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Sample records for ii dehydroquinase inhibitors

  1. Rational design of new bifunctional inhibitors of type II dehydroquinase.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Miguel D; Stewart, Kirsty A; Coggins, John R; Lapthorn, Adrian J; Abell, Chris

    2005-09-07

    Selective inhibitors of type II dehydroquinase were rationally designed to explore a second binding-pocket in the active-site. The molecular modelling, synthesis, inhibition studies and crystal structure determination are described.

  2. Irreversible inhibition of type I dehydroquinase by substrates for type II dehydroquinase.

    PubMed

    Bello, C G; Harris, J M; Manthey, M K; Coggins, J R; Abell, C

    2000-03-06

    Mechanistic differences between type I and type II dehydroquinases have been exploited in the design of type specific inhibitors. (2R)-2-Bromo-3-dehydroquinic acid (3), (2R)-2-fluoro-3-dehydroquinic acid (5) and 2-bromo-3-dehydroshikimic acid (4), all excellent substrates for type II dehydroquinase, are shown to be irreversible inhibitors of type I dehydroquinase.

  3. Design, synthesis and evaluation of bifunctional inhibitors of type II dehydroquinase.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Miguel D; Frederickson, Martyn; Evans, David P; Coggins, John R; Abell, Chris; González-Bello, Concepción

    2003-06-21

    Inhibitors of type II dehydroquinase were designed to straddle the two distinct binding sites identified for the inhibitor (1S,3R,4R)-1,3,4-trihydroxy-5-cyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid and a glycerol molecule in a crystallographic study of the Streptomyces coelicolor enzyme. A number of compounds were designed to incorporate characteristics of both ligands. These analogues were synthesized from quinic acid, and were assayed against type I (Salmonella typhi) and type II (S. coelicolor) dehydroquinases. None of the analogues showed inhibition for type I dehydroquinase. Six of the analogues were shown to have inhibition constants in the micromolar to low millimolar range against the S. coelicolor type II dehydroquinase, while two showed no inhibition. The binding modes of the analogues in the active site of the S. coelicolor enzyme were studied by molecular docking with GOLD1.2. These studies suggest a binding mode where the ring is in a similar position to (1S,3R,4R)-1,3,4-trihydroxy-5-cyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid in the crystal structure and the side-chain occupies part of the glycerol binding-pocket.

  4. Crystal structures of Helicobacter pylori type II dehydroquinase inhibitor complexes: new directions for inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Robinson, David A; Stewart, Kirsty A; Price, Nicholas C; Chalk, Peter A; Coggins, John R; Lapthorn, Adrian J

    2006-02-23

    The crystal structures of the type II dehydroquinase (DHQase) from Helicobacter pylori in complex with three competitive inhibitors have been determined. The inhibitors are the substrate analogue 2,3-anhydroquinate (FA1), citrate, and an oxoxanthene sulfonamide derivative (AH9095). Despite the very different chemical nature of the inhibitors, in each case the primary point of interaction with the enzyme is via the residues that bind the C1 functionalities of the substrate, 3-dehydroquinate, i.e., N76, H102, I103, and H104. The DHQase/AH9095 complex crystal structure shows that sulfonamides can form a scaffold for nonsubstrate-like inhibitors and identifies a large conserved hydrophobic patch at the entrance to the active site as a locus that can be exploited in the development of new ligands.

  5. Nanomolar competitive inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Streptomyces coelicolor type II dehydroquinase.

    PubMed

    Prazeres, Verónica F V; Sánchez-Sixto, Cristina; Castedo, Luis; Lamb, Heather; Hawkins, Alastair R; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Coggins, John R; Lapthorn, Adrian J; González-Bello, Concepción

    2007-02-01

    Isomeric nitrophenyl and heterocyclic analogues of the known inhibitor (1S,3R,4R)-1,3,4-trihydroxy-5-cyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid have been synthesized and tested as inhibitors of M. tuberculosis and S. coelicolor type II dehydroquinase, the third enzyme of the shikimic acid pathway. The target compounds were synthesized by a combination of Suzuki and Sonogashira cross-coupling and copper(I)-catalyzed 2,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions from a common vinyl triflate intermediate. These studies showed that a para-nitrophenyl derivative is almost 20-fold more potent as a competitive inhibitor against the S. coelicolor enzyme than that of M. tuberculosis. The opposite results were obtained with the meta isomer. Five of the bicyclic analogues reported herein proved to be potent competitive inhibitors of S. coelicolor dehydroquinase, with inhibition constants in the low nanomolar range (4-30 nM). These derivatives are also competitive inhibitors of the M. tuberculosis enzyme, but with lower affinities. The most potent inhibitor against the S. coelicolor enzyme, a 6-benzothiophenyl derivative, has a K(i) value of 4 nM-over 2000-fold more potent than the best previously known inhibitor, (1R,4R,5R)-1,5-dihydroxy-4-(2-nitrophenyl)cyclohex-2-en-1-carboxylic acid (8 microM), making it the most potent known inhibitor against any dehydroquinase. The binding modes of the analogues in the active site of the S. coelicolor enzyme (GOLD 3.0.1), suggest a key pi-stacking interaction between the aromatic rings and Tyr 28, a residue that has been identified as essential for enzyme activity.

  6. Comparative binding energy COMBINE analysis for understanding the binding determinants of type II dehydroquinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Peón, Antonio; Coderch, Claire; Gago, Federico; González-Bello, Concepción

    2013-05-01

    Herein we report comparative binding energy (COMBINE) analyses to derive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models that help rationalize the determinants of binding affinity for inhibitors of type II dehydroquinase (DHQ2), the third enzyme of the shikimic acid pathway. Independent COMBINE models were derived for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DHQ2, which is an essential enzyme in both these pathogenic bacteria that has no counterpart in human cells. These studies quantify the importance of the hydrogen bonding interactions between the ligands and the water molecule involved in the DHQ2 reaction mechanism. They also highlight important differences in the ligand interactions with the interface pocket close to the active site that could provide guides for future inhibitor design.

  7. Nanomolar inhibition of type II dehydroquinase based on the enolate reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Miguel D; Payne, Richard J; Chiba, Akira; Kerbarh, Olivier; Abell, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We describe the rational design of a novel, highly potent inhibitor of type II dehydroquinase, the dicarboxylate 6. The incorporation of a carboxylate at the 3-position mimics the putative enolate intermediate in the reaction mechanism, and allows a potential electrostatic binding interaction with the arginine on the active site flap. This results in a 1000-fold increase in potency, making the dicarboxylate 6 the most potent inhibitor of type II dehydroquinase reported to date, with a high ligand efficiency of -0.68 kcal mol(-1) per nonhydrogen atom. The systematic dissection of 6 in compounds 7-12, all of which show a drop in potency, confirm the synergistic importance of the two carboxylates, the C3 and C4 hydroxyl groups, and the anhydroquinate ring structure for the potency of 6.

  8. Type II dehydroquinase: molecular replacement with many copies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Kirsty Anne; Robinson, David Alexander; Lapthorn, Adrian Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Type II dehydroquinase is a small (150-amino-acid) protein which in solution packs together to form a dodecamer with 23 cubic symmetry. In crystals of this protein the symmetry of the biological unit can be coincident with the crystallographic symmetry, giving rise to cubic crystal forms with a single monomer in the asymmetric unit. In crystals where this is not the case, multiple copies of the monomer are present, giving rise to significant and often confusing noncrystallographic symmetry in low-symmetry crystal systems. These different crystal forms pose a variety of challenges for solution by molecular replacement. Three examples of structure solutions, including a highly unusual triclinic crystal form with 16 dodecamers (192 monomers) in the unit cell, are described. Four commonly used molecular-replacement packages are assessed against two of these examples, one of high symmetry and the other of low symmetry; this study highlights how program performance can vary significantly depending on the given problem. In addition, the final refined structure of the 16-dodecamer triclinic crystal form is analysed and shown not to be a superlattice structure, but rather an F-centred cubic crystal with frustrated crystallographic symmetry. PMID:18094474

  9. Mechanistic insight into the reaction catalysed by bacterial type II dehydroquinases.

    PubMed

    Coderch, Claire; Lence, Emilio; Peón, Antonio; Lamb, Heather; Hawkins, Alastair R; Gago, Federico; González-Bello, Concepción

    2014-03-15

    DHQ2 (type II dehydroquinase), which is an essential enzyme in Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis and does not have any counterpart in humans, is recognized to be an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents. Computational and biochemical studies that help understand in atomic detail the catalytic mechanism of these bacterial enzymes are reported in the present paper. A previously unknown key role of certain conserved residues of these enzymes, as well as the structural changes responsible for triggering the release of the product from the active site, were identified. Asp89*/Asp88* from a neighbouring enzyme subunit proved to be the residue responsible for the deprotonation of the essential tyrosine to afford the catalytic tyrosinate, which triggers the enzymatic process. The essentiality of this residue is supported by results from site-directed mutagenesis. For H. pylori DHQ2, this reaction takes place through the assistance of a water molecule, whereas for M. tuberculosis DHQ2, the tyrosine is directly deprotonated by the aspartate residue. The participation of a water molecule in this deprotonation reaction is supported by solvent isotope effects and proton inventory studies. MD simulation studies provide details of the required motions for the catalytic turnover, which provides a complete overview of the catalytic cycle. The product is expelled from the active site by the essential arginine residue and after a large conformational change of a loop containing two conserved arginine residues (Arg109/Arg108 and Arg113/Arg112), which reveals a previously unknown key role for these residues. The present study highlights the key role of the aspartate residue whose blockage could be useful in the rational design of inhibitors and the mechanistic differences between both enzymes.

  10. Inhibition of Shikimate Kinase and Type II Dehydroquinase for Antibiotic Discovery: Structure-Based Design and Simulation Studies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bello, Concepcion

    2016-01-01

    The loss of effectiveness of current antibiotics caused by the development of drug resistance has become a severe threat to public health. Current widely used antibiotics are surprisingly targeted at a few bacterial functions - cell wall, DNA, RNA, and protein biosynthesis - and resistance to them is widespread and well identified. There is therefore great interest in the discovery of novel drugs and therapies to tackle antimicrobial resistance, in particular drugs that target other essential processes for bacterial survival. In the past few years a great deal of effort has been focused on the discovery of new inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, also known as the shikimic acid pathway, in which chorismic acid is synthesized. The latter compound is the synthetic precursor of L-Phe, L-Tyr, L-Phe, and other important aromatic metabolites. These enzymes are recognized as attractive targets for the development of new antibacterial agents because they are essential in important pathogenic bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Helicobacter pylori, but do not have any counterpart in human cells. This review is focused on two key enzymes of this pathway, shikimate kinase and type II dehydroquinase. An overview of the use of structure-based design and computational studies for the discovery of selective inhibitors of these enzymes will be provided. A detailed view of the structural changes caused by these inhibitors in the catalytic arrangement of these enzymes, which are responsible for the inhibition of their activity, is described.

  11. Reducing the Flexibility of Type II Dehydroquinase for Inhibition: A Fragment-Based Approach and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Peón, Antonio; Robles, Adrián; Blanco, Beatriz; Convertino, Marino; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R; Caflisch, Amedeo; González-Bello, Concepción

    2017-09-21

    A multidisciplinary approach was used to identify and optimize a quinazolinedione-based ligand that would decrease the flexibility of the substrate-covering loop (catalytic loop) of the type II dehydroquinase from Helicobacter pylori. This enzyme, which is essential for the survival of this bacterium, is involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. A computer-aided fragment-based protocol (ALTA) was first used to identify the aromatic fragments able to block the interface pocket that separates two neighboring enzyme subunits and is located at the active site entrance. Chemical modification of its non-aromatic moiety through an olefin cross-metathesis and Seebach's self-reproduction of chirality synthetic principle allowed the development of a quinazolinedione derivative that disables the catalytic loop plasticity, which is essential for the enzyme's catalytic cycle. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the ligand would force the catalytic loop into an inappropriate arrangement for catalysis by strong interactions with the catalytic tyrosine and by expelling the essential arginine out of the active site. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The structure and mechanism of the type II dehydroquinase from Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Roszak, Aleksander W; Robinson, David A; Krell, Tino; Hunter, Iain S; Fredrickson, Martyn; Abell, Chris; Coggins, John R; Lapthorn, Adrian J

    2002-04-01

    The structure of the type II DHQase from Streptomyces coelicolor has been solved and refined to high resolution in complexes with a number of ligands, including dehydroshikimate and a rationally designed transition state analogue, 2,3-anhydro-quinic acid. These structures define the active site of the enzyme and the role of key amino acid residues and provide snap shots of the catalytic cycle. The resolution of the flexible lid domain (residues 21-31) shows that the invariant residues Arg23 and Tyr28 close over the active site cleft. The tyrosine acts as the base in the initial proton abstraction, and evidence is provided that the reaction proceeds via an enol intermediate. The active site of the structure of DHQase in complex with the transition state analog also includes molecules of tartrate and glycerol, which provide a basis for further inhibitor design.

  13. Insights into substrate binding and catalysis in bacterial type I dehydroquinase.

    PubMed

    Maneiro, María; Peón, Antonio; Lence, Emilio; Otero, José M; Van Raaij, Mark J; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R; González-Bello, Concepción

    2014-09-15

    Structural, biochemical and computational studies to study substrate binding and the role of the conserved residues of the DHQ1 (type I dehydroquinase) enzyme active site are reported in the present paper. The crystal structure of DHQ1 from Salmonella typhi in complex with (2R)-2-methyl-3-dehydroquinic acid, a substrate analogue, was solved at 1.5 Å. The present study reveals a previously unknown key role for conserved Glu46, Phe145 and Met205 and Gln236, Pro234 and Ala233 residues, with the latter three being located in the flexible substrate-covering loop. Gln236 was shown to be responsible for the folding of this loop and for the dramatic reduction of its flexibility, which triggers active site closure. Glu46 was found to be key in bringing the substrate close to the lysine/histidine catalytic pocket to initiate catalysis. The present study could be useful in the rational design of inhibitors of this challenging and recognized target for the development of novel herbicides and antimicrobial agents.

  14. A new photosystem II electron transfer inhibitor from Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Rimando, A M; Dayan, F E; Czarnota, M A; Weston, L A; Duke, S O

    1998-07-01

    Our study of the mechanism(s) by which sorgoleone (1) acts as a photosystem II (PS II) inhibitor led to the isolation of a new benzoquinone derivative, 2-hydroxy-5-ethoxy-3-[(Z,Z)-8',11', 14'-pentadecatriene]-rho-benzoquinone (2), from the root exudate of sorghum. The structure of 2, which is being given the name 5-ethoxy-sorgoleone, was determined by spectroscopic means. A methoxy derivative (3) of 1 was also prepared. Both 2 and 3 caused a reduction in oxygen evolution by thylakoid membranes and induced variable chlorophyll fluorescence. These compounds, however, were less active inhibitors of PS II than 1.

  15. Assessing Sensitivity to Antibacterial Topoisomerase II Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Linnell, Sonia K.; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Nitiss, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Both prokaryotes and eukaryotes have two major classes of topoisomerases that make transient single- or double-strand cuts in DNA. While these enzymes play critical roles in cellular processes, they are also important targets of therapeutic agents. This unit describes assays to use in characterizing topoisomerase II-targeting agents in vitro and in bacterial cells. It provides protocols for characterizing the action of small molecules against bacterial type II topoisomerases in vitro and the in vivo effects of putative topoisomerase II-targeting antibiotics, as well as for measuring trapped enzyme/DNA covalent complexes, the major cytotoxic lesion induced by fluoroquinolones. PMID:21948169

  16. Mechanisms regulating resistance to inhibitors of topoisomerase II

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Ram N.; Ganapathi, Mahrukh K.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of topoisomerase II (topo II) are clinically effective in the management of hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The efficacy of anti-tumor drugs targeting topo II is often limited by resistance and studies with in vitro cell culture models have provided several insights on potential mechanisms. Multidrug transporters that are involved in the efflux and consequently reduced cytotoxicity of diverse anti-tumor agents suggest that they play an important role in resistance to clinically active drugs. However, in clinical trials, modulating the multidrug-resistant phenotype with agents that inhibit the efflux pump has not had an impact. Since reduced drug accumulation per se is insufficient to explain tumor cell resistance to topo II inhibitors several studies have focused on characterizing mechanisms that impact on DNA damage mediated by drugs that target the enzyme. Mammalian topo IIα and topo IIβ isozymes exhibit similar catalytic, but different biologic, activities. Whereas topo IIα is associated with cell division, topo IIβ is involved in differentiation. In addition to site specific mutations that can affect drug-induced topo II-mediated DNA damage, post-translation modification of topo II primarily by phosphorylation can potentially affect enzyme-mediated DNA damage and the downstream cytotoxic response of drugs targeting topo II. Signaling pathways that can affect phosphorylation and changes in intracellular calcium levels/calcium dependent signaling that can regulate site-specific phosphorylation of topoisomerase have an impact on downstream cytotoxic effects of topo II inhibitors. Overall, tumor cell resistance to inhibitors of topo II is a complex process that is orchestrated not only by cellular pharmacokinetics but more importantly by enzymatic alterations that govern the intrinsic drug sensitivity. PMID:23914174

  17. DNA methyltransferase inhibitor CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zirong; Jin, Guorong; Lin, Shuibin; Lin, Xiumei; Gu, Yumei; Zhu, Yujuan; Hu, Chengbin; Zhang, Qingjiong; Wu, Lizi; Shen, Huangxuan

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors and structural proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibited proliferation and migration of C2C12 myoblasts. -- Abstract: CDA-II (cell differentiation agent II), isolated from healthy human urine, is a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. Previous studies indicated that CDA-II played important roles in the regulation of cell growth and certain differentiation processes. However, it has not been determined whether CDA-II affects skeletal myogenesis. In this study, we investigated effects of CDA-II treatment on skeletal muscle progenitor cell differentiation, migration and proliferation. We found that CDA-II blocked differentiation of murine myoblasts C2C12 in a dose-dependent manner. CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors, such as Myogenin and Mef2c, and structural proteins, such as myosin heavy chain (Myh3), light chain (Mylpf) and MCK. Moreover, CDA-II inhibited C1C12 cell migration and proliferation. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that CDA-II inhibits growth and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells, suggesting that the use of CDA-II might affect skeletal muscle functions.

  18. Novel EGFR inhibitors attenuate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kesong; Tian, Xinqiao; Qian, Yuanyuan; Skibba, Melissa; Zou, Chunpeng; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Jingying; Xu, Zheng; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an important risk factor for heart failure. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this current study was to examine the role of EGFR in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we observed that both Ang II and EGF could increase the phospohorylation of EGFR and protein kinase B (AKT)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and then induce cell hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. Both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic silencing significantly reduced Ang II-induced EGFR signalling pathway activation, hypertrophic marker overexpression, and cell hypertrophy. In addition, our results showed that Ang II-induced EGFR activation is mediated by c-Src phosphorylation. In vivo, Ang II treatment significantly led to cardiac remodelling including cardiac hypertrophy, disorganization and fibrosis, accompanied by the activation of EGFR signalling pathway in the heart tissues, while all these molecular and pathological alterations were attenuated by the oral administration with EGFR inhibitors. In conclusion, the c-Src-dependent EGFR activation may play an important role in Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and inhibition of EGFR by specific molecules may be an effective strategy for the treatment of Ang II-associated cardiac diseases. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Blebbistatin, a myosin II inhibitor, is photoinactivated by blue light.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takeshi; Limouze, John; Combs, Christian A; Straight, Aaron F; Sellers, James R

    2005-01-18

    Blebbistatin is a small molecule inhibitor discovered in a screen for inhibitors of nonmuscle myosin IIA. Blebbistatin inhibits the actin-activated MgATPase activity and in vitro motility of class II myosins. In cells, it has been shown to inhibit contraction of the cytokinetic ring. Blebbistatin has some photochemical properties that may affect its behavior in cells. In particular, we have found that exposure to light at wavelengths below 488 nm rapidly inactivates the inhibitory action of blebbistatin using the in vitro motility of myosin as an assay. In addition, the inhibition of cytokinetic ring contraction can be reversed by exposure of the cells to blue light. This property may be useful in locally reversing the action of blebbistatin treatment in a cell. However, caution should be exercised as free radicals may be produced upon irradiation of blebbistatin that could result in cell damage.

  20. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  1. CHZ868, a Type II JAK2 Inhibitor, Reverses Type I JAK Inhibitor Persistence and Demonstrates Efficacy in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sara C; Keller, Matthew D; Chiu, Sophia; Koppikar, Priya; Guryanova, Olga A; Rapaport, Franck; Xu, Ke; Manova, Katia; Pankov, Dmitry; O'Reilly, Richard J; Kleppe, Maria; McKenney, Anna Sophia; Shih, Alan H; Shank, Kaitlyn; Ahn, Jihae; Papalexi, Eftymia; Spitzer, Barbara; Socci, Nick; Viale, Agnes; Mandon, Emeline; Ebel, Nicolas; Andraos, Rita; Rubert, Joëlle; Dammassa, Ernesta; Romanet, Vincent; Dölemeyer, Arno; Zender, Michael; Heinlein, Melanie; Rampal, Raajit; Weinberg, Rona Singer; Hoffman, Ronald; Sellers, William R; Hofmann, Francesco; Murakami, Masato; Baffert, Fabienne; Gaul, Christoph; Radimerski, Thomas; Levine, Ross L

    2015-07-13

    Although clinically tested JAK inhibitors reduce splenomegaly and systemic symptoms, molecular responses are not observed in most myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients. We previously demonstrated that MPN cells become persistent to type I JAK inhibitors that bind the active conformation of JAK2. We investigated whether CHZ868, a type II JAK inhibitor, would demonstrate activity in JAK inhibitor persistent cells, murine MPN models, and MPN patient samples. JAK2 and MPL mutant cell lines were sensitive to CHZ868, including type I JAK inhibitor persistent cells. CHZ868 showed significant activity in murine MPN models and induced reductions in mutant allele burden not observed with type I JAK inhibitors. These data demonstrate that type II JAK inhibition is a viable therapeutic approach for MPN patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. CHZ868, a Type II JAK2 Inhibitor, Reverses Type I JAK Inhibitor Persistence and Demonstrates Efficacy in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sara C.; Keller, Matthew D.; Chiu, Sophia; Koppikar, Priya; Guryanova, Olga A.; Rapaport, Franck; Xu, Ke; Manova, Katia; Pankov, Dmitry; O’Reilly, Richard J.; Kleppe, Maria; McKenney, Anna Sophia; Shih, Alan H.; Shank, Kaitlyn; Ahn, Jihae; Papalexi, Eftymia; Spitzer, Barbara; Socci, Nick; Viale, Agnes; Mandon, Emeline; Ebel, Nicolas; Andraos, Rita; Rubert, Joëlle; Dammassa, Ernesta; Romanet, Vincent; Dölemeyer, Arno; Zender, Michael; Heinlein, Melanie; Rampal, Rajit; Weinberg, Rona Singer; Hoffman, Ron; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Murakami, Masato; Baffert, Fabienne; Gaul, Christoph; Radimerski, Thomas; Levine, Ross L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Although clinically tested JAK inhibitors reduce splenomegaly and systemic symptoms, molecular responses are not observed in most myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) patients. We previously demonstrated that MPN cells become persistent to type I JAK inhibitors that bind the active conformation of JAK2. We investigated if CHZ868, a type II JAK inhibitor, would demonstrate activity in JAK inhibitor persistent cells, murine MPN models, and MPN patient samples. JAK2- and MPL-mutant cell lines were sensitive to CHZ868, including type I JAK inhibitor persistent cells. CHZ868 showed significant activity in murine MPN models and induced reductions in mutant allele burden not observed with type I JAK inhibitors. These data demonstrate that type II JAK inhibition is a viable therapeutic approach for MPN patients. PMID:26175413

  3. Structural and functional characteristics of plant proteinase inhibitor-II (PI-II) family.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Shazia; Aziz, Ejaz; Akhtar, Wasim; Ilyas, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq

    2017-02-09

    Plant proteinase inhibitor-II (PI-II) proteins are one of the promising defensive proteins that helped the plants to resist against different kinds of unfavorable conditions. Different roles for PI-II have been suggested such as regulation of endogenous proteases, modulation of plant growth and developmental processes and mediating stress responses. The basic knowledge on genetic and molecular diversity of these proteins has provided significant insight into their gene structure and evolutionary relationships in various members of this family. Phylogenetic comparisons of these family genes in different plants suggested that the high rate of retention of gene duplication and inhibitory domain multiplication may have resulted in the expansion and functional diversification of these proteins. Currently, a large number of transgenic plants expressing PI-II genes are being developed for enhancing the defensive capabilities against insects, bacteria and pathogenic fungi. Much emphasis is yet to be given to exploit this ever expanding repertoire of genes for improving abiotic stress resistance in transgenic crops. This review presents an overview about the current knowledge on PI-II family genes, their multifunctional role in plant defense and physiology with their potential applications in biotechnology.

  4. Materials Evaluation. Part II. Development of Corrosion Inhibitors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    and Identify by block number) A borax -nitrite based inhibitor has been developed for incorporation into the Air Force Rinse Facility at MacDill Air...Block 20 inhibitors has been tested and a borax -nitrite based formulation developed which inhibits the corrosion of several ferrous and nonferrous...alternatives to chromates, one such alternative being a borax -nitrite based inhibitor. The value of borax nitrite as a corrosion inhibitor has long been

  5. Docking studies of sulphamate inhibitors of estrone sulphatase in human carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Vicker, Nigel; Ho, Yaikat; Robinson, James; Woo, Lawrence L W; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2003-03-10

    We describe the docking of selected steroidal and non-steroidal estrone sulphatase inhibitors, including the Phase I clinical trial candidate 667COUMATE (6), into the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II). The docking scores are compared with the inhibition of hCA II and show good correlation with biological activity.

  6. Mutagenesis of active site residues in type I dehydroquinase from Escherichia coli. Stalled catalysis in a histidine to alanine mutant.

    PubMed

    Leech, A P; James, R; Coggins, J R; Kleanthous, C

    1995-10-27

    Chemical modification experiments have previously implicated four amino acid residues in the mechanism of type I dehydroquinase from Escherichia coli. To further test their importance, these residues were mutated, and the resulting mutants were expressed, purified, and characterized. When the highly conserved, Schiff base-forming lysine residue was mutated (K170A) the resulting enzyme showed a approximately 10(6)-fold reduction in catalytic activity, but was still able to bind both substrate and product, as shown by a novel fluorescence-based ligand-binding assay. This is consistent with Lys-170 playing a central role in catalysis and shows that, although forming a covalent bond with the substrate, it is not essential for ground state binding of substrate or product. Conversely, substituting leucine for the conserved, iodoacetate-reactive methionine residue (M205L) had little effect on kcat or Km. Diethylpyrocarbonate experiments had previously implicated either His-143 or His-146 as the putative active site general base. Substituting alanine for each shows that H146A retains full catalytic activity while H143A shows a 10(6)-fold loss of activity. As with the K170A mutant, H143A can bind ligand, and in addition to the predicted role of this residue as the proton-abstracting general base, our data suggest that it is also involved in the formation and breakdown of Schiff base intermediates. Isoelectric focusing, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and fluorescence spectroscopy show that the H143A mutant preferentially stabilizes the formation of the product Schiff base, and that this results in burst kinetics reminiscent of p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis by chymotrypsin. The most striking illustration of this stabilization is the fact that the H143A mutant is isolated from overexpressing cells with a significant proportion of the enzyme monomers covalently bound to the product, 3-dehydroshikimate, via a Schiff base linkage. Our data suggest that the H143A

  7. Carbonic anhydrase II-induced selection of inhibitors from a dynamic combinatorial library of Schiff's bases.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Gihane; Petit, Eddy; Supuran, Claudiu T; Winum, Jean-Yves; Barboiu, Mihail

    2009-11-01

    A dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) has been generated under thermodynamic control by using the aminocarbonyl/imine interconversion as reversible chemistry, combined with non-covalent binding within the active site of the metalloenzyme human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II, EC 4.2.1.1). The high affinity of hCA II isozyme towards some sulfonamide inhibitors obtained here was used to select from the dynamic library specific inhibitors of this isoform. These results point out to the possibility of identifying sulfonamide amplified compounds presenting potent inhibition and high yield of formation in the presence of the isoform(s) towards which the inhibitors were designed.

  8. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent.

  9. Type II topoisomerases--inhibitors, repair mechanisms and mutations.

    PubMed

    Heisig, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases are ubiquitous enzymes that play an essential role in the control of replicative DNA synthesis and share structural and functional homology among different prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Antibacterial fluoroquinolones target prokaryotic topoisomerases at concentrations 100- to 1000-fold lower than mammalian enzymes, the preferred targets of anticancer drugs such as etoposide. The mechanisms of action of both of these types of inhibitors involve the fixation of an intermediate reaction step, where the enzyme is covalently bound to an enzyme-mediated DNA double-strand break (DSB). The resulting ternary drug-enzyme-DNA complexes can then be converted to cleavage complexes that block further movement of the DNA replication fork, subsequently inducing stress responses. In haploid prokaryotic cells, stress responses include error-free and error-prone DNA damage repair pathways, such as homologous recombination and translesion synthesis, respectively. The latter can result in the acquisition of point mutations. Diploid mammalian cells are assumed to preferentially use recombination mechanisms for the repair of DSBs, an example of which, non-homologous end joining, is a major error-prone repair mechanism associated with an increased frequency of detectable small deletions, insertions and translocations. However, results obtained from safety testing of novel fluoroquinolones at high concentrations indicate that point mutations may also occur in mammalian cells. Recent data provide evidence for translesion synthesis catalysed by error-prone repair polymerases as a damage-tolerance repair mechanism of DSBs in eukaryotic cells. This paper discusses possible roles of different mechanisms for the repair of DSBs operating in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells that result in recombinational rearrangements, deletions/insertions as well as point mutations.

  10. Co-tolerance of phytoplankton communities to photosynthesis II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Knauer, Katja; Leimgruber, Andrea; Hommen, Udo; Knauert, Stefanie

    2010-03-01

    Natural variability in sensitivity and pollution induced community tolerance (PICT) to atrazine, isoproturon and diuron and a mixture of these three herbicides to natural algal assemblages in mesocosms was determined. The specificity of PICT was examined by evaluating co-tolerance pattern for these photosystem-II (PSII) inhibitors. Phytoplankton communities were constantly exposed to equipotent concentrations of atrazine, isoproturon, diuron namely the 30% hazard concentration (HC(30)) obtained from species sensitivity distributions and an equitoxic mixture (Sigma3 x 1/3 x HC(30) of each herbicide) for five weeks in outdoor mesocosms. Induction of tolerance to the various herbicides was investigated by photosynthetic efficiency measurements of the algal assemblages in short-term laboratory tests. The composition of the algal communities in the various treatments was determined and ordination techniques such as the principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to log-transformed data to compare the seasonal community structure development. Temporal variation in sensitivity of the control algal assemblage to atrazine and isoproturon, but less to diuron was observed. The results further demonstrated that the control communities were in general more sensitive than the treated ones over the whole period tested indicating an enhanced tolerance of pre-exposed phytoplankton in the mesocosms. Co-tolerance was also observed for atrazine pre-exposed algal community to isoproturon, however, not vise versa. A pre-exposure to diuron induced similar tolerance to all three herbicides. A pre-exposure to the mixture treatment also lead to tolerance to isoproturon and diuron, less to atrazine. Overall, the observed co-tolerance pattern indicates that co-tolerance was not comparable between the herbicides with strong similarity in their biochemical mode of action. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The two types of 3-dehydroquinase have distinct structures but catalyze the same overall reaction.

    PubMed

    Gourley, D G; Shrive, A K; Polikarpov, I; Krell, T; Coggins, J R; Hawkins, A R; Isaacs, N W; Sawyer, L

    1999-06-01

    The structures of enzymes catalyzing the reactions in central metabolic pathways are generally well conserved as are their catalytic mechanisms. The two types of 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQase) are therefore most unusual since they are unrelated at the sequence level and they utilize completely different mechanisms to catalyze the same overall reaction. The type I enzymes catalyze a cis-dehydration of 3-dehydroquinate via a covalent imine intermediate, while the type II enzymes catalyze a trans-dehydration via an enolate intermediate. Here we report the three-dimensional structures of a representative member of each type of biosynthetic DHQase. Both enzymes function as part of the shikimate pathway, which is essential in microorganisms and plants for the biosynthesis of aromatic compounds including folate, ubiquinone and the aromatic amino acids. An explanation for the presence of two different enzymes catalyzing the same reaction is presented. The absence of the shikimate pathway in animals makes it an attractive target for antimicrobial agents. The availability of these two structures opens the way for the design of highly specific enzyme inhibitors with potential importance as selective therapeutic agents.

  12. Triticum aestivum L. endoxylanase inhibitor (TAXI) consists of two inhibitors, TAXI I and TAXI II, with different specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Gebruers, K; Debyser, W; Goesaert, H; Proost, P; Van Damme J; Delcour, J A

    2001-01-01

    The Triticum aestivum L. endoxylanase inhibitor (TAXI) discovered by Debyser and Delcour [(1997) Eur. Pat. filed April 1997, published as WO 98/49278] and Debyser, Derdelinckx and Delcour [(1997) J. Am. Soc. Brew. Chem. 55, 153-156] seems to be a mixture of two different endoxylanase inhibitors, called TAXI I and TAXI II. By using Aspergillus niger as well as Bacillus subtilis endoxylanases for assaying inhibition activity, both inhibitors could be purified to homogeneity from wheat (Triticum aestivum L., var. Soissons). TAXI I and TAXI II have similar molecular structures. They both have a molecular mass of approx. 40.0 kDa, are not glycosylated and occur in two molecular forms, i.e. a non-proteolytically processed one and a proteolytically processed one. However, the pI of TAXI II (at least 9.3) is higher than that of TAXI I (8.8). TAXI I and TAXI II clearly show different inhibition activities towards different endoxylanases. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of both inhibitors show a high degree of identity, which might indicate that there is an evolutionary relationship between them. PMID:11139386

  13. Efficacy of the small molecule inhibitor of Lipid II BAS00127538 against Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the activity of a small molecule compound that targets Lipid II against Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods Susceptibility to small molecule Lipid II inhibitor BAS00127538 was assessed using carbapenem- and colistin-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii. In addition, synergy between colisitin and this compound was assessed. Results Small molecule Lipid II inhibitor BAS00127538 potently acts against A. baumannii and acts synergistically with colistin. Conclusion For the first time, a compound that targets Lipid II is described that acts against multi-drug resistant isolates of A. baumannii. The synergy with colistin warrants further lead development of BAS00127538. PMID:25143710

  14. Design of highly potent urea-based, exosite-binding inhibitors selective for glutamate carboxypeptidase II.

    PubMed

    Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Jančařík, Andrej; Bařinková, Jitka; Navrátil, Václav; Starková, Jana; Šrámková, Karolína; Konvalinka, Jan; Majer, Pavel; Šácha, Pavel

    2015-05-28

    We present here a structure-aided design of inhibitors targeting the active site as well as exosites of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), a prostate cancer marker, preparing potent and selective inhibitors that are more than 1000-fold more active toward GCPII than its closest human homologue, glutamate carboxypeptidase III (GCPIII). Additionally, we demonstrate that the prepared inhibitor conjugate can be used for sensitive and selective imaging of GCPII in mammalian cells.

  15. Virtual screening and optimization of Type II inhibitors of JAK2 from a natural product library.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dik-Lung; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Wei, Guo; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Yang, Hui; Leung, Lai To; Gullen, Elizabeth A; Chiu, Pauline; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-11-21

    Amentoflavone has been identified as a JAK2 inhibitor by structure-based virtual screening of a natural product library. In silico optimization using the DOLPHIN model yielded analogues with enhanced potency against JAK2 activity and HCV activity in cellulo. Molecular modeling and kinetic experiments suggested that the analogues may function as Type II inhibitors of JAK2.

  16. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites.

  17. In silico prediction of ROCK II inhibitors by different classification approaches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuipu; Wu, Qihui; Luo, Yunxia; Ma, Huili; Shen, Jiangang; Zhang, Yongbin; Yang, Lei; Chen, Yunbo; Wen, Zehuai; Wang, Qi

    2017-08-02

    ROCK II is an important pharmacological target linked to central nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this research is to generate ROCK II inhibitor prediction models by machine learning approaches. Firstly, four sets of descriptors were calculated with MOE 2010 and PaDEL-Descriptor, and optimized by F-score and linear forward selection methods. In addition, four classification algorithms were used to initially build 16 classifiers with k-nearest neighbors [Formula: see text], naïve Bayes, Random forest, and support vector machine. Furthermore, three sets of structural fingerprint descriptors were introduced to enhance the predictive capacity of classifiers, which were assessed with fivefold cross-validation, test set validation and external test set validation. The best two models, MFK + MACCS and MLR + SubFP, have both MCC values of 0.925 for external test set. After that, a privileged substructure analysis was performed to reveal common chemical features of ROCK II inhibitors. Finally, binding modes were analyzed to identify relationships between molecular descriptors and activity, while main interactions were revealed by comparing the docking interaction of the most potent and the weakest ROCK II inhibitors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on ROCK II inhibitors utilizing machine learning approaches that provides a new method for discovering novel ROCK II inhibitors.

  18. Novel Type II Fatty Acid Biosynthesis (FAS II) Inhibitors as Multistage Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Florian C.; Glinca, Serghei; Sattler, Julia M.; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Afanador, Gustavo A.; Prigge, Sean T.; Lanzer, Michael; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Klebe, Gerhard; Schlitzer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a potentially fatal disease caused by Plasmodium parasites and poses a major medical risk in large parts of the world. The development of new, affordable antimalarial drugs is of vital importance as there are increasing reports of resistance to the currently available therapeutics. In addition, most of the current drugs used for chemoprophylaxis merely act on parasites already replicating in the blood. At this point, a patient might already be suffering from the symptoms associated with the disease and could additionally be infectious to an Anopheles mosquito. These insects act as a vector, subsequently spreading the disease to other humans. In order to cure not only malaria but prevent transmission as well, a drug must target both the blood- and pre-erythrocytic liver stages of the parasite. P. falciparum (Pf) enoyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) is a key enzyme of plasmodial type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS II). It has been shown to be essential for liver-stage development of Plasmodium berghei and is therefore qualified as a target for true causal chemoprophylaxis. Using virtual screening based on two crystal structures of PfENR, we identified a structurally novel class of FAS inhibitors. Subsequent chemical optimization yielded two compounds that are effective against multiple stages of the malaria parasite. These two most promising derivatives were found to inhibit blood-stage parasite growth with IC50 values of 1.7 and 3.0 µm and lead to a more prominent developmental attenuation of liver-stage parasites than the gold-standard drug, primaquine. PMID:23341167

  19. Structures of adamalysin II with peptidic inhibitors. Implications for the design of tumor necrosis factor alpha convertase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-Rüth, F. X.; Meyer, E. F.; Kress, L. F.; Politi, V.

    1998-01-01

    Crotalus adamanteus snake venom adamalysin II is the structural prototype of the adamalysin or ADAM family comprising proteolytic domains of snake venom metalloproteinases, multimodular mammalian reproductive tract proteins, and tumor necrosis factor alpha convertase, TACE, involved in the release of the inflammatory cytokine, TNFalpha. The structure of adamalysin II in noncovalent complex with two small-molecule right-hand side peptidomimetic inhibitors (Pol 647 and Pol 656) has been solved using X-ray diffraction data up to 2.6 and 2.8 A resolution. The inhibitors bind to the S'-side of the proteinase, inserting between two protein segments, establishing a mixed parallel-antiparallel three-stranded beta-sheet and coordinate the central zinc ion in a bidentate manner via their two C-terminal oxygen atoms. The proteinase-inhibitor complexes are described in detail and are compared with other known structures. An adamalysin-based model of the active site of TACE reveals that these small molecules would probably fit into the active site cleft of this latter metalloproteinase, providing a starting model for the rational design of TACE inhibitors. PMID:9521103

  20. Proteinase inhibitor II from potatoes: isolation and characterization of its protomer components.

    PubMed

    Bryant, J; Green, T R; Gurusaddaiah, T; Ryan, C A

    1976-08-10

    Proteinase inhibitor II, an inhibitor of chymotrypsin and trypsin, is a heat-stable protein with a dimeric molecular weight of 21 000 that is a component of Russet Burbank potato tubers. Four monomeric isoinhibitor species of molecular weight 10 500 comprise inhibitor II and were isolated by chromatography on phosphocellulose in 8 M urea. Upon removal of the urea, each monomeric species dimerized to yield homogeneous dimers. The three major protomer species, called B, C, and D, and their homogeneous dimers were further characterized. They have similar molecular weights and amino acid compositions, and each has an N-terminal alanine residue. Dimers of purified protomers B, C, and D exhibited full cross-reactivities with each other in immunological double-diffusion assays. Reconstituted dimers possess two binding sites for bovine alpha-chymotrypsin, indicating that each monomer possesses one binding site for this enzyme. Significant differences were noted among the reconstituted dimers in their isoelectric points, immunoelectrophoretic mobilities, ion-exchange properties, and their inhibitory reactivities against trypsin. The properties of the inhibitor II dimeric species are similar but not identical to inhibitors IIa and IIb reported from Japanese potatoes (variety "Danshaku-Imo"), indicating the existence of intervarietal, as well as intravarietal, differences among potato tuber inhibitor II isoinhibitors.

  1. Catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II suppress the androgen receptor signaling and prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haolong; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E.; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Although the new generation of androgen receptor (AR) antagonists like enzalutamide (ENZ) prolong survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), AR-driven tumors eventually recur indicating that additional therapies are required to fully block AR function. Since DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II) was demonstrated to be essential for AR to initiate gene transcription, this study tested whether catalytic inhibitors of Topo II can block AR signaling and suppress ENZ-resistant CRPC growth. Using multiple prostate cancer cell lines, we showed that catalytic Topo II inhibitors, ICRF187 and ICRF193 inhibited transcription activities of the wild-type AR, mutant ARs (F876L and W741C) and the AR-V7 splice variant. ICRF187 and ICRF193 decreased AR recruitment to target promoters and reduced AR nuclear localization. Both ICRF187 and ICRF193 also inhibited cell proliferation and delayed cell cycling at the G2/M phase. ICRF187 inhibited tumor growth of castration-resistant LNCaP and 22RV1 xenografts as well as ENZ-resistant MR49F xenografts. We conclude that catalytic Topo II inhibitors can block AR signaling and inhibit tumor growth of CRPC xenografts, identifying a potential co-targeting approach using these inhibitors in combination with AR pathway inhibitors in CRPC. PMID:26009876

  2. Caprine plasma proteinase inhibitors--II. Genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Vankan, D M; Bell, K

    1993-01-01

    1. Analysis of the inheritances of the variants of five caprine plasma proteinase inhibitor systems in families demonstrated a genetic control of codominant alleles at five loci. 2. The PIA, B, C, D and E proteins are controlled by four (PIA1,2,3,4), three (PIB1,4,0), three (PIC2,3,0), five (PID1,2,3,4,0) and two (PIE1,2) alleles respectively. Null alleles were postulated for the PIB, PIC and PID systems. 3. The frequencies of the alleles differed substantially between the Australian and Texan Angoras and Cashmere breeds of goats. 4. The combined exclusion probability for the five PI systems was as high as 0.82 in the Cashmere breed, indicating the potential of the proteinase inhibitor proteins for parentage control purposes.

  3. Human Multiple Myeloma Cells Are Sensitized to Topoisomerase II Inhibitors by CRM1 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joel G.; Marchion, Douglas C.; Dawson, Jana L.; Emmons, Michael F.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Washausen, Peter; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2009-01-01

    Topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα) is exported from the nucleus of human myeloma cells by a CRM1-dependent mechanism at cellular densities similar to those found in patient bone marrow. When topo IIα is trafficked to the cytoplasm, it is not in contact with the DNA; thus topo IIα inhibitors are unable to induce DNA-cleavable complexes and cell death. Using a CRM1 inhibitor or a CRM1-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA), we were able to block nuclear export of topo IIα as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Human myeloma cell lines and patient myeloma cells isolated from bone marrow were treated with a CRM1 inhibitor or CRM1-specific siRNA and exposed to doxorubicin or etoposide (VP-16) at high cell densities. CRM1-treated cell lines or myeloma patient cells were fourfold more sensitive to topo II poisons, as determined by activated caspase assay. Normal cells were not significantly affected by CRM1-topo II combination treatment. Cell death was correlated with increased DNA double-strand breaks as shown by the comet assay. Band depletion assays of CRM1 inhibitor-exposed myeloma cells demonstrated increased topo IIα covalently bound to DNA. Topo IIα knockdown by a topo IIα-specific siRNA abrogated the CRM1-topo II therapy synergistic effect. These results suggest that blocking topo IIα nuclear export sensitizes myeloma cells to topo II inhibitors. This method of sensitizing myeloma cells suggests a new therapeutic approach to multiple myeloma. PMID:19690141

  4. Photobleaching reveals complex effects of inhibitors on transcribing RNA polymerase II in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fromaget, Maud; Cook, Peter R. . E-mail: peter.cook@path.ox.ac.uk

    2007-08-15

    RNA polymerase II transcribes most eukaryotic genes. Photobleaching studies have revealed that living Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the catalytic subunit of the polymerase tagged with the green fluorescent protein contain a large rapidly exchanging pool of enzyme, plus a smaller engaged fraction; genetic complementation shows this tagged polymerase to be fully functional. We investigated how transcriptional inhibitors - some of which are used therapeutically - affect the engaged fraction in living cells using fluorescence loss in photobleaching; all were used at concentrations that have reversible effects. Various kinase inhibitors (roscovitine, DRB, KM05283, alsterpaullone, isoquinolinesulfonamide derivatives H-7, H-8, H-89, H-9), proteasomal inhibitors (lactacystin, MG132), and an anti-tumour agent (cisplatin) all reduced the engaged fraction; an intercalator (actinomycin D), two histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A, sodium butyrate), and irradiation with ultra-violet light all increased it. The polymerase proves to be both a sensitive sensor and effector of the response to these inhibitors.

  5. Different effects of eubacterial and eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors on chloroplasts ofEuglena gracilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajčovič, Juraj; Ebringer, Libor

    1990-03-01

    Inhibitors of eubacterial and eukaryotic DNA topoisomerases type II exhibited different effects on chloroplasts of the flagellateEuglena gracilis. Antibacterial agents (cinoxacin, nalidixic and oxolinic acids, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin) from the group of quinolones and coumarins (coumermycin A1, clorobiocin and novobiocin) — all inhibitors of prokaryotic DNA topoisomerase II — were very potent eliminators of chloroplasts fromE. gracilis. In contrast, antitumor drugs (adriamycin, etoposide, teniposide and mitoxantrone) — antagonists of the eukaryotic counterpart — did not affect these semiautonomous photosynthetic organelles. These findings point out again the close evolutionary relationships between eubacteria and chloroplasts and are in agreement with the hypothesis of an endosymbiotic origin of chloroplasts.

  6. Potent microRNA suppression by RNA Pol II-transcribed 'Tough Decoy' inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bak, Rasmus O; Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Sørensen, Camilla Darum; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression and modulators of diverse biological pathways. Analyses of miRNA function as well as therapeutic managing of miRNAs rely on cellular administration of miRNA inhibitors which may be achieved by the use of viral vehicles. This study explores the miRNA-suppressive capacity of inhibitors expressed intracellularly from lentivirus-derived gene vectors. Superior activity of two decoy-type inhibitors, a "Bulged Sponge" with eight miRNA recognition sites and a hairpin-shaped "Tough Decoy" containing two miRNA recognition sites, is demonstrated in a side-by-side comparison of seven types of miRNA inhibitors transcribed as short RNAs from an RNA Pol III promoter. We find that lentiviral vectors expressing Tough Decoy inhibitors are less vulnerable than Bulged Sponge-encoding vectors to targeting by the cognate miRNA and less prone, therefore, to reductions in transfer efficiency. Importantly, it is demonstrated that Tough Decoy inhibitors retain their miRNA suppression capacity in the context of longer RNA transcripts expressed from an RNA Pol II promoter. Such RNA Pol II-transcribed Tough Decoy inhibitors are new tools in managing of miRNAs and may have potential for temporal and spatial regulation of miRNA activity as well as for therapeutic targeting of miRNAs that are aberrantly expressed in human disease.

  7. Photosystem II inhibitor resistance in the Columbia Basin of Washington state

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato and mint (peppermint and spearmint) are commonly produced in the irrigated regions of the Pacific Northwest and both crops rely heavily on photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor herbicides metribuzin (potato) and terbacil (mint) for weed management. Seed was collected in 2010 from Powell amaranth, r...

  8. Structural characterization of P1'-diversified urea-based inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II.

    PubMed

    Pavlicek, Jiri; Ptacek, Jakub; Cerny, Jiri; Byun, Youngjoo; Skultetyova, Lubica; Pomper, Martin G; Lubkowski, Jacek; Barinka, Cyril

    2014-05-15

    Urea-based inhibitors of human glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) have advanced into clinical trials for imaging metastatic prostate cancer. In parallel efforts, agents with increased lipophilicity have been designed and evaluated for targeting GCPII residing within the neuraxis. Here we report the structural and computational characterization of six complexes between GCPII and P1'-diversified urea-based inhibitors that have the C-terminal glutamate replaced by more hydrophobic moieties. The X-ray structures are complemented by quantum mechanics calculations that provide a quantitative insight into the GCPII/inhibitor interactions. These data can be used for the rational design of novel glutamate-free GCPII inhibitors with tailored physicochemical properties.

  9. [Apoptosis of human leukemic cells induced by topoisomerase I and II inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Solary, E; Dubrez, L; Eymin, B; Bertrand, R; Pommier, Y

    1996-03-01

    Comparison between five human leukemic lines (BV173, HL60, U937, K562, KCL22) suggest that the main determinant of their sensitivity to topoisomerase I (camptothecin) and II (VP-16) inhibitors is their ability to regulate cell cycle progression in response to specific DNA damage, then to die through apoptosis: the more the cells inhibit cell cycle progression, the less sensitive they are. The final pathway of apoptosis induction involves a cytoplasmic signal, active at neutral pH, needing magnesium, sensitive to various protease inhibitors and activated directly by staurosporine. Modulators of intracellular signaling (calcium chelators, calmodulin inhibitors, PKC modulators, kinase and phosphatase inhibitors) have no significant influence upon apoptosis induction. Conversely, apoptosis induction pathway is modified during monocytic differentiation of HL60 cells induced by phorbol esters. Lastly, poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and chromatine structure should regulate apoptotic DNA fragmentation that is prevented by 3-aminobenzamide and spermine, respectively.

  10. Analyzing the binding of Co(II)-specific inhibitors to the methionyl aminopeptidases from Escherichia coli and Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sanghamitra; Sheppard, George; Wang, Jieyi; Bennett, Brian; Holz, Richard C

    2009-05-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) represent a unique class of protease that is capable of the hydrolytic removal of an N-terminal methionine residue from nascent polypeptide chains. MetAPs are physiologically important enzymes; hence, there is considerable interest in developing inhibitors that can be used as antiangiogenic and antimicrobial agents. A detailed kinetic and spectroscopic study has been performed to probe the binding of a triazole-based inhibitor and a bestatin-based inhibitor to both Mn(II)- and Co(II)-loaded type-I (Escherichia coli) and type-II (Pyrococcus furiosus) MetAPs. Both inhibitors were found to be moderate competitive inhibitors. The triazole-type inhibitor was found to interact with both active-site metal ions, while the bestatin-type inhibitor was capable of switching its mode of binding depending on the metal in the active site and the type of MetAP enzyme.

  11. Virtual and experimental high-throughput screening (HTS) in search of novel inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase II (IMPDH II) inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkern, Torsten; Prabhu, Arati; Kharkar, Prashant S.; Goebel, Heike; Rolser, Edith; Burckhard-Boer, Waltraud; Arumugam, Premkumar; Makhija, Mahindra T.

    2012-11-01

    IMPDH (Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase) catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. IMPDH inhibition in sensitive cell types (e.g., lymphocytes) blocks proliferation (by blocking RNA and DNA synthesis as a result of decreased cellular levels of guanine nucleotides). This makes it an interesting target for cancer and autoimmune disorders. Currently available IMPDH inhibitors such as mycophenolic acid (MPA, uncompetitive inhibitor) and nucleoside analogs (e.g., ribavirin, competitive inhibitor after intracellular activation by phosphorylation) have unfavorable tolerability profiles which limit their use. Hence, the quest for novel IMPDH inhibitors continues. In the present study, a ligand-based virtual screening using IMPDH inhibitor pharmacophore models was performed on in-house compound collection. A total of 50,000 virtual hits were selected for primary screen using in vitro IMPDH II inhibition up to 10 μM. The list of 2,500 hits (with >70 % inhibition) was further subjected to hit confirmation for the determination of IC50 values. The hits obtained were further clustered using maximum common substructure based formalism resulting in 90 classes and 7 singletons. A thorough inspection of these yielded 7 interesting classes in terms of mini-SAR with IC50 values ranging from 0.163 μM to little over 25 μM. The average ligand efficiency was found to be 0.3 for the best class. The classes thus discovered represent structurally novel chemotypes which can be taken up for further development.

  12. Differential effects of viroporin inhibitors against feline infectious peritonitis virus serotypes I and II.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Nakano, Kenta; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-05-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIP virus: FIPV), a feline coronavirus of the family Coronaviridae, causes a fatal disease called FIP in wild and domestic cat species. The genome of coronaviruses encodes a hydrophobic transmembrane protein, the envelope (E) protein. The E protein possesses ion channel activity. Viral proteins with ion channel activity are collectively termed "viroporins". Hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), a viroporin inhibitor, can inhibit the ion channel activity of the E protein and replication of several coronaviruses. However, it is not clear whether HMA and other viroporin inhibitors affect replication of FIPV. We examined the effect of HMA and other viroporin inhibitors (DIDS [4,4'-disothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulphonic acid] and amantadine) on infection by FIPV serotypes I and II. HMA treatment drastically decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2 in a dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146. In contrast, DIDS treatment decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146 in dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2. We investigated whether there is a difference in ion channel activity of the E protein between viral serotypes using E. coli cells expressing the E protein of FIPV serotypes I and II. No difference was observed, suggesting that a viroporin other than the E protein influences the differences in the actions of HMA and DIDS on FIPV serotypes I and II.

  13. Carbonic Anhydrase Interaction With Lipothioars Enites: A Novel Class of Isozymes I and II Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Timotheatou, Despina; Ioannou, Panayiotis V.; Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes I and II with a series of As(III) derivatives, dialkyl and diaryl rac-2,3-dimyristoyloxypropyldithioarsonites, was investigated kinetically and spectrophotometrically, utilizing the native and Co(II)-substituted enzymes. Depending on the substitution pattern at the -As(SR)2 moiety of the investigated derivatives, inactive compounds were found for R = phenyl or naphthyl, and active ones for derivatives containing carboxyl groups (R = CH2COOH, cysteinyl and glutathionyl). Together with the arsonolipids previously investigated, the active compounds of this series - the "lipothioarsenites"- constitute a novel class of CA inhibitors that bind to the metal ion within the enzyme active site, as proved by changes in the electronic spectra of adducts of such inhibitors with Co(II)CA. PMID:18475756

  14. Identification of type II and III DDR2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Richters, André; Nguyen, Hoang D; Phan, Trang; Simard, Jeffrey R; Grütter, Christian; Engel, Julian; Rauh, Daniel

    2014-05-22

    Discoidin domain-containing receptors (DDRs) exhibit a unique mechanism of action among the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) because their catalytic activity is induced by extracellular collagen binding. Moreover, they are essential components in the assimilation of extracellular signals. Recently, DDRs were reported to be significantly linked to tumor progression in breast cancer by facilitating the processes of invasion, migration, and metastasis. Here, we report the successful development of a fluorescence-based, direct binding assay for the detection of type II and III DFG-out binders for DDR2. Using sequence alignments and homology modeling, we designed a DDR2 construct appropriate for fluorescent labeling. Successful assay development was validated by sensitive detection of a reference DFG-out binder. Subsequent downscaling led to convenient application to high-throughput screening formats. Screening of a representative compound library identified high-affinity DDR2 ligands validated by orthogonal activity-based assays, and a subset of identified compounds was further investigated with respect to DDR1 inhibition.

  15. Tacrine derivatives as dual topoisomerase I and II catalytic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Janočková, Jana; Plšíková, Jana; Koval', Ján; Jendželovský, Rastislav; Mikeš, Jaromír; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Hamuľaková, Slávka; Fedoročko, Peter; Kožurková, Mária

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the binding properties of a series of newly synthetized tacrine derivatives 1-4 and their anticancer effects. Spectroscopic techniques (UV-Vis, fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal denaturation, and linear spectropolarimetry) and viscometry were used to study DNA binding properties and to determine the types of DNA interaction with the studied derivatives. The binding constants for the complexes with DNA were obtained using UV-Vis spectroscopic titrations (K = 1.6 × 10(4)-4.0 × 10(5) M(-1)) and electrophoretic methods were used to determine the effect of the derivatives on topoisomerase I and II activity. Monotacrine derivative 1 showed evidence of topoisomerase Irelaxation activity at a concentration of 30 × 10(-6) M, while bistacrine derivatives 2-4 produced a complete inhibition of topoisomerase Iat a concentration of 5 × 10(-6) M. The biological activities of the derivatives were studied using MTT-assay and flow cytometric methods (detection of mitochondrial membrane potential and measurement of cell viability) following incubation of 24 and 48 h with human leukemic cancer cell line HL60. The ability of the derivatives to impair cell proliferation was also tested through the analysis of cell cycle distribution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L.; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Uhlig, Holm H.; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers. PMID:26320862

  17. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E; Cuny, Gregory D; Uhlig, Holm H; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N

    2015-09-17

    RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers.

  18. Classical and slow-binding inhibitors of human type II arginase.

    PubMed

    Colleluori, D M; Ash, D E

    2001-08-07

    Arginases catalyze the hydrolysis of L-arginine to yield L-ornithine and urea. Recent studies indicate that arginases, both the type I and type II isozymes, participate in the regulation of nitric oxide production by modulating the availability of arginine for nitric oxide synthase. Due to the reciprocal regulation between arginase and nitric oxide synthase, arginase inhibitors have therapeutic potential in treating nitric oxide-dependent smooth muscle disorders, such as erectile dysfunction. We demonstrate the competitive inhibition of the mitochondrial human type II arginase by N(omega)-hydroxy-L-arginine, the intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by nitric oxide synthase, and its analogue N(omega)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine, with K(i) values of 1.6 microM and 51 nM at pH 7.5, respectively. We also demonstrate the inhibition of human type II arginase by the boronic acid-based transition-state analogues 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH) and S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (BEC), which are known inhibitors of type I arginase. At pH 7.5, both ABH and BEC are classical, competitive inhibitors of human type II arginase with K(i) values of 0.25 and 0.31 microM, respectively. However, at pH 9.5, ABH and BEC are slow-binding inhibitors of the enzyme with K(i) values of 8.5 and 30 nM, respectively. The findings presented here indicate that the design of arginine analogues with uncharged, tetrahedral functional groups will lead to the development of more potent inhibitors of arginases at physiological pH.

  19. Towards Development of Small Molecule Lipid II Inhibitors as Novel Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Jamal; Cardinale, Steven; Fang, Lei; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M.; Pennington, M. Ross; Basi, Kelly; diTargiani, Robert; Capacio, Benedict R.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Opperman, Timothy J.; Fletcher, Steven; de Leeuw, Erik P. H.

    2016-01-01

    Recently we described a novel di-benzene-pyrylium-indolene (BAS00127538) inhibitor of Lipid II. BAS00127538 (1-Methyl-2,4-diphenyl-6-((1E,3E)-3-(1,3,3-trimethylindolin-2-ylidene)prop-1-en-1-yl)pyryl-1-ium) tetrafluoroborate is the first small molecule Lipid II inhibitor and is structurally distinct from natural agents that bind Lipid II, such as vancomycin. Here, we describe the synthesis and biological evaluation of 50 new analogs of BAS00127538 designed to explore the structure-activity relationships of the scaffold. The results of this study indicate an activity map of the scaffold, identifying regions that are critical to cytotoxicity, Lipid II binding and range of anti-bacterial action. One compound, 6jc48-1, showed significantly enhanced drug-like properties compared to BAS00127538. 6jc48-1 has reduced cytotoxicity, while retaining specific Lipid II binding and activity against Enterococcus spp. in vitro and in vivo. Further, this compound showed a markedly improved pharmacokinetic profile with a half-life of over 13 hours upon intravenous and oral administration and was stable in plasma. These results suggest that scaffolds like that of 6jc48-1 can be developed into small molecule antibiotic drugs that target Lipid II. PMID:27776124

  20. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors and Poisons, and the Influence of Cell Cycle Checkpoints.

    PubMed

    D Arcy, Nicholas; Gabrielli, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between the decatenation checkpoint and Topoisomerase II (TopoII) are vital for maintaining integrity of the genome. Agents that target this enzyme have been in clinical use in cancer therapy for over 30 years with great success. The types of compounds that have been developed to target TopoII are broadly divided into poisons and catalytic inhibitors. The TopoII poisons are in clinical use as anti-cancer therapies, although in common to most chemotherapeutic agents, they display considerable normal tissue toxicity. Inhibition of the TopoIIb isoform has been implicated in this cytotoxicity. Response to TopoII active agents is determined by several factors, but cell cycle checkpoints play a large role in sensitivity and resistance. The G2/M phase checkpoints are of particular importance in considering the effectiveness of these drugs and are reviewed in this article. Functionality of the ATM dependent decatenation checkpoint may represent a new avenue for selective cancer therapy. Here we review the function of TopoII, the anti-cancer mechanisms and limitations of current catalytic inhibitors and poisons, and their influence on cell cycle checkpoints. We will also assess potential new mechanisms for targeting this enzyme to limit normal tissue toxicity, and how the cell cycle checkpoint triggered by these drugs may provide an alternative and possibly better target for novel therapies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Topoisomerase I and II inhibitors: chemical structure, mechanisms of action and role in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhenkova, L. G.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Shtil, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The review summarizes and analyzes recent published data on topoisomerase I and II inhibitors as potential antitumour agents. Functions and the mechanism of action of topoisomerases are considered. The molecular mechanism of interactions between low-molecular-weight compounds and these proteins is discussed. Topoisomerase inhibitors belonging to different classes of chemical compounds are systematically covered. Assays for the inhibition of topoisomerases and the possibilities of using the computer-aided modelling for the rational design of novel drugs for cancer chemotherapy are presented. The bibliography includes 127 references.

  2. Identification of Noncompetitive Inhibitors of Cytosolic 5'-Nucleotidase II Using a Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Marton, Zsuzsanna; Guillon, Rémi; Krimm, Isabelle; Preeti; Rahimova, Rahila; Egron, David; Jordheim, Lars P; Aghajari, Nushin; Dumontet, Charles; Périgaud, Christian; Lionne, Corinne; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Chaloin, Laurent

    2015-12-24

    We used a combined approach based on fragment-based drug design (FBDD) and in silico methods to design potential inhibitors of the cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II), which has been recognized as an important therapeutic target in hematological cancers. Two subgroups of small compounds (including adenine and biaryl moieties) were identified as cN-II binders and a fragment growing strategy guided by molecular docking was considered. Five compounds induced a strong inhibition of the 5'-nucleotidase activity in vitro, and the most potent ones were characterized as noncompetitive inhibitors. Biological evaluation in cancer cell lines showed synergic effect with selected anticancer drugs. Structural studies using X-ray crystallography lead to the identification of new binding sites for two derivatives and of a new crystal form showing important domain swapping. Altogether, the strategy developed herein allowed identifying new original noncompetitive inhibitors against cN-II that act in a synergistic manner with well-known antitumoral agents.

  3. Insight into selectivity of peptidomimetic inhibitors with modified statine core for plasmepsin II of Plasmodium falciparum over human cathepsin D.

    PubMed

    Dali, Brice; Keita, Melalie; Megnassan, Eugene; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav

    2012-04-01

    Plasmepsin II (PlmII), an aspartic protease expressed in the food vacuole of Plasmodium falciparum (pf), cleaves the hemoglobin of the host during the erythrocytic stage of the parasite life cycle. Various peptidomimetic inhibitors of PlmII reported so far discriminate poorly between the drug target and aspartic proteases of the host organism, e.g., human cathepsinD (hCatD). hCatD is a protein digestion enzyme and signaling molecule involved in a variety of physiological processes; therefore, inhibition of hCatD by PlmII inhibitors may lead to pathophysiological conditions. In this study, binding of PlmII inhibitors has been modeled using the crystal structures of pfPlmII and hCatD complexes to gain insight into structural requirements underlying the target selectivity. A series of 26 inhibitors were modeled in the binding clefts of the pfPlmII and hCatD to establish QSAR models of the protease inhibition. In addition, 3D-QSAR pharmacophore models were generated for each enzyme. It was concluded that the contributions of the P(2) and P(3') residues to the inhibitor's binding affinity are responsible for the target selectivity. Based on these findings, new inhibitor candidates were designed with predicted inhibition constants K (pre)(i PlmII) reaching 0.2nm and selectivity index (S.I.)=K(pre)(i PlmII) >1200.

  4. Molecular identification of wheat endoxylanase inhibitor TAXI-II and the determinants of its inhibition specificity.

    PubMed

    Raedschelders, Gert; Fierens, Katleen; Sansen, Stefaan; Rombouts, Sigrid; Gebruers, Kurt; Robben, Johan; Rabijns, Anja; Courtin, Christophe M; Delcour, Jan A; Van Campenhout, Steven; Volckaert, Guido

    2005-09-23

    Wheat grains contain Triticum aestivum xylanase inhibitor (TAXI) proteins which inhibit microbial xylanases, some of which are used in cereal based food industries. These inhibitors may play a role in plant defence. Among the TAXI isoforms described so far, TAXI-II displays a deviating inhibition specificity pattern. Here, we report on the molecular identity of TAXI-II and the basis of its inhibition specificity. Three candidate TAXI-II encoding sequences were isolated and recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris. To identify TAXI-II, the resulting proteins were tested against glycoside hydrolase family (GHF) 11 xylanases of Aspergillus niger (ANX) and Bacillus subtilis (BSX). One of these proteins (rTAXI-IB) inhibited both enzymes, like natural TAXI-I. The other candidates (rTAXI-IIA and rTAXI-IIB) showed an inhibition pattern typical for natural TAXI-II, only clearly inhibiting BSX. Comparative analysis of these highly similar sequences with distinct inhibition activity patterns, combined with information on the structural basis for ANX inhibition by TAXI-I [S. Sansen, C.J. De Ranter, K. Gebruers, K. Brijs, C.M. Courtin, J.A. Delcour, A. Rabijns, Structural basis for inhibition of Aspergillus niger xylanase by Triticum aestivum xylanase inhibitor-I, J. Biol. Chem. 279 (2004) 36022-36028], indicated a crucial role for Pro294 of TAXI-IIA and Gln376 of TAXI-IIB in determining the reduced inhibition activity towards ANX. Consequently, single point mutants rTAXI-IIA[P294L] and rTAXI-IIB[Q376H], both displaying the Leu/His combination corresponding to TAXI-I, were able to inhibit ANX. These results show that TAXI-II inhibition specificity bears on the identity of two key residues at positions 294 and 376, which are involved in the interaction at the -2 glycon subsite and the active site of GHF 11, respectively.

  5. Inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by Cu(II) and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kwon, N S; Chan, P C; Kesner, L

    1990-03-01

    When alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was treated with 1-5 microM CuSO4 in the presence of H2O2 (250-1000 microM), its elastase inhibitory capacity was markedly decreased. Several other metal ions tested had either very little or no effect. The Cu(II)-catalyzed decreased in the inhibition of elastase activity can also be demonstrated in dialyzed plasma. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that in several pathological conditions in which extracellular copper levels are elevated, Cu(II)-catalyzed peroxidation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor may occur at sites of inflammation where H2O2 is secreted as a major product by activated phagocytes.

  6. Urotensin II inhibitor eases neuropathic pain by suppressing the JNK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhao, Pan-Pan; Hao, Ting; Wang, Dan; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yang-Zi; Wu, Yu-Qing; Zhou, Cheng-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Urotensin II (U-II), a cyclic peptide originally isolated from the caudal neurosecretory system of fishes, can produce proinflammatory effects through its specific G protein-coupled receptor, GPR14. Neuropathic pain, a devastating disease, is related to excessive inflammation in the spinal dorsal horn. However, the relationship between U-II and neuropathic pain has not been reported. This study was designed to investigate the effect of U-II antagonist on neuropathic pain and to understand the associated mechanisms. We reported that U-II and its receptor GPR14 were persistently upregulated and activated in the dorsal horn of L4-6 spinal cord segments after chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Intrathecal injection of SB657510, a specific antagonist against U-II, reversed CCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, we found that SB657510 reduced the expression of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 as well as subsequent secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). It was also showed that both the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC significantly attenuated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. Our present research showed that U-II receptor antagonist alleviated neuropathic pain possibly through the suppression of the JNK/NF-κB pathway in CCI rats, which will contribute to the better understanding of function of U-II and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

  7. "Addition" and "Subtraction": Selectivity Design for Type II Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Giraldes, John; Sprague, Elizabeth R; Shakya, Subarna; Chen, Zhuoliang; Wang, Yaping; Joud, Carol; Mathieu, Simon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Straub, Christopher; Duca, Jose; Hurov, Kristen; Yuan, Yanqiu; Shao, Wenlin; Touré, B Barry

    2017-03-09

    While adding the structural features that are more favored by on-target activity is the more common strategy in selectivity optimization, the opposite strategy of subtracting the structural features that contribute more to off-target activity can also be very effective. Reported here is our successful effort of improving the kinase selectivity of type II maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase inhibitors by applying these two complementary approaches together, which clearly demonstrates the powerful synergy between them.

  8. The pthaladyns: GTP competitive inhibitors of dynamin I and II GTPase derived from virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Odell, Luke R; Howan, Dian; Gordon, Christopher P; Robertson, Mark J; Chau, Ngoc; Mariana, Anna; Whiting, Ainslie E; Abagyan, Ruben; Daniel, James A; Gorgani, Nick N; Robinson, Phillip J; McCluskey, Adam

    2010-07-22

    We report the development of a homology model for the GTP binding domain of human dynamin I based on the corresponding crystal structure of Dictyostelium discoidum dynamin A. Virtual screening identified 2-[(2-biphenyl-2-yl-1,3-dioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-isoindole-5-carbonyl)amino]-4-chlorobenzoic acid (1) as a approximately 170 microM potent inhibitor. Homology modeling- and focused library-led synthesis resulted in development of a series of active compounds (the "pthaladyns") with 4-chloro-2-(2-(4-(hydroxymethyl)phenyl)-1,3-dioxoisoindoline-5-carboxamido)benzoic acid (29), a 4.58 +/- 0.06 microM dynamin I GTPase inhibitor. Pthaladyn-29 displays borderline selectivity for dynamin I relative to dynamin II ( approximately 5-10 fold). Only pthaladyn-23 (dynamin I IC(50) 17.4 +/- 5.8 microM) was an effective inhibitor of dynamin I mediated synaptic vesicle endocytosis in brain synaptosomes with an IC(50) of 12.9 +/- 5.9 microM. This compound was also competitive with respect to Mg(2+).GTP. Thus the pthaladyns are the first GTP competitive inhibitors of dynamin I and II GTPase and may be effective new tools for the study of neuronal endocytosis.

  9. Selective CNS Uptake of the GCP-II Inhibitor 2-PMPA following Intranasal Administration

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Wozniak, Krystyna; Wu, Ying; Niwa, Minae; Stathis, Marigo; Alt, Jesse; Giroux, Marc; Sawa, Akira; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP-II) is a brain metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes the abundant neuropeptide N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) to NAA and glutamate. Small molecule GCP-II inhibitors increase brain NAAG, which activates mGluR3, decreases glutamate, and provide therapeutic utility in a variety of preclinical models of neurodegenerative diseases wherein excess glutamate is presumed pathogenic. Unfortunately no GCP-II inhibitor has advanced clinically, largely due to their highly polar nature resulting in insufficient oral bioavailability and limited brain penetration. Herein we report a non-invasive route for delivery of GCP-II inhibitors to the brain via intranasal (i.n.) administration. Three structurally distinct classes of GCP-II inhibitors were evaluated including DCMC (urea-based), 2-MPPA (thiol-based) and 2-PMPA (phosphonate-based). While all showed some brain penetration following i.n. administration, 2-PMPA exhibited the highest levels and was chosen for further evaluation. Compared to intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration, equivalent doses of i.n. administered 2-PMPA resulted in similar plasma exposures (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 1.0) but dramatically enhanced brain exposures in the olfactory bulb (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 67), cortex (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 46) and cerebellum (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 6.3). Following i.n. administration, the brain tissue to plasma ratio based on AUC0-t in the olfactory bulb, cortex, and cerebellum were 1.49, 0.71 and 0.10, respectively, compared to an i.p. brain tissue to plasma ratio of less than 0.02 in all areas. Furthermore, i.n. administration of 2-PMPA resulted in complete inhibition of brain GCP-II enzymatic activity ex-vivo confirming target engagement. Lastly, because the rodent nasal system is not similar to humans, we evaluated i.n. 2-PMPA also in a non-human primate. We report that i.n. 2-PMPA provides selective brain delivery with micromolar concentrations. These studies support

  10. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  11. Substrate and Inhibitor Specificity of the Type II p21-Activated Kinase, PAK6

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jia; Ha, Byung Hak; Lou, Hua Jane; Morse, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Rong; Calderwood, David A.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2013-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are important effectors of Rho-family small GTPases. The PAK family consists of two groups, type I and type II, which have different modes of regulation and signaling. PAK6, a type II PAK, influences behavior and locomotor function in mice and has an ascribed role in androgen receptor signaling. Here we show that PAK6 has a peptide substrate specificity very similar to the other type II PAKs, PAK4 and PAK5 (PAK7). We find that PAK6 catalytic activity is inhibited by a peptide corresponding to its N-terminal pseudosubstrate. Introduction of a melanoma-associated mutation, P52L, into this peptide reduces pseudosubstrate autoinhibition of PAK6, and increases phosphorylation of its substrate PACSIN1 (Syndapin I) in cells. Finally we determine two co-crystal structures of PAK6 catalytic domain in complex with ATP-competitive inhibitors. We determined the 1.4 Å co-crystal structure of PAK6 with the type II PAK inhibitor PF-3758309, and the 1.95 Å co-crystal structure of PAK6 with sunitinib. These findings provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of PAK6 and may facilitate development of PAK6 targeted therapies. PMID:24204982

  12. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L.; Hood, Molly M.; Lord, John W.; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F.; Patt, William C.; Smith, Bryan D.; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D.; Petillo, Peter A.; Wise, Scott C.; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L.

    2012-01-20

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  13. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-01-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes. Plants showing vigorous PPT resistance were obtained by a series concentration selection for PPT resistance and subsequent regeneration of leaf explants dissected from the putative chimera. Transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and genomic Southern blotting, which showed that the bar and pinII genes were integrated into the plant genome. Double haploid homozygous transgenic plants were obtained by microspore culture. The pinII expression was detected using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and detection of PINII protein content in the transgenic homozygous lines. Insect-feeding trials using the larvae of cabbage worm (Pieris rapae) and the larvae of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) showed higher larval mortality, stunted larval development, and lower pupal weights, pupation rates, and eclosion rates in most of the transgenic lines in comparison with the corresponding values in the non-transformed wild-type line. PMID:23136521

  14. Photosystem II-inhibitors play a limited role in sweet corn response to 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase-inhibiting herbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Postemergence (POST) application of 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) inhibitors in combination with a photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor, such as atrazine, is common practice in sweet corn production. Given the sensitivity of sweet corn to HPPD-inhibiting herbicides, the objective of this wo...

  15. Iminochromene inhibitors of dynamins I and II GTPase activity and endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Timothy A; Mariana, Anna; Gordon, Christopher P; Odell, Luke R; Robertson, Mark J; McGeachie, Andrew B; Chau, Ngoc; Daniel, James A; Gorgani, Nick N; Robinson, Phillip J; McCluskey, Adam

    2010-05-27

    Herein we report the synthesis of discrete iminochromene ("iminodyn") libraries (14-38) as potential inhibitors of dynamin GTPase. Thirteen iminodyns were active (IC(50) values of 260 nM to 100 microM), with N,N-(ethane-1,2-diyl)bis(7,8-dihydroxy-2-iminochromene-3-carboxamide) (17), N,N-(ethane-1,2-diyl)bis(7,8-dihydroxy-2-iminochromene-3-carboxamide) (22), and N,N-(ethane-1,2-diyl)bis(7,8-dihydroxy-2-iminochromene-3-carboxamide) (23) (IC(50) values of 330 +/- 70, 450 +/- 50, and 260 +/- 80 nM, respectively) being the most potent. Five of the most potent iminodyns all inhibited dynamins I and II approximately equally. Iminodyn-22 displayed uncompetitive inhibition with respect to GTP. Selected iminodyns were evaluated for their ability to block receptor mediated endocytosis (RME, mediated by dynamin II) and synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE, mediated by dynamin I), with 17 showing no activity while 22 returned RME and SVE IC(50) values of 10.7 +/- 4.5 and 99.5 +/- 1.7 microM, respectively. The iminodyns reported herein represent a new chemical class of the first nanomolar potent dynamin inhibitors that are also effective endocytosis inhibitors.

  16. 13C NMR studies of carboxylate inhibitor binding to cobalt(II) carboxypeptidase A.

    PubMed

    Bertini, I; Monnanni, R; Pellacani, G C; Sola, M; Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1988-01-01

    Both 13C NMR and electronic absorption spectral studies on cobalt(II) carboxypeptidase A in the presence of acetate and phenylacetate provide evidence for two binding sites for each of these agents. The transverse relaxation rate T2-1 for the 13C-enriched carboxyl groups of the inhibitors is significantly increased when bound to the paramagnetic cobalt carboxypeptidase as compared to the diamagnetic zinc enzyme. The acetate concentration dependence of T2p-1 shows two inflections indicative of sequential binding of two inhibitor molecules. The cobalt-13C distances, calculated by means of the Solomon equation, indicate that the second acetate molecule binds directly to the metal ion while the first acetate molecule binds to a protein group at a distance 0.5-0.8 nm for the metal ion, consistent with it binding to one or more of the arginyl residues (Arg-145, Arg-127, or Arg-71). In the case of phenylacetate, perturbation of the cobalt electronic absorption spectrum shows that binding occurs stepwise. 13C NMR distance measurements indicate that one of the two phenylacetates is bound to the metal in the EI2 complex. These binding sites may correspond to those identified previously by kinetic means (one of which is competitive, the other noncompetitive) with peptide binding. The studies further indicate that it should be possible to map the protein interactions of the carbonyl groups of both substrate and noncompetitive inhibitors during catalysis by means of 13C NMR studies with suitably labeled substrates and inhibitors.

  17. Selective Loss of Cysteine Residues and Disulphide Bonds in a Potato Proteinase Inhibitor II Family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Tieling; Donnelly, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins play a key role in protein folding, stability, and function. Loss of a disulphide bond is often associated with functional differentiation of the protein. The evolution of disulphide bonds is still actively debated; analysis of naturally occurring variants can promote understanding of the protein evolutionary process. One of the disulphide bond-containing protein families is the potato proteinase inhibitor II (PI-II, or Pin2, for short) superfamily, which is found in most solanaceous plants and participates in plant development, stress response, and defence. Each PI-II domain contains eight cysteine residues (8C), and two similar PI-II domains form a functional protein that has eight disulphide bonds and two non-identical reaction centres. It is still unclear which patterns and processes affect cysteine residue loss in PI-II. Through cDNA sequencing and data mining, we found six natural variants missing cysteine residues involved in one or two disulphide bonds at the first reaction centre. We named these variants Pi7C and Pi6C for the proteins missing one or two pairs of cysteine residues, respectively. This PI-II-7C/6C family was found exclusively in potato. The missing cysteine residues were in bonding pairs but distant from one another at the nucleotide/protein sequence level. The non-synonymous/synonymous substitution (Ka/Ks) ratio analysis suggested a positive evolutionary gene selection for Pi6C and various Pi7C. The selective deletion of the first reaction centre cysteine residues that are structure-level-paired but sequence-level-distant in PI-II illustrates the flexibility of PI-II domains and suggests the functionality of their transient gene versions during evolution. PMID:21494600

  18. Type-II Kinase Inhibitor Docking, Screening, and Profiling Using Modified Structures of Active Kinase States

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Type-II kinase inhibitors represent a class of chemicals that trap their target kinases in an inactive, so-called DFG-out, state, occupying a hydrophobic pocket adjacent to the ATP binding site. These compounds are often more specific than those targeting active, DFG-in, kinase conformations. Unfortunately, the discovery of novel type-II scaffolds presents a considerable challenge, partly because the lack of compatible kinase structures makes structure-based methods inapplicable. We present a computational protocol for converting multiple available DFG-in structures of various kinases (∼70% of mammalian structural kinome) into accurate and specific models of their type-II-bound state. The models, described as Deletion-Of-Loop asp-PHe-gly-IN (DOLPHIN) kinase models, demonstrate exceptional performance in various inhibitor discovery applications, including compound pose prediction, screening, and in silico activity profiling. Given the abundance of the DFG-in structures, the presented approach opens possibilities for kinome-wide discovery of specific molecules targeting inactive kinase states. PMID:19053777

  19. Oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Aerts, C; Gressier, B; Gosset, P; Voisin, C

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of guinea pig alveolar epithelial type II cells to generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species to inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI). Inactivation of alpha 1-PI was evaluated by its inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic elastase and was expressed as a percentage. The same experiments were performed in parallel with alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained from the same animals and with MRC-5 fibroblasts. Both type II cells and AM released significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, whereas the fibroblasts did not. Unstimulated type II cells (0.5 +/- 2%), AM (1.2 +/- 1.5%), and fibroblasts (0.5 +/- 0.5%) were unable to inactivate alpha 1-PI. Addition of phorbol myristate acetate did not increase their ability to inactivate alpha 1-PI. In contrast, type II cells (79.7 +/- 7%) and AM (80.1 +/- 8%) dramatically inactivated alpha 1-PI in the presence of myeloperoxidase (25 mU/ml), whereas fibroblasts did not. Addition of catalase to the reaction significantly prevented the inactivation of alpha 1-PI. Western blot analysis of alpha 1-PI did not reveal a significant proteolysis of alpha 1-PI, which supports the hypothesis that, in the presence of neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase, type II cells may oxidatively inactivate alpha 1-PI.

  20. Structure-activity exploration of a small-molecule Lipid II inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Steven; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M; Chauhan, Jay; Opperman, Timothy J; MacKerell, Alexander D; de Leeuw, Erik P H

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified low-molecular weight compounds that act as inhibitors of Lipid II, an essential precursor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Lipid II comprises specialized lipid (bactoprenol) linked to a hydrophilic head group consisting of a peptidoglycan subunit (N-acetyl glucosamine [GlcNAc]-N-acetyl muramic acid [MurNAc] disaccharide coupled to a short pentapeptide moiety) via a pyrophosphate. One of our lead compounds, a diphenyl-trimethyl indolene pyrylium, termed BAS00127538, interacts with the MurNAc moiety and the isoprenyl tail of Lipid II. Here, we report on the structure-activity relationship of BAS00127538 derivatives obtained by in silico analyses and de novo chemical synthesis. Our results indicate that Lipid II binding and bacterial killing are related to three features: the diphenyl moiety, the indolene moiety, and the positive charge of the pyrylium. Replacement of the pyrylium moiety with an N-methyl pyridinium, which may have importance in stability of the molecule, did not alter Lipid II binding or antibacterial potency.

  1. Structure–activity exploration of a small-molecule Lipid II inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M; Chauhan, Jay; Opperman, Timothy J; MacKerell, Alexander D; de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified low-molecular weight compounds that act as inhibitors of Lipid II, an essential precursor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Lipid II comprises specialized lipid (bactoprenol) linked to a hydrophilic head group consisting of a peptidoglycan subunit (N-acetyl glucosamine [GlcNAc]–N-acetyl muramic acid [MurNAc] disaccharide coupled to a short pentapeptide moiety) via a pyrophosphate. One of our lead compounds, a diphenyl-trimethyl indolene pyrylium, termed BAS00127538, interacts with the MurNAc moiety and the isoprenyl tail of Lipid II. Here, we report on the structure–activity relationship of BAS00127538 derivatives obtained by in silico analyses and de novo chemical synthesis. Our results indicate that Lipid II binding and bacterial killing are related to three features: the diphenyl moiety, the indolene moiety, and the positive charge of the pyrylium. Replacement of the pyrylium moiety with an N-methyl pyridinium, which may have importance in stability of the molecule, did not alter Lipid II binding or antibacterial potency. PMID:25987836

  2. Natural diterpenes from Croton ciliatoglanduliferus as photosystem II and photosystem I inhibitors in spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Flores, Félix; Aguilar, María Isabel; King-Díaz, Beatriz; de Santiago-Gómez, Jesús-Ricardo; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas

    2007-01-01

    In our search for new natural photosynthetic inhibitors that could lead to the development of "green herbicides" less toxic to environment, the diterpene labdane-8alpha,15-diol (1) and its acetyl derivative (2) were isolated for the first time from Croton ciliatoglanduliferus Ort. They inhibited photophosphorylation, electron transport (basal, phosphorylating and uncoupled) and the partial reactions of both photosystems in spinach thylakoids. Compound 1 inhibits the photosystem II (PS II) partial reaction from water to Na(+) Silicomolibdate (SiMo) and has no effect on partial reaction from diphenylcarbazide (DPC) to 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP), therefore 1 inhibits at the water splitting enzyme and also inhibits PS I partial reaction from reduced phenylmetasulfate (PMS) to methylviologen (MV). Thus, it also inhibits in the span of P(700) to Iron sulfur center X (F(X)). Compound 2 inhibits both, the PS II partial reactions from water to SiMo and from DPC to DCPIP; besides this, it inhibits the photosystem I (PS I) partial reaction from reduced PMS to MV. With these results, we concluded that the targets of the natural product 2 are located at the water splitting enzyme, and at P(680) in PS II and at the span of P(700) to F(X) in PS I. The results of compounds 1 and 2 on PS II were corroborated by chlorophyll a fluorescence.

  3. WRN protects against topo I but not topo II inhibitors by preventing DNA break formation

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Markus; Tomicic, Maja T.; Gestrich, Christopher; Roos, Wynand P.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Kaina, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    The Werner syndrome helicase/3′-exonuclease (WRN) is a major component of the DNA repair and replication machinery. To analyze whether WRN is involved in the repair of topoisomerase-induced DNA damage we utilized U2-OS cells, in which WRN is stably down-regulated (wrn-kd), and the corresponding wild-type cells (wrn-wt). We show that cells not expressing WRN are hypersensitive to the toxic effect of the topoisomerase I inhibitor topotecan, but not to the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide. This was shown by mass survival assays, colony formation and induction of apoptosis. Upon topotecan treatment WRN deficient cells showed enhanced DNA replication inhibition and S-phase arrest, whereas after treatment with etoposide they showed the same cell cycle response as the wild-type. A considerable difference between WRN and wild-type cells was also observed for DNA single-and double-strand break formation in response to topotecan. Topotecan induced most DNA single-strand breaks 6 h after treatment. In both wrn-wt and wrn-kd cells these breaks were repaired at similar kinetics. However, in wrn-kd but not wrn-wt cells they were converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at high frequency, as shown by neutral comet assay and phosphorylation of H2AX. Our data provide evidence that WRN is involved in the repair of topoisomerase I, but not topoisomerase II-induced DNA damage, most likely via preventing the conversion of DNA single-strand breaks into DSBs during the resolution of stalled replication forks at topo I–DNA complexes. We suggest that the WRN status of tumor cells impacts anticancer therapy with topoisomerase I, but not topoisomerase II inhibitors. PMID:18805512

  4. Heterologous expression of Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) in Pichia pastoris system: Purification, isotopic labeling and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Mansur, Manuel; Camejo, Ayamey; Pires, José R; Alonso-Del-Rivero Antigua, Maday

    2016-10-01

    Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) is a tight-binding serine protease inhibitor of the Kazal family with an atypical broad specificity, being active against several proteases such as bovine pancreatic trypsin, human neutrophil elastase and subtilisin A. CmPI-II 3D structures are necessary for understanding the molecular basis of its activity. In the present work, we describe an efficient and straightforward recombinant expression strategy, as well as a cost-effective procedure for isotope labeling for NMR structure determination purposes. The vector pCM101 containing the CmPI-II gene, under the control of Pichia pastoris AOX1 promoter was constructed. Methylotrophic Pichia pastoris strain KM71H was then transformed with the plasmid and the recombinant protein (rCmPI-II) was expressed in benchtop fermenter in unlabeled or (15)N-labeled forms using ammonium chloride ((15)N, 99%) as the sole nitrogen source. Protein purification was accomplished by sequential cation exchange chromatography in STREAMLINE DirectHST, anion exchange chromatography on Hitrap Q-Sepharose FF and gel filtration on Superdex 75 10/30, yielding high quantities of pure rCmPI-II and (15)N rCmPI-II. Recombinant proteins displayed similar functional features as compared to the natural inhibitor and NMR spectra indicated folded and homogeneously labeled samples, suitable for further studies of structure and protease-inhibitor interactions.

  5. Rational Design Synthesis and Evaluation of New Selective Inhibitors of Microbial Class II (Zinc Dependent) Fructose Bis-phosphate Aldolases

    SciTech Connect

    R Daher; M Coincon; M Fonvielle; P Gest; M Guerin; M Jackson; J Sygusch; M Therisod

    2011-12-31

    We report the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of several selective inhibitors of class II (zinc dependent) fructose bis-phosphate aldolases (Fba). The products were designed as transition-state analogues of the catalyzed reaction, structurally related to the substrate fructose bis-phosphate (or sedoheptulose bis-phosphate) and based on an N-substituted hydroxamic acid, as a chelator of the zinc ion present in active site. The compounds synthesized were tested on class II Fbas from various pathogenic microorganisms and, by comparison, on a mammalian class I Fba. The best inhibitor shows Ki against class II Fbas from various pathogens in the nM range, with very high selectivity (up to 105). Structural analyses of inhibitors in complex with aldolases rationalize and corroborate the enzymatic kinetics results. These inhibitors represent lead compounds for the preparation of new synthetic antibiotics, notably for tuberculosis prophylaxis.

  6. δ-Thiolactones as prodrugs of thiol-based glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Dana V; Majer, Pavel; Ni, Chiyou; Slusher, C Ethan; Rais, Rana; Wu, Ying; Wozniak, Krystyna M; Alt, Jesse; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S; Tsukamoto, Takashi

    2014-01-09

    δ-Thiolactones derived from thiol-based glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors were evaluated as prodrugs. In rat liver microsomes, 2-(3-mercaptopropyl)pentanedioic acid (2-MPPA, 1) was gradually produced from 3-(2-oxotetrahydrothiopyran-3-yl)propionic acid (5), a thiolactone derived from 1. Compound 1 was detected in plasma at concentrations well above its IC50 for GCPII following oral administration of 5 in rats. Consistent with the oral plasma pharmacokinetics, thiolactone 5 exhibited efficacy in a rat model of neuropathic pain following oral administration.

  7. Saccharin sulfonamides as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases I, II, VII, XII, and XIII.

    PubMed

    Morkūnaitė, Vaida; Baranauskienė, Lina; Zubrienė, Asta; Kairys, Visvaldas; Ivanova, Jekaterina; Trapencieris, Pēteris; Matulis, Daumantas

    2014-01-01

    A series of modified saccharin sulfonamides have been designed as carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors and synthesized. Their binding to CA isoforms I, II, VII, XII, and XIII was measured by the fluorescent thermal shift assay (FTSA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Saccharin bound the CAs weakly, exhibiting the affinities of 1-10 mM for four CAs except CA I where binding could not be detected. Several sulfonamide-bearing saccharines exhibited strong affinities of 1-10 nM towards particular CA isoforms. The functional group binding Gibbs free energy additivity maps are presented which may provide insights into the design of compounds with increased affinity towards selected CAs.

  8. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) and lactation: an update.

    PubMed

    Shannon, M E; Malecha, S E; Cha, A J

    2000-05-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are commonly used for the treatment of hypertension. ACEIs have been promoted as first-line therapy for selected patients with chronic hypertension and for the prevention of diabetic nephropathy, thus creating the potential for frequent ACEI exposure among women of childbearing age. ARBs are the most recent addition to the available options for antihypertensive agents. This review specifically focuses on the most up-to-date information regarding these newer antihypertensives with regard to lactation.

  9. Proteinuria, a modifiable risk factor: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).

    PubMed

    Dykeman-Sharpe, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Microalbuminuria and proteinuria have been determined to be modifiable risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease as well as risk factors for cardiovascular events. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers have been demonstrated to decrease proteinuria at all stages and slow the progression of renal disease. Proteinuria can be used as a marker of successful treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease in combination with other established targets. This article discusses the various diagnostic tests used for the detection of microalbuminuria and proteinuria and appropriate pharmaceutical treatment.

  10. Copper (II) and zinc (II) complexes with flavanone derivatives: Identification of potential cholinesterase inhibitors by on-flow assays.

    PubMed

    Sarria, André Lucio Franceschini; Vilela, Adriana Ferreira Lopes; Frugeri, Bárbara Mammana; Fernandes, João Batista; Carlos, Rose Maria; da Silva, Maria Fátima das Graças Fernandes; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Cardoso, Carmen Lúcia

    2016-11-01

    Metal chelates strongly influence the nature and magnitude of pharmacological activities in flavonoids. In recent years, studies have shown that a promising class of flavanone-metal ion complexes can act as selective cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), which has led our group to synthesize a new series of flavanone derivatives (hesperidin, hesperetin, naringin, and naringenin) complexed to either copper (II) or zinc (II) and to evaluate their potential use as selective ChEIs. Most of the synthesized complexes exhibited greater inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) than against butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Nine of these complexes constituted potent, reversible, and selective ChEIs with inhibitory potency (IC50) and inhibitory constant (Ki) ranging from 0.02 to 4.5μM. Copper complexes with flavanone-bipyridine derivatives afforded the best inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE. The complex Cu(naringin)(2,2'-bipyridine) (11) gave IC50 and Ki values of 0.012±0.002 and 0.07±0.01μM for huAChE, respectively, which were lower than the inhibitory values obtained for standard galanthamine (IC50=206±30.0 and Ki=126±18.0μM). Evaluation of the inhibitory activity of this complex against butyrylcholinesterase from human serum (huBChE) gave IC50 and Ki values of 8.0±1.4 and 2.0±0.1μM, respectively. A Liquid Chromatography-Immobilized Capillary Enzyme Reactor by UV detection (LC-ICER-UV) assay allowed us to determine the IC50 and Ki values and the type of mechanism for the best inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Current ideas on the biology of IGFBP-6: More than an IGF-II inhibitor?

    PubMed

    Bach, Leon A

    IGFBP-6 binds IGF-II with higher affinity than IGF-I and it is a relatively specific inhibitor of IGF-II actions. More recently, IGFBP-6 has also been reported to have IGF-independent effects on cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and migration. IGFBP-6 binds to several ligands in the extracellular space, cytoplasm and nucleus. These interactions, together with activation of distinct intracellular signaling pathways, may contribute to its IGF-independent actions; for example, IGF-independent migration induced by IGFBP-6 involves interaction with prohibitin-2 and activation of MAP kinase pathways. A major challenge for the future is delineating the relative roles of the IGF-dependent and -independent actions of IGFBP-6, which may lead to the development of therapeutic approaches for diseases including cancer.

  12. Effects of a lipoxygenase inhibitor, panaxynol, on vascular contraction induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Takai, S; Jin, D; Kirimura, K; Ikeda, J; Sakaguchi, M; Baba, K; Fujita, T; Miyazaki, M

    1999-05-01

    We investigated whether a lipoxygenase inhibitor, panaxynol, affected the vascular contraction induced by angiotensin (Ang) II and the mean arterial pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Panaxynol suppressed dose-dependently the contractile responses induced by 30 nM Ang II in isolated intact and endothelial cell-denuded aorta in the hamster. IC50 values in the intact and endothelial cell-denuded aorta were 23 and 20 microM, respectively. In SHR, the mean arterial pressure after injection of 30 and 60 mg/kg panaxynol was reduced, and the maximum hypotensive values were 23 and 48 mmHg, respectively. Thus, lipoxygenase products may affect the renin-angiotensin system.

  13. The anticancer multi-kinase inhibitor dovitinib also targets topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Hasinoff, Brian B; Wu, Xing; Nitiss, John L; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Yalowich, Jack C

    2012-12-15

    Dovitinib (TKI258/CHIR258) is a multi-kinase inhibitor in phase III development for the treatment of several cancers. Dovitinib is a benzimidazole-quinolinone compound that structurally resembles the bisbenzimidazole minor groove binding dye Hoechst 33258. Dovitinib bound to DNA as shown by its ability to increase the DNA melting temperature and by increases in its fluorescence spectrum that occurred upon the addition of DNA. Molecular modeling studies of the docking of dovitinib into an X-ray structure of a Hoechst 33258-DNA complex showed that dovitinib could reasonably be accommodated in the DNA minor groove. Because DNA binders are often topoisomerase I (EC 5.99.1.2) and topoisomerase II (EC 5.99.1.3) inhibitors, the ability of dovitinib to inhibit these DNA processing enzymes was also investigated. Dovitinib inhibited the catalytic decatenation activity of topoisomerase IIα. It also inhibited the DNA-independent ATPase activity of yeast topoisomerase II which suggested that it interacted with the ATP binding site. Using isolated human topoisomerase IIα, dovitinib stabilized the enzyme-cleavage complex and acted as a topoisomerase IIα poison. Dovitinib was also found to be a cellular topoisomerase II poison in human leukemia K562 cells and induced double-strand DNA breaks in K562 cells as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of H2AX. Finally, dovitinib inhibited the topoisomerase I-catalyzed relaxation of plasmid DNA and acted as a cellular topoisomerase I poison. In conclusion, the cell growth inhibitory activity and the anticancer activity of dovitinib may result not only from its ability to inhibit multiple kinases, but also, in part, from its ability to target topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II.

  14. Discovery of Bacterial Fatty Acid Synthase Type II Inhibitors Using a Novel Cellular Bioluminescent Reporter Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Joselynn; Bowlin, Nicholas O.; Mills, Debra M.; Saenkham, Panatda; Kwasny, Steven M.; Opperman, Timothy J.; Williams, John D.; Rock, Charles O.; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Novel, cellular, gain-of-signal, bioluminescent reporter assays for fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) inhibitors were constructed in an efflux-deficient strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and based on the discovery that FASII genes in P. aeruginosa are coordinately upregulated in response to pathway disruption. A screen of 115,000 compounds identified a series of sulfonamidobenzamide (SABA) analogs, which generated strong luminescent signals in two FASII reporter strains but not in four control reporter strains designed to respond to inhibitors of pathways other than FASII. The SABA analogs selectively inhibited lipid biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity to mammalian cells (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50] ≥ 80 μM). The most potent SABA analogs had MICs of 0.5 to 7.0 μM (0.2 to 3.0 μg/ml) against an efflux-deficient Escherichia coli (ΔtolC) strain but had no detectable MIC against efflux-proficient E. coli or against P. aeruginosa (efflux deficient or proficient). Genetic, molecular genetic, and biochemical studies revealed that SABA analogs target the enzyme (AccC) catalyzing the biotin carboxylase half-reaction of the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase step in the initiation phase of FASII in E. coli and P. aeruginosa. These results validate the capability and the sensitivity of this novel bioluminescent reporter screen to identify inhibitors of E. coli and P. aeruginosa FASII. PMID:26169404

  15. Therapeutic trials comparing angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Elliott, W J

    2000-08-01

    Two independent pharmacologic methods of specifically interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been brought to the marketplace: angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). These agents have the potential not only to be very widely used for a broad variety of clinical indications but also to compete against each other as treatments for hypertension, heart failure, renal impairment, and other conditions. Many short-term comparative studies of these two classes of drugs have now been completed. Most have focused on surrogate endpoints, such as blood pressure, renal function, or cough. These studies have generally concluded that ARBs are better tolerated but that the two drug classes otherwise have similar efficacy. The largest clinical trial comparing ARBs and ACE inhibitors thus far completed, Evaluation of Losartan in the Elderly (ELITE 2), failed to confirm the results of a smaller study; it did not demonstrate a significant improvement in outcomes (death or hospitalization for heart failure) with an ARB used alone, despite better tolerability. Many longer-term outcome studies with survival endpoints are under way, but most will compare the combination against an ACE inhibitor alone. These studies will define the optimal use of these agents in medicine for decades to come.

  16. Finding Potent Sirt Inhibitor in Coffee: Isolation, Confirmation and Synthesis of Javamide-II (N-Caffeoyltryptophan) as Sirt1/2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae B

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that Sirt inhibition may have beneficial effects on several human diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Coffee is one of most popular beverages with several positive health effects. Therefore, in this paper, potential Sirt inhibitors were screened using coffee extract. First, HPLC was utilized to fractionate coffee extract, then screened using a Sirt1/2 inhibition assay. The screening led to the isolation of a potent Sirt1/2 inhibitor, whose structure was determined as javamide-II (N-caffeoyltryptophan) by NMR. For confirmation, the amide was chemically synthesized and its capacity of inhibiting Sirt1/2 was also compared with the isolated amide. Javamide-II inhibited Sirt2 (IC50; 8.7 μM) better than Sirt1(IC50; 34μM). Since javamide-II is a stronger inhibitor for Sirt2 than Sirt1. The kinetic study was performed against Sirt2. The amide exhibited noncompetitive Sirt2 inhibition against the NAD+ (Ki = 9.8 μM) and showed competitive inhibition against the peptide substrate (Ki = 5.3 μM). Also, a docking simulation showed stronger binding pose of javamide-II to Sirt2 than AGK2. In cellular levels, javamide-II was able to increase the acetylation of total lysine, cortactin and histone H3 in neuronal NG108-15 cells. In the same cells, the amide also increased the acetylation of lysine (K382) in p53, but not (K305). This study suggests that Javamide-II found in coffee may be a potent Sirt1/2 inhibitor, probably with potential use in some conditions of human diseases.

  17. Finding Potent Sirt Inhibitor in Coffee: Isolation, Confirmation and Synthesis of Javamide-II (N-Caffeoyltryptophan) as Sirt1/2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that Sirt inhibition may have beneficial effects on several human diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Coffee is one of most popular beverages with several positive health effects. Therefore, in this paper, potential Sirt inhibitors were screened using coffee extract. First, HPLC was utilized to fractionate coffee extract, then screened using a Sirt1/2 inhibition assay. The screening led to the isolation of a potent Sirt1/2 inhibitor, whose structure was determined as javamide-II (N-caffeoyltryptophan) by NMR. For confirmation, the amide was chemically synthesized and its capacity of inhibiting Sirt1/2 was also compared with the isolated amide. Javamide-II inhibited Sirt2 (IC50; 8.7μM) better than Sirt1(IC50; 34μM). Since javamide-II is a stronger inhibitor for Sirt2 than Sirt1. The kinetic study was performed against Sirt2. The amide exhibited noncompetitive Sirt2 inhibition against the NAD+ (Ki = 9.8 μM) and showed competitive inhibition against the peptide substrate (Ki = 5.3 μM). Also, a docking simulation showed stronger binding pose of javamide-II to Sirt2 than AGK2. In cellular levels, javamide-II was able to increase the acetylation of total lysine, cortactin and histone H3 in neuronal NG108-15 cells. In the same cells, the amide also increased the acetylation of lysine (K382) in p53, but not (K305). This study suggests that Javamide-II found in coffee may be a potent Sirt1/2 inhibitor, probably with potential use in some conditions of human diseases. PMID:26986569

  18. Antipsychotic agents screened as human carbonic anhydrase I and II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Erzengin, Mahmut; Bilen, Cigdem; Ergun, Adem; Gencer, Nahit

    2014-02-01

    The antipsychotic drugs currently used to treat schizophrenia can be divided into two distinct classes, typical and atypical antipsychotics. Many drug molecules are enzyme inhibitors that bind reversibly or irreversibly to their target through intermolecular interactions. That's why enzyme inhibition studies are an important issue for drug design and biochemical applications. In this study, in vitro inhibition effect of some antipsychotic drugs on the purified carbonic anhydrase (CA) I and II isoenzymes were investigated by using CO2 as a substrate. CA I and II were purified from human erythrocytes by a simple one step procedure using Sepharose 4B-L-tyrosine-sulfonamide affinity column. The results showed that all the drugs inhibited the cytosolic carbonic anhydrases enzyme activity in a concentration-dependent fashion. Among the studied drugs, aripiprazole and pramipexole were found to be the most active one for hCA I (IC50: 3.64 and 5.37 μM) and hCA II (IC50: 4.16 and 4.81 μM) activity, respectively.

  19. High-resolution structure of human carbonic anhydrase II complexed with acetazolamide reveals insights into inhibitor drug design.

    PubMed

    Sippel, Katherine H; Robbins, Arthur H; Domsic, John; Genis, Caroli; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McKenna, Robert

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of human carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) complexed with the inhibitor acetazolamide (AZM) has been determined at 1.1 A resolution and refined to an R(cryst) of 11.2% and an R(free) of 14.7%. As observed in previous CA II-inhibitor complexes, AZM binds directly to the zinc and makes several key interactions with active-site residues. The high-resolution data also showed a glycerol molecule adjacent to the AZM in the active site and two additional AZMs that are adventitiously bound on the surface of the enzyme. The co-binding of AZM and glycerol in the active site demonstrate that given an appropriate ring orientation and substituents, an isozyme-specific CA inhibitor may be developed.

  20. Effects of ACE inhibitors on cardiac angiotensin II and aldosterone in humans: "Relevance of lipophilicity and affinity for ACE".

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Marcel; Coletta, Elizabeth; White, Roselyn; Davies, Ross; Haddad, Haissam; Leenen, Frans H H

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors differ in their lipophilic/hydrophilic index that determines their tissue bioavailability and affinity to ACE, which may result in major differences in the degree of blockade of cardiac ACE. We evaluated the hypothesis that in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and activated cardiac renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), lipophilic ACE inhibitors with high affinity for ACE (perindopril and quinapril) will cause marked blockade of cardiac angiotensin (Ang) II and aldosterone generation, but not a hydrophilic ACE inhibitor with low affinity for ACE (lisinopril). Patients were randomized to receive perindopril (8 mg/day), quinapril (40 mg/day), or lisinopril (20 mg/day) for 3-4 weeks before cardiac catheterization. The coronary sinus-aortic root gradients for Ang I and II, and aldosterone were determined. A total of 19 patients completed the study. Compared to a healthy control group, all three ACE inhibitors decreased circulating Ang II and aldosterone to a similar extent. There were only minor differences between the three ACE inhibitors for the Ang II gradient between the coronary sinus and aortic root. The gradient for aldosterone tended to be positive in the quinapril group and absent/negative in the lisinopril and perindopril groups. Despite the lowest pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), gradients between the coronary sinus and aortic root for Ang II and aldosterone were actually the highest in the quinapril group. These findings do not support the concept that a hydrophilic ACE inhibitor is less effective in blocking the cardiac RAAS as compared to lipophilic ACE inhibitors.

  1. In silico modification of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) as potential inhibitor for class II histone deacetylase (HDAC)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer for the woman in the world. It is caused by the oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV). The inhibition activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is widely known as a low toxicity HDAC inhibitor. This research presents in silico SAHA modification by utilizing triazole, in order to obtain a better inhibitor. We conducted docking of the SAHA inhibitor and 12 modified versions to six class II HDAC enzymes, and then proceeded with drug scanning of each one of them. Results The docking results show that the 12 modified inhibitors have much better binding affinity and inhibition potential than SAHA. Based on drug scan analysis, six of the modified inhibitors have robust pharmacological attributes, as revealed by drug likeness, drug score, oral bioavailability, and toxicity levels. Conclusions The binding affinity, free energy and drug scan screening of the best inhibitors have shown that 1c and 2c modified inhibitors are the best ones to inhibit class II HDAC. PMID:22373132

  2. In silico modification of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) as potential inhibitor for class II histone deacetylase (HDAC).

    PubMed

    Tambunan, Usman S F; Bramantya, N; Parikesit, Arli A

    2011-01-01

    The cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer for the woman in the world. It is caused by the oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV). The inhibition activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is widely known as a low toxicity HDAC inhibitor. This research presents in silico SAHA modification by utilizing triazole, in order to obtain a better inhibitor. We conducted docking of the SAHA inhibitor and 12 modified versions to six class II HDAC enzymes, and then proceeded with drug scanning of each one of them. The docking results show that the 12 modified inhibitors have much better binding affinity and inhibition potential than SAHA. Based on drug scan analysis, six of the modified inhibitors have robust pharmacological attributes, as revealed by drug likeness, drug score, oral bioavailability, and toxicity levels. The binding affinity, free energy and drug scan screening of the best inhibitors have shown that 1c and 2c modified inhibitors are the best ones to inhibit class II HDAC.

  3. Saccharin Sulfonamides as Inhibitors of Carbonic Anhydrases I, II, VII, XII, and XIII

    PubMed Central

    Morkūnaitė, Vaida; Baranauskienė, Lina; Zubrienė, Asta; Trapencieris, Pēteris

    2014-01-01

    A series of modified saccharin sulfonamides have been designed as carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors and synthesized. Their binding to CA isoforms I, II, VII, XII, and XIII was measured by the fluorescent thermal shift assay (FTSA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Saccharin bound the CAs weakly, exhibiting the affinities of 1–10 mM for four CAs except CA I where binding could not be detected. Several sulfonamide-bearing saccharines exhibited strong affinities of 1–10 nM towards particular CA isoforms. The functional group binding Gibbs free energy additivity maps are presented which may provide insights into the design of compounds with increased affinity towards selected CAs. PMID:25276805

  4. Design of composite inhibitors targeting glutamate carboxypeptidase II: the importance of effector functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Novakova, Zora; Cerny, Jiri; Choy, Cindy J.; Nedrow, Jessie; Choi, Joeseph K.; Lubkowski, Jacek; Berkman, Clifford E.; Barinka, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors targeting human glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) typically consist of a P1’ glutamate-derived binding module, which warrants the high-affinity and specificity, linked to an effector function that is positioned within the entrance funnel of the enzyme. Here we present a comprehensive structural and computational study aimed at dissecting the importance of the effector function for GCPII binding and affinity. To this end we determined crystal structures of human GCPII in complex with a series of phosphoramidate-based inhibitors harboring effector functions of diverse physicochemical characteristics. Our data shows that higher binding affinities of phosphoramidates, when compared to matching phosphonates, are linked to the presence of additional hydrogen bonds between Glu424 and Gly518 of the enzyme and the amide group of the phosphoramidate. While the positioning of the P1’ glutamate-derived module within the S1’ pocket of GCPII is invariant, interaction interfaces between effector functions and residues lining the entrance funnel are highly varied, with the positively charged arginine patch defined by Arg463, Arg534, Arg536, being the only ‘hot-spot’ common to several studied complexes. This variability stems in part from the fact that the effector/GCPII interfaces generally encompass isolated areas of non-polar residues within the entrance funnel and resulting van der Waals contacts lack the directionality typical for hydrogen-bonding interactions. Presented data unravel a complexity of binding modes of inhibitors within non-prime site(s) of GCPII and can be exploited for the design of novel GCPII-specific compounds. PMID:26460595

  5. Potato type I and II proteinase inhibitors: modulating plant physiology and host resistance.

    PubMed

    Turra, David; Lorito, Matteo

    2011-08-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (PIs) are a large and complex group of plant proteins. Members of the potato type I (Pin1) and II (Pin2) proteinase inhibitor families are among the first and most extensively characterized plant PIs. Many insects and phytopathogenic microorganisms use intracellular and extracellular serine proteases playing important roles in pathogenesis. Plants, however, are able to fight these pathogens through the activation of an intricate defence system that leads to the accumulation of various PIs, including Pin1 and Pin2. Several transgenic plants over-expressing members of the Pin1 and Pin2 families have been obtained in the last twenty years and their enhanced defensive capabilities demonstrated against insects, fungi and bacteria. Furthermore, Pin1 and Pin2 genetically engineered plants showed altered regulation of different plant physiological processes (e.g., dehydratation response, programmed cell death, plant growth, trichome density and branching), supporting an endogenous role in various plant species in addition to the well established defensive one. This review summarizes the current knowledge about Pin1 and Pin2 structure, the role of these proteins in plant defence and physiology, and their potential exploitation in biotechnology.

  6. Phase II study of an AKT inhibitor MK2206 in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Oki, Yasuhiro; Fanale, Michelle; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Copeland, Amanda; Samaniego, Felipe; Kwak, Larry W.; Neelapu, Sattva; Wang, Michael; Feng, Lei; Younes, Anas

    2017-01-01

    Summary We conducted a phase II study of the AKT inhibitor, MK2206 in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma of any histology excluding Burkitt lymphoma or lymphoblastic lymphoma. MK-2206 was administered orally at 200 mg once weekly in 28-d cycles up to 12 cycles in the absence of progression or significant toxicity. The dose was adjusted based on tolerance. A total of 59 patients were enrolled. The final doses patients received were 300 mg (n = 33), 250 mg (n = 2), 200 mg (n = 16) and 135 mg (n = 8). Based on intent-to-treat analysis, objective response was observed in 8 (14%) patients (2 complete response and 6 partial response), with median response duration of 5.8 months. The overall response rate was 20% in 25 patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Rash was the most common toxicity (any grade 53%, Grade 3 in 15%) and was observed in a dose-dependent manner. The correlative cytokine analysis showed paradoxical increase in several cytokines, which may be explained by negative feedback mechanism induced by the on-target effect of AKT inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that MK2206 has a favourable safety profile with a modest activity in patients with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma. The future studies should explore mechanism-based combinations (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01258998). PMID:26213141

  7. Phase II study of an AKT inhibitor MK2206 in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Oki, Yasuhiro; Fanale, Michelle; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Copeland, Amanda; Samaniego, Felipe; Kwak, Larry W; Neelapu, Sattva; Wang, Michael; Feng, Lei; Younes, Anas

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a phase II study of the AKT inhibitor, MK2206 in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma of any histology excluding Burkitt lymphoma or lymphoblastic lymphoma. MK-2206 was administered orally at 200 mg once weekly in 28-d cycles up to 12 cycles in the absence of progression or significant toxicity. The dose was adjusted based on tolerance. A total of 59 patients were enrolled. The final doses patients received were 300 mg (n = 33), 250 mg (n = 2), 200 mg (n = 16) and 135 mg (n = 8). Based on intent-to-treat analysis, objective response was observed in 8 (14%) patients (2 complete response and 6 partial response), with median response duration of 5·8 months. The overall response rate was 20% in 25 patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Rash was the most common toxicity (any grade 53%, Grade 3 in 15%) and was observed in a dose-dependent manner. The correlative cytokine analysis showed paradoxical increase in several cytokines, which may be explained by negative feedback mechanism induced by the on-target effect of AKT inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that MK2206 has a favourable safety profile with a modest activity in patients with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma. The future studies should explore mechanism-based combinations (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01258998). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. In silico approaches to identify the potential inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Janaki Ramaiah, M; Stanley, Balraj Alex; Prasanna Lakshmi, S; Vishnu Priya, J; Hussain, Tajamul; Alrokayan, Salman A; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-07

    To develop a potential inhibitor for glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) effective against all the eight common genetic variants reported, PyMOL molecular visualization system was used to generate models of variants using the crystal structure of GCPII i.e. 2OOT as a template. High-throughput virtual screening of 29 compounds revealed differential efficacy across the eight genetic variants (pIC50: 4.70 to 10.22). Pharmacophore analysis and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies revealed a urea-based N-acetyl aspartyl glutamate (NAAG) analogue as more potent inhibitor, which was effective across all the genetic variants of GCPII as evidenced by glide scores (-4.32 to -7.08) and protein-ligand interaction plots (13 interactions in wild GCPII). This molecule satisfied Lipinski rule of five and rule of three for drug-likeliness. Being a NAAG-analogue, this molecule might confer neuroprotection by inhibiting glutamatergic neurotransmission mediated by N-acetylated alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase), a splice variant of GCPII.

  9. Interaction of protein C inhibitor with the type II transmembrane serine protease enteropeptidase.

    PubMed

    Prohaska, Thomas A; Wahlmüller, Felix C; Furtmüller, Margareta; Geiger, Margarethe

    2012-01-01

    The serine protease inhibitor protein C inhibitor (PCI) is expressed in many human tissues and exhibits broad protease reactivity. PCI binds glycosaminoglycans and certain phospholipids, which modulate its inhibitory activity. Enteropeptidase (EP) is a type II transmembrane serine protease mainly found on the brush border membrane of epithelial cells in the duodenum, where it activates trypsinogen to initiate the digestion of food proteins. Some active EP is also present in duodenal fluid and has been made responsible for causing pancreatitis in case of duodeno-pancreatic reflux. Together with its substrate trypsinogen, EP is furthermore present in the epidermis and in some cancer cells. In this report, we show that PCI inhibited EP with an apparent 2nd order rate constant of 4.48 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). Low molecular weight (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin (UFH) slightly reduced the inhibitory effect of PCI. The SI (stoichiometry of inhibition) value for the inhibition of EP by PCI was 10.8 in the absence and 17.9 in the presence of UFH (10 U/ml). By inhibiting trypsin, chymotrypsin, and additionally EP, PCI might play a role in the protection of the pancreas from autodigestion. Furthermore the interaction of PCI with EP may influence the regulation of epithelial differentiation.

  10. Selective class II HDAC inhibitors impair myogenesis by modulating the stability and activity of HDAC–MEF2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nebbioso, Angela; Manzo, Fabio; Miceli, Marco; Conte, Mariarosaria; Manente, Lucrezia; Baldi, Alfonso; De Luca, Antonio; Rotili, Dante; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello; Usiello, Alessandro; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Altucci, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are promising new epi-drugs, but the presence of both class I and class II enzymes in HDAC complexes precludes a detailed elucidation of the individual HDAC functions. By using the class II-specific HDAC inhibitor MC1568, we separated class I- and class II-dependent effects and defined the roles of class II enzymes in muscle differentiation in cultured cells and in vivo. MC1568 arrests myogenesis by (i) decreasing myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) expression, (ii) by stabilizing the HDAC4–HDAC3–MEF2D complex, and (iii) paradoxically, by inhibiting differentiation-induced MEF2D acetylation. In vivo MC1568 shows an apparent tissue-selective HDAC inhibition. In skeletal muscle and heart, MC1568 inhibits the activity of HDAC4 and HDAC5 without affecting HDAC3 activity, thereby leaving MEF2–HDAC complexes in a repressed state. Our results suggest that HDAC class II-selective inhibitors might have a therapeutic potential for the treatment of muscle and heart diseases. PMID:19498465

  11. Dominant lethal mutations of topoisomerase II inhibitors etoposide and merbarone in male mice: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M

    2012-05-01

    Two topoisomerase II inhibitors, etoposide and merbarone, were tested for the induction of dominant lethal mutations in male mice. Etoposide was administered at a dosage of 30 or 60 mg/kg. Merbarone was administered at a dosage of 40 or 80 mg/kg. These males were mated at weekly intervals to virgin females for 6 weeks. In the present experiments, regardless of the agent, spermatids appeared to be the most sensitive germ-cell stage to dominant lethal induction. Etoposide and merbarone clearly induced dominant lethal mutations in the early spermatid stage only with the highest tested doses. The mutagenic effects were also directly correlated with reactive oxygen species accumulation as an obvious increase in 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence level was noted in the sperm of animals treated with higher doses of etoposide and merbarone. Treatment of male mice with N-acetylcysteine significantly protected mice from etoposide- and merbarone-induced dominant lethality. Moreover, N-acetylcysteine treatment had no antagonizing effect on etoposide- and merbarone-induced topoisomerase II inhibition. Overall, this study provides for the first time that etoposide and merbarone induce dominant lethal mutations in the early spermatid stage through a mechanism that involves increases in oxidative stress. The demonstrated mutagenicity profile of etoposide and merbarone may support further development of effective chemotherapy with less mutagenicity.

  12. Identification of a better Homo sapiens Class II HDAC inhibitor through binding energy calculations and descriptor analysis.

    PubMed

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Wulandari, Evi Kristin

    2010-10-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the most common on sexually transmitted viruses in the world. HPVs are responsible for a large spectrum of deseases, both benign and malignant. The certain types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cancer. In attemps to find additional drugs in the treatment of cervical cancer, inhibitors of the histone deacetylases (HDAC) have received much attention due to their low cytotoxic profiles and the E6/E7 oncogene function of human papilomavirus can be completely by passed by HDAC inhibition. The histone deacetylase inhibitors can induce growth arrest, differentiation and apoptosis of cancer cells. HDAC class I and class II are considered the main targets for cancer. Therefore, the six HDACs class II was modeled and about two inhibitors (SAHA and TSA) were docked using AutoDock4.2, to each of the inhibitor in order to identify the pharmacological properties. Based on the results of docking, SAHA and TSA were able to bind with zinc ion in HDACs models as a drug target. SAHA was satisfied almost all the properties i.e., binding affinity, the Drug-Likeness value and Drug Score with 70% oral bioavailability and the carbonyl group of these compound fits well into the active site of the target where the zinc is present. Hence, SAHA could be developed as potential inhibitors of class II HDACs and valuable cervical cancer drug candidate.

  13. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists and heart failure: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors remain the first-line option.

    PubMed

    2005-10-01

    (1) Some angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) reduce mortality in patients with heart failure (captopril, enalapril, ramipril and trandolapril), and in patients with recent myocardial infarction and heart failure or marked left ventricular dysfunction (captopril, ramipril and trandolapril). (2) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, otherwise known as angiotensin receptor blockers, have haemodynamic effects similar to ACE inhibitors, but differ in their mechanism of action and certain adverse effects. (3) Five clinical trials have evaluated angiotensin II receptor antagonists (candesartan, losartan and valsartan) in terms of their effect on mortality and on the risk of clinical deterioration in patients with symptomatic heart failure, but without severe renal failure, hyperkalemia or hypotension. In these trials, candesartan and valsartan were used at much higher doses than those recommended for the treatment of arterial hypertension. (4) In patients with heart failure who were not taking an angiotensin II receptor antagonist or an ACE inhibitor at enrollment, no significant difference was found between losartan and captopril in terms of mortality or the risk of clinical deterioration. (5) In patients with heart failure who had stopped taking an ACE inhibitor because of adverse effects, candesartan had no effect on mortality as compared with placebo, but it did reduce the risk of clinical deterioration (3 fewer hospitalisations per year per 100 patients). However, candesartan was associated with adverse effects such as renal failure and hyperkalemia, especially in patients who had experienced these same adverse effects while taking an ACE inhibitor. (6) In patients with heart failure who were already taking an ACE inhibitor, adjunctive candesartan or valsartan treatment did not influence mortality in comparison to the addition of a placebo. Adding candesartan or valsartan reduced the risk of hospitalisation (between 1 and 3 fewer hospitalisations

  14. Structure-activity relationships for analogues of the phenazine-based dual topoisomerase I/II inhibitor XR11576.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouming; Miller, Warren; Milton, John; Vicker, Nigel; Stewart, Alistair; Charlton, Peter; Mistry, Prakash; Hardick, David; Denny, William A

    2002-02-11

    As part of a programme to identify further analogues of the dual topo I/II inhibitor XR11576, we describe here the syntheses and SAR studies of various 'minimal' and 3,4-benzofused phenazine chromophores of the phenazine template of XR11576.

  15. Recent advances in inhibitors of bacterial fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) system enzymes as potential antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ma, Shutao

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial infections are a constant and serious threat to human health. With the increase of multidrug resistance of clinically pathogenic bacteria, common antibiotic therapies have been less effective. Fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) system enzymes are essential for bacterial membrane lipid biosynthesis and represent increasingly promising targets for the discovery of antibacterial agents with new mechanisms of action. This review highlights recent advances in inhibitors of bacterial FASII as potential antibacterial agents, paying special attention to the activities, mechanisms, and structure-activity relationships of those inhibitors that mainly target β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase, β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase, and enoyl-ACP reductase. Although inhibitors with low nanomolar and selective activity against various bacterial FASII have entered clinical trials, further research is needed to expand upon both available and yet unknown scaffolds to identify new FASII inhibitors that may have antibacterial potential, particularly against resistant bacterial strains.

  16. Effects of treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor in tumors based on 15 phase II clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Lu, Mingjie; Yao, Mengqian; Zhu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp)90 serves as a chaperone protein that promotes the proper folding of proteins involved in a variety of signal transduction processes involved in cell growth. Hsp90 inhibitors, which inhibit the activity of critical client proteins, have emerged as the accessory therapeutic agents for multiple human cancer types. To better understand the effects of Hsp90 inhibitors in cancer treatment, the present study reviewed 15 published phase II clinical trials to investigate whether Hsp90 inhibitors will benefit patients with cancer. Information of complete response, partial response, stable disease, objective response and objective response rate was collected to evaluate clinical outcomes. Overall, Hsp90 inhibitors are effective against a variety of oncogene-addicted cancers, including those that have developed resistance to specific receptors. PMID:27602225

  17. Rational design of urea-based glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors as versatile tools for specific drug targeting and delivery.

    PubMed

    Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Bařinková, Jitka; Pachl, Petr; Poštová-Slavětínská, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), also known as prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is an established prostate cancer marker and is considered a promising target for specific anticancer drug delivery. Low-molecular-weight inhibitors of GCPII are advantageous specific ligands for this purpose. However, they must be modified with a linker to enable connection of the ligand with an imaging molecule, anticancer drug, and/or nanocarrier. Here, we describe a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of GCPII inhibitors with linkers suitable for imaging and drug delivery. Structure-assisted inhibitor design and targeting of a specific GCPII exosite resulted in a 7-fold improvement in Ki value compared to the parent structure. X-ray structural analysis of the inhibitor series led to the identification of several inhibitor binding modes. We also optimized the length of the inhibitor linker for effective attachment to a biotin-binding molecule and showed that the optimized inhibitor could be used to target nanoparticles to cells expressing GCPII.

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  19. Synthesis and Mechanism Studies of 1,3-Benzoazolyl Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyrazine Derivatives as Nonintercalative Topoisomerase II Catalytic Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Hui; Zeng, Ping; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Yao, Pei-Fen; Mai, Yan-Wen; Tan, Jia-Heng; Ou, Tian-Miao; Huang, Shi-Liang; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu

    2016-01-14

    Novel topoisomerase II (Topo II) inhibitors have gained considerable interest for the development of anticancer agents. In this study, a series of 1,3-benzoazolyl-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyrazine derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential Topo II catalytic inhibitors. It was found that some of derivatives had good antiproliferative activity on seven cancer cell lines, especially on HL-60/MX2, a cancer cell line derivative from HL-60 that is resistant to Topo II poison. Topo II mediated DNA relaxation assay results showed that derivatives could significantly inhibit the activity of Topo II, and the structure-activity relationship studies indicated the importance of the alkylamino side chain and the benzoazolyl group. Further mechanism studies revealed that derivatives function as Topo II nonintercalative catalytic inhibitors and may block the ATP binding site of Topo II. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis showed that this class of compounds could induce apoptosis of HL-60 cells.

  20. Light Activation of a Cysteine Protease Inhibitor: Caging of a Peptidomimetic Nitrile with RuII(bpy)2

    PubMed Central

    Respondek, Tomasz; Garner, Robert N.; Herroon, Mackenzie K.; Podgorski, Izabela; Turro, Claudia; Kodanko, Jeremy J.

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for caging protease inhibitors is described. The complex [RuII(bpy)2(1)2](PF6)2 (2) was prepared from the nitrile-based peptidomimetic inhibitor Ac-Phe-NHCH2CN (1). 1H NMR, UV-vis and IR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric data confirm that two equiv of inhibitor 1 bind to RuII through the nitrile functional group. Complex 2 shows excellent stability in aqueous solution in the dark and fast release of 1 upon irradiation with visible light. Due to binding to the RuII center, the nitriles of complex 2 are caged, and 2 does not act as a potent enzyme inhibitor. However, when 2 is irradiated, it releases 1 that inhibits the cysteine proteases papain and cathepsins B, K and L, up to two times more potently than 1 alone. Ratios for IC50 values for 2 range from 6:1 to 33:1 under dark vs. light conditions, against isolated enzymes and in human cell lysates, confirming a high level of photoinduced enzyme inhibition is obtained with this method. PMID:21973207

  1. A common mechanism links differently acting complex II inhibitors to cardioprotection: modulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Dröse, Stefan; Bleier, Lea; Brandt, Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the effect of different cardioprotective complex II inhibitors on the mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) because ROS seem to be essential for signaling during preconditioning to prevent ischemia/reperfusion injury. Despite different binding sites and concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition-ranging from nanomolar for the Q site inhibitor atpenin A5 to millimolar for the succinate analog malonate-all inhibitors modulated ROS production in the same ambivalent fashion: they promoted the generation of superoxide at the Q(o) site of complex III under conditions of "oxidant-induced reduction" but attenuated ROS generated at complex I due to reverse electron transfer. All inhibitors showed these ambivalent effects independent of the presence of K(+). These findings suggest a direct modulation of mitochondrial ROS generation during cardioprotection via complex II inhibition and question the recently proposed role of complex II as a regulatory component of the putative mitochondrial K(ATP) channel.

  2. A Phase II Study of RO4929097 Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor in Metastatic Melanoma: SWOG 0933

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sylvia M.; Moon, James; Redman, Bruce G.; Chidiac, Tarek; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Zha, Yuanyuan; Othus, Megan; Ribas, Antoni; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant Notch activation confers a proliferative advantage onto many human tumors, including melanoma. This phase II trial assessed the antitumor activity of RO4929097, a gamma-secretase inhibitor of Notch signaling, on the progression-free and overall survival of patients with advanced melanoma. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic melanoma of cutaneous or unknown origin were treated with RO4929097 at a dose of 20 mg orally daily, 3 consecutive days per week. A two-step accrual design was used, with an interim analysis on the first 32 patients, and continuation of enrollment if ≥4/32 patients responded. Results Thirty-six patients from 23 institutions were enrolled; 32 patients were evaluable. RO4929097 was well-tolerated, and most toxicities were grade 1 or 2. The most common toxicities were nausea (53%), fatigue (41%), and anemia (22%). There was 1 confirmed partial response lasting 7 months, and 8 patients with stable disease lasting at least through week 12, with one of these continuing for 31 months. The 6-month PFS was 9% (95% CI: 2–22%), and 1-year OS was 50% (95% CI: 32–66%). Peripheral blood T cell assays showed no significant inhibition of IL-2 production, a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker of Notch inhibition, suggesting that the drug levels were insufficient to achieve Notch target inhibition. Conclusions RO4929097 showed minimal clinical activity against metastatic melanoma in this phase II trial, possibly due to inadequate exposure to therapeutic drug levels. While Notch inhibition remains a compelling target in melanoma, our results do not support further investigation of RO4929097 at this dose and schedule. PMID:25250858

  3. Virtual screening filters for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase inhibitors: a fragment based library generation approach.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we introduce the development and application of a three-step scoring and filtering procedure for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase leads using allosteric fragments extracted from virtual screening hits. The design of the virtual screening filters is based on a thorough evaluation of docking methods, DFG-loop conformation, binding interactions and chemotype specificity of the 138 p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from Protein Data Bank bound to DFG-in and DFG-out conformations using Glide, GOLD and CDOCKER. A 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation with the apo, type I with DFG-in and type II with DFG-out forms was carried out to delineate the effects of structural variations on inhibitor binding. The designed docking-score and sub-structure filters were first tested on a dataset of 249 potent p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from seven diverse series and 18,842 kinase inhibitors from PDB, to gauge their capacity to discriminate between kinase and non-kinase inhibitors and likewise to selectively filter-in target-specific inhibitors. The designed filters were then applied in the virtual screening of a database of ten million (10⁷) compounds resulting in the identification of 100 hits. Based on their binding modes, 98 allosteric fragments were extracted from the hits and a fragment library was generated. New type II p38 MAP kinase leads were designed by tailoring the existing type I ATP site binders with allosteric fragments using a common urea linker. Target specific virtual screening filters can thus be easily developed for other kinases based on this strategy to retrieve target selective compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lead Discovery of Type II BRAF V600E Inhibitors Targeting the Structurally Validated DFG-Out Conformation Based upon Selected Fragments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingwen; Zhang, Xuejin; You, Qidong

    2016-07-16

    The success of the first approved kinase inhibitor imatinib has spurred great interest in the development of type II inhibitors targeting the inactive DFG-out conformation, wherein the Phe of the DFG motif at the start of the activation loop points into the ATP binding site. Nevertheless, kinase inhibitors launched so far are heavily biased toward type I inhibitors targeting the active DFG-in conformation, wherein the Phe of the DFG motif flips by approximately 180° relative to the inactive conformation, resulting in Phe and Asp swapping their positions. Data recently obtained with structurally validated type II inhibitors supported the conclusion that type II inhibitors are more selective than type I inhibitors. In our type II BRAF V600E inhibitor lead discovery effort, we identified phenylaminopyrimidine (PAP) and unsymmetrically disubstituted urea as two fragments that are frequently presented in FDA-approved protein kinase inhibitors. We therefore defined PAP and unsymmetrically disubstituted urea as privileged fragments for kinase drug discovery. A pharmacophore for type II inhibitors, 4-phenylaminopyrimidine urea (4-PAPU), was assembled based upon these privileged fragments. Lead compound SI-046 with BRAF V600E inhibitory activity comparable to the template compound sorafenib was in turn obtained through preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) study. Molecular docking suggested that SI-046 is a bona fide type II kinase inhibitor binding to the structurally validated "classical DFG-out" conformation of BRAF V600E. Our privileged fragments-based approach was shown to efficiently deliver a bona fide type II kinase inhibitor lead. In essence, the theme of this article is to showcase the strategy and rationale of our approach.

  5. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Parameters of Sarcopenia: Relation to Muscle Mass, Strength and Function: Data from the Berlin Aging Study-II (BASE-II).

    PubMed

    Spira, Dominik; Walston, Jeremy; Buchmann, Nikolaus; Nikolov, Jivko; Demuth, Ilja; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Eckardt, Rahel; Norman, Kristina

    2016-11-01

    Pharmacological options for the treatment of sarcopenia currently do not exist. However, off-label treatment options of some established drugs have been suggested. The aim of this study was to assess differences in various muscle and physical performance parameters in relation to the intake of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in a cohort of community-dwelling older people. Eight hundred and thirty-eight participants from the Berlin Aging Study-II (BASE-II) were included. Appendicular lean mass was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and related to height and body mass index. Muscle strength was measured by grip strength and related to muscle mass (arm muscle quality) and functional status was assessed via the timed "Up and Go" test. Users of ACE inhibitors had higher lean mass related to height but significantly lower lean mass related to body mass index (p = 0.001 for women and p < 0.0001 for men). Moreover, they exhibited lower arm muscle quality (p = 0.032 for women and p = 0.031 for men) and reported difficulties in climbing stairs more often than non-users (p = 0.014 for women and p = 0.004 for men). After adjustment for confounders, there were no significant differences regarding lean mass, arm muscle quality and the timed "Up and Go" test according to the use of ACE inhibitors. In BASE-II, no positive relationship was found between the intake of ACE inhibitors and lean mass, strength, muscle quality or function. Moreover, remarkable differences between parameters of absolute and relative lean mass in relation to the use of ACE inhibitors became evident. Fat mass proved to be an important confounder and therefore muscle mass cannot be viewed irrespectively of whole body composition.

  6. The endogenous mitochondrial complex II inhibitor malonate regulates mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels: implications for ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Wojtovich, Andrew P; Brookes, Paul S

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) affords cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, and while the molecular mechanisms of IPC are debated, the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (mK(ATP)) has emerged as a candidate effector for several IPC signaling pathways. The molecular identity of this channel is unknown, but significant pharmacologic overlap exists between mK(ATP) and mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate dehydrogenase). In this investigation, we utilized isolated cardiac mitochondria, Langendorff perfused hearts, and a variety of biochemical methods, to make the following observations: (i) The competitive complex II inhibitor malonate is formed in mitochondria under conditions resembling IPC. (ii) IPC leads to a reversible inhibition of complex II that has likely been missed in previous investigations due to the use of saturating concentrations of succinate. (iii) Malonate opens mK(ATP) channels even when mitochondria are respiring on complex I-linked substrates, suggesting an effect of this inhibitor on the mK(ATP) channel independent of complex II inhibition. Together, these observations suggest that complex II inhibition by endogenously formed malonate may represent an important activation pathway for mK(ATP) channels during IPC.

  7. Evaluation of selenide, diselenide and selenoheterocycle derivatives as carbonic anhydrase I, II, IV, VII and IX inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Andrea; Tanini, Damiano; Viglianisi, Caterina; Panzella, Lucia; Capperucci, Antonella; Menichetti, Stefano; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-04-15

    A series of selenides, diselenides and organoselenoheterocycles were evaluated as carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors against the human (h) isoforms hCA I, II, IV, VII and IX, involved in a variety of diseases among which glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa, epilepsy, arthritis and tumors etc. These investigated compounds showed inhibitory action against these isoforms and some of them were selective for inhibiting the cytosolic over the membrane-bound isoforms, thus making them interesting leads for the development of isoform-selective inhibitors.

  8. Phase II randomised discontinuation trial of the MET/VEGF receptor inhibitor cabozantinib in metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Adil; Kluger, Harriet M; Kurzrock, Razelle; Schimmoller, Frauke; Weitzman, Aaron L; Samuel, Thomas A; Moussa, Ali H; Gordon, Michael S; Shapiro, Geoffrey I

    2017-01-01

    Background: A phase II randomised discontinuation trial assessed cabozantinib (XL184), an orally bioavailable inhibitor of tyrosine kinases including VEGF receptors, MET, and AXL, in a cohort of patients with metastatic melanoma. Methods: Patients received cabozantinib 100 mg daily during a 12-week lead-in. Patients with stable disease (SD) per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) at week 12 were randomised to cabozantinib or placebo. Primary endpoints were objective response rate (ORR) at week 12 and postrandomisation progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Seventy-seven patients were enroled (62% cutaneous, 30% uveal, and 8% mucosal). At week 12, the ORR was 5% 39% of patients had SD. During the lead-in phase, reduction in target lesions from baseline was seen in 55% of evaluable patients overall and in 59% of evaluable patients with uveal melanoma. Median PFS after randomisation was 4.1 months with cabozantinib and 2.8 months with placebo (hazard ratio of 0.59; P=0.284). Median PFS from study day 1 was 3.8 months, 6-month PFS was 33%, and median overall survival was 9.4 months. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were fatigue (14%), hypertension (10%), and abdominal pain (8%). One treatment-related death was reported from peritonitis due to diverticular perforation. Conclusions: Cabozantinib has clinical activity in patients with metastatic melanoma, including uveal melanoma. Further clinical investigation is warranted. PMID:28103611

  9. EZH2 inhibition sensitizes BRG1 and EGFR mutant lung tumors to TopoII inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, Christine M.; Xu, Chunxiao; Desai, Pooja T.; Berry, Joanne M.; Rowbotham, Samuel P.; Lin, Yi-Jang; Zhang, Haikuo; Marquez, Victor E.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kim, Carla F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide1. Chemotherapies such as the topoisomerase II inhibitor (TopoIIi) etoposide effectively reduce disease in a minority of NSCLC patients2,3; therefore, alternative drug targets, including epigenetic enzymes, are under consideration for therapeutic intervention4. A promising potential epigenetic target is the methyltransferase EZH2, which in the context of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is well known to tri-methylate Histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) and elicit gene silencing5. Here, we demonstrate that EZH2 inhibition (EZH2i) had differential effects on TopoIIi response of NSCLCs in vitro and in vivo. EGFR and BRG1 mutations were genetic biomarkers that predicted enhanced sensitivity to TopoIIi in response to EZH2i. BRG1 loss-of-function mutant tumors responded to EZH2i with increased S phase, anaphase bridging, apoptosis, and TopoIIi sensitivity. Conversely, EGFR and BRG1 wild-type tumors up-regulated BRG1 in response to EZH2i and ultimately became more resistant to TopoIIi. EGFR gain-of-function mutant tumors were also sensitive to dual EZH2i and TopoIIi, due to genetic antagonism between EGFR and BRG1. These findings suggest an exciting opportunity for precision medicine in the genetically complex disease of NSCLC. PMID:25629630

  10. A mutation unique in serine protease inhibitors (serpins) identified in a family with type II hereditary angioneurotic edema.

    PubMed

    Ocejo-Vinyals, J G; Leyva-Cobián, F; Fernández-Luna, J L

    1995-09-01

    Hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE) is an autosomal dominant disease due to genetic alterations at the C1 inhibitor gene. Mutations within the C1 inhibitor gene are responsible for the molecular defect in type II HANE. Most of the dysfunctional proteins result from mutations involving the Arg-444 (the P-1 site of the reactive center) or amino acids NH2-terminal to the reactive center. We have studied a Spanish family with type II HANE by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify the exon eight of the C1 inhibitor gene. The purified 338-bp PCR product was subcloned and transformed into competent cells. After overnight cultures, we extracted the cloning vector from the positive colonies and sequenced both strands of the PCR product from each patient and healthy members of the family. We show that affected individuals in this family have a missense mutation, changing an adenine to cytosine in the codon 445. This substitution changes threonine at the P-1' site of the reactive center to a proline. This mutation generates a new restriction site, recognized by Bsi YI. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular defect characterized in a Spanish family with type II HANE, and to date, this is the first reported mutation at the P-1' site of the reactive center in individuals with type II HANE. This new mutation located at the reactive center emphasizes once more time the enormous heterogeneity of this gene.

  11. Development of a Method for Converting a TAK1 Type I Inhibitor into a Type II or c-Helix-Out Inhibitor by Structure-Based Drug Design (SBDD).

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Terushige; Ide, Mitsuaki; Irie, Machiko; Morikami, Kenji; Miura, Takaaki; Nishihara, Masamichi; Kashiwagi, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a method for converting a transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) type I inhibitor into a type II or c-helix-out inhibitor by structure-based drug design (SBDD) to achieve an effective strategy for developing these different types of kinase inhibitor in parallel. TAK1 plays a key role in inflammatory and immune signaling, and is therefore considered to be an attractive molecular target for the treatment of human diseases (inflammatory disease, cancer, etc.). We have already reported novel type I TAK1 inhibitor, so we utilized its X-ray information to design a new chemical class type II and c-helix-out inhibitors. To develop the type II inhibitor, we superimposed the X-ray structure of our reported type I inhibitor onto a type II compound that inhibits multiple kinases, and used SBDD to design a new type II inhibitor. For the TAK1 c-helix-out inhibitor, we utilized the X-ray structure of a b-Raf c-helix-out inhibitor to design compounds, because TAK1 is located close to b-Raf in the Sugen kinase tree, so we considered that TAK1 would, similarly to b-Raf, form a c-helix-out conformation. The X-ray crystal structure of the inhibitors in complex with TAK1 confirmed the binding modes of the compounds we designed. This report is notable for being the first discovery of a c-helix-out inhibitor against TAK1.

  12. Mapping of DNA topoisomerase II poisons (etoposide, clerocidin) and catalytic inhibitors (aclarubicin, ICRF-187) to four distinct steps in the topoisomerase II catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Sehested, M; Jensen, P B

    1996-04-12

    The complex catalytic cycle of topoisomerase II is the target of important antitumor agents. Topoisomerase II poisons, such as etoposide and daunorubicin, inhibit the resealing of DNA breaks created by the enzyme. This enzyme-coupled cell kill is susceptible to pharmacological regulation by drugs interfering with other steps in the enzyme's catalytic cycle (i.e. so-called catalytic inhibitors). From in vitro studies, is appears that there are 2 distinct sites in the cycle at which a complete antagonism of the toxicity of topoisomerase II poisons can be obtained. The first is the inhibition of the enzyme's binding to its DNA substrate as seen with intercalating drugs such as chloroquine and aclarubicin; a second, more specific, interaction is elicited by bisdioxopiperazines, which are thought to lock the homodimeric topoisomerase II in the form of a closed bracelet surrounding the DNA at the postreligation step. To investigate these in vitro findings in the more complex whole cell system, we studied enzyme-DNA binding in Western blots of 0.35 M NaCL nuclear extracts from human small cell lung cancer OC-NYH cells incubated with the bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-187 and aclarubicin. With ICRF-187, we found a reversible ATP dependent decrease in the extractable levels of both the alpha and the beta isoforms of topoisomerase II. In contrast to ICRF-187, aclarubicin increased the amount of extractable enzyme from cells. Further, when using the terpenoid clerocidin, which differs from conventional topoisomerase II poisons by forming a salt-and heat-stable inhibition of DNA resealing, no antagonism was found by ICRF-187 on formation of DNA strand breaks and cytotoxicity. However, aclarubicin, which interferes early in the topoisomerase II catalytic cycle, was able to antagonize DNA breaks and cytotoxicity caused by clerocidin. The results indicate 4 different steps in the topoisomerase II cycle that can be uncoupled in the cell by different drug types: etoposide and clerocidin

  13. Palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of neutral [N2O2] donor Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde: synthesis, characterization, fluorescence and corrosion inhibitors of ligands.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omyma A M

    2014-11-11

    Metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde and 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylendiamine (L1) or 4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylendiamine (L2) have been reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis. The complexes are found to have the formulae [PdL1-2]Cl2 and [ZnL1-2](AcO)2·H2O. The molar conductance data reveal that Pd(II) and Zn(II) chelates are ionic in nature and are of the type 2:1 electrolytes. The spectral data are consistent with a square planar and tetrahedral geometry around Pd(II) and Zn(II), respectively, in which the ligands act as tetradentate ligands. The thermal behavior of some chelates is studied and the activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern method. The corrosion inhibition of stainless steel types 410 and 304 in 1 M HCl using the synthesized Schiff bases as inhibitors have been studied by weight loss method. The obtained data considered these ligands as efficient corrosion inhibitors. The ligands and their metal complexes exhibited considerable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcusaureus, and Escherichiacoli and antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of neutral [N2O2] donor Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde: Synthesis, characterization, fluorescence and corrosion inhibitors of ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Omyma A. M.

    2014-11-01

    Metal complexes of Schiff bases derived from furfuraldehyde and 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylendiamine (L1) or 4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylendiamine (L2) have been reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis. The complexes are found to have the formulae [PdL1-2]Cl2 and [ZnL1-2](AcO)2·H2O. The molar conductance data reveal that Pd(II) and Zn(II) chelates are ionic in nature and are of the type 2:1 electrolytes. The spectral data are consistent with a square planar and tetrahedral geometry around Pd(II) and Zn(II), respectively, in which the ligands act as tetradentate ligands. The thermal behavior of some chelates is studied and the activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern method. The corrosion inhibition of stainless steel types 410 and 304 in 1 M HCl using the synthesized Schiff bases as inhibitors have been studied by weight loss method. The obtained data considered these ligands as efficient corrosion inhibitors. The ligands and their metal complexes exhibited considerable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcusaureus, and Escherichiacoli and antifungal activity against Candida albicans.

  15. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Interaction of isozymes I, II, IV, V, and IX with carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Alessio; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Casey, Joseph R; Supuran, Claudiut

    2005-02-01

    A detailed inhibition study of five carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes with carboxylates including aliphatic (formate, acetate), dicarboxylic (oxalate, malonate), hydroxy/keto acids (l-lactate, l-malate, pyruvate), tricarboxylic (citrate), or aromatic (benzoate, tetrafluorobenzoate) representatives, some of which are important intermediates in the Krebs cycle, is presented. The cytosolic isozyme hCA I was strongly activated by acetate, oxalate, pyruvate, l-lactate, and citrate (K(A) around 0.1 microM), whereas formate, malonate, malate, and benzoate were weaker activators (K(A) in the range 0.1-1mM). The cytosolic isozyme hCA II was weakly inhibited by all the investigated anions, with inhibition constants in the range of 0.03-24 mM. The membrane-associated isozyme hCA IV was the most sensitive to inhibition by carboxylates, showing a K(I) of 99 nM for citrate and oxalate, of 2.8 microM for malonate and of 14.5 microM for pyruvate among others. The mitochondrial isozyme hCA V was weakly inhibited by all these carboxylates (K(I)s in the range of 1.67-25.9 mM), with the best inhibitor being citrate (K(I) of 1.67 mM), whereas this is the most resistant CA isozyme to pyruvate inhibition (K(I) of 5.5mM), which may be another proof that CA V is the isozyme involved in the transfer of acetyl groups from the mitochondrion to the cytosol for the provision of substrate(s) for de novo lipogenesis. Furthermore, the relative resistance of CA V to inhibition by pyruvate may be an evolutionary adaptation of this mitochondrial isozyme to the presence of high concentrations of this anion within this organelle. The transmembrane, tumor-associated isozyme hCA IX was similar to isozyme II in its slight inhibition by all these anions (K(I) in the range of 1.12-7.42 mM), except acetate, lactate, and benzoate, which showed a K(I)>150 mM. The lactate insensitivity of CA IX also represents an interesting finding, since it is presumed that this isozyme evolved in such a way as to

  16. Phase II study of tivozanib, an oral VEGFR inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Chandra, Vyshak; Da, Xiao; Ou, Yangming; Emblem, Kyrre E; Muzikansky, Alona; Cai, Xuezhu; Douw, Linda; Evans, John G; Dietrich, Jorg; Chi, Andrew S; Wen, Patrick Y; Stufflebeam, Stephen; Rosen, Bruce; Duda, Dan G; Jain, Rakesh K; Batchelor, Tracy T; Gerstner, Elizabeth R

    2017-02-01

    Targeting tumor angiogenesis is a potential therapeutic strategy for glioblastoma because of its high vascularization. Tivozanib is an oral pan-VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that hits a central pathway in glioblastoma angiogenesis. We conducted a phase II study to test the effectiveness of tivozanib in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Ten adult patients were enrolled and treated with tivozanib 1.5 mg daily, 3 weeks on/1 week off in 28-day cycles. Brain MRI and blood biomarkers of angiogenesis were performed at baseline, within 24-72 h of treatment initiation, and monthly thereafter. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI, dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI, and vessel architecture imaging were used to assess vascular effects. Resting state MRI was used to assess brain connectivity. Best RANO criteria responses were: 1 complete response, 1 partial response, 4 stable diseases, and 4 progressive disease (PD). Two patients were taken off study for toxicity and 8 patients were taken off study for PD. Median progression-free survival was 2.3 months and median overall survival was 8.1 months. Baseline abnormal tumor vascular permeability, blood flow, tissue oxygenation and plasma sVEGFR2 significantly decreased and plasma PlGF and VEGF increased after treatment, suggesting an anti-angiogenic effect of tivozanib. However, there were no clear structural changes in vasculature as vessel caliber and enhancing tumor volume did not significantly change. Despite functional changes in tumor vasculature, tivozanib had limited anti-tumor activity, highlighting the limitations of anti-VEGF monotherapy. Future studies in glioblastoma should leverage the anti-vascular activity of agents targeting VEGF to enhance the activity of other therapies.

  17. NK314, a Topoisomerase II Inhibitor That Specifically Targets the α Isoform*

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Eriko; Kagaya, Shigehide; Cowell, Ian G.; Kurosawa, Aya; Kamoshita, Keiichi; Nishikawa, Kiyohiro; Iiizumi, Susumu; Koyama, Hideki; Austin, Caroline A.; Adachi, Noritaka

    2008-01-01

    Topoisomerase II (Top2) is a ubiquitous nuclear enzyme that relieves torsional stress in chromosomal DNA during various cellular processes. Agents that target Top2, involving etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone, are among the most effective anticancer drugs used in the clinic. Mammalian cells possess two genetically distinct Top2 isoforms, both of which are the target of these agents. Top2α is essential for cell proliferation and is highly expressed in vigorously growing cells, whereas Top2β is nonessential for growth and has recently been implicated in treatment-associated secondary malignancies, highlighting the validity of a Top2α-specific drug for future cancer treatment; however, no such agent has been hitherto reported. Here we show that NK314, a novel synthetic benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid, targets Top2α and not Top2β in vivo. Unlike other Top2 inhibitors, NK314 induces Top2-DNA complexes and double-strand breaks (DSBs) in an α isoform-specific manner. Heterozygous disruption of the human TOP2α gene confers increased NK314 resistance, whereas TOP2β homozygous knock-out cells display increased NK314 sensitivity, indicating that the α isoform is the cellular target. We further show that the absence of Top2β does not alleviate NK314 hypersensitivity of cells deficient in non-homologous end-joining, a critical pathway for repairing Top2-mediated DSBs. Our results indicate that NK314 acts as a Top2α-specific poison in mammalian cells, with excellent potential as an efficacious and safe chemotherapeutic agent. We also suggest that a series of human knock-out cell lines are useful in assessing DNA damage and repair induced by potential topoisomerase-targeting agents. PMID:18596031

  18. Phase II study of a neutrophil elastase inhibitor (AZD9668) in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Robert; De Soyza, Anthony; Gunawardena, Kulasiri; Perrett, John; Forsman-Semb, Kristina; Entwistle, Neil; Snell, Noel

    2013-04-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity is increased in bronchiectasis and may play a role in this condition. We wished to determine the effect of AZD9668, a selective oral inhibitor of NE. Efficacy and safety of AZD9668 60 mg twice daily over 4 weeks were evaluated in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, Phase II, signal-searching study in patients with bronchiectasis. Outcome measures included: waking and post-waking sputum neutrophil counts; lung function tests; 24-h sputum weight; BronkoTest(®) diary card data; St George's Respiratory Questionnaire for COPD patients (SGRQ-C); sputum NE activity; inflammatory biomarker levels; desmosine levels; adverse events, safety haematology and biochemistry. AZD9668 levels in plasma and sputum were measured to confirm exposure. Thirty-eight patients were randomised: 16 to placebo and 22 to AZD9668. There was no change in sputum neutrophils with AZD9668. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s improved by 100 mL in the AZD9668 group compared with placebo (p = 0.006). Significant changes (defined a priori as p < 0.1) in favour of AZD9668 were also seen in slow vital capacity, plasma interleukin-8, and post-waking sputum interleukin-6 and Regulated on Activation, Normal T-cell Expressed and Secreted levels. Non-significant changes in favour of AZD9668 were seen in other lung function tests, sputum weight and the SGRQ-C. AZD9668 was well tolerated. In this small signal-searching study, 4 weeks' treatment with AZD9668 improved lung function in patients with bronchiectasis and there were trends for reductions in sputum inflammatory biomarkers. Larger studies of longer duration would be needed to confirm the potential benefits of this agent in bronchiectasis. NCT00769119. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro biological evaluation of novel broad-spectrum isothiazolone inhibitors of bacterial type II topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Cédric; Salisbury, Anne-Marie; Savage, Victoria J; Moyo, Emmanuel; Forward, Henry; Ooi, Nicola; Cheung, Jonathan; Metzger, Richard; McGarry, David; Walker, Rolf; Cooper, Ian R; Ratcliffe, Andrew J; Stokes, Neil R

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the in vitro biological properties of a novel class of isothiazolone inhibitors of the bacterial type II topoisomerases. Inhibition of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activity was assessed using DNA supercoiling and decatenation assays. MIC and MBC were determined according to CLSI guidelines. Antibacterial combinations were assessed using a two-dimensional chequerboard MIC method. Spontaneous frequency of resistance was measured at various multiples of the MIC. Resistant mutants were generated by serial passage at subinhibitory concentrations of antibacterials and genetic mutations were determined through whole genome sequencing. Mammalian cytotoxicity was evaluated using the HepG2 cell line. Representative isothiazolone compound REDX04957 and its enantiomers (REDX05967 and REDX05990) showed broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against the ESKAPE organisms, with the exception of Enterococcus spp., as well as against a variety of other human bacterial pathogens. Compounds retained activity against quinolone-resistant strains harbouring GyrA S83L and D87G mutations (MIC ≤4 mg/L). Compounds inhibited the supercoiling activity of wild-type DNA gyrase and the decatenation function of topoisomerase IV. Frequency of resistance of REDX04957 at 4× MIC was <9.1 × 10(-9). Against a panel of recent MDR isolates, REDX05967 demonstrated activity against Acinetobacter baumannii with MIC50 and MIC90 of 16 and 64 mg/L, respectively. Compounds showed a lack of cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells at 128 mg/L. Isothiazolone compounds show potent activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens with a dual targeting mechanism-of-action and a low potential for resistance development, meriting their continued investigation as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Cobalt(II) β-ketoaminato complexes as novel inhibitors of neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Jocelyn M; Beloukhina, Natalia; Boudreau, Kalun; Boettcher, Tyson A; Gurley, Lydia; Walker, Douglas G; McNeil, W Stephen; Klegeris, Andis

    2012-02-15

    Neuroinflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological disorders including stroke, head trauma, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as well as age-associated neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Therefore, anti-inflammatory drugs could be used to slow the progression of these diseases. We studied the anti-neuroinflammatory activity of four novel square planar cobalt(II) compounds bearing tetradentate β-ketoaminato ligands with variation in the number of CF(3) ligand substituents, as well as their corresponding unmetallated organic ligands. Cobalt (Co) complexes were consistently more active than their corresponding ligands. One of the complexes, L(3)Co at concentrations (1-10 μM) that were not toxic to cells, significantly reduced cytotoxic secretions by human monocytic THP-1 cells, astrocytoma U-373 MG cells, and primary human microglia. This anti-neurotoxic action of L(3)Co was reduced by SP600125 and PD98059, selective inhibitors of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK)1/2 respectively. L(3)Co had no effect on secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) by THP-1 cells, but it inhibited the NADPH oxidase-dependent respiratory burst activity of differentiated human HL-60 cells. L(3)Co upregulated heme oxygenase-1 (HOX-1) expression by THP-1 cells, which may be one of the molecular mechanisms responsible for its anti-inflammatory properties. Two of the Co compounds tested showed activity only at high concentrations (50 μM), but L(2)Co was highly toxic to all cell types used. Select Co complexes, such as L(3)Co, may exhibit pharmacological properties beneficial in human diseases involving neuroinflammatory processes. Further studies of the in vivo efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of L(3)Co are warranted.

  1. Biological evaluation of benzothiazole ethyl urea inhibitors of bacterial type II topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Neil R; Thomaides-Brears, Helena B; Barker, Stephanie; Bennett, James M; Berry, Joanne; Collins, Ian; Czaplewski, Lloyd G; Gamble, Vicki; Lancett, Paul; Logan, Alastair; Lunniss, Christopher J; Peasley, Hilary; Pommier, Stéphanie; Price, Daniel; Smee, Carol; Haydon, David J

    2013-12-01

    The type II topoisomerases DNA gyrase (GyrA/GyrB) and topoisomerase IV (ParC/ParE) are well-validated targets for antibacterial drug discovery. Because of their structural and functional homology, these enzymes are amenable to dual targeting by a single ligand. In this study, two novel benzothiazole ethyl urea-based small molecules, designated compound A and compound B, were evaluated for their biochemical, antibacterial, and pharmacokinetic properties. The two compounds inhibited the ATPase activity of GyrB and ParE with 50% inhibitory concentrations of <0.1 μg/ml. Prevention of DNA supercoiling by DNA gyrase was also observed. Both compounds potently inhibited the growth of a range of bacterial organisms, including staphylococci, streptococci, enterococci, Clostridium difficile, and selected Gram-negative respiratory pathogens. MIC90s against clinical isolates ranged from 0.015 μg/ml for Streptococcus pneumoniae to 0.25 μg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus. No cross-resistance with common drug resistance phenotypes was observed. In addition, no synergistic or antagonistic interactions between compound A or compound B and other antibiotics, including the topoisomerase inhibitors novobiocin and levofloxacin, were detected in checkerboard experiments. The frequencies of spontaneous resistance for S. aureus were <2.3 × 10(-10) with compound A and <5.8 × 10(-11) with compound B at concentrations equivalent to 8× the MICs. These values indicate a multitargeting mechanism of action. The pharmacokinetic properties of both compounds were profiled in rats. Following intravenous administration, compound B showed approximately 3-fold improvement over compound A in terms of both clearance and the area under the concentration-time curve. The measured oral bioavailability of compound B was 47.7%.

  2. Biological Evaluation of Benzothiazole Ethyl Urea Inhibitors of Bacterial Type II Topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Neil R.; Thomaides-Brears, Helena B.; Barker, Stephanie; Bennett, James M.; Berry, Joanne; Collins, Ian; Czaplewski, Lloyd G.; Gamble, Vicki; Lancett, Paul; Logan, Alastair; Lunniss, Christopher J.; Peasley, Hilary; Pommier, Stéphanie; Price, Daniel; Smee, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The type II topoisomerases DNA gyrase (GyrA/GyrB) and topoisomerase IV (ParC/ParE) are well-validated targets for antibacterial drug discovery. Because of their structural and functional homology, these enzymes are amenable to dual targeting by a single ligand. In this study, two novel benzothiazole ethyl urea-based small molecules, designated compound A and compound B, were evaluated for their biochemical, antibacterial, and pharmacokinetic properties. The two compounds inhibited the ATPase activity of GyrB and ParE with 50% inhibitory concentrations of <0.1 μg/ml. Prevention of DNA supercoiling by DNA gyrase was also observed. Both compounds potently inhibited the growth of a range of bacterial organisms, including staphylococci, streptococci, enterococci, Clostridium difficile, and selected Gram-negative respiratory pathogens. MIC90s against clinical isolates ranged from 0.015 μg/ml for Streptococcus pneumoniae to 0.25 μg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus. No cross-resistance with common drug resistance phenotypes was observed. In addition, no synergistic or antagonistic interactions between compound A or compound B and other antibiotics, including the topoisomerase inhibitors novobiocin and levofloxacin, were detected in checkerboard experiments. The frequencies of spontaneous resistance for S. aureus were <2.3 × 10−10 with compound A and <5.8 × 10−11 with compound B at concentrations equivalent to 8× the MICs. These values indicate a multitargeting mechanism of action. The pharmacokinetic properties of both compounds were profiled in rats. Following intravenous administration, compound B showed approximately 3-fold improvement over compound A in terms of both clearance and the area under the concentration-time curve. The measured oral bioavailability of compound B was 47.7%. PMID:24041906

  3. A phase I/II study of the protease inhibitor indinavir in children with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Mueller, B U; Sleasman, J; Nelson, R P; Smith, S; Deutsch, P J; Ju, W; Steinberg, S M; Balis, F M; Jarosinski, P F; Brouwers, P; Mistry, G; Winchell, G; Zwerski, S; Sei, S; Wood, L V; Zeichner, S; Pizzo, P A

    1998-07-01

    Indinavir, an inhibitor of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease, is approved for the treatment of HIV infection in adults when antiretroviral therapy is indicated. We evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of the indinavir free-base liquid suspension and the sulfate salt dry-filled capsules in HIV-infected children, and studied its preliminary antiviral and clinical activity in this patient population. In addition, we evaluated the pharmacokinetic profile of a jet-milled suspension after a single dose. Previously untreated children or patients with progressive HIV disease despite antiretroviral therapy or with treatment-associated toxicity were eligible for this phase I/II study. Three dose levels (250 mg/m2, 350 mg/m2, and 500 mg/m2 per dose given orally every 8 h) were evaluated in 2 age groups (<12 years and >/=12 years). Indinavir was initially administered as monotherapy and then in combination with zidovudine and lamivudine after 16 weeks. Fifty-four HIV-infected children (ages 3.1 to 18.9 years) were enrolled. The indinavir free-base suspension was less bioavailable than the dry-filled capsule formulation, and therapy was changed to capsules in all children. Hematuria was the most common side effect, occurring in 7 (13%) children, and associated with nephrolithiasis in 1 patient. The combination of indinavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine was well tolerated. The median CD4 cell count increased after 2 weeks of indinavir monotherapy by 64 cells/mm3, and this was sustained at all dose levels. Plasma ribonucleic acid levels decreased rapidly in a dose-dependent way, but increased toward baseline after a few weeks of indinavir monotherapy. Indinavir dry-filled capsules are relatively well tolerated by children with HIV infection, although hematuria occurs at higher doses. Future studies need to evaluate the efficacy of indinavir when combined de novo with zidovudine and lamivudine.

  4. Angiotensin II Induces a Region-Specific Hyperplasia of the Ascending Aorta Through Regulation of Inhibitor of Differentiation 3

    PubMed Central

    Owens, A. Phillip; Subramanian, Venkateswaran; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Guo, Zhenheng; McNamara, Coleen A.; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Angiotensin II (AngII) has diverse effects on smooth muscle cells. The diversity of effects may relate to the regional location of this cell type. Objective The aim of this study was to define whether AngII exerted divergent effects on smooth muscle cells (SMC) in the aorta and determine the role of blood pressure and specific oxidant mechanisms. Methods and Results AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min) infusion for 28 days into mice increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) and promoted medial expansion of equivalent magnitude throughout the entire aorta. Both effects were ablated by AT1a receptor deficiency. Similar increases in blood pressure by administration of norepinephrine promoted no changes in aortic medial thickness. Increased medial thickness was due to SMC expansion attributable to hypertrophy in most aortic regions, with the exception of hyperplasia of the ascending aorta. Deficiency of the p47phox component of NADPH oxidase ablated AngII-induced medial expansion in all aortic regions. Analysis of mRNA and protein throughout the aorta revealed a much higher abundance of the inhibitor of differentiation 3 (Id3) in the ascending aorta compared to all other regions. A functional role was demonstrated by Id3 deficiency inhibiting AngII-induced SMC hyperplasia of the ascending aorta. Conclusions In conclusion, AngII promotes both aortic medial hypertrophy and hyperplasia in a region-specific manner via an oxidant mechanism. The ascending aortic hyperplasia is dependent on Id3. PMID:20019328

  5. The PP2A inhibitor I2PP2A is essential for sister chromatid segregation in oocyte meiosis II.

    PubMed

    Chambon, Jean-Philippe; Touati, Sandra A; Berneau, Stéphane; Cladière, Damien; Hebras, Céline; Groeme, Rachel; McDougall, Alex; Wassmann, Katja

    2013-03-18

    Haploid gametes are generated through two consecutive meiotic divisions, with the segregation of chromosome pairs in meiosis I and sister chromatids in meiosis II. Separase-mediated stepwise removal of cohesion, first from chromosome arms and later from the centromere region, is a prerequisite for maintaining sister chromatids together until their separation in meiosis II [1]. In all model organisms, centromeric cohesin is protected from separase-dependent removal in meiosis I through the activity of PP2A-B56 phosphatase, which is recruited to centromeres by shugoshin/MEI-S332 (Sgo) [2-5]. How this protection of centromeric cohesin is removed in meiosis II is not entirely clear; we find that all the PP2A subunits remain colocalized with the cohesin subunit Rec8 at the centromere of metaphase II chromosomes. Here, we show that sister chromatid separation in oocytes depends on a PP2A inhibitor, namely I2PP2A. I2PP2A colocalizes with the PP2A enzyme at centromeres at metaphase II, independently of bipolar attachment. When I2PP2A is depleted, sister chromatids fail to segregate during meiosis II. Our findings demonstrate that in oocytes I2PP2A is essential for faithful sister chromatid segregation by mediating deprotection of centromeric cohesin in meiosis II.

  6. The dietary flavonoids myricetin and fisetin act as dual inhibitors of DNA topoisomerases I and II in cells.

    PubMed

    López-Lázaro, Miguel; Willmore, Elaine; Austin, Caroline A

    2010-02-01

    DNA topoisomerases (topos) are the target of several drugs commonly used in cancer chemotherapy; these drugs induce topo-DNA complexes with either topo I or topo II that eventually trigger cell death. The inhibition of these enzymes induces DNA alterations that may also lead to carcinogenic effects; indeed, an increased risk for developing leukemia has been observed in patients treated with some topo II inhibitors. Several flavonoids have been shown to interact with purified topo I and topo II, therefore suggesting that these compounds may possess both anticancer and carcinogenic activity. Because the activity of a drug on purified topoisomerases does not always represent the activity in the cell, the aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of several common dietary flavonoids on these enzymes in cells. Using the cell-based TARDIS assay, we have evaluated the effects of the flavonoids quercetin, apigenin, fisetin and myricetin on topo I and topo II in K562 human leukemia cells at several concentrations and exposure times. Quercetin and apigenin induced moderate levels of topo II-DNA complexes and did not induce topo I-DNA complexes in these cells. Fisetin induced neither topo I- nor topo II-DNA complexes, but behaved as a catalytic inhibitor of both enzymes. Myricetin induced high levels of topo-DNA complexes with both enzymes. In addition, murine embryo fibroblasts lacking topo IIbeta were resistant to myricetin-induced cell-growth inhibition, therefore suggesting that topo IIbeta is an important drug target for this flavonoid. These results support the idea that specific concentrations of some dietary flavonoids may produce topoisomerase-mediated carcinogenic and chemotherapeutic effects in vivo. The ability of myricetin to induce topo-DNA complexes with both topo I and topo II in leukemia cells may be therapeutically useful and deserves further study. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification and characterization of inhibitors of cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase cN-II issued from virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Jordheim, Lars Petter; Marton, Zsuzsanna; Rhimi, Moez; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Lionne, Corinne; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Dumontet, Charles; Aghajari, Nushin; Chaloin, Laurent

    2013-02-15

    Clinical and preclinical observations have lead to the hypothesis that 5'-nucleotidase cN-II could constitute a therapeutic target in oncology, either per se or to increase the activity of cytotoxic nucleoside analogs. To identify potential cN-II inhibitors, we performed in silico screening of freely available chemical databases, in vitro enzymatic assays with recombinant cN-II, soaking experiments with crystals of truncated cN-II as well as biological evaluation of selected compounds, alone or in combination with cytotoxic nucleoside analogs, on cancer cells. The top ranked compounds from virtual screening included an anthraquinone derivative (AdiS) that were shown to block the enzyme activity with a K(i) of 2.0mM. Soaking experiments performed with crystals of truncated cN-II allowed to obtain crystallographic data at a resolution of 2.9 Å and indicating interaction between AdiS and F354/I152 situated in the effector site 1 of cN-II. In addition, this compound exhibited different levels of cytotoxicity in vitro on several cancer cell lines and increased the induction of apoptosis in RL cells incubated with 0.5 or 1.5 μM cladribine, 0.05 μM clofarabine or 30 μM fludarabine. Finally, AdiS showed synergy with cladribine and additivity with clofarabine. This study showed that virtual screening is a useful tool for the identification of potent cN-II inhibitors, and our biological results indicated interesting activity for one lead compound that can be further developed as therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Therapeutic perspective: starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Jarred, Ghassan; Kennedy, R Lee

    2010-02-01

    There are extensive data confirming involvement of the renin-angiotensin system in microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. Blockade of the system with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) is regarded as the first-line approach to managing hypertension and end-organ protection in patients with diabetes. ACE inhibitors are still the preferred agents for most patients. Dose should be lower with renal impairment unless an agent which is not excreted by the kidneys is chosen. Dose should be titrated up to the maximum tolerated to optimize end-organ protection, and intermediate-acting agents should be given in a twice daily divided dose when higher doses are used. Electrolytes should be checked before commencing, 1-2 weeks later, and after each dose increment. A modest decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and increase in creatinine often occurs with ACE inhibitors or ARBs. The agents may need to be discontinued if eGFR decreases by >15%, if creatinine increases by >20%, or if hyperkalemia develops. Cough occurs in 5-10% of patients taking ACE inhibitor, but not with ARBs. Angioedema is probably equally common with ACE inhibitor or ARBs. It is not widely appreciated that ACE inhibitors may precipitate hypoglycaemia in patients taking glucose-lowering medication. The combination of ACE inhibitor and ARB is not routinely indicated for either hypertension or end-organ protection. While patients should not be denied the undoubted benefits of these important classes of drugs, we should also guard against their indiscriminate use in patients with diabetes. We must also ensure that patients receive appropriate counselling and monitoring.

  9. Therapeutic perspective: starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Jarred, Ghassan; Kennedy, R. Lee

    2010-01-01

    There are extensive data confirming involvement of the renin-angiotensin system in microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. Blockade of the system with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) is regarded as the first-line approach to managing hypertension and end-organ protection in patients with diabetes. ACE inhibitors are still the preferred agents for most patients. Dose should be lower with renal impairment unless an agent which is not excreted by the kidneys is chosen. Dose should be titrated up to the maximum tolerated to optimize end-organ protection, and intermediate-acting agents should be given in a twice daily divided dose when higher doses are used. Electrolytes should be checked before commencing, 1–2 weeks later, and after each dose increment. A modest decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and increase in creatinine often occurs with ACE inhibitors or ARBs. The agents may need to be discontinued if eGFR decreases by >15%, if creatinine increases by >20%, or if hyperkalemia develops. Cough occurs in 5–10% of patients taking ACE inhibitor, but not with ARBs. Angioedema is probably equally common with ACE inhibitor or ARBs. It is not widely appreciated that ACE inhibitors may precipitate hypoglycaemia in patients taking glucose-lowering medication. The combination of ACE inhibitor and ARB is not routinely indicated for either hypertension or end-organ protection. While patients should not be denied the undoubted benefits of these important classes of drugs, we should also guard against their indiscriminate use in patients with diabetes. We must also ensure that patients receive appropriate counselling and monitoring. PMID:23148146

  10. Debate: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers--a gap in evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Ball, Stephen G; White, William B

    2003-05-22

    In this article, 2 leading physicians debate the strength of outcome data on the efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for reducing the incidence of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renovascular events. Dr. Stephen G. Ball notes that the efficacy of ACE inhibitors for reducing the risk for myocardial infarction independent of their effects on blood pressure is controversial. In the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) study, ramipril treatment in high-risk patients was associated with a 20% reduction in the risk for myocardial infarction; mean reduction in blood pressure was 3 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and 1 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure. The HOPE investigators propose that the 20% reduction was much greater than would be expected based on the observed blood pressure reduction. However, a meta-regression analysis of blood pressure reduction in >20 antihypertensive therapy outcome trials found that the reduction in myocardial infarction risk with ramipril observed in HOPE was consistent with the modest blood pressure reduction seen with that agent. Nevertheless, there are convincing data for prevention of myocardial infarction with ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure, including those with heart failure after myocardial infarction, as well as supportive evidence from studies in patients with diabetes mellitus and concomitant hypertension. On the other hand, Dr. William B. White takes the position that ARBs are well-tolerated antihypertensive agents that specifically antagonize the angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor and provide a more complete block of the pathologic effects of angiotensin II-which are mediated via the AT(1) receptor-than ACE inhibitors. The Evaluation of Losartan in the Elderly (ELITE) II study and the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial (ValHeFT) suggest that ARBs reduce the risk for mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. The Losartan

  11. Strategic approaches to drug design. II. Modelling studies on phosphodiesterase substrates and inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A.; Warrington, B. H.; Vinter, J. G.

    1987-07-01

    Modelling studies have been carried out on the phosphodiesterase (PDE) substrates, adenosine- and guanosine-3'5'-cyclic monophosphates, and on a number of non-specific and type III-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitors. These studies have assisted the understanding of PDE substrate differentiation and the design of potent, selective PDE type III inhibitors.

  12. Carbonic anhydrase activators. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine, sertraline and citalopram are strong activators of isozymes I and II.

    PubMed

    Casini, Angela; Caccia, Silvio; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2003-08-18

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) fluoxetine, sertraline and citalopram have been investigated for their ability to activate two carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, hCA I and hCA II, in parallel with two standard activators for which the X-ray structure (in complex with isozyme II) has been resolved: histamine and phenylalanine. All three SSRI activated both isozymes with potencies comparable to that of the standards although the profile was different: for hCA I, best activators were fluoxetine and histamine, with citalopram and sertraline showing weaker activity. For hCA II, the best activators were phenylalanine and citalopram, and the weakest histamine and sertraline, whereas fluoxetine showed an intermediate behavior. These results suggest that SSRI efficacy in major depression complicating Alzheimer's disease may be partly due to their ability to activate CA isozymes and may lead to the development of potent activators for the therapy of diseases associated with significant decreases in brain CA activity.

  13. Investigational phosphodiesterase inhibitors in phase I and phase II clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Prickaerts, Jos; Heckman, Pim R A; Blokland, Arjan

    2017-09-01

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors improve signaling pathways in brain circuits by increasing intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and/or cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In the last decade, the first clinical studies investigating selective PDE inhibitors in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been initiated, based on their positive effects on cognitive processes and neuroprotection in numerous animal studies. Areas covered: This article reviews the clinical studies investigating the pro-cognitive/neuroprotective effects of PDE inhibitors in patients with AD, as well as in age-associated memory impaired elderly and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the prodromal stage of AD. PDE inhibitors will also be discussed with respect to adverse effects including safety and tolerability. Expert opinion: The limited available data of clinical studies with PDE inhibitors tested in different populations of AD patients do not allow the drawing of any concrete conclusion yet. Currently, studies with a PDE3 (cilostazol) or PDE9 inhibitor (BI 409,306) are still ongoing in patients with MCI or AD, respectively. Studies with PDE4 inhibitors (HT-0712, roflumilast and BPN14770) in healthy elderly and elderly with age-associated memory impairments indicate that the optimum dose and/or inhibiting the most relevant PDE isoform hold great promise when tested in the appropriate population of patients with MCI or AD eventually.

  14. ACE inhibitor and angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist therapies in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus: are they underutilized?

    PubMed

    Pappoe, Lamioko Shika; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2010-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent in older adults in the industrialized world. These patients are at high risk of complications from diabetes, including diabetic kidney disease. ACE inhibitors and their newer cousins, angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]), are powerful medications for the prevention of progression of diabetic renal disease. Unfortunately, among the elderly, these medications have been underutilized. The reasons for this include physician concerns regarding patient age and limited life expectancy and potential complications of ACE inhibitor or ARB use, specifically an increase in creatinine levels and hyperkalaemia. As discussed in this article, there have been several studies that show that the effects of inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system can be beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular disease and renal disease among elderly patients with diabetes and that the potential risks mentioned above are no greater in this group than in the general population. For these reasons, several professional societies recommend that elderly patients with diabetes and hypertension (systolic blood pressure >or=140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure >or=90 mmHg) be treated with an ACE inhibitor or ARB (as is recommended for younger diabetics). Use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs is also recommended for those with cardiovascular disease or those who are at risk of cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, in the management of diabetic kidney disease in elderly patients, treatment with ACE inhibitors or ARBs is also recommended to reduce the risk or slow the progression of nephropathy. Renal function and potassium levels should be monitored within the first 12 weeks of initiation of these medications, with each dose increase, and on a yearly basis thereafter. This article summarizes the current guidelines on the use of ACE inhibitors and ARBs in older adults with diabetes, reviews the evidence for their use in the elderly

  15. Discovery and optimization of indole and 7-azaindoles as Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors (part-II).

    PubMed

    Sessions, E Hampton; Chowdhury, Sarwat; Yin, Yan; Pocas, Jennifer R; Grant, Wayne; Schröter, Thomas; Lin, Li; Ruiz, Claudia; Cameron, Michael D; LoGrasso, Philip; Bannister, Thomas D; Feng, Yangbo

    2011-12-01

    Therapeutic interventions with Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors may effectively treat several disorders such as hypertension, stroke, cancer, and glaucoma. Herein we disclose the optimization and biological evaluation of potent novel ROCK inhibitors based on substituted indole and 7-azaindole core scaffolds. Substitutions on the indole C3 position and on the indole NH and/or amide NH positions all yielded potent and selective ROCK inhibitors (25, 42, and 50). Improvement of aqueous solubility and tailoring of in vitro and in vivo DMPK properties could be achieved through these substitutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and leukocyte elastase inhibitor/L-DNase II (LEI/LDNaseII), can interact to conduct caspase-independent cell death.

    PubMed

    Leprêtre, Chloé; Tchakarska, Guergana; Blibech, Hounayda; Lebon, Cécile; Torriglia, Alicia

    2013-09-01

    Programmed cell death is an important factor in tissue homeostasis. Lot of work has been performed to characterize the caspase-dependent cell death. Caspase-independent cell death, although important in many physiological situations, is less investigated. In this work we show that two caspase-independent effectors of cell death, namely apoptosis-inducing factor and leukocyte elastase inhibitor derived DNase II interact and can cooperate to induce cell death. These results contribute to the knowledge of molecular pathways of cell death, an important issue in the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer or neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Discovery of 2-(alpha-methylbenzylamino) pyrazines as potent Type II inhibitors of FMS.

    PubMed

    Burns, Christopher J; Harte, Michael F; Bu, Xianyong; Fantino, Emmanuelle; Giarrusso, Marilena; Joffe, Max; Kurek, Margarita; Legge, Fiona S; Razzino, Pasquale; Su, Stephen; Treutlein, Herbert; Wan, Soo San; Zeng, Jun; Wilks, Andrew F

    2009-02-15

    A series of 2-(alpha-methylbenzylamino) pyrazines have shown to be potent inhibitors of the FMS tyrosine receptor kinase. Details of SAR studies, modeling and synthesis of compounds within this series are reported.

  18. Identification of type I and type II inhibitors of c-Yes kinase using in silico and experimental techniques.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekaran; Mary Thangakani, Anthony; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Anantha Krishnan, Dhanabalan; Sekijima, Masakazu; Akiyama, Yutaka; Gromiha, M Michael

    2017-06-07

    c-Yes kinase is considered as one of the attractive targets for anti-cancer drug design. The DFG (Asp-Phe-Gly) motif present in most of the kinases will adopt active and inactive conformations, known as DFG-in and DFG-out and their inhibitors are classified into type I and type II, respectively. In the present study, two screening protocols were followed for identification of c-Yes kinase inhibitors. (i) Structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) and (ii) Structure-based (SB) and Pharmacophore-based (PB) tandem screening. In SBVS, the c-Yes kinase structure was obtained from homology modeling and seven ensembles with different active site scaffolds through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. For SB-PB tandem screening, we modeled ligand bound active and inactive conformations. Physicochemical properties of inhibitors of Src kinase family and c-Yes kinase were used to prepare target focused libraries for screenings. Our screening procedure along with docking showed 520 probable hits in SBVS and tandem screening (120 and 400, respectively). Out of 5000 compounds identified from different computational methods, 2410 were examined using kinase inhibition assays. It includes 266 compounds (5.32%) identified from our method. We observed that 14 compounds (12%) are identified by the present method out of 168 that showed > 30% inhibition. Among them, three compounds are novel, unique, and showed good inhibition. Further, we have studied the binding of these compounds at the DFG-in and DFG-out conformations and reported the probable class (type I or type II). Hence, we suggest that these compounds could be novel drug leads for regulation of colorectal cancer.

  19. Effect of preservation solutions UW and EC on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase II and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase II genes in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Sulikowski, Tadeusz; Domanski, Leszek; Zietek, Zbigniew; Adler, Grażyna; Pawlik, Andrzej; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz; Ostrowski, Marek

    2012-01-30

    Matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases play an important role in the regulation of mesangial cell proliferation and may be involved in ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Preservation solutions are thought to diminish the ischemic injury and appropriate choice of the solution should guarantee a better graft function and good prognosis for graft survival. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of preservation solutions UW and EC on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase II and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase II genes in rat kidney. The study was carried out on Wistar rat kidneys divided into 3 groups: kidneys perfused with 0.9% NaCl (control group), with UW, and with EC preservation solution. The results show an enhancement of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 gene expression after 12 min of cold ischemia. This increase was more expressed in kidneys preserved with UW solution in comparison with kidneys perfused with EC solution and 0.9% NaCl. After 24 h of cold ischemia the expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 genes in kidney perfused with UW solution decreased, while in kidneys perfused with EC it was increased. After warm ischemia the MMP-2 and TIMP-2 gene expression increased, whereas it was significantly lower in kidneys perfused with EC solution.

  20. Tissue and Cellular Localization of Proteinase Inhibitors I and II in the Fruit of the Wild Tomato, Lycopersicon peruvianum (L.) Mill 1

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, Vincent P. M.; Franceschi, Vincent R.; Ryan, Clarence A.

    1991-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of proteinase inhibitor I and inhibitor II proteins in the fruit of the wild tomato species Lycopersicon peruvianum (L.) Mill., LA 107 was determined by immunoanalysis of tissue blots and protein-A gold immunocytochemistry. Tissue blot analysis showed that the proteinase inhibitor I proteins were located throughout the fruit tissue, with the exception of the seeds. Light microscopy, using immunocytochemical labeling, indicated that all the parenchyma cells of the pericarp contained inhibitor I and II proteins in dense vacuolar protein aggregates that were not membrane bound. The size, number, and morphology of the aggregates within individual cells varied greatly. The funiculus, ovule, and early embryonic tissues were devoid of inhibitor I and II. Immunocytochemical analysis using transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the proteinase inhibitor I proteins were principally located and stored in protein aggregates within the vacuole of the fruit parenchyma cells. Some cytoplasmic protein-A gold immunolabeling of inhibitor I proteins was evident, which may be related to the synthesis and intermediate transport steps preceding storage of the inhibitor I proteins in the vacuoles. ImagesFigure 7-9Figure 3-6Figure 1Figure 2 PMID:16668425

  1. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of CmPI-II, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from marine snail Cenchritis muricatus.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Alonso-del-Rivero Antigua, Maday; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A protease inhibitor (CmPI-II) (UNIPROT: IPK2_CENMR) from the marine mollusc Cenchritis muricatus, has been isolated and characterized. It is the first member of a new group (group 3) of non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors. CmPI-II is a tight-binding inhibitor of serine proteases: trypsin, human neutrophil elastase (HNE), subtilisin A and pancreatic elastase. This specificity is exceptional in the members of Kazal-type inhibitor family. Several models of three-dimensional structure of CmPI-II have been constructed by homology with other inhibitors of the family but its structure has not yet been solved experimentally. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of CmPI-II as basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified three β-strands β1: residues 14-19, β2: 23-35 and β3: 43-45 and one helix α1: 28-37 arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-α1-β3. These secondary structure elements suggest that CmPI-II adopts the typical scaffold of a Kazal-type inhibitor.

  2. Discovery and structure-activity relationships of a novel isothiazolone class of bacterial type II topoisomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ian R; McCarroll, Andrew J; McGarry, David; Kirkham, James; Pichowicz, Mark; Walker, Rolf; Warrilow, Catherine; Salisbury, Anne-Marie; Savage, Victoria J; Moyo, Emmanuel; Forward, Henry; Cheung, Jonathan; Metzger, Richard; Gault, Zoe; Nelson, Gary; Hughes, Diarmaid; Cao, Sha; Maclean, John; Charrier, Cédric; Craighead, Mark; Best, Stuart; Stokes, Neil R; Ratcliffe, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    There is an urgent and unmet medical need for new antibacterial drugs that tackle infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. During the course of our wider efforts to discover and exploit novel mechanism of action antibacterials, we have identified a novel series of isothiazolone based inhibitors of bacterial type II topoisomerase. Compounds from the class displayed excellent activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with encouraging activity against a panel of MDR clinical Escherichia coli isolates when compared to ciprofloxacin. Representative compounds also displayed a promising in vitro safety profile.

  3. Using DFT methodology for more reliable predictive models: Design of inhibitors of Golgi α-Mannosidase II.

    PubMed

    Bobovská, Adela; Tvaroška, Igor; Kóňa, Juraj

    2016-05-01

    Human Golgi α-mannosidase II (GMII), a zinc ion co-factor dependent glycoside hydrolase (E.C.3.2.1.114), is a pharmaceutical target for the design of inhibitors with anti-cancer activity. The discovery of an effective inhibitor is complicated by the fact that all known potent inhibitors of GMII are involved in unwanted co-inhibition with lysosomal α-mannosidase (LMan, E.C.3.2.1.24), a relative to GMII. Routine empirical QSAR models for both GMII and LMan did not work with a required accuracy. Therefore, we have developed a fast computational protocol to build predictive models combining interaction energy descriptors from an empirical docking scoring function (Glide-Schrödinger), Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) method, and quantum mechanical density functional theory (QM-DFT) calculations. The QSAR models were built and validated with a library of structurally diverse GMII and LMan inhibitors and non-active compounds. A critical role of QM-DFT descriptors for the more accurate prediction abilities of the models is demonstrated. The predictive ability of the models was significantly improved when going from the empirical docking scoring function to mixed empirical-QM-DFT QSAR models (Q(2)=0.78-0.86 when cross-validation procedures were carried out; and R(2)=0.81-0.83 for a testing set). The average error for the predicted ΔGbind decreased to 0.8-1.1kcalmol(-1). Also, 76-80% of non-active compounds were successfully filtered out from GMII and LMan inhibitors. The QSAR models with the fragmented QM-DFT descriptors may find a useful application in structure-based drug design where pure empirical and force field methods reached their limits and where quantum mechanics effects are critical for ligand-receptor interactions. The optimized models will apply in lead optimization processes for GMII drug developments.

  4. Heat shock protein 90 inhibitor attenuates renal fibrosis through degradation of transforming growth factor-β type II receptor.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyun J; Yu, Mi R; Kim, Wan-Young; Kim, Jin; Ryu, Jung H; Kwon, Soon H; Jeon, Jin S; Han, Dong C; Ziyadeh, Fuad

    2012-11-01

    The accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the interstitial area is the final common feature of chronic kidney diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 promotes the development of renal fibrosis. Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 inhibitors have been shown to repress TGF-β1 signaling, but whether they inhibit renal fibrosis is unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the therapeutic efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitor on renal fibrosis. In TGF-β1-treated HK2 cells and unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) kidneys, we found that 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG), an Hsp90 inhibitor, decreased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and collagen I and largely restored the expression of E-cadherin. 17AAG inhibited TGF-β1-mediated phosphorylation of Smad2, Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in HK2 cells. Inhibition of Hsp90 also blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of snail1. This 17AAG-induced reduction was completely restored by simultaneous treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132. Furthermore, 17AAG blocked the interaction between Hsp90 and TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) and promoted ubiquitination of TβRII, leading to the decreased availability of TβRII. Smurf2-specific siRNA reversed the ability of 17AAG to inhibit TGF-β1 signaling. The effect of 17AAG on TβRII expression and renal fibrosis was confirmed in UUO kidneys. These findings suggest that Hsp90 inhibitor prevents the development of renal fibrosis via a mechanism dependent on Smurf2-mediated degradation of TβRII.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of cyclic imides incorporating benzenesulfonamide moieties as carbonic anhydrase I, II, IV and IX inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Alaa A-M; Angeli, Andrea; El-Azab, Adel S; Abu El-Enin, Mohamed A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-03-01

    A group of cyclic imides was synthesized by reaction of amino-substituted benzenesulfonamides with a series of acid anhydrides such as succinic, maleic, tetrahydrophthalic, pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid anhydride, and substituted phthalic anhydrides. The synthesized sulfonamides were evaluated as carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors against the human (h) isoforms hCA I, II, IV and IX, involved in a variety of diseases among which glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa, etc. Some of these sulfonamides showed effective inhibitory action (in the nanomolar range) against the cytosolic isoform hCA II and the transmembrane, tumor-associated one hCA IX, making them interesting candidates for preclinical evaluation in glaucoma or various tumors in which the two enzymes are involved. hCA I and IV were on the other hand less inhibited by these sulfonamides, with inhibition constants in the micromolar range.

  6. Kinetic and in silico studies of hydroxy-based inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I and II.

    PubMed

    Ekhteiari Salmas, Ramin; Mestanoglu, Mert; Durdagi, Serdar; Sentürk, Murat; Kaya, A Afşin; Kaya, Elif Çelenk

    2016-01-01

    A series of hydroxy and phenolic compounds have been assayed for the inhibition of two physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes, the cytosolic human isozymes I and II. The investigated molecules showed inhibition constants in the range of 1.07-4003 and 0.09-31.5 μM at the hCA I and hCA II enzymes, respectively. In order to investigate the binding mechanisms of these inhibitors, in silico studies were also applied. Molecular docking scores of the studied compounds are compared using three different scoring algorithms, namely Glide/SP, Glide/XP and Glide/IFD. In addition, different ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) analysis was performed. All the examined compounds were found within the acceptable range of pharmacokinetic profiles.

  7. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumor phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Ham, Hwa-Yong; Kim, Yeon-Ja; Yun, Young-Jin; Kim, Min-Ju; Kwon, Min-Soo; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor microenvironments polarize neutrophils to protumoral phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate that the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumoral phenotype. The ACEis or AGTR1 antagonist enhanced hypersegmentation of human neutrophils and increased neutrophil cytotoxicity against tumor cells. This neutrophil hypersegmentation was dependent on the mTOR pathway. In a murine tumor model, ACEis and AGTR1 antagonist attenuated tumor growth and enhanced neutrophil hypersegmentation. ACEis inhibited tumor-induced polarization of neutrophils to a protumoral phenotype. Neutrophil depletion reduced the antitumor effect of ACEi. Together, these data suggest that the modulation of Ang II pathway attenuates tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils to an antitumoral phenotype. PMID:26942086

  8. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: inhibition of cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozymes II and VII with simple aromatic sulfonamides and some azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Pothen, Blessy; Maresca, Alfonso; Tiwari, Meena; Singh, Vineet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-08-01

    Several substituted benzenesulfonamides were synthesized by various pathways starting from sulfanilamide. The sulfanilamide diazonium salt was reacted with copper (I) halides, potassium iodide and/or aromatic derivatives, leading to 4-halogeno-, and 4-hydroxy-benzenesulfonamides as well as diazo dyes incorporating sulfamoyl moieties. These sulfonamides were assayed as inhibitors of two physiologically relevant isoforms of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), i.e., the cytosolic CA II (ubiquitous), and CA VII (brain-specific enzyme). Good CA inhibitory activity was detected for some of these derivatives, with inhibition constants (Ki) in the range of 17.5-863 nm against CA II; and 30-4200 nm against CA VII.

  9. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 461 Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II and IV With Trifluoromethylsulfonamide Derivatives and Their Zinc(II) and Copper(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mincione, Giovanna; Scozzafava, Andrea

    1997-01-01

    Reaction of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides containing a free amino group with triflic anhydride afforded compounds possessing trifluoromethanesulfonamido moieties in their molecule. The Zn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of these new sulfonamides were prepared and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis, spectroscopic, magnetic, thermogravimetric and conductimetric measurements). The new derivatives showed good inhibitory activity against three isozymes of carbonic anhydrase (CA), i.e., CA I, II and IV. PMID:18475762

  10. Millepachine, a potential topoisomerase II inhibitor induces apoptosis via activation of NF-κB pathway in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Haoyu; Wang, Taijin; Wang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jianhong; Wei, Yuquan; Zhu, Jingqiang; Chen, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Millepachine (MIL) was a novel chalcone that was separated from Millettia pachycarpa Benth (Leguminosae). We found MIL induced apoptosis through activating NF-κB pathway both in SK-OV-3 and A2780S cells. Western blot showed that MIL increased the levels of IKKα, p-IKKα/β, p-IκBα and NF-κB (p65) proteins, and decreased the expression of IκBα protein. Immunohistochemistry analysis indicated that translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus increased in both ovarian cancer cells. EMSA assay proved MIL enhanced NF-κB DNA-binding activity in the nuclear. That specific NF-κB inhibitors alleviated MIL-induced apoptosis suggested NF-κB activation showed a pro-apoptotic function in SK-OV-3 and A2780S cells. Since NF-κB could be activated by double strand breaks and showed a pro-apoptotic function in the DNA damage response, SCGE assay and western blot revealed that MIL caused DNA strand breaks and significantly increased the level of p-ATM protein and further increased the levels of p-IKKα/β and NF-κB (p65) protein in SK-OV-3 and A2780S cells, while a specific ATM inhibitor could alleviated these effects. Moreover, Topoisomerase II drug screening kit and computer modeling assay were used to prove that MIL induced the production of linear DNA and inhibited the activity of topoisomerase II through binding with Topoisomerase II-Cleaved DNA complex to stabilize the complex. Taken together, our results identified that MIL exhibited anti-tumor activity through inhibiting topoisomerase II activity to induce tumor cells DNA damage, and MIL-activated NF-κB pathway showed a pro-apoptotic function in response to DNA damage. PMID:27447570

  11. Novel, potent, selective, and orally bioavailable human betaII-tryptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, David; Tai, Vincent W-F; Lohman, Julia; Hirschbein, Bernie; Mendonca, Rohan; Lee, Chang-Sun; Spencer, Jeffrey R; Janc, James; Nguyen, Margaret; Beltman, Jerlyn; Sprengeler, Paul; Scheerens, Heleen; Lin, Tong; Liu, Liang; Gadre, Ashwini; Kellogg, Alisha; Green, Michael J; McGrath, Mary E

    2006-08-01

    The synthesis of novel [1,2,4]oxadiazoles and their structure-activity relationship (SAR) for the inhibition of tryptase and related serine proteases is presented. Elaboration of the P'-side afforded potent, selective, and orally bioavailable tryptase inhibitors.

  12. Combination therapy with ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to halt progression of chronic renal disease: pathophysiology and indications.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gunter; Ritz, Eberhard

    2005-03-01

    It is no a secret that we are confronted by an alarmingly increasing number of patients with progressive renal disease. There is ample evidence for the notion that angiotensin II (Ang II) is a major culprit in progression. The vasopeptide Ang II turned out to have also multiple nonhemodynamic pathophysiologic actions on the kidney, including proinflammatory and profibrogenic effects. Diverse complex Ang II generating systems have been identified, including specifically local tissue-specific renin-angiotensin systems (RAS). For example, proximal tubular cells have all components required for a functional RAS capable of synthesizing Ang II. On the other hand, Ang II is not the only effector of the RAS and other peptides generated by the RAS influence renal function and structure as well. Moreover, the discoveries that Ang II can be generated by enzymes other than angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and that Ang II and other RAS derived peptides bind to various receptors with different functional consequences have further added to the complexity of this system. Several major clinical trials have clearly shown that ACE inhibitor treatment slows the progression of renal diseases, including in diabetic nephropathy. Well-controlled studies demonstrated that this effect is in part independent of blood pressure control. More recently, with Ang II type 1 receptor (AT(1)) receptor antagonists a similarly protective effect on renal function was seen in patients with type 2 diabetes. Neither ACE inhibitor treatment nor AT(1) receptor blockade completely abrogate progression of renal disease. A recently introduced novel therapeutic approach is combination treatment comprising both ACE inhibitor and AT(1) receptor antagonists. The rationale for this approach is based on several considerations. Small-scale clinical studies, mainly of crossover design, documented that combination therapy is more potent in reducing proteinuria in patients with different chronic renal diseases. Blood

  13. SYBR Green II Dye-Based Real-Time Assay for Measuring Inhibitor Activity Against HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Kokkula, Chakradhar; Palanisamy, Navaneethan; Ericstam, Malin; Lennerstrand, Johan

    2016-10-01

    There are arrays of in vitro assays to quantify the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). These assays utilize either chemically customized/labelled nucleotides, or TaqMan probes, or radiolabeled nucleotides/primers. Although several real-time PCR assays exist commercially for measuring the RT activity, which are usually used for quantifying the viral titres, these assays are not optimized for measuring the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of HIV-1 RT inhibitors. Moreover, a recently established inorganic pyrophosphate-coupled enzyme assay cannot be employed for studying nonphosphorylated nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). In the present study, we have developed a novel one-step assay with native nucleotide substrates and SYBR Green II dye to determine IC50 values of triphosphorylated NRTIs against HIV-1 RT. Using exact batches of wild-type and mutant RT, and triphosphorylated NRTIs, we showed that our method gave IC50 values for inhibitors similar to that of an earlier published colorimetric assay with BrdUTP substrate (CABS). Our assay should be suitable for high-throughput screening of antiretroviral drugs and could also be suitable for studying drug resistance profiles. Additionally, we also used our assay to study inhibition by AZT in its nonphosphorylated form by supplementing the reaction mixture with necessary kinases and ATP.

  14. Simplified AIP-II Peptidomimetics Are Potent Inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus AgrC Quorum Sensing Receptors.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Joseph K; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Tyler, Kimberly A; Blackwell, Helen E

    2017-02-16

    The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus controls many aspects of virulence by using the accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing (QS) system. The agr system is activated by a macrocyclic peptide signal known as an autoinducing peptide (AIP). We sought to develop structurally simplified mimetics of AIPs for use as chemical tools to study QS in S. aureus. Herein, we report new peptidomimetic AgrC receptor inhibitors based on a tail-truncated AIP-II peptide that have almost analogous inhibitory activities to the parent peptide. Structural comparison of one of these peptidomimetics to the parent peptide and a highly potent, all-peptide-derived, S. aureus agr inhibitor (AIP-III D4A) revealed a conserved hydrophobic motif and overall amphipathic nature. Our results suggest that the AIP scaffold is amenable to structural mimicry and minimization for the development of synthetic agr inhibitors. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Metals affect the structure and activity of human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. II. Binding affinity and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lawrence C; Goswami, Sumit; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2011-01-01

    Human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor with a metastable active conformation. The lifespan of the active form of PAI-1 is modulated via interaction with the plasma protein, vitronectin, and various metal ions. These metal ions fall into two categories: Type I metals, including calcium, magnesium, and manganese, stabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, whereas Type II metals, including cobalt, copper, and nickel, destabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, but stabilize PAI-1 in its presence. To provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the unusual modulation of PAI-1 structure and activity, the binding characteristics and conformational effects of these two types of metals were further evaluated. Steady-state binding measurements using surface plasmon resonance indicated that both active and latent PAI-1 exhibit a dissociation constant in the low micromolar range for binding to immobilized nickel. Stopped-flow measurements of approach-to-equilibrium changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence indicated that the Type I and Type II metals bind in different modes that induce distinct conformational effects on PAI-1. Changes in the observed rate constants with varying concentrations of metal allowed accurate determination of binding affinities for cobalt, nickel, and copper, yielding dissociation constants of ∼40, 30, and 0.09 μM, respectively. Competition experiments that tested effects on PAI-1 stability were consistent with these measurements of affinity and indicate that copper binds tightly to PAI-1. PMID:21280128

  16. Oral administration of GW788388, an inhibitor of TGF-beta type I and II receptor kinases, decreases renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M; Thorikay, M; Deckers, M; van Dinther, M; Grygielko, E T; Gellibert, F; de Gouville, A C; Huet, S; ten Dijke, P; Laping, N J

    2008-03-01

    Progressive kidney fibrosis precedes end-stage renal failure in up to a third of patients with diabetes mellitus. Elevated intra-renal transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is thought to underlie disease progression by promoting deposition of extracellular matrix and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. GW788388 is a new TGF-beta type I receptor inhibitor with a much improved pharmacokinetic profile compared with SB431542. We studied its effect in vitro and found that it inhibited both the TGF-beta type I and type II receptor kinase activities, but not that of the related bone morphogenic protein type II receptor. Further, it blocked TGF-beta-induced Smad activation and target gene expression, while decreasing epithelial-mesenchymal transitions and fibrogenesis. Using db/db mice, which develop diabetic nephropathy, we found that GW788388 given orally for 5 weeks significantly reduced renal fibrosis and decreased the mRNA levels of key mediators of extracellular matrix deposition in kidneys. Our study shows that GW788388 is a potent and selective inhibitor of TGF-beta signalling in vitro and renal fibrosis in vivo.

  17. Befloxatone, a new reversible and selective monoamine oxidase-A inhibitor. II. Pharmacological profile.

    PubMed

    Caille, D; Bergis, O E; Fankhauser, C; Gardes, A; Adam, R; Charieras, T; Grosset, A; Rovei, V; Jarreau, F X

    1996-04-01

    The pharmacological profile of befloxatone, a reversible, selective and competitive inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-A has been investigated in rodents. In mice, befloxatone was more active at potentiating generalized tremors induced by L-5-hydroxytryptophan (ED50, 0.21 mg/kg p.o.) than phenylethylamine-induced stereotypies (ED50, 58 mg/kg p.o.), indicating a very high in vivo selectivity for inhibition of the A form of monoamine oxidase. Befloxatone showed potent activity in behavioral models in rodents predictive of antidepressant activity (forced swimming test, learned helplessness and reserpine reversal) with minimal effective doses of 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg p.o. In these tests, befloxatone was much more potent (10- to 500-fold) than reference antidepressant compounds (reversible and irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors and monoamine reuptake inhibitors). In rats, befloxatone increased rapid eye movement sleep latency and decreased rapid eye movement sleep duration, without rebound effects. Potential anxiolytic activity was observed in the elevated-plus maze test in rats (minimal effective dose, 1-2 mg/kg p.o.). Befloxatone had no effect on motor performance, did not induce sedative or stimulant activity up to doses of 200 mg/kg p.o. and was devoid of anticholinergic activity in mice. Interaction studies with p.o. dietary tyramine (12 mg/kg), carried out in freely moving rats, demonstrated that, in contrast to irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors, befloxatone did not potentiate the pressor effect of this amine in the range of doses which showed pharmacological activity in antidepressant behavioral models. Furthermore, of the compounds tested (moclobemide, brofaromine, nialamide and phenelzine), comparison of doses active in antidepressant models and doses potentiating the pressor effects of tyramine demonstrated that befloxatone had the best therapeutic index. The results suggest that befloxatone will show clinical antidepressant activity at low doses and

  18. Purification of sea-urchin RNA polymerase II. Characterization by template requirements and sensitivity to inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ballario, P; Di Mauro, E; Giuliani, C; Pedone, F

    1980-04-01

    The purification of RNA polymerase II from gastrulae of Paracentrotus lividus is described. The enzyme obtained is homogeneous as judged by electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions. It is able to transcribe both native high-Mr P. lividus DNA and Psammechinus miliaris h22 histone DNA, although single-stranded and nicked DNAs are better templates. P. lividus RNA polymerase II forms with homologous native DNA stable binary complexes that are able to initiate RNA chains after exposure to heparin. Heparin-resistant complexes do not form on nicks of DNA molecules. Sensitivity of sea-urchin RNA polymerase II to rifamycin derivatives and alpha-amanitin has been determined.

  19. The influence of anions and inhibitors on the catalytic metal ion in Co(II)-substituted horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bertini, I; Lanini, G; Luchinat, C; Haas, C; Maret, W; Zeppezauer, M

    1987-01-01

    1H-NMR and electronic spectroscopic data are reported for the interaction of the effector molecule imidazole and the inhibitor molecule pyrazole with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase whose catalytic zinc ions were replaced by Co(II). In addition 13C-NMR and optical data are given for the binding of acetate to this enzyme species. For the binary complex with imidazole an assignment of the protons of the metal-coordinated imidazole has been made and it was found that the rate of exchange of the effector molecule is slow on the NMR time scale. In the presence of NADH which is bound to the open conformation of the binary complex, the most pronounced change is a shift of the beta-CH2 protons of the metal-coordinated cysteine residues which is attributed to hydrogen bonding interactions between the carboxamide group of the nicotinamide moiety with cysteine 46. The 1H-NMR spectra of the binary complex of Co(II)-HLADH with pyrazole show resonances assigned to the protons in the 3- and 4-positions of the bound inhibitor, the NH proton resonance is not detectable. In the ternary complex with pyrazole and NAD+ only the resonances of the beta-CH2 protons (beyond 150 ppm) are changed whereas the protons of histidine 67 and the bound inhibitor are unchanged. The data demonstrate that the coordination environment of the catalytic metal ion is changed very little when the protein changes from the open to the closed conformation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Screening of novel chemical compounds as possible inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase and photosynthetic activity of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Mehmet Sayım; Zharmukhamedov, Sergei K; Mamaş, Serhat; Kupriyanova, Elena V; Shitov, Alexandr V; Klimov, Vyacheslav V; Özbek, Neslihan; Özmen, Ümmühan; Gündüzalp, Ayla; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Karacan, Nurcan; Friedrich, Thomas; Los, Dmitry A; Carpentier, Robert; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-08-01

    Thirty novel chemical compounds were designed and synthesized expecting that they would be possible inhibitors. From this number eleven were organic bases, twenty-four were their organic derivatives and fourteen were metal complexes. Screening of these chemicals by their action on photosynthetic electron transfer (PET) and carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity (CAA) of photosystem II (PSII), α-CA, as well as β-CA was done. Several groups were revealed among them. Some of them are capable to suppress either one, two, three, or even all of the measured activities. As example, one of the Cu(II)-phenyl sulfonylhydrazone complexes (compound 25) suppresses CAA of α-CA by 88%, CAA of β-CA by 100% inhibition; CAA of PSII by 100% and the PSII photosynthetic activity by 66.2%. The Schiff base compounds (12, 15) and Cu(II)-phenyl sulfonylhydrazone complexes (25, 26) inhibited the CAA and PET of PSII significantly. The obtained data indicate that the PSII donor side is a target of the inhibitory action of these agents. Some physico- or electrochemical properties such as diffusion coefficient, number of transferred electrons, peak potential and heterogeneous standard rate constants of the compounds were determined in nonaqueous media. pKa values were also determined in nonaqueous and aqueous media. Availability in the studied group of novel chemical agents possessing different inhibitory activity allow in future to isolate the "active part" in the structure of the inhibitors responsible for different inhibitory mechanisms, as well as to determine the influence of side substituters on its inhibitory efficiency.

  1. A cyclic peptide inhibitor of apoC-II peptide fibril formation: mechanistic insight from NMR and molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael D W; Yeung, Levi; Hung, Andrew; Todorova, Nevena; Mok, Yee-Foong; Karas, John A; Gooley, Paul R; Yarovsky, Irene; Howlett, Geoffrey J

    2012-03-09

    The misfolding and aggregation of proteins to form amyloid fibrils is a characteristic feature of several common age-related diseases. Agents that directly inhibit formation of amyloid fibrils represent one approach to combating these diseases. We have investigated the potential of a cyclic peptide to inhibit fibril formation by fibrillogenic peptides from human apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II). Cyc[60-70] was formed by disulfide cross-linking of cysteine residues added to the termini of the fibrillogenic peptide comprising apoC-II residues 60-70. This cyclic peptide did not self-associate into fibrils. However, substoichiometric concentrations of cyc[60-70] significantly delayed fibril formation by the fibrillogenic, linear peptides apoC-II[60-70] and apoC-II[56-76]. Reduction of the disulfide bond or scrambling the amino acid sequence within cyc[60-70] significantly impaired its inhibitory activity. The solution structure of cyc[60-70] was solved using NMR spectroscopy, revealing a well-defined structure comprising a hydrophilic face and a more hydrophobic face containing the Met60, Tyr63, Ile66 and Phe67 side chains. Molecular dynamics (MD) studies identified a flexible central region within cyc[60-70], while MD simulations of "scrambled" cyc[60-70] indicated an increased formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and a reduction in the overall flexibility of the peptide. Our structural studies suggest that the inhibitory activity of cyc[60-70] is mediated by an elongated structure with inherent flexibility and distinct hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces, enabling cyc[60-70] to interact transiently with fibrillogenic peptides and inhibit fibril assembly. These results suggest that cyclic peptides based on amyloidogenic core peptides could be useful as specific inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation.

  2. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: Human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David P.; Hann, Zachary S.; Cohen, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    An ever increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, Zn(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins. PMID:23706138

  3. Phase II study of XR 5000, an inhibitor of topoisomerases I and II, in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Caponigro, F; Dittrich, C; Sorensen, J B; Schellens, J H M; Duffaud, F; Paz Ares, L; Lacombe, D; de Balincourt, C; Fumoleau, P

    2002-01-01

    XR 5000 is one of a series of tricyclic carboxamide-based cytotoxic agents. It binds to DNA by intercalation and stimulates DNA cleavage by inhibition of both topoisomerase I and II, thus possibly overcoming the resistance resulting from downregulation of either enzyme. Twenty patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer, unpretreated for metastatic disease, received XR 5000 at the dose of 3010 mg/m(2) in a 120-h central intravenous (i.v.) infusion every 3 weeks. Response was evaluated every two cycles. No complete (CR) or partial responses (PR) were observed in eligible patients (response rate, 0 of 19, 0%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0-18%). 5 patients had stable disease, which lasted from 79 to 157 days. Haematological toxicity was low, since only one grade 4 neutropenia and two grade 3 anaemia were observed. Other treatment-related grade 3-4 toxicities were: deep venous thrombosis (2 cases), liver toxicity, diarrhoea, anorexia, dyspnoea, chest pain, infection (1 case each). Despite the good toxicity profile, these results do not support further trials with XR 5000 in metastatic colorectal cancer.

  4. Synthesis and discovery of (I-3,II-3)-biacacetin as a novel non-zinc binding inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Nanjan, Pandurangan; Nambiar, Jyotsna; Nair, Bipin G; Banerji, Asoke

    2015-07-01

    Eleven biflavones (7a-b and 9a-i) were synthesised by a simple and efficient protocol and screened for MMP-2 and MMP-9 inhibitory activities. Amongst them, a natural product-like analog, (I-3,II-3)-biacacetin (9h) was found to be the most potent inhibitor. Molecular docking studies suggest that unlike most of the known inhibitors, 9h inhibits MMP-2 and MMP-9 through non-zinc binding interactions.

  5. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize.

    PubMed

    Lu Y-T; Feldman, L J; Hidaka, H

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  6. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  7. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  8. Discovery of novel type II c-Met inhibitors based on BMS-777607.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ai, Jing; Shi, Dakuo; Peng, Xia; Ji, Yinchun; Liu, Jian; Geng, Meiyu; Li, Yingxia

    2014-06-10

    Twenty-two new analogs based on the structure of BMS-777607 were designed, synthesized, and evaluated to determine their biological activities. Compounds bearing a cyclic sulfonamide or α-chloropiperidone scaffold exhibited good activity, which may provide a new basis for further structural optimization. Quinoline-containing analogs exhibited better results than did their counterparts with an aminopyrimidine, aminopyridine, or pyrrolopyridine unit. Two analogs, 22d and 22e, stood out as the most potent c-Met inhibitors with IC50s of 0.9 and 1.7 nM, respectively. These two compounds were more potent than BMS-777607 in enzymatic inhibition and cell proliferation studies.

  9. Design and discovery of novel quinoxaline derivatives as dual DNA intercalators and topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Ibrahim H; El-Naggar, Abeer M; El-Sattar, Nour E A Abd; Youssef, Ahmed S A

    2017-07-10

    In attempt to develop new potent anti-tumor agents, a series of quinoxaline derivatives was designed and synthesized. The novel compounds were tested in vitro for their anti-proliferative activities against HePG-2, MCF-7 and HCT-116 cell lines. Additionally, DNA binding affinities as well as DNA-top II inhibitory activities of the synthesized compounds were investigated as potential mechanism for the anticancer activity. Compounds 13, 15, 16 and 19 exhibited good cytotoxicity activities against the three cell lines (IC50 ranging from 7.6 to 32.4 µM) comparable to that of doxorubicin (IC50 = 9.8 µM). Interestingly, the results of DNA binding and DNA-top II inhibition assays were in agreement with that of the cytotoxicity tests, where the most potent anticancer compounds showed good DNA binding affinities (IC50 ranging from 25.1 to 32.4 µM) and DNA-top II inhibitory activities (IC50 ranging from 6.4 to 15.3 µM) comparable to that of doxorubicin (IC50 = 28.1 and 3.8 µM, respectively). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were carried out for the new compounds in order to investigate their binding pattern with the prospective target, DNA-top II complex (PDB-code: 3qx3). Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Effects of pH and inhibitors on the absorption spectrum of cobalt(II)-substituted carbonic anhydrase III from bovine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Engberg, P; Lindskog, S

    1984-05-21

    Bovine apocarbonic anhydrase III has been prepared by incubation with 2-carboxy-1,10-phenanthroline at pH 5.5. The Co(II)-substituted enzyme has been prepared and its absorption spectrum has been studied. The spectrum is nearly pH-independent above pH 6. It is very similar to the high pH spectral forms of Co(II)-carbonic anhydrases I and II. The spectra of complexes with the sulfonamide inhibitor, acetazolamide, and with CN- and NCO - are virtually identical to the spectra of the corresponding complexes with Co(II)-isoenzymes I and II. The spectrum of the N-3 complex indicates that this anion is bound somewhat differently in Co(II) isoenzyme III than in the other Co(II)-substituted isoenzymes.

  11. Structural investigation of inhibitor designs targeting 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase from the shikimate pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Marcio V.B.; Snee, William C.; Bromfield, Karen M.; Payne, Richard J.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Ciulli, Alessio; Howard, Nigel I.; Abell, Chris; Sacchettini, James C.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2011-09-06

    The shikimate pathway is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its absence from humans makes the enzymes of this pathway potential drug targets. In the present paper, we provide structural insights into ligand and inhibitor binding to 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (dehydroquinase) from M. tuberculosis (MtDHQase), the third enzyme of the shikimate pathway. The enzyme has been crystallized in complex with its reaction product, 3-dehydroshikimate, and with six different competitive inhibitors. The inhibitor 2,3-anhydroquinate mimics the flattened enol/enolate reaction intermediate and serves as an anchor molecule for four of the inhibitors investigated. MtDHQase also forms a complex with citrazinic acid, a planar analogue of the reaction product. The structure of MtDHQase in complex with a 2,3-anhydroquinate moiety attached to a biaryl group shows that this group extends to an active-site subpocket inducing significant structural rearrangement. The flexible extensions of inhibitors designed to form {pi}-stacking interactions with the catalytic Tyr{sup 24} have been investigated. The high-resolution crystal structures of the MtDHQase complexes provide structural evidence for the role of the loop residues 19-24 in MtDHQase ligand binding and catalytic mechanism and provide a rationale for the design and efficacy of inhibitors.

  12. Treatment of hyperactive children with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. II. Plasma and urinary monoamine findings after treatment.

    PubMed

    Zametkin, A; Rapoport, J L; Murphy, D L; Linnoila, M; Karoum, F; Potter, W Z; Ismond, D

    1985-10-01

    Urinary monoamines and metabolites as well as plasma norepinephrine (NE) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol were measured in 14 boys (mean age, 9.2 years) with Attention Deficit Disorder With Hyperactivity during an initial placebo period, after four weeks of treatment with either dextroamphetamine sulfate (N=5) or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (N=9) and at the end of a subsequent two-week placebo "washout" period. Both dextroamphetamine and monoamine oxidase inhibitors produced persistent changes in monoamines and metabolites, which were most marked and consistent for NE and its metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol. These changes did not correlate in a consistent fashion with clinical response during drug treatment. Moreover, there was rapid clinical relapse following cessation of either treatment while the alterations in NE metabolism remained during the two weeks following drug, further demonstrating the independence of these changes from clinical state. Future studies with dextroamphetamine need drug-free periods that are greater than 14 days to obtain true "baseline" conditions.

  13. Perioperative management of patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers: a quality improvement audit.

    PubMed

    Vijay, A; Grover, A; Coulson, T G; Myles, P S

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients continuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers on the day of surgery are more likely to have significant intraoperative hypotension, higher rates of postoperative acute kidney injury, and lower incidences of postoperative atrial fibrillation. However, many of these studies were prone to bias and confounding, and questions remain over the validity of these outcomes. This observational, before-and-after quality improvement audit aimed to assess the effect of withholding these medications on the morning of surgery. We recruited 323 participants, with 83 (26%) having their preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) withheld on the day of surgery. There were only very small Spearman rank-order correlations between time since last dose of these medications (rho -0.12, P=0.057) and intraoperative and recovery room intravenous fluid administration (rho -0.11, P=0.042). There was no statistically significant difference between the continued or withheld groups in vasopressor (metaraminol use 3.5 [1.5-8.3] mg versus 3.5 [1.5-8.5] mg, P=0.67) or intravenous fluid administration (1000 ml [800-1500] ml versus 1000 [800-1500] ml, P=0.096), nor rates of postoperative acute kidney injury (13% vs 18%, P=0.25) or atrial fibrillation (15% versus 18%, P=0.71). This audit found no significant differences in measured outcomes between the continued or withheld ACEi/ARB groups. This finding should be interpreted with caution due to the possibility of confounding and an insufficient sample size. However, as the finding is in contrast to many previous studies, future prospective randomised clinical trials are required to answer this important question.

  14. Casein kinase II inhibitor enhances production of infectious genotype 1a hepatitis C virus (H77S).

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungtaek; Jin, Bora; Choi, Sung Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Genotype 2a JFH1 virus has substantially contributed to the progress of HCV biology by allowing entire viral life cycle of HCV in cell culture. Using this genotype 2a virus, casein kinase II (CKII) was previously identified as a crucial host factor in virus assembly by phosphorylating NS5A. Since most of the prior studies employed genotype 2a JFH1 or JFH1-based intragenotypic chimera, we used genotype 1a H77S to study virus assembly. CKII inhibition by chemical inhibitors enhanced H77S virus production in contrast to that of JFH1 virus, but genetic inhibition of CKII by siRNA did not change H77S virus titer significantly. The different outcomes from these two approaches of CKII inhibition suggested that nonspecific target kinase of CKII inhibitors plays a role in increasing H77S virus production and both viral and host factors were investigated in this study. Our results emphasize substantial differences among the HCV genotypes that should be considered in both basic research and clinical practices.

  15. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex as inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and Aβ aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nilima A; Bhat, Satish S; Kumbhar, Avinash S; Sonawane, Uddhavesh B; Jani, Vinod; Joshi, Rajendra R; Ramteke, Shefali N; Kulkarni, Prasad P; Joshi, Bimba

    2014-03-21

    Two ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(phen)3](2+) (1) and [Ru(phen)2(bxbg)](2+) (2) (where phen = 1,10 phenanthroline, bxbg = bis(o-xylene)bipyridine glycoluril) have been evaluated for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) aggregation inhibition. Complex 2 exhibits higher potency of AChE inhibition and kinetics and molecular modeling studies indicate that ancillary ligand plays significant role in inhibitory potency exhibited by complex 2. The inhibitory effect of these complexes on Aβ (1-40) aggregation is investigated using Thioflavin T fluorescence and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Both complexes efficiently inhibit Aβ (1-40) aggregation and are negligibly toxic to human neuroblastoma cells. This is the first demonstration that ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes simultaneously inhibit AChE and Aβ aggregation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of naphthoquinone-coumarin conjugates as topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hueso-Falcón, Idaira; Amesty, Ángel; Anaissi-Afonso, Laura; Lorenzo-Castrillejo, Isabel; Machín, Félix; Estévez-Braun, Ana

    2017-02-01

    Based on previous Topoisomerase II docking studies of naphthoquinone derivatives, a series of naphthoquinone-coumarin conjugates was synthesized through a multicomponent reaction from aromatic aldehydes, 4-hydroxycoumarin and 2-hydroxynaphthoquinone. The hybrid structures were evaluated against the α isoform of human topoisomerase II (hTopoIIα), Escherichia coli DNA Gyrase and E. coli Topoisomerase I. All tested compounds inhibited the hTopoIIα-mediated relaxation of negatively supercoiled circular DNA in the low micromolar range. This inhibition was specific since neither DNA Gyrase nor Topoisomerase I were affected. Cleavage assays pointed out that naphthoquinone-coumarins act by catalytically inhibiting hTopoIIα. ATPase assays and molecular docking studies further pointed out that the mode of action is related to the hTopoIIα ATP-binding site.

  17. Type II Kinase Inhibitors Show an Unexpected Inhibition Mode against Parkinson’s Disease-Linked LRRK2 Mutant G2019S

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Bender, Samantha A.; Cuny, Gregory D; Sherman, Woody; Glicksman, Marcie; Ray, Soumya S.

    2014-01-01

    A number of well-known type II inhibitors (ATP non-competitive) that bind kinases in their DFG-out conformation were tested against wild-type LRRK2 and the most common Parkinson’s disease-linked mutation G2019S. We found that traditional type II inhibitors exhibit surprising variability in their inhibition mechanism between wild type (WT) and the G2019S mutant of LRRK2. The type II kinase inhibitors were found to work by an ATP-competitive fashion against the G2019S mutant, whereas they appear to follow the expected non-competitive mechanism against WT. Since the G2019S mutation lies in the DXG-motif (DYG in LRRK2 but DFG in most other kinases) of the activation loop, we explored the structural consequence of the mutation on loop dynamics using an enhanced sampling method called metadynamics. The simulations suggest that the G2019S mutation stabilizes the DYG-in state of LRRK2 through a series of hydrogen bonds, leading to an increase in the conformational barrier between the active and inactive forms of the enzyme and a relative stabilization of the active form. The conformational bias toward the active form of LRRK2 mutants has two primary consequences: 1) the mutant enzyme becomes hyperactive, a known contributor to the Parkinsonian phenotype, as a consequence of being “locked” into the activated state and 2) the mutation creates an unusual allosteric pocket that can bind type II inhibitors but in an ATP competitive fashion. Our results suggest that developing type II inhibitors, which are generally considered superior to type I inhibitors due to desirable selectivity profiles, might be especially challenging for the G2019S LRRK2 mutant. PMID:23379419

  18. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors decrease angiotensin II-induced vascular fibrosis: role of RhoA/ROCK and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Rupérez, Mónica; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Esteban, Vanesa; Carvajal, Gisselle; Plaza, Juan José; Egido, Jesús; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2007-08-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-coenzyme A (CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) present beneficial effects in cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to cardiovascular damage through the production of profibrotic factors, such as connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Our aim was to investigate whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors could modulate Ang II responses, evaluating CTGF expression and the mechanisms underlying this process. In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) atorvastatin and simvastatin inhibited Ang II-induced CTGF production. The inhibitory effect of statins on CTGF upregulation was reversed by mevalonate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, suggesting that RhoA inhibition could be involved in this process. In VSMCs, statins inhibited Ang II-induced Rho membrane localization and activation. In these cells Ang II regulated CTGF via RhoA/Rho kinase activation, as shown by inhibition of Rho with C3 exoenzyme, RhoA dominant-negative overexpression, and Rho kinase inhibition. Furthermore, activation of p38MAPK and JNK, and redox process were also involved in Ang II-mediated CTGF upregulation, and were downregulated by statins. In rats infused with Ang II (100 ng/kg per minute) for 2 weeks, treatment with atorvastatin (5 mg/kg per day) diminished aortic CTGF and Rho activation without blood pressure modification. Rho kinase inhibition decreased CTGF upregulation in rat aorta, mimicking statin effect. CTGF is a vascular fibrosis mediator. Statins diminished extracellular matrix (ECM) overexpression caused by Ang II in vivo and in vitro. In summary, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors inhibit several intracellular signaling systems activated by Ang II (RhoA/Rho kinase and MAPK pathways and redox process) involved in the regulation of CTGF. Our results may explain, at least in part, some beneficial effects of statins in cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Unlike other chemicals, etoposide (a topoisomerase-II inhibitor) produces peak mutagenicity in primary spermatocytes of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Johnson, D K; Shelby, M D

    1998-05-25

    The cancer chemotherapy agent, and topoisomerase-II inhibitor, etoposide (VP-16) produced both recessive mutations at specific loci and dominants at other loci with peak frequencies in primary spermatocytes, a cell type in which the topo-II gene has been shown to be activated. Etoposide thus differs from all other chemicals whose germ-cell-stage specificity has been analyzed. No effects of etoposide exposure of spermatogonial stem cells ( approximately 15, 000 offspring scored) were detectable by either mutagenicity or productivity endpoints. The significant mutagenic response that followed exposure of poststem-cell stages ( approximately 25,000 offspring scored) showed a clear peak, with three of four specific-locus mutants, and three of four dominant mutants conceived during weeks 4 or 5 (days 22-35) post-injection, a period that also encompassed the dominant-lethal peak. For this period, the induced specific-locus rate (with 95% confidence limits) at a weighted-average exposure of 75.1 mg etop/kg was 59.5 (14.6, 170. 9)x10-6/locus. At least 3 of the 4 specific-locus mutations were deletions, paralleling findings with etoposide or analogs in other test systems where a recombinational origin of the deletions has been suggested. Because, unlike other chemicals that induce deletions in male germ cells, etoposide is effective in stages normally associated with recombinational events, it will be of interest to determine whether this chemical can affect meiotic recombination.

  20. 2-Octadecynoic acid as a dual life stage inhibitor of Plasmodium infections and plasmodial FAS-II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Carballeira, Néstor M; Bwalya, Angela Gono; Itoe, Maurice Ayamba; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Cordero-Maldonado, María Lorena; Kaiser, Marcel; Mota, Maria M; Crawford, Alexander D; Guido, Rafael V C; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2014-09-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium goes through two life stages in the human host, a non-symptomatic liver stage (LS) followed by a blood stage with all clinical manifestation of the disease. In this study, we investigated a series of 2-alkynoic fatty acids (2-AFAs) with chain lengths between 14 and 18 carbon atoms for dual in vitro activity against both life stages. 2-Octadecynoic acid (2-ODA) was identified as the best inhibitor of Plasmodium berghei parasites with ten times higher potency (IC50=0.34 μg/ml) than the control drug. In target determination studies, the same compound inhibited three Plasmodium falciparum FAS-II (PfFAS-II) elongation enzymes PfFabI, PfFabZ, and PfFabG with the lowest IC50 values (0.28-0.80 μg/ml, respectively). Molecular modeling studies provided insights into the molecular aspects underlying the inhibitory activity of this series of 2-AFAs and a likely explanation for the considerably different inhibition potentials. Blood stages of P. falciparum followed a similar trend where 2-ODA emerged as the most active compound, with 20 times less potency. The general toxicity and hepatotoxicity of 2-AFAs were evaluated by in vitro and in vivo methods in mammalian cell lines and zebrafish models, respectively. This study identifies 2-ODA as the most promising antiparasitic 2-AFA, particularly towards P. berghei parasites.

  1. Optimization of physicochemical properties and safety profile of novel bacterial topoisomerase type II inhibitors (NBTIs) with activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Reck, Folkert; Ehmann, David E; Dougherty, Thomas J; Newman, Joseph V; Hopkins, Sussie; Stone, Gregory; Agrawal, Nikunj; Ciaccio, Paul; McNulty, John; Barthlow, Herbert; O'Donnell, Jennifer; Goteti, Kosalaram; Breen, John; Comita-Prevoir, Janelle; Cornebise, Mark; Cronin, Mark; Eyermann, Charles J; Geng, Bolin; Carr, Greg R; Pandarinathan, Lakshmipathi; Tang, Xuejun; Cottone, Andrew; Zhao, Liang; Bezdenejnih-Snyder, Natascha

    2014-10-01

    Type II bacterial topoisomerases are well validated targets for antimicrobial chemotherapy. Novel bacterial type II topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) of these targets are of interest for the development of new antibacterial agents that are not impacted by target-mediated cross-resistance with fluoroquinolones. We now disclose the optimization of a class of NBTIs towards Gram-negative pathogens, especially against drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Physicochemical properties (pKa and logD) were optimized for activity against P. aeruginosa and for reduced inhibition of the hERG channel. The optimized analogs 9g and 9i displayed potent antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa, and a significantly improved hERG profile over previously reported analogs. Compound 9g showed an improved QT profile in in vivo models and lower clearance in rat over earlier compounds. The compounds show promise for the development of new antimicrobial agents against drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rho-kinase inhibitor reduces hypersensitivity to ANG II in human mesenteric arteries retrieved and conserved under the same conditions as transplanted organs.

    PubMed

    Szadujkis-Szadurski, Rafal; Slupski, Maciej; Szadujkis-Szadurska, Katarzyna; Szadujkis-Szadurski, Leszek; Jasinski, Milosz; Grzesk, Grzegorz; Grzesk, Elżbieta; Woderska, Aleksandra; Wlodarczyk, Zbigniew

    2014-08-22

    Rho-kinase and GTP-ase Rho are important regulators of vascular tone and blood pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Rho-kinase in artery reactions induced by angiotensin II (ANG II) and the effects of ischemia-reperfusion injury as well as the function of intra- and extracellular calcium in these reactions. Experiments were performed on mesenteric superior arteries procured from cadaveric organ donors and conserved under the same conditions as transplanted kidneys. The vascular contraction in reaction to ANG II was measured in the presence of Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632, after ischemia and reperfusion, in Ca2+ and Ca2+-free solution. The maximal response to ANG II was reduced after ischemia, while an increase was observed after reperfusion. Vascular contraction induced by ANG II was decreased by Y-27632. Y-27632 reduced vascular contraction after reperfusion, both in Ca2+ and Ca2+-free solution. Reperfusion augments vascular contraction in reaction to ANG II. The Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 reduces the hypersensitivity to ANG II after reperfusion mediated by both intra- and extracellular calcium. These results confirm the role of Rho-kinase in receptor-independent function of ANG II and in reperfusion-induced hypersensitivity.

  3. Synthesis and characterisation of novel Co(II) complexes of pyrazole carboxylate derivated of sulfonamide as carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Büyükkidan, Nurgün; Büyükkidan, Bülent; Bülbül, Metin; Kasimoğullari, Rahmi; Serdar, Murat; Mert, Samet

    2013-03-01

    Two new metal complexes, diaquabis(4-benzoyl-1,5-diphenyl-N-(5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide)cobalt(II) dihydrate (2) and diaquabis(ethyl-1-(3-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-3-(5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxylate)cobalt(II) monohydrate (4), containing sulfonamide have been synthesized by the reaction of Co(II) with 4-benzoyl-1,5-diphenyl-N-(5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (1) and ethyl-1-(3-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-3-(5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxylate (3), respectively. The structures of Co(II) complexes 2 and 4 have been characterised by spectroscopic methods and elemental analyses. Human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA-I and hCA-II) were purified from erythrocyte cells by affinity chromatography. The inhibitory effects of ligands 3 and 4, acetazolamide as a control compound and the newly synthesized complexes on the activity of hydratase and esterase of these isoenzymes have been studied in vitro. The concentration of compounds 2 and 4 producing a 50% inhibition of hydratase activity (IC(50) values) were 0.473 ± 0.025 and 0.065 ± 0.002 μm for hCA-I and 0.213 ± 0.015 and 0.833 ± 0.021 μm for hCA-II, respectively. The IC(50) values of synthesized compounds 2 and 4 for esterase activity were, 0.058 ± 0.006 and 0.297 ± 0.015 μm for hCA-I and 0.110 ± 0.010 and 0.052 ± 0.002 μm for hCA-II, respectively. In relation to esterase activity, the inhibition equilibrium constants (K(i) ) were determined as 0.039 ± 0.004 and 0.247 ± 0.035 μm on hCA-I and 0.078 ± 0.002 and 0.363 ± 0.015 μm on hCA-II for 2 and 4, respectively. The synthesized compounds 2 and 4 had effective inhibitory activity (P < 0.0001) on hCA-I and hCA-II than the corresponding free ligands, 1 and 3, and acetazolamide. Compounds 2 and 4 might be considered as potential inhibitors. © 2012 The Authors. JPP

  4. Small molecule inhibitors of peptidoglycan synthesis targeting the lipid II precursor.

    PubMed

    Derouaux, Adeline; Turk, Samo; Olrichs, Nick K; Gobec, Stanislav; Breukink, Eefjan; Amoroso, Ana; Offant, Julien; Bostock, Julieanne; Mariner, Katherine; Chopra, Ian; Vernet, Thierry; Zervosen, Astrid; Joris, Bernard; Frère, Jean-Marie; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; Terrak, Mohammed

    2011-05-01

    Bacterial peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases (GTs) of family 51 catalyze the polymerization of the lipid II precursor into linear peptidoglycan strands. This activity is essential to bacteria and represents a validated target for the development of new antibacterials. Application of structure-based virtual screening to the National Cancer Institute library using eHits program and the structure of the glycosyltransferase domain of the Staphylococcus aureus penicillin-binding protein 2 resulted in the identification of two small molecules analogues 5, a 2-[1-[(2-chlorophenyl)methyl]-2-methyl-5-methylsulfanylindol-3-yl]ethanamine and 5b, a 2-[1-[(3,4-dichlorophenyl)methyl]-2-methyl-5-methylsulfanylindol-3-yl]ethanamine that exhibit antibacterial activity against several Gram-positive bacteria but were less active on Gram-negative bacteria. The two compounds inhibit the activity of five GTs in the micromolar range. Investigation of the mechanism of action shows that the compounds specifically target peptidoglycan synthesis. Unexpectedly, despite the fact that the compounds were predicted to bind to the GT active site, compound 5b was found to interact with the lipid II substrate via the pyrophosphate motif. In addition, this compound showed a negatively charged phospholipid-dependent membrane depolarization and disruption activity. These small molecules are promising leads for the development of more active and specific compounds to target the essential GT step in cell wall synthesis.

  5. Ciprofloxacin is a potential topoisomerase II inhibitor for the treatment of NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    KLOSKOWSKI, TOMASZ; GURTOWSKA, NATALIA; OLKOWSKA, JOANNA; NOWAK, JAKUB MARCIN; ADAMOWICZ, JAN; TWORKIEWICZ, JAKUB; DĘBSKI, ROBERT; GRZANKA, ALINA; DREWA, TOMASZ

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common tumors and its treatment is still inefficient. In our previous work we proved that ciprofloxacin has a different influence on five cancer cell lines. Here, we aimed to compare the biological effect of ciprofloxacin on cell lines representing different responses after treatment, thus A549 was chosen as a sensitive model, C6 and B16 as highly resistant. Three different cell lines were analyzed (A549, B16 and C6). The characterization of continuous cell growth was analyzed with the Real-Time Cell Analyzer (RTCA)-DP system. Cytoskeletal changes were demonstrated using immunofluorescence. The cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometry. Ciprofloxacin was cytostatic only against the A549 cell line. In the case of other tested cell lines a cytostatic effect was not observed. Cytoskeletal analysis confirms the results obtained with RTCA-DP. A549 cells were inhibited in the G2/M phase suggesting a mechanism related to topoisomerase II inhibition. The biological effects of ciprofloxacin support the hypothesis that this drug can serve as an adjuvant treatment for lung cancer, due to its properties enabling topoisomerase II inhibition. PMID:23042104

  6. Discovery of Type II Inhibitors of TGFβ-Activated Kinase 1 (TAK1) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 2 (MAP4K2)

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Li; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon; Gurbani, Deepak; ...

    2014-07-17

    Here, we developed a pharmacophore model for type II inhibitors that was used to guide the construction of a library of kinase inhibitors. Kinome-wide selectivity profiling of the library resulted in the identification of a series of 4-substituted 1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridines that exhibited potent inhibitory activity against two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), TAK1 (MAP3K7) and MAP4K2, as well as pharmacologically well interrogated kinases such as p38α (MAPK14) and ABL. Further investigation of the structure–activity relationship (SAR) resulted in the identification of potent dual TAK1 and MAP4K2 inhibitors such as 1 (NG25) and 2 as well as MAP4K2 selective inhibitors such as 16more » and 17. Some of these inhibitors possess good pharmacokinetic properties that will enable their use in pharmacological studies in vivo. Lastly, a 2.4 Å cocrystal structure of TAK1 in complex with 1 confirms that the activation loop of TAK1 assumes the DFG-out conformation characteristic of type II inhibitors.« less

  7. DTA0100, dual topoisomerase II and microtubule inhibitor, evades paclitaxel resistance in P-glycoprotein overexpressing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Podolski-Renić, Ana; Banković, Jasna; Dinić, Jelena; Ríos-Luci, Carla; Fernandes, Miguel X; Ortega, Nuria; Kovačević-Grujičić, Nataša; Martín, Víctor S; Padrón, José M; Pešić, Milica

    2017-07-15

    The efficacy of microtubule targeting agents in cancer treatment has been compromised by the development of drug resistance that may involve both, P-glycoprotein overexpression and the changes in β-tubulin isoforms' expression. The anti-Topoisomerase II activity of methyl 4-((E)-2-(methoxycarbonyl)vinyloxy)oct-2-ynoate (DTA0100) was recently reported. Herein, we further evaluated this propargylic enol ether derivative and found that it exerts inhibitory effect on tubulin polymerization by binding to colchicine binding site. DTA0100 mitotic arrest properties were investigated in two multi-drug resistant cancer cell lines with P-glycoprotein overexpression (colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma). The sensitivity of multi-drug resistant cancer cell lines to DTA0100 was not significantly changed in contrast to microtubule targeting agents such as paclitaxel, vinblastine and colchicine. DTA0100 clearly induced microtubule depolymerization, leading to disturbance of cell cycle kinetics and subsequent apoptosis. The fine-tuning in β-tubulin isoforms expression observed in multi-drug resistant cancer cells may influence the efficacy of DTA0100. Importantly, DTA0100 blocked the P-glycoprotein function in both multi-drug resistant cancer cell lines without inducing the increase in P-glycoprotein expression. Therefore, DTA0100 acting as dual inhibitor of Topoisomerase II and microtubule formation could be considered as multi-potent anticancer agent. Besides, it is able to overcome the problem of drug resistance that emerges in the therapeutic approaches with either Topoisomerase II or microtubule targeting agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Discovery of kibdelomycin, a potent new class of bacterial type II topoisomerase inhibitor by chemical-genetic profiling in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John W; Goetz, Michael A; Smith, Scott K; Zink, Deborah L; Polishook, Jon; Onishi, Russell; Salowe, Scott; Wiltsie, Judyann; Allocco, John; Sigmund, Janet; Dorso, Karen; Lee, Suzy; Skwish, Stephen; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Martín, Jesús; Vicente, Francisca; Genilloud, Olga; Lu, Jun; Painter, Ronald E; Young, Katherine; Overbye, Karen; Donald, Robert G K; Singh, Sheo B

    2011-08-26

    Bacterial resistance to known therapeutics has led to an urgent need for new chemical classes of antibacterial agents. To address this we have applied a Staphylococcus aureus fitness test strategy to natural products screening. Here we report the discovery of kibdelomycin, a novel class of antibiotics produced by a new member of the genus Kibdelosporangium. Kibdelomycin exhibits broad-spectrum, gram-positive antibacterial activity and is a potent inhibitor of DNA synthesis. We demonstrate through chemical genetic fitness test profiling and biochemical enzyme assays that kibdelomycin is a structurally new class of bacterial type II topoisomerase inhibitor preferentially inhibiting the ATPase activity of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Kibdelomycin is thus the first truly novel bacterial type II topoisomerase inhibitor with potent antibacterial activity discovered from natural product sources in more than six decades. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene-deficient mice. II. Effects on hemostasis, thrombosis, and thrombolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Carmeliet, P; Stassen, J M; Schoonjans, L; Ream, B; van den Oord, J J; De Mol, M; Mulligan, R C; Collen, D

    1993-01-01

    The effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene inactivation on hemostasis, thrombosis and thrombolysis were studied in homozygous PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1-/-) mice, generated by homologous recombination in D3 embryonic stem cells. Diluted (10-fold) whole blood clots from PAI-1-/- and from PAI-1 wild type (PAI-1+/+) mice underwent limited but significantly different (P < 0.001) spontaneous lysis within 3 h (6 +/- 1 vs 3 +/- 1%, respectively). A 25-microliters 125I-fibrin-labeled normal murine plasma clot, injected into a jugular vein, was lysed for 47 +/- 5, 66 +/- 3, and 87 +/- 7% within 8 h in PAI-1+/+, heterozygous PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1+/-), and PAI-1-/- mice, respectively (P = 0.002 for PAI-1+/+ vs PAI-1-/- mice). Corresponding values after pretreatment with 0.5 mg/kg endotoxin in PAI-1+/+ and PAI-1-/- mice, were 35 +/- 5 and 91 +/- 3% within 4 h, respectively (P < 0.001). 11 out of 26 PAI-1+/+ but only 1 out of 25 PAI-1-/- mice developed venous thrombosis (P = 0.004) within 6 d after injection of 10 or 50 micrograms endotoxin in the footpad. Spontaneous bleeding or delayed rebleeding could not be documented in PAI-1-/- mice after partial amputation of the tail or of the caecum. Thus, disruption of the PAI-1 gene in mice appears to induce a mild hyperfibrinolytic state and a greater resistance to venous thrombosis but not to impair hemostasis. Images PMID:8254029

  10. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. II. Improvement of oat protoplasts by an inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Kaur-Sawhney, R.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to improve the viability of cereal mesophyll protoplasts by pretreatment of leaves with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific 'suicide' inhibitor of the enzyme (arginine decarboxylase) responsible for their osmotically induced putrescine accumulation. Leaf pretreatment with DFMA before a 6 hour osmotic shock caused a 45% decrease of putrescine and a 2-fold increase of spermine titer. After 136 hours of osmotic stress, putrescine titer in DFMA-pretreated leaves increased by only 50%, but spermidine and spermine titers increased dramatically by 3.2- and 6-fold, respectively. These increases in higher polyamines could account for the reduced chlorophyll loss and enhanced ability of pretreated leaves to incorporate tritiated thymidine, uridine, and leucine into macromolecules. Pretreatment with DFMA significantly improved the overall viability of the protoplasts isolated from these leaves. The results support the view that the osmotically induced rise in putrescine and blockage of its conversion to higher polyamines may contribute to the lack of sustained cell division in cereal mesophyll protoplasts, although other undefined factors must also play a major role.

  11. A biochemical logic gate using an enzyme and its inhibitor. Part II: The logic gate.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Sarit; Tuchman, Samuel; Lotan, Noah

    2003-06-01

    Enzyme-Based Logic Gates (ENLOGs) are key components in bio-molecular systems for information processing. This report and the previous one in this series address the characterization of two bio-molecular switching elements, namely the alpha-chymotrypsin (alphaCT) derivative p-phenylazobenzoyl-alpha-chymotrypsin (PABalphaCT) and its inhibitor (proflavine), as well as their assembly into a logic gate. The experimental output of the proposed system is expressed in terms of enzymic activity and this was translated into logic output (i.e. "1" or "0") relative to a predetermined threshold value. We have found that an univalent link exists between the dominant isomers of PABalphaCT (cis or trans), the dominant form of either acridine (proflavine) or acridan and the logic output of the system. Thus, of all possible combinations, only the trans-PABalphaCT and the acridan lead to an enzymic activity that can be defined as logic output "1". The system operates under the rules of Boolean algebra and performs as an "AND" logic gate.

  12. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. II. Improvement of oat protoplasts by an inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Kaur-Sawhney, R.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to improve the viability of cereal mesophyll protoplasts by pretreatment of leaves with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific 'suicide' inhibitor of the enzyme (arginine decarboxylase) responsible for their osmotically induced putrescine accumulation. Leaf pretreatment with DFMA before a 6 hour osmotic shock caused a 45% decrease of putrescine and a 2-fold increase of spermine titer. After 136 hours of osmotic stress, putrescine titer in DFMA-pretreated leaves increased by only 50%, but spermidine and spermine titers increased dramatically by 3.2- and 6-fold, respectively. These increases in higher polyamines could account for the reduced chlorophyll loss and enhanced ability of pretreated leaves to incorporate tritiated thymidine, uridine, and leucine into macromolecules. Pretreatment with DFMA significantly improved the overall viability of the protoplasts isolated from these leaves. The results support the view that the osmotically induced rise in putrescine and blockage of its conversion to higher polyamines may contribute to the lack of sustained cell division in cereal mesophyll protoplasts, although other undefined factors must also play a major role.

  13. [Cyclooxygenases inhibitors and other compounds with antiinflammatory potential in osteoarthrosis--part II].

    PubMed

    Dzielska-Olczak, Małgorzata

    2011-01-01

    NO-NSAIDs (or CINODs that is COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donors) are new class of antiinflammatory drugs and have a multi-pathway mechanism of action that involves cyclooxygenases (COXs) inhibition and nitric oxide (NO) donation. The first drug of this group is naproxcinod, which exerts rarely adverse effects of stomach, gut and less cardiovascular toxicity with naproxen. NO is an important mediator of endothelial function acting as a vasodilator and plays role in inflammation and pain perception that may be of relevance in osteoarthritis and in healing injures in stomach and gut. Lipoxins (LX, LXs): LXA4, LXB4 are group of lipid mediators leading to resolution of inflammation and protective influence on gastrointestinal mucosa. ATL (AT mean aspirin triggered therefore "depend on aspirin") synthesis, via COX-2, reduces the severity of damage gastrointestinal tract induced by NSAIDs. ATL also plays role in gastric adaptation during chronic aspirin administration. Antiinflammatory drugs hydrogen sulfide-releasing (H2S) (ATB-337 that consist of diclofenac linked to a hydrogen sulfide-releasing moiety) may show better efficacy and less toxicity. COX/5-LOX inhibitors and NO-NSAIDs heals symptoms of osteoarthrosis.

  14. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. II. Improvement of oat protoplasts by an inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Tiburcio, A F; Kaur-Sawhney, R; Galston, A W

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to improve the viability of cereal mesophyll protoplasts by pretreatment of leaves with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific 'suicide' inhibitor of the enzyme (arginine decarboxylase) responsible for their osmotically induced putrescine accumulation. Leaf pretreatment with DFMA before a 6 hour osmotic shock caused a 45% decrease of putrescine and a 2-fold increase of spermine titer. After 136 hours of osmotic stress, putrescine titer in DFMA-pretreated leaves increased by only 50%, but spermidine and spermine titers increased dramatically by 3.2- and 6-fold, respectively. These increases in higher polyamines could account for the reduced chlorophyll loss and enhanced ability of pretreated leaves to incorporate tritiated thymidine, uridine, and leucine into macromolecules. Pretreatment with DFMA significantly improved the overall viability of the protoplasts isolated from these leaves. The results support the view that the osmotically induced rise in putrescine and blockage of its conversion to higher polyamines may contribute to the lack of sustained cell division in cereal mesophyll protoplasts, although other undefined factors must also play a major role.

  15. Effects of mechanism-based reversible inhibitors on the metal environment of cobalt(II)carboxypeptidase A: an electronic spectral study.

    PubMed

    Martin, M T; Holmquist, B; Riordan, J F

    1989-05-01

    Electronic absorption, circular dichroic (CD), and magnetic circular dichroic (MCD) spectra have been determined for complexes of cobalt(II)-substituted carboxypeptidase A and five reversible inhibitors. Three of the inhibitors, N-(1-carboxy-5-butyloxycarbonylaminopentyl)-L-phenylalanine, (I); (R,S)-2-benzyl-4-oxobutanoic acid, (III); and 2-benzyl-4-oxo-5,5,5-trifluoropentanoic acid, (IV) are mechanism-based inhibitors. Another, N-(1-carboxy-5-carbobenzoxyaminopentyl)-glycyl-L-phenylalanine, (II), is a tight binding, slowly hydrolyzed substrate. The fifth, phosphoramidon, (V), is a mechanism-based inhibitor of thermolysin, and may also bind to carboxypeptidase in a mechanism-based mode. The absorption and CD spectra of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes all differ from the spectrum of the free enzyme and from each other. The MCD spectra indicate that the tetrahedral coordination geometry of cobalt, which is distorted in the free enzyme, is also distorted in the inhibitor complexes, although to various degrees. The complexes of I and III are spectrally similar despite being structurally dissimilar, and that of IV, whose structure resembles III, is spectrally distinct, indicating that I and III, but not IV, may perturb the metal in nearly the same way. The absorption spectrum of IV is identical to that, at high pH, of Co(II)carboxypeptidase in which Glu-270 has been modified by a carbodiimide reagent, possibly pointing to a common perturbation of this residue. The absorption and CD spectra of II are similar to those of the catalytic intermediate that precedes the rate-limiting step in peptide hydrolysis [D. S. Auld, A. Galdes, K. F. Geoghegan, B. Holmquist, R. Martinelli, and B. L. Vallee, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 4675-4681 (1984)]. Since II is a substrate, the steady-state bound species that it generates may therefore be a true productive intermediate rather than a nonproductive mimic of an intermediate. The spectra of the complexes with II and V differ

  16. Natural product inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase I and II isoenzymes: osajin and pomiferin.

    PubMed

    Dilek, Esra; Erol, Hüseyin Serkan; Cakir, Ahmet; Koc, Murat; Halici, Mesut Bünyami

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to purify carbonic anhydrase I and II isoenzymes from human erythrocyte, isolate two natural products osajin (OSJ) and pomiferin (PMF) from Maclura pomifera fruits, and evaluate the in vitro effect of these natural metabolites on these isoenzymes. These natural products may be used as starting points for drug discovery (like drugs used in several therapeutic applications, including antiglaucoma activity). For the purification procedure, the Sepharose-4B-l-tyrosine-sulphonamide affinity chromatography was used. Column chromatography and thin layer chromatography methods were used for isolation of OSJ and PMF from M. pomifera fruits and their chemical structures were elucidated by IR, 1D, and 2D NMR methods. We compared inhibitory effects of these natural products with inhibitory effects of phenolic compounds and found that these products demonstrated average inhibition effects. We thought that this study will give inspiration to scientists interested in this issue.

  17. Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Neprilysin Inhibitor (ARNI): New Avenues in Cardiovascular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Volpe, M; Tocci, G; Battistoni, A; Rubattu, S

    2015-09-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is continuously and progressively raising worldwide. Essential hypertension is a major driver of cardiovascular events, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke and congestive heart failure. This latter may represent the final common pathway of different cardiovascular diseases, and it is often mediated by progressive uncontrolled hypertension. Despite solid advantages derived from effective and sustained blood pressure control, and the widespread availability of effective antihypertensive medications, the vast majority of the more than 1 billion hypertensive patients worldwide continue to have uncontrolled hypertension. Among various factors that may be involved, the abnormal activation of neurohormonal systems is one consistent feature throughout the continuum of cardiovascular diseases. These systems may initiate biologically meaningful "injury responses". However, their sustained chronic overactivity often may induce and maintain the progression from hypertension towards congestive heart failure. The renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system, the sympathetic nervous system and the endothelin system are major neurohormonal stressor systems that are not only able to elevate blood pressure levels by retaining water and sodium, but also to play a role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. More recently, the angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) represents a favourable approach to inhibit neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and suppress the RAAS via blockade of the AT1 receptors, without the increased risk of angioedema. LCZ696, the first-in-class ARNI, has already demonstrated BP lowering efficacy in patients with hypertension, in particular with respect to systolic blood pressure levels, improved cardiac biomarkers, cardiac remodelling and prognosis in patients with heart failure. This manuscript will briefly overview the main pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of ARNI in

  18. Growth-inhibitory activity of lymphoid cell plasma membranes. II. Partial characterization of the inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We have shown that plasma membranes from lymphoid cells have inhibitory activity for the growth of normal lymphocytes and lymphoid tumor cells (Stallcup, K. C., A. Dawson, and M. F. Mescher, J. Cell Biol. 99:1221- 1226). This growth-inhibitory activity has been found to co-purify with major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (H-2K and D) when these cell surface glycoproteins are isolated from detergent lysates of cells by affinity chromatography on monoclonal antibody columns. When incorporated into liposomes, the affinity-purified H-2 antigens inhibited the growth of both normal lymphocytes and tumor cells at concentrations of 1-3 micrograms/ml. Inhibition was readily reversed upon removal of the liposomes from the cell cultures, even after several days of exposure of cells to the inhibitor. Inhibitory activity was insensitive to protease digestion or heat treatment, indicating that it was not due to the H-2 glycoproteins. This was confirmed by the demonstration that inhibitory activity could be separated from the H-2 protein by gel filtration in the presence of deoxycholate and could be extracted from membranes or H-2 antigen preparations with organic solvents. The results demonstrate that the growth-inhibitory component(s) of the plasma membrane is a minor lipid or lipid-like molecule which retains activity in the absence of other membrane components. The findings reported here and in the preceding article suggest that this novel membrane component may have a role in control of lymphoid cell growth, possibly mediated by cell contacts. PMID:6332814

  19. pH-dependent properties of cobalt(II) carboxypeptidase A-inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Auld, D S; Bertini, I; Donaire, A; Messori, L; Moratal, J M

    1992-04-21

    1H NMR spectroscopy of the isotropically shifted signals in cobalt carboxypeptidase, CoCPD, permits a direct and selective detection of protons belonging to the residues liganded to the metal. The chemical shift of these protons in the free enzyme and enzyme-inhibitor complexes with changing pH monitors the state of ionization of the ligands directly and of other residues in the active center indirectly. The 1H NMR spectrum of CoCPD at pH 6 shows three well-resolved isotropically shifted signals in the downfield region at 62 (a), 52 (c), and 45 (d) ppm which have been assigned to the NH proton of His-69 and to the C-4 H's of His-69 and His-196, respectively. Titration of signal a with pH is characterized by a pKa of 8.8 which is identical to that seen in prior electronic absorption and kinetic studies. The fact that the signal reflecting the NH of His-69 is still observed at pH 10 and no major shifts occur for the signals reflecting the C-4 H's indicates the alkaline pKa in carboxypeptidase A catalysis, pKEH, cannot be ascribed to ionization of the histidyl NH of either His-69 or His-196. Binding of L-Phe shifts this pKa to 7.7 while not greatly perturbing the downfield 1H NMR signals that reflect the ligation shell of the cobalt coordination sphere. These results indicate the pKa of 8.8 in CoCPD and the pKa of 7.7 in the CoCPD.L-Phe adduct reflect ionization of the same group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Characterization and comparative 3D modeling of CmPI-II, a novel 'non-classical' Kazal-type inhibitor from the marine snail Cenchritis muricatus (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    González, Yamile; Pons, Tirso; Gil, Jeovanis; Besada, Vladimir; Alonso-del-Rivero, Maday; Tanaka, Aparecida S; Araujo, Mariana S; Chávez, María A

    2007-11-01

    The complete amino acid sequence obtained by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of the proteinase inhibitor CmPI-II isolated from Cenchritis muricatus is described. CmPI-II is a 5480-Da protein with three disulfide bridges that inhibits human neutrophil elastase (HNE) (K(i) 2.6+/-0.2 nM), trypsin (K(i) 1.1+/-0.9 nM), and other serine proteinases such as subtilisin A (K(i) 30.8+/-1.2 nM) and pancreatic elastase (K(i) 145.0+/-4.4 nM); chymotrypsin, pancreatic and plasma kallikreins, thrombin and papain are not inhibited. CmPI-II shares homology with the Kazal-type domain and may define a new group of 'non-classical' Kazal inhibitors according to its Cys(I)-Cys(V) disulfide bridge position. The 3D model of CmPI-II exhibits similar secondary structure characteristics to Kazal-type inhibitors and concurs with circular dichroism experiments. A 3D model of the CmPI-II/HNE complex provides a structural framework for the interpretation of its experimentally determined K(i) value. The model shows both similar and different contacts at the primary binding sites in comparison with the structure of turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3)/HNE used as template. Additional contacts calculated at the protease-inhibitor interface could also contribute to the association energy of the complex. This inhibitor represents an exception in terms of specificity owing to its ability to strongly inhibit elastases and trypsin.

  1. Updates on the treatment of essential hypertension: a summary of AHRQ's comparative effectiveness review of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, and direct renin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Powers, Benjamin; Greene, Laurence; Balfe, Lisa M

    2011-10-01

    In 2007, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) published a comparative effectiveness review (CER) on the benefits and risks of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for treating essential hypertension in adults. The main findings indicated that the 2 classes of antihypertensive medications caused similar reductions in blood pressure, although higher rates of adverse events, especially cough, were reported by patients treated with ACEIs. In addition, the 2007 review indicated no treatment related differences in lipid levels, glycemic control, or progression of kidney disease among the agents. Since 2007, 39 relevant studies have been published that compare outcomes for adults treated with ACEIs versus ARBs or a drug in one of these 2 classes versus a direct renin inhibitor (DRI). To systematically analyze findings from the new research, AHRQ commissioned and, in June 2011, published an updated comparative effectiveness review on the benefits and risks of agents that target the renin-angiotensin- aldosterone system (RAAS), specifically ACEIs, ARBs, and DRIs. To (a) familiarize health care professionals with the methods and findings from AHRQ's 2011 comparative effectiveness review on ACEIs, ARBs, and DRIs for adults with essential hypertension; (b) provide commentary and encourage consideration of the clinical and managed care applications of the review findings; and (c) identify limitations to the existing research on the benefits and risks of ACEIs, ARBs, and DRIs. Consistent with the findings from AHRQ's 2007 report, the 2011 update indicated no overall differences in blood pressure control, mortality rates, and major cardiovascular events in patients treated with ACEIs versus ARBs. With a low strength of evidence, 2 studies reported a small significantly greater blood pressure reduction for patients treated with the DRI aliskiren versus the ACEI ramipril. Studies evaluating the DRI aliskiren

  2. ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in IgA nephropathy with mild proteinuria: the ACEARB study.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Claudio; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Casartelli, Donatella; Pozzoni, Pietro; Andrulli, Simeone; Amore, Alessandro; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna; Locatelli, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have investigated IgA nephropathy patients presenting with 'favorable' clinical features at onset, such as normal renal function, proteinuria<1 g/24 hours and the absence of hypertension, and no controlled clinical trials have tested the effects of treatment in such patients who may nevertheless develop end-stage renal disease. It is therefore important to find a well-tolerated and economic therapy capable of decreasing their risk of high proteinuria and blood pressure levels. The aim of this multicenter open-label randomized clinical trial is to test whether blocking the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) decreases the risk of progression in patients aged 3-60 years with biopsy-proven benign IgA glomerulonephritis, proteinuria levels of 0.3-0.9 g/24 hours, and normal renal function and blood pressure. The RAS is blocked by first using a single drug class (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker), and then combining the 2 classes as soon as the 1-drug blockade has become ineffective. We plan to enroll 378 patients over the next 3 years and randomize them to receive ramipril 5 mg/day (3 mg/m2 in children) (group A), irbesartan 300 mg/day (175 mg/m 2 in children) (group B) or supportive therapy (group C); if an increase in proteinuria of at least 50% from baseline is detected after 6 months of treatment, the other RAS inhibitor will be added. The observation period will be at least 5 years (except in the case of the development of the primary end point).

  3. The catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor dexrazoxane induces DNA breaks, ATF3 and the DNA damage response in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shiwei; Yan, Tiandong; Nikolova, Teodora; Fuhrmann, Dominik; Nemecek, Andrea; Gödtel-Armbrust, Ute; Kaina, Bernd; Wojnowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitor dexrazoxane has been associated not only with improved cancer patient survival but also with secondary malignancies and reduced tumour response. Experimental Approach We investigated the DNA damage response and the role of the activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) accumulation in tumour cells exposed to dexrazoxane. Key Results Dexrazoxane exposure induced topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A)-dependent cell death, γ-H2AX accumulation and increased tail moment in neutral comet assays. Dexrazoxane induced DNA damage responses, shown by enhanced levels of γ-H2AX/53BP1 foci, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ATM and Rad3-related), Chk1 and Chk2 phosphorylation, and by p53 accumulation. Dexrazoxane-induced γ-H2AX accumulation was dependent on ATM. ATF3 protein was induced by dexrazoxane in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, which was abolished in TOP2A-depleted cells and in cells pre-incubated with ATM inhibitor. Knockdown of ATF3 gene expression by siRNA triggered apoptosis in control cells and diminished the p53 protein level in both control and dexrazoxane -treated cells. This was accompanied by increased γ-H2AX accumulation. ATF3 knockdown also delayed the repair of dexrazoxane -induced DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions and Implications As with other TOP2A poisons, dexrazoxane induced DNA double-strand breaks followed by activation of the DNA damage response. The DNA damage-triggered ATF3 controlled p53 accumulation and generation of double-strand breaks and is proposed to serve as a switch between DNA damage and cell death following dexrazoxane treatment. These findings suggest a mechanistic explanation for the diverse clinical observations associated with dexrazoxane. PMID:25521189

  4. The orally active glutamate carboxypeptidase II inhibitor E2072 exhibits sustained nerve exposure and attenuates peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Krystyna M; Wu, Ying; Vornov, James J; Lapidus, Rena; Rais, Rana; Rojas, Camilo; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2012-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy from nerve trauma is a significant problem in the human population and often constitutes a dose-limiting toxicity in patients receiving chemotherapy. (3-2-Mercaptoethyl)biphenyl-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (E2072) is a potent (K(i) = 10 nM), selective, and orally available inhibitor of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII). Here, we report that E2072 attenuates hyperalgesia and nerve conduction velocity deficits in preclinical rodent models of neuropathic pain and oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. In the chronic constrictive injury model, orally administered E2072 reversed pre-existing thermal hyperalgesia in rats in a dose-dependent fashion with a minimally effective dose of 0.1 mg/kg/day. It is noteworthy that multiple days of dosing of E2072 were required before analgesia was realized even though GCPII inhibitory exposures were achieved on the first day of dosing. In addition, analgesia was found to persist for up to 7 days after cessation of dosing, consistent with E2072's pharmacokinetic profile and sustained exposure. Furthermore, in a chronic oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy model (6 mg/kg i.p. oxaliplatin twice weekly for 4 weeks), female BALB/c mice receiving daily oral E2072 at 1.0 and 0.1 mg/kg displayed no deficits in either caudal or digital velocity compared with significant deficits observed in mice treated with oxaliplatin alone (12 ± 3 and 9 ± 2%, respectively). Similar findings were seen with oxaliplatin-induced digital and caudal amplitude deficits. It is noteworthy that E2072 showed no interference with the antineoplastic efficacy of oxaliplatin in mice bearing leukemia (L1210), even at doses 100 times its neuroprotective/analgesic dose, indicating a selective effect on neuropathy. These data support the therapeutic utility of GCPII inhibitors in neuropathy and neuropathic pain.

  5. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Priya; Aguirre, Sebastian; Yen, Benjamin C.; Pietzsch, Colette A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria T.; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Morlock, Lorraine K.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Leung, Daisy W.; Williams, Noelle S.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN) by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication. PMID:28377530

  6. Novel angular benzophenazines: dual topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II inhibitors as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Vicker, Nigel; Burgess, Luke; Chuckowree, Irina S; Dodd, Rory; Folkes, Adrian J; Hardick, David J; Hancox, Timothy C; Miller, Warren; Milton, John; Sohal, Sukhjit; Wang, Shouming; Wren, Stephen P; Charlton, Peter A; Dangerfield, Wendy; Liddle, Chris; Mistry, Prakash; Stewart, Alistair J; Denny, William A

    2002-01-31

    A series of substituted angular benzophenazines were prepared using a new synthetic route via a novel regiocontrolled condensation of 1,2-naphthoquinones and 2,3-diaminobenzoic acids. The synthesis and biological activity of this new series of substituted 8,9-benzo[a]phenazine carboxamide systems are described. The analogues were evaluated against the H69 parental human small cell lung carcinoma cell line and H69/LX4 resistant cell line which overexpresses P-glycoprotein. Selected analogues were evaluated against the COR-L23 parental human non small cell lung carcinoma cell line and the COR-L23/R resistant cell line which overexpresses multidrug resistance protein. This series of novel angular benzophenazines were potent cytotoxic agents in these cell lines and may be able to circumvent multidrug resistance mechanisms which result in the lack of efficacy of many drugs in cancer chemotherapy. These compounds show dual inhibition of topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II and thus target two key enzymes responsible for the topology of DNA that are active at different points in the cell cycle. The introduction of chirality into the carboxamide side chain of these novel benzophenazine carboxamides has resulted in the discovery of a potent enantiospecific series of cytotoxic agents, exemplified by 4-methoxy-benzo[a]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid (2-(dimethylamino)-1-(R)-methyl-ethyl)-amide, XR11576 ((R)-4j' '). In vivo activity has been demonstrated for 4-methoxy-benzo[a]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid (2-(dimethylamino)-1-(R)-methyl-ethyl)-amide, XR11576, after intravenous administration to female mice, and this compound has been selected as a development candidate for further evaluation.

  7. Small-molecule inhibitors of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 protect against angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew W; Kinzenbaw, Dale A; Modrick, Mary L; Faraci, Frank M

    2013-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is known to promote vascular disease and hypertension in part by formation of cytokines, such as interleukin-6. However, the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in these processes and Ang II/interleukin-6 signaling is unclear. Using 2 models, we tested the hypothesis that STAT3 is essential for Ang II-induced vascular dysfunction and hypertension. Incubation of isolated carotid arteries from C57BL/6J mice with Ang II overnight increased superoxide ≈2-fold and reduced vasodilator responses to the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine by ≈50% versus controls (P<0.05). These effects were prevented by the addition of small-molecular inhibitors of STAT3 activation (S3I-201 or STATTIC). In vivo, administration of Ang II (1.4 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) using osmotic minipumps increased arterial pressure by ≈40 mm Hg at day 14 compared with vehicle-treated mice, and this effect was prevented by S3I-201 treatment (5 mg/kg IP, QOD). After systemic treatment with Ang II, dilator responses to acetylcholine were reduced by ≈30% to 50% in carotid artery and basilar arteries, whereas S3I-201 treatment prevented most of this impairment (P<0.05). In contrast to effects on vascular function and blood pressure, S31-201 did not prevent Ang II-induced hypertrophy in the carotid artery. These findings provide the first evidence that inhibitors of STAT3 activation protect against Ang II-induced oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension. Because Ang II promotes vascular disease in the presence of multiple cardiovascular risk factors, these results suggest that selective targeting of STAT3 may have substantial therapeutic potential.

  8. Conformation and recognition of DNA damaged by antitumor cis-dichlorido platinum(II) complex of CDK inhibitor bohemine.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Olga; Liskova, Barbora; Vystrcilova, Jana; Suchankova, Tereza; Vrana, Oldrich; Starha, Pavel; Travnicek, Zdenek; Brabec, Viktor

    2014-05-06

    A substitution of the ammine ligands of cisplatin, cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2], for cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor bohemine (boh), [2-(3-hydroxypropylamino)-6-benzylamino-9-isopropylpurine], results in a compound, cis-[Pt(boh)2Cl2] (C1), with the unique anticancer profile which may be associated with some features of the damaged DNA and/or its cellular processing (Travnicek Z et al. (2003) J Inorg Biochem94, 307-316; Liskova B (2012) Chem Res Toxicol25, 500-509). A combination of biochemical and molecular biology techniques was used to establish mechanistic differences between cisplatin and C1 with respect to the DNA damage they produce and their interactions with critical DNA-binding proteins, DNA-processing enzymes and glutathione. The results show that replacement of the NH3 groups in cisplatin by bohemine modulates some aspects of the mechanism of action of C1. More specifically, the results of the present work are consistent with the thesis that, in comparison with cisplatin, effects of other factors, such as: (i) slower rate of initial binding of C1 to DNA; (ii) the lower efficiency of C1 to form bifunctional adducts; (iii) the reduced bend of longitudinal DNA axis induced by the major 1,2-GG intrastrand cross-link of C1; (iv) the reduced affinity of HMG domain proteins to the major adduct of C1; (v) the enhanced efficiency of the DNA adducts of C1 to block DNA polymerization and to inhibit transcription activity of human RNA pol II and RNA transcription; (vi) slower rate of the reaction of C1 with glutathione, may partially contribute to the unique activity of C1.

  9. Spatial and temporal expression patterns of diverse Pin-II proteinase inhibitor genes in Capsicum annuum Linn.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Giri, Ashok P; Kumar, Pavan; Gupta, Vidya S

    2009-08-01

    Pin-II type proteinase inhibitor (PI) genes were cloned from fruit and stem tissues of Capsicum annuum L. var Phule Jyoti using primers designed from reported CanPI gene sequence (AF039398). In total, 21 novel CanPIs, members of the Pin-II PI family, were identified in the study, with three isoforms of 1-inhibitory repeat domain (IRD), eight isoforms of 2-IRD, three isoforms of 3-IRD, five isoforms of 4-IRD and two partial CanPI sequences. Most of the sequences showed variation (2 to 20%) in the deduced AA sequences which were pronounced close to the reactive site loop. Expression patterns of CanPIs in the fruit and stem tissues of mature C. annuum plants were shown to vary qualitatively and quantitatively using semi-quantitative RT-PCR expression analysis. In the fruit tissue, CanPIs with different IRDs (from 1 to 4) were expressed simultaneously. In stem tissue, 1- and 2-IRD CanPIs were strongly expressed along moderate expression of 3- and 4-IRD genes. Analysis of CanPI protein activity showed a range of active forms across the tissues. CanPI expression was differentially up-regulated upon wounding and insect attack. Although infestation by aphids (Myzus persicae) and lepidopteran pests (Spodoptera litura) specifically induced 4-IRD CanPIs, virus-infected leaves did not affect CanPI expression. Analysis of CanPI protein activity indicated that the up-regulation in CanPI expression was not always correlated with increase in PI activity. Our results demonstrated that CanPI expression is regulated spatially, temporally as well as qualitatively and quantitatively.

  10. In silico analysis of interaction pattern switching in ligandreceptor binding in Golgi α-mannosidase II induced by the protonated states of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sladek, V; Kóňa, J; Tokiwa, H

    2017-05-21

    Golgi α-mannosidase II (GM) is a pharmaceutical target for the design of inhibitors with anticancer activity. The known potent GM inhibitors undergo complex interactions with Zn(2+) ions and the active-site amino acids, many of which contain ionisable functional groups. Herein, the physical insight into the ligandreceptor interactions has been provided based on energy decomposition techniques: SAPT (symmetry adapted perturbation theory) and FMO-PIEDA (fragment molecular orbital-pair interaction energy decomposition analysis) for a large GM active-site cluster. Protonation-dependent molecular recognition in Golgi α-mannosidase was demonstrated for five inhibitors, mannose, and its transition state. Zn(2+) ion and Asp472 induce the key interactions with the deprotonated inhibitors (bearing an amino group in the neutral state), followed by Asp92 and Asp341. This interaction pattern is consistent for all the studied inhibitors and is similar to the interaction pattern of the enzyme native substrate - mannose. The interactions with Zn(2+) ion become repulsive for the protonated states of the inhibitors (bearing an amino group with +1 charge) and the mannosyl transition state. The importance of Asp92 and Asp204 considerably increases, while the interactions with Asp472 and Asp341 are slightly modified. The interaction pattern for the protonated ligands seems to have an oxocarbenium transition state-like character, rather than a Michaelis complex of GM. The electrostatic interactions with amino acids coordinating zinc ion are of key importance for both the neutral and protonated states of the inhibitors. The ligand's diol group has a dual role as an electron donor, coordinating zinc ion, and as an electron acceptor, interacting with Asp92 and Asp472 via strong hydrogen bonds. This interaction pattern is an essential structural feature of the potent GM inhibitors, which is consistent with the experimental findings. Based on the calculations, either the protonated or

  11. An optimized micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on the molybdenum blue method and its application in screening natural product inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Kou, Jun-Ping; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-06-01

    Myosin II plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological functions through its ATPase activity. The present study was designed to optimize a micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on molybdenum blue method, using a known myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blebbistatin. Several parameters were observed in the enzymatic reaction procedure, including the concentrations of the substrate (ATP) and calcium chloride, pH, and the reaction and incubation times. The proportion of coloration agent was also investigated. The sensitivity of this assay was compared with the malachite green method and bioluminescence method. Additionally, 20 natural compounds were studied for myosin II ATPase inhibitory activity using the optimized method. Our results showed that ATP at the concentration of 5 mmol·L(-1) and ammonium molybdate : stannous chloride at the ratio of 15 : 1 could greatly improve the sensitivity of this method. The IC50 of blebbistatin obtained by this method was consistent with literature. Compound 8 was screened with inhibitory activity on myosin II ATPase. The optimized method showed similar accuracy, lower detecting limit, and wider linear range, which could be a promising approach to screening myosin II ATPase inhibitors in vitro.

  12. Phase II Study of the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor MGCD0103 in Patients with Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kristie A.; Advani, Anjani; Fernandez, Louis; Van Der Jagt, Richard; Brandwein, Joseph; Kambhampati, Suman; Kassis, Jeannine; Davis, Melanie; Bonfils, Claire; Dubay, Marja; Dumouchel, Julie; Drouin, Michel; Lucas, David M.; Martell, Robert E.; Byrd, John C.

    2009-01-01

    MGCD0103, an orally available class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, was examined for pre-clinical activity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). A phase II clinical trial was performed, starting at a dose of 85 mg/day, three times per week. Dose escalation to 110 mg or the addition of rituximab was permitted in patients without a response after 2 or more cycles. MGCD0103 demonstrated pre-clinical activity against CLL cells with a LC50 (concentration lethal to 50%) of 0.23 μM and increased acetylation of the HDAC class I specific target histone H3. Twenty-one patients received a median of 2 cycles of MGCD0103 (range, 0–12). All patients had previously received fludarabine, 33% were fludarabine refractory, and 71% had del(11q22.3) or del(17p13.1). No responses according to the National Cancer Institutes 1996 criteria were observed. Three patients received 110 mg and 4 patients received concomitant rituximab, with no improvement in response. Grade 3–4 toxicity consisted of infections, thrombocytopenia, anemia, diarrhea, and fatigue. HDAC inhibition was observed in 6 out of 9 patients on day 8. Limited activity was observed with single agent MGCD0103 in high risk patients with CLL. Future investigations in CLL should focus on broad HDAC inhibition, combination strategies, and approaches to diminish constitutional symptoms associated with this class of drugs. PMID:19747365

  13. Growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, on potato plants expressing the oryzacystatin II proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cingel, Aleksandar; Savić, Jelena; Vinterhalter, Branka; Vinterhalter, Dragan; Kostić, Miroslav; Jovanović, Darka Šešlija; Smigocki, Ann; Ninković, Slavica

    2015-08-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. PI oryzacystatin II (OCII), isolated from rice, showed potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate the applicability of the OCII gene in enhancing plant defence, OCII-transformed potatoes were bioassayed for resistance to Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). Feeding on transformed leaves of potato cultivars Desiree and Jelica significantly affected larval growth and development, but did not change mortality rates. During the L2 and L3 developmental stages larvae consumed the OCII-transformed foliage faster as compared to the nontransformed control. Also these larvae reached the prepupal stage (end of L4 stage) 2 days earlier than those fed on control leaves. However, the total amounts of consumed OCII-transformed leaves were up to 23% lower than of control, and the maximal weights of prepupal larvae were reduced by up to 18% as compared to larvae fed on nontransformed leaves. The reduction in insect fitness reported in this study in combination with other control measures, could lead to improved CPB resistance management in potato.

  14. Transdermal delivery of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and others for management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ahad, Abdul; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah Mohammed; Al-Jenoobi, Fahad Ibrahim; Aqil, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) are some of the most commonly prescribed medications for hypertension. Most of all conventional dosage forms of ARBs and ACEIs undergo extensive first-pass metabolism, which significantly reduces bioavailability. Majority of ARBs and ACEIs are inherently short acting due to a rapid elimination half-life. In addition, oral dosage forms of ARBs and ACEIs have many high incidences of adverse effects due to variable absorption profiles, higher frequency of administration and poor patient compliance. Many attempts have been made globally at the laboratory level to investigate the skin permeation and to develop transdermal therapeutic systems of various ARBs, ACEIs and other anti-hypertensives, to circumvent the drawbacks associated with their conventional dosage form. This manuscript presents an outline of the transdermal research specifically in the area of ARBs, ACEIs and other anti-hypertensives reported in various pharmaceutical journals. The transdermal delivery has gained a significant importance for systemic treatment as it is able to avoid first-pass metabolism and major fluctuations of plasma levels typical of repeated oral administration. As we can experience from this review article that transdermal delivery of different ARBs and ACEIs improves bioavailability as well as patient compliance by many folds. In fact, the rationale development of some newer ARBs, ACEIs and other anti-hypertensives transdermal systems will provide new ways of treatment, circumventing current limitations for conventional dosage forms.

  15. Renoprotective Effect of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers in Diabetic Patients with Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Feng-Yi; Lin, Fang-Ju; Ou, Huang-Tz; Huang, Shih-Hui; Wang, Chi-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Limited evidence exists on the choice of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) in diabetic patients with nephropathy. We aim to assess the renal effectiveness and safety of these drugs among diabetic nephropathy patients. This retrospective cohort study was conducted with diabetic nephropathy patients who initiated ACEI or ARB monotherapy. The primary outcome was a composite of end stage of renal disease and renal transplantation, and the secondary outcome was all-cause mortality. The safety endpoint was hyperkalemia. Three thousand seven hundred and thirty-nine ACEI users and 3,316 ARB users were identified. ARBs seemed to be inferior to ACEIs given their poorer renal outcome (HR 1.31; 95% CI, 1.15-1.50) and higher risk of hyperkalemia (HR 1.17; 95% CI, 1.04-1.32). Among the four ACEIs compared, captopril was an inferior treatment choice given its poorer renal outcomes (HR 1.42; 95% CI, 1.05-1.93) and higher mortality rate (HR 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01-1.55). Irbesartan appeared to be a poorer treatment choice among the three ARBs compared, given its inferior renal protective effect (HR 1.35; 95% CI, 1.03-1.78). Our findings suggest ACEIs as a relatively more renoprotective and safer treatment as compared to ARBs. Captopril and irbesartan may be inferior to the other ACEIs and ARBs respectively. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Circulating T lymphocyte subsets, cytokines, and immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with bipolar II or major depression: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Zheng, Ya-li; Tian, Li-ping; Lai, Jian-bo; Hu, Chan-chan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Jing-kai; Hu, Jian-bo; Huang, Man-li; Wei, Ning; Xu, Wei-juan; Zhou, Wei-hua; Lu, Shao-jia; Lu, Jing; Qi, Hong-li; Wang, Dan-dan; Zhou, Xiao-yi; Duan, Jin-feng; Xu, Yi; Hu, Shao-hua

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the less known activation pattern of T lymphocyte populations and immune checkpoint inhibitors on immunocytes in patients with bipolar II disorder depression (BD) or major depression (MD). A total of 23 patients with BD, 22 patients with MD, and 20 healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. The blood cell count of T lymphocyte subsets and the plasma level of cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) were selectively investigated. The expression of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain containing-3 (TIM-3), programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, on T lymphocytes and monocytes, was detected. In results, blood proportion of cytotoxic T cells significantly decreased in BD patients than in either MD patients or HCs. The plasma level of IL-6 increased in patients with BD and MD. The expression of TIM-3 on cytotoxic T cells significantly increased, whereas the expression of PD-L2 on monocytes significantly decreased in patients with BD than in HCs. These findings extended our knowledge of the immune dysfunction in patients with affective disorders. PMID:28074937

  17. Multi-targeted organometallic ruthenium(II)-arene anticancer complexes bearing inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1: A strategy to improve cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhigang; Qian, Hui; Yiu, Shek-Man; Sun, Jianwei; Zhu, Guangyu

    2014-02-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) have currently drawn much attention as promising chemotherapeutic drug candidates, and there is a need to develop more potent PARP inhibitors with improved bioavailability. Here we report a strategy to improve the cytotoxicity of PARP inhibitors by conjugation with organometallic ruthenium(II)-arene compounds. We also report a systematic study to reveal the mechanism of action of these ruthenium-PARP inhibitor conjugates. The complexes have been synthesized and characterized spectroscopically. The improved antiproliferative activity from the as-prepared complexes in four human cancer cell lines has indicated their potential for further development as antitumor drugs. Cellular uptake study reveals that the most active complex 3 easily entered into cells. Target validation assays show that the complexes inhibited PARP-1 slightly better than the original PARP inhibitors, that complex 3 strongly bound to DNA and inhibited transcription, and that this complex arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 stage. This type of information could shed light on the design of the next generation of more active ruthenium-PARP inhibitor conjugates.

  18. Pharmacological properties and pathophysiological significance of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (Rusvikunin-II) and its protein complex (Rusvikunin complex) purified from Daboia russelii russelii venom.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashis K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2014-10-01

    A 7.1 kDa basic peptide (Rusvikunin-II) was purified from a previously described protein complex (Rusvikunin complex, consists of Rusvikunin and Rusvikunin-II) of Daboia russelii russelii venom. The N-terminal sequence of Rusvikunin-II was found to be blocked, but peptide mass fingerprinting analysis indicated its identity as Kunitz-type basic protease inhibitor 2, previously reported from Russell's Viper venom. A tryptic peptide sequence of Rusvikunin-II containing the N-terminal sequence HDRPTFCNLFPESGR demonstrated significant sequence homology to venom basic protease inhibitors, Kunitz-type protease inhibitors and trypsin inhibitors. The secondary structure of Rusvikunin-II was dominated by β-sheets (60.4%), followed by random coil (38.2%), whereas α-helix (1.4%) contributes the least to its secondary structure. Both Rusvikunin-II and the Rusvikunin complex demonstrated dose-dependent anticoagulant activity; however, the anticoagulant potency of latter was found to be higher. Both inhibited the amidolytic activity of trypsin > plasmin > FXa, fibrinogen clotting activity of thrombin, and, to a lesser extent, the prothrombin activation property of FXa; however, the inhibitory effect of the Rusvikunin complex was more pronounced. Neither Rusvikunin-II nor Rusvikunin complex inhibited the amidolytic activity of chymotrypsin and thrombin. Rusvikunin-II at 10 μg/ml was not cytotoxic to Colo-205, MCF-7 or 3T3 cancer cells; conversely, Rusvikunin complex showed ∼30% reduction of MCF-7 cells under identical experimental conditions. Rusvikunin-II (5.0 mg/kg body weight, i.p. injection) was not lethal to mice or House Geckos; nevertheless, it showed in vivo anticoagulant action in mice. However, the Rusvikunin complex (at 5.0 mg/kg) was toxic to NSA mice, but not to House Geckos, suggesting it has prey-specific toxicity. Rusvikunin complex-treated mice exhibited dyspnea and hind-limb paresis prior to death. The present study indicates that the Kunitz

  19. Pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives as type II kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) inhibitors: CoMFA and CoMSIA studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Wen-Hua; Wu, Shu-Guang; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Zhang, Jia-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) inhibitors have been proved to be very effective anticancer agents. Molecular docking, 3D-QSAR methods, CoMFA and CoMSIA were performed on pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives as non-ATP competitive KDR inhibitors (type II). The bioactive conformation was explored by docking one potent compound 20 into the active site of KDR in its DFG-out inactive conformation. The constructed CoMFA and CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q(2) of 0.542 and 0.552, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r(2) of 0.912 and 0.955, and predicted correction coefficients r(2) (pred) of 0.913 and 0.897, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of a series of new potent KDR inhibitors.

  20. Role of salt bridge dynamics in inter domain recognition of human IMPDH isoforms: an insight to inhibitor topology for isoform-II.

    PubMed

    Bairagya, Hridoy R; Mukhopadhyay, Bishnu P; Bera, Asim K

    2011-12-01

    Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) enzyme involves in the biosynthesis pathway of guanosine nucleotide. Type II isoform of the enzyme is selectively upregulated in neoplastic fast replicating lymphocytes and CML cancer cells. The hIMPDH-II is an excellent target for antileukemic agent. The detailed investigation during MD-Simulation (15 ns) of three different unliganded structures (1B3O, 1JCN and 1JR1) have clearly explored the salt bridge mediated stabilization of inter or intra domain (catalytic domains I(N), I(C) with res. Id. 28-111 and 233-504, whereas two CBS domains C₁, C₂ are 112-171 and 172-232) in IMPDH enzyme which are mostly inaccessible in their X-rays structures. The salt bridge interaction in I(N)---C₁ inter-domain of hIMPDH-I, I(N)---C₂ of IMPDH-II and C₁---I(C) of nhIMPDH-II are discriminative features among the isoforms. The I(N)---C₂ recognition in hIMPDH-II (1B3O) is missing in type-I isoform (1JCN). The salt bridge interaction D232---K238 at the surface of protein and the involvement of three conserved water molecules or the hydrophilic centers (WA²³²(OD1), WB ²³²(OD2) and W²³⁸(NZ)) to those acidic and basic residues seem to be unique in hIMPDH-II. The hydrophilic susceptibility, geometrical and electronic consequences of this salt bridge interaction could be useful to design the topology of specific inhibitor for hIMPDH-II which may not be effective for hIMPDH-I. Possibly, the aliphatic ligand containing carboxyl, amide or hydrophilic groups with flexible structure may be implicated for hIMPDH-II inhibitor design using the conserved water mimic drug design protocol.

  1. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: synthesis and inhibition of the human carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII with benzene sulfonamides incorporating 4- and 3-nitrophthalimide moieties.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Kalyan K; Verma, Saurabh M; Tanç, Muhammet; Purper, Gaultier; Calafato, Gaetan; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-03-01

    A series of 4 and 5 nitro-1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl benzenesulfonamide derivatives (compounds 1-8) was synthesized by reaction of benzenesulfonamide derivatives with 4 and 3-nitrophthalic anhydrides. These new sulfonamides were investigated as inhibitors of the zinc metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more specifically against the human (h) cytosolic isoforms hCA I and II and the transmembrane, tumor-associated hCA IX and XII. Most of the novel compounds were medium potency-weak hCA I inhibitors (Kis in the range of 295-10,000 nM), but were more effective hCA II inhibitors (Kis of 1.7-887 nM). The tumor-associated hCA IX was also inhibited, with Kis in the micromolar range, whereas against hCA XII the inhibition constants were in the range of 90-3,746 nM. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) with this series of sulfonamides is straightforward, with the main features leading to good activity for each isoforms being established. The high sequence hCA alignment homology and molecular docking studies was performed in order to rationalize the activities reported and binding mode to different hCA as inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Salivary secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and head and neck cancer: The Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christine M. Pierce; Giuliano, Anna R.; Torres, B. Nelson; O'Keefe, Michael T.; Ingles, Donna J.; Anderson, Rebecca L.; Teras, Lauren R.; Gapstur, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is an innate-immunity protein displaying antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties that is found in high concentrations in saliva. The role of extracellular salivary SLPI in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains unclear. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the association between SLPI and HNSCC risk in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. Materials and Methods Among 53,180 men and women with no history of cancer who provided an oral rinse between 2001 and 2002, 60 were subsequently diagnosed with incident HNSCC between specimen collection and June 2009. In this nested case-control study, archived oral supernatants were evaluated using the Human SLPI Quantikine ELISA Kit for all 60 cases and 180 controls individually matched on gender, race, date of birth, and date of oral rinse collection. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate HNSCC risk. Results Overall, pre-diagnostic salivary SLPI was associated with a non-statistically significant higher risk of HNSCC (OR=1.6, 95% CI=0.9–3.0). Among never smokers, high SLPI was associated with a non-statistically significant lower risk (OR=0.5, 95% CI=0.1–1.9), whereas among ever smokers, high SLPI was associated with a statistically significant higher risk (OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.0–4.3) of HNSCC, compared to low SLPI. Conclusion While results from this study suggest that higher concentrations of salivary SLPI might increase the risk of HNSCC among ever smokers, more research is needed to verify these findings and define the mechanisms by which SLPI and smoking influence the etiology of HNSCC. PMID:27016010

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers reduced dementia risk in patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yi-Chun; Huang, Kuang-Wei; Yen, Der-Jen; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-10-01

    The effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) on dementia risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension remain unknown. We investigated the effects of ACEIs and ARBs on dementia risk in patients with type 2 DM and hypertension. We conducted a cohort study by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We included 2377 patients receiving ACEIs and 1780 patients receiving ARBs in the ACEI and ARB cohorts, respectively. We included a comparable number of patients not receiving ACEIs and ARBs as controls in the non-ACEI and non-ARB cohorts through propensity score matching. The effect of ACEIs and ARBs on dementia risk was estimated through multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression after adjustment for several confounding factors. During the 12-year follow-up period, compared with the non-ACEI cohort, all-cause dementia risk decreased by 26% in the ACEI cohort [hazard ratio (HR)=0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.56-0.96]. The all-cause dementia risk was nearly 40% lower in the ARB cohort than in the non-ARB cohort (HR=0.60, 95% CI=0.37-0.97). These drugs prevented the occurrence of vascular dementia (VD), however, this effect was nonsignificant for Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Treatment duration- and dosage-related protection effects on dementia occurrence were observed. ACEIs and ARBs may effectively prevent all-cause dementia, particularly VD, in patients with type 2 DM and hypertension. Moreover, compared with ACEIs, ARBs appear to be more advantageous in dementia prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phase II study of glucosamine with chondroitin on aromatase inhibitor-associated joint symptoms in women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Heather; Crew, Katherine D.; Shao, Theresa; Kranwinkel, Grace; Kalinsky, Kevin; Maurer, Matthew; Brafman, Lois; Insel, Beverly; Tsai, Wei Yann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Many women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer discontinue effective aromatase inhibitor (AI) treatment due to joint symptoms. Methods We conducted a single-arm, open-label, phase II study evaluating glucosamine-sulfate (1,500 mg/day)+ chondroitin-sulfate (1,200 mg/day) for 24 weeks to treat joint pain/stiffness in postmenopausal women with early stage breast cancer who developed moderate-to-severe joint pain after initiating AIs. The primary endpoint was improvement in pain/stiffness at week 24 assessed by the Outcome Measure in Rheumatology Clinical Trials and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OMERACT-OARSI) criteria. Secondary endpoints assessed changes in pain, stiffness, and function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) Index for hips/knees and the Modified Score for the Assessment and Quantification of Chronic Rheumatoid Affections of the Hands (M-SACRAH) for hands/wrists. The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) assessed pain interference, severity, and worst pain. Results Of 53 patients enrolled, 39 were evaluable at week 24. From baseline to week 24, 46 % of patients improved according to OMERACT-OARSI criteria. At week 24, there were improvements (all P<0.05) in pain and function as assessed by WOMAC and M-SACRAH, and in pain interference, severity, and worst pain as assessed by BPI. Estradiol levels did not change from baseline. The most commonly reported side effects were headache (28 %), dyspepsia (15 %), and nausea (17 %). Conclusions In this single-arm study, 24 weeks of glucosamine/chondroitin resulted in moderate improvements in AI-induced arthralgias, with minimal side effects, and no changes in estradiol levels. These results suggest a need to evaluate efficacy in a placebo-controlled trial. PMID:23111941

  5. Osilodrostat, a potent oral 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor: 22-week, prospective, Phase II study in Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Fleseriu, Maria; Pivonello, Rosario; Young, Jacques; Hamrahian, Amir H; Molitch, Mark E; Shimizu, Chikara; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Shimatsu, Akira; White, Tracy; Hilliard, Annie; Tian, Chuan; Sauter, Nicholas; Biller, Beverly M K; Bertagna, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    In a 10-week proof-of-concept study (LINC 1), the potent oral 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor osilodrostat (LCI699) normalized urinary free cortisol (UFC) in 11/12 patients with Cushing's disease. The current 22-week study (LINC 2; NCT01331239) further evaluated osilodrostat in patients with Cushing's disease. Phase II, open-label, prospective study of two patient cohorts. Follow-up cohort: 4/12 patients previously enrolled in LINC 1, offered re-enrollment if baseline mean UFC was above ULN. Expansion cohort: 15 newly enrolled patients with baseline UFC > 1.5 × ULN. In the follow-up cohort, patients initiated osilodrostat twice daily at the penultimate efficacious/tolerable dose in LINC 1; dose was adjusted as needed. In the expansion cohort, osilodrostat was initiated at 4 mg/day (10 mg/day if baseline UFC > 3 × ULN), with dose escalated every 2 weeks to 10, 20, 40, and 60 mg/day until UFC ≤ ULN. Main efficacy endpoint was the proportion of responders (UFC ≤ ULN or ≥50% decrease from baseline) at weeks 10 and 22. Overall response rate was 89.5% (n/N = 17/19) at 10 weeks and 78.9% (n/N = 15/19) at 22 weeks; at week 22, all responding patients had UFC ≤ ULN. The most common AEs observed during osilodrostat treatment were nausea, diarrhea, asthenia, and adrenal insufficiency (n = 6 for each). New or worsening hirsutism (n = 2) and/or acne (n = 3) were reported among four female patients, all of whom had increased testosterone levels. Osilodrostat treatment reduced UFC in all patients; 78.9% (n/N = 15/19) had normal UFC at week 22. Treatment with osilodrostat was generally well tolerated.

  6. Pyrrolopyrimidine inhibitors of DNA gyrase B (GyrB) and topoisomerase IV (ParE), Part II: development of inhibitors with broad spectrum, Gram-negative antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Trzoss, Micheal; Bensen, Daniel C; Li, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhiyong; Lam, Thanh; Zhang, Junhu; Creighton, Christopher J; Cunningham, Mark L; Kwan, Bryan; Stidham, Mark; Nelson, Kirk; Brown-Driver, Vickie; Castellano, Amanda; Shaw, Karen J; Lightstone, Felice C; Wong, Sergio E; Nguyen, Toan B; Finn, John; Tari, Leslie W

    2013-03-01

    The structurally related bacterial topoisomerases DNA gyrase (GyrB) and topoisomerase IV (ParE) have long been recognized as prime candidates for the development of broad spectrum antibacterial agents. However, GyrB/ParE targeting antibacterials with spectrum that encompasses robust Gram-negative pathogens have not yet been reported. Using structure-based inhibitor design, we optimized a novel pyrrolopyrimidine inhibitor series with potent, dual targeting activity against GyrB and ParE. Compounds were discovered with broad antibacterial spectrum, including activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. Herein we describe the SAR of the pyrrolopyrimidine series as it relates to key structural and electronic features necessary for Gram-negative antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomimetic design of platelet adhesion inhibitors to block integrin α2β1-collagen interactions: II. Inhibitor library, screening, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Yan

    2014-04-29

    Platelet adhesion on collagen mediated by integrin α2β1 has been proven important in arterial thrombus formation, leading to an exigent demand on development of potent inhibitors for the integrin α2β1-collagen binding. In the present study, a biomimetic design strategy of platelet adhesion inhibitors was established, based on the affinity binding model of integrin proposed in part I. First, a heptapeptide library containing 8000 candidates was designed to functionally mimic the binding motif of integrin α2β1. Then, each heptapeptide in the library was docked onto a collagen molecule for the assessment of its affinity, followed by a screening based on its structure similarity to the original structure in the affinity binding model. Eight candidates were then selected for further screening by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Thereafter, three candidates chosen from MD simulations were separately added into the physiological saline containing separated integrin and collagen, to check their abilities for blocking the integrin-collagen interaction using MD simulations. Of these three candidates, significant inhibition was observed in the presence of LWWNSYY. Finally, the binding affinity of LWWNSYY for collagen was demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry. Moreover, significant inhibition of platelet adhesion in the presence of LWWNSYY has been experimentally validated. This work has thus developed an effective strategy for the biomimetic design of peptide-based platelet adhesion inhibitors.

  8. Molecular interactions of DNA-topoisomerase I and II inhibitor with DNA and topoisomerases and in ternary complexes: binding modes and biological effects for intoplicine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nabiev, I; Chourpa, I; Riou, J F; Nguyen, C H; Lavelle, F; Manfait, M

    1994-08-02

    Molecular interactions of intoplicine, dual DNA-topoisomerases (Topo) I and II inhibitor, with topoisomerases, plasmid DNA, in ternary cleavable complexes with enzymes and plasmid DNA, and in the reversed cleavable complexes were examined by means of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and CD spectroscopy and by biochemical techniques. Detailed spectral analysis of intoplicine derivatives allowed us to assign SERS vibrational modes of chromophores and to propose the models for these complexes. Intoplicine was found to be able to interact specifically with the Topo II alone, but with Topo I only when in the presence of DNA. It shows at least two modes of binding to the DNA: the first was found to be dominant for its derivative 1c (most potent Topo I inhibitor), and the second was dominant for derivative 2a (most potent Topo II inhibitor). The possibility of forming these two types of complexes simultaneously is suggested to be one of the main factors enabling the drug to be a dual Topo I and Topo II inhibitor. The "deep intercalation mode" of the drug from the DNA minor groove with the long axis of the chromophore oriented roughly parallel to the dyad axis has been suggested to be responsible for induction of distortions of the DNA structure by the intercalating drug. Being involved in the formation of Topo I-mediated cleavable ternary complex, the molecules participating in the deep intercalation mode within the DNA do not change their molecular interactions as compared with their complex with the DNA alone. The stabilization of the Topo I-mediated cleavable complex was shown to be followed by the local denaturation of DNA in the AT-rich regions of the helix. When the ternary cleavable complex was reversed, the drug was shown to be in the complex with the plasmid. The "outside binding mode" from the DNA major groove via the hydroxyl group of the A-ring of the chromophore has been suggested to be responsible for Topo II inhibition. These molecules did not

  9. Synthesis of 17beta-N-substituted 19-Nor-10-azasteroids as inhibitors of human 5alpha-reductases I and II.

    PubMed

    Scarpi, Dina; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Danza, Giovanna; Serio, Mario; Guarna, Antonio

    2002-11-01

    The synthesis of 17beta-[N-(phenyl)methyl/phenyl-amido] substituted 10-azasteroids has been accomplished by either the TiCl4- or TMSOTf-catalysed reaction of carbamates 11 and 12 with Danishefsky's diene. The reaction provided 5alpha-H isomers 3a-5a and 5beta-H isomers 3b-5b depending on the reaction conditions. Both epimers of each compound were tested against human 5alpha-reductase types I and II. Unexpectedly, 5beta-H compounds were found more active than their 5alpha-H counterparts, the best inhibitors being 3b (IC50=279 and 2000 nM toward isoenzyme I and II, respectively) and 5b (IC50=913 and 247 nM toward isoenzymes I and II, respectively).

  10. Losartan, a selective inhibitor of subtype AT1 receptors for angiotensin II, inhibits the binding of N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine to neutrophil receptors.

    PubMed

    Raiden, S; Giordano, M; Andonegui, G; Trevani, A S; López, D H; Nahmod, V; Geffner, J R

    1997-05-01

    Losartan, a selective antagonist of AT1 receptors for angiotensin II, is widely used clinically to manage hypertension. We report here that losartan markedly inhibits neutrophil shape change, adherence and chemiluminescence responses triggered by N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), without affecting responses induced by immune complexes, zymosan or concanavalin A. Neither saralasin, another antagonist of angiotensin II receptors, nor captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, reproduced the effects of losartan. It was also observed that neutrophil responses triggered by fMLP were not affected by exogenously added angiotensin II. The effect of losartan on the binding of fMLP was measured using [3H]fMLP. It was found that losartan inhibits the binding of [3H]fMLP to neutrophil receptors. As observed for neutrophils, studies performed with monocytes showed that losartan inhibits chemiluminescence emission triggered by fMLP, without affecting chemiluminescence responses triggered by immune complexes, zymosan or concanavalin A.

  11. Phase II study of copanlisib, a PI3K inhibitor, in relapsed or refractory, indolent or aggressive lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dreyling, M; Morschhauser, F; Bouabdallah, K; Bron, D; Cunningham, D; Assouline, S E; Verhoef, G; Linton, K; Thieblemont, C; Vitolo, U; Hiemeyer, F; Giurescu, M; Garcia-Vargas, J; Gorbatchevsky, I; Liu, L; Koechert, K; Peña, C; Neves, M; Childs, B H; Zinzani, P L

    2017-09-01

    Copanlisib is a pan-class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor with predominant activity against the α- and δ-isoforms. This phase II study evaluated the response rate of copanlisib administered intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle, in patients with indolent or aggressive malignant lymphoma. Archival tumor tissues were used for immunohistochemistry, gene-expression profiling, and mutation analysis. Thirty-three patients with indolent lymphoma and 51 with aggressive lymphoma received copanlisib. Follicular lymphoma (48.5%) and peripheral T-cell lymphoma (33.3%) were the most common histologic subtypes. Most patients (78.6%) had received prior rituximab and 54.8% were rituximab-refractory. Median duration of treatment was 23 and 8 weeks in the indolent and aggressive cohorts, respectively (overall range 2-138). Eighty patients were evaluated for efficacy. The objective response rate was 43.7% (14/32) in the indolent cohort and 27.1% (13/48) in the aggressive cohort; median progression-free survival was 294 days (range 0-874) and 70 days (range 0-897), respectively; median duration of response was 390 days (range 0-825) and 166 days (range 0-786), respectively. Common adverse events included hyperglycemia (57.1%; grade ≥3, 23.8%), hypertension (54.8%; grade ≥3, 40.5%), and diarrhea (40.5%; grade ≥3, 4.8%), all generally manageable. Neutropenia occurred in 28.6% of patients (grade 4, 11.9%). Molecular analyses showed enhanced antitumor activity in tumors with upregulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway gene expression. Intravenous copanlisib demonstrated promising efficacy and manageable toxicity in heavily pretreated patients with various subtypes of indolent and aggressive malignant lymphoma. Subtype-specific studies of copanlisib in patients with follicular, peripheral T-cell, and mantle cell lymphomas are ongoing. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01660451 (Part A).

  12. Randomized controlled clinical trial of a combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor for patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Su, Yong; Su, Ya-Li; Lv, Li-Fang; Wang, Li-Min; Li, Quan-Zhong; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor for patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Type II diabetic patients exhibiting poor glycemic control following α-glucosidase inhibitor treatment for at least two months were selected and randomly distributed into vildagliptin and placebo groups. The body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c) and blood lipid levels and hepatorenal functions of the patients were determined before and 12 weeks after the trial. Following the trial, the FBG, PPG, HbA1c, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglyceride (TG) levels in the vildagliptin group were significantly decreased compared with the pretreatment levels (P<0.05), whereas only the PPG level in the placebo group decreased (P<0.05). The FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in the vildagliptin group were markedly lower than those in the placebo group 12 weeks after the trial. A comparison of the body weights and hepatorenal functions before and after the trial or between groups did not show statistically significant differences. The combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor effectively reduced the FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in patients without inducing weight gain or hepatorenal dysfunction. However, the therapy may have caused a reduction in the blood lipid levels.

  13. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII with novel Schiff bases: identification of selective inhibitors for the tumor-associated isoforms over the cytosolic ones.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Busra; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-11-01

    A series of new Schiff bases was obtained from sulfanilamide, 3-fluorosulfanilamide or 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonamide and aromatic/heterocyclic aldehydes incorporating both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties. The obtained sulfonamides were investigated as inhibitors of four physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms, the cytosolic CA I and II, as well as the transmembrane, tumor-associated CA IX and XII. Most derivatives were medium potency or weak hCA I/II inhibitors, but several of them showed nanomolar affinity for CA IX and/or XII, making them an interesting example of isoform-selective compounds. The nature of the aryl/hetaryl moiety present in the initial aldehyde was the main factor influencing potency and isoform selectivity. The best and most CA IX-selective compounds incorporated moieties such as 4-methylthiophenyl, 4-cyanophenyl-, 4-(2-pyridyl)-phenyl and the 4-aminoethylbenzenesulfonamide scaffold. The best hCA XII inhibitors, also showing selectivity for this isoform, incorporated 2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl-, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl and 4-(2-pyridyl)-phenyl functionalities and were also derivatives of 4-aminoethylbenzenesulfonamide. The sulfanilamide and 3-fluorosulfanilamide derived Schiff bases were less active compared to the corresponding 4-aminoethyl-benzenesulfonamide derivatives. As hCA IX/XII selective inhibition is attractive for obtaining antitumor agents/diagnostic tools with a new mechanism of action, compounds of the type described here may be considered interesting preclinical candidates.

  14. Design and synthesis of benzothiazole-6-sulfonamides acting as highly potent inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Diaa A; Lasheen, Deena S; Zaky, Maysoun Y; Ibrahim, Amany W; Vullo, Daniela; Ceruso, Mariangela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Abou El Ella, Dalal A

    2015-08-01

    A series of novel 2-aminobenzothiazole derivatives bearing sulfonamide at position 6 was designed, synthesized and investigated as inhibitors of four isoforms of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), the cytosolic CA I and II, and the tumor-associated isozymes CA IX and XII. Docking and binding energy studies were carried out to reveal details regarding the favorable interactions between the scaffolds of these new inhibitors and the active sites of the investigated CA isoforms. Most of the novel compounds were acting as highly potent inhibitors of the tumor-associated hCA IX and hCA XII with KIs in the nanomolar range. The ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozyme hCA II was also inhibited with KIs ranging from 3.5 to 45.4 nM. The favorable interactions between some of the new compounds and the active site of different CA isoforms were delineated by using molecular docking which may be useful for designing compounds with high affinity and selectivity for some CAs with biomedical applications.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of complex Histones Deacetylase (HDAC) Class II Homo Sapiens with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and its derivatives as inhibitors of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Bakri, Ridla; Prasetia, Tirtana; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Kerami, Djati

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is second most common cancer in woman worldwide. Cervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogene. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity has been known as a potential strategy for cancer therapy. SAHA is an HDAC inhibitor that has been used in cancer therapy but still has side effects. SAHA modification proposed to minimize side effects. Triazole attachment on the chain of SAHA has been known to enhance the inhibition ability of SAHA and less toxic. In this study, it will be carried out with molecular dynamic simulations of SAHA modifications consisting ligand 1a, 2a and, 2c to interact with six HDAC in hydrated conditions. To all six HDAC Class II, performed docking with SAHA and a modified inhibitor. The docking results were then carried out molecular dynamics simulations to determine the inhibitor affinities in hydrated conditions. The molecular dynamic simulations results show better affinities of ligand 2c with HDAC 4, 6, and 7 than SAHA itself, and good affinity was also shown by ligand 2a and 1c on HDAC 5 and 9. The results of this study can be a reference to obtain better inhibitors.

  16. Identification of Novel Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors of Natural Origin (Part II): In Silico Prediction in Antidiabetic Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Laura; Sala, Esther; Ojeda, María José; Valls, Cristina; Bladé, Cinta; Mulero, Miquel; Blay, Mayte; Ardévol, Anna; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Pujadas, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background Natural extracts play an important role in traditional medicines for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and are also an essential resource for new drug discovery. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors are potential candidates for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the effectiveness of certain antidiabetic extracts of natural origin could be, at least partially, explained by the inhibition of DPP-IV. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an initial set of 29,779 natural products that are annotated with their natural source and an experimentally validated virtual screening procedure previously developed in our lab (Guasch et al.; 2012) [1], we have predicted 12 potential DPP-IV inhibitors from 12 different plant extracts that are known to have antidiabetic activity. Seven of these molecules are identical or similar to molecules with described antidiabetic activity (although their role as DPP-IV inhibitors has not been suggested as an explanation for their bioactivity). Therefore, it is plausible that these 12 molecules could be responsible, at least in part, for the antidiabetic activity of these extracts through their inhibitory effect on DPP-IV. In addition, we also identified as potential DPP-IV inhibitors 6 molecules from 6 different plants with no described antidiabetic activity but that share the same genus as plants with known antidiabetic properties. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules that we predicted as DPP-IV inhibitors exhibits chemical similarity with a group of 2,342 known DPP-IV inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance Our study identified 18 potential DPP-IV inhibitors in 18 different plant extracts (12 of these plants have known antidiabetic properties, whereas, for the remaining 6, antidiabetic activity has been reported for other plant species from the same genus). Moreover, none of the 18 molecules exhibits chemical similarity with a large group of known DPP-IV inhibitors. PMID:23028712

  17. Impact of losartan and angiotensin II on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Song; Wu, Zong-Gui; Yang, Jun-Ke; Chen, Xin-Jing

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the impact of losartan and angiotensin II (AngII) on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), secreted by rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Rat VSMCs were isolated and cultured in different concentrations of AngII and losartan for 24 h and western blot analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed to observe the subsequent impact on the gene and protein expression of MMP-9 and TIMP-1. AngII was shown to promote the protein and gene expression of MMP-9 in VSMCs in a concentration-dependent manner. No effect was observed on the expression of TIMP-1, therefore, an increase in the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was observed. Losartan was shown to be able to inhibit MMP-9 protein and gene expression in a concentration-dependent manner, whilst promoting an increase in TIMP-1 expression, thus decreasing the ratio of MMP-9/TIMP-1. The combined action of losartan and AngII resulted in the same directional changes in MMP-9 and TIMP-1 expression as observed for losartan alone. The comparison of AngII, losartan and the combinatory effect on the expression of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in VSMCs indicated that losartan inhibited the effects of AngII, therefore reducing the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, which may contribute to the molecular mechanism of losartan in preventing atherosclerosis. In atherosclerosis, the development of the extracellular matrix of plaque is closely correlated with the evolution of AS. The balance between MMPs and TIMPs is important in maintaining the dynamic equilibrium between the ECM, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is involved in the pathologenesis of AS, and in which AngII has a central role.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial activity and carbonic anhydrase enzyme inhibitor effects of salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone and its Palladium(II), Cobalt(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyar, Saliha; Adem, Şevki

    2014-10-01

    We report the synthesis of the ligand, salicilaldehyde-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone (salptsmh) derived from p-toluenesulfonicacid-1-methylhydrazide (ptsmh) and its Pd(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized for the first time. The structure of the ligand and their complexes were investigated using elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR, NMR and LC-MS) measurements. Salptsmh has also been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for crystal structure were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The complexes were found to have general composition [ML2]. The results of elemental analysis showed 1:2 (metal/ligand) stoichiometry for all the complex. Magnetic and spectral data indicate a square planar geometry for Pd(II) complex and a distorted tetrahedral geometry for Co(II) complexes. The ligand and its metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disk diffusion method against the selected Gram positive bacteria: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Gram negative bacteria: Eschericha coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and carbonic anhydrase I (CA I) have been investigated by comparing IC50 and Ki values and it has been found that Pd(II) complex have more enzyme inhibition efficiency than salptsmh and Co(II) complex.

  19. Angiotensin II receptor antagonist olmesartan and NF-kappaB inhibitor as cytotoxic and apoptotic agents in MCF-7 human cell line.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiari, Elham; Hosseini, Azar; Boroushaki, Mohammad Taher; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi

    2016-08-01

    Over expression of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) have major role in many cancers. In this study, role of angiotensin II (Ag II) and NF-kappaB pathway in breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) proliferation were studied using olmesartan (as a novel Ag II antagonist) and Bay11-7082 (as NF-kappaB inhibitor). Cells were treated with different concentrations of olmesartan and Bay11-7082.Cell proliferation was determined by 4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl, 2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Apoptotic cells were evaluated using PI staining of DNA fragmentation. Olmesartan and Bay11-7082 decreased cell viability. Combination of olmesartan with Bay11-7082 also decreased cell viability as compared with single agent treatments. Results showed that apoptosis is involved in olmesartan and Bay11-7082-induced toxicity. Olmesartan and Bay11-7082 inhibit the MCF-7 cells growth indicating RAS and NF-kappaB pathway blockade lead to cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction against tumour cells. So ARBs and NF-kappaB pathway inhibitors could be considered as anticancer drugs in future.

  20. New Iminodiacetate-Thiosemicarbazone Hybrids and Their Copper(II) Complexes Are Potential Ribonucleotide Reductase R2 Inhibitors with High Antiproliferative Activity.

    PubMed

    Zaltariov, Mirela F; Hammerstad, Marta; Arabshahi, Homayon J; Jovanović, Katarina; Richter, Klaus W; Cazacu, Maria; Shova, Sergiu; Balan, Mihaela; Andersen, Niels H; Radulović, Siniša; Reynisson, Jóhannes; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Arion, Vladimir B

    2017-03-20

    As ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) plays a crucial role in nucleic acid metabolism, it is an important target for anticancer therapy. The thiosemicarbazone Triapine is an efficient R2 inhibitor, which has entered ∼20 clinical trials. Thiosemicarbazones are supposed to exert their biological effects through effectively binding transition-metal ions. In this study, six iminodiacetate-thiosemicarbazones able to form transition-metal complexes, as well as six dicopper(II) complexes, were synthesized and fully characterized by analytical, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-vis; (1)H and (13)C NMR), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. The antiproliferative effects were examined in several human cancer and one noncancerous cell lines. Several of the compounds showed high cytotoxicity and marked selectivity for cancer cells. On the basis of this, and on molecular docking calculations one lead dicopper(II) complex and one thiosemicarbazone were chosen for in vitro analysis as potential R2 inhibitors. Their interaction with R2 and effect on the Fe(III)2-Y· cofactor were characterized by microscale thermophoresis, and two spectroscopic techniques, namely, electron paramagnetic resonance and UV-vis spectroscopy. Our findings suggest that several of the synthesized proligands and copper(II) complexes are effective antiproliferative agents in several cancer cell lines, targeting RNR, which deserve further investigation as potential anticancer drugs.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors in angiotensin-II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ulu, Arzu; Harris, Todd R; Morisseau, Christophe; Miyabe, Christina; Inoue, Hiromi; Schuster, Gertrud; Dong, Hua; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Liu, Jun-Yan; Weiss, Robert H; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Imig, John D; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory and antihypertensive effects of long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) are still unclear. The epoxides of an ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid epoxyeicosatrienoic acids also exhibit antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, we hypothesized that the major ω-3 PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may lower the blood pressure and attenuate renal markers of inflammation through their epoxide metabolites. Here, we supplemented mice with an ω-3 rich diet for 3 weeks in a murine model of angiotensin-II-dependent hypertension. Also, because EPA and DHA epoxides are metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), we tested the combination of an sEH inhibitor and the ω-3 rich diet. Our results show that ω-3 rich diet in combination with the sEH inhibitor lowered Ang-II, increased the blood pressure, further increased the renal levels of EPA and DHA epoxides, reduced renal markers of inflammation (ie, prostaglandins and MCP-1), downregulated an epithelial sodium channel, and upregulated angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 message and significantly modulated cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolic pathways. Overall, our findings suggest that epoxides of the ω-3 PUFAs contribute to lowering systolic blood pressure and attenuating inflammation in part by reduced prostaglandins and MCP-1 and by upregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 in angiotensin-II-dependent hypertension.

  2. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors in Angiotensin-II Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ulu, Arzu; Harris, Todd R; Morisseau, Christophe; Miyabe, Christina; Inoue, Hiromi; Schuster, Gertrud; Dong, Hua; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Liu, Jun-Yan; Weiss, Robert H; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Imig, John D; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertensive effects of long chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are still unclear. The epoxides of an ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid (epoxyeicosatrienoic acids; EETs) also exhibit anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, we hypothesized that the major ω-3 PUFAs including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may lower blood pressure and attenuate renal markers of inflammation through their epoxide metabolites. Here, we supplemented mice with an ω-3 rich diet for three weeks in a murine model of angiotensin-II dependent hypertension. Also, since EPA and DHA epoxides are metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), we tested the combination of a sEH inhibitor and the ω-3 rich diet. Our results show that ω-3 rich diet in combination with the sEH inhibitor lowered Ang-II increased blood pressure, further increased renal levels of EPA and DHA epoxides, reduced renal markers of inflammation (i.e. prostaglandins and MCP-1), down-regulated an epithelial sodium channel and up-regulated Angiotensin converting enzyme-2 message (ACE-2) and significantly modulated cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolic pathways. Overall, our findings suggest that epoxides of the ω-3 PUFAs contribute to lowering SBP and attenuating inflammation in part by reduced prostaglandins and MCP-1 and by up-regulation of ACE-2 in angiotensin-II dependent hypertension. PMID:23676336

  3. Morphologic Damage of Rat Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells Induced by Bile Acids Could Be Ameliorated by Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibitor Z-Guggulsterone In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaowei; Hou, Xusheng; Wu, Wenyu; Nie, Lei; Tian, Yinghong; Lu, Yanmeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether bile acids (BAs) affect respiratory functions through the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) expressed in the lungs and to explore the possible mechanisms of BAs-induced respiratory disorder. Methods. Primary cultured alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECIIs) of rat were treated with different concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) in the presence or absence of FXR inhibitor Z-guggulsterone (GS). Then, expression of FXR in nuclei of AECIIs was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. And ultrastructural changes of the cells were observed under transmission electron microscope and analyzed by Image-Pro Plus software. Results. Morphologic damage of AECIIs was exhibited in high BAs group in vitro, with high-level expression of FXR, while FXR inhibitor GS could attenuate the cytotoxicity of BAs to AECIIs. Conclusions. FXR expression was related to the morphologic damage of AECIIs induced by BAs, thus influencing respiratory functions. PMID:27340672

  4. Structure based design of 4-(3-aminomethylphenyl)piperidinyl-1-amides: novel, potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitors of betaII tryptase.

    PubMed

    Levell, Julian; Astles, Peter; Eastwood, Paul; Cairns, Jennifer; Houille, Olivier; Aldous, Suzanne; Merriman, Gregory; Whiteley, Brian; Pribish, James; Czekaj, Mark; Liang, Guyan; Maignan, Sebastien; Guilloteau, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Alain; Davidson, Jane; Harrison, Trevor; Morley, Andrew; Watson, Simon; Fenton, Garry; McCarthy, Clive; Romano, Joseph; Mathew, Rose; Engers, Darren; Gardyan, Michael; Sides, Keith; Kwong, Jennifer; Tsay, Joseph; Rebello, Sam; Shen, Liduo; Wang, Jie; Luo, Yongyi; Giardino, Odessa; Lim, Heng-Keang; Smith, Keith; Pauls, Henry

    2005-04-15

    Tryptase is a serine protease found almost exclusively in mast cells. It has trypsin-like specificity, favoring cleavage of substrates with an arginine (or lysine) at the P1 position, and has optimal catalytic activity at neutral pH. Current evidence suggests tryptase beta is the most important form released during mast cell activation in allergic diseases. It is shown to have numerous pro-inflammatory cellular activities in vitro, and in animal models tryptase provokes broncho-constriction and induces a cellular inflammatory infiltrate characteristic of human asthma. Screening of in-house inhibitors of factor Xa (a closely related serine protease) identified beta-amidoester benzamidines as potent inhibitors of recombinant human betaII tryptase. X-ray structure driven template modification and exchange of the benzamidine to optimize potency and pharmacokinetic properties gave selective, potent and orally bioavailable 4-(3-aminomethyl phenyl)piperidinyl-1-amides.

  5. Phase Ib/II Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Combination Therapy with Multikinase VEGF Inhibitor Pazopanib and MEK Inhibitor Trametinib In Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Meyer, Christian; Zinner, Ralph; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Zahurak, Marianna L; O'Connor, Ashley; Roszik, Jason; Shaw, Kenna; Ludwig, Joseph A; Kurzrock, Razelle; Azad, Nilofer A

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: Pazopanib, a multireceptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting primarily VEGFRs1-3, is approved for advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and renal cell cancer. Downstream of VEGFR, trametinib is an FDA-approved MEK inhibitor used for melanoma. We hypothesized that vertical pathway inhibition using trametinib would synergize with pazopanib in advanced STS.Experimental Design: In an open-label, multicenter, investigator-initiated National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN)-sponsored trial, patients with metastatic or advanced STS received pazopanib 800 mg and 2 mg of trametinib continuously for 28-day cycles. The primary endpoint was 4-month progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were overall survival, response rate, and disease control rate.Results: Twenty-five patients were enrolled. The median age was 49 years (range, 22-77 years) and 52% were male. Median PFS was 2.27 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9-3.9], and the 4-month PFS rate was 21.1% (95% CI, 9.7-45.9), which was not an improvement over the hypothesized null 4-month PFS rate of 28.3% (P = 0.79). Median overall survival was 9.0 months (95% CI, 5.7-17.7). A partial response occurred in 2 (8%) of the evaluable patients (95% CI, 1.0-26.0), one with PIK3CA E542K-mutant embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and another with spindle cell sarcoma. The disease control rate was 14/25 (56%; 95% CI, 34.9-75.6). The most common adverse events were diarrhea (84%), nausea (64%), and fatigue (56%).Conclusions: The combination of pazopanib and trametinib was tolerable without indication of added activity of the combination in STS. Further study may be warranted in RAS/RAF aberrant sarcomas. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 4027-34. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 functions by leukocyte elastase inhibitor/LEI-derived DNase II during caspase-independent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Leprêtre, C; Scovassi, A I; Shah, G M; Torriglia, A

    2009-05-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is an important regulator of apoptosis. Its over-activation at the onset of apoptosis can inhibit the action of apoptotic endonucleases like caspase-activated DNase and DNAS1L3. Therefore, controlled PARP-1 proteolysis during caspase-dependent apoptosis is considered essential to promote DNA degradation. Yet, little is known about the interplay of PARP-1 and endonucleases that operate during caspase-independent cell death. Here we show that in the long-term cultured HeLa cells which undergo caspase-independent death, PARP-1 co-immunoprecipitates with leukocyte elastase inhibitor-derived DNase II (L-DNase II), an acid DNase implicated in this death pathway and activated by serine proteases. Our results indicate that, despite having putative poly(ADP-ribose)-acceptor sites, LEI/L-DNase II is neither significantly poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated nor inhibited by PARP-1 during caspase-independent apoptosis. Unexpectedly, caspase-independent apoptosis induced by hexa-methylene amiloride, LEI/L-DNase II can activate PARP-1 and promote its auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, thus inhibiting PARP-1 activity. Moreover, overexpression of LEI blocks the pro-survival effect of PARP-1 in this model of cell death. Our results provide the original evidence for a new mechanism of PARP-1 activity regulation in the caspase-independent death pathway involving LEI/L-DNase II.

  7. Synthesis of the novel PARP-1 inhibitor AG-690/11026014 and its protective effects on angiotensin II-induced mouse cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guo-Shuai; Zhu, Cui-Ge; Li, Zhuo-Ming; Wang, Pan-Xia; Huang, Yi; Liu, Min; He, Ping; Lou, Lan-Lan; Chen, Shao-Rui; Liu, Pei-Qing

    2017-02-27

    We previously identified AG-690/11026014 (6014) as a novel poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitor that effectively prevented angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In the present study, we reported a new synthesis route for 6014, and investigated its protective effects on Ang II-induced cardiac remodeling and cardiac dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms in mice. We designed a new synthesis route to obtain a sufficient quantity of 6014 for this in vivo study. C57BL/6J mice were infused with Ang II and treated with 6014 (10, 30, 90 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), ig) for 4 weeks. Then two-dimensional echocardiography was performed to assess the cardiac function and structure. Histological changes of the hearts were examined with HE staining and Masson's trichrome staining. The protein expression was evaluated by Western blot, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence assays. The activities of sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1) and the content of NAD+ were detected with the corresponding test kits. Treatment with 6014 dose-dependently improved cardiac function, including LVEF, CO and SV and reversed the changes of cardiac structure in Ang II-infused mice: it significantly ameliorated Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy evidenced by attenuating the enlargement of cardiomyocytes, decreased HW/BW and LVW/BW, and decreased expression of hypertrophic markers ANF, BNP and β-MHC; it also prevented Ang II-induced cardiac fibrosis, as implied by the decrease in excess accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components collagen I, collagen III and FN. Further studies revealed that treatment with 6014 did not affect the expression levels of PARP-1, but dose-dependently inhibited the activity of PARP-1 and subsequently restored the activity of SIRT-1 in heart tissues due to the decreased consumption of NAD+ and attenuated Poly-ADP-ribosylation (PARylation) of SIRT-1. In conclusion, the novel PARP-1 inhibitor 6014 effectively protects mice against AngII-induced cardiac

  8. Adrenomedullin is a potent inhibitor of angiotensin II-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Kano, H; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Hanehira, T; Yoshikawa, J

    1997-06-01

    The migration of coronary artery medial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerotic lesions. In the current study, we examined the possible interaction of adrenomedullin, a novel vasorelaxant peptide, and angiotensin II (Ang II) on human coronary artery SMC migration using Boyden's chamber method. Ang II stimulated SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(6) and 10(8) mol/L. This stimulation was clearly blocked by the Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist losartan but not by the type 2 receptor antagonist PD 123319. The migration stimulatory effect of Ang II was chemotactic in nature for cultured human coronary artery SMCs but was not chemokinetic. Human adrenomedullin clearly inhibited Ang II-induced migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Human adrenomedullin stimulated cAMP formation in these cells. Inhibition by adrenomedullin of Ang II-induced SMC migration was paralleled by an increase in the cellular level of cAMP. 8-Bromo-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, and forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, inhibited the Ang II-induced SMC migration. These results suggest that Ang II stimulates SMC migration via type 1 receptors in human coronary artery and adrenomedullin inhibits Ang II-induced migration at least partly through a cAMP-dependent mechanism. Taken together with the finding that adrenomedullin is synthesized in and secreted from vascular endothelial cells, this peptide may play a role as a local antimigration factor in certain pathological conditions.

  9. Discovery of dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-thiophen-2-yl-pyridine as a non-intercalative DNA-binding topoisomerase II-specific catalytic inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Hanbyeol; Park, So-Eun; Lee, Eunyoung; Karki, Radha; Thapa, Pritam; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Eung-Seok; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-06-10

    We describe our rationale for designing specific catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II (topo II) over topoisomerase I (topo I). Based on 3D-QSAR studies of previously published dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-aryl pyridine derivatives, 9 novel dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-thiophen-2-yl pyridine compounds were designed, synthesized, and their biological activities were evaluated. These compounds have 2-thienyl ring substituted on the R(3) group on the pyridine ring and they all showed excellent specificity toward topo II compared to topo I. In vitro experiments were performed for compound 13 to determine the mechanism of action for this series of compounds. Compound 13 inhibited topoisomerase II specifically by non-intercalative binding to DNA and did not stabilize enzyme-cleavable DNA complex. Compound 13 efficiently inhibited cell viability, cell migration, and induced G1 arrest. Also from 3D-QSAR studies, the results were compared with other previously published dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-aryl pyridine derivatives to explain the structure-activity relationships. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors in phase I and phase II clinical trials for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Karachaliou, Niki; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Gonzalez Cao, Maria; Teixido, Cristina; Sosa, Aaron E; Berenguer, Jordi; Rodriguez Capote, Alejandra; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    Crizotinib is a first-in-class ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), which has proven its superiority over standard platinum-based chemotherapy for the first-line therapy of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The development of acquired resistance to crizotinib represents an ongoing challenge with the central nervous system being one of the most common sites of relapse. Ceritinib and alectinib are approved second-generation ALK TKIs. Several novel ALK inhibitors, more potent and with different selectivity compared to crizotinib, are currently in development. Areas covered: This review will focus on new ALK inhibitors, currently in phase 1 or 2 clinical studies. We will also comment on the mechanisms of resistance to ALK inhibition and the strategies to delay or overcome resistance. Expert opinion: The therapeutic management of ALK-rearranged NSCLC has been greatly improved. Next-generation ALK inhibitors have shown differential potency against ALK rearrangements and ALK resistance mutations. The molecular profile of the tumor at the time of disease progression to crizotinib is crucial for the sequencing of novel ALK TKIs. Ongoing clinical studies will address key issues, including the optimal therapeutic algorithm and whether combinational approaches are more effective than single ALK inhibition for the outcome of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients.

  11. A phase II study of the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat combined with tamoxifen for the treatment of patients with hormone therapy-resistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Munster, P N; Thurn, K T; Thomas, S; Raha, P; Lacevic, M; Miller, A; Melisko, M; Ismail-Khan, R; Rugo, H; Moasser, M; Minton, S E

    2011-01-01

    Background: Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are crucial components of the oestrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional complex. Preclinically, HDAC inhibitors can reverse tamoxifen/aromatase inhibitor resistance in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. This concept was examined in a phase II combination trial with correlative end points. Methods: Patients with ER-positive metastatic breast cancer progressing on endocrine therapy were treated with 400 mg of vorinostat daily for 3 of 4 weeks and 20 mg tamoxifen daily, continuously. Histone acetylation and HDAC2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were also evaluated. Results: In all, 43 patients (median age 56 years (31–71)) were treated, 25 (58%) received prior adjuvant tamoxifen, 29 (67%) failed one prior chemotherapy regimen, 42 (98%) progressed after one, and 23 (54%) after two aromatase inhibitors. The objective response rate by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours criteria was 19% and the clinical benefit rate (response or stable disease >24 weeks) was 40%. The median response duration was 10.3 months (confidence interval: 8.1–12.4). Histone hyperacetylation and higher baseline HDAC2 levels correlated with response. Conclusion: The combination of vorinostat and tamoxifen is well tolerated and exhibits encouraging activity in reversing hormone resistance. Correlative studies suggest that HDAC2 expression is a predictive marker and histone hyperacetylation is a useful pharmacodynamic marker for the efficacy of this combination. PMID:21559012

  12. Phase II study of the c-MET inhibitor tivantinib (ARQ 197) in patients with relapsed or relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Baljevic, Muhamed; Zaman, Shadia; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Lin, Yan Heather; de Partovi, Claudia Morales; Berkova, Zuzana; Amini, Behrang; Thomas, Sheeba K; Shah, Jatin J; Weber, Donna M; Fu, Min; Cleeland, Charles S; Wang, Xin Shelley; Stellrecht, Christine M; Davis, Richard E; Gandhi, Varsha; Orlowski, Robert Z

    2017-06-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor/c-MET pathway has been implicated in the pathobiology of multiple myeloma, and c-MET inhibitors induce myeloma cell apoptosis, suggesting that they could be useful clinically. We conducted a phase II study with the c-MET inhibitor tivantinib in patients with relapsed, or relapsed and refractory myeloma whose disease had progressed after one to four prior therapies. Tivantinib, 360 mg orally per dose, was administered twice daily continuously over a 4-week treatment cycle without a cap on the number of allowed cycles, barring undue toxicities or disease progression. Primary objectives were to determine the overall response rate and the toxicities of tivantinib in this patient population. Sixteen patients were enrolled in a two-stage design. Notable grade 3 and 4 hematological adverse events were limited to neutropenia in five and four patients, respectively. Nonhematological adverse events of grade 3 or higher included hypertension (in four patients); syncope, infection, and pain (two each); and fatigue, cough, and pulmonary embolism (one each). Four of 11 evaluable patients (36%) had stable disease as their best response, while the remainder showed disease progression. Overall, tivantinib as a single agent did not show promise for unselected relapsed/refractory myeloma patients. However, the ability to achieve stable disease does suggest that combination regimens incorporating targeted inhibitors in patients with c-MET pathway activation could be of interest.

  13. Treatment strategy in depression. II. MAO inhibitors in depression resistant to cyclic antidepressants: two controlled crossover studies with tranylcypromine versus L-5-hydroxytryptophan and nomifensine.

    PubMed

    Nolen, W A; van de Putte, J J; Dijken, W A; Kamp, J S; Blansjaar, B A; Kramer, H J; Haffmans, J

    1988-12-01

    Antidepressants are ineffective in about 30% of the patients with major depression. Besides electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and lithium, MAO inhibitors have been suggested as an alternative in such patients. In 2 controlled, partial crossover studies involving 47 patients with major depression who had already been treated unsuccessfully with at least 2 cyclic antidepressants, the effect of the MAO inhibitor tranylcypromine was studied. The first study was an open comparison with L-5-hydroxytryptophan (L-5HTP), the second study a double-blind comparison with nomifensine. Neither the patients treated with L-5HTP nor the patients treated with nomifensine, except one, improved. In contrast, tranylcypromine was effective in 50% of the patients. The depressions of the responders to tranylcypromine appeared to be more endogenous (according Newcastle Scale II) and of shorter duration than those of the non-responders. It is concluded that MAO inhibitors such as tranylcypromine are an effective alternative to ECT and lithium in patients with major depression who have failed to respond to cyclic antidepressants.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of the complex-forming ability of hydroxypyranones and hydroxypyridinones with Ni (II) as possible inhibitors for urease enzyme in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Palizban, Abbasali; Saghaie, Lotfollah

    2016-01-01

    The complex-forming ability of 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyran-4-one (1a), 2-ethyl-3-hydroxypyran-4-one (1b), 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (4a) and 1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (4b) with nickel(Ni(II)) were characterized by infrared, ultraviolet, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and melting point. The mole-ratio of nickel:ligands was analyzed by atomic-absorption-spectrometry. The partition-coefficients (KOW) of the compounds were also determined. The binding of ligands with Ni(II) are through deprotonated hydroxyl group (-O-, disapeared at 3259 cm-1) and ioan-pairs of carbonyl group (=CO., shifted from 1650 to 1510-1515 cm-1). The characterization of complex geometry for bis-(2-methyl-3-hydroxypyranonato)Ni(II) (5a) and bis-(2-ethyl-3-hydroxypyranonato)Ni(II) (5b) predicted to be square-planer while for bis-(1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridinonato)Ni(II) (5c) and bis-(1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridinonato)Ni(II) (5d) distorted to tetrahedral-geometry. Inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori urease are nickel chelators. The compounds 1a, 4a and 4b are likely suitable ligands with complex forming-ability to make complexes of 5a, 5c and 5d with nickel. The KOW values show the compound 5c with low partition-coefficient is more suitable ligand with lower penetration from GI lumen. Future studies demand to find out the biological activity of developed compounds on H. pylori. PMID:27651814

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of the complex-forming ability of hydroxypyranones and hydroxypyridinones with Ni (II) as possible inhibitors for urease enzyme in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Palizban, Abbasali; Saghaie, Lotfollah

    2016-07-01

    The complex-forming ability of 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyran-4-one (1a), 2-ethyl-3-hydroxypyran-4-one (1b), 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (4a) and 1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (4b) with nickel(Ni(II)) were characterized by infrared, ultraviolet, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and melting point. The mole-ratio of nickel:ligands was analyzed by atomic-absorption-spectrometry. The partition-coefficients (KOW) of the compounds were also determined. The binding of ligands with Ni(II) are through deprotonated hydroxyl group (-O(-), disapeared at 3259 cm(-1)) and ioan-pairs of carbonyl group (=CO(.), shifted from 1650 to 1510-1515 cm(-1)). The characterization of complex geometry for bis-(2-methyl-3-hydroxypyranonato)Ni(II) (5a) and bis-(2-ethyl-3-hydroxypyranonato)Ni(II) (5b) predicted to be square-planer while for bis-(1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridinonato)Ni(II) (5c) and bis-(1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridinonato)Ni(II) (5d) distorted to tetrahedral-geometry. Inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori urease are nickel chelators. The compounds 1a, 4a and 4b are likely suitable ligands with complex forming-ability to make complexes of 5a, 5c and 5d with nickel. The KOW values show the compound 5c with low partition-coefficient is more suitable ligand with lower penetration from GI lumen. Future studies demand to find out the biological activity of developed compounds on H. pylori.

  16. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: in vitro inhibition of α isoforms (hCA I, hCA II, bCA III, hCA IV) by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Derya; Karagoz, Lutfi; Ekinci, Deniz; Senturk, Murat; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    A series of flavonoids, such as quercetin, catechin, apigenin, luteolin, morin, were investigated for their inhibitory effects against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). The compounds were tested against four α-CA isozymes purified from human and bovine (hCA I, hCA II, bCA III, hCA IV) tissues. The four isozymes showed quite diverse inhibition profiles with these compounds. The flavonoids inhibited hCA I with K(I)-s in the range of 2.2-12.8 μM, hCA II with K(I)-s in the range of 0.74-6.2 μM, bCA III with K(I)-s in the range of 2.2-21.3 μM, and hCA IV with inhibition constants in the range of 4.4-15.7, with an esterase assay using 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate. Some simple phenols/sulfonamides were also investigated as standard inhibitors. The flavonoids incorporate phenol moieties which inhibit these CAs through a diverse, not yet determined inhibition mechanism, compared to classic inhibitors such as the sulfonamide/sulfamate ones.

  17. Identification of Tight-Binding Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 Inhibitors in Aqueous Extracts of Marine Invertebrates by the Combination of Enzymatic and Interaction-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Sarduy, Emir; Guerra, Yasel; Covaleda Cortés, Giovanni; Avilés, Francesc Xavier; Chávez Planes, María A.

    2017-01-01

    Natural products from marine origin constitute a very promising and underexplored source of interesting compounds for modern biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries. However, their evaluation is quite challenging and requires specifically designed assays to reliably identify the compounds of interest in a highly heterogeneous and interfering context. In the present study, we describe a general strategy for the confident identification of tight-binding protease inhibitors in the aqueous extracts of 62 Cuban marine invertebrates, using Plasmodium falciparum hemoglobinases Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 as model enzymes. To this end, we first developed a screening strategy that combined enzymatic with interaction-based assays and then validated screening conditions using five reference extracts. Interferences were evaluated and minimized. The results from the massive screening of such extracts, the validation of several hits by a variety of interaction-based assays and the purification and functional characterization of PhPI, a multifunctional and reversible tight-binding inhibitor for Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 from the gorgonian Plexaura homomalla, are presented. PMID:28430158

  18. Identification of Tight-Binding Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 Inhibitors in Aqueous Extracts of Marine Invertebrates by the Combination of Enzymatic and Interaction-Based Assays.

    PubMed

    Salas-Sarduy, Emir; Guerra, Yasel; Covaleda Cortés, Giovanni; Avilés, Francesc Xavier; Chávez Planes, María A

    2017-04-21

    Natural products from marine origin constitute a very promising and underexplored source of interesting compounds for modern biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries. However, their evaluation is quite challenging and requires specifically designed assays to reliably identify the compounds of interest in a highly heterogeneous and interfering context. In the present study, we describe a general strategy for the confident identification of tight-binding protease inhibitors in the aqueous extracts of 62 Cuban marine invertebrates, using Plasmodium falciparum hemoglobinases Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 as model enzymes. To this end, we first developed a screening strategy that combined enzymatic with interaction-based assays and then validated screening conditions using five reference extracts. Interferences were evaluated and minimized. The results from the massive screening of such extracts, the validation of several hits by a variety of interaction-based assays and the purification and functional characterization of PhPI, a multifunctional and reversible tight-binding inhibitor for Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 from the gorgonian Plexaura homomalla, are presented.

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for non-small-cell lung cancer: A phase II trial and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Kenya; Ishida, Takashi; Oizumi, Satoshi; Shinagawa, Naofumi; Sukoh, Noriaki; Harada, Masao; Ogura, Shigeaki; Munakata, Mitsuru; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2014-09-01

    Several preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are efficient for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, two recent phase III clinical trials using COX-2 inhibitors in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy failed to demonstrate a survival benefit. Thus, validation and discussion regarding the usefulness of COX-2 inhibitors for patients with NSCLC are required. We conducted a prospective trial using COX-2 inhibitors for the treatment of 50 NSCLC patients accrued between April, 2005 and July, 2006. Patients with untreated advanced NSCLC received oral meloxicam (150 mg daily), carboplatin (area under the curve = 5 mg/ml × min on day 1) and docetaxel (60 mg/m(2) on day 1) every 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was response rate. The response and disease control rates were 36.0 and 76.0%, respectively. The time-to-progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 5.7 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.6-6.7] and 13.7 months (95% CI: 11.4-15.9), respectively. The 1-year survival ratio was 56.0%. Grade 3 neuropathy was observed in only 1 patient. We performed tumor immunohistochemistry for COX-2 and p27 and investigated the correlation between their expression and clinical outcome. COX-2 expression in the tumor tended to correlate with a higher response rate (50.0% in the high- and 18.2% in the low-COX-2 group; P=0.092). Based on our results and previous reports, various trial designs, such as the prospective use of COX-2 inhibitors only for patients with COX-2-positive NSCLC, including the exploratory analysis of biomarkers associated with the COX-2 pathway, may be worth further consideration.

  20. Summary of AHRQ's comparative effectiveness review of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers added to standard medical therapy for treating stable ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    White, C Michael; Greene, Laurence

    2011-06-01

    Standard therapies for the management of stable ischemic heart disease (IHD) partially reduce the risk of a future acute coronary syndrome. Among patients with chronic heart failure or previous myocardial infarction and left ventricular dysfunction, a large body of evidence supports the benefits of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs) and, in heart failure, combined therapy with these agents. In contrast, there is less certainty regarding outcomes of ACE inhibitors and ARBs for people with stable IHD who have preserved left ventricular function and no signs or symptoms of heart failure. To compile and synthesize findings derived from research on this specific population, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) commissioned and, in October 2009, published a systematic review and meta-analysis on the benefits and harms of ACE inhibitors and ARBs. To (a) familiarize health care professionals with AHRQ’s 2009 systematic review on ACE inhibitors and ARBs for people with stable IHD and preserved left ventricular function, (b) provide commentary and encourage consideration of the clinical and managed care applications of the review findings, and (c) identify limitations to the existing research on the benefits and harms of ACE inhibitors and ARBs. Six trials meeting eligibility criteria provided moderate to strong evidence that, compared with standard therapies alone, ACE inhibitors significantly lower the risks of total mortality, cardiovascular mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and other clinical outcomes. However, study participants on ACE inhibitors had higher incidences of withdrawals due to adverse events, including syncope, cough, and hyperkalemia. Only 1 trial (TRANSCEND) met eligibility criteria for comparing standard therapies alone versus an ARB (telmisartan). No significant differences were observed for individual clinical endpoints across groups in TRANSCEND, although

  1. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of isozymes I, II, IV, V, and IX with anions isosteric and isoelectronic with sulfate, nitrate, and carbonate.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Alessio; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2005-02-01

    The inhibition of five human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes; the cytosolic hCA I and II, the membrane-bound hCA IV, the mitochondrial hCA V, and the tumor-associated, transmembrane hCA IX, with anions isosteric and isoelectronic with sulfate, nitrate, and carbonate; such as chlorate, perchlorate, bromate, iodate, periodate, silicate, bismuthate, vanadate, molybdate, and wolframate is reported. Apparently, the geometry of the inhibitor (tetrahedral or trigonal) does not influence its binding to the Zn(II) ion of the enzyme active site, but the nature of the central element is the most important factor influencing potency. Isozymes hCA I and II are best inhibited by chlorate, perchlorate, and silicate, together with the anions structurally related to sulfate, sulfamate, and sulfamidate, but sulfate itself is a weak inhibitor (inhibition constant of 74 mM against hCA I and 183 mM against hCA II). Molybdate is a very weak hCA I inhibitor (K(I) of 914 mM) but it interacts with hCA II (K(I) of 27.5mM). Isozyme IV is well inhibited by sulfate (K(I) of 9 mM), sulfamate, and sulfamidate (in the low micromolar range), but not by perchlorate (K(I) of 767 mM). The mitochondrial isozyme V has the lowest affinity for sulfate (K(I) of 680 mM) and carbonate (K(I) of 95 mM) among all the investigated isozymes, suggesting on one hand its possible participation in metabolon(s) with sulfate anion exchanger(s), and on the other hand an evolutionary adaptation to working at higher pH values (around 8.5 in mitochondria) where rather high amounts of carbonate in equilibrium with bicarbonate may be present. Metasilicate, isosteric to carbonate, is also about a 10 times weaker inhibitor of this isozyme as compared to other CAs investigated here (K(I) of 28.2 mM). Surprisingly, the tumor-associated isozyme IX is resistant to sulfate inhibition (K(I) of 154 mM) but has affinity in the low micromolar range for carbonate, sulfamate, and sulfamidate (K(I) in the range of 8

  2. Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors Within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Eric D.; Hornung, Michael W.; Hedge, Joan M.; Judson, Richard S.; Crofton, Kevin M.; Houck, Keith A.; Simmons, Steven O.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening for potential thyroid-disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge on perturbed thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. Screening for MIEs specific to TH-disrupting pathways is limited in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ToxCast screening assay portfolio. To fill 1 critical screening gap, the Amplex UltraRed-thyroperoxidase (AUR-TPO) assay was developed to identify chemicals that inhibit TPO, as decreased TPO activity reduces TH synthesis. The ToxCast phase I and II chemical libraries, comprised of 1074 unique chemicals, were initially screened using a single, high concentration to identify potential TPO inhibitors. Chemicals positive in the single-concentration screen were retested in concentration-response. Due to high false-positive rates typically observed with loss-of-signal assays such as AUR-TPO, we also employed 2 additional assays in parallel to identify possible sources of nonspecific assay signal loss, enabling stratification of roughly 300 putative TPO inhibitors based upon selective AUR-TPO activity. A cell-free luciferase inhibition assay was used to identify nonspecific enzyme inhibition among the putative TPO inhibitors, and a cytotoxicity assay using a human cell line was used to estimate the cellular tolerance limit. Additionally, the TPO inhibition activities of 150 chemicals were compared between the AUR-TPO and an orthogonal peroxidase oxidation assay using guaiacol as a substrate to confirm the activity profiles of putative TPO inhibitors. This effort represents the most extensive TPO inhibition screening campaign to date and illustrates a tiered screening approach that focuses resources, maximizes assay throughput, and reduces animal use. PMID:26884060

  3. Purification of a specific inhibitor of pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase II from the marine annelide Hermodice carunculata. in vivo effects in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Isel; Gil-Parrado, Shirley; Cisneros, Miguel; Joseph-Bravo, Patricia; Díaz, Joaquín; Possani, Lourival D; Charli, Jean Louis; Chávez, María

    2004-01-01

    An inhibitor of the metallo-ectoenzyme, pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase II (PPII), a thyrotropin releasing hormone-specific peptidase, was identified by screening extracts from marine species of the Cuban coast-line belonging to the phylla Chordata, Echinodermata, Annelida, Mollusca, Cnidaria, Porifera, Chlorophyta and Magnoliophyta. Isolation of the inhibitor (HcPI), from the marine annelide Hermodice carunculata, was achieved by trichloroacetic acid treatment of the aqueous extract, followed by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE Sephacel, gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 and reverse phase-HPLC. HcPI had a small apparent molecular weight (below 1000 Da) and was not a peptide. It inhibited rat PPII (a membrane preparation with 8.5mg protein/ml) with an apparent K(i) of 51 nM. HcPI did not inhibit serine (trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase and dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV), cysteine (papain, bromelain and pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase I), aspartic (pepsin and recombinant human immunodeficiency virus 1 protease (HIV1-PR)) nor other metallo proteinases (collagenase, gelatinase, angiotensin converting enzyme, aminopeptidase N and carboxypeptidase A). HcPI was non-toxic and active in vivo. Intraperitoneal injection of HcPI reduced mouse pituitary and brain PPII activity. Potency of the effect was higher in hypophysis and hypothalamus than in other brain regions. Intrathecal administration to male rats reduced PPII activity in the spinal cord. In conclusion we have identified a specific inhibitor of PPII that is the first M1 family zinc metallo-peptidase inhibitor isolated from marine invertebrates. It may be useful for elucidating the in vivo role of PPII in the pituitary and central nervous system.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activities and carbonic anhydrase enzyme inhibitor effects of new arylsulfonylhydrazone and their Ni(II), Co(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ummühan Ozmen; Arslan, Fatma; Hamurcu, Fatma

    2010-01-01

    Ethane sulfonic acide hydrazide (esh: CH(3)CH(2)SO(2)NHNH(2)) derivatives as 5-methylsalicyl-aldehydeethanesulfonylhydrazone (5msalesh), 5-methyl-2-hydroxyacetophenoneethane sulfonylhydrazone (5mafesh) and their Ni(II), Co(II) complexes have been synthesized for the first time. The structure of these compounds has been investigated by elemental analysis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, LC/MS, UV-vis spectrophotometric method, magnetic susceptibility, thermal studies and conductivity measurements. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against Gram positive bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus magaterium and Gram negative bacteria; Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli by using the microdilution broth method. The biological activity screening showed that ligands have more activity than complexes against the tested bacteria. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) have been investigated by comparing IC(50) and K(i) values and it has been found that 5msalesh and its complexes have more enzyme inhibition efficiency than other compounds.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activities and carbonic anhydrase enzyme inhibitor effects of new arylsulfonylhydrazone and their Ni(II), Co(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Ümmühan Özmen; Arslan, Fatma; Hamurcu, Fatma

    2010-01-01

    Ethane sulfonic acide hydrazide ( esh: CH 3CH 2SO 2NHNH 2) derivatives as 5-methylsalicyl-aldehydeethanesulfonylhydrazone ( 5msalesh), 5-methyl-2-hydroxyacetophenoneethane sulfonylhydrazone ( 5mafesh) and their Ni(II), Co(II) complexes have been synthesized for the first time. The structure of these compounds has been investigated by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, LC/MS, UV-vis spectrophotometric method, magnetic susceptibility, thermal studies and conductivity measurements. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against Gram positive bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus magaterium and Gram negative bacteria; Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli by using the microdilution broth method. The biological activity screening showed that ligands have more activity than complexes against the tested bacteria. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) have been investigated by comparing IC 50 and Ki values and it has been found that 5msalesh and its complexes have more enzyme inhibition efficiency than other compounds.

  6. Targeting the Type II Secretion System: Development, Optimization, and Validation of a High-Throughput Screen for the Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Waack, Ursula; Johnson, Tanya L.; Chedid, Khalil; Xi, Chuanwu; Simmons, Lyle A.; Mobley, Harry L. T.; Sandkvist, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Nosocomial pathogens that develop multidrug resistance present an increasing problem for healthcare facilities. Due to its rapid rise in antibiotic resistance, Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most concerning gram-negative species. A. baumannii typically infects immune compromised individuals resulting in a variety of outcomes, including pneumonia and bacteremia. Using a murine model for bacteremia, we have previously shown that the type II secretion system (T2SS) contributes to in vivo fitness of A. baumannii. Here, we provide support for a role of the T2SS in protecting A. baumannii from human complement as deletion of the T2SS gene gspD resulted in a 100-fold reduction in surviving cells when incubated with human serum. This effect was abrogated in the absence of Factor B, a component of the alternative pathway of complement activation, indicating that the T2SS protects A. baumannii against the alternative complement pathway. Because inactivation of the T2SS results in loss of secretion of multiple enzymes, reduced in vivo fitness, and increased sensitivity to human complement, the T2SS may be a suitable target for therapeutic intervention. Accordingly, we developed and optimized a whole-cell high-throughput screening (HTS) assay based on secreted lipase activity to identify small molecule inhibitors of the T2SS. We tested the reproducibility of our assay using a 6,400-compound library. With small variation within controls and a dynamic range between positive and negative controls, the assay had a z-factor of 0.65, establishing its suitability for HTS. Our screen identified the lipase inhibitors Orlistat and Ebelactone B demonstrating the specificity of the assay. To eliminate inhibitors of lipase activity and lipase expression, two counter assays were developed and optimized. By implementing these assays, all seven tricyclic antidepressants present in the library were found to be inhibitors of the lipase, highlighting the potential of identifying

  7. Comparative effectiveness of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with type 2 diabetes and retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chia-Jen; Chen, Hung-Ta; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Li, Szu-Yuan; Lai, Pi-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Chen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2016-05-17

    Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy, but randomized trials and meta-analyses comparing their effects on macrovascular complications have yielded conflicting results. We compared the effectiveness of these drugs in patients with pre-existing diabetic retinopathy in a large population-based cohort. We conducted a propensity score-matched cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We included adult patients prescribed an ACE inhibitor or ARB within 90 days after diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy between 2000 and 2010. Primary outcomes were all-cause death and major adverse cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or cardiovascular death). Secondary outcomes were hospital admissions with acute kidney injury or hyperkalemia. We identified 11 246 patients receiving ACE inhibitors and 15 173 receiving ARBs, of whom 9769 patients in each group were matched successfully by propensity scores. In the intention-to-treat analyses, ARBs were similar to ACE inhibitors in risk of all-cause death (hazard ratio [HR] 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.01) and major adverse cardiovascular events (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.87-1.04), including myocardial infarction (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.88-1.20), ischemic stroke (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.85-1.04) and cardiovascular death (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.88-1.16). They also did not differ from ACE inhibitors in risk of hospital admission with acute kidney injury (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.91-1.13) and hospital admission with hyperkalemia (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.86-1.18). Results were similar in as-treated analyses. Our study showed that ACE inhibitors were similar to ARBs in risk of all-cause death, major adverse cardiovascular events and adverse effects among patients with pre-existing diabetic retinopathy. © 2016 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Cytotoxic Evaluation of Certain 7-Chloro-4-(piperazin-1-yl)quinoline Derivatives as VEGFR-II Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Enein, Mohamed Nabil; El-Azzouny, Aida M Abd El-Sattar; Ragab, Fatma Abdel-Fattah; Hamissa, Mohamed Farouk

    2017-03-17

    Signaling pathway inhibition of VEGFR-II is visualized as valuable tool in cancer management. In the current study, the synthesis of novel 1-4-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)-2-(N-substituted-amino)-ethanone derivatives (4a-t) was achieved through the amination of 2-chloro-1-(4-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)ethanone (3) with different secondary amines. The structures of the target compounds were confirmed by IR, (1) H-NMR, (13) C-NMR, HRMS, and microanalysis. Compounds 4a-t were subjected to in vitro anticancer screening against human breast cancer (MCF-7) and prostate cancer (PC3) cell lines. The highest cytotoxicty against both cell lines was displayed by 2-(4-(4-bromobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-(4-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)ethanone (4q), with IC50 values of 6.502 and 11.751 μM against MCF-7 and PC3 cells, respectively, compared with the standard drug doxorubicin (MCF-7: 6.774 μM, PC3: 7.7316 μM). Due to its notable activity toward MCF-7 cells, 4q was further evaluated as VEGFR-II inhibitor, showing an IC50 of 1.38 μM compared to sorafenib (0.33 μM). The docking study proved that 4q has a binding mode akin to that of VEGFR-II inhibitors.

  9. Parkinson's disease management. Part II- discovery of MAO-B inhibitors based on nitrogen heterocycles and analogues.

    PubMed

    Reis, Joana; Encarnação, Igor; Gaspar, Alexandra; Morales, Aliuska; Milhazes, Nuno; Borges, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by a progressive neurodegeneration of the dopaminergic neurons. The available pharmacological therapy for PD aims to stop the progress of symptoms, reduce disability, slowing the neurodegenerative process and/or preventing long-term complications along the therapy. The main strategic developments that have led to progress in the medical management of PD have focused on improvements in dopaminergic therapies. Despite all the recent research, there are only a few classes of drugs approved for the treatment of motor related symptoms of PD which primarily act on the dopaminergic neurons system: L-dopa, dopamine agonists, monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitors. Anticholinergic drugs and glutamate antagonists are also available but are not commonly used in routine practice. As no effective therapeutic strategy has yet been attended, other solutions must be investigated. Privileged structures, such as indoles, arylpiperazines, biphenyls and benzopyranes are currently ascribed as helpful approaches. Different families of nitrogen and oxygen heterocycles, such as pyrazoles, hydrazinylthiazoles, xanthones, coumarins or chromones have also been extensively used as scaffolds in medicinal chemistry programs for searching novel MAO-B inhibitors. Nitrogen derivatives play a key role in this subject with several studies pointing out hydrazines, thiazoles or indoles as important scaffolds for the development of novel MAO-B inhibitors. This review comprises an overview of the state of the art on the actual pharmacological therapy for PD followed by a specific focus on the discovery and development of nitrogen-based heterocyclic compounds analogues as promising MAO-B inhibitors.

  10. Perioperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers for preventing mortality and morbidity in adults.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zui; Yuan, Hong B; Yang, Bo; Xu, Fengying; Chen, Xiao Y; Liu, Guan J; Shi, Xue Y

    2016-01-27

    Perioperative hypertension requires careful management. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) have shown efficacy in treating hypertension associated with surgery. However, there is lack of consensus about whether they can prevent mortality and morbidity. To systematically assess the benefits and harms of administration of ACEIs or ARBs perioperatively for the prevention of mortality and morbidity in adults (aged 18 years and above) undergoing any type of surgery under general anaesthesia. We searched the current issue of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE (1966 to 8 December 2014), EMBASE (1980 to 8 December 2014), and references of the retrieved randomized trials, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing perioperative administration of ACEIs or ARBs with placebo in adults (aged 18 years and above) undergoing any type of surgery under general anaesthesia. We excluded studies in which participants underwent procedures that required local anaesthesia only, or participants who had already been on ACEIs or ARBs. Two review authors independently performed study selection, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted data. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included seven RCTs with a total of 571 participants in the review. Two of the seven trials involved 36 participants undergoing non-cardiac vascular surgery (infrarenal aortic surgery), and five involved 535 participants undergoing cardiac surgery, including valvular surgery, coronary artery bypass surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. The intervention was started from 11 days to 25 minutes before surgery in six trials and during surgery in one trial. We considered all seven RCTs to carry a high risk of bias. The effects of ACEIs or ARBs on perioperative mortality and acute myocardial infarction were uncertain

  11. [Hyperkalemia during prolonged use of angiotensin II-converting enzyme inhibitors in end-stage renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Mooser, V; Fellay, G; Regamey, C

    1992-12-12

    Hyperkalemia is a severe complication of end-stage renal failure. To evaluate whether ACE inhibitors may even worsen the propensity to develop hyperkalemia in this condition, we have analyzed retrospectively pre-dialytic blood pressure and serum potassium in 15 patients on chronic hemodialysis before and during long-term ACE inhibition. This treatment induced a significant drop in blood pressure (from 173 +/- 3/90 +/- 2 to 159 +/- 5/85 +/- 2 mm Hg [p < 0.05]), whereas serum potassium increased from 4.9 +/- 0.2 to 5.5 +/- 0.2 mM (p < 0.05), irrespective of the dosage of ACE inhibitor and of the residual diuresis. Hyperkalemia was well tolerated and was corrected in all patients by dialysis; treatment was discontinued in only one case. In conclusion, ACE inhibitors represent effective antihypertensive treatment in end-stage renal failure. However, long-term ACE inhibition may be accompanied by a worsening of hyperkalemia, which could be accounted for by a reduced effect of aldosterone on extrarenal potassium homeostasis.

  12. Sex differences in the enhanced responsiveness to acute angiotensin II in growth-restricted rats: role of fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Norma B.; Royals, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that Rho kinase contributes to the enhanced pressor response to acute angiotensin II in intact male growth-restricted and gonadectomized female growth-restricted rats. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal function were determined in conscious animals pretreated with enalapril (250 mg/l in drinking water) for 1 wk to block the endogenous renin-angiotensin system and normalize blood pressure (baseline). Blood pressure and renal hemodynamics did not differ at baseline. Acute Ang II (100 ng·kg−1·min−1) induced a greater increase in MAP and renal vascular resistance and enhanced reduction in glomerular filtration rate in intact male growth-restricted rats compared with intact male controls (P < 0.05). Cotreatment with the Rho kinase inhibitor fasudil (33 μg·kg−1·min−1) significantly attenuated these hemodynamic changes (P < 0.05), but it did not abolish the differential increase in blood pressure above baseline, suggesting that the impact of intrauterine growth restriction on blood pressure in intact male growth-restricted rats is independent of Rho kinase. Gonadectomy in conjunction with fasudil returned blood pressure back to baseline in male growth-restricted rats, and yet glomerular filtration rate remained significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Thus, these data suggest a role for enhanced renal sensitivity to acute Ang II in the developmental programming of hypertension in male growth-restricted rats. However, inhibition of Rho kinase had no effect on the basal or enhanced increase in blood pressure induced by acute Ang II in the gonadectomized female growth-restricted rat. Therefore, these studies suggest that Rho kinase inhibition exerts a sex-specific effect on blood pressure sensitivity to acute Ang II in growth-restricted rats. PMID:23344570

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues as potential inhibitors of the mycobacterial FAS-II dehydratase enzyme Rv0636.

    PubMed

    Bhowruth, Veemal; Brown, Alistair K; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2008-07-01

    The identification of potential new anti-tubercular chemotherapeutics is paramount due to the recent emergence of extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XDR-TB). Libraries of NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues were synthesized and evaluated for their whole-cell activity against Mycobacterium bovis BCG. NAS-21 analogues 1 and 2 demonstrated enhanced whole-cell activity in comparison to the parental compound, and an M. bovis BCG strain overexpressing the dehydratase enzyme Rv0636 was resistant to these analogues. NAS-91 analogues with ortho-modifications gave enhanced whole-cell activity. However, extension with biphenyl modifications compromised the whole-cell activities of both NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues. Interestingly, both libraries demonstrated in vitro activity against fatty acid synthase II (FAS-II) but not FAS-I in cell-free extracts. In in vitro assays of FAS-II inhibition, NAS-21 analogues 4 and 5 had IC(50) values of 28 and 19 mug ml(-1), respectively, for the control M. bovis strain, and the M. bovis BCG strain overexpressing Rv0636 showed a marked increase in resistance. In contrast, NAS-91 analogues demonstrated moderate in vitro activity, although increased resistance was again observed in FAS-II activity assays with the Rv0636-overexpressing strain. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and mycolic acid methyl ester (MAME) analysis of M. bovis BCG and the Rv0636-overexpressing strain revealed that the effect of the drug was relieved in the overexpressing strain, further implicating and potentially identifying Rv0636 as the target for these known FabZ dehydratase inhibitors. This study has identified candidates for further development as drug therapeutics against the mycobacterial FAS-II dehydratase enzyme.

  14. Platelet-derived miR-92a downregulates cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C in type II diabetic lower limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUNFENG; GUAN, QIANG; JIN, XING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of microRNA (miR)-92a on cystatin C expression in patients with type II diabetes and lower limb ischemia. A total of 199 patients diagnosed with type II diabetes were included in the study and divided into three experimental groups: Simple type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM; n=60) group; type II diabetes with light to moderate occlusion (LLI-LM; n=70) group; and the type II diabetes with severe occlusion (LLI-S; n=69) group according to the patient ankle-brachial index score. In addition, 60 healthy individuals were examined as a control population. The expression levels of various biochemical indices were detected, including cystatin C in the peripheral blood. The expression levels of miR-92a and cystatin C mRNA were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and the correlation between miR-92a, cystatin C and the pathological development of type II diabetic lower limb ischemia was analyzed. The protein expression levels of cystatin C were detected using western blot analysis. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that miR-92a was able to downregulate cystatin C expression, and this result was supported by endothelial cell transfection. In the transfection assay, an miR-92a mimic downregulated cystatin C expression, while an miR-92a inhibitor upregulated cystatin C expression. The results of the RT-qPCR indicated that the expression levels of miR-92a in the LLI-S group were reduced compared with those in the T2DM and LLI-LM groups, and significantly lower compared with those in the negative control group. Platelet-derived miR-92a appeared to downregulate cystatin C expression in patients with type II diabetes and lower limb ischemia. Therefore, the combined detection of miR-92a and cystatin C may be useful as a method for clinically screening patients with type II diabetes for lower limb ischemia. PMID:26136970

  15. A rational design strategy of the novel topoisomerase II inhibitors for the synthesis of the 4-O-(2-pyrazinecarboxylic)-4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin with antitumor activity by diminishing the relaxation reaction of topoisomerase II-DNA decatenation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Lu; Li, Hong-Mei; Wang, Duan-Ji; Li, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Tao; Yuan, Zhan-Peng; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2014-06-01

    A rational design strategy of the novel podophyllum topoisomerase II (Topo II) inhibitors for the synthesis of the esterification and amidation substituted 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (DMEP) derivates was developed in order to discover the potential antitumor prodrug. Firstly, according to the structure-activity relationship, drug combination principle and bioisosterism, the -COO- and the -NH- bond substituents at the 4 position of cycloparaffin would be a great modification direction to improve antitumor activity of 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (DMEP). Secondly, from the prodrug principle view, the esterification and amidation at the C-4 position of DMEP would be two useful structure modifications for improve solubility. Thirdly, from the activity pocket in Topo II-DNA cleavage complex point of view, a series of heterocyclic with pharmacological activity were chosen as module for improving antitumor activity by binding with Topo II. Finally, nine novel esterification and amidation DMEP derivates were designed and synthesized for the potential Topo II inhibitors with the superior biological activity. All the novel compounds exhibited promising in vitro antitumor activity, especially 4-O-(2-pyrazinecarboxylic)-4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (compound 1). The antitumor activity of compound 1 against tumor cell line HeLa (i.e., the IC50 value of 0.60 ± 0.20 μM), A549 (i.e., the IC50 value of 3.83 ± 0.08 μM), HepG2 (i.e., the IC50 value of 1.21 ± 0.05 μM), and BGC-823 (i.e., the IC50 value of 4.15 ± 1.13 μM) was significantly improved by 66, 16, 12, and 6 times than that of the clinically important podophyllum anticancer drug etoposide (i.e., the IC50 values of 15.32 ± 0.10, 59.38 ± 0.77, 67.25 ± 7.05, and 30.74 ± 5.13 μM), respectively. Compound 1 could arrest HeLa cell cycle G2/M and induce apoptosis by strongly diminishing the relaxation reaction of Topo II-DNA decatenation. The correctness of rational drug design was strictly demonstrated by the

  16. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of human cytosolic isoforms I and II with (reduced) Schiff's bases incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylate and carboxymethyl moieties.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Gihane; Cristian, Alina; Barboiu, Mihail; Vullo, Daniella; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-05-15

    A library of Schiff bases was synthesized by condensation of aromatic amines incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylic acid or carboxymethyl functionalities as Zn(2+)-binding groups, with aromatic aldehydes incorporating tert-butyl, hydroxy and/or methoxy groups. The corresponding amines were thereafter obtained by reduction of the imines. These compounds were assayed for the inhibition of two cytosolic human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoenzymes, hCA I and II. The Ki values of the Schiff bases were in the range of 7.0-21,400nM against hCA II and of 52-8600nM against hCA I, respectively. The corresponding amines showed Ki values in the range of 8.6nM-5.3μM against hCA II, and of 18.7-251nM against hCA I, respectively. Unlike the imines, the reduced Schiff bases are stable to hydrolysis and several low-nanomolar inhibitors were detected, most of them incorporating sulfonamide groups. Some carboxylates also showed interesting CA inhibitory properties. Such hydrosoluble derivatives may show pharmacologic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. SKI-II--a sphingosine kinase 1 inhibitor--exacerbates atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDL-R-/-) mice on high cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Potì, Francesco; Ceglarek, Uta; Burkhardt, Ralph; Simoni, Manuela; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2015-05-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysosphingolipid associated with high-density lipoproteins (HDL) that contributes to their anti-atherogenic potential. We investigated whether a reduction in S1P plasma levels affects atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDL-R-/-) mice. LDL-R-/- mice on Western diet containing low (0.25% w/w) or high (1.25% w/w) cholesterol were treated for 16 weeks with SKI-II, a sphingosine kinase 1 inhibitor that significantly reduced plasma S1P levels. SKI-II treatment increased atherosclerotic lesions in the thoracic aorta in mice on high but not low cholesterol diet. This compound did not affect body weight, blood cell counts and plasma total and HDL cholesterol, but decreased triglycerides. In addition, mice on high cholesterol diet receiving SKI-II showed elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and endothelial adhesion molecules (sICAM-1, sVCAM-1). Prolonged lowering of plasma S1P produces pro-atherogenic effects in LDL-R-/- mice that are evident under condition of pronounced hypercholesterolemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Design and synthesis of thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazolines as DYRK1A inhibitors, part II.

    PubMed

    Foucourt, Alicia; Hédou, Damien; Dubouilh-Benard, Carole; Girard, Angélique; Taverne, Thierry; Casagrande, Anne-Sophie; Désiré, Laurent; Leblond, Bertrand; Besson, Thierry

    2014-09-26

    The convenient synthesis of a focused library (forty molecules) of novel 6,6,5-tricyclic thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazolines was realized mainly under microwave irradiation. A novel 6-aminobenzo[d]thiazole-2,7-dicarbonitrile (1) was used as a versatile molecular platform for the synthesis of various derivatives. Kinase inhibition, of the obtained final compounds, was evaluated on a panel of two kinases (DYRK1A/1B) together with some known reference DYRK1A and DYRK1B inhibitors (harmine, TG003, NCGC-00189310 and leucettine L41). Compound IC50 values were obtained and compared. Five of the novel thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazoline derivatives prepared, EHT 5372 (8c), EHT 6840 (8h), EHT 1610 (8i), EHT 9851 (8k) and EHT 3356 (9b) displayed single-digit nanomolar or subnanomolar IC50 values and are among the most potent DYRK1A/1B inhibitors disclosed to date. DYRK1A/1B kinases are known to be involved in the regulation of various molecular pathways associated with oncology, neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer disease, AD, or other tauopathies), genetic diseases (such as Down Syndrome, DS), as well as diseases involved in abnormal pre-mRNA splicing. The compounds described in this communication constitute a highly potent set of novel molecular probes to evaluate the biology/pharmacology of DYR1A/1B in such diseases.

  19. Kinetics and molecular docking studies of cholinesterase inhibitors derived from water layer of Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. (II).

    PubMed

    Hung, Tran Manh; Lee, Joo Sang; Chuong, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Jeong Ah; Oh, Sang Ho; Woo, Mi Hee; Choi, Jae Sue; Min, Byung Sun

    2015-10-05

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors increase the availability of acetylcholine in central cholinergic synapses and are the most promising drugs currently available for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our screening study indicated that the water fraction of the methanolic extract of Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. significantly inhibited AChE in vitro. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of a new lignan glycoside, lycocernuaside A (12), and fourteen known compounds (1-11 and 13-15). Compound 7 exhibited the most potent AChE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.23 μM. Compound 15 had the most potent inhibitory activity against BChE and BACE1 with IC50 values of 0.62 and 2.16 μM, respectively. Compounds 4 and 7 showed mixed- and competitive-type AChE inhibition. Compound 7 noncompetitively inhibited BChE whereas 15 showed competitive and 8, 13, and 14 showed mixed-type inhibition. The docking results for complexes with AChE or BChE revealed that inhibitors 4, 7, and 15 stably positioned themselves in several pocket/catalytic domains of the AChE and BChE residues.

  20. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 551 Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2-Sulfonamide Derivatives: In Vitro Inhibition Studies With Carbonic Anhydrase Isozymes I, II and IV

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio; Ilies, Marc A.; Jitianu, Andrei

    1998-01-01

    Coordination compounds of 5-chloroacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide (Hcaz) with V(IV), Cr(lll), Fe(ll), Co(ll), Ni(ll) and Cu(ll) have been prepared and characterized by standard procedures (spectroscopic, magnetic, EPR, thermogravimetric and conductimetric measurements). Some of these compounds showed very good in vitro inhibitory properties against three physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA)isozymes, i.e., CA I, II, and IV. The differences between these isozymes in susceptibility to inhibition by these metal complexes is discussed in relationship to the characteristic features of their active sites, and is rationalized in terms useful for developing isozyme-specific CA inhibitors. PMID:18475829

  1. Ability of four potential topoisomerase II inhibitors to enhance the cytotoxicity of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) in Chinese hamster ovary cells and in an epipodophyllotoxin-resistant subline.

    PubMed

    Eder, J P; Teicher, B A; Holden, S A; Senator, L; Cathcart, K N; Schnipper, L E

    1990-01-01

    Four drugs known to interact with topoisomerase II were assessed for their ability to enhance the cytotoxicity of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines sensitive and resistant to VM-26. The combination treatments were analyzed by isobologram methodology. On 24 h exposure, there was no significant difference in the cytotoxicity of novobiocin or ciprofloxacin toward either cell line. The resistant cells were approximately 9-fold more resistant to 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA) and approximately 170-fold more resistant to etoposide after a 24-h exposure. The combination of novobiocin and cisplatin produced greater than additive cell kill over the entire dose range of cisplatin tested in both cell lines. m-AMSA and CDDP produced cell kill that fell within the envelope of additivity. Etoposide and CDDP resulted in cytotoxicity that was slightly greater than additive at low CDDP concentrations and additive at the highest concentration of CDDP tested in the parental cell line and was slightly greater than additive in the resistant cell line. Ciprofloxacin and CDDP, like novobiocin, resulted in greater than additive cell kill in both cell lines. The enhancement of CDDP cytotoxicity by novobiocin that was seen in exponentially growing cells was lost in stationary-phase cultures. In these studies, novobiocin and, to a lesser degree, ciprofloxacin produced greater than additive cell kill in combination with CDDP in parental and epipodophyllotoxin-resistant CHO cells.

  2. Safety and efficacy of abexinostat, a pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor, in non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia: results of a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Ribrag, Vincent; Kim, Won Seog; Bouabdallah, Reda; Lim, Soon Thye; Coiffier, Bertrand; Illes, Arpad; Lemieux, Bernard; Dyer, Martin J S; Offner, Fritz; Felloussi, Zakia; Kloos, Ioana; Luan, Ying; Vezan, Remus; Graef, Thorsten; Morschhauser, Franck

    2017-05-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors are members of a class of epigenetic drugs that have proven activity in T-cell malignancies, but little is known about their efficacy in B-cell lymphomas. Abexinostat is an orally available hydroxamate-containing histone deacetylase inhibitor that differs from approved inhibitors; its unique pharmacokinetic profile and oral dosing schedule, twice daily four hours apart, allows for continuous exposure at concentrations required to efficiently kill tumor cells. In this phase II study, patients with relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia received oral abexinostat at 80 mg BID for 14 days of a 21-day cycle and continued until progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity. A total of 100 patients with B-cell malignancies and T-cell lymphomas were enrolled between October 2011 and July 2014. All patients received at least one dose of study drug. Primary reasons for discontinuation included progressive disease (56%) and adverse events (25%). Grade 3 or over adverse events and any serious adverse events were reported in 88% and 73% of patients, respectively. The most frequently reported grade 3 or over treatment-emergent related adverse events were thrombocytopenia (80%), neutropenia (27%), and anemia (12%). Among the 87 patients evaluable for efficacy, overall response rate was 28% (complete response 5%), with highest responses observed in patients with follicular lymphoma (overall response rate 56%), T-cell lymphoma (overall response rate 40%), and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (overall response rate 31%). Further investigation of the safety and efficacy of abexinostat in follicular lymphoma, T-cell lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma implementing a less dose-intense week-on-week-off schedule is warranted. (Trial registered at: EudraCT-2009-013691-47). Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. Phase II Study of the AKT inhibitor MK-2206 plus Erlotinib in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer who Previously Progressed on Erlotinib

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Primo N.; Longmate, Jeff; Mack, Philip C.; Kelly, Karen; Socinski, Mark A.; Salgia, Ravi; Gitlitz, Barbara; Li, Tianhong; Koczywas, Mariana; Reckamp, Karen L.; Gandara, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical modeling in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) showed that stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), the ligand for MET, could reverse the cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of the epidermal-growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib in erlotinib-sensitive cell lines. Inhibitors of AKT signaling mitigated this HGF-mediated resistance, partially restoring erlotinib activity. We conducted a phase II trial of erlotinib plus MK2206, a highly selective inhibitor of AKT, in NSCLC patients. Experimental Design Eligible patients must have progressed following prior benefit from erlotinib, defined as response or stable disease > 12 weeks. Treatment consisted of erlotinib 150 mg po QD + MK-2206 45 mg po QOD on a 28 day cycle. Primary endpoints were RECIST response rate > 30% (stratum 1: EGFR mutant) and disease control rate (DCR) > 20% at 12 weeks (stratum 2: EGFR wild type). Results Eighty patients were enrolled, 45 and 35 in stratum 1 and 2, respectively. Most common attributable adverse events (all grade 3) were rash, diarrhea, fatigue, and mucositis. Response and DCR were respectively 9% and 40% in stratum 1; 3% and 47% in stratum 2. Median progression free survival was 4.4 months in stratum 1 and 4.6 months in stratum 2. Conclusions Combination MK2206 and erlotinib met its primary endpoint in erlotinib-pretreated patients with EGFR wild type NSCLC. While activity was seen in EGFR mutated NSCLC, this did not exceed a priori estimates. AKT pathway inhibition merits further clinical evaluation in EGFR wild type NSCLC. PMID:26106072

  4. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitor 2-PMPA reduces rewarding effects of the synthetic cathinone MDPV in rats: a role for N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG).

    PubMed

    Hicks, Callum; Gregg, Ryan A; Nayak, Sunil U; Cannella, Lee Anne; Schena, Giana J; Tallarida, Christopher S; Reitz, Allen B; Smith, Garry R; Rawls, Scott M

    2017-06-01

    Metabotropic glutamate 2 and 3 (mGluR2/3) receptors are implicated in drug addiction as they limit excessive glutamate release during relapse. N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is an endogenous mGluR2/3 agonist that is inactivated by the glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) enzyme. GCPII inhibitors, and NAAG itself, attenuate cocaine-seeking behaviors. However, their effects on the synthetic cathinone 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) have not been examined. We determined whether withdrawal following repeated MDPV administration alters GCPII expression in corticolimbic regions. We also examined whether a GCPII inhibitor (2-(phosphonomethyl)-pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA)), and NAAG, reduce the rewarding and locomotor-stimulant effects of MDPV in rats. GCPII was assessed following repeated MDPV exposure (7 days). The effects of 2-PMPA and NAAG on acute MDPV-induced hyperactivity were determined using a locomotor test. We also examined the inhibitory effects of 2-PMPA and NAAG on MDPV-induced place preference, and whether the mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 could prevent these effects. MDPV withdrawal reduced GCPII expression in the prefrontal cortex. Systemic injection of 2-PMPA (100 mg/kg) did not affect the hyperactivity produced by MDPV (0.5-3 mg/kg). However, nasal administration of NAAG did reduce MDPV-induced ambulation, but only at the highest dose (500 μg/10 μl). We also showed that 2-PMPA (10-30 mg/kg) and NAAG (10-500 μg/10 μl) dose-dependently attenuated MDPV place preference, and that the effect of NAAG was blocked by LY341495 (3 mg/kg). These findings demonstrate that MDPV withdrawal produces dysregulation in the endogenous NAAG-GCPII signaling pathway in corticolimbic circuitry. Systemic administration of the GCPII inhibitor 2-PMPA, or NAAG, attenuates MDPV reward.

  5. Utilization of Boron Compounds for the Modification of Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid as Inhibitor of Histone Deacetylase Class II Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Ridla; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Satriyanto, Cipta Prio; Kerami, Djati; Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) has a critical function in regulating gene expression. The inhibition of HDAC has developed as an interesting anticancer research area that targets biological processes such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell differentiation. In this study, an HDAC inhibitor that is available commercially, suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), has been modified to improve its efficacy and reduce the side effects of the compound. Hydrophobic cap and zinc-binding group of these compounds were substituted with boron-based compounds, whereas the linker region was substituted with p-aminobenzoic acid. The molecular docking analysis resulted in 8 ligands with ΔGbinding value more negative than the standards, SAHA and trichostatin A (TSA). That ligands were analyzed based on the nature of QSAR, pharmacological properties, and ADME-Tox. It is conducted to obtain a potent inhibitor of HDAC class II Homo sapiens. The screening process result gave one best ligand, Nova2 (513246-99-6), which was then further studied by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:25214833

  6. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  7. Impact of Angiotensin I-converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Type-1 Receptor Blockers on Survival of Patients with NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lili; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Ling; Wan, Huanying; Gao, Beili; Feng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type-1 receptor blockers (ARBs) can decrease tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis and inhibit metastasis. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are found in approximately 30% of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in East Asia and in 10–15% of such patients in Western countries. We retrospectively identified 228 patients with histologically confirmed advanced NSCLC and 73 patients with early stage disease; 103 of these patients took antihypertensive drugs, and 112 received treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There was a significant difference in progression-free survival after first-line therapy (PFS1) between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. For the patients treated with TKIs, there was a significant difference in PFS but not in overall survival (OS) between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. For the patients with advanced NSCLC, there was a significant difference in PFS1 between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. ACEI/ARB in combination with standard chemotherapy or TKIs had a positive effect on PFS1 or OS, regardless of whether the lung cancer was in the early or advanced stage. PMID:26883083

  8. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: guaiacol and catechol derivatives effectively inhibit certain human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA I, II, IX and XII).

    PubMed

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Passaponti, Maurizio; Supuran, Claudiu T; Gülçin, İlhami

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are widespread metalloenzymes in higher vertebrates including humans. A series of phenolic compounds, including guaiacol, 4-methylguaiacol, 4-propylguaiacol, eugenol, isoeugenol, vanillin, syringaldehyde, catechol, 3-methyl catechol, 4-methyl catechol and 3-methoxy catechol were investigated for their inhibition of all the catalytically active mammalian isozymes of the Zn(2+)-containing CA (EC 4.2.1.1). All the phenolic compounds effectively inhibited human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA I, II, IX and XII), with Kis in the range of 2.20-515.98 μM. The various isozymes showed diverse inhibition profiles. Among the tested phenolic derivatives, compounds 4-methyl catechol and 3-methoxy catechol showed potent activity as inhibitors of the tumour-associated transmembrane isoforms (hCA IX and XII) in the submicromolar range, with high selectivity. The results obtained from this research may lead to the design of more effective carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme inhibitors (CAIs) based on such phenolic compound scaffolds.

  9. Comparison of three development approaches for Stationary Phase Optimised Selectivity Liquid Chromatography based screening methods Part II: A group of structural analogues (PDE-5 inhibitors in food supplements).

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Ghijs, L; Kamugisha, A; Courselle, P

    2016-02-01

    Three approaches for the development of a screening method to detect adulterated dietary supplements, based on Stationary Phase Optimised Selectivity Liquid Chromatography were compared for their easiness/speed of development and the performance of the optimal method obtained. This comparison was performed for a heterogeneous group of molecules, i.e. slimming agents (Part I) and a group of structural analogues, i.e. PDE-5 inhibitors (Part II). The first approach makes use of primary runs at one isocratic level, the second of primary runs in gradient mode and the third of primary runs at three isocratic levels to calculate the optimal combination of segments of stationary phases. In each approach the selection of the stationary phase was followed by a gradient optimisation. For the PDE-5 inhibitors, the group of structural analogues, only the method obtained with the third approach was able to differentiate between all the molecules in the development set. Although not all molecules are baseline separated, the method allows the identification of the selected adulterants in dietary supplements using only diode array detection. Though, due to the mobile phases used, the method could also be coupled to mass spectrometry. The method was validated for its selectivity following the guidelines as described for the screening of pesticide residues and residues of veterinary medicines in food.

  10. A phase II trial of the Src-kinase inhibitor AZD0530 in patients with advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer: a California Cancer Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Lara, Primo N; Longmate, Jeff; Evans, Christopher P; Quinn, David I; Twardowski, Przemyslaw; Chatta, Gurkamal; Posadas, Edwin; Stadler, Walter; Gandara, David R

    2009-03-01

    Prostate cancer cells undergo neuroendocrine differentiation during androgen deprivation and secrete neuropeptides, hence activating androgen receptor-regulated genes. Src-family protein kinases are involved in neuropeptide-induced prostate cancer growth and migration. A phase II trial of AZD0530, an oral Src-family kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced castration resistant prostate cancer was conducted. The primary endpoint was prostate cancer-specific antigen (PSA) response rate, defined as a 30% or greater decrease. A two-stage Simon design was used. Eligibility criteria included documentation of castration resistance (including antiandrogen withdrawal), adequate end-organ function, and performance status, and not more than one prior taxane-based chemotherapy regimen. AZD0530 was given at 175 mg orally once daily continuously. Rapid accrual led to 28 patients registering in the first stage. Median age was 67 years. Sixteen patients had performance status (PS) 0, eight patients had PS 1, and four patients had PS 2. Nine patients (32%) had prior docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Five patients had transient PSA reductions not meeting PSA response criteria. Median progression-free survival time was 8 weeks. Treatment was generally well tolerated. AZD0530, a potent oral Src kinase inhibitor, is feasible and tolerable in this pretreated patient population but possessed little clinical efficacy as monotherapy. Strong preclinical evidence warrants further investigation of AZD0530 in earlier-stage prostate cancer or as combination therapy.

  11. Development and Application of a Cellular, Gain-of-Signal, Bioluminescent Reporter Screen for Inhibitors of Type II Secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Moir, Donald T.; Di, Ming; Wong, Erica; Moore, Richard A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Woods, Donald E.; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    The type II secretion (T2S) system in Gram-negative bacteria is comprised of the Sec and Tat pathways for translocating proteins into the periplasm and an outer membrane secretin for transporting proteins into the extracellular space. To discover Sec/Tat/T2S pathway inhibitors as potential new therapeutics, we used a Pseudomonas aeruginosa bioluminescent reporter strain responsive to SecA depletion and inhibition to screen compound libraries and characterize the hits. The reporter strain placed a luxCDABE operon under regulation of a SecA depletion-responsive up-regulated promoter in a secA deletion background complemented with an ectopic lac-regulated secA copy. Bioluminescence was indirectly proportional to the IPTG concentration and stimulated by azide, a known SecA ATPase inhibitor. A total of 96 compounds (0.1% of 73,000) were detected as primary hits due to stimulation of luminescence with a z-score ≥5. Direct secretion assays of the 9 most potent hits, representing 5 chemical scaffolds, revealed that they do not inhibit SecA-mediated secretion of β-lactamase into the periplasm, but do inhibit T2S-mediated extracellular secretion of elastase with IC50 values from 5 – 25 μM. In addition, 7 of the 9 compounds also inhibited the T2S-mediated extracellular secretion of phospholipases C by P. aeruginosa and of protease activity by Burkholderia pseudomallei. PMID:21602485

  12. Phosphorylation of the type II transmembrane serine protease, TMPRSS13, in hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 and -2-mediated cell-surface localization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew S; Varela, Fausto A; Hyland, Thomas E; Schoenbeck, Andrew J; White, Jordan M; Tanabe, Lauren M; Todi, Sokol V; List, Karin

    2017-09-08

    TMPRSS13 is a member of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family. Although various TTSPs have been characterized in detail biochemically and functionally, the basic properties of TMPRSS13 remain unclear. Here, we investigate the activation, inhibition, post-translational modification, and localization of TMPRSS13. We show that TMPRSS13 is a glycosylated, active protease and that its own proteolytic activity mediates zymogen cleavage. Full-length, active TMPRSS13 exhibits impaired cell-surface expression in the absence of the cognate Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 or HAI-2. Concomitant presence of TMPRSS13 with either HAI-1 or -2 mediates phosphorylation of residues in the intracellular domain of the protease, and it coincides with efficient transport of the protease to the cell surface and its subsequent shedding. Cell-surface labeling experiments indicate that the dominant form of TMPRSS13 on the cell surface is phosphorylated, whereas intracellular TMPRSS13 is predominantly non-phosphorylated. These data provide novel insight into the cellular properties of TMPRSS13 and highlight phosphorylation of TMPRSS13 as a novel post-translational modification of this TTSP family member and potentially other members of this family of proteases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Predicting cyclooxygenase inhibition by three-dimensional pharmacophoric profiling. Part II: Identification of enzyme inhibitors from Prasaplai, a Thai traditional medicine

    PubMed Central

    Waltenberger, Birgit; Schuster, Daniela; Paramapojn, Sompol; Gritsanapan, Wandee; Wolber, Gerhard; Rollinger, Judith M.; Stuppner, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Prasaplai is a medicinal plant mixture that is used in Thailand to treat primary dysmenorrhea, which is characterized by painful uterine contractility caused by a significant increase of prostaglandin release. Cyclooxygenase (COX) represents a key enzyme in the formation of prostaglandins. Former studies revealed that extracts of Prasaplai inhibit COX-1 and COX-2. In this study, a comprehensive literature survey for known constituents of Prasaplai was performed. A multiconformational 3D database was created comprising 683 molecules. Virtual parallel screening using six validated pharmacophore models for COX inhibitors was performed resulting in a hit list of 166 compounds. 46 Prasaplai components with already determined COX activity were used for the external validation of this set of COX pharmacophore models. 57% of these components were classified correctly by the pharmacophore models. These findings confirm that the virtual approach provides a helpful tool (i) to unravel which molecular compounds might be responsible for the COX-inhibitory activity of Prasaplai and (ii) for the fast identification of novel COX inhibitors. PMID:20851587

  14. Randomized phase II trial of cyclophosphamide and the oral poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor veliparib in patients with recurrent, advanced triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kummar, Shivaani; Wade, James L; Oza, Amit M; Sullivan, Daniel; Chen, Alice P; Gandara, David R; Ji, Jiuping; Kinders, Robert J; Wang, Lihua; Allen, Deborah; Coyne, Geraldine O'Sullivan; Steinberg, Seth M; Doroshow, James H

    2016-06-01

    Background In tumors carrying BRCA mutations, DNA damage caused by standard cytotoxic chemotherapy can be potentiated by poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, leading to increased cell death through synthetic lethality. Individuals carrying mutations in BRCA have an increased incidence of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). In order to assess the role of PARP inhibition in the treatment of TNBC, we conducted a randomized phase II trial of the combination of veliparib, a small molecule PARP inhibitor, with the cytotoxic agent cyclophosphamide versus cyclophosphamide alone in patients with refractory TNBC. Methods Adult patients with TNBC were randomized to receive oral cyclophosphamide 50 mg once daily with or without oral veliparib at 60 mg daily in 21-day cycles. Patients on the cyclophosphamide arm could crossover to the combination arm at disease progression. Results Forty-five patients were enrolled; 18 received cyclophosphamide alone and 21 received the combination as their initial treatment regimen. Lymphopenia was the most common grade 3/4 toxicity noted in both arms. One patient in the cyclophosphamide alone arm, and 2 in the combination arm had objective responses. Response rates and median progression free survival did not significantly differ between both treatment arms. Conclusion The addition of veliparib to cyclophosphamide, at the dose and schedule evaluated, did not improve the response rate over cyclophosphamide treatment alone in patients with heavily pre-treated triple-negative breast cancer.

  15. Effects of a myosin-II inhibitor (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide, BTS) on contractile characteristics of intact fast-twitch mammalian muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Pinniger, G J; Bruton, J D; Westerblad, H; Ranatunga, K W

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the effects of N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (BTS), a potent and specific inhibitor of fast muscle myosin-II, using small bundles of intact fibres or single fibres from rat foot muscle. BTS decreased tetanic tension reversibly in a concentration-dependent manner with half-maximal inhibition at approximately approximately 2 microM at 20 degrees C. The inhibition of tension with 10 microM BTS was marked at the three temperatures examined (10, 20 and 30 degrees C), but greatest at 10 degrees C. BTS decreased active muscle stiffness to a lesser extent than tetanic tension indicating that not all of the tension inhibition was due to a reduced number of attached cross-bridges. BTS-induced inhibition of active tension was not accompanied by any change in the free myoplasmic Ca2+ transients. The potency and specificity of BTS make it a very suitable myosin inhibitor for intact mammalian fast muscle and should be a useful tool for the examination of outstanding questions in muscle contraction.

  16. Characterization of nineteen antimony(III) complexes as potent inhibitors of photosystem II, carbonic anhydrase, and glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Mehmet Sayım; Rodionova, Margarita V; Tunç, Turgay; Venedik, Kübra Begüm; Mamaş, Serhat; Shitov, Alexandr V; Zharmukhamedov, Sergei K; Klimov, Vyacheslav V; Karacan, Nurcan; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2016-12-01

    Nineteen antimony(III) complexes were obtained and examined as possible herbicides. Six of these were synthesized for the first time, and their structures were identified using elemental analyses, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, FTIR, LCMS, magnetic susceptibility, and conductivity measurement techniques. For the nineteen examined antimony(III) complexes their most-stable forms were determined by DFT/B3LYP/LanL2DZ calculation method. These compounds were examined for effects on photosynthetic electron transfer and carbonic anhydrase activity of photosystem II, and glutathione reductase from chloroplast as well were investigated. Our results indicated that all antimony(III) complexes inhibited glutathione reductase activity of chloroplast. A number of these also exhibited good inhibitory efficiency of the photosynthetic and carbonic anhydrase activity of Photosystem II.

  17. Adverse effects of combination angiotensin II receptor blockers plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors for left ventricular dysfunction: a quantitative review of data from randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher O; Kashani, Amir; Ko, Dennis K; Francis, Gary; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2007-10-08

    We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to assess ongoing concerns about the safety profile of combination angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) plus angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction. MEDLINE (January 1966-December 2006) and Web sites for the National Institute of Health Clinical Trials and the Food and Drug Administration were searched for eligible RCTs that included 500 or more subjects, had a follow-up of 3 months or longer, and reported adverse effects. We used a random effects model to calculate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the following outcome measures: medication discontinuations because of adverse effects, worsening renal function (an increase in serum creatinine level of > 0.5 mg/dL [to convert to micromoles per liter, multiply by 88.4]), hyperkalemia (serum potassium level > 5.5 mEq/L [to convert to millimoles per liter, multiply by 1]), and symptomatic hypotension. Four studies (N = 17 337; mean follow-up, 25 months [range, 11-41 months]) were selected. Combination ARB plus ACE inhibitor vs control treatment that included ACE inhibitors was associated with significant increases in medication discontinuations because of adverse effects in patients with chronic heart failure (RR, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.22-1.55]) or in patients with acute myocardial infarction with symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (RR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.03-1.34]), and for both conditions there were significant increases in worsening renal function (RR, 2.17 [95% CI, 1.59-2.97] and RR, 1.61 [95% CI, 1.31-1.98], respectively), hyperkalemia (RR, 4.87 [95% CI, 2.39-9.94] and RR, 1.33 [95% CI, 0.90-1.98], respectively; the latter was not significant), and symptomatic hypotension (RR, 1.50 [95% CI, 1.09-2.07], and RR, 1.48 [95% CI, 1.33-3.18], respectively). Combination ARB plus ACE inhibitor therapy in subjects with symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction was accompanied by marked

  18. A phase I/II study of the pan Bcl-2 inhibitor obatoclax mesylate plus bortezomib for relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Goy, André; Hernandez-Ilzaliturri, Francisco J; Kahl, Brad; Ford, Peggy; Protomastro, Ewelina; Berger, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Obatoclax, a BH3 mimetic inhibitor of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, demonstrates synergy with bortezomib in preclinical models of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). This phase I/II study assessed obatoclax plus bortezomib in patients with relapsed/refractory MCL. Twenty-three patients received obatoclax 30 or 45 mg plus bortezomib 1.0 or 1.3 mg/m(2), administered intravenously on days 1, 4, 8 and 11 of a 21-day cycle. In phase I, the combination was feasible at all doses. Obatoclax 45 mg plus bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2) was selected for phase II study. Common adverse events were somnolence (87%), fatigue (61%) and euphoric mood (57%), all primarily grade 1/2. Grade 3/4 events included thrombocytopenia (21%), anemia (13%) and fatigue (13%). Objective responses occurred in 4/13 (31%) evaluable patients (three complete and one partial response). Six patients (46%) had stable disease lasting ≥ 8 weeks. Obatoclax plus bortezomib was feasible, but the synergy demonstrated in preclinical models was not confirmed.

  19. Induction of unique structural changes in guanine-rich DNA regions by the triazoloacridone C-1305, a topoisomerase II inhibitor with antitumor activities

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Krzysztof; Wojciechowski, Marcin; Laine, William; Bailly, Christian; Colson, Pierre; Baginski, Maciej; Larsen, Annette K.; Skladanowski, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported that the antitumor triazoloacridone, compound C-1305, is a topoisomerase II poison with unusual properties. In this study we characterize the DNA interactions of C-1305 in vitro, in comparison with other topoisomerase II inhibitors. Our results show that C-1305 binds to DNA by intercalation and possesses higher affinity for GC- than AT-DNA as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. Chemical probing with DEPC indicated that C-1305 induces structural perturbations in DNA regions with three adjacent guanine residues. Importantly, this effect was highly specific for C-1305 since none of the other 22 DNA interacting drugs tested was able to induce similar structural changes in DNA. Compound C-1305 induced stronger structural changes in guanine triplets at higher pH which suggested that protonation/deprotonation of the drug is important for this drug-specific effect. Molecular modeling analysis predicts that the zwitterionic form of C-1305 intercalates within the guanine triplet, resulting in widening of both DNA grooves and aligning of the triazole ring with the N7 atoms of guanines. Our results show that C-1305 binds to DNA and induces very specific and unusual structural changes in guanine triplets which likely plays an important role in the cytotoxic and antitumor activity of this unique compound. PMID:16254080

  20. Biological activities of Zn(II)-S-methyl-cysteine complex as antiradical, inhibitor of acid phosphatase enzyme and in vivo antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Graciela E; Martini, Nancy; Jori, Khalil; Jori, Nadir; Maresca, Nahuel R; Laino, Carlos H; Naso, Luciana G; Williams, Patricia A M; Ferrer, Evelina G

    2016-12-01

    The antidepressant effect of simple Zn(II) salts has been proved in several animal models of depression. In this study, a coordination metal complex of Zn(II) having a sulfur containing ligand is tested as antidepressant for the first time. Forced swimming test method on male Wistar rats shows a decrease in the immobility and an increase in the swimming behavior after treatment with [Zn(S-Met)2] (S-Met=S-methyl-l-cysteine) being more effective and remarkable than ZnCl2. The thiobarbituric acid and the pyranine consumption (hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals, respectively) methods were applied to evaluate the antioxidant activity of S-Met and [Zn(S-Met)2] showing evidence of attenuation of hydroxyl but not peroxyl radicals activities. UV-vis studies on the inhibition of acid phosphatase enzyme (AcP) demonstrated that S-methyl-l-cysteine did not produce any effect but, in contrast, [Zn(S-Met)2] complex behaved as a moderate inhibitor. Finally, bioavailability studies were performed by fluorescence spectroscopy denoting the ability of the albumin to transport the complex.

  1. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of DACA (XR5000): a novel inhibitor of topoisomerase I and II. CRC Phase I/II Committee.

    PubMed

    Twelves, C J; Gardner, C; Flavin, A; Sludden, J; Dennis, I; de Bono, J; Beale, P; Vasey, P; Hutchison, C; Macham, M A; Rodriguez, A; Judson, I; Bleehen, N M

    1999-08-01

    DACA, also known as XR5000, is an acridine derivative active against both topoisomerase I and II. In this phase I study, DACA was given as a 3-h intravenous infusion on 3 successive days, repeated every 3 weeks. A total of 41 patients were treated at 11 dose levels between 9 mg m(-2) d(-1) and the maximum tolerated dose of 800 mg m(-2) day(-1). The commonest, and dose-limiting, toxicity was pain in the infusion arm. One patient given DACA through a central venous catheter experienced chest pain with transient electrocardiogram changes, but no evidence of myocardial infarction. At the highest dose levels, several patients also experienced flushing, pain and paraesthesia around the mouth, eyes and nose and a feeling of agitation. Other side-effects, such as nausea and vomiting, myelosuppression, stomatitis and alopecia, were uncommon. There was one minor response but no objective responses. DACA pharmacokinetics were linear and did not differ between days 1 and 3. The pattern of toxicity seen with DACA is unusual and appears related to the mode of delivery. It is possible that higher doses of DACA could be administered using a different schedule of administration.

  2. Albumin-binding of diclofenac and the effect of a site II inhibitor in the aqueous humor of cataract patients with the instillation of diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Takashi; Ozaki, Mineo; Takamura, Norito; Ogata, Kenji; Tokunaga, Jin; Setoguchi, Nao; Arimori, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Diclofenac instillation has been used widely in cataract surgery to prevent postoperative inflammation. Since diclofenac binds strongly to albumin in the circulation, it does not have a sufficient effect on patients in whom diclofenac binds strongly to albumin in the aqueous humor. A decrease in diclofenac binding and an increase in free diclofenac levels are necessary in these patients. The binding of diclofenac to albumin was investigated in the aqueous humor. In a diclofenac binding assay with albumin in the aqueous humor of individual patients, diclofenac was extracted from aliquots of the aqueous humor, and its total levels were measured using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC). Free diclofenac levels were measured using ultrafiltration and UHPLC. The albumin-binding fraction of diclofenac was 0.8 or higher in the aqueous humor of some patients. Ibuprofen significantly inhibited diclofenac binding to site II of albumin in mimic aqueous humor, but not in pooled aqueous humor. This difference may have been due to the weak binding of diclofenac to site II in the pooled aqueous humor. Flurbiprofen was used instead of diclofenac. Flurbiprofen has been shown to bind more strongly than diclofenac to the same site of albumin. Thus, the inhibitory effect of ibuprofen on the binding of flurbiprofen to albumin was investigated in pooled aqueous humor. The results indicated that ibuprofen significantly inhibited the flurbiprofen binding. An effective diclofenac administration method may be established for clinical application by the instillation of an appropriate inhibitor of binding to the albumin site II. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Mechanism of Action of the Antibiotic NXL101, a Novel Nonfluoroquinolone Inhibitor of Bacterial Type II Topoisomerases ▿

    PubMed Central

    Black, Michael T.; Stachyra, Thérèse; Platel, Denis; Girard, Anne-Marie; Claudon, Monique; Bruneau, Jean-Michel; Miossec, Christine

    2008-01-01

    NXL101 is one of a new class of quinoline antibacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors showing potent activity against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. NXL101 inhibited topoisomerase IV more effectively than gyrase from Escherichia coli, whereas the converse is true of enzymes from Staphylococcus aureus. This apparent target preference is opposite to that which is associated with most fluoroquinolone antibiotics. In vitro isolation of S. aureus mutants resistant to NXL101 followed by cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding gyrase and topoisomerase IV led to the identification of several different point mutations within, or close to, the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of GyrA. However, the mutations were not those that are most frequently associated with decreased sensitivity to quinolones. A fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant variant of gyrase generated in vitro was highly resistant to inhibition by the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin but remained fully susceptible to inhibition by NXL101. Two mutant gyrases constructed in vitro, with mutations in gyrA engineered according to those most frequently found in S. aureus strains resistant to NXL101, were insensitive to inhibition by NXL101 and had a diminished sensitivity to ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Certain combinations of mutations giving rise to NXL101 resistance and those giving rise to fluoroquinolone resistance may be mutually exclusive. PMID:18625781

  4. Kinetics of successive seeding of monodisperse polystyrene latexes. I - Initiation via potassium persulfate. II - Azo initiators with and without inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudol, E. D.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Vanderhoff, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The polymerization kinetics of monodisperse polystyrene latexes with diameters of 1 micron are studied. The monodisperse latexes were prepared by the successive seeding method using 1 mM K2S2O8 with an 8 percent emulsifier surface coverage and 0.5 mM K2S2O8 with a 4 percent emulsifier surface coverage, and the kinetics were measured in a piston/cylinder dialometer. The data reveal that the polymerization rate decreases with increasing particle size; and the surface charge decreases with increasing particle size. The effects of initiators (AIBN and AMBN) and inhibitors (NH24SCN, NaNO2, and hydroquinone) on the product monodispersity and polymerization kinetics of latexes with diameters greater than 1 micron are investigated in a second experiment. It is observed that hydroquinone combined with AMBN are most effective in reducing nucleation without causing flocculation. It is noted that the kinetic transition from emulsion to bulk is complete for a particle size exceeding 1 micron in which the polymerization rate is independent of the particle size.

  5. Novel alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, CKD-711 and CKD-711a produced by Streptomyces sp. CK-4416. II. Biological properties.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-In; Son, Hyeog-Jin; Moon, Kyoung Sik; Kim, Joon Kyum; Kim, Jong-Gwan; Chun, Hyoung-Sik; Ahn, Soon Kil; Hong, Chung Il

    2002-05-01

    CKD-711 and CKD-711a are aminooligosaccharide alpha-glucosidase inhibitors discovered during the bioactive material screening for antibacterial agent. Their inhibitory activities were studied and compared with those of acarbose in vitro and in vivo with animals. In in vitro study, CKD-711 showed similar effects to acarbose on porcine intestinal maltase and sucrase, IC50s of 2.5 and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively, whereas it had about 2 fold lower alpha-amylase inhibitory activity (IC50, 78.0 microg/ml) than acarbose (IC50, 36 microg/ml). CKD-711a showed less inhibitory activity than CKD-711 against all the enzymes tested. In rat fed on starch and sucrose meals, the dose of CKD-711 which reduced the postprandial blood glucose increment by 50 percent in comparison to control rats (ED50) were 3.07 and 1.15 mg/kg, respectively, and acarbose had ED50s of 1.94 and 1.15 mg/kg, respectively. CKD-711 and CKD-711a also showed antibacterial activity against Comamonas terrigena.

  6. Kinetics of successive seeding of monodisperse polystyrene latexes. I - Initiation via potassium persulfate. II - Azo initiators with and without inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudol, E. D.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Vanderhoff, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The polymerization kinetics of monodisperse polystyrene latexes with diameters of 1 micron are studied. The monodisperse latexes were prepared by the successive seeding method using 1 mM K2S2O8 with an 8 percent emulsifier surface coverage and 0.5 mM K2S2O8 with a 4 percent emulsifier surface coverage, and the kinetics were measured in a piston/cylinder dialometer. The data reveal that the polymerization rate decreases with increasing particle size; and the surface charge decreases with increasing particle size. The effects of initiators (AIBN and AMBN) and inhibitors (NH24SCN, NaNO2, and hydroquinone) on the product monodispersity and polymerization kinetics of latexes with diameters greater than 1 micron are investigated in a second experiment. It is observed that hydroquinone combined with AMBN are most effective in reducing nucleation without causing flocculation. It is noted that the kinetic transition from emulsion to bulk is complete for a particle size exceeding 1 micron in which the polymerization rate is independent of the particle size.

  7. Mechanism of action of the antibiotic NXL101, a novel nonfluoroquinolone inhibitor of bacterial type II topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael T; Stachyra, Thérèse; Platel, Denis; Girard, Anne-Marie; Claudon, Monique; Bruneau, Jean-Michel; Miossec, Christine

    2008-09-01

    NXL101 is one of a new class of quinoline antibacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors showing potent activity against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. NXL101 inhibited topoisomerase IV more effectively than gyrase from Escherichia coli, whereas the converse is true of enzymes from Staphylococcus aureus. This apparent target preference is opposite to that which is associated with most fluoroquinolone antibiotics. In vitro isolation of S. aureus mutants resistant to NXL101 followed by cloning and sequencing of the genes encoding gyrase and topoisomerase IV led to the identification of several different point mutations within, or close to, the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of GyrA. However, the mutations were not those that are most frequently associated with decreased sensitivity to quinolones. A fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant variant of gyrase generated in vitro was highly resistant to inhibition by the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin but remained fully susceptible to inhibition by NXL101. Two mutant gyrases constructed in vitro, with mutations in gyrA engineered according to those most frequently found in S. aureus strains resistant to NXL101, were insensitive to inhibition by NXL101 and had a diminished sensitivity to ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Certain combinations of mutations giving rise to NXL101 resistance and those giving rise to fluoroquinolone resistance may be mutually exclusive.

  8. Phase II study of paclitaxel plus the protein kinase C inhibitor bryostatin-1 in advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Anthony P; Sparano, Joseph A; Vinciguerra, Vincent; Ocean, Allyson J; Christos, Paul; Hochster, Howard; Camacho, Fernando; Goel, Sanjay; Mani, Sridhar; Kaubisch, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    To determine the efficacy and toxicity of the protein kinase C inhibitor bryostatin-1 plus paclitaxel in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Each treatment cycle consisted of paclitaxel 90 mg/m by intravenous infusion over 1 hour on days 1, 8, and 16, plus bryostatin 25 mcg/m as a 1-hour intravenous infusion on days 2, 9, and 15, given every 28 days. Patients were evaluated for response after every 2 treatment cycles, and continued therapy until disease progression or prohibitive toxicity. The primary objective was to determine whether the combination produced a response rate of at least 30%. Nineteen patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma received a total of 52 cycles of therapy (range: 1-10). Patients received the combination as first-line therapy for advanced disease (N = 5) or after prior chemotherapy used alone or in combination with local therapy. No patients had a confirmed objective response. The median time to treatment failure was 1.9 months (95% confidence intervals: 1.2, 2.6 months). Reasons for discontinuing therapy included progressive disease or death in 14 patients (74%) or because of adverse events or patient choice in 5 patients (26%). The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities included leukopenia in 26%, anemia in 11%, myalgias in 11%, gastrointestinal bleeding in 11%, infection in 10%, and thrombosis in 10%. The combination of weekly paclitaxel and bryostatin-1 is not an effective therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  9. Phase II study of XR5000 (DACA), an inhibitor of topoisomerase I and II, administered as a 120-h infusion in patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Christian; Dieras, Veronique; Kerbrat, Pierre; Punt, Cornelis; Sorio, Roberto; Caponigro, Francesco; Paoletti, Xavier; de Balincourt, Christine; Lacombe, Denis; Fumoleau, Pierre

    2003-08-01

    XR5000 is a tricyclic carboxamide-based cytotoxic agent that binds to DNA by intercalation and stimulates DNA cleavage by inhibition of both topoisomerase I and II. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitumoral activity and safety profile of XR5000 given as second-line chemotherapy in patients with ovarian cancer who had relapsed within 1 year after first-line chemotherapy with taxanes and platinum for advanced disease. Patients received XR5000 at the dose of 3010 mg/m(2) through a 120-h central venous infusion every 3 weeks. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), version 2.0. An independent panel assessed response every two cycles according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Gehan's rule was used for sample size determination. Sixteen patients were enrolled; one patient was ineligible because of prior melphalan single agent treatment. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status was 0 (eight patients), 1 (five patients), or 2 (two patients). The 15 eligible patients received 43 cycles of XR5000 (median 2, range 1-8). Hematological toxicity was mild with only one grade 3 anemia in one patient. Other drug-related toxicities never exceeded grade 3 and included fatigue (four patients), thrombosis (one patient), nausea (one patient), stomatitis (one patient) as well as dyspnea/cough (one patient). One patient who had refused further therapy and controls after the first cycle was not assessable for response evaluation. No objective responses were observed. Four patients experienced stable disease and 10 patients progressive disease. The median time to progression was 42 days (CI 95% 40; 54). The complete lack of any objective response does not justify further evaluation of XR5000 in patients with advanced ovarian cancer using this dose and schedule, although the therapy was generally well tolerated.

  10. Phase II Study of Alisertib, a Selective Aurora A Kinase Inhibitor, in Relapsed and Refractory Aggressive B- and T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Mahadevan, Daruka; Cebula, Erin; Persky, Daniel; Lossos, Izidore; Agarwal, Amit B.; Jung, JungAh; Burack, Richard; Zhou, Xiaofei; Leonard, E. Jane; Fingert, Howard; Danaee, Hadi; Bernstein, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aurora A kinase (AAK) is overexpressed in aggressive lymphomas and can correlate with more histologically aggressive forms of disease. We therefore designed a phase II study of alisertib, a selective AAK inhibitor, in patients with relapsed and refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Patients and Methods Patients age ≥ 18 years were eligible if they had relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL), transformed follicular lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, or noncutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Alisertib was administered orally at 50 mg twice daily for 7 days in 21-day cycles. Results We enrolled 48 patients. Histologies included DLBCL (n = 21), MCL (n = 13), peripheral T-cell lymphoma (n = 8), transformed follicular lymphoma (n = 5), and Burkitt's (n = 1). Most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events were neutropenia (63%), leukopenia (54%), anemia (35%), thrombocytopenia (33%), stomatitis (15%), febrile neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (6%). Four deaths during the study were attributed to progressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2), treatment-related sepsis (n = 1), and unknown cause (n = 1). The overall response rate was 27%, including responses in three of 21 patients with DLBCL, three of 13 with MCL, one of one with Burkitt's lymphoma, two of five with transformed follicular lymphoma, and four of eight with noncutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The alisertib steady-state trough concentration (n = 25) revealed the expected pharmacokinetic variability, with a trend for higher incidence of adverse event–related dose reductions at higher trough concentrations. Analysis for AAK gene amplification and total AAK protein revealed no differences between histologies or correlation with clinical response. Conclusion The novel AAK inhibitor alisertib seems clinically active in both B- and T-cell aggressive lymphomas. On the basis of these results, confirmatory single-agent and combination studies have been initiated. PMID:24043741

  11. Clinical and In Vitro Resistance to GS-9669, a Thumb Site II Nonnucleoside Inhibitor of the Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Voitenleitner, Christian; Mabery, Eric; Skurnac, Taylor; Lawitz, Eric J.; McHutchison, John; Svarovskaia, Evguenia S.; Delaney, William; Miller, Michael D.; Mo, Hongmei

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with GS-9669, a novel nonnucleoside inhibitor (site II) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural 5B (NS5B) polymerase, resulted in significant antiviral activity in HCV genotype (GT) 1 patients dosed at 50 and 500 mg once daily (QD) and at 50, 100, and 500 mg twice daily (BID) for 3 days. This report characterizes the virologic resistance to GS-9669 in vitro and in GT1 HCV-infected patients from a phase I clinical study. An in vitro resistance selection study with GS-9669 revealed substitutions at several NS5B residues that conferred resistance. The M423 variants were selected at low drug concentrations (5× the 50% effective concentration [EC50]), and the L419, R422, and I482 variants were selected at higher drug concentrations (20× the EC50). During the phase I clinical study, substitutions at NS5B residues 419, 422, and 486 were the predominant changes associated with GS-9669 monotherapy. Substitutions at position 423 were observed only in GT1a patients in the low-dose groups (50 and 100 mg BID). Interestingly, four HCV patients had substitutions at position 423 at baseline. Consistent with the low resistance level at this position, three patients with M423I or M423V at baseline achieved >2-log10 reductions of HCV RNA when treated with 100 mg BID or with 500 mg QD or BID of GS-9669. The fourth patient, who had the M423V substitution at baseline, had a 4.4-log10 reduction of HCV RNA with 500 mg BID of GS-9669. Phenotypic analyses demonstrated that the viral isolates with multiple GS-9669 resistance-associated variants have reduced susceptibility to GS-9669 and lomibuvir (VX-222) but are not cross-resistant to other classes of HCV inhibitors. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01431898.) PMID:25155588

  12. The dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor linagliptin and the angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan show renal benefit by different pathways in rats with 5/6 nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Tsuprykov, Oleg; Ando, Ryotaro; Reichetzeder, Christoph; von Websky, Karoline; Antonenko, Viktoriia; Sharkovska, Yuliya; Chaykovska, Lyubov; Rahnenführer, Jan; Hasan, Ahmed A; Tammen, Harald; Alter, Markus; Klein, Thomas; Ueda, Seiji; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Okuda, Seiya; Hocher, Berthold

    2016-05-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors delay chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression in experimental diabetic nephropathy in a glucose-independent manner. Here we compared the effects of the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin versus telmisartan in preventing CKD progression in non-diabetic rats with 5/6 nephrectomy. Animals were allocated to 1 of 4 groups: sham operated plus placebo; 5/6 nephrectomy plus placebo; 5/6 nephrectomy plus linagliptin; and 5/6 nephrectomy plus telmisartan. Interstitial fibrosis was significantly decreased by 48% with linagliptin but a non-significant 24% with telmisartan versus placebo. The urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio was significantly decreased by 66% with linagliptin and 92% with telmisartan versus placebo. Blood pressure was significantly lowered by telmisartan, but it was not affected by linagliptin. As shown by mass spectrometry, the number of altered peptide signals for linagliptin in plasma was 552 and 320 in the kidney. For telmisartan, there were 108 peptide changes in plasma and 363 in the kidney versus placebo. Linagliptin up-regulated peptides derived from collagen type I, apolipoprotein C1, and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, a potential downstream target of atrial natriuretic peptide, whereas telmisartan up-regulated angiotensin II. A second study was conducted to confirm these findings in 5/6 nephrectomy wild-type and genetically deficient DPP-4 rats treated with linagliptin or placebo. Linagliptin therapy in wild-type rats was as effective as DPP-4 genetic deficiency in terms of albuminuria reduction. Thus, linagliptin showed comparable efficacy to telmisartan in preventing CKD progression in non-diabetic rats with 5/6 nephrectomy. However, the underlying pathways seem to be different. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Midostaurin, a Novel Protein Kinase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Insights from Human Absorption, Metabolism and Excretion Studies of a BDDCS II Drug.

    PubMed

    He, Handan; Tran, Phi; Gu, Helen; Tedesco, Vivienne; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Wen; Gatlik, Ewa; Klein, Kai; Heimbach, Tycho

    2017-03-07

    The absorption, metabolism and excretion of midostaurin, a potent class III tyrosine protein kinase inhibitor for acute myelogenous leukemia, were evaluated in healthy subjects. A microemulsion formulation was chosen to optimize absorption. After a 50 mg [14C]midostaurin dose, oral absorption was high (> 90%) and relatively rapid. In plasma, the major circulating components were midostaurin (22%), CGP52421 (32.7%), and CGP62221 (27.7%). Long plasma half-lives were observed for midostaurin (20.3 h), CGP52421 (495 h), and CGP62221 (33.4 h). Through careful mass-balance study design, the recovery achieved was good (81.6%), despite the long radioactivity half-lives. Most of the radioactive dose was recovered in feces (77.6%) mainly as metabolites; as only 3.43% was unchanged, suggesting mainly hepatic metabolism. Renal elimination was minor (4%). Midostaurin metabolism pathways involved hydroxylation, O demethylation, amide hydrolysis and N demethylation. High plasma CGP52421 and CGP62221 exposures in humans, along with relatively potent cell-based IC50 for FLT3-ITD inhibition, suggested that the antileukemic activity in AML patients may also be maintained by the metabolites. Very high plasma protein binding (>99%) required equilibrium gel filtration to identify differences between humans and animals. As midostaurin, CGP52421 and CGP62221 are metabolized mainly by CYP3A4 and are inhibitors/inducers for CYP3A, potential drug-drug interactions with mainly CYP3A4 modulators/CYP3A substrates could be expected. Given its low aqueous solubility, high oral absorption and extensive metabolism (> 90%), midostaurin is a BCS/BDDCS class II drug in human, consistent with rat BDDCS in vivo data showing high absorption (>90%) and extensive metabolism (>90%).

  14. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of DACA (XR5000): a novel inhibitor of topoisomerase I and II

    PubMed Central

    Twelves, C J; Gardner, C; Flavin, A; Sludden, J; Dennis, I; Bono, J de; Beale, P; Vasey, P; Hutchison, C; Macham, M A; Rodriguez, A; Judson, I; Bleehen, N M

    1999-01-01

    DACA, also known as XR5000, is an acridine derivative active against both topoisomerase I and II. In this phase I study, DACA was given as a 3-h intravenous infusion on 3 successive days, repeated every 3 weeks. A total of 41 patients were treated at 11 dose levels between 9 mg m−2 d−1 and the maximum tolerated dose of 800 mg m−2 day−1 . The commonest, and dose-limiting, toxicity was pain in the infusion arm. One patient given DACA through a central venous catheter experienced chest pain with transient electrocardiogram changes, but no evidence of myocardial infarction. At the highest dose levels, several patients also experienced flushing, pain and paraesthesia around the mouth, eyes and nose and a feeling of agitation. Other side-effects, such as nausea and vomiting, myelosuppression, stomatitis and alopecia, were uncommon. There was one minor response but no objective responses. DACA pharmacokinetics were linear and did not differ between days 1 and 3. The pattern of toxicity seen with DACA is unusual and appears related to the mode of delivery. It is possible that higher doses of DACA could be administered using a different schedule of administration. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10468297

  15. Synthesis and biological research of novel azaacridine derivatives as potent DNA-binding ligands and topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Yuan, Zigao; Chen, Shaopeng; Zhang, Cunlong; Song, Lu; Gao, Chunmei; Chen, Yuzong; Tan, Chunyan; Jiang, Yuyang

    2017-07-01

    DNA and DNA-related enzymes are one of the most effective and common used intracellular anticancer targets in clinic and laboratory studies, however, most of DNA-targeting drugs suffered from toxic side effects. Development of new molecules with good antitumor activity and low side effects is important. Based on computer aided design and our previous studies, a series of novel azaacridine derivatives were synthesized as DNA and topoisomerases binding agents, among which compound 9 displayed the best antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 0.57μM against U937 cells, which was slightly better than m-AMSA. In addition, compound 9 displayed low cytotoxicity against human normal liver cells (QSG-7701), the IC50 of which was more than 3 times lower than m-AMSA. Later study indicated that all the compounds displayed topoisomerases II inhibition activity at 50μM. The representative compound 9 could bind with DNA and induce U937 apoptosis through the exogenous pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The AKT inhibitor perifosine in biochemically recurrent prostate cancer: a phase II California/Pittsburgh cancer consortium trial.

    PubMed

    Chee, Karen G; Longmate, Jeff; Quinn, David I; Chatta, Gurkamal; Pinski, Jacek; Twardowski, Przemyslaw; Pan, Chong-Xian; Cambio, Angelo; Evans, Christopher P; Gandara, David R; Lara, Primo N

    2007-12-01

    Perifosine is an oral alkylphospholipid that inhibits cancer cell growth through decreased Akt phosphorylation. We conducted a phase II trial of perifosine in patients with biochemically recurrent, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Eligible patients had histologically confirmed prostate cancer, previous prostatectomy and/or radiation therapy, and rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) without radiographic evidence of metastasis. Previous androgen deprivation therapy < 9 months in duration (completed >or= 1 year before registration) was allowed. The primary endpoint was PSA response, defined as a decrease by >or= 50% from the pretreatment value. Treatment was composed of a loading dose of perifosine 900 mg orally on day 1, then 100 mg daily starting 24 hours later. Of 25 patients, 24 were evaluable for response. After a median follow-up of 8 months, 5 patients (20%) had a reduction in serum PSA levels, but none met criteria for PSA response. Three patients immediately progressed with no response to therapy. Median progression-free survival was 6.64 months (range, 4.53-12.81 months). No change in the PSA doubling time (7 months) was observed before and after treatment initiation. Dose-limiting toxicities (all grade 3) included hyponatremia, arthritis, hyperuricemia, and photophobia. Although well tolerated, perifosine did not meet prespecified PSA criteria for response as a single agent in biochemically recurrent prostate cancer. However, 20% of patients had evidence of PSA reduction, suggesting modest single-agent clinical activity. The role of perifosine in combination with androgen deprivation or chemotherapy is currently under investigation.

  17. Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II Inhibitors Disrupt AKAP79-dependent PKC Signaling to GluA1 AMPA Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Ian M.; Tavalin, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    GluA1 (formerly GluR1) AMPA receptor subunit phosphorylation at Ser-831 is an early biochemical marker for long-term potentiation and learning. This site is a substrate for Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and protein kinase C (PKC). By directing PKC to GluA1, A-kinase anchoring protein 79 (AKAP79) facilitates Ser-831 phosphorylation and makes PKC a more potent regulator of GluA1 than CaMKII. PKC and CaM bind to residues 31–52 of AKAP79 in a competitive manner. Here, we demonstrate that common CaMKII inhibitors alter PKC and CaM interactions with AKAP79(31–52). Most notably, the classical CaMKII inhibitors KN-93 and KN-62 potently enhanced the association of CaM to AKAP79(31–52) in the absence (apoCaM) but not the presence of Ca2+. In contrast, apoCaM association to AKAP79(31–52) was unaffected by the control compound KN-92 or a mechanistically distinct CaMKII inhibitor (CaMKIINtide). In vitro studies demonstrated that KN-62 and KN-93, but not the other compounds, led to apoCaM-dependent displacement of PKC from AKAP79(31–52). In the absence of CaMKII activation, complementary cellular studies revealed that KN-62 and KN-93, but not KN-92 or CaMKIINtide, inhibited PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GluA1 in hippocampal neurons as well as AKAP79-dependent PKC-mediated augmentation of recombinant GluA1 currents. Buffering cellular CaM attenuated the ability of KN-62 and KN-93 to inhibit AKAP79-anchored PKC regulation of GluA1. Therefore, by favoring apoCaM binding to AKAP79, KN-62 and KN-93 derail the ability of AKAP79 to efficiently recruit PKC for regulation of GluA1. Thus, AKAP79 endows PKC with a pharmacological profile that overlaps with CaMKII. PMID:21156788

  18. Synthesis, characterization, computational studies, antimicrobial activities and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor effects of 2-hydroxy acetophenone-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone and its Co(II), Pd(II), Pt(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özbek, Neslihan; Alyar, Saliha; Memmi, Burcu Koçak; Gündüzalp, Ayla Balaban; Bahçeci, Zafer; Alyar, Hamit

    2017-01-01

    2-Hydroxyacetophenone-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone (afptsmh) derived from p-toluenesulfonicacid-1-methylhydrazide (ptsmh) and its Co(II), Pd(II), Pt(II) complexes were synthesized for the first time. Synthesized compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, 1Hsbnd 13C NMR, LC-MS, UV-vis), magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurements. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for crystal structure of ligand were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The vibrational band assignments were performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) theory level combined with scaled quantum mechanics force field (SQMFF) methodology. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against some Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria by using microdilution and disc diffusion methods. In vitro enzyme inhibitory effects of the compounds were measured by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The enzyme activities against human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) were evaluated as IC50 (the half maximal inhibitory concentration) values. It was found that afptsmh and its metal complexes have inhibitory effects on hCA II isoenzyme. General esterase activities were determined using alpha and beta naphtyl acetate substrates (α- and β-NAs) of Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster). Activity results show that afptsmh does not strongly affect the bacteria strains and also shows poor inhibitory activity against hCAII isoenzyme whereas all complexes posses higher biological activities.

  19. The Myosin II Inhibitor, Blebbistatin, Ameliorates FeCl3-induced Arterial Thrombosis via the GSK3β-NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Long; Zhao, Yazheng; Han, Han; Hu, Yang; Liang, Di; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2017-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis and its related diseases are major healthcare problems worldwide. Blebbistatin is an inhibitor of myosin II, which plays an important role in thrombosis. The aim of our study is to explore the effect and potential mechanism of blebbistatin on arterial thrombosis. A ferric chloride (FeCl3) solution at a concentration of 5% was used to induce carotid artery thrombosis in mice. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the expression or activation of non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC IIA), tissue factor (TF), GSK3β and NF-κB. Blebbistatin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced carotid artery thrombosis induced by FeCl3 solution in mice, inhibited NMMHC IIA expression and impeded TF expression via the GSK3β-NF-κB signalling pathway in mouse arterial vascular tissues. The present study demonstrates that blebbistatin may impede TF expression partly via the Akt/GSK3β-NF-κB signalling pathways in the endothelium in a FeCl3 model, shedding new insights into the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis and providing new clues for the development of antithrombotic drugs. PMID:28539835

  20. The Myosin II Inhibitor, Blebbistatin, Ameliorates FeCl3-induced Arterial Thrombosis via the GSK3β-NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Long; Zhao, Yazheng; Han, Han; Hu, Yang; Liang, Di; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2017-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis and its related diseases are major healthcare problems worldwide. Blebbistatin is an inhibitor of myosin II, which plays an important role in thrombosis. The aim of our study is to explore the effect and potential mechanism of blebbistatin on arterial thrombosis. A ferric chloride (FeCl3) solution at a concentration of 5% was used to induce carotid artery thrombosis in mice. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the expression or activation of non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC IIA), tissue factor (TF), GSK3β and NF-κB. Blebbistatin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced carotid artery thrombosis induced by FeCl3 solution in mice, inhibited NMMHC IIA expression and impeded TF expression via the GSK3β-NF-κB signalling pathway in mouse arterial vascular tissues. The present study demonstrates that blebbistatin may impede TF expression partly via the Akt/GSK3β-NF-κB signalling pathways in the endothelium in a FeCl3 model, shedding new insights into the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis and providing new clues for the development of antithrombotic drugs.

  1. Genetic Resistance Determinants, In Vitro Time-Kill Curve Analysis and Pharmacodynamic Functions for the Novel Topoisomerase II Inhibitor ETX0914 (AZD0914) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Sunniva; Golparian, Daniel; Jacobsson, Susanne; Hathaway, Lucy J.; Low, Nicola; Shafer, William M.; Althaus, Christian L.; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae to all available therapeutic antimicrobials has emerged and new efficacious drugs for treatment of gonorrhea are essential. The topoisomerase II inhibitor ETX0914 (also known as AZD0914) is a new spiropyrimidinetrione antimicrobial that has different mechanisms of action from all previous and current gonorrhea treatment options. In this study, the N. gonorrhoeae resistance determinants for ETX0914 were further described and the effects of ETX0914 on the growth of N. gonorrhoeae (ETX0914 wild type, single step selected resistant mutants, and efflux pump mutants) were examined in a novel in vitro time-kill curve analysis to estimate pharmacodynamic parameters of the new antimicrobial. For comparison, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline were also examined (separately and in combination with ETX0914). ETX0914 was rapidly bactericidal for all wild type strains and had similar pharmacodynamic properties to ciprofloxacin. All selected resistant mutants contained mutations in amino acid codons D429 or K450 of GyrB and inactivation of the MtrCDE efflux pump fully restored the susceptibility to ETX0914. ETX0914 alone and in combination with azithromycin and ceftriaxone was highly effective against N. gonorrhoeae and synergistic interaction with ciprofloxacin, particularly for ETX0914-resistant mutants, was found. ETX0914, monotherapy or in combination with azithromycin (to cover additional sexually transmitted infections), should be considered for phase III clinical trials and future gonorrhea treatment. PMID:26696986

  2. Genetic Resistance Determinants, In Vitro Time-Kill Curve Analysis and Pharmacodynamic Functions for the Novel Topoisomerase II Inhibitor ETX0914 (AZD0914) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Sunniva; Golparian, Daniel; Jacobsson, Susanne; Hathaway, Lucy J; Low, Nicola; Shafer, William M; Althaus, Christian L; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae to all available therapeutic antimicrobials has emerged and new efficacious drugs for treatment of gonorrhea are essential. The topoisomerase II inhibitor ETX0914 (also known as AZD0914) is a new spiropyrimidinetrione antimicrobial that has different mechanisms of action from all previous and current gonorrhea treatment options. In this study, the N. gonorrhoeae resistance determinants for ETX0914 were further described and the effects of ETX0914 on the growth of N. gonorrhoeae (ETX0914 wild type, single step selected resistant mutants, and efflux pump mutants) were examined in a novel in vitro time-kill curve analysis to estimate pharmacodynamic parameters of the new antimicrobial. For comparison, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline were also examined (separately and in combination with ETX0914). ETX0914 was rapidly bactericidal for all wild type strains and had similar pharmacodynamic properties to ciprofloxacin. All selected resistant mutants contained mutations in amino acid codons D429 or K450 of GyrB and inactivation of the MtrCDE efflux pump fully restored the susceptibility to ETX0914. ETX0914 alone and in combination with azithromycin and ceftriaxone was highly effective against N. gonorrhoeae and synergistic interaction with ciprofloxacin, particularly for ETX0914-resistant mutants, was found. ETX0914, monotherapy or in combination with azithromycin (to cover additional sexually transmitted infections), should be considered for phase III clinical trials and future gonorrhea treatment.

  3. Phase II study of single-agent bosutinib, a Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer pretreated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Campone, M; Bondarenko, I; Brincat, S; Hotko, Y; Munster, P N; Chmielowska, E; Fumoleau, P; Ward, R; Bardy-Bouxin, N; Leip, E; Turnbull, K; Zacharchuk, C; Epstein, R J

    2012-03-01

    This phase II study evaluated single-agent bosutinib in pretreated patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Patients received oral bosutinib 400 mg/day. The primary end point was the progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 16 weeks. Secondary end points included objective response rate, clinical benefit rate, 2-year overall survival rate, safety, and changes in levels of bone resorption/formation biomarkers. Seventy-three patients were enrolled and treated. Median time from diagnosis of metastatic disease to initiation of bosutinib treatment was 24.5 months. For the intent-to-treat population, the PFS rate at 16 weeks was 39.6%. Unexpectedly, all responding patients (n = 4) were hormone receptor positive. The clinical benefit rate was 27.4%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 26.4%. The main toxic effects were diarrhea (66%), nausea (55%), and vomiting (47%). Grade 3-4 laboratory aminotransferase elevations occurred in 14 (19%) patients. Myelosuppression was minimal. No consistent changes in the levels of bone resorption/formation biomarkers were seen. Bosutinib showed promising efficacy in prolonging time to progression in chemotherapy-pretreated patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Bosutinib was generally well tolerated, with a safety profile different from that of the Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib in a similar patient population.

  4. Valproic Acid, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, in Combination with Paclitaxel for Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Phase II/III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Mariateresa; Gallo, Marco; Brignardello, Enrico; Milla, Paola; Orlandi, Fabio; Limone, Paolo Piero; Arvat, Emanuela; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe; Piovesan, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) has a median survival less than 5 months and, to date, no effective therapy exists. Taxanes have recently been stated as the main drug treatment for ATC, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid efficiently potentiates the effects of paclitaxel in vitro. Based on these data, this trial assessed the efficacy and safety of the combination of paclitaxel and valproic acid for the treatment of ATC. This was a randomized, controlled phase II/III trial, performed on 25 ATC patients across 5 centers in northwest Italy. The experimental arm received the combination of paclitaxel (80 mg/m2/weekly) and valproic acid (1,000 mg/day); the control arm received paclitaxel alone. Overall survival and disease progression, evaluated in terms of progression-free survival, were the primary outcomes. The secondary outcome was the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. The coadministration of valproic acid did not influence the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. Neither median survival nor median time to progression was statistically different in the two arms. Median survival of operated-on patients was significantly better than that of patients who were not operated on. The present trial demonstrates that the addition of valproic acid to paclitaxel has no effect on overall survival and disease progression of ATC patients. This trial is registered with EudraCT 2008-005221-11. PMID:27766105

  5. Use of Sandwich-Cultured Human Hepatocytes to Predict Biliary Clearance of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Koji; Bridges, Arlene S.; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that in vitro biliary clearance (Clbiliary) determined in sandwich-cultured hepatocytes correlates well with in vivo Clbiliary for limited sets of compounds. The purpose of this study was 1) to determine the in vitro Clbiliary in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes of angiotensin II receptor blockers and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that undergo limited metabolism and 2) to compare the predicted Clbiliary values with estimated in vivo hepatic clearance data in humans. The average biliary excretion index and in vitro intrinsic Clbiliary values of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and pitavastatin in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes were 35, 23, 31, 25, and 16%, respectively, and 0.943, 1.20, 0.484, 3.39, and 5.48 ml/min/kg, respectively. Clbiliary values predicted from sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes correlated with estimated in vivo hepatic clearance values based on published data (no in vivo data in humans was available for pitavastatin), and the rank order was also consistent. In conclusion, in vitro Clbiliary determined in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes can be used to predict in vivo Clbiliary of compounds in humans. PMID:19074974

  6. Comparative effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers for major renal outcomes in patients with diabetes: A 15-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hon-Yen; Peng, Chiao-Ling; Chen, Pei-Chun; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Chang, Chee-Jen; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Peng, Yu-Sen; Tu, Yu-Kang; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are considered to have similar renoprotective effects; so far there has been no consensus about their priorities. This study aimed to compare ACEIs and ARBs for major renal outcomes and survival in a 15-year cohort of adults with diabetes. This study utilized Taiwan's medical and pharmacy claims data in the Longitudinal Cohort of Diabetes Patients. The primary outcome was long-term dialysis, and secondary outcomes were hospitalization for acute kidney injury, hospitalization for hyperkalemia, all-cause death, cardiovascular death, and non-cardiovascular death. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for outcomes comparing ACEIs with ARBs. We conducted subgroup analyses and interaction tests among patients with different age and comorbid diseases. A total of 34,043 patients received ACEIs and 23,772 patients received ARBs. No differences were found for primary or secondary outcomes in the main analyses. ACEIs showed significantly lower hazard than ARBs for long-term dialysis among patients with cardiovascular disease (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.97, interaction P = 0.003) or chronic kidney disease (0.81, 0.71-0.93, interaction P = 0.001). Our analyses show similar effects of ACEIs and ARBs in patients with diabetes. However, ACEIs might provide additional renoprotective effects among patients who have cardiovascular disease or chronic kidney disease.

  7. Novel N-linked aminopiperidine inhibitors of bacterial topoisomerase type II with reduced pK(a): antibacterial agents with an improved safety profile.

    PubMed

    Reck, Folkert; Alm, Richard A; Brassil, Patrick; Newman, Joseph V; Ciaccio, Paul; McNulty, John; Barthlow, Herbert; Goteti, Kosalaram; Breen, John; Comita-Prevoir, Janelle; Cronin, Mark; Ehmann, David E; Geng, Bolin; Godfrey, Andrew Aydon; Fisher, Stewart L

    2012-08-09

    Novel non-fluoroquinolone inhibitors of bacterial type II topoisomerases (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV) are of interest for the development of new antibacterial agents that are not impacted by target-mediated cross-resistance with fluoroquinolones. N-Linked amino piperidines, such as 7a, generally show potent antibacterial activity, including against quinolone-resistant isolates, but suffer from hERG inhibition (IC(50) = 44 μM for 7a) and QT prolongation in vivo. We now disclose the finding that new analogues of 7a with reduced pK(a) due to substitution with an electron-withdrawing substituent in the piperidine moiety, such as R,S-7c, retained the Gram-positive activity of 7a but showed significantly less hERG inhibition (IC(50) = 233 μM for R,S-7c). This compound exhibited moderate clearance in dog, promising efficacy against a MRSA strain in a mouse infection model, and an improved in vivo QT profile as measured in a guinea pig in vivo model. As a result of its promising activity, R,S-7c was advanced into phase I clinical studies.

  8. Induction of heat-shock response and alterations of protein phosphorylation by a novel topoisomerase II inhibitor, withangulatin A, in 9L rat brain tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, W C; Lin, K Y; Chen, C M; Chen, Z T; Liu, H J; Lai, Y K

    1991-10-01

    Withangulatin A is a newly identified in vitro topoisomerase II inhibitor isolated from the Chinese antitumor herb Physalis angulata. In vivo, it was found to be cytotoxic, capable of suppressing general protein synthesis and of inducing the synthesis of a small set of proteins including those generated by heat-shock treatment. The 70 kDa protein generated by withangulatin A was unequivocally identified as the heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) since both proteins migrated to the same position on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels, could be recognized by a monoclonal antibody to human HSP70, and exhibited identical peptide maps. The induction of protein synthesis by withangulatin A was regulated at the transcriptional level since it was aborted in cells pre-treated with actinomycin D. However, the initiation of this process did not require de novo protein synthesis since it was not affected by cycloheximide. Other cellular effect of withangulatin A was alterations of protein phosphorylation including an enhancement of phosphorylation of a 65 kDa protein which was also detected in the heat-shocked cells. Moreover, this process was observed within 7.5 min after the initial heat treatment which is much faster than the onset of HSP synthesis. Therefore, increased phosphorylation of the 65 kDa protein may represent one of the earliest signals generated by both heat-shock and withangluatin A and may be involved in the upstream regulation of heat-shock response in cells.

  9. Novel N-linked aminopiperidine inhibitors of bacterial topoisomerase type II: broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with reduced hERG activity.

    PubMed

    Reck, Folkert; Alm, Richard; Brassil, Patrick; Newman, Joseph; Dejonge, Boudewijn; Eyermann, Charles J; Breault, Gloria; Breen, John; Comita-Prevoir, Janelle; Cronin, Mark; Davis, Hajnalka; Ehmann, David; Galullo, Vincent; Geng, Bolin; Grebe, Tyler; Morningstar, Marshall; Walker, Phil; Hayter, Barry; Fisher, Stewart

    2011-11-24

    Novel non-fluoroquinolone inhibitors of bacterial type II topoisomerases (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV) are of interest for the development of new antibacterial agents that are not impacted by target-mediated cross-resistance with fluoroquinolones. Aminopiperidines that have a bicyclic aromatic moiety linked through a carbon to an ethyl bridge, such as 1, generally show potent broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including quinolone-resistant isolates, but suffer from potent hERG inhibition (IC(50)= 3 μM for 1). We now disclose the finding that new analogues of 1 with an N-linked cyclic amide moiety attached to the ethyl bridge, such as 24m, retain the broad-spectrum antibacterial activity of 1 but show significantly less hERG inhibition (IC(50)= 31 μM for 24m) and higher free fraction than 1. One optimized analogue, compound 24l, showed moderate clearance in the dog and promising efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse thigh infection model.

  10. p21-activated kinase group II small compound inhibitor GNE-2861 perturbs estrogen receptor alpha signaling and restores tamoxifen-sensitivity in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhilun; Lorent, Julie; Zhao, Chunyan; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Strömblad, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in most breast cancers. Consequently, ERα modulators, such as tamoxifen, are successful in breast cancer treatment, although tamoxifen resistance is commonly observed. While tamoxifen resistance may be caused by altered ERα signaling, the molecular mechanisms regulating ERα signaling and tamoxifen resistance are not entirely clear. Here, we found that PAK4 expression was consistently correlated to poor patient outcome in endocrine treated and tamoxifen-only treated breast cancer patients. Importantly, while PAK4 overexpression promoted tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, pharmacological treatment with a group II PAK (PAK4, 5, 6) inhibitor, GNE-2861, sensitized tamoxifen resistant MCF-7/LCC2 breast cancer cells to tamoxifen. Mechanistically, we identified a regulatory positive feedback loop, where ERα bound to the PAK4 gene, thereby promoting PAK4 expression, while PAK4 in turn stabilized the ERα protein, activated ERα transcriptional activity and ERα target gene expression. Further, PAK4 phosphorylated ERα-Ser305, a phosphorylation event needed for the PAK4 activation of ERα-dependent transcription. In conclusion, PAK4 may be a suitable target for perturbing ERα signaling and tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients. PMID:26554417

  11. Intra-nucleus accumbens administration of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor AIP induced antinociception in rats with mononeuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hui; Yu, Long-Chuan

    2015-07-10

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a serine/threonine- dependent protein kinase, which has been implicated in pain modulation at different levels of the central nervous system. The present study was performed in rats with mononeuropathy induced by left common sciatic nerve ligation. Unilateral sciatic nerve loose ligation produced decreases in the hindpaw withdrawal latency (HWL) to noxious thermal and mechanical stimulation. Intra-nucleus accumbens (NAc) injection of 3 μg, 6 μg and 12 μg of myristoylated autocamtide-2-inhibitory peptide (AIP), the CaMKII inhibitor, dose-dependently increased the HWL to noxious thermal and mechanical stimulation in rats with mononeuropathy. Furthermore, intra-NAc administration of morphine, the HWL to noxious thermal and mechanical stimulation increased markedly, and there were no significant differences between morphine group and AIP group. Taken together, the results showed that intra-NAc injection of AIP induced significant antinociceptive effects in rats with mononeuropathy, indicating that CaMKII may play an important role in the transmission and/or modulation of nociceptive information in the NAc in rats with mononeuropathy.

  12. Re-evaluation of the side effects of cytochrome b6f inhibitor dibromothymoquinone on photosystem II excitation and electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Belatik, Ahmed; Joly, David; Hotchandani, Surat; Carpentier, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB) has been used as a specific inhibitor of plastoquinol oxidation at the Q0 binding site of the cytochrome b6f complex for 40 years. It is thought to suppress electron transfer between photosystem (PS) II and I, as well as cyclic electron transfer around PSI. However, DBMIB has also been reported to act as a quencher of chlorophyll excited states. In this study, we have re-evaluated the effects of DBMIB on chlorophyll excited states and PSII photochemistry. The results show that DBMIB significantly quenches the chlorophyll excited states of PSII antenna even at low concentration (from 0.1 μM), lowering the effective excitation rate of the actinic light. It also acts as a potent PSII electron acceptor retarding the reduction of the plastoquinone pool with almost maximal potency at 2 μM. Altogether, these results suggest that experiments using DBMIB can easily be misinterpreted and stress on the importance of taking into account all these side effects that occur in the same range of DBMIB concentration used for inhibition of plastoquinol oxidation (1 μM).

  13. Icariside II, a natural mTOR inhibitor, disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis via suppressing mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis in sarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Geng, Ya-di; An, Fa-liang; Xia, Yuan-zheng; Guo, Chao; Luo, Jian-guang; Zhang, Lu-yong; Guo, Qing-long; Kong, Ling-yi

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant energy homeostasis that characterized by high rate of energy production (glycolysis) and energy consumption (mRNA translation) is associated with the development of cancer. As mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of aberrant energy homeostasis, it is an attractive target for anti-tumor intervention. The flavonoid compound Icariside II (IS) is a natural mTOR inhibitor derived from Epimedium. Koreanum. Herein, we evaluate the effect of IS on aberrant energy homeostasis. The reduction of glycolysis and mRNA translation in U2OS (osteosarcoma), S180 (fibrosarcoma) and SW1535 (chondrosarcoma) cells observed in our study, indicate that, IS inhibits aberrant energy homeostasis. This inhibition is found to be due to suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) axis through blocking the assembly of mTORC1. Furthermore, IS inhibits the cap-dependent translation of c-myc through mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis which links the relationship between mRNA translation and glycolysis. Inhibition of aberrant energy homeostasis by IS, contributes to its in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferation activity. These data indicate that IS disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis of sarcoma cells through suppression of mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis, providing a novel mechanism of IS to inhibit cell proliferation in sarcoma cells. PMID:27056897

  14. The versatile binding mode of transition-state analogue inhibitors of tyrosinase towards dicopper(II) model complexes: experimental and theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Orio, Maylis; Bochot, Constance; Dubois, Carole; Gellon, Gisèle; Hardré, Renaud; Jamet, Hélène; Luneau, Dominique; Philouze, Christian; Réglier, Marius; Serratrice, Guy; Belle, Catherine

    2011-11-25

    We describe 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (HSPNO) as a new and efficient competitive inhibitor of mushroom tyrosinase (K(IC) =3.7 μM). Binding studies of HSPNO and 2-hydroxypyridine-N-oxide (HOPNO) on dinuclear copper(II) complexes [Cu(2)(BPMP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2) (1; HBPMP=2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenol) and [Cu(2)(BPEP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2)) (2; HBPEP=2,6-bis{bis[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]aminomethyl}-4-methylphenol), known to be functional models for the tyrosinase diphenolase activity, have been performed. A combination of structural data, spectroscopic studies, and DFT calculations evidenced the adaptable binding mode (bridging versus chelating) of HOPNO in relation to the geometry and chelate size of the dicopper center. For comparison, binding studies of HSPNO and kojic acid (5-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) on dinuclear complexes were performed. A theoretical approach has been developed and validated on HOPNO adducts to compare the binding mode on the model complexes. It has been applied for HSPNO and kojic acid. Although results for HSPNO were in line with those obtained with HOPNO, thus reflecting their chemical similarity, we showed that the bridging mode was the most preferential binding mode for kojic acid on both complexes.

  15. I. Development of Metal-Mediated SPOT-Synthesis Methods for the Efficient Construction of Small-Molecule Macroarrays. II. Design and Synthesis of Novel Bacterial Biofilm Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Reto

    I. The use of small molecule probes to explore biological phenomena has become a valuable tool in chemical biology. As a result, methods that permit the rapid synthesis and biological evaluation of such compounds are highly sought-after. The small molecule macroarray represents one such approach for the synthesis and identification of novel bioactive agents. Macroarrays are readily constructed via the SPOT-synthesis technique on planar cellulose membranes, yielding spatially addressed libraries of ˜10-1000 unique compounds. We sought to expand the arsenal of chemical reactions compatible with this solid-phase platform, and developed highly efficient SPOT-synthesis protocols for the Mizoroki-Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura, and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. We demonstrated that these metal-mediated reactions can be implemented, either individually or sequentially, for the efficient construction of small molecules in high purity on rapid time scales. Utilizing these powerful C-C and C-N bond forming coupling reactions, we constructed a series of macroarrays based on novel stilbene, phenyl-naphthalene, and triazole scaliblds. Subsequent biological testing of the stilbene and phenyl-naphthalene libraries revealed several potent antagonists and agonists, respectively, of the quorum sensing (QS) receptor LuxR in Vibrio fischeri. II. Bacteria living within biofilms are notorious for their resistance to known antibiotic agents, and constitute a major human health threat. Methods to attenuate biofilm growth would have a significant impact on the management of bacterial infections. Despite intense research efforts, small molecules capable of either inhibiting or dispersing biolilms remain scarce. We utilized natural products with purported anti-biofilm or QS inhibitory activity as sources of structural insight to guide the synthesis of novel biofilm modulators with improved activities. These studies revealed 2-aminobenzimidazole derivatives as highly potent

  16. 3D QSAR studies, pharmacophore modeling, and virtual screening of diarylpyrazole-benzenesulfonamide derivatives as a template to obtain new inhibitors, using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model protein.

    PubMed

    Entezari Heravi, Yeganeh; Sereshti, Hassan; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Ghasemi, Jahan; Amirmostofian, Marzieh; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-12-01

    A 3D-QSAR modeling was performed on a series of diarylpyrazole-benzenesulfonamide derivatives acting as inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The compounds were collected from two datasets with the same scaffold, and utilized as a template for a new pharmacophore model to screen the ZINC database of commercially available derivatives. The datasets were divided into training, test, and validation sets. As the first step, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), CoMFA region focusing and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) in parallel with docking studies were applied to a set of 41 human (h) CA II inhibitors. The validity and the prediction capacity of the resulting models were evaluated by leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation approach. The reliability of the model for the prediction of possibly new CA inhibitors was also tested.

  17. The putative P-gp inhibitor telmisartan does not affect the transcellular permeability and cellular uptake of the calcium channel antagonist verapamil in the P-glycoprotein expressing cell line MDCK II MDR1

    PubMed Central

    Saaby, Lasse; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Brodin, Birger

    2015-01-01

    Verapamil is used in high doses for the treatment of cluster headache. Verapamil has been described as a P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) substrate. We wished to evaluate in vitro whether co administration of a P-gp inhibitor with verapamil could be a feasible strategy for increasing CNS uptake of verapamil. Fluxes of radiolabelled verapamil across MDCK II MDR1 monolayers were measured in the absence and presence of the putative P-gp inhibitor telmisartan (a clinically approved drug compound). Verapamil displayed a vectorial basolateral-to-apical transepithelial efflux across the MDCK II MDR1 monolayers with a permeability of 5.7 × 10−5 cm sec−1 compared to an apical to basolateral permeability of 1.3 × 10−5 cm sec-1. The efflux could be inhibited with the P-gp inhibitor zosuquidar. Zosuquidar (0.4 μmol/L) reduced the efflux ratio (PB-A/PA-B) for verapamil 4.6–1.6. The presence of telmisartan, however, only caused a slight reduction in P-gp-mediated verapamil transport to an efflux ratio of 3.4. Overall, the results of the present in vitro approach indicate, that clinical use of telmisartan as a P-gp inhibitor may not be an effective strategy for increasing brain uptake of verapamil by co-administration with telmisartan. PMID:26171231

  18. Microwave-assisted synthesis of ruthenium(II) complexes with alkynes as potential inhibitor by selectively recognizing c-myc G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuangyan; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Qi; Wang, Xicheng; Mei, Wenjie; Wu, Xiaohui; Zheng, Wenjie

    2017-11-01

    Herein, two polypyridyl ruthenium(II) complexes with alkynes, [Ru(bpy)2L](ClO4)2 (L=p-TEPIP (1) and p-BEPIP (2); bpy=2,2'-bipyridine; p-TEPIP=2-(4-trimethylsilylpropargyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5f][1,10]phenanthroline; p-BEPIP=2-(4-phenyacetylenephenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5f][1,10]phenanthroline) have been successfully achieved in yields of 32%-89% by a Sonogashira coupling reaction under microwave irradiation. We studied these complexes as potential stabilizers of c-myc G-quadruplex DNA. Observations revealed that both complexes could selectively bind to and stabilize c-myc G-quadruplex DNA with a constant of approximately 1.61±0.78 and 9.47±4.20×10(3)M(-1), respectively, as determined from ITC (isothermal ttitration calorimetry) experiments, FRET (fluorescence resonance energy ttransfer) assay and competitive FRET assay. Moreover, the melting point (Tm) of the c-myc G-quadruplex DNA increased in the presence of 1 and 2 ([Ru]=0.2μM) by approximately 9 and 19.9°C, respectively. It is noteworthy that the conformation of the c-myc G-quadruplex DNA appeared to change when titrated with 1 and 2, which was accompanied by a negative-induced CD (circular dichroism) signal that appeared at a wavelength of 295nm. Furthermore, the conformational change in c-myc G-quadruplex DNA induced by 1 and 2have also been confirmed by TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and AFM (atomic force microscopy). Consequently, the replication of c-myc DNA was blocked by 1 and 2, and especially by 2, as verified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) -stop assay and Western-blot assay. Thus, these ruthenium(II) complexes can be developed as potential inhibitors in chemotherapy through their binding and stabilization of c-myc G-quadruplex DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91).

  20. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91). PMID:26938528

  1. Development and use of a high-throughput bacterial DNA gyrase assay to identify mammalian topoisomerase II inhibitors with whole-cell anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Roychoudhury, Siddhartha; Makin, Kelly M; Twinem, Tracy L; Stanton, David T; Nelson, Sandra L; Catrenich, Carl E

    2003-04-01

    A high-throughput screen (HTS) was developed and used to identify inhibitors of bacterial DNA gyrase. Among the validated hits were 53 compounds that also inhibited mammalian topoisomerase II with IC(50) values of <12.5 micro g/mL for 51 of them. Using computational methods, these compounds were subjected to cluster analysis to categorize them according to their chemical and structural properties. Nine compounds from different clusters were tested for their whole-cell inhibitory activity against 3 cancer cell lines-NCI-H460 (lung), MCF7 (breast), and SF-268 (CNS)-at a concentration of 100 micro M. Five compounds inhibited cell growth by >50% for all 3 cell lines tested. These compounds were tested further against a panel of 53 to 57 cell lines representing leukemia, melanoma, colon, CNS, ovarian, renal, prostate, breast, and non-small cell lung cancers. In this assay, PGE-7143417 was found to be the most potent compound, which inhibited the growth of all the cell lines by 50% at a concentration range of 0.31 to 2.58 micro M, with an average of 1.21 micro M. An additional 17 compounds were also tested separately against a panel of 10 cell lines representing melanoma, colon, lung, mammary, ovarian, prostate, and renal cancers. In this assay, 4 compounds-PGE-3782569, PGE-7411516, PGE-2908955, and PGE-3521917-were found to have activity with concentrations for 50% cell growth inhibition in the 0.59 to 3.33, 22.5 to 59.1, 7.1 to >100, and 24.7 to >100 micro M range.

  2. Primary analysis of a phase II open-label trial of INCB039110, a selective JAK1 inhibitor, in patients with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, John O; Talpaz, Moshe; Gupta, Vikas; Foltz, Lynda M; Savona, Michael R; Paquette, Ronald; Turner, A Robert; Coughlin, Paul; Winton, Elliott; Burn, Timothy C; O'Neill, Peter; Clark, Jason; Hunter, Deborah; Assad, Albert; Hoffman, Ronald; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2017-02-01

    Combined Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK2 inhibition therapy effectively reduces splenomegaly and symptom burden related to myelofibrosis but is associated with dose-dependent anemia and thrombocytopenia. In this open-label phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of three dose levels of INCB039110, a potent and selective oral JAK1 inhibitor, in patients with intermediate- or high-risk myelofibrosis and a platelet count ≥50×10(9)/L. Of 10, 45, and 32 patients enrolled in the 100 mg twice-daily, 200 mg twice-daily, and 600 mg once-daily cohorts, respectively, 50.0%, 64.4%, and 68.8% completed week 24. A ≥50% reduction in total symptom score was achieved by 35.7% and 28.6% of patients in the 200 mg twice-daily cohort and 32.3% and 35.5% in the 600 mg once-daily cohort at week 12 (primary end point) and 24, respectively. By contrast, two patients (20%) in the 100 mg twice-daily cohort had ≥50% total symptom score reduction at weeks 12 and 24. For the 200 mg twice-daily and 600 mg once-daily cohorts, the median spleen volume reductions at week 12 were 14.2% and 17.4%, respectively. Furthermore, 21/39 (53.8%) patients who required red blood cell transfusions during the 12 weeks preceding treatment initiation achieved a ≥50% reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused during study weeks 1-24. Only one patient discontinued for grade 3 thrombocytopenia. Non-hematologic adverse events were largely grade 1 or 2; the most common was fatigue. Treatment with INCB039110 resulted in clinically meaningful symptom relief, modest spleen volume reduction, and limited myelosuppression.

  3. The inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II KN93 attenuates bone cancer pain via inhibition of KIF17/NR2B trafficking in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Liang, Ying; Hou, Bailing; Liu, Ming; Yang, Xuli; Liu, Chenglong; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-09-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) containing subunit 2B (NR2B) is critical for the regulation of nociception in bone cancer pain, although the precise molecular mechanisms remain unclear. KIF17, a kinesin motor, plays a key role in the dendritic transport of NR2B. The up-regulation of NR2B and KIF17 transcription results from an increase in phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), which is activated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In this study, we hypothesized that CaMKII-mediated KIF17/NR2B trafficking may contribute to bone cancer pain. Osteosarcoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right femurs of C3H/HeJ mice to induce progressive bone cancer-related pain behaviors. The expression of spinal t-CaMKII, p-CaMKII, NR2B and KIF17 after inoculation was also evaluated. These results showed that inoculation of osteosarcoma cells induced progressive bone cancer pain and resulted in a significant up-regulation of p-CaMKII, NR2B and KIF17 expression after inoculation. Intrathecal administration of KN93, a CaMKII inhibitor, down-regulated these three proteins and attenuated bone cancer pain in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These findings indicated that CaMKII-mediated KIF17/NR2B trafficking may contribute to bone cancer pain, and inhibition of CaMKII may be a useful alternative or adjunct therapy for relieving cancer pain.

  4. Discovery and characterization of a novel potent type II native and mutant BCR-ABL inhibitor (CHMFL-074) for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Yun; Liu, Xiaochuan; Wang, Aoli; Hu, Chen; Wang, Wenchao; Wang, Huiping; Wu, Fan; Ruan, Yanjie; Qi, Shuang; Liu, Juan; Zou, Fengming; Hu, Zhenquan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shanchun; Yun, Cai-Hong; Zhai, Zhimin; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    BCR gene fused ABL kinase is the critical driving force for the Philadelphia Chromosome positive (Ph+) Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and has been extensively explored as a drug target. With a structure-based drug design approach we have discovered a novel inhibitor CHMFL-074, that potently inhibits both the native and a variety of clinically emerged mutants of BCR-ABL kinase. The X-ray crystal structure of CHMFL-074 in complex with ABL1 kinase (PDB ID: 5HU9) revealed a typical type II binding mode (DFG-out) but relatively rare hinge binding. Kinome wide selectivity profiling demonstrated that CHMFL-074 bore a high selectivity (S score(1) = 0.03) and potently inhibited ABL1 kinase (IC50: 24 nM) and PDGFR α/β (IC50: 71 nM and 88 nM). CHMFL-074 displayed strong anti-proliferative efficacy against BCR-ABL–driven CML cell lines such as K562 (GI50: 56 nM), MEG-01 (GI50: 18 nM) and KU812 (GI50: 57 nM). CHMFL-074 arrested cell cycle into the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis in the Ph+ CML cell lines. In addition, it potently inhibited the CML patient primary cell's proliferation but did not affect the normal bone marrow cells. In the CML cell K562 inoculated xenograft mouse model, oral administration of 100 mg/kg/d of CHMFL-074 achieved a tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of 65% without exhibiting apparent toxicity. As a potential drug candidate for fighting CML, CHMFL-074 is under extensive preclinical safety evaluation now. PMID:27322145

  5. VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) induced vascular insufficiency in zebrafish as a model for studying vascular toxicity and vascular preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shang; Dang, Yuan Ye; Oi Lam Che, Ginny; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Chan, Shun Wan; Leung, George Pak Heng; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen; Hoi, Maggie Pui Man

    2014-11-01

    In ischemic disorders such as chronic wounds and myocardial ischemia, there is inadequate tissue perfusion due to vascular insufficiency. Besides, it has been observed that prolonged use of anti-angiogenic agents in cancer therapy produces cardiovascular toxicity caused by impaired vessel integrity and regeneration. In the present study, we used VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) to chemically induce vascular insufficiency in zebrafish in vivo and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro to further study the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis in these pathological conditions. We also explored the possibility of treating vascular insufficiency by enhancing vascular regeneration and repair with pharmacological intervention. We observed that pretreatment of VRI induced blood vessel loss in developing zebrafish by inhibiting angiogenesis and increasing endothelial cell apoptosis, accompanied by down-regulation of kdr, kdrl and flt-1 genes expression. The VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish could be restored by post-treatment of calycosin, a cardiovascular protective isoflavone. Similarly, VRI induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HUVEC which could be rescued by calycosin post-treatment. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms showed that the PI3K/AKT/Bad cell survival pathway was a main contributor of the vascular regenerative effect of calycosin. These findings indicated that the cardiovascular toxicity in anti-angiogenic therapy was mainly caused by insufficient endothelial cell survival, suggesting its essential role in vascular integrity, repair and regeneration. In addition, we showed that VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish represented a simple and effective in vivo model for studying vascular insufficiency and evaluating cancer drug vascular toxicities. - Highlights: • In vivo VRI model • Rescue effects of calycosin • Calycosin EC survival pathways.

  6. Comparative Effectiveness of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers in Terms of Major Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shu-Chen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chao, Pei-Wen; Li, Szu-Yuan; Lee, Yi-Jung; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Chu, Hsi; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Renin and aldosterone activity levels are low in elderly patients, raising concerns about the benefits and risks of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) use. However, data from direct comparisons of the effects of ACEIs on ARBs in the elderly population remain inconclusive. In this nationwide study, all patients aged ≥ 70 years were retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database for the period 2000 to 2009 and were followed up until the end of 2010. The ARB cohort (12,347 patients who continuously used ARBs for ≥ 90 days) was matched to ACEI cohort using high-dimensional propensity score (hdPS). Intention-to-treat (ITT) and as-treated (AT) analyses were conducted. In the ITT analysis, after considering death as a competing risk, the ACEI cohort had similar risks of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio [HR] 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79–1.06), ischemic stroke (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.90–1.07), and heart failure (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.83–1.04) compared with the ARB cohort. No difference in adverse effects, such as acute kidney injury (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89–1.09) and hyperkalemia (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.87–1.20), was observed between cohorts. AT analysis produced similar results to those of ITT analysis. We were unable to demonstrate a survival difference between cohorts (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.88–1.21) after considering drug discontinuation as a competing risk in AT analysis. Our study supports the notion that ACEI and ARB users have similar risks of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), even in elderly populations. PMID:26512568

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms: nation-wide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Karl Emil; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Egfjord, Martin; Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2015-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) on human AAAs remain unclear. We therefore examined whether treatment with ACEIs or ARBs influenced hard clinical end points in a nation-wide cohort of patients with AAA. All patients diagnosed with AAA during the period 1995 to 2011 were identified from the Danish nation-wide registries. Subjects were divided according to ACEI and ARB treatment status and followed up for an average of 5 years. Study outcomes were evaluated by time-dependent Cox proportional hazard models. Of 9441 patients with AAA, 12.6% were treated with ACEIs and 5.0% received ARBs. Incidence rates of death from AAA per 100 patient-years were 3.7, 3.6, 4.0, and 4.7 for treatment with ACEIs or ARBs, ACEIs, ARBs, and no ACEI/ARB, respectively. Hazard ratios of death from AAA were 0.64 (95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.80; P<0.001) for patients receiving ACEIs and 0.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.88; P=0.006) for those receiving ARBs, respectively (P for difference=0.944). The risk of surgery for AAA was significantly reduced in patients receiving ACEIs (hazard ratio, 0.86 [95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.99]; P=0.040) but not in patients receiving ARBs (hazard ratio, 1.02 [95% confidence interval, 0.84-1.23]; P=0.867; P for difference=0.119). In this observational study, treatment with ACEIs or ARBs was associated with a comparable reduction in mortality but not in surgery for AAA among patients with AAA. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these findings. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers have no beneficial effect on ablation outcome in chronic persistent atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bin; Kang, Junping; Tian, Ying; Tang, Ribo; Long, Deyong; Yu, Ronghui; He, Hua; Zhang, Ming; Shi, Lisheng; Tao, Hailong; Liu, Xingpeng; Dong, Jianzeng; Ma, Changsheng

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) could reverse structural and electrical atria remodelling and decrease atrial fibrillation (AF) onset or recurrence. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate whether ACEIs/ARBs had beneficial effects on ablation outcome of chronic persistent AF. This study included 139 patients with chronic persistent AF who underwent radiofrequency ablation in our centre. Patients were divided into an ACEIs/ARBs group or a non-ACEIs/ARBs group. During follow-up (14.6 +/- 8.9 months) after AF ablation, AF-free survival in the ACEIs/ARBs group was not significantly different from the non-ACEIs/ARBs group (P = 0.339). Univariate analysis showed that predictors for AF-free survival were AF history (HR, 1.064; 95% CI, 1.021-1.108; P = 0.003) and duration of chronic persistent AF (HR, 1.012; 95% CI, 1.005-1.019; P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that predictors for AF-free survival were AF history (HR, 1.051; 95% CI, 1.004-1.101; P = 0.035) and duration of chronic persistent AF (HR, 1.012; 95% CI, 1.004-1.020; P = 0.004). ACEIs/ARBs therapy was not a predictor for AF-free survival neither in univariate nor multivariate analysis. In this observational study, no effect of ACEIs or ARBs was seen on the AF recurrence after ablation of chronic persistent AF.ACEIs/ARBs did not help to predict a better ablation outcome. Predictors for ablation outcome are AF history and duration of chronic persistent AF.

  9. A signal-off sandwich photoelectrochemical immunosensor using TiO2 coupled with CdS as the photoactive matrix and copper (II) ion as inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixin; Li, Rongxia; Gao, Picheng; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Hongmin; Yang, Jiaojiao; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a novel sandwich photoelectrochemical (PEC) biosensor was developed based on a signal-off strategy using TiO2 coupled with CdS quantum dots (QDs) as the photoactive matrix and copper (II) ion (Cu(2+)) as inhibitor. TiO2/CdS modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode was employed for primary antibody (Ab1) immobilization and the subsequent sandwich-type antibody-antigen (Ab-Ag) affinity interactions. Flower-like copper oxide (CuO) was used as labels of secondary antibody (Ab2) and immobilized on the modified electrode via specific affinity interactions between Ab2 and Ag. Cu(2+) was released by dissolving CuO with HCl, and then reacted with CdS to form CuxS (x=1, 2), which would create new energy levels for electron-hole recombination and resulted in a decrease of the photocurrent. CuO, as the labels of Ab2, was first applied in PEC biosensor based on the signal-off strategy of the Cu(2+) for CdS. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved through the coupling of CdS QDs with TiO2. Besides, the introduction of polythiophene (PT-Cl) on the surface of TiO2 made the PEC signal more stable. Under 405nm irradiation at 0.1V, the PEC biosensor for H-IgG determination exhibited a linear range from 0.1pgmL(-1) to 100ngmL(-1) with a low detection limit of 0.03pgmL(-1). The proposed biosensor showed high sensitivity, stability and selectivity, which opens up a new promising signal-off PEC platform for future bioassay.

  10. Discovery and characterization of a novel potent type II native and mutant BCR-ABL inhibitor (CHMFL-074) for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML).

    PubMed

    Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Beilei; Wang, Qiang; Qi, Ziping; Chen, Cheng; Kong, Lu-Lu; Chen, Ji-Yun; Liu, Xiaochuan; Wang, Aoli; Hu, Chen; Wang, Wenchao; Wang, Huiping; Wu, Fan; Ruan, Yanjie; Qi, Shuang; Liu, Juan; Zou, Fengming; Hu, Zhenquan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shanchun; Yun, Cai-Hong; Zhai, Zhimin; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-07-19

    BCR gene fused ABL kinase is the critical driving force for the Philadelphia Chromosome positive (Ph+) Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and has been extensively explored as a drug target. With a structure-based drug design approach we have discovered a novel inhibitor CHMFL-074, that potently inhibits both the native and a variety of clinically emerged mutants of BCR-ABL kinase. The X-ray crystal structure of CHMFL-074 in complex with ABL1 kinase (PDB ID: 5HU9) revealed a typical type II binding mode (DFG-out) but relatively rare hinge binding. Kinome wide selectivity profiling demonstrated that CHMFL-074 bore a high selectivity (S score(1) = 0.03) and potently inhibited ABL1 kinase (IC50: 24 nM) and PDGFR α/β (IC50: 71 nM and 88 nM). CHMFL-074 displayed strong anti-proliferative efficacy against BCR-ABL-driven CML cell lines such as K562 (GI50: 56 nM), MEG-01 (GI50: 18 nM) and KU812 (GI50: 57 nM). CHMFL-074 arrested cell cycle into the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis in the Ph+ CML cell lines. In addition, it potently inhibited the CML patient primary cell's proliferation but did not affect the normal bone marrow cells. In the CML cell K562 inoculated xenograft mouse model, oral administration of 100 mg/kg/d of CHMFL-074 achieved a tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of 65% without exhibiting apparent toxicity. As a potential drug candidate for fighting CML, CHMFL-074 is under extensive preclinical safety evaluation now.

  11. A Phase II Trial of AZD6244 (Selumetinib, ARRY-142886), an Oral MEK1/2 Inhibitor, in Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Holkova, Beata; Zingone, Adriana; Kmieciak, Maciej; Bose, Prithviraj; Badros, Ashraf Z; Voorhees, Peter M; Baz, Rachid; Korde, Neha; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle; Xi, Liqiang; Raffeld, Mark; Zhao, Xiuhua; Wan, Wen; Tombes, Mary Beth; Shrader, Ellen; Weir-Wiggins, Caryn; Sankala, Heidi; Hogan, Kevin T; Doyle, Austin; Annunziata, Christina M; Wellons, Martha; Roberts, John D; Sullivan, Daniel; Landgren, Ola; Grant, Steven

    2016-03-01

    AZD6244 is a MEK1/2 inhibitor with significant preclinical activity in multiple myeloma cells. This phase II study used a two-stage Simon design to determine the AZD6244 response rate in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. AZD6244 (75 mg) was administered orally, twice a day, continuously for 28-day cycles. Response was evaluated after three cycles. Thirty-six patients received therapy. The median age was 65 years (range: 43-81) and the median number of prior therapies was 5 (range: 2-11). The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities included anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, diarrhea, and fatigue. Three deaths occurred possibly related to AZD6244 (2 due to sepsis, 1 due to acute kidney injury). After AZD6244 discontinuation, three additional deaths occurred due to disease progression. The response rate (CR + PR) was 5.6% with a mean duration of response of 4.95 months and median progression-free survival time of 3.52 months. One patient had a very good partial response (VGPR), 1 patient had a partial response, 17 patients had stable disease, 13 patients had progressive disease, and 4 patients could not be assessed for response. Pharmacodynamic studies revealed variable effects on bone marrow CD138(+) cell MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The best clinical response, a prolonged VGPR, occurred in a patient with an MMSET translocation. Single-agent AZD6244 was tolerable and had minimal activity in this heavily pretreated population. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Randomized phase II trial of cytosine arabinoside with and without the CHK1 inhibitor MK-8776 in relapsed and refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jonathan A; Tibes, Raoul; Morris, Larry; Blackford, Amanda L; Litzow, Mark; Patnaik, Mrinal; Rosner, Gary L; Gojo, Ivana; Kinders, Robert; Wang, Lihua; Doyle, L Austin; Huntoon, Catherine J; Karnitz, Larry M; Kaufmann, Scott H; Karp, Judith E; Smith, B Douglas

    2017-10-01

    Cytosine arabinoside (AraC) remains the backbone of most treatment regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Incorporation of AraC into DNA activates checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1), leading to cell-cycle arrest and diminished AraC cytotoxicity, which can be reversed by the selective Chk1 inhibitor MK-8776. Building on a Phase I trial, we conducted a phase II trial comparing timed sequential AraC with or without MK-8776. Patients with relapsed or primary refractory AML were randomized 1:1 to receive either AraC with MK-8776 (Arm A); or AraC alone (Arm B). 32 patients were treated: 14 assigned to Arm A and 18 to Arm B. There were 5 (36%) complete responses (CR/CRi) and 1 (7%) partial response (PR) in Arm A, and 8 (44%) CR/CRis and 1 (6%) PR in Arm B. Median survival did not differ significantly between the two groups (5.9months in Arm A vs. 4.5 months in Arm B). MK-8776 led to a robust increase in DNA damage in circulating leukemic blasts as measured by increased γ-H2AX (16.9%±6.1% prior and 36.4%±6.8% at one hour after MK-8776 infusion, p=0.016). Response rates and survival were similar between the two groups in spite of evidence that MK-8776 augmented DNA damage in circulating leukemic blasts. Better than expected results in the control arm using timed sequential AraC and truncated patient enrollment may have limited the ability to detect clinical benefit from the combination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Interaction of isozymes I, II, IV, V, and IX with phosphates, carbamoyl phosphate, and the phosphonate antiviral drug foscarnet.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Stefano; Innocenti, Alessio; Vullo, Daniela; Mastrolorenzo, Antonio; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2004-12-06

    A detailed inhibition study of five carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes with inorganic phosphates, carbamoyl phosphate, the antiviral phosphonate foscarnet as well as formate is reported. The cytosolic isozyme hCA I was weakly inhibited by neutral phosphate, strongly inhibited by carbamoyl phosphate (K(I) of 9.4 microM), and activated by hydrogen- and dihydrogenphosphate, foscarnet and formate (best activator foscarnet, K(A)=12 microM). The cytosolic isozyme hCA II was weakly inhibited by all the investigated anions, with carbamoyl phosphate showing a K(I) of 0.31 mM. The membrane-associated isozyme hCA IV was the most sensitive to inhibition by phosphates/phosphonates, showing a K(I) of 84 nM for PO(4)(3-), of 9.8 microM for HPO(4)(2-), and of 9.9 microM for carbamoyl phosphate. Foscarnet was the best inhibitor of this isozyme (K(I) of 0.82 mM) highly abundant in the kidneys, which may explain some of the renal side effects of the drug. The mitochondrial isozyme hCA V was weakly inhibited by all phosphates/phosphonates, except carbamoyl phosphate, which showed a K(I) of 8.5 microM. Thus, CA V cannot be the isozyme involved in the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I biosynthetic reaction, as hypothesized earlier. Furthermore, the relative resistance of CA V to inhibition by inorganic phosphates suggests an evolutionary adaptation of this mitochondrial isozyme to the presence of high concentrations of such anions in these energy-converting organelles, where high amounts of ATP are produced by ATP synthetase, from ADP and inorganic phosphates. The transmembrane, tumor-associated isozyme hCA IX was on the other hand slightly inhibited by all these anions.

  14. Primary analysis of a phase II open-label trial of INCB039110, a selective JAK1 inhibitor, in patients with myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, John O.; Talpaz, Moshe; Gupta, Vikas; Foltz, Lynda M.; Savona, Michael R.; Paquette, Ronald; Turner, A. Robert; Coughlin, Paul; Winton, Elliott; Burn, Timothy C.; O’Neill, Peter; Clark, Jason; Hunter, Deborah; Assad, Albert; Hoffman, Ronald; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2017-01-01

    Combined Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK2 inhibition therapy effectively reduces splenomegaly and symptom burden related to myelofibrosis but is associated with dose-dependent anemia and thrombocytopenia. In this open-label phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of three dose levels of INCB039110, a potent and selective oral JAK1 inhibitor, in patients with intermediate- or high-risk myelofibrosis and a platelet count ≥50×109/L. Of 10, 45, and 32 patients enrolled in the 100 mg twice-daily, 200 mg twice-daily, and 600 mg once-daily cohorts, respectively, 50.0%, 64.4%, and 68.8% completed week 24. A ≥50% reduction in total symptom score was achieved by 35.7% and 28.6% of patients in the 200 mg twice-daily cohort and 32.3% and 35.5% in the 600 mg once-daily cohort at week 12 (primary end point) and 24, respectively. By contrast, two patients (20%) in the 100 mg twice-daily cohort had ≥50% total symptom score reduction at weeks 12 and 24. For the 200 mg twice-daily and 600 mg once-daily cohorts, the median spleen volume reductions at week 12 were 14.2% and 17.4%, respectively. Furthermore, 21/39 (53.8%) patients who required red blood cell transfusions during the 12 weeks preceding treatment initiation achieved a ≥50% reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused during study weeks 1–24. Only one patient discontinued for grade 3 thrombocytopenia. Non-hematologic adverse events were largely grade 1 or 2; the most common was fatigue. Treatment with INCB039110 resulted in clinically meaningful symptom relief, modest spleen volume reduction, and limited myelosuppression. PMID:27789678

  15. Recognition and stabilization of a unique CPRI--structural motif in cucurbitaceae family trypsin inhibitor peptides: molecular dynamics based homology modeling using the X-ray structure of MCTI-II.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, S; Haldar, U; Bera, A K; Pal, A K; Bhattacharya, S; Ghosh, S; Mukhopadhyay, B P; Banerjee, A

    2001-02-01

    The high resolution crystallographic structure of MCTI-II complexed with beta trypsin (PDB entry 1MCT) was used to model the corresponding structures of the six inhibitor peptides belonging to Cucurbitaceae family (MCTI-I, LA-1, LA-2, CMTI-I, CMTI-III, CMTI-IV). Two model inhibitors, LA-1 and LA-2 were refined by molecular dynamics to estimate the average solution structure. The difference accessible surface area (DASA) study of the inhibitors with and without trypsin revealed the Arginine and other residues of the inhibitors which bind to trypsin. The hydration dynamics study of LA1 and LA2 also confirm the suitability of water molecules at the active Arg site. Moreover, the presence of a unique 3D-structural motif comprises with the four CPRI residues from the amino terminal is thought to be conserved in all the six studied inhibitors, which seems essential for the directional fixation for proper complexation of the Arg (5) residue towards the trypsin S1-binding pocket. The role of the disulphide linkage in the geometrical stabilization of CPRI (Cysteine, Proline, Arginine, Isoleucine) motif has also been envisaged from the comparative higher intra molecular Cys (3) -Cys (20) disulphide dihedral energies.

  16. The effect of COX-2 inhibitor on capecitabine-induced hand-foot syndrome in patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer: a phase II randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong-Xin; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Lu, Shi-Xun; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen; Chen, Gong

    2011-06-01

    Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is a common adverse event that can be induced by capecitabine. It is hypothesized that capecitabine (Hoffmann-La Roche Inc.) based chemotherapy can cause overexpression of COX-2 in tumor and healthy tissue, which finally induced HFS in hands and feet. Based on this, we believed that a selected COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals LLC) could ease HFS. We designed a prospective clinical study to test the hypothesis. From August 2008 to January 2010, 110 patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer who were eligible for adjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled in the study and divided into 4 groups by random, but 9 patients did not finish at least 4 cycles of chemotherapy. There were sixteen patients in capecitabine group, and fifteen patients in capecitabine and celecoxib group. Thirty-four patients were in XELOX (capecitabine plus oxaliplatine) group, and thirty-six patients in XELOX+ celecoxib group. All 101 patients finished chemotherapy and follow-up interviews. The group that had received capecitabine and celecoxib had a significantly reduced frequency of  >grade 1 hand-foot syndrome (29 vs. 72% P < 0.001), and >grade 2 (11.76% vs. 30% P = 0.024). Five patients experienced grade 3 HFS in capecitabine group and only 1 patient had grade 3 HFS in capecitabine and celecoxib group. There were 5 patients in capecitabine group who refused to go on chemotherapy because of HFS, but there was none in capecitabine and celecoxib group. From the result of this study, we could learn that celecoxib could reduce HFS that was induced by capecitabine. So we recommend that celecoxib can be used in capecitabine-based chemotherapy.

  17. A phase II study of single-agent RO4929097, a gamma-secretase inhibitor of Notch signaling, in patients with recurrent platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer: A study of the Princess Margaret, Chicago and California phase II consortia.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Padilla, Ivan; Wilson, Michelle K; Clarke, Blaise A; Hirte, Hal W; Welch, Stephen A; Mackay, Helen J; Biagi, Jim J; Reedijk, Michael; Weberpals, Johanne I; Fleming, Gini F; Wang, Lisa; Liu, Geoffrey; Zhou, Chen; Blattler, Chantale; Ivy, S Percy; Oza, Amit M

    2015-05-01

    A phase II study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of single-agent RO4929097 (a gamma-secretase inhibitor) in patients with recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Women with progressive platinum-resistant ovarian cancer treated with ≤2 chemotherapy regimens for recurrent disease were enrolled in this trial. Patients received oral RO4929097 at 20 mg once daily, 3 days on/4 days off each week in a three week cycle. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) rate at the end of 4 cycles. Secondary objectives included assessment of the safety of RO4929097 and exploration of molecular correlates of outcome in archival tumor tissue and serum. Of 45 patients enrolled, 40 were evaluable for response. Thirty-seven (82%) patients had high-grade ovarian cancer. No objective responses were observed. Fifteen patients (33%) had stable disease as their best response, with a median duration of 3.1 months. The median PFS for the whole group was 1.3 months (1.2-2.5). Treatment was generally well tolerated with 10% of patients discontinuing treatment due to an adverse event. In high grade serous ovarian cancer patients, the median PFS trended higher when the expression of intracellular Notch (NICD) protein by immunohistochemistry was high versus low (3.3 versus 1.3 months, p=0.09). No clear relationship between circulating angiogenic factors and PFS was found despite a suggestion of an improved outcome with higher baseline VEGFA levels. RO4929097 has insufficient activity as a single-agent in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer to warrant further study as monotherapy. Future studies are needed to explore the potential for cohort enrichment using NICD expression. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of malonate-based inhibitors of phosphosugar-metabolizing enzymes: class II fructose-1,6-bis-phosphate aldolases, type I phosphomannose isomerase, and phosphoglucose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Desvergnes, Stéphanie; Courtiol-Legourd, Stéphanie; Daher, Racha; Dabrowski, Maciej; Salmon, Laurent; Therisod, Michel

    2012-02-15

    In the design of inhibitors of phosphosugar metabolizing enzymes and receptors with therapeutic interest, malonate has been reported in a number of cases as a good and hydrolytically-stable surrogate of the phosphate group, since both functions are dianionic at physiological pH and of comparable size. We have investigated a series of malonate-based mimics of the best known phosphate inhibitors of class II (zinc) fructose-1,6-bis-phosphate aldolases (FBAs) (e.g., from Mycobacterium tuberculosis), type I (zinc) phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) from Escherichia coli, and phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) from yeast. In the case of FBAs, replacement of one phosphate by one malonate on a bis-phosphorylated inhibitor (1) led to a new compound (4) still showing a strong inhibition (K(i) in the nM range) and class II versus class I selectivity (up to 8×10(4)). Replacement of the other phosphate however strongly affected binding efficiency and selectivity. In the case of PGI and PMI, 5-deoxy-5-malonate-D-arabinonohydroxamic acid (8) yielded a strong decrease in binding affinities when compared to its phosphorylated parent compound 5-phospho-D-arabinonohydroxamic acid (2). Analysis of the deposited 3D structures of the kinetically evaluated enzymes complexed to the phosphate-based inhibitors indicate that malonate could be a good phosphate surrogate only if phosphate is not tightly bound at the enzyme active site, such as in position 7 of compound 1 for FBAs. These observations are of importance for further design of inhibitors of phosphorylated-compounds metabolizing enzymes with therapeutic interest.

  19. Characterization and 2D NMR study of the stable [9-21, 15-27] 2 disulfide intermediate in the folding of the 3 disulfide trypsin inhibitor EETI II.

    PubMed Central

    Le-Nguyen, D.; Heitz, A.; Chiche, L.; el Hajji, M.; Castro, B.

    1993-01-01

    The three disulfide Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor II (EETI II) reduction with dithiothreitol (DTT) and reoxidation of the fully reduced derivative have been examined. A common stable intermediate has been observed for both processes. Isolation and sequencing of carboxymethylated material showed that the intermediate lacks the [2-19] bridge. The NMR study showed a very strong structural conservation as compared to the native EETI II, suggesting that the bridges are the [9-21] and [15-27] native ones. The differences occurred in sections 2-7 (containing the free cysteine 2 and the Arg 4-Ile 5 active site) and 19-21 (containing the second free cysteine). Distance geometry calculations and restrained molecular dynamics refinements were also in favor of a [9-21, 15-27] arrangement and resulted in a well-conserved (7-28) segment. PMID:8443596

  20. Clinical, molecular and immune analysis of dabrafenib and trametinib in metastatic melanoma patients that progressed on BRAF inhibitor monotherapy: a phase II clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo; McQuade, Jennifer L.; Panka, David J.; Hudgens, Courtney W.; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Bahl, Samira; Jane-Valbuena, Judit; Wani, Khalida M.; Reuben, Alexandre; Creasy, Caitlyn A.; Jiang, Hong; Cooper, Zachary A.; Roszik, Jason; Bassett, Roland L.; Joon, Aron Y.; Simpson, Lauren M.; Mouton, Rosalind D.; Glitza, Isabella C.; Patel, Sapna P.; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Amaria, Rodabe N.; Diab, Adi; Hwu, Patrick; Lazar, Alexander J.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Garraway, Levi A.; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Kim, Kevin B.; Davies, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Combined treatment with dabrafenib and trametinib (CombiDT) achieves clinical responses in only ~15% of BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi)-refractory metastatic melanoma patients, in contrast to the high activity observed in BRAFi-naïve patients. Identifying correlates of response and mechanisms of resistance in this population will facilitate clinical management and rational therapeutic development. Objective To determine correlates of benefit from CombiDT therapy in BRAFi-refractory metastatic melanoma patients. Design Single-center, single-arm prospective phase II study of CombiDT in patients with BRAFV600 metastatic melanoma resistant to BRAFi monotherapy conducted between September 2012 and October 2014. Setting University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Participants 28 patients were screened and 23 enrolled. Key eligibility criteria included: BRAFV600 metastatic melanoma, prior BRAFi monotherapy, measurable disease (RECIST 1.1), and accessible tumor for biopsy. Intervention Patients were treated with dabrafenib (150 mg twice daily) and trametinib (2 mg daily) continuously until disease progression or intolerance. All participants underwent a mandatory baseline biopsy, and optional biopsies were performed on-treatment and at progression. Whole-exome sequencing, RT-PCR for BRAF splicing, RNAseq and IHC were performed on tumor samples, and blood was analyzed for levels of circulating BRAFV600. Main outcome measures Primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were secondary clinical endpoints. Results Among evaluable patients, the confirmed ORR was 10%, disease control rate (DCR) was 45%, and median PFS was 13 weeks. Clinical benefit was associated with duration of prior BRAFi >6 months (DCR 73% vs. 11% for ≤6 months, p=0.02) and decrease in circulating BRAFV600 at day 8 of cycle 1 (DCR 75% vs. 18% for no decrease, p=0.015), but not by pre-treatment MAPK pathway mutations or activation. On

  1. A randomized phase II study of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat as maintenance therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiappori, A A; Kolevska, T; Spigel, D R; Hager, S; Rarick, M; Gadgeel, S; Blais, N; Von Pawel, J; Hart, L; Reck, M; Bassett, E; Burington, B; Schiller, J H

    2015-02-01

    Continuation or 'switch' maintenance therapy is commonly used in patients with advancd non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we evaluated the efficacy of the telomerase inhibitor, imetelstat, as switch maintenance therapy in patients with advanced NSCLC. The primary end point of this open-label, randomized phase II study was progression-free survival (PFS). Patients with non-progressive, advanced NSCLC after platinum-based doublet (first-line) chemotherapy (with or without bevacizumab), any histology, with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1 were eligible. Randomization was 2 : 1 in favor of imetelstat, administered at 9.4 mg/kg on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle, or observation. Telomere length (TL) biomarker exploratory analysis was carried out in tumor tissue by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and telomerase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of 116 patients enrolled, 114 were evaluable. Grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were more frequent with imetelstat. Median PFS was 2.8 and 2.6 months for imetelstat-treated versus control [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.844; 95% CI 0.54-1.31; P = 0.446]. Median survival time favored imetelstat (14.3 versus 11.5 months), although not significantly (HR = 0.68; 95% CI 0.41-1.12; P = 0.129). Exploratory analysis demonstrated a trend toward longer median PFS (HR = 0.43; 95% CI 0.14-1.3; P = 0.124) and overall survival (OS; HR = 0.41; 95% CI 0.11-1.46; P = 0.155) in imetelstat-treated patients with short TL, but no improvement in median PFS and OS in patients with long TL (HR = 0.86; 95% CI 0.39-1.88; and HR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.2-1.28; P = 0.145). Maintenance imetelstat failed to improve PFS in advanced NSCLC patients responding to first-line therapy. There was a trend toward a improvement in median PFS and OS in patients with short TL. Short TL as a predictive biomarker will require further investigation for the clinical development of imetelstat. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  2. A randomized multi-center phase II trial of the angiogenesis inhibitor Cilengitide (EMD 121974) and gemcitabine compared with gemcitabine alone in advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friess, Helmut; Langrehr, Jan M; Oettle, Helmut; Raedle, Jochen; Niedergethmann, Marco; Dittrich, Christian; Hossfeld, Dieter K; Stöger, Herbert; Neyns, Bart; Herzog, Peter; Piedbois, Pascal; Dobrowolski, Frank; Scheithauer, Werner; Hawkins, Robert; Katz, Frieder; Balcke, Peter; Vermorken, Jan; van Belle, Simon; Davidson, Neville; Esteve, Albert Abad; Castellano, Daniel; Kleeff, Jörg; Tempia-Caliera, Adrien A; Kovar, Andreas; Nippgen, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenic treatment is believed to have at least cystostatic effects in highly vascularized tumours like pancreatic cancer. In this study, the treatment effects of the angiogenesis inhibitor Cilengitide and gemcitabine were compared with gemcitabine alone in patients with advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods A multi-national, open-label, controlled, randomized, parallel-group, phase II pilot study was conducted in 20 centers in 7 countries. Cilengitide was administered at 600 mg/m2 twice weekly for 4 weeks per cycle and gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m2 for 3 weeks followed by a week of rest per cycle. The planned treatment period was 6 four-week cycles. The primary endpoint of the study was overall survival and the secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), response rate, quality of life (QoL), effects on biological markers of disease (CA 19.9) and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor), and safety. An ancillary study investigated the pharmacokinetics of both drugs in a subset of patients. Results Eighty-nine patients were randomized. The median overall survival was 6.7 months for Cilengitide and gemcitabine and 7.7 months for gemcitabine alone. The median PFS times were 3.6 months and 3.8 months, respectively. The overall response rates were 17% and 14%, and the tumor growth control rates were 54% and 56%, respectively. Changes in the levels of CA 19.9 went in line with the clinical course of the disease, but no apparent relationships were seen with the biological markers of angiogenesis. QoL and safety evaluations were comparable between treatment groups. Pharmacokinetic studies showed no influence of gemcitabine on the pharmacokinetic parameters of Cilengitide and vice versa. Conclusion There were no clinically important differences observed regarding efficacy, safety and QoL between the groups. The observations lay in the range of other clinical studies in this setting. The

  3. A novel cell permeant peptide inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase II inhibits intimal hyperplasia in a human saphenous vein organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Luciana B; Brophy, Colleen M; Flynn, Charles R; Yi, Zhengping; Bowen, Benjamin P; Smoke, Christopher; Seal, Brandon; Panitch, Alyssa; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2010-12-01

    The present study was aimed at developing a new cell-permeant peptide inhibitor (MK2i) of the kinase that phosphorylates and activates heat-shock protein (HSP)27 (MAPKAP kinase II), and evaluating the ability of this peptide to inhibit HSP27 phosphorylation and intimal thickening. The ability of MK2i to reduce HSP27 phosphorylation and cell migration was evaluated in A7R5 cells stimulated with arsenite or lysophosphatidic acid. Stable isotopic labeling using amino acids in cell culture, in combination with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, was used to characterize the effect of MK2i on global protein expression in fibroblasts. The effect of MK2i on intimal thickening and connective tissue growth factor expression was evaluated in human saphenous vein (HSV) rings maintained with 30% fetal bovine serum for 14 days by light microscopy and immunoblotting. Pretreatment of cells with MK2i (10 μM) prior to arsenite or lysophosphatidic acid stimulation decreased phosphorylation of HSP27 (36% ± 9% and 33% ± 10%, respectively) compared with control (not pretreated) cells. MK2i also inhibited A7R5 migration, and downregulated the transforming growth factor-induced expression of collagen and fibronectin in keloid cells, two major matrix proteins involved in the development of intimal hyperplasia. Treatment of HSV segments with MK2i enhanced relaxation, reduced HSP27 phosphorylation (40% ± 17%), connective tissue growth factor expression (17% ± 5%), and intimal thickness (48.2% ± 10.5%) compared with untreated segments. On the other hand, treatment with a recombinant fusion protein containing a cell-permeant peptide attached to the HSP27 sequence increased intimal thickness of HSV segments by 48% ± 14%. Our results suggest that HSP27 may play a role in the development of processes leading to intimal hyperplasia in HSV, and reduction of HSP27 phosphorylation by MK2i may be a potential strategy to inhibit the development of intimal hyperplasia in HSV to prevent the

  4. A Novel Cell Permeant Peptide Inhibitor of MAPKAP Kinase II Inhibits Intimal Hyperplasia in a Human Saphenous Vein Organ Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Luciana B.; Brophy, Colleen M.; Flynn, Charles R.; Yi, Zhengping; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Smoke, Christopher; Seal, Brandon; Panitch, Alyssa; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2010-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at developing a new cell-permeant peptide inhibitor (MK2i) of the kinase that phosphorylates and activates HSP27 (MAPKAP kinase II), and evaluating the ability of this peptide to inhibit HSP27 phosphorylation and intimal thickening. Design of study The ability of MK2i to reduce HSP27 phosphorylation and cell migration was evaluated in A7R5 cells stimulated with arsenite or lysophosphatidic acid. Stable isotopic labeling using amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), in combination with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used to characterize the effect of MK2i on global protein expression in fibroblasts. The effect of MK2i on intimal thickening and CTGF expression was evaluated in human saphenous vein (HSV) rings maintained with 30% FBS for 14 days by light microscopy and immunoblotting. Results Pre-treatment of cells with MK2i (10 μM) prior to arsenite or lysophosphatidic acid stimulation decreased phosphorylation of HSP27 (36±9% and 33±10% respectively) compared to control (not pre-treated) cells. MK2i also inhibited A7R5 migration, and downregulated the TGF-induced expression of collagen and fibronectin in keloid cells, two major matrix proteins involved in the development of intimal hyperplasia. Treatment of HSV segments with MK2i enhanced relaxation, reduced HSP27 phosphorylation (40±17%), CTGF expression (17±5%) and intimal thickness (48.2±10.5%) compared to untreated segments. On the other hand, treatment with a recombinant fusion protein containing a cell permeant peptide attached to the HSP27 sequence increased intimal thickness of HSV segments by 48±14%. Conclusion Our results suggest that HSP27 may play a role in the development of processes leading to intimal hyperplasia in HSV, and reduction of HSP27 phosphorylation by MK2i may be a potential strategy to inhibit the development of intimal hyperplasia in HSV to prevent the autologous vascular graft failure. PMID:20864298

  5. Comparison of the influence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor lisinopril and angiotensin II receptor antagonist losartan in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy and nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kosmadakis, George; Filiopoulos, Vasileios; Georgoulias, Christodoulos; Tentolouris, Nicolaos; Michail, Spiridon

    2010-09-01

    In this prospective study, the effects of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor [lisinopril (LIS)] and an angiotensin II receptor antagonist [losartan (LOS)] were compared in nephrotic patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy. Twenty-seven patients (13 males, mean age +/- SD 51.3 +/- 15.4 years) were treated with LIS (13 patients, six males, mean age 52.1 +/- 15.3 years) or LOS (14 patients, seven males, mean age 50.5 +/- 15.5 years) for 12 months. At baseline and after the treatment period, serum albumin, total cholesterol, estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), 24 h proteinuria and mean arterial pressure were determined. Proteinuria (g/24 h) was significantly reduced in both groups (LIS from 4.82 +/- 1.26 to 1.75 +/- 0.64, p < 0.0001; LOS from 4.55 +/- 1.09 to 2.54 +/- 1.94, p = 0.002) (all results +/- SD). Serum albumin levels (g/dl) increased significantly in both groups (LIS 2.27 +/- 0.41 to 3.17 +/- 0.63, p < 0.0001; LOS 2.93 +/- 0.40 to 3.55 +/- 0.44, p < 0.0001). GFR (ml/min x 1.73 m(2)) did not change significantly in either group (LIS 55 +/- 17 to 56 +/- 17, p = 0.65; LOS 64 +/- 18 to 59 +/- 16, p = 0.13). Total cholesterol (mg/dl) was significantly reduced only in the lisinopril group (LIS 347 +/- 81 to 266 +/- 64, p < 0.0001; LOS 306 +/- 58 to 263 +/- 77, p = 0.138). Mean arterial pressure (mmHg) was reduced in both groups (LIS 107 +/- 12 to 95 +/- 6, p < 0.0001; LOS 104 +/- 10 to 96 +/- 5, p = 0.003). In the comparison between the two groups, serum albumin levels were higher in the losartan group at baseline (p < 0.0001) and after 12 months (p = 0.029). There were no significant differences between the baseline and end-of-study values for the rest of the studied parameters. Treatment with lisinopril and losartan in nephrotic patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy results in similar (and significant) effects on renal function, hypoalbuminaemia, proteinuria and blood pressure.

  6. Discovery of Dihydrobenzoxazepinone (GS-6615) Late Sodium Current Inhibitor (Late INai), a Phase II Agent with Demonstrated Preclinical Anti-Ischemic and Antiarrhythmic Properties.

    PubMed

    Zablocki, Jeff A; Elzein, Elfatih; Li, Xiaofen; Koltun, Dmitry O; Parkhill, Eric Q; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Martinez, Ruben; Corkey, Britton; Jiang, Haibo; Perry, Thao; Kalla, Rao; Notte, Gregory T; Saunders, Oliver; Graupe, Michael; Lu, Yafan; Venkataramani, Chandru; Guerrero, Juan; Perry, Jason; Osier, Mark; Strickley, Robert; Liu, Gongxin; Wang, Wei-Qun; Hu, Lufei; Li, Xiao-Jun; El-Bizri, Nesrine; Hirakawa, Ryoko; Kahlig, Kris; Xie, Cheng; Li, Cindy Hong; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Rajamani, Sridharan; Mollova, Nevena; Soohoo, Daniel; Lepist, Eve-Irene; Murray, Bernard; Rhodes, Gerry; Belardinelli, Luiz; Desai, Manoj C

    2016-10-03

    Late sodium current (late INa) is enhanced during ischemia by reactive oxygen species (ROS) modifying the Nav 1.5 channel, resulting in incomplete inactivation. Compound 4 (GS-6615, eleclazine) a novel, potent, and selective inhibitor of late INa, is currently in clinical development for treatment of long QT-3 syndrome (LQT-3), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and ventricular tachycardia-ventricular fibrillation (VT-VF). We will describe structure-activity relationship (SAR) leading to the discovery of 4 that is vastly improved from the first generation late INa inhibitor 1 (ranolazine). Compound 4 was 42 times more potent than 1 in reducing ischemic burden in vivo (S-T segment elevation, 15 min left anteriorior descending, LAD, occlusion in rabbits) with EC50 values of 190 and 8000 nM, respectively. Compound 4 represents a new class of potent late INa inhibitors that will be useful in delineating the role of inhibitors of this current in the treatment of patients.

  7. 1,3-Oxazole-based selective picomolar inhibitors of cytosolic human carbonic anhydrase II alleviate ocular hypertension in rabbits: Potency is supported by X-ray crystallography of two leads.

    PubMed

    Ferraroni, Marta; Lucarini, Laura; Masini, Emanuela; Korsakov, Mikhail; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Krasavin, Mikhail

    2017-09-01

    Two lead 1,3-oxazole-based carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) earlier identified as selective, picomolar inhibitors of hCA II (a cytosolic target for treatment of glaucoma) have been investigated further. Firstly, they were found to be conveniently synthesized on multigram scale, which enables further development. These compounds were found to be comparable in efficacy to dorzolamide eye drops when applied in the eye drop form as well. Finally, the reasons for unusually high potency of these compounds became understood from their high-resolution X-ray crystallography structures. These data significantly expand our understanding of heterocycle-based primary sulfonamides, many of which have recently emerged from our labs - particularly, from the corneal permeability standpoint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Administration of a Ca-super(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor prevents the learning deficit observed in spinal rats after noncontingent shock administration.

    PubMed

    Baumbauer, Kyle M; Young, Erin E; Hoy, Kevin C; Abood, Athena; Joynes, Robin L

    2007-06-01

    Research has shown that spinal rats given shock to the hind leg when it is in an extended position (contingent shock) will learn to maintain a flexion response. However, subjects that experience shock irrespective of leg position (noncontingent shock) do not exhibit this learning. The current studies examined the role of Ca-super(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in this learning deficit. Subjects were given intrathecal injections of CaMKII inhibitor solution or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) 15 min prior to and immediately or 4 hr following noncontingent shock training. Results demonstrate that the CaMKII inhibitor successfully reversed the learning deficit when injected prior to and immediately following training. These results indicate the importance of CaMKII in the learning deficit present in spinal animals trained with noncontingent shock. Copyright (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. The effects of anti-DNA topoisomerase II drugs, etoposide and ellipticine, are modified in root meristem cells of Allium cepa by MG132, an inhibitor of 26S proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Żabka, Aneta; Winnicki, Konrad; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Maszewski, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II), a highly specialized nuclear enzyme, resolves various entanglement problems concerning DNA that arise during chromatin remodeling, transcription, S-phase replication, meiotic recombination, chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. The genotoxic effects of two Topo II inhibitors known as potent anti-cancer drugs, etoposide (ETO) and ellipticine (EPC), were assayed in root apical meristem cells of Allium cepa. Despite various types of molecular interactions between these drugs and DNA-Topo II complexes at the chromatin level, which have a profound negative impact on the genome integrity (production of double-strand breaks, chromosomal bridges and constrictions, lagging fragments of chromosomes and their uneven segregation to daughter cell nuclei), most of the elicited changes were apparently similar, regarding both their intensity and time characteristics. No essential changes between ETO- and EPC-treated onion roots were noticed in the frequency of G1-, S-, G2-and M-phase cells, nuclear morphology, chromosome structures, tubulin-microtubule systems, extended distribution of mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites of histone H3, and the induction of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD). However, the important difference between the effects induced by the ETO and EPC concerns their catalytic activities in the presence of MG132 (proteasome inhibitor engaged in Topo II-mediated formation of cleavage complexes) and relates to the time-variable changes in chromosomal aberrations and AL-PCD rates. This result implies that proteasome-dependent mechanisms may contribute to the course of physiological effects generated by DNA lesions under conditions that affect the ability of plant cells to resolve topological problems that associated with the nuclear metabolic activities.

  10. PESTICINS II. I and II

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Robert R.; Surgalla, Michael J.

    1962-01-01

    Brubaker, Robert R. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.) and Michael J. Surgalla. Pesticins. II. Production of pesticin I and II. J. Bacteriol. 84:539–545. 1962.—Pesticin I was separated from pesticin I inhibitor by ion-exchange chromatography of cell-free culture supernatant fluids and by acid precipitation of soluble preparations obtained from mechanically disrupted cells. The latter procedure resulted in formation of an insoluble pesticin I complex which, upon removal by centrifugation and subsequent dissolution in neutral buffer, exhibited a 100- to 1,000-fold increase in antibacterial activity over that originally observed. However, activity returned to the former level upon addition of the acid-soluble fraction, which contained pesticin I inhibitor. Since the presence of pesticin I inhibitor leads to serious errors in the determination of pesticin I, an assay medium containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in excess Ca++ was developed; this medium eliminated the effect of the inhibitor. By use of the above medium, sufficient pesticin I was found to be contained within 500 nonirradiated cells to inhibit growth of a suitable indicator strain; at least 107 cells were required to effect a corresponding inhibition by pesticin II. Although both pesticins are located primarily within the cell during growth, pesticin I may arise extracellularly during storage of static cells. Slightly higher activity of pesticin I inhibitor was found in culture supernatant fluids than occurred in corresponding cell extracts of equal volume. The differences and similarities between pesticin I and some known bacteriocins are discussed. PMID:14016110

  11. In silico calculated affinity of FVIII-derived peptides for HLA class II alleles predicts inhibitor development in haemophilia A patients with missense mutations in the F8 gene.

    PubMed

    Pashov, A D; Calvez, T; Gilardin, L; Maillère, B; Repessé, Y; Oldenburg, J; Pavlova, A; Kaveri, S V; Lacroix-Desmazes, S

    2014-03-01

    Forty per cent of haemophilia A (HA) patients have missense mutations in the F8 gene. Yet, all patients with identical mutations are not at the same risk of developing factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors. In severe HA patients, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype was identified as a risk factor for onset of FVIII inhibitors. We hypothesized that missense mutations in endogenous FVIII alter the affinity of the mutated peptides for HLA class II, thus skewing FVIII-specific T-cell tolerance and increasing the risk that the corresponding wild-type FVIII-derived peptides induce an anti-FVIII immune response during replacement therapy. Here, we investigated whether affinity for HLA class II of wild-type FVIII-derived peptides that correspond to missense mutations described in the Haemophilia A Mutation, Structure, Test and Resource database is associated with inhibitor development. We predicted the mean affinity for 10 major HLA class II alleles of wild-type FVIII-derived peptides that corresponded to 1456 reported cases of missense mutations. Linear regression analysis confirmed a significant association between the predicted mean peptide affinity and the mutation inhibitory status (P = 0.006). Significance was lost after adjustment on mutation position on FVIII domains. Although analysis of the A1-A2-A3-C1 domains yielded a positive correlation between predicted HLA-binding affinity and inhibitory status (OR = 0.29 [95% CI: 0.14-0.60] for the high affinity tertile, P = 0.002), the C2 domain-restricted analysis indicated an inverse correlation (OR = 3.56 [1.10-11.52], P = 0.03). Our data validate the importance of the affinity of FVIII peptides for HLA alleles to the immunogenicity of therapeutic FVIII in patients with missense mutations.

  12. ACE inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACE inhibitors There are many different names and brands of ACE inhibitors. Most work as well as ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  13. Tetrahydroindazoles as Interleukin-2 Inducible T-Cell Kinase Inhibitors. Part II. Second-Generation Analogues with Enhanced Potency, Selectivity, and Pharmacodynamic Modulation in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Burch, Jason D; Barrett, Kathy; Chen, Yuan; DeVoss, Jason; Eigenbrot, Charles; Goldsmith, Richard; Ismaili, M Hicham A; Lau, Kevin; Lin, Zhonghua; Ortwine, Daniel F; Zarrin, Ali A; McEwan, Paul A; Barker, John J; Ellebrandt, Claire; Kordt, Daniel; Stein, Daniel B; Wang, Xiaolu; Chen, Yong; Hu, Baihua; Xu, Xiaofeng; Yuen, Po-Wai; Zhang, Yamin; Pei, Zhonghua

    2015-05-14

    The medicinal chemistry community has directed considerable efforts toward the discovery of selective inhibitors of interleukin-2 inducible T-cell kinase (ITK), given its role in T-cell signaling downstream of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and the implications of this target for inflammatory disorders such as asthma. We have previously disclosed a structure- and property-guided lead optimization effort which resulted in the discovery of a new series of tetrahydroindazole-containing selective ITK inhibitors. Herein we disclose further optimization of this series that resulted in further potency improvements, reduced off-target receptor binding liabilities, and reduced cytotoxicity. Specifically, we have identified a correlation between the basicity of solubilizing elements in the ITK inhibitors and off-target antiproliferative effects, which was exploited to reduce cytotoxicity while maintaining kinase selectivity. Optimized analogues were shown to reduce IL-2 and IL-13 production in vivo following oral or intraperitoneal dosing in mice.

  14. Biochemical characterization of 60S acidic ribosomal P proteins associated with CK-II from bamboo shoots and potent inhibitors of their phosphorylation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, T; Kosuge, S; Sakamoto, S; Funayama, S; Komiyama, K; Ohtsuki, K

    1999-07-01

    Three effective phosphate acceptors (35, 15 and 13 kDa polypeptides) for casein kinase II (CK-II) in the Superdex CK-II fraction prepared from a 0.5 M NaCl extract of bamboo shoots were selectively purified by glycyrrhizin (GL)-affinity column chromatography (HPLC). These three proteins (p35, p15 and p13) were identified as 60S acidic ribosomal P proteins by determination of their partial N-terminal sequences. CK-II was associated with p35 since the GL-affinity fraction was coprecipitated with an anti-serum against Drosophila CK-IIbeta. Moreover, a derivative (oGA) of glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) and several polyphenol-containing anti-oxidative compounds [quercetin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and two isoflavones, i.e., 3',4',7-trihydroxyisoflavone (3',4',7-THI) and 8-chloro-3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyisoflavone (8C-3',4',5,7-THI)] inhibited the CK-II-mediated phosphorylation of 60S acidic ribosomal P proteins in vitro. Quercetin was found to be the most effective compound on CK-II activity since its ID50 was approx. 50 nM. These results suggest that (i) GL-affinity column chromatography is useful for the selective purification of 60S acidic ribosomal P proteins as a heterocomplex associated with CK-II from various cell sources; (ii) natural anti-oxidative compounds with polyphenols, but not GL and GA, act as potent CK-II suppressors; and (iii) CK-II mediates the regulation of the physiological functions of 60S acidic ribosomal P proteins in growing plant cells.

  15. CGK733-induced LC3 II formation is positively associated with the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 through modulation of the AMPK and PERK/CHOP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufeng; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Baron, Byron; Kitagawa, Takao; Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Akada, Junko; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2015-11-24

    Microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3)-II is essential for autophagosome formation and is widely used to monitor autophagic activity. We show that CGK733 induces LC3 II and LC3-puncta accumulation, which are not involved in the activation of autophagy. The treatment of CGK733 did not alter the autophagic flux and was unrelated to p62 degradation. Treatment with CGK733 activated the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (PERK/CHOP) pathways and elevated the expression of p21Waf1/Cip1. Inhibition of both AMPK and PERK/CHOP pathways by siRNA or chemical inhibitor could block CGK733-induced p21Waf1/Cip1 expression as well as caspase-3 cleavage. Knockdown of LC3 B (but not LC3 A) abolished CGK733-triggered LC3 II accumulation and consequently diminished AMPK and PERK/CHOP activity as well as p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. Our results demonstrate that CGK733-triggered LC3 II formation is an initial event upstream of the AMPK and PERK/CHOP pathways, both of which control p21Waf1/Cip1 expression.

  16. Leuhistin, a new inhibitor of aminopeptidase M, produced by Bacillus laterosporus BMI156-14F1. II. Structure determination of leuhistin.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Naganawa, H; Aoyagi, T; Takeuchi, T; Takeuchi, Y; Kodama, Y

    1991-06-01

    Leuhistin, a new inhibitor of aminopeptidase M, has been isolated from the culture broth of Bacillus laterosporus BMI156-14F1. The structure of leuhistin was determined by NMR studies. X-Ray and chemical analysis confirmed the absolute structure to be (2R,3S)-3-amino-2-hydroxy-2-(1H-imidazol-4-ylmethyl)-5-methylhe xanoic acid.

  17. Functional characterization and anti-cancer action of the clinical phase II cardiac Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor istaroxime: in vitro and in vivo properties and cross talk with the membrane androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Konstantinos; Dimas, Konstantinos; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Schmidt, Eva-Maria; Tsapara, Anna; Alkahtani, Saad; Honisch, Sabina; Prousis, Kyriakos C.; Alarifi, Saud; Calogeropoulou, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    Sodium potassium pump (Na+/K+ ATPase) is a validated pharmacological target for the treatment of various cardiac conditions. Recent published data with Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors suggest a potent anti-cancer action of these agents in multiple indications. In the present study, we focus on istaroxime, a Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor that has shown favorable safety and efficacy properties in cardiac phase II clinical trials. Our experiments in 22 cancer cell lines and in prostate tumors in vivo proved the strong anti-cancer action of this compound. Istaroxime induced apoptosis, affected the key proliferative and apoptotic mediators c-Myc and caspase-3 and modified actin cystoskeleton dynamics and RhoA activity in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, istaroxime was capable of binding to mAR, a membrane receptor mediating rapid, non-genomic actions of steroids in prostate and other cells. These results support a multi-level action of Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors in cancer cells and collectively validate istaroxime as a strong re-purposing candidate for further cancer drug development. PMID:27027435

  18. Vitamin D3 therapy corrects the tissue sensitivity to angiotensin ii akin to the action of a converting enzyme inhibitor in obese hypertensives: an interventional study.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Anand; Sun, Bei; Larson, Carol; Forman, John P; Williams, Jonathan S

    2012-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and obesity are associated with increased tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity. The objective of the study was to evaluate whether vitamin D(3) therapy in obesity reduces tissue-RAS activity, as indicated by an increase in tissue sensitivity to angiotensin II (AngII). Participants included obese subjects with hypertension and 25-hydroxyvitamin D less than 25 ng/ml. Subjects were studied before and after 1 month of vitamin D(3) 15,000 IU/d, while in dietary sodium balance, and off all interfering medications. Fourteen subjects successfully completed all study procedures. The study was conducted at a clinical research center. At each study visit, tissue sensitivity to AngII was assessed by measuring renal plasma flow (RPF), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and adrenal secretion of aldosterone during an infusion of AngII. Subjects were then given captopril, and a second AngII infusion to evaluate the effect of captopril on tissue-RAS activity. Vitamin D(3) therapy increased 25-hydroxyvitamin D (18 to 52 ng/ml) and basal RPF (+5%) and lowered supine MAP (-3%) (all P < 0.01). There was a greater decline in RPF and higher stimulation of aldosterone with AngII infusion after vitamin D(3) therapy (both P < 0.05). As anticipated, captopril increased the renal-vascular, MAP, and adrenal sensitivity to AngII, but this effect was much smaller after vitamin D(3) therapy, indicating that vitamin D(3) therapy corrected the tissue sensitivity to AngII akin to captopril. Vitamin D(3) therapy in obese hypertensives modified RPF, MAP, and tissue sensitivity to AngII similar to converting enzyme inhibition. Whether chronic vitamin D(3) therapy abrogates the development of diseases associated with excess RAS activity warrants investigation.

  19. Vitamin D3 Therapy Corrects the Tissue Sensitivity to Angiotensin II Akin to the Action of a Converting Enzyme Inhibitor in Obese Hypertensives: An Interventional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bei; Larson, Carol; Forman, John P.; Williams, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Vitamin D deficiency and obesity are associated with increased tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity. Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate whether vitamin D3 therapy in obesity reduces tissue-RAS activity, as indicated by an increase in tissue sensitivity to angiotensin II (AngII). Participants: Participants included obese subjects with hypertension and 25-hydroxyvitamin D less than 25 ng/ml. Design: Subjects were studied before and after 1 month of vitamin D3 15,000 IU/d, while in dietary sodium balance, and off all interfering medications. Fourteen subjects successfully completed all study procedures. Setting: The study was conducted at a clinical research center. Outcome Measures: At each study visit, tissue sensitivity to AngII was assessed by measuring renal plasma flow (RPF), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and adrenal secretion of aldosterone during an infusion of AngII. Subjects were then given captopril, and a second AngII infusion to evaluate the effect of captopril on tissue-RAS activity. Results: Vitamin D3 therapy increased 25-hydroxyvitamin D (18 to 52 ng/ml) and basal RPF (+5%) and lowered supine MAP (−3%) (all P < 0.01). There was a greater decline in RPF and higher stimulation of aldosterone with AngII infusion after vitamin D3 therapy (both P < 0.05). As anticipated, captopril increased the renal-vascular, MAP, and adrenal sensitivity to AngII, but this effect was much smaller after vitamin D3 therapy, indicating that vitamin D3 therapy corrected the tissue sensitivity to AngII akin to captopril. Conclusions: Vitamin D3 therapy in obese hypertensives modified RPF, MAP, and tissue sensitivity to AngII similar to converting enzyme inhibition. Whether chronic vitamin D3 therapy abrogates the development of diseases associated with excess RAS activity warrants investigation. PMID:22539586

  20. Structure-activity relationships of β-hydroxyphosphonate nucleoside analogues as cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II potential inhibitors: synthesis, in vitro evaluation and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Meurillon, Maïa; Marton, Zsuzsanna; Hospital, Audrey; Jordheim, Lars Petter; Béjaud, Jérôme; Lionne, Corinne; Dumontet, Charles; Périgaud, Christian; Chaloin, Laurent; Peyrottes, Suzanne

    2014-04-22

    The cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II) has been proposed as an attractive molecular target for the development of novel drugs circumventing resistance to cytotoxic nucleoside analogues currently used for treating leukemia and other malignant hemopathies. In the present work, synthesis of β-hydroxyphosphonate nucleoside analogues incorporating modifications either on the sugar residue or the nucleobase, and their in vitro evaluation towards the purified enzyme were carried out in order to determine their potency towards the inhibition of cN-II. In addition to the biochemical investigations, molecular modeling studies revealed important structural features for binding affinities towards the target enzyme.

  1. The remarkable efficiency of a Pin-II proteinase inhibitor sans two conserved disulfide bonds is due to enhanced flexibility and hydrogen bond density in the reactive site loop.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Mishra, Manasi; Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Ghosh, Anirban; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Suresh, C G; Joshi, Rajendra; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-01-01

    Capsicum annuum (L.) expresses diverse potato type II family proteinase inhibitors comprising of inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) as basic functional unit. Most IRDs contain eight conserved cysteines forming four disulfide bonds, which are indispensible for their stability and activity. We investigated the functional significance of evolutionary variations in IRDs and their role in mediating interaction between the inhibitor and cognate proteinase. Among the 18 IRDs encoded by C. annuum, IRD-7, -9, and -12 were selected for further characterization on the basis of variation in their reactive site loop, number of conserved cysteine residues, and higher theoretical ΔGbind for interaction with Helicoverpa armigera trypsin. Moreover, inhibition kinetics showed that IRD-9, despite loss of some of the disulfide bonds, was a more potent proteinase inhibitor among the three selected IRDs. Molecular dynamic simulations revealed that serine residues in the place of cysteines at seventh and eighth positions of IRD-9 resulted in an increase in the density of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and reactive site loop flexibility. Results of the serine residues chemical modification also supported this observation and provided a possible explanation for the remarkable inhibitory potential of IRD-9. Furthermore, this natural variant among IRDs showed special attributes like stability to proteolysis and synergistic inhibitory effect on other IRDs. It is likely that IRDs have coevolved selective specialization of their structure and function as a response towards specific insect proteases they encountered. Understanding the molecular mechanism of pest protease-plant proteinaceous inhibitor interaction will help in developing effective pest control strategies. An animated interactive 3D complement (I3DC) is available in Proteopedia at http://proteopedia.org/w/Journal:JBSD:39.

  2. Phase II study of the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma: a stratified type I-type II study from the GINECO group.

    PubMed

    Heudel, P-E; Fabbro, M; Roemer-Becuwe, C; Kaminsky, M C; Arnaud, A; Joly, F; Roche-Forestier, S; Meunier, J; Foa, C; You, B; Priou, F; Tazi, Y; Floquet, A; Selle, F; Berton-Rigaud, D; Lesoin, A; Kalbacher, E; Lortholary, A; Favier, L; Treilleux, I; Ray-Coquard, I

    2017-01-01

    Backround:Patients with metastatic endometrial carcinoma have a poor prognosis and PIK3CA mutations and amplifications are common in these cancers. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the pure PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma.

  3. Phase I/II clinical trial of 2-difluoromethyl-ornithine (DFMO) and a novel polyamine transport inhibitor (MQT 1426) for feline oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Skorupski, K A; O'Brien, T G; Guerrero, T; Rodriguez, C O; Burns, M R

    2011-12-01

    Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation. Their production is dysregulated in many cancers and polyamine depletion leads to tumour regression in mouse models of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The purpose of this study was to determine the maximally tolerated dose of the polyamine transport inhibitor, MQT 1426, when combined with the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) inhibitor, DFMO, and to determine whether this therapy results in reduction in tumour polyamine levels. Thirteen cats with oral SCC received both drugs orally and serial tumour biopsies were obtained for polyamine measurement. Cats were monitored for response to therapy and toxicity. A maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of MQT 1426 when combined with DFMO was determined. Dose-limiting toxicity was vestibular in nature, but was fully reversible. Spermidine and total polyamine levels decreased significantly in tissues, two cats experienced objective tumour regression and six cats had stable disease. These results suggest that further study of polyamine depletion therapies is warranted.

  4. Use of β-Blockers, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers, and Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Nationwide Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Gitte Vrelits; Ganz, Patricia A.; Cole, Steven W.; Pedersen, Lars A.; Toft Sørensen, Henrik; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P.; Peter Garne, Jens; Christiansen, Peer M.; Lash, Timothy L.; Ahern, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To estimate associations between use of β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and breast cancer recurrence in a large Danish cohort. Patients and Methods We enrolled 18,733 women diagnosed with nonmetastatic breast cancer between 1996 and 2003. Patient, treatment, and 10-year recurrence data were ascertained from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group registry. Prescription and medical histories were ascertained by linkage to the National Prescription Registry and Registry of Patients, respectively. β-Blocker exposure was defined in aggregate and according to solubility, receptor selectivity, and individual drugs. ACE inhibitor and ARB exposures were defined in aggregate. Recurrence associations were estimated with multivariable Cox regression models in which time-varying drug exposures were lagged by 1 year. Results Compared with never users, users of any β-blocker had a lower recurrence hazard in unadjusted models (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.0) and a slightly higher recurrence hazard in adjusted models (adjusted HR = 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.5). Associations were similar for exposures defined by receptor selectivity and solubility. Although most individual β-blockers showed no association with recurrence, metoprolol and sotalol were associated with increased recurrence rates (adjusted metoprolol HR = 1.5, 95% CI, 1.2 to 1.8; adjusted sotalol HR = 2.0, 95% CI, 0.99 to 4.0). ACE inhibitors were associated with a slightly increased recurrence hazard, whereas ARBs were not associated with recurrence (adjusted ACE inhibitor HR = 1.2, 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.4; adjusted ARBs HR = 1.1, 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.3). Conclusion Our data do not support the hypothesis that β-blockers attenuate breast cancer recurrence risk. PMID:23650417

  5. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. II. Contribution of the uni- and bimolecular activation routes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Escribano, J; Masia-Perez, J; Muñoz-Muñoz, J L; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    From the kinetic study carried out in part I of this series (preceding article) an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the uni- and bimolecular routes has been carried out. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect on this relative weight of the initial zymogen, inhibitor and activating enzyme concentrations.

  6. ProTx-II, a selective inhibitor of NaV1.7 sodium channels, blocks action potential propagation in nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Schmalhofer, William A; Calhoun, Jeffrey; Burrows, Rachel; Bailey, Timothy; Kohler, Martin G; Weinglass, Adam B; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L; Koltzenburg, Martin; Priest, Birgit T

    2008-11-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)1) channels play a critical role in modulating the excitability of sensory neurons, and human genetic evidence points to Na(V)1.7 as an essential contributor to pain signaling. Human loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A, the gene encoding Na(V)1.7, cause channelopathy-associated indifference to pain (CIP), whereas gain-of-function mutations are associated with two inherited painful neuropathies. Although the human genetic data make Na(V)1.7 an attractive target for the development of analgesics, pharmacological proof-of-concept in experimental pain models requires Na(V)1.7-selective channel blockers. Here, we show that the tarantula venom peptide ProTx-II selectively interacts with Na(V)1.7 channels, inhibiting Na(V)1.7 with an IC(50) value of 0.3 nM, compared with IC(50) values of 30 to 150 nM for other heterologously expressed Na(V)1 subtypes. This subtype selectivity was abolished by a point mutation in DIIS3. It is interesting that application of ProTx-II to desheathed cutaneous nerves completely blocked the C-fiber compound action potential at concentrations that had little effect on Abeta-fiber conduction. ProTx-II application had little effect on action potential propagation of the intact nerve, which may explain why ProTx-II was not efficacious in rodent models of acute and inflammatory pain. Mono-iodo-ProTx-II ((125)I-ProTx-II) binds with high affinity (K(d) = 0.3 nM) to recombinant hNa(V)1.7 channels. Binding of (125)I-ProTx-II is insensitive to the presence of other well characterized Na(V)1 channel modulators, suggesting that ProTx-II binds to a novel site, which may be more conducive to conferring subtype selectivity than the site occupied by traditional local anesthetics and anticonvulsants. Thus, the (125)I-ProTx-II binding assay, described here, offers a new tool in the search for novel Na(V)1.7-selective blockers.

  7. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-4-ones as a New Class of Topoisomerase II Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Baraldi, Stefania; Prencipe, Filippo; Preti, Delia; Saponaro, Giulia; Romagnoli, Romeo; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Stefanelli, Angela; Fazzi, Debora; Borea, Pier Andrea; Maia, Rodolfo Couto; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Fraga, Carlos A M; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2015-01-01

    A series of 1,3,6-triphenylpyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-4-one derivatives was designed, synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxic activity in A375 human melanoma and human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells. The new pyrazolopyridones displayed comparable activities to the antitumor compound etoposide. The inhibitory effect of compounds 17, 18, 27 and 32 against topoisomerase II-mediated cleavage activities was measured finding good correlation with the results obtained from MTS assay. Docking studies into bacterial topoisomerase II (DNA Gyrase), topoisomerase IIα and topoisomerase IIβ binding sites in the DNA binding interface were performed.

  8. Louisianins A, B, C and D: non-steroidal growth inhibitors of testosterone-responsive SC 115 cells. II. Physico-chemical properties and structural elucidation.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, S; Kim, Y P; Hayashi, M; Furuhata, K; Takayanagi, H; Komiyama, K; Woodruff, H B; Omura, S

    1995-10-01

    New non-steroidal growth inhibitors of testosterone-responsive SC 115 cells, louisianins A (MW: 189; C11H11NO2), B (MW: 191; C11H13NO2), C (MW: 173; C11H11NO) and D (MW: 173; C11H11NO) were isolated from the cultured broth of Streptomyces sp. WK-4028. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data. The structure of louisianin A in particular was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The four compounds commonly possess a unique pyrindine skeleton in the molecule.

  9. Carbasugar probes to explore the enzyme binding pocket at the anomeric position: application to the design of Golgi mannosidase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vinader, M V; Afarinkia, K

    2013-01-01

    A methodology is described for the highly efficient and divergent synthesis of pseudosugars which allows the stereoselective introduction of polar groups at either the α or the β pseudoanomeric positions. Using this method, a series of 3-deoxycarbasugar analogues of mannose bearing a pyridyl group are rationally designed, prepared and tested for inhibition of Golgi α-mannosidase II.

  10. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... side effects include: Dizziness Elevated blood potassium level (hyperkalemia) Localized swelling of tissues (angioedema) There have been ... 31, 2016. Townsend RR. Major side effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers. http://www.uptodate. ...

  11. Modulation of inhibitory activity of xylanase-α-amylase inhibitor protein (XAIP): binding studies and crystal structure determination of XAIP-II from Scadoxus multiflorus at 1.2 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjit; Singh, Nagendra; Mishra, Biswajit; Dube, Divya; Sinha, Mau; Singh, S Baskar; Dey, Sharmistha; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2010-11-20

    Plants produce a wide range of proteinaceous inhibitors to protect themselves against hydrolytic enzymes. Recently a novel protein XAIP belonging to a new sub-family (GH18C) was reported to inhibit two structurally unrelated enzymes xylanase GH11 and α-amylase GH13. It was shown to inhibit xylanase GH11 with greater potency than that of α-amylase GH13. A new form of XAIP (XAIP-II) that inhibits α-amylase GH13 with a greater potency than that of XAIP and xylanase GH11 with a lower potency than that of XAIP, has been identified in the extracts of underground bulbs of Scadoxus multiflorus. This kind of occurrence of isoforms of inhibitor proteins is a rare observation and offers new opportunities for understanding the principles of protein engineering by nature. In order to determine the structural basis of the enhanced potency of XAIP-II against α-amylase GH13 and its reduced potency against xylanase GH11 as compared to that of XAIP, we have purified XAIP-II to homogeneity and obtained its complete amino acid sequence using cloning procedure. It has been crystallized with 0.1 M ammonium sulphate as the precipitating agent and the three-dimensional structure has been determined at 1.2 Å resolution. The binding studies of XAIP-II with xylanase GH11 and α-amylase GH13 have been carried out with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The structure determination revealed that XAIP-II adopts the well known TIM barrel fold. The xylanase GH11 binding site in XAIP-II is formed mainly with loop α3-β3 (residues, 102 - 118) which has acquired a stereochemically less favorable conformation for binding to xylanase GH11 because of the addition of an extra residue, Ala105 and due to replacements of two important residues, His106 and Asn109 by Thr107 and Ser110. On the other hand, the α-amylase binding site, which consists of α-helices α6 (residues, 193 - 206), α7 (residues, 230 - 243) and loop β6-α6 (residues, 180 - 192) adopts a stereochemically more favorable conformation

  12. Phase II trial of the farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib plus fulvestrant in hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer: New York Cancer Consortium Trial P6205

    PubMed Central

    Li, T.; Christos, P. J.; Sparano, J. A.; Hershman, D. L.; Hoschander, S.; O'Brien, K.; Wright, J. J.; Vahdat, L. T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Fulvestrant produces a clinical benefit rate (CBR) of ∼45% in tamoxifen-resistant, hormone receptor (HR)-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and 32% in aromatase inhibitor (AI)-resistant disease. The farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib inhibits Ras signaling and has preclinical and clinical activity in endocrine therapy-resistant disease. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of tipifarnib–fulvestrant combination in HR-positive MBC. Patients and methods: Postmenopausal women with no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease received i.m. fulvestrant 250 mg on day 1 plus oral tipifarnib 300 mg twice daily on days 1–21 every 28 days. The primary end point was CBR. Results: The CBR was 51.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 34.0% to 69.2%] in 31 eligible patients and 47.6% (95% CI 26.3% to 69.0%) in 21 patients with AI-resistant disease. A futility analysis indicated that it was unlikely to achieve the prespecified 70% CBR. Tipifarnib dose modification was required in 8 of 33 treated patients (24%). Conclusions: The target CBR of 70% for the tipifarnib–fulvestrant combination in HR-positive MBC was set too high and was not achieved. The 48% CBR in AI-resistant disease compares favorably with the 32% CBR observed with fulvestrant alone in prior studies and merit further clinical and translational evaluation. PMID:19153124

  13. Combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide and 5-fluorouracil upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II and p21 genes and activates caspase-3/7 in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kouji; Hakata, Shuko; Terashima, Jun; Gamou, Toshie; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic anticancer drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been combined with existing anticancer drugs for synergistic or additive effects. In the present study, we found that a very low concentration of depsipeptide, an HDAC inhibitor, potentiated the antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a human colon cancer cell model using HCT-116, HT29, and SW48 cells via the inhibition of colony formation ability or cellular viability. Exposure to a combination of 5-FU (1.75 µM) and 1 nM depsipeptide for 24 and 48 h resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase in activated caspase-3/7, while 5-FU alone failed to activate caspase-3/7. Microarray and subsequent gene ontology analyses revealed that compared to 5-FU or depsipeptide alone, the combination treatment of 5-FU and depsipeptide upregulated genes related to cell death and the apoptotic process consistent with the inhibition of colony formation and caspase-3/7 activation. These analyses indicated marked upregulation of antigen processing and presentation of peptide or polysaccharide antigen via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class (GO:0002504) and MHC protein complex (GO:0042611). Compared with vehicle controls, the cells treated with the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide showed marked induction (3- to 8.5-fold) of expression of MHC class II genes, but not of MHC class I genes. Furthermore, our global analysis of gene expression, which was focused on genes involved in the molecular regulation of MHC class II genes, showed enhancement of pro-apoptotic PCAF and CIITA after the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide. These results may indicate a closer relationship between elevation of MHC class II expression and cellular apoptosis induced by the combination of depsipeptide and 5-FU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report that the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide induces human colon cancer cell apoptosis in a concerted manner with the induction of MHC class II gene

  14. A phase II trial of ganetespib, a heat shock protein 90 Hsp90) inhibitor, in patients with docetaxel-pretreated metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)-a prostate cancer clinical trials consortium (PCCTC) study.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manish K; Heilbrun, Lance K; Sheng, Shijie; Stein, Mark; Liu, Glenn; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Dzinic, Sijana H; Li, Xiaohua; Freeman, Stacy; Smith, Daryn; Heath, Elisabeth I

    2016-02-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been studied as a therapeutic target in many cancers. In preclinical trials, the Hsp90 ATPase inhibitor ganetespib demonstrated potent inhibition of solid tumor growth, with superior potency than prior Hsp90 inhibitors. Given the promising preclinical outcome and favorable pharmacologic properties of ganetespib, we conducted a phase II trial of single-agent ganetespib in patients with metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The primary objective of the study was to determine the 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate. Patients with mCRPC who had been previously treated with docetaxel were enrolled after meeting eligibility criteria. All patients received ganetespib at 200 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of every 28 days (one cycle). Subjects who tolerated therapy were continued on ganetespib until disease progression. Considering that Hsp90 acetylation may confer insensitivity to Hsp90 inhibitors and maspin inhibits protein deacetylation, maspin-associated molecular markers were evaluated. Eighteen patients were recruited into the trial; most were Caucasian, had performance status 1, had received prior docetaxel, and were heavily pretreated. Of the 17 patients who were treated, none attained 6-month PFS. Only 2 patients achieved PFS > 4 months. The median PFS was 1.9 months. As per the study design, the trial was terminated after the interim analysis. The most frequent types of Grade 3 toxicity were dehydration, diarrhea, and fatigue. Molecular markers provided little additional insight regarding drug activity. Ganetespib demonstrated minimal clinical activity in men with mCRPC. The true 6-month PFS rate was, at most, 0.20. Possible reasons for this include selection of a heavily pretreated patient population and lack of agent potency in patients with mCRPC.

  15. Next generation sequencing analysis of platinum refractory advanced germ cell tumor sensitive to Sunitinib (Sutent®) a VEGFR2/PDGFRβ/c-kit/ FLT3/RET/CSF1R inhibitor in a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Mills, Gordon B; Shaw, Kenna R Mills; Bailey, Ann Marie; Rao, Priya; Ward, John F; Pagliaro, Lance C

    2014-08-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are the most common solid tumors in adolescent and young adult males (age 15 and 35 years) and remain one of the most curable of all solid malignancies. However a subset of patients will have tumors that are refractory to standard chemotherapy agents. The management of this refractory population remains challenging and approximately 400 patients continue to die every year of this refractory disease in the United States. Given the preclinical evidence implicating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in the biology of germ cell tumors, we hypothesized that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor sunitinib (Sutent) may possess important clinical activity in the treatment of this refractory disease. We proposed a Phase II efficacy study of sunitinib in seminomatous and non-seminomatous metastatic GCT's refractory to first line chemotherapy treatment (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00912912). Next generation targeted exome sequencing using HiSeq 2000 (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) was performed on the tumor sample of the unusual responder. Five patients are enrolled into this Phase II study. Among them we report here the clinical course of a patient (Patient # 5) who had an exceptional response to sunitinib. Next generation sequencing to understand this patient's response to sunitinib revealed RET amplification, EGFR and KRAS amplification as relevant aberrations. Oncoscan MIP array were employed to validate the copy number analysis that confirmed RET gene amplification. Sunitinib conferred clinical benefit to this heavily pre-treated patient. Next generation sequencing of this 'exceptional responder' identified the first reported case of a RET amplification as a potential basis of sensitivity to sunitinib (VEGFR2/PDGFRβ/c-kit/ FLT3/RET/CSF1R inhibitor) in a patient with refractory germ cell tumor. Further characterization of GCT patients using biomarkers for clinical response and patient

  16. The effect of ACE inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor antagonist therapy on serum uric acid levels and potassium homeostasis in hypertensive renal transplant recipients treated with CsA.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A; Gruber, U; Böhmig, G; Köller, E; Mayer, G

    2001-05-01

    The angiotensin II (AT II) type I receptor antagonist losartan has been reported to increase urinary uric acid and potassium excretion. These effects might be beneficial in cyclosporin (CsA)-treated renal transplant recipients, who frequently suffer from hyperuricaemia and hyperkalaemia. In this prospective, open, randomized, two-way cross-over study we included 13 hypertensive CsA-treated patients after renal transplantation and administered either the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors enalapril or losartan. Laboratory parameters, 24-h urinary protein excretion, and mean 24-h arterial blood pressure (MAP) were checked after 3 weeks treatment with enalapril, after a wash-out period of 2 weeks, and before and after a 3-week treatment course with losartan. Both drugs slightly reduced MAP (losartan from 97+/-6 to 94+/-9 and enalapril to 93+/-8 mmHg). Serum potassium levels significantly increased during enalapril therapy (from 4.3+/-0.5 to 4.8+/-0.4 mmol/l, P<0.05), as did, although not significantly, uric acid concentrations (from 7.8+/-1.9 to 8.2+/-1.8 mg/dl, P=0.5). Losartan, on the contrary, only mildly affected serum potassium (4.3+/-0.5 vs 4.5+/-0.5 mmol/l, P=0.25) and serum uric acid decreased (from 7.8+/-2.4 to 7.3+/-1.8 mg/dl, P=0.6). Serum aldosterone and urinary aldosterone excretion were significantly reduced only during ACE inhibitor treatment, which might explain the variable effects on potassium homeostasis. Losartan may be a useful agent to reduce blood pressure and serum uric acid levels in renal transplant recipients treated with CSA: Furthermore, in this high-risk population, the effects on serum potassium levels are less marked with losartan than with enalapril.

  17. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of MitochondrialRespiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent AdductWith a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C.; Shen,John T.; Tung, Eric Y.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  18. 3-nitropropionic acid is a suicide inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration that, upon oxidation by complex II, forms a covalent adduct with a catalytic base arginine in the active site of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C; Shen, John T; Tung, Eric Y; Anderson, Vernon E; Berry, Edward A

    2006-03-03

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 A resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg(297) as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg(297). The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg(297) to be increased by 83 Da and to have the potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  19. New derivatives of 11-methyl-6-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-6H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline as cytotoxic DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luniewski, Wojciech; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Godlewska, Joanna; Switalska, Marta; Piskozub, Malgorzata; Peczynska-Czoch, Wanda; Kaczmarek, Lukasz

    2012-10-01

    Novel indolo[2,3-b]quinoline derivatives substituted at N-6 and C-2 or C-9 positions with (dimethylamino)ethyl chains linked to heteroaromatic core by ether, amide or amine bonds, were manufactured and evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against several cell lines of different origin including multidrug resistant sublines and tested for their ability to influence the cell cycle and inhibit topoisomerase II activity. It was found, that all compounds show cytotoxic activity against cell lines tested, including multidrug resistant LoVo/DX, MES-SA/DX5 and HL-60 sublines. The tested compounds induce the G(2)M phase cell cycle arrest in Jurkat cells, and inhibit topoisomerase II activity.

  20. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of 9-benzylamino-6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridine derivatives as potent DNA-binding ligands and topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Ti; Wang, Ning; Gao, Chunmei; Tan, Chunyan; Liu, Hongxia; Jiang, Yuyang

    2016-06-30

    A series of 9-benzylamino acridine derivatives were synthesized as an extension of our discovery of acridine antitumor agents. Most of these acridine compounds displayed good antiproliferative activity with IC50 values in low micromole range and structure-activity relationships were studied. Topo I- and II- mediated relaxation studies suggested that all of our compounds displayed strong Topo II inhibitory activity at 100 μM, while only four exhibited moderate Topo I inhibitory activity. The typical compound 8p could penetrate A549 cancer cells efficiently. Compound 8p could intercalate within the double-stranded DNA structure and induce DNA damage. Moreover, compound 8p could induce A549 cells apoptosis through caspase-dependent intrinsic pathway and arrest A549 cells at the G2/M phase.

  1. Natural inhibitors of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Huntington, James A

    2014-04-01

    The serine protease thrombin is the effector enzyme of blood coagulation. It has many activities critical for the formation of stable clots, including cleavage of fibrinogen to fibrin, activation of platelets and conversion of procofactors to active cofactors. Thrombin carries-out its multiple functions by utilising three special features: a deep active site cleft and two anion binding exosites (exosite I and II). Similarly, thrombin inhibitors have evolved to exploit the unique features of thrombin to achieve rapid and specific inactivation of thrombin. Exogenous thrombin inhibitors come from several different protein families and are generally found in the saliva of haematophagous animals (blood suckers) as part of an anticoagulant cocktail that allows them to feed. Crystal structures of several of these inhibitors reveal how peptides and proteins can be targeted to thrombin in different and interesting ways. Thrombin activity must also be regulated by endogenous inhibitors so that thrombi do not occlude blood flow and cause thrombosis. A single protein family, the serpins, provides all four of the endogenous thrombin inhibitors found in man. The crystal structures of these serpins bound to thrombin have been solved, revealing a similar exosite-dependence on complex formation. In addition to forming the recognition complex, serpins destroy the structure of thrombin, allowing them to be released from cofactors and substrates for clearance. This review examines how the special features of thrombin have been exploited by evolution to achieve inhibition of the ultimate coagulation protease.

  2. Copper(II) complexes with highly water-soluble L- and D-proline-thiosemicarbazone conjugates as potential inhibitors of Topoisomerase IIα.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Felix; Enyedy, Éva A; Nagy, Nóra V; Rockenbauer, Antal; Bognár, Gabriella M; Trondl, Robert; Novak, Maria S; Klapproth, Erik; Kiss, Tamás; Arion, Vladimir B

    2013-08-05

    Two proline-thiosemicarbazone bioconjugates with excellent aqueous solubility, namely, 3-methyl-(S)-pyrrolidine-2-carboxylate-2-formylpyridine thiosemicarbazone [L-Pro-FTSC or (S)-H2L] and 3-methyl-(R)-pyrrolidine-2-carboxylate-2-formylpyridine thiosemicarbazone [D-Pro-FTSC or (R)-H2L], have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The complexation behavior of L-Pro-FTSC with copper(II) in an aqueous solution and in a 30% (w/w) dimethyl sulfoxide/water mixture has been studied via pH potentiometry, UV-vis spectrophotometry, electron paramagnetic resonance, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and spectrofluorimetry. By the reaction of copper(II) acetate with (S)-H2L and (R)-H2L in water, the complexes [Cu(S,R)-L] and [Cu(R,S)-L] have been synthesized and comprehensively characterized. An X-ray diffraction study of [Cu(S,R)-L] showed the formation of a square-pyramidal complex, with the bioconjugate acting as a pentadentate ligand. Both copper(II) complexes displayed antiproliferative activity in CH1 ovarian carcinoma cells and inhibited Topoisomerase IIα activity in a DNA plasmid relaxation assay.

  3. Novel mammalian cell cycle inhibitors, tryprostatins A, B and other diketopiperazines produced by Aspergillus fumigatus. II. Physico-chemical properties and structures.

    PubMed

    Cui, C B; Kakeya, H; Osada, H

    1996-06-01

    Two novel diketopiperazines named tryprostatins A and B and a new natural product belonging to the diketopiperazine series, designated as demethoxyfumitremorgin C, together with four known diketopiperazines, fumitremorgin C, 12,13-dihydroxyfumitremorgin C, fumitremorgin B and verruculogen, are new M phase inhibitors of the mammalian cell cycle, which were isolated from the secondary metabolites of Aspergillus fumigatus. The structures of tryprostatins A, B and demethoxyfumitremorgin C were determined mainly by the use of spectroscopic methods especially by detailed analyses of their 1H and 13C NMR spectra with the aid of 2D NMR techniques including pulse field gradient heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (PFG-HMBC) spectroscopy. Their absolute configurations were determined on the basis of the optical rotational values and CD spectra.

  4. [Thromboxane synthetase inhibitors. II. Optical resolution of 4-[alpha-hydroxy-5-(1-imidazolyl)-2-methylbenzyl]-3,5-dimethylbenzo ic acid].

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, M; Shiotsuki, T; Matsumoto, T; Oe, T

    1989-01-01

    The optical resolution of racemic 4-[alpha-hydroxy-5-(1-imidazolyl)-2-methylbenzyl]-3,5-dimethylbenzoic acid (dl-I), a new potent and long lasting thromboxane synthetase inhibitor, was investigated. (S)-3-(3,5-Dinitrobenzoylthio)-2-methylpropionyl group was introduced to alpha-hydroxy moiety of methyl ester of dl-I by three steps of reaction to give the corresponding ester compound (VIa). Then, two diastereomers of VIa, alpha-VIa and beta-VIa, were separated by column chromatography using on silica gel. Alkaline hydrolysis of alpha-VIa and beta-VIa, followed by reactions with sodium ethylate gave optically pure sodium salts of (-)-I and (+)-I, respectively. The separative determination methods for the diastereomers of VIa, and for the enantiomers of the sodium salts of dl-I by high performance liquid chromatography were also established.

  5. In silico modification of Zn2+ binding group of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by organoselenium compounds as Homo sapiens class II HDAC inhibitor of cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumo Friend Tambunan, Usman; Bakri, Ridla; Aditya Parikesit, Arli; Ariyani, Titin; Dyah Puspitasari, Ratih; Kerami, Djati

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women, and ranks seventh of all cancers worldwide, with 529000 cases in 2008 and more than 85% cases occur in developing countries. One way to treat this cancer is through the inhibition of HDAC enzymes which play a strategic role in the regulation of gene expression. Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) or Vorinostat is a drug which commercially available to treat the cancer, but still has some side effects. This research present in silico SAHA modification in Zinc Binding Group (ZBG) by organoselenium compound to get ligands which less side effect. From molecular docking simulation, and interaction analysis, there are five best ligands, namely CC27, HA27, HB28, IB25, and KA7. These five ligands have better binding affinity than the standards, and also have interaction with Zn2+ cofactor of inhibited HDAC enzymes. This research is expected to produce more potent HDAC inhibitor as novel drug for cervical cancer treatment.

  6. The CDK inhibitor AT7519M in patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma. A Phase II study of the Canadian Cancer Trials Group.

    PubMed

    Seftel, Matthew D; Kuruvilla, John; Kouroukis, Tom; Banerji, Versha; Fraser, Graeme; Crump, Michael; Kumar, Rajat; Chalchal, Haji I; Salim, Muhammad; Laister, Rob C; Crocker, Susan; Gibson, Spencer B; Toguchi, Marcia; Lyons, John F; Xu, Hao; Powers, Jean; Sederias, Joana; Seymour, Lesley; Hay, Annette E

    2017-06-01

    AT7519M is a small molecule inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 1, 2, 4, 5, and 9 with in vitro activity against lymphoid malignancies. In two concurrent Phase II trials, we evaluated AT7519M in relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) using the recommended Phase II dosing of 27 mg/m(2) twice weekly for 2 of every 3 weeks. Primary objective was objective response rate (ORR). Nineteen patients were accrued (7 CLL, 12 MCL). Four CLL patients achieved stable disease (SD). Two MCL patients achieved partial response (PR), and 6 had SD. One additional MCL patient with SD subsequently achieved PR 9 months after completion of AT7519M. Tumor lysis syndrome was not reported. In conclusion, AT7519M was safely administered to patients with relapsed/refractory CLL and MCL. In CLL, some patients had tumor reductions, but the ORR was low. In MCL, activity was noted with ORR of 27%.

  7. Microwave assisted synthesis of novel tetrazole/sulfonamide derivatives based on octahydroacridine, xanthene and chromene skeletons as inhibitors of the carbonic anhydrases isoforms I, II, IV and VII.

    PubMed

    Esirden, İbrahim; Tanç, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T; Kaya, Muharrem

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of novel tetrazole/sulfonamide derivatives based on octahydroacridine, xanthene and chromene scaffold by using microwave (MW) assisted techniques is reported in this study. These synthesized hybrid compounds were assayed for the inhibition of carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The inhibitory activities were determined against three cytosolic human isoforms (hCA I, II and VII) and one membrane-associated (hCA IV) isoform. Some of the newly synthesized sulfonamides showed micromolar to nanomolar inhibitory activity against these enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Phosphorylation of p53 on Ser15 during cell cycle caused by Topo I and Topo II inhibitors in relation to ATM and Chk2 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Traganos, Frank; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2008-10-01

    The DNA topoisomerase I (topo1) inhibitor topotecan (TPT) and topo2 inhibitor mitoxantrone (MXT) damage DNA inducing formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We have recently examined the kinetics of ATM and Chk2 activation as well as histone H2AX phosphorylation, the reporters of DNA damage, in individual human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells treated with these drugs. Using a phospho-specific Ab to tumor suppressor protein p53 phosphorylated on Ser15 (p53-Ser15(P)) combined with an Ab that detects p53 regardless of the phosphorylation status and multiparameter cytometry we correlated the TPT- and MXT-induced p53-Ser15(P) with ATM and Chk2 activation as well as with H2AX phosphorylation in relation to the cell cycle phase. In untreated interphase cells, p53-Ser15(P) had "patchy" localization throughout the nucleoplasm while mitotic cells showed strong p53-Ser15(P) cytoplasmic immunofluorescence (IF). The intense phosphorylation of p53-Ser15, combined with activation of ATM and Chk2 (involving centrioles) as well as phosphorylation of H2AX seen in the untreated mitotic cells, suggest mobilization of the DNA damage detection/repair machinery in controlling cytokinesis. In the nuclei of cells treated with TPT or MXT, the expression of p53-Ser15(P) appeared as closely packed foci of intense IF. Following TPT treatment, the induction of p53-Ser15(P) was most pronounced in S-phase cells while no significant cell cycle phase differences were seen in cells treated with MXT. The maximal increase in p53-Ser15(P) expression, rising up to 2.5-fold above the level of its constitutive expression, was observed in cells treated with TPT or MXT for 4-6 h. This maximum expression of p53-Ser15(P) coincided in time with the peak of Chk2 activation but not with ATM activation and H2AX phosphorylation, both of which crested 1-2 h after the treatment with TPT or MXT. The respective kinetics of p53-Ser15 phosphorylation versus ATM and Chk2 activation suggest that in response to DNA

  9. Phosphorylation of p53 on Ser15 during cell cycle caused by Topo I and Topo II inhibitors in relation to ATM and Chk2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Traganos, Frank; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    The DNA topoisomerase I (topo1) inhibitor topotecan (TPT) and topo2 inhibitor mitoxantrone (MXT) damage DNA inducing formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We have recently examined the kinetics of ATM and Chk2 activation as well as histone H2AX phosphorylation, the reporters of DNA damage, in individual human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells treated with these drugs. Using a phospho-specific Ab to tumor suppressor protein p53 phosphorylated on Ser15 (p53-Ser15P) combined with an Ab that detects p53 regardless of the phosphorylation status and multiparameter cytometry we correlated the TPT- and MXT- induced p53-Ser15P with ATM and Chk2 activation as well as with H2AX phosphorylation in relation to the cell cycle phase. In untreated interphase cells, p53-Ser15P had “patchy” localization throughout the nucleoplasm while mitotic cells showed strong p53-Ser15P cytoplasmic immunofluorescence (IF). The intense phosphorylation of p53-Ser15, combined with activation of ATM and Chk2 (involving centrioles) as well as phosphorylation of H2AX seen in the untreated mitotic cells, suggest mobilization of the DNA damage detection/repair machinery in controlling cytokinesis. In the nuclei of cells treated with TPT or MXT, the expression of p53-Ser15P appeared as closely packed foci of intense IF. Following TPT treatment, the induction of p53-Ser15P was most pronounced in S-phase cells while no significant cell cycle phase differences were seen in cells treated with MXT. The maximal increase in p53-Ser15P expression, rising up to 2.5-fold above the level of its constitutive expression, was observed in cells treated with TPT or MXT for 4–6 h. This maximum expression of p53-Ser15P coincided in time with the peak of Chk2 activation but not with ATM activation and H2AX phosphorylation, both of which crested 1–2 h after the treatment with TPT or MXT. The respective kinetics of p53-Ser15 phosphorylation versus ATM and Chk2 activation suggest that in response to DNA damage by

  10. Biological evaluation of omega-(dialkylamino)alkyl derivatives of 6H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline--novel cytotoxic DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Joanna; Luniewski, Wojciech; Zagrodzki, Bogdan; Kaczmarek, Lukasz; Bielawska-Pohl, Aleksandra; Dus, Danuta; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Opolski, Adam; Siwko, Magdalena; Jaromin, Anna; Jakubiak, Anna; Kozubek, Arkadiusz; Peczyñska-Czoch, Wanda

    2005-01-01

    A series of novel 6H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline derivatives, substituted at C-2, C-9 or N-6 position with dialkyl(alkylamino)alkyl chains differing in the number of methylene groups, was prepared. These compounds were evaluated in vitro for their antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity against several cell lines of different origin and tested for their ability to influence the cell cycle and inhibit topoisomerase II activity. Liphophilic and calf thymus DNA-binding properties of these compounds were also investigated. All the compounds tested inhibited the growth of Gram-positive bacteria and fungi at MIC values ranging between 0.25 and 1 mM. They also showed cytotoxic activity against KB (human cervix carcinoma) cells (ID50 varied from 2.1 to 9.0 microM) and were able to overcome multidrug resistance in colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo/DX, uterine sarcoma MES-SA/DX5 and promyelocytic leukemia HL-60/MX2 cells (the values of the resistance index RI fell between 0.54 and 2.4). The compounds induced G2M-phase cell cycle arrest in Jurkat T-cell leukemia cells, revealed DNA-binding properties and inhibited topoisomerase II activity.

  11. Looking for the new preparations for antibacterial therapy. II. Clinical trials; new beta-lactam antibiotics and beta-lactamase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Karpiuk, Izabela; Tyski, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    To obtain a status of a medicinal product, a compound possessing potential antimicrobial activity and displaying no cytotoxicity, must undergo three phases of clinical trials to prove its therapeutic efficacy, safety and quality. Properties of the compound should be based on the results of studies meeting specific criteria. Studies should be: randomized, double-blind, involving sufficient number of volunteers, concerning the infections localized in strictly defined area and caused by identified microorganisms. After the medicinal product is authorized to be on the market, clinical trials of the fourth phase are carried out to detect adverse effects, overdose symptoms, interactions of the new drug with other medicinal products and to establish characteristic of activity among groups such as children, elderly, women in pregnancy and patients suffering from other diseases, but only if the benefits of receiving treatment outweigh the risks. This article is a second part of the series associated with searching for new antibacterial agents and it relates to performance of clinical trials and the new compounds belonging to the class of beta-lactams. Among the 9 presented compounds, candidates to become medicinal products, two belong to the cephalosporins (CXA-101, S-649266), one to carbapenems (razupenem), three to monobactams (BAL30072, BAL30376, MC-1) and three to beta-lactamase inhibitors (NXL-104, MK-7655, ME1071).

  12. Phase II study assessing lapatinib added to letrozole in patients with progressive disease under aromatase inhibitor in metastatic breast cancer-Study BES 06.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, C; Romieu, G; Salvat, J; Chaigneau, L; Merrouche, Y; N'guyen, T; Vuillemin, A Thiery; Demarchi, M; Dobi, E; Pivot, Xavier

    2013-06-01

    This trial evaluated the effect of adding lapatinib to letrozole after clinical resistance to aromatase inhibitor (IA) treatment in hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer. Postmenopausal women received daily letrozole plus lapatinib (1,500 mg). The primary end point was objective rate response (ORR) at week 12. Secondary objectives included time to response, duration of response, clinical benefit (CB), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival, and safety. Twenty-four human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative patients were included with secondary resistance to IA. ORR at 12 weeks was 4 % (95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.7-20). Stable and progression diseases were reported in 25 % (95 % CI, 12-45) and 71 % (95 % CI, 51-85) of cases, respectively. At 24 weeks, the ORR increased to 8 %. CB was 21 % (95 % CI, 9-40). At a median follow-up of 27 months, median PFS was 3.4 months (95 % CI, 2.8-5.4). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events were rarely reported. No clinical cardiac toxicity was observed. Lapatinib was discontinued in two patients due to severe diarrhea. This trial was prematurely closed due to low recruitment. These preliminary results suggest that the addition of lapatinib to letrozole has a favorable safety profile and could overcome tumoral resistance to letrozole among HER2-negative tumors.

  13. Economic evaluations of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in type 2 diabetic nephropathy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Structured comparison of pharmacoeconomic analyses for ACEIs and ARBs in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy is still lacking. This review aims to systematically review the cost-effectiveness of both ACEIs and ARBs in type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy. Methods A systematic literature search was performed in MEDLINE and EMBASE for the period from November 1, 1999 to Oct 31, 2011. Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of the articles included and extracted data. All cost-effectiveness results were converted to 2011 Euros. Results Up to October 2011, 434 articles were identified. After full-text checking and quality assessment, 30 articles were finally included in this review involving 39 study settings. All 6 ACEIs studies were literature-based evaluations which synthesized data from different sources. Other 33 studies were directed at ARBs and were designed based on specific trials. The Markov model was the most common decision analytic method used in the evaluations. From the cost-effectiveness results, 37 out of 39 studies indicated either ACEIs or ARBs were cost-saving comparing with placebo/conventional treatment, such as amlodipine. A lack of evidence was assessed for valid direct comparison of cost-effectiveness between ACEIs and ARBs. Conclusion There is a lack of direct comparisons of ACEIs and ARBs in existing economic evaluations. Considering the current evidence, both ACEIs and ARBs are likely cost-saving comparing with conventional therapy, excluding such RAAS inhibitors. PMID:24428868

  14. A phase II study of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, CV6504, in advanced pancreatic cancer: correlation of clinical data with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic endpoints.

    PubMed

    Ferry, D R; Deakin, M; Baddeley, J; Daryanani, S; Bramhall, S; Anderson, D A; Wakelam, M J; Doran, J; Pemberton, G; Young, A M; Buckels, J; Kerr, D J

    2000-09-01

    Primary objective was to determine response rate of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer to a novel lipoxygenase and thromboxane A2 synthetase inhibitor (CV6504); secondary objectives included estimation of pharmacokinetics of CV6504, target-enzyme inhibition, safety and tolerance, quality of life and survival. Thirty-one patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were planned to receive CV6504, 100 mg TDS, orally for three months, at which point CT scans were performed to assess therapeutic response rates. Steady state concentrations of CV6504 and thromboxane B2 (an indirect measure of thromboxane A2 synthetase (TA2S) inhibition) were made. Of the 31 patients entered into the study, 23 were considered fully evaluable for response. The drug was well tolerated with few side effects; no partial or complete responses were seen, but 10 patients had stable disease at 3 months; quality of life was maintained during therapy; mean CV6504 steady state plasma concentrations of 14 +/- 6 ng/ml resulting in 75 +/- 18% inhibition of TA2S were achieved; median-survival time for all patients considered eligible for assessment of efficacy was 36.6 weeks after the initial dose of study medication. The actuarial one-year survival was approximately 25%. CV6504 inhibits its target enzyme in vivo, maintains stable disease in 32% of evaluable patients and is well tolerated.

  15. Economic evaluations of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in type 2 diabetic nephropathy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yunyu; Zhou, Qiyun; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Postma, Maarten J

    2014-01-15

    Structured comparison of pharmacoeconomic analyses for ACEIs and ARBs in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy is still lacking. This review aims to systematically review the cost-effectiveness of both ACEIs and ARBs in type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy. A systematic literature search was performed in MEDLINE and EMBASE for the period from November 1, 1999 to Oct 31, 2011. Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of the articles included and extracted data. All cost-effectiveness results were converted to 2011 Euros. Up to October 2011, 434 articles were identified. After full-text checking and quality assessment, 30 articles were finally included in this review involving 39 study settings. All 6 ACEIs studies were literature-based evaluations which synthesized data from different sources. Other 33 studies were directed at ARBs and were designed based on specific trials. The Markov model was the most common decision analytic method used in the evaluations. From the cost-effectiveness results, 37 out of 39 studies indicated either ACEIs or ARBs were cost-saving comparing with placebo/conventional treatment, such as amlodipine. A lack of evidence was assessed for valid direct comparison of cost-effectiveness between ACEIs and ARBs. There is a lack of direct comparisons of ACEIs and ARBs in existing economic evaluations. Considering the current evidence, both ACEIs and ARBs are likely cost-saving comparing with conventional therapy, excluding such RAAS inhibitors.

  16. CRM1 Inhibition Sensitizes Drug Resistant Human Myeloma Cells to Topoisomerase II and Proteasome Inhibitors both In Vitro and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joel G.; Dawson, Jana; Emmons, Michael F.; Cubitt, Christopher L.; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable disease despite improved treatments, including lenalidomide/pomalidomide and bortezomib/carfilzomib based therapies and high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue. New drug targets are needed to further improve treatment outcomes. Nuclear export of macromolecules is misregulated in many cancers, including in hematological malignancies such as MM. CRM1 (chromosome maintenance protein-1) is a ubiquitous protein that exports large proteins (>40 kDa) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. We found that small-molecule Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export (SINE) prevent CRM1-mediated export of p53 and topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα). SINE's CRM1-inhibiting activity was verified by nuclear-cytoplasmic fractionation and immunocytochemical staining of the CRM1 cargoes p53 and topo IIα in MM cells. We found that SINE molecules reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis when used as both single agents in the sub-micromolar range and when combined with doxorubicin, bortezomib, or carfilzomib but not lenalidomide, melphalan, or dexamethasone. In addition, CRM1 inhibition sensitized MM cell lines and patient myeloma cells to doxorubicin, bortezomib, and carfilzomib but did not affect peripheral blood mononuclear or non-myeloma bone marrow mononuclear cells as shown by cell viability and apoptosis assay. Drug resistance induced by co-culture of myeloma cells with bone marrow stroma cells was circumvented by the addition of SINE molecules. These results support the continued development of SINE for patients with MM. PMID:24155773

  17. Phase II and Biomarker Study of the Dual MET/VEGFR2 Inhibitor Foretinib in Patients With Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choueiri, Toni K.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Logan, Theodore F.; Harzstark, Andrea L.; Bukowski, Ronald M.; Rini, Brian I.; Srinivas, Sandy; Stein, Mark N.; Adams, Laurel M.; Ottesen, Lone H.; Laubscher, Kevin H.; Sherman, Laurie; McDermott, David F.; Haas, Naomi B.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Ross, Robert; Eisenberg, Peter; Meltzer, Paul S.; Merino, Maria J.; Bottaro, Donald P.; Linehan, W. Marston; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Foretinib is an oral multikinase inhibitor targeting MET, VEGF, RON, AXL, and TIE-2 receptors. Activating mutations or amplifications in MET have been described in patients with papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC). We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of foretinib in patients with PRCC. Patients and Methods Patients were enrolled onto the study in two cohorts with different dosing schedules of foretinib: cohort A, 240 mg once per day on days 1 through 5 every 14 days (intermittent arm); cohort B, 80 mg daily (daily dosing arm). Patients were stratified on the basis of MET pathway activation (germline or somatic MET mutation, MET [7q31] amplification, or gain of chromosome 7). The primary end point was overall response rate (ORR). Results Overall, 74 patients were enrolled, with 37 in each dosing cohort. ORR by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.0 was 13.5%, median progression-free survival was 9.3 months, and median overall survival was not reached. The presence of a germline MET mutation was highly predictive of a response (five of 10 v five of 57 patients with and without germline MET mutations, respectively). The most frequent adverse events of any grade associated with foretinib were fatigue, hypertension, gastrointestinal toxicities, and nonfatal pulmonary emboli. Conclusion Foretinib demonstrated activity in patients with advanced PRCC with a manageable toxicity profile and a high response rate in patients with germline MET mutations. PMID:23213094

  18. Engineered regulatory T cells coexpressing MHC class II:peptide complexes are efficient inhibitors of autoimmune T cell function and prevent the development of autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhaohui; Latham, Kary A; Whittington, Karen B; Miller, David C; Brand, David D; Rosloniec, Edward F

    2013-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical homeostatic components in preventing the development of autoimmunity, and are a major focus for their therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases. To enhance the efficacy of Tregs in adoptive therapy, we developed a strategy for generating engineered Tregs that have the capacity to target autoimmune T cells in an Ag-specific manner. Using a retroviral expression system encoding Foxp3 and HLA-DR1 covalently linked to the immunodominant peptide of the autoantigen type II collagen (DR1-CII), naive T cells were engineered to become Tregs that express DR1-CII complexes on their surface. When these cells were tested for their ability to prevent the development of collagen induced arthritis, both the engineered DR1-CII-Foxp3 and Foxp3 only Tregs significantly reduced the severity and incidence of disease. However, the mechanism by which these two populations of Tregs inhibited disease differed significantly. Disease inhibition by the DR1-CII-Foxp3 Tregs was accompanied by significantly lower numbers of autoimmune CII-specific T cells in vivo and lower levels of autoantibodies in comparison with engineered Tregs expressing Foxp3 alone. In addition, the numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-17-expressing T cells in mice treated with DR1-CII-Foxp3 Tregs were also significantly reduced in comparison with mice treated with Foxp3 engineered Tregs or vector control cells. These data indicate that the coexpression of class II autoantigen-peptide complexes on Tregs provides these cells with a distinct capacity to regulate autoimmune T cell responses that differs from that used by conventional Tregs.

  19. Bile acids and their oxo derivatives: Potential inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase I and II, androgen receptor antagonists and CYP3A4 substrates.

    PubMed

    Trifunović, Jovana; Borčić, Vladan; Mikov, Momir

    2017-05-01

    Some biological properties of bile acids and their oxo derivatives have not been sufficiently investigated, although the interest in bile acids as signaling molecules is rising. The aim of this work was to evaluate physico-chemical parametar b (slope) that represents the lipophilicity of the examined molecules and to investigate interactions of bile acids with carbonic anhydrase I, II, androgen receptor and CYP450s. Thirteen candidates were investigated using normal-phase thin-layer chromatography in two solvent systems. Retention parameters were used in further quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis and docking studies to predict interactions and binding affinities of examined molecules with enzymes and receptors. Prediction of activity on androgen receptor showed that compounds 3α-hydroxy-12-oxo-5β-cholanoic and 3α-hydroxy-7-oxo-5β-cholanoic acid have stronger antiandrogen activity than natural bile acids. The inhibitory potential for carbonic anhydrase I and II was tested and it was concluded that molecules 3α-hydroxy-12-oxo-5β-cholanoic, 3α-hydroxy-7-oxo-5β-cholanoic, 3,7,12-trioxo-5β-cholanoic acid and hyodeoxycholic acid show the best results. Substrate behavior for CYP3A4 was confirmed for all investigated compounds. Oxo derivatives of bile acids show stronger interactions with enzymes and receptors as classical bile acids and lower membranolytic activity compared with them. These significant observations could be valuable in consideration of oxo derivatives as building blocks in medicinal chemistry. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Engineered Tregulatory cells co-expressing MHC class II:peptide complexes are efficient inhibitors of autoimmune T cell function and prevent the development of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhaohui; Latham, Kary A.; Whittington, Karen B.; Miller, David C.; Brand, David D.; Rosloniec, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Treg cells are critical homeostatic components in preventing the development of autoimmunity, and are a major focus for their therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases. In order to enhance the efficacy of Treg cells in adoptive therapy, we developed a strategy for generating engineered Tregs that have the capacity to target autoimmune T cells in an antigen specific manner. Using a retroviral expression system encoding Foxp3 and HLA-DR1 covalently linked to the immunodominant peptide of the autoantigen type II collagen (DR1-CII), naïve T cells were engineered to become Treg cells that express DR1-CII complexes on their surface. When these cells were tested for their ability to prevent the development of collagen induced arthritis, both the engineered DR1-CII-Foxp3 and Foxp3 only Treg cells significantly reduced the severity and incidence of disease. However, the mechanism buy which these two populations of Treg cells inhibited disease differed significantly. Disease inhibition by the DR1-CII-Foxp3 Treg cells was accompanied by significantly lower numbers of autoimmune CII-specific T cells in vivo and lower levels of autoantibodies in comparison to engineered Tregs expressing Foxp3 alone. Additionally, the numbers of IFN-γ and IL-17 expressing T cells in mice treated with DR1-CII-Foxp3 Tregs were also significantly reduced in comparison to mice treated with Foxp3 engineered Treg cells or vector control cells. These data indicate that the co-expression of class II autoantigen-peptide complexes on Treg cells provides these cells with a distinct capacity to regulate autoimmune T cell responses that differs from that used by conventional Treg cells. PMID:23630354

  1. In vitro and in vivo metabolism of 14C-AZ11, a novel inhibitor of bacterial DNA gyrase/type II topoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Joubran, Camil; Luzietti, Ricardo A; Zhou, Fei; Basarab, Gregory S; Vishwanathan, Karthick

    2015-02-01

    1. (2R,4S,4aS)-11-Fluoro-2,4-dimethyl-8-((S)-4-methyl-2-oxooxazolidin-3-yl)-2,4,4a,6-tetrahydro-1H,1'H-spiro [isoxazolo[4,5-g][1,4]oxazino[4,3-a]quinoline-5,5'-pyrimidine]-2',4',6'(3'H)-trione (AZ11) is a novel mode-of-inhibition bacterial topoisomerase inhibitor that entered preclinical development for the treatment of Gram-positive bacteria infection. 2. The in vitro biotransformation studies of AZ11 using mouse, rat, dog and human hepatocytes showed low-intrinsic clearance in all species attributed to microsomal metabolism. 3. After a single intravenous administration of [14C]AZ11 in bile duct cannulated rats, the mean percentage of dose recovered in rat urine, bile and feces was approximately 18, 36 and 42%, respectively. Unchanged AZ11 recovered in rat urine and bile was less than 9% of the dose, indicating that AZ11 underwent extensive metabolism in rats. 4. The most abundant in vivo metabolite detected in urine and bile was M1 formed via ring opening on the piperidine and morpholine rings accounting for 20% of the administered dose. The major fecal metabolite was M5, which accounted for approximately 32% of administered dose. M5 was not formed when AZ11 incubated with rat intestinal microsomes and cytosol but was formed when incubated with fresh rat feces, suggesting that unchanged AZ11 was directly excreted into gut lumen where M5 formed as an intestinal microflora-mediated product. This process could have significant impact on bioavailability or exposure of AZ11 in rat.

  2. Post-marketing safety and effectiveness evaluation of the intravenous anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor peramivir. II: a pediatric drug use investigation.

    PubMed

    Komeda, Takuji; Ishii, Shingo; Itoh, Yumiko; Ariyasu, Yasuyuki; Sanekata, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Takayoshi; Shimada, Jingoro

    2015-03-01

    Peramivir is the only intravenous formulation among anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitors currently available. Peramivir was approved for manufacturing and marketing in Japan in January 2010. In October 2010, an additional indication for pediatric use was approved. We conducted a pediatric drug use investigation of peramivir from October 2010 to February 2012 and evaluated its real-world safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients. We collected the data of 1254 peramivir-treated pediatric patients from 161 facilities across Japan and examined the safety in 1199 patients and effectiveness in 1188 patients. In total, 245 adverse events were observed with an incidence rate of 14.01% (168/1199). Of these, 115 events were adverse drug reactions (ADRs) with an incidence rate of 7.67% (92/1199). Common ADRs were diarrhea and abnormal behavior, with incidence rates of 2.50% (30/1199) and 2.25% (27/1199), respectively. Fourteen serious ADRs were observed in 12 patients (1.00%), including 5 cases each of abnormal behavior and neutrophil count decreased. While 87.0% (100 events) of ADRs occurred within 3 days after the initiation of peramivir administration, 87.8% (101 events) resolved or improved within 7 days after onset. Multivariate analyses indicated that the presence or absence of underlying diseases/complications was significantly related to ADR incidence. With regard to effectiveness, the median time to alleviation of both influenza symptoms and fever was 3 days, including the first day of administration. Thus, this study confirms the pediatric safety of peramivir without any concerns about effectiveness under routine clinical settings.

  3. Synthesis of 2-pyridyl-benzimidazole iridium(III), ruthenium(II), and platinum(II) complexes. study of the activity as inhibitors of amyloid-β aggregation and neurotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yellol, Gorakh S; Yellol, Jyoti G; Kenche, Vijaya B; Liu, Xiang Ming; Barnham, Kevin J; Donaire, Antonio; Janiak, Christoph; Ruiz, José

    2015-01-20

    The design of small molecules that can target the aggregation of Aβ as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease is an area of study that has attracted a lot of attention recently. The novel ligand methyl 1-butyl-2-pyridyl-benzimidazole carboxylate was prepared for the synthesis of a series of new iridium(III), ruthenium(II), and platinum(II) 2-pyridyl-benzimidazole complexes. The crystal structure of the half-sandwich iridium(III) complex was established by X-ray diffraction. An arrangement of two cationic complexes in the unit cell is observed, and it seems to be organized by weak π···π interactions that are taking place between two symmetry-related benzimidazole ring systems. All new compounds inhibited aggregation of Aβ1-42 in vitro as shown by both thioflavin T fluorescence assay and transmission electron microscopy. Among them the Ir compound rescued the toxicity of Aβ1-42 in primary cortical neurons effectively.

  4. New modulated design, docking and synthesis of carbohydrate-conjugate heterobimetallic CuII-SnIV complex as potential topoisomerase II inhibitor: in vitro DNA binding, cleavage and cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Afzal, Mohd; Arjmand, Farukh

    2014-03-03

    New carbohydrate-conjugate heterobimetallic complexes [C₂₂H₅₀N₆O₁₃CuSnCl₂] (3) and [C₂₂H₅₈N₆O₁₇NiSnCl₂] (4) were synthesized from their monometallic analogs [C₂₂H₅₂N₆O₁₃Cu] (1) and [C₂₂H₆₀N₆O₁₇Ni] (2) containing N-glycoside ligand (L). In vitro DNA binding studies of L and complexes (1-4) with CT DNA were carried out by employing various biophysical and molecular docking techniques which revealed that heterobimetallic complex 3 strongly binds to DNA in comparison to 4, monometallic complexes (1 and 2) and the free ligand. Complex 3 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway (confirmed by T4 DNA ligase assay) and inhibited Topo-II activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, complex 3 was docked into the ATPase domain of human-Topo-II in order to probe the possible mechanism of inhibition.

  5. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiretroviral activity of the potent, specific human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor nelfinavir: results of a phase I/II trial and extended follow-up in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Moyle, G J; Youle, M; Higgs, C; Monaghan, J; Prince, W; Chapman, S; Clendeninn, N; Nelson, M R

    1998-08-01

    The safety, antiretroviral activity, and pharmacokinetic profile of nelfinavir, a potent and specific inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease, were assessed in a small open-label phase I/II dose-ranging study in protease inhibitor-naive HIV-positive men. A total of 22 patients with baseline plasma HIV RNA > or = 20,000 copies/mL and CD4+ counts between 200 and 500 cells/mm3 were enrolled in the study. Of the 22 patients, 20 were evaluated for activity; 10 patients assigned to 771 mg/day base equivalent (300 mg three times daily) and 10 patients assigned to 1,026 mg/day base equivalent (600 mg twice daily) given monotherapy. A capsule formulation of nelfinavir was used. The initial study period was 28 days; patients showing a virologic response of 1 log10 reduction were eligible for enrollment in an extension phase and addition of nucleoside analogues. A maximally tolerated dose of nelfinavir was not established. A dose-response relationship was observed for four (40%) patients in the 771-mg group and six (60%) patients in the 1,026-mg group experiencing a reduction from baseline in plasma HIV RNA of at lest 1 log during the 28-day study. Of these patients, five sustained the reduction in plasma HIV RNA beyond day 28 (2 patients receiving 771 mg/day and 3 patients receiving 1,026 mg/day). Median increases from baseline in CD4+ counts at day 28 were 21