka, Cyril; Byun, Youngjoo

    2015-11-15

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) is a zinc metalloprotease on the surface of astrocytes which cleaves N-acetylaspartylglutamate to release N-acetylaspartate and glutamate. GCPII inhibitors can decrease glutamate concentration and play a protective role against apoptosis or degradation of brain neurons. Herein, we report the synthesis and structural analysis of novel carborane-based GCPII inhibitors. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of GCPII in complex with a carborane-containing inhibitor at 1.79Å resolution. The X-ray analysis revealed that the bulky closo-carborane cluster is located in the spacious entrance funnel region of GCPII, indicating that the carborane cluster can be further structurally modified to identify promising lead structures of novel GCPII inhibitors.

  12. Differential effects of viroporin inhibitors against feline infectious peritonitis virus serotypes I and II.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Nakano, Kenta; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-05-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIP virus: FIPV), a feline coronavirus of the family Coronaviridae, causes a fatal disease called FIP in wild and domestic cat species. The genome of coronaviruses encodes a hydrophobic transmembrane protein, the envelope (E) protein. The E protein possesses ion channel activity. Viral proteins with ion channel activity are collectively termed "viroporins". Hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), a viroporin inhibitor, can inhibit the ion channel activity of the E protein and replication of several coronaviruses. However, it is not clear whether HMA and other viroporin inhibitors affect replication of FIPV. We examined the effect of HMA and other viroporin inhibitors (DIDS [4,4'-disothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulphonic acid] and amantadine) on infection by FIPV serotypes I and II. HMA treatment drastically decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2 in a dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146. In contrast, DIDS treatment decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146 in dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2. We investigated whether there is a difference in ion channel activity of the E protein between viral serotypes using E. coli cells expressing the E protein of FIPV serotypes I and II. No difference was observed, suggesting that a viroporin other than the E protein influences the differences in the actions of HMA and DIDS on FIPV serotypes I and II.

  13. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L.; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Uhlig, Holm H.; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers. PMID:26320862

  14. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E; Cuny, Gregory D; Uhlig, Holm H; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N

    2015-09-17

    RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers. PMID:26320862

  15. Topoisomerase I and II inhibitors: chemical structure, mechanisms of action and role in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhenkova, L. G.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Shtil, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The review summarizes and analyzes recent published data on topoisomerase I and II inhibitors as potential antitumour agents. Functions and the mechanism of action of topoisomerases are considered. The molecular mechanism of interactions between low-molecular-weight compounds and these proteins is discussed. Topoisomerase inhibitors belonging to different classes of chemical compounds are systematically covered. Assays for the inhibition of topoisomerases and the possibilities of using the computer-aided modelling for the rational design of novel drugs for cancer chemotherapy are presented. The bibliography includes 127 references.

  16. Towards Development of Small Molecule Lipid II Inhibitors as Novel Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Jamal; Cardinale, Steven; Fang, Lei; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M.; Pennington, M. Ross; Basi, Kelly; diTargiani, Robert; Capacio, Benedict R.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Opperman, Timothy J.; Fletcher, Steven; de Leeuw, Erik P. H.

    2016-01-01

    Recently we described a novel di-benzene-pyrylium-indolene (BAS00127538) inhibitor of Lipid II. BAS00127538 (1-Methyl-2,4-diphenyl-6-((1E,3E)-3-(1,3,3-trimethylindolin-2-ylidene)prop-1-en-1-yl)pyryl-1-ium) tetrafluoroborate is the first small molecule Lipid II inhibitor and is structurally distinct from natural agents that bind Lipid II, such as vancomycin. Here, we describe the synthesis and biological evaluation of 50 new analogs of BAS00127538 designed to explore the structure-activity relationships of the scaffold. The results of this study indicate an activity map of the scaffold, identifying regions that are critical to cytotoxicity, Lipid II binding and range of anti-bacterial action. One compound, 6jc48-1, showed significantly enhanced drug-like properties compared to BAS00127538. 6jc48-1 has reduced cytotoxicity, while retaining specific Lipid II binding and activity against Enterococcus spp. in vitro and in vivo. Further, this compound showed a markedly improved pharmacokinetic profile with a half-life of over 13 hours upon intravenous and oral administration and was stable in plasma. These results suggest that scaffolds like that of 6jc48-1 can be developed into small molecule antibiotic drugs that target Lipid II. PMID:27776124

  17. Identification of Noncompetitive Inhibitors of Cytosolic 5'-Nucleotidase II Using a Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Marton, Zsuzsanna; Guillon, Rémi; Krimm, Isabelle; Preeti; Rahimova, Rahila; Egron, David; Jordheim, Lars P; Aghajari, Nushin; Dumontet, Charles; Périgaud, Christian; Lionne, Corinne; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Chaloin, Laurent

    2015-12-24

    We used a combined approach based on fragment-based drug design (FBDD) and in silico methods to design potential inhibitors of the cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II), which has been recognized as an important therapeutic target in hematological cancers. Two subgroups of small compounds (including adenine and biaryl moieties) were identified as cN-II binders and a fragment growing strategy guided by molecular docking was considered. Five compounds induced a strong inhibition of the 5'-nucleotidase activity in vitro, and the most potent ones were characterized as noncompetitive inhibitors. Biological evaluation in cancer cell lines showed synergic effect with selected anticancer drugs. Structural studies using X-ray crystallography lead to the identification of new binding sites for two derivatives and of a new crystal form showing important domain swapping. Altogether, the strategy developed herein allowed identifying new original noncompetitive inhibitors against cN-II that act in a synergistic manner with well-known antitumoral agents. PMID:26599519

  18. N-Substituted Glutamyl Sulfonamides As Inhibitors Of Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (GCP2)

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Brian R.; Alayoglu, Pinar; Engen, William; Choi, Joseph K.; Berkman, Clifford E.; Anderson, Marc O.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP2) is a membrane-bound cell-surface peptidase which is implicated in several neurological disorders, and is also over-expressed in prostate tumor cells. There is significant interest in the inhibition of GCP2 as a means of neuroprotection, while GCP2 inhibition as a method to treat prostate cancer remains a topic of further investigation. The key zinc-binding functional group of the well characterized classes of GCP2 inhibitors (phophonates and phosphoramidates) is tetrahedral and negatively charged at neutral pH, while glutamyl urea class of inhibitors possess a planar and neutral zinc-binding group. This study introduces a new class of GCP2 inhibitors, N-substituted glutamyl sulfonamides, which possess a neutral tetrahedral zinc-binding motif. A library containing 15 secondary sulfonamides and 4 tertiary (N-methyl) sulfonamides was prepared and evaluated for inhibitory potency against purified GCP2 enzyme activity. While most inhibitors lacked potency at 100 μM, short alkyl sulfonamides exhibited promising low micromolar potency, with the optimal inhibitor in this series being glutamyl N-propylsulfonamide (2g). Lastly, molecular docking was used to develop a model to formulate an explanation for the relative inhibitory potencies employed for this class of inhibitors. PMID:21219587

  19. Structure–activity studies with high-affinity inhibitors of pyroglutamyl-peptidase II

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Inhibitors of PPII (pyroglutamyl-peptidase II) (EC 3.4.19.6) have potential applications as investigative and therapeutic agents. The rational design of inhibitors is hindered, however, by the lack of an experimental structure for PPII. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of histidine in TRH (thyrotropin-releasing hormone) with asparagine produces a competitive PPII inhibitor (Ki 17.5 μM). To gain further insight into which functional groups are significant for inhibitory activity, we investigated the effects on inhibition of structural modifications to Glp-Asn-ProNH2 (pyroglutamyl-asparaginyl-prolineamide). Synthesis and kinetic analysis of a diverse series of carboxamide and C-terminally extended Glp-Asn-ProNH2 analogues were undertaken. Extensive quantitative structure–activity relationships were generated, which indicated that key functionalities in the basic molecular structure of the inhibitors combine in a unique way to cause PPII inhibition. Data from kinetic and molecular modelling studies suggest that hydrogen bonding between the asparagine side chain and PPII may provide a basis for the inhibitory properties of the asparagine-containing peptides. Prolineamide appeared to be important for interaction with the S2′ subsite, but some modifications were tolerated. Extension of Glp-Asn-ProNH2 with hydrophobic amino acids at the C-terminus led to a novel set of PPII inhibitors active in vitro at nanomolar concentrations. Such inhibitors were shown to enhance recovery of TRH released from rat brain slices. Glp-Asn-Pro-Tyr-Trp-Trp-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin displayed a Ki of 1 nM, making it the most potent competitive PPII inhibitor described to date. PPII inhibitors with this level of potency should find application in exploring the biological functions of TRH and PPII, and potentially provide a basis for development of novel therapeutics. PMID:15799721

  20. IBIS II: a breast cancer prevention trial in postmenopausal women using the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole.

    PubMed

    Cuzick, Jack

    2008-09-01

    Tamoxifen has been shown to reduce the incidence of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer by approximately 50% in high-risk women. Similar results are seen for raloxifene, but it has a more favorable side-effect profile. Data on contralateral tumors from women in adjuvant trials treated with aromatase inhibitors suggest that new tumors can be reduced by another 50% with these drugs, suggesting a potential 75% reduction of estrogen receptor-positive tumors when used in a prophylactic manner. Side effects appear to be fewer with the aromatase inhibitors, with no excess of gynecologic (including endometrial cancer) or thromboembolic events, but an increase in fracture risk and joint symptoms does occur. IBIS II is a placebo-controlled prevention trial evaluating 5 years of the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole in high-risk postmenopausal women. The primary end point is breast cancer incidence, but major efforts are also being directed at minimizing any fracture risk.

  1. Sulfamates of methyl triterpenoates are effective and competitive inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan; Sommerwerk, Sven; Lucas, Susana D; Heller, Lucie; Csuk, René

    2014-10-30

    Carbonic anhydrase II, belonging to one of the most important enzyme groups of the human body, is a well-studied isozyme from the family of the carbonic anhydrases. Since it is involved in several physiological processes, it has been a pharmaceutical target for many years. In this study we synthesized a number of sulfamates derived from pentacyclic methyl triterpenoates, and we demonstrate their potential as carbonic anhydrase II inhibitors using the well-established photometric 4-nitrophenyl acetate assay. Inhibition constants, as an indicator of their inhibition strength, were in the micromolar range; one compound (10, methyl (3β) 3-(aminosulfonyloxy)-oleanoate) showed a Ki value as low as 0.3 μM. This Ki value is comparable to that of acetazolamide which is a potent carbonic anhydrase inhibitor and a drug for the treatment of glaucoma.

  2. Angiotensin II induces secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and a tissue metalloprotease inhibitor-related protein from rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.A. Jr.; Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Buhi, W.C.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The present study investigates angiotensin (Ang) II effects on secretory protein synthesis in brain astrocytes cultured from neonatal and 21-day-old rats. Ang II-induced changes in the de novo synthesis of (35S)methionine-labeled secretory proteins were visualized using two-dimensional NaDodSO4/PAGE. Astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brain possess specific high-affinity receptors for Ang II. These cells express two Ang II-induced secretory proteins with Mr 55,000 (AISP-55K) and Mr 30,000 (AISP-30K), which were time- and dose-dependent (EC50, 1 nM). (Sar1, Ile8)Ang II (where Sar is sarcosine) inhibited Ang II-induced secretion of AISP-55K but not AISP-30K. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that AISP-55K is identical to rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, whereas AISP-30K exhibits 72-81% identity to three closely related proteins: human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, a rat phorbol ester-induced protein, and the murine growth-responsive protein 16C8. Immunofluorescent staining with rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 antibody was induced in the majority of cells in culture after Ang II treatment of astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brains. Absence of this response to Ang II in astrocytes from neonatal rat brain provides evidence that this action of Ang II on astrocytes is developmentally regulated.

  3. Coexpression of potato type I and II proteinase inhibitors gives cotton plants protection against insect damage in the field

    PubMed Central

    Dunse, K. M.; Stevens, J. A.; Lay, F. T.; Gaspar, Y. M.; Heath, R. L.; Anderson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Potato type I and II serine protease inhibitors are produced by solanaceous plants as a defense mechanism against insects and microbes. Nicotiana alata proteinase inhibitor (NaPI) is a multidomain potato type II inhibitor (pin II) that is produced at high levels in the female reproductive tissues of the ornamental tobacco, Nicotiana alata. The individual inhibitory domains of NaPI target the major classes of digestive enzymes, trypsin and chymotrypsin, in the gut of lepidopteran larval pests. Although consumption of NaPI dramatically reduced the growth and development of a major insect pest, Helicoverpa punctigera, we discovered that surviving larvae had high levels of chymotrypsin activity resistant to inhibition by NaPI. We found a potato type I inhibitor, Solanum tuberosum potato type I inhibitor (StPin1A), was a strong inhibitor of the NaPI-resistant chymotrypsin activity. The combined inhibitory effect of NaPI and StPin1A on H. armigera larval growth in the laboratory was reflected in the increased yield of cotton bolls in field trials of transgenic plants expressing both inhibitors. Better crop protection thus is achieved using combinations of inhibitors in which one class of proteinase inhibitor is used to match the genetic capacity of an insect to adapt to a second class of proteinase inhibitor. PMID:20696895

  4. Discovery of arjunolic acid as a novel non-zinc binding carbonic anhydrase II inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kalyanavenkataraman, Subhalakshmi; Nanjan, Pandurangan; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G; Kumar, Geetha B

    2016-06-01

    Elevated levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) have been shown to be associated with cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Although arjunolic acid (AA) has a diverse range of therapeutic applications including cardio-protection, there have been no reports on the effect of AA on CA II. The present study describes for the first time, the novel zinc independent inhibition of CA II by AA. The molecular docking studies of AA indicated that the hydroxyl group at C2 of the A-ring, which hydrogen bonds with the catalytic site residues (His64, Asn62 and Asn67), along with the gem-dimethyl group at C20 of the E-ring, greatly influences the inhibitory activity, independent of the catalytic zinc, unlike the inhibition observed with most CA II inhibitors. Among the triterpenoids tested viz. arjunolic acid, arjunic acid, asiatic acid, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid, AA was the most potent in inhibiting CA II in vitro with an IC50 of 9μM. It was interesting to note, that in spite of exhibiting very little differences in their structures, these triterpenoids exhibited vast differences in their inhibitory activities, with IC50 values ranging from 9μM to as high as 333μM. Furthermore, AA also inhibited the cytosolic activity of CA in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, as reflected by the decrease in acidification of the intracellular pH (pHi). The decreased acidification reduced the intracellular calcium levels, which further prevented the mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Thus, these studies provide a better understanding for establishing the novel molecular mechanism involved in CA II inhibition by the non-zinc binding inhibitor AA. PMID:27038848

  5. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  6. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L.; Hood, Molly M.; Lord, John W.; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F.; Patt, William C.; Smith, Bryan D.; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D.; Petillo, Peter A.; Wise, Scott C.; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L.

    2012-01-20

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  7. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L; Hood, Molly M; Lord, John W; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F; Patt, William C; Smith, Bryan D; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D; Petillo, Peter A; Wise, Scott C; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L

    2010-10-01

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  8. Photosystem II-inhibitors play a limited role in sweet corn response to 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase-inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postemergence (POST) application of 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) inhibitors in combination with a photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor, such as atrazine, is common practice in sweet corn production. Given the sensitivity of sweet corn to HPPD-inhibiting herbicides, the objective of this wo...

  9. Computational identification of novel natural inhibitors of glucagon receptor for checking type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interaction of the small peptide hormone glucagon with glucagon receptor (GCGR) stimulates the release of glucose from the hepatic cells during fasting; hence GCGR performs a significant function in glucose homeostasis. Inhibiting the interaction between glucagon and its receptor has been reported to control hepatic glucose overproduction and thus GCGR has evolved as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. Results In the present study, a large library of natural compounds was screened against 7 transmembrane domain of GCGR to identify novel therapeutic molecules that can inhibit the binding of glucagon with GCGR. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamic behaviour of the docked complexes and the molecular interactions between the screened compounds and the ligand binding residues of GCGR were analysed in detail. The top scoring compounds were also compared with already documented GCGR inhibitors- MK-0893 and LY2409021 for their binding affinity and other ADME properties. Finally, we have reported two natural drug like compounds PIB and CAA which showed good binding affinity for GCGR and are potent inhibitor of its functional activity. Conclusion This study contributes evidence for application of these compounds as prospective small ligand molecules against type II diabetes. Novel natural drug like inhibitors against the 7 transmembrane domain of GCGR have been identified which showed high binding affinity and potent inhibition of GCGR PMID:25521597

  10. Interactions between Human Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II and Urea-Based Inhibitors: Structural Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Barinka, Cyril; Byun, Youngjoo; Dusich, Crystal L.; Banerjee, Sangeeta R.; Chen, Ying; Castanares, Mark; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.; Lubkowski, Jacek

    2009-01-21

    Urea-based, low molecular weight ligands of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) have demonstrated efficacy in various models of neurological disorders and can serve as imaging agents for prostate cancer. To enhance further development of such compounds, we determined X-ray structures of four complexes between human GCPII and urea-based inhibitors at high resolution. All ligands demonstrate an invariant glutarate moiety within the S1{prime} pocket of the enzyme. The ureido linkage between P1 and P1{prime} inhibitor sites interacts with the active-site Zn{sub 1}{sup 2+} ion and the side chains of Tyr552 and His553. Interactions within the S1 pocket are defined primarily by a network of hydrogen bonds between the P1 carboxylate group of the inhibitors and the side chains of Arg534, Arg536, and Asn519. Importantly, we have identified a hydrophobic pocket accessory to the S1 site that can be exploited for structure-based design of novel GCPII inhibitors with increased lipophilicity.

  11. Novel Substrate-Based Inhibitors of Human Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II with Enhanced Lipophilicity

    SciTech Connect

    Plechanovová, Anna; Byun, Youngjoo; Alquicer, Glenda; Škultétyová, L; ubica; Ml; #269; ochová, Petra; N; #283; mcová, Adriana; Kim, Hyung-Joon; Navrátil, Michal; Mease, Ronnie; Lubkowski, Jacek; Pomper, Martin; Konvalinka, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Ba; #345; inka, Cyril

    2012-10-09

    Virtually all low molecular weight inhibitors of human glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) are highly polar compounds that have limited use in settings where more lipophilic molecules are desired. Here we report the identification and characterization of GCPII inhibitors with enhanced liphophilicity that are derived from a series of newly identified dipeptidic GCPII substrates featuring nonpolar aliphatic side chains at the C-terminus. To analyze the interactions governing the substrate recognition by GCPII, we determined crystal structures of the inactive GCPII(E424A) mutant in complex with selected dipeptides and complemented the structural data with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. Results reveal the importance of nonpolar interactions governing GCPII affinity toward novel substrates as well as formerly unnoticed plasticity of the S1' specificity pocket. On the basis of those data, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a series of novel GCPII inhibitors with enhanced lipophilicity, with the best candidates having low nanomolar inhibition constants and clogD > -0.3. Our findings offer new insights into the design of more lipophilic inhibitors targeting GCPII.

  12. Selective Loss of Cysteine Residues and Disulphide Bonds in a Potato Proteinase Inhibitor II Family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Tieling; Donnelly, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins play a key role in protein folding, stability, and function. Loss of a disulphide bond is often associated with functional differentiation of the protein. The evolution of disulphide bonds is still actively debated; analysis of naturally occurring variants can promote understanding of the protein evolutionary process. One of the disulphide bond-containing protein families is the potato proteinase inhibitor II (PI-II, or Pin2, for short) superfamily, which is found in most solanaceous plants and participates in plant development, stress response, and defence. Each PI-II domain contains eight cysteine residues (8C), and two similar PI-II domains form a functional protein that has eight disulphide bonds and two non-identical reaction centres. It is still unclear which patterns and processes affect cysteine residue loss in PI-II. Through cDNA sequencing and data mining, we found six natural variants missing cysteine residues involved in one or two disulphide bonds at the first reaction centre. We named these variants Pi7C and Pi6C for the proteins missing one or two pairs of cysteine residues, respectively. This PI-II-7C/6C family was found exclusively in potato. The missing cysteine residues were in bonding pairs but distant from one another at the nucleotide/protein sequence level. The non-synonymous/synonymous substitution (Ka/Ks) ratio analysis suggested a positive evolutionary gene selection for Pi6C and various Pi7C. The selective deletion of the first reaction centre cysteine residues that are structure-level-paired but sequence-level-distant in PI-II illustrates the flexibility of PI-II domains and suggests the functionality of their transient gene versions during evolution. PMID:21494600

  13. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of type-II VEGFR-2 inhibitors based on quinoxaline scaffold.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Mai I; Abou El Ella, Dalal A; Ismail, Nasser S M; Abouzid, Khaled A M

    2014-10-01

    In an effort to develop ATP-competitive VEGFR-2 selective inhibitors, a series of new quinoxaline-based derivatives was designed and synthesized. The target compounds were biologically evaluated for their inhibitory activity against VEGFR-2. The design of the target compounds was accomplished after a profound study of the structure activity relationship (SAR) of type-II VEGFR-2 inhibitors. Among the synthesized compounds, 1-(2-((4-methoxyphenyl)amino)-3-oxo-3,4 dihydroquinoxalin-6-yl)-3-phenylurea (VIIa) displayed the highest inhibitory activity against VEGFR-2. Molecular modeling study involving molecular docking and field alignment was implemented to interpret the variable inhibitory activity of the newly synthesized compounds.

  14. Structure–activity exploration of a small-molecule Lipid II inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M; Chauhan, Jay; Opperman, Timothy J; MacKerell, Alexander D; de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified low-molecular weight compounds that act as inhibitors of Lipid II, an essential precursor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Lipid II comprises specialized lipid (bactoprenol) linked to a hydrophilic head group consisting of a peptidoglycan subunit (N-acetyl glucosamine [GlcNAc]–N-acetyl muramic acid [MurNAc] disaccharide coupled to a short pentapeptide moiety) via a pyrophosphate. One of our lead compounds, a diphenyl-trimethyl indolene pyrylium, termed BAS00127538, interacts with the MurNAc moiety and the isoprenyl tail of Lipid II. Here, we report on the structure–activity relationship of BAS00127538 derivatives obtained by in silico analyses and de novo chemical synthesis. Our results indicate that Lipid II binding and bacterial killing are related to three features: the diphenyl moiety, the indolene moiety, and the positive charge of the pyrylium. Replacement of the pyrylium moiety with an N-methyl pyridinium, which may have importance in stability of the molecule, did not alter Lipid II binding or antibacterial potency. PMID:25987836

  15. Rational Design Synthesis and Evaluation of New Selective Inhibitors of Microbial Class II (Zinc Dependent) Fructose Bis-phosphate Aldolases

    SciTech Connect

    R Daher; M Coincon; M Fonvielle; P Gest; M Guerin; M Jackson; J Sygusch; M Therisod

    2011-12-31

    We report the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of several selective inhibitors of class II (zinc dependent) fructose bis-phosphate aldolases (Fba). The products were designed as transition-state analogues of the catalyzed reaction, structurally related to the substrate fructose bis-phosphate (or sedoheptulose bis-phosphate) and based on an N-substituted hydroxamic acid, as a chelator of the zinc ion present in active site. The compounds synthesized were tested on class II Fbas from various pathogenic microorganisms and, by comparison, on a mammalian class I Fba. The best inhibitor shows Ki against class II Fbas from various pathogens in the nM range, with very high selectivity (up to 105). Structural analyses of inhibitors in complex with aldolases rationalize and corroborate the enzymatic kinetics results. These inhibitors represent lead compounds for the preparation of new synthetic antibiotics, notably for tuberculosis prophylaxis.

  16. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  17. Heterologous expression of Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) in Pichia pastoris system: Purification, isotopic labeling and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Mansur, Manuel; Camejo, Ayamey; Pires, José R; Alonso-Del-Rivero Antigua, Maday

    2016-10-01

    Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) is a tight-binding serine protease inhibitor of the Kazal family with an atypical broad specificity, being active against several proteases such as bovine pancreatic trypsin, human neutrophil elastase and subtilisin A. CmPI-II 3D structures are necessary for understanding the molecular basis of its activity. In the present work, we describe an efficient and straightforward recombinant expression strategy, as well as a cost-effective procedure for isotope labeling for NMR structure determination purposes. The vector pCM101 containing the CmPI-II gene, under the control of Pichia pastoris AOX1 promoter was constructed. Methylotrophic Pichia pastoris strain KM71H was then transformed with the plasmid and the recombinant protein (rCmPI-II) was expressed in benchtop fermenter in unlabeled or (15)N-labeled forms using ammonium chloride ((15)N, 99%) as the sole nitrogen source. Protein purification was accomplished by sequential cation exchange chromatography in STREAMLINE DirectHST, anion exchange chromatography on Hitrap Q-Sepharose FF and gel filtration on Superdex 75 10/30, yielding high quantities of pure rCmPI-II and (15)N rCmPI-II. Recombinant proteins displayed similar functional features as compared to the natural inhibitor and NMR spectra indicated folded and homogeneously labeled samples, suitable for further studies of structure and protease-inhibitor interactions. PMID:27353494

  18. Heterologous expression of Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) in Pichia pastoris system: Purification, isotopic labeling and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Mansur, Manuel; Camejo, Ayamey; Pires, José R; Alonso-Del-Rivero Antigua, Maday

    2016-10-01

    Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) is a tight-binding serine protease inhibitor of the Kazal family with an atypical broad specificity, being active against several proteases such as bovine pancreatic trypsin, human neutrophil elastase and subtilisin A. CmPI-II 3D structures are necessary for understanding the molecular basis of its activity. In the present work, we describe an efficient and straightforward recombinant expression strategy, as well as a cost-effective procedure for isotope labeling for NMR structure determination purposes. The vector pCM101 containing the CmPI-II gene, under the control of Pichia pastoris AOX1 promoter was constructed. Methylotrophic Pichia pastoris strain KM71H was then transformed with the plasmid and the recombinant protein (rCmPI-II) was expressed in benchtop fermenter in unlabeled or (15)N-labeled forms using ammonium chloride ((15)N, 99%) as the sole nitrogen source. Protein purification was accomplished by sequential cation exchange chromatography in STREAMLINE DirectHST, anion exchange chromatography on Hitrap Q-Sepharose FF and gel filtration on Superdex 75 10/30, yielding high quantities of pure rCmPI-II and (15)N rCmPI-II. Recombinant proteins displayed similar functional features as compared to the natural inhibitor and NMR spectra indicated folded and homogeneously labeled samples, suitable for further studies of structure and protease-inhibitor interactions.

  19. Saccharin sulfonamides as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases I, II, VII, XII, and XIII.

    PubMed

    Morkūnaitė, Vaida; Baranauskienė, Lina; Zubrienė, Asta; Kairys, Visvaldas; Ivanova, Jekaterina; Trapencieris, Pēteris; Matulis, Daumantas

    2014-01-01

    A series of modified saccharin sulfonamides have been designed as carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors and synthesized. Their binding to CA isoforms I, II, VII, XII, and XIII was measured by the fluorescent thermal shift assay (FTSA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Saccharin bound the CAs weakly, exhibiting the affinities of 1-10 mM for four CAs except CA I where binding could not be detected. Several sulfonamide-bearing saccharines exhibited strong affinities of 1-10 nM towards particular CA isoforms. The functional group binding Gibbs free energy additivity maps are presented which may provide insights into the design of compounds with increased affinity towards selected CAs.

  20. Discovery of Bacterial Fatty Acid Synthase Type II Inhibitors Using a Novel Cellular Bioluminescent Reporter Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Joselynn; Bowlin, Nicholas O.; Mills, Debra M.; Saenkham, Panatda; Kwasny, Steven M.; Opperman, Timothy J.; Williams, John D.; Rock, Charles O.; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Novel, cellular, gain-of-signal, bioluminescent reporter assays for fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) inhibitors were constructed in an efflux-deficient strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and based on the discovery that FASII genes in P. aeruginosa are coordinately upregulated in response to pathway disruption. A screen of 115,000 compounds identified a series of sulfonamidobenzamide (SABA) analogs, which generated strong luminescent signals in two FASII reporter strains but not in four control reporter strains designed to respond to inhibitors of pathways other than FASII. The SABA analogs selectively inhibited lipid biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity to mammalian cells (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50] ≥ 80 μM). The most potent SABA analogs had MICs of 0.5 to 7.0 μM (0.2 to 3.0 μg/ml) against an efflux-deficient Escherichia coli (ΔtolC) strain but had no detectable MIC against efflux-proficient E. coli or against P. aeruginosa (efflux deficient or proficient). Genetic, molecular genetic, and biochemical studies revealed that SABA analogs target the enzyme (AccC) catalyzing the biotin carboxylase half-reaction of the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase step in the initiation phase of FASII in E. coli and P. aeruginosa. These results validate the capability and the sensitivity of this novel bioluminescent reporter screen to identify inhibitors of E. coli and P. aeruginosa FASII. PMID:26169404

  1. A review on ROCK-II inhibitors: From molecular modelling to synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Surmil; Savjani, Jignasa

    2016-05-15

    Rho kinase enzyme expressed in different disease conditions and involved in mediating vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling in the pathogenesis. There are two isoforms of Rho kinases, namely ROCK I and ROCK II, responsible for different physiological function due to difference in distribution, but almost similar in structure. The Rho kinase 2 belongs to AGC family and is widely distributed in brain, heart and muscles. It is responsible for contraction of vascular smooth muscles by calcium sensitization. Its defective and unwanted expression can lead to many medical conditions like multiple sclerosis, myocardial ischemia, inflammatory responses, etc. Many Rho kinase 1 and 2 inhibitors have been designed for Rho/Rho kinase pathway by use of molecular modeling studies. Most of the designed compounds have been modeled based on ROCK 1 enzyme. This article is focused on Rho kinase 2 inhibitors as there are many ways to improvise by use of Computer aided drug designing as very less quantum of research work carried out. Herein, the article highlights different stages of designing like docking, SAR and synthesis of ROCK inhibitors and recent advances. It also highlights future prospective to improve the activity.

  2. Control of the flow properties of DNA by topoisomerase II and its targeting inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kundukad, Binu; van der Maarel, Johan R C

    2010-09-22

    The flow properties of DNA are important for understanding cell division and, indirectly, cancer therapy. DNA topology controlling enzymes such as topoisomerase II are thought to play an essential role. We report experiments showing how double-strand passage facilitated by topoisomerase II controls DNA rheology. For this purpose, we have measured the elastic storage and viscous loss moduli of a model system comprising bacteriophage λ-DNA and human topoisomerase IIα using video tracking of the Brownian motion of colloidal probe particles. We found that the rheology is critically dependent on the formation of temporal entanglements among the DNA molecules with a relaxation time of ∼1 s. We observed that topoisomerase II effectively removes these entanglements and transforms the solution from an elastic physical gel to a viscous fluid depending on the consumption of ATP. A second aspect of this study is the effect of the generic topoisomerase II inhibitor adenylyl-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). In mixtures of AMP-PNP and ATP, the double-strand passage reaction gets blocked and progressively fewer entanglements are relaxed. A total replacement of ATP by AMP-PNP results in a temporal increase in elasticity at higher frequencies, but no transition to an elastic gel with fixed cross-links. PMID:20858436

  3. Finding Potent Sirt Inhibitor in Coffee: Isolation, Confirmation and Synthesis of Javamide-II (N-Caffeoyltryptophan) as Sirt1/2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae B

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that Sirt inhibition may have beneficial effects on several human diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Coffee is one of most popular beverages with several positive health effects. Therefore, in this paper, potential Sirt inhibitors were screened using coffee extract. First, HPLC was utilized to fractionate coffee extract, then screened using a Sirt1/2 inhibition assay. The screening led to the isolation of a potent Sirt1/2 inhibitor, whose structure was determined as javamide-II (N-caffeoyltryptophan) by NMR. For confirmation, the amide was chemically synthesized and its capacity of inhibiting Sirt1/2 was also compared with the isolated amide. Javamide-II inhibited Sirt2 (IC50; 8.7 μM) better than Sirt1(IC50; 34μM). Since javamide-II is a stronger inhibitor for Sirt2 than Sirt1. The kinetic study was performed against Sirt2. The amide exhibited noncompetitive Sirt2 inhibition against the NAD+ (Ki = 9.8 μM) and showed competitive inhibition against the peptide substrate (Ki = 5.3 μM). Also, a docking simulation showed stronger binding pose of javamide-II to Sirt2 than AGK2. In cellular levels, javamide-II was able to increase the acetylation of total lysine, cortactin and histone H3 in neuronal NG108-15 cells. In the same cells, the amide also increased the acetylation of lysine (K382) in p53, but not (K305). This study suggests that Javamide-II found in coffee may be a potent Sirt1/2 inhibitor, probably with potential use in some conditions of human diseases. PMID:26986569

  4. Finding Potent Sirt Inhibitor in Coffee: Isolation, Confirmation and Synthesis of Javamide-II (N-Caffeoyltryptophan) as Sirt1/2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that Sirt inhibition may have beneficial effects on several human diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Coffee is one of most popular beverages with several positive health effects. Therefore, in this paper, potential Sirt inhibitors were screened using coffee extract. First, HPLC was utilized to fractionate coffee extract, then screened using a Sirt1/2 inhibition assay. The screening led to the isolation of a potent Sirt1/2 inhibitor, whose structure was determined as javamide-II (N-caffeoyltryptophan) by NMR. For confirmation, the amide was chemically synthesized and its capacity of inhibiting Sirt1/2 was also compared with the isolated amide. Javamide-II inhibited Sirt2 (IC50; 8.7μM) better than Sirt1(IC50; 34μM). Since javamide-II is a stronger inhibitor for Sirt2 than Sirt1. The kinetic study was performed against Sirt2. The amide exhibited noncompetitive Sirt2 inhibition against the NAD+ (Ki = 9.8 μM) and showed competitive inhibition against the peptide substrate (Ki = 5.3 μM). Also, a docking simulation showed stronger binding pose of javamide-II to Sirt2 than AGK2. In cellular levels, javamide-II was able to increase the acetylation of total lysine, cortactin and histone H3 in neuronal NG108-15 cells. In the same cells, the amide also increased the acetylation of lysine (K382) in p53, but not (K305). This study suggests that Javamide-II found in coffee may be a potent Sirt1/2 inhibitor, probably with potential use in some conditions of human diseases. PMID:26986569

  5. Finding Potent Sirt Inhibitor in Coffee: Isolation, Confirmation and Synthesis of Javamide-II (N-Caffeoyltryptophan) as Sirt1/2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae B

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that Sirt inhibition may have beneficial effects on several human diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Coffee is one of most popular beverages with several positive health effects. Therefore, in this paper, potential Sirt inhibitors were screened using coffee extract. First, HPLC was utilized to fractionate coffee extract, then screened using a Sirt1/2 inhibition assay. The screening led to the isolation of a potent Sirt1/2 inhibitor, whose structure was determined as javamide-II (N-caffeoyltryptophan) by NMR. For confirmation, the amide was chemically synthesized and its capacity of inhibiting Sirt1/2 was also compared with the isolated amide. Javamide-II inhibited Sirt2 (IC50; 8.7 μM) better than Sirt1(IC50; 34μM). Since javamide-II is a stronger inhibitor for Sirt2 than Sirt1. The kinetic study was performed against Sirt2. The amide exhibited noncompetitive Sirt2 inhibition against the NAD+ (Ki = 9.8 μM) and showed competitive inhibition against the peptide substrate (Ki = 5.3 μM). Also, a docking simulation showed stronger binding pose of javamide-II to Sirt2 than AGK2. In cellular levels, javamide-II was able to increase the acetylation of total lysine, cortactin and histone H3 in neuronal NG108-15 cells. In the same cells, the amide also increased the acetylation of lysine (K382) in p53, but not (K305). This study suggests that Javamide-II found in coffee may be a potent Sirt1/2 inhibitor, probably with potential use in some conditions of human diseases.

  6. Protein quality control disruption by PKCβII in heart failure; rescue by the selective PKCβII inhibitor, βIIV5-3.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Julio C B; Boer, Berta Napchan; Grinberg, Max; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2012-01-01

    Myocardial remodeling and heart failure (HF) are common sequelae of many forms of cardiovascular disease and a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Accumulation of damaged cardiac proteins in heart failure has been described. However, how protein quality control (PQC) is regulated and its contribution to HF development are not known. Here, we describe a novel role for activated protein kinase C isoform βII (PKCβII) in disrupting PQC. We show that active PKCβII directly phosphorylated the proteasome and inhibited proteasomal activity in vitro and in cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes. Importantly, inhibition of PKCβII, using a selective PKCβII peptide inhibitor (βIIV5-3), improved proteasomal activity and conferred protection in cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes. We also show that sustained inhibition of PKCβII increased proteasomal activity, decreased accumulation of damaged and misfolded proteins and increased animal survival in two rat models of HF. Interestingly, βIIV5-3-mediated protection was blunted by sustained proteasomal inhibition in HF. Finally, increased cardiac PKCβII activity and accumulation of misfolded proteins associated with decreased proteasomal function were found also in remodeled and failing human hearts, indicating a potential clinical relevance of our findings. Together, our data highlights PKCβII as a novel inhibitor of proteasomal function. PQC disruption by increased PKCβII activity in vivo appears to contribute to the pathophysiology of heart failure, suggesting that PKCβII inhibition may benefit patients with heart failure. (218 words).

  7. Protein kinase C betaII peptide inhibitor exerts cardioprotective effects in rat cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Omiyi, Didi; Brue, Richard J; Taormina, Philip; Harvey, Margaret; Atkinson, Norrell; Young, Lindon H

    2005-08-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion (I/R) in the presence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) results in a marked cardiac contractile dysfunction. A cell-permeable protein kinase C (PKC) betaII peptide inhibitor was used to test the hypothesis that PKC betaII inhibition could attenuate PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction by suppression of superoxide production from PMNs and increase NO release from vascular endothelium. The effects of the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor were examined in isolated ischemic (20 min) and reperfused (45 min) rat hearts with PMNs. The PKC betaII inhibitor (10 microM; n = 7) significantly attenuated PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction compared with I/R hearts (n = 9) receiving PMNs alone in left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP (+dP/dt(max)) cardiac function indices (p < 0.01). The PKC betaII inhibitor at 10 microM significantly increased endothelial NO release from a basal value of 1.85 +/- 0.18 pmol NO/mg tissue to 3.49 +/- 0.62 pmol NO/mg tissue from rat aorta. It also significantly inhibited superoxide release (i.e., absorbance) from N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine-stimulated rat PMNs from 0.13 +/- 0.01 to 0.02 +/- 0.004 (p < 0.01) at 10 microM. Histological analysis of the left ventricle of representative rat hearts from each group showed that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor-treated hearts experienced a marked reduction in PMN vascular adherence and infiltration into the postreperfused cardiac tissue compared with I/R + PMN hearts (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor attenuates PMN-induced post-I/R cardiac contractile dysfunction by increasing endothelial NO release and by inhibiting superoxide release from PMNs. PMID:15878997

  8. Cyclooxygenase I and II inhibitors distinctly enhance hippocampal- and cortex-dependent cognitive functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Syed, Huma; Ikram, Muhammad Faisal; Yaqinuddin, Ahmed; Ahmed, Touqeer

    2015-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes are expressed in the brain; however, their role in hippocampus-dependent and cortex-dependent cognitive functions remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to comparatively investigate the effects of piroxicam, a selective COX-I inhibitor, and celecoxib, a selective COX‑II inhibitor, on cognitive functions in an AlCl3‑induced neurotoxicity mouse model to understand the specific role of each COX enzyme in the hippocampus and cortex. The AlCl3 (250 mg/kg) was administered to the mice in drinking water and the drugs were administered in feed for 30 days. Assessments of memory, including a Morris water maze, social behavior and nesting behavior were performed in control and treated mice. The RNA expression of the COX enzymes were analyzed using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. An ex‑vivo 2,2‑Diphenyl‑1‑picrylhydrazyl assay was performed in the hippocampus and cortex. Following 30 days of treatment with thedrugs, the mice in the celecoxib‑ and piroxicam‑treated groups exhibited enhanced learning (6.84 ± 0.76 and 9.20 ± 1.08, respectively), compared with the AlCl3‑induced neurotoxicity group (21.14 ± 0.76) on the fifth day of the Morris water maze test. Celecoxib treatment improved social affiliation in the AlCl3‑induced neurotoxicity group, the results of which were superior to piroxicam. Piroxicam led to better improvement in nesting score in the AlCl3‑induced neurotoxicity group. Both drugs decreased the expression levels of COX‑I and COX‑II in the hippocampus and cortex, and rescued oxidative stress levels. These findings suggested that each drug distinctly affected cognitive functions, highlighting the distinctive roles of COX-I and COX-II in learning and memory.

  9. Ring-substituted 8-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxanilides as photosystem II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jampilek, Josef; Kralova, Katarina; Pesko, Matus; Kos, Jiri

    2016-08-15

    Ring-substituted 8-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxanilides inhibited photosynthetic electron transport (PET) through photosystem (PS) II. Their inhibitory efficiency depended on the compound lipophilicity, the electronic properties of the substituent R and the position of the substituent R on the benzene ring. The most effective inhibitors showing IC50 values in the range 2.3-3.6μM were substituted in C'(3) by F, CH3, Cl and Br. The dependence of the PET-inhibiting activity on the lipophilicity of the compounds was quasi-parabolic for 3-substituted derivatives, while for C'(2) ones a slight increase and for C'(4) derivatives a sharp decrease of the activity were observed with increasing lipophilicity. In addition, the dependence of PET-inhibiting activity on electronic Hammett's σ parameter of the substituent R was observed with optimum σ value 0.06 for C'(4) and 0.34 for C'(3) substituted derivatives, while the value of σ parameter did not significantly influence the PET-inhibiting activity of C'(2) substituted compounds. Interactions of the studied compounds with chlorophyll a and aromatic amino acids present in the pigment-protein complexes mainly in PS II were documented by fluorescence spectroscopy. The section between P680 and plastoquinone QB occurring on the acceptor side of PS II can be suggested as the site of action of the compounds. PMID:27432762

  10. Trypsin inhibition by macrocyclic and open-chain variants of the squash inhibitor MCoTI-II.

    PubMed

    Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Le Nguyen, Dung; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2005-12-01

    MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis are inhibitors of trypsin-like proteases and the only known members of the large family of squash inhibitors that are cyclic and contain an additional loop connecting the amino- and the carboxy-terminus. To investigate the contribution of macrocycle formation to biological activity, we synthesized a set of open-chain variants of MCoTI-II that lack the cyclization loop and contain various natural and non-natural amino acid substitutions in the reactive-site loop. Upon replacement of P1 lysine residue #10 within the open-chain variant of MCoTI-II by the non-natural isosteric nucleo amino acid AlaG [beta-(guanin-9-yl)-L-alanine], a conformationally restricted arginine mimetic, residual inhibitory activity was detected, albeit reduced by four orders of magnitude. While the cyclic inhibitors MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II were found to be very potent trypsin inhibitors, with picomolar inhibition constants, the open-chain variants displayed an approximately 10-fold lower affinity. These data suggest that the formation of a circular backbone in the MCoTI squash inhibitors results in enhanced affinity and therefore is a determinant of biological activity. PMID:16336125

  11. Trypsin inhibition by macrocyclic and open-chain variants of the squash inhibitor MCoTI-II.

    PubMed

    Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Le Nguyen, Dung; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2005-12-01

    MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis are inhibitors of trypsin-like proteases and the only known members of the large family of squash inhibitors that are cyclic and contain an additional loop connecting the amino- and the carboxy-terminus. To investigate the contribution of macrocycle formation to biological activity, we synthesized a set of open-chain variants of MCoTI-II that lack the cyclization loop and contain various natural and non-natural amino acid substitutions in the reactive-site loop. Upon replacement of P1 lysine residue #10 within the open-chain variant of MCoTI-II by the non-natural isosteric nucleo amino acid AlaG [beta-(guanin-9-yl)-L-alanine], a conformationally restricted arginine mimetic, residual inhibitory activity was detected, albeit reduced by four orders of magnitude. While the cyclic inhibitors MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II were found to be very potent trypsin inhibitors, with picomolar inhibition constants, the open-chain variants displayed an approximately 10-fold lower affinity. These data suggest that the formation of a circular backbone in the MCoTI squash inhibitors results in enhanced affinity and therefore is a determinant of biological activity.

  12. In silico modification of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) as potential inhibitor for class II histone deacetylase (HDAC)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer for the woman in the world. It is caused by the oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV). The inhibition activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is widely known as a low toxicity HDAC inhibitor. This research presents in silico SAHA modification by utilizing triazole, in order to obtain a better inhibitor. We conducted docking of the SAHA inhibitor and 12 modified versions to six class II HDAC enzymes, and then proceeded with drug scanning of each one of them. Results The docking results show that the 12 modified inhibitors have much better binding affinity and inhibition potential than SAHA. Based on drug scan analysis, six of the modified inhibitors have robust pharmacological attributes, as revealed by drug likeness, drug score, oral bioavailability, and toxicity levels. Conclusions The binding affinity, free energy and drug scan screening of the best inhibitors have shown that 1c and 2c modified inhibitors are the best ones to inhibit class II HDAC. PMID:22373132

  13. In silico approaches to identify the potential inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Janaki Ramaiah, M; Stanley, Balraj Alex; Prasanna Lakshmi, S; Vishnu Priya, J; Hussain, Tajamul; Alrokayan, Salman A; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    To develop a potential inhibitor for glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) effective against all the eight common genetic variants reported, PyMOL molecular visualization system was used to generate models of variants using the crystal structure of GCPII i.e. 2OOT as a template. High-throughput virtual screening of 29 compounds revealed differential efficacy across the eight genetic variants (pIC50: 4.70 to 10.22). Pharmacophore analysis and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies revealed a urea-based N-acetyl aspartyl glutamate (NAAG) analogue as more potent inhibitor, which was effective across all the genetic variants of GCPII as evidenced by glide scores (-4.32 to -7.08) and protein-ligand interaction plots (13 interactions in wild GCPII). This molecule satisfied Lipinski rule of five and rule of three for drug-likeliness. Being a NAAG-analogue, this molecule might confer neuroprotection by inhibiting glutamatergic neurotransmission mediated by N-acetylated alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase), a splice variant of GCPII. PMID:27430729

  14. Potato type I and II proteinase inhibitors: modulating plant physiology and host resistance.

    PubMed

    Turra, David; Lorito, Matteo

    2011-08-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (PIs) are a large and complex group of plant proteins. Members of the potato type I (Pin1) and II (Pin2) proteinase inhibitor families are among the first and most extensively characterized plant PIs. Many insects and phytopathogenic microorganisms use intracellular and extracellular serine proteases playing important roles in pathogenesis. Plants, however, are able to fight these pathogens through the activation of an intricate defence system that leads to the accumulation of various PIs, including Pin1 and Pin2. Several transgenic plants over-expressing members of the Pin1 and Pin2 families have been obtained in the last twenty years and their enhanced defensive capabilities demonstrated against insects, fungi and bacteria. Furthermore, Pin1 and Pin2 genetically engineered plants showed altered regulation of different plant physiological processes (e.g., dehydratation response, programmed cell death, plant growth, trichome density and branching), supporting an endogenous role in various plant species in addition to the well established defensive one. This review summarizes the current knowledge about Pin1 and Pin2 structure, the role of these proteins in plant defence and physiology, and their potential exploitation in biotechnology. PMID:21418020

  15. Ellagic acid and polyhydroxylated urolithins are potent catalytic inhibitors of human topoisomerase II: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Furlanetto, Valentina; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Pasquale, Riccardo; Moro, Stefano; Gatto, Barbara

    2012-09-12

    Ellagic acid (EA), a natural polyphenol abundant in fruits and common in our diet, is under intense investigation for its chemopreventive activity resulting from multiple effects. EA inhibits topoisomerase II, but the effects on the human enzyme of urolithins, its monolactone metabolites, are not known. Therefore, the action of several synthetic urolithins toward topoisomerases II was evaluated, showing that polyhydroxylated urolithins, EA, and EA-related compounds are potent inhibitors of the α and β isoforms of human topoisomerase II at submicromolar concentrations. Competition tests demonstrate a dose-dependent relationship between ATP and the inhibition of the enzyme. Docking experiments show that the active compounds bind the ATP pocket of the human enzyme, thus supporting the hypothesis that EA and polyhydroxylated urolithins act as ATP-competitive inhibitors of human topoisomerase II.

  16. Salicylate, a catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase II, inhibits DNA cleavage and is selective for the α isoform.

    PubMed

    Bau, Jason T; Kang, Zhili; Austin, Caroline A; Kurz, Ebba U

    2014-02-01

    Topoisomerase II (topo II) is a ubiquitous enzyme that is essential for cell survival through its role in regulating DNA topology and chromatid separation. Topo II can be poisoned by common chemotherapeutics (such as doxorubicin and etoposide), leading to the accumulation of cytotoxic enzyme-linked DNA double-stranded breaks. In contrast, nonbreak-inducing topo II catalytic inhibitors have also been described and have more limited use in clinical chemotherapy. These agents, however, may alter the efficacy of regimens incorporating topo II poisons. We previously identified salicylate, the primary metabolite of aspirin, as a novel catalytic inhibitor of topo II. We have now determined the mechanism by which salicylate inhibits topo II. As catalytic inhibitors can act at a number of steps in the topo II catalytic cycle, we used multiple independent, biochemical approaches to interrogate the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, as mammalian cells express two isoforms of topo II (α and β), we examined whether salicylate was isoform selective. Our results demonstrate that salicylate is unable to intercalate DNA, and does not prevent enzyme-DNA interaction, nor does it promote stabilization of topo IIα in closed clamps on DNA. Although salicylate decreased topo IIα ATPase activity in a dose-dependent noncompetitive manner, this was secondary to salicylate-mediated inhibition of DNA cleavage. Surprisingly, comparison of salicylate's effects using purified human topo IIα and topo IIβ revealed that salicylate selectively inhibits the α isoform. These findings provide a definitive mechanism for salicylate-mediated inhibition of topo IIα and provide support for further studies determining the basis for its isoform selectivity. PMID:24220011

  17. Recent advances in inhibitors of bacterial fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) system enzymes as potential antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ma, Shutao

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial infections are a constant and serious threat to human health. With the increase of multidrug resistance of clinically pathogenic bacteria, common antibiotic therapies have been less effective. Fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) system enzymes are essential for bacterial membrane lipid biosynthesis and represent increasingly promising targets for the discovery of antibacterial agents with new mechanisms of action. This review highlights recent advances in inhibitors of bacterial FASII as potential antibacterial agents, paying special attention to the activities, mechanisms, and structure-activity relationships of those inhibitors that mainly target β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase, β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase, and enoyl-ACP reductase. Although inhibitors with low nanomolar and selective activity against various bacterial FASII have entered clinical trials, further research is needed to expand upon both available and yet unknown scaffolds to identify new FASII inhibitors that may have antibacterial potential, particularly against resistant bacterial strains.

  18. Effects of treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor in tumors based on 15 phase II clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Lu, Mingjie; Yao, Mengqian; Zhu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp)90 serves as a chaperone protein that promotes the proper folding of proteins involved in a variety of signal transduction processes involved in cell growth. Hsp90 inhibitors, which inhibit the activity of critical client proteins, have emerged as the accessory therapeutic agents for multiple human cancer types. To better understand the effects of Hsp90 inhibitors in cancer treatment, the present study reviewed 15 published phase II clinical trials to investigate whether Hsp90 inhibitors will benefit patients with cancer. Information of complete response, partial response, stable disease, objective response and objective response rate was collected to evaluate clinical outcomes. Overall, Hsp90 inhibitors are effective against a variety of oncogene-addicted cancers, including those that have developed resistance to specific receptors.

  19. Rational design of urea-based glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors as versatile tools for specific drug targeting and delivery.

    PubMed

    Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Bařinková, Jitka; Pachl, Petr; Poštová-Slavětínská, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), also known as prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is an established prostate cancer marker and is considered a promising target for specific anticancer drug delivery. Low-molecular-weight inhibitors of GCPII are advantageous specific ligands for this purpose. However, they must be modified with a linker to enable connection of the ligand with an imaging molecule, anticancer drug, and/or nanocarrier. Here, we describe a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of GCPII inhibitors with linkers suitable for imaging and drug delivery. Structure-assisted inhibitor design and targeting of a specific GCPII exosite resulted in a 7-fold improvement in Ki value compared to the parent structure. X-ray structural analysis of the inhibitor series led to the identification of several inhibitor binding modes. We also optimized the length of the inhibitor linker for effective attachment to a biotin-binding molecule and showed that the optimized inhibitor could be used to target nanoparticles to cells expressing GCPII. PMID:24954515

  20. Rational design of urea-based glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors as versatile tools for specific drug targeting and delivery.

    PubMed

    Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Bařinková, Jitka; Pachl, Petr; Poštová-Slavětínská, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), also known as prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is an established prostate cancer marker and is considered a promising target for specific anticancer drug delivery. Low-molecular-weight inhibitors of GCPII are advantageous specific ligands for this purpose. However, they must be modified with a linker to enable connection of the ligand with an imaging molecule, anticancer drug, and/or nanocarrier. Here, we describe a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of GCPII inhibitors with linkers suitable for imaging and drug delivery. Structure-assisted inhibitor design and targeting of a specific GCPII exosite resulted in a 7-fold improvement in Ki value compared to the parent structure. X-ray structural analysis of the inhibitor series led to the identification of several inhibitor binding modes. We also optimized the length of the inhibitor linker for effective attachment to a biotin-binding molecule and showed that the optimized inhibitor could be used to target nanoparticles to cells expressing GCPII.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression.

    PubMed

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S

    2014-10-30

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, (18)F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [(18)F]-18 and [(18)F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  3. Virtual screening filters for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase inhibitors: a fragment based library generation approach.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we introduce the development and application of a three-step scoring and filtering procedure for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase leads using allosteric fragments extracted from virtual screening hits. The design of the virtual screening filters is based on a thorough evaluation of docking methods, DFG-loop conformation, binding interactions and chemotype specificity of the 138 p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from Protein Data Bank bound to DFG-in and DFG-out conformations using Glide, GOLD and CDOCKER. A 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation with the apo, type I with DFG-in and type II with DFG-out forms was carried out to delineate the effects of structural variations on inhibitor binding. The designed docking-score and sub-structure filters were first tested on a dataset of 249 potent p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from seven diverse series and 18,842 kinase inhibitors from PDB, to gauge their capacity to discriminate between kinase and non-kinase inhibitors and likewise to selectively filter-in target-specific inhibitors. The designed filters were then applied in the virtual screening of a database of ten million (10⁷) compounds resulting in the identification of 100 hits. Based on their binding modes, 98 allosteric fragments were extracted from the hits and a fragment library was generated. New type II p38 MAP kinase leads were designed by tailoring the existing type I ATP site binders with allosteric fragments using a common urea linker. Target specific virtual screening filters can thus be easily developed for other kinases based on this strategy to retrieve target selective compounds. PMID:22306417

  4. Effect of the topoisomerase-II inhibitor etoposide on meiotic recombination in male mice.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Hack, A M; Ashley, T

    2000-01-24

    Unlike other chemicals that have been tested in mammalian germ cells, the type-II topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide exhibits significant mutagenicity in primary spermatocytes. Because this is the cell stage during which meiotic recombination normally occurs, and because topoisomerases play a role in recombination, we studied the effect of etoposide on crossing-over in male mice. Exposure to those meiotic prophase stages (probably early to mid-pachytene) during which specific-locus deletion mutations can be induced resulted in decreased crossing-over in the p-Tyr(c) interval of mouse chromosome 7. Accompanying cytological studies with fluorescent antibodies indicated that while there was no detectable effect on the number of recombination nodules (MLH1 foci), there were marked changes in the stage of appearance and localization of RAD51 and RPA proteins. These temporal and spatial protein patterns suggest the formation of multiple lesions in the DNA after MLH1 has already disappeared from spermatocytes. Since etoposide blocks religation of the cut made by type II topoisomerases, repair of DNA damage may result in rejoining of the original DNA strands, undoing the reciprocal exchange that had already occurred and resulting in reduced crossing-over despite a normal frequency of MLH1 foci. Crossing-over could conceivably be affected differentially in different chromosomal regions. If, however, the predominant action of etoposide is to decrease homologous meiotic recombination, the chemical could be expected to increase nondisjunction, an event associated with human genetic risk. Three periods in spermatogenesis respond to etoposide in different ways. Exposure of (a) late differentiating spermatogonia (and, possibly, preleptotene spermatocytes) results in cell death; (b) early- to mid-pachytene induces specific-locus deletions and crossover reduction; and, (c) late pachytene-through-diakinesis leads to genetically unbalanced conceptuses as a result of clastogenic damage.

  5. Phase II Trial of Talampanel, a Glutamate Receptor Inhibitor, for Adults with Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Kreisl, Teri N.; Kim, Lyndon; Duic, J. Paul; Butman, John A.; Albert, Paul S.; Fine, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glioma cells secrete glutamate and also express AMPA glutamate receptors, which contribute to proliferation, migration and neurotoxicity of malignant gliomas. Talampanel is an oral AMPA receptor inhibitor with excellent CNS penetration and good tolerability in clinical trials for epilepsy and other neurological disorders. Methods: We conducted a phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy of talampanel in patients with recurrent malignant glioma as measured by 6-month progression free survival (PFS6). Results: Thirty patients (22 glioblastomas [GBM], 8 anaplastic gliomas [AG]; 63% men) with median age of 51 years (range, 20 to 67) and median KPS of 80 were included. Patients tolerated treatment well and most adverse events were mild and reversible; the most common toxicities were fatigue (27%), dizziness (23%) and ataxia (17%). There was only one partial response (5%) in the GBM stratum and none among AG patients. With a median follow-up of 13 months, 28 patients (93%) had died. The PFS6 was 4.6% for the initial 22 GBM patients and the study was terminated early due to treatment futility; PFS6 was 0% for 8 AG patients. Median PFS was 5.9 weeks for GBM and 8.9 weeks for AG patients. Median overall survival was 13 weeks for GBM and 14 months for AG patients. Conclusion: Talampanel was well tolerated but had no significant activity as a single agent in unselected recurrent malignant gliomas. PMID:20143438

  6. DFGmodel: Predicting Protein Kinase Structures in Inactive States for Structure-Based Discovery of Type-II Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases exist in equilibrium of active and inactive states, in which the aspartate-phenylalanine-glycine motif in the catalytic domain undergoes conformational changes that are required for function. Drugs targeting protein kinases typically bind the primary ATP-binding site of an active state (type-I inhibitors) or utilize an allosteric pocket adjacent to the ATP-binding site in the inactive state (type-II inhibitors). Limited crystallographic data of protein kinases in the inactive state hampers the application of rational drug discovery methods for developing type-II inhibitors. Here, we present a computational approach to generate structural models of protein kinases in the inactive conformation. We first perform a comprehensive analysis of all protein kinase structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. We then develop DFGmodel, a method that takes either a known structure of a kinase in the active conformation or a sequence of a kinase without a structure, to generate kinase models in the inactive conformation. Evaluation of DFGmodel’s performance using various measures indicates that the inactive kinase models are accurate, exhibiting RMSD of 1.5 Å or lower. The kinase models also accurately distinguish type-II kinase inhibitors from likely nonbinders (AUC > 0.70), suggesting that they are useful for virtual screening. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our approach with three case studies. For example, the models are able to capture inhibitors with unintended off-target activity. Our computational approach provides a structural framework for chemical biologists to characterize kinases in the inactive state and to explore new chemical spaces with structure-based drug design. PMID:25420233

  7. Activity of the type II JAK2 inhibitor CHZ868 in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Li, Loretta S.; Kopp, Nadja; Montero, Joan; Chapuy, Bjoern; Yoda, Akinori; Christie, Amanda L.; Liu, Huiyun; Christodoulou, Alexandra; van Bodegom, Diederik; van der Zwet, Jordy; Layer, Jacob V.; Tivey, Trevor; Lane, Andrew A.; Ryan, Jeremy A.; Ng, Samuel Y.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Stone, Richard M.; Steensma, David; Wadleigh, Martha; Harris, Marian; Mandon, Emeline; Ebel, Nicolas; Andraos, Rita; Romanet, Vincent; Dölemeyer, Arno; Sterker, Dario; Zender, Michael; Rodig, Scott J.; Murakami, Masato; Hofmann, Francesco; Kuo, Frank; Eck, Michael J.; Silverman, Lewis B.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Letai, Anthony; Baffert, Fabienne; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Radimerski, Thomas; Gaul, Christoph; Weinstock, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A variety of cancers depend on JAK2 signaling, including the high-risk subset of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs) with CRLF2 rearrangements. Type I JAK2 inhibitors induce paradoxical JAK2 hyperphosphorylation in these leukemias and have limited activity. To improve the efficacy of JAK2 inhibition in B-ALL, we developed the type II inhibitor CHZ868, which stabilizes JAK2 in an inactive conformation. CHZ868 potently suppressed the growth of CRLF2-rearranged human B-ALL cells, abrogated JAK2 signaling, and improved survival in mice with human or murine B-ALL. CHZ868 and dexamethasone synergistically induced apoptosis in JAK2-dependent B-ALLs and further improved in vivo survival compared to CHZ868 alone. These data support the testing of type II JAK2 inhibition in patients with JAK2-dependent leukemias and other disorders. PMID:26175414

  8. Palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of neutral [N2O2] donor Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde: Synthesis, characterization, fluorescence and corrosion inhibitors of ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Omyma A. M.

    2014-11-01

    Metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde and 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylendiamine (L1) or 4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylendiamine (L2) have been reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis. The complexes are found to have the formulae [PdL1-2]Cl2 and [ZnL1-2](AcO)2·H2O. The molar conductance data reveal that Pd(II) and Zn(II) chelates are ionic in nature and are of the type 2:1 electrolytes. The spectral data are consistent with a square planar and tetrahedral geometry around Pd(II) and Zn(II), respectively, in which the ligands act as tetradentate ligands. The thermal behavior of some chelates is studied and the activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern method. The corrosion inhibition of stainless steel types 410 and 304 in 1 M HCl using the synthesized Schiff bases as inhibitors have been studied by weight loss method. The obtained data considered these ligands as efficient corrosion inhibitors. The ligands and their metal complexes exhibited considerable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcusaureus, and Escherichiacoli and antifungal activity against Candida albicans.

  9. Palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of neutral [N2O2] donor Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde: synthesis, characterization, fluorescence and corrosion inhibitors of ligands.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omyma A M

    2014-11-11

    Metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde and 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylendiamine (L1) or 4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylendiamine (L2) have been reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis. The complexes are found to have the formulae [PdL1-2]Cl2 and [ZnL1-2](AcO)2·H2O. The molar conductance data reveal that Pd(II) and Zn(II) chelates are ionic in nature and are of the type 2:1 electrolytes. The spectral data are consistent with a square planar and tetrahedral geometry around Pd(II) and Zn(II), respectively, in which the ligands act as tetradentate ligands. The thermal behavior of some chelates is studied and the activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern method. The corrosion inhibition of stainless steel types 410 and 304 in 1 M HCl using the synthesized Schiff bases as inhibitors have been studied by weight loss method. The obtained data considered these ligands as efficient corrosion inhibitors. The ligands and their metal complexes exhibited considerable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcusaureus, and Escherichiacoli and antifungal activity against Candida albicans. PMID:24858346

  10. Palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of neutral [N2O2] donor Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde: synthesis, characterization, fluorescence and corrosion inhibitors of ligands.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omyma A M

    2014-11-11

    Metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde and 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylendiamine (L1) or 4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylendiamine (L2) have been reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis. The complexes are found to have the formulae [PdL1-2]Cl2 and [ZnL1-2](AcO)2·H2O. The molar conductance data reveal that Pd(II) and Zn(II) chelates are ionic in nature and are of the type 2:1 electrolytes. The spectral data are consistent with a square planar and tetrahedral geometry around Pd(II) and Zn(II), respectively, in which the ligands act as tetradentate ligands. The thermal behavior of some chelates is studied and the activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern method. The corrosion inhibition of stainless steel types 410 and 304 in 1 M HCl using the synthesized Schiff bases as inhibitors have been studied by weight loss method. The obtained data considered these ligands as efficient corrosion inhibitors. The ligands and their metal complexes exhibited considerable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcusaureus, and Escherichiacoli and antifungal activity against Candida albicans.

  11. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Can Enhance Baculovirus-Mediated Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells through the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Kun; Lin, Jhe-Jhih; Chen, Chung-Yung; Kuo, Szu-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Tzong Yuan

    2016-01-01

    BacMam is an insect-derived recombinant baculovirus that can deliver genes into mammalian cells. BacMam vectors carrying target genes are able to enter a variety of cell lines by endocytosis, but the level of expression of the transgene depends on the cell line and the state of the transduced cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the DNA damage response (DDR) could act as an alternative pathway to boost the transgene(s) expression by BacMam and be comparable to the inhibitors of histone deacetylase. Topoisomerase II (Top II) inhibitor-induced DDR can enhance the CMV-IE/enhancer mediated gene expression up to 12-fold in BacMam-transduced U-2OS cells. The combination of a Top II inhibitor, VM-26, can also augment the killing efficiency of a p53-expressing BacMam vector in U-2OS osteosarcoma cells. These results open a new avenue to facilitate the application of BacMam for gene delivery and therapy. PMID:27314325

  12. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of the topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor fostriecin

    PubMed Central

    Jong, R S de; Mulder, N H; Uges, D R A; Sleijfer, D Th; Höppener, F J P; Groen, H J M; Willemse, P H B; Graaf, W T A van der; Vries, E G E de

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a phase I and pharmacokinetic study of the topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor fostriecin. Fostriecin was administered intravenously over 60 min on days 1–5 at 4-week intervals. Dose was escalated from 2 mg m−2day−1to 20 mg m−2day−1in 20 patients. Drug pharmacokinetics was analysed with high performance liquid chromatography with UV-detection. Plasma collected during drug administration was tested in vitro for growth inhibition of a teniposide-resistant small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line. The predominant toxicities were elevated liver transaminases (maximum common toxicity criteria (CTC) grade 4) and serum creatinine (maximum CTC grade 2). These showed only a limited increase with increasing doses, often recovered during drug administration and were fully reversible. Duration of elevated alanine–amino transferase (ALT) was dose-limiting in one patient at 20 mg m−2. Other frequent toxicities were grade 1–2 nausea/vomiting, fever and mild fatigue. Mean fostriecin plasma half-life was 0.36 h (initial; 95% CI, 0–0.76 h) and 1.51 h (terminal; 95% CI, 0.41–2.61 h). A metabolite, most probably dephosphorylated fostriecin, was detected in plasma and urine. No tumour responses were observed, but the plasma concentrations reached in the patients were insufficient to induce significant growth inhibition in vitro. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) has not been reached, because drug supply was stopped at the 20 mg m−2dose level. However, further escalation seems possible and is warranted to achieve potentially effective drug levels. Fostriecin has a short plasma half-life and longer duration of infusion should be considered. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10070885

  13. Debate: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers--a gap in evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Ball, Stephen G; White, William B

    2003-05-22

    In this article, 2 leading physicians debate the strength of outcome data on the efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for reducing the incidence of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renovascular events. Dr. Stephen G. Ball notes that the efficacy of ACE inhibitors for reducing the risk for myocardial infarction independent of their effects on blood pressure is controversial. In the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) study, ramipril treatment in high-risk patients was associated with a 20% reduction in the risk for myocardial infarction; mean reduction in blood pressure was 3 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and 1 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure. The HOPE investigators propose that the 20% reduction was much greater than would be expected based on the observed blood pressure reduction. However, a meta-regression analysis of blood pressure reduction in >20 antihypertensive therapy outcome trials found that the reduction in myocardial infarction risk with ramipril observed in HOPE was consistent with the modest blood pressure reduction seen with that agent. Nevertheless, there are convincing data for prevention of myocardial infarction with ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure, including those with heart failure after myocardial infarction, as well as supportive evidence from studies in patients with diabetes mellitus and concomitant hypertension. On the other hand, Dr. William B. White takes the position that ARBs are well-tolerated antihypertensive agents that specifically antagonize the angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor and provide a more complete block of the pathologic effects of angiotensin II-which are mediated via the AT(1) receptor-than ACE inhibitors. The Evaluation of Losartan in the Elderly (ELITE) II study and the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial (ValHeFT) suggest that ARBs reduce the risk for mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. The Losartan

  14. Debate: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers--a gap in evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Ball, Stephen G; White, William B

    2003-05-22

    In this article, 2 leading physicians debate the strength of outcome data on the efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for reducing the incidence of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renovascular events. Dr. Stephen G. Ball notes that the efficacy of ACE inhibitors for reducing the risk for myocardial infarction independent of their effects on blood pressure is controversial. In the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) study, ramipril treatment in high-risk patients was associated with a 20% reduction in the risk for myocardial infarction; mean reduction in blood pressure was 3 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and 1 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure. The HOPE investigators propose that the 20% reduction was much greater than would be expected based on the observed blood pressure reduction. However, a meta-regression analysis of blood pressure reduction in >20 antihypertensive therapy outcome trials found that the reduction in myocardial infarction risk with ramipril observed in HOPE was consistent with the modest blood pressure reduction seen with that agent. Nevertheless, there are convincing data for prevention of myocardial infarction with ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure, including those with heart failure after myocardial infarction, as well as supportive evidence from studies in patients with diabetes mellitus and concomitant hypertension. On the other hand, Dr. William B. White takes the position that ARBs are well-tolerated antihypertensive agents that specifically antagonize the angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor and provide a more complete block of the pathologic effects of angiotensin II-which are mediated via the AT(1) receptor-than ACE inhibitors. The Evaluation of Losartan in the Elderly (ELITE) II study and the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial (ValHeFT) suggest that ARBs reduce the risk for mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. The Losartan

  15. Solution structure of the squash trypsin inhibitor MCoTI-II. A new family for cyclic knottins.

    PubMed

    Heitz, A; Hernandez, J F; Gagnon, J; Hong, T T; Pham, T T; Nguyen, T M; Le-Nguyen, D; Chiche, L

    2001-07-10

    The "knottin" fold is a stable cysteine-rich scaffold, in which one disulfide crosses the macrocycle made by two other disulfides and the connecting backbone segments. This scaffold is found in several protein families with no evolutionary relationships. In the past few years, several homologous peptides from the Rubiaceae and Violaceae families were shown to define a new structural family based on macrocyclic knottin fold. We recently isolated from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds the first known macrocyclic squash trypsin inhibitors. These compounds are the first members of a new family of cyclic knottins. In this paper, we present NMR structural studies of one of them, MCoTI-II, and of a beta-Asp rearranged form, MCoTI-IIb. Both compounds display similar and well-defined conformations. These cyclic squash inhibitors share a similar conformation with noncyclic squash inhibitors such as CPTI-II, and it is postulated that the main effect of the cyclization is a reduced sensitivity to exo-proteases. On the contrary, clear differences were detected with the three-dimensional structures of other known cyclic knottins, i.e., kalata B1 or circulin A. The two-disulfide cystine-stabilized beta-sheet motif [Heitz et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 10615-10625] is conserved in the two families, whereas in the C-to-N linker, one disulfide bridge and one loop are differently located. The molecular surface of MCoTI-II is almost entirely charged in contrast to circulin A that displays a well-marked amphiphilic character. These differences might explain why the isolated macrocyclic squash inhibitors from M. cochinchinensis display no significant antibacterial activity, whereas circulins and kalata B1 do. PMID:11434766

  16. Solution structure of the squash trypsin inhibitor MCoTI-II. A new family for cyclic knottins.

    PubMed

    Heitz, A; Hernandez, J F; Gagnon, J; Hong, T T; Pham, T T; Nguyen, T M; Le-Nguyen, D; Chiche, L

    2001-07-10

    The "knottin" fold is a stable cysteine-rich scaffold, in which one disulfide crosses the macrocycle made by two other disulfides and the connecting backbone segments. This scaffold is found in several protein families with no evolutionary relationships. In the past few years, several homologous peptides from the Rubiaceae and Violaceae families were shown to define a new structural family based on macrocyclic knottin fold. We recently isolated from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds the first known macrocyclic squash trypsin inhibitors. These compounds are the first members of a new family of cyclic knottins. In this paper, we present NMR structural studies of one of them, MCoTI-II, and of a beta-Asp rearranged form, MCoTI-IIb. Both compounds display similar and well-defined conformations. These cyclic squash inhibitors share a similar conformation with noncyclic squash inhibitors such as CPTI-II, and it is postulated that the main effect of the cyclization is a reduced sensitivity to exo-proteases. On the contrary, clear differences were detected with the three-dimensional structures of other known cyclic knottins, i.e., kalata B1 or circulin A. The two-disulfide cystine-stabilized beta-sheet motif [Heitz et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 10615-10625] is conserved in the two families, whereas in the C-to-N linker, one disulfide bridge and one loop are differently located. The molecular surface of MCoTI-II is almost entirely charged in contrast to circulin A that displays a well-marked amphiphilic character. These differences might explain why the isolated macrocyclic squash inhibitors from M. cochinchinensis display no significant antibacterial activity, whereas circulins and kalata B1 do.

  17. Discovery and optimization of indole and 7-azaindoles as Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors (part-II).

    PubMed

    Sessions, E Hampton; Chowdhury, Sarwat; Yin, Yan; Pocas, Jennifer R; Grant, Wayne; Schröter, Thomas; Lin, Li; Ruiz, Claudia; Cameron, Michael D; LoGrasso, Philip; Bannister, Thomas D; Feng, Yangbo

    2011-12-01

    Therapeutic interventions with Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors may effectively treat several disorders such as hypertension, stroke, cancer, and glaucoma. Herein we disclose the optimization and biological evaluation of potent novel ROCK inhibitors based on substituted indole and 7-azaindole core scaffolds. Substitutions on the indole C3 position and on the indole NH and/or amide NH positions all yielded potent and selective ROCK inhibitors (25, 42, and 50). Improvement of aqueous solubility and tailoring of in vitro and in vivo DMPK properties could be achieved through these substitutions.

  18. Screening derivatized peptide libraries for tight binding inhibitors to carbonic anhydrase II by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Cheng, X; Chen, R; Sigal, G B; Bruce, J E; Schwartz, B L; Hofstadler, S A; Anderson, G A; Smith, R D; Whitesides, G M

    1996-05-10

    This paper describes the use of electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to screen two libraries of soluble compounds to search for tight binding inhibitors for carbonic anhydrase II (EC 4.2.1.1). The two libraries, H2NO2SC6H4C(O)NH-AA1-AA2-C(O)NHCH2CH2CO2H where AA1 and AA2 are L-amino acids (library size: 289 compounds) or D-amino acids (256 compounds), were constructed by attaching tripeptides to the carboxyl group of 4-carboxybenzenesulfonamide. Screening of both libraries yielded, as the tightest binding inhibitor, compound 1 (AA1 = AA2 = L-Leu; binding constant Kb = 1.4 x 10(8) M-1). The ability of ESI-MS to estimate simultaneously the relative binding affinities of a protein to soluble ligands in a library, if general, should be useful in drug development. PMID:8642553

  19. Quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazones and their Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes as topoisomerase IIa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bisceglie, Franco; Musiari, Anastasia; Pinelli, Silvana; Alinovi, Rossella; Menozzi, Ilaria; Polverini, Eugenia; Tarasconi, Pieralberto; Tavone, Matteo; Pelosi, Giorgio

    2015-11-01

    A series of quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazones and their copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes were synthesized and characterized. In all complexes the ligands are in the E configuration with respect to the imino bond and behave as terdentate. The copper(II) complexes form square planar derivatives with one molecule of terdentate ligand and chloride ion. A further non-coordinated chloride ion compensates the overall charge. Nickel(II) ions form instead octahedral complexes with two ligands for each metal ion, independently from the stoichiometric metal:ligand ratio used in the synthesis. Ligands and complexes were tested for their antiproliferative properties on histiocytic lymphoma cell line U937. Copper(II) derivatives are systematically more active than the ligands and the nickel complexes. All copper derivatives result in inhibiting topoisomerase IIa in vitro. Computational methods were used to propose a model to explain the different extent of inhibition presented by these compounds. The positive charge of the dissociated form of the copper complexes may play a key role in their action. PMID:26335598

  20. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of CmPI-II, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from marine snail Cenchritis muricatus.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Alonso-del-Rivero Antigua, Maday; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A protease inhibitor (CmPI-II) (UNIPROT: IPK2_CENMR) from the marine mollusc Cenchritis muricatus, has been isolated and characterized. It is the first member of a new group (group 3) of non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors. CmPI-II is a tight-binding inhibitor of serine proteases: trypsin, human neutrophil elastase (HNE), subtilisin A and pancreatic elastase. This specificity is exceptional in the members of Kazal-type inhibitor family. Several models of three-dimensional structure of CmPI-II have been constructed by homology with other inhibitors of the family but its structure has not yet been solved experimentally. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of CmPI-II as basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified three β-strands β1: residues 14-19, β2: 23-35 and β3: 43-45 and one helix α1: 28-37 arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-α1-β3. These secondary structure elements suggest that CmPI-II adopts the typical scaffold of a Kazal-type inhibitor. PMID:26547437

  1. Using DFT methodology for more reliable predictive models: Design of inhibitors of Golgi α-Mannosidase II.

    PubMed

    Bobovská, Adela; Tvaroška, Igor; Kóňa, Juraj

    2016-05-01

    Human Golgi α-mannosidase II (GMII), a zinc ion co-factor dependent glycoside hydrolase (E.C.3.2.1.114), is a pharmaceutical target for the design of inhibitors with anti-cancer activity. The discovery of an effective inhibitor is complicated by the fact that all known potent inhibitors of GMII are involved in unwanted co-inhibition with lysosomal α-mannosidase (LMan, E.C.3.2.1.24), a relative to GMII. Routine empirical QSAR models for both GMII and LMan did not work with a required accuracy. Therefore, we have developed a fast computational protocol to build predictive models combining interaction energy descriptors from an empirical docking scoring function (Glide-Schrödinger), Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) method, and quantum mechanical density functional theory (QM-DFT) calculations. The QSAR models were built and validated with a library of structurally diverse GMII and LMan inhibitors and non-active compounds. A critical role of QM-DFT descriptors for the more accurate prediction abilities of the models is demonstrated. The predictive ability of the models was significantly improved when going from the empirical docking scoring function to mixed empirical-QM-DFT QSAR models (Q(2)=0.78-0.86 when cross-validation procedures were carried out; and R(2)=0.81-0.83 for a testing set). The average error for the predicted ΔGbind decreased to 0.8-1.1kcalmol(-1). Also, 76-80% of non-active compounds were successfully filtered out from GMII and LMan inhibitors. The QSAR models with the fragmented QM-DFT descriptors may find a useful application in structure-based drug design where pure empirical and force field methods reached their limits and where quantum mechanics effects are critical for ligand-receptor interactions. The optimized models will apply in lead optimization processes for GMII drug developments. PMID:27035259

  2. Copper(II) Ions Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Dynamics in Key Structural Regions That Govern Stability.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Joel C; Trelle, Morten Beck; McClintock, Carlee S; Qureshi, Tihami; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2016-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) regulates the fibrinolysis pathway by inhibiting the protease activity of plasminogen activators. PAI-1 works in concert with vitronectin (VN), an extracellular protein that aids in localization of active PAI-1 to tissues. The Peterson laboratory demonstrated that Cu(II) and other transition metals modulate the stability of PAI-1, exhibiting effects that are dependent on the presence or absence of the somatomedin B (SMB) domain of VN. The study presented here dissects the changes in molecular dynamics underlying the destabilizing effects of Cu(II) on PAI-1. We utilize backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to assess PAI-1 dynamics in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions with and without the SMB domain of VN. We show that Cu(II) produces an increase in dynamics in regions important for the function and overall stability of PAI-1, while the SMB domain elicits virtually the opposite effect. A mutant form of PAI-1 lacking two N-terminal histidine residues at positions 2 and 3 exhibits similar increases in dynamics upon Cu(II) binding compared to that of active wild-type PAI-1, indicating that the observed structural effects are not a result of coordination of Cu(II) to these histidine residues. Finally, addition of Cu(II) results in an acceleration of the local unfolding kinetics of PAI-1 presumed to be on pathway to the latency conversion. The effect of ligands on the dynamics of PAI-1 adds another intriguing dimension to the mechanisms for regulation of PAI-1 stability and function. PMID:27416303

  3. Copper(II) Ions Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Dynamics in Key Structural Regions That Govern Stability.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Joel C; Trelle, Morten Beck; McClintock, Carlee S; Qureshi, Tihami; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2016-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) regulates the fibrinolysis pathway by inhibiting the protease activity of plasminogen activators. PAI-1 works in concert with vitronectin (VN), an extracellular protein that aids in localization of active PAI-1 to tissues. The Peterson laboratory demonstrated that Cu(II) and other transition metals modulate the stability of PAI-1, exhibiting effects that are dependent on the presence or absence of the somatomedin B (SMB) domain of VN. The study presented here dissects the changes in molecular dynamics underlying the destabilizing effects of Cu(II) on PAI-1. We utilize backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to assess PAI-1 dynamics in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions with and without the SMB domain of VN. We show that Cu(II) produces an increase in dynamics in regions important for the function and overall stability of PAI-1, while the SMB domain elicits virtually the opposite effect. A mutant form of PAI-1 lacking two N-terminal histidine residues at positions 2 and 3 exhibits similar increases in dynamics upon Cu(II) binding compared to that of active wild-type PAI-1, indicating that the observed structural effects are not a result of coordination of Cu(II) to these histidine residues. Finally, addition of Cu(II) results in an acceleration of the local unfolding kinetics of PAI-1 presumed to be on pathway to the latency conversion. The effect of ligands on the dynamics of PAI-1 adds another intriguing dimension to the mechanisms for regulation of PAI-1 stability and function.

  4. Structural investigation of inhibitor designs targeting 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase from the shikimate pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Marcio V.B.; Snee, William C.; Bromfield, Karen M.; Payne, Richard J.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Ciulli, Alessio; Howard, Nigel I.; Abell, Chris; Sacchettini, James C.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2011-09-06

    The shikimate pathway is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its absence from humans makes the enzymes of this pathway potential drug targets. In the present paper, we provide structural insights into ligand and inhibitor binding to 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (dehydroquinase) from M. tuberculosis (MtDHQase), the third enzyme of the shikimate pathway. The enzyme has been crystallized in complex with its reaction product, 3-dehydroshikimate, and with six different competitive inhibitors. The inhibitor 2,3-anhydroquinate mimics the flattened enol/enolate reaction intermediate and serves as an anchor molecule for four of the inhibitors investigated. MtDHQase also forms a complex with citrazinic acid, a planar analogue of the reaction product. The structure of MtDHQase in complex with a 2,3-anhydroquinate moiety attached to a biaryl group shows that this group extends to an active-site subpocket inducing significant structural rearrangement. The flexible extensions of inhibitors designed to form {pi}-stacking interactions with the catalytic Tyr{sup 24} have been investigated. The high-resolution crystal structures of the MtDHQase complexes provide structural evidence for the role of the loop residues 19-24 in MtDHQase ligand binding and catalytic mechanism and provide a rationale for the design and efficacy of inhibitors.

  5. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: inhibition of cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozymes II and VII with simple aromatic sulfonamides and some azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Pothen, Blessy; Maresca, Alfonso; Tiwari, Meena; Singh, Vineet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-08-01

    Several substituted benzenesulfonamides were synthesized by various pathways starting from sulfanilamide. The sulfanilamide diazonium salt was reacted with copper (I) halides, potassium iodide and/or aromatic derivatives, leading to 4-halogeno-, and 4-hydroxy-benzenesulfonamides as well as diazo dyes incorporating sulfamoyl moieties. These sulfonamides were assayed as inhibitors of two physiologically relevant isoforms of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), i.e., the cytosolic CA II (ubiquitous), and CA VII (brain-specific enzyme). Good CA inhibitory activity was detected for some of these derivatives, with inhibition constants (Ki) in the range of 17.5-863 nm against CA II; and 30-4200 nm against CA VII. PMID:19549076

  6. Optimization of physicochemical properties and safety profile of novel bacterial topoisomerase type II inhibitors (NBTIs) with activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Reck, Folkert; Ehmann, David E; Dougherty, Thomas J; Newman, Joseph V; Hopkins, Sussie; Stone, Gregory; Agrawal, Nikunj; Ciaccio, Paul; McNulty, John; Barthlow, Herbert; O'Donnell, Jennifer; Goteti, Kosalaram; Breen, John; Comita-Prevoir, Janelle; Cornebise, Mark; Cronin, Mark; Eyermann, Charles J; Geng, Bolin; Carr, Greg R; Pandarinathan, Lakshmipathi; Tang, Xuejun; Cottone, Andrew; Zhao, Liang; Bezdenejnih-Snyder, Natascha

    2014-10-01

    Type II bacterial topoisomerases are well validated targets for antimicrobial chemotherapy. Novel bacterial type II topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) of these targets are of interest for the development of new antibacterial agents that are not impacted by target-mediated cross-resistance with fluoroquinolones. We now disclose the optimization of a class of NBTIs towards Gram-negative pathogens, especially against drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Physicochemical properties (pKa and logD) were optimized for activity against P. aeruginosa and for reduced inhibition of the hERG channel. The optimized analogs 9g and 9i displayed potent antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa, and a significantly improved hERG profile over previously reported analogs. Compound 9g showed an improved QT profile in in vivo models and lower clearance in rat over earlier compounds. The compounds show promise for the development of new antimicrobial agents against drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  7. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumor phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Ham, Hwa-Yong; Kim, Yeon-Ja; Yun, Young-Jin; Kim, Min-Ju; Kwon, Min-Soo; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor microenvironments polarize neutrophils to protumoral phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate that the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumoral phenotype. The ACEis or AGTR1 antagonist enhanced hypersegmentation of human neutrophils and increased neutrophil cytotoxicity against tumor cells. This neutrophil hypersegmentation was dependent on the mTOR pathway. In a murine tumor model, ACEis and AGTR1 antagonist attenuated tumor growth and enhanced neutrophil hypersegmentation. ACEis inhibited tumor-induced polarization of neutrophils to a protumoral phenotype. Neutrophil depletion reduced the antitumor effect of ACEi. Together, these data suggest that the modulation of Ang II pathway attenuates tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils to an antitumoral phenotype. PMID:26942086

  8. Kinetic and in silico studies of hydroxy-based inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I and II.

    PubMed

    Ekhteiari Salmas, Ramin; Mestanoglu, Mert; Durdagi, Serdar; Sentürk, Murat; Kaya, A Afşin; Kaya, Elif Çelenk

    2016-01-01

    A series of hydroxy and phenolic compounds have been assayed for the inhibition of two physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes, the cytosolic human isozymes I and II. The investigated molecules showed inhibition constants in the range of 1.07-4003 and 0.09-31.5 μM at the hCA I and hCA II enzymes, respectively. In order to investigate the binding mechanisms of these inhibitors, in silico studies were also applied. Molecular docking scores of the studied compounds are compared using three different scoring algorithms, namely Glide/SP, Glide/XP and Glide/IFD. In addition, different ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) analysis was performed. All the examined compounds were found within the acceptable range of pharmacokinetic profiles.

  9. Treatment of type I and II hereditary angioedema with Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary and acquired angioedema are of outstanding clinical importance, as edematous attacks associated with these conditions can thrust afflicted patients into mortal danger. Currently, C1 inhibitor concentrate - a human blood product - is available as a replacement therapy. In view of the limited number of donors, as well as the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections, it is a reasonable expectation to develop a therapeutic alternative based on recombinant technology, which would eliminate all these shortcomings. Pharming (Leiden, The Netherlands) has developed Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor, as a proprietary product, which is currently being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials. Ongoing studies conducted within the framework of the development program are almost complete and their interim findings are reassuring. This should facilitate successful regulatory approval in the near future, which is indispensable in order to make Rhucin available for patients with hereditary angioedema or other disorders amenable to C1 inhibitor replacement.

  10. Treatment of type I and II hereditary angioedema with Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary and acquired angioedema are of outstanding clinical importance, as edematous attacks associated with these conditions can thrust afflicted patients into mortal danger. Currently, C1 inhibitor concentrate - a human blood product - is available as a replacement therapy. In view of the limited number of donors, as well as the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections, it is a reasonable expectation to develop a therapeutic alternative based on recombinant technology, which would eliminate all these shortcomings. Pharming (Leiden, The Netherlands) has developed Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor, as a proprietary product, which is currently being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials. Ongoing studies conducted within the framework of the development program are almost complete and their interim findings are reassuring. This should facilitate successful regulatory approval in the near future, which is indispensable in order to make Rhucin available for patients with hereditary angioedema or other disorders amenable to C1 inhibitor replacement. PMID:20477114

  11. PHOTOREGULATION OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY BY PHOTOCROMIC REAGENTS, II. INHIBITORS OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE*†

    PubMed Central

    Bieth, Joseph; Vratsanos, Spyros M.; Wassermann, Norbert; Erlanger, Bernard F.

    1969-01-01

    The enzymic activity of acetylcholinesterase can be photoregulated through the mediation of photochromic inhibitors of the enzyme. N-p-phenylazophenyl-N-phenylcarbamyl fluoride, an irreversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, exists as two geometric isomers which are interconvertible through the action of light. The cis isomer, which predominates after exposure to light of 320 nm, is more active than the trans isomer, which results from exposure to light of 420 nm. It was possible, therefore, to use light energy to regulate the inactivation of the enzyme. Similarly, levels of acetylcholinesterase activity could be photo-regulated in a completely reversible manner by means of the photochromic reversible inhibitor p-phenylazophenyltrimethylammonium chloride. These experiments can serve as models for similar phenomena observed in nature, particularly in photoperiodic rhythms of higher animals. Images PMID:5264140

  12. Metals affect the structure and activity of human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. II. Binding affinity and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lawrence C; Goswami, Sumit; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2011-01-01

    Human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor with a metastable active conformation. The lifespan of the active form of PAI-1 is modulated via interaction with the plasma protein, vitronectin, and various metal ions. These metal ions fall into two categories: Type I metals, including calcium, magnesium, and manganese, stabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, whereas Type II metals, including cobalt, copper, and nickel, destabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, but stabilize PAI-1 in its presence. To provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the unusual modulation of PAI-1 structure and activity, the binding characteristics and conformational effects of these two types of metals were further evaluated. Steady-state binding measurements using surface plasmon resonance indicated that both active and latent PAI-1 exhibit a dissociation constant in the low micromolar range for binding to immobilized nickel. Stopped-flow measurements of approach-to-equilibrium changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence indicated that the Type I and Type II metals bind in different modes that induce distinct conformational effects on PAI-1. Changes in the observed rate constants with varying concentrations of metal allowed accurate determination of binding affinities for cobalt, nickel, and copper, yielding dissociation constants of ∼40, 30, and 0.09 μM, respectively. Competition experiments that tested effects on PAI-1 stability were consistent with these measurements of affinity and indicate that copper binds tightly to PAI-1. PMID:21280128

  13. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Hann, Zachary S; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-11-01

    An ever-increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, zinc(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design of new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins.

  14. Haplofungins, new inositol phosphorylceramide synthase inhibitors, from Lauriomyces bellulus SANK 26899 II. Structure elucidation.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Takashi; Yano, Tatsuya; Takatsu, Toshio

    2009-10-01

    Eight new inositol phosphorylceramide synthase inhibitors: haplofungin A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H, were discovered in a culture broth of the fungus Lauriomyces bellulus SANK 26899. The planar structures for these haplofungins were elucidated by various spectroscopic analyses and a GC/MS analysis of their degradation products. All eight compounds were found to comprise an arabinonic acid moiety linked through an ester bond to a modified long alkyl chain.

  15. Synthesis and discovery of (I-3,II-3)-biacacetin as a novel non-zinc binding inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Nanjan, Pandurangan; Nambiar, Jyotsna; Nair, Bipin G; Banerji, Asoke

    2015-07-01

    Eleven biflavones (7a-b and 9a-i) were synthesised by a simple and efficient protocol and screened for MMP-2 and MMP-9 inhibitory activities. Amongst them, a natural product-like analog, (I-3,II-3)-biacacetin (9h) was found to be the most potent inhibitor. Molecular docking studies suggest that unlike most of the known inhibitors, 9h inhibits MMP-2 and MMP-9 through non-zinc binding interactions.

  16. Identification of tenuazonic acid as a novel type of natural photosystem II inhibitor binding in Q(B)-site of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiguo; Xu, Xiaoming; Dai, Xinbin; Yang, Chunlong; Qiang, Sheng

    2007-04-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA) is a natural phytotoxin produced by Alternaria alternata, the causal agent of brown leaf spot disease of Eupatorium adenophorum. Results from chlorophyll fluorescence revealed TeA can block electron flow from Q(A) to Q(B) at photosystem II acceptor side. Based on studies with D1-mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the No. 256 amino acid plays a key role in TeA binding to the Q(B)-niche. The results of competitive replacement with [(14)C]atrazine combined with JIP-test and D1-mutant showed that TeA should be considered as a new type of photosystem II inhibitor because it has a different binding behavior within Q(B)-niche from other known photosystem II inhibitors. Bioassay of TeA and its analogues indicated 3-acyl-5-alkyltetramic and even tetramic acid compounds may represent a new structural framework for photosynthetic inhibitors.

  17. Effects of VM26, a specific inhibitor of type II DNA topoisomerase, on SV40 chromatin replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, A; Strausfeld, U

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the influence of VM26 (teniposide), a specific inhibitor of mammalian type II DNA topoisomerase, on the replication of SV40 minichromosomes in vitro. The replication system we used consists of replicative intermediate SV40 chromatin as substrate which is converted to mature SV40 chromatin in the presence of ATP, deoxynucleotides and a protein extract from uninfected cells. The addition of 100 microM VM26 to this system reduces DNA synthesis to 70 to 80 percent of the control and leads to an accumulation of 'late replicative intermediates'. The VM26 induced block of replication was not released by the addition of large quantities of type I DNA topoisomerase. We conclude, that type II DNA topoisomerase is essential for the final replication steps leading from late Cairns structures of replicative intermediates to monomeric minichromosomes. It appears that type I DNA topoisomerase can function as a swivelase during most of the replicative elongation phase, but must later be replaced by type II DNA topoisomerase. Images PMID:2848217

  18. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize.

    PubMed

    Lu Y-T; Feldman, L J; Hidaka, H

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants. PMID:11540083

  19. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  20. Discovery of novel VEGFR-2 inhibitors. Part II: biphenyl urea incorporated with salicylaldoxime.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongping; Su, Ping; Shi, Yaling; Shen, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Yanmin; Dong, Jinyun; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-27

    A series of novel VEGFR-2 inhibitors containing oxime as hinge binding fragment were described. A strategy of pseudo six-membered ring formed through intramolecular hydrogen bond was employed to mimic the planar quinazoline. The oxime group was firstly introduced to interact with hinge region of VEGFR-2. Most of compounds tested showed moderate to high VEGFR-2 inhibitory activity. In particular, 12l, 12p and 12y exhibited significant enzymatic inhibitory activity as well as potent antiproliferative activity against cancer cells. Molecular docking suggested that the salicylaldoxime formed two hydrogen bonds with hinge region. These biphenylureas could serve as promising lead compounds for developing novel anticancer agents.

  1. Pharmacotherapy of intraocular pressure - part II. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, prostaglandin analogues and prostamides.

    PubMed

    Costagliola, Ciro; dell'Omo, Roberto; Romano, Mario R; Rinaldi, Michele; Zeppa, Lucia; Parmeggiani, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    The second part of this two part review (please see Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy 10(16)) reports the characteristics of other antiglaucoma medications: systemic (acetazomide) and topical (dorzolamide and brinzolamide) carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, which suppress aqueous humour formation; and prostaglandin analogues (latanoprost and travoprost) and prostamides (bimatoprost), which raise aqueous humour outflow. The pharmacologic properties of each compound and its efficacy in the medical treatment of glaucoma, mainly the primary open-angle form, are discussed briefly, focusing on the clinical evidence supporting their use. PMID:19929706

  2. Antitumor triptycene bisquinones: a novel synthetic class of dual inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase I and II activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Buna; Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Wang, Yang; Tamura, Masafumi; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean-Pierre H

    2003-08-01

    Synthetic triptycene analogs (TT code number) mimic the antitumor effects of daunorubicin in the nanomolar range in vitro, but have the advantage of blocking nucleoside transport and retaining their efficacy in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells. Since TT bisquinones induce poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 cleavage at 6 h and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation at 24 h, which are, respectively, early and late markers of apoptosis, these lead antitumor drugs were tested for their ability to trigger the DNA topoisomerase (Topo) inhibitions responsible for the initial and massive high-molecular-weight cleavage of DNA required for tumor cells to commit apoptosis. Interestingly, antitumor TTs have the unusual ability to inhibit, in a concentration-dependent manner, the relaxation of supercoiled plasmid DNA catalyzed by both purified human Topo I and II enzymes. However, if there is a relationship between the ability of TT analogs to inhibit Topo activities and their quinone functionality and cytotoxicity, it is far from perfect, suggesting that other molecular targets may be involved in the mechanism of action of these antitumor drugs. Moreover, one of the most cytotoxic TT bisquinone, 6-bromo-7-methoxy- or 7-bromo-6-methoxy-2-N-methylamino-1 H,4 H,5 H,8H-9,10-dihydro-9,10-[1',2']benzenoanthracene-1,4,5,8-tetraone (TT24), inhibits Topo II activity more effectively than amsacrine (m-AMSA) and matches the Topo I inhibitory effect of camptothecin (CPT). The dual inhibitory activity of TT24 is substantiated by the findings that TT24 mimics the action of m-AMSA in the Topo II assay, where the Topo I inhibitor CPT is ineffective, and also mimics the action of CPT in the Topo I assay, where the Topo II inhibitor etoposide is ineffective. Because of their ability to target nucleoside transport and topoisomerase activities, synthetic TT bisquinones might represent a novel class of bifunctional drugs valuable to develop new means of polychemotherapy and circumvent MDR. PMID

  3. Perioperative management of patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers: a quality improvement audit.

    PubMed

    Vijay, A; Grover, A; Coulson, T G; Myles, P S

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients continuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers on the day of surgery are more likely to have significant intraoperative hypotension, higher rates of postoperative acute kidney injury, and lower incidences of postoperative atrial fibrillation. However, many of these studies were prone to bias and confounding, and questions remain over the validity of these outcomes. This observational, before-and-after quality improvement audit aimed to assess the effect of withholding these medications on the morning of surgery. We recruited 323 participants, with 83 (26%) having their preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) withheld on the day of surgery. There were only very small Spearman rank-order correlations between time since last dose of these medications (rho -0.12, P=0.057) and intraoperative and recovery room intravenous fluid administration (rho -0.11, P=0.042). There was no statistically significant difference between the continued or withheld groups in vasopressor (metaraminol use 3.5 [1.5-8.3] mg versus 3.5 [1.5-8.5] mg, P=0.67) or intravenous fluid administration (1000 ml [800-1500] ml versus 1000 [800-1500] ml, P=0.096), nor rates of postoperative acute kidney injury (13% vs 18%, P=0.25) or atrial fibrillation (15% versus 18%, P=0.71). This audit found no significant differences in measured outcomes between the continued or withheld ACEi/ARB groups. This finding should be interpreted with caution due to the possibility of confounding and an insufficient sample size. However, as the finding is in contrast to many previous studies, future prospective randomised clinical trials are required to answer this important question.

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibitors activate CIITA and MHC class II antigen expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cycon, Kelly A; Mulvaney, Kathleen; Rimsza, Lisa M; Persky, Daniel; Murphy, Shawn P

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) diagnosed in the USA, consists of at least two distinct subtypes: germinal centre B (GCB) and activated B-cell (ABC). Decreased MHC class II (MHCII) expression on the tumours in both DLBCL subtypes directly correlates with significant decreases in patient survival. One common mechanism accounting for MHCII down-regulation in DLBCL is reduced expression of the MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), the master regulator of MHCII transcription. Furthermore, reduced CIITA expression in ABC DLBCL correlates with the presence of the transcriptional repressor positive regulatory domain-I-binding factor-1 (PRDI-BF1). However, the mechanisms underlying down-regulation of CIITA in GCB DLBCL are currently unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that neither PRDI-BF1 nor CpG hypermethylation at the CIITA promoters are responsible for decreased CIITA in GCB DLBCL. In contrast, histone modifications associated with an open chromatin conformation and active transcription were significantly lower at the CIITA promoters in CIITA− GCB cells compared with CIITA+ B cells, which suggests that epigenetic mechanisms contribute to repression of CIITA transcription. Treatment of CIITA− or CIITAlow GCB cells with several different histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) activated modest CIITA and MHCII expression. However, CIITA and MHCII levels were significantly higher in these cells after exposure to the HDAC-1-specific inhibitor MS-275. These results suggest that CIITA transcription is repressed in GCB DLBCL cells through epigenetic mechanisms involving HDACs, and that HDACi treatment can alleviate repression. These observations may have important implications for patient therapy. PMID:23789844

  5. Perioperative management of patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers: a quality improvement audit.

    PubMed

    Vijay, A; Grover, A; Coulson, T G; Myles, P S

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients continuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers on the day of surgery are more likely to have significant intraoperative hypotension, higher rates of postoperative acute kidney injury, and lower incidences of postoperative atrial fibrillation. However, many of these studies were prone to bias and confounding, and questions remain over the validity of these outcomes. This observational, before-and-after quality improvement audit aimed to assess the effect of withholding these medications on the morning of surgery. We recruited 323 participants, with 83 (26%) having their preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) withheld on the day of surgery. There were only very small Spearman rank-order correlations between time since last dose of these medications (rho -0.12, P=0.057) and intraoperative and recovery room intravenous fluid administration (rho -0.11, P=0.042). There was no statistically significant difference between the continued or withheld groups in vasopressor (metaraminol use 3.5 [1.5-8.3] mg versus 3.5 [1.5-8.5] mg, P=0.67) or intravenous fluid administration (1000 ml [800-1500] ml versus 1000 [800-1500] ml, P=0.096), nor rates of postoperative acute kidney injury (13% vs 18%, P=0.25) or atrial fibrillation (15% versus 18%, P=0.71). This audit found no significant differences in measured outcomes between the continued or withheld ACEi/ARB groups. This finding should be interpreted with caution due to the possibility of confounding and an insufficient sample size. However, as the finding is in contrast to many previous studies, future prospective randomised clinical trials are required to answer this important question. PMID:27246933

  6. Search for novel histone deacetylase inhibitors. Part II: design and synthesis of novel isoferulic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wen; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Tao; Dong, Jinyun; Gao, Hongping; Su, Ping; Shi, Yaling; Zhang, Jie

    2014-05-01

    Previously, we described the discovery of potent ferulic acid-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) with halogeno-acetanilide as novel surface recognition moiety (SRM). In order to improve the affinity and activity of these HDACIs, twenty seven isoferulic acid derivatives were described herein. The majority of title compounds displayed potent HDAC inhibitory activity. In particular, IF5 and IF6 exhibited significant enzymatic inhibitory activities, with IC50 values of 0.73 ± 0.08 and 0.57 ± 0.16 μM, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds showed moderate antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells. Especially, IF6 displayed promising profile as an antitumor candidate with IC50 value of 3.91 ± 0.97 μM against HeLa cells. The results indicated that these isoferulic acid derivatives could serve as promising lead compounds for further optimization. PMID:24702857

  7. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part II. Integrase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Huang, Sylvia; Huang, Philip Lin; Zhang Dawei; Lee, Jae Wook; Bao Ju; Sun Yongtao; Chang, Young-Tae; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul Lee . E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu

    2007-03-23

    We report molecular modeling and functional confirmation of Ole and HT binding to HIV-1 integrase. Docking simulations identified two binding regions for Ole within the integrase active site. Region I encompasses the conserved D64-D116-E152 motif, while region II involves the flexible loop region formed by amino acid residues 140-149. HT, on the other hand, binds to region II. Both Ole and HT exhibit favorable interactions with important amino acid residues through strong H-bonding and van der Waals contacts, predicting integrase inhibition. To test and confirm modeling predictions, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 integrase activities including 3'-processing, strand transfer, and disintegration. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on all three activities, with EC{sub 50}s in the nanomolar range. These studies demonstrate that molecular modeling of target-ligand interaction coupled with structural-activity analysis should facilitate the design and identification of innovative integrase inhibitors and other therapeutics.

  8. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. II. Improvement of oat protoplasts by an inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Kaur-Sawhney, R.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to improve the viability of cereal mesophyll protoplasts by pretreatment of leaves with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific 'suicide' inhibitor of the enzyme (arginine decarboxylase) responsible for their osmotically induced putrescine accumulation. Leaf pretreatment with DFMA before a 6 hour osmotic shock caused a 45% decrease of putrescine and a 2-fold increase of spermine titer. After 136 hours of osmotic stress, putrescine titer in DFMA-pretreated leaves increased by only 50%, but spermidine and spermine titers increased dramatically by 3.2- and 6-fold, respectively. These increases in higher polyamines could account for the reduced chlorophyll loss and enhanced ability of pretreated leaves to incorporate tritiated thymidine, uridine, and leucine into macromolecules. Pretreatment with DFMA significantly improved the overall viability of the protoplasts isolated from these leaves. The results support the view that the osmotically induced rise in putrescine and blockage of its conversion to higher polyamines may contribute to the lack of sustained cell division in cereal mesophyll protoplasts, although other undefined factors must also play a major role.

  9. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. II. Improvement of oat protoplasts by an inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Tiburcio, A F; Kaur-Sawhney, R; Galston, A W

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to improve the viability of cereal mesophyll protoplasts by pretreatment of leaves with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific 'suicide' inhibitor of the enzyme (arginine decarboxylase) responsible for their osmotically induced putrescine accumulation. Leaf pretreatment with DFMA before a 6 hour osmotic shock caused a 45% decrease of putrescine and a 2-fold increase of spermine titer. After 136 hours of osmotic stress, putrescine titer in DFMA-pretreated leaves increased by only 50%, but spermidine and spermine titers increased dramatically by 3.2- and 6-fold, respectively. These increases in higher polyamines could account for the reduced chlorophyll loss and enhanced ability of pretreated leaves to incorporate tritiated thymidine, uridine, and leucine into macromolecules. Pretreatment with DFMA significantly improved the overall viability of the protoplasts isolated from these leaves. The results support the view that the osmotically induced rise in putrescine and blockage of its conversion to higher polyamines may contribute to the lack of sustained cell division in cereal mesophyll protoplasts, although other undefined factors must also play a major role.

  10. The catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor dexrazoxane induces DNA breaks, ATF3 and the DNA damage response in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shiwei; Yan, Tiandong; Nikolova, Teodora; Fuhrmann, Dominik; Nemecek, Andrea; Gödtel-Armbrust, Ute; Kaina, Bernd; Wojnowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor dexrazoxane has been associated not only with improved cancer patient survival but also with secondary malignancies and reduced tumour response. Experimental Approach We investigated the DNA damage response and the role of the activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) accumulation in tumour cells exposed to dexrazoxane. Key Results Dexrazoxane exposure induced topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A)-dependent cell death, γ-H2AX accumulation and increased tail moment in neutral comet assays. Dexrazoxane induced DNA damage responses, shown by enhanced levels of γ-H2AX/53BP1 foci, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ATM and Rad3-related), Chk1 and Chk2 phosphorylation, and by p53 accumulation. Dexrazoxane-induced γ-H2AX accumulation was dependent on ATM. ATF3 protein was induced by dexrazoxane in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, which was abolished in TOP2A-depleted cells and in cells pre-incubated with ATM inhibitor. Knockdown of ATF3 gene expression by siRNA triggered apoptosis in control cells and diminished the p53 protein level in both control and dexrazoxane -treated cells. This was accompanied by increased γ-H2AX accumulation. ATF3 knockdown also delayed the repair of dexrazoxane -induced DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions and Implications As with other TOP2A poisons, dexrazoxane induced DNA double-strand breaks followed by activation of the DNA damage response. The DNA damage-triggered ATF3 controlled p53 accumulation and generation of double-strand breaks and is proposed to serve as a switch between DNA damage and cell death following dexrazoxane treatment. These findings suggest a mechanistic explanation for the diverse clinical observations associated with dexrazoxane. PMID:25521189

  11. Identification of metabolic pathways of brain angiotensin II and III using specific aminopeptidase inhibitors: predominant role of angiotensin III in the control of vasopressin release.

    PubMed Central

    Zini, S; Fournie-Zaluski, M C; Chauvel, E; Roques, B P; Corvol, P; Llorens-Cortes, C

    1996-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II and Ang III are two peptide effectors of the brain renin-angiotensin system that participate in the control of blood pressure and increase water consumption and vasopressin release. In an attempt to delineate the respective roles of these peptides in the regulation of vasopressin secretion, their metabolic pathways and their effects on vasopressin release were identified in vivo. For this purpose, we used recently developed selective inhibitors of aminopeptidase A (APA) and aminopeptidase N (APN), two enzymes that are believed to be responsible for the N-terminal cleavage of Ang II and Ang III, respectively. Mice received [3H]Ang II intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) in the presence or absence of the APN inhibitor, EC33 (3-amino-4-thio-butyl sulfonate) of the APN inhibitor, EC27 (2-amino-pentan-1,5-dithiol). [3H]Ang II and [3H]Ang III levels were evaluated from hypothalamus homogenates by HPLC. EC33 increased the half-life of [3H]Ang II 2.6-fold and completely blocked the formation of [3H]Ang III, whereas EC27 increased the half-life of [3H]Ang III 2.3-fold. In addition, the effects of EC33 and EC27 on Ang-induced vasopressin release were studied in mice. Ang II was injected i.c.v. in the presence or absence of EC33, and plasma vasopressin levels were estimated by RIA. While vasopressin levels were increased 2-fold by Ang II (5 ng), EC33 inhibited Ang II-induced vasopressin release in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, EC27 injected alone increased in a dose-dependent manner vasopressin levels. The EC27-induced vasopressin release was completely blocked by the coadministration of the Ang receptor antagonist (Sar1-Ala8) Ang II. These results demonstrate for the first time that (i) APA and APN are involved in vivo in the metabolism of brain Ang II and Ang III, respectively, and that (ii) the action of Ang II on vasopressin release depends upon the prior conversion of Ang II to Ang III. This shows that Ang III behaves as one of the main

  12. Clinical modulation of doxorubicin resistance by the calmodulin-inhibitor, trifluoperazine: a phase I/II trial.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Bukowski, R M; Budd, G T; Purvis, J; Weick, J K; Shepard, K; Midha, K K; Ganapathi, R

    1988-05-01

    Drug resistance to chemotherapy agents such as doxorubicin appears to be an important cause of therapeutic failure in cancer treatment. Based on preclinical information demonstrating that the phenothiazine calmodulin-inhibitor trifluoperazine can enhance retention and cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in resistant cells, a phase I/II trial of the combination was performed to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of trifluoperazine that could be administered with doxorubicin. Patients with intrinsic (no previous response) and acquired (previous response with relapse) doxorubicin resistance were eligible. Doxorubicin was administered as a 96-hour continuous infusion (60 mg/m2) on days 2 through 5. Trifluoperazine was administered in divided doses orally on days 1 through 6, with dose escalation from 20 to 100 mg/d. Thirty-six patients were evaluable. The MTD of trifluoperazine was 60 mg/d, with dose-limiting toxicity being extrapyramidal side effects. No alteration of doxorubicin toxicity was observed. Seven of the 36 patients responded (one complete response [CR], six partial responses [PR]), with seven of 21 patients having acquired resistance, and zero of 15 with intrinsic resistance demonstrating responses. Doxorubicin plasma levels were not affected by trifluoperazine, and the maximal trifluoperazine plasma levels achieved were 129.83 ng/mL. This trial demonstrates the combination of trifluoperazine and doxorubicin is well tolerated, and the schedule recommended for phase II trials is doxorubicin, 60 mg/m2 (continuous infusion) days 2 through 5, and trifluoperazine, 15 mg four times per day orally days 1 through 6. Continued investigation of this combination is indicated for patients with acquired doxorubicin resistance.

  13. Conformation and recognition of DNA damaged by antitumor cis-dichlorido platinum(II) complex of CDK inhibitor bohemine.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Olga; Liskova, Barbora; Vystrcilova, Jana; Suchankova, Tereza; Vrana, Oldrich; Starha, Pavel; Travnicek, Zdenek; Brabec, Viktor

    2014-05-01

    A substitution of the ammine ligands of cisplatin, cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2], for cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor bohemine (boh), [2-(3-hydroxypropylamino)-6-benzylamino-9-isopropylpurine], results in a compound, cis-[Pt(boh)2Cl2] (C1), with the unique anticancer profile which may be associated with some features of the damaged DNA and/or its cellular processing (Travnicek Z et al. (2003) J Inorg Biochem94, 307-316; Liskova B (2012) Chem Res Toxicol25, 500-509). A combination of biochemical and molecular biology techniques was used to establish mechanistic differences between cisplatin and C1 with respect to the DNA damage they produce and their interactions with critical DNA-binding proteins, DNA-processing enzymes and glutathione. The results show that replacement of the NH3 groups in cisplatin by bohemine modulates some aspects of the mechanism of action of C1. More specifically, the results of the present work are consistent with the thesis that, in comparison with cisplatin, effects of other factors, such as: (i) slower rate of initial binding of C1 to DNA; (ii) the lower efficiency of C1 to form bifunctional adducts; (iii) the reduced bend of longitudinal DNA axis induced by the major 1,2-GG intrastrand cross-link of C1; (iv) the reduced affinity of HMG domain proteins to the major adduct of C1; (v) the enhanced efficiency of the DNA adducts of C1 to block DNA polymerization and to inhibit transcription activity of human RNA pol II and RNA transcription; (vi) slower rate of the reaction of C1 with glutathione, may partially contribute to the unique activity of C1. PMID:24675180

  14. An optimized micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on the molybdenum blue method and its application in screening natural product inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Kou, Jun-Ping; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-06-01

    Myosin II plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological functions through its ATPase activity. The present study was designed to optimize a micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on molybdenum blue method, using a known myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blebbistatin. Several parameters were observed in the enzymatic reaction procedure, including the concentrations of the substrate (ATP) and calcium chloride, pH, and the reaction and incubation times. The proportion of coloration agent was also investigated. The sensitivity of this assay was compared with the malachite green method and bioluminescence method. Additionally, 20 natural compounds were studied for myosin II ATPase inhibitory activity using the optimized method. Our results showed that ATP at the concentration of 5 mmol·L(-1) and ammonium molybdate : stannous chloride at the ratio of 15 : 1 could greatly improve the sensitivity of this method. The IC50 of blebbistatin obtained by this method was consistent with literature. Compound 8 was screened with inhibitory activity on myosin II ATPase. The optimized method showed similar accuracy, lower detecting limit, and wider linear range, which could be a promising approach to screening myosin II ATPase inhibitors in vitro. PMID:27473959

  15. Growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, on potato plants expressing the oryzacystatin II proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cingel, Aleksandar; Savić, Jelena; Vinterhalter, Branka; Vinterhalter, Dragan; Kostić, Miroslav; Jovanović, Darka Šešlija; Smigocki, Ann; Ninković, Slavica

    2015-08-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. PI oryzacystatin II (OCII), isolated from rice, showed potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate the applicability of the OCII gene in enhancing plant defence, OCII-transformed potatoes were bioassayed for resistance to Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). Feeding on transformed leaves of potato cultivars Desiree and Jelica significantly affected larval growth and development, but did not change mortality rates. During the L2 and L3 developmental stages larvae consumed the OCII-transformed foliage faster as compared to the nontransformed control. Also these larvae reached the prepupal stage (end of L4 stage) 2 days earlier than those fed on control leaves. However, the total amounts of consumed OCII-transformed leaves were up to 23% lower than of control, and the maximal weights of prepupal larvae were reduced by up to 18% as compared to larvae fed on nontransformed leaves. The reduction in insect fitness reported in this study in combination with other control measures, could lead to improved CPB resistance management in potato. PMID:25820664

  16. Growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, on potato plants expressing the oryzacystatin II proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cingel, Aleksandar; Savić, Jelena; Vinterhalter, Branka; Vinterhalter, Dragan; Kostić, Miroslav; Jovanović, Darka Šešlija; Smigocki, Ann; Ninković, Slavica

    2015-08-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. PI oryzacystatin II (OCII), isolated from rice, showed potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate the applicability of the OCII gene in enhancing plant defence, OCII-transformed potatoes were bioassayed for resistance to Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). Feeding on transformed leaves of potato cultivars Desiree and Jelica significantly affected larval growth and development, but did not change mortality rates. During the L2 and L3 developmental stages larvae consumed the OCII-transformed foliage faster as compared to the nontransformed control. Also these larvae reached the prepupal stage (end of L4 stage) 2 days earlier than those fed on control leaves. However, the total amounts of consumed OCII-transformed leaves were up to 23% lower than of control, and the maximal weights of prepupal larvae were reduced by up to 18% as compared to larvae fed on nontransformed leaves. The reduction in insect fitness reported in this study in combination with other control measures, could lead to improved CPB resistance management in potato.

  17. Abscisic Acid Mediates Wound Induction but Not Developmental-Specific Expression of the Proteinase Inhibitor II Gene Family.

    PubMed Central

    Pena-Cortes, H; Willmitzer, L; Sanchez-Serrano, JJ

    1991-01-01

    The expression of the potato and tomato proteinase inhibitor II (pin2) gene family is subject to both developmental and environmental control, being constitutively expressed in potato tubers while only being present in the foliage of the potato or tomato plants after mechanical damage. There is evidence that the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in this wound induction of pin2 gene expression. This paper describes experiments that demonstrate that ABA is able to induce the expression of the pin2 gene family, both locally and systemically, at physiological concentrations. The significance of the ABA involvement in the pin2 induction upon wounding has been further strengthened by analyzing the expression of a pin2 promoter-[beta]-glucuronidase gene fusion in transgenic ABA-deficient mutant potato plants. We have analyzed the developmental regulation of pin2 gene expression in wild-type and ABA-deficient potato and tomato plants. The pin2 mRNA level is identical in mutant and wild-type parental Solanum phureja tubers. In addition, evidence is presented for pin2 also being constitutively expressed at certain stages in the development of both tomato and potato flowers. Again, the ABA deficiency appears to have little influence in this tissue-specific expression in the mutants. These results suggest the action of separate pathways for the developmental and environmental regulation of pin2 gene expression. PMID:12324624

  18. Short term recovery of periphyton photosynthesis after pulse exposition to the photosystem II inhibitors atrazine and isoproturon.

    PubMed

    Laviale, Martin; Morin, Soizic; Créach, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Aquatic organisms are exposed to fluctuating concentrations of herbicides which contaminate rivers following their use for agricultural or domestic purposes. The development of sensitive bioanalytical tests enabling us not only to detect the effects of those pollutants but to take into account this pattern of exposure should improve the ecological relevance of river toxicity assessment. In this respect, the use of chlorophyll fluorescence measurements is a convenient way to probe the effect of photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors on primary producers. This study was devoted to validate the combined use of two fluorescence parameters, the effective and the optimal quantum yields of PSII photochemistry (Φ(PSII) and F(v)/F(m)), as reliable biomarkers of initial isoproturon (IPU) or atrazine (ATZ) toxicity to natural periphyton in a pulse exposition scenario. Φ(PSII) and F(v)/F(m) were regularly estimated during a 7 h-exposure to each pollutant (0-100 μM) and also later after being transferred in herbicide-free water (up to 36 h). Our results showed that IPU was more toxic than ATZ, but with effects reversible within 12 h. Moreover, these two similarly acting herbicides (i.e. same target site) presented contrasted short term recovery patterns, regarding the previous exposure duration.

  19. Effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists in rats with heart failure. Role of kinins and angiotensin II type 2 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y H; Yang, X P; Sharov, V G; Nass, O; Sabbah, H N; Peterson, E; Carretero, O A

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) improve cardiac function and remodeling and prolong survival in patients with heart failure (HF). Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) with an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist (AT1-ant) may have a similar beneficial effect. In addition to inhibition of the RAS, ACEi may also act by inhibiting kinin destruction, whereas AT1-ant may block the RAS at the level of the AT1 receptor and activate the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor. Using a model of HF induced by myocardial infarction (MI) in rats, we studied the role of kinins in the cardioprotective effect of ACEi. We also investigated whether an AT1-ant has a similar effect and whether these effects are partly due to activation of the AT2 receptor. Two months after MI, rats were treated for 2 mo with: (a) vehicle; (b) the ACEi ramipril, with and without the B2 receptor antagonist icatibant (B2-ant); or (c) an AT1-ant with and without an AT2-antagonist (AT2-ant) or B2-ant. Vehicle-treated rats had a significant increase in left ventricular end-diastolic (LVEDV) and end-systolic volume (LVESV) as well as interstitial collagen deposition and cardiomyocyte size, whereas ejection fraction was decreased. Left ventricular remodeling and cardiac function were improved by the ACEi and AT1-ant. The B2-ant blocked most of the cardioprotective effect of the ACEi, whereas the effect of the AT1-ant was blocked by the AT2-ant. The decreases in LVEDV and LVESV caused by the AT1-ant were also partially blocked by the B2-ant. We concluded that (a) in HF both ACEi and AT1-ant have a cardioprotective effect, which could be due to either a direct action on the heart or secondary to altered hemodynamics, or both; and (b) the effect of the ACEi is mediated in part by kinins, whereas that of the AT1-ant is triggered by activation of the AT2 receptor and is also mediated in part by kinins. We speculate that in HF, blockade of AT1 receptors increases both renin and

  20. Cellular response to antitumor cis-Dichlorido platinum(II) complexes of CDK inhibitor Bohemine and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Liskova, Barbora; Zerzankova, Lenka; Novakova, Olga; Kostrhunova, Hana; Travnicek, Zdenek; Brabec, Viktor

    2012-02-20

    The cellular and molecular pharmacology of the new class of anticancer drugs, in which the CDK inhibitor bohemine and its analogues are coordinated to Pt(II) to form cisplatin derivatives, was investigated. The results revealed the unique anticancer profile of a cisplatin-derived platinum(II) dichlorido complex involving N(7)-coordinated bohemine (C1). Although the IC(50) values were ∼6-fold higher for C1 than for cisplatin in cisplatin-sensitive tumor cells, the tumor cells in which C1 was also active are those which acquired resistance to cisplatin. In addition, among the novel conjugates of bohemine and its analogues with cisplatin, marked selectivity of C1 for tumor cells relative to the nontumorigenic, normal cells was observed. However, coordination of bohemine to platinum in C1 considerably reduced one of the dual functionalities anticipated to be effective after C1 reaches the nucleus. Further studies performed in the cells with wt p53 status show differences between cisplatin and C1 at the level of cell cycle regulation. Impedance-based real-time monitoring of the effects of C1 and cisplatin on cell growth supported the thesis that critical differences exist in the rate and mechanisms of cell kill caused by the two agents and that C1 was a more potent inducer of apoptosis and/or necrosis than cisplatin. The results also showed that the distinct differences in cell killing observed for C1 and cisplatin might be associated with processes at the DNA level. The DNA binding experiments carried out in a cell-free medium demonstrated that modification reactions resulting in the irreversible coordination of C1 to DNA were slower than that of cisplatin. Transcription mapping experiments and determination of interstrand cross-linking efficiency of C1 suggested that several aspects of DNA binding mode of C1 and cisplatin were similar. It was concluded that C1 remains a promising prototype of compounds for the generation of novel drug candidates with cytotoxicity

  1. Citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor: clinical antidepressive and long-term effect--a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, O L; Kragh-Sørensen, P; Bjerre, M; Overø, K F; Gram, L F

    1982-01-01

    In a phase II study the antidepressive effect of citalopram, a selective and potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was examined in 20 endogenously and three non-endogenously depressed hospitalized patients. Four endogenously depressed patients dropped out due to deterioration early in the treatment period. The remaining 19 patients completed a 4-6 week treatment schedule. Of 16 endogenously depressed patients 11 responded, one was a partial responder and four did not respond. Of three patients with non-endogenous depressions, two responded and one did not respond. No correlation between plasma citalopram concentration and therapeutic outcome was found. Fourteen patients were given maintenance treatment for 8-113 weeks. One patient developed depression when the dose was reduced from 60 to 40 mg and one patient became manic. After discontinuation of treatment seven patients had a depressive relapse and six of these who again were treated with citalopram responded completely. Side effect rating scores of symptoms usually associated with depression or treatment with tricyclic antidepressants declined during treatment. Three patients complained of increased need of sleep for a period after several weeks of treatment. Apart from an unspecific, transient rise in liver enzymes in two patients, detailed biochemical laboratory tests were all normal. There were no effects on blood pressure, pulse rate, orthostatic reaction, or electrocardiogram. One patient took an overdose of citalopram resulting in plasma levels about six times higher than the average therapeutic level, but there were no signs of severe toxicity. In particular no change in consciousness, electrocardiogram or blood pressure occurred. Pharmacokinetic variables such as dose schedule, steady state kinetics, and metabolism are discussed. PMID:6812140

  2. Bioanalytical method for evaluating the pharmacokinetics of the GCP-II inhibitor 2-phosphonomethyl pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA).

    PubMed

    Rais, Rana; Rojas, Camilo; Wozniak, Krystyna; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Ming; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Rudek, Michelle A; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    2-Phosphonomethyl pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA) is a potent and selective inhibitor of glutamate carboxypeptidase-II, an enzyme which catabolizes the abundant neuropeptide N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate. 2-PMPA demonstrates robust efficacy in numerous animal models of neurological disease, however its pharmacokinetics has not yet been fully described. 2-PMPA is a highly polar compound with multiple negative charges causing significant challenges for analysis in biological matrices. Here we report a derivatization method for the acidic groups that involved protein precipitation with acetonitrile followed by reaction with N-tert-butyldimethysilyl-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). The silylated analyte with transitions (683→551.4) and the internal standard (669→537.2) were monitored by tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray positive ionization mode. The method was subsequently used to evaluate 2-PMPA pharmacokinetics in rats. Intraperitoneal administration of 100mg/kg 2-PMPA resulted in maximum concentration in plasma of 275μg/mL at 0.25h. The half-life, area under the curve, apparent clearance, and volume of distribution were 0.64h, 210μg×h/mL, 7.93mL/min/kg, and 0.44L/kg, respectively. The tissue/plasma ratios in brain, sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion were 0.018, 0.120 and 0.142, respectively. In summary, a sensitive analytical method for 2-PMPA is reported that can be employed for similarly charged molecules.

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide inhibits the expression of tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 induced by angiotensin II in cultured rat aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, M; Tsuji, H; Nishimura, H; Kasahara, T; Sugano, T; Masuda, H; Nakagawa, K; Nakahara, Y; Kitamura, H; Yamada, K; Yoneda, M; Sawada, S; Nakagawa, M

    1998-03-01

    The pharmacological characteristics of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), such as natriuresis, vasodilation, or suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation, are well investigated. However, this is the first study to report its role on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis mediated by vascular endothelial cells. In this study, the effects of ANP on the enhanced expression of tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by angiotensin II (Ang II) in cultured rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs) were examined. The expressions of TF and PAI-1 mRNA were detected by northern blotting methods. The activities of TF on the surface of RAECs and PAI-1 in the culture media were measured by chromogenic assay. ANP suppressed mRNA expressions of TF and PAI-1 induced by Ang II in a concentration-dependent manner. This suppression was accompanied by the decreased activities of TF and PAI-1.

  4. Attenuation of increased secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, matricellular proteins and angiotensin II and left ventricular remodeling by candesartan and omapatrilat during healing after reperfused myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, Ariv; Uwiera, Richard R E; Idikio, Halliday; Menon, Vijay; Jugdutt, Catherine; Jugdutt, Bodh I

    2013-04-01

    While secretory-leukocyte-protease-inhibitor (SLPI) may promote skin wound healing, its role in infarct healing after reperfused myocardial infarction (RMI) remains unclear. Short-term intravenous angiotensin II (AngII) receptor blocker therapy with candesartan (CN) attenuates increased SLPI and markers of early matrix/left ventricular (LV) in acute RMI. To determine whether reducing effects of AngII with CN or the vasopeptidase inhibitor omapatrilat (OMA) during the healing phase after RMI attenuates SLPI and other mediators of healing and matrix/LV remodeling, we measured these in Sprague-Dawley rats randomized to oral placebo, CN (30 mg/kg/day) or OMA (10 mg/kg/day) therapy during healing between days 2 and 23 after RMI and sham. On day-25, RMI-placebo showed significant LV remodeling, systolic/diastolic dysfunction and impaired passive compliance, and ischemic zone increases in SLPI, secreted-protein-acidic-and-rich-in-cysteine (SPARC) and osteopontin (OPN) mRNA and protein. In addition, metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and -2, a-disintegrin-and-metalloproteinase (ADAM)-10 and -17, inducible-nitric-oxide-synthase (iNOS), pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β(1) and its signaling molecule p-Smad-2, myeloperoxidase (MPO), AngII, MPO-positive granulocytes, MAC387-positive macrophages and monocytes, scar collagens, cardiomyocyte and fibroblast apoptosis, and microvascular no-reflow also increased whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 decreased. Both CN and OMA attenuated all the changes except IL-10, which normalized. Thus, CN or OMA treatment during healing after RMI results in attenuation of SLPI as well as tissue AngII and mediators of inflammation and matrix/LV remodeling including SPARC, OPN, and ADAMs. Whether increasing SLPI on top of background AngII inhibition or therapy such as CN or OMA might produce added remodeling benefit needs study.

  5. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII with novel Schiff bases: identification of selective inhibitors for the tumor-associated isoforms over the cytosolic ones.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Busra; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-11-01

    A series of new Schiff bases was obtained from sulfanilamide, 3-fluorosulfanilamide or 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonamide and aromatic/heterocyclic aldehydes incorporating both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties. The obtained sulfonamides were investigated as inhibitors of four physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms, the cytosolic CA I and II, as well as the transmembrane, tumor-associated CA IX and XII. Most derivatives were medium potency or weak hCA I/II inhibitors, but several of them showed nanomolar affinity for CA IX and/or XII, making them an interesting example of isoform-selective compounds. The nature of the aryl/hetaryl moiety present in the initial aldehyde was the main factor influencing potency and isoform selectivity. The best and most CA IX-selective compounds incorporated moieties such as 4-methylthiophenyl, 4-cyanophenyl-, 4-(2-pyridyl)-phenyl and the 4-aminoethylbenzenesulfonamide scaffold. The best hCA XII inhibitors, also showing selectivity for this isoform, incorporated 2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl-, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl and 4-(2-pyridyl)-phenyl functionalities and were also derivatives of 4-aminoethylbenzenesulfonamide. The sulfanilamide and 3-fluorosulfanilamide derived Schiff bases were less active compared to the corresponding 4-aminoethyl-benzenesulfonamide derivatives. As hCA IX/XII selective inhibition is attractive for obtaining antitumor agents/diagnostic tools with a new mechanism of action, compounds of the type described here may be considered interesting preclinical candidates. PMID:25267005

  6. Application of genetic algorithm-kernel partial least square as a novel nonlinear feature selection method: activity of carbonic anhydrase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Kyani, Anahita

    2007-05-01

    This paper introduces the genetic algorithm-kernel partial least square (GA-KPLS), as a novel nonlinear feature selection method. This technique combines genetic algorithms (GAs) as powerful optimization methods with KPLS as a robust nonlinear statistical method for variable selection. This feature selection method is combined with artificial neural network to develop a nonlinear QSAR model for predicting activities of a series of substituted aromatic sulfonamides as carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) inhibitors. Eight simple one- and two-dimensional descriptors were selected by GA-KPLS and considered as inputs for developing artificial neural networks (ANNs). These parameters represent the role of acceptor-donor pair, hydrogen bonding, hydrosolubility and lipophilicity of the active sites and also the size of the inhibitors on inhibitor-isozyme interaction. The accuracy of 8-4-1 networks was illustrated by validation techniques of leave-one-out (LOO) and leave-multiple-out (LMO) cross-validations and Y-randomization. Superiority of this method (GA-KPLS-ANN) over the linear one (MLR) in a previous work and also the GA-PLS-ANN in which a linear feature selection method has been used indicates that the GA-KPLS approach is a powerful method for the variable selection in nonlinear systems. PMID:17316919

  7. Identification of Novel Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors of Natural Origin (Part II): In Silico Prediction in Antidiabetic Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Laura; Sala, Esther; Ojeda, María José; Valls, Cristina; Bladé, Cinta; Mulero, Miquel; Blay, Mayte; Ardévol, Anna; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Pujadas, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background Natural extracts play an important role in traditional medicines for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and are also an essential resource for new drug discovery. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors are potential candidates for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the effectiveness of certain antidiabetic extracts of natural origin could be, at least partially, explained by the inhibition of DPP-IV. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an initial set of 29,779 natural products that are annotated with their natural source and an experimentally validated virtual screening procedure previously developed in our lab (Guasch et al.; 2012) [1], we have predicted 12 potential DPP-IV inhibitors from 12 different plant extracts that are known to have antidiabetic activity. Seven of these molecules are identical or similar to molecules with described antidiabetic activity (although their role as DPP-IV inhibitors has not been suggested as an explanation for their bioactivity). Therefore, it is plausible that these 12 molecules could be responsible, at least in part, for the antidiabetic activity of these extracts through their inhibitory effect on DPP-IV. In addition, we also identified as potential DPP-IV inhibitors 6 molecules from 6 different plants with no described antidiabetic activity but that share the same genus as plants with known antidiabetic properties. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules that we predicted as DPP-IV inhibitors exhibits chemical similarity with a group of 2,342 known DPP-IV inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance Our study identified 18 potential DPP-IV inhibitors in 18 different plant extracts (12 of these plants have known antidiabetic properties, whereas, for the remaining 6, antidiabetic activity has been reported for other plant species from the same genus). Moreover, none of the 18 molecules exhibits chemical similarity with a large group of known DPP-IV inhibitors. PMID:23028712

  8. Impact of losartan and angiotensin II on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Song; Wu, Zong-Gui; Yang, Jun-Ke; Chen, Xin-Jing

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the impact of losartan and angiotensin II (AngII) on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), secreted by rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Rat VSMCs were isolated and cultured in different concentrations of AngII and losartan for 24 h and western blot analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed to observe the subsequent impact on the gene and protein expression of MMP-9 and TIMP-1. AngII was shown to promote the protein and gene expression of MMP-9 in VSMCs in a concentration-dependent manner. No effect was observed on the expression of TIMP-1, therefore, an increase in the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was observed. Losartan was shown to be able to inhibit MMP-9 protein and gene expression in a concentration-dependent manner, whilst promoting an increase in TIMP-1 expression, thus decreasing the ratio of MMP-9/TIMP-1. The combined action of losartan and AngII resulted in the same directional changes in MMP-9 and TIMP-1 expression as observed for losartan alone. The comparison of AngII, losartan and the combinatory effect on the expression of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in VSMCs indicated that losartan inhibited the effects of AngII, therefore reducing the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, which may contribute to the molecular mechanism of losartan in preventing atherosclerosis. In atherosclerosis, the development of the extracellular matrix of plaque is closely correlated with the evolution of AS. The balance between MMPs and TIMPs is important in maintaining the dynamic equilibrium between the ECM, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is involved in the pathologenesis of AS, and in which AngII has a central role.

  9. Morphologic Damage of Rat Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells Induced by Bile Acids Could Be Ameliorated by Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibitor Z-Guggulsterone In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaowei; Hou, Xusheng; Wu, Wenyu; Nie, Lei; Tian, Yinghong; Lu, Yanmeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether bile acids (BAs) affect respiratory functions through the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) expressed in the lungs and to explore the possible mechanisms of BAs-induced respiratory disorder. Methods. Primary cultured alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECIIs) of rat were treated with different concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) in the presence or absence of FXR inhibitor Z-guggulsterone (GS). Then, expression of FXR in nuclei of AECIIs was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. And ultrastructural changes of the cells were observed under transmission electron microscope and analyzed by Image-Pro Plus software. Results. Morphologic damage of AECIIs was exhibited in high BAs group in vitro, with high-level expression of FXR, while FXR inhibitor GS could attenuate the cytotoxicity of BAs to AECIIs. Conclusions. FXR expression was related to the morphologic damage of AECIIs induced by BAs, thus influencing respiratory functions. PMID:27340672

  10. F-actin-myosin II inhibitors affect chromaffin granule plasma membrane distance and fusion kinetics by retraction of the cytoskeletal cortex.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, José; Torres, Vanesa; Torregrosa-Hetland, Cristina J; Garcia-Martinez, Virginia; López-Font, Inmaculada; Viniegra, Salvador; Gutiérrez, Luis M

    2012-10-01

    Chromaffin cell catecholamines are released when specialized secretory vesicles undergo exocytotic membrane fusion. Evidence indicates that vesicle supply and fusion are controlled by the activity of the cortical F-actin-myosin II network. To study in detail cell cortex and vesicle interactions, we use fluorescent labeling with GFP-lifeact and acidotropic dyes in confocal and evanescent wave microscopy. These techniques provide structural details and dynamic images of chromaffin granules caged in a complex cortical structure. Both the movement of cortical structures and granule motion appear to be linked, and this motion can be restricted by the myosin II-specific inhibitor, blebbistatin, and the F-actin stabilizer, jasplakinolide. These treatments also affect the position of the vesicles in relation to the plasma membrane, increasing the distance between them and the fusion sites. Consequently, we observed slower single vesicle fusion kinetics in treated cells after neutralization of acridine orange-loaded granules during exocytosis. Increasing the distance between the granules and the fusion sites appears to be linked to the retraction of the F-actin cytoskeleton when treated with jasplakinolide. Thus, F-actin-myosin II inhibitors appear to slow granule fusion kinetics by altering the position of vesicles after relaxation of the cortical network.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial activity and carbonic anhydrase enzyme inhibitor effects of salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone and its Palladium(II), Cobalt(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyar, Saliha; Adem, Şevki

    2014-10-01

    We report the synthesis of the ligand, salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone (salptsmh) derived from p-toluenesulfonicacid-1-methylhydrazide (ptsmh) and its Pd(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized for the first time. The structure of the ligand and their complexes were investigated using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR, NMR and LC-MS) measurements. Salptsmh has also been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for crystal structure were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The complexes were found to have general composition [ML2]. The results of elemental analysis showed 1:2 (metal/ligand) stoichiometry for all the complex. Magnetic and spectral data indicate a square planar geometry for Pd(II) complex and a distorted tetrahedral geometry for Co(II) complexes. The ligand and its metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disk diffusion method against the selected Gram positive bacteria: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Gram negative bacteria: Eschericha coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and carbonic anhydrase I (CA I) have been investigated by comparing IC50 and Ki values and it has been found that Pd(II) complex have more enzyme inhibition efficiency than salptsmh and Co(II) complex.

  12. Docking studies, synthesis, characterization of some novel oxazine substituted 9-anilinoacridine derivatives and evaluation for their antioxidant and anticancer activities as topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kalirajan, R; Kulshrestha, Vivek; Sankar, S; Jubie, S

    2012-10-01

    A series of 9-anilinoacridines substituted with oxazine derivatives were synthesized to evaluate their antioxidant and anticancer activity against Daltons Lymphoma Ascites (DLA) cell growth by in vitro method. It was revealed that these conjugates exhibited significant antioxidant and anticancer activity (inhibition of DLA cell proliferation). Among these agents, compounds 5a, 5h, 5i, 5j were the most cytotoxic with CTC(50) value of 140-250 μg/mL. The docking studies of the synthesized compounds were performed towards the key Topoisomerase II (1QZR) by using Schrodinger Maestro 9.2 version. The oxazine substituted 9-anilinoacridine derivatives 5a, 5h, 5i, 5j have significant anticancer activity as topoisomerase II inhibitors. PMID:22982526

  13. Evaluation of epigallocatechin gallate and related plant polyphenols as inhibitors of the FabG and FabI reductases of bacterial type II fatty-acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O

    2004-07-23

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is the major component of green tea extracts and possesses antibacterial, antiviral, and antitumor activity. Our study focused on validating the inhibition of the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis system as a mechanism for the antibacterial effects of EGCG and related plant polyphenols. EGCG and the related tea catechins potently inhibited both the FabG and FabI reductase steps in the fatty acid elongation cycle with IC(50) values between 5 and 15 microm. The presence of the galloyl moiety was essential for activity, and EGCG was a competitive inhibitor of FabI and a mixed type inhibitor of FabG demonstrating that EGCG interfered with cofactor binding in both enzymes. EGCG inhibited acetate incorporation into fatty acids in vivo, although it was much less potent than thiolactomycin, a validated fatty acid synthesis inhibitor, and overexpression of FabG, FabI, or both did not confer resistance. A panel of other plant polyphenols was screened for FabG/FabI inhibition and antibacterial activity. Most of these inhibited both reductase steps, possessed antibacterial activity, and inhibited cellular fatty acid synthesis. The ability of the plant secondary metabolites to interfere with the activity of multiple NAD(P)-dependent cellular processes must be taken into account when assessing the specificity of their effects.

  14. Discovery of dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-thiophen-2-yl-pyridine as a non-intercalative DNA-binding topoisomerase II-specific catalytic inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Hanbyeol; Park, So-Eun; Lee, Eunyoung; Karki, Radha; Thapa, Pritam; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Eung-Seok; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-06-10

    We describe our rationale for designing specific catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II (topo II) over topoisomerase I (topo I). Based on 3D-QSAR studies of previously published dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-aryl pyridine derivatives, 9 novel dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-thiophen-2-yl pyridine compounds were designed, synthesized, and their biological activities were evaluated. These compounds have 2-thienyl ring substituted on the R(3) group on the pyridine ring and they all showed excellent specificity toward topo II compared to topo I. In vitro experiments were performed for compound 13 to determine the mechanism of action for this series of compounds. Compound 13 inhibited topoisomerase II specifically by non-intercalative binding to DNA and did not stabilize enzyme-cleavable DNA complex. Compound 13 efficiently inhibited cell viability, cell migration, and induced G1 arrest. Also from 3D-QSAR studies, the results were compared with other previously published dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-aryl pyridine derivatives to explain the structure-activity relationships. PMID:24796883

  15. Type II hereditary angioneurotic edema that may result from a single nucleotide change in the codon for alanine-436 in the C1 inhibitor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, N.J.; Ramesh, N.; Daviss, A.E. III ); Cicardi, M. ); Harrison, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Identical single-base changes in the C1 inhibitor gene that may result in dysfunctional inhibitor proteins are described in two different families with type II hereditary angioneurotic edema. Initially, a restriction fragment length polymorphism was defined that resulted from loss of a Pst I site within exon VIII, which encodes the region containing the reactive center. Exon VIII from the normal and abnormal allelles was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. Amplified DNA product was cloned into plasmid pUC18; clones representing normal and mutant allelles were distinguished by the presence and absence, respectively of the Pst I restriction site. DNA sequence analysis revealed a G {yields} A mutation in the codon for alanine-436, which would result in replacement with a threonine residue. This position is nine amino acid residues amino-terminal to the reactive-center arginylthreonine peptide bond. In contrast, previously defined mutations in type II hereditary angioneurotic edema result in replacement of the reactive-center arginine.

  16. Atrial fibrillation after radiofrequency ablation of atrial flutter: preventive effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, and diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Anné, W; Willems, R; Van der Merwe, N; Van de Werf, F; Ector, H; Heidbüchel, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To determine risk factors for the development of atrial fibrillation (AF) after atrial flutter (AFL) ablation; and to study the relation between AF development and periprocedural drug use. Methods: AFL ablation was performed in 196 patients. The relation between AF occurrence and clinical, echocardiographic, and procedural factors and periprocedural drug use was analysed retrospectively by a Cox proportional hazard method. Results: After a median follow up of 2.2 years, 114 patients (58%) developed at least one AF episode. Factors associated with AF development were the presence of preprocedural AF, a history of cardioversion, and the number of antiarrhythmic drugs used before the procedure. Use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers and diuretics was significantly associated by univariate and multivariate analyses with less development of AF. Conclusions: A high proportion of patients develop AF after AFL ablation. The incidence of AF is related to pre-ablation AF and its persistence. ACE inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers and diuretics seem to protect against AF. PMID:15310691

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of the complex-forming ability of hydroxypyranones and hydroxypyridinones with Ni (II) as possible inhibitors for urease enzyme in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Palizban, Abbasali; Saghaie, Lotfollah

    2016-01-01

    The complex-forming ability of 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyran-4-one (1a), 2-ethyl-3-hydroxypyran-4-one (1b), 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (4a) and 1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (4b) with nickel(Ni(II)) were characterized by infrared, ultraviolet, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and melting point. The mole-ratio of nickel:ligands was analyzed by atomic-absorption-spectrometry. The partition-coefficients (KOW) of the compounds were also determined. The binding of ligands with Ni(II) are through deprotonated hydroxyl group (-O-, disapeared at 3259 cm-1) and ioan-pairs of carbonyl group (=CO., shifted from 1650 to 1510-1515 cm-1). The characterization of complex geometry for bis-(2-methyl-3-hydroxypyranonato)Ni(II) (5a) and bis-(2-ethyl-3-hydroxypyranonato)Ni(II) (5b) predicted to be square-planer while for bis-(1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridinonato)Ni(II) (5c) and bis-(1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridinonato)Ni(II) (5d) distorted to tetrahedral-geometry. Inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori urease are nickel chelators. The compounds 1a, 4a and 4b are likely suitable ligands with complex forming-ability to make complexes of 5a, 5c and 5d with nickel. The KOW values show the compound 5c with low partition-coefficient is more suitable ligand with lower penetration from GI lumen. Future studies demand to find out the biological activity of developed compounds on H. pylori. PMID:27651814

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of the complex-forming ability of hydroxypyranones and hydroxypyridinones with Ni (II) as possible inhibitors for urease enzyme in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Palizban, Abbasali; Saghaie, Lotfollah

    2016-07-01

    The complex-forming ability of 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyran-4-one (1a), 2-ethyl-3-hydroxypyran-4-one (1b), 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (4a) and 1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (4b) with nickel(Ni(II)) were characterized by infrared, ultraviolet, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and melting point. The mole-ratio of nickel:ligands was analyzed by atomic-absorption-spectrometry. The partition-coefficients (KOW) of the compounds were also determined. The binding of ligands with Ni(II) are through deprotonated hydroxyl group (-O(-), disapeared at 3259 cm(-1)) and ioan-pairs of carbonyl group (=CO(.), shifted from 1650 to 1510-1515 cm(-1)). The characterization of complex geometry for bis-(2-methyl-3-hydroxypyranonato)Ni(II) (5a) and bis-(2-ethyl-3-hydroxypyranonato)Ni(II) (5b) predicted to be square-planer while for bis-(1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridinonato)Ni(II) (5c) and bis-(1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridinonato)Ni(II) (5d) distorted to tetrahedral-geometry. Inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori urease are nickel chelators. The compounds 1a, 4a and 4b are likely suitable ligands with complex forming-ability to make complexes of 5a, 5c and 5d with nickel. The KOW values show the compound 5c with low partition-coefficient is more suitable ligand with lower penetration from GI lumen. Future studies demand to find out the biological activity of developed compounds on H. pylori. PMID:27651814

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of the complex-forming ability of hydroxypyranones and hydroxypyridinones with Ni (II) as possible inhibitors for urease enzyme in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Palizban, Abbasali; Saghaie, Lotfollah

    2016-01-01

    The complex-forming ability of 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyran-4-one (1a), 2-ethyl-3-hydroxypyran-4-one (1b), 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (4a) and 1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (4b) with nickel(Ni(II)) were characterized by infrared, ultraviolet, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and melting point. The mole-ratio of nickel:ligands was analyzed by atomic-absorption-spectrometry. The partition-coefficients (KOW) of the compounds were also determined. The binding of ligands with Ni(II) are through deprotonated hydroxyl group (-O-, disapeared at 3259 cm-1) and ioan-pairs of carbonyl group (=CO., shifted from 1650 to 1510-1515 cm-1). The characterization of complex geometry for bis-(2-methyl-3-hydroxypyranonato)Ni(II) (5a) and bis-(2-ethyl-3-hydroxypyranonato)Ni(II) (5b) predicted to be square-planer while for bis-(1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridinonato)Ni(II) (5c) and bis-(1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridinonato)Ni(II) (5d) distorted to tetrahedral-geometry. Inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori urease are nickel chelators. The compounds 1a, 4a and 4b are likely suitable ligands with complex forming-ability to make complexes of 5a, 5c and 5d with nickel. The KOW values show the compound 5c with low partition-coefficient is more suitable ligand with lower penetration from GI lumen. Future studies demand to find out the biological activity of developed compounds on H. pylori.

  20. Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors Within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries.

    PubMed

    Paul Friedman, Katie; Watt, Eric D; Hornung, Michael W; Hedge, Joan M; Judson, Richard S; Crofton, Kevin M; Houck, Keith A; Simmons, Steven O

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput screening for potential thyroid-disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge on perturbed thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. Screening for MIEs specific to TH-disrupting pathways is limited in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ToxCast screening assay portfolio. To fill 1 critical screening gap, the Amplex UltraRed-thyroperoxidase (AUR-TPO) assay was developed to identify chemicals that inhibit TPO, as decreased TPO activity reduces TH synthesis. The ToxCast phase I and II chemical libraries, comprised of 1074 unique chemicals, were initially screened using a single, high concentration to identify potential TPO inhibitors. Chemicals positive in the single-concentration screen were retested in concentration-response. Due to high false-positive rates typically observed with loss-of-signal assays such as AUR-TPO, we also employed 2 additional assays in parallel to identify possible sources of nonspecific assay signal loss, enabling stratification of roughly 300 putative TPO inhibitors based upon selective AUR-TPO activity. A cell-free luciferase inhibition assay was used to identify nonspecific enzyme inhibition among the putative TPO inhibitors, and a cytotoxicity assay using a human cell line was used to estimate the cellular tolerance limit. Additionally, the TPO inhibition activities of 150 chemicals were compared between the AUR-TPO and an orthogonal peroxidase oxidation assay using guaiacol as a substrate to confirm the activity profiles of putative TPO inhibitors. This effort represents the most extensive TPO inhibition screening campaign to date and illustrates a tiered screening approach that focuses resources, maximizes assay throughput, and reduces animal use. PMID:26884060

  1. Computer based screening for novel inhibitors against Vibrio cholerae using NCI diversity set-II: an alternative approach by targeting transcriptional activator ToxT.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shakhinur Islam; Khadka, Bijendra; Akter, Arzuba; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Sultana, Razia

    2014-06-01

    Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae and remains as a major health risk in developing countries. The emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant V. cholerae strains during the past two decades is now a major problem in the treatment of cholera and have created the urgent need for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Targeting transcriptional factor is now a novel approach to tackle the development of multi-drug resistant strain. In the recent year virtual high throughput screening has emerged as a widely accepted powerful technology in the identification of novel and diverse lead. This study provides new insight to the search for new potent and selective inhibitors that still remains necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. The publications of high resolution X-ray structure of V. cholerae ToxT has open the way to the structure based virtual screening to identify new small molecular inhibitors which still remain necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. In this study we have performed structure based virtual screening approach using NCI diversity set-II to look for novel inhibitor of ToxT and proposed eight candidate compounds with high scoring function. Thus from complex scoring and binding ability it is elucidated that these compounds could be the promising inhibitors or could be developed as novel lead compounds for drug design against cholera.

  2. Comparative effectiveness of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with type 2 diabetes and retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chia-Jen; Chen, Hung-Ta; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Li, Szu-Yuan; Lai, Pi-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Chen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy, but randomized trials and meta-analyses comparing their effects on macrovascular complications have yielded conflicting results. We compared the effectiveness of these drugs in patients with pre-existing diabetic retinopathy in a large population-based cohort. Methods: We conducted a propensity score–matched cohort study using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. We included adult patients prescribed an ACE inhibitor or ARB within 90 days after diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy between 2000 and 2010. Primary outcomes were all-cause death and major adverse cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or cardiovascular death). Secondary outcomes were hospital admissions with acute kidney injury or hyperkalemia. Results: We identified 11 246 patients receiving ACE inhibitors and 15 173 receiving ARBs, of whom 9769 patients in each group were matched successfully by propensity scores. In the intention-to-treat analyses, ARBs were similar to ACE inhibitors in risk of all-cause death (hazard ratio [HR] 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87–1.01) and major adverse cardiovascular events (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.87–1.04), including myocardial infarction (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.88–1.20), ischemic stroke (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.85–1.04) and cardiovascular death (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.88–1.16). They also did not differ from ACE inhibitors in risk of hospital admission with acute kidney injury (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.91–1.13) and hospital admission with hyperkalemia (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.86–1.18). Results were similar in as-treated analyses. Interpretation: Our study showed that ACE inhibitors were similar to ARBs in risk of all-cause death, major adverse cardiovascular events and adverse effects among patients with pre-existing diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27001739

  3. [Inhibitors of alpha-amylase from plants--a possibility to treat diabetes mellitus type II by phytotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Melzig, Matthias F; Funke, Ines

    2007-01-01

    Antidiabetics of plant origin are in common use. A proof of their effectiveness or their mode of action is often missing. The aim of this work was to review the knowledge about inhibitors of alpha-amylase from plants and to comment on the use in anti-diabetic treatment. Herbal alpha-amylase inhibitors are rarely described in the literature, nevertheless they have the ability to lower postprandial blood glucose level and should be used in the supplementary treatment of diabetes. Important constituents for the inhibitory activity against alpha-amylase are mainly polyphenolic compounds. There is a need for further clinical studies to establish a rational therapy with traditional herbal preparations, especially for the leaves from the blueberry, tamarind, lemon balm and rosemary, the hulls from white kidney beans or green tea extract. PMID:17704980

  4. Corrosion inhibitors in concrete. Part II: Effect on chloride threshold values for corrosion of steel in synthetic pore solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mammoliti, L.; Hansson, C.M.; Hope, B.B.

    1999-10-01

    The effectiveness of four commercially available corrosion inhibitors for use in cement-based materials was assessed in synthetic concrete pore solution containing chlorides. The effect of the surface topography of the sample and the composition of the pore solution was also assessed. Although in a parallel study the inhibitors were observed to delay the onset of corrosion, in these tests in pore solution they were found to be ineffective in increasing the chloride threshold value of reinforcing steel exposed to chlorides and had little influence on the progression of corrosion once initiated. This suggests that chemical reactions within the cement phase are responsible for the observed results. Metallographically polished samples proved the most resistant to corrosion regardless of electrolyte composition and samples with all surface finishes exhibited lower resistance in solutions containing only calcium hydroxide than in the higher pH synthetic concrete pore solutions.

  5. Parkinson's disease management. Part II- discovery of MAO-B inhibitors based on nitrogen heterocycles and analogues.

    PubMed

    Reis, Joana; Encarnação, Igor; Gaspar, Alexandra; Morales, Aliuska; Milhazes, Nuno; Borges, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by a progressive neurodegeneration of the dopaminergic neurons. The available pharmacological therapy for PD aims to stop the progress of symptoms, reduce disability, slowing the neurodegenerative process and/or preventing long-term complications along the therapy. The main strategic developments that have led to progress in the medical management of PD have focused on improvements in dopaminergic therapies. Despite all the recent research, there are only a few classes of drugs approved for the treatment of motor related symptoms of PD which primarily act on the dopaminergic neurons system: L-dopa, dopamine agonists, monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitors. Anticholinergic drugs and glutamate antagonists are also available but are not commonly used in routine practice. As no effective therapeutic strategy has yet been attended, other solutions must be investigated. Privileged structures, such as indoles, arylpiperazines, biphenyls and benzopyranes are currently ascribed as helpful approaches. Different families of nitrogen and oxygen heterocycles, such as pyrazoles, hydrazinylthiazoles, xanthones, coumarins or chromones have also been extensively used as scaffolds in medicinal chemistry programs for searching novel MAO-B inhibitors. Nitrogen derivatives play a key role in this subject with several studies pointing out hydrazines, thiazoles or indoles as important scaffolds for the development of novel MAO-B inhibitors. This review comprises an overview of the state of the art on the actual pharmacological therapy for PD followed by a specific focus on the discovery and development of nitrogen-based heterocyclic compounds analogues as promising MAO-B inhibitors.

  6. LY2109761, a novel transforming growth factor β receptor type I and type II dual inhibitor, as a therapeutic approach to suppressing pancreatic cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Melisi, Davide; Ishiyama, Satoshi; Sclabas, Guido M.; Fleming, Jason B.; Xia, Qianghua; Tortora, Giampaolo; Abbruzzese, James L.; Chiao, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Most pancreatic cancer patients present with inoperable disease or develop metastases after surgery. Conventional therapies are usually ineffective in treating metastatic disease. It is evident that novel therapies remain to be developed. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) plays a key role in cancer metastasis, signaling through the TGF-β type I/II receptors (TβRI/II). We hypothesized that targeting TβRI/II kinase activity with the novel inhibitor LY2109761 would suppress pancreatic cancer metastatic processes. The effect of LY2109761 has been evaluated on soft agar growth, migration, invasion using a fibroblast coculture model, and detachment-induced apoptosis (anoikis) by Annexin V flow cytometric analysis. The efficacy of LY2109761 on tumor growth, survival, and reduction of spontaneous metastasis have been evaluated in an orthotopic murine model of metastatic pancreatic cancer expressing both luciferase and green fluorescence proteins (L3.6pl/GLT). To determine whether pancreatic cancer cells or the cells in the liver microenvironment were involved in LY2109761-mediated reduction of liver metastasis, we used a model of experimental liver metastasis. LY2109761 significantly inhibited the L3.6pl/GLT soft agar growth, suppressed both basal and TGF-β1–induced cell migration and invasion, and induced anoikis. In vivo, LY2109761, in combination with gemcitabine, significantly reduced the tumor burden, prolonged survival, and reduced spontaneous abdominal metastases. Results from the experimental liver metastasis models indicate an important role for targeting TβRI/II kinase activity on tumor and liver microenvironment cells in suppressing liver metastasis. Targeting TβRI/II kinase activity on pancreatic cancer cells or the cells of the liver microenvironment represents a novel therapeutic approach to prevent pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:18413796

  7. A rational design strategy of the novel topoisomerase II inhibitors for the synthesis of the 4-O-(2-pyrazinecarboxylic)-4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin with antitumor activity by diminishing the relaxation reaction of topoisomerase II-DNA decatenation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Lu; Li, Hong-Mei; Wang, Duan-Ji; Li, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Tao; Yuan, Zhan-Peng; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2014-06-01

    A rational design strategy of the novel podophyllum topoisomerase II (Topo II) inhibitors for the synthesis of the esterification and amidation substituted 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (DMEP) derivates was developed in order to discover the potential antitumor prodrug. Firstly, according to the structure-activity relationship, drug combination principle and bioisosterism, the -COO- and the -NH- bond substituents at the 4 position of cycloparaffin would be a great modification direction to improve antitumor activity of 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (DMEP). Secondly, from the prodrug principle view, the esterification and amidation at the C-4 position of DMEP would be two useful structure modifications for improve solubility. Thirdly, from the activity pocket in Topo II-DNA cleavage complex point of view, a series of heterocyclic with pharmacological activity were chosen as module for improving antitumor activity by binding with Topo II. Finally, nine novel esterification and amidation DMEP derivates were designed and synthesized for the potential Topo II inhibitors with the superior biological activity. All the novel compounds exhibited promising in vitro antitumor activity, especially 4-O-(2-pyrazinecarboxylic)-4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (compound 1). The antitumor activity of compound 1 against tumor cell line HeLa (i.e., the IC50 value of 0.60 ± 0.20 μM), A549 (i.e., the IC50 value of 3.83 ± 0.08 μM), HepG2 (i.e., the IC50 value of 1.21 ± 0.05 μM), and BGC-823 (i.e., the IC50 value of 4.15 ± 1.13 μM) was significantly improved by 66, 16, 12, and 6 times than that of the clinically important podophyllum anticancer drug etoposide (i.e., the IC50 values of 15.32 ± 0.10, 59.38 ± 0.77, 67.25 ± 7.05, and 30.74 ± 5.13 μM), respectively. Compound 1 could arrest HeLa cell cycle G2/M and induce apoptosis by strongly diminishing the relaxation reaction of Topo II-DNA decatenation. The correctness of rational drug design was strictly demonstrated by the

  8. ICRF-193, an anticancer topoisomerase II inhibitor, induces arched telophase spindles that snap, leading to a ploidy increase in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Norihiko; Mehrotra, Rajesh; Arakawa, Orie; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-09-01

    ICRF-193 [meso-4,4-(2,3-butanediyl)-bis(2,6-piperazinedione)] is a complex-stabilizing inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II (topo II) that is used as an effective anticancer drug. ICRF-193 inhibits topo II catalytic activity in vitro and blocks nuclear division in vivo. Here, we examined the effects of ICRF-193 treatment on chromatin behavior and spindle dynamics using detailed live mitotic cell analysis in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Time-lapse movie analysis showed that ICRF-193 treatment leads to an elongation of presumed chromatin fibers connected to kinetochores during mid-mitosis. Anaphase spindles begin to arch, and eventually spindle poles come together abruptly, as if the spindle snapped at the point of spindle microtubule overlap in telophase. Segregating chromosomes appeared as elastic clumps and subsequently pulled back and merged. The snapped spindle phenotype was abolished by microtubule destabilization after thiabendazole treatment, accompanied by unequal chromosome segregation or severe defects in spindle extension. Thus, we conclude that ICRF-193-treated, unseparated sister chromatids pulling toward opposite spindle poles produce the arched and snapped telophase spindle. ICRF-193 treatment increased DNA content, suggesting that the failure of sister chromatids to separate properly in anaphase, causes the spindle to break in telophase, resulting in polyploidization. PMID:27458047

  9. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of human cytosolic isoforms I and II with (reduced) Schiff's bases incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylate and carboxymethyl moieties.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Gihane; Cristian, Alina; Barboiu, Mihail; Vullo, Daniella; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-05-15

    A library of Schiff bases was synthesized by condensation of aromatic amines incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylic acid or carboxymethyl functionalities as Zn(2+)-binding groups, with aromatic aldehydes incorporating tert-butyl, hydroxy and/or methoxy groups. The corresponding amines were thereafter obtained by reduction of the imines. These compounds were assayed for the inhibition of two cytosolic human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoenzymes, hCA I and II. The Ki values of the Schiff bases were in the range of 7.0-21,400nM against hCA II and of 52-8600nM against hCA I, respectively. The corresponding amines showed Ki values in the range of 8.6nM-5.3μM against hCA II, and of 18.7-251nM against hCA I, respectively. Unlike the imines, the reduced Schiff bases are stable to hydrolysis and several low-nanomolar inhibitors were detected, most of them incorporating sulfonamide groups. Some carboxylates also showed interesting CA inhibitory properties. Such hydrosoluble derivatives may show pharmacologic applications. PMID:24746465

  10. ICRF-193, an anticancer topoisomerase II inhibitor, induces arched telophase spindles that snap, leading to a ploidy increase in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Norihiko; Mehrotra, Rajesh; Arakawa, Orie; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-09-01

    ICRF-193 [meso-4,4-(2,3-butanediyl)-bis(2,6-piperazinedione)] is a complex-stabilizing inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II (topo II) that is used as an effective anticancer drug. ICRF-193 inhibits topo II catalytic activity in vitro and blocks nuclear division in vivo. Here, we examined the effects of ICRF-193 treatment on chromatin behavior and spindle dynamics using detailed live mitotic cell analysis in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Time-lapse movie analysis showed that ICRF-193 treatment leads to an elongation of presumed chromatin fibers connected to kinetochores during mid-mitosis. Anaphase spindles begin to arch, and eventually spindle poles come together abruptly, as if the spindle snapped at the point of spindle microtubule overlap in telophase. Segregating chromosomes appeared as elastic clumps and subsequently pulled back and merged. The snapped spindle phenotype was abolished by microtubule destabilization after thiabendazole treatment, accompanied by unequal chromosome segregation or severe defects in spindle extension. Thus, we conclude that ICRF-193-treated, unseparated sister chromatids pulling toward opposite spindle poles produce the arched and snapped telophase spindle. ICRF-193 treatment increased DNA content, suggesting that the failure of sister chromatids to separate properly in anaphase, causes the spindle to break in telophase, resulting in polyploidization.

  11. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of human cytosolic isoforms I and II with (reduced) Schiff's bases incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylate and carboxymethyl moieties.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Gihane; Cristian, Alina; Barboiu, Mihail; Vullo, Daniella; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-05-15

    A library of Schiff bases was synthesized by condensation of aromatic amines incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylic acid or carboxymethyl functionalities as Zn(2+)-binding groups, with aromatic aldehydes incorporating tert-butyl, hydroxy and/or methoxy groups. The corresponding amines were thereafter obtained by reduction of the imines. These compounds were assayed for the inhibition of two cytosolic human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoenzymes, hCA I and II. The Ki values of the Schiff bases were in the range of 7.0-21,400nM against hCA II and of 52-8600nM against hCA I, respectively. The corresponding amines showed Ki values in the range of 8.6nM-5.3μM against hCA II, and of 18.7-251nM against hCA I, respectively. Unlike the imines, the reduced Schiff bases are stable to hydrolysis and several low-nanomolar inhibitors were detected, most of them incorporating sulfonamide groups. Some carboxylates also showed interesting CA inhibitory properties. Such hydrosoluble derivatives may show pharmacologic applications.

  12. Albumin-binding of diclofenac and the effect of a site II inhibitor in the aqueous humor of cataract patients with the instillation of diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Takashi; Ozaki, Mineo; Takamura, Norito; Ogata, Kenji; Tokunaga, Jin; Setoguchi, Nao; Arimori, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Diclofenac instillation has been used widely in cataract surgery to prevent postoperative inflammation. Since diclofenac binds strongly to albumin in the circulation, it does not have a sufficient effect on patients in whom diclofenac binds strongly to albumin in the aqueous humor. A decrease in diclofenac binding and an increase in free diclofenac levels are necessary in these patients. The binding of diclofenac to albumin was investigated in the aqueous humor. In a diclofenac binding assay with albumin in the aqueous humor of individual patients, diclofenac was extracted from aliquots of the aqueous humor, and its total levels were measured using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC). Free diclofenac levels were measured using ultrafiltration and UHPLC. The albumin-binding fraction of diclofenac was 0.8 or higher in the aqueous humor of some patients. Ibuprofen significantly inhibited diclofenac binding to site II of albumin in mimic aqueous humor, but not in pooled aqueous humor. This difference may have been due to the weak binding of diclofenac to site II in the pooled aqueous humor. Flurbiprofen was used instead of diclofenac. Flurbiprofen has been shown to bind more strongly than diclofenac to the same site of albumin. Thus, the inhibitory effect of ibuprofen on the binding of flurbiprofen to albumin was investigated in pooled aqueous humor. The results indicated that ibuprofen significantly inhibited the flurbiprofen binding. An effective diclofenac administration method may be established for clinical application by the instillation of an appropriate inhibitor of binding to the albumin site II.

  13. Two phospholipase A2 inhibitors from the plasma of Cerrophidion (Bothrops) godmani which selectively inhibit two different group-II phospholipase A2 myotoxins from its own venom: isolation, molecular cloning and biological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Lizano, S; Angulo, Y; Lomonte, B; Fox, J W; Lambeau, G; Lazdunski, M; Gutiérrez, J M

    2000-01-01

    Myotoxic phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s; group II) account for most of the muscle-tissue damage that results from envenomation by viperid snakes. In the venom of the Godman's viper (Cerrophidion godmani, formerly Bothrops godmani), an enzymically active PLA(2) (myotoxin I) and an inactive, Lys-49 variant (myotoxin II) induce extensive muscle damage and oedema. In this study, two distinct myotoxin inhibitor proteins of C. godmani, CgMIP-I and CgMIP-II, were purified directly from blood plasma by selective binding to affinity columns containing either myotoxin I or myotoxin II, respectively. Both proteins are glycosylated, acidic (pI=4) and composed of 20-25-kDa subunits that form oligomers of 110 kDa (CgMIP-I) or 180 kDa (CgMIP-II). In inhibition studies, CgMIP-I specifically neutralized the PLA(2) and the myotoxic, oedema-forming and cytolytic activities of myotoxins I, whereas CgMIP-II selectively inhibited the toxic properties of myotoxin II. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis and sequencing of cDNAs encoding the two inhibitors revealed that CgMIP-I is similar to gamma-type inhibitors, which share a pattern of cysteine residues present in the Ly-6 superfamily of proteins, whereas CgMIP-II shares sequence identity with alpha-type inhibitors that contain carbohydrate-recognition-like domains, also found in C-type lectins and mammalian PLA(2) receptors. N-terminal sequencing of myotoxin I revealed a different primary structure from myotoxin II [De Sousa, Morhy, Arni, Ward, Díaz and Gutiérrez (1998) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1384, 204-208], which provides insight into the nature of such pharmacological specificity. PMID:10698689

  14. TM-02IDENTIFICATION OF THE AZOLE CLASS OF ANTIFUNGALS AS POTENT INHIBITORS OF HEXOKINASE II MEDIATED TUMOUR METABOLISM IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Vartanian, Alenoush; Burrell, Kelly; Singh, Sanjay; Alamsahebpour, Amir; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly proliferating tumour cells preferentially use aerobic glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to support growth and survive unfavorable microenvironment conditions. This metabolic reprogramming is referred to as the “Warburg effect” and offers a novel way to target cancer cells including glioblastoma (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor. Here we demonstrate that Hexokinase 2 (HK2) but not HK1 or HK3 is a critical mediator of metabolic reprograming in GBMs and its inhibition is a potential therapeutic strategy for sensitization of GBM tumors to radiation (RAD) and temozolomide (TMZ). In GBM xenografts, conditional HK2 loss sensitizes tumors to concomitant RAD/TMZ and results in a significant survival benefit. Loss of HK2 resulted in increased necrosis, hypoxia, inflammatory infiltration and reduced vascularization. Currently, no direct inhibitor of HK2 exists so we explored whether a system biology approach to identify gene networks associated with HK2 could lead to the identification of HK2 inhibitors. Using HK2 knockdown in established GBM cell lines and primary cultures we established gene signatures and networks associated with HK2 expression. Loss of HK2 led to attenuation of several pro GBM signaling pathways affecting tumour cell invasion, glucose metabolism and proliferation. Using a small drug screen targeting potential HK2 regulated gene expression networks we identified the azole class of antifungals as inhibitors of tumour metabolism by reducing proliferation, lactate production, glucose uptake in GBM cells but not primary normal human astrocytes or normal neural stem cells. Interestingly, several azole compounds were more potent at killing GBM cells in hypoxic conditions. Azoles in combination with further HK2 knockdown, RT or in combination with other metabolic therapeutics including pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM) activators led to synergistic tumour cell death. In summary, the azole class of antifungals may represent a new way

  15. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 551 Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2-Sulfonamide Derivatives: In Vitro Inhibition Studies With Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II and IV

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio; Ilies, Marc A.; Jitianu, Andrei

    1998-01-01

    Coordination compounds of 5-chloroacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide (Hcaz) with V(IV), Cr(lll), Fe(ll), Co(ll), Ni(ll) and Cu(ll) have been prepared and characterized by standard procedures (spectroscopic, magnetic, EPR, thermogravimetric and conductimetric measurements). Some of these compounds showed very good in vitro inhibitory properties against three physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA)isozymes, i.e., CA I, II, and IV. The differences between these isozymes in susceptibility to inhibition by these metal complexes is discussed in relationship to the characteristic features of their active sites, and is rationalized in terms useful for developing isozyme-specific CA inhibitors. PMID:18475829

  16. Kinetics and molecular docking studies of cholinesterase inhibitors derived from water layer of Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. (II).

    PubMed

    Hung, Tran Manh; Lee, Joo Sang; Chuong, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Jeong Ah; Oh, Sang Ho; Woo, Mi Hee; Choi, Jae Sue; Min, Byung Sun

    2015-10-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors increase the availability of acetylcholine in central cholinergic synapses and are the most promising drugs currently available for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our screening study indicated that the water fraction of the methanolic extract of Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. significantly inhibited AChE in vitro. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of a new lignan glycoside, lycocernuaside A (12), and fourteen known compounds (1-11 and 13-15). Compound 7 exhibited the most potent AChE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.23 μM. Compound 15 had the most potent inhibitory activity against BChE and BACE1 with IC50 values of 0.62 and 2.16 μM, respectively. Compounds 4 and 7 showed mixed- and competitive-type AChE inhibition. Compound 7 noncompetitively inhibited BChE whereas 15 showed competitive and 8, 13, and 14 showed mixed-type inhibition. The docking results for complexes with AChE or BChE revealed that inhibitors 4, 7, and 15 stably positioned themselves in several pocket/catalytic domains of the AChE and BChE residues. PMID:26297990

  17. Design and synthesis of thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazolines as DYRK1A inhibitors, part II.

    PubMed

    Foucourt, Alicia; Hédou, Damien; Dubouilh-Benard, Carole; Girard, Angélique; Taverne, Thierry; Casagrande, Anne-Sophie; Désiré, Laurent; Leblond, Bertrand; Besson, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    The convenient synthesis of a focused library (forty molecules) of novel 6,6,5-tricyclic thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazolines was realized mainly under microwave irradiation. A novel 6-aminobenzo[d]thiazole-2,7-dicarbonitrile (1) was used as a versatile molecular platform for the synthesis of various derivatives. Kinase inhibition, of the obtained final compounds, was evaluated on a panel of two kinases (DYRK1A/1B) together with some known reference DYRK1A and DYRK1B inhibitors (harmine, TG003, NCGC-00189310 and leucettine L41). Compound IC50 values were obtained and compared. Five of the novel thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazoline derivatives prepared, EHT 5372 (8c), EHT 6840 (8h), EHT 1610 (8i), EHT 9851 (8k) and EHT 3356 (9b) displayed single-digit nanomolar or subnanomolar IC50 values and are among the most potent DYRK1A/1B inhibitors disclosed to date. DYRK1A/1B kinases are known to be involved in the regulation of various molecular pathways associated with oncology, neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer disease, AD, or other tauopathies), genetic diseases (such as Down Syndrome, DS), as well as diseases involved in abnormal pre-mRNA splicing. The compounds described in this communication constitute a highly potent set of novel molecular probes to evaluate the biology/pharmacology of DYR1A/1B in such diseases. PMID:25264830

  18. Novel endophytic yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain PTD3 II: production of xylitol and ethanol in the presence of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vajzovic, Azra; Bura, Renata; Kohlmeier, Kevin; Doty, Sharon L

    2012-10-01

    A systematic study was conducted characterizing the effect of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), and acetic acid concentration on the production of xylitol and ethanol by a novel endophytic yeast, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain PTD3. The influence of different inhibitor concentrations on the growth and fermentation abilities of PTD3 cultivated in synthetic nutrient media containing 30 g/l xylose or glucose were measured during liquid batch cultures. Concentrations of up to 5 g/l of furfural stimulated production of xylitol to 77 % of theoretical yield (10 % higher compared to the control) by PTD3. Xylitol yields produced by this yeast were not affected in the presence of 5-HMF at concentrations of up to 3 g/l. At higher concentrations of furfural and 5-HMF, xylitol and ethanol yields were negatively affected. The higher the concentration of acetic acid present in a media, the higher the ethanol yield approaching 99 % of theoretical yield (15 % higher compared to the control) was produced by the yeast. At all concentrations of acetic acid tested, xylitol yield was lowered. PTD3 was capable of metabolizing concentrations of 5, 15, and 5 g/l of furfural, 5-HMF, and acetic acid, respectively. This yeast would be a potent candidate for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic sugars to biochemicals given that in the presence of low concentrations of inhibitors, its xylitol and ethanol yields are stimulated, and it is capable of metabolizing pretreatment degradation products.

  19. Kinetics and molecular docking studies of cholinesterase inhibitors derived from water layer of Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. (II).

    PubMed

    Hung, Tran Manh; Lee, Joo Sang; Chuong, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Jeong Ah; Oh, Sang Ho; Woo, Mi Hee; Choi, Jae Sue; Min, Byung Sun

    2015-10-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors increase the availability of acetylcholine in central cholinergic synapses and are the most promising drugs currently available for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our screening study indicated that the water fraction of the methanolic extract of Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. significantly inhibited AChE in vitro. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of a new lignan glycoside, lycocernuaside A (12), and fourteen known compounds (1-11 and 13-15). Compound 7 exhibited the most potent AChE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.23 μM. Compound 15 had the most potent inhibitory activity against BChE and BACE1 with IC50 values of 0.62 and 2.16 μM, respectively. Compounds 4 and 7 showed mixed- and competitive-type AChE inhibition. Compound 7 noncompetitively inhibited BChE whereas 15 showed competitive and 8, 13, and 14 showed mixed-type inhibition. The docking results for complexes with AChE or BChE revealed that inhibitors 4, 7, and 15 stably positioned themselves in several pocket/catalytic domains of the AChE and BChE residues.

  20. Comparison of three development approaches for Stationary Phase Optimised Selectivity Liquid Chromatography based screening methods Part II: A group of structural analogues (PDE-5 inhibitors in food supplements).

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Ghijs, L; Kamugisha, A; Courselle, P

    2016-02-01

    Three approaches for the development of a screening method to detect adulterated dietary supplements, based on Stationary Phase Optimised Selectivity Liquid Chromatography were compared for their easiness/speed of development and the performance of the optimal method obtained. This comparison was performed for a heterogeneous group of molecules, i.e. slimming agents (Part I) and a group of structural analogues, i.e. PDE-5 inhibitors (Part II). The first approach makes use of primary runs at one isocratic level, the second of primary runs in gradient mode and the third of primary runs at three isocratic levels to calculate the optimal combination of segments of stationary phases. In each approach the selection of the stationary phase was followed by a gradient optimisation. For the PDE-5 inhibitors, the group of structural analogues, only the method obtained with the third approach was able to differentiate between all the molecules in the development set. Although not all molecules are baseline separated, the method allows the identification of the selected adulterants in dietary supplements using only diode array detection. Though, due to the mobile phases used, the method could also be coupled to mass spectrometry. The method was validated for its selectivity following the guidelines as described for the screening of pesticide residues and residues of veterinary medicines in food.

  1. Comparison of three development approaches for Stationary Phase Optimised Selectivity Liquid Chromatography based screening methods Part II: A group of structural analogues (PDE-5 inhibitors in food supplements).

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Ghijs, L; Kamugisha, A; Courselle, P

    2016-02-01

    Three approaches for the development of a screening method to detect adulterated dietary supplements, based on Stationary Phase Optimised Selectivity Liquid Chromatography were compared for their easiness/speed of development and the performance of the optimal method obtained. This comparison was performed for a heterogeneous group of molecules, i.e. slimming agents (Part I) and a group of structural analogues, i.e. PDE-5 inhibitors (Part II). The first approach makes use of primary runs at one isocratic level, the second of primary runs in gradient mode and the third of primary runs at three isocratic levels to calculate the optimal combination of segments of stationary phases. In each approach the selection of the stationary phase was followed by a gradient optimisation. For the PDE-5 inhibitors, the group of structural analogues, only the method obtained with the third approach was able to differentiate between all the molecules in the development set. Although not all molecules are baseline separated, the method allows the identification of the selected adulterants in dietary supplements using only diode array detection. Though, due to the mobile phases used, the method could also be coupled to mass spectrometry. The method was validated for its selectivity following the guidelines as described for the screening of pesticide residues and residues of veterinary medicines in food. PMID:26653459

  2. Utilization of Boron Compounds for the Modification of Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid as Inhibitor of Histone Deacetylase Class II Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Ridla; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Satriyanto, Cipta Prio; Kerami, Djati; Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) has a critical function in regulating gene expression. The inhibition of HDAC has developed as an interesting anticancer research area that targets biological processes such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell differentiation. In this study, an HDAC inhibitor that is available commercially, suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), has been modified to improve its efficacy and reduce the side effects of the compound. Hydrophobic cap and zinc-binding group of these compounds were substituted with boron-based compounds, whereas the linker region was substituted with p-aminobenzoic acid. The molecular docking analysis resulted in 8 ligands with ΔGbinding value more negative than the standards, SAHA and trichostatin A (TSA). That ligands were analyzed based on the nature of QSAR, pharmacological properties, and ADME-Tox. It is conducted to obtain a potent inhibitor of HDAC class II Homo sapiens. The screening process result gave one best ligand, Nova2 (513246-99-6), which was then further studied by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:25214833

  3. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  4. Novel pyrazole derivatives as potent inhibitors of type II topoisomerases. Part 1: synthesis and preliminary SAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Laurent; Hack, Michael D; Wu, Jiejun; Wiener, John J M; Venkatesan, Hari; Santillán, Alejandro; Pippel, Daniel J; Mani, Neelakandha; Morrow, Brian J; Motley, S Timothy; Shaw, Karen Joy; Wolin, Ronald; Grice, Cheryl A; Jones, Todd K

    2007-05-15

    In an attempt to search for a new class of antibacterial agents, we have discovered a series of pyrazole analogs that possess good antibacterial activity for Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms via inhibition of type II bacterial topoisomerases. We have investigated the structure-activity relationships of this series, with an emphasis on the length and conformation of the linker. This work led to the identification of tetrahydroindazole analogs, such as compound 1, as the most potent class of compounds.

  5. Tetrahydroindazole inhibitors of bacterial type II topoisomerases. Part 2: SAR development and potency against multidrug-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Wiener, John J M; Gomez, Laurent; Venkatesan, Hariharan; Santillán, Alejandro; Allison, Brett D; Schwarz, Kimberly L; Shinde, Shirin; Tang, Liu; Hack, Michael D; Morrow, Brian J; Motley, S Timothy; Goldschmidt, Raul M; Shaw, Karen Joy; Jones, Todd K; Grice, Cheryl A

    2007-05-15

    We have previously reported a novel class of tetrahydroindazoles that display potency against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, potentially via interaction with type II bacterial topoisomerases. Herein are reported SAR investigations of this new series. Several compounds possessing broad-spectrum potency were prepared. Further, these compounds exhibit activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive microorganisms equivalent to that against susceptible strains.

  6. A phase I/II trial of the histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin for adults with recurrent malignant glioma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study 03-03

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Alfred Yung, W.K.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Chang, Susan M.; Lieberman, Frank S.; Prados, Michael D.; Fine, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Romidepsin, a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown activity in preclinical glioma models. The primary objectives of this trial were to determine the pharmacokinetics of romidepsin in patients with recurrent glioma on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of romidepsin in patients with recurrent glioblastoma who were not receiving EIAEDs. Two dose cohorts were studied in the phase I component of the trial (13.3 and 17.7 mg/m2/d). Patients in the phase II component were treated with intravenous romidepsin at a dosage of 13.3 mg/m2/day on days 1, 8, and 15 of each 28-day cycle. Eight patients were treated on the phase I component. A similar romidepsin pharmacokinetic profile was demonstrated between patients receiving EIAEDs to those not receving EIAEDs. Thirty-five patients with glioblastoma were accrued to the phase II component. There was no objective radiographic response. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks and only 1 patient had a PFS time ≥6 months (PFS6 = 3%). To date, 34 patients (97%) have died, with a median survival duration of 34 weeks. Despite in vitro studies showing that romidepsin is primarily metabolized by CYP3A4, no decrease in exposure to romidepsin was seen in patients receiving potent CYP3A4 inducers. Romidepsin, at its standard dose and schedule, was ineffective for patients with recurrent glioblastomas. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00085540. PMID:21377994

  7. A phase I/II trial of the histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin for adults with recurrent malignant glioma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study 03-03.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Fabio M; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Kuhn, John G; Wen, Patrick Y; Yung, W K Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R; Chang, Susan M; Lieberman, Frank S; Prados, Michael D; Fine, Howard A

    2011-05-01

    Romidepsin, a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown activity in preclinical glioma models. The primary objectives of this trial were to determine the pharmacokinetics of romidepsin in patients with recurrent glioma on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of romidepsin in patients with recurrent glioblastoma who were not receiving EIAEDs. Two dose cohorts were studied in the phase I component of the trial (13.3 and 17.7 mg/m(2)/d). Patients in the phase II component were treated with intravenous romidepsin at a dosage of 13.3 mg/m(2)/day on days 1, 8, and 15 of each 28-day cycle. Eight patients were treated on the phase I component. A similar romidepsin pharmacokinetic profile was demonstrated between patients receiving EIAEDs to those not receving EIAEDs. Thirty-five patients with glioblastoma were accrued to the phase II component. There was no objective radiographic response. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks and only 1 patient had a PFS time ≥6 months (PFS6 = 3%). To date, 34 patients (97%) have died, with a median survival duration of 34 weeks. Despite in vitro studies showing that romidepsin is primarily metabolized by CYP3A4, no decrease in exposure to romidepsin was seen in patients receiving potent CYP3A4 inducers. Romidepsin, at its standard dose and schedule, was ineffective for patients with recurrent glioblastomas. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00085540.

  8. Biological activities of Zn(II)-S-methyl-cysteine complex as antiradical, inhibitor of acid phosphatase enzyme and in vivo antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Graciela E; Martini, Nancy; Jori, Khalil; Jori, Nadir; Maresca, Nahuel R; Laino, Carlos H; Naso, Luciana G; Williams, Patricia A M; Ferrer, Evelina G

    2016-12-01

    The antidepressant effect of simple Zn(II) salts has been proved in several animal models of depression. In this study, a coordination metal complex of Zn(II) having a sulfur containing ligand is tested as antidepressant for the first time. Forced swimming test method on male Wistar rats shows a decrease in the immobility and an increase in the swimming behavior after treatment with [Zn(S-Met)2] (S-Met=S-methyl-l-cysteine) being more effective and remarkable than ZnCl2. The thiobarbituric acid and the pyranine consumption (hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals, respectively) methods were applied to evaluate the antioxidant activity of S-Met and [Zn(S-Met)2] showing evidence of attenuation of hydroxyl but not peroxyl radicals activities. UV-vis studies on the inhibition of acid phosphatase enzyme (AcP) demonstrated that S-methyl-l-cysteine did not produce any effect but, in contrast, [Zn(S-Met)2] complex behaved as a moderate inhibitor. Finally, bioavailability studies were performed by fluorescence spectroscopy denoting the ability of the albumin to transport the complex.

  9. A phase I/II study of the pan Bcl-2 inhibitor obatoclax mesylate plus bortezomib for relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Goy, André; Hernandez-Ilzaliturri, Francisco J.; Kahl, Brad; Ford, Peggy; Protomastro, Ewelina; Berger, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Obatoclax, a BH3 mimetic inhibitor of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, demonstrates synergy with bortezomib in preclinical models of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). This phase I/II study assessed obatoclax plus bortezomib in patients with relapsed/refractory MCL. Twenty-three patients received obatoclax 30 or 45 mg plus bortezomib 1.0 or 1.3 mg/m2, administered intravenously on days 1, 4, 8 and 11 of a 21-day cycle. In phase I, the combination was feasible at all doses. Obatoclax 45 mg plus bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 was selected for phase II study. Common adverse events were somnolence (87%), fatigue (61%) and euphoric mood (57%), all primarily grade 1/2. Grade 3/4 events included thrombocytopenia (21%), anemia (13%) and fatigue (13%). Objective responses occurred in 4/13 (31%) evaluable patients (three complete and one partial response). Six patients (46%) had stable disease lasting ≥ 8 weeks. Obatoclax plus bortezomib was feasible, but the synergy demonstrated in preclinical models was not confirmed. PMID:24679008

  10. Label-free electrochemical detection of methyltransferase activity and inhibitor screening based on endonuclease HpaII and the deposition of polyaniline.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linqun; Wei, Min; Gao, Chunyan; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2015-11-15

    Detection of DNA methylation and methyltransferase (MTase) activity are important in determining human cancer because aberrant methylation was linked to cancer initiation and progression. In this work, we proposed an electrochemical method for sensitive detection of DNA methylation and MTase activity based on methylation sensitive restriction endonuclease HpaII and the deposition of polyaniline (PANI) catalyzed by HRP-mimicking DNAzyme. In the presence of methylated DNA, HRP-mimicking DNAzyme catalyzed the polymerization of aniline on the dsDNA template, producing huge DPV current. In the presence of non-methylated DNA, dsDNA are cleaved and digested by HpaII and exonuclease III, as a result, no PANI are deposited. This method can be used to determine DNA methylation at the site of CpG. It exhibits a wide linear response toward M.SssI MTase activity in the range of 0.5-0.6 U mL(-1) with the detection limit of 0.12 U mL(-1). G-rich DNA forms HRP mimicking DNAzyme, which avoids complex labeling procedures and is robust. The method is simple, reliable, sensitive and specific, which has been successfully applied in human serum samples and been used to screen the inhibitors. Thus, the proposed method may be a potential and powerful tool for clinical diagnosis and drug development in the future.

  11. Kinetics of successive seeding of monodisperse polystyrene latexes. I - Initiation via potassium persulfate. II - Azo initiators with and without inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudol, E. D.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Vanderhoff, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The polymerization kinetics of monodisperse polystyrene latexes with diameters of 1 micron are studied. The monodisperse latexes were prepared by the successive seeding method using 1 mM K2S2O8 with an 8 percent emulsifier surface coverage and 0.5 mM K2S2O8 with a 4 percent emulsifier surface coverage, and the kinetics were measured in a piston/cylinder dialometer. The data reveal that the polymerization rate decreases with increasing particle size; and the surface charge decreases with increasing particle size. The effects of initiators (AIBN and AMBN) and inhibitors (NH24SCN, NaNO2, and hydroquinone) on the product monodispersity and polymerization kinetics of latexes with diameters greater than 1 micron are investigated in a second experiment. It is observed that hydroquinone combined with AMBN are most effective in reducing nucleation without causing flocculation. It is noted that the kinetic transition from emulsion to bulk is complete for a particle size exceeding 1 micron in which the polymerization rate is independent of the particle size.

  12. Treatment with C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate in type I or II hereditary angioedema: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Bork, Konrad; Steffensen, Isabella; Machnig, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1 esterase inhibitor (HAE-C1-INH) deficiency is a rare genetic disorder presenting with recurrent episodes of skin swellings, abdominal pain attacks, and potentially fatal laryngeal edema. This study was designed to review the efficacy and safety of pasteurized, human, plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate for the treatment of patients with HAE-C1-INH. A systematic search of electronic databases up to December 2011 was performed without language or date restrictions. Two reviewers completed the study selection using predefined inclusion criteria, tabulated, and analyzed the data. The data were inappropriate for meta-analysis; thus, a qualitative synthesis was performed. We identified 89 studies (≍2000 patients) that investigated C1-INH. Replacement therapy with C1-INH significantly shortened time to onset of symptom relief in HAE attacks compared with placebo in a randomized controlled trial, and similar improvements were consistently reported in observational and descriptive studies, accompanied by improvements in patients' quality of life. C1-INH has been shown to be effective for patients receiving home therapy and short- and long-term prophylaxis. Treatment with C1-INH was generally well tolerated. Administration of C1-INH was not associated with transmission of viruses or development of autoantibodies irrespective of treatment duration. This research provides additional confirmation of the efficacy of C1-INH in the treatment and prevention of HAE attacks. C1-INH is generally safe and well tolerated and has an excellent safety record for over 25 years of clinical use.

  13. Phase II Study of Alisertib, a Selective Aurora A Kinase Inhibitor, in Relapsed and Refractory Aggressive B- and T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Mahadevan, Daruka; Cebula, Erin; Persky, Daniel; Lossos, Izidore; Agarwal, Amit B.; Jung, JungAh; Burack, Richard; Zhou, Xiaofei; Leonard, E. Jane; Fingert, Howard; Danaee, Hadi; Bernstein, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aurora A kinase (AAK) is overexpressed in aggressive lymphomas and can correlate with more histologically aggressive forms of disease. We therefore designed a phase II study of alisertib, a selective AAK inhibitor, in patients with relapsed and refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Patients and Methods Patients age ≥ 18 years were eligible if they had relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL), transformed follicular lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, or noncutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Alisertib was administered orally at 50 mg twice daily for 7 days in 21-day cycles. Results We enrolled 48 patients. Histologies included DLBCL (n = 21), MCL (n = 13), peripheral T-cell lymphoma (n = 8), transformed follicular lymphoma (n = 5), and Burkitt's (n = 1). Most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events were neutropenia (63%), leukopenia (54%), anemia (35%), thrombocytopenia (33%), stomatitis (15%), febrile neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (6%). Four deaths during the study were attributed to progressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2), treatment-related sepsis (n = 1), and unknown cause (n = 1). The overall response rate was 27%, including responses in three of 21 patients with DLBCL, three of 13 with MCL, one of one with Burkitt's lymphoma, two of five with transformed follicular lymphoma, and four of eight with noncutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The alisertib steady-state trough concentration (n = 25) revealed the expected pharmacokinetic variability, with a trend for higher incidence of adverse event–related dose reductions at higher trough concentrations. Analysis for AAK gene amplification and total AAK protein revealed no differences between histologies or correlation with clinical response. Conclusion The novel AAK inhibitor alisertib seems clinically active in both B- and T-cell aggressive lymphomas. On the basis of these results, confirmatory single-agent and combination studies have been initiated. PMID:24043741

  14. The Nox1/4 Dual Inhibitor GKT137831 or Nox4 Knockdown Inhibits Angiotensin-II-Induced Adult Mouse Cardiac Fibroblast Proliferation and Migration. AT1 Physically Associates With Nox4.

    PubMed

    Somanna, Naveen K; Valente, Anthony J; Krenz, Maike; Fay, William P; Delafontaine, Patrice; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2016-05-01

    Both oxidative stress and inflammation contribute to chronic hypertension-induced myocardial fibrosis and adverse cardiac remodeling. Here we investigated whether angiotensin (Ang)-II-induced fibroblast proliferation and migration are NADPH oxidase (Nox) 4/ROS and IL-18 dependent. Our results show that the potent induction of mouse cardiac fibroblast (CF) proliferation and migration by Ang-II is markedly attenuated by Nox4 knockdown and the Nox inhibitor DPI. Further, Nox4 knockdown and DPI pre-treatment attenuated Ang-II-induced IL-18, IL-18Rα and collagen expression, and MMP9 and LOX activation. While neutralization of IL-18 blunted Ang-II-induced CF proliferation and migration, knockdown of MMP9 attenuated CF migration. The antioxidant NAC and the cell-permeable SOD mimetics Tempol, MnTBAP, and MnTMPyP attenuated oxidative stress and inhibited CF proliferation and migration. The Nox1/Nox4 dual inhibitor GKT137831 also blunted Ang-II-induced H2 O2 production and CF proliferation and migration. Further, AT1 bound Nox4, and Ang-II enhanced their physical association. Notably, GKT137831 attenuated the AT1/Nox4 interaction. These results indicate that Ang-II induces CF proliferation and migration in part via Nox4/ROS-dependent IL-18 induction and MMP9 activation, and may involve AT1/Nox4 physical association. Thus, either (i) neutralizing IL-18, (ii) blocking AT1/Nox4 interaction or (iii) use of the Nox1/Nox4 inhibitor GKT137831 may have therapeutic potential in chronic hypertension-induced adverse cardiac remodeling.

  15. Impaired anterior swim bladder inflation following exposure to the thyroid peroxidase inhibitor 2-mercaptobenzothiazole part II: Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stinckens, Evelyn; Vergauwen, Lucia; Schroeder, Anthony L; Maho, Walid; Blackwell, Brett R; Witters, Hilda; Blust, Ronny; Ankley, Gerald T; Covaci, Adrian; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Knapen, Dries

    2016-04-01

    Disruption of the thyroid hormone (TH) system, an important mode of action, can lead to ecologically relevant adverse outcomes, especially during embryonic development. The present study characterizes the effects of disruption of TH synthesis on swim bladder inflation during zebrafish early-life stages using 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT), a thyroid peroxidase (TPO) inhibitor. Zebrafish were exposed to different MBT concentrations until 120/168h post fertilization (hpf) and 32days post fertilization (dpf), in two sets of experiments, to investigate the effects of TPO inhibition on posterior and anterior swim bladder inflation respectively, as well as whole body thyroid hormone concentrations (triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone, thyroxine (T4)). At 120hpf, MBT did not directly impair posterior chamber inflation or size, while anterior chamber inflation and size was impaired at 32dpf. As previously shown in amphibians and mammals, we confirmed that MBT inhibits TPO in fish. Whole-body T4 decreased after MBT exposure at both time points, while T3 levels were unaltered. There was a significant relationship between T4 levels and the anterior chamber surface at 32dpf. The absence of effects on posterior chamber inflation can possibly be explained by maternal transfer of T4 into the eggs. These maternally derived THs are depleted at 32dpf and cannot offset TPO inhibition, resulting in impaired anterior chamber inflation. Therefore, we hypothesize that TPO inhibition only inhibits swim bladder inflation during late development, after depletion of maternally derived T4. In a previous study, we showed that iodothyronine deiodinase (ID) knockdown impaired posterior chamber inflation during early development. Our findings, in parallel with similar effects observed in fathead minnow (see part I, this issue) suggest that thyroid disruption impacts swim bladder inflation, and imply an important distinction among specific subtypes of TH disrupting chemicals. However, the

  16. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor-II Antagonist Prescribing and Hospital Admissions with Acute Kidney Injury: A Longitudinal Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Laurie A.; Abel, Gary A.; Chaudhry, Afzal N.; Tomson, Charles R.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Roland, Martin O.; Payne, Rupert A.

    2013-01-01

    Background ACE Inhibitors (ACE-I) and Angiotensin-Receptor Antagonists (ARAs) are commonly prescribed but can cause acute kidney injury (AKI) during intercurrent illness. Rates of hospitalization with AKI are increasing. We aimed to determine whether hospital AKI admission rates are associated with increased ACE-I/ARA prescribing. Methods and Findings English NHS prescribing data for ACE-I/ARA prescriptions were matched at the level of the general practice to numbers of hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of AKI. Numbers of prescriptions were weighted for the demographic characteristics of general practices by expressing prescribing as rates where the denominator is Age, Sex, and Temporary Resident Originated Prescribing Units (ASTRO-PUs). We performed a mixed-effect Poisson regression to model the number of admissions for AKI occurring in each practice for each of 4 years from 1/4/2007. From 2007/8-2010/11, crude AKI admission rates increased from 0.38 to 0.57 per 1000 patients (51.6% increase), and national annual ACE-I/ARA prescribing rates increased by 0.032 from 0.202 to 0.234 (15.8% increase). There was strong evidence (p<0.001) that increases in practice-level prescribing of ACE-I/ARA over the study period were associated with an increase in AKI admission rates. The increase in prescribing seen in a typical practice corresponded to an increase in admissions of approximately 5.1% (rate ratio = 1.051 for a 0.03 per ASTRO-PU increase in annual prescribing rate, 95%CI 1.047-1.055). Using the regression model we predict that 1,636 (95%CI 1,540-1,780) AKI admissions would have been avoided if prescribing rates were at the 2007/8 level, equivalent to 14.8% of the total increase in AKI admissions. Conclusion In this ecological analysis, up to 15% of the increase in AKI admissions in England over a 4-year time period is potentially attributable to increased prescribing of ACE-I and ARAs. However, these findings are limited by the lack of patient level

  17. Impaired anterior swim bladder inflation following exposure to the thyroid peroxidase inhibitor 2-mercaptobenzothiazole part II: Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stinckens, Evelyn; Vergauwen, Lucia; Schroeder, Anthony L; Maho, Walid; Blackwell, Brett R; Witters, Hilda; Blust, Ronny; Ankley, Gerald T; Covaci, Adrian; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Knapen, Dries

    2016-04-01

    Disruption of the thyroid hormone (TH) system, an important mode of action, can lead to ecologically relevant adverse outcomes, especially during embryonic development. The present study characterizes the effects of disruption of TH synthesis on swim bladder inflation during zebrafish early-life stages using 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT), a thyroid peroxidase (TPO) inhibitor. Zebrafish were exposed to different MBT concentrations until 120/168h post fertilization (hpf) and 32days post fertilization (dpf), in two sets of experiments, to investigate the effects of TPO inhibition on posterior and anterior swim bladder inflation respectively, as well as whole body thyroid hormone concentrations (triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone, thyroxine (T4)). At 120hpf, MBT did not directly impair posterior chamber inflation or size, while anterior chamber inflation and size was impaired at 32dpf. As previously shown in amphibians and mammals, we confirmed that MBT inhibits TPO in fish. Whole-body T4 decreased after MBT exposure at both time points, while T3 levels were unaltered. There was a significant relationship between T4 levels and the anterior chamber surface at 32dpf. The absence of effects on posterior chamber inflation can possibly be explained by maternal transfer of T4 into the eggs. These maternally derived THs are depleted at 32dpf and cannot offset TPO inhibition, resulting in impaired anterior chamber inflation. Therefore, we hypothesize that TPO inhibition only inhibits swim bladder inflation during late development, after depletion of maternally derived T4. In a previous study, we showed that iodothyronine deiodinase (ID) knockdown impaired posterior chamber inflation during early development. Our findings, in parallel with similar effects observed in fathead minnow (see part I, this issue) suggest that thyroid disruption impacts swim bladder inflation, and imply an important distinction among specific subtypes of TH disrupting chemicals. However, the

  18. Structure-based de novo design, molecular docking and molecular dynamics of primaquine analogues acting as quinone reductase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Murce, Erika; Cuya-Guizado, Teobaldo Ricardo; Padilla-Chavarria, Helmut Isaac; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Pimentel, Andre Silva

    2015-11-01

    Primaquine is a traditional antimalarial drug with low parasitic resistance and generally good acceptance at higher doses, which has been used for over 60 years in malaria treatment. However, several limitations related to its hematotoxicity have been reported. It is believed that this toxicity comes from the hydroxylation of the C-5 and C-6 positions of its 8-aminoquinoline ring before binding to the molecular target: the quinone reductase II (NQO2) human protein. In this study we propose primaquine derivatives, with substitution at position C-6 of the 8-aminoquinoline ring, planned to have better binding to NQO2, compared to primaquine, but with a reduced toxicity related to the C-5 position being possible to be oxidized. On this sense the proposed analogues were suggested in order to reduce or inhibit hydroxylation and further oxidation to hemotoxic metabolites. Five C-6 substituted primaquine analogues were selected by de novo design and further submitted to docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results suggest that all analogues bind better to NQO2 than primaquine and may become better antimalarials. However, the analogues 3 and 4 are predicted to have a better activity/toxicity balance.

  19. Icariside II, a natural mTOR inhibitor, disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis via suppressing mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis in sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Geng, Ya-di; An, Fa-Liang; Xia, Yuan-Zheng; Guo, Chao; Luo, Jian-Guang; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Guo, Qing-Long; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2016-05-10

    The aberrant energy homeostasis that characterized by high rate of energy production (glycolysis) and energy consumption (mRNA translation) is associated with the development of cancer. As mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of aberrant energy homeostasis, it is an attractive target for anti-tumor intervention. The flavonoid compound Icariside II (IS) is a natural mTOR inhibitor derived from Epimedium. Koreanum. Herein, we evaluate the effect of IS on aberrant energy homeostasis. The reduction of glycolysis and mRNA translation in U2OS (osteosarcoma), S180 (fibrosarcoma) and SW1535 (chondrosarcoma) cells observed in our study, indicate that, IS inhibits aberrant energy homeostasis. This inhibition is found to be due to suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) axis through blocking the assembly of mTORC1. Furthermore, IS inhibits the cap-dependent translation of c-myc through mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis which links the relationship between mRNA translation and glycolysis. Inhibition of aberrant energy homeostasis by IS, contributes to its in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferation activity. These data indicate that IS disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis of sarcoma cells through suppression of mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis, providing a novel mechanism of IS to inhibit cell proliferation in sarcoma cells.

  20. The versatile binding mode of transition-state analogue inhibitors of tyrosinase towards dicopper(II) model complexes: experimental and theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Orio, Maylis; Bochot, Constance; Dubois, Carole; Gellon, Gisèle; Hardré, Renaud; Jamet, Hélène; Luneau, Dominique; Philouze, Christian; Réglier, Marius; Serratrice, Guy; Belle, Catherine

    2011-11-25

    We describe 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (HSPNO) as a new and efficient competitive inhibitor of mushroom tyrosinase (K(IC) =3.7 μM). Binding studies of HSPNO and 2-hydroxypyridine-N-oxide (HOPNO) on dinuclear copper(II) complexes [Cu(2)(BPMP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2) (1; HBPMP=2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenol) and [Cu(2)(BPEP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2)) (2; HBPEP=2,6-bis{bis[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]aminomethyl}-4-methylphenol), known to be functional models for the tyrosinase diphenolase activity, have been performed. A combination of structural data, spectroscopic studies, and DFT calculations evidenced the adaptable binding mode (bridging versus chelating) of HOPNO in relation to the geometry and chelate size of the dicopper center. For comparison, binding studies of HSPNO and kojic acid (5-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) on dinuclear complexes were performed. A theoretical approach has been developed and validated on HOPNO adducts to compare the binding mode on the model complexes. It has been applied for HSPNO and kojic acid. Although results for HSPNO were in line with those obtained with HOPNO, thus reflecting their chemical similarity, we showed that the bridging mode was the most preferential binding mode for kojic acid on both complexes. PMID:22025275

  1. Genetic Resistance Determinants, In Vitro Time-Kill Curve Analysis and Pharmacodynamic Functions for the Novel Topoisomerase II Inhibitor ETX0914 (AZD0914) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Sunniva; Golparian, Daniel; Jacobsson, Susanne; Hathaway, Lucy J; Low, Nicola; Shafer, William M; Althaus, Christian L; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae to all available therapeutic antimicrobials has emerged and new efficacious drugs for treatment of gonorrhea are essential. The topoisomerase II inhibitor ETX0914 (also known as AZD0914) is a new spiropyrimidinetrione antimicrobial that has different mechanisms of action from all previous and current gonorrhea treatment options. In this study, the N. gonorrhoeae resistance determinants for ETX0914 were further described and the effects of ETX0914 on the growth of N. gonorrhoeae (ETX0914 wild type, single step selected resistant mutants, and efflux pump mutants) were examined in a novel in vitro time-kill curve analysis to estimate pharmacodynamic parameters of the new antimicrobial. For comparison, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline were also examined (separately and in combination with ETX0914). ETX0914 was rapidly bactericidal for all wild type strains and had similar pharmacodynamic properties to ciprofloxacin. All selected resistant mutants contained mutations in amino acid codons D429 or K450 of GyrB and inactivation of the MtrCDE efflux pump fully restored the susceptibility to ETX0914. ETX0914 alone and in combination with azithromycin and ceftriaxone was highly effective against N. gonorrhoeae and synergistic interaction with ciprofloxacin, particularly for ETX0914-resistant mutants, was found. ETX0914, monotherapy or in combination with azithromycin (to cover additional sexually transmitted infections), should be considered for phase III clinical trials and future gonorrhea treatment.

  2. Genetic Resistance Determinants, In Vitro Time-Kill Curve Analysis and Pharmacodynamic Functions for the Novel Topoisomerase II Inhibitor ETX0914 (AZD0914) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Sunniva; Golparian, Daniel; Jacobsson, Susanne; Hathaway, Lucy J.; Low, Nicola; Shafer, William M.; Althaus, Christian L.; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae to all available therapeutic antimicrobials has emerged and new efficacious drugs for treatment of gonorrhea are essential. The topoisomerase II inhibitor ETX0914 (also known as AZD0914) is a new spiropyrimidinetrione antimicrobial that has different mechanisms of action from all previous and current gonorrhea treatment options. In this study, the N. gonorrhoeae resistance determinants for ETX0914 were further described and the effects of ETX0914 on the growth of N. gonorrhoeae (ETX0914 wild type, single step selected resistant mutants, and efflux pump mutants) were examined in a novel in vitro time-kill curve analysis to estimate pharmacodynamic parameters of the new antimicrobial. For comparison, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline were also examined (separately and in combination with ETX0914). ETX0914 was rapidly bactericidal for all wild type strains and had similar pharmacodynamic properties to ciprofloxacin. All selected resistant mutants contained mutations in amino acid codons D429 or K450 of GyrB and inactivation of the MtrCDE efflux pump fully restored the susceptibility to ETX0914. ETX0914 alone and in combination with azithromycin and ceftriaxone was highly effective against N. gonorrhoeae and synergistic interaction with ciprofloxacin, particularly for ETX0914-resistant mutants, was found. ETX0914, monotherapy or in combination with azithromycin (to cover additional sexually transmitted infections), should be considered for phase III clinical trials and future gonorrhea treatment. PMID:26696986

  3. Genetic Resistance Determinants, In Vitro Time-Kill Curve Analysis and Pharmacodynamic Functions for the Novel Topoisomerase II Inhibitor ETX0914 (AZD0914) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Sunniva; Golparian, Daniel; Jacobsson, Susanne; Hathaway, Lucy J; Low, Nicola; Shafer, William M; Althaus, Christian L; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae to all available therapeutic antimicrobials has emerged and new efficacious drugs for treatment of gonorrhea are essential. The topoisomerase II inhibitor ETX0914 (also known as AZD0914) is a new spiropyrimidinetrione antimicrobial that has different mechanisms of action from all previous and current gonorrhea treatment options. In this study, the N. gonorrhoeae resistance determinants for ETX0914 were further described and the effects of ETX0914 on the growth of N. gonorrhoeae (ETX0914 wild type, single step selected resistant mutants, and efflux pump mutants) were examined in a novel in vitro time-kill curve analysis to estimate pharmacodynamic parameters of the new antimicrobial. For comparison, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline were also examined (separately and in combination with ETX0914). ETX0914 was rapidly bactericidal for all wild type strains and had similar pharmacodynamic properties to ciprofloxacin. All selected resistant mutants contained mutations in amino acid codons D429 or K450 of GyrB and inactivation of the MtrCDE efflux pump fully restored the susceptibility to ETX0914. ETX0914 alone and in combination with azithromycin and ceftriaxone was highly effective against N. gonorrhoeae and synergistic interaction with ciprofloxacin, particularly for ETX0914-resistant mutants, was found. ETX0914, monotherapy or in combination with azithromycin (to cover additional sexually transmitted infections), should be considered for phase III clinical trials and future gonorrhea treatment. PMID:26696986

  4. Icariside II, a natural mTOR inhibitor, disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis via suppressing mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis in sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Geng, Ya-di; An, Fa-Liang; Xia, Yuan-Zheng; Guo, Chao; Luo, Jian-Guang; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Guo, Qing-Long; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2016-05-10

    The aberrant energy homeostasis that characterized by high rate of energy production (glycolysis) and energy consumption (mRNA translation) is associated with the development of cancer. As mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of aberrant energy homeostasis, it is an attractive target for anti-tumor intervention. The flavonoid compound Icariside II (IS) is a natural mTOR inhibitor derived from Epimedium. Koreanum. Herein, we evaluate the effect of IS on aberrant energy homeostasis. The reduction of glycolysis and mRNA translation in U2OS (osteosarcoma), S180 (fibrosarcoma) and SW1535 (chondrosarcoma) cells observed in our study, indicate that, IS inhibits aberrant energy homeostasis. This inhibition is found to be due to suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) axis through blocking the assembly of mTORC1. Furthermore, IS inhibits the cap-dependent translation of c-myc through mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis which links the relationship between mRNA translation and glycolysis. Inhibition of aberrant energy homeostasis by IS, contributes to its in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferation activity. These data indicate that IS disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis of sarcoma cells through suppression of mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis, providing a novel mechanism of IS to inhibit cell proliferation in sarcoma cells. PMID:27056897

  5. Type II arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 regulates gene expression of inhibitors of differentiation/DNA binding Id2 and Id4 during glial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghan; Vogel, Gillian; Yu, Zhenbao; Almazan, Guillermina; Richard, Stéphane

    2011-12-30

    PRMT5 is a type II protein arginine methyltranferase that catalyzes monomethylation and symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues. PRMT5 is functionally involved in a variety of biological processes including embryo development and circadian clock regulation. However, the role of PRMT5 in oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination is unknown. Here we show that PRMT5 expression gradually increases throughout postnatal brain development, coinciding with the period of active myelination. PRMT5 expression was observed in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. siRNA-mediated depletion of PRMT5 in mouse primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cells abrogated oligodendrocyte differentiation. In addition, the PRMT5-depleted oligodendrocyte progenitor and C6 glioma cells expressed high levels of the inhibitors of differentiation/DNA binding, Id2 and Id4, known repressors of glial cell differentiation. We observed that CpG-rich islands within the Id2 and Id4 genes were bound by PRMT5 and were hypomethylated in PRMT5-deficient cells, suggesting that PRMT5 plays a role in gene silencing during glial cell differentiation. Our findings define a role of PRMT5 in glial cell differentiation and link PRMT5 to epigenetic changes during oligodendrocyte differentiation. PMID:22041901

  6. Icariside II, a natural mTOR inhibitor, disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis via suppressing mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis in sarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Geng, Ya-di; An, Fa-liang; Xia, Yuan-zheng; Guo, Chao; Luo, Jian-guang; Zhang, Lu-yong; Guo, Qing-long; Kong, Ling-yi

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant energy homeostasis that characterized by high rate of energy production (glycolysis) and energy consumption (mRNA translation) is associated with the development of cancer. As mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of aberrant energy homeostasis, it is an attractive target for anti-tumor intervention. The flavonoid compound Icariside II (IS) is a natural mTOR inhibitor derived from Epimedium. Koreanum. Herein, we evaluate the effect of IS on aberrant energy homeostasis. The reduction of glycolysis and mRNA translation in U2OS (osteosarcoma), S180 (fibrosarcoma) and SW1535 (chondrosarcoma) cells observed in our study, indicate that, IS inhibits aberrant energy homeostasis. This inhibition is found to be due to suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) axis through blocking the assembly of mTORC1. Furthermore, IS inhibits the cap-dependent translation of c-myc through mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis which links the relationship between mRNA translation and glycolysis. Inhibition of aberrant energy homeostasis by IS, contributes to its in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferation activity. These data indicate that IS disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis of sarcoma cells through suppression of mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis, providing a novel mechanism of IS to inhibit cell proliferation in sarcoma cells. PMID:27056897

  7. Hemodynamic, renal, and humoral effects of the calcium entry blocker nicardipine and converting enzyme inhibitor captopril in hypertensive type II diabetic patients with nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Stornello, M; Valvo, E V; Scapellato, L

    1989-12-01

    We compared the effect of nicardipine, a dihydropiridine derivative calcium entry blocker (CEB), with that of captopril (CAP), a converting-enzyme inhibitor (CEI), and that of the two drugs combined, on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and renal function in 12 hypertensive type II diabetic outpatients with nephropathy (persistent proteinuria greater than 500 mg/24 h) according to a 2 x 2 factorial design. For 4-week treatments, the patients received nicardipine (NIC) 20 mg t.i.d., CAP 50 mg b.i.d., NIC plus CAP, and matched placebo. Each active treatment significantly reduced BP, with an additive effect of NIC and CAP combined versus either drug alone. HR did not change. Effective renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GRF) were unmodified, but renal vascular resistances (RVRs) were significantly reduced by the three active treatments. Filtration fraction (FF) did not change with NIC or with NIC plus CAP and was significantly reduced with CAP. Urinary albumin excretion (UAE) was significantly reduced by each active treatment to a similar extent. Plasma renin activity (PRA) increased significantly with NIC plus CAP only and did not change when the drugs were administered singly. Plasma aldosterone, glucose, potassium, fructosamine, and urinary sodium and volume did not change during the trial. We conclude that the two drugs singly and combined are useful for treatment of hypertensive non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDD) patients with persistent proteinuria.

  8. Valproic Acid, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, in Combination with Paclitaxel for Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Phase II/III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Mariateresa; Gallo, Marco; Brignardello, Enrico; Milla, Paola; Orlandi, Fabio; Limone, Paolo Piero; Arvat, Emanuela; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe; Piovesan, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) has a median survival less than 5 months and, to date, no effective therapy exists. Taxanes have recently been stated as the main drug treatment for ATC, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid efficiently potentiates the effects of paclitaxel in vitro. Based on these data, this trial assessed the efficacy and safety of the combination of paclitaxel and valproic acid for the treatment of ATC. This was a randomized, controlled phase II/III trial, performed on 25 ATC patients across 5 centers in northwest Italy. The experimental arm received the combination of paclitaxel (80 mg/m2/weekly) and valproic acid (1,000 mg/day); the control arm received paclitaxel alone. Overall survival and disease progression, evaluated in terms of progression-free survival, were the primary outcomes. The secondary outcome was the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. The coadministration of valproic acid did not influence the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. Neither median survival nor median time to progression was statistically different in the two arms. Median survival of operated-on patients was significantly better than that of patients who were not operated on. The present trial demonstrates that the addition of valproic acid to paclitaxel has no effect on overall survival and disease progression of ATC patients. This trial is registered with EudraCT 2008-005221-11. PMID:27766105

  9. Crystal structure and bonding analysis of the first dinuclear calcium(II)-proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) `butterfly molecule': a combined microcrystal synchrotron and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hengjiang

    2016-04-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) are prodrugs used widely to treat acid-related diseases since the late 1980s. After an extensive research effort it has become clear that the fundamental interactions between metal atoms and PPIs are of paramount importance for both drug release and long-term therapeutic safety. Unfortunately, until now, very little information has been available on this topic. In this paper, we report the crystal structure analysis of a novel calcium-PPI compound incorporating bridging and terminal deprotonated (R)-rabeprazole tricyclic ligands (L), namely bis[μ-(R)-2-({[4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3-methylpyridin-2-yl]methyl}sulfinyl)-6,7-dihydro-3H-benzofuro[5,6-d]imidazol-1-ido]bis{dimethanol[(R)-2-({[4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3-methylpyridin-2-yl]methyl}sulfinyl)-6,7-dihydro-3H-benzofuro[5,6-d]imidazol-1-ido]calcium(II)} methanol hexasolvate, [Ca2(C20H22N3O4S)4(CH3OH)4]·6CH3OH or [Ca2(L)4(CH3OH)4]·6CH3OH, which crystallizes from methanol in the polar C2 space group. Using low-temperature microcrystal synchrotron radiation, we demonstrate that this compound is in the form of a beautiful `butterfly molecule', consisting of a C2-symmetric dinuclear (CH3OH)2LCa(II)(μ2-L)2Ca(II)L(HOCH3)2 framework. A large amount of disorder is found within the bridging L ligand and the conformation of the fused tetrahydrofuran ring exhibits great variety. All the sulfinyl groups remain intact and the nonbonded Ca...Ca distance is significantly longer than in other calcium dimers, indicating steric hindrance in the bridging ligands. Considerable hydrogen bonding and aromatic C-H...π interactions co-operate to stabilize the whole complex, as well as to facilitate supramolecular assembly. Additional investigations into the bond nature were made using density functional theory (DFT) methods at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level; geometry optimization, Mulliken atomic charges, MEP (molecular electrostatic potential), HOMO-LUMO (highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular

  10. I. Development of Metal-Mediated SPOT-Synthesis Methods for the Efficient Construction of Small-Molecule Macroarrays. II. Design and Synthesis of Novel Bacterial Biofilm Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Reto

    I. The use of small molecule probes to explore biological phenomena has become a valuable tool in chemical biology. As a result, methods that permit the rapid synthesis and biological evaluation of such compounds are highly sought-after. The small molecule macroarray represents one such approach for the synthesis and identification of novel bioactive agents. Macroarrays are readily constructed via the SPOT-synthesis technique on planar cellulose membranes, yielding spatially addressed libraries of ˜10-1000 unique compounds. We sought to expand the arsenal of chemical reactions compatible with this solid-phase platform, and developed highly efficient SPOT-synthesis protocols for the Mizoroki-Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura, and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. We demonstrated that these metal-mediated reactions can be implemented, either individually or sequentially, for the efficient construction of small molecules in high purity on rapid time scales. Utilizing these powerful C-C and C-N bond forming coupling reactions, we constructed a series of macroarrays based on novel stilbene, phenyl-naphthalene, and triazole scaliblds. Subsequent biological testing of the stilbene and phenyl-naphthalene libraries revealed several potent antagonists and agonists, respectively, of the quorum sensing (QS) receptor LuxR in Vibrio fischeri. II. Bacteria living within biofilms are notorious for their resistance to known antibiotic agents, and constitute a major human health threat. Methods to attenuate biofilm growth would have a significant impact on the management of bacterial infections. Despite intense research efforts, small molecules capable of either inhibiting or dispersing biolilms remain scarce. We utilized natural products with purported anti-biofilm or QS inhibitory activity as sources of structural insight to guide the synthesis of novel biofilm modulators with improved activities. These studies revealed 2-aminobenzimidazole derivatives as highly potent

  11. Discovery of (R)-2-amino-6-borono-2-(2-(piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)hexanoic acid and congeners as highly potent inhibitors of human arginases I and II for treatment of myocardial reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Van Zandt, Michael C; Whitehouse, Darren L; Golebiowski, Adam; Ji, Min Koo; Zhang, Mingbao; Beckett, R Paul; Jagdmann, G Erik; Ryder, Todd R; Sheeler, Ryan; Andreoli, Monica; Conway, Bruce; Mahboubi, Keyvan; D'Angelo, Gerard; Mitschler, Andre; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ruiz, Francesc X; Howard, Eduardo I; Podjarny, Alberto D; Schroeter, Hagen

    2013-03-28

    Recent efforts to identify treatments for myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury have resulted in the discovery of a novel series of highly potent α,α-disubstituted amino acid-based arginase inhibitors. The lead candidate, (R)-2-amino-6-borono-2-(2-(piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)hexanoic acid, compound 9, inhibits human arginases I and II with IC50s of 223 and 509 nM, respectively, and is active in a recombinant cellular assay overexpressing human arginase I (CHO cells). It is 28% orally bioavailable and significantly reduces the infarct size in a rat model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) for this novel series of inhibitors along with pharmacokinetic and in vivo efficacy data for compound 9 and X-ray crystallography data for selected lead compounds cocrystallized with arginases I and II.

  12. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91). PMID:26938528

  13. VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) induced vascular insufficiency in zebrafish as a model for studying vascular toxicity and vascular preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shang; Dang, Yuan Ye; Oi Lam Che, Ginny; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Chan, Shun Wan; Leung, George Pak Heng; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen; Hoi, Maggie Pui Man

    2014-11-01

    In ischemic disorders such as chronic wounds and myocardial ischemia, there is inadequate tissue perfusion due to vascular insufficiency. Besides, it has been observed that prolonged use of anti-angiogenic agents in cancer therapy produces cardiovascular toxicity caused by impaired vessel integrity and regeneration. In the present study, we used VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) to chemically induce vascular insufficiency in zebrafish in vivo and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro to further study the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis in these pathological conditions. We also explored the possibility of treating vascular insufficiency by enhancing vascular regeneration and repair with pharmacological intervention. We observed that pretreatment of VRI induced blood vessel loss in developing zebrafish by inhibiting angiogenesis and increasing endothelial cell apoptosis, accompanied by down-regulation of kdr, kdrl and flt-1 genes expression. The VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish could be restored by post-treatment of calycosin, a cardiovascular protective isoflavone. Similarly, VRI induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HUVEC which could be rescued by calycosin post-treatment. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms showed that the PI3K/AKT/Bad cell survival pathway was a main contributor of the vascular regenerative effect of calycosin. These findings indicated that the cardiovascular toxicity in anti-angiogenic therapy was mainly caused by insufficient endothelial cell survival, suggesting its essential role in vascular integrity, repair and regeneration. In addition, we showed that VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish represented a simple and effective in vivo model for studying vascular insufficiency and evaluating cancer drug vascular toxicities. - Highlights: • In vivo VRI model • Rescue effects of calycosin • Calycosin EC survival pathways.

  14. Knots in rings. The circular knotted protein Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II folds via a stable two-disulfide intermediate.

    PubMed

    Cemazar, Masa; Daly, Norelle L; Häggblad, Sara; Lo, Kai Pong; Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Craik, David J

    2006-03-24

    The aim of this work was to elucidate the oxidative folding mechanism of the macrocyclic cystine knot protein MCoTI-II. We aimed to investigate how the six-cysteine residues distributed on the circular backbone of the reduced unfolded peptide recognize their correct partner and join up to form a complex cystine-knotted topology. To answer this question, we studied the oxidative folding of the naturally occurring peptide using a range of spectroscopic methods. For both oxidative folding and reductive unfolding, the same disulfide intermediate species was prevalent and was characterized to be a native-like two-disulfide intermediate in which the Cys1-Cys18 disulfide bond was absent. Overall, the folding pathway of this head-to-tail cyclized protein was found to be similar to that of linear cystine knot proteins from the squash family of trypsin inhibitors. However, the pathway differs in an important way from that of the cyclotide kalata B1, in that the equivalent two-disulfide intermediate in that case is not a direct precursor of the native protein. The size of the embedded ring within the cystine knot motif appears to play a crucial role in the folding pathway. Larger rings contribute to the independence of disulfides and favor an on-pathway native-like intermediate that has a smaller energy barrier to cross to form the native fold. The fact that macrocyclic proteins are readily able to fold to a complex knotted structure in vitro in the absence of chaperones makes them suitable as protein engineering scaffolds that have remarkable stability. PMID:16547012

  15. Phase II trial of pazopanib (GW786034), an oral multi-targeted angiogenesis inhibitor, for adults with recurrent glioblastoma (North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study 06-02)

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh P.; Chang, Susan M.; Butowski, Nicholas A.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Zhang, Wei-Ting; Prados, Michael D.; Fine, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this phase II single-arm study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pazopanib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, -2, and -3, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α and -β, and c-Kit, in recurrent glioblastoma. Patients with ≤2 relapses and no prior anti-VEGF/VEGFR therapy were treated with pazopanib 800 mg daily on 4-week cycles without planned interruptions. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and clinical reassessment were made every 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was efficacy as measured by 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6). Thirty-five GBM patients with a median age of 53 years and median Karnofsky performance scale of 90 were accrued. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (n = 1), lymphopenia (n = 2), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), ALT elevation (n = 3), AST elevation (n = 1), CNS hemorrhage (n = 1), fatigue (n = 1), and thrombotic/embolic events (n = 3); 8 patients required dose reduction. Two patients had a partial radiographic response by standard bidimensional measurements, whereas 9 patients (6 at the 8-week point and 3 only within the first month of treatment) had decreased contrast enhancement, vasogenic edema, and mass effect but <50% reduction in tumor. The median PFS was 12 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8–14 weeks) and only 1 patient had a PFS time ≥6 months (PFS6 = 3%). Thirty patients (86%) had died and median survival was 35 weeks (95% CI: 24–47 weeks). Pazopanib was reasonably well tolerated with a spectrum of toxicities similar to other anti-VEGF/VEGFR agents. Single-agent pazopanib did not prolong PFS in this patient population but showed in situ biological activity as demonstrated by radiographic responses. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00459381. PMID:20200024

  16. An ab initio investigation of the interactions involving the aromatic group of the set of fluorinated N-(4-sulfamylbenzoyl)benzylamine inhibitors and human carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kevin E; Cui, Guanglei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2007-05-24

    In this work we investigate the interactions that occur between the aromatic portion of the set of fluorinated N-(4-sulfamylbenzoyl)benzylamine (SBB) inhibitors and two residues of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II (HCAII), namely Phe-131 and Pro-202. Calculations were carried out at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory and the counterpoise scheme of Boys and Bernardi was employed to account for the basis set superposition error. The most striking result obtained here is that the SBB phenyl ring interacts at least as strongly with the proline pyrrolidine ring as with the phenylalanine phenyl ring, which is surprising because aromatic-aromatic interactions have long been thought to be particularly favorable in protein and protein-ligand structure. Comparison of the MP2 binding energies to those obtained with the Hartree-Fock method indicates that the attraction between the proline pyrrolidine ring and the SBB phenyl ring is largely attributable to dispersion forces. These favorable interactions between pyrrolidine and phenyl rings may have important implications in protein structure because there is potential for proline residues to interact with phenylalanine residues in a fashion analogous to that seen here. A preliminary protein data bank search indicates that the proline-phenylalanine contacts are about 40% as common as those between two phenylalanines. It is also found here that the number and pattern of fluorine substituents on the SBB phenyl ring is much less important in determining the SBB-HCAII binding energy than the relative geometric configuration of the interacting pairs.

  17. Knots in rings. The circular knotted protein Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II folds via a stable two-disulfide intermediate.

    PubMed

    Cemazar, Masa; Daly, Norelle L; Häggblad, Sara; Lo, Kai Pong; Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Craik, David J

    2006-03-24

    The aim of this work was to elucidate the oxidative folding mechanism of the macrocyclic cystine knot protein MCoTI-II. We aimed to investigate how the six-cysteine residues distributed on the circular backbone of the reduced unfolded peptide recognize their correct partner and join up to form a complex cystine-knotted topology. To answer this question, we studied the oxidative folding of the naturally occurring peptide using a range of spectroscopic methods. For both oxidative folding and reductive unfolding, the same disulfide intermediate species was prevalent and was characterized to be a native-like two-disulfide intermediate in which the Cys1-Cys18 disulfide bond was absent. Overall, the folding pathway of this head-to-tail cyclized protein was found to be similar to that of linear cystine knot proteins from the squash family of trypsin inhibitors. However, the pathway differs in an important way from that of the cyclotide kalata B1, in that the equivalent two-disulfide intermediate in that case is not a direct precursor of the native protein. The size of the embedded ring within the cystine knot motif appears to play a crucial role in the folding pathway. Larger rings contribute to the independence of disulfides and favor an on-pathway native-like intermediate that has a smaller energy barrier to cross to form the native fold. The fact that macrocyclic proteins are readily able to fold to a complex knotted structure in vitro in the absence of chaperones makes them suitable as protein engineering scaffolds that have remarkable stability.

  18. In Vitro Biliary Clearance of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors in Sandwich-Cultured Rat Hepatocytes: Comparison to In Vivo Biliary Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Koji; Bridges, Arlene S.; Yue, Wei; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that in vitro biliary clearance (Clbiliary) determined in sandwich-cultured hepatocytes correlates well with in vivo Clbiliary for limited sets of compounds. This study was designed to estimate the in vitro Clbiliary in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes (SCRH) of angiotensin II receptor blockers and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that undergo limited metabolism, to compare the estimated Clbiliary values with published in vivo Clbiliary data in rats, and to characterize the mechanism(s) of basolateral uptake and canalicular excretion of these drugs in rats. Average biliary excretion index (BEI) and in vitro Clbiliary of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and pitavastatin were 15%, 19%, 43%, 45%, and 20%, respectively, and 1.7, 3.2, 4.4, 46.1, and 34.6 ml/min/kg, respectively. Clbiliary predicted from SCRH, accounting for plasma unbound fraction, correlated with reported in vivo Clbiliary for these drugs. The rank order of Clbiliary values predicted from SCRH was consistent with in vivo Clbiliary values. Bromosulfophthalein inhibited the uptake of all drugs. BEI and Clbiliary values of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin, known multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp)2 substrates, were reduced in SCRH from Mrp2-deficient (TR−) compared to wild-type (WT) rats. Although Mrp2 plays a minor role in pitavastatin biliary excretion, pitavastatin BEI and Clbiliary were reduced in TR− compared to WT SCRH; Bcrp expression in SCRH from TR− rats was decreased. In conclusion, in vitro Clbiliary determined in SCRH can be used to estimate and compare in vivo Clbiliary of compounds in rats, and to characterize transport proteins responsible for their hepatic uptake and excretion. PMID:18574002

  19. Comparative Effectiveness of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers in Terms of Major Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shu-Chen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chao, Pei-Wen; Li, Szu-Yuan; Lee, Yi-Jung; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Chu, Hsi; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Renin and aldosterone activity levels are low in elderly patients, raising concerns about the benefits and risks of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) use. However, data from direct comparisons of the effects of ACEIs on ARBs in the elderly population remain inconclusive. In this nationwide study, all patients aged ≥ 70 years were retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database for the period 2000 to 2009 and were followed up until the end of 2010. The ARB cohort (12,347 patients who continuously used ARBs for ≥ 90 days) was matched to ACEI cohort using high-dimensional propensity score (hdPS). Intention-to-treat (ITT) and as-treated (AT) analyses were conducted. In the ITT analysis, after considering death as a competing risk, the ACEI cohort had similar risks of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio [HR] 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79–1.06), ischemic stroke (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.90–1.07), and heart failure (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.83–1.04) compared with the ARB cohort. No difference in adverse effects, such as acute kidney injury (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89–1.09) and hyperkalemia (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.87–1.20), was observed between cohorts. AT analysis produced similar results to those of ITT analysis. We were unable to demonstrate a survival difference between cohorts (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.88–1.21) after considering drug discontinuation as a competing risk in AT analysis. Our study supports the notion that ACEI and ARB users have similar risks of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), even in elderly populations. PMID:26512568

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of malonate-based inhibitors of phosphosugar-metabolizing enzymes: class II fructose-1,6-bis-phosphate aldolases, type I phosphomannose isomerase, and phosphoglucose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Desvergnes, Stéphanie; Courtiol-Legourd, Stéphanie; Daher, Racha; Dabrowski, Maciej; Salmon, Laurent; Therisod, Michel

    2012-02-15

    In the design of inhibitors of phosphosugar metabolizing enzymes and receptors with therapeutic interest, malonate has been reported in a number of cases as a good and hydrolytically-stable surrogate of the phosphate group, since both functions are dianionic at physiological pH and of comparable size. We have investigated a series of malonate-based mimics of the best known phosphate inhibitors of class II (zinc) fructose-1,6-bis-phosphate aldolases (FBAs) (e.g., from Mycobacterium tuberculosis), type I (zinc) phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) from Escherichia coli, and phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) from yeast. In the case of FBAs, replacement of one phosphate by one malonate on a bis-phosphorylated inhibitor (1) led to a new compound (4) still showing a strong inhibition (K(i) in the nM range) and class II versus class I selectivity (up to 8×10(4)). Replacement of the other phosphate however strongly affected binding efficiency and selectivity. In the case of PGI and PMI, 5-deoxy-5-malonate-D-arabinonohydroxamic acid (8) yielded a strong decrease in binding affinities when compared to its phosphorylated parent compound 5-phospho-D-arabinonohydroxamic acid (2). Analysis of the deposited 3D structures of the kinetically evaluated enzymes complexed to the phosphate-based inhibitors indicate that malonate could be a good phosphate surrogate only if phosphate is not tightly bound at the enzyme active site, such as in position 7 of compound 1 for FBAs. These observations are of importance for further design of inhibitors of phosphorylated-compounds metabolizing enzymes with therapeutic interest.

  1. Effect of baseline serum vitamin D levels on aromatase inhibitors induced musculoskeletal symptoms: results from the IBIS-II, chemoprevention study using anastrozole.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Cuzick, Jack; Mesher, David; Richmond, Bill; Howell, Anthony

    2012-04-01

    Severe deficiency of vitamin D in adults can cause musculoskeletal pain, stiffness, and joint discomfort. Musculoskeletal symptoms similar to those associated with vitamin D deficiency are frequently seen in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors (AIs). This is presumably due to oestrogen deficiency caused by AIs. However, no data are available on serum levels of vitamin D and their relation to developing musculoskeletal symptoms/arthralgia in women receiving an AI. IBIS-II is a multicentre randomized placebo controlled trial of the AI, anastrozole, in postmenopausal women aged 40-70 years, who are at increased risk of breast cancer. Serum vitamin D levels were measured for 416 participants. The samples were sent for assays in three batches: the first two batches (n = 250) included paired serum samples and the third batch (n = 166) included paired samples and samples from women who had arthralgia within the first year of follow-up. At entry, 56 (13%) women had adequate (≥ 30 ng/ml), 173 (41%) had inadequate (≥ 20-< 30 ng/mL), 167 (40%) were deficient (> 10-< 20 ng/mL), and 24 (6%) were severely deficient (< 10 ng/mL). At the time of analysis, 225 out of 834 (27%) women had reported arthralgia within the first year of follow-up. Baseline serum vitamin D levels did not significantly predict arthralgia within the first year of follow-up either in the overall group (OR 0.87 (95% CI: 0.67, 1.13; P = 0.30) or separately in the anastrozole (P = 0.60) or placebo groups (P = 0.38). Absolute serum levels of vitamin D increased significantly at one year in the anastrozole group (2.88 ng/ml, [1.71, 4.06; P < 0.0001]) but not in the placebo group (0.75 ng/ml [-0.35, 1.85; P = 0.18]). Only a small and a nonsignificant effect of baseline vitamin D levels were seen on the risk of musculoskeletal symptoms. This does not appear to be a major determinant of risk for these symptoms.

  2. Clinical, molecular and immune analysis of dabrafenib and trametinib in metastatic melanoma patients that progressed on BRAF inhibitor monotherapy: a phase II clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo; McQuade, Jennifer L.; Panka, David J.; Hudgens, Courtney W.; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Bahl, Samira; Jane-Valbuena, Judit; Wani, Khalida M.; Reuben, Alexandre; Creasy, Caitlyn A.; Jiang, Hong; Cooper, Zachary A.; Roszik, Jason; Bassett, Roland L.; Joon, Aron Y.; Simpson, Lauren M.; Mouton, Rosalind D.; Glitza, Isabella C.; Patel, Sapna P.; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Amaria, Rodabe N.; Diab, Adi; Hwu, Patrick; Lazar, Alexander J.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Garraway, Levi A.; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Kim, Kevin B.; Davies, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Combined treatment with dabrafenib and trametinib (CombiDT) achieves clinical responses in only ~15% of BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi)-refractory metastatic melanoma patients, in contrast to the high activity observed in BRAFi-naïve patients. Identifying correlates of response and mechanisms of resistance in this population will facilitate clinical management and rational therapeutic development. Objective To determine correlates of benefit from CombiDT therapy in BRAFi-refractory metastatic melanoma patients. Design Single-center, single-arm prospective phase II study of CombiDT in patients with BRAFV600 metastatic melanoma resistant to BRAFi monotherapy conducted between September 2012 and October 2014. Setting University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Participants 28 patients were screened and 23 enrolled. Key eligibility criteria included: BRAFV600 metastatic melanoma, prior BRAFi monotherapy, measurable disease (RECIST 1.1), and accessible tumor for biopsy. Intervention Patients were treated with dabrafenib (150 mg twice daily) and trametinib (2 mg daily) continuously until disease progression or intolerance. All participants underwent a mandatory baseline biopsy, and optional biopsies were performed on-treatment and at progression. Whole-exome sequencing, RT-PCR for BRAF splicing, RNAseq and IHC were performed on tumor samples, and blood was analyzed for levels of circulating BRAFV600. Main outcome measures Primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were secondary clinical endpoints. Results Among evaluable patients, the confirmed ORR was 10%, disease control rate (DCR) was 45%, and median PFS was 13 weeks. Clinical benefit was associated with duration of prior BRAFi >6 months (DCR 73% vs. 11% for ≤6 months, p=0.02) and decrease in circulating BRAFV600 at day 8 of cycle 1 (DCR 75% vs. 18% for no decrease, p=0.015), but not by pre-treatment MAPK pathway mutations or activation. On

  3. The effects of anti-DNA topoisomerase II drugs, etoposide and ellipticine, are modified in root meristem cells of Allium cepa by MG132, an inhibitor of 26S proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Żabka, Aneta; Winnicki, Konrad; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Maszewski, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II), a highly specialized nuclear enzyme, resolves various entanglement problems concerning DNA that arise during chromatin remodeling, transcription, S-phase replication, meiotic recombination, chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. The genotoxic effects of two Topo II inhibitors known as potent anti-cancer drugs, etoposide (ETO) and ellipticine (EPC), were assayed in root apical meristem cells of Allium cepa. Despite various types of molecular interactions between these drugs and DNA-Topo II complexes at the chromatin level, which have a profound negative impact on the genome integrity (production of double-strand breaks, chromosomal bridges and constrictions, lagging fragments of chromosomes and their uneven segregation to daughter cell nuclei), most of the elicited changes were apparently similar, regarding both their intensity and time characteristics. No essential changes between ETO- and EPC-treated onion roots were noticed in the frequency of G1-, S-, G2-and M-phase cells, nuclear morphology, chromosome structures, tubulin-microtubule systems, extended distribution of mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites of histone H3, and the induction of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD). However, the important difference between the effects induced by the ETO and EPC concerns their catalytic activities in the presence of MG132 (proteasome inhibitor engaged in Topo II-mediated formation of cleavage complexes) and relates to the time-variable changes in chromosomal aberrations and AL-PCD rates. This result implies that proteasome-dependent mechanisms may contribute to the course of physiological effects generated by DNA lesions under conditions that affect the ability of plant cells to resolve topological problems that associated with the nuclear metabolic activities. PMID:26233708

  4. Precocene II, a Trichothecene Production Inhibitor, Binds to Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel and Increases the Superoxide Level in Mitochondria of Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Sakamoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Michio; Kimura, Makoto; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Precocene II, a constituent of essential oils, shows antijuvenile hormone activity in insects and inhibits trichothecene production in fungi. We investigated the molecular mechanism by which precocene II inhibits trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum, the main causal agent of Fusarium head blight and trichothecene contamination in grains. Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, was identified as the precocene II-binding protein by an affinity magnetic bead method. Precocene II increased the superoxide level in mitochondria as well as the amount of oxidized mitochondrial proteins. Ascorbic acid, glutathione, and α-tocopherol promoted trichothecene production by the fungus. These antioxidants compensated for the inhibitory activity of precocene II on trichothecene production. These results suggest that the binding of precocene II to VDAC may cause high superoxide levels in mitochondria, which leads to stopping of trichothecene production. PMID:26248339

  5. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a novel series of non-peptide angiotensin II receptor binding inhibitors specific for the AT2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Blankley, C J; Hodges, J C; Klutchko, S R; Himmelsbach, R J; Chucholowski, A; Connolly, C J; Neergaard, S J; Van Nieuwenhze, M S; Sebastian, A; Quin, J

    1991-11-01

    Structure-activity relationships are reported for a novel class of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-6-carboxylic acid derivatives that displace 125I-labeled angiotensin II from a specific subset of angiotensin II (Ang II) binding sites in rat adrenal preparations. This binding site is not the Ang II receptor mediating vascular contraction or aldosterone release, but, rather, is one whose function has not yet been fully elucidated. It has been identified in a number of tissues and has a similar affinity for Ang II and its peptide analogues as does the vascular receptor. The non-peptide compounds reported here are uniquely specific in displacing Ang II at this binding site and are inactive in antagonizing Ang II at the vascular receptor or in pharmacological assays measuring vascular effects. PD 123,319 (79), one of the most potent compounds, has an IC50 of 34 nM. Certain of these compounds may have utility in the definition and study of Ang II receptor subtypes.

  6. A Phase II clinical trial of a mixture of plasma-derived factor VIIa and factor X (MC710) in haemophilia patients with inhibitors: haemostatic efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shirahata, A; Fukutake, K; Takamatsu, J; Shima, M; Hanabusa, H; Mugishima, H; Amano, K; Takedani, H; Tamashima, S; Matsushita, T; Tawa, A; Tanaka, I; Higasa, S; Kosaka, Y; Fujii, T; Sakai, M; Migita, M; Kawakami, K; Ohashi, Y; Saito, H

    2013-11-01

    MC710, a mixture of plasma-derived activated factor VII and factor X at a protein weight ratio of 1:10, is a novel bypassing agent for haemostasis in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. In a Phase II trial, we evaluated the haemostatic efficacy and safety of single doses of MC710, and investigated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters in nine joint bleeding episodes in six male haemophilia patients with inhibitors. This trial was a multi-centre, open-label, non-randomized study of two doses (60 and 120 μg kg(-1) as FVIIa dose), allowing the re-administration of different MC710 dosages to the same subjects. Haemostatic efficacy was assessed by evaluating reduction in pain and swelling, as well as increase in range of motion in a bleeding joint. The results of the study showed that in nine bleeding episodes, seven treatments were rated as 'excellent' or 'effective' according to investigator's rating system of efficacy at 8 h after administration. No serious or severe adverse events were observed after administration; furthermore, measurement of several diagnostic markers revealed no signs or symptoms of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The haemostatic potential of MC710 was confirmed at doses of 60 and 120 μg kg(-1) in this trial. MC710 is thus expected to be a safe and efficacious novel bypassing agent for controlling bleeding in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. PMID:23738888

  7. Functional characterization and anti-cancer action of the clinical phase II cardiac Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor istaroxime: in vitro and in vivo properties and cross talk with the membrane androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Konstantinos; Dimas, Konstantinos; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Schmidt, Eva-Maria; Tsapara, Anna; Alkahtani, Saad; Honisch, Sabina; Prousis, Kyriakos C.; Alarifi, Saud; Calogeropoulou, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    Sodium potassium pump (Na+/K+ ATPase) is a validated pharmacological target for the treatment of various cardiac conditions. Recent published data with Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors suggest a potent anti-cancer action of these agents in multiple indications. In the present study, we focus on istaroxime, a Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor that has shown favorable safety and efficacy properties in cardiac phase II clinical trials. Our experiments in 22 cancer cell lines and in prostate tumors in vivo proved the strong anti-cancer action of this compound. Istaroxime induced apoptosis, affected the key proliferative and apoptotic mediators c-Myc and caspase-3 and modified actin cystoskeleton dynamics and RhoA activity in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, istaroxime was capable of binding to mAR, a membrane receptor mediating rapid, non-genomic actions of steroids in prostate and other cells. These results support a multi-level action of Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors in cancer cells and collectively validate istaroxime as a strong re-purposing candidate for further cancer drug development. PMID:27027435

  8. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  9. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  10. Azaindole N-methyl hydroxamic acids as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors-II. The impact of physicochemical properties on ADME and PK.

    PubMed

    Tanis, Steven P; Plewe, Michael B; Johnson, Ted W; Butler, Scott L; Dalvie, Deepak; DeLisle, Dorothy; Dress, Klaus R; Hu, Qiyue; Huang, Buwen; Kuehler, Jon E; Kuki, Atsuo; Liu, Wen; Peng, Qinghai; Smith, Graham L; Solowiej, Jim; Tran, Khanh T; Wang, Hai; Yang, Anle; Yin, Chunfeng; Yu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Junhu; Zhu, Huichun

    2010-12-15

    HIV-1 integrase is one of three enzymes encoded by the HIV genome and is essential for viral replication, and HIV-1 IN inhibitors have emerged as a new promising class of therapeutics. Recently, we reported the discovery of azaindole hydroxamic acids that were potent inhibitors of the HIV-1 IN enzyme. N-Methyl hydroxamic acids were stable against oxidative metabolism, however were cleared rapidly through phase 2 glucuronidation pathways. We were able to introduce polar groups at the β-position of the azaindole core thereby altering physical properties by lowering calculated log D values (c Log D) which resulted in attenuated clearance rates in human hepatocytes. Pharmacokinetic data in dog for representative compounds demonstrated moderate oral bioavailability and reasonable half-lives. These ends were accomplished without a large negative impact on enzymatic and antiviral activity, thus suggesting opportunities to alter clearance parameters in future series.

  11. Discovery of novel hydroxamates as highly potent tumor necrosis factor-[alpha] converting enzyme inhibitors. Part II: Optimization of the S3′ pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzola Jr., Robert D.; Zhu, Zhaoning; Sinning, Lisa; McKittrick, Brian; Lavey, Brian; Spitler, James; Kozlowski, Joseph; Neng-Yang, Shih; Zhou, Guowei; Guo, Zhuyan; Orth, Peter; Madison, Vincent; Sun, Jing; Lundell, Daniel; Niu, Xiaoda

    2010-10-01

    A series of cyclopropyl hydroxamic acids were prepared. Many of the compounds displayed picomolar affinity for the TACE enzyme while maintaining good to excellent selectivity profiles versus MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -14, and ADAM-10. X-ray analysis of an inhibitor in the TACE active site indicated that the molecules bound to the enzyme in the S1{prime}-S3{prime} pocket.

  12. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. II. Contribution of the uni- and bimolecular activation routes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Escribano, J; Masia-Perez, J; Muñoz-Muñoz, J L; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    From the kinetic study carried out in part I of this series (preceding article) an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the uni- and bimolecular routes has been carried out. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect on this relative weight of the initial zymogen, inhibitor and activating enzyme concentrations.

  13. Pyripyropenes, novel inhibitors of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase produced by Aspergillus fumigatus. II. Structure elucidation of pyripyropenes A, B, C and D.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y K; Tomoda, H; Nishida, H; Sunazuka, T; Obata, R; Omura, S

    1994-02-01

    The structures of pyripyropenes A, B, C and D, novel acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors, were determined mainly by spectroscopic studies including various NMR measurements. Pyripyropenes have a common structure which consists of pyridine, alpha-pyrone and sesquiterpene moieties. One of the three O-acetyl residues in the sesquiterpene moiety of pyripyropene A is replaced with an O-propionyl residue in pyripyropenes B, C and D. PMID:8150710

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of the antiproliferative activity of novel pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline derivatives, potential inhibitors of Akt kinase. Part II.

    PubMed

    Desplat, Vanessa; Moreau, Stephane; Gay, Aurore; Fabre, Solene Belisle; Thiolat, Denis; Massip, Stephane; Macky, Gregory; Godde, Frederic; Mossalayi, Djavad; Jarry, Christian; Guillon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    Attenuation of protein kinases by selective inhibitors is an extremely active field of activity in anticancer drug development. Therefore, Akt, a serine/threonine protein kinase, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), represents an attractive potential target for therapeutic intervention. Recent efforts in the development and biological evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of Akt have led to the identification of novel inhibitors with various heterocycle scaffolds. Based on previous results obtained on the antiproliferative activities of new pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalines, a novel series was designed and synthesized from various substituted phenyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid alkyl esters via a multistep heterocyclization process. These new compounds were tested for their in vitro ability to inhibit the proliferation of the human leukemic cell lines K562, U937, and HL60, and the breast cancer cell line MCF7. The first biological evaluation of our new substituted pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalines showed antiproliferative activity against the tested cell lines. From a general SAR point of view, these preliminary biological results highlight the importance of substitution at the C-4 position of the pyrroloquinoxaline scaffold by a benzylpiperidinyl fluorobenzimidazole group, and also the need for a functionalization on the pyrrole ring.

  15. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  16. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-4-ones as a New Class of Topoisomerase II Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Baraldi, Stefania; Prencipe, Filippo; Preti, Delia; Saponaro, Giulia; Romagnoli, Romeo; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Stefanelli, Angela; Fazzi, Debora; Borea, Pier Andrea; Maia, Rodolfo Couto; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Fraga, Carlos A M; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2015-01-01

    A series of 1,3,6-triphenylpyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-4-one derivatives was designed, synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxic activity in A375 human melanoma and human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells. The new pyrazolopyridones displayed comparable activities to the antitumor compound etoposide. The inhibitory effect of compounds 17, 18, 27 and 32 against topoisomerase II-mediated cleavage activities was measured finding good correlation with the results obtained from MTS assay. Docking studies into bacterial topoisomerase II (DNA Gyrase), topoisomerase IIα and topoisomerase IIβ binding sites in the DNA binding interface were performed. PMID:25494808

  17. Natural inhibitors of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Huntington, James A

    2014-04-01

    The serine protease thrombin is the effector enzyme of blood coagulation. It has many activities critical for the formation of stable clots, including cleavage of fibrinogen to fibrin, activation of platelets and conversion of procofactors to active cofactors. Thrombin carries-out its multiple functions by utilising three special features: a deep active site cleft and two anion binding exosites (exosite I and II). Similarly, thrombin inhibitors have evolved to exploit the unique features of thrombin to achieve rapid and specific inactivation of thrombin. Exogenous thrombin inhibitors come from several different protein families and are generally found in the saliva of haematophagous animals (blood suckers) as part of an anticoagulant cocktail that allows them to feed. Crystal structures of several of these inhibitors reveal how peptides and proteins can be targeted to thrombin in different and interesting ways. Thrombin activity must also be regulated by endogenous inhibitors so that thrombi do not occlude blood flow and cause thrombosis. A single protein family, the serpins, provides all four of the endogenous thrombin inhibitors found in man. The crystal structures of these serpins bound to thrombin have been solved, revealing a similar exosite-dependence on complex formation. In addition to forming the recognition complex, serpins destroy the structure of thrombin, allowing them to be released from cofactors and substrates for clearance. This review examines how the special features of thrombin have been exploited by evolution to achieve inhibition of the ultimate coagulation protease.

  18. Adxanthromycins A and B, new inhibitors of ICAM-1/LFA-1 mediated cell adhesion molecule from Streptomyces sp. NA-148. II. Physico-chemical properties and structure elucidation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Nakano, T; Koiwa, T; Noshita, T; Funayama, S; Koshino, H; Nakagawa, A

    2000-02-01

    Adxanthromycins A and B are new inhibitors of ICAM-1/LFA-1 mediated cell adhesion molecule isolated from the fermentation broth of Streptomyces sp. NA-148. The molecular formula of adxanthromycins A and B were determined as C42H40O17 and C48H50O22, respectively by FAB-MS and NMR spectral analyses, and the structures of both compounds were elucidated to be a dimeric anthrone peroxide skeleton containing alpha-D-galactose by various NMR spectral analyses and chemical degradation. PMID:10805577

  19. Combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide and 5-fluorouracil upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II and p21 genes and activates caspase-3/7 in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kouji; Hakata, Shuko; Terashima, Jun; Gamou, Toshie; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic anticancer drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been combined with existing anticancer drugs for synergistic or additive effects. In the present study, we found that a very low concentration of depsipeptide, an HDAC inhibitor, potentiated the antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a human colon cancer cell model using HCT-116, HT29, and SW48 cells via the inhibition of colony formation ability or cellular viability. Exposure to a combination of 5-FU (1.75 µM) and 1 nM depsipeptide for 24 and 48 h resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase in activated caspase-3/7, while 5-FU alone failed to activate caspase-3/7. Microarray and subsequent gene ontology analyses revealed that compared to 5-FU or depsipeptide alone, the combination treatment of 5-FU and depsipeptide upregulated genes related to cell death and the apoptotic process consistent with the inhibition of colony formation and caspase-3/7 activation. These analyses indicated marked upregulation of antigen processing and presentation of peptide or polysaccharide antigen via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class (GO:0002504) and MHC protein complex (GO:0042611). Compared with vehicle controls, the cells treated with the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide showed marked induction (3- to 8.5-fold) of expression of MHC class II genes, but not of MHC class I genes. Furthermore, our global analysis of gene expression, which was focused on genes involved in the molecular regulation of MHC class II genes, showed enhancement of pro-apoptotic PCAF and CIITA after the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide. These results may indicate a closer relationship between elevation of MHC class II expression and cellular apoptosis induced by the combination of depsipeptide and 5-FU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report that the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide induces human colon cancer cell apoptosis in a concerted manner with the induction of MHC class II gene

  20. Combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide and 5-fluorouracil upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II and p21 genes and activates caspase-3/7 in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kouji; Hakata, Shuko; Terashima, Jun; Gamou, Toshie; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2016-10-01

    Epigenetic anticancer drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been combined with existing anticancer drugs for synergistic or additive effects. In the present study, we found that a very low concentration of depsipeptide, an HDAC inhibitor, potentiated the antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a human colon cancer cell model using HCT-116, HT29, and SW48 cells via the inhibition of colony formation ability or cellular viability. Exposure to a combination of 5-FU (1.75 µM) and 1 nM depsipeptide for 24 and 48 h resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase in activated caspase-3/7, while 5-FU alone failed to activate caspase-3/7. Microarray and subsequent gene ontology analyses revealed that compared to 5-FU or depsipeptide alone, the combination treatment of 5-FU and depsipeptide upregulated genes related to cell death and the apoptotic process consistent with the inhibition of colony formation and caspase-3/7 activation. These analyses indicated marked upregulation of antigen processing and presentation of peptide or polysaccharide antigen via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class (GO:0002504) and MHC protein complex (GO:0042611). Compared with vehicle controls, the cells treated with the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide showed marked induction (3- to 8.5-fold) of expression of MHC class II genes, but not of MHC class I genes. Furthermore, our global analysis of gene expression, which was focused on genes involved in the molecular regulation of MHC class II genes, showed enhancement of pro-apoptotic PCAF and CIITA after the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide. These results may indicate a closer relationship between elevation of MHC class II expression and cellular apoptosis induced by the combination of depsipeptide and 5-FU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report that the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide induces human colon cancer cell apoptosis in a concerted manner with the induction of MHC

  1. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of MitochondrialRespiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent AdductWith a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C.; Shen,John T.; Tung, Eric Y.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  2. Next generation sequencing analysis of platinum refractory advanced germ cell tumor sensitive to Sunitinib (Sutent®) a VEGFR2/PDGFRβ/c-kit/ FLT3/RET/CSF1R inhibitor in a phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Germ cell tumors (GCT) are the most common solid tumors in adolescent and young adult males (age 15 and 35 years) and remain one of the most curable of all solid malignancies. However a subset of patients will have tumors that are refractory to standard chemotherapy agents. The management of this refractory population remains challenging and approximately 400 patients continue to die every year of this refractory disease in the United States. Methods Given the preclinical evidence implicating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in the biology of germ cell tumors, we hypothesized that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor sunitinib (Sutent) may possess important clinical activity in the treatment of this refractory disease. We proposed a Phase II efficacy study of sunitinib in seminomatous and non-seminomatous metastatic GCT’s refractory to first line chemotherapy treatment (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00912912). Next generation targeted exome sequencing using HiSeq 2000 (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) was performed on the tumor sample of the unusual responder. Results Five patients are enrolled into this Phase II study. Among them we report here the clinical course of a patient (Patient # 5) who had an exceptional response to sunitinib. Next generation sequencing to understand this patient’s response to sunitinib revealed RET amplification, EGFR and KRAS amplification as relevant aberrations. Oncoscan MIP array were employed to validate the copy number analysis that confirmed RET gene amplification. Conclusion Sunitinib conferred clinical benefit to this heavily pre-treated patient. Next generation sequencing of this ‘exceptional responder’ identified the first reported case of a RET amplification as a potential basis of sensitivity to sunitinib (VEGFR2/PDGFRβ/c-kit/ FLT3/RET/CSF1R inhibitor) in a patient with refractory germ cell tumor. Further characterization of GCT patients using

  3. Neurite outgrowth of neuroblastoma cells overexpressing alpha and beta isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-effects of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, T; Yoshimura, Y; Nomura, T; Fujii, M; Sugiura, H

    1998-06-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) is one of the most abundant protein kinases in the brain and has a broad substrate specificity [M.K. Bennett, N.E. Erondu, M.B. Kennedy, Purification and characterization of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase that is highly concentrated in brain, J. Biol. Chem. 258 (1983) 12735-12744 [1]; J.R. Goldenring, B. Gonzalez, J.S. McGuire, Jr., R.J. DeLorenzo, Purification and characterization of a calmodulin-dependent kinase from rat brain cytosol able to phosphorylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, J. Biol. Chem. 258 (1983) 12632-12640 [4]; M.B. Kennedy, P. Greengard, Two calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, which are highly concentrated in brain, phosphorylate protein I at distinct sites, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78 (1981) 1293-1297 [10]; T. Yamauchi, H. Fujisawa, Evidence for three distinct forms of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases from rat brain, FEBS Lett. 116 (1980) 141-144 [20]; T. Yamauchi, H. Fujisawa, Purification and characterization of the brain calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (kinase II), which is involved in the activation of tryptophan 5-monooxygenase, Eur. J. Biochem. 132 (1983) 15-21 [21

  4. Copper(II) complexes with highly water-soluble L- and D-proline-thiosemicarbazone conjugates as potential inhibitors of Topoisomerase IIα.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Felix; Enyedy, Éva A; Nagy, Nóra V; Rockenbauer, Antal; Bognár, Gabriella M; Trondl, Robert; Novak, Maria S; Klapproth, Erik; Kiss, Tamás; Arion, Vladimir B

    2013-08-01

    Two proline-thiosemicarbazone bioconjugates with excellent aqueous solubility, namely, 3-methyl-(S)-pyrrolidine-2-carboxylate-2-formylpyridine thiosemicarbazone [L-Pro-FTSC or (S)-H2L] and 3-methyl-(R)-pyrrolidine-2-carboxylate-2-formylpyridine thiosemicarbazone [D-Pro-FTSC or (R)-H2L], have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The complexation behavior of L-Pro-FTSC with copper(II) in an aqueous solution and in a 30% (w/w) dimethyl sulfoxide/water mixture has been studied via pH potentiometry, UV-vis spectrophotometry, electron paramagnetic resonance, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and spectrofluorimetry. By the reaction of copper(II) acetate with (S)-H2L and (R)-H2L in water, the complexes [Cu(S,R)-L] and [Cu(R,S)-L] have been synthesized and comprehensively characterized. An X-ray diffraction study of [Cu(S,R)-L] showed the formation of a square-pyramidal complex, with the bioconjugate acting as a pentadentate ligand. Both copper(II) complexes displayed antiproliferative activity in CH1 ovarian carcinoma cells and inhibited Topoisomerase IIα activity in a DNA plasmid relaxation assay. PMID:23829568

  5. In silico modification of Zn2+ binding group of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by organoselenium compounds as Homo sapiens class II HDAC inhibitor of cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumo Friend Tambunan, Usman; Bakri, Ridla; Aditya Parikesit, Arli; Ariyani, Titin; Dyah Puspitasari, Ratih; Kerami, Djati

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women, and ranks seventh of all cancers worldwide, with 529000 cases in 2008 and more than 85% cases occur in developing countries. One way to treat this cancer is through the inhibition of HDAC enzymes which play a strategic role in the regulation of gene expression. Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) or Vorinostat is a drug which commercially available to treat the cancer, but still has some side effects. This research present in silico SAHA modification in Zinc Binding Group (ZBG) by organoselenium compound to get ligands which less side effect. From molecular docking simulation, and interaction analysis, there are five best ligands, namely CC27, HA27, HB28, IB25, and KA7. These five ligands have better binding affinity than the standards, and also have interaction with Zn2+ cofactor of inhibited HDAC enzymes. This research is expected to produce more potent HDAC inhibitor as novel drug for cervical cancer treatment.

  6. Finger loop inhibitors of the HCV NS5b polymerase. Part II. Optimization of tetracyclic indole-based macrocycle leading to the discovery of TMC647055.

    PubMed

    Vendeville, Sandrine; Lin, Tse-I; Hu, Lili; Tahri, Abdellah; McGowan, David; Cummings, Maxwell D; Amssoms, Katie; Canard, Maxime; Last, Stefaan; Van den Steen, Iris; Devogelaere, Benoit; Rouan, Marie-Claude; Vijgen, Leen; Berke, Jan Martin; Dehertogh, Pascale; Fransen, Els; Cleiren, Erna; van der Helm, Liesbet; Fanning, Gregory; Van Emelen, Kristof; Nyanguile, Origène; Simmen, Kenny; Raboisson, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Optimization of a novel series of macrocyclic indole-based inhibitors of the HCV NS5b polymerase targeting the finger loop domain led to the discovery of lead compounds exhibiting improved potency in cellular assays and superior pharmacokinetic profile. Further lead optimization performed on the most promising unsaturated-bridged subseries provided the clinical candidate 27-cyclohexyl-12,13,16,17-tetrahydro-22-methoxy-11,17-dimethyl-10,10-dioxide-2,19-methano-3,7:4,1-dimetheno-1H,11H-14,10,2,9,11,17-benzoxathiatetraazacyclo docosine-8,18(9H,15H)-dione, TMC647055 (compound 18a). This non-zwitterionic 17-membered ring macrocycle combines nanomolar cellular potency (EC(50) of 82 nM) with minimal associated cell toxicity (CC(50)>20 μM) and promising pharmacokinetic profiles in rats and dogs. TMC647055 is currently being evaluated in the clinic.

  7. Novel mammalian cell cycle inhibitors, tryprostatins A, B and other diketopiperazines produced by Aspergillus fumigatus. II. Physico-chemical properties and structures.

    PubMed

    Cui, C B; Kakeya, H; Osada, H

    1996-06-01

    Two novel diketopiperazines named tryprostatins A and B and a new natural product belonging to the diketopiperazine series, designated as demethoxyfumitremorgin C, together with four known diketopiperazines, fumitremorgin C, 12,13-dihydroxyfumitremorgin C, fumitremorgin B and verruculogen, are new M phase inhibitors of the mammalian cell cycle, which were isolated from the secondary metabolites of Aspergillus fumigatus. The structures of tryprostatins A, B and demethoxyfumitremorgin C were determined mainly by the use of spectroscopic methods especially by detailed analyses of their 1H and 13C NMR spectra with the aid of 2D NMR techniques including pulse field gradient heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (PFG-HMBC) spectroscopy. Their absolute configurations were determined on the basis of the optical rotational values and CD spectra. PMID:8698635

  8. Finger loop inhibitors of the HCV NS5b polymerase. Part II. Optimization of tetracyclic indole-based macrocycle leading to the discovery of TMC647055.

    PubMed

    Vendeville, Sandrine; Lin, Tse-I; Hu, Lili; Tahri, Abdellah; McGowan, David; Cummings, Maxwell D; Amssoms, Katie; Canard, Maxime; Last, Stefaan; Van den Steen, Iris; Devogelaere, Benoit; Rouan, Marie-Claude; Vijgen, Leen; Berke, Jan Martin; Dehertogh, Pascale; Fransen, Els; Cleiren, Erna; van der Helm, Liesbet; Fanning, Gregory; Van Emelen, Kristof; Nyanguile, Origène; Simmen, Kenny; Raboisson, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Optimization of a novel series of macrocyclic indole-based inhibitors of the HCV NS5b polymerase targeting the finger loop domain led to the discovery of lead compounds exhibiting improved potency in cellular assays and superior pharmacokinetic profile. Further lead optimization performed on the most promising unsaturated-bridged subseries provided the clinical candidate 27-cyclohexyl-12,13,16,17-tetrahydro-22-methoxy-11,17-dimethyl-10,10-dioxide-2,19-methano-3,7:4,1-dimetheno-1H,11H-14,10,2,9,11,17-benzoxathiatetraazacyclo docosine-8,18(9H,15H)-dione, TMC647055 (compound 18a). This non-zwitterionic 17-membered ring macrocycle combines nanomolar cellular potency (EC(50) of 82 nM) with minimal associated cell toxicity (CC(50)>20 μM) and promising pharmacokinetic profiles in rats and dogs. TMC647055 is currently being evaluated in the clinic. PMID:22633687

  9. Molecular modelling studies, synthesis and biological activity of a series of novel bisnaphthalimides and their development as new DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Filosa, Rosanna; Peduto, Antonella; Micco, Simone Di; Caprariis, Paolo de; Festa, Michela; Petrella, Antonello; Capranico, Giovanni; Bifulco, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    A series of bisnaphthalimide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for growth-inhibitory property against HT-29 human colon carcinoma. The N,N'-bis[2-(5-nitro-1,3-dioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-benz[de]-isoquinolin-2-yl)]propane-2-ethanediamine (9) and the N,N'-Bis[2-(5-nitro-1,3-dioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-benz[de]-isoquinolin-2-yl)]butylaminoethyl]-2-propanediamine (12) derivatives emerged as the most potent compounds of this series. Molecular modelling studies indicated that the high potency of 12, the most cytotoxic compound of the whole series, could be due to larger number of intermolecular interactions and to the best position of the naphthalimido rings, which favours pi-pi stacking interactions with purine and pyrimidine bases in the DNA active site. Moreover, 12 was designed as a DNA topoisomerase II poison and biochemical studies showed its effect on human DNA topoisomerase II. We then selected the compounds with a significant cytotoxicity for apoptosis assay. Derivative 9 was able to induce significantly apoptosis (40%) at 0.1 microM concentration, and we demonstrated that the effect on apoptosis in HT-29 cells is mediated by caspases activation.

  10. Double-Stranded RNA as an Inhibitor of Protein Synthesis and as a Substrate for a Nuclease in Extracts of Krebs II Ascites Cells

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Hugh D.; Mathews, Michael B.

    1973-01-01

    Concentrations of double-stranded RNA above about 0.1 μg/ml inhibit translation of encephalo-myocarditis viral RNA and mouse globin messenger RNA in extracts of Krebs II ascites cells. Protein synthesis initially proceeds at the control rate, then abruptly shuts off in a manner similar to that observed in reticulocyte lysates [Hunt, T. & Ehrenfeld, E. (1971) Nature New Biol. 230, 91-94]. Substantially higher concentrations of double-stranded RNA are required to give this effect in ascites extracts. Subcellular fractions of Krebs II ascites cells contain a nucleolytic activity capable of digesting several natural and synthetic double-stranded RNAs. This nuclease is most active under conditions of protein synthesis, and part of the activity remains associated with ribosomes upon sedimentation. It is probably because of digestion of double-stranded RNA by this nuclease that higher concentrations of double-stranded RNA are required for inhibition of protein synthesis in Krebs cell extracts than in reticulocyte lysates. PMID:4346034

  11. Ribulose 1,5-Diphosphate Carboxylase Synthesis in Euglena: II. Effect of Inhibitors on Enzyme Synthesis during Regreening and Subsequent Transfer to Darkness.

    PubMed

    Lord, J M; Armitage, T L; Merrett, M J

    1975-11-01

    Dark-grown Euglena gracilis Klebs strain Z Pringsheim cells, which have been partially regreened in the light, show a striking, continued synthesis of the chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-diphosphate carboxylase on transfer back into darkness. This dark synthesis of the enzyme was completely prevented by the addition of 15 mug/ml of cycloheximide to the culture medium but was unaffected, for at least 8 hours, by the addition of 1 mg/ml of d-threo-chloramphenicol. The addition of either cycloheximide or d-threo-chloramphenicol to dark-grown cultures at the onset of illumination completely inhibited the light-induced synthesis of ribulose 1,5-diphosphate carboxylase. When cells which had been illuminated in the presence of d-threo-chloramphenicol, and hence were unable to synthesize ribulose 1,5-diphosphate carboxylase, were transferred to darkness in the absence of this inhibitor, synthesis of the carboxylase then occurred. Dark-grown cells which had been illuminated in the presence of cycloheximide failed to synthesize the enzyme when placed in the dark in the absence of cycloheximide. The addition of 5-fluorouracil to regreening cultures to prevent light-induced transcriptional steps completely blocked the synthesis of ribulose 1,5-diphosphate carboxylase.

  12. Economic evaluations of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in type 2 diabetic nephropathy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Structured comparison of pharmacoeconomic analyses for ACEIs and ARBs in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy is still lacking. This review aims to systematically review the cost-effectiveness of both ACEIs and ARBs in type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy. Methods A systematic literature search was performed in MEDLINE and EMBASE for the period from November 1, 1999 to Oct 31, 2011. Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of the articles included and extracted data. All cost-effectiveness results were converted to 2011 Euros. Results Up to October 2011, 434 articles were identified. After full-text checking and quality assessment, 30 articles were finally included in this review involving 39 study settings. All 6 ACEIs studies were literature-based evaluations which synthesized data from different sources. Other 33 studies were directed at ARBs and were designed based on specific trials. The Markov model was the most common decision analytic method used in the evaluations. From the cost-effectiveness results, 37 out of 39 studies indicated either ACEIs or ARBs were cost-saving comparing with placebo/conventional treatment, such as amlodipine. A lack of evidence was assessed for valid direct comparison of cost-effectiveness between ACEIs and ARBs. Conclusion There is a lack of direct comparisons of ACEIs and ARBs in existing economic evaluations. Considering the current evidence, both ACEIs and ARBs are likely cost-saving comparing with conventional therapy, excluding such RAAS inhibitors. PMID:24428868

  13. Synthesis and structure elucidation of a cobalt(II) complex as topoisomerase I inhibitor: in vitro DNA binding, nuclease and RBC hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Musheer; Afzal, Mohd; Tabassum, Sartaj; Kalińska, Bożena; Mrozinski, Jerzy; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2014-03-01

    Metal-based cancer chemotherapeutic agent of the type Co(II) complex [Co(mpca)₂]·H₂O (1), where, Hmpca = 9-methyl-[1,10]phenanthroline-2-carboxylic acid was synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques and further authenticated by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. In vitro DNA binding studies of complex 1 with CT DNA was carried out by several biophysical techniques in accordance with molecular docking technique which revealed that 1 binds to DNA via intercalation mode having GC-rich sequences. Complex 1 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway (validated by T4 DNA ligase assay). Furthermore, complex 1 exhibits significant inhibitory effects on the catalytic activity of Topo-I at 25 μM concentration and further validated by molecular docking studies.

  14. Curcumin-inspired cytotoxic 3,5-bis(arylmethylene)-1-(N-(ortho-substituted aryl)maleamoyl)-4-piperidones: A novel group of topoisomerase II alpha inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jha, Amitabh; Duffield, Katherine M; Ness, Matthew R; Ravoori, Sujatha; Andrews, Gabrielle; Bhullar, Khushwant S; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Three series of novel 3,5-bis(arylmethylene)-1-(N-(ortho-substituted aryl)maleamoyl)-4-piperidones, designed as simplified analogs of curcumin with maleic diamide tether, were synthesized and bioevaluated. These compounds displayed potent cytotoxicity towards human Molt 4/C8 and CEM T-lymphocytes as well as murine L1210 leukemic cells. In contrast, the related N-arylmaleamic acids possessed little or no cytotoxicity in these three screens. Design of these compounds was based on molecular modeling studies performed on a related series of molecule in a previous study. Representative title compounds were found to be significantly potent in inhibiting the activity of topoisomerase II alpha indicating the possible mode of action of these compounds. These compounds were also potent antioxidants in vitro and attenuated the AAPH triggered peroxyl radical production in human fibroblasts. Various members of these series were also well tolerated in both in vitro and in vivo toxicity analysis. PMID:26456623

  15. Phase I/II Trial of AEG35156 X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein Antisense Oligonucleotide Combined With Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Patients With Relapsed or Primary Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schimmer, Aaron D.; Estey, Elihu H.; Borthakur, Gautam; Carter, Bing Z.; Schiller, Gary J.; Tallman, Martin S.; Altman, Jessica K.; Karp, Judith E.; Kassis, Jeannine; Hedley, David W.; Brandwein, Joseph; Xu, Wei; Mak, Duncan H.; LaCasse, Eric; Jacob, Christine; Morris, Stephen J.; Jolivet, Jacques; Andreeff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is an inhibitor of caspases 3 and 9 which are overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and may contribute to chemoresistance. We report on a phase I/II trial of the XIAP antisense oligonucleotide AEG35156 in combination with reinduction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Twenty-four patients with rapidly relapsed or refractory AML were treated with escalating doses of AEG35156 (12 to 250 mg/m2) as an intravenous solution over 2 hours and 32 patients were treated with the highest planned dose of 350 mg/m2 in combination with idarubicin and high-dose cytarabine reinduction chemotherapy. Correlative studies were conducted to determine the effects of AEG35156 on levels of XIAP mRNA. Results Knockdown of XIAP mRNA during treatment increased with the dose of the antisense. All patients who received 350 mg/m2 of AEG35156 had higher than 30% target knockdown with a median maximal knockdown of 90% (range, 48% to 100%). The overall response rate was higher among the patients receiving the highest dose of AEG35156. In this group, 15 (47%) of 32 patients achieved complete response (CR)/CR with incomplete platelet count recovery (CRp) compared with only one (4%) of 24 receiving 12 to 250 mg/m2 AEG35156. Among the patients receiving 350 mg/m2 of AEG35156 in combination with chemotherapy, 10 (91%) of 11 who were refractory to a single induction chemotherapy regimen achieved CR/CRp after reinduction with AEG35156 and chemotherapy. AEG35156 was well tolerated save for two cases of peripheral neuropathy in patients receiving multiple doses of AEG35156. Conclusion At the highest dose tested, AEG35156 knocks down its target and appears very effective when combined with chemotherapy in patients with AML refractory to a single induction regimen. PMID:19652057

  16. Randomized Phase Ib/II Study of Gemcitabine Plus Placebo or Vismodegib, a Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitor, in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Daniel V.T.; Junttila, Melissa R.; Karrison, Theodore; Bahary, Nathan; Horiba, Margit N.; Nattam, Sreenivasa R.; Marsh, Robert; Wallace, James; Kozloff, Mark; Rajdev, Lakshmi; Cohen, Deirdre; Wade, James; Sleckman, Bethany; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Stiff, Patrick; Kumar, Pankaj; Xu, Peng; Henderson, Les; Takebe, Naoko; Salgia, Ravi; Wang, Xi; Stadler, Walter M.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Kindler, Hedy L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sonic hedgehog (SHH), an activating ligand of smoothened (SMO), is overexpressed in > 70% of pancreatic cancers (PCs). We investigated the impact of vismodegib, an SHH antagonist, plus gemcitabine (GV) or gemcitabine plus placebo (GP) in a multicenter phase Ib/randomized phase II trial and preclinical PC models. Patients and Methods Patients with PC not amenable to curative therapy who had received no prior therapy for metastatic disease and had Karnofsky performance score ≥ 80 were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned in a one-to-one ratio to GV or GP. The primary end point was progression-free-survival (PFS). Exploratory correlative studies included serial SHH serum levels and contrast perfusion computed tomography imaging. To further investigate putative biologic mechanisms of SMO inhibition, two autochthonous pancreatic cancer models (KrasG12D; p16/p19fl/fl; Pdx1-Cre and KrasG12D; p53R270H/wt; Pdx1-Cre) were studied. Results No safety issues were identified in the phase Ib portion (n = 7), and the phase II study enrolled 106 evaluable patients (n = 53 in each arm). Median PFS was 4.0 and 2.5 months for GV and GP arms, respectively (95% CI, 2.5 to 5.3 and 1.9 to 3.8, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.54 to 1.21; P = .30). Median overall survival (OS) was 6.9 and 6.1 months for GV and GP arms, respectively (95% CI, 5.8 to 8.0 and 5.0 to 8.0, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.58; P = .84). Response rates were not significantly different. There were no significant associations between correlative markers and overall response rate, PFS, or OS. Preclinical trials revealed no significant differences with vismodegib in drug delivery, tumor growth rate, or OS in either model. Conclusion The addition of vismodegib to gemcitabine in an unselected cohort did not improve overall response rate, PFS, or OS in patients with metastatic PC. Our preclinical and clinical results revealed no statistically significant

  17. Clinical evaluation of proinflammatory cytokine inhibitors (sTNFR I, sTNFR II, IL-1 ra), anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-13) and activation of neutrophils after burn-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sikora, J P; Chlebna-Sokół, D; Andrzejewska, E; Chrul, S; Polakowska, E; Wysocka, A; Sikora, A

    2008-08-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the involvement of sTNFR I, sTNFR II, IL-1 ra, IL-10, IL-13 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) development in severely burned children and at assessing the prognostic value of the immunological markers studied. The study comprised 37 patients (17 burned children and 20 controls). Serum levels of the markers determined by means of ELISA and respiratory burst of neutrophils as well as p55 and p75 tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) receptor expression using flow cytometry were evaluated twice. The burned children presented significantly higher levels of IL-10 and cytokine inhibitors within the first 6-24 h after injury compared with controls (P < 0.05). The decreased oxygen metabolism of neutrophils and increased TNF-alpha receptor expression were found on admission. Moreover, a significant decrease in initially high sTNFR I, sTNFR II, IL-1 ra, IL-10, IL-13 concentrations (P < 0.05) and reduced expression of TNF-alpha receptors (P < 0.05) were observed after burn therapy, whereas ROS generation evidently augmented (P < 0.05). Four of our children who developed hypovolaemic shock revealed a significantly lower ROS generation and higher concentrations of soluble TNF-alpha receptors and IL-1 ra together with IL-10, IL-13 compared with children with good outcome (P < 0.05). Our results revealed the involvement of both ROS, soluble TNF-alpha receptors and IL-1 ra in the development of SIRS in burned children; their monitoring allows for an assessment of the systemic inflammatory reaction activity. The neutrophil BURSTTEST and IL-1 ra might have been clinically helpful markers of SIRS prognosis.

  18. Influence of the novel urease inhibitor N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide on ruminant nitrogen metabolism: II. Ruminal nitrogen metabolism, diet digestibility, and nitrogen balance in lambs.

    PubMed

    Ludden, P A; Harmon, D L; Huntington, G B; Larson, B T; Axe, D E

    2000-01-01

    Three lamb metabolism experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of chronic administration of the novel urease inhibitor N (n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) on ruminal N metabolism, fermentation, and N balance. In Exp. 1, ruminally cannulated wethers (n = 28; 45.0 +/- .9 kg) were administered one of seven doses of NBPT (0 [control], .125, .25, .5, 1, 2, or 4 g of NBPT daily) and fed a common cracked corn/cottonseed hull-based diet twice daily containing 2% urea at 2.5% of initial BW for the duration of the 15-d experiment. Overall, NBPT decreased (linear P < .0001; quadratic P < .001) ruminal urease activity, resulting in linear increases (P < .0001) in ruminal urea and decreases in ruminal NH3 N concentrations. However, the detection of an NBPT x day interaction (d 2 vs 15; P < .01) indicated that this depression in urea degradation diminished as the experiment progressed. Increasing NBPT linearly decreased (P < .01) total VFA concentrations on d 2 of the experiment, but it had no effect (P > .10) on d 15. Increasing NBPT had no effect (P > .10) on DM or ADF digestibilities, but it linearly decreased (P < .01) N digestibility. Supplementing NBPT produced a linear increase (P < .05) in urinary N excretion and a linear decrease (P < .01) in N retention. In Exp. 2, ruminally cannulated wethers (n = 30; 46.8 +/- .6 kg) were fed one of two basal diets (2.0 vs 1.1% dietary urea) at 2.5% of initial BW and dosed with either 0 (control), .25, or 2 g of NBPT daily for the duration of the 15-d experiment. There were no NBPT x dietary urea interactions (P > .10) for Exp. 2. Increasing NBPT depressed (linear and quadratic P < .0001) ruminal urease activity, producing linear (P < .0001) increases in urea N and linear decreases in NH3 N in the rumen. As in Exp. 1, an NBPT x day interaction (P < .05) was noted for urea, NH3 N, and total VFA concentrations; the maximum response to NBPT occurred on d 2 but diminished by d 15 of the experiment. Administration of

  19. Thienothiopyransulfonamides as Complexing Agents for the Preparation of Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    1995-01-01

    Co(II); Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of two new sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors, derivatives of thienothiopyran-2-sulfonamide, were prepared and characterized by analytic, spectroscopic, magnetic and conductimetric measurements. The new complexes are more potent CA inhibitors than the parent sulfonamides, with IC50 values around 0.1 nM, against isozyme CA II. PMID:18472783

  20. Phase II open label study of the oral vascular endothelial growth factor-receptor inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (vatalanib) in adult patients with refractory or relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Brander, Danielle; Rizzieri, David; Gockerman, Jon; Diehl, Louis; Shea, Thomas Charles; Decastro, Carlos; Moore, Joseph O; Beaven, Anne

    2013-12-01

    PTK787/ZK222584 (vatalanib), an orally active inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs), was evaluated in this phase II study of 20 patients with relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Patients received once-daily PTK787/ZK222584 at a target dose of 1250 mg. Eighteen patients were evaluable for response: one patient had a complete response (CR), six patients had stable disease but subsequently progressed, 10 patients had progressive disease by three cycles and one subject withdrew before response evaluation. The patient who attained a CR underwent autologous stem cell transplant and remains disease-free 76 months after study completion. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Grade 3 thrombocytopenia occurred in 20% and grade 3 hypertension occurred in 10%. There were no episodes of grade 3 proteinuria. In conclusion, PTK787/ZK222584 was well tolerated in a heavily pretreated population of patients with DLBCL, although its therapeutic potential as a single agent in DLBCL appears limited. PMID:23488610

  1. Changes in DNA methylation and transgenerational mobilization of a transposable element (mPing) by the Topoisomerase II inhibitor, Etoposide, in rice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Etoposide (epipodophyllotoxin) is a chemical commonly used as an anti-cancer drug which inhibits DNA synthesis by blocking topoisomerase II activity. Previous studies in animal cells have demonstrated that etoposide constitutes a genotoxic stress which may induce genomic instability including mobilization of normally quiescent transposable elements (TEs). However, it remained unknown whether similar genetically mutagenic effects could be imposed by etoposide in plant cells. Also, no information is available with regard to whether the drug may cause a perturbation of epigenetic stability in any organism. Results To investigate whether etoposide could generate genetic and/or epigenetic instability in plant cells, we applied etoposide to germinating seeds of six cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes including both subspecies, japonica and indica. Based on the methylation-sensitive gel-blotting results, epigenetic changes in DNA methylation of three TEs (Tos17, Osr23 and Osr36) and two protein-encoding genes (Homeobox and CDPK-related genes) were detected in the etoposide-treated plants (S0 generation) in four of the six studied japonica cultivars, Nipponbare, RZ1, RZ2, and RZ35, but not in the rest japonica cultivar (Matsumae) and the indica cultivar (93-11). DNA methylation changes in the etoposide-treated S0 rice plants were validated by bisulfite sequencing at both of two analyzed loci (Tos17 and Osr36). Transpositional activity was tested for eight TEs endogenous to the rice genome in both the S0 plants and their selfed progenies (S1 and S2) of one of the cultivars, RZ1, which manifested heritable phenotypic variations. Results indicated that no transposition occurred in the etoposide-treated S0 plants for any of the TEs. Nonetheless, a MITE transposon, mPing, showed rampant mobilization in the S1 and S2 progenies descended from the drug-treated S0 plants. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that etoposide imposes a similar genotoxic stress on

  2. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  3. Trypsin inhibitors of buffalo seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, N; Ramesh, V

    1992-03-01

    Two trypsin inhibitors from acid-treated buffalo seminal plasma were purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography. These acid-stable trypsin inhibitors having charge heterogeneity were homogeneous with respect to size as revealed by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. Gel filtration data suggest molecular weight value of 9,900 Da for inhibitor I and 10,900 Da for inhibitor II. Molecular weight estimated by SDS-PAGE was found to be 10,600 Da and 11,200 Da for inhibitors I and II, respectively. The hydrodynamic properties such as Stokes radii (1.58 nm and 1.62 nm); intrinsic viscosity (2.5725 ml/g and 2.5025 ml/g) and diffusion coefficient (13.499 x 10(-11) m2/sec. and 13.166X10(-11) m2/sec) respectively for inhibitor I and II were determined by analytical gel filtration. These inhibitors were fairly thermostable and could not be stained by PAS reagent. Both the inhibitors were found to inhibit buffalo acrosin but not bovine chymotrypsin.

  4. Targeting HER2 aberrations as actionable drivers in lung cancers: phase II trial of the pan-HER tyrosine kinase inhibitor dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kris, M. G.; Camidge, D. R.; Giaccone, G.; Hida, T.; Li, B. T.; O'Connell, J.; Taylor, I.; Zhang, H.; Arcila, M. E.; Goldberg, Z.; Jänne, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HER2 mutations and amplifications have been identified as oncogenic drivers in lung cancers. Dacomitinib, an irreversible inhibitor of HER2, EGFR (HER1), and HER4 tyrosine kinases, has demonstrated activity in cell-line models with HER2 exon 20 insertions or amplifications. Here, we studied dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified lung cancers. Patients and methods As a prespecified cohort of a phase II study, we included patients with stage IIIB/IV lung cancers with HER2 mutations or amplification. We gave oral dacomitinib at 30–45 mg daily in 28-day cycles. End points included partial response rate, overall survival, and toxicity. Results We enrolled 30 patients with HER2-mutant (n = 26, all in exon 20 including 25 insertions and 1 missense mutation) or HER2-amplified lung cancers (n = 4). Three of 26 patients with tumors harboring HER2 exon 20 mutations [12%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2% to 30%] had partial responses lasting 3+, 11, and 14 months. No partial responses occurred in four patients with tumors with HER2 amplifications. The median overall survival was 9 months from the start of dacomitinib (95% CI 7–21 months) for patients with HER2 mutations and ranged from 5 to 22 months with amplifications. Treatment-related toxicities included diarrhea (90%; grade 3/4: 20%/3%), dermatitis (73%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%), and fatigue (57%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%). One patient died on study likely due to an interaction of dacomitinib with mirtazapine. Conclusions Dacomitinib produced objective responses in patients with lung cancers with specific HER2 exon 20 insertions. This observation validates HER2 exon 20 insertions as actionable targets and justifies further study of HER2-targeted agents in specific HER2-driven lung cancers. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00818441. PMID:25899785

  5. Non-ATP competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, L; Roberti, M; Bottegoni, G

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases represent an attractive target in oncology drug discovery. Most of kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive and are called type I inhibitors. The ATP-binding pocket is highly conserved among members of the kinase family and it is difficult to find selective agents. Moreover, the ATP-competitive inhibitors must compete with high intracellular ATP levels leading to a discrepancy between IC50s measured by biochemical versus cellular assays. The non-ATP competitive inhibitors, called type II and type III inhibitors, offer the possibility to overcome these problems. These inhibitors act by inducing a conformational shift in the target enzyme such that the kinase is no longer able to function. In the DFG-out form, the phenylalanine side chain moves to a new position. This movement creates a hydrophobic pocket available for occupation by the inhibitor. Some common features are present in these inhibitors. They contain a heterocyclic system that forms one or two hydrogen bonds with the kinase hinge residue. They also contain a hydrophobic moiety that occupies the pocket formed by the shift of phenylalanine from the DFG motif. Moreover, all the inhibitors bear a hydrogen bond donor-acceptor pair, usually urea or amide, that links the hinge-binding portion to the hydrophobic moiety and interacts with the allosteric site. Examples of non ATP-competitive inhibitors are available for various kinases. In this review small molecules capable of inducing the DFG-out conformation are reported, especially focusing on structural feature, SAR and biological properties.

  6. Towards a Green Hydrate Inhibitor: Imaging Antifreeze Proteins on Clathrates

    PubMed Central

    Gordienko, Raimond; Ohno, Hiroshi; Singh, Vinay K.; Jia, Zongchao; Ripmeester, John A.; Walker, Virginia K.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs) possess the ability to modify structure II (sII) tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors. PMID:20161789

  7. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Salaski, Edward J

    2002-05-01

    Specific mutations in the ras gene impair the guanosine triphophatase (GTPase) activity of Ras proteins, which play a fundamental role in the signaling cascade, leading to uninterrupted growth signals and to the transformation of normal cells into malignant phenotypes. It has been shown that normal cells transfected with mutant ras gene become cancerous and that unfarnesylated, cytosolic mutant Ras protein does not anchor onto cell membranes and cannot induce this transformation. Posttranslational modification and plasma membrane association of mutant Ras is necessary for this transforming activity. Since its identification, the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) that catalyzes the first and essential step of the three Ras-processing steps has emerged as the most promising target for therapeutic intervention. FTase has been implicated as a potential target in inhibiting the prenylation of a variety of proteins, thus in controlling varied disease states (e.g. cancer, neurofibromatosis, restenosis, viral hepatitis, bone resorption, parasitic infections, corneal inflammations, and diabetes) associated with prenyl modifications of Ras and other proteins. Furthermore, it has been suggested that FTase inhibitors indirectly help in inhibiting tumors via suppression of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Major milestones have been achieved with small-molecule FTase inhibitors that show efficacy without toxicity in vitro, as well as in mouse models bearing ras-dependent tumors. With the determination of the crystal structure of mammalian FTase, existent leads have been fine-tuned and new potent molecules of diverse structural classes have been designed. A few of these molecules are currently in the clinic, with at least three drug candidates in Phase II studies and one in Phase III. This article will review the progress that has been reported with FTase inhibitors in drug discovery and in the clinic. PMID:12733981

  8. Non-target-site resistance to ALS inhibitors in waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A waterhemp population (MCR) previously characterized as resistant to 4-hyroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) and photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors was found to have two different resistance responses to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors. Plants from the MCR population exhibiting high resistan...

  9. Discovery of N-((1-(4-(3-(3-((6,7-Dimethoxyquinolin-3-yl)oxy)phenyl)ureido)-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)piperidin-4-yl)methyl)propionamide (CHMFL-KIT-8140) as a Highly Potent Type II Inhibitor Capable of Inhibiting the T670I "Gatekeeper" Mutant of cKIT Kinase.

    PubMed

    Li, Binhua; Wang, Aoli; Liu, Juan; Qi, Ziping; Liu, Xiaochuan; Yu, Kailin; Wu, Hong; Chen, Cheng; Hu, Chen; Wang, Wenchao; Wu, Jiaxin; Hu, Zhenquan; Ye, Ling; Zou, Fengming; Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Beilei; Wang, Li; Ren, Tao; Zhang, Shaojuan; Bai, Mingfeng; Zhang, Shanchun; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-09-22

    cKIT kinase inhibitors, e.g., imatinib, could induce drug-acquired mutations such as cKIT T670I that rendered drug resistance after chronic treatment. Through a type II kinase inhibitor design approach we discovered a highly potent type II cKIT kinase inhibitor compound 35 (CHMFL-KIT-8140), which potently inhibited both cKIT wt (IC50 = 33 nM) and cKIT gatekeeper T670I mutant (IC50 = 99 nM). Compound 35 displayed strong antiproliferative effect against GISTs cancer cell lines GIST-T1 (cKIT wt, GI50 = 4 nM) and GIST-5R (cKIT T670I, GI50 = 26 nM). In the cellular context it strongly inhibited c-KIT mediated signaling pathways and induced apoptosis. In the BaF3-TEL-cKIT-T670I isogenic cell inoculated xenograft mouse model, 35 exhibited dose dependent tumor growth suppression efficacy and 100 mg/kg dosage provided 47.7% tumor growth inhibition (TGI) without obvious toxicity. We believe compound 35 would be a good pharmacological tool for exploration of the cKIT-T670I mutant mediated pathology in GISTs. PMID:27545040

  10. HDAC Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olzscha, Heidi; Bekheet, Mina E; Sheikh, Semira; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is one of the most abundant posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells. The dynamic homeostasis of lysine acetylation and deacetylation is dictated by the action of histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). Important substrates for HATs and HDACs are histones, where lysine acetylation generally leads to an open and transcriptionally active chromatin conformation. Histone deacetylation forces the compaction of the chromatin with subsequent inhibition of transcription and reduced gene expression. Unbalanced HAT and HDAC activity, and therefore aberrant histone acetylation, has been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis and progression of malignancy in different types of cancer. Therefore, the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) as therapeutic agents against cancer is of great interest. However, treatment with HDIs can also affect the acetylation status of many other non-histone proteins which play a role in different pathways including angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, autophagy and apoptosis. These effects have led HDIs to become anticancer agents, which can initiate apoptosis in tumor cells. Hematological malignancies in particular are responsive to HDIs, and four HDIs have already been approved as anticancer agents. There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to predict the response to HDI treatment. This chapter provides information on how to assess HDAC activity in vitro and determine the potency of HDIs on different HDACs. It also gives information on how to analyze cellular markers following HDI treatment and to analyze tissue biopsies from HDI-treated patients. Finally, a protocol is provided on how to detect HDI sensitivity determinants in human cells, based on a pRetroSuper shRNA screen upon HDI treatment. PMID:27246222

  11. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications.

  12. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications. PMID:25260821

  13. Modeling chemical interaction profiles: II. Molecular docking, spectral data-activity relationship, and structure-activity relationship models for potent and weak inhibitors of cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 isozyme.

    PubMed

    Tie, Yunfeng; McPhail, Brooks; Hong, Huixiao; Pearce, Bruce A; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Ge, Weigong; Buzatu, Dan A; Wilkes, Jon G; Fuscoe, James C; Tong, Weida; Fowler, Bruce A; Beger, Richard D; Demchuk, Eugene

    2012-03-15

    Polypharmacy increasingly has become a topic of public health concern, particularly as the U.S. population ages. Drug labels often contain insufficient information to enable the clinician to safely use multiple drugs. Because many of the drugs are bio-transformed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, inhibition of CYP activity has long been associated with potentially adverse health effects. In an attempt to reduce the uncertainty pertaining to CYP-mediated drug-drug/chemical interactions, an interagency collaborative group developed a consensus approach to prioritizing information concerning CYP inhibition. The consensus involved computational molecular docking, spectral data-activity relationship (SDAR), and structure-activity relationship (SAR) models that addressed the clinical potency of CYP inhibition. The models were built upon chemicals that were categorized as either potent or weak inhibitors of the CYP3A4 isozyme. The categorization was carried out using information from clinical trials because currently available in vitro high-throughput screening data were not fully representative of the in vivo potency of inhibition. During categorization it was found that compounds, which break the Lipinski rule of five by molecular weight, were about twice more likely to be inhibitors of CYP3A4 compared to those, which obey the rule. Similarly, among inhibitors that break the rule, potent inhibitors were 2-3 times more frequent. The molecular docking classification relied on logistic regression, by which the docking scores from different docking algorithms, CYP3A4 three-dimensional structures, and binding sites on them were combined in a unified probabilistic model. The SDAR models employed a multiple linear regression approach applied to binned 1D ¹³C-NMR and 1D ¹⁵N-NMR spectral descriptors. Structure-based and physical-chemical descriptors were used as the basis for developing SAR models by the decision forest method. Thirty-three potent inhibitors and 88 weak

  14. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  15. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  16. Inhibitors in LPE growth of garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roode, W. H.; Robertson, J. M.

    1983-09-01

    The growth rate of LPE growth garnets can be reduced considerably by the addition of small amounts of group II oxides. This effect can be helpful for the controlled growth of very thin garnet films for sub-micron bubbles and optical devices. The largest effect was found with the addition of Mg 2+ and Ca 2+, resulting in a maximum decrease of the growth rate of approximately 70%. A semi-empirical formula was used to describe the growth rate as a function of the dipping temperature. The change in the growth rate on the addition of the inhibitor ion at constant temperature was found to be proportional to ( aMO)/( aMO+2 Ln 2O 3), where M is a group II element, Ln 2O 2 is the sum of the yttrium and RE oxides in the melt, and a is the inhibitor factor. The value of the inhibitor factor depends on both the inhibitor ion as well as the composition of the garnet. The lowering of the growth rate on the addition of an inhibitor ion is explained by the introduction of an extra growth resistance due to the charge compensation mechanism of the divalent ions. The influence of the different charge compensation possibilities in the garnet system is examined and the relative importance of these possibilities for charge compensation is discussed.

  17. Squash inhibitors: from structural motifs to macrocyclic knottins.

    PubMed

    Chiche, Laurent; Heitz, Annie; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Gracy, Jérôme; Chau, Pham T T; Ha, Phan T; Hernandez, Jean-François; Le-Nguyen, Dung

    2004-10-01

    In this article, we will first introduce the squash inhibitor, a well established family of highly potent canonical serine proteinase inhibitors isolated from Cucurbitaceae. The squash inhibitors were among the first discovered proteins with the typical knottin fold shared by numerous peptides extracted from plants, animals and fungi. Knottins contain three knotted disulfide bridges, two of them arranged as a Cystine-Stabilized Beta-sheet motif. In contrast to cyclotides for which no natural linear homolog is known, most squash inhibitors are linear. However, Momordica cochinchinensis Trypsin Inhibitor-I and (MCoTI-I and -II), 34-residue squash inhibitors isolated from seeds of a common Cucurbitaceae from Vietnam, were recently shown to be macrocyclic. In these circular squash inhibitors, a short peptide linker connects residues that correspond to the N- and C-termini in homologous linear squash inhibitors. In this review we present the isolation, characterization, chemical synthesis, and activity of these macrocyclic knottins. The solution structure of MCoTI-II will be compared with topologically similar cyclotides, homologous linear squash inhibitors and other knottins, and potential applications of such scaffolds will be discussed. PMID:15551519

  18. Squash inhibitors: from structural motifs to macrocyclic knottins.

    PubMed

    Chiche, Laurent; Heitz, Annie; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Gracy, Jérôme; Chau, Pham T T; Ha, Phan T; Hernandez, Jean-François; Le-Nguyen, Dung

    2004-10-01

    In this article, we will first introduce the squash inhibitor, a well established family of highly potent canonical serine proteinase inhibitors isolated from Cucurbitaceae. The squash inhibitors were among the first discovered proteins with the typical knottin fold shared by numerous peptides extracted from plants, animals and fungi. Knottins contain three knotted disulfide bridges, two of them arranged as a Cystine-Stabilized Beta-sheet motif. In contrast to cyclotides for which no natural linear homolog is known, most squash inhibitors are linear. However, Momordica cochinchinensis Trypsin Inhibitor-I and (MCoTI-I and -II), 34-residue squash inhibitors isolated from seeds of a common Cucurbitaceae from Vietnam, were recently shown to be macrocyclic. In these circular squash inhibitors, a short peptide linker connects residues that correspond to the N- and C-termini in homologous linear squash inhibitors. In this review we present the isolation, characterization, chemical synthesis, and activity of these macrocyclic knottins. The solution structure of MCoTI-II will be compared with topologically similar cyclotides, homologous linear squash inhibitors and other knottins, and potential applications of such scaffolds will be discussed.

  19. Discovery of N-(3-((1-Isonicotinoylpiperidin-4-yl)oxy)-4-methylphenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide (CHMFL-KIT-110) as a Selective, Potent, and Orally Available Type II c-KIT Kinase Inhibitor for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Beilei; Zou, Fengming; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Xiaochuan; Wang, Aoli; Qi, Shuang; Wang, Wenchao; Qi, Ziping; Zhao, Zheng; Hu, Zhenquan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shanchun; Wang, Yuexiang; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-04-28

    c-KIT kinase is a validated drug discovery target for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Clinically used c-KIT kinase inhibitors, i.e., Imatinib and Sunitinib, bear other important targets such as ABL or FLT3 kinases. Here we report our discovery of a more selective c-KIT inhibitor, compound 13 (CHMFL-KIT-110), which completely abolished ABL and FLT3 kinase activity. KinomeScan selectivity profiling (468 kinases) of 13 exhibited a high selectivity (S score (1) = 0.01). 13 displayed great antiproliferative efficacy against GISTs cell lines GIST-T1 and GIST-882 (GI50: 0.021 and 0.043 μM, respectively). In the cellular context, it effectively affected c-KIT-mediated signaling pathways and induced apoptosis as well as cell cycle arrest. In addition, 13 possessed acceptable bioavailability (36%) and effectively suppressed the tumor growth in GIST-T1 cell inoculated xenograft model without apparent toxicity. 13 currently is undergoing extensive preclinical evaluation and might be a potential drug candidate for GISTs. PMID:27077705

  20. SHH inhibitors for the treatment of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Samkari, Ayman; White, Jason; Packer, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. It is currently stratified into four molecular variants through the advances in transcriptional profiling. They include: wingless, sonic hedgehog (SHH), Group III, and Group IV. The SHH group is characterized by constitutive activation of the SHH signaling pathway, and genetically characterized by mutations in patched homolog 1 (PTCH1) or other downstream pathway mutations. SHH inhibitors have become of great clinical interest in treating SHH-driven medulloblastoma. Many inhibitors are currently in different stages of development, some already approved for other SHH-driven cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma. In vitro and in vivo medulloblastoma studies have shown efficacy and these findings have been translated into Phase I and II clinical trials. In this review, we present an overview of SHH medulloblastoma, as well as a discussion of currently available SHH inhibitors, and the challenges associated with their use. PMID:26027634

  1. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  2. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  3. CHF6001 II: a novel phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, suitable for topical pulmonary administration--in vivo preclinical pharmacology profile defines a potent anti-inflammatory compound with a wide therapeutic window.

    PubMed

    Villetti, Gino; Carnini, Chiara; Battipaglia, Loredana; Preynat, Laurent; Bolzoni, Pier Tonino; Bassani, Franco; Caruso, Paola; Bergamaschi, Marco; Pisano, Anna Rita; Puviani, Veronica; Stellari, Fabio Franco; Cenacchi, Valentina; Volta, Roberta; Bertacche, Vittorio; Mileo, Valentina; Bagnacani, Valentina; Moretti, Elisa; Puccini, Paola; Catinella, Silvia; Facchinetti, Fabrizio; Sala, Angelo; Civelli, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    CHF6001 [(S)-3,5-dichloro-4-(2-(3-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-4-(difluoromethoxy)phenyl)-2-(3-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-4-(methylsulfonamido)benzoyloxy)ethyl)pyridine 1-oxide] is a novel phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor designed for use in pulmonary diseases by inhaled administration. Intratracheal administration of CHF6001 to ovalbumin-sensitized Brown-Norway rats suppressed the antigen-induced decline of lung functions (ED50 = 0.1 µmol/kg) and antigen-induced eosinophilia (ED50 = 0.03 µmol/kg) when administered (0.09 μmol/kg) up to 24 hours before antigen challenge, in agreement with CHF6001-sustained lung concentrations up to 72 hours after intratracheal treatment (mean residence time 26 hours). Intranasal, once daily administration of CHF6001 inhibited neutrophil infiltration observed after 11 days of tobacco smoke exposure in mice, both upon prophylactic (0.15-0.45 µmol/kg per day) or interventional (0.045-0.45 µmol/kg per day) treatment. CHF6001 was ineffective in reversing ketamine/xylazine-induced anesthesia (a surrogate of emesis in rat) up to 5 µmol/kg administered intratracheally, a dose 50- to 150-fold higher than anti-inflammatory ED50 observed in rats. When given topically to ferrets, no emesis and nausea were evident up to 10 to 20 µmol/kg, respectively, whereas the PDE4 inhibitor GSK-256066 (6-[3-(dimethylcarbamoyl)phenyl]sulfonyl-4-(3-methoxyanilino)-8-methylquinoline-3-carboxamide) induced nausea at 1 µmol/kg intratracheally. A 14-day inhalation toxicology study in rats showed a no-observed-adverse-effect level dose of 4.4 µmol/kg per day for CHF6001, lower than the 0.015 μmol/kg per day for GSK-256066. CHF6001 was found effective and extremely well tolerated upon topical administration in relevant animal models, and may represent a step forward in PDE4 inhibition for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive respiratory disease. PMID:25576073

  4. Design and synthesis of novel 4-(4-oxo-2-arylthiazolidin-3-yl)benzenesulfonamides as selective inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase IX over I and II with potential anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Sharad Kumar; Bansal, Sumit; Lohan, Sandeep; Modak, Vikarm; Chaudhary, Anil; Tiwari, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The novel 4-(4-oxo-2-arylthiazolidin-3-yl)benzenesulfonamide derivatives were designed and synthesized for selective carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) inhibitory activity with anticancer potential. In the CA inhibition assay, 3f was found to be the most potent and selective inhibitor of CA IX with inhibitory constant (K(I)) value of 2.2 nM. Among the synthesized compounds, 3f showed IC₅₀ values of 5.03 μg/ml (cisplatin: 6.56 μg/ml), 5.81 μg/ml (cisplatin: 5.85 μg/ml), and 23.93 μg/ml (cisplatin: 2.75 μg/ml) against COLO-205, MDA-MB-231, and DU-145 cell lines, respectively. At IC₅₀, 3f caused cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation, and nuclear fragmentation events characteristic to apoptosis in the Hoechst 33258 and acridine orange-ethidium bromide staining studies of COLO-205 cells. In the Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA) solid tumor model 3f decreased tumor volume by 64.83% (cisplatin: 71.62%), while increase in mean body weight was found to be only 4.09% (cisplatin: 3.47%). PMID:23827177

  5. Pathway modulators and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitors of specific cellular pathways are useful for investigating the roles of proteins of unknown function, and for selectively inhibiting a protein in complex pathways to uncover its relationships to other proteins in this and other interacting pathways. This appendix provides links to Web sites that describe cellular processes and pathways along with the various classes of inhibitors, numerous references, downloadable diagrams, and technical tips.

  6. Update on TNF Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kerdel, Francisco A

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors dramatically improved the management of psoriasis. Some newer or investigational biologics with different mechanisms of action have demonstrated noninferiority or superiority to etanercept, the first self-injectable anti-TNF-α agent to become available in the United States. Nonetheless, TNF-α inhibitors are likely to remain a mainstay of therapy for many years.

  7. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  8. Design and synthesis of the novel DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors: esterification and amination substituted 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin derivates exhibiting anti-tumor activity by activating ATM/ATR signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Zhao, Wei; Li, Hong-Mei; Wan, Duan-Ji; Li, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Tao; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2014-06-10

    According to the structure-activity relationship, drug combination principle and bioisosterism, a series of the novel esterification and amination 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin derivates were rationally designed in order to discover the potential antitumor prodrug. And then these compounds were tested by the drug-topoisomerase II docking models for virtual screening. Thus, twelve target compounds were screened out and synthesized. Most of compounds exhibited promising in vitro anti-tumor activity, particularly 4-N-tris(hydroxymethyl)metylaminomethane-4-deoxy-4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (Compound 1). The anti-tumor activity of Compound 1 against the tumor cell lines BGC-823 (i.e., the IC50 value of 5.35 ± 0.77 μM), HeLa (i.e., the IC50 value of 160.48 ± 14.50 μM), and A549 (i.e., the IC50 value of 13.95 ± 5.41 μM) was significantly improved by 706%, 31% and 900% than that of etoposide (i.e., the IC50 values of 43.74 ± 5.13, 209.90 ± 13.42, and 139.54 ± 7.05 μM), respectively. Moreover, the IC50 value of Compound 1 against the normal human cell line HK-2 (i.e., 16.3 ± 3.77 μM) was 78% lower than that of etoposide (i.e., 9.17 ± 1.58 μM). Compound 1 could diminish the relaxation reaction topoisomerase II DNA decatenation at a concentration of 10 μM and induce BGC-823 apoptosis by breaking DNA double-strand and activating ATM/ATR signaling pathways.

  9. Pazopanib, a multikinase angiogenesis inhibitor, in patients with relapsed or refractory advanced soft tissue sarcoma: a phase II study from the European organisation for research and treatment of cancer-soft tissue and bone sarcoma group (EORTC study 62043).

    PubMed

    Sleijfer, Stefan; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Papai, Zsuzsa; Le Cesne, Axel; Scurr, Michelle; Schöffski, Patrick; Collin, Françoise; Pandite, Lini; Marreaud, Sandrine; De Brauwer, Annick; van Glabbeke, Martine; Verweij, Jaap; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2009-07-01

    PURPOSE Given the importance of angiogenesis in soft tissue sarcoma (STS), pazopanib, an oral angiogenesis inhibitor that targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and platelet-derived growth factor receptor, was explored in patients with advanced STS. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients with intermediate- or high-grade advanced STS who were ineligible for chemotherapy or who had received no more than two prior cytotoxic agents for advanced disease, who had documented progression, who had adequate performance status, and who had good organ function were eligible. Pazopanib 800 mg was given daily. The primary end point was progression-free rate at 12 weeks (PFR(12 weeks)). Secondary end points were response, safety, and overall survival. Four different strata were studied: adipocytic STS, leiomyosarcomas, synovial sarcomas, and other STS types. A Simon two-stage design was applied (P1 = 40%; P0 = 20%; alpha = beta = .1) for each stratum. Results One hundred forty-two patients were enrolled. The adipocytic STS stratum was closed after the first stage, given insufficient activity (PFR(12 weeks), five [26%] of19). PFR(12 weeks) was 18 (44%) of 41 patients in the leiomyosarcoma cohort, 18 (49%) of 37 in the synovial sarcomas, and 16 (39%) of 41 in the other STS types. Compared with historical controls who were treated with second-line chemotherapy, progression-free and overall survivals were prolonged in the three cohorts in which the primary end point was reached. The most frequent drug-related toxicities were hypertension, fatigue, hypopigmentation, and nausea. Other toxicities included liver enzyme elevations, myelosuppression, and proteinuria, all of which were mostly grades 1 to 2. The most frequent grades 3 to 4 toxicities were hyperbilirubinemia (6.3%), hypertension (7.7%), and fatigue (7.7%). CONCLUSION Pazopanib is well tolerated in patients with relapsed, advanced STS and demonstrates interesting activity that warrants additional study in patients with

  10. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  11. A non-comparative randomized phase II study of two doses of ATN-224, a copper/zinc superoxide dismutase inhibitor, in patients with biochemically recurrent hormone-naïve prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianqing; Zahurak, Marianna; Beer, Tomasz M.; Ryan, Charles. J.; Wilding, George; Mathew, Paul; Morris, Michael; Callahan, Jennifer. A.; Gordon, Gilad; Reich, Steven D.; Carducci, Michael A.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective ATN-224 (choline tetrathiomolybdate) is an oral Cu2+/Zn2+-superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) inhibitor with preclinical antitumor activity. We hypothesized that ATN-224 may induce antitumor effects as an antiangiogenic agent at low dose-levels while possessing direct antitumor activity at higher dose-levels. The objective of this study was to screen its clinical activity in patients with biochemically recurrent hormone-naïve prostate cancer. Methods Biochemically-recurrent prostate cancer patients with prostate specific antigen doubling times (PSADT) <12 months, no radiographic evidence of metastasis, and no hormonal therapy within 6 months (with serum testosterone levels >150 ng/dL) were eligible. ATN-224 was administered at two dose-levels, 300 mg (n=23) or 30 mg (n=24) daily, by way of randomization. PSA progression was defined as a ≥50% increase (and >5 ng/mL) in PSA from baseline or post-treatment nadir. Endpoints included the proportion of patients who were free of PSA progression at 24 weeks, changes in PSA slope/PSADT, and safety. The study was not powered to detect differences between the two treatment groups. Results At 24 weeks, 59% (95% CI 33–82%) of men in the low-dose arm and 45% (95% CI 17–77%) in the high-dose arm were PSA progression-free. Median PSA progression-free survival was 30 weeks (95% CI 21–40+) and 26 weeks (95% CI 24–39+) in the low-dose and high-dose groups, respectively. Pre- and on-treatment PSA kinetics analyses showed a significant mean PSA slope decrease (p=0.006) and a significant mean PSADT increase (p=0.032) in the low-dose arm only. Serum ceruloplasmin levels, a biomarker for ATN-224 activity, were lowered in the high-dose group, but did not correlate with PSA changes. Conclusions Low-dose ATN-224 (30 mg daily) may have biologic activity in men with biochemically-recurrent prostate cancer, as suggested by an improvement in PSA kinetics. However, the clinical significance of PSA kinetics changes in this patient

  12. Blebbistatin and blebbistatin-inactivated myosin II inhibit myosin II-independent processes in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Shi; Liu, Xiong; Korn, Edward D.

    2005-01-01

    Blebbistatin, a cell-permeable inhibitor of class-II myosins, was developed to provide a tool for studying the biologic roles of myosin II. Consistent with this use, we find that blebbistatin inhibits three myosin II-dependent processes in Dictyostelium (growth in suspension culture, capping of Con A receptors, and development to fruiting bodies) and does not inhibit growth on plates, which does not require myosin II. As expected, macropinocytosis (myosin I-dependent), contractile vacuole activity (myosin V-dependent), and phagocytosis (myosin VII-dependent), none of which requires myosin II, are not inhibited by blebbistatin in myosin II-null cells, but, unexpectedly, blebbistatin does inhibit macropinocytosis and phagocytosis by cells expressing myosin II. Expression of catalytically inactive myosin II in myosin II-null cells also inhibits macropinocytosis and phagocytosis. Both blebbistatin-inhibited myosin II and catalytically inactive myosin II form cytoplasmic aggregates, which may be why they inhibit myosin II-independent processes, but neither affects the distribution of actin filaments in vegetative cells or actin and myosin distribution in dividing or polarized cells. Blebbistatin also inhibits cell streaming and plaque expansion in myosin II-null cells. Our results are consistent with myosin II being the only Dictyostelium myosin that is inhibited by blebbistatin but also show that blebbistatin-inactivated myosin II inhibits some myosin II-independent processes and that blebbistatin inhibits other activities in the absence of myosin II. PMID:15671182

  13. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. PMID:26362302

  14. Novel Cytoprotective Inhibitors for Apoptotic Endonuclease G

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dae Song; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Apostolov, Eugene O.; Wang, Xiaoying; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptotic endonuclease G (EndoG) is responsible for DNA fragmentation both during and after cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that genetic inactivation of EndoG is cytoprotective against various pro-apoptotic stimuli; however, specific inhibitors for EndoG are not available. In this study, we have developed a high-throughput screening assay for EndoG and have used it to screen a chemical library. The screening resulted in the identification of two potent EndoG inhibitors, PNR-3-80 and PNR-3-82, which are thiobarbiturate analogs. As determined by their IC50s, the inhibitors are more potent than ZnCl2 or EDTA. They inhibit EndoG at one or two orders of magnitude greater than another apoptotic endonuclease, DNase I, and do not inhibit the other five tested cell death-related enzymes: DNase II, RNase A, proteinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase 1. Exposure of natural EndoG-expressing 22Rv1 or EndoG-overexpressing PC3 cells rendered them significantly resistant to Cisplatin and Docetaxel, respectively. These novel EndoG inhibitors have the potential to be utilized for amelioration of cell injuries in which participation of EndoG is essential. PMID:25401220

  15. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  16. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  17. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cockrill, Barbara A; Waxman, Aaron B

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling plays a key role in modulating vascular tone and remodeling in the pulmonary circulation. The guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanylate monophosphate-signaling pathway primarily mediates nitric oxide signaling. This pathway is critical in normal regulation of the pulmonary vasculature, and is an important target for therapy in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In the pulmonary vasculature, degradation of cGMP is primarily regulated by PDE-5, and inhibition of this enzyme has important effects on pulmonary vasculature smooth muscle tone. Large randomized placebo-controlled trials of PDE-5 inhibitors demonstrated improved exercise capacity, hemodynamics and quality of life in adult patients with PAH. This chapter will discuss the mechanisms of NO signaling in the vasculature, characteristics of the PDE5-inhibitors approved for treatment of PH, and review available data on the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in PH. PMID:24092343

  18. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: benzenesulfonamides incorporating cyanoacrylamide moieties are low nanomolar/subnanomolar inhibitors of the tumor-associated isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Alafeefy, Ahmed M; Isik, Semra; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Ashour, Abdelkader E; Vullo, Daniela; Al-Jaber, Nabila A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-03-15

    A series of benzenesulfonamides incorporating cyanoacrylamide moieties (tyrphostine analogues) have been obtained by reaction of sulfanilamide with ethylcyanoacetate followed by condensation with aromatic/heterocyclic aldehydes, isothiocyanates or diazonium salts. The new compounds have been investigated as inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4. 2.1.1), and more specifically against the cytosolic human (h) isoforms hCA I and II, as well as the transmembrane, tumor-associated ones CA IX and XII, which are validated antitumor targets. Most of the new benzenesulfonamides were low nanomolar or subnanomolar CA IX/XII inhibitors whereas they were less effective as inhibitors of CA I and II. The structure-activity relationship for this class of effective CA inhibitors is also discussed. Generally, electron donating groups in the starting aldehyde reagent favored CA IX and XII inhibition, whereas halogeno, methoxy and dimethylamino moieties led to very potent CA XII inhibitors. PMID:23290254

  19. Pectin methylesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Giovane, A; Servillo, L; Balestrieri, C; Raiola, A; D'Avino, R; Tamburrini, M; Ciardiello, M A; Camardella, L

    2004-02-12

    Pectin methylesterase (PME) is the first enzyme acting on pectin, a major component of plant cell wall. PME action produces pectin with different structural and functional properties, having an important role in plant physiology. Regulation of plant PME activity is obtained by the differential expression of several isoforms in different tissues and developmental stages and by subtle modifications of cell wall local pH. Inhibitory activities from various plant sources have also been reported. A proteinaceous inhibitor of PME (PMEI) has been purified from kiwi fruit. The kiwi PMEI is active against plant PMEs, forming a 1:1 non-covalent complex. The polypeptide chain comprises 152 amino acid residues and contains five Cys residues, four of which are connected by disulfide bridges, first to second and third to fourth. The sequence shows significant similarity with the N-terminal pro-peptides of plant PME, and with plant invertase inhibitors. In particular, the four Cys residues involved in disulfide bridges are conserved. On the basis of amino acid sequence similarity and Cys residues conservation, a large protein family including PMEI, invertase inhibitors and related proteins of unknown function has been identified. The presence of at least two sequences in the Arabidopsis genome having high similarity with kiwi PMEI suggests the ubiquitous presence of this inhibitor. PMEI has an interest in food industry as inhibitor of endogenous PME, responsible for phase separation and cloud loss in fruit juice manufacturing. Affinity chromatography on resin-bound PMEI can also be used to concentrate and detect residual PME activity in fruit and vegetable products.

  20. The design of inhibitors for medicinally relevant metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Faith E; Lewis, Jana A; Cohen, Seth M

    2007-02-01

    A number of metalloproteins are important medicinal targets for conditions ranging from pathogenic infections to cancer. Many but not all of these metalloproteins contain a zinc(II) ion in the protein active site. Small-molecule inhibitors of these metalloproteins are designed to bind directly to the active site metal ions. In this review several metalloproteins of interest are discussed, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), histone deacetylases (HDACs), anthrax lethal factor (LF), and others. Different strategies that have been employed to design effective inhibitors against these proteins are described, with an effort to highlight the strengths and drawbacks of each approach. An emphasis is placed on examining the bioinorganic chemistry of these metal active sites and how a better understanding of the coordination chemistry in these systems may lead to improved inhibitors. It is hoped that this review will help inspire medicinal, biological, and inorganic chemists to tackle this important problem by considering all aspects of metalloprotein inhibitor design.

  1. Tyrosinaemia II.

    PubMed

    Colditz, P B; Yu, J S; Billson, F A; Rogers, M; Molloy, H F; O'Halloran, M; Wilcken, B

    1984-08-18

    Four cases of tyrosinaemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome) are reported. This syndrome consists of corneal erosions, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, and sometimes mental retardation. Presentation with photophobia and dendritic corneal ulceration or circumscribed palmoplantar keratoderma should alert the physician to the possible diagnosis of tyrosinaemia II. Early diagnosis is important, as the clinical picture can be modified by dietary restriction.

  2. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  3. [JAK2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hernández Boluda, Juan Carlos; Gómez, Montse; Pérez, Ariadna

    2016-07-15

    Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase activity of JAK proteins can interfere with the signaling of immunomodulatory cytokines and block the constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway that characterizes certain malignancies, including chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK inhibitors may, therefore, be useful to treat malignancies as well as inflammatory or immune disorders. Currently, the most significant advances have been made in the treatment of myelofibrosis, where these drugs may lead to a remarkable improvement in the control of hyperproliferative manifestations. However, available data suggest that this treatment is not curative of myelofibrosis. In general, JAK2 inhibition induces cytopaenias, with this being considered a class side-effect. By contrast, the extrahaematologic toxicity profile varies significantly among the different JAK inhibitors. At present, there are several clinical trials evaluating the combination of ruxolitinib with other drugs, in order to improve its therapeutic activity as well as reducing haematologic toxicity. PMID:27033437

  4. Coagulation inhibitors in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Esmon, C T

    2005-04-01

    Coagulation is triggered by inflammatory mediators in a number of ways. However, to prevent unwanted clot formation, several natural anticoagulant mechanisms exist, such as the antithrombin-heparin mechanism, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor mechanism and the protein C anticoagulant pathway. This review examines the ways in which these pathways are down-regulated by inflammation, thus limiting clot formation and decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. PMID:15787615

  5. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  6. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: glycosylsulfanilamides act as subnanomolar inhibitors of the human secreted isoform VI.

    PubMed

    Winum, Jean-Yves; Montero, Jean-Louis; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-12-01

    A series of sulfonamides incorporating sugar moieties and the sulfanilamide scaffold have been investigated for their interaction with the secretory isoform of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), CA VI. This isoform is secreted in saliva, tears, and milk of mammals - where it plays important physiological roles - even if little is understood at this moment regarding its inhibition, due to the lack of potent and/or selective inhibitors. Here we report a series of low nanomolar and subnanomolar CA VI inhibitors, belonging to the glycosylamine-sulfanilamide class. The glucose, ribose, arabinose, xylose, and fucose derivatives showed excellent CA VI inhibitory activity, with K(i)s in the range of 0.56-5.1 nm, whereas the least active derivatives, incorporating gallactose, mannose, and rhamnose scaffolds showed inhibition constants in the range of 10.1-34.1 nm. Many of these sulfonamides were also selective inhibitors for their interaction with CA VI over the physiologically dominant and ubiquitous isoform CA II, with selectivity ratios of 4.11-35.93 for inhibiting the secreted over the cytosolic isozyme. Because of their high water solubility and high affinity for CA VI over CA II, these compounds are useful tools for better understanding the secreted CA isoform CA VI. PMID:19824891

  7. Search for aflatoxin and trichothecene production inhibitors and analysis of their modes of action.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Shohei; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Jermnak, Usuma; Takagi, Keiko; Iimura, Kurin; Yamamoto, Toshiyoshi; Suzuki, Michio; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxin contamination of crops is a serious problem throughout the world because of its impact on human and animal health as well as economy. Inhibitors of mycotoxin production are useful not only for developing effective methods to prevent mycotoxin contamination, but also for investigating the molecular mechanisms of secondary metabolite production by fungi. We have been searching for mycotoxin production inhibitors among natural products and investigating their modes of action. In this article, we review aflatoxin and trichothecene production inhibitors, including our works on blasticidin S, methyl syringate, cyclo(L-Ala-L-Pro), respiration inhibitors, and precocene II.

  8. Selective Water-Soluble Gelatinase Inhibitor Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Gooyit, Major; Lee, Mijoon; Schroeder, Valerie A.; Ikejiri, Masahiro; Suckow, Mark A.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2011-01-01

    SB-3CT (1), a selective and potent thiirane-based gelatinase inhibitor, is effective in animal models of cancer metastasis and stroke; however, it is limited by poor aqueous solubility and extensive metabolism. We addressed these issues by blocking the primary site of metabolism and capitalizing on a prodrug strategy to achieve >5000-fold increased solubility. The amide prodrugs were quantitatively hydrolyzed in human blood to a potent gelatinase inhibitor, ND-322 (3). The arginyl amide prodrug (ND-478, 5d) was metabolically stable in mouse, rat, and human liver microsomes. Both 5d and 3 were non-mutagenic in the Ames II mutagenicity assay. The prodrug 5d showed moderate clearance of 0.0582 L/min/kg, remained mostly in the extracellular fluid compartment (Vd = 0.0978 L/kg), and had a terminal half-life of >4 h. The prodrug 5d had superior pharmacokinetic properties than 3, making the thiirane class of selective gelatinase inhibitors suitable for intravenous administration in treatment of acute gelatinase-dependent diseases. PMID:21866961

  9. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  10. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  11. Group II p21-activated kinases as therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yang-Guang; Ning, Ke; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are central players in various oncogenic signaling pathways. The six PAK family members are classified into group I (PAK1-3) and group II (PAK4-6). Focus is currently shifting from group I PAKs to group II PAKs. Group II PAKs play important roles in many fundamental cellular processes, some of which have particular significance in the development and progression of cancer. Because of their important functions, group II PAKs have become popular potential drug target candidates. However, few group II PAKs inhibitors have been reported, and most do not exhibit satisfactory kinase selectivity and “drug-like” properties. Isoform- and kinase-selective PAK inhibitors remain to be developed. This review describes the biological activities of group II PAKs, the importance of group II PAKs in the development and progression of gastrointestinal cancer, and small-molecule inhibitors of group II PAKs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26811660

  12. [Study on hemolytic mechanism of polyphyllin II].

    PubMed

    Ning, Li-hua; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Yao-xiang; Li, Xin-ping

    2015-09-01

    To study the hemolytic effect of polyphyllin II (PP II) mediated by anion channel protein and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), in order to initially reveal its hemolytic mechanism in vitro. In the experiment, the spectrophotometric method was adopted to detect the hemolysis of PP II in vitro and the effect of anion channel-related solution and blocker, glucose channel-related inhibitor and multi-target drugs dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and diazepam on the hemolysis of PP II. The scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope were used to observe the effect of PP II on erythrocyte (RBC) morphology. The results showed that PP II -processed blood cells were severely deformed into spherocytes, acanthocyturia and vesicae. According to the results of the PP II hemolysis experiment in vitro, the anion hypertonic solution LiCl, NaHCO3, Na2SO4 and PBS significantly inhibited the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.05), while blockers NPPB and DIDS remarkably promoted it (P < 0.01). Hyperosmotic sodium chloride, fructose and glucose at specific concentrations notably antagonized the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.05). The glucose channel inhibitor Cytochalasin B and verapamil remarkably antagonized the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.01). The hemolysis induced by PP II could also be antagonized by 1 gmol x L(1) diazepam and 100 μmol x L(-1) DHEA pretreated for 1 min (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the hemolytic mechanism of PP II in vitro may be related to the increase in intracellular osmotic pressure and rupture of erythrocytes by changing the anion channel transport activity, with GLUT1 as the major competitive interaction site. PMID:26983211

  13. mTOR Inhibitors Alone and in Combination with JAK2 Inhibitors Effectively Inhibit Cells of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Serena; Tozzi, Lorenzo; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bosi, Alberto; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dysregulated signaling of the JAK/STAT pathway is a common feature of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), usually associated with JAK2V617F mutation. Recent clinical trials with JAK2 inhibitors showed significant improvements in splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms in patients with myelofibrosis but meaningful molecular responses were not documented. Accordingly, there remains a need for exploring new treatment strategies of MPN. A potential additional target for treatment is represented by the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway that has been found constitutively activated in MPN cells; proof-of-evidence of efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 has been obtained recently in a Phase I/II trial in patients with myelofibrosis. The aim of the study was to characterize the effects in vitro of mTOR inhibitors, used alone and in combination with JAK2 inhibitors, against MPN cells. Findings Mouse and human JAK2V617F mutated cell lines and primary hematopoietic progenitors from MPN patients were challenged with an allosteric (RAD001) and an ATP-competitive (PP242) mTOR inhibitor and two JAK2 inhibitors (AZD1480 and ruxolitinib). mTOR inhibitors effectively reduced proliferation and colony formation of cell lines through a slowed cell division mediated by changes in cell cycle transition to the S-phase. mTOR inhibitors also impaired the proliferation and prevented colony formation from MPN hematopoietic progenitors at doses significantly lower than healthy controls. JAK2 inhibitors produced similar antiproliferative effects in MPN cell lines and primary cells but were more potent inducers of apoptosis, as also supported by differential effects on cyclinD1, PIM1 and BcLxL expression levels. Co-treatment of mTOR inhibitor with JAK2 inhibitor resulted in synergistic activity against the proliferation of JAK2V617F mutated cell lines and significantly reduced erythropoietin-independent colony growth in patients with polycythemia vera

  14. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3‑2 and NO‑3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10‑4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  15. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 541: Metal Complexes of Heterocyclic Sulfonamides: A New Class of Antiglaucoma Agents

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Jitianu, Andrei

    1997-01-01

    Metal complexes of heterocyclic sulfonamides possessing carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitory properties were recently shown to be useful as intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering agents in experimental animals, and might be developed as a novel class of antiglaucoma drugs. Here we report the synthesis of a heterocyclic sulfonamide CA inhibitor and of the metal complexes containing main group metal ions, such as Be(II), Mg(II), Al(III), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) and the new sulfonamide as well as 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide as ligands. The new complexes were characterized by standard physico-chemical procedures, and assayed as inhibitors of three CA isozymes, CA I, II and IV. Some of them (but not the parent sulfonamides) strongly lowered IOP in rabbits when administered as a 2% solution into the eye. PMID:18475811

  16. Quaternary ammonium sulfanilamide: a membrane-impermeant carbonic anhydrase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.P.

    1987-05-01

    A novel carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, quaternary ammonium sulfanilamide (QAS), was tested for potency as a CA inhibitor and for its ability to be excluded from permeating biological membranes. Inhibitor titration plots of QAS vs. pure bovine CA II and CA from the gills of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, yielded K/sub i/ values of approx. 15 ..mu..M; thus QAS is a relatively weak but effective CA inhibitor. Permeability of the QAS was directly tested by two independent methods. The inhibitor was excluded from human erythrocytes incubated in 5 mM QAS for 24 h as determined using an /sup 18/O-labeled mass spectrometer CA assay for intact cells. Also QAS injected into the hemolymph of C. sapidus (1 or 10 mM) did not cross the basal membrane of the gill. The compound was cleared from the hemolymph by 96 h after injection, and at no time during that period could the QAS be detected in homogenates of gill tissue. Total branchial CA activity was only slightly reduced following the QAS injection. These data indicate that QAS is a CA inhibitor to which biological membranes are impermeable and that can be used in vivo and in vitro in the study of membrane-associated CA.

  17. Quaternary ammonium sulfanilamide: a membrane-impermeant carbonic anhydrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Henry, R P

    1987-05-01

    A novel carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, quaternary ammonium sulfanilamide (QAS), was tested for potency as a CA inhibitor and for its ability to be excluded from permeating biological membranes. Inhibitor titration plots of QAS vs. pure bovine CA II and CA from the gills of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, yielded Ki values of approximately 15 microM; thus QAS is a relatively weak but effective CA inhibitor. Permeability of the QAS was directly tested by two independent methods. The inhibitor was excluded from human erythrocytes incubated in 5 mM QAS for 24 h as determined using an 18O-labeled mass spectrometer CA assay for intact cells. Also QAS injected into the hemolymph of C. sapidus (1 or 10 mM) did not cross the basal membrane of the gill. The compound was cleared from the hemolymph by 96 h after injection, and at no time during that period could the QAS be detected in homogenates of gill tissue. Total branchial CA activity was only slightly reduced following the QAS injection. These data indicate that QAS is a CA inhibitor to which biological membranes are impermeable and that can be used in vivo or in vitro in the study of membrane-associated CA.

  18. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC50 values around 10−8M against isozyme CA II, and 10−7 M against isozyme CAI. PMID:18472784

  19. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties.

    PubMed

    Supuran, C T

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC(50) values around 10(-8)M against isozyme CA II, and 10(-7) M against isozyme CAI.

  20. Investigating the role of metal chelation in HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Alessia; Carcelli, Mauro; Compari, Carlotta; Fisicaro, Emilia; Pala, Nicolino; Rispoli, Gabriele; Rogolino, Dominga; Sanchez, Tino W; Sechi, Mario; Sinisi, Valentina; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-12-22

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) has been validated as an attractive target for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Several studies have confirmed that the metal binding function is a crucial feature in many of the reported IN inhibitors. To provide new insights on the metal chelating mechanism of IN inhibitors, we prepared a series of metal complexes of two ligands (HL1 and HL2), designed as representative models of the clinically used compounds raltegravir and elvitegravir. Potentiometric measurements were conducted for HL2 in the presence of Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) in order to delineate a metal speciation model. We also determined the X-ray structures of both of the ligands and of three representative metal complexes. Our results support the hypothesis that several selective strand transfer inhibitors preferentially chelate one cation in solution and that the metal complexes can interact with the active site of the enzyme.

  1. New hydroxypyrimidinone-containing sulfonamides as carbonic anhydrase inhibitors also acting as MMP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Esteves, M Alexandra; Ortet, Osvaldo; Capelo, Anabela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Marques, Sérgio M; Santos, M Amélia

    2010-06-15

    A set of benzenesulfonamide (BSA) derivatives bearing a hydroxypyrimidinone (HPM) moiety were synthesized and investigated for their inhibitory activity against several carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes. They all revealed to be very potent inhibitors (nanomolar order) of the cytosolic CA I and II isozymes, but especially of the transmembrane, tumor-associated CA IX isozyme, a beneficial feature for a potential antitumor effect of these compounds. Further structure optimization aimed at improving the specificity of CA inhibition and enhancing their matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitory activity may also lead to new compounds with an attractive dual mechanism of action as antitumor agents.

  2. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  3. High performance oilfield scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Duccini, Y.; Dufour, A.; Hann, W.M.; Sanders, T.W.; Weinstein, B.

    1997-08-01

    Sea water often reacts with the formation water in offshore fields to produce barium, calcium and strontium sulfate deposits that hinder oil production. Newer fields often have more difficult to control scale problems than older ones, and current technology scale inhibitors are not able to control the deposits as well as needed. In addition, ever more stringent regulations designed to minimize the impact of inhibitors on the environment are being enacted. Three new inhibitors are presented that overcome many of the problems of older technology scale inhibitors.

  4. Positioning of aminopeptidase inhibitors in next generation cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hitzerd, Sarina M; Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J

    2014-04-01

    Aminopeptidases represent a class of (zinc) metalloenzymes that catalyze the cleavage of amino acids nearby the N-terminus of polypeptides, resulting in hydrolysis of peptide bonds. Aminopeptidases operate downstream of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and are implicated in the final step of intracellular protein degradation either by trimming proteasome-generated peptides for antigen presentation or full hydrolysis into free amino acids for recycling in renewed protein synthesis. This review focuses on the function and subcellular location of five key aminopeptidases (aminopeptidase N, leucine aminopeptidase, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase and endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1/2) and their association with different diseases, in particular cancer and their current position as target for therapeutic intervention by aminopeptidase inhibitors. Historically, bestatin was the first prototypical aminopeptidase inhibitor that entered the clinic 35 years ago and is still used for the treatment of lung cancer. More recently, new generation aminopeptidase inhibitors became available, including the aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug tosedostat, which is currently tested in phase II clinical trials for acute myeloid leukemia. Beyond bestatin and tosedostat, medicinal chemistry has emerged with additional series of potential aminopeptidases inhibitors which are still in an early phase of (pre)clinical investigations. The expanded knowledge of the unique mechanism of action of aminopeptidases has revived interest in aminopeptidase inhibitors for drug combination regimens in anti-cancer treatment. In this context, this review will discuss relevant features and mechanisms of action of aminopeptidases and will also elaborate on factors contributing to aminopeptidase inhibitor efficacy and/or loss of efficacy due to drug resistance-related phenomena. Together, a growing body of data point to aminopeptidase inhibitors as attractive tools for

  5. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  6. Sulfonation Pathway Inhibitors Block Reactivation of Latent HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Murry, Jeffrey P.; Godoy, Joseph; Mukim, Amey; Swann, Justine; Bruce, James W.; Ahlquist, Paul; Bosque, Alberto; Planelles, Vicente; Spina, Celsa A.; Young, John A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived pools of latently infected cells are a significant barrier to the development of a cure for HIV-1 infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms of reactivation from latency is needed to facilitate the development of novel therapies that address this problem. Here we show that chemical inhibitors of the sulfonation pathway prevent virus reactivation, both in latently infected J-Lat and U1 cell lines and in a primary human CD4+ T cell model of latency. In each of these models, sulfonation inhibitors decreased transcription initiation from the HIV-1 promoter. These inhibitors block transcription initiation at a step that lies downstream of nucleosome remodeling and affects RNA polymerase II recruitment to the viral promoter. These results suggest that the sulfonation pathway acts by a novel mechanism to regulate efficient virus transcription initiation during reactivation from latency, and further that augmentation of this pathway could be therapeutically useful. PMID:25310595

  7. A Novel Inhibitor of the Obesity-Related Protein FTO.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yan; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Meizi; Liu, Weijia; Han, Zhifu; Song, Chuanjun; Yu, Wenquan; Yang, Qinghua; Wang, Ruiyong; Wang, Shaomin; Shi, Shuai; Zhao, Renbin; Chai, Jijie; Chang, Junbiao

    2016-03-15

    Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate-dependent fat mass and obesity associated protein (FTO)-dependent demethylation of m⁶A is important for regulation of mRNA splicing and adipogenesis. Developing FTO-specific inhibitors can help probe the biology of FTO and unravel novel therapeutic targets for treatment of obesity or obesity-associated diseases. In the present paper, we have identified that 4-chloro-6-(6'-chloro-7'-hydroxy-2',4',4'-trimethyl-chroman-2'-yl)benzene-1,3-diol (CHTB) is an inhibitor of FTO. The crystal structure of CHTB complexed with human FTO reveals that the novel small molecule binds to FTO in a specific manner. The identification of the novel small molecule offers opportunities for further development of more selective and potent FTO inhibitors.

  8. Ets-1 upregulation mediates angiotensin II-related cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guanghua; Han, Zhenhua; Meng, Zhe; Wei, Jin; Gao, Dengfeng; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    Ets-1, the prototypical member of the family of Ets transcription factors, has been shown to participate in tissue fibrotic remodeling. However, its role in cardiac fibrosis has not been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Ets-1 in profibrotic actions of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) and in the in vivo heart. In growth-arrested CFs, Ang II induced Ets-1 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with Ang II type 1 receptor blocker losartan, protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059, or c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 partly inhibited this induction accompanied with impaired cell proliferation and production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein, the two downstream targets of Ets-1. Knockdown of Ets-1 by siRNA significantly inhibited the inductive effects of Ang II on cell proliferation and expression of CTGF and PAI-1. Moreover, the levels of Ets-1, PAI-1 and CTGF protein were simultaneously upregulated in left ventricle of Ang II-infused rats in parallel with an increase in the activation of ERK and JNK. Our data suggest that Ets-1 may mediate Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic effects.

  9. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  10. 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors and prostatic disease.

    PubMed

    Schröder, F H

    1994-08-01

    5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors are a new class of substances with very specific effects on type I and type II 5 alpha R which may be of use in the treatment of skin disease, such as male pattern baldness, male acne and hirsutism, as well as prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. At least two types of 5 alpha R inhibitors with a different pH optimum have been described. cDNA encoding for both the type I and the type II enzyme has been cloned. Most of the orally effective 5 alpha R inhibitors belong to the class of 4-azasteroids. The radical substituted in the 17 position of the steroid ring seems to be related to species specific variations and to the types of 5 alpha R enzymes in different species and organ systems. 5 alpha R inhibitors lead to a decrease of plasma DHT by about 65% while there is a slight rise in plasma testosterone. The decrease of tissue DHT in the ventral prostate of the intact rat, the dog and in humans is more pronounced and amounts to about 85%. There is a reciprocal rise of tissue T in these systems. The application of an inhibitor of 5 alpha R type II leads to a shrinkage of BPH in men by about 30%. In the rat a similar shrinkage accompanied by a significant decrease of total organ DNA occurs. This decrease, however, is not as pronounced as can be achieved with castration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7522999

  11. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  12. Osteocompatibility of biofilm inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  13. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  14. Anthranilamide inhibitors of factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Mendel, David; Marquart, Angela L; Joseph, Sajan; Waid, Philip; Yee, Ying K; Tebbe, Anne Louise; Ratz, Andrew M; Herron, David K; Goodson, Theodore; Masters, John J; Franciskovich, Jeffry B; Tinsley, Jennifer M; Wiley, Michael R; Weir, Leonard C; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Klimkowski, Valentine J; Smith, Gerald F; Towner, Richard D; Froelich, Larry L; Buben, John; Craft, Trelia J

    2007-09-01

    SAR about the B-ring of a series of N(2)-aroyl anthranilamide factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors is described. B-ring o-aminoalkylether and B-ring p-amine probes of the S1' and S4 sites, respectively, afforded picomolar fXa inhibitors that performed well in in vitro anticoagulation assays.

  15. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    PubMed

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. PMID:25462990

  16. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  17. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  18. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  19. Cocrystal Structures of Primed Side-Extending α-Ketoamide Inhibitors Reveal Novel Calpain-Inhibitor Aromatic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Qian,J.; Cuerrier, D.; Davies, P.; Li, Z.; Powers, J.; Campbell, R.

    2008-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular cysteine proteases that catalyze the cleavage of target proteins in response to Ca2+ signaling. When Ca2+ homeostasis is disrupted, calpain overactivation causes unregulated proteolysis, which can contribute to diseases such as postischemic injury and cataract formation. Potent calpain inhibitors exist, but of these many cross-react with other cysteine proteases and will need modification to specifically target calpain. Here, we present crystal structures of rat calpain 1 protease core ({mu}I-II) bound to two a-ketoamide-based calpain inhibitors containing adenyl and piperazyl primed-side extensions. An unexpected aromatic-stacking interaction is observed between the primed-side adenine moiety and the Trp298 side chain. This interaction increased the potency of the inhibitor toward {mu}I-II and heterodimeric m-calpain. Moreover, stacking orients the adenine such that it can be used as a scaffold for designing novel primed-side address regions, which could be incorporated into future inhibitors to enhance their calpain specificity.

  20. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  1. BORE II

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  2. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  3. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  4. Prognostic Factors in Cholinesterase Inhibitor Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sun, In O; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Lee, Kwang Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Organophosphates and carbamates are insecticides that are associated with high human mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors affecting survival in patients with cholinesterase inhibitor (CI) poisoning. Material/Methods This study included 92 patients with CI poisoning in the period from January 2005 to August 2013. We divided these patients into 2 groups (survivors vs. non-survivors), compared their clinical characteristics, and analyzed the predictors of survival. Results The mean age of the included patients was 56 years (range, 16–88). The patients included 57 (62%) men and 35 (38%) women. When we compared clinical characteristics between the survivor group (n=81, 88%) and non-survivor group (n=11, 12%), there were no differences in renal function, pancreatic enzymes, or serum cholinesterase level, except for serum bicarbonate level and APACHE II score. The serum bicarbonate level was lower in non-survivors than in survivors (12.45±2.84 vs. 18.36±4.73, P<0.01). The serum APACHE II score was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (24.36±5.22 vs. 12.07±6.67, P<0.01). The development of pneumonia during hospitalization was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (n=9, 82% vs. n=31, 38%, P<0.01). In multiple logistic regression analysis, serum bicarbonate concentration, APACHE II score, and pneumonia during hospitalization were the important prognostic factors in patients with CI poisoning. Conclusions Serum bicarbonate and APACHE II score are useful prognostic factors in patients with CI poisoning. Furthermore, pneumonia during hospitalization was also important in predicting prognosis in patients with CI poisoning. Therefore, prevention and active treatment of pneumonia is important in the management of patients with CI poisoning. PMID:26411989

  5. Undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors: antibacterial drug leads.

    PubMed

    Sinko, William; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yonghui; Feixas, Ferran; Cox, Courtney L; Mitchell, Douglas A; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-07-10

    There is a significant need for new antibiotics due to the rise in drug resistance. Drugs such as methicillin and vancomycin target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, but methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) have now arisen and are of major concern. Inhibitors acting on new targets in cell wall biosynthesis are thus of particular interest since they might also restore sensitivity to existing drugs, and the cis-prenyl transferase undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), essential for lipid I, lipid II, and thus, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, is one such target. We used 12 UPPS crystal structures to validate virtual screening models and then assayed 100 virtual hits (from 450,000 compounds) against UPPS from S. aureus and Escherichia coli. The most promising inhibitors (IC50 ∼2 μM, Ki ∼300 nM) had activity against MRSA, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. with MIC or IC50 values in the 0.25-4 μg/mL range. Moreover, one compound (1), a rhodanine with close structural similarity to the commercial diabetes drug epalrestat, exhibited good activity as well as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.1 with methicillin against the community-acquired MRSA USA300 strain, indicating strong synergism. PMID:24827744

  6. Converting potent indeno[1,2-b]indole inhibitors of protein kinase CK2 into selective inhibitors of the breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Jabor Gozzi, Gustavo; Bouaziz, Zouhair; Winter, Evelyn; Daflon-Yunes, Nathalia; Aichele, Dagmar; Nacereddine, Abdelhamid; Marminon, Christelle; Valdameri, Glaucio; Zeinyeh, Waël; Bollacke, Andre; Guillon, Jean; Lacoudre, Aline; Pinaud, Noël; Cadena, Silvia M; Jose, Joachim; Le Borgne, Marc; Di Pietro, Attilio

    2015-01-01

    A series of indeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione derivatives were synthesized as human casein kinase II (CK2) inhibitors. The most potent inhibitors contained a N(5)-isopropyl substituent on the C-ring. The same series of compounds was found to also inhibit the breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2 but with totally different structure-activity relationships: a N(5)-phenethyl substituent was critical, and additional hydrophobic substituents at position 7 or 8 of the D-ring or a methoxy at phenethyl position ortho or meta also contributed to inhibition. The best ABCG2 inhibitors, such as 4c, 4h, 4i, 4j, and 4k, behaved as very weak inhibitors of CK2, whereas the most potent CK2 inhibitors, such as 4a, 4p, and 4e, displayed limited interaction with ABCG2. It was therefore possible to convert, through suitable substitutions of the indeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione scaffold, potent CK2 inhibitors into selective ABCG2 inhibitors and vice versa. In addition, some of the best ABCG2 inhibitors, which displayed a very low cytotoxicity, thus giving a high therapeutic ratio, and appeared not to be transported, constitute promising candidates for further investigations.

  7. Small molecules inhibitors of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 - an overview.

    PubMed

    Rouch, Anne; Vanucci-Bacqué, Corinne; Bedos-Belval, Florence; Baltas, Michel

    2015-03-01

    PAI-1, a glycoprotein from the serpin family and the main inhibitor of tPA and uPA, plays an essential role in the regulation of intra and extravascular fibrinolysis by inhibiting the formation of plasmin from plasminogen. PAI-1 is also involved in pathological processes such as thromboembolic diseases, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and cancer. The inhibition of PAI-1 activity by small organic molecules has been observed in vitro and with some in vivo models. Based on these findings, PAI-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. Over the past decades, many efforts have therefore been devoted to developing PAI-1 inhibitors. This article provides an overview of the publishing activity on small organic molecules used as PAI-1 inhibitors. The chemical synthesis of the most potent inhibitors as well as their biological and biochemical evaluations is also presented.

  8. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  9. Glycosylasparaginase inhibition studies: competitive inhibitors, transition state mimics, noncompetitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Risley, J M; Huang, D H; Kaylor, J J; Malik, J J; Xia, Y Q

    2001-01-01

    Glycosylasparaginase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosylic bond between asparagine and N-acetylglucosamine in the catabolism of N-linked glycoproteins. Previously only three competitive inhibitors, one noncompetitive inhibitor, and one irreversible inhibitor of glycosylasparaginase activity had been reported. Using human glycosylasparaginase from human amniotic fluid, L-aspartic acid and four of its analogues, where the alpha-amino group was substituted with a chloro, bromo, methyl or hydrogen, were competitive inhibitors having Ki values between 0.6-7.7 mM. These results provide supporting evidence for a proposed intramolecular autoproteolytic activation reaction. A proposed phosphono transition state mimic and a sulfo transition state mimic were competitive inhibitors with Ki values 0.9 mM and 1.4 mM, respectively. These results support a mechanism for the enzyme-catalyzed reaction involving formation of a tetrahedral high-energy intermediate. Three analogues of the natural substrate were noncompetitive inhibitors with Ki values between 0.56-0.75 mM, indicating the presence of a second binding site that may recognize (substituted)acetamido groups.

  10. C1 inhibitor hinge region mutations produce dysfunction by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E; Aulak, K; Parad, R B; Stecklein, H P; Eldering, E; Hack, C E; Kramer, J; Strunk, R C; Bissler, J; Rosen, F S

    1992-08-01

    Heterozygosity for a mutant dysfunctional C1 inhibitor protein, a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) superfamily, results in type II hereditary angioneurotic oedema. We identified a "hinge" region mutation in C1 inhibitor with a Val to Glu replacement at P14 Val-432. Recombinant C1 inhibitors P10 Ala-->Thr and P14Val-->Glu did not form stable complexes with fluid phase C1s or kallikrein. The P14 Val-->Glu mutant, however, was cleaved to a 96K form by C1s, while the P10 Ala-->Thr mutant was not. The recombinant P10 mutant also did not complex with C1s, kallikrein or beta-factor Xlla-Sepharose. The two mutations, therefore, result in dysfunction by different mechanisms: in one (P14 Val-->Glu), the inhibitor is converted to a substrate, while in the other (P10 Ala-->Thr), interaction with target protease is blocked.

  11. High Proteolytic Resistance of Spider-Derived Inhibitor Cystine Knots

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kyoko; Sugiura, Mika; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Proteolytic stability in gastrointestinal tract and blood plasma is the major obstacle for oral peptide drug development. Inhibitor cystine knots (ICKs) are linear cystine knot peptides which have multifunctional properties and could become promising drug scaffolds. ProTx-I, ProTx-II, GTx1-15, and GsMTx-4 were spider-derived ICKs and incubated with pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase in physiological conditions to find that all tested peptides were resistant to pepsin, and ProTx-II, GsMTx-4, and GTx1-15 showed resistance to all tested proteases. Also, no ProTx-II degradation was observed in rat blood plasma for 24 hours in vitro and ProTx-II concentration in circulation decreased to half in 40 min, indicating absolute stability in plasma and fast clearance from the system. So far, linear peptides are generally thought to be unsuitable in vivo, but all tested ICKs were not degraded by pepsin and stomach could be selected for the alternative site of drug absorption for fast onset of the drug action. Since spider ICKs are selective inhibitors of various ion channels which are related to the pathology of many diseases, engineered ICKs will make a novel class of peptide medicines which can treat variety of bothering symptoms. PMID:26843868

  12. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  13. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  14. [Pharmacology of bone resorption inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Currently, bone resorption inhibitor is mainly used for osteoporosis. A number of these agents have been developed. These pharmacological action are various. Bisphosphonate inhibit functions of the osteoclasts by inducing apoptosis. On the one hand, RANK-ligand inhibitor and selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibit formation of osteoclasts. It is important to understand these pharmacological action for the selection of the appropriate medicine. PMID:26529923

  15. Mannostatin A, a new glycoprotein-processing inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Tropea, J.E.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pastuszak, I.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. ); Aoyagi, Takaaki ); Molyneux, R.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Mannostatin A is a metabolite produced by the microorganism Streptoverticillium verticillus and reported to be a potent competitive inhibitor of rat epididymal {alpha}-mannosidase. When tested against a number of other arylglycosidases, mannostatin A was inactive toward {alpha}- and {beta}-glucosidase and galactosidase as well as {beta}-mannosidase, but it was a potent inhibitor of jack bean, mung bean, and rat liver lysosomal {alpha}-mannosidases, with estimated IC{sub 50}'s of 70 nM, 450 nM, and 160 nM, respectively. The type of inhibition was competitive in nature. This compound also proved to be an effective competitive inhibitor of the glycoprotein-processing enzyme mannosidase II (IC{sub 50} of about 10-15 nM with p-nitrophenyl {alpha}-D-mannopyranoside as substrate, and about 90 nM with ({sup 3}H)mannose-labeled GlcNAc-Man{sub 5}GlcNAc as substrate). However, it was virtually inactive toward mannosidase I. The N-acetylated derivative of mannostatin A had no inhibitory activity. In cell culture studies, mannostatin A also proved to be a potent inhibitor of glycoprotein processing. Thus, in influenza virus infected Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, mannostatin A blocked the normal formation of complex types of oligosaccharides on the viral glycoproteins and caused the accumulation of hybrid types of oligosaccharides. This observation is in keeping with other data which indicate that the site of action of mannostatin A is mannosidase II. Thus, mannostatin A represents the first nonalkaloidal processing inhibitor and adds to the growing list of chemical structures that can have important biological activity.

  16. A Noncompetitive Inhibitor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis's Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase

    PubMed Central

    Capodagli, Glenn C.; Sedhom, Wafik G.; Jackson, Mary; Ahrendt, Kateri A.; Pegan, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) is an enzyme critical for bacterial, fungal, and protozoan glycolysis/gluconeogenesis. Importantly, humans lack this type of aldolase, having instead a class I FBA that is structurally and mechanistically distinct from class II FBAs. As such, class II FBA is considered a putative pharmacological target for the development of novel antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent for tuberculosis (TB). To date, several competitive class II FBA substrate mimic-styled inhibitors have been developed; however, they lack either specificity, potency, or properties that limit their potential as possible therapeutics. Recently, through the use of enzymatic and structure-based assisted screening, we identified 8-hydroxyquinoline carboxylic acid (HCA) that has an IC50 of 10 ± 1 μM for the class II FBA present in M. tuberculosis (MtFBA). As opposed to previous inhibitors, HCA behaves in a noncompetitive manner, shows no inhibitory properties toward human and rabbit class I FBAs, and possesses anti-TB properties. Furthermore, we were able to determine the crystal structure of HCA bound to MtFBA to 2.1 Å. HCA also demonstrates inhibitory effects for other class II FBAs, including pathogenic bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. With its broad-spectrum potential, unique inhibitory characteristics, and flexibility of functionalization, the HCA scaffold likely represents an important advancement in the development of class II FBA inhibitors that can serve as viable preclinical candidates. PMID:24325645

  17. Inhibition of topoisomerase II by liriodenine.

    PubMed

    Woo, S H; Reynolds, M C; Sun, N J; Cassady, J M; Snapka, R M

    1997-08-15

    The cytotoxic oxoaporphine alkaloid liriodenine, isolated from Cananga odorata, was found to be a potent inhibitor of topoisomerase II (EC 5.99.1.3) both in vivo and in vitro. Liriodenine treatment of SV40 (simian virus 40)-infected CV-1 cells caused highly catenated SV40 daughter chromosomes, a signature of topoisomerase II inhibition. Strong catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II by liriodenine was confirmed by in vitro assays with purified human topoisomerase II and kinetoplast DNA. Liriodenine also caused low-level protein-DNA cross-links to pulse-labeled SV40 chromosomes in vivo, suggesting that it may be a weak topoisomerase II poison. This was supported by the finding that liriodenine caused topoisomerase II-DNA cross-links in an in vitro assay for topoisomerase II poisons. Verapamil did not increase either liriodenine-induced protein-DNA cross-links or catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II in SV40-infected cells. This indicates that liriodenine is not a substrate for the verapamil-sensitive drug efflux pump in CV-1 cells. PMID:9313773

  18. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril maleate) accelerates recovery of mouse skin from UVB-induced wrinkles

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura-Hachiya, Yuko; Arai, Koji Y.; Ozeki, Rieko; Kikuta, Ayako; Nishiyama, Toshio

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) increases in UVB-irradiated skin. •Administration of an ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced skin wrinkle. •ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced epidermal hypertrophy. •ACE inhibitor improved transepidermal water loss in the UVB-irradiated skin. -- Abstract: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and angiotensin II signaling regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue remodeling, as well as blood pressure, while in skin, angiotensin II signaling is involved in wound healing, inflammation, and pathological scar formation. Therefore, we hypothesized that angiotensin II is also involved in photoaging of skin. In this study, we examined the effect of enalapril maleate, an ACE inhibitor, on recovery of wrinkled skin of hairless mice exposed to long-term UVB irradiation. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that expression of ACE, angiotensin II, and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors in the skin was increased after UVB irradiation (3 times/week at increasing intensities for 8 weeks). Administration of enalapril maleate (5 times/week for 6 weeks, starting 1 week after 10-week irradiation) accelerated recovery from UVB-induced wrinkles, epidermal hyperplasia and epidermal barrier dysfunction, as compared with the vehicle control. Our results indicate that ACE and angiotensin II activity are involved in skin photoaging, and suggest that ACE inhibitor such as enalapril maleate may have potential for improvement of photoaged skin.

  19. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  20. Effect of glycoprotein-processing inhibitors on fucosylation of glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, P.M.; Elbein, A.D.

    1985-11-25

    Influenza viral hemagglutinin contains L-fucose linked alpha 1,6 to some of the innermost GlcNAc residues of the complex oligosaccharides. To determine what structural features of the oligosaccharide were required for fucosylation influenza virus-infected MDCK cells were incubated in the presence of various inhibitors of glycoprotein processing to stop trimming at different points. After several hours of incubation with the inhibitors, (5,6-TH)fucose and (1- UC)mannose were added to label the glycoproteins, and cells were incubated in inhibitor and isotope for about 40 h to produce mature virus. Glycopeptides were prepared from the viral and the cellular glycoproteins, and these glycopeptides were isolated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-4. The glycopeptides were then digested with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H and rechromatographed on the Bio-Gel column. In the presence of castanospermine or 2,5-dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine, both inhibitors of glucosidase I, most of the radioactive mannose was found in Glc3Man7-9GlcNAc structures, and these did not contain radioactive fucose. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, most of the ( UC)mannose was in a Man9GlcNAc structure which was also not fucosylated. However, in the presence of swainsonine, an inhibitor of mannosidase II, the ( UC)mannose was mostly in hybrid types of oligosaccharides, and these structures also contained radioactive fucose. Treatment of the hybrid structures with endoglucosaminidase H released the (TH)fucose as a small peptide (Fuc-GlcNAc-peptide), whereas the ( UC)mannose remained with the oligosaccharide. The data support the conclusion that the addition of fucose linked alpha 1,6 to the asparagine-linked GlcNAc is dependent upon the presence of a beta 1,2-GlcNAc residue on the alpha 1,3-mannose branch of the core structure.

  1. Aldosterone synthase inhibitors in hypertension: current status and future possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Hargovan, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin aldosterone system is a critical mechanism for controlling blood pressure, and exerts most of its physiological effects through the action of angiotensin II. In addition to increasing blood pressure by increasing vascular resistance, angiotensin II also stimulates aldosterone secretion from the adrenal gland. Aldosterone acts to cause an increase in sodium and water reabsorption, thus elevating blood pressure. Although treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors initially lowers circulating aldosterone, with chronic treatment aldosterone levels increase back to baseline, a phenomenon termed aldosterone escape; aldosterone blockade may therefore give added value in the treatment of hypertension. The first mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist developed was spironolactone, but its use has been severely hampered by adverse (notably oestrogenic) effects. The more recently developed mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenone exhibits a better adverse effect profile, although it is not devoid of effects similar to spironolactone. In addition, aldosterone activates non-genomic receptors that are not inhibited by either eplerenone or spironolactone. It is believed that deleterious organ remodelling is mediated by aldosterone via such non-genomic pathways. A new class of drugs, the aldosterone synthase inhibitors, is currently under development. These may offer a novel therapeutic approach for both lowering blood pressure and preventing the non-genomic effects of aldosterone. Here, we will review the cardiovascular effects of aldosterone and review the drugs available that target this hormone, with a particular focus on the aldosterone synthase inhibitors. PMID:24570839

  2. Pitavastatin Regulates Ang II Induced Proliferation and Migration via IGFBP-5 in VSMC

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Yu Mi; Nam, Ju-Ock

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), a key mediator of hypertensive, causes structural changes in the arteries (vascular remodeling), which involve alterations in cell growth, vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy. Ang II promotes fibrotic factor like IGFBP5, which mediates the profibrotic effects of Ang II in the heart and kidneys, lung and so on. The purpose of this study was to identify the signaling pathway of IGFBP5 on cell proliferation and migration of Ang II-stimulated VSMC. We have been interested in Ang II-induced IGFBP5 and were curious to determine whether a Pitavastatin would ameliorate the effects. Herein, we investigated the question of whether Ang II induced the levels of IGFBP5 protein followed by proliferation and migration in VSMC. Pretreatment with the specific Angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) inhibitor (Losartan), Angiotensin receptor type 2 (AT2) inhibitor (PD123319), MAPK inhibitor (U0126), ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059), P38 inhibitor (SB600125) and PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) resulted in significantly inhibited IGFBP5 production, proliferation, and migration in Ang II-stimulated VSMC. In addition, IGFBP5 knockdown resulted in modulation of Ang II induced proliferation and migration via IGFBP5 induction. In addition, Pitavastatin modulated Ang II induced proliferation and migration in VSMC. Taken together, our results indicated that Ang II induces IGFBP5 through AT1, ERK1/2, P38, and PI3K signaling pathways, which were inhibited by Pitavastatin. These findings may suggest that Pitavastatin has an effect on vascular disease including hypertension. PMID:26557016

  3. PCSK9 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gencer, Baris; Lambert, Gilles; Mach, François

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) has considerably changed the therapeutic options in the field of lipid management. PCSK9 reduces LDL receptor recycling, leading to a decrease of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) receptors on the surface of hepatocytes and a subsequent increase of circulating LDL-C levels. In observational studies, the loss-of-function mutations of PCSK9 have been associated with a reduction of LDL-C levels and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. In contrast, humans with high levels of PCSK9 have higher level of plasma LDL-C and significantly enhanced CVD risk during their lifetime, gain-of-function mutations on PCSK9 are, for instance, causatively associated with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). Inhibition of PCSK9 is therefore a promising therapeutic option for the lowering of LDL-C levels. The clinical development of human monoclonal antibodies against PCSK9 has progressed, with promising results reported from phase 2 clinical studies in patients with FH or intolerant to statin with LDL-C levels not on target levels. Phase I studies demonstrated safety and efficacy. In phase II, a 60%-70% reduction in LDL-C was observed, especially when subcutaneous injections were performed regularly every two weeks. No significant side effects were observed, with the exception of injection site reactions. Three large phase III programmes with the new anti PCSK9 antibodies are currently underway in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and LDL-C inadequately controlled by standard treatments. The main objective of these studies is to evaluate the effect of PCSK9 inhibition on the occurrence of CVD events in patients with ACS. PMID:25856746

  4. Juggling jobs: roles and mechanisms of multifunctional protease inhibitors in plants.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Holz, Friederike M; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-05-01

    Multifunctional protease inhibitors juggle jobs by targeting different enzymes and thereby often controlling more than one biological process. Here, we discuss the biological functions, mechanisms and evolution of three types of multifunctional protease inhibitors in plants. The first type is double-headed inhibitors, which feature two inhibitory sites targeting proteases with different specificities (e.g. Bowman-Birk inhibitors) or even different hydrolases (e.g. α-amylase/protease inhibitors preventing both early germination and seed predation). The second type consists of multidomain inhibitors which evolved by intragenic duplication and are released by processing (e.g. multicystatins and potato inhibitor II, implicated in tuber dormancy and defence, respectively). The third type consists of promiscuous inhibitory folds which resemble mouse traps that can inhibit different proteases cleaving the bait they offer (e.g. serpins, regulating cell death, and α-macroglobulins). Understanding how multifunctional inhibitors juggle biological jobs increases our knowledge of the connections between the networks they regulate. These examples show that multifunctionality evolved independently from a remarkable diversity of molecular mechanisms that can be exploited for crop improvement and provide concepts for protein design. PMID:26800491

  5. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Randolph, John T; DeGoey, David A

    2004-01-01

    There are currently (July, 2002) six protease inhibitors approved for the treatment of HIV infection, each of which can be classified as peptidomimetic in structure. These agents, when used in combination with other antiretroviral agents, produce a sustained decrease in viral load, often to levels below the limits of quantifiable detection, and a significant reconstitution of the immune system. Therapeutic regimens containing one or more HIV protease inhibitors thus provide a highly effective method for disease management. The important role of protease inhibitors in HIV therapy, combined with numerous challenges remaining in HIV treatment, have resulted in a continued effort both to optimize regimens using the existing agents and to identify new protease inhibitors that may provide unique properties. This review will provide an overview of the discovery and clinical trials of the currently approved HIV protease inhibitors, followed by an examination of important aspects of therapy, such as pharmacokinetic enhancement, resistance and side effects. A description of new peptidomimetic compounds currently being investigated in the clinic and in preclinical discovery will follow. PMID:15193140

  6. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  7. Evolutionary families of peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D; Tolle, Dominic P; Barrett, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    The proteins that inhibit peptidases are of great importance in medicine and biotechnology, but there has never been a comprehensive system of classification for them. Some of the terminology currently in use is potentially confusing. In the hope of facilitating the exchange, storage and retrieval of information about this important group of proteins, we now describe a system wherein the inhibitor units of the peptidase inhibitors are assigned to 48 families on the basis of similarities detectable at the level of amino acid sequence. Then, on the basis of three-dimensional structures, 31 of the families are assigned to 26 clans. A simple system of nomenclature is introduced for reference to each clan, family and inhibitor. We briefly discuss the specificities and mechanisms of the interactions of the inhibitors in the various families with their target enzymes. The system of families and clans of inhibitors described has been implemented in the MEROPS peptidase database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), and this will provide a mechanism for updating it as new information becomes available. PMID:14705960

  8. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted.

  9. Glaucoma and the applications of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the treatment of glaucoma, a disease affecting a large number of people and characterized by an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). At least three isoforms, CA II, IV and XII are targeted by the sulfonamide inhibitors, some of which are clinically used drugs. Acetazolamide, methazolamide and dichlorophenamide are first generation CA inhibitors (CAIs) still used as systemic drugs for the management of this disease. Dorzolamide and brinzolamide represent the second generation inhibitors, being used topically, as eye drops, with less side effects compared to the first generation drugs. Third generation inhibitors have been developed by using the tail approach, but they did not reach the clinics yet. The most promising such derivatives are the sulfonamides incorporating either tails with nitric oxide releasing moieties or hybrid drugs possessing prostaglandin (PG) F agonist moieties in their molecules. Recently, the dithiocarbamates have also been described as CAIs possessing IOP lowering effects in animal models of glaucoma. CAIs are used alone or in combination with other drugs such as adrenergic agonist/antagonists, or PG analogs, being an important component of the antiglaucoma drugs armamentarium. PMID:24146387

  10. Mechanism of membrane redistribution of protein kinase C by its ATP-competitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Namiki, Hideo

    2007-07-15

    ATP-competitive inhibitors of PKC (protein kinase C) such as the bisindolylmaleimide GF 109203X, which interact with the ATP-binding site in the PKC molecule, have also been shown to affect several redistribution events of PKC. However, the reason why these inhibitors affect the redistribution is still controversial. In the present study, using immunoblot analysis and GFP (green fluorescent protein)-tagged PKC, we showed that, at commonly used concentrations, these ATP-competitive inhibitors alone induced redistribution of DAG (diacylglycerol)-sensitive PKCalpha, PKCbetaII, PKCdelta and PKCepsilon, but not atypical PKCzeta, to the endomembrane or the plasma membrane. Studies with deletion and point mutants showed that the DAG-sensitive C1 domain of PKC was required for membrane redistribution by these inhibitors. Furthermore, membrane redistribution was prevented by the aminosteroid PLC (phospholipase C) inhibitor U-73122, although an ATP-competitive inhibitor had no significant effect on acute DAG generation. Immunoblot analysis showed that an ATP-competitive inhibitor enhanced cell-permeable DAG analogue- or phorbol-ester-induced translocation of endogenous PKC. Furthermore, these inhibitors also enhanced [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding to the cytosolic fractions from PKCalpha-GFP-overexpressing cells. These results clearly demonstrate that ATP-competitive inhibitors cause redistribution of DAG-sensitive PKCs to membranes containing endogenous DAG by altering the DAG sensitivity of PKC and support the idea that the inhibitors destabilize the closed conformation of PKC and make the C1 domain accessible to DAG. Most importantly, our findings provide novel insights for the interpretation of studies using ATP-competitive inhibitors, and, especially, suggest caution about the interpretation of the relationship between the redistribution and kinase activity of PKC.

  11. Diversity of parasite complex II.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shigeharu; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Ohmori, Junko; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Parasites have developed a variety of physiological functions necessary for completing at least part of their life cycles in the specialized environments of surrounding the parasites in the host. Regarding energy metabolism, which is essential for survival, parasites adapt to the low oxygen environment in mammalian hosts by using metabolic systems that are very different from those of the hosts. In many cases, the parasite employs aerobic metabolism during the free-living stage outside the host but undergoes major changes in developmental control and environmental adaptation to switch to anaerobic energy metabolism. Parasite mitochondria play diverse roles in their energy metabolism, and in recent studies of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, the mitochondrial complex II plays an important role in anaerobic energy metabolism of parasites inhabiting hosts by acting as a quinol-fumarate reductase. In Trypanosomes, parasite complex II has been found to have a novel function and structure. Complex II of Trypanosoma cruzi is an unusual supramolecular complex with a heterodimeric iron-sulfur subunit and seven additional non-catalytic subunits. The enzyme shows reduced binding affinities for both substrates and inhibitors. Interestingly, this structural organization is conserved in all trypanosomatids. Since the properties of complex II differ across a wide range of parasites, this complex is a potential target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In this regard, structural information on the target enzyme is essential for the molecular design of drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory complex II: Role in cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23333273

  12. Specific MAPK inhibitors prevent hyperglycemia-induced renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhe; Hong, Zongyuan; Wu, Denglong; Nie, Hezhongrong

    2016-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) play critical roles in the process of renal diseases, but their interaction has not been comprehensively discussed. In the present studies, we investigated the renoprotective effects of MPAK inhibitors on renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model, and clarify the crosstalk among MAPK signaling. Type 1 diabetic mouse model was established in male C57BL/6 J mice, and treated with or without 10 mg/kg MAPK blockers, including ERK inhibitor PD98059, p38 inhibitor SB203850, and JNK inhibitor SP600125 for four weeks. Hyperglycemia induced renal injuries, but treating them with MAPK inhibitors significantly decreased glomerular volume and glycogen in renal tissues. Although slightly changed body weight and fasting blood glucose levels, MAPK inhibitors attenuated blood urea nitrogen, urea protein, and microalbuminuria. Administration also reduced the diabetes-induced RAS activation, including angiotensin II converting enzyme (c) and Ang II, which contributed to its renal protective effects in the diabetic mice. In addition, the anti-RAS of MAPK inhibitor treatment markedly reduced gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, fibrotic accumulation, and transforming growth factor-β1 levels in renal tissues. Furthermore, chemical inhibitors and genetic siRNA results identified the crosstalk among the three MAPK signaling, and proved JNK signaling played a critical role in MAPK-mediated ACE pathway in hyperglycemia state. Collectively, these results support the therapeutic effects of MAPK-specific inhibitors, especially JNK inactivation, on hyperglycemia-induced renal damages. PMID:27389030

  13. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  14. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  15. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  16. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  17. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  18. An environmentally friendly scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, J.B.; Brown, J.M.

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a method of inhibiting the formation of scales such as barium and strontium sulfate in low pH aqueous systems, and calcium carbonate in systems containing high concentrations of dissolved iron. The solution, chemically, involves treating the aqueous system with an inhibitor designed to replace organic-phosphonates. Typical low pH aqueous systems where the inhibitor is particularly useful are oilfield produced-water, resin bed water softeners that form scale during low pH, acid regeneration operations. Downhole applications are recommended where high concentrations of dissolved iron are present in the produced water. This new approach to inhibition replaces typical organic phosphonates and polymers with a non-toxic, biodegradable scale inhibitor that performs in harsh environments.

  19. Diverse inhibitors of aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Robert A; Boston, Rebecca S; Payne, Gary A

    2008-03-01

    Pre-harvest and post-harvest contamination of maize, peanuts, cotton, and tree nuts by members of the genus Aspergillus and subsequent contamination with the mycotoxin aflatoxin pose a widespread food safety problem for which effective and inexpensive control strategies are lacking. Since the discovery of aflatoxin as a potently carcinogenic food contaminant, extensive research has been focused on identifying compounds that inhibit its biosynthesis. Numerous diverse compounds and extracts containing activity inhibitory to aflatoxin biosynthesis have been reported. Only recently, however, have tools been available to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which these inhibitors affect aflatoxin biosynthesis. Many inhibitors are plant-derived and a few may be amenable to pathway engineering for tissue-specific expression in susceptible host plants as a defense against aflatoxin contamination. Other compounds show promise as protectants during crop storage. Finally, inhibitors with different modes of action could be used in comparative transcriptional and metabolomic profiling experiments to identify regulatory networks controlling aflatoxin biosynthesis.

  20. A class of sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase inhibitors with neuropathic pain modulating effects.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pinard, Melissa; Ghelardini, Carla; Scozzafava, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-04-15

    A series of benzene sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors which incorporate lipophilic 4-alkoxy- and 4-aryloxy moieties, together with several derivatives of ethoxzolamide and sulfanilamide are reported. These derivatives were investigated as inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) of which multiple isoforms are known, and some appear to be involved in pain. These sulfonamides showed modest inhibition against the cytosolic isoform CA I, but were generally effective, low nanomolar CA II, VII, IX and XII inhibitors. X-ray crystallographic data for the adduct of several such sulfonamides with CA II allowed us to rationalize the good inhibition data. In a mice model of neuropathic pain induced by oxaliplatin, one of the strong CA II/VII inhibitors reported here induced a long lasting pain relieving effect, a fact never observed earlier. This is the first report of rationally designed sulfonamide CA inhibitors with pain effective modulating effects. PMID:25766630

  1. MEK and the inhibitors: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Four distinct MAP kinase signaling pathways involving 7 MEK enzymes have been identified. MEK1 and MEK2 are the prototype members of MEK family proteins. Several MEK inhibitors are in clinical trials. Trametinib is being evaluated by FDA for the treatment of metastatic melanoma with BRAF V600 mutation. Selumetinib has been studied in combination with docetaxel in phase II randomized trial in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer. Selumetinib group had better response rate and progression-free survival. This review also summarized new MEK inhibitors in clinical development, including pimasertib, refametinib, PD-0325901, TAK733, MEK162 (ARRY 438162), RO5126766, WX-554, RO4987655 (CH4987655), GDC-0973 (XL518), and AZD8330. PMID:23587417

  2. ADMINISTRATION OF A SUBSTITUTED ADAMANTLY-UREA INHIBITOR OF THE SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE PROTECTS THE KIDNEY FROM DAMAGE IN HYPERTENSIVE GOTO-KAKIZAKI RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hypertension and type II diabetes are co-morbid diseases that lead to the development of nephropathy. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors are reported to provide protection from renal injury. We hypothesized that the sEH inhibitor 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido) dodecanoic acid (AUDA) protects ...

  3. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S; Carlomagno, Francesca; Santoro, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  4. Tri-substituted acylhydrazines as tertiary amide bioisosteres: HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Canales, Eda; Carlson, Joseph S; Appleby, Todd; Fenaux, Martijn; Lee, Johnny; Tian, Yang; Tirunagari, Neeraj; Wong, Melanie; Watkins, William J

    2012-07-01

    The use of a tri-substituted acylhydrazine as an isostere of a tertiary amide was explored in a series of HCV NS5B thumb site II inhibitors. Direct replacement generated an analog with similar conformational and physicochemical properties. The series was extended to produce compounds with potent binding affinities and encouraging levels of cellular potency.

  5. Targeting Tat Inhibitors in the Assembly of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Transcription Complexes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    D'Orso, Iván; Grunwell, Jocelyn R.; Nakamura, Robert L.; Das, Chandreyee; Frankel, Alan D.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transcription is regulated by the viral Tat protein, which relieves a block to elongation by recruiting an elongation factor, P-TEFb, to the viral promoter. Here, we report the discovery of potent Tat inhibitors that utilize a localization signal to target a dominant negative protein to its site of action. Fusing the Tat activation domain to some splicing factors, particularly to the Arg-Ser (RS) domain of U2AF65, creates Tat inhibitors that localize to subnuclear speckles, sites where pre-mRNA processing factors are stored for assembly into transcription complexes. A U2AF65 fusion named T-RS interacts with the nonphosphorylated C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) via its RS domain and is loaded into RNAP II holoenzyme complexes. T-RS is recruited efficiently to the HIV-1 promoter in a TAR-independent manner before RNAP II hyperphosphorylation but not to cellular promoters. The “preloading” of T-RS into HIV-1 preinitiation complexes prevents the entry of active Tat molecules, leaving the complexes in an elongation-incompetent state and effectively suppressing HIV-1 replication. The ability to deliver inhibitors to transcription complexes through the use of targeting/localization signals may provide new avenues for designing viral and transcription inhibitors. PMID:18667497

  6. SY 12-2 ACE INHIBITORS AND ARBS: SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN CV RISK REDUCTION.

    PubMed

    Danser, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) can be accomplished at the level of the angiotensin-generating enzymes renin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE; using renin inhibitors or ACE inhibitors), the type 1 angiotensin II (AT1) receptor or mineralocorticoid receptor (MR; using angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs] or MR blockers) and/or renin release (using beta-blockers). Several of these drugs are often combined-for example in heart failure-but such approaches may ultimately lead to RAAS annihilation with adverse consequences such as hypotension, renal dysfunction and hyperkalaemia. The biochemical consequences of each type of blockade are different. For instance, ACE inhibitors will lower angiotensin II, thus no longer allowing stimulation of both AT1 and type 2 angiotensin II (AT2) receptors, while ARBs raise angiotensin II, allowing selective stimulation of the unoccupied AT2 receptor. This might be of particular importance in women, in whom the protective AT2 receptor pathway is believed to be upregulated. Multiple clinical trials have compared the various types of RAAS blockers and/or their combination. This talk will summarize the current evidence with regard to similarities and differences between ACE inhibitors and ARBs, also considering their side-effect profile, dose and combination with other RAAS blockers. PMID:27643121

  7. The Cupric Ion as an Inhibitor of Photosynthetic Electron Transport in Isolated Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Cedeno-Maldonado, Arturo; Swader, J. A.; Heath, Robert L.

    1972-01-01

    Strong inhibition of uncoupled photosynthetic electron transport by Cu2+ in isolated spinach chloroplasts was observed by measuring changes in O2 concentration in the reaction medium. Inhibition was dependent not only on the concentration of the inhibitor, but also on the ratio of chlorophyll to inhibitor. Binding of Cu2+ to the chloroplast membranes resulted in removal of Cu2+ from solution. When chloroplasts were exposed to preincubation in light, there was increased inhibition as a result of Cu2+ binding to inhibitory sites. Preincubation in the dark resulted in Cu2+ binding to noninhibitory sites and decreased inhibition. The degree of inhibition was lower at low light intensities than at high light intensities. When the photosystems were assayed separately, photosystem I was more resistant to inhibition than photosystem II. The most sensitive site to the inhibitor was the oxidizing side of photosystem II. PMID:16658246

  8. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is an endogenous inhibitory neuromodulator that increases nociceptive thresholds in response to tissue trauma and inflammation. Adenosine kinase (AK) is a key intracellular enzyme regulating intra- and extracellular concentrations of ADO. AK inhibition selectively amplifies extracellular ADO levels at cell and tissue sites where accelerated release of ADO occurs. AK inhibitors have been shown to provide effective antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anticonvulsant activity in animal models, thus suggesting their potential therapeutic utility for pain, inflammation, epilepsy and possibly other central and peripheral nervous system diseases associated with cellular trauma and inflammation. This beneficial outcome may potentially lack nonspecific effects associated with the systemic administration of ADO receptor agonists. Until recently all of the reported AK inhibitors contained adenosine-like structural motif. The present review will discuss design, synthesis and analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of the novel nonnucleoside AK inhibitors that do not have close structural resemblance with the natural substrate ADO. Two classes of the nonnucleoside AK inhibitors are built on pyridopyrimidine and alkynylpyrimidine cores.

  9. C1-inhibitor and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Excessive activation of the protein cascade systems has been associated with post-transplantation inflammatory disorders. There is increasing evidence that complement not only significantly contributes to ischemia/reperfusion injury upon cold storage of the organ but also, although to a different degree, to allograft rejection. Complement activation is most fulminant in hyperacute rejection but seems also to contribute to acute transplant rejection. Therapeutic substitution of appropriate regulators, therefore, appears to be a reasonable approach to reduce undesirable inflammatory reactions in the grafted organ. C1-inhibitor, a multifunctional regulator of the various kinin-generating cascade systems (for review see: E. Hack, chapter in this issue), is frequently reduced in patients suffering from severe inflammatory disorders. Studies applying pathophysiologically relevant animal models of allo- and xenotransplantation as well as promising first clinical results from successful allotransplantation now provide evidence that C1-inhibitor may also serve as an effective means to protect the grafted organ against inflammatory tissue injury. In xenotransplantation, complement inhibition by specific regulators such as C1-inhibitor may help to overcome hyperacute graft rejection. After a brief introduction on the significance of complement to allo- and xenotransplantation the following review will focus on the impact of C1-inhibitor treatment on transplantation-associated inflammatory disorders, where complement contributes to the pathogenesis.

  10. Bivalent Inhibitors of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Carrie M.; Chang, Matthew E. K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are key players in a large number of cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulated kinase activity has been implicated in a number of diseases, and members of this enzyme family are of therapeutic interest. However, due to the fact that most inhibitors interact with the highly conserved ATP-binding sites of kinases, it is a significant challenge to develop pharmacological agents that target only one of the greater than 500 kinases present in humans. A potential solution to this problem is the development of bisubstrate and bivalent kinase inhibitors, in which an active site-directed moiety is tethered to another ligand that targets a location outside of the ATP-binding cleft. Because kinase signaling specificity is modulated by regions outside of the ATP-binding site, strategies that exploit these interactions have the potential to provide reagents with high target selectivity. This review highlights examples of kinase interaction sites that can potentially be exploited by bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors. Furthermore, an overview of efforts to target these interactions with bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors is provided. Finally, several examples of the successful application of these reagents in a cellular setting are described. PMID:24564382

  11. PDE-5 inhibitors: clinical points.

    PubMed

    Doumas, Michael; Lazaridis, Antonios; Katsiki, Niki; Athyros, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is usually of vascular origin and is frequently encountered in men with cardiovascular disease. The introduction of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors has revolutionized the management of patients with erectile dysfunction. Currently available phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have distinct pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, thus permitting for tailoring sexual therapy according to patient characteristics and needs. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors possess vasorelaxing properties and exert systemic hemodynamic effects, which need to be taken into account when other cardiovascular drugs are co-administered. Special caution is needed with alpha-blockers, while the co-administration with nitrates is contra-indicated due to the risk of life-threatening hypotension. This review presents the advent of sexual therapy, describes the mechanism of action and the specific characteristics of commercially available phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, summarizes the efficacy and safety of these drugs with special emphasis on the cardiovascular system, and discusses the clinical criteria used for the selection of each drug for the individual patient. PMID:25392015

  12. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  13. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  14. Cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, MIAO-QIAN; SU, FEI-FEI; XU, XUAN; LIU, XIONG-TAO; WANG, HONG-TAO; ZHANG, WEI; LI, XUE; LIAN, CHENG; ZHENG, QIANG-SUN; FENG, ZHI-CHUN

    2016-01-01

    Patients with essential hypertension undergo endothelial dysfunction, particularly in the conduit arteries. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, serves a role in the inhibition of platelet aggregation and it is widely used in the treatment of peripheral vascular diseases. Previous studies have suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial dysfunction; however, it remains unknown whether cilostazol protects the endothelial function in essential hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether, and how, cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II (angII)-induced endothelial dysfunction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to angII and treated with cilostazol. Endothelial cell apoptosis and function, nitric oxide and superoxide production, phosphorylation (p) of Akt, and caspase-3 protein expression levels were investigated. AngII exposure resulted in the apoptosis of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, cilostazol significantly suppressed the angII-induced apoptosis of HUVECs; however, this effect was reduced in the presence of LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Furthermore, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced p-Akt downregulation and cleaved caspase-3 upregulation. These effects were also alleviated by LY294002. In vivo, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced endothelial cell apoptosis and dysfunction. Cilostazol was also demonstrated to partially reduced the angII-induced increase in superoxide production. The results of the present study suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial apoptosis and dysfunction by modulating the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:26862035

  15. Induction of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in human abdominal aortic aneurysm: therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Galán, María; Varona, Saray; Orriols, Mar; Rodríguez, José Antonio; Aguiló, Silvia; Dilmé, Jaume; Camacho, Mercedes; Martínez-González, José; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Clinical management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is currently limited to elective surgical repair because an effective pharmacotherapy is still awaited. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity could be a promising therapeutic option in cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to characterise HDAC expression in human AAA and to evaluate the therapeutic potential of class I and IIa HDAC inhibitors in the AAA model of angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry evidenced an increased expression of HDACs 1, 2 (both class I), 4 and 7 (both class IIa) in abdominal aorta samples from patients undergoing AAA open repair (n=22) compared with those from donors (n=14). Aortic aneurysms from Ang-II-infused ApoE(-/-) mice exhibited a similar HDAC expression profile. In these animals, treatment with a class I HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) or a class IIa inhibitor (MC-1568) improved survival, reduced the incidence and severity of AAA and limited aneurysmal expansion evaluated by Doppler ultrasonography. These beneficial effects were more potent in MC-1568-treated mice. The disorganisation of elastin and collagen fibres and lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration were effectively reduced by both inhibitors. Additionally, HDAC inhibition attenuated the exacerbated expression of pro-inflammatory markers and the increase in metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activity induced by Ang II in this model. Therefore, our data evidence that HDAC expression is deregulated in human AAA and that class-selective HDAC inhibitors limit aneurysm expansion in an AAA mouse model. New-generation HDAC inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic approach to overcome human aneurysm progression.

  16. Induction of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in human abdominal aortic aneurysm: therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Galán, María; Varona, Saray; Orriols, Mar; Rodríguez, José Antonio; Aguiló, Silvia; Dilmé, Jaume; Camacho, Mercedes; Martínez-González, José; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clinical management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is currently limited to elective surgical repair because an effective pharmacotherapy is still awaited. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity could be a promising therapeutic option in cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to characterise HDAC expression in human AAA and to evaluate the therapeutic potential of class I and IIa HDAC inhibitors in the AAA model of angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry evidenced an increased expression of HDACs 1, 2 (both class I), 4 and 7 (both class IIa) in abdominal aorta samples from patients undergoing AAA open repair (n=22) compared with those from donors (n=14). Aortic aneurysms from Ang-II-infused ApoE−/− mice exhibited a similar HDAC expression profile. In these animals, treatment with a class I HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) or a class IIa inhibitor (MC-1568) improved survival, reduced the incidence and severity of AAA and limited aneurysmal expansion evaluated by Doppler ultrasonography. These beneficial effects were more potent in MC-1568-treated mice. The disorganisation of elastin and collagen fibres and lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration were effectively reduced by both inhibitors. Additionally, HDAC inhibition attenuated the exacerbated expression of pro-inflammatory markers and the increase in metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activity induced by Ang II in this model. Therefore, our data evidence that HDAC expression is deregulated in human AAA and that class-selective HDAC inhibitors limit aneurysm expansion in an AAA mouse model. New-generation HDAC inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic approach to overcome human aneurysm progression. PMID:26989193

  17. Effects of known phenoloxidase inhibitors on hemocyanin-derived phenoloxidase from Limulus polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jamie; Clark, William McCaskill; Cain, Jennifer A; Patterson, Alan; Coates, Christopher J; Nairn, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of phenoloxidase are used routinely to characterise the structural and functional properties of phenoloxidases. Hemocyanin-derived phenoloxidase activity is also sensitive to standard phenoloxidase inhibitors. In this study, we characterise the effects of a number of phenoloxidase inhibitors on hemocyanin-derived phenoloxidase activity from the chelicerate, Limulus polyphemus. Both inhibition type and K(i) values were similar to those observed for hemocyanin-derived phenoloxidase from another chelicerate, Eurypelma californicum. In addition, substrate inhibition was observed at concentrations above 2mM dopamine. The conformation in which two of the inhibitors, namely tropolone and kojic acid, would bind near the Cu(II) centre of hemocyanin is proposed. PMID:22885403

  18. Small-molecule inhibitors of the c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Sabine; Miduturu, Chandra V; Kanda, Shigeru; Zhang, Jianming; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Salah, Eidarus; Deng, Xianming; Choi, Hwan Geun; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Knapp, Stefan; Gray, Nathanael S; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2012-04-20

    The c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase modulates cellular signaling pathways governing differentiation, the innate immune response, and vasculogenesis. Here, we report the identification of types I and II kinase inhibitors with potent activity against c-Fes both in vitro and in cell-based assays. One of the most potent inhibitors is the previously described anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor TAE684. The crystal structure of TAE684 in complex with the c-Fes SH2-kinase domain showed excellent shape complementarity with the ATP-binding pocket and a key role for the gatekeeper methionine in the inhibitory mechanism. TAE684 and two pyrazolopyrimidines with nanomolar potency against c-Fes in vitro were used to establish a role for this kinase in osteoclastogenesis, illustrating the value of these inhibitors as tool compounds to probe the diverse biological functions associated with this unique kinase.

  19. Engineered cystine knot miniproteins as potent inhibitors of human mast cell tryptase beta.

    PubMed

    Sommerhoff, Christian P; Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the design, chemical and recombinant synthesis, and functional properties of a series of novel inhibitors of human mast cell tryptase beta, a protease of considerable interest as a therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic asthma and inflammatory disorders. These inhibitors are derived from a linear variant of the cyclic cystine knot miniprotein MCoTI-II, originally isolated from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis. A synthetic cyclic miniprotein that bears additional positive charge in the loop connecting the N- and C-termini inhibits all monomers of the tryptase beta tetramer with an overall equilibrium dissociation constant K(i) of 1 nM and thus is one of the most potent proteinaceous inhibitors of tryptase beta described to date. These cystine knot miniproteins may therefore become valuable scaffolds for the design of a new generation of tryptase inhibitors. PMID:19852971

  20. Cloning, purification and biochemical characterization of dipetarudin, a new chimeric thrombin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    López, M; Mende, K; Steinmetzer, T; Nowak, G

    2003-03-25

    The development of thrombin inhibitors could provide invaluable progress for antithrombotic therapy. In this paper, we report the cloning, purification and biochemical characterization of dipetarudin, a chimeric thrombin inhibitor composed of the N-terminal head structure of dipetalogastin II, the strongest inhibitor from the assassin bug Dipetalogaster maximus, and the exosite 1 blocking segment of hirudin, connected through a five glycine linker. The cloning of dipetarudin was performed by a simple method which had not been used previously to clone chimeras. Biochemical characterization of dipetarudin revealed that it is a slow, tight-binding inhibitor with a molecular mass (M(r)=7560) and a thrombin inhibitory activity (K(i)=446 fM) comparable to r-hirudin. PMID:12651003

  1. Engineered cystine knot miniproteins as potent inhibitors of human mast cell tryptase beta.

    PubMed

    Sommerhoff, Christian P; Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the design, chemical and recombinant synthesis, and functional properties of a series of novel inhibitors of human mast cell tryptase beta, a protease of considerable interest as a therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic asthma and inflammatory disorders. These inhibitors are derived from a linear variant of the cyclic cystine knot miniprotein MCoTI-II, originally isolated from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis. A synthetic cyclic miniprotein that bears additional positive charge in the loop connecting the N- and C-termini inhibits all monomers of the tryptase beta tetramer with an overall equilibrium dissociation constant K(i) of 1 nM and thus is one of the most potent proteinaceous inhibitors of tryptase beta described to date. These cystine knot miniproteins may therefore become valuable scaffolds for the design of a new generation of tryptase inhibitors.

  2. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  3. Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases*

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas H.; Antalis, Toni M.; Wu, Qingyu

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of genome and expressed sequence tag data bases at the turn of the millennium unveiled a new protease family named the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) in a Journal of Biological Chemistry minireview (Hooper, J. D., Clements, J. A., Quigley, J. P., and Antalis, T. M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 857–860). Since then, the number of known TTSPs has more than doubled, and more importantly, our understanding of the physiological functions of individual TTSPs and their contribution to human disease has greatly increased. Progress has also been made in identifying molecular substrates and endogenous inhibitors. This minireview summarizes the current knowledge of the rapidly advancing TTSP field. PMID:19487698

  4. A hinge region mutation in C1-inhibitor (Ala436-->Thr) results in nonsubstrate-like behavior and in polymerization of the molecule.

    PubMed

    Aulak, K S; Eldering, E; Hack, C E; Lubbers, Y P; Harrison, R A; Mast, A; Cicardi, M; Davis, A E

    1993-08-25

    C1-inhibitor(Mo), a dysfunctional C1-inhibitor molecule produced in two kindred with type II hereditary angioedema, has a mutation at the P10 position (Ala436 to Thr). Like most serpins with hinge region mutations (P14, P12, P10), C1-inhibitor(Mo) loses its inhibitory activity. However, unlike the other hinge region mutations, this mutant is not converted to a substrate. As shown by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and electron microscopy, C1-inhibitor(Mo) exists in both monomeric and multimeric forms. Polymerization probably results from reactive center loop insertion into the A sheet of an adjacent molecule. Native C1-inhibitor(Mo) was shown to have a thermal stability profile intermediate to those of intact and of cleaved normal C1-inhibitor. Native C1-inhibitor(Mo) did not bind to monoclonal antibody KII, which binds only to reactive center-cleaved normal C1-inhibitor. It did, however, react with monoclonal antibody KOK12, which recognizes complexed or cleaved C1-inhibitor but not intact normal C1-inhibitor. Native C1-inhibitor(Mo), therefore, exists in a conformation similar to the complexed form of normal C1-inhibitor.

  5. Angiotensin II stimulates water and NaCl intake through separate cell signalling pathways in rats.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek; Mietlicki, Elizabeth G; Nowak, Erica L; Fluharty, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) stimulation of water and NaCl intake is a classic model of the behavioural effects of hormones. In vitro studies indicate that the AngII type 1 (AT(1)) receptor stimulates intracellular pathways that include protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation. Previous studies support the hypotheses that PKC is involved in AngII-induced water, but not NaCl intake and that MAP kinase plays a role in NaCl consumption, but not water intake, after injection of AngII. The present experiments test these hypotheses in rats using central injections of AngII in the presence or absence of a PKC inhibitor or a MAP kinase inhibitor. Pretreatment with the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine attenuated AngII-induced water intake, but NaCl intake was unaffected. In contrast, pretreatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, had no effect on AngII-induced water intake, but attenuated NaCl intake. These data support the working hypotheses and significantly extend our earlier findings and those of others. Perhaps more importantly, these experiments demonstrate the remarkable diversity of peptide receptor systems and add support for the surprising finding that intracellular signalling pathways can have divergent behavioural relevance.

  6. Mechanisms for autophagy modulation by isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dykstra, Kaitlyn M.; Allen, Cheryl; Born, Ella J.; Tong, Huaxiang; Holstein, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the production of monoclonal protein (MP). We have shown previously that disruption of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) causes a block in MP secretion through a disruption of Rab GTPase activity, leading to an enhanced unfolded protein response and subsequent apoptosis in MM cells. Autophagy is induced by cellular stressors including nutrient deprivation and ER stress. IBP inhibitors have been shown to have disparate effects on autophagy. Here we define the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of IBP inhibitors on autophagic flux in MM cells utilizing specific pharmacological inhibitors. We demonstrate that IBP inhibition induces a net increase in autophagy as a consequence of disruption of isoprenoid biosynthesis which is not recapitulated by direct geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. IBP inhibitor-induced autophagy is a cellular defense mechanism as treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 enhances the cytotoxic effects of GGPP depletion, but not geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that IBP inhibitors disrupt ER to Golgi trafficking of monoclonal light chain protein and that this protein is not a substrate for alternative degradative pathways such as aggresomes and autophagosomes. These studies support further development of specific GGTase II inhibitors as anti-myeloma agents. PMID:26595805

  7. Purification and inhibitory profile of phospholipase A2 inhibitors from Australian elapid sera.

    PubMed

    Hains, P G; Broady, K W

    2000-02-15

    Although the resistance of snakes to their own venom is well known, until now no investigators have examined the serum of Australian snakes. Here we describe the identification and purification of a range of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) inhibitors from the serum of Australian elapids. All PLA(2) inhibitors were composed of two protein chains, an alpha-chain and a beta-chain. The alpha-chains were approx. 22.5 kDa in size and variably glycosylated, whereas the beta-chains were approx. 19.8 kDa in size and not glycosylated. Identification of isoforms of the two subunit chains was significant because three of the six sera examined were from single snake specimens. In addition, the glycosylation patterns of the alpha-chains were thoroughly investigated in these unpooled sera. The functional and structural properties of the purified inhibitors were studied. Uniquely, a snake PLA(2) inhibitor was found to inhibit human type II PLA(2) enzyme, which has implications for the treatment of the many diseases in which PLA(2) enzymes have been implicated. Further, we demonstrate that the inhibitor forms a non-covalent association with a purified PLA(2) enzyme. Finally, the purified PLA(2) inhibitor was shown to protect in vivo against the lethal affects of a homologous PLA(2) enzyme, suggesting a role for PLA(2) inhibitors in the treatment of snake bite victims. PMID:10657250

  8. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are the one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism has been reported with different proton pump inhibitors with prolonged oral use. We report the first reported case of possible such effect with intravenous preparation of proton pump inhibitor. This case report raises awareness among physicians worldwide of this often unknown association, as life-threatening cardiac and neuromuscular complications can arise with unrecognized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia with proton pump inhibitors.

  9. KID, a Kinase Inhibitor Database project.

    PubMed

    Collin, O; Meijer, L

    1999-01-01

    The Kinase Inhibitor Database is a small specialized database dedicated to the gathering of information on protein kinase inhibitors. The database is accessible through the World Wide Web system and gives access to structural and bibliographic information on protein kinase inhibitors. The data in the database will be collected and submitted by researchers working in the kinase inhibitor field. The submitted data will be checked by the curator of the database before entry.

  10. Lovastatin prevents angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat heart cells.

    PubMed

    Oi, S; Haneda, T; Osaki, J; Kashiwagi, Y; Nakamura, Y; Kawabe, J; Kikuchi, K

    1999-07-01

    Angiotensin II activates p21ras, and mediates cardiac hypertrophic growth through the type 1 angiotensin II receptor in cardiac myocytes. An inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase has been shown to block the post-translational farnesylation of p21ras and inhibit protein synthesis in several cell types. Primary cultures of neonatal cardiac myocytes were used to determine whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin inhibit the angiotensin II-induced hypertrophic growth. Angiotensin II (10(-6) M) significantly increased protein-DNA ratio, RNA-DNA ratio, ratios of protein synthesis and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Lipid-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, lovastatin (10(-6) M) and simvastatin (10(-6) M) partially and significantly inhibited the angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters, but a water-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, pravastatin (10(-6) M) did not. Mevalonate (10(-4) M) overcame the inhibitory effects of lovastatin and simvastatin on angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters. A selective protein kinase C inhibitor, calphostin C (10(-6) M) partially and significantly prevented angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters, and treatment with both lovastatin and calphostin C inhibited completely. Angiotensin II increased p21ras activity and membrane association, and lovastatin inhibited them. These studies demonstrate that a lipid-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, lovastatin, may prevent angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, at least in part, through p21ras/MAP kinase pathway, which is linked to mevalonate metabolism.

  11. The dawn of hedgehog inhibitors: Vismodegib.

    PubMed

    Sandhiya, Selvarajan; Melvin, George; Kumar, Srinivasamurthy Suresh; Dkhar, Steven Aibor

    2013-01-01

    Cancer, one of the leading causes of death worldwide is estimated to increase to approximately 13.1 million by 2030. This has amplified the research in oncology towards the exploration of novel targets. Recently there has been lots of interest regarding the hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which plays a significant role in the development of organs and tissues during embryonic and postnatal periods. In a normal person, the Hh signaling pathway is under inhibition and gets activated upon the binding of Hh ligand to a transmembrane receptor called Patched (PTCH1) thus allowing the transmembrane protein, smoothened (SMO) to transfer signals through various proteins. One of the newer drugs namely vismodegib involves the inhibition of Hh pathway and has shown promising results in the treatment of advanced basal-cell carcinoma as well as medulloblastoma. It has been granted approval by US Food and Drug Administration's (US FDA) priority review program on January 30, 2012 for the treatment of advanced basal-cell carcinoma. The drug is also being evaluated in malignancies like medulloblastoma, pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, chondrosarcoma and prostate cancer. Moreover various Hh inhibitors namely LDE 225, saridegib, BMS 833923, LEQ 506, PF- 04449913 and TAK-441 are also undergoing phase I and II trials for different neoplasms. Hence this review will describe briefly the Hh pathway and the novel drug vismodegib.

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new family of anti-benzylanilinosulfonamides as CA IX inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thiry, Anne; Delayen, Aurélie; Goossens, Laurence; Houssin, Raymond; Ledecq, Marie; Frankart, Aurélie; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Wouters, Johan; Supuran, Claudiu T; Hénichart, Jean-Pierre; Masereel, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    We report the synthesis and the pharmacological evaluation of a new class of human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) inhibitors prepared regio- and stereoselectively by reacting sulfanilamide with ethyl trans-phenylglycidate in the presence of cobalt(II) chloride. Various derivatizations of the ester moiety in the parent compound led to a small library of derivatives (2R,3R and 2S,3S) which displayed interesting inhibitory activities towards the human tumor-associated isoform CA IX. One of the new compounds shows high selectivity in inhibiting hCA IX compared to the two physiologically relevant, cytosolic isozymes hCA I and hCA II. A molecular modeling study was conducted in order to simulate the binding mode of this new family of enzyme inhibitors within the active sites of hCA IX and hCA II. PMID:18479784

  13. [Alpha-amylase inhibitors and soluble dietary fiber in rye: partial purification and effect on postprandial glycemia].

    PubMed

    Täufel, A; Lüder, W; Proll, J

    1996-06-01

    The protein inhibitor of the alpha-amylase (D-type) and the soluble arabinoxylan of rye (Var. Clou) were isolated from flour and bran, respectively. The isolation of the alpha-amylase inhibitor involves the extraction of rye flour in aqueous CaCl2-solution (2 x 10(-3) M containing the hemicellulase preparation Veron HE (2 g/100 g flour), dialysis and lyophilization (preparation I) and further fractionation with ammonsulfate, using the fraction 20-50% for isolation (preparation II). The arabinoxylan isolation is carried out using extraction of rye bran in 80% ethanol (80 degrees C), centrifugation, aqueous extraction of the sediment, dialysis and lyophilization (preparation I). The further purification using the precipitate of the fraction 20-50% leads to preparation II. The alpha-amylase inhibitor preparation II and the arabinoxylan preparation II were applied in a diet containing wheat starch and casein and fed to diabetic and healthy rats (Levis and Wistar). The postprandial increase of glucose was determined. It was detected that the postprandial increase of glucose is influenced neither by the alpha-amylase inhibitor nor by the soluble arabinoxylan in comparison to the control experiments. However, the alpha-amylase inhibitor of wheat significantly decreases the postprandial increase of glucose. The application of a test meal with alpha-amylase inhibitor of rye to health and diabetic of type-II-volunteers showed no variation of the blood glucose values. The reduction of the increase of glucose by the soluble beta-glucan of oat cannot be confirmed for the soluble arabinoxylan of rye. We conclude that the effect of the alpha-amylase inhibitor as well as the soluble pentosan or glucan has to be examined for each cereal species.

  14. Angiotensin-II blockage, muscle strength, and exercise capacity in physically independent older adults

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Vinícius A.; Probst, Vanessa S.; Nogari, Bruna M.; Teixeira, Denilson C.; Felcar, Josiane M.; Santos, Denis C.; Gomes, Marcus Vinícius M.; Andraus, Rodrigo A. C.; Fernandes, Karen B. P.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the exercise capacity and muscle strength in elderly people using drugs for angiotensin-II blockage. [Subjects and Methods] Four hundred and seven older adults were recruited for this study. Data about comorbidities and medication use were recorded and the individuals were divided into three groups: control group- elderly people with normal exercise capacity (n=235); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group − individuals using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (n=140); and angiotensin-II receptor blocker group- patients using angiotensin-II receptor blockers (n= 32). Exercise capacity was evaluated by a 6-minute walking test and muscle strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. [Results] Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 99 ± 12%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 101 ± 14%) showed higher predicted values in the 6-minute walking test than the control group patients (mean: 96 ± 10%). Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 105 ± 19%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 105.1 ± 18.73%) showed higher predicted values of muscle strength than control group patients (mean: 98.15 ± 18.77%). [Conclusion] Older adults using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers have better functional exercise capacity and muscle strength. PMID:27065543

  15. Angiotensin-II blockage, muscle strength, and exercise capacity in physically independent older adults.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Vinícius A; Probst, Vanessa S; Nogari, Bruna M; Teixeira, Denilson C; Felcar, Josiane M; Santos, Denis C; Gomes, Marcus Vinícius M; Andraus, Rodrigo A C; Fernandes, Karen B P

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the exercise capacity and muscle strength in elderly people using drugs for angiotensin-II blockage. [Subjects and Methods] Four hundred and seven older adults were recruited for this study. Data about comorbidities and medication use were recorded and the individuals were divided into three groups: control group- elderly people with normal exercise capacity (n=235); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group - individuals using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (n=140); and angiotensin-II receptor blocker group- patients using angiotensin-II receptor blockers (n= 32). Exercise capacity was evaluated by a 6-minute walking test and muscle strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. [Results] Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 99 ± 12%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 101 ± 14%) showed higher predicted values in the 6-minute walking test than the control group patients (mean: 96 ± 10%). Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 105 ± 19%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 105.1 ± 18.73%) showed higher predicted values of muscle strength than control group patients (mean: 98.15 ± 18.77%). [Conclusion] Older adults using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers have better functional exercise capacity and muscle strength.

  16. Salicylanilide inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P; Ferreira, Leandra R; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patricia J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Welsh, William J; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-10-11

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose antiapicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles.

  17. Salicylanilide Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D.; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P.; Ferriera, Leandra R.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Welsh, William J.; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose anti-apicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles. PMID:22970937

  18. Macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Rawat, J.; Ajmal, M.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of three macrocyclic compounds on corrosion of mild steel (MS) in hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, alternating current (AC) impedance, and hydrogen permeation techniques. All the investigated compounds showed significant efficiencies and reduced permeation of hydrogen through MS in HCl. Inhibition efficiency (IE) varied with the nature and concentrations of the inhibitors, temperature, and concentrations of the acid solutions. The addition of iodide ions (I{sup {minus}}) increased IE of all the tested compounds as a result of the synergistic effect. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that macrocyclic compounds acted as mixed inhibitors in 1 M HCl to 5 M HCl. Adsorption on the metal surface obeyed Temkin`s adsorption isotherm. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of the polished MS surface, exposed with tetraphenyldithia-octaazacyclotetradeca-hexaene (PTAT) proved adsorption of this compound on the surface through nitrogen and sulfur atoms.

  19. [Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Agnieszka Ewa; Zińczuk, Justyna; Kłoczko, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238), delanzomib (CEP-18770), oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047) and marizomib (NPI-0052). PMID:27259216

  20. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Aromatase inhibitors and other compounds for lowering breast cancer risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  1. PKCβII Modulation of Myocyte Contractile Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyosook; Robinson, Dustin A; Stevenson, Tamara K; Wu, Helen C; Kampert, Sarah E; Pagani, Francis D; Dyke, D. Brad; Martin, Jody L; Sadayappan, Sakthival; Day, Sharlene M; Westfall, Margaret V

    2012-01-01

    Significant up-regulation of the protein kinase CβII (PKCβII) develops during heart failure and yet divergent functional outcomes are reported in animal models. The goal here is to investigate PKCβII modulation of contractile function and gain insights into downstream targets in adult cardiac myocytes. Increased PKCβII protein expression and phosphorylation developed after gene transfer into adult myocytes while expression remained undetectable in controls. The PKCβII was distributed in a perinuclear pattern and this expression resulted in diminished rates and amplitude of shortening and re-lengthening compared to controls and myocytes expressing dominant negative PKCβII (PKCβDN). Similar decreases were observed in the Ca2+ transient and the Ca2+ decay rate slowed in response to caffeine in PKCβII-expressing myocytes. Parallel phosphorylation studies indicated PKCβII targets phosphatase activity to reduce phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylation at residue Thr17 (pThr17-PLB). The PKCβ inhibitor, LY379196 (LY) restored pThr17-PLB to control levels. In contrast, myofilament protein phosphorylation was enhanced by PKCβII expression, and individually, LY and the phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A each failed to block this response. Further work showed PKCβII increased Ca2+- activated, calmodulin-dependent kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ) expression and enhanced both CaMKIIδ and protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of both signaling targets also was resistant to acute inhibition by LY. These later results provide evidence PKCβII modulates contractile function via intermediate downstream pathway(s) in cardiac myocytes. PMID:22587992

  2. Conformation-specific inhibitors of Raf kinases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolun; Schleicher, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery linking B-Raf mutations to human tumors in 2002, significant advances in the development of Raf inhibitors have been made, leading to the recent approval of two Raf inhibitor drugs. This chapter includes a brief introduction to B-Raf as a validated target and focuses on the three different binding modes observed with Raf small-molecule inhibitors. These various binding modes lock the Raf kinase in different conformations that impact the toxicity profiles of the inhibitors. Possible solutions to mitigate the side effects caused by inhibitor-induced dimerization are also discussed.

  3. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  4. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  5. ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIONS OF HDAC INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Herbert E.; Maze, Ian; LaPlant, Quincey C.; Vialou, Vincent F.; Yoshinori, Ohnishi N.; Berton, Olivier; Fass, Dan M.; Renthal, William; Rush, Augustus J.; Wu, Emma Y.; Ghose, Subroto; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Russo, Scott J.; Tamminga, Carol; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Persistent symptoms of depression suggest the involvement of stable molecular adaptations in brain, which may be reflected at the level of chromatin remodeling. We find that chronic social defeat stress in mice causes a transient decrease, followed by a persistent increase, in levels of acetylated histone H3 in the nucleus accumbens, an important limbic brain region. This persistent increase in H3 acetylation is associated with decreased levels of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the nucleus accumbens. Similar effects were observed in the nucleus accumbens of depressed humans studied postmortem. These changes in H3 acetylation and HDAC2 expression mediate long-lasting positive neuronal adaptations, since infusion of HDAC inhibitors into the nucleus accumbens, which increases histone acetylation, exerts robust antidepressant-like effects in the social defeat paradigm and other behavioral assays. HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) infusion also reverses the effects of chronic defeat stress on global patterns of gene expression in the nucleus accumbens, as determined by microarray analysis, with striking similarities to the effects of the standard antidepressant, fluoxetine. Stress-regulated genes whose expression is normalized selectively by MS-275 may provide promising targets for the future development of novel antidepressant treatments. Together, these findings provide new insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of depression and antidepressant action, and support the antidepressant potential of HDAC inhibitors and perhaps other agents that act at the level of chromatin structure. PMID:19759294

  6. Acrylamide catalytically inhibits topoisomerase II in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Sciandrello, Giulia; Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Catanzaro, Irene; Saverini, Marghereth; Barbata, Giusi

    2010-04-01

    The vinyl monomer acrylamide is characterized by the presence of an alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group that makes it reactive towards thiol, hydroxyl or amino groups and towards the nucleophilic centers in DNA. The ability of acrylamide to chemically modify protein thiols has prompted us to consider topoisomerase II as one possible target of acrylamide, since agents targeting protein sulfhydryl groups act as either catalytic inhibitors or poisons of topoisomerase II. Nuclear extracts from V79 Chinese hamster cells incubated with acrylamide reduced topoisomerase II activity as inferred by an inability to convert kinetoplast DNA to the decatenated form. Nuclear extracts incubated with acrylamide pre-incubated with DTT converted kinetoplast DNA to the decatenated form, suggesting that acrylamide influences topoisomerase II activity through reaction with sulfhydryl groups on the enzyme. Furthermore, acrylamide did not induce the pBR322 DNA cleavage, as assessed by cleavage assay; thus, it cannot be regarded as a poison of topoisomerase II. As a catalytic inhibitor, acrylamide antagonizes the effect of etoposide, a topoisomerase II poison, as determined by clonogenic assay in V79 cells. This antagonism is confirmed by band depletion assay, from which it can be inferred that acrylamide reduces the level of catalytically active cellular topoisomerase II available for the action of etoposide. PMID:20006698

  7. Investigating the selectivity of metalloenzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Day, Joshua A; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-10-24

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY), was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe(3+) from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe(3+) from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity.

  8. The burden of inhibitors in haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christopher E; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; Auerswald, Guenter; Grancha, Salvador

    2016-08-31

    The burden of disease in haemophilia patients has wide ranging implications for the family and to society. There is evidence that having a current inhibitor increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Morbidity is increased by the inability to treat adequately and its consequent disabilities, which then equates to a poor quality of life compared with non-inhibitor patients. The societal cost of care, or `burden of inhibitors', increases with the ongoing presence of an inhibitor. Therefore, it is clear that successful eradication of inhibitors by immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the single most important milestone one can achieve in an inhibitor patient. The type of factor VIII (FVIII) product used in ITI regimens varies worldwide. Despite ongoing debate, there is in vitro and retrospective clinical evidence to support the use of plasma-derived VWF-containing FVIII concentrates in ITI regimens in order to achieve early and high inhibitor eradication success rates. PMID:27528280

  9. Investigating the Selectivity of Metalloenzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Day, Joshua A.; Cohen, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors, in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY) was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe3+ from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe3+ from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity. PMID:24074025

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors induce autophagy through FOXO1-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbin; Ng, Shukie; Wang, Jigang; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Shi-Hao; Yang, Naidi; Lin, Qingsong; Xia, Dajing; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process in response to starvation or other stress conditions to sustain cellular homeostasis. At present, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to induce autophagy in cells through inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) pathway. FOXO1, an important transcription factor regulated by AKT, is also known to play a role in autophagy induction. At present, the role of FOXO1 in the HDACIs-induced autophagy has not been reported. In this study, we first observed that HDACIs increased the expression of FOXO1 at the mRNA and protein level. Second, we found that FOXO1 transcriptional activity was enhanced by HDACIs, as evidenced by increased FOXO1 nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity. Third, suppression of FOXO1 function by siRNA knockdown or by a chemical inhibitor markedly blocked HDACIs-induced autophagy. Moreover, we found that FOXO1-mediated autophagy is achieved via its transcriptional activation, leading to a dual effect on autophagy induction: (i) enhanced expression of autophagy-related (ATG) genes, and (ii) suppression of MTOR via transcription of the SESN3 (sestrin 3) gene. Finally, we found that inhibition of autophagy markedly enhanced HDACIs-mediated cell death, indicating that autophagy serves as an important cell survival mechanism. Taken together, our studies reveal a novel function of FOXO1 in HDACIs-mediated autophagy in human cancer cells and thus support the development of a novel therapeutic strategy by combining HDACIs and autophagy inhibitors in cancer therapy.

  11. New Frontiers in Selective Human MAO-B Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Simone; Silvestri, Romano

    2015-09-10

    Accumulating evidence shows a relationship between the human MAO-B (hMAO-B) enzyme and neuropsychiatric/degenerative disorder, personality traits, type II alcoholism, borderline personality disorders, aggressiveness and violence in crime, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, suicide, schizophrenia, anorexia nervosa, migraine, dementia, and PD. Thus, MAO-B represents an attractive target for the treatment of a number of human diseases. The discovery, development, and therapeutic use of drugs that inhibit MAO-B are major challenges for future therapy. Various compounds and drugs that selectively target this isoform have been discovered recently. These agents are synthetic compounds or natural products and their analogues, including chalcones, pyrazoles, chromones, coumarins, xanthines, isatin derivatives, thiazolidindiones, (thiazol-2-yl)hydrazones, and analogues of marketed drugs. Despite considerable efforts in understanding the binding interaction with specific substrates or inhibitors, structural information available for the rational design of new hMAO-B inhibitors remains unsatisfactory. Therefore, the quest for novel, potent, and selective hMAO-B inhibitors remains of high interest.

  12. [Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    In experimental and clinical cardiology, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have brought scientific interest as a therapeutic tool in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) management in recent years. Phosphodiesterases are a superfamily of enzymes that inactivate cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the second messengers of prostacyclin and nitric oxide. The rationale for the use of PDE-5 inhibitors in PAH is based on their capacity to overexpresss the nitric oxide pathway pursued inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate hydrolysis. By increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels it promotes vasodilation, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects that may reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. There is also evidence that these drugs may directly enhance right ventricular contractility through an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated by the inhibition of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate -sensitive PDE-3. Sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil are 3 specific PDE-5 inhibitors in current clinical use, which share similar mechanisms of action but present some significant differences regarding potency, selectivity for PDE-5 and pharmacokinetic properties. Sildenafil received approval in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and tadalafil in 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of PAH in patients classified as NYHA/WHO functional class II and III. In Mexico, sildenafil and tadalafil were approved by Comisión Federal de Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios for this indication in 2010 and 2011, respectively. PMID:26047999

  13. Antidiabetic Indian plants: a good source of potent amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Menakshi; Zinjarde, Smita S; Bhargava, Shobha Y; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Joshi, Bimba N

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is known as a multifactorial disease. The treatment of diabetes (Type II) is complicated due to the inherent patho-physiological factors related to this disease. One of the complications of diabetes is post-prandial hyperglycemia (PPHG). Glucosidase inhibitors, particularly α-amylase inhibitors are a class of compounds that helps in managing PPHG. Six ethno-botanically known plants having antidiabetic property namely, Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss.; Murraya koenigii (L.) Sprengel; Ocimum tenuflorum (L.) (syn: Sanctum); Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (syn: Eugenia jambolana); Linum usitatissimum (L.) and Bougainvillea spectabilis were tested for their ability to inhibit glucosidase activity. The chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts were prepared sequentially from either leaves or seeds of these plants. It was observed that the chloroform extract of O. tenuflorum; B. spectabilis; M. koenigii and S. cumini have significant α-amylase inhibitory property. Plants extracts were further tested against murine pancreatic, liver and small intestinal crude enzyme preparations for glucosidase inhibitory activity. The three extracts of O. tenuflorum and chloroform extract of M. koenigi showed good inhibition of murine pancreatic and intestinal glucosidases as compared with acarbose, a known glucosidase inhibitor. PMID:18955350

  14. [Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    In experimental and clinical cardiology, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have brought scientific interest as a therapeutic tool in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) management in recent years. Phosphodiesterases are a superfamily of enzymes that inactivate cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the second messengers of prostacyclin and nitric oxide. The rationale for the use of PDE-5 inhibitors in PAH is based on their capacity to overexpresss the nitric oxide pathway pursued inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate hydrolysis. By increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels it promotes vasodilation, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects that may reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. There is also evidence that these drugs may directly enhance right ventricular contractility through an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated by the inhibition of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate -sensitive PDE-3. Sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil are 3 specific PDE-5 inhibitors in current clinical use, which share similar mechanisms of action but present some significant differences regarding potency, selectivity for PDE-5 and pharmacokinetic properties. Sildenafil received approval in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and tadalafil in 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of PAH in patients classified as NYHA/WHO functional class II and III. In Mexico, sildenafil and tadalafil were approved by Comisión Federal de Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios for this indication in 2010 and 2011, respectively.

  15. New Frontiers in Selective Human MAO-B Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Simone; Silvestri, Romano

    2015-09-10

    Accumulating evidence shows a relationship between the human MAO-B (hMAO-B) enzyme and neuropsychiatric/degenerative disorder, personality traits, type II alcoholism, borderline personality disorders, aggressiveness and violence in crime, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, suicide, schizophrenia, anorexia nervosa, migraine, dementia, and PD. Thus, MAO-B represents an attractive target for the treatment of a number of human diseases. The discovery, development, and therapeutic use of drugs that inhibit MAO-B are major challenges for future therapy. Various compounds and drugs that selectively target this isoform have been discovered recently. These agents are synthetic compounds or natural products and their analogues, including chalcones, pyrazoles, chromones, coumarins, xanthines, isatin derivatives, thiazolidindiones, (thiazol-2-yl)hydrazones, and analogues of marketed drugs. Despite considerable efforts in understanding the binding interaction with specific substrates or inhibitors, structural information available for the rational design of new hMAO-B inhibitors remains unsatisfactory. Therefore, the quest for novel, potent, and selective hMAO-B inhibitors remains of high interest. PMID:25915162

  16. Isolation and purification of trypsin inhibitors from the seeds of Abelmoschus moschatus L.

    PubMed

    Dokka, Muni Kumar; Seva, Lavanya; Davuluri, Siva Prasad

    2015-04-01

    Four trypsin inhibitors, AMTI-I, AMTI-II, AMTI-III, and AMTI-IV, have been isolated and purified to homogeneity from the seeds of Abelmoschus moschatus following ammonium sulphate fractionation, DEAE-cellulose ion exchange chromatography and gel permeation on Sephadex G-100, and their molecular weights were determined to be 22.4, 21.2, 20.8 and 20.2 kDa respectively by SDS-PAGE. While all the four inhibitors were very active against bovine trypsin, two of them (AMTI-III and AMTI-IV) showed moderate activity towards bovine chymotrypsin. AMTI-I and AMTI-II were found to be glycoproteins with neutral sugar content of 2.8 and 4 %, respectively, and all the four inhibitors were devoid of free sulphhydryl groups. The inhibitors were quite stable up to 80 °C for 10 min and were not affected at alkaline as well as acidic conditions tested. Treating them with 8 M urea and 1 % SDS for 24 h at room temperature did not result in any loss of their antitryptic activities. However, they lost considerable antitryptic activity when treated with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Activities of the inhibitors were unaffected even after their reduction with DTT suggesting that disulphide bonds are not needed for their inhibitory activities.

  17. Isolation and purification of trypsin inhibitors from the seeds of Abelmoschus moschatus L.

    PubMed

    Dokka, Muni Kumar; Seva, Lavanya; Davuluri, Siva Prasad

    2015-04-01

    Four trypsin inhibitors, AMTI-I, AMTI-II, AMTI-III, and AMTI-IV, have been isolated and purified to homogeneity from the seeds of Abelmoschus moschatus following ammonium sulphate fractionation, DEAE-cellulose ion exchange chromatography and gel permeation on Sephadex G-100, and their molecular weights were determined to be 22.4, 21.2, 20.8 and 20.2 kDa respectively by SDS-PAGE. While all the four inhibitors were very active against bovine trypsin, two of them (AMTI-III and AMTI-IV) showed moderate activity towards bovine chymotrypsin. AMTI-I and AMTI-II were found to be glycoproteins with neutral sugar content of 2.8 and 4 %, respectively, and all the four inhibitors were devoid of free sulphhydryl groups. The inhibitors were quite stable up to 80 °C for 10 min and were not affected at alkaline as well as acidic conditions tested. Treating them with 8 M urea and 1 % SDS for 24 h at room temperature did not result in any loss of their antitryptic activities. However, they lost considerable antitryptic activity when treated with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Activities of the inhibitors were unaffected even after their reduction with DTT suggesting that disulphide bonds are not needed for their inhibitory activities. PMID:25701144

  18. Novel Inhibitor Cystine Knot Peptides from Momordica charantia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Richard J.; Tang, Jun; Zeng, Guang-Zhi; Franco, Octavio L.; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.; Tan, Ning-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Two new peptides, MCh-1 and MCh-2, along with three known trypsin inhibitors (MCTI-I, MCTI-II and MCTI-III), were isolated from the seeds of the tropical vine Momordica charantia. The sequences of the peptides were determined using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using a strategy involving partial reduction and stepwise alkylation of the peptides, followed by enzymatic digestion and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing, the disulfide connectivity of MCh-1 was elucidated to be CysI-CysIV, CysII-CysV and CysIII-CysVI. The three-dimensional structures of MCh-1 and MCh-2 were determined using NMR spectroscopy and found to contain the inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) motif. The sequences of the novel peptides differ significantly from peptides previously isolated from this plant. Therefore, this study expands the known peptide diversity in M. charantia and the range of sequences that can be accommodated by the ICK motif. Furthermore, we show that a stable two-disulfide intermediate is involved in the oxidative folding of MCh-1. This disulfide intermediate is structurally homologous to the proposed ancestral fold of ICK peptides, and provides a possible pathway for the evolution of this structural motif, which is highly prevalent in nature. PMID:24116036

  19. Depressor effect of chymase inhibitor in mice with high salt-induced moderate hypertension.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Sankar; Yahiro, Eiji; Uehara, Yoshinari; Habe, Shigehisa; Nishiyama, Akira; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Saku, Keijiro; Urata, Hidenori

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether long-term high salt intake in the drinking water induces hypertension in wild-type (WT) mice and whether a chymase inhibitor or other antihypertensive drugs could reverse the increase of blood pressure. Eight-week-old male WT mice were supplied with drinking water containing 2% salt for 12 wk (high-salt group) or high-salt drinking water plus an oral chymase inhibitor (TPC-806) at four different doses (25, 50, 75, or 100 mg/kg), captopril (75 mg/kg), losartan (100 mg/kg), hydrochlorothiazide (3 mg/kg), eplerenone (200 mg/kg), or amlodipine (6 mg/kg). Control groups were given normal water with or without the chymase inhibitor. Blood pressure and heart rate gradually showed a significant increase in the high-salt group, whereas a dose-dependent depressor effect of the chymase inhibitor was observed. There was also partial improvement of hypertension in the losartan- and eplerenone-treated groups but not in the captopril-, hydrochlorothiazide-, and amlodipine-treated groups. A high salt load significantly increased chymase-dependent ANG II-forming activity in the alimentary tract. In addition, the relative contribution of chymase to ANG II formation, but not actual average activity, showed a significant increase in skin and skeletal muscle, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme-dependent ANG II-forming activity and its relative contribution were reduced by high salt intake. Plasma and urinary renin-angiotensin system components were significantly increased in the high-salt group but were significantly suppressed in the chymase inhibitor-treated group. In conclusion, 2% salt water drinking for 12 wk caused moderate hypertension and activated the renin-angiotensin system in WT mice. A chymase inhibitor suppressed both the elevation of blood pressure and heart rate, indicating a definite involvement of chymase in salt-sensitive hypertension.

  20. HIV-1 IN strand transfer chelating inhibitors: a focus on metal binding.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Alessia; Carcelli, Mauro; Compari, Carlotta; Fisicaro, Emilia; Pala, Nicolino; Rispoli, Gabriele; Rogolino, Dominga; Sanchez, Tino W; Sechi, Mario; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-04-01

    Most active and selective strand transfer HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors contain chelating functional groups that are crucial feature for the inhibition of the catalytic activities of the enzyme. In particular, diketo acids and their derivatives can coordinate one or two metal ions within the catalytic core of the enzyme. The present work is intended as a contribution to elucidate the mechanism of action of the HIV-IN inhibitors by studying the coordinative features of H₂L¹ (L-708,906), an important member of the diketo acids family of inhibitors, and H₂L₂, a model for S-1360, another potent IN inhibitor. Magnesium(II) and manganese(II) complexes of H₂L¹ and H₂L² were isolated and fully characterized in solution and in the solid state. The crystal structures of the manganese complex [Mn(HL₂)₂(CH₃OH)₂]·2CH₃OH were solved by X-ray diffraction analysis. Moreover, the speciation models for H₂L₂ with magnesium(II) and manganese(II) ions were performed and the formation constants of the complexes were measured. M(HL₂)₂ (M = Mg²+, Mn²+) was the most abundant species in solution at physiological pH. All the synthesized compounds were tested for their anti-IN activity, showing good results both for the ligand and the corresponding complexes. From analysis of the speciation models and of the biological data we can conclude that coordination of both metal cofactors could not be strictly necessary and that inhibitors can act as complexes and not only as free ligands.

  1. Flavonoid glycoside: a new inhibitor of eukaryotic DNA polymerase alpha and a new carrier for inhibitor-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Ishidoh, Tomomi; Kamisuki, Shinji; Nakazawa, Satoshi; Takemura, Masaharu; Sugawara, Fumio; Yoshida, Hiromi; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2003-02-01

    Two flavonoid glycosides, kaempferol 3-O-(6"-acetyl)-beta-glucopyranoside (KAG) and quercetin 3-O-(6"-acetyl)-beta-glucopyranoside (QAG), were found to be inhibitors of eukaryotic DNA polymerases from a Japanese vegetable, Petasites japonicus. These compounds inhibited the activities of mammalian replicative DNA polymerases (i.e., pol alpha, delta, and epsilon), but not other pol beta, eta, kappa, and lambda activities. KAG was a stronger inhibitor and more selective to pol alpha than QAG. The IC(50) values of KAG for pol alpha, delta, and epsilon were 41, 164, and 127 microM, respectively. The pol alpha inhibition by KAG was non-competitive with respect to both the DNA template-primer and the dNTP substrate. KAG and QAG did not influence the activities of prokaryotic DNA polymerases or other mammalian DNA metabolic enzymes such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, human telomerase, human DNA topoisomerase I and II, T7 RNA polymerase, and bovine deoxyribonuclease I. Therefore, we concluded that these flavonoid glycosides are moderate replicative DNA polymerase inhibitors leaning more relatively to pol alpha, and could be used as chromatographic carriers to purify the DNA polymerases rather than cytotoxic agents. We then made a KAG-conjugated column such as the epoxy-activated Sepharose 6B. In the column, pol alpha was selectively adsorbed and eluted. PMID:12565887

  2. Plasma levels of C1- inhibitor complexes and cleaved C1- inhibitor in patients with hereditary angioneurotic edema.

    PubMed

    Cugno, M; Nuijens, J; Hack, E; Eerenberg, A; Frangi, D; Agostoni, A; Cicardi, M

    1990-04-01

    C1- inhibitor (C1(-)-Inh) catabolism in plasma of patients with hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE) was assessed by measuring the complexes formed by C1(-)-Inh with its target proteases (C1-s, Factor XIIa, and kallikrein) and a modified (cleaved) inactive form of C1(-)-Inh (iC1(-)-Inh). This study was performed in plasma from 18 healthy subjects and 30 patients with HANE in remission: 20 with low antigen concentration (type I) and 10 (from 5 different kindreds) with dysfunctional protein (type II). Both type-I and type-II patients had increased C1(-)-C1(-)-Inh complexes (P less than 0.0001), which in type I inversely correlated with the levels of C1(-)-Inh (P less than 0.001). iC1(-)-Inh was normal in all type-I patients and in type-II patients from three families with increased C1(-)-Inh antigen, whereas iC1(-)-Inh was higher than 20 times the normal values in patients from the remaining two families with C1(-)-Inh antigen in the normal range. None of the subjects had an increase of either Factor XIIa-C1(-)-Inh or kallikrein-C1(-)-Inh complexes. This study shows that the hypercatabolism of C1(-)-Inh in HANE patients at least in part occurs via the formation of complexes with C1- and that genetically determined differences in catabolism of dysfunctional C1(-)-Inh proteins are present in type-II patients.

  3. Dithiocarbamates: a new class of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Crystallographic and kinetic investigations.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Aggarwal, Mayank; Maresca, Alfonso; Scozzafava, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-02-11

    The zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) is inhibited by several classes of zinc-binders (sulfonamides, sulfamates, and sulfamides) as well as by compounds which do not interact with the metal ion (phenols, polyamines and coumarins). Here we report a new class of potent CA inhibitors which bind the zinc ion: the dithiocarbamates (DTCs). They coordinate to the zinc ion from the enzyme active site in monodentate manner and establish many favorable interactions with amino acid residues nearby. Several low nanomolar CA I, II and IX inhibitors were detected. PMID:22218610

  4. [Low-molecular cytolysins and trypsin inhibitors from sea anemone Radianthus macrodactylus. Isolation and partial characterization].

    PubMed

    Zykova, T A; Monastyrnaia, M M; Apalikova, O V; Shvets, T V; Kozlovskaia, E P

    1998-07-01

    Two low-molecular cytolytic toxins (RmI and RmII) and four trypsin inhibitors were isolated from the aqueous extract of sea anemone Radianthus macrodactylus. The method of isolation involved precipitation with acetone, gel filtration on acrylex P-4, ion-exchange chromatography on CM-32 cellulose, affinity chromatography on trypsin-binding sepharose 4B, ion exchange chromatography on an Ultrapore TSK CM-3SW column, and reversed phase HPLC on a Silasorb C18 column. RmI, RmII, and JnI inhibitor displayed molecular masses 5100, 6100, and 7100 Da, respectively, when subjected to SDS-PAGE. The isoelectric points were 9.2 and 9.3 for RmI and RmII, respectively. The amino acid composition and N-terminal amino acid residue (glycine) were determined for RmI, RmII, and JnI. Both proteins were nontoxic to mice and crabs. Hemolytic activity was determined to be 25 and 20 HU/mg for RmI and RmII, respectively, and their action on erythrocyte membrane was not inhibited by exogenous sphingomyelin. RmI and RmII exhibited antihistamine activity.

  5. Uptake, p53 Pathway Activation, and Cytotoxic Responses for Co(II) and Ni(II) in Human Lung Cells: Implications for Carcinogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt(II) and nickel(II) ions display similar chemical properties and act as hypoxia mimics in cells. However, only soluble Co(II) but not soluble Ni(II) is carcinogenic by inhalation. To explore potential reasons for these differences, we examined responses of human lung cells to both metals. We found that Co(II) showed almost 8 times higher accumulation than Ni(II) in H460 cells but caused a less efficient activation of the transcriptional factor p53 as measured by its accumulation, Ser15 phosphorylation, and target gene expression. Unlike Ni(II), Co(II) was ineffective in downregulating the p53 inhibitor MDM4 (HDMX). Co(II)-treated cells continued DNA replication at internal doses that caused massive apoptosis by Ni(II). Apoptosis and the overall cell death by Co(II) were delayed and weaker than by Ni(II). Inhibition of caspases but not programmed necrosis pathways suppressed Co(II)-induced cell death. Knockdown of p53 produced 50%–60% decreases in activation of caspases 3/7 and expression of 2 most highly upregulated proapoptotic genes PUMA and NOXA by Co(II). Overall, p53-mediated apoptosis accounted for 55% cell death by Co(II), p53-independent apoptosis for 20%, and p53/caspase-independent mechanisms for 25%. Similar to H460, normal human lung fibroblasts and primary human bronchial epithelial cells had several times higher accumulation of Co(II) than Ni(II) and showed a delayed and weaker caspase activation by Co(II). Thus, carcinogenicity of soluble Co(II) could be related to high survival of metal-loaded cells, which permits accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. High cytotoxicity of soluble Ni(II) causes early elimination of damaged cells and is expected to be cancer suppressive. PMID:24068677

  6. Novel bone-targeted Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, William C; Metcalf, Chester A; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Keenan, Terence; Weigele, Manfred; Bohacek, Regine S; Dalgarno, David C; Sawyer, Tomi K

    2003-09-01

    Bone-targeted Src tyrosine kinase (STK) inhibitors have recently been developed for the treatment of osteoporosis and cancer-related bone diseases. The concept of bone targeting derives from bisphosphonates, and from the evolution of such molecules in terms of therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of bone disorders. Interestingly, some of the earliest bisphosphonates were recognized for their ability to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation (scaling) by virtue of their affinity to chelate calcium. This chelating property was subsequently exploited in the development of bisphosphonate analogs as inhibitors of the bone-resorbing cells known as osteoclasts, giving rise to breakthrough medicines, such as Fosamax (for the treatment of osteoporosis) and Zometa (for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone metastases). Relative to these milestone achievements, there is a tremendous opportunity to explore beyond the limited chemical space (functional group diversity) of such bisphosphonates to design novel bone-targeting moieties, which may be used to develop other classes of promising small-molecule drugs affecting different biological pathways. Here, we review studies focused on bone-targeted inhibitors of STK, a key enzyme in osteoclast-dependent bone resorption. Two strategies are described relative to bone-targeted STK inhibitor drug discovery: (i) the development of novel Src homology (SH)-2 inhibitors incorporating non-hydrolyzable phosphotyrosine mimics and exhibiting molecular recognition and bone-targeting properties, leading to the in vivo-effective lead compound AP-22408; and (ii) the development of novel ATP-based Src kinase inhibitors incorporating bone-targeting moieties, leading to the in vivo-effective lead compound AP-23236. In summary, AP-22408 and AP-23236, which differ mechanistically by virtue of blocking Src-dependent non-catalytic or catalytic activities in osteoclasts, exemplify ARIAD Pharmaceuticals' structure-based design of novel bone

  7. Simple preparation of aminothiourea-modified chitosan as corrosion inhibitor and heavy metal ion adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Manlin; Xu, Juan; Li, Ronghua; Wang, Dongen; Li, Tianbao; Yuan, Maosen; Wang, Jinyi

    2014-03-01

    By a simple and convenient method of using formaldehyde as linkages, two new chitosan (CS) derivatives modified respectively with thiosemicarbazide (TSFCS) and thiocarbohydrazide (TCFCS) were synthesized. The new compounds were characterized and studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermal gravity analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, and their surface morphologies were determined via scanning electron microscopy. These CS derivatives could form pH dependent gels. The behavior of 304 steel in 2% acetic acid containing different inhibitors or different concentrations of inhibitor had been studied by potentiodynamic polarization test. The preliminary results show that the new compound TCFCS can act as a mixed-type metal anticorrosion inhibitor in some extent; its inhibition efficiency is 92% when the concentration was 60 mg/L. The adsorption studies on a metal ion mixture aqueous solution show that two samples TSFCS and TCFCS can absorb As (V), Ni (II), Cu (II), Cd (II) and Pb (II) efficiently at pH 9 and 4.

  8. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  9. Techniques for Screening Translation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Sergiev, Petr V.

    2016-01-01

    The machinery of translation is one of the most common targets of antibiotics. The development and screening of new antibiotics usually proceeds by testing antimicrobial activity followed by laborious studies of the mechanism of action. High-throughput methods for new antibiotic screening based on antimicrobial activity have become routine; however, identification of molecular targets is usually a challenge. Therefore, it is highly beneficial to combine primary screening with the identification of the mechanism of action. In this review, we describe a collection of methods for screening translation inhibitors, with a special emphasis on methods which can be performed in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27348012

  10. Combinatorial optimization of cystine-knot peptides towards high-affinity inhibitors of human matriptase-1.

    PubMed

    Glotzbach, Bernhard; Reinwarth, Michael; Weber, Niklas; Fabritz, Sebastian; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fittler, Heiko; Christmann, Andreas; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cystine-knot miniproteins define a class of bioactive molecules with several thousand natural members. Their eponymous motif comprises a rigid structured core formed by six disulfide-connected cysteine residues, which accounts for its exceptional stability towards thermic or proteolytic degradation. Since they display a remarkable sequence tolerance within their disulfide-connected loops, these molecules are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Natural open-chain cystine-knot trypsin inhibitors of the MCoTI (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor) and SOTI (Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitor) families served as starting points for the generation of inhibitors of matriptase-1, a type II transmembrane serine protease with possible clinical relevance in cancer and arthritic therapy. Yeast surface-displayed libraries of miniproteins were used to select unique and potent matriptase-1 inhibitors. To this end, a knowledge-based library design was applied that makes use of detailed information on binding and folding behavior of cystine-knot peptides. Five inhibitor variants, four of the MCoTI family and one of the SOTI family, were identified, chemically synthesized and oxidatively folded towards the bioactive conformation. Enzyme assays revealed inhibition constants in the low nanomolar range for all candidates. One subnanomolar binder (Ki = 0.83 nM) with an inverted selectivity towards trypsin and matriptase-1 was identified. PMID:24146945

  11. Combinatorial Optimization of Cystine-Knot Peptides towards High-Affinity Inhibitors of Human Matriptase-1

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Niklas; Fabritz, Sebastian; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fittler, Heiko; Christmann, Andreas; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cystine-knot miniproteins define a class of bioactive molecules with several thousand natural members. Their eponymous motif comprises a rigid structured core formed by six disulfide-connected cysteine residues, which accounts for its exceptional stability towards thermic or proteolytic degradation. Since they display a remarkable sequence tolerance within their disulfide-connected loops, these molecules are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Natural open-chain cystine-knot trypsin inhibitors of the MCoTI (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor) and SOTI (Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitor) families served as starting points for the generation of inhibitors of matriptase-1, a type II transmembrane serine protease with possible clinical relevance in cancer and arthritic therapy. Yeast surface-displayed libraries of miniproteins were used to select unique and potent matriptase-1 inhibitors. To this end, a knowledge-based library design was applied that makes use of detailed information on binding and folding behavior of cystine-knot peptides. Five inhibitor variants, four of the MCoTI family and one of the SOTI family, were identified, chemically synthesized and oxidatively folded towards the bioactive conformation. Enzyme assays revealed inhibition constants in the low nanomolar range for all candidates. One subnanomolar binder (Ki = 0.83 nM) with an inverted selectivity towards trypsin and matriptase-1 was identified. PMID:24146945

  12. Combinatorial optimization of cystine-knot peptides towards high-affinity inhibitors of human matriptase-1.

    PubMed

    Glotzbach, Bernhard; Reinwarth, Michael; Weber, Niklas; Fabritz, Sebastian; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fittler, Heiko; Christmann, Andreas; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cystine-knot miniproteins define a class of bioactive molecules with several thousand natural members. Their eponymous motif comprises a rigid structured core formed by six disulfide-connected cysteine residues, which accounts for its exceptional stability towards thermic or proteolytic degradation. Since they display a remarkable sequence tolerance within their disulfide-connected loops, these molecules are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Natural open-chain cystine-knot trypsin inhibitors of the MCoTI (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor) and SOTI (Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitor) families served as starting points for the generation of inhibitors of matriptase-1, a type II transmembrane serine protease with possible clinical relevance in cancer and arthritic therapy. Yeast surface-displayed libraries of miniproteins were used to select unique and potent matriptase-1 inhibitors. To this end, a knowledge-based library design was applied that makes use of detailed information on binding and folding behavior of cystine-knot peptides. Five inhibitor variants, four of the MCoTI family and one of the SOTI family, were identified, chemically synthesized and oxidatively folded towards the bioactive conformation. Enzyme assays revealed inhibition constants in the low nanomolar range for all candidates. One subnanomolar binder (Ki = 0.83 nM) with an inverted selectivity towards trypsin and matriptase-1 was identified.

  13. Suppression of microRNAs by dual-targeting and clustered Tough Decoy inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Bak, Rasmus O.; Haslund, Didde; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that contribute to almost any cellular process. Methods for managing of miRNA activity are attracting increasing attention in relation to diverse experimental and therapeutic applications. DNA-encoded miRNA inhibitors expressed from plasmid or virus-based vectors provide persistent miRNA suppression and options of tissue-directed micromanaging. In this report, we explore the potential of exploiting short, hairpin-shaped RNAs for simultaneous suppression of two or more miRNAs. Based on the “Tough Decoy” (TuD) design, we create dual-targeting hairpins carrying two miRNA recognition sites and demonstrate potent co-suppression of different pairs of unrelated miRNAs by a single DNA-encoded inhibitor RNA. In addition, enhanced miRNA suppression is achieved by expression of RNA polymerase II-transcribed inhibitors carrying clustered TuD hairpins with up to a total of eight miRNA recognition sites. Notably, by expressing clustered TuD inhibitors harboring a single recognition site for each of a total of six miRNAs, we document robust parallel suppression of multiple miRNAs by inhibitor RNA molecules encoded by a single expression cassette. These findings unveil a new potential of TuD-based miRNA inhibitors and pave the way for standardizing synchronized suppression of families or clusters of miRNAs. PMID:23324610

  14. Effects of camptothecin derivatives and topoisomerase dual inhibitors on Trypanosoma cruzi growth and ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease that is an endemic disease in Latin America and affects about 8 million people. This parasite belongs to the Trypanosomatidae family which contains a single mitochondrion with an enlarged region, named kinetoplast that harbors the mitochondrial DNA (kDNA). The kinetoplast and the nucleus present a great variety of essential enzymes involved in DNA replication and topology, including DNA topoisomerases. Such enzymes are considered to be promising molecular targets for cancer treatment and for antiparasitic chemotherapy. In this work, the proliferation and ultrastructure of T. cruzi epimastigotes were evaluated after treatment with eukaryotic topoisomerase I inhibitors, such as topotecan and irinotecan, as well as with dual inhibitors (compounds that block eukaryotic topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II activities), such as baicalein, luteolin and evodiamine. Previous studies have shown that such inhibitors were able to block the growth of tumor cells, however most of them have never been tested on trypanosomatids. Results Considering the effects of topoisomerase I inhibitors, our results showed that topotecan decreased cell proliferation and caused unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin, however none of these alterations were observed after treatment with irinotecan. The dual inhibitors baicalein and evodiamine decreased cell growth; however the nuclear and kinetoplast ultrastructures were not affected. Conclusions Taken together, our data showed that camptothecin is more efficient than its derivatives in decreasing T. cruzi proliferation. Furthermore, we conclude that drugs pertaining to a certain class of topoisomerase inhibitors may present different efficiencies as chemotherapeutical agents. PMID:24917086

  15. Energy-optimised pharmacophore approach to identify potential hotspots during inhibition of Class II HDAC isoforms.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad; Shanmugam, Karthi; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are conjugated enzymes that modulate chromatin architecture by deacetylating lysine residues on the histone tails leading to transcriptional repression. Pharmacological interventions of these enzymes with small molecule inhibitors called Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown enhanced acetylation of the genome and are hence emerging as potential targets at the clinic. Type-specific inhibition of Class II HDACs has shown enhanced therapeutic benefits against developmental and neurodegenerative disorders. However, the structural identity of class-specific isoforms limits the potential of their inhibitors in precise targeting of their enzymes. Diverse strategies have been implemented to recognise the features in HDAC enzymes which may help in identifying isoform specificity factors. This work attempts a computational approach that combines in silico docking and energy-optimised pharmacophore (E-pharmacophore) mapping of 18 known HDAC inhibitors and has identified structural variations that regulate their interactions against the six Class II HDAC enzymes considered for the study. This combined approach establishes that inhibitors possessing higher number of aromatic rings in different structural regions might function as potent inhibitors, while inhibitors with scarce ring structures might point to compromised potency. This would aid the rationale for chemical optimisation and design of isoform selective HDAC inhibitors with enhanced affinity and therapeutic efficiency.

  16. Catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II by a novel rationally designed ATP-competitive purine analogue

    PubMed Central

    Chène, Patrick; Rudloff, Joëlle; Schoepfer, Joseph; Furet, Pascal; Meier, Peter; Qian, Zhiyan; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc; Schmitz, Rita; Radimerski, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Topoisomerase II poisons are in clinical use as anti-cancer therapy for decades and work by stabilizing the enzyme-induced DNA breaks. In contrast, catalytic inhibitors block the enzyme before DNA scission. Although several catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II have been described, preclinical concepts for exploiting their anti-proliferative activity based on molecular characteristics of the tumor cell have only recently started to emerge. Topoisomerase II is an ATPase and uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to orchestrate the movement of the DNA double strands along the enzyme. Thus, interfering with ATPase function with low molecular weight inhibitors that target the nucleotide binding pocket should profoundly affect cells that are committed to undergo mitosis. Results Here we describe the discovery and characterization of a novel purine diamine analogue as a potent ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Quinoline aminopurine compound 1 (QAP 1) inhibited topoisomerase II ATPase activity and decatenation reaction at sub-micromolar concentrations, targeted both topoisomerase II alpha and beta in cell free assays and, using a quantitative cell-based assay and a chromosome segregation assay, displayed catalytic enzyme inhibition in cells. In agreement with recent hypothesis, we show that BRCA1 mutant breast cancer cells have increased sensitivity to QAP 1. Conclusion The results obtained with QAP 1 demonstrate that potent and selective catalytic inhibition of human topoisomerase II function with an ATP-competitive inhibitor is feasible. Our data suggest that further drug discovery efforts on ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitors are warranted and that such drugs could potentially be developed as anti-cancer therapy for tumors that bear the appropriate combination of molecular alterations. PMID:19128485

  17. Mechanism of angiotensin II-induced arachidonic acid metabolite release in aortic smooth muscle cells: involvement of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, J; Kozawa, O; Suzuki, A; Watanabe-Tomita, Y; Oiso, Y; Uematsu, T

    1997-02-01

    In a previous study, we have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) activates phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D due to Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx from extracellular space in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. In the present study, we have investigated the role of phospholipase D in Ang II-induced arachidonic acid (AA) metabolite release and prostacyclin synthesis in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Ang II significantly stimulated AA metabolite release in a concentration-dependent manner in the range between 1 nmol/I and 0.1 mumol/I. D.L.-Propranolol hydrochloride (propranolol), an inhibitor of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced release of AA metabolites. The Ang II-induced AA metabolite release was reduced by chelating extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA. Genistein, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, significantly suppressed the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. 1,6-Bis-(cyclohexyloximinocarbonylamino)-hexane (RHC-80267), a potent and selective inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. Both propranolol and RHC-80267 inhibited the Ang II-induced synthesis of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin. The synthesis was suppressed by genistein. These results strongly suggest that the AA metabolite release induced by Ang II is mediated, at least in part, through phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by phospholipase D activation in aortic smooth muscle cells.

  18. Norepinephrine metabolism in neuronal cultures is increased by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Sumners, C.; Shalit, S.L.; Kalberg, C.J.; Raizada, M.K.

    1987-06-01

    In this study the authors have examined the actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) on catecholamine metabolism in neuronal brain cell cultures prepared from the hypothalamus and brain stem. Neuronal cultures prepared from the brains of 1-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit specific neuronal uptake mechanisms for both norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA), and also monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity. Separate neuronal uptake sites for NE and DA were identified by using specific neuronal uptake inhibitors for each amine. In previous studies, they determined that ANG II (10 nM-1 ..mu..M) stimulates increased neuronal (/sup 3/H)NE uptake by acting as specific receptors. They have confirmed these results here and in addition have shown that ANG II has not significant effects on neuronal (/sup 3/H)DA uptake. These results suggest that the actions of ANG II are restricted to the NE transporter in neuronal cultures. It is possible that ANG II stimulates the intraneuronal metabolism of at least part of the NE that is taken up, because the peptide stimulates MAO activity, an effect mediated by specific ANG II receptors. ANG II had no effect on COMT activity in neuronal cultures. Therefore, the use of neuronal cultures of hypothalamus and brain stem they have determined that ANG II can specifically alter NE metabolism in these areas, while apparently not altering DA metabolism.

  19. Oligopeptide cyclophilin inhibitors: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Kahlert, Viktoria; Lücke, Christian; Fischer, Gunter

    2011-11-01

    Potent cyclophilin A (CypA) inhibitors such as non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A (CsA) derivatives have been already used in clinical trials in patients with viral infections. CypA is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) that catalyzes slow prolyl bond cis/trans interconversions of the backbone of substrate peptides and proteins. In this study we investigate whether the notoriously low affinity inhibitory interaction of linear proline-containing peptides with the active site of CypA can be increased through a combination of a high cis/trans ratio and a negatively charged C-terminus as has been recently reported for Trp-Gly-Pro. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal formation of an inhibitory CypA/Trp-Gly-Pro complex previously described within a complex stability range similar to CsA, a nanomolar CypA inhibitor. Moreover, despite of cis content of 41% at pH 7.5 Trp-Gly-Pro cannot inhibit CypA-catalyzed standard substrate isomerization up to high micromolar concentrations. However, in the context of the CsA framework a net charge of -7 clustered at the amino acid side chain of position 1 resulted in slightly improved CypA inhibition.

  20. Carborane-based carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brynda, Jiří; Mader, Pavel; Šícha, Václav; Fábry, Milan; Poncová, Kristýna; Bakardiev, Mario; Grüner, Bohumír; Cígler, Petr; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2013-12-16

    CA inhibitors: Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Various carborane cages are shown to act as active-site-directed inhibitors, and substitution with a sulfamide group and other substituents leads to compounds with high selectivity towards the cancer-specific isozyme IX. Crystal structures of the carboranes in the active site provide information that can be applied to the structure-based design of specific inhibitors. PMID:24307504

  1. Validity of Eucaryote Inhibitors for Assessing Production and Grazing Mortality of Marine Bacterioplankton †

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gordon T.; Pace, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    Application of eucaryote inhibitors to the estimation of production and grazing mortality of bacterioplankton was evaluated. Exposure to a range of concentrations of thiram, cycloheximide, and neutral red (0.4 to 210, 36 to 1,777, 4 to 346 μM, respectively) was 98 to 100% effective at inhibiting growth of a chrysomonad in culture. Exposure to colchicine and griseofulvin (50 to 1,000 μM for both) yielded only 24 to 94 and 53 to 79% inhibition, respectively. Exposures to thiram, neutral red, and griseofulvin were 90 to 100% effective at inhibiting growth in culture of a ciliate, Cyclidium sp., and the responses to colchicine and cycloheximide were variable (64 to 100 and 0 to 100% inhibition, respectively). Thiram and neutral red inhibited field populations of nanozooplankton more effectively than cycloheximide and colchicine. Direct effects of eucaryote inhibitors on growing cultures of bacterioplankton varied with parameters measured and duration of exposure. After 3-day exposures, specific growth rates and “instantaneous” heterotrophic potential ([14C]glucose uptake) were not consistently affected, but biosynthetic activity (RNA and DNA syntheses) was depressed. The degree of inhibition of isolates and field populations of phytoplankton depended upon type of inhibitor and phytoplankton species. In field experiments, it was possible to calculate rates of bacterioplankton production and grazing mortality for only 16 of 29 inhibitor experiments and for 4 of 10 size fractionation experiments. Bacterioplankton production and mortality estimates varied greatly with the eucaryote inhibitor used, and those derived from inhibition techniques were substantially different from those derived from fractionation techniques. The poor performances of both techniques are attributed to the following: (i) effects of inhibitors on phytoplankton, (ii) indirect effects of the inhibitors on bacterioplankton, and (iii) insufficient separation of grazers from prey by filtration

  2. Opposite effects of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 activity on the pressor response to angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhonghua; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Langenbach, Robert I.; Breyer, Richard M.; Redha, Reyadh; Morrow, Jason D.; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2002-01-01

    Therapeutic use of cyclooxygenase-inhibiting (COX-inhibiting) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is often complicated by renal side effects including hypertension and edema. The present studies were undertaken to elucidate the roles of COX1 and COX2 in regulating blood pressure and renal function. COX2 inhibitors or gene knockout dramatically augment the pressor effect of angiotensin II (Ang II). Unexpectedly, after a brief increase, the pressor effect of Ang II was abolished by COX1 deficiency (either inhibitor or knockout). Ang II infusion also reduced medullary blood flow in COX2-deficient but not in control or COX1-deficient animals, suggesting synthesis of COX2-dependent vasodilators in the renal medulla. Consistent with this, Ang II failed to stimulate renal medullary prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin I2 production in COX2-deficient animals. Ang II infusion normally promotes natriuresis and diuresis, but COX2 deficiency blocked this effect. Thus, COX1 and COX2 exert opposite effects on systemic blood pressure and renal function. COX2 inhibitors reduce renal medullary blood flow, decrease urine flow, and enhance the pressor effect of Ang II. In contrast, the pressor effect of Ang II is blunted by COX1 inhibition. These results suggest that, rather than having similar cardiovascular effects, the activities of COX1 and COX2 are functionally antagonistic. PMID:12093889

  3. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII with Schiff's bases incorporating iminoureido moieties.

    PubMed

    Singasane, Namrata; Kharkar, Prashant S; Ceruso, Mariangela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Toraskar, Mrunmayee P

    2015-12-01

    A series of new Schiff's bases was obtained from the sulfanilamide semicarbazone (4-aminosulfonylphenyl semicarbazide) and aromatic/heterocyclic aldehydes. The new compounds were designed to incorporate moieties known to induce effective inhibitory activity against carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms involved in crucial physiologic or pathologic processes such as the cytosolic CA I and II or the transmembrane, tumor-associated CA IX and XII: the compounds were medium potency - weak CA I inhibitors, highly effective, low nanomolar CA II inhibitors, but few of them inhibited effectively CA IX and XII. This may probably due to the long spacer between the sulfamoylphenyl and imine fragments of the molecules, which probably induces a highly flexible conformation of the inhibitor bound to the active site of the enzyme, with destabilizing effects for the adduct. The detailed structure activity relationship for this class of inhibitors is discussed. PMID:25744513

  4. Modulation of activation-loop phosphorylation by JAK inhibitors is binding mode dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Débora; Rubert, Joëlle; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Scheufler, Clemens; Marque, Fanny; Régnier, Catherine H.; De Pover, Alain; Ryckelynck, Hugues; Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Goel, Aviva; Wyder, Lorenza; Tavares, Gisele; Baffert, Fabienne; Pissot-Soldermann, Carole; Manley, Paul W.; Gaul, Christoph; Voshol, Hans; Levine, Ross L.; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Radimerski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    JAK inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemias. Most of these drugs target the ATP-binding pocket and stabilize the active conformation of the JAK kinases. This type-I binding mode leads to an increase in JAK activation-loop phosphorylation, despite blockade of kinase function. Here we report that stabilizing the inactive state via type-II inhibition acts in the opposite manner, leading to a loss of activation-loop phosphorylation. We used X-ray crystallography to corroborate the binding mode and report for the first time the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain in an inactive conformation. Importantly, JAK inhibitor-induced activation-loop phosphorylation requires receptor interaction, as well as intact kinase and pseudokinase domains. Hence, depending on the respective conformation stabilized by a JAK inhibitor, hyperphosphorylation of the activation-loop may or may not be elicited. PMID:22684457

  5. Identification of the first low-molecular-weight inhibitors of matriptase-2.

    PubMed

    Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Stirnberg, Marit; Maurer, Eva; Hammami, Maya; Bajorath, Jürgen; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-08-12

    As recently discovered, matriptase-2, a type II transmembrane serine protease, plays a crucial role in body iron homeostasis by down-regulating hepcidin expression, which results in increased iron levels. Thus, matriptase-2 represents a novel target for the development of enzyme inhibitors potentially useful for the treatment of systemic iron overload (hemochromatosis). A comparative three-dimensional model of the catalytic domain of matriptase-2 was generated and utilized for structure-based virtual screening in combination with similarity searching and knowledge-based compound design. Two N-protected dipeptide amides containing a 4-amidinobenzylamide as P1 residue (compounds 1 and 3) were identified as the first small molecule inhibitors of matriptase-2 with K(i) values of 170 and 460 nM, respectively. An inhibitor of the closely related protease matriptase (compound 2, K(i) = 220 nM), with more than 50-fold selectivity over matriptase-2, was also identified. PMID:20684597

  6. Design and discovery of new pyrimidine coupled nitrogen aromatic rings as chelating groups of JMJD3 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianping; Wang, Xin; Chen, Lin; Huang, Min; Tang, Wei; Zuo, Jianping; Liu, Yu-Chih; Shi, Zhe; Liu, Rongfeng; Shen, Jingkang; Xiong, Bing

    2016-02-01

    The histone methylation on lysine residues is one of the most studied post-translational modifications, and its aberrant states have been associated with many human diseases. In 2012, Kruidenier et al. reported GSK-J1 as a selective Jumonji H3K27 demethylase (JMJD3 and UTX) inhibitor. However, there is limited information on the structure-activity relationship of this series of compounds. Moreover, there are few scaffolds reported as chelating groups for Fe(II) ion in Jumonji demethylase inhibitors development. To further elaborate the structure-activity relationship of selective JMJD3 inhibitors and to explore the novel chelating groups for Fe(II) ion, we initialized a medicinal chemistry modification based on the GSK-J1 structure. Finally, we found that several compounds bearing different chelating groups showed similar activities with respect to GSK-J1 and excellent metabolic stability in liver microsomes. The ethyl ester prodrugs of these inhibitors also showed a better activity than GSK-J4 for inhibition of TNF-α production in LPS-stimulated murine macrophage cell line Raw 264.7 cells. Taking together, the current study not only discovered alternative potent JMJD3 inhibitors, but also can benefit other researchers to design new series of Jumonji demethylase inhibitors based on the identified chelating groups.

  7. OF4949, new inhibitors of aminopeptidase B. I. Taxonomy, fermentation, isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Sano, S; Ikai, K; Kuroda, H; Nakamura, T; Obayashi, A; Ezure, Y; Enomoto, H

    1986-12-01

    New aminopeptidase B inhibitors that we named OF4949-I, II, III and IV were isolated from the culture broth of a fungus, Penicillium rugulosum OF4949. The molecular formula of I was C23H26N4O8 and that of II, C22H24O8, judging from elemental analysis and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The concentrations of I, II, III and IV required for 50% inhibition of aminopeptidase, using Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells as the source of the enzyme, were 0.0054, 0.0048, 3.4 and 1.7 micrograms/ml, respectively. Components I and II augmented delayed-type hypersensitivity in mice to sheep red blood cells. PMID:3818441

  8. Discovery of Potent Carbonic Anhydrase and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: 2-Aminoindan β-Lactam Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Genç, Hayriye; Kalin, Ramazan; Köksal, Zeynep; Sadeghian, Nastaran; Kocyigit, Umit M.; Zengin, Mustafa; Gülçin, İlhami; Özdemir, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactams are pharmacologically important compounds because of their various biological uses, including antibiotic and so on. β-Lactams were synthesized from benzylidene-inden derivatives and acetoxyacetyl chloride. The inhibitory effect of these compounds was examined for human carbonic anhydrase I and II (hCA I, and II) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The results reveal that β-lactams are inhibitors of hCA I, II and AChE. The Ki values of β-lactams (2a–k) were 0.44–6.29 nM against hCA I, 0.93–8.34 nM against hCA II, and 0.25–1.13 nM against AChE. Our findings indicate that β-lactams (2a–k) inhibit both carbonic anhydrases (CA) isoenzymes and AChE at low nanomolar concentrations. PMID:27775608

  9. Heterotrimetallic Ru(II)/Pd(II)/Ru(II) complexes: synthesis, crystalstructure, spectral characterization, DFT calculation and antimicrobial study.

    PubMed

    Al-Noaimi, Mousa; Nafady, Ayman; Warad, Ismail; Alshwafy, Rwaida; Husein, Ahmad; Talib, Wamidh H; Hadda, Taibi Ben

    2014-03-25

    New ruthenium(II) mononuclear complexes of the type [RuCl2(PPh3)2(η(2)-triamine)] (2) [RuCl(PPh3)2(η(3)-triamine)]Cl (5) (triemine=N(1)-(2-aminoethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine) have been synthesized by reacting [RuCl2(PPh3)3] (1) with one mole equivalent of N(1)-(2-aminoethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine in dichloromethane. Reaction of (2) with half-equivalent of (PhCN)2PdCl2 or Pd(OAc)2 in dichloromethane as a solvent afforded two novel heterotrimetallic Ru(II)-Pd(II)-Ru(II) complexes, [Ru(II)Cl2(PPh3)2(triamine)]2[Pd(II)X2](X=Cl, OAc) (3 and 4), bearing bioactive ligand. The progress of the undertaken reactions was monitored by (31)P{1H} NMR and FTIR. Crystal structure of complex 2 was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The absorption spectrum of 2 in dichloromethane was modeled by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The in vitro antimicrobial studies of complex 2-5 against an array of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) were conducted. Complexes 3 and 4 exhibit high dual antibacterial and antifungal activity inhibiting microorganisms possibly via hydrolytic pathway which further evidenced by electrochemical analyses. The complexes 3 and 4 show a high inhibitory activity at 200 μg/ml concentration, suggesting that complexes 3 and 4 are two efficient catalytic inhibitor of microorganisms and further, they should be tested against cancer strains.

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors modulate kynurenic acid production in rat brain cortex in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zakrocka, Izabela; Turski, Waldemar A; Kocki, Tomasz

    2016-10-15

    It is well established that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is present in the brain and that glutamate activates the brain centers responsible for blood pressure control. An antagonist of glutamate, kynurenic acid (KYNA) was shown to decrease blood pressure after intracerebral administration. KYNA is an endogenous metabolite of tryptophan produced from the breakdown of kynurenine by kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT), mainly within astrocytes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of three angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (lisinopril, perindopril and ramipril) on KYNA production and KAT activity in the rat brain cortex in vitro. The effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on KYNA production was examined on rat brain cortical slices incubated for 2h in the presence of l-kynurenine and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. To analyze KAT I and KAT II activity, brain cortical homogenates were incubated for 2h with L-kynurenine and the tested drugs. KYNA was separated by HPLC and quantified fluorometrically. Among the examined angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, lisinopril increased KYNA production, perindopril was ineffective, and ramipril decreased KYNA synthesis in rat brain cortical slices. Lisinopril increased KAT I activity and perindopril did not affect it. However, ramipril lowered KAT I activity in rat brain cortex in vitro. Neither lisinopril nor perindopril affected KAT II activity, but ramipril decreased KAT II activity in the rat brain cortex in vitro. Our study reveals that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors show various influences on KYNA production in rat brain cortical slices and activity of KATs.

  11. KH-30 Parafin Inhibitor Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, J.

    2001-09-30

    United Energy Corporation (UNRG) and the U.S. Department of Energy personnel tested KH-30 at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) outside Casper, Wyoming on two separate occasions. KH-30 is a non-toxic, non-hazardous product, which combines the functions of a solvent dispersant, crystal modifier and inhibitor into a single solution. The first test was held in March of 2001, wherein five wells were treated with a mixture of KH-30 and brine water, heated to 180 degrees F. No increase in production was attained in these tests. In June, 2001, three shallow, low pressure RMOTC wells with 30 years of production were treated with a mixture of 40% KH-30 and 60% diesel. Increases were seen in three wells. The wells then returned to their original rates.

  12. Natural Products as Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating also the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein. PMID:18690828

  13. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Trawinska, Malgorzata Monika; Perrotti, Alessio Pio; De Fabritiis, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) during pregnancy has become recently a matter of continuous debate. The introduction of the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) in clinical practice has dramatically changed the prognosis of CML patients; in fact, patients diagnosed in chronic phase can reasonably expect many years of excellent disease control and good quality of life, as well as a normal life expectancy, including the necessity to address issues relating to fertility and pregnancy. Physicians are frequently being asked for advice regarding the need for, and/or the appropriateness of, stopping treatment in order to conceive. In this report, we will review the data published in terms of fertility, conception, pregnancy, pregnancy outcome and illness control for TKI treated CML patients, as well as how to manage a planned and/or unplanned pregnancy. PMID:24804001

  14. Glycine Transporters and Their Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Robert; Kerr, Jennifer; Walker, Glenn; Wishart, Grant

    Glycine plays a ubiquitous role in many biological processes. In the central nervous system it serves as an important neurotransmitter acting as an agonist at strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and as an essential co-agonist with glutamate at the NMDA receptor complex. Control of glycine concentrations in the vicinity of these receptors is mediated by the specific glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Inhibition of these transporters has been postulated to be of potential benefit in several therapeutic indications including schizophrenia and pain. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of glycine transporters and focus on recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors.

  15. Structure-Activity Relationships of Novel Tryptamine-Based Inhibitors of Bacterial Transglycosylase.

    PubMed

    Sosič, Izidor; Anderluh, Marko; Sova, Matej; Gobec, Martina; Mlinarič Raščan, Irena; Derouaux, Adeline; Amoroso, Ana; Terrak, Mohammed; Breukink, Eefjan; Gobec, Stanislav

    2015-12-24

    Penicillin-binding proteins represent well-established, validated, and still very promising targets for the design and development of new antibacterial agents. The transglycosylase domain of penicillin-binding proteins is especially important, as it catalyzes polymerization of glycan chains, using the peptidoglycan precursor lipid II as a substrate. On the basis of the previous discovery of a noncovalent small-molecule inhibitor of transglycosylase activity, we systematically explored the structure-activity relationships of these tryptamine-based inhibitors. The main aim was to reduce the nonspecific cytotoxic properties of the initial hit compound and concurrently to retain the mode of its inhibition. A focused library of tryptamine-based compounds was synthesized, characterized, and evaluated biochemically. The results presented here show the successful reduction of the nonspecific cytotoxicity, and the retention of the inhibition of transglycosylase enzymatic activity, as well as the ability of these compounds to bind to lipid II and to have antibacterial actions. PMID:26588190

  16. Primary structure of a cysteine proteinase inhibitor from the fruit of avocado (Persea americana Mill).

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Ikeda, T; Fukumoto, D; Yamasaki, N; Yonekura, M

    1995-12-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a proteinaceous cysteine proteinase inhibitor from the fruit of avocado (avocado cystatin) is presented. The protein consists of 100 amino acid residues and has a molecular mass of 11,300 Da. Comparison of this sequence with sequences of plant cysteine proteinase inhibitors (phytocystatins), including oryzacystatins I and II from rice seeds, cowpea cystatin, and corn cystatin, showed that the avocado cystatin molecule has 60% and 54% residues identical with the two forms of the rice seed proteins, oryzacystatins I and II, respectively, and 64% and 63% with the cowpea and corn proteins, respectively. The totally conserved sequence, Gln-Val-Val-Ala-Gly, among several of the animal cystatins as well as phytocystatins, is at positions 47-51 in the avocado cystatin molecule.

  17. FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-26

    FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) II ... stratocumulus systems, the radiative properties of these clouds and their interactions. Relevant Documents:  FIRE Project Guide FIRE II - Cirrus Home Page FIRE II - Cirrus Mission Summaries ...

  18. Enzyme-Inhibitor Association Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Resat, Haluk; Marrone, Tami J.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Studying the thermodynamics of biochemical association reactions at the microscopic level requires efficient sampling of the configurations of the reactants and solvent as a function of the reaction pathways. In most cases, the associating ligand and receptor have complementary interlocking shapes. Upon association, loosely connected or disconnected solvent cavities at and around the binding site are formed. Disconnected solvent regions lead to severe statistical sampling problems when simulations are performed with explicit solvent. It was recently proposed that, when such limitations are encountered, they might be overcome by the use of the grand canonical ensemble. Here we investigate one such case and report the association free energy profile (potential of mean force) between trypsin and benzamidine along a chosen reaction coordinate as calculated using the grand canonical Monte Carlo method. The free energy profile is also calculated for a continuum solvent model using the Poisson equation, and the results are compared to the explicit water simulations. The comparison shows that the continuum solvent approach is surprisingly successful in reproducing the explicit solvent simulation results. The Monte Carlo results are analyzed in detail with respect to solvation structure. In the binding site channel there are waters bridging the carbonyl oxygen groups of Asp189 with the NH2 groups of benzamidine, which are displaced upon inhibitor binding. A similar solvent-bridging configuration has been seen in the crystal structure of trypsin complexed with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The predicted locations of other internal waters are in very good agreement with the positions found in the crystal structures, which supports the accuracy of the simulations. ImagesFIGURE 5 PMID:9017183

  19. Does the use of ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers affect bone loss in older men?

    PubMed Central

    Leung, J.; Zhang, Y. F.; Bauer, D.; Ensrud, K. E.; Barrett-Connor, E.; Leung, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a prospective cohort study of 5,995 older American men (MrOS), users of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors had a small but significant increase in bone loss at the hip over 4 years after adjustment for confounders. Use of angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARB) was not significantly associated with bone loss. Introduction Experimental evidence suggests that angiotensin II promotes bone loss by its effects on osteoblasts. It is therefore plausible that ACE inhibitor and ARB may reduce rates of bone loss. The objective of this study is to examine the independent effects of ACE inhibitor and ARB on bone loss in older men. Methods Out of 5,995 American men (87.2%) aged ≥65 years, 5,229 were followed up for an average of 4.6 years in a prospective six-center cohort study—The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS). Bone mineral densities (BMD) at total hip, femoral neck, and trochanter were measured by Hologic densitometer (QDR 4500) at baseline and year 4. Results Out of 3,494 eligible subjects with complete data, 1,166 and 433 subjects reported use of ACE inhibitors and ARBs, respectively. When compared with nonusers, continuous use of ACE inhibitors was associated with a small (0.004 g/cm2) but significant increase in the average rate of BMD loss at total hip and trochanter over 4 years after adjustment for confounders. Use of ARB was not significantly associated with bone loss. Conclusion Use of ACE inhibitors but not ARB may marginally increase bone loss in older men. PMID:22080379

  20. Three dimensional pharmacophore modeling of human CYP17 inhibitors. Potential agents for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Clement, Omoshile O; Freeman, Clive M; Hartmann, Rolf W; Handratta, Venkatesh D; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Brodie, Angela M H; Njar, Vincent C O

    2003-06-01

    We report here a molecular modeling investigation of steroidal and nonsteroidal inhibitors of human cytochrome P450 17alpha-hydroxylase-17,20-lyase (CYP17). Using the pharmacophore perception technique, we have generated common-feature pharmacophore model(s) to explain the putative binding requirements for two classes of human CYP17 inhibitors. Common chemical features in the steroid and nonsteroid human CYP17 enzyme inhibitors, as deduced by the Catalyst/HipHop program, are one to two hydrogen bond acceptors (HBAs) and three hydrophobic groups. For azole-steroidal ligands, the 3beta-OH group of ring A and the N-3 of the azole ring attached to ring D at C-17 act as hydrogen bond acceptors. A model that permits hydrogen bond interaction between the azole functionality on ring D and the enzyme is consistent with experimental deductions for type II CYP17 inhibitors where a sixth ligating atom interacts with Fe(II) of heme. In general, pharmacophore models derived for steroid and nonsteroidal compounds bear striking similarities to all azole sites mapping the HBA functionality and to three hydrophobic features describing the hydrophobic interactions between the ligands and the enzyme. Using the pharmacophore model derived for azole-steroidal inhibitors as a 3D search query against several 3D multiconformational Catalyst formatted databases, we identified several steroidal compounds with potential inhibition of this enzyme. Biological testing of some of these compounds show low to high inhibitory potency against the human CYP17 enzyme. This shows the potential of our pharmacophore model in identifying new and potent CYP17 inhibitors. Further refinement of the model is in progress with a view to identifying and optimizing new leads. PMID:12773039

  1. Three dimensional pharmacophore modeling of human CYP17 inhibitors. Potential agents for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Clement, Omoshile O; Freeman, Clive M; Hartmann, Rolf W; Handratta, Venkatesh D; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Brodie, Angela M H; Njar, Vincent C O

    2003-06-01

    We report here a molecular modeling investigation of steroidal and nonsteroidal inhibitors of human cytochrome P450 17alpha-hydroxylase-17,20-lyase (CYP17). Using the pharmacophore perception technique, we have generated common-feature pharmacophore model(s) to explain the putative binding requirements for two classes of human CYP17 inhibitors. Common chemical features in the steroid and nonsteroid human CYP17 enzyme inhibitors, as deduced by the Catalyst/HipHop program, are one to two hydrogen bond acceptors (HBAs) and three hydrophobic groups. For azole-steroidal ligands, the 3beta-OH group of ring A and the N-3 of the azole ring attached to ring D at C-17 act as hydrogen bond acceptors. A model that permits hydrogen bond interaction between the azole functionality on ring D and the enzyme is consistent with experimental deductions for type II CYP17 inhibitors where a sixth ligating atom interacts with Fe(II) of heme. In general, pharmacophore models derived for steroid and nonsteroidal compounds bear striking similarities to all azole sites mapping the HBA functionality and to three hydrophobic features describing the hydrophobic interactions between the ligands and the enzyme. Using the pharmacophore model derived for azole-steroidal inhibitors as a 3D search query against several 3D multiconformational Catalyst formatted databases, we identified several steroidal compounds with potential inhibition of this enzyme. Biological testing of some of these compounds show low to high inhibitory potency against the human CYP17 enzyme. This shows the potential of our pharmacophore model in identifying new and potent CYP17 inhibitors. Further refinement of the model is in progress with a view to identifying and optimizing new leads.

  2. Pyridopyrimidine analogues as novel adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Z; Lee, C; Pratt, J K; Perner, R J; Jiang, M Q; Gomtsyan, A; Matulenko, M A; Mao, Y; Koenig, J R; Kim, K H; Muchmore, S; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K; Alexander, K M; McGaraughty, S; Chu, K L; Wismer, C T; Mikusa, J; Jarvis, M F; Marsh, K; Kowaluk, E A; Bhagwat, S S; Stewart, A O

    2001-08-20

    A novel series of pyridopyrimidine analogues 9 was identified as potent adenosine kinase inhibitors based on the SAR and computational studies. Substitution of the C7 position of the pyridopyrimidino core with C2' substituted pyridino moiety increased the in vivo potency and enhanced oral bioavailability of these adenosine kinase inhibitors.

  3. Rust inhibitor and oil composition containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Bialy, J.J.; Cullen, W.P.; Dorn, P.; Nebzydoski, J.W.; Sung, R.L.

    1981-04-21

    A rust inhibitor comprising the reaction product of a hydrocarbylsuccinic anhydride in which the hydrocarbyl radical has from about 6 to 30 carbon atoms and an aminotriazole is provided. The rust inhibitor is effective in motor fuel and lubricating oil compositions.

  4. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  5. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  6. Computer simulation of inhibitor application -- A review

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, G.; Vasanth, K.L.

    1997-12-01

    The rapid development of powerful software as well as hardware in computer technology has changed the traditional approach to all areas of science and technology. In the field of corrosion inhibitors, computers are used to model, simulate, analyze and monitor inhibitor applications in both laboratory and industrial environments. This paper will present an up-to-date critical review of such simulation studies.

  7. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  8. Aminofurazans as potent inhibitors of AKT kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Meagan B.; Seefeld, Mark A.; Leber, Jack D.; McNulty, Kenneth C.; Sun, Lihui; Miller, William H.; Zhang, ShuYun; Minthorn, Elisabeth A.; Concha, Nestor O.; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Schaber, Michael D.; Heerding, Dirk A.

    2009-06-24

    AKT inhibitors containing an imidazopyridine aminofurazan scaffold have been optimized. We have previously disclosed identification of the AKT inhibitor GSK690693, which has been evaluated in clinical trials in cancer patients. Herein we describe recent efforts focusing on investigating a distinct region of this scaffold that have afforded compounds (30 and 32) with comparable activit