Science.gov

Sample records for ii development efforts

  1. Development and Testing of a Jet Assisted Polycrystalline Diamond Drilling Bit. Phase II Development Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Pixton

    1999-09-20

    Phase II efforts to develop a jet-assisted rotary-percussion drill bit are discussed. Key developments under this contract include: (1) a design for a more robust polycrystalline diamond drag cutter; (2) a new drilling mechanism which improves penetration and life of cutters; and (3) a means of creating a high-pressure mud jet inside of a percussion drill bit. Field tests of the new drill bit and the new robust cutter are forthcoming.

  2. Final Report: Very Low Friction Small Radius Dome Cutters for Percussion Bits - Phase II Development Efforts, April 1, 1997 - September 1, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Pixton, David S.

    1999-07-15

    Phase II efforts to develop very low friction (polished) small radius cutters for drill bits are discussed. Key developments under this contract include: (1) improvements to robustness of polycrystalline diamond coatings enabling their use on sharper cutter shapes; (2) polishable coating materials which exhibit improved polish retention; and (3) a means of polishing a non-planar polycrystalline diamond surface economically. Field tests have shown acceptability of new small radius cutters, but have yet to show benefits of polishing. Further field tests are planned.

  3. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report II. Breckinridge Project design basis

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The Breckinridge Project is a pioneer endeavor involving the engineering, construction, and operation of a commercial facility that will convert 23,000 tons per day of run-of-mine, high-sulfur coal into 50,000 barrels per day of liquid hydrocarbons equivalent to those produced from crude oil. The Initial Effort, now complete, was executed under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC05-80OR20717 between the Department of Energy and the Participants, Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc., and Airco Energy Company, Inc. The Initial Effort produced a preliminary design, capital estimate, and economic analysis of the commercial plant, as well as a plan for the design, construction, and operation of that plant. The extensive and rigorous attention given to environmental, socioeconomic, safety, and health considerations is indicative of the high priority these issues will continue to receive throughout the life of the project. The Breckinridge Energy Company, a partnership of several major corporations, is being formed to finance, own, and manage the Breckinridge Project. Report II is intended for the reader who is primarily interested in less detailed discussion of the coal liquefaction process and Breckinridge facility than presented in the eleven volumes of Reports IV and V. The overview section describes the project goals and briefly introduces the coal liquefaction process. The report continues with a discussion of the history of the project and the H-COAL process from its concept to the proposed commercialization technology. The report describes the site, the Breckinridge Facility, and concludes with a summary of the eleven reports that contain the deliverable documentation of the Initial Effort or Development Phase of the project.

  4. The Cossack Ranger II Seismograph, Research And Outreach Efforts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husebye, E. S.; Fedorenko, Y. V.; Pilgaev, S. V.; Matveeva, T. S.

    2006-12-01

    Earthquake monitoring is a highly desirable endaveour among seismologists but far from easy in practise. The reason for this is 3-fold; costly instrumentation, colleagues who dislike competition in network operations and running costs in terms of data transfer, storage and analysis. However, developments in recent years have off- set technical obstacles of the above kinds thus allowing for personal or small institution seismometry albeit the human factor remains. Anyway, a conventional SP-seismometer costs at least 2000 dollars while a complete 3-component seismograph may well cost 10000 dollars. However, a geophone-based 3-component seismograph may cost less than 2000 dollars but still have a performance matching that of a conventional station. The largest worry is normally not the one-time instrument expenses but operational and maintenance costs over say a 5-years time span. A solution here is socalled Seis Schooloperations implying that stations are deployed close to schools having good 'rocky' sites and permanent Internet access. Such sites are not necessarily optimum regarding ambient noise but on the other hand offer free data transfer to Hub and dedicated teachers taking care of the station operation. We have deployed small seismograph networks based on the above design and operational principles both in Norway and Karelia (NW Russia) as part of national outreach efforts. Noteworthy; recordings from these networks have proved useful in advanced wavefield analysis. A number of countries are economically poor but rich in earthquake activities. In other words, can hardly afford adequate monitoring of local seismicity. An interesting undertaking here is the SENSES project in Bulgaria supported by the "NATO Science for Peace and Security Programme' including 25 seismograph stations deployed nation-wide at sites close to local high schools. The close cooperation with these schools will ensure modest operational costs but also strengthen local outreach efforts in

  5. Emerging policy issues in PURPA implementation: an examination of policy issues related to federal and state efforts to encourage development of cogeneration and small power production under Title II of PURPA

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    Purpose of this study is to examine the results of FERG and state efforts to encourage the development of cogeneration and small power production under Title II of the Public Utility Regualtory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) in the years since the statute was enacted. The frame of reference specified by DOE for use in this study includes both the original purposes of the legislation as set forth in PURPA and the current overall energy policy goal which is to ''foster an adequate supply of energy at reasonable costs.'' This review of PURPA implementation efforts is designed to assess the results to date in terms of achieving the stated goals of the statute (including ''to encourage cogeneration and small power production''), identify perceived areas of conflict between federal and state efforts to maximize development of qualifying facilities (QFs) and current Administration concerns for achieving greater levels of economic efficiency in electric power supply, briefly examine the nature of such conflicts, with reference to specific cases wherever possible, and suggest possible means of conforming government efforts to encourage QF development with the economic efficiency objectives underlying national energy policy.

  6. International efforts to develop biospecimen best practices.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Jimmie B; Caboux, Elodie; Hainaut, Pierre

    2010-04-01

    Variables introduced during the processes involved in biospecimen collection, processing, storage, and analysis are among the potential sources of bias in biomarker research. International efforts are under way to develop best practices to standardize biospecimen handling protocols. In general, documents on best practices address three major recurring themes: technical best practices on infrastructure and specimen handling, recommendations on informatics and data management, and recommendations on ethical, legal, and social issues. There are many areas of agreement among various international efforts, but no single set of practices has emerged as a unifying document. The ethical, legal, and social issues are particularly difficult to harmonize due to the many country-specific issues that are governed by a variety of local and federal rules and regulations. Given the increasingly international nature of research involving biomarkers and biospecimens, it will be necessary to continue to cooperate in the development of harmonized evidence-based best practices. Several international organizations including the International Cancer Genome Consortium are engaged in such efforts.

  7. American Reform Efforts: German Professional Education after World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Profiles the reeducation and denazification efforts aimed at the training of doctors, lawyers, teachers, and engineers. The efforts espoused few radical innovations and generally supported a return to the well-regarded conditions of the Weimar Republic. These efforts laid the foundation for later reforms in the 1960s. (MJP)

  8. Database development in toxicogenomics: issues and efforts.

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, William B; Pettit, Syril D; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Bushel, Pierre R; Waters, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    The marriage of toxicology and genomics has created not only opportunities but also novel informatics challenges. As with the larger field of gene expression analysis, toxicogenomics faces the problems of probe annotation and data comparison across different array platforms. Toxicogenomics studies are generally built on standard toxicology studies generating biological end point data, and as such, one goal of toxicogenomics is to detect relationships between changes in gene expression and in those biological parameters. These challenges are best addressed through data collection into a well-designed toxicogenomics database. A successful publicly accessible toxicogenomics database will serve as a repository for data sharing and as a resource for analysis, data mining, and discussion. It will offer a vehicle for harmonizing nomenclature and analytical approaches and serve as a reference for regulatory organizations to evaluate toxicogenomics data submitted as part of registrations. Such a database would capture the experimental context of in vivo studies with great fidelity such that the dynamics of the dose response could be probed statistically with confidence. This review presents the collaborative efforts between the European Molecular Biology Laboratory-European Bioinformatics Institute ArrayExpress, the International Life Sciences Institute Health and Environmental Science Institute, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences National Center for Toxigenomics Chemical Effects in Biological Systems knowledge base. The goal of this collaboration is to establish public infrastructure on an international scale and examine other developments aimed at establishing toxicogenomics databases. In this review we discuss several issues common to such databases: the requirement for identifying minimal descriptors to represent the experiment, the demand for standardizing data storage and exchange formats, the challenge of creating standardized nomenclature

  9. AWIPS II in the University Community: Unidata's efforts and capabilities of the software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, Mohan; James, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System, version II (AWIPS II) is a weather forecasting, display and analysis tool that is used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Weather Service (NOAA/NWS) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) to ingest analyze and disseminate operational weather data. The AWIPS II software is built on a Service Oriented Architecture, takes advantage of open source software, and its design affords expandability, flexibility, and portability. Since many university meteorology programs are eager to use the same tools used by NWS forecasters, Unidata community interest in AWIPS II is high. The Unidata Program Center (UPC) has worked closely with NCEP staff during AWIPS II development in order to devise a way to make it available to the university. The Unidata AWIPS II software was released in beta form in 2014, and it incorporates a number of key changes to the baseline U. S. National Weather Service release to process and display additional data formats and run all components in a single-server standalone configuration. In addition to making available open-source instances of the software libraries that can be downloaded and run at any university, Unidata has also deployed the data-server side of AWIPS II, known as EDEX, in the Amazon Web Service and Microsoft Azure cloud environments. In this set up, universities receive all of the data from remote cloud instances, while they only have to run the AWIPS II client, known as CAVE, to analyze and visualize the data. In this presentation, we will describe Unidata's AWIPS II efforts, including the capabilities of the software in visualizing many different types of real-time meteorological data and its myriad uses in university and other settings.

  10. Past Activeness, Solidarity, and Local Development Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zekeri, Andrew A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Draws upon community field theory and human ecology and uses data from 120 rural Pennsylvania school districts to examine the relative contributions of past community actions, development of solidarity, and ecological variables (socioeconomic status, remoteness, previous industrialization, and percentage of residents commuting to work) to the…

  11. Center punched solar cell module development effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. E.; Mortensen, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The results are given of an advanced module development program with the objective of providing a low cost solar cell mechanical interconnect design. The design approach, which avoids soldering or welding operations, lends itself to automated assembly techniques thus supporting the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project goals. The first group of six modules contained aluminum contact cells and the second group of six modules contained silver-titanium-palladium contact cells. Extensive component and environmental testing at the module level showed that reliable cell mechanical interconnection can be achieved when utilizing the proper electrical contact materials and pressures. A discussion is given of the module design, manufacturing procedure, test program, significant problem areas and solutions, and conclusions and recommendations as formulated and conducted by XEOS.

  12. MACCS2 development and verification efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.; Chanin, D.

    1997-03-01

    MACCS2 represents a major enhancement of the capabilities of its predecessor MACCS, the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System. MACCS, released in 1987, was developed to estimate the potential impacts to the surrounding public of severe accidents at nuclear power plants. The principal phenomena considered in MACCS/MACCS2 are atmospheric transport and deposition under time-variant meteorology, short-term and long-term mitigative actions and exposure pathways, deterministic and stochastic health effects, and economic costs. MACCS2 was developed as a general-purpose analytical tool applicable to diverse reactor and nonreactor facilities. The MACCS2 package includes three primary enhancements: (1) a more flexible emergency response model, (2) an expanded library of radionuclides, and (3) a semidynamic food-chain model. In addition, errors that had been identified in MACCS version1.5.11.1 were corrected, including an error that prevented the code from providing intermediate-phase results. MACCS2 version 1.10 beta test was released to the beta-test group in May, 1995. In addition, the University of New Mexico (UNM) has completed an independent verification study of the code package. Since the beta-test release of MACCS2 version 1.10, a number of minor errors have been identified and corrected, and a number of enhancements have been added to the code package. The code enhancements added since the beta-test release of version 1.10 include: (1) an option to allow the user to input the {sigma}{sub y} and {sigma}{sub z} plume expansion parameters in a table-lookup form for incremental downwind distances, (2) an option to define different initial dimensions for up to four segments of a release, (3) an enhancement to the COMIDA2 food-chain model preprocessor to allow the user to supply externally calculated tables of tritium food-chain dose per unit deposition on farmland to support analyses of tritium releases, and (4) the capability to calculate direction-dependent doses.

  13. Should the US abandon efforts to develop commercial fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, W.D.; Kinter, E.E.

    1993-01-22

    This article presents viewpoints and rationale for continuing and disbanding the US efforts to develop commercial fusion power. The views of W.D. Kay, an assistant professor of political science at Northeastern University, are presented regarding - yes, abandon efforts. Meanwhile, the views of Edwin Keutes, former director of the Magnetic Fusion Program for DOE, are presented for continued development.

  14. Canada's efforts in developing capabilities in radiological population monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Wilkins, Ruth; Dai, Xiongxin; Sadi, Baki; Ko, Raymond; Kramer, Gary H

    2011-08-01

    Population monitoring is an important component of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response. Since 2002, Canada has been investing in developing national capabilities in radiological population monitoring. This paper summarizes Canada's efforts in developing methods and techniques in biological dosimetry and in vivo and in vitro bioassay techniques. There are still many gaps to fill that require further efforts. Integration of different monitoring methods and techniques in order to have the best assessment of radiation dose to support medical management and integration of Canada's efforts with international efforts are recommended.

  15. The Development of Effortful Control in Children Born Preterm

    PubMed Central

    Poehlmann, Julie; Schwichtenberg, AJ Miller; Shah, Prachi E.; Shlafer, Rebecca J.; Hahn, Emily; Maleck, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study examined emerging effortful control skills at 24- and 36-months postterm in 172 children born preterm (<36 weeks gestation). Infant (neonatal health risks), family (sociodemographic risks) and maternal risk factors (depressive symptoms, anger expressions during play interactions) were assessed at six timepoints across 3 years. Additionally, children’s emerging effortful control skills, cognitive development, and mother-reported behavior and attention problems were assessed at 24- and 36-months. Analyses documented links between effortful control skills, cognitive skills, and concurrent attention problems in children born preterm. The study also found that preterm children’s effortful control skills improved over time. In addition, neonatal health risks, family sociodemographic risks, and angry parenting interactions were associated with less optimal effortful control skills. PMID:20589563

  16. 48 CFR 35.009 - Subcontracting research and development effort.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Subcontracting research... ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 35.009 Subcontracting research and development effort. Since the selection of R&D contractors is substantially based...

  17. 48 CFR 35.009 - Subcontracting research and development effort.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Subcontracting research and development effort. 35.009 Section 35.009 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING...

  18. 48 CFR 35.009 - Subcontracting research and development effort.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 35.009 Subcontracting research and development effort. Since the selection of R&D contractors is substantially based on... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subcontracting...

  19. An Overview of the Launch Vehicle Blast Environments Development Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Erin; Bangham, Mike; Blackwood, James; Skinner, Troy; Hays, Michael; Jackson, Austin; Richman, Ben

    2014-01-01

    NASA has been funding an ongoing development program to characterize the explosive environments produced during a catastrophic launch vehicle accident. These studies and small-scale tests are focused on the near field environments that threaten the crew. The results indicate that these environments are unlikely to result in immediate destruction of the crew modules. The effort began as an independent assessment by NASA safety organizations, followed by the Ares program and NASA Engineering and Safety Center and now as a Space Launch Systems (SLS) focused effort. The development effort is using the test and accident data available from public or NASA sources as well as focused scaled tests that are examining the fundamental aspects of uncontained explosions of Hydrogen and air and Hydrogen and Oxygen. The primary risk to the crew appears to be the high-energy fragments and these are being characterized for the SLS. The development efforts will characterize the thermal environment of the explosions as well to ensure that the risk is well understood and to document the overall energy balance of an explosion. The effort is multi-path in that analytical, computational and focused testing is being used to develop the knowledge to understand potential SLS explosions. This is an ongoing program with plans that expand the development from fundamental testing at small-scale levels to large-scale tests that can be used to validate models for commercial programs. The ultimate goal is to develop a knowledge base that can be used by vehicle designers to maximize crew survival in an explosion.

  20. AMRDEC's HWIL synthetic environment development efforts for LADAR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin J.; Cornell, Michael C.; Naumann, Charles B.

    2004-08-01

    Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing has been an integral part of the modeling and simulation efforts at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Engineering, and Development Center (AMRDEC). AMRDEC's history includes the development and implementation of several unique technologies for producing synthetic environments in the visible, infrared, MMW and RF regions. With the emerging sensor/electronics technology, LADAR sensors are becoming more viable option as an integral part of weapon systems, and AMRDEC has been expending efforts to develop the capabilities for testing LADAR sensors in a HWIL environment. There are several areas of challenges in LADAR HWIL testing, since the simulation requirements for the electronics and computation are stressing combinations of the passive image and active sensor HWIL testing. There have been several key areas where advancements have been made to address the challenges in developing a synthetic environment for the LADAR sensor testing. In this paper, we will present the latest results from the LADAR projector development and test efforts at AMRDEC's Advanced Simulation Center (ASC).

  1. Application of Complex Systems Research To Efforts of International Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Hans-Peter

    Fundamental research on complex systems has shown relevance to efforts of international development. This paper canvasses some practitioner friendly approaches to international development. Development is about interventions in a highly complex system, the society. Complex systems research tells us that development interventions should not be overly planned, rather the fundamental uncertainty of a changing social system requires a diversity of interventions, and rapid learning from development success and failure. Developing economies are functioning at a low level of effectiveness and resource use. Complex systems are change resistant, and intervention requires understanding the autocatalytic nature of a process of change. International development is about the stimulation of a society's innate autocatalytic / self-organizing processes through interventions that stimulate enough to overcome change resistance, but which do not overwhelm the system. Since the size of financial interventions may in some cases be a substantial fraction of the existing economic activity, disruption is a likely outcome. Crucially, one must avoid having the socio-economic activity organized around the intervention itself, since then an undesirable dependency of the economy on the intervention arises. Stimulation of the innate modes of activity results in the development of socio-economic organization around energy, material and financial flows. The primary generator of effectiveness is an appropriate network structure of interactions and relationships. This paper summarizes traditional development efforts and their outcomes as well as a plausible description of the process of complex systems motivated interventions. Examples are given of recent approaches which aim to appropriately stimulate international development.

  2. Effort Drivers Estimation for Brazilian Geographically Distributed Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Ana Carina M.; Souza, Renata; Aquino, Gibeon; Meira, Silvio

    To meet the requirements of today’s fast paced markets, it is important to develop projects on time and with the minimum use of resources. A good estimate is the key to achieve this goal. Several companies have started to work with geographically distributed teams due to cost reduction and time-to-market. Some researchers indicate that this approach introduces new challenges, because the teams work in different time zones and have possible differences in culture and language. It is already known that the multisite development increases the software cycle time. Data from 15 DSD projects from 10 distinct companies were collected. The analysis shows drivers that impact significantly the total effort planned to develop systems using DSD approach in Brazil.

  3. Software Development at Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Thomas; Hauth, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Belle II is a next generation B-factory experiment that will collect 50 times more data than its predecessor Belle. This requires not only a major upgrade of the detector hardware, but also of the simulation, reconstruction, and analysis software. The challenges of the software development at Belle II and the tools and procedures to address them are reviewed in this article.

  4. Adolescent Development: Workshop II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keng, Chiam Heng; And Others

    Workshops concerning adolescent development explored problems of adolescents, schooling and adolescence, preparation for adulthood, leisure and recreation, as well as values, culture, and change in relation to the development of youth. The discussion of adolescents' problems identified major problem areas, (emphasizing problems of communicating…

  5. Development effort of sheet molding compound (SMC) parabolic trough panels

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, P.A.; Champion, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives of the development effort are to: investigate the problems of molding parabolic trough solar reflector panels of sheet molding compound (SMC); develop molding techniques and processes by which silvered glass reflector sheets can be integrally molded into SMC trough panels; provide representative prototype panels for evaluation; and provide information regarding the technical feasibility of molding SMC panels in high volume production. The approach taken to meet the objectives was to design the parabolic panel, fabricate a prototype die, choose an SMC formulation and mold the glass and SMC together into a vertex to rim mirrored panel. The main thrust of the program was to successfully co-mold a mirrored glass sheet with the SMC. Results indicate that mirrored glass sheets, if properly strengthened to withstand the temperature and pressure of the molding process, can be successfully molded with SMC in a single press stroke using standard compression molding techniques. The finalized design of the trough panel is given. The SMC formulation chosen is a low shrink, low profile SMC using 40% by weight one inch chopped glass fibers in a uv stabilized polyester resin matrix. A program to test for the adhesion between mirrored glass sheets and the SMC is discussed briefly. (LEW)

  6. How Effective Have Thirty Years of Internationally Driven Conservation and Development Efforts Been in Madagascar?

    PubMed

    Waeber, Patrick O; Wilmé, Lucienne; Mercier, Jean-Roger; Camara, Christian; Lowry, Porter P

    2016-01-01

    Conservation and development are intricately linked. The international donor community has long provided aid to tropical countries in an effort to alleviate poverty and conserve biodiversity. While hundreds of millions of $ have been invested in over 500 environmental-based projects in Madagascar during the period covered by a series of National Environmental Action Plans (1993-2008) and the protected areas network has expanded threefold, deforestation remains unchecked and none of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) established for 2000-2015 were likely be met. Efforts to achieve sustainable development had failed to reduce poverty or deliver progress toward any of the MDGs. Cross-sectorial policy adjustments are needed that (i) enable and catalyze Madagascar's capacities rather than deepening dependency on external actors such as the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and donor countries, and that (ii) deliver improvements to the livelihoods and wellbeing of the country's rural poor. PMID:27532499

  7. How Effective Have Thirty Years of Internationally Driven Conservation and Development Efforts Been in Madagascar?

    PubMed Central

    Wilmé, Lucienne; Mercier, Jean-Roger; Camara, Christian; Lowry, Porter P.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation and development are intricately linked. The international donor community has long provided aid to tropical countries in an effort to alleviate poverty and conserve biodiversity. While hundreds of millions of $ have been invested in over 500 environmental-based projects in Madagascar during the period covered by a series of National Environmental Action Plans (1993–2008) and the protected areas network has expanded threefold, deforestation remains unchecked and none of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) established for 2000–2015 were likely be met. Efforts to achieve sustainable development had failed to reduce poverty or deliver progress toward any of the MDGs. Cross-sectorial policy adjustments are needed that (i) enable and catalyze Madagascar’s capacities rather than deepening dependency on external actors such as the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and donor countries, and that (ii) deliver improvements to the livelihoods and wellbeing of the country’s rural poor. PMID:27532499

  8. U.S. Navy battery requirements and development efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.H.; James, S.D.; Keller, P.B.

    1995-07-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research, The Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) is the focal point for exploratory battery development within the US Navy. NSWC is responsible for identifying naval power needs not met by existing technology. To accomplish this, the authors conduct a biennial power source survey to assess the technology gap between state-of-the-art battery performance and mid-to-long term fleet needs. Once Navy power requirements have been identified, high payoff technologies are developed to meet them. During the 1993 survey, the authors identified four Navy systems requiring battery developments, namely sonobuoys, mines, underwater vehicles and torpedoes. Power supply inadequacies were found to be the result of two important factors, a shift in Navy focus from deep ocean waters to the more complex, littoral (coastal) environments, and an increased emphasis on the cost effectiveness of a system in an era of reduced military budgets. The survey revealed the following issues: (1) future sonobuoys will require significantly greater power than the presently used lithium/sulfur dioxide batteries can provide; (2) there is concern in the mine community over the future availability of specific batteries; (3) in the case of underwater vehicles (including torpedo targets), there is a desire for a more cost-effective power source having a greater energy density than the presently used silver oxide/zinc cells; (4) enhanced energy density was requested by the torpedo community to provide increased operational time. As expected, safety and environmental issues were of concern to participants responding to the survey. This paper will discuss the recommendations of the power needs survey and summarize efforts underway to implement them.

  9. The Development of Effortful Control in Children Born Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehlmann, Julie; Schwichtenberg, A. J. Miller; Shah, Prachi E.; Shlafer, Rebecca J.; Hahn, Emily; Maleck, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study examined emerging effortful control skills at 24- and 36-months postterm in 172 children born preterm (less than 36 weeks gestation). Infant (neonatal health risks), family (sociodemographic risks), and maternal risk factors (depressive symptoms, anger expressions during play interactions) were assessed at six…

  10. Programs of Study: Development Efforts in Six States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumer, Robert; Digby, Cynitha

    2013-01-01

    Educational reform in the United States is perpetually evolving. Much of the recent reforms have concentrated on high-stakes testing and assessment, but a parallel effort has been emerging in the field of vocational and career education. Prompted partly by federal legislation--most recently by the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act…

  11. Efforts to Develop a 300°C Solder

    SciTech Connect

    Norann, Randy A

    2015-01-25

    This paper covers the efforts made to find a 300°C electrical solder solution for geothermal well monitoring and logging tools by Perma Works LLC. This paper covers: why a high temperature solder is needed, what makes for a good solder, testing flux, testing conductive epoxy and testing intermetallic bonds. Future areas of research are suggested.

  12. United States Research and Development effort on ITER magnet tasks

    DOE PAGES

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N.; Reierson, Wayne T.

    2011-01-22

    This study presents the status of research and development (R&D) magnet tasks that are being performed in support of the U.S. ITER Project Office (USIPO) commitment to provide a central solenoid assembly and toroidal field conductor for the ITER machine to be constructed in Cadarache, France. The following development tasks are presented: winding development, inlets and outlets development, internal and bus joints development and testing, insulation development and qualification, vacuum-pressure impregnation, bus supports, and intermodule structure and materials characterization.

  13. An Overview of Power, Energy Storage, and Conversion Efforts for 2014 SBIR Phases I and II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for agency projects. NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights 15 of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and II projects that focus on one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Power, Energy Storage and Conversion. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high-radiation-tolerant ceramic voltage isolators, development of hermetic sealing glasses for solid oxide fuel cells, rechargeable lithium metal cells, high-efficiency direct methane solid oxide fuel cell systems, Li metal protection for high-energy space batteries, isolated bidirectional direct current converters for distributed battery energy applications, and high-efficiency rad-hard ultrathin Si photovoltaic cell technology for space. Each article describes an innovation and technical objective and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  14. Singing from the Same Sheet: Collaborative Efforts for Leadership Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Lynn K.; Buckner, Kermit; Hopkins, Peggy

    This paper describes a collaborative model for assessing and developing leadership skills in school administrators. Representatives of East Carolina University's (ECU-North Carolina) School of Education and local school districts collaborated to identify future leaders, assess their leadership skills, and provide continual development. The pilot…

  15. Latest Sensors and Data Acquisition Development Efforts at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation summarizes the characteristics required on sensors by consumers desiring access to space, a long term plan developed at KSC (Kennedy Space Center) to identify promising technologies for NASA's own future sensor needs, and the characteristics of several smart sensors already developed. Also addressed are the computer hardware and architecture used to operate sensors, and generic testing capabilities. Consumers desire sensors which are lightweight, inexpensive, intelligent, and easy to use.

  16. Developing demographic toxicity data: optimizing effort for predicting population outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Stark, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that population endpoints in risk assessment are far more accurate than static assessments. Complete demographic toxicity data based on full life tables are eminently useful in predicting population outcomes in many applications because they capture both lethal and sublethal effects; however, developing these life tables is extremely costly. In this study we investigated the efficiency of partial life cycle tests as a substitute for full life cycles in parameterizing population models. Life table data were developed for three species of Daphniids, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna, and D. pulex, weekly throughout the life span of these species. Population growth rates (λ) and a series of other demographic parameters generated from the complete life cycle were compared to those calculated from cumulative weeks of the life cycle in order to determine the minimum number of weeks needed to generate an accurate population projection. Results showed that for C. dubia and D. pulex, λ values developed at >4 weeks (44.4% of the life cycle) were not significantly different from λ developed for the full life cycle (9 weeks) of each species. For D. magna, λ values developed at >7 weeks (70% of the life cycle) were not significantly different from λ developed for the full life cycle (10 weeks). Furthermore, these cutoff points for λ were not the same for other demographic parameters, with no clear pattern emerging. Our results indicate that for C. dubia, D. magna, and D. pulex, partial life tables can be used to generate population growth rates in lieu of full life tables. However, the implications of differences in cutoff points for different demographic parameters need to be investigated further. PMID:27257546

  17. Developing demographic toxicity data: optimizing effort for predicting population outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stark, John D; Banks, John E

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that population endpoints in risk assessment are far more accurate than static assessments. Complete demographic toxicity data based on full life tables are eminently useful in predicting population outcomes in many applications because they capture both lethal and sublethal effects; however, developing these life tables is extremely costly. In this study we investigated the efficiency of partial life cycle tests as a substitute for full life cycles in parameterizing population models. Life table data were developed for three species of Daphniids, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna, and D. pulex, weekly throughout the life span of these species. Population growth rates (λ) and a series of other demographic parameters generated from the complete life cycle were compared to those calculated from cumulative weeks of the life cycle in order to determine the minimum number of weeks needed to generate an accurate population projection. Results showed that for C. dubia and D. pulex, λ values developed at >4 weeks (44.4% of the life cycle) were not significantly different from λ developed for the full life cycle (9 weeks) of each species. For D. magna, λ values developed at >7 weeks (70% of the life cycle) were not significantly different from λ developed for the full life cycle (10 weeks). Furthermore, these cutoff points for λ were not the same for other demographic parameters, with no clear pattern emerging. Our results indicate that for C. dubia, D. magna, and D. pulex, partial life tables can be used to generate population growth rates in lieu of full life tables. However, the implications of differences in cutoff points for different demographic parameters need to be investigated further. PMID:27257546

  18. Continued Effort and Success: An Urban Professional School Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Diane G.; Weber, Edward J.; Francis, Kiffany

    2013-01-01

    The PDS partnership between the Cleveland State University Master of Urban Secondary Teaching (MUST) program and the Cleveland School of Science and Medicine (CSSM) has an established history of preparing educators to teach in urban schools. Recently awarded the NAPDS Award for Exemplary Professional Development School Achievement, this…

  19. Increasing Pupil Physical Activity: A Comprehensive Professional Development Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2012-01-01

    Study aim: To determine if pupil physical activity and Body Mass Index classifications maintained or improved after a one-year professional development program involving both classroom and physical education teachers. Guskey's model of teacher change guided this study. Material and methods: Indigenous children from ten schools (N = 320) in grades…

  20. Professional Development: A Key to Kentucky's Reform Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borko, Hilda; Elliott, Rebekah; Uchiyama, Kay

    This paper describes the Kentucky Department of Education's (KDE's) multi-faceted approach to professional development and provides evidence for its impact on schools' achievement of the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) goals. Data are drawn from the exemplary case study component of a larger research project. Many Kentucky school districts…

  1. Analysis of international efforts in energy research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaiyan, A.J.; Gill, R.T.

    1995-09-01

    Research and experimental development comprise innovative and creative work undertaken systematically to increase the stock of knowledge of science, engineering, and society. This knowledge reserve is used to improve living conditions and standards, including economic growth. Research and development (R&D) expenditures are useful measures of the scale and direction of technological innovation within a country, industry, or scientific field. Administrators concerned with economic growth and performance rely on R&D statistics as one possible type of indicator of technological change. R&D statistics are an essential tool in many government programs and evaluations (OECD 1993). The objective of the analysis was to identify and evaluate R&D funding sources, levels, and trends in the energy sectors of selected industrialized countries (Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States) and the European Union (EU). Fossil fuel technologies, particularly fuel cells and advanced gas turbines, were the focus of the analysis, whose results are presented in this report.

  2. Use of a palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative kinetic resolution in synthetic efforts toward bielschowskysin

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michael E.; Phillips, John H.; Ferreira, Eric M.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Progress toward the cyclobutane core of bielshowskysin is reported. The core was thought to arise from a cyclopropane intermediate via a furan-mediated cyclopropane fragmentation, followed by a 1,4-Michael addition. The synthesis of the cyclopropane intermediate utilizes a Suzuki coupling reaction, an esterification with 2-diazoacetoacetic acid, and a copper catalyzed cyclopropanation. An alcohol intermediate within the synthetic route was obtained in high enantiopurity via a highly selective palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative kinetic resolution (OKR). PMID:23913988

  3. Cultivating a Teacher Community of Practice for Sustainable Professional Development: Beyond Planned Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Barley; Pun, Shuk-Han

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic study-cum-action research documents the cultivation of a community of practice for sustainable professional development among a group of 18 teachers of English as second language in Hong Kong through a series of planned efforts over 10?months. By juxtaposing the theory-driven planned efforts and the spontaneous actions and…

  4. U.S. Effort in the Development of New Crops (Lesquerella, Pennycress, Coriander, and Cuphea)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. effort for the development of New Crops is directed toward the advancement of crops that can be grown in rotation with traditional commodity crops, off-season production and utilization of acreage not currently under cultivation. This effort is intended to have no or minimal impact on crop...

  5. Overview 2004 of NASA-Stirling Convertor CFD Model Development and Regenerator R&D Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Demko, Rikako

    2005-02-01

    This paper reports on accomplishments in 2004 in (1) development of Stirling-convertor CFD models at NASA GRC and via a NASA grant, (2) a Stirling regenerator-research effort being conducted via a NASA grant (a follow-on effort to an earlier DOE contract), and (3) a regenerator-microfabrication contract for development of a "next-generation Stirling regenerator." Cleveland State University is the lead organization for all three grant/contractual efforts, with the University of Minnesota and Gedeon Associates as subcontractors. Also, the Stirling Technology Co. and Sunpower, Inc. are both involved in all three efforts, either as funded or unfunded participants. International Mezzo Technologies of Baton Rouge, LA is the regenerator fabricator for the regenerator-microfabrication contract. Results of the efforts in these three areas are summarized.

  6. Overview 2004 of NASA-Stirling Convertor CFD Model Development and Regenerator R and D Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Demko, Rikako

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on accomplishments in 2004 in (1) development of Stirling-convertor CFD models at NASA Glenn and via a NASA grant, (2) a Stirling regenerator-research effort being conducted via a NASA grant (a follow-on effort to an earlier DOE contract), and (3) a regenerator-microfabrication contract for development of a "next-generation Stirling regenerator." Cleveland State University is the lead organization for all three grant/contractual efforts, with the University of Minnesota and Gedeon Associates as subcontractors. Also, the Stirling Technology Company and Sunpower, Inc. are both involved in all three efforts, either as funded or unfunded participants. International Mezzo Technologies of Baton Rouge, Louisiana is the regenerator fabricator for the regenerator-microfabrication contract. Results of the efforts in these three areas are summarized.

  7. Isokinetic performance capacity of trunk muscles. Part II: Coefficient of variation in isokinetic measurement in maximal effort and in submaximal effort.

    PubMed

    Luoto, S; Hupli, M; Alaranta, H; Hurri, H

    1996-12-01

    It has been claimed that with the aid of isokinetic trunk strength measuring devices it is possible to distinguish true muscular weakness from submaximal effort in the test. This proposition is based on the presumption that in the isokinetic trunk strength test identical performances can only be reproduced by maximal effort. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to distinguish maximal effort from submaximal with the aid of the coefficient of variation (CV) in an isokinetic trunk muscle strength test. The study group included 35 (21 male and 14 female) subjects of whom 12 were healthy, 10 had a mild low-back pain and 13 had a more severe chronic low-back pain. The subjects performed five consecutive bendings both with maximal (100%) and submaximal (50%) efforts at a speed of 90 degrees/second. In maximal effort only healthy subjects reached an average level of CV close to 10% both in extension and in flexion. In the chronic low-back pain group the average CV was close to 20%. The difference in CV was statistically significant (p < 0.05-0.02) between the healthy and the chronic low-back pain subjects. In the submaximal effort all health groups had a CV of approximately 20% or more and no significant differences were found. The group of slightly variable measurements (CV = 11-20%) was remarkably large in both the maximal and submaximal effort. The results suggest that an effort with a CV of 11-20% cannot be classified as definitely submaximal or maximal. When the CV is less than 10% the effort can be fairly certainly classified as maximal.

  8. Genetic programming as alternative for predicting development effort of individual software projects.

    PubMed

    Chavoya, Arturo; Lopez-Martin, Cuauhtemoc; Andalon-Garcia, Irma R; Meda-Campaña, M E

    2012-01-01

    Statistical and genetic programming techniques have been used to predict the software development effort of large software projects. In this paper, a genetic programming model was used for predicting the effort required in individually developed projects. Accuracy obtained from a genetic programming model was compared against one generated from the application of a statistical regression model. A sample of 219 projects developed by 71 practitioners was used for generating the two models, whereas another sample of 130 projects developed by 38 practitioners was used for validating them. The models used two kinds of lines of code as well as programming language experience as independent variables. Accuracy results from the model obtained with genetic programming suggest that it could be used to predict the software development effort of individual projects when these projects have been developed in a disciplined manner within a development-controlled environment.

  9. Genetic Programming as Alternative for Predicting Development Effort of Individual Software Projects

    PubMed Central

    Chavoya, Arturo; Lopez-Martin, Cuauhtemoc; Andalon-Garcia, Irma R.; Meda-Campaña, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Statistical and genetic programming techniques have been used to predict the software development effort of large software projects. In this paper, a genetic programming model was used for predicting the effort required in individually developed projects. Accuracy obtained from a genetic programming model was compared against one generated from the application of a statistical regression model. A sample of 219 projects developed by 71 practitioners was used for generating the two models, whereas another sample of 130 projects developed by 38 practitioners was used for validating them. The models used two kinds of lines of code as well as programming language experience as independent variables. Accuracy results from the model obtained with genetic programming suggest that it could be used to predict the software development effort of individual projects when these projects have been developed in a disciplined manner within a development-controlled environment. PMID:23226305

  10. Personal Professional Development Efforts Scale for Science and Technology Teachers Regarding Their Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilgin, Aysegül; Balbag, Mustafa Zafer

    2016-01-01

    This study has developed "Personal Professional Development Efforts Scale for Science and Technology Teachers Regarding Their Fields". Exploratory factor analysis of the scale has been conducted based on the data collected from 200 science and technology teachers across Turkey. The scale has been observed through varimax rotation method,…

  11. 75 FR 65281 - Public Meeting To Discuss NIOSH's Respirator Standards Development Efforts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... Technology Laboratory (NPPTL), will conduct a public meeting to discuss current respirator standards... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 84 Public Meeting To Discuss NIOSH's Respirator Standards Development Efforts..., NPPTL, Policy and Standards Development Branch Chief, P.O. Box 18070, 626 Cochrans Mill Road,...

  12. Integrating State Development Efforts: An Agenda for Service Providers. Business Assistance Note #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shonka, Molly; Bergman, Terri

    States that are successfully integrating three development programs--economic, work force, and technology--are focusing on the results as the first step in the process and have an easier time developing, monitoring, and improving their strategies. To structure their integration efforts around results, states need to begin with a vision of a…

  13. Basic Research and Development Effort to Design a Micro Nuclear Power Plant for Brazilian Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimares, L. N. F.; Camillo, G. P.; Placco, G. M.; Barrios, G., A., Jr.; Do Nascimento, J. A.; Borges, E. M.; De Castro Lobo, P. D.

    For some years the Nuclear Energy Division of the Institute for Advanced Studies is conducting the TERRA (Portuguese abbreviation for advanced fast reactor technology) project. This project aims at research and development of the key issues related with nuclear energy applied to space technology. The purpose of this development is to allow future Brazilian space explorers the access of a good and reliable heat, power and/or propulsion system based on nuclear energy. Efforts are being made in fuel and nuclear core design, designing and building a closed Brayton cycle loop for energy conversion, heat pipe systems research for passive space heat rejection, developing computational programs for thermal loop safety analysis and other technology that may be used to improve efficiency and operation. Currently there is no specific mission that requires these technology development efforts; therefore, there is a certain degree of freedom in the organization and development efforts. This paper will present what has been achieved so far, what is the current development status, where efforts are heading and a proposed time table to meet development objectives.

  14. Topaz-II reactor control unit development

    SciTech Connect

    Wyant, F.J.; Jensen, D.; Logothetis, J.

    1994-12-31

    The development for a new digital reactor control unit for the Topaz-II reactor is described. The unit is expected to provide the means for automated control during a possible Topaz flight experiment. The breadboard design and development is discussed.

  15. Temperament and the Development of Conscience: The Moderating Role of Effortful Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifter, Cynthia A.; Cipriano, Elizabeth; Conway, Anne; Kelleher, Rachael

    2009-01-01

    In this longitudinal study we examined whether two components of effortful control, behavioral control, and executive function moderated the relation between temperament and conscience development. Temperament was assessed when participants were two years of age, and three temperament groups were formed: inhibited, exuberant, and low reactive. At…

  16. Chile and Its Efforts to Present High-Level Technologies to the Developed World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    Chile is rich in natural resources. Like many other resource-dependent nations, it has never made technology transfer a subject of intense focus. This article sheds light on the technological state of Chile today and its efforts to promote development, increase innovation and move towards a knowledge-based economy. The paper summarizes current…

  17. From the Grassroots: Case Studies of Eight Rural Self-Development Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flora, Jan L.; And Others

    Grassroots efforts were examined through a survey of 103 self-development projects across the United States, enriched by an indepth study of 8 successful and unsuccessful cases. They were as follows: Revolving Loan Fund, Mankato, Kansas; Orofino Unlimited, Orofino, Idaho; Center for Industry, Rome, Georgia; Windmill Market Farm and Craft Co-op,…

  18. Current efforts on developing an HWIL synthetic environment for LADAR sensor testing at AMRDEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin J.; Cornell, Michael C.; Naumann, Charles B.

    2005-05-01

    Efforts in developing a synthetic environment for testing LADAR sensors in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation are continuing at the Aviation and Missile Research, Engineering, and Development Center (AMRDEC) of the U.S. Army Research, Engineering and Development Command (RDECOM). Current activities have concentrated on developing the optical projection hardware portion of the synthetic environment. These activities range from system level design down to component level testing. Of particular interest have been schemes for generating the optical signals representing the individual pixels of the projection. Several approaches have been investigated and tested with emphasis on operating wavelength, intensity dynamic range and uniformity, and flexibility in pixel waveform generation. This paper will discuss some of the results from these current efforts at RDECOM's Advanced Simulation Center (ASC).

  19. DARPA-funded efforts in the development of novel brain-computer interface technologies.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Robbin A; Casebeer, William D; Hein, Amy M; Judy, Jack W; Krotkov, Eric P; Laabs, Tracy L; Manzo, Justin E; Pankratz, Kent G; Pratt, Gill A; Sanchez, Justin C; Weber, Douglas J; Wheeler, Tracey L; Ling, Geoffrey S F

    2015-04-15

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has funded innovative scientific research and technology developments in the field of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) since the 1970s. This review highlights some of DARPA's major advances in the field of BCI, particularly those made in recent years. Two broad categories of DARPA programs are presented with respect to the ultimate goals of supporting the nation's warfighters: (1) BCI efforts aimed at restoring neural and/or behavioral function, and (2) BCI efforts aimed at improving human training and performance. The programs discussed are synergistic and complementary to one another, and, moreover, promote interdisciplinary collaborations among researchers, engineers, and clinicians. Finally, this review includes a summary of some of the remaining challenges for the field of BCI, as well as the goals of new DARPA efforts in this domain.

  20. The Interaction between Negative Emotionality and Effortful Control in Early Social-emotional Development

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Lyndsey R.; Lengua, Liliana J.; Zalewski, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between reactive and regulatory dimensions of temperament may be particularly relevant to children’s adjustment but are examined infrequently. This study investigated these interactions by examining effortful control as a moderator of the relations of fear and frustration reactivity to children’s social competence, internalizing, and externalizing problems. Participants included 306 three-year-old children and their mothers. Children’s effortful control was measured using observational measures, and reactivity was assessed with both observational and mother-reported measures. Mothers reported on children’s adjustment. Significant interactions indicated that children with higher mother-reported fear or higher observed frustration and lower executive control showed higher externalizing problems whereas children with higher observed fear and higher delay ability demonstrated lower externalizing problems. These results highlight effortful control as a moderator of the relation between reactivity and adjustment, and may inform the development of interventions geared toward the management of specific negative affects. PMID:25429192

  1. Issues in development of a protocol to evaluate children's reasoning about ability and effort in sport.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, J; Smith, A G

    1996-10-01

    This study developed a protocol to identify in a sporting activity the developmental stages in differentiating effort and ability derived by Nicholls in 1978 from cognitive tasks. 32 boys aged 8 to 13 years were shown videoclips depicting two performers on a split-screen shooting at off-screen baskets with unequal effort. False scores were presented to indicate that the sporadic worker scored the same as or higher than the consistent worker. Subjects were then interviewed about the performers' ability and effort, and their responses were categorized using Nicholls' criteria for developmental level. The responses showed the same developmental stages derived from cognitive tasks, with some new interpretations specific to this psychomotor task. Issues of generalizability are discussed and alternative protocols recommended.

  2. Income and the Development of Effortful Control as Predictors of Teacher Reports of Preschool Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Stephanie F.; Lengua, Liliana J.; Zalewski, Maureen; Moran, Lyndsey

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relations of income and children’s effortful control to teacher reports of preschoolers’ social competence and adjustment problems. This study tested whether changes in effortful control accounted for the effects of income on children’s adjustment. A community sample (N=306) of preschool-age children (36-40 mos.) and their mothers, representing the full range of income (29% at or near poverty, 28% at or below the local median income), was used. Path analyses were used to test the prospective effects of income on rank-order changes in two aspects of effortful control, executive control and delay ability, which in turn, predicted teacher-reported adjustment problems and social competence. Lower income predicted smaller rank-order change in executive control, but did not predict changes in delay ability. Smaller rank-order change in delay ability predicted greater adjustment problems above the effect of income. Larger rank-order change in executive control predicted greater social competence and fewer adjustment problems above the effect of income. These findings provided some support for the hypothesis that disruptions in the development of effortful control related to low income might account for the effects of low income on young children’s adjustment. Effortful control is potentially a fruitful target for intervention, particularly among children living in low income and poverty. PMID:24223473

  3. An evaluation of efforts to educate mothers about child development in pediatric office practices.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlin, R W; Szumowski, E K; Zastowny, T R

    1979-01-01

    The efforts expended by pediatricians in a variety of private practice settings to educate mothers of first-born children about child behavior and development were examined in relation to various outcome measures of mother and child functioning over a time period of one-and-a-half years. Mothers learned more about child development in group settings than in solo practice settings, but differences between medical groups with and without nurse practitioners were not significant. Mothers receiving care from pediatricians who made at least a moderate effort to teach, learned more about child development, described more use of positive contact with their children, and felt they were helped more in their childrearing efforts than did mothers receiving care from pediatricians who made little effort to teach. However, there were no significant differences in measures of the child's developmental status related to physician teaching input, and mothers exposed to higher levels of teaching input reported more behavioral problems with their children. The most important predictor of the child's developmental status at 18 months of age was the amount of positive contact between mother and child at one year. It is suggested that the effects of changing the frequency of well-child visits on the mothers' interaction patterns with their children and on their feelings of being supported by the physician be ascertained before making recommendations about the optimal number of such visits. PMID:474843

  4. Design, Evaluation and Experimental Effort Toward Development of a High Strain Composite Wing for Navy Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, Joseph; Libeskind, Mark

    1990-01-01

    This design development effort addressed significant technical issues concerning the use and benefits of high strain composite wing structures (Epsilon(sub ult) = 6000 micro-in/in) for future Navy aircraft. These issues were concerned primarily with the structural integrity and durability of the innovative design concepts and manufacturing techniques which permitted a 50 percent increase in design ultimate strain level (while maintaining the same fiber/resin system) as well as damage tolerance and survivability requirements. An extensive test effort consisting of a progressive series of coupon and major element tests was an integral part of this development effort, and culminated in the design, fabrication and test of a major full-scale wing box component. The successful completion of the tests demonstrated the structural integrity, durability and benefits of the design. Low energy impact testing followed by fatigue cycling verified the damage tolerance concepts incorporated within the structure. Finally, live fire ballistic testing confirmed the survivability of the design. The potential benefits of combining newer/emerging composite materials and new or previously developed high strain wing design to maximize structural efficiency and reduce fabrication costs was the subject of subsequent preliminary design and experimental evaluation effort.

  5. States and compacts: Issues and events affecting facility development efforts, including the Barnwell opening

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    Ten years have passed since the first regional low-level radioactive waste compacts received Congressional consent and initiated their efforts to develop new disposal capacity. During these 10 years, both significant achievements and serious setbacks have marked our efforts and affect our current outlook. Recent events in the waste marketplace, particularly in the operating status of the Barnwell disposal facility, have now raised legitimate questions about the continued rationale for the regional framework that grew out of the original legislation enacted by Congress in 1980. At the same time, licensing activities for new regional disposal facilities are under way in three states, and a fourth awaits the final go-ahead to begin construction. Uncertainty over the meaning and reliability of the marketplace events makes it difficult to gauge long-term implications. In addition, differences in the status of individual state and compact facility development efforts lead to varying assessments of the influence these events will, or should, have on such efforts.

  6. Symbol Character Generator Developed for Decwriter II

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, R.J.

    2001-03-15

    The versatile dot matrix printer of the DECwriter II was modified to enable printing of symbol characters., e.g., Greek letters and other symbol for mathematical expressions and units of measurement. This development involved the replacement of the read-only memory (ROM) units with erasable-programmable read-only memory (EPROM) units.

  7. Doctors develop vascular center. Marketing new Jupiter, Fla., facility a collaborative effort.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    Two interventional radiologists came to Jupiter Medical Center, Jupiter, Fla., as it was making a number of strategic expansion efforts. Together, the doctors developed a center devoted exclusively to their specialty, committing some of their time to the marketing and outreach education about interventional radiology. Using a multi-faceted marketing approach, the campaign has raised knowledge and awareness of The Vascular Institute to the point of reversing the outflow of patients.

  8. Overview of NASA Multi-Dimensional Stirling Convertor Code Development and Validation Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Cairelli, James E.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Simon, Terrence W.; Gedeon, David

    2003-01-01

    A NASA grant has been awarded to Cleveland State University (CSU) to develop a multi-dimensional (multi-D) Stirling computer code with the goals of improving loss predictions and identifying component areas for improvements. The University of Minnesota (UMN) and Gedeon Associates are teamed with CSU. Development of test rigs at UMN and CSU and validation of the code against test data are part of the effort. The one-dimensional (1-D) Stirling codes used for design and performance prediction do not rigorously model regions of the working space where abrupt changes in flow area occur (such as manifolds and other transitions between components). Certain hardware experiences have demonstrated large performance gains by varying manifolds and heat exchanger designs to improve flow distributions in the heat exchangers. 1-D codes were not able to predict these performance gains. An accurate multi-D code should improve understanding of the effects of area changes along the main flow axis, sensitivity of performance to slight changes in internal geometry, and, in general, the understanding of various internal thermodynamic losses. The commercial CFD-ACE code has been chosen for development of the multi-D code. This 2-D/3-D code has highly developed pre- and post-processors, and moving boundary capability. Preliminary attempts at validation of CFD-ACE models of MIT gas spring and ``two space'' test rigs were encouraging. Also, CSU's simulations of the UMN oscillating-flow rig compare well with flow visualization results from UMN. A complementary Department of Energy (DOE) Regenerator Research effort is aiding in development of regenerator matrix models that will be used in the multi-D Stirling code. This paper reports on the progress and challenges of this multi-D code development effort.

  9. Quantum Cascade Laser Development Efforts for Implementation into Chemical and Remote Sensing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Michael D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Cannon, Bret D.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Mosely, Trinesha

    2004-12-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) offer many desirable attributes as mid-infrared laser sources for chemical and remote sensing. Some key advantages are a narrow linewidth, wide bandwidth current modulation characteristics and moderate tunability (15 cm-1). Combined, these characteristics allow for applications to a wide variety of chemical and remote sensing techniques such as wavelength and frequency modulation based detection techniques, cavity enhanced point sensors as well as techniques such as LIDAR and DIAL. This paper will describe laser development efforts to enhance QCL frequency stabilization and QCL injection locking and to develop robust external cavity QCL designs.

  10. Overview of Altair's Thermal Control System and the Associated Technology Development Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In early 2004, President Bush announced a bold vision for space exploration. One of the goals included in this vision is a return to the moon by 2020. In response to this vision, NASA established the Constellation Program, which includes several project offices. One of the Constellation projects is Altair, which is the next generation Lunar Lander. The future Altair missions are very different than the Lunar missions accomplished during the Apollo era. As such, there are several project risks and design challenges that have never before been addressed. Due to the unique thermal environment associated with this mission, many of these risks and design challenges are associated with the vehicle's thermal control system. NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) includes the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP). ETDP consists of several technology development projects. The project chartered with mitigating the aforementioned risks and design challenges is the Thermal Control System Development for Exploration Project. The current paper will summarize the Altair mission profile, the operational phases, and the thermal design challenges unique to this particular vehicle. The paper will also describe the technology development efforts being performed to mitigate the risks and design challenges. The technology development project is performing a rigorous development effort that includes thermal control system fluids, evaporators, heat exchangers, and Lunar surface radiators. Constellation Program, there are several project offices. One of these projects includes the development of NASA's new lunar lander vehicle. The overall mission architecture for this vehicle, Altair, is very similar to Apollo's architecture. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Altair vehicle. In addition, Altair's thermal control system, including the functionality and the hardware, will be discussed. The paper will also describe the technology

  11. Recent developments in the effort to cure HIV infection: going beyond N = 1.

    PubMed

    Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) can suppress plasma HIV to undetectable levels, allowing HIV-infected individuals who are treated early a nearly normal life span. Despite the clear ability of ART to prevent morbidity and mortality, it is not curative. Even in individuals who have full suppression of viral replication on ART, there are resting memory CD4+ T cells that harbor stably integrated HIV genomes, which are capable of producing infectious virus upon T cell activation. This latent viral reservoir is considered the primary obstacle to the development of an HIV cure, and recent efforts in multiple areas of HIV research have been brought to bear on the development of strategies to eradicate or develop a functional cure for HIV. Reviews in this series detail progress in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of viral latency, efforts to accurately assess the size and composition of the latent reservoir, the characterization and development of HIV-targeted broadly neutralizing antibodies and cytolytic T lymphocytes, and animal models for the study HIV latency and therapeutic strategies.

  12. Summary Report of Summer 2009 NGSI Human Capital Development Efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dougan, A; Dreicer, M; Essner, J; Gaffney, A; Reed, J; Williams, R

    2009-11-16

    In 2009, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engaged in several activities to support NA-24's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). This report outlines LLNL's efforts to support Human Capital Development (HCD), one of five key components of NGSI managed by Dunbar Lockwood in the Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). There were five main LLNL summer safeguards HCD efforts sponsored by NGSI: (1) A joint Monterey Institute of International Studies/Center for Nonproliferation Studies-LLNL International Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis Course; (2) A Summer Safeguards Policy Internship Program at LLNL; (3) A Training in Environmental Sample Analysis for IAEA Safeguards Internship; (4) Safeguards Technology Internships; and (5) A joint LLNL-INL Summer Safeguards Lecture Series. In this report, we provide an overview of these five initiatives, an analysis of lessons learned, an update on the NGSI FY09 post-doc, and an update on students who participated in previous NGSI-sponsored LLNL safeguards HCD efforts.

  13. Microgravity Investigation of Crew Reactions in 0-G (MICR0-G): Ground-Based Development Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Dava J.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the technology development of an advanced load sensor ground-based prototype and details the preliminary tests in microgravity during parabolic flights. The research effort is entitled, the Microgravity Investigation and Crew Reactions in 0-G (MICR0-G), a ground-based research effort funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The MICR0-G project was a follow-on to the Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS) spaceflight experiment flown on the Russian Space Station Mir. The technology development of the advanced load sensor prototype has been carried out by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), with collaboration from Politecnico di Milano University and the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The key hardware of the advanced sensor prototype is a set of two types of load sensors - a hand-hold and foot restraints - similar in appearance to the mobility aids found in the Space Shuttle orbiter to assist the crew in moving inside the spacecraft, but able to measure the applied forces and moments about the x-, y-, and z- axes. The aim of Chapter 1 is to give a brief overview of the report contents. The first section summarizes the previous research efforts on astronaut-induced loads in microgravity. The second section provides information on the MICR0-G research project and the technology development work conducted at MIT. Section 1.3 details the motivation for designing a new generation of load sensors and describes the main enhancements and contributions of the MICR0-G advanced load sensors system compared to the EDLS system. Finally, the last section presents the outline of the report.

  14. An Overview of In-Space Propulsion and Cryogenics Fluids Management Efforts for 2014 SBIR Phases I and II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for Agency programs. This report highlights 11 of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and II projects from 2010 to 2012 that focus on one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-In-Space Propulsion and Cryogenic Fluids Management. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as divergent field annular ion engines, miniature nontoxic nitrous oxide-propane propulsion, noncatalytic ignition systems for high-performance advanced monopropellant thrusters, nontoxic storable liquid propulsion, and superconducting electric boost pumps for nuclear thermal propulsion. Each article describes an innovation and technical objective and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  15. Cryogenic Fluid Storage Technology Development: Recent and Planned Efforts at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent technology development work conducted at NASA in the area of Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) storage is highlighted, including summary results, key impacts, and ongoing efforts. Thermodynamic vent system (TVS) ground test results are shown for hydrogen, methane, and oxygen. Joule-Thomson (J-T) device tests related to clogging in hydrogen are summarized, along with the absence of clogging in oxygen and methane tests. Confirmation of analytical relations and bonding techniques for broad area cooling (BAC) concepts based on tube-to-tank tests are presented. Results of two-phase lumped-parameter computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models are highlighted, including validation of the model with hydrogen self pressurization test data. These models were used to simulate Altair representative methane and oxygen tanks subjected to 210 days of lunar surface storage. Engineering analysis tools being developed to support system level trades and vehicle propulsion system designs are also cited. Finally, prioritized technology development risks identified for Constellation cryogenic propulsion systems are presented, and future efforts to address those risks are discussed.

  16. Supporting Leadership Development: An Examination of High School Principals' Efforts to Develop Leaders' Personal Capacities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Kristin Shawn; Klar, Hans W.; Hammonds, Hattie L.; Buskey, Frederick C.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report findings from an exploratory, qualitative study in which we used a constructivist lens to examine how two high school principals endeavored to develop the personal capacities of teachers and other leaders in their schools. We collected data from semistructured interviews with the principals and three other leaders from…

  17. Development Efforts Expanded in Ion Propulsion: Ion Thrusters Developed With Higher Power Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Sovey, James S.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center was the major contributor of 2-kW-class ion thruster technology to the Deep Space 1 mission, which was successfully completed in early 2002. Recently, NASA s Office of Space Science awarded approximately $21 million to Glenn to develop higher power xenon ion propulsion systems for large flagship missions such as outer planet explorers and sample return missions. The project, referred to as NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT), is a logical follow-on to the ion propulsion system demonstrated on Deep Space 1. The propulsion system power level for NEXT is expected to be as high as 25 kW, incorporating multiple ion thrusters, each capable of being throttled over a 1- to 6-kW power range. To date, engineering model thrusters have been developed, and performance and plume diagnostics are now being documented. The project team-Glenn, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, General Dynamics, Boeing Electron Dynamic Devices, the Applied Physics Laboratory, the University of Michigan, and Colorado State University-is in the process of developing hardware for a ground demonstration of the NEXT propulsion system, which comprises a xenon feed system, controllers, multiple thrusters, and power processors. The development program also will include life assessments by tests and analyses, single-string tests of ion thrusters and power systems, and finally, multistring thruster system tests in calendar year 2005. In addition, NASA's Office of Space Science selected Glenn to lead the development of a 25-kW xenon thruster to enable NASA to conduct future missions to the outer planets of Jupiter and beyond, under the High Power Electric Propulsion (HiPEP) program. The development of a 100-kW-class ion propulsion system and power conversion systems are critical components to enable future nuclear-electric propulsion systems. In fiscal year 2003, a team composed of Glenn, the Boeing Company, General Dynamics, the Applied Physics Laboratory, the Naval Research

  18. The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Object Survey Public Database Development Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Brian; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Putnam, Lowell

    2014-11-01

    The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Object Survey (MANOS) began in August 2013 as a multi-year physical characterization survey that was awarded large survey status by NOAO. MANOS will target several hundred mission-accessible NEOs across visible and near-infrared wavelengths, ultimately providing a comprehensive catalog of physical properties (astrometry, light curves, spectra). The MANOS project will provide a resource that not only helps to manage our survey in a fully transparent, publicly accessible forum, but will also help to coordinate minor planet characterization efforts and target prioritization across multiple research groups. Working towards that goal, we are developing a portal for rapid, up to date, public dissemination of our data. Migrating the Lowell Astorb dataset to a SQL framework is a major step towards the modernization of the system and will make capable up-to-date deployment of data. This will further allow us to develop utilities of various complexity, such as a deltaV calculator, minor planet finder charts, and sophisticated ephemeri generation functions. We present the state of this effort and a preliminary timeline for functionality.

  19. Overview of NASA Multi-dimensional Stirling Convertor Code Development and Validation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Cairelli, James E.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Simon, Terrence W.; Gedeon, David

    2002-01-01

    A NASA grant has been awarded to Cleveland State University (CSU) to develop a multi-dimensional (multi-D) Stirling computer code with the goals of improving loss predictions and identifying component areas for improvements. The University of Minnesota (UMN) and Gedeon Associates are teamed with CSU. Development of test rigs at UMN and CSU and validation of the code against test data are part of the effort. The one-dimensional (1-D) Stirling codes used for design and performance prediction do not rigorously model regions of the working space where abrupt changes in flow area occur (such as manifolds and other transitions between components). Certain hardware experiences have demonstrated large performance gains by varying manifolds and heat exchanger designs to improve flow distributions in the heat exchangers. 1-D codes were not able to predict these performance gains. An accurate multi-D code should improve understanding of the effects of area changes along the main flow axis, sensitivity of performance to slight changes in internal geometry, and, in general, the understanding of various internal thermodynamic losses. The commercial CFD-ACE code has been chosen for development of the multi-D code. This 2-D/3-D code has highly developed pre- and post-processors, and moving boundary capability. Preliminary attempts at validation of CFD-ACE models of MIT gas spring and "two space" test rigs were encouraging. Also, CSU's simulations of the UMN oscillating-flow fig compare well with flow visualization results from UMN. A complementary Department of Energy (DOE) Regenerator Research effort is aiding in development of regenerator matrix models that will be used in the multi-D Stirling code. This paper reports on the progress and challenges of this

  20. Overview of NASA Multi-Dimensional Stirling Convertor Code Development and Validation Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Cairelli, James E.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Simon, Terrence W.; Gedeon, David

    2002-12-01

    A NASA grant has been awarded to Cleveland State University (CSU) to develop a multi-dimensional (multi-D) Stirling computer code with the goals of improving loss predictions and identifying component areas for improvements. The University of Minnesota (UMN) and Gedeon Associates are teamed with CSU. Development of test rigs at UMN and CSU and validation of the code against test data are part of the effort. The one-dimensional (1-D) Stirling codes used for design and performance prediction do not rigorously model regions of the working space where abrupt changes in flow area occur (such as manifolds and other transitions between components). Certain hardware experiences have demonstrated large performance gains by varying manifolds and heat exchanger designs to improve flow distributions in the heat exchangers. 1-D codes were not able to predict these performance gains. An accurate multi-D code should improve understanding of the effects of area changes along the main flow axis, sensitivity of performance to slight changes in internal geometry, and, in general, the understanding of various internal thermodynamic losses. The commercial CFD-ACE code has been chosen for development of the multi-D code. This 2-D/3-D code has highly developed pre- and post-processors, and moving boundary capability. Preliminary attempts at validation of CFD-ACE models of MIT gas spring and "two space" test rigs were encouraging. Also, CSU's simulations of the UMN oscillating-flow fig compare well with flow visualization results from UMN. A complementary Department of Energy (DOE) Regenerator Research effort is aiding in development of regenerator matrix models that will be used in the multi-D Stirling code. This paper reports on the progress and challenges of this

  1. Lunar In Situ Materials-Based Habitat Technology Development Efforts at NASA/MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodiford, Melanie P.; Burks, K. H.; Perry M. R.; Cooper, R. W.; Fiske, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    For long duration missions on other planetary bodies, the use of in situ materials will become increasingly critical. As man's presence on these bodies expands, so must the structures to accommodate them including habitats, laboratories, berms, garages, solar storm shelters, greenhouses, etc. The use of in situ materials will significantly offset required launch upmass and volume issues. Under the auspices of the In Situ Fabrication & Repair (ISFR) Program at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Habitat Structures project has been developing materials and construction technologies to support development of these in situ structures. This paper will report on the development of several of these technologies at MSFC's Prototype Development Laboratory (PDL). These technologies include, but are not limited to, development of extruded concrete and inflatable concrete dome technologies based on waterless and water-based concretes, development of regolith-based blocks with potential radiation shielding binders including polyurethane and polyethylene, pressure regulation systems for inflatable structures, production of glass fibers and rebar derived from molten lunar regolith simulant, development of regolithbag structures, and others, including automation design issues. Results to date and planned efforts for FY06 will also be presented.

  2. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory: Developing Our Human Capital FY2015

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Rebecca S.; Hawkins Erpenbeck, Heather

    2015-10-13

    This report documents the accomplishments of the Safeguards HCD Fiscal Year 2015 (FY15) Project Work Plan, highlighting LANL’s work as well as the accomplishments of our NGSI-sponsored students, graduate and postdoctoral fellows, and mid-career professionals during this past year. While fiscal year 2015 has been a year of transition in the Human Capital Development area for LANL, we are working to revitalize our efforts to promote and develop Human Capital in Safeguards and Non-proliferation and are looking forward to implementing new initiatives in the coming fiscal year and continuing to transition the knowledge of staff who have been on assignment at IAEA and Headquarters to improve our support to HCD.

  3. Participation in multilateral effort to develop high performance integrated CPC evacuated collectors. [Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, R.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1992-05-31

    The University of Chicago Solar Energy Group has had a continuing program and commitment to develop an advanced evacuated solar collector integrating nonimaging concentration into its design. During the period from 1985--1987, some of our efforts were directed toward designing and prototyping a manufacturable version of an Integrated Compound Parabolic Concentrator (ICPC) evacuated collector tube as part of an international cooperative effort involving six organizations in four different countries. This multilateral'' project made considerable progress towards a commercially practical collector. One of two basic designs considered employed a heat pipe and an internal metal reflector CPC. We fabricated and tested two large diameter (125mm) borosilicate glass collector tubes to explore this concept. The other design also used a large diameter (125mm) glass tube but with a specially configured internal shaped mirror CPC coupled to a U-tube absorber. Performance projections in a variety of systems applications using the computer design tools developed by the International Energy Agency (IEA) task on evacuated collectors were used to optimize the optical and thermal design. The long-term goal of this work continues to be the development of a high efficiency, low cost solar collector to supply solar thermal energy at temperatures up to 250{degree}C. Some experience and perspectives based on our work are presented and reviewed. Despite substantial progress, the stability of research support and the market for commercial solar thermal collectors were such that the project could not be continued. A cooperative path involving university, government and industrial collaboration remains the most attractive near term option for developing a commercial ICPC.

  4. Overview 2003 of NASA Multi-D Stirling Convertor Development and DOE and NASA Stirling Regenerator R and D Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twe, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Gedeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary

    2004-01-01

    This paper will report on (1) continuation through the 3rd year of a NASA grant for multi-dimensional Stirling CFD code development and validation, (2) continuation through the 3rd and final year of a Department of Energy, Golden Field Office (DOE) regenerator research effort. Results of the NASA multi-D code development effort and the DOE regenerator research efforts will be summarized. Early results and planning for the new regenerator microfabrication contract will also be discussed.

  5. Low Temperature Double-layer Capacitors with Improved Energy Density: An Overview of Recent Development Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Yushin, Gleb; Korenblit, Yair; Kajdos, Adam; Kvit, Alexander; Jagiello, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors are finding increased use in a wide range of energy storage applications, particularly where high pulse power capabilities are required. Double-layer capacitors store charge at a liquid/solid interface, making them ideal for low temperature power applications, due to the facile kinetic processes associated with the rearrangement of the electrochemical double-layer at these temperatures. Potential low temperature applications include hybrid and electric vehicles, operations in polar regions, high altitude aircraft and aerospace avionics, and distributed environmental and structural health monitoring. State-of-the-art capacitors can typically operate to -40 C, with a subsequent degradation in power performance below room temperature. However, recent efforts focused on advanced electrolyte and electrode systems can enable operation to temperatures as low as -70 C, with capacities similar to room temperature values accompanied by reasonably low equivalent series resistances. This presentation will provide an overview of recent development efforts to extend and improve the wide temperature performance of these devices.

  6. Current Technology Development Efforts on the International X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David

    2011-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory (IXO) is a collaboration between NASA, ESA, and JAXA which is under study for launch in 2021. IXO will be a large 6600 kilogram Great Observatory-class mission which will build upon the legacies of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. There is an extensive ongoing effort to raise the technology readiness level of the X-ray mirror from TRL 3 to TRL 6 in the next decade. Improvements have recently been made in the area of positioning and bonding mirrors on the nanometer scale and developing metals and composites with a matching coefficient of thermal expansion to the glass X-ray mirrors. On the mission systems side, the NASA reference design has been through a preliminary coupled loads analysis and a STOP analysis of the flight mirror assembly has been initiated. An impact study was performed comparing launching IXO on an Ariane 5 or a U.S. EELV. This paper will provide a snapshot of NASA's current observatory configuration and summarize the progress of these various technology and design efforts.

  7. Summary of the research and development effort on steam plants for electric-utility service

    SciTech Connect

    Fraas, A.P.

    1981-06-01

    The development of steam power plants for electric utility service over the past century is reviewed with particular emphasis on the prime problems and their solution. Increases in steam pressure and temperature made possible by developments in metallurgy led to an increase in thermal efficiency by a factor of 8 between 1880 and 1955. Further improvements have not been made because the use of still more expensive alloys is not economically justified, even with the much higher fuel prices of the latter 1970's. In fact, EPA regulations on waste heat and sulfur emissions have led to the use of cooling towers and wet limestone stack gas scrubbers that cause a degradation in plant thermal efficiency. The various possibilities for further improvements in efficiency and their problems are examined. The development of steam power plants in the past has been carried out in sufficiently small steps that the utilities and the equipment manufacturers have been able to assume the financial risk involved; but the fluidized-bed combustion system, which appears to be the most promising area, presents such a large step with major uncertainties that U.S. government financial support of the research and development effort appears to be required. The potential benefits appear to justify the research and development cost many times over.

  8. The coefficient of variation as a measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength, Part II: sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, O

    2001-01-01

    The coefficient of variation (CV) is commonly used to detect sincerity of effort. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the CV possessed adequate sensitivity and specificity to effectively detect sincerity of effort of grip strength. One hundred forty-six uninjured volunteers underwent a series of grip strength tests. Sensitivity and specificity values were calculated for various CV cut-off values (between 2.5% and 22%) of the static grip test. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves based on these values demonstrated the trade-offs between specificity and sensitivity. For example, the "traditional" 15% cut-off value yielded poor sensitivity (0.55), whereas the 11% cut-off value yielded poor specificity (0.74). Selecting any cut-off value along the continuum did not provide adequate sensitivity or specificity for labeling an effort sincere or insincere. Although the CV differentiated between maximal and submaximal effort, it was not sensitive or specific enough to do so effectively. Thus, the CV should not be used to assess sincerity of effort of grip strength.

  9. Soviet aerospace industry - Aerodynamic Institute aids effort to develop fuel-efficient transports

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Two new turbofan-powered transports currently undergoing flight testing, the Il-96-300 and the Tu-204, are believed to substantially owe their excellent fuel efficiencies to the research work conducted by the Central Aero-Hydrodynamic Institute in Moscow. This institute is responsible for the bulk of the USSR's aerodynamic, stability and control, aeroelasticity, and airframe structural characteristics research. As a measure of the quality of aerodynamic design achievable on the basis of these research efforts, it has been claimed that the Il-96-300 has a L/D value of 19 at Mach 0.92. The primary shortcoming of the institute is its poor hardware resources for CFD; these are compensated by the intensive development of sophisticated computer programs.

  10. Developing acceleration schedules for NDCX-II

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W M; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Henestroza, E; Leitner, M A; Waldron, W L

    2008-08-11

    The Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy-Ion Fusion Science is developing a physics design for NDCX-II, an experiment to study warm dense matter heated by ions near the Bragg-peak energy. Present plans call for using about thirty induction cells to accelerate 30 nC of Li+ ions to more than 3 MeV, followed by neutralized drift-compression. To heat targets to useful temperatures, the beam must be compressed to a sub-millimeter radius and a duration of about 1 ns. An interactive 1-D particle-in-cell simulation with an electrostatic field solver, acceleation-gap fringe fields, and a library of realizable analytic waveforms has been used for developing NDCX-II acceleration schedules. Axisymmetric simulations with WARP have validated this 1-D model and have been used both to design transverse focusing and to compensate for injection non-uniformities and radial variation of the fields. Highlights of this work are presented here.

  11. Developing acceleration schedules for NDCX-II*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M. A.; Waldron, W. L.

    2009-07-01

    The Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy-Ion Fusion Science is developing a physics design for NDCX-II, an experiment to study warm dense matter heated by ions near the Bragg-peak energy. Present plans call for using about thirty induction cells to accelerate 30 nC of Li + ions to more than 3 MeV, followed by neutralized drift-compression. To heat targets to useful temperatures, the beam must be compressed to a millimeter-scale radius and a duration of about 1 ns. An interactive 1-D particle-in-cell simulation with an electrostatic field solver, acceleration-gap fringe fields, and a library of realizable analytic waveforms has been used for developing NDCX-II acceleration schedules. Axisymmetric simulations with WARP have validated this 1-D model and have been used both to design transverse focusing and to compensate for injection non-uniformities and radial variation of the fields. Highlights of this work are presented here.

  12. Spatial Data Transfer Standard and efforts to develop a federal Profile for Vector Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDermott, Matthew H.; DeWitt, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    The ongoing efforts to create a more accessible and user friendly Spatial Data Transfer Standard include the development of a Profile for Vector Data and the development of a library of public domain software tools to support the encoding and decoding process. A profile is, in effect, a limited subset of the standard. The best way to use the standard is to first define a profile containing a limited number of the standard's options and then to design encoding/decoding software around those options. Limiting the standard's optionality will make it easier to develop encoding/decoding software. The success of any standard depends upon acceptance by the user community. Accordingly, the development of a library of software tools is being coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey. When complete, the library will assist users in interfacing with the standard. The software tools will include the capability to encode and decode specific vector data formats into and out of the standard's Vector Profile. With the formal National Institute of Standards and Technology review of the standard coming to a close on July 10, 1991, the likelihood that the standard will be approved as a Federal Information Processing Standard in early 1992 is high. Having such a standard in place is a great/step forward and will allow users to transfer digital spatial data sets in a variety of formats between dissimilar computer systems. The standard's conformance requirements must be understood by all Federal agencies distributing or using spatial data.

  13. Efforts to develop a cultured sponge cell line: revisiting an intractable problem.

    PubMed

    Grasela, James J; Pomponi, Shirley A; Rinkevich, Buki; Grima, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Residents of the marine environment, sponges (Porifera) have the ability to produce organic compounds known as secondary metabolites, which are not directly involved in the normal growth, development, or reproduction of an organism. Because of their sessile nature, the production of these bioactive compounds has been interpreted as a functional adaptation to serve in an important survival role as a means to counter various environmental stress factors such as predation, overgrowth by fouling organisms, or competition for limited space. Regardless of the reasons for this adaptation, a variety of isolated compounds have already proven to demonstrate remarkable anticancer, fungicidal, and antibiotic properties. A major obstacle to the isolation and production of novel compounds from sponges is the lack of a large, reliable source of sponge material. Sponge collection from the sea would be environmentally detrimental to the already stressed and sparse sponge populations. Sponge production in an aquaculture setting might appear to be an ideal alternative but would also be cost-ineffective and sponge growth is extremely slow. A third approach involves the development of a sponge cell culture system capable of producing the necessary cell numbers to harvest for research purposes as well as for the eventual commercial-scale production of promising bioactive compounds. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in this direction other than the establishment of temporary cultures containing aggregates and fragments of cells. One impediment toward successful sponge cell culture might be ascribed to a lack of published knowledge of failed methodologies, and thus, time and effort is wasted on continued reinvention of the same methods and procedures. Consequently, we have undertaken here to chart some of our unsuccessful research efforts, our methodology, and results to provide the sponge research community with knowledge to assist them to better avoid taking the same failed

  14. An effort for developing a seamless transport modeling and remote sensing system for air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, T.; Goto, D.; Dai, T.; Misawa, S.; Uchida, J.; Schutgens, N.; Hashimoto, M.; Oikawa, E.; Takenaka, H.; Tsuruta, H.; Inoue, T.; Higurashi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Wide area of the globe, like Asian region, still suffers from a large emission of air pollutants and cause serious impacts on the earth's climate and the public health of the area. Launch of an international initiative, Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), is an example of efforts to ease the difficulties by reducing Short-Lived Climate Pollutants (SLCPs), i.e., black carbon aerosol, methane and other short-lived atmospheric materials that heat the earth's system, along with long-lived greenhouse gas mitigation. Impact evaluation of the air pollutants, however, has large uncertainties. We like to introduce a recent effort of projects MEXT/SALSA and MOEJ/S-12 to develop a seamless transport model for atmospheric constituents, NICAM-Chem, that is flexible enough to cover global scale to regional scale by the NICAM nonhydrostatic dynamic core (NICAM), coupled with SPRINTARS aerosol model, CHASER atmospheric chemistry model and with their three computational grid systems, i.e. quasi homogeneous grids, stretched grids and diamond grids. A local ensemble transform Kalman filter/smoother with this modeling system was successfully applied to data from MODIS, AERONET, and CALIPSO for global assimilation/inversion and surface SPM and SO2 air pollution monitoring networks for Japanese area assimilation. My talk will be extended to discuss an effective utility of satellite remote sensing of aerosols using Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) on board the GOSAT satellite and Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) on board the new third generation geostationary satellite, Himawari-8. The CAI has a near-ultraviolet channel of 380nm with 500m spatial resolution and the AHI has high frequency measurement capability of every 10 minutes. These functions are very effective for accurate land aerosol remote sensing, so that a combination with the developed aerosol assimilation system is promising.

  15. Expanding the Conversation about SEM: Advancing SEM Efforts to Improve Student Learning and Persistence--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yale, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The first article in this two-part series focused on the need for enrollment management conceptual and organizational models to focus more intentionally and purposefully on efforts related to improving student learning, success, and persistence. Time and again, SEM is viewed from a conventional lens comprising marketing, recruitment and …

  16. The intentionality model and language acquisition: engagement, effort, and the essential tension in development.

    PubMed

    Bloom, L; Tinker, E

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the longitudinal research reported in this Monograph was to examine language acquisition in the second year of life in the context of developments in cognition, affect, and social connectedness. The theoretical focus for the research is on the agency of the child and the importance of the child's intentionality for explaining development, rather than on language as an independent object. The model of development for the research is a Model of Intentionality with two components: the engagement in a world of persons and objects that motivates acquiring a language, and the effort that is required to express and articulate increasingly discrepant and elaborate intentional state representations. The fundamental assumption in the model is that the driving force for acquiring language is in the essential tension between engagement and effort for linguistic, emotional, and physical actions of interpretation and expression. Results of lag sequential analyses are reported to show how different behaviors--words, sentences, emotional expressions, conversational interactions, and constructing thematic relations between objects in play--converged, both in the stream of children's actions in everyday events, in real time, and in developmental time between the emergence of words at about 13 months and the transition to simple sentences at about 2 years of age. Patterns of deviation from baseline rates of the different behaviors show that child emotional expression, child speech, and mother speech clearly influence each other, and the mutual influences between them are different at times of either emergence or achievement in both language and object play. The three conclusions that follow from the results of the research are that (a) expression and interpretation are the acts of performance in which language is learned, which means that performance counts for explaining language acquisition; (b) language is not an independent object but is acquired by a child in

  17. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) design evolution and associated development and verification of data product efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, Vincent V.

    1991-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) is a key observing facility to be flown on the Earth Observing System (EOS). The facility is composed of two instruments called MODIS-N (nadir) and MODIS-T (tilt). The MODIS-N is being built under contract to NASA by the Santa Barbara Research Center. The MODIS-T is being fabricated by the Engineering Directorate at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The MODIS Science Team has defined nearly 40 biogeophysical data products for studies of the ocean and land surface and properties of the atmosphere including clouds that can be expected to be produced from the MODIS instruments shortly after the launch of EOS. The ocean, land, atmosphere, and calibration groups of the MODIS Science Team are now proceeding to plan and implement the operations and facilities involving the analysis of data from existing spaceborne, airborne, and in-situ sensors required to develop and validate the algorithms that will produce the geophysical data products. These algorithm development and validation efforts will be accomplished wherever possible within the context of existing or planned national and international experiments or programs such as those in the World Climate Research Program.

  18. Implementation of a protein profiling platform developed as an academic-pharmaceutical industry collaborative effort.

    PubMed

    Végvári, Akos; Magnusson, Mattias; Wallman, Lars; Ekström, Simon; Bolmsjö, Gunnar; Nilsson, Johan; Miliotis, Tasso; Ostling, Jörgen; Kjellström, Sven; Ottervald, Jan; Franzén, Bo; Hultberg, Hans; Marko-Varga, György; Laurell, Thomas

    2008-06-01

    As much attention has devoted to the proteome research during the last few years, biomarker discovery has become an increasingly hot area, potentially enabling the development of new assays for diagnosis and prognosis of severe diseases. This is the field of research interest where efforts originating from both academic and industrial groups should jointly work on solutions. In this paper, we would like to demonstrate the fruitful combination of both research domains where the scientific crossroads sprout fresh ideas from the basic research domain and how these are refined and tethered to industrial standards. We will present an approach that is based on novel microfluidic devices, utilizing their benefits in processing small-volume samples. Our biomarker discovery strategy, built around this platform, involves optimized samples processing (based on SPE and sample enrichment) and fast MALDI-MS readout. The identification of novel biomarkers at low-abundance level has been achieved by the utilization of a miniaturized sample handling platform, which offers clean-up and enrichment of proteins in one step. Complete automation has been realized in the form of a unique robotic instrumentation that is able to extract and transfer 96 samples onto standard MALDI target plates with high throughput. The developed platform was operated with a 60 sample turnaround per hour allowing sensitivities in femtomol regions of medium- and low-abundant target proteins from clinical studies on samples of multiple sclerosis and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Several proteins have been identified as new biomarkers from cerebrospinal fluid and esophagus epithelial cells.

  19. Dual chamber injection development (Mark II). Final report, 12 April 1984-15 December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, N.; Dietrich, W.C.

    1986-03-15

    This report describes final development, submission of NDA, and mass production of Antidote Kit, Nerve Agent, Mark II. It discusses engineering, production, quality control, materials management, and regulatory - clinical efforts. It also includes results of animal and clinical studies and study protocols. A summary of the Technical Data Package and Training Course is presented.

  20. Overview 2004 of NASA Stirling-Convertor CFD-Model Development and Regenerator R&D Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Demko, Rikako

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on accomplishments in 2004 in development of Stirling-convertor CFD model at NASA GRC and via a NASA grant, a Stirling regenerator-research effort being conducted via a NASA grant (a follow-on effort to an earlier DOE contract), and a regenerator-microfabrication contract for development of a "next-generation Stirling regenerator." Cleveland State University is the lead organization for all three grant/contractual efforts, with the University of Minnesota and Gedeor Associates as subcontractors. Also, the Stirling Technology Co. and Sunpower, Inc. are both involved in all three efforts, either as funded or unfunded participants. International Mezzo Technologies of Baton Rouge, LA is the regenerator fabricator for the regenerator-microfabrication contract. Results of the efforts in these three areas are summarized.

  1. Maryland's efforts to develop regulations creating an air emissions offset trading program

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, D.M.; Zaw-Mon, M.

    1999-07-01

    Under the federal Clean Air Act's New Source Review program, many companies located in or planning to locate in areas that do not meet federal air quality standards or in the Northeast Ozone Transport Region (northern Virginia to Maine) must obtain emission reductions (called offsets) of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides that are greater than the new emissions that will be released. This offset requirement allows growth in industry while protecting air quality against deterioration. Despite the federal offset requirement, a formal banking and trading program is not mandated by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Still, a mechanism is needed to ensure that emission reduction credits (ERCs) are available for sources to use to meet the offset requirement. Currently, Maryland does not have regulations covering the sale or transfer of ERCs from one facility to another. Maryland works with industry on a case-by-case basis to identify potential sources of ERCs and to assist in obtaining them. Then, the offset requirement and the ERCs used to meet the offsets are incorporated into individual permits using various permitting mechanisms. Desiring certainty and stability in the banking and trading process, Maryland's business community has pressed for regulations to formalize Maryland's procedures. Working over several years through a stakeholder process, Maryland has developed concepts for a trading program and a draft regulation. This paper describes Maryland's current case-by-case banking and trading procedure and traces efforts to develop a regulation to formalize the process. The paper discusses complex policy issues related to establishing a banking and trading program, describes the principal elements of Maryland's draft regulation, and summarizes elements of other states' emissions banking and trading programs.

  2. Delta II development and flight results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, S. K.

    An account is given of the design modifications of the Delta launch vehicle which have resulted in its Delta II variant, together with flight results obtained with the Delta II to date. Delta II launchers feature a stretched LX tank, a larger-diameter satellite-payload fairing, and an expansion of first-stage nozzle expansion ratio from 8:1 to 12:1. The thrust-augmenting solid rocket boosters use graphite/epoxy composite motor cases. Both two-stage and three-stage launches are discussed, with attention to flights for the Navstar satellites.

  3. Learner Characteristic Based Learning Effort Curve Mode: The Core Mechanism on Developing Personalized Adaptive E-Learning Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pi-Shan

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to develop the core mechanism for realizing the development of personalized adaptive e-learning platform, which is based on the previous learning effort curve research and takes into account the learner characteristics of learning style and self-efficacy. 125 university students from Taiwan are classified into 16 groups according…

  4. Development of an apnea detection algorithm based on temporal analysis of thoracic respiratory effort signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, C. R.; Cañadas, G. E.; Correa, L. S.; Laciar, E.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the design of an algorithm for detecting apnea episodes, based on analysis of thorax respiratory effort signal. Inspiration and expiration time, and range amplitude of respiratory cycle were evaluated. For range analysis the standard deviation statistical tool was used over respiratory signal temporal windows. The validity of its performance was carried out in 8 records of Apnea-ECG database that has annotations of apnea episodes. The results are: sensitivity (Se) 73%, specificity (Sp) 83%. These values can be improving eliminating artifact of signal records.

  5. Intergenerational Efforts to Develop a Healthy Environment for Everyone: Sustainability as a Human Rights Issue.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Tina M; Savage, Caroline E; Newsham, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    As climate change proceeds at an unprecedented rate, concern for the natural environment has increased. The world's population aging also continues to rise at an unprecedented rate, giving greater attention to the implications of an older population. The two trends are linked through the fact that changes to the environment affect older adults, and older adults affect the environment. Sustainability is, therefore, an intergenerational phenomenon, and protecting resources today leaves a positive legacy and enhances quality of life for future generations. Older adults have much to share with younger generations about behaviors that promote sustainable living, yet few sustainability efforts are intergenerational in nature. As large numbers of people currently subsist without secure access to basic needs, ensuring equitable resource consumption for all generations is urgent and aligns with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Through exploring linkages between aging and sustainability, we identify intergenerational strategies to protect the environment and promote human rights and quality of life for older adults.

  6. Current developments for type-II superlattice imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutz, Frank; Rehm, Robert; Walther, Martin; Kirste, Lutz; Masur, Michael; Wörl, Andreas; Schmitz, Johannes; Wauro, Matthias; Niemasz, Jasmin; Scheibner, Ralf; Ziegler, Johann

    2011-06-01

    InAs/GaSb-based type-II superlattice photodiodes have considerably gained interest as high-performance infrared detectors. Beside the excellent properties of InAs/GaSb superlattices, like the relatively high effective electron mass suppressing tunneling currents, the low Auger recombination rate, and a high quantum efficiency, the bandgap can be widely adjusted within the infrared spectral range from 3 - 30 μm depending on the layer thickness rather than on composition. Superlattice growth and process technology have shown tremendous progress during the last years. Fully integrated superlattice cameras have been demonstrated by several groups worldwide. Within very few years, the InAs/GaSb superlattice technology has proven its suitability for high-performance infrared imaging detector arrays. At Fraunhofer IAF and AIM, the efforts have been focused on developing a mature fabrication technology for bispectral InAs/GaSb superlattice focal plane arrays for a simultaneous, co-located detection at 3-4 μm and 4-5 μm in the mid-wavelength infrared atmospheric transmission window. A very low number of pixel outages and cluster defects is mandatory for dual-color detector arrays. Sources for pixel outages are manifold and might be caused by dislocations in the substrate, the epitaxial growth process or by imperfections during the focal plane array fabrication process. Process refinements, intense root cause analysis and specific test methodologies employed at various stages during the process have proven to be the key for yield enhancements.

  7. Student Stalking of Faculty: Potential Gaps in Campus Faculty Development Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robin K.; Hunter, Sarah; Bertrand, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Centers for teaching and learning (CTLs) provide much of the faculty development in universities across the nation. Many of these centers developed out of a need for enhanced faculty development in technology areas. Fifty CTLs provided data in the current study. Types of programs offered by each center were identified, with specific attention…

  8. Good Faith Efforts? Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2000-01-01

    Regarding Catholic parents' suit against a suburban New York district for promoting occult activities, a federal court ruled in May 1999 that parents had failed to prove existence of the so- called Bedford program. This Solomon-like ruling also rejected First Amendment religious claims and 14th Amendment privacy claims. (MLH)

  9. Forensic Science in Support of Wildlife Conservation Efforts - Developments in Genetic Approaches in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, H M; Tsai, L C; Lee, J Ci

    2011-01-01

    To control illegal wildlife-product trade and protect endangered species of animals, unambiguous identification of the animal specimens is vitally important. Genetic approaches were adopted to identify animal species for conservation and to prevent their fraudulent misidentification in Taiwan, especially for samples of animal residues, powders, and processed products. PCR or nested PCR based on the nature of DNA was used for amplification of cyt b, COI, CHD, and D-loop DNA fragments. Sequences of these fragments were compared with those registered in DNA databases and phylogenetic analysis was performed. The established methods were applied in forensic cases for support of conservation efforts and they were proved to be robust. For conservation animal identification, various samples seized by law enforcement agents have been identified by our systems as rhinoceros horns, Indian sawback turtles, shahtoosh, ivories, dolphins, whales, etc. The systems were also successfully used in investigating the illegal trade of commercial turtle shells and the fraudulent misidentification of food contents on product labels in Taiwanese markets. This review summarizes the work conducted in our laboratory and describes the Taiwan experience.

  10. Leadership and Leader Developmental Self-Efficacy: Their Role in Enhancing Leader Development Efforts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Susan Elaine; Johnson, Stefanie K

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the role of two types of self-efficacy-leader self-efficacy and leader developmental efficacy-for enhancing leadership development. Practical implications for designing and developing leadership programs that take into account these two types of self-efficacy are discussed.

  11. A review of the Los Alamos effort in the development of nuclear rocket propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, F.P.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the achievements of the Los Alamos nuclear rocket propulsion program and describes some specific reactor design and testing problems encountered during the development program along with the progress made in solving these problems. The relevance of these problems to a renewed nuclear thermal rocket development program for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) is discussed. 11 figs.

  12. Community Participation in International Development Education Quality Improvement Efforts: Current Paradoxes and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Nancy; Kaunda, Zikani; Friedson-Rideneur, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    International development organizations increasingly use "participatory development" approaches to improve the effectiveness of their programs. Participatory frameworks are commonly limited in scope and funder-driven; these top-down approaches to participation have proven to be both ineffective, and at times, contradictory in their…

  13. AWIPS II Application Development, a SPoRT Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Jason E.; Smith, Matthew; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) is deploying its next-generation decision support system, called AWIPS II (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II). NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several software 'plug-ins' to extend the capabilities of AWIPS II. SPoRT aims to continue its mission of improving short-term forecasts by providing NASA and NOAA products on the decision support system used at NWS weather forecast offices (WFOs). These products are not included in the standard Satellite Broadcast Network feed provided to WFOs. SPoRT has had success in providing support to WFOs as they have transitioned to AWIPS II. Specific examples of transitioning SPoRT plug-ins to WFOs with newly deployed AWIPS II systems will be presented. Proving Ground activities (GOES-R and JPSS) will dominate SPoRT's future AWIPS II activities, including tool development as well as enhancements to existing products. In early 2012 SPoRT initiated the Experimental Product Development Team, a group of AWIPS II developers from several institutions supporting NWS forecasters with innovative products. The results of the team's spring and fall 2013 meeting will be presented. Since AWIPS II developers now include employees at WFOs, as well as many other institutions related to weather forecasting, the NWS has dealt with a multitude of software governance issues related to the difficulties of multiple remotely collaborating software developers. This presentation will provide additional examples of Research-to-Operations plugins, as well as an update on how governance issues are being handled in the AWIPS II developer community.

  14. Lunar In Situ Materials-Based Surface Structure Technology Development Efforts at NASA/MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, M. R.; McGregor, W.; Pope, R.; McLemore, C. A.; Kaul, R.; Smithers, G.; Ethridge, E.; Toutanji, H.

    2007-01-01

    For long-duration missions on other planetary bodies, the use of in situ materials will become increasingly critical. As man's presence on these bodies expands, so must the structures to accommodate them, including habitats, laboratories, berms, radiation shielding for surface reactors, garages, solar storm shelters, greenhouses, etc. The use of in situ materials will significantly offset required launch upmass and volume issues. Under the auspices of the In Situ Fabrication & Repair (ISFR) Program at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Surface Structures project has been developing materials and construction technologies to support development of these in situ structures. This paper will report on the development of several of these technologies at MSFC's Prototype Development Laboratory (PDL). These technologies include, but are not limited to, development of extruded concrete and inflatable concrete dome technologies based on waterless and water-based concretes, development of regolith-based blocks with potential radiation shielding binders including polyurethane and polyethylene, pressure regulation systems for inflatable structures, production of glass fibers and rebar derived from molten lunar regolith simulant, development of regolithbag structures, and others, including automation design issues. Results to date and lessons learned will be presented, along with recommendations for future activities.

  15. Remote Sensing Education and Development Countries: Multilateral Efforts through the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Leslie Bermann

    1998-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) is an international organization which coordinates space-based Earth observations world wide. Created in 1984, CEOS now comprises 38 national space agencies, regional organizations and international space-related and research groups. The aim of CEOS is to achieve international coordination in the planning of satellite missions for Earth observation and to maximize the utilization of data from these missions world-wide. With regard to developing countries, the fundamental aim of CEOS is to encourage the creation and maintenance of indigenous capability that is integrated into the local decision-making process, thereby enabling developing countries to obtain the maximum benefit from Earth observation. Obtaining adequate access to remote sensing information is difficult for developing countries and students and teachers alike. High unit data prices, the specialized nature of the technology , difficulty in locating specific data, complexities of copyright provisions, the emphasis on "leading edge" technology and research, and the lack of training materials relating to readily understood application are frequently noted obstacles. CEOS has developed an education CD-ROM which is aimed at increasing the integration of space-based data into school curricula, meeting the heretofore unsatisfied needs of developing countries for information about Earth observation application, data sources and future plans; and raising awareness around the world of the value of Earth observation data from space. The CD-ROM is designed to be used with an Internet web browser, increasing the information available to the user, but it can also be used on a stand-alone machine. It contains suggested lesson plans and additional resources for educators and users in developing countries.

  16. Achondrogenesis type II with normally developed extremities: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kocakoc, Ercan; Kiris, Adem

    2002-07-01

    We present a case of achondrogenesis type II with normally developed extremities that was confirmed with postmortem ultrasonographic and radiographic examination. The length of the long bones may vary and the diagnosis of achondrogenesis should not be ruled out with normally developed extremities. Intrauterine sonographic examination of the vertebrae is very important and the absence of vertebral body ossification may be the unique finding of achondrogenesis type II. Axial ultrasonographic images and postmortem plain radiographs are useful to clarify the pathology. PMID:12124695

  17. An Overview of NASA's Current Materials Development Efforts for Mars EDL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A.; Gasch, Matthew; Calomino, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Current roadmaps point to landing heavy masses (cargo, followed by manned vehicles) on Mars in the 2030's and the existing entry, descent and landing (EDL) technology will not be sufficient to facilitate such missions. In 2009 the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) established the Entry, Descent and Landing Technology Development Project (EDL TDP), to be managed programmatically at Langley Research Center (LaRC) and technically a Ames Research Center (ARC). The purpose of the project is to further the technologies required to land heavy (approximately 40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate exploration. The EDL TDP contains three technical elements. They are: 1) Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) development 2) Modeling and Tools (MAT) development 3) Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP) development The primary goals of the EDL TDP TPS element is to design and develop TPS materials capable of withstanding the severe aerothermal loads associated with aerocapture and entry into the Martian atmosphere while significantly decreasing the TPS mass fraction contribution to the entry system. Significant advancements in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable heavy mass payloads to be successfully landed on the Martian surface for robotic precursors and subsequent human exploration missions. The EDL TDP TPS element is further divided into two different TPS concepts for Mars EDL those being: 1) Rigid TPS for a mid L/D aeroshell with the capability to withstand dual pulsed heating environments as high as 500 W/square cm for aerocapture and 130 W/square cm for entry 2) Flexible TPS for a deployable aerodynamic decelerator with the capability to withstand dual pulsed heating environments as high as 120 W/square cm for aerocapture and 30 W/square cm for entry NASA, along with its vendors, has begun developing and testing materials for each of the deceleration approaches. These include multi-layer rigid ablators and flexible ablative materials. In order

  18. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed. PMID:26458801

  19. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed.

  20. Issues in Developing a Local Minimum Competency Test: Our BEST Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matter, M. Kevin; Ligon, Glynn

    This paper describes the development of the Basic Educational Skills Test (BEST) in the Austin Independent School District. In 1982 future options for the AISD minimum competency program, which requires all students to meet minimum proficiency levels in reading and mathematics before graduation, were evaluated against legal and local criteria. It…

  1. Development and Implementation of an International Counseling Outreach Effort in Bhutan: A Group Stage Conceptualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guth, Lorraine J.; Lorelle, Sonya; Hinkle, J. Scott; Remley, Theodore P.

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the development and implementation of an international counseling outreach program in Bhutan using a group stage conceptualization that includes the initial, transition, working, and final stages. The initial stage included a counseling initiative started by one of the queens as well as meetings with key leaders from the…

  2. Discovering "What's Innovative": The Challenge of Evaluating Education Research and Development Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; Hackett, Edward J.; Chubin, Daryl E.

    2008-01-01

    National Science Foundation's (NSF's) MSP Program seeks foremost "to improve student outcomes in high-quality mathematics and science by all students, at all pre-K-12 levels". The MSP Program, consisting of a portfolio of funded projects, in part positions itself as a research and development (R&D) program. This study has addressed the need to…

  3. An Effort at Instructional and Faculty Development at the University of Michigan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozma, Robert

    A project at the University of Michigan is described that involved the award of a small number of faculty fellowships that allowed some released time and financial support for development and implementation of classroom innovations. The focus of the Fellowship was the analysis and redesign of target courses regularly taught by the fellows.…

  4. Professional Norms in School Leadership: Change Efforts in Implementation of Education for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leo, Ulf; Wickenberg, Per

    2013-01-01

    This study identifies and analyses professional norms as a means of illuminating school cultures and how norms are distributed in the system. Of special interest is the role of school leaders and how they lead, organize and realise school development. The study research question is: What professional norms do school leaders highlight in change…

  5. [Health promotion policy and urban planning: joint efforts for the development of healthy cities].

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Ana Maria Girotti; Francisco, Lauro Luiz; Mattos, Thiago Pedrosa

    2016-06-01

    The National Health Promotion Policy (PNPS) defines strategies for devising inter-sectoral public policies that ensure the development of healthy cities. Urban planning constitutes a tool to improve the quality of life and enhance health promotion. Using the studies and cooperation actions conducted by the Urban Research Laboratory (LABINUR/FEC-Unicamp) as a reference, this article describes relevant aspects of the PNPS that have an interface with urban planning policies in Brazil. An increase in interdisciplinary and inter-sectoral measures related to the new PNPS after the passing of Ordinance 2.446/14 was identified, which include: mobility and accessibility; safe development (sanitation, housing and transport); healthy eating with social inclusion and reduction of poverty (community vegetable gardens); corporal activities and physical exercise and the enhancement of urban spaces. The conclusion drawn is that social participation, inter-sectoral activities and the role of the university are important aspects for the promotion of healthy cities. PMID:27276542

  6. [Health promotion policy and urban planning: joint efforts for the development of healthy cities].

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Ana Maria Girotti; Francisco, Lauro Luiz; Mattos, Thiago Pedrosa

    2016-06-01

    The National Health Promotion Policy (PNPS) defines strategies for devising inter-sectoral public policies that ensure the development of healthy cities. Urban planning constitutes a tool to improve the quality of life and enhance health promotion. Using the studies and cooperation actions conducted by the Urban Research Laboratory (LABINUR/FEC-Unicamp) as a reference, this article describes relevant aspects of the PNPS that have an interface with urban planning policies in Brazil. An increase in interdisciplinary and inter-sectoral measures related to the new PNPS after the passing of Ordinance 2.446/14 was identified, which include: mobility and accessibility; safe development (sanitation, housing and transport); healthy eating with social inclusion and reduction of poverty (community vegetable gardens); corporal activities and physical exercise and the enhancement of urban spaces. The conclusion drawn is that social participation, inter-sectoral activities and the role of the university are important aspects for the promotion of healthy cities.

  7. Recent efforts directed to the development of more sustainable asymmetric organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Hernández, José G; Juaristi, Eusebio

    2012-06-01

    In line with the principles of "green" chemistry, organocatalysis seeks to reduce energy consumption and to optimize the use of the available resources, aiming to become a sustainable strategy in chemical transformations. Nevertheless, during the last decade diverse experimental protocols have made organocatalysis an even "greener" alternative by the use of friendlier reaction conditions, or via the application of solvent-free methodologies, or through the design and synthesis of more selective catalysts, or via the development of multicomponent one-pot organocatalytic reactions, or by the recycling and reuse of organocatalysts, or by means of the application of more energy-efficient activation techniques, among other approaches. In this feature article we review some of the remarkable advancements that have made it possible to develop even more sustainable asymmetric organocatalyzed methodologies.

  8. Early focus development effort, ultrasonic inspection of fixed housing metal-to-adhesive bondline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, John K.; Hoskins, Brad R.; Karner, Paul

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique was developed for the fixed housing metal-to-adhesive bondline that will support the Flight 15 time frame and subsequent motors. The technique has the capability to detect a 1.0 inch diameter unbond with a 90 percent probability of detection (POD) at a 95 percent confidence level. The technique and support equipment will perform within the working envelope dictated by a stacked motor configuration.

  9. FEAMAC-CARES Software Coupling Development Effort for CMC Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan; Arnold, Steven; Mital, Subodh; Murthy, Pappu; Walton, Owen

    2015-01-01

    Reported here is a coupling of two NASA developed codes: CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) with the MACGMC composite material analysis code. The resulting code is called FEAMACCARES and is constructed as an Abaqus finite element analysis UMAT (user defined material). Here we describe the FEAMACCARES code and an example problem (taken from the open literature) of a laminated CMC in off-axis loading is shown. FEAMACCARES performs stochastic-strength-based damage simulation response of a CMC under multiaxial loading using elastic stiffness reduction of the failed elements.

  10. Radio astronomy Explorer-B in-flight mission control system development effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutsky, D. A.; Bjorkman, W. S.; Uphoff, C.

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of the development for the Mission Analysis Evaluation and Space Trajectory Operations (MAESTRO) program to be used for the in-flight decision making process during the translunar and lunar orbit adjustment phases of the flight of the Radio Astronomy Explorer-B. THe program serves two functions: performance and evaluation of preflight mission analysis, and in-flight support for the midcourse and lunar insertion command decisions that must be made by the flight director. The topics discussed include: analysis of program and midcourse guidance capabilities; methods for on-line control; printed displays of the MAESTRO program; and in-flight operational logistics and testing.

  11. Tree nut allergy: risk factors for development, mitigation of reaction risk and current efforts in desensitization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mona; Burks, A Wesley; Green, Todd D

    2015-05-01

    Allergy to tree nuts has grown widespread among patients, specifically in the pediatric population, in recent years. In this review, we evaluate and summarize the literature specific to development and treatment of tree nut allergy. The cause of tree nut allergy, such as most food allergies, is unknown; there are theories regarding maternal dietary factors as well as sensitization related to cross-reactivity to peanut allergens. The gold standard for the diagnosis of tree nut allergy is the double-blind, placebo-controlled, oral food challenge; however, simpler and more cost-effective diagnostic methods, such as the skin prick test and serum-specific IgE are often used as a supplement for diagnosis. Management of tree nut allergy consists of dietary avoidance and using epinephrine to manage serious allergic reactions. Alternative therapeutic methods, such as oral and sublingual immunotherapy and modification of allergenic proteins are being explored to develop safer, more effective and long-lasting management of tree nut allergy. We comment on the current studies involving risk factors for sensitization, diagnosis and management of tree nut allergy.

  12. Advancing environmental flow science: Developing frameworks for altered landscapes and integrating efforts across disciplines.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, Shannon K.; McManamay, Ryan A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A.; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a better understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.

  13. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Shannon K.; McManamay, Ryan A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A.; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a better understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.

  14. Tree nut allergy: risk factors for development, mitigation of reaction risk and current efforts in desensitization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mona; Burks, A Wesley; Green, Todd D

    2015-05-01

    Allergy to tree nuts has grown widespread among patients, specifically in the pediatric population, in recent years. In this review, we evaluate and summarize the literature specific to development and treatment of tree nut allergy. The cause of tree nut allergy, such as most food allergies, is unknown; there are theories regarding maternal dietary factors as well as sensitization related to cross-reactivity to peanut allergens. The gold standard for the diagnosis of tree nut allergy is the double-blind, placebo-controlled, oral food challenge; however, simpler and more cost-effective diagnostic methods, such as the skin prick test and serum-specific IgE are often used as a supplement for diagnosis. Management of tree nut allergy consists of dietary avoidance and using epinephrine to manage serious allergic reactions. Alternative therapeutic methods, such as oral and sublingual immunotherapy and modification of allergenic proteins are being explored to develop safer, more effective and long-lasting management of tree nut allergy. We comment on the current studies involving risk factors for sensitization, diagnosis and management of tree nut allergy. PMID:25824522

  15. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Shannon K; McManamay, Ryan A; Miller, Andrew D; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a better understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.

  16. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines

    DOE PAGES

    Brewer, Shannon; McManamay, Ryan A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A.; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-05-13

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a bettermore » understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards.« less

  17. Advancing Environmental Flow Science: Developing Frameworks for Altered Landscapes and Integrating Efforts Across Disciplines.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Shannon K; McManamay, Ryan A; Miller, Andrew D; Mollenhauer, Robert; Worthington, Thomas A; Arsuffi, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing approaches to address streamflow needs in highly modified landscapes where historic flows do not provide reasonable comparisons, (2) integrating water quality needs where interactions are apparent with quantity but not necessarily the proximate factor of the ecological degradation, especially as frequency and magnitudes of inflows to bays and estuaries, (3) providing a better understanding of the ecological needs of native species to offset the often unintended consequences of benefiting non-native species or their impact on flows, (4) improving our understanding of the non-use economic value to balance consumptive economic values, and (5) increasing our understanding of the stakeholder socioeconomic spatial distribution of attitudes and perceptions across the landscape. Environmental flow science is still an emerging interdisciplinary field and by integrating socioeconomic disciplines and developing new frameworks to accommodate our altered landscapes, we should help advance environmental flow science and likely increase successful implementation of flow standards. PMID:27177541

  18. Energy Storage (II): Developing Advanced Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L

    1974-01-01

    Energy storage, considered by some scientists to be the best technological and economic advancement after advanced nuclear power, still rates only modest funding for research concerning the development of advanced technologies. (PEB)

  19. International Perspectives in Leadership Development: Part II.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    In the second part of this two-part series, leadership development perspectives are shared from the opening of the Penn Wharton China Center in Beijing. The symposium brought national leaders from Chinese academic settings and professional organizations together with thought leaders from the United States to discuss nursing leadership across the care continuum. Highlights of demographic shifts, clinical demands, and policy decisions are presented, with an eye toward future trends in professional development.

  20. Development of ASTM standards in support of advanced ceramics -- continuing efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.

    1998-02-01

    An update is presented of the activities of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Committee C-28 on Advanced Ceramics. Since its inception in 1986, this committee, which has five standard producing subcommittees, has written and published over 32 consensus standards. These standards are concerned with mechanical testing of monolithic and composite ceramics, nondestructive examination, statistical analysis and design, powder characterization, quantitative microscopy, fractography, and terminology. These standards ensure optimum material behavior with physical and mechanical property reproducibility, component reliability, and well-defined methods of data treatment and material analysis for both monolithic and composite materials. Committee C-28 continues to sponsor technical symposia and to cooperate in the development of international standards. An update of recent and current activities as well as possible new areas of standardization work will be presented.

  1. DOE`s efforts in identification and development of innovative technologies: Suppliers forum

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, H.F. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    The Savannah River Site conducted its first Supplier Information Exchange in September 1993. The intent of the conference was to inform potential suppliers of the Savannah River Site`s mission, and research and development program objectives in the areas of environmental restoration and waste management, and to solicit proposals for innovative research in those areas. Major areas addressed were Solid Waste, Environmental Restoration, Environmental Monitoring, Transition Decontamination and Decommissioning, and the Savannah River Technology Center. A total of 1,062 proposals were received addressing the 89 abstracts presented. This paper will describe the forum, the process for solicitation, the process for proposal review and selection, and review the overall results and benefits to Savannah River.

  2. An Effort to Develop an Algorithm to Target Abdominal CT Scans for Patients After Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Pernar, Luise I M; Lockridge, Ryan; McCormack, Colleen; Chen, Judy; Shikora, Scott A; Spector, David; Tavakkoli, Ali; Vernon, Ashley H; Robinson, Malcolm K

    2016-10-01

    Abdominal CT (abdCT) scans are frequently ordered for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain, but often do not reveal intra-abdominal pathology. We aimed to develop an algorithm for rational ordering of abdCTs. We retrospectively reviewed our institution's RYGB patients presenting acutely with abdominal pain, documenting clinical and laboratory data, and scan results. Associations of clinical parameters to abdCT results were examined for outcome predictors. Of 1643 RYGB patients who had surgery between 2005 and 2015, 355 underwent 387 abdCT scans. Based on abdCT, 48 (12 %) patients required surgery and 86 (22 %) another intervention. No clinical or laboratory parameter predicted imaging results. Imaging decisions for RYGB patients do not appear to be amenable to a simple algorithm, and patient work-up should be based on astute clinical judgment.

  3. Efforts in developing design and simulation tools for MEMS: DS/MEMS and CA/MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Sung Kie; Kwak, Byung M.; Kwon, Jang-Hyuk; Chang, Su-Young; Huh, Jae S.; Kim, Eugene

    2002-04-01

    In this work, multi-physics simulation software (CA/MEMS) and design-optimization software (DS/MEMS) tailored for MEMS devices are introduced. The CA/MEMS, which is a simulation engine for DS/MEMS, is a 3-D multi-physics analysis code utilizing various numerical methods such as FEM, BEM and FVM to efficiently model MEMS application problems. The current CA/MEMS includes analysis- modules for structural, thermal, electric, electromagnetic and fluidic fields and is capable of the analyses of various coupled- field problems for MEMS applications. DS/MEMS is design optimization engine for MEMS devices. With integrating CA/MEMS and pre/post processor into CAD environment, DS/MEMS is organized to work in parametric CAD platform. DS/MEMS consists of optimal design module and robust design module. The optimal design module provides users three methods nonlinear programming, Taguchi parameter design and the response surface method. The robust design module, which is specially developed for MEMS application, can be used to minimize the perturbation of performances of MEMS devices under uncertainties of MEMS devices, such as process tolerance and the change of operating environments. To verify the efficiency and accuracy of CA/MEMS and the practical usefulness of DS/MEMS, we have been comparing the simulated results of CA/MEMS with those of other commercial codes and experimental data of manufactured MEMS devices, and investigating the performances of the optimized designs through DS/MEMS.

  4. Teaching, Learning and Development: Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCaro, James J., Ed.; Areson, Ann H., Ed.

    The second volume of papers commissioned by Foundations, a project designed to examine the career development needs of students entering the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, this document contains papers that deal with the instructional components of learning. An introduction presents a conceptual framework for the Foundations project,…

  5. Rethinking antibiotic research and development: World War II and the penicillin collaborative.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Roswell

    2013-03-01

    Policy leaders and public health experts may be overlooking effective ways to stimulate innovative antibiotic research and development. I analyzed archival resources concerning the US government's efforts to produce penicillin during World War II, which demonstrate how much science policy can differ from present approaches. By contrast to current attempts to invigorate commercial participation in antibiotic development, the effort to develop the first commercially produced antibiotic did not rely on economic enticements or the further privatization of scientific resources. Rather, this extremely successful scientific and, ultimately, commercial endeavor was rooted in government stewardship, intraindustry cooperation, and the open exchange of scientific information. For policymakers facing the problem of stimulating antibiotic research and development, the origins of the antibiotic era offer a template for effective policy solutions that concentrate primarily on scientific rather than commercial goals.

  6. Rethinking Antibiotic Research and Development: World War II and the Penicillin Collaborative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Policy leaders and public health experts may be overlooking effective ways to stimulate innovative antibiotic research and development. I analyzed archival resources concerning the US government’s efforts to produce penicillin during World War II, which demonstrate how much science policy can differ from present approaches. By contrast to current attempts to invigorate commercial participation in antibiotic development, the effort to develop the first commercially produced antibiotic did not rely on economic enticements or the further privatization of scientific resources. Rather, this extremely successful scientific and, ultimately, commercial endeavor was rooted in government stewardship, intraindustry cooperation, and the open exchange of scientific information. For policymakers facing the problem of stimulating antibiotic research and development, the origins of the antibiotic era offer a template for effective policy solutions that concentrate primarily on scientific rather than commercial goals. PMID:22698031

  7. Why the developing nations like India need strong capacity building efforts in greenhouse gases mitigation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishal, V.; Sudhakaran, A.; Singh, T. N.

    2014-12-01

    Today, India rubs shoulders with nations like USA and China for being the major shareholders in global greenhouse emissions and has more emissions than Russia! Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) has been proven as a reliable method to counter global warming and keep the 2ºC per year policy in check and is currently in the pilot stage in many developed nations. The three major requirements for CCUS are: manpower in diverse fields, implementation potential and capital. Keeping other social problems aside, India still has sufficient mankind in all spheres of research ranging from earth science, engineering, basic sciences, economy, policy making, regulation, public outreach etc. to successfully work on such challenges. India has leading academic institutions, research labs and universities in science and engineering. They also have a working power force in aspects like economy, policy making, regulation, public outreach etc. in various management institutes of repute. India, however, lacks in sufficient funding for advanced research and capacity building schemes to support projects of such scale. Deployment of facts and concepts on climate change need an approach of much greater scope than what is anticipated. The above workforces can put forth a clear picture about the various entities surrounding CCUS and provide sensible planning and implementation information through scientific research. CCUS is only possible when the direct anthropogenic emitters like fossil fuel plants modify their features to incorporate the methods associated with it. The rural population has to be educated in context to the safety of the storage sites. Above all, the Indian government must holistically divert funds for such programs and provide economic incentives to the industries for the industries. The bottom line is that India has been working in lots of aspects with not very clear cuts objectives. There are CO2 capture technologies like amine scrubbing and membrane

  8. Adverse outcome pathway development II: best practices.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Daniel L; Crump, Doug; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Hecker, Markus; Hutchinson, Thomas H; LaLone, Carlie A; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lettieri, Teresa; Munn, Sharon; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Vergauwen, Lucia; Whelan, Maurice

    2014-12-01

    Organization of existing and emerging toxicological knowledge into adverse outcome pathway (AOP) descriptions can facilitate greater application of mechanistic data, including those derived through high-throughput in vitro, high content omics and imaging, and biomarker approaches, in risk-based decision making. The previously ad hoc process of AOP development is being formalized through development of internationally harmonized guidance and principles. The goal of this article was to outline the information content desired for formal AOP description and some rules of thumb and best practices intended to facilitate reuse and connectivity of elements of an AOP description in a knowledgebase and network context. For example, key events (KEs) are measurements of change in biological state that are indicative of progression of a perturbation toward a specified adverse outcome. Best practices for KE description suggest that each KE should be defined as an independent measurement made at a particular level of biological organization. The concept of "functional equivalence" can help guide both decisions about how many KEs to include in an AOP and the specificity with which they are defined. Likewise, in describing both KEs and evidence that supports a causal linkage or statistical association between them (ie, a key event relationship; KER), best practice is to build from and contribute to existing KE or KER descriptions in the AOP knowledgebase rather than creating redundant descriptions. The best practices proposed address many of the challenges and uncertainties related to AOP development and help promote a consistent and reliable, yet flexible approach. PMID:25466379

  9. Adverse outcome pathway development II: best practices.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Daniel L; Crump, Doug; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Hecker, Markus; Hutchinson, Thomas H; LaLone, Carlie A; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lettieri, Teresa; Munn, Sharon; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Vergauwen, Lucia; Whelan, Maurice

    2014-12-01

    Organization of existing and emerging toxicological knowledge into adverse outcome pathway (AOP) descriptions can facilitate greater application of mechanistic data, including those derived through high-throughput in vitro, high content omics and imaging, and biomarker approaches, in risk-based decision making. The previously ad hoc process of AOP development is being formalized through development of internationally harmonized guidance and principles. The goal of this article was to outline the information content desired for formal AOP description and some rules of thumb and best practices intended to facilitate reuse and connectivity of elements of an AOP description in a knowledgebase and network context. For example, key events (KEs) are measurements of change in biological state that are indicative of progression of a perturbation toward a specified adverse outcome. Best practices for KE description suggest that each KE should be defined as an independent measurement made at a particular level of biological organization. The concept of "functional equivalence" can help guide both decisions about how many KEs to include in an AOP and the specificity with which they are defined. Likewise, in describing both KEs and evidence that supports a causal linkage or statistical association between them (ie, a key event relationship; KER), best practice is to build from and contribute to existing KE or KER descriptions in the AOP knowledgebase rather than creating redundant descriptions. The best practices proposed address many of the challenges and uncertainties related to AOP development and help promote a consistent and reliable, yet flexible approach.

  10. Adverse Outcome Pathway Development II: Best Practices

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Crump, Doug; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Hecker, Markus; Hutchinson, Thomas H.; LaLone, Carlie A.; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lettieri, Teresa; Munn, Sharon; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Vergauwen, Lucia; Whelan, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Organization of existing and emerging toxicological knowledge into adverse outcome pathway (AOP) descriptions can facilitate greater application of mechanistic data, including those derived through high-throughput in vitro, high content omics and imaging, and biomarker approaches, in risk-based decision making. The previously ad hoc process of AOP development is being formalized through development of internationally harmonized guidance and principles. The goal of this article was to outline the information content desired for formal AOP description and some rules of thumb and best practices intended to facilitate reuse and connectivity of elements of an AOP description in a knowledgebase and network context. For example, key events (KEs) are measurements of change in biological state that are indicative of progression of a perturbation toward a specified adverse outcome. Best practices for KE description suggest that each KE should be defined as an independent measurement made at a particular level of biological organization. The concept of “functional equivalence” can help guide both decisions about how many KEs to include in an AOP and the specificity with which they are defined. Likewise, in describing both KEs and evidence that supports a causal linkage or statistical association between them (ie, a key event relationship; KER), best practice is to build from and contribute to existing KE or KER descriptions in the AOP knowledgebase rather than creating redundant descriptions. The best practices proposed address many of the challenges and uncertainties related to AOP development and help promote a consistent and reliable, yet flexible approach. PMID:25466379

  11. Development of KURAMA-II and its operation in Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigaki, M.; Okumura, R.; Takamiya, K.; Sato, N.; Yoshino, H.; Yoshinaga, H.; Kobayashi, Y.; Uehara, A.; Yamana, H.

    2015-05-01

    A carborne survey system, named as KURAMA (Kyoto University RAdiation MApping system), was developed as a response to the nuclear accident at TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011. Now the system has evolved into KURAMA-II, characterized by its compactness, autonomous operation, and acquisition of pulse-height spectrum data. A two-year field test of radiation monitoring by KURAMA-II on local buses, performed by Kyoto University, has successfully proceeded to the phase of official operation by the Fukushima prefectural government, supported by Kyoto University and JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). An outline and the current status of KURAMA-II, including some results of the continuous monitoring by KURAMA-II on local buses in Fukushima, are introduced.

  12. Assessing Development Impacts Associated with Low Emission Development Strategies: Lessons Learned from Pilot Efforts in Kenya and Montenegro

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, S.; Katz, J.; Wurtenberger, L.

    2014-01-01

    Low emission development strategies (LEDS) articulate economy-wide policies and implementation plans designed to enable a country to meet its long-term development objectives while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A development impact assessment tool was developed to inform an analytically robust and transparent prioritization of LEDS actions based on their economic, social, and environmental impacts. The graphical tool helps policymakers communicate the development impacts of LEDS options and identify actions that help meet both emissions reduction and development goals. This paper summarizes the adaptation and piloting of the tool in Kenya and Montenegro. The paper highlights strengths of the tool and discusses key needs for improving it.

  13. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research Phase II: N+4 Advanced Concept Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2012-01-01

    This final report documents the work of the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team on Task 1 of the Phase II effort. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. Using a quantitative workshop process, the following technologies, appropriate to aircraft operational in the N+4 2040 timeframe, were identified: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Hydrogen, fuel cell hybrids, battery electric hybrids, Low Energy Nuclear (LENR), boundary layer ingestion propulsion (BLI), unducted fans and advanced propellers, and combinations. Technology development plans were developed.

  14. Results of Two-Stage Light-Gas Gun Development Efforts and Hypervelocity Impact Tests of Advanced Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelison, C. J.; Watts, Eric T.

    1998-01-01

    Gun development efforts to increase the launching capabilities of the NASA Ames 0.5-inch two-stage light-gas gun have been investigated. A gun performance simulation code was used to guide initial parametric variations and hardware modifications, in order to increase the projectile impact velocity capability to 8 km/s, while maintaining acceptable levels of gun barrel erosion and gun component stresses. Concurrent with this facility development effort, a hypervelocity impact testing series in support of the X-33/RLV program was performed in collaboration with Rockwell International. Specifically, advanced thermal protection system materials were impacted with aluminum spheres to simulate impacts with on-orbit space debris. Materials tested included AETB-8, AETB-12, AETB-20, and SIRCA-25 tiles, tailorable advanced blanket insulation (TABI), and high temperature AFRSI (HTA). The ballistic limit for several Thermal Protection System (TPS) configurations was investigated to determine particle sizes which cause threshold TPS/structure penetration. Crater depth in tiles was measured as a function of impact particle size. The relationship between coating type and crater morphology was also explored. Data obtained during this test series was used to perform a preliminary analysis of the risks to a typical orbital vehicle from the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  15. Participation in multilateral effort to develop high performance integrated CPC evacuated collectors. Final report, July 1, 1986--May 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, R.; O`Gallagher, J.J.

    1992-05-31

    The University of Chicago Solar Energy Group has had a continuing program and commitment to develop an advanced evacuated solar collector integrating nonimaging concentration into its design. During the period from 1985--1987, some of our efforts were directed toward designing and prototyping a manufacturable version of an Integrated Compound Parabolic Concentrator (ICPC) evacuated collector tube as part of an international cooperative effort involving six organizations in four different countries. This ``multilateral`` project made considerable progress towards a commercially practical collector. One of two basic designs considered employed a heat pipe and an internal metal reflector CPC. We fabricated and tested two large diameter (125mm) borosilicate glass collector tubes to explore this concept. The other design also used a large diameter (125mm) glass tube but with a specially configured internal shaped mirror CPC coupled to a U-tube absorber. Performance projections in a variety of systems applications using the computer design tools developed by the International Energy Agency (IEA) task on evacuated collectors were used to optimize the optical and thermal design. The long-term goal of this work continues to be the development of a high efficiency, low cost solar collector to supply solar thermal energy at temperatures up to 250{degree}C. Some experience and perspectives based on our work are presented and reviewed. Despite substantial progress, the stability of research support and the market for commercial solar thermal collectors were such that the project could not be continued. A cooperative path involving university, government and industrial collaboration remains the most attractive near term option for developing a commercial ICPC.

  16. Interservice Procedures for Instructional Systems Development. Phase II: Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Robert K.; And Others

    The document is the second of a five-part series focusing in minute detail on the processes involved in the formulation of an instructional systems development (ISD) program for military interservice training that will adequately train individuals to do a particular job. Phase II, Design, is concerned with designing instructional materials based…

  17. NASA Efforts on Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the field of nanotechnology within the theme of "New efforts in Nanotechnology Research," will be presented. NASA's interest, requirements and current efforts in this emerging field will be discussed. In particular, NASA efforts to develop nanoelectronic devices, fuel cells, and other applications of interest using this novel technology by collaborating with academia will be addressed. Progress on current collaborations in this area with the University of Puerto Rico will be highlighted.

  18. Establishing cause for developing and implementing a broad-based marketing effort for the health education field.

    PubMed

    Stellefson, Michael; Barry, Adam; Chaney, Beth H; Chaney, J Don; Hanik, Bruce

    2011-05-01

    What exactly is health education? Professionals with advanced degrees in health education have most likely encountered questions such as these either during introductory coursework or from those inquiring about the field. These queries can prove quite perplexing when asked by individuals who are unaware of the health education profession. Because the act of marketing health education is crucial to the sustainability of the field, the purpose of this article is to (a) explore the issue of describing and promoting health education, (b) establish ideas that can facilitate the provision of coordinated marketing efforts, and (c) offer marketing management and implementation principles that can assist in marketing both health education and health educators. Based on this discussion, the authors suggest building mainstream consensus in regards to marketing message development and implementation to better position health education.

  19. Recommendations for energy conservation standards for new residential buildings - volume 3: Introduction and Background to the Standard Development Effort

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    The Energy Conservation for New Buildings Act of 1976, as amended, 42 U.S.C Section 6831 et. seq. requires the US Department of Energy to issue energy conservation standards for the design of new residential and commercial buildings. The standards will be mandatory only for the design of new federal buildings, and will serve as voluntary guidelines for the design of new non-federal buildings. This report documents the development and testing of a set of recommendations, from the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) Special Projects Committee No. 53, designed to provide the technical foundation for the Congressionally-mandated energy standard for new residential buildings. The recommendations have been developed over the past 25 months by a multidisciplinary project team, under the management of the US Department of Energy and its prime contractor, Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Volume III -- Introduction and Background to the Standard Development Effort is a description of the Standard development process and contains the rationale for the general approach and specific criteria contained within the recommendations.

  20. Analysis of the research and development effort in the private sector to reduce energy consumption in irrigated agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, E.A.; Cone, B.W.

    1980-09-01

    Manufacturers of irrigation equipment perform research and development in an effort to improve or maintain their position in a very competitive market. The market forces and conditions that create the intense competition and provide incentive for invention are described. Particular emphasis is placed on the market force of increased energy costs, but the analysis is developed from the perspective that energy is but one of many inputs to agricultural production. The analysis is based upon published literature, patent activity profiles, microeconomic theory, and conversations with many representatives of the irrigation industry. The published literature provides an understanding of the historical development of irrigation technology, a description of the industry's structure, and various data, which were important for the quantitative analyses. The patent activity profiles, obtained from the US Patent Office, provided details of patent activity within the irrigation industry over the past decade. Microeconomic theory was used to estimate industry-wide research and development expenditures on energy-conserving products. The results of these analyses were then compared with the insights gained from conversations with the industry representatives.

  1. Continuous Efforts to Develop the National System for Material Control and Accounting Training at the George Kuzmycz Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, Victor I.; Kirischuk, Volodymyr; Romanova, Olena; Levina, Elena; Diakov, Oleksii; Drapey, Sergiy; Proskurin, Dmitry; Gavrilyuk-Burakova, Anna

    2011-10-01

    The George Kuzmycz Training Center (GKTC) for Physical Protection, Control and Accounting of Nuclear Materials was established in 1998 at the Kyiv Institute of Nuclear Research of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences through the collaborative efforts of the United States and Ukraine. Later the European Commission (EC) joined the US in assisting with the Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) part of the GKTC training program. The Government of Ukraine designated the GKTC as the National Center responsible for providing training and methodological support for nuclear facilities and nuclear specialists in the Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) area. To increase the efficiency of the State MC&A system an essential number of new regulations, norms and rules have been developed; some of them mandate regular and more intensive training of MC&A specialists in the industry - from those working at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Ukraine to the personnel of nuclear facilities. To meet such regulations GKTC plans to develop next year a number of training courses under the EC contract; such courses will reflect both the specifics of Ukrainian nuclear facilities and the level of expertise of the facilities’ personnel. The NDA training laboratory, established in 2003 with US DOE financial support and technical and methodological assistance, considerably expanded the GKTC’s training capabilities for MC&A programs. Next year that lab will be supplemented with a new NM Surveillance and Containment laboratory as current plans call for under the EC contract. The US DOE is also providing funding to support that project. Under the EC contract the laboratory will be equipped with state-of-the-art, advanced surveillance and containment equipment which will strengthen and expand even further the GKTC’s training capabilities and potential. This will allow GKTC to train Ukrainian nuclear industry specialists in practically all MC&A topics. Furthermore, GKTC is

  2. Current Efforts to Develop Alternate "TB700-2" Test Protocols for the Hazard Classification of Large Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Daniel F.; Bennett, Robert R.; Graham, Kenneth J.; Boggs, Thomas L.; Atwood, Alice I.

    2001-09-01

    When the Department of Defense (DoD) revised Technical Bulletin (TB) 700-2, NAVSEAINST 8020.8B, TO 11A-1-47, DLAR 8220.12 hazard classification guidelines in January 1998 1, it significantly changed the procedures used to determine the explosive classification of rocket motors, to be shipped or placed in DoD storage facilities. The revised test protocols outlined in this document, (hereafter referred to as TB 700-2) are far more conservative and costly to implement than the previous ones. These changes could have a profound impact on the solid rocket community and in particular those involved with the research and development and manufacture of large (equal to or greater than) 304.8-millimeter (equal to or greater than 12-inch diameter solid rocket motors (SRMs). The ramifications may include higher development costs and limitations on performance improvements. This paper outlines current efforts of the solid rocket community to develop acceptable alternate test protocols for large rocket motors that could fulfill the intent of TB 700-2 and be considered by the Department of Defense Explosive Safety Board (DDESB) for incorporation into a future revision to TB 700-2.

  3. Current Efforts to Develop Alternate "TB 700-2" Test Protocols for the Hazard Classification of Large Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Daniel F.; Bennett, Robert R.; Graham, Kenneth J.; Boggs, Thomas L.; Atwood, Alice I.; Butcher, A. Garn

    2002-04-01

    When the Department of Defense (DoD) revised Technical Bulletin (TB) 700-2, NAVSEAINST 8020.8B, TO 11A-1-47, DLAR 8220.12 hazard classification guidelines in January 1998, it significantly changed the procedures used to determine the explosive classification of rocket motors, to be shipped or placed in DoD storage facilities. The revised test protocols outlined in this document, (hereafter referred to as TB 700-2) are far more conservative and costly to implement than the previous ones. These changes could have a profound impact on the solid rocket community and in particular those involved with the research and development and manufacture of large (less than or = 304.8-millimeter (less than or = 12-inch)) diameter solid rocket motors (SRMs). The ramifications may include higher development costs and limitations on performance improvements. This paper outlines current efforts of the solid rocket community to develop acceptable alternate test protocols for large rocket motors that could fulfill the intent of TB 700-2 and be considered by the Department of Defense Explosive Safety Board (DDESB) for incorporation into a future revision to TB 700-2.

  4. Current Efforts to Develop Alternate "TB 700-2" Test Protocols for the Hazard Classification of Large Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Daniel F.; Bennett, Robert R.; Graham, Kenneth J.; Boggs, Thomas L.; Atwood, Alice I.

    1998-01-01

    When the Department of Defense (DoD) revised Technical Bulletin (TB) 700-2, NAVSEAINST 8020.8B, TO 11A-1-47, DLAR 8220.12 hazard classification guidelines in January 1998 1, it significantly changed the procedures used to determine the explosive classification of rocket motors, to be shipped or placed in DoD storage facilities. The revised test protocols outlined in this document, (hereafter referred to as TB 700-2) are far more conservative and costly to implement than the previous ones. These changes could have a profound impact on the solid rocket community and in particular those involved with the research and development and manufacture of large (greater than or equal 304.8-millimeter (greater than or equal l2-inch)) diameter solid rocket motors (SRMs). The ramifications may include higher development costs and limitations on performance improvements. This paper outlines current efforts of the solid rocket community to develop acceptable alternate test protocols for large rocket motors that could fulfill the intent of TB 700-2 and be considered by the Department of Defense Explosive Safety Board (DDESB) for incorporation into a future revision to TB 700-2.

  5. Professional Development for Early Childhood Educators: Efforts to Improve Math and Science Learning Opportunities in Early Childhood Classrooms

    PubMed Central

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Logan, Jessica A. R.; Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Capps, Janet L.; Petrill, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Because recent initiatives highlight the need to better support preschool-aged children’s math and science learning, the present study investigated the impact of professional development in these domains for early childhood educators. Sixty-five educators were randomly assigned to experience 10.5 days (64 hours) of training on math and science or on an alternative topic. Educators’ provision of math and science learning opportunities were documented, as were the fall-to-spring math and science learning gains of children (n = 385) enrolled in their classrooms. Professional development significantly impacted provision of science, but not math, learning opportunities. Professional development did not directly impact children’s math or science learning, although science learning was indirectly affected via the increase in science learning opportunities. Both math and science learning opportunities were positively associated with children’s learning. Results suggest that substantive efforts are necessary to ensure that children have opportunities to learn math and science from a young age. PMID:26257434

  6. Incentivising effort in governance of public hospitals: Development of a delegation-based alternative to activity-based remuneration.

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Rikke; Kristensen, Søren Rud; Bech, Mickael

    2015-08-01

    This paper is a first examination of the development of an alternative to activity-based remuneration in public hospitals, which is currently being tested at nine hospital departments in a Danish region. The objective is to examine the process of delegating the authority of designing new incentive schemes from the principal (the regional government) to the agents (the hospital departments). We adopt a theoretical framework where, when deciding about delegation, the principal should trade off an initiative effect against the potential cost of loss of control. The initiative effect is evaluated by studying the development process and the resulting incentive schemes for each of the departments. Similarly, the potential cost of loss of control is evaluated by assessing the congruence between focus of the new incentive schemes and the principal's objectives. We observe a high impact of the effort incentive in the form of innovative and ambitious selection of projects by the agents, leading to nine very different solutions across departments. However, we also observe some incongruence between the principal's stated objectives and the revealed private interests of the agents. Although this is a baseline study involving high uncertainty about the future, the findings point at some issues with the delegation approach that could lead to inefficient outcomes.

  7. Review of US Department of Energy health and environmental research and development program support to SRC-II technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, M.J.; Fillo, J.P.; Kreisher, J.H.; Sgro, G.A.

    1980-07-01

    This document outlines the technical framework of DOE's overall synthetic fuels health and environmental characterization program. Current project environmental activities directly associated with SRC-II technology development are summarized for the convenience of the Environmental Impact Statement reviewers. An extended, technically detailed statement of the SRC-II health and environmental program, activities, and plans was released in late 1980, as part of the final Environmental Impact Statement of the SRC-II Demonstration Project. Program development is necessarily iterative. Early screening results on a small scale equipment suggest the need for further screening studies on a larger-scale system. Results of screening studies set the priorities for more extensive and costly long-term baseline biological and ecological studies. Parametric studies establish the sensitivity of measured screening and baseline characteristics to changes in processing conditions and also provide a basis for correlating low- and high-tier biological and ecological test information. Monitoring system development is stimulated by findings in screening and baseline characterization efforts. Choice of monitoring systems is dependent upon screening and baseline biological and ecological test results and results of initial site analyses. As a result, the overall characterization program necessarily emerges in phases, each with a distribution of activities in the four component areas. Characterization efforts on PDU- and pilot-scale equipment focus on screening and baseline studies of steady state and non-steady state production. At the demonstration scale, these activities are expanded to include extensive monitoring and the investigation of large-scale steady state and non-steady state effluent production and control characteristics.

  8. Targeting the MHC II presentation pathway in allergy vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Rhyner, C; Kündig, T; Akdis, C A; Crameri, R

    2007-08-01

    The worldwide increase in the incidence of allergic diseases and the limited efficacy of current vaccines require the development of new efficient vaccination strategies. Based on PTD (protein transduction domain) technology, we have engineered MAT (modular antigen translocation) molecules, aimed to enhance antigen presentation through intracellular targeting of the MHC II presentation pathway. MAT vaccines consist of a cloning cassette, which fuses Tat (transactivator of transcription) peptide to a truncated Ii (invariant chain), which is able to target antigens to the nascent MHC II molecules in the trans-Golgi compartment. To test the efficacy of intracellular targeting, we engineered arrays of MAT-fusions and compared the effects of recombinant allergens, Tat-conjugated allergens and MAT-conjugated allergens for the ability to stimulate T-cell proliferation and cytokine production in human PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cell) cultures derived from allergic individuals, and to elicit protective immune responses in mice. MAT-vaccines induced a strong proliferation of PBMCs at a low concentration and induced a Th2/Treg (regulatory T-cell) cell shift in the cytokine profile, reflecting those reported in successfully desensitized allergic individuals. In allergic mouse models, we showed that MAT-vaccines are highly efficient in desensitizing mice and protect them from anaphylactic shock. The technology is applicable not only for the treatment of allergies, but also for the development of preventive vaccines in general.

  9. Development of mercury (II) ion biosensors based on mercury-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanying; Wen, Yanli; Xu, Li; Xu, Qin; Song, Shiping; Zuo, Xiaolei; Yan, Juan; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-15

    Mercury (II) ion (Hg(2+)) contamination can be accumulated along the food chain and cause serious threat to the public health. Plenty of research effort thus has been devoted to the development of fast, sensitive and selective biosensors for monitoring Hg(2+). Thymine was demonstrated to specifically combine with Hg(2+) and form a thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) structure, with binding constant even higher than T-A Watson-Crick pair in DNA duplex. Recently, various novel Hg(2+) biosensors have been developed based on T-rich Mercury-Specific Oligonucleotide (MSO) probes, and exhibited advanced selectivity and excellent sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection. In this review, we explained recent development of MSO-based Hg(2+) biosensors mainly in 3 groups: fluorescent biosensors, colorimetric biosensors and electrochemical biosensors.

  10. Bay Area Fatherhood Initiatives: Policymaker and Practitioner Perspectives on Intergrating Fathering Efforts. A Report from the Bay Area Fathering Integrated Data System (BAyFIDS) II Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadsden, Vivian L.; Rethemeyer, R. Karl

    The past 10 years have been a period of enormous growth in efforts around father involvement, with local government systems attempting to meet the needs of the diverse father population. The Bay Area Fathering Indicators Data System (BAYFIDS) Project is designed to track and analyze the operation and impact of fathering programs and describe the…

  11. Development of the stored waste autonomous mobile inspector (SWAMI II)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.D.; Ward, C.R.

    1995-02-01

    A mobile robot system called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI) is under development by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Robotics Group of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to perform mandated inspections of waste drums stored in warehouse facilities. The system will reduce personnel exposure to potential hazards and create accurate, high-quality documentation to ensure regulatory compliance and enhance waste management operations. Development work is coordinated among several Department of Energy (DOE), academic, and commercial entities in accordance with DOE`s technology transfer initiative. The prototype system, SWAMI I, was demonstrated at Savannah River Site (SRS) in November, 1993. SWAMI II is now under development for field trials at the Fernald site.

  12. Overview 2003 of NASA Multi-D Stirling Convertor Code Development and DOE and NASA Stirling Regenerator R and D Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Simon, Terry; Mantell, Susan; Gedeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary

    2004-01-01

    This paper win report on continuation through the third year of a NASA grant for multi-dimensional Stirling CFD code development and validation; continuation through the third and final year of a Department of Energy, Golden Field Office (DOE), regenerator research effort and a NASA grant for continuation of the effort through two additional years; and a new NASA Research Award for design, microfabrication and testing of a "Next Generation Stirling Engine Regenerator." Cleveland State University (CSU) is the lead organization for all three efforts, with the University of Minnesota (UMN) and Gedeon Associates as subcontractors. The Stirling Technology Company and Sun power, Inc. acted as unfunded consultants or participants through the third years of both the NASA multi-D code development and DOE regenerator research efforts; they win both be subcontractors on the new regenerator microfabrication contract.

  13. The miniaturised Moessbauer spectrometer MIMOS II: future developments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, D.; Blumers, M.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Bernhardt, B.; Fleischer, I.; Schröder, C.; Morris, R.; Girones Lopez, J.

    2007-08-01

    In January 2004, the first in situ extraterrestrial Mössbauer spectrum was received from the Martian surface. At the present time (May 2007) two Miniaturized Mössbauer Spectrometers (MIMOS II) on board of the two Mars Exploration Rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity" continue to collect valuable scientific data. Both spectrometers are operational after more than 3 years of work. Originally, the mission was expected to last for 90 days. To date more than 600 spectra were obtained with a total integration time for both rovers exceeding 260 days. The MER mission has proven that Mössbauer spectroscopy is a valuable technique for the in situ exploration of extraterrestrial bodies and the study of Fe-bearing samples. The Mössbauer team at the University of Mainz has accumulated a lot of experience and learned many lessons during last three years. All that makes MIMOS II a feasible choice for the future missions to Mars and other targets. Currently MIMOS II is on the scientific payload of two missions: Phobos Grunt (Russian Space Agency) and ExoMars (European Space Agency). Phobos Grunt is scheduled to launch in 2009. The main goals of the mission are: a) Phobos regolith sample return, b) Phobos in situ study, c) Mars and Phobos remote sensing. MIMOS II will be installed on the arm of a landing module. Currently, we are manufacturing an engineering model for testing purposes. The ESA "ExoMars" mission involves the development of a MER-like rover with more complex scientific payload (Pasteur exobiology instruments, including a drilling system). Its aim is to further characterise the biological environment in preparation for robotic missions and eventually human exploration. Data from the mission will provide invaluable input to the field of exobiology - the study of the origin, the evolution and distribution of life in the universe. The launch date is scheduled for 2013. Like on MER, the MIMOS II instrument will be mounted on a robotic arm. Advanced and improved version of

  14. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2001-07-23

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit level. During the past quarter approval for the re-direction took place and work was initiated at both levels.

  15. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2002-01-22

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit (PDU) level.

  16. Calibration and Data Efforts of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) Airborne Observation Platform during its Engineering Development Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, J.; Goulden, T.; Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Musinsky, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) has collected airborne photographic, lidar, and imaging spectrometer data in 5 of 20 unique ecological climate regions (domains) within the United States. As part of its mission to detect and forecast ecological change at continental scales over multiple decades, NEON Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) will aerially survey the entire network of 60 core and re-locatable terrestrial sites annually, each of which are a minimum of 10km-by-10km in extent. The current effort encompasses three years of AOP engineering test flights; in 2017 NEON will transition to full operational status in all 20 domains. To date the total airborne data collected spans 34 Terabytes, and three of the five sampled domain's L1 data are publically available upon request. The large volume of current data, and the expected data collection over the remaining 15 domains, is challenging NEON's data distribution plans, backup capability, and data discovery processes. To provide the public with the highest quality data, calibration and validation efforts of the camera, lidar, and spectrometer L0 data are implemented to produce L1 datasets. Where available, the collected airborne measurements are validated against ground reference points and surfaces and adjusted for instrumentation and atmospheric effects. The imaging spectrometer data is spectrally and radiometrically corrected using NIST-traceable procedures. This presentation highlights three years of flight operation experiences including:1) Lessons learned on payload re-configuration, data extraction, data distribution, permitting requirements, flight planning, and operational procedures2) Lidar validation through control data comparisons collected at the Boulder Municipal Airport (KBDU), the site of NEON's new hangar facility3) Spectrometer calibration efforts, to include both the laboratory and ground observations

  17. Angiotensin II regulates growth of the developing papillas ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Khalili, Ali; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that lack of angiotensin (ANG) II production in angiotensinogen (AGT)-deficient mice or pharmacologic antagonism of ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) impairs growth of the developing papillas ex vivo, thus contributing to the hypoplastic renal medulla phenotype observed in AGT- or AT1R-null mice. Papillas were dissected from Hoxb7GFP+ or AGT+/+, +/−, −/− mouse metanephroi on postnatal day P3 and grown in three-dimentional collagen matrix gels in the presence of media (control), ANG II (10−5 M), or the specific AT1R antagonist candesartan (10−6 M) for 24 h. Percent reduction in papillary length was attenuated in AGT+/+ and in AGT+/− compared with AGT−/− (−18.4 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, −22.8 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). ANG II blunted the decrease in papilla length observed in respective media-treated controls in Hoxb7GFP+ (−1.5 ± 0.3 vs. −10.0 ± 1.4%, P < 0.05) or AGT+/+, +/−, and −/− papillas (−12.8 ± 0.7 vs. −18.4 ± 1.3%, P < 0.05, −16.8 ± 1.1 vs. −23 ± 1.2%, P < 0.05; −26.2 ± 1.6 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). In contrast, percent decrease in the length of Hoxb7GFP+ papillas in the presence of the AT1R antagonist candesartan was higher compared with control (−24.3 ± 2.1 vs. −10.5 ± 1.8%, P < 0.05). The number of proliferating phospho-histone H3 (pH3)-positive collecting duct cells was lower, whereas the number of caspase 3-positive cells undergoing apoptosis was higher in candesartan- vs. media-treated papillas (pH3: 12 ± 1.4 vs. 21 ± 2.1, P < 0.01; caspase 3: 3.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.7 ± 0.2, P < 0.01). Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that AT1R signaling regulates the expression of genes implicated in morphogenesis of the renal medulla. We conclude that AT1R prevents shrinkage of the developing papillas observed ex vivo via control of Wnt7b, FGF7, β-catenin, calcineurin B1, and α3 integrin gene expression, collecting duct cell

  18. Policy efforts used to develop awareness aimed at increased students' scientific literacy and career choices in mathematics, science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, Frank Albert

    The lack of an adequate supply of human resources in science and engineering has been well documented. Efforts from a number of agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, have been implemented to alleviate this national problem. However, it is unclear what concerted efforts state agencies are taking to increase the number of African American students' scientific literacy, and career choices in science and engineering. The purpose of this study was to select a talent pool of African American students who are academically able to pursue a career in a math-based major. The selection of this talent pool lead to the recommendation of an encouragement process model to be used by the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) system to encourage the selectees of this talent pool to enter math-based programs at TBR universities. An integrated literature review was conducted. This review includes perspectives on national, state, and local educational policy decisions which affect educational purposes, institutional governance and secondary-postsecondary linkages. Existing TBR system data were analyzed and tabulated. This tabulated data along with the recommended model will be offered to the TBR system for possible adoption. The results of these data support the methodological notion that there are an appreciable number of potential TBR system African American students academically able to enter math related majors who, however, may be reluctant to choose a career direction in a math-based career field. Implications of this study and suggestions for further research are discussed. On an applied level, the study might suggest to other states ways in which to deal with similar problems.

  19. Grass meristems II: inflorescence architecture, flower development and meristem fate.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Wakana; Pautler, Michael; Jackson, David; Hirano, Hiro-Yuki

    2013-03-01

    Plant development depends on the activity of various types of meristems that generate organs such as leaves and floral organs throughout the life cycle. Grass species produce complex inflorescences and unique flowers. The grass inflorescence is composed of different types of branches, including a specialized branch called a spikelet. The spikelet is a special unit of the inflorescence and forms one to several florets, depending on the species. In the floret, floral organs such as perianth organs, carpels and stamens are formed. In Arabidopsis, because the inflorescence meristem (IM) forms the floral meristems (FMs) directly on its flanks, the change of meristem fate is relatively simple. In contrast, in grasses, different types of meristem, such as the IM, the branch meristem (BM), the spikelet pair meristem (SPM) in some grasses, the spikelet meristem (SM) and the FM, are responsible for the elaboration of their complex inflorescences and flowers. Therefore, sequential changes of meristem fate are required, and a number of genes involved in the specification of the fate of each meristem have been identified. In this review, we focus on the following issues concerning the fate of the reproductive meristems in two grass species, maize (Zea mays) and rice (Oryza sativa): (i) meristem regulation during inflorescence development; (ii) specification and fate change of the BM and the SM; (iii) determinacy of the FM; and (iv) communication between the meristem and lateral organs.

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Perspective on Code Development and High Performance Computing Resources in Support of the National HED/ICF Effort

    SciTech Connect

    Clouse, C. J.; Edwards, M. J.; McCoy, M. G.; Marinak, M. M.; Verdon, C. P.

    2015-07-07

    Through its Advanced Scientific Computing (ASC) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) code development efforts, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides a world leading numerical simulation capability for the National HED/ICF program in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). In addition the ASC effort provides high performance computing platform capabilities upon which these codes are run. LLNL remains committed to, and will work with, the national HED/ICF program community to help insure numerical simulation needs are met and to make those capabilities available, consistent with programmatic priorities and available resources.

  1. The SEDL/Regional Exchange: One Component of an Emerging Effort to Disseminate the Outcomes of Educational Research and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronkosky, Preston C.

    This paper describes the need for a regional dissemination system; the conceptualization of the Southwest Educational Development Labortory (SEDL) Regional Exchange as part of the nation-wide Research and Development Exchange (RDx); and the operation of the SEDL Regional Exchange (RX). It emphasizes that the Research and Development Exchange is…

  2. Improving effectiveness of protection efforts in tiger source sites: Developing a framework for law enforcement monitoring using MIST.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Emma J

    2010-12-01

    Wild tigers are in a critical state with an estimated population decline of more than 95% over the past century. Improving the capacity and effectiveness of law enforcement in reducing poaching of tigers is an immediate priority to secure remaining wild populations in source sites. From 2008-2010, standardized patrol-based law enforcement monitoring (LEM) was established under the Tigers Forever Program across 8 key tiger sites in order to improve and evaluate law enforcement interventions. Patrol-based monitoring has the distinct advantage of providing regular and rapid information on illegal activities and ranger performance, although, until recently, it has received relatively little scrutiny from the conservation community. The present paper outlines a framework for implementation of LEM in tiger source sites using MIST, a computerized management information system for ranger-based data collection. The framework addresses many of the technical, practical and institutional challenges involved in the design, implementation, sustainability and evaluation of LEM. Adoption of such a framework for LEM is a cost-effective strategy to improve the efficiency of law enforcement efforts, to increase the motivation of enforcement staff and to promote the accountability of law enforcement agencies in addressing threats to tigers. When combined with independent, systematic and science-based monitoring of tigers and their prey, LEM has great potential for evaluating the effectiveness of protection-based conservation investments.

  3. No Pending National Elections, Who Cares? What Newspaper Publications Reveal about Local Efforts Towards Millennium Development Goal 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arku, Frank S.; Arku, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) has become a catch phrase in development discourse. This study is an assessment of the MDG 3: to promote gender equality at all levels of education in Ghana. The Daily Graphic (a newspaper in Ghana) which is Ghana's prominent newspaper was reviewed from 2000 to 2011 to determine the frequency of articles…

  4. Copper(II)-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry) Reactions: Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Murugavel, Govindarasu; Sadhu, Pradeep; Punniyamurthy, Tharmalingam

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled copper(II) complexes are described as effective catalysts for nitroaldol (Henry) reactions on water. The protocol involves a heterogeneous process and the catalysts can be recovered and recycled without loss of activity. Further, C2-symmetric N,N'-substituted chiral copper(II) salan complexes are found to be more effective catalysts than chiral copper(II) salen complexes for reactions in homogeneous catalysis, with high enantioselectivities. The reactions involve bifunctional catalysis, bearing the properties of a Brønsted base, as well as a Lewis acid, to effect the reaction in the absence of external additives.

  5. Tangled paths: Three experienced teachers' growth in understanding during an extended science community of practice professional development effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nancy Melamed

    This qualitative investigation extends the study of teacher learning within a reform-based community of practice model of professional development. This long-term, multiple case study examined three experienced teachers' transformations in thinking about science instruction. Data were collected during the three years of the Guided Inquiry supporting Multiple Literacies research project, designed to develop instructional practices informed by a socio-cultural, inquiry-based orientation. Data sources included: transcripts of semi-structured interviews collected at strategic points, the teacher's journals, initial application information, and teachers' written case studies. Using an interpretive case study approach, tenets of the teachers' orientations were identified through a recursive process. Results are organized to reflect two principles that were integral to the design of the professional development community. The first principle describes changes in teachers' orientations about the goals and characteristics of science instruction in the elementary grades. The second describes changes about teachers' knowledge about themselves as learners and the influence of this knowledge on their thinking about science instruction and student learning. Illustrative findings indicate that: (a) it is possible for teachers' language regarding conceptions of their practice to change with only superficial change in their orientations, (b) teachers can hold dualistic ways of thinking about their practice, (c) in some cases, teachers use a significant amount of autobiography about their own learning to explain their practice; over time, this was replaced with warrants using the language that developed within the professional development community, and (d) long-term case studies revealed differences in orientations that emerged and were refined over time. These findings provide strong support for communities of practice as a model of professional development and hold implications

  6. Professional Development for Early Childhood Educators: Efforts to Improve Math and Science Learning Opportunities in Early Childhood Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Logan, Jessica A. R.; Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Capps, Janet L.; Petrill, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Because recent initiatives highlight the need to better support preschool-aged children's math and science learning, the present study investigated the impact of professional development in these domains for early childhood educators. Sixty-five educators were randomly assigned to experience 10.5 days (64 hr) of training on math and science or on…

  7. Standards for the Global Information Infrastructure (GII): A Review of Recent Developments, Ongoing Efforts, Future Directions and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needleman, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews developments related to standards in electronic and networked information. Discusses traditional library and Internet communities, and notes the importance of having a supporting infrastructure in place. Topics include: Z39.50; Z39.56 Serial Item/Contribution Identifier (SICI); Interlibrary Loan (ILL) Protocol; character set standards;…

  8. Development of the DHQ II and C-DHQ II Nutrient & Food Group Database

    Cancer.gov

    The nutrient and food group database, created for analyzing the DHQ II, is based on a compilation of national 24-hour dietary recall data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) conducted in 2001-02, 2003-04, and 2005-06.

  9. Challenges and Current Efforts in the Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Inflammatory and Remodeling Conditions of the Lungs.

    PubMed

    Grunig, Gabriele; Baghdassarian, Aram; Park, Sung-Hyun; Pylawka, Serhiy; Bleck, Bertram; Reibman, Joan; Berman-Rosenzweig, Erika; Durmus, Nedim

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses biomarkers that are being researched for their usefulness to phenotype chronic inflammatory lung diseases that cause remodeling of the lung's architecture. The review focuses on asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary hypertension. Bio-markers of environmental exposure and specific classes of biomarkers (noncoding RNA, metabolism, vitamin, coagulation, and microbiome related) are also discussed. Examples of biomarkers that are in clinical use, biomarkers that are under development, and biomarkers that are still in the research phase are discussed. We chose to present examples of the research in biomarker development by diseases, because asthma, COPD, and pulmonary hypertension are distinct entities, although they clearly share processes of inflammation and remodeling. PMID:26917944

  10. Challenges and Current Efforts in the Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Inflammatory and Remodeling Conditions of the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Grunig, Gabriele; Baghdassarian, Aram; Park, Sung-Hyun; Pylawka, Serhiy; Bleck, Bertram; Reibman, Joan; Berman-Rosenzweig, Erika; Durmus, Nedim

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses biomarkers that are being researched for their usefulness to phenotype chronic inflammatory lung diseases that cause remodeling of the lung’s architecture. The review focuses on asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary hypertension. Bio-markers of environmental exposure and specific classes of biomarkers (noncoding RNA, metabolism, vitamin, coagulation, and microbiome related) are also discussed. Examples of biomarkers that are in clinical use, biomarkers that are under development, and biomarkers that are still in the research phase are discussed. We chose to present examples of the research in biomarker development by diseases, because asthma, COPD, and pulmonary hypertension are distinct entities, although they clearly share processes of inflammation and remodeling. PMID:26917944

  11. Swedish nuclear waste efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Rydberg, J.

    1981-09-01

    After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

  12. Indirect land use changes of biofuel production – a review of modelling efforts and policy developments in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The issue of indirect land use changes (ILUC) caused by the promotion of transport biofuels has attracted considerable attention in recent years. In this paper, we reviewed the current literature on modelling work to estimate emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) caused by ILUC of biofuels. We also reviewed the development of ILUC policies in the EU. Our review of past modelling work revealed that most studies employ economic equilibrium modelling and focus on ethanol fuels, especially with maize as feedstock. It also revealed major variation in the results from the models, especially for biodiesel fuels. However, there has been some convergence of results over time, particularly for ethanol from maize, wheat and sugar cane. Our review of EU policy developments showed that the introduction of fuel-specific ILUC factors has been officially suggested by policymakers to deal with the ILUC of biofuels. The values proposed as ILUC factors in the policymaking process in the case of ethanol fuels are generally in line with the results of the latest modelling exercises, in particular for first-generation ethanol fuels from maize and sugar cane, while those for biodiesel fuels are somewhat higher. If the proposed values were introduced into EU policy, no (first-generation) biodiesel fuel would be able to comply with the EU GHG saving requirements. We identified a conflict between the demand from EU policymakers for exact, highly specific values and the capacity of the current models to supply results with that level of precision. We concluded that alternative policy approaches to ILUC factors should be further explored. PMID:24602172

  13. Initial development of efficient, low-debris laser targets for the Sandia soft x-ray projection lithography effort

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, P.D.; Hunter, J.A.; Kubiak, G.D.

    1997-03-01

    During the fiscal years 92-94 a joint group from Sandia/New Mexico and Sandia/California studied the development of new laser-plasma targets for projection x-ray or EUV (extreme ultraviolet) lithography. Our experimental and theoretical analyses incorporated target design as an integral part of the lithographic optical system. Targets studied included thick solid targets, thin-foil metal-coated targets, and cryogenic targets. Our complete measurement suite consisted of x-ray conversion efficiency measurements, source size imaging, source x-ray angular distribution measurements, debris collection, and source EUV spectrum. Target evaluation also included the variation of laser characteristics, such as, laser intensity, spot size, wavelength, pulselength, and pulseshape. Over the course of these experiments we examined targets using KrF (248nm), XeCl (308nm), and CO{sub 2} (10.6 {mu}m) lasers. While debris issues now dominate research in this area, final details were concluded on our understanding of material spectra and radiation transport of 13 run light in laser-plasmas. Additionally, conclusive results were obtained with 308 rim light, showing the pulselength threshold below which plumes no longer limited the transmission of (and thus the conversion efficiency to) 13 nm radiation.

  14. Determining subsampling effort for the development of a rapid bioassessment protocol using benthic macroinvertebrates in streams of Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Renata B S; Mugnai, Riccardo; Castro, Carolina M; Baptista, Darcilio F

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a subsampling procedure for benthic macroinvertebrates to aid in the development of a multimetric index to assess the biological condition of streams. Data from six streams that are considered minimally impaired were used. Subsampling was done using a device divided into 24 quadrats. The sediment from each quadrat was sorted, and all organisms were removed and identified. Richness metrics were the most affected by subsample size. Relative-abundance metrics were the most stable, proving that the sample was well distributed throughout the tray and abundance proportions were maintained. The results showed that the macroinvertebrate assemblage present in the six quadrats was similar to that present in the full sample. These analyses indicated that six quadrats, randomly designated, with a minimum of 200 collected specimens could be used in place of the full sample. In routine water management, managing time and costs are a major challenge; therefore, this type of simplification is absolutely necessary to ensure that a biomonitoring tool is useful for practical applications.

  15. 40 CFR 52.1423 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... committed to conform to the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... classified as Group II areas for the purpose of PM10 State Implementation Plan (SIP) development. The... development in group II areas. 52.1423 Section 52.1423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  16. 40 CFR 52.1423 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Nebraska § 52.1423 PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas. The state of Nebraska committed to conform to the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... development in group II areas. 52.1423 Section 52.1423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  17. Contaminated Sediment Management in Dam Removals and River Restoration Efforts: Critical Need for Research and Policy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Over 1,000 U.S. dams have been removed (1975-2015) for reasons including obsolescence, liability concerns, water quality upgrades, fisheries, or ecosystem enhancements. Contaminated sediment can significantly complicate the approval process, cost, and timeline of a dam removal, or stop it entirely. In a dam removal, reservoir sediment changes from a sink to a source of contaminants. Recently, the Sierra Club sued to stop the removal of a large dam in Ohio because of the potential impact of phosphate releases on toxic algal blooms in Lake Erie. Heavy metals, PCBs, PAHs, pesticides, and petroleum hydrocarbons can be present in reservoir sediments. In a non-dam removal scenario, reservoir management tools range from "no action" to dredging, dewatering and removal, or sediment capping. But it is not clear how these reservoir management techniques apply to dam removals. Case studies show typically >80% of the reservoir sediment is eventually eroded, precluding sediment capping as a containment option. However, the released contaminants are diluted by mixing with "clean" sediment and are transported to different physio-chemical environments which may immobilize or biodegrade the contaminants. Poorly understood options include phased drawdown/reseeding the former reservoir to contain sediments, diking contaminant "hot spots," and addressing contaminant stratigraphy (where historical use created "hot layers" in the reservoir sediment). Research and policy development needs include: (1) assessment methods based on synergistic effects of multiple contaminants being present; (2) ways to translate the pre-removal contaminant concentrations to post-removal health risks downstream; (3) evaluation of management practices for contaminant "hot spots" and "hot layers;" (4) tools to forecast the presence of contaminated sediment using easily accessible information; and (5) ways to limit liability risk for organizations participating in dam removals involving contaminated sediment.

  18. Navy superconductivity efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  19. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm), a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization). Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT) and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome. PMID:22111588

  20. Team one (GA/MCA) effort of the DOE 12 Tesla Coil Development Program. 12 Tesla ETF toroidal field coil helium bath cooled NbTi alloy concept

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the conceptual design of an ETF compatible toroidal field coil, employing helium bath cooled NbTi alloy conductor. The ten TF-coil array generates a peak field of 11-1/2 tesla at 2.87 m radius, corresponding to a major axis field of 6.1 tesla. The 10 kA conductor is an uninsulated, unsoldered Rutherford cable, employing NbTiTa ally as developed in Phase I of this effort. The conductor is encased within a four element frame of stainless steel strips to provide hoop and bearing load support.

  1. Development of temperamental effortful control mediates the relationship between maturation of the prefrontal cortex and psychopathology during adolescence: a 4-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Nandita; Whittle, Sarah; Dennison, Meg; Yücel, Murat; Simmons, Julian; Allen, Nicholas B

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the development of effortful control (EC), a temperamental measure of self-regulation, and concurrent development of three regions of the prefrontal cortex (anterior cingulate cortex, ACC; dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dlPFC; ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, vlPFC) between early- and mid-adolescence. It also examined whether development of EC mediated the relationship between cortical maturation and emotional and behavioral symptoms. Ninety-two adolescents underwent baseline assessments when they were approximately 12 years old and follow-up assessments approximately 4 years later. At each assessment, participants had MRI scans and completed the Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire-Revised, as well as measures of depressive and anxious symptoms, and aggressive and risk taking behavior. Cortical thicknesses of the ACC, dlPFC and vlPFC, estimated using the FreeSurfer software, were found to decrease over time. EC also decreased over time in females. Greater thinning of the left ACC was associated with less reduction in EC. Furthermore, change in effortful control mediated the relationship between greater thinning of the left ACC and improvements in socioemotional functioning, including reductions in psychopathological symptoms. These findings highlight the dynamic association between EC and the maturation of the anterior cingulate cortex, and the importance of this relationship for socioemotional functioning during adolescence.

  2. Recent developments in Topaz II reactor safety assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.

    1993-07-01

    In December 1991, the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of a US launch of a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. The primary mission goal would be to demonstrate and evaluate Nuclear Electric Propulsion technology to establish a capability for future civilian and military missions. A preliminary nuclear safety assessment, involving selected safety analyses, was initiated to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. This paper describes the preliminary safety assessment results and the nuclear safety program now being established for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP).

  3. Recent developments in Topaz-II reactor safety assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C. )

    1993-01-01

    In December 1991, the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of a US launch of a Russian Topaz-II space nuclear power system. The primary mission goal would be to demonstrate and evaluate nuclear electric propulsion technology to establish a capability for future civilian and military missions. A preliminary nuclear safety analysis was initiated to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. This paper describes preliminary safety analysis results and the nuclear safety program now being established for the NEP space test (NEPST).

  4. 24 CFR Appendix II to Subpart C of... - Development of Standards; Calculation Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; Calculation Methods II Appendix II to Subpart C of Part 51 Housing and Urban Development Office of the...; Calculation Methods I. Background Information Concerning the Standards (a) Thermal Radiation: (1) Introduction... some distance away from the site of the fire. (2) Criteria for Acceptable Separation Distance...

  5. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns Collaborate with the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project to Monitor and Study Restoration Efforts using NASA's Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Michelle E.; Kuss, Amber Jean; Nguyen, Andrew; Schmidt, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    In the past, natural tidal marshes in the south bay were segmented by levees and converted into ponds for use in salt production. In an effort to provide habitat for migratory birds and other native plants and animals, as well as to rebuild natural capital, the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP) is focused on restoring a portion of the over 15,000 acres of wetlands in California's South San Francisco Bay. The process of restoration begins when a levee is breached; the bay water and sediment flow into the ponds and eventually restore natural tidal marshes. Since the spring of 2010 the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) DEVELOP student internship program has collaborated with the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP) to study the effects of these restoration efforts and to provide valuable information to assist in habitat management and ecological forecasting. All of the studies were based on remote sensing techniques -- NASA's area of expertise in the field of Earth Science, and used various analytical techniques such as predictive modeling, flora and fauna classification, and spectral detection, to name a few. Each study was conducted by a team of aspiring scientists as a part of the DEVELOP program at Ames.

  6. Instructional Development: The State of the Art, II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Ronald K., Ed.; Dills, Charles R., Ed.

    Designed to serve both as a textbook and as a reference source for instructional developers who wish to keep up with developments in the field, this book presents a broad view of the field of instructional development (ID) together with in-depth descriptions of important new topics and the latest developments in the old ones. The 48 chapters,…

  7. Development of spherical iron(II) sulfate heptahydrate-containing solid particles with sustained drug release.

    PubMed

    Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Farkas, Béla; Gregor, Tamás; Nagy, Kálmán; Pallagi, Edina

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a simple, economic procedure for the manufacturing of coated iron(II) sulfate particles by using a crystallization technique for the development of round particles, followed by coating with a lipophilic material. Several batches of iron(II) sulfate heptahydrate were produced by a cooling crystallization, with variation of the crystallization parameters. The spherical crystals were coated with stearin. The products were characterized for particle size, roundness, bulk density and in vitro drug dissolution. Crystallization was performed from deionized water with no addition of seed crystals and by cooling by applying a linear cooling rate. The developed iron(II) sulfate crystals were round with average diameter of 729+/-165 microm. The best form for the sustained release of iron(II) sulfate was the sample HTP-2 which contained 11% of stearin relative to the iron(II) sulfate. The spherical crystallization of iron(II) sulfate is simple and fast, and does not require a dangerous, expensive solvent. The round particles can coat directly with lipophilic material which results in slow release of iron(II) sulfate and protects the iron(II) from oxidation and inhibits the loss of crystal water. The coated crystals can be filled into capsules to yield the final dosage form.

  8. Program management plan for development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts associated with Oak Ridge Reservation`s Land Disposal Restrictions Federal Facility Compliance Agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, T.B.

    1994-04-01

    This program management plan covers the development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all the waste listed in Appendix B of the ORR`s LDR/FFCA as well as any new wastes which meet Appendix B criteria. To successfully identify a treatment method, at least a proof-of-principle level of understanding must be obtained: that is, the candidate processes must be demonstrated as effective in treating the wastes to the LDR; however, an optimized process is not required. Where applicable and deemed necessary and where the budgets will support them, pilot-scale demonstrations will be pursued. The overall strategy being adopted in this program will be composed of the following activities: Scoping of the study; characterization; development and screening of alternatives; treatability investigations; and detailed analysis of alternatives.

  9. Diagnostics development for the PEP-II B factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. S.; Alzofon, D.; Arnett, D.; Bong, E.; Daly, E.; Gioumousis, A.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Langton, J.; Reuter, E.; Seeman, J. T.; Wienands, H. U.; Wright, D.; Chin, M.; Hinkson, J.; Hunt, D.; Kennedy, K.

    1997-01-01

    PEP-II is a 2.2-km collider with a 2.1-A, 3.1-GeV positron ring 1 m above a 1-A, 9-GeV electron ring; both are designed for a maximum of 3 A. Several diagnostics are now in preparation for commissioning the rings. The beam size and pulse duration are measured using visible synchrotron radiation from arc dipoles. Grazing-incidence, water-cooled mirrors that must withstand up to 200 W/cm extract the light. The sum signal from a set of four pickup buttons, normalized to a DC current transformer's measurement of the ring current, is processed to measure the charge in each bunch. This enables us to fill 1658 of the 3492 buckets per ring to a charge that must be equal within ±2%. For diagnostics and machine protection, 100 photomultiplier-based Cherenkov detectors measure the beam-loss distribution.

  10. Comprehensive Career Development Program: The Second Year. Reflections of Participants II. [Practitioners Monograph II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Univ., Knoxville. Dept. of Technological and Adult Education.

    Intended primarily for principals and guidance counselors, this monograph contains 15 articles written by practitioners associated with, and staff of, the Comprehenisve Career Development Project for Secondary Schools in Tennessee. The following articles are included: "Changes: From Crisis Counseling to a Comprehensive Career Development Guidance…

  11. Cultural Development. Social Studies: Course II-Unit II. Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ellen K.

    This teachers guide for a secondary course on cultural development builds upon earlier sequential learning courses and deals with concepts and generalizations drawn from the field of anthropology. Primary objectives are to develop students' understanding and awareness of culture. Five sections comprise this 10-week course. The nature of culture is…

  12. Zn(II)-coordination modulated ligand photophysical processes – the development of fluorescent indicators for imaging biological Zn(II) ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhao; Simmons, J. Tyler; Sreenath, Kesavapillai

    2014-01-01

    Molecular photophysics and metal coordination chemistry are the two fundamental pillars that support the development of fluorescent cation indicators. In this article, we describe how Zn(II)-coordination alters various ligand-centered photophysical processes that are pertinent to developing Zn(II) indicators. The main aim is to show how small organic Zn(II) indicators work under the constraints of specific requirements, including Zn(II) detection range, photophysical requirements such as excitation energy and emission color, temporal and spatial resolutions in a heterogeneous intracellular environment, and fluorescence response selectivity between similar cations such as Zn(II) and Cd(II). In the last section, the biological questions that fluorescent Zn(II) indicators help to answer are described, which have been motivating and challenging this field of research. PMID:25071933

  13. [Development and psychometric evaluation of a Japanese version of the Personal Growth Initiative Scale-II].

    PubMed

    Tokuyoshi, Yoga; Iwasaki, Syoichi

    2014-06-01

    We conducted two studies to develop a Japanese version of the Personal Growth Initiative Scale-II (PGIS-II), and examined its reliability and validity. PGIS-II was developed as a multidimensional measure of the multiple processes of the Personal Growth Initiative (PGI). The PGI describes an active, intentional engagement in the process of personal growth for self-improvement of life experiences. Study 1 (N = 204) reports the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the Japanese version of the PGIS-II. The CFA confirmed that 4-factor model showed acceptable fit indices, with reliability coefficients ranging from .67 to .84. Concurrent validity of the PGIS-II was indicated by the correlation with happiness, the positive score for automatic thoughts. Study 2 (N = 101) reports the concurrent validity of the PGIS-II using scales for locus of control, self-esteem and coping. Results suggested significant correlations between scores on the PGIS-II and locus of control, self-esteem and some coping subscales. The overall results suggest that the Japanese version of the PGIS-II has satisfactory statistical reliability and validity. PMID:25016838

  14. Cassini launch contingency effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yale; O'Neil, John M.; McGrath, Brian E.; Heyler, Gene A.; Brenza, Pete T.

    2002-01-01

    On 15 October 1997 at 4:43 AM EDT, the Cassini spacecraft was successfully launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur on a mission to explore the Saturnian system. It carried three Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) and 117 Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs). As part of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) safety effort, a contingency plan was prepared to address the unlikely events of an accidental suborbital reentry or out-of-orbital reentry. The objective of the plan was to develop procedures to predict, within hours, the Earth impact footprints (EIFs) for the nuclear heat sources released during the atmospheric reentry. The footprint predictions would be used in subsequent notification and recovery efforts. As part of a multi-agency team, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) had the responsibility to predict the EIFs of the heat sources after a reentry, given the heat sources' release conditions from the main spacecraft. (No ablation burn-through of the heat sources' aeroshells was expected, as a result of earlier testing.) JHU/APL's other role was to predict the time of reentry from a potential orbital decay. The tools used were a three degree-of-freedom trajectory code, a database of aerodynamic coefficients for the heat sources, secure links to obtain tracking data, and a high fidelity special perturbation orbit integrator code to predict time of spacecraft reentry from orbital decay. In the weeks and days prior to launch, all the codes and procedures were exercised. Notional EIFs were derived from hypothetical reentry conditions. EIFs predicted by JHU/APL were compared to those by JPL and US SPACECOM, and were found to be in good agreement. The reentry time from orbital decay for a booster rocket for the Russian Progress M-36 freighter, a cargo ship for the Mir space station, was predicted to within 5 minutes more than two hours before reentry. For the

  15. NSLS-II X-Ray Diagnostics Development

    SciTech Connect

    ILINSKI, P.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II x-ray diagnostics will provide continuous online data of electron beam dimensions, which will be used to derive electron beam emittance and energy spread. It will also provide information of electron beam tilt for coupling evaluation. X-ray diagnostics will be based on imaging of bending magnet and three-pole wiggler synchrotron radiation sources. Diagnostics from three-pole wiggler source will be used to derive particles energy spread. Beta and dispersion functions will have to be evaluated for emittance and particles energy spread calculations. Due to small vertical source sizes imaging need to be performed in x-ray energy range. X-ray optics with high numerical aperture, such as compound refractive lens, will be used to achieve required spatial resolution. Optical setups with different magnifications in horizontal and vertical directions fill be employed to deal with large aspect ratio of the source. X-ray diagnostics setup will include x-ray imaging optics, monochromatization, x-ray imaging and recording components.

  16. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    D.K. Morton

    2012-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  17. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    D.K. Morton

    2011-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  18. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    D.K. Morton

    2010-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  19. Promoting Educator Contributions to Colorado's Vocational Education Curriculum Materials Development Efforts: Selected Papers and Synopses of Remarks Presented at the Curriculum Materials Development Workshop. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Margarette Y., Comp.

    This compilation of 14 papers presented at a curriculum materials development workshop for vocational educators includes the following topics: "Curriculum Concepts" by William D. Woolf, "Systems Approaches to Curriculum Development in Vocational Education" by James E. Wall, "Instructional Materials Laboratory: University of Missouri-Columbia" by…

  20. Agricultural Development Workers Training Manual. Volume II. Extension Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Peter; And Others

    This training manual, the second volume in a four-volume series of curriculum guides for use in training Peace Corps agricultural development workers, deals with extension skills. The first chapter provides suggested guidelines for setting up and carrying out the extension skills component of the agricultural development worker training series.…

  1. Increased levels of carbonic anhydrase II in the developing Down syndrome brain.

    PubMed

    Palminiello, Sonia; Kida, Elizabeth; Kaur, Kulbir; Walus, Marius; Wisniewski, Krystyna E; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa; Rabe, Ausma; Albertini, Giorgio; Golabek, Adam A

    2008-01-23

    By using a proteomic approach, we found increased levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) in the brain of Ts65Dn mice, a mouse model for Down syndrome (DS). Further immunoblot analyses showed that the levels of CA II are increased not only in the brain of adult Ts65Dn mice but also in the brain of infants and young children with DS. Cellular localization of the enzyme in human brain, predominantly in the oligodendroglia and primitive vessels in fetal brain and in the oligodendroglia and some GABAergic neurons postnatally, was similar in DS subjects and controls. Given the role of CA II in regulation of electrolyte and water balance and pH homeostasis, up-regulation of CA II may reflect a compensatory mechanism mobilized in response to structural/functional abnormalities in the developing DS brain. However, this up-regulation may also have an unfavorable effect by increasing susceptibility to seizures of children with DS.

  2. The Development of Relevant Indicators for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation of Country Efforts for Promoting Youth's Role in Development. Report of the Expert Group Meeting (Manila, Philippines, December 13-20, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok (Thailand).

    The report of a United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) Expert Group meeting, involving 13 experts from 10 countries, discusses planning national efforts to promote youth's role in development. Current systems and indicators used to assess the situation of rural and urban youth and their contribution to…

  3. Armchair Aids to Better Teaching. Professional Development Directory, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Describes a variety of teacher-recommended books and videos to help educators sharpen their professional edge at home. Topics include classroom management, understanding students, professional development, changing the system, and curriculum (language arts, social studies, science, and math). (SM)

  4. SH-2F LAMPS Instructional Systems Development: Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Hymes, Jonah P.

    This project was one of four aircrew training development projects in a continuing study of the methodology, effectiveness, and resource requirements of the Instructional Systems Development (ISD) process. This report covers the Phase II activities of a two-phase project for the development of aircrew training for SH-2F anti-submarine warfare…

  5. The Development Puzzle: A Sourcebook for Teaching About the "Rich World/Poor World" Divide, and Efforts Towards "One World" Development. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyson, Nance Lui

    The sourcebook contains background information, suggestions, and resources on teaching about developing countries at the elementary and secondary levels. The main objective is to provide guidelines for teachers. Among the approaches suggested and discussed are readings, classroom discussions, a Third World Week Conference and Other projects,…

  6. Professional development implications of Ebola virus disease education: part II.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elaine L; Kerner, Robert L; Schindler, Jaclyn S; DeVoe, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series that explores how one large, integrated health care system swiftly responded to the emerging threat of Ebola virus disease. In this second article, the educational and training activities that were developed are described.

  7. Recent Developments in Teaching Chemistry in the United Kingdom, II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews developments in chemistry curriculum/instruction, providing lists of chemistry cassettes, monographs, educational literature from the Royal Society of Chemistry, new teaching packages, and course materials for science in society. Extends information presented in a previous article (EJ 235 051) appearing in this journal. (JN)

  8. Developing a Positive Self-Concept. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibrowski, Lee; Slater, Shirley

    This publication supplements an earlier publication, "What Do You Like about Yourself? Developing a Positive Self-Concept" that presented an introduction to self-concept and included activities that could be used with students of all ages. This particular document, divided into two parts, includes additional ideas and activities that relate to…

  9. State energy price system. Volume II: data base development

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.M.; Nieves, L.A.; Sherman, K.L.; Hood, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This volume documents the entire data development process in sufficient detail to permit critical assessment of the data base. However, since a methodological discussion is included in Chapter 3 of Volume I, it is not repeated here. The data base development process was conducted in a fuel-by-fuel fashion, following the general sequence of electricity, natural gas, coal, distillate fuel, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas. For each of the fuels, a detailed data source review was conducted, which included a preliminary screening against criteria set up for this purpose. After this first screening, the data sources that met most of the review criteria were evaluated in more detail. If one data source met all the criteria, that data source was recommended for use, with minimal change or imputation. If there were substantial gaps in the available data series, then alternative imputation procedures were developed and compared, and recommendations were formulated. This entire procedure was then documented in a draft working paper for review and discussion. To the extent reasonable and practical, comments from the formal EIA reviews were then incorporated into the final recommendations and the data base was developed.

  10. American Indian Language Development Institute - 1982: Curriculum Guide. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weryackwe, Suzanne, Ed.; And Others

    A product of the 1982 American Indian Language Development Institute, sponsored by the Center of Indian Education and the Bilingual Education Service Center at Arizona State University, the curriculum guide reflects valuable language and cultural information of six tribal language groups (Hualapai, Havasupai, Papago, Pima, Ute, and Shoshone).…

  11. Heterogeneity of angiotensin II receptors in membranes of developing rat metanephros.

    PubMed

    Uva, B; Vallarino, M; Ghiani, P

    1985-10-01

    Specific and high affinity binding sites for angiotensin II were demonstrated in the membranes of the developing rat metanephros during the second half of pregnancy and in the newborn by binding studies with 125I angiotensin II. Only one type of angiotensin receptor was found during intrauterine life while after birth two classes of angiotensin receptors were present in the membranes of the cortical renal tissue.

  12. Alfalfa variety development. Minnesota Agripower Project, Task II research report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.F.S.; Samac, D.A.; Sheaffer, C.C.

    1997-10-30

    This report briefly summarizes preliminary results from crossbreeding alfalfa to develop desirable characteristics for a dedicated biomass feed stock. The varieties development is part of a larger project which includes preparation and gasification of the alfalfa stems for energy production, and use of the co-product alfalfa leaves in livestock feed. The desired alfalfa traits include winter hardiness, resistance to major pathogens, resistance to foliar disease complexes, many thick, tall, solid, non-lodging stems with high lignin content, delayed flowering, and high quality leaves retained through harvest. Currently no alfalfa varieties meet these criteria. Three crosses were made using old European varieties, with thick stems, and modern resistant varieties. The crossbreeds showed some resistance to diseases, but increased resistance is needed to maximize leaf and steam yield. 1 tab.

  13. High-R Window Technology Development : Phase II Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, Dariush

    1991-01-01

    Of all building envelope elements, windows always have had the highest heat loss rates. However, recent advances in window technologies such as low-emissivity (low-E) coatings and low- conductivity gas fillings have begun to change the status of windows in the building energy equation, raising the average R-value (resistance to heat flow) from 2 to 4 h-ft{sup 2}-{degrees}F/Btu. Building on this trend and using a novel combination of low-E coatings, gas-fills, and three glazing layers, the authors developed a design concept for R-6 to R-10 super'' windows. Three major window manufacturers produced prototype superwindows based this design for testing and demonstration in three utility-sponsored and -monitored energy-conserving homes in northwestern Montana. This paper discusses the design and tested performance of these three windows and identifies areas requiring further research if these window concepts are to be successfully developed for mass markets.

  14. [Strategies for pharmaceutical research and development. II. Generic drugs].

    PubMed

    Kuchar, M

    1996-07-01

    When the patent protection is terminated, the original registered-mark preparation becomes a generic drug, which results in a decrease in its price as compared with the original pharmaceutical. The effects of changes in price relation are discussed from the viewpoint of the generic firms and the manufacturers of original preparations. The differences in the insurance system and legislative regulations of the registration of generic preparations can markedly the size influence of the share of generic drugs in the total consumption of drugs. The future development of generic drugs from a general viewpoint is discussed in relation to the contemporary extensive expiration of patent protection of drugs. The hitherto results are summed up and the topics for the present strategy of the development of generic drugs in the Research Institute for Pharmacy and Biochemistry, or in the Czech Republic, respectively are discussed.

  15. Rice caryopsis development II: Dynamic changes in the endosperm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoba; Liu, Jinxin; Li, Dongqi; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2016-09-01

    The rice endosperm plays crucial roles in nourishing the embryo during embryogenesis and seed germination. Although previous studies have provided the general information about rice endosperm, a systematic investigation throughout the entire endosperm developmental process is still lacking. In this study, we examined in detail rice endosperm development on a daily basis throughout the 30-day period of post-fertilization development. We observed that coenocytic nuclear division occurred in the first 2 days after pollination (DAP), cellularization occurred between 3 and 5 DAP, differentiation of the aleurone and starchy endosperm occurred between 6 and 9 DAP, and accumulation of storage products occurred concurrently with the aleurone/starchy endosperm differentiation from 6 DAP onwards and was accomplished by 21 DAP. Changes in cytoplasmic membrane permeability, possibly caused by programmed cell death, were observed in the central region of the starchy endosperm at 8 DAP, and expanded to the whole starchy endosperm at 21 DAP when the aleurone is the only living component in the endosperm. Further, we observed that a distinct multi-layered dorsal aleurone formed near the dorsal vascular bundle, while the single- or occasionally two-cell layered aleurone was located in the lateral and ventral positions of endosperm. Our results provide in detail the dynamic changes in mitotic divisions, cellularization, cell differentiation, storage product accumulation, and programmed cell death that occur during rice endosperm development.

  16. Rice caryopsis development II: Dynamic changes in the endosperm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoba; Liu, Jinxin; Li, Dongqi; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2016-09-01

    The rice endosperm plays crucial roles in nourishing the embryo during embryogenesis and seed germination. Although previous studies have provided the general information about rice endosperm, a systematic investigation throughout the entire endosperm developmental process is still lacking. In this study, we examined in detail rice endosperm development on a daily basis throughout the 30-day period of post-fertilization development. We observed that coenocytic nuclear division occurred in the first 2 days after pollination (DAP), cellularization occurred between 3 and 5 DAP, differentiation of the aleurone and starchy endosperm occurred between 6 and 9 DAP, and accumulation of storage products occurred concurrently with the aleurone/starchy endosperm differentiation from 6 DAP onwards and was accomplished by 21 DAP. Changes in cytoplasmic membrane permeability, possibly caused by programmed cell death, were observed in the central region of the starchy endosperm at 8 DAP, and expanded to the whole starchy endosperm at 21 DAP when the aleurone is the only living component in the endosperm. Further, we observed that a distinct multi-layered dorsal aleurone formed near the dorsal vascular bundle, while the single- or occasionally two-cell layered aleurone was located in the lateral and ventral positions of endosperm. Our results provide in detail the dynamic changes in mitotic divisions, cellularization, cell differentiation, storage product accumulation, and programmed cell death that occur during rice endosperm development. PMID:27449987

  17. Development and sustainability of NSF-funded climate change education efforts: lessons learned and strategies used to develop the Reconstructing Earth's Climate History (REaCH) curriculum (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St John, K. K.; Jones, M. H.; Leckie, R. M.; Pound, K. S.; Krissek, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The context for understanding modern global climate change lies in the records of Earth's past. This is demonstrated by decades of paleoclimate research by scientists in organizations such as IODP and ANDRILL, yet making that science accessible to educators has been a long-standing challenge. Furthermore, content transfer is not enough; in science education, addressing how we know is as important as addressing what we know about science. To that end, our initial NSF-CCLI/TUES objective of Teaching Anchor Concepts of Climate Change (NSF #0737335) was to put authentic data and published case studies of past climate change at students' fingertips in a series of 7 multipart inquiry-based exercise modules for undergraduate classroom and lab use. After 4 years of funding (incl. 2 no-cost extensions) we surpassed our project objective and established an avenue for sustainability that is proving successful. The purpose of this presentation is to share (1) the process by which we developed the curriculum and (2) the strategies used to ensure sustainability. The curriculum development process reflected many of the same successful strategies used in scientific research. It drew on the knowledge and skills of the team; it was collaborative, iterative, and primarily distributive, yet at times directive. The team included paleoclimate researchers and educators from a broad range of undergraduate institutions. We evaluated published data from scientific reports and peer-reviewed journal articles, and used these as the foundation for writing curriculum that was data-rich and inquiry-based. In total 14 multipart exercise modules were developed. The feedback from early and frequent meeting presentations, from formative evaluation by students in courses and by faculty in workshops, and from peer-review by paleoclimate scientists and undergraduate educators helped us fine-tune the materials to the needs of the education and paleoclimate science communities. It additionally helped us

  18. Computerized Operator Support System – Phase II Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas A.; Boring, Ronald L.; Lew, Roger T.; Thomas, Kenneth D.

    2015-02-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) prototype for nuclear control room process control is proposed and discussed. The COSS aids operators in addressing rapid plant upsets that would otherwise result in the shutdown of the power plant and interrupt electrical power generation, representing significant costs to the owning utility. In its current stage of development the prototype demonstrates four advanced functions operators can use to more efficiently monitor and control the plant. These advanced functions consist of: (1) a synthesized and intuitive high level overview display of system components and interrelations, (2) an enthalpy-based mathematical chemical and volume control system (CVCS) model to detect and diagnose component failures, (3) recommended strategies to mitigate component failure effects and return the plant back to pre-fault status, and (4) computer-based procedures to walk the operator through the recommended mitigation actions. The COSS was demonstrated to a group of operators and their feedback was collected. The operators responded positively to the COSS capabilities and features and indicated the system would be an effective operator aid. The operators also suggested several additional features and capabilities for the next iteration of development. Future versions of the COSS prototype will include additional plant systems, flexible computer-based procedure presentation formats, and support for simultaneous component fault diagnosis and dual fault synergistic mitigation action strategies to more efficiently arrest any plant upsets.

  19. A 10-Year Mechatronics Curriculum Development Initiative: Relevance, Content, and Results--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnan, M.; Das, S.; Yost, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the second and third phases of a comprehensive mechatronics curriculum development effort. They encompass the development of two advanced mechatronics courses ("Simulation and Modeling of Mechatronic Systems" and "Sensors and Actuators for Mechatronic Systems"), the formulation of a Mechatronics concentration, and offshoot…

  20. Type II fatty acid synthesis is essential only for malaria parasite late liver stage development

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Ashley M; O'Neill, Matthew T; Tarun, Alice S; Camargo, Nelly; Phuong, Thuan M; Aly, Ahmed S I; Cowman, Alan F; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular malaria parasites require lipids for growth and replication. They possess a prokaryotic type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS II) pathway that localizes to the apicoplast plastid organelle and is assumed to be necessary for pathogenic blood stage replication. However, the importance of FAS II throughout the complex parasite life cycle remains unknown. We show in a rodent malaria model that FAS II enzymes localize to the sporozoite and liver stage apicoplast. Targeted deletion of FabB/F, a critical enzyme in fatty acid synthesis, did not affect parasite blood stage replication, mosquito stage development and initial infection in the liver. This was confirmed by knockout of FabZ, another critical FAS II enzyme. However, FAS II-deficient Plasmodium yoelii liver stages failed to form exo-erythrocytic merozoites, the invasive stage that first initiates blood stage infection. Furthermore, deletion of FabI in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum did not show a reduction in asexual blood stage replication in vitro. Malaria parasites therefore depend on the intrinsic FAS II pathway only at one specific life cycle transition point, from liver to blood. PMID:19068099

  1. Flight Model Development of Tokyo Tech Nano-Satellite Cute-1.7 + APD II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashida, Hiroki; Nishida, Junichi; Omagari, Kuniyuki; Fujiwara, Ken; Konda, Yasumi; Yamanaka, Tomio; Tanaka, Yohei; Maeno, Masaki; Fujihashi, Kota; Inagawa, Shinichi; Miura, Yoshiyuki; Matunaga, Saburo

    The Laboratory for Space Systems at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed the nano-satellite Cute-1.7+APD. The satellite was launched by JAXA M-V-8 rocket on February 22, 2006 and operated for about a month. A successor to the Cute-1.7+APD was developed and is named Cute-1.7+APD II. This new satellite is based on its predecessor but has some modifications. In this paper an overview of the Cute-1.7 series and flight model development of Cute-1.7+APD II are introduced.

  2. 40 CFR 52.1423 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... committed to conform to the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... classified as Group II areas for the purpose of PM10 State Implementation Plan (SIP) development. The... accordance with the requirements for PM10 SIP development, the State of Nebraska commits to perform...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1423 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... committed to conform to the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... classified as Group II areas for the purpose of PM10 State Implementation Plan (SIP) development. The... accordance with the requirements for PM10 SIP development, the State of Nebraska commits to perform...

  4. Sex differences in T-lymphocyte tissue infiltration and development of angiotensin II hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pollow, Dennis P; Uhrlaub, Jennifer; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J; Sandberg, Kathryn; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko; Brooks, Heddwen L; Hay, Meredith

    2014-08-01

    There is extensive evidence that activation of the immune system is both necessary and required for the development of angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension in males. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sex differences exist in the ability of the adaptive immune system to induce Ang II-dependent hypertension and whether central and renal T-cell infiltration during Ang II-induced hypertension is sex dependent. Recombinant activating gene-1 (Rag-1)(-/-) mice, lacking both T and B cells, were used. Male and female Rag-1(-/-) mice received adoptive transfer of male CD3(+) T cells 3 weeks before 14-day Ang II infusion (490 ng/kg per minute). Blood pressure was monitored via tail cuff. In the absence of T cells, systolic blood pressure responses to Ang II were similar between sexes (Δ22.1 mm Hg males versus Δ18 mm : Hg females). After adoptive transfer of male T cells, Ang II significantly increased systolic blood pressure in males (Δ37.7 mm : Hg; P<0.05) when compared with females (Δ13.7 mm : Hg). Flow cytometric analysis of total T cells and CD4(+), CD8(+), and regulatory Foxp3(+)-CD4(+) T-cell subsets identified that renal lymphocyte infiltration was significantly increased in males versus females in both control and Ang II-infused animals (P<0.05). Immunohistochemical staining for CD3(+)-positive T cells in the subfornical organ region of the brain was increased in males when compared with that in females. These results suggest that female Rag-1(-/-) mice are protected from male T-cell-mediated increases in Ang II-induced hypertension when compared with their male counterparts, and this protection may involve sex differences in the magnitude of T-cell infiltration of the kidney and brain.

  5. Iso2k: A community-driven effort to develop a global database of paleo-water isotopes covering the past two millennia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konecky, B. L.; Partin, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Iso2k is a new, community-based effort within the Past Global Changes 2k (PAGES2k) project to investigate decadal to centennial-scale variability in hydroclimate over the past 2,000 years. This PAGES2K Trans-Regional Project will create a global database, available for public use, of archives that record the stable isotopic composition of water (δ18O and δD). Stable water isotopes detect regional-scale circulation patterns, making them excellent tracers of the water cycle's response to changes in climate. Researchers will use the database to identify regional- and global-scale features in hydroclimate and atmospheric circulation during the past 2kyr and their relationship with temperature reconstructions. Other key science questions to be addressed include: How do water isotope proxy records capture changes in the tropical water cycle? Where and how well do the modern day temperature-hydrology relationships hold over the last 2k? How do changes in atmospheric conditions relate to changes in oceanic conditions? The Iso2k database will be also be a valuable tool for the wider community, including those researching such topics as isotope-enabled climate model simulations and proxy system modeling. To facilitate broad use of the database, experts in various proxy archive types developed metadata fields to encode the information needed to accurately and systematically interpret isotope ratios. Proxy records in the database are derived from many archives, including corals, ice cores, fossil groundwater, speleothems, tree ring cellulose, and marine and lacustrine sediments. Annually-banded records have a minimum duration of 30 years, and low-resolution records have a minimum duration of 200 years and at least 5 data points during the past 2kyr. Chronological accuracy standards follow those of the PAGES2k temperature database. Datasets are publicly archived, although unpublished data is accepted in some circumstances. Ultimately, isotope records will be integrated into

  6. The effort to close the gap: tracking the development of illusory contour processing from childhood to adulthood with high-density electrical mapping.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Ted S; Molholm, Sophie; Butler, John S; Mercier, Manuel R; Brandwein, Alice B; Foxe, John J

    2014-04-15

    The adult human visual system can efficiently fill-in missing object boundaries when low-level information from the retina is incomplete, but little is known about how these processes develop across childhood. A decade of visual-evoked potential (VEP) studies has produced a theoretical model identifying distinct phases of contour completion in adults. The first, termed a perceptual phase, occurs from approximately 100-200 ms and is associated with automatic boundary completion. The second is termed a conceptual phase occurring between 230 and 400 ms. The latter has been associated with the analysis of ambiguous objects which seem to require more effort to complete. The electrophysiological markers of these phases have both been localized to the lateral occipital complex, a cluster of ventral visual stream brain regions associated with object-processing. We presented Kanizsa-type illusory contour stimuli, often used for exploring contour completion processes, to neurotypical persons ages 6-31 (N=63), while parametrically varying the spatial extent of these induced contours, in order to better understand how filling-in processes develop across childhood and adolescence. Our results suggest that, while adults complete contour boundaries in a single discrete period during the automatic perceptual phase, children display an immature response pattern-engaging in more protracted processing across both timeframes and appearing to recruit more widely distributed regions which resemble those evoked during adult processing of higher-order ambiguous figures. However, children older than 5years of age were remarkably like adults in that the effects of contour processing were invariant to manipulation of contour extent.

  7. Army thermophotovoltaic efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, John S.; Guazzoni, Guido; Nawrocki, Selma J.

    1999-03-01

    A presentation and description of the several efforts in Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) Energy Conversion for power generation supported/monitored by the Army is provided with their more recent technical status and results. The efforts are related to small business (SBIR, STTR) contracts, academic research grants (MURI), and contracts awarded as the result of specialized solicitations. This paper covers a number of Army potential uses of the TPV power generation and is an attempt to give a more cohesive and integrated picture of the various military interests in TPV. With the exception of low power (<10 W) units, all Army potential uses of TPV power sources will demand operation with logistically available fuels.

  8. Fluid retention in Bioplasty Misti Gold II breast prostheses with development of capsular contracture.

    PubMed

    Benediktsson, K; Perbeck, L G

    2000-03-01

    We compared the incidence of capsular contracture in an implant (Bioplasty Misti Gold II) which has a textured surface and is filled with polyvinyl-pirrolidone (PVP)-hydrogel, with that in saline-filled implants with textured surfaces when the implants are placed subcutaneously during immediate reconstruction after subcutaneous mastectomy. In 41 patients, mean age 55 years (range 30-81), with breast cancer that was not suitable for breast conservation, 20 patients had 22 Misti Gold II prostheses inserted (two patients bilaterally) and 21 patients had saline-filled prostheses (one patient bilaterally). The development of capsular contracture was assessed using Baker's classification and applanation tonometry. Fourteen patients with Misti Gold II implants were classified one year postoperatively as Baker 2 and 3 compared with five with saline-filled implants (p = 0.01). On applanation tonometry 16 of the Misti Gold II group had an operative:postoperative ratio of < or = 0.75, compared with 50% in the saline-filled group (p = 0.096). In the 12 Misti Gold II prostheses that were removed because of capsular contracture between 13-40 months postoperatively, the volume in the prostheses had increased by 48%. The poor results obtained with the Misti Gold II prosthesis can be explained by the volume that they gained after implantation as a result of osmosis.

  9. Towards Development of Small Molecule Lipid II Inhibitors as Novel Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Jamal; Cardinale, Steven; Fang, Lei; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M.; Pennington, M. Ross; Basi, Kelly; diTargiani, Robert; Capacio, Benedict R.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Opperman, Timothy J.; Fletcher, Steven; de Leeuw, Erik P. H.

    2016-01-01

    Recently we described a novel di-benzene-pyrylium-indolene (BAS00127538) inhibitor of Lipid II. BAS00127538 (1-Methyl-2,4-diphenyl-6-((1E,3E)-3-(1,3,3-trimethylindolin-2-ylidene)prop-1-en-1-yl)pyryl-1-ium) tetrafluoroborate is the first small molecule Lipid II inhibitor and is structurally distinct from natural agents that bind Lipid II, such as vancomycin. Here, we describe the synthesis and biological evaluation of 50 new analogs of BAS00127538 designed to explore the structure-activity relationships of the scaffold. The results of this study indicate an activity map of the scaffold, identifying regions that are critical to cytotoxicity, Lipid II binding and range of anti-bacterial action. One compound, 6jc48-1, showed significantly enhanced drug-like properties compared to BAS00127538. 6jc48-1 has reduced cytotoxicity, while retaining specific Lipid II binding and activity against Enterococcus spp. in vitro and in vivo. Further, this compound showed a markedly improved pharmacokinetic profile with a half-life of over 13 hours upon intravenous and oral administration and was stable in plasma. These results suggest that scaffolds like that of 6jc48-1 can be developed into small molecule antibiotic drugs that target Lipid II. PMID:27776124

  10. DNase I hypersensitive sites flank the mouse class II major histocompatibility complex during B cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, S

    1991-01-01

    The mouse class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encodes a polymorphic, multigene family important in the immune response, and is expressed mainly on mature B cells, on certain types of dendritic cells and is also inducible by gamma-interferon on antigen presenting cells. To study the regulatory elements which control this expression pattern, we have examined the chromatin structure flanking the class II MHC region, in particular during B cell differentiation. Using a panel of well-characterised mouse cell lines specific for different stages of B cell development (pre-B, B, plasma cell) as well as non-B cell lines, we have mapped the DNase I hypersensitive (DHS) sites adjacent to the mouse MHC class II region. The results presented show, for the first time that there are specific hypersensitive sites flanking the class II MHC locus during pre B cell, B cell and plasma cell stages of B cell differentiation, irrespective of the status of class II MHC expression. These hypersensitive sites are not found in T cell, fibroblast or uninduced myelomonocytic cell lines. This suggests that these DHS sites define a developmentally stable, chromatin structure, which can be used as a marker of B cell lineage commitment and may indicate that a combination of these hypersensitive sites reflect regulatory proteins involved in the immediate expression of a particular class II MHC gene or possibly control of the entire locus. Images PMID:1923768

  11. Measuring Cycling Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahnke, Thomas; Hamson, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the basic mechanics of cycling with a simple reckoning of how much effort is needed from the cyclist. The work done by the cyclist is quantified when the ride is on the flat and also when pedaling uphill. Proves that by making use of the available gears on a mountain bike, cycling uphill can be accomplished without pain. (Author/ASK)

  12. Near-Surface Sensing of Vegetative Heavy Metal Stress: Method Development for an Accelerated Assessment of Mine Tailing Waste and Remediation Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. T.; Gottfried, M.; Berglund, E.; Rodriguez, G.; Ceckanowicz, D. J.; Cutter, N.; Badgeley, J.

    2014-12-01

    The boom and bust history of mineral extraction in the American southwest is visible today in tens of thousands of abandoned and slowly decaying mine installations that scar the landscape. Mine tailing piles, mounds of crushed mineral ore, often contain significant quantities of heavy metal elements which may leach into surrounding soils, surface water and ground water. Chemical analysis of contaminated soils is a tedious and time-consuming process. Regional assessment of heavy metal contamination for treatment prioritization would be greatly accelerated by the development of near-surface imaging indices of heavy-metal vegetative stress in western grasslands. Further, the method would assist in measuring the ongoing effectiveness of phytoremedatian and phytostabilization efforts. To test feasibility we ground truthed nine phytoremediated and two control sites sites along the mine-impacted Kerber Creek watershed in Saguache County, Colorado. Total metal concentration was determined by XRF for both plant and soil samples. Leachable metals were extracted from soil samples following US EPA method 1312. Plants were identified, sorted into roots, shoots and leaves, and digested via microwave acid extraction. Metal concentrations were determined with high accuracy by ICP-OES analysis. Plants were found to contain significantly higher concentrations of heavy metals than surrounding soils, particularly for manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), barium (Ba), and lead (Pb). Plant species accumulated and distributed metals differently, yet most showed translocation of metals from roots to above ground structures. Ground analysis was followed by near surface imaging using an unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with visible/near and shortwave infrared (0.7 to 1.5 μm) cameras. Images were assessed for spectral shifts indicative of plant stress and attempts made to correlate results with measured soil and plant metal concentrations.

  13. 40 CFR 52.881 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... State implementation plan development in group II areas. The state has submitted a committal SIP for Kansas City, Kansas. The committal SIP contains all the requirements identified in the July 1, 1987, promulgation of the SIP requirements for PM10 at 52 FR 24681, except the state will report the PM10 data...

  14. 40 CFR 52.881 - PM10 State implementation plan development in group II areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... State implementation plan development in group II areas. The state has submitted a committal SIP for Kansas City, Kansas. The committal SIP contains all the requirements identified in the July 1, 1987, promulgation of the SIP requirements for PM10 at 52 FR 24681, except the state will report the PM10 data...

  15. Interactions among energy consumption, economic development and greenhouse gas emissions in Japan after World War II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The long-term dynamic changes in the triad, energy consumption, economic development, and Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, in Japan after World War II were quantified, and the interactions among them were analyzed based on an integrated suite of energy, emergy and economic indices...

  16. Career Options Research and Development. Materials From Phase II Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago, IL. Career Options Research and Development (CORD).

    The Social Service Aide Project for the training and education of paraprofessionals is a part of the Career Options Research and Development project of the Young Men's Christian Association of Chicago. These materials from the Phase II Final Report include: (1) Fourth Quarterly Progress Report (July-September 1970)," (2) "Systems Approach to Job…

  17. Development of an iron(II)-catalyzed aerobic catechol cleavage and biomimetic synthesis of betanidin.

    PubMed

    Guimond, Nicolas; Mayer, Peter; Trauner, Dirk

    2014-07-28

    An aerobic iron(II)-catalyzed cleavage of catechols was developed. This reaction allows for the preparation of 2-methoxy-2 H-pyrans that can be employed as versatile building blocks for synthesis. The utility of this biomimetic oxidative cleavage is featured in the synthesis of betanidin, a natural colorant with antioxidant properties.

  18. Phase II: Resource and Referral Service, Research and Development Exchange. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, William L.

    Activities of the Resource and Referral Service (RRS), a central service contractor to the Research and Development Exchange (RDx), are documented for the period between March 1, 1977, when Phase II was funded, to November 30, 1977. Product outputs from RRS are described and related to project objectives. The objectives, which correspond to…

  19. In-vessel inspection before head removal: TMI II: Phase I. (Conceptual development)

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, N.E.; Greenlee, D.W.; Lawrence, G.R.; Paglia, A.L.; Piatt, T.D.; Tucker, B.A.

    1981-08-01

    The objective of the task is to provide for an internal inspection of the reactor vessel and the fuel assemblies prior to reactor vessel head removal. Because the degree of damage to equipment and fuel in the TMI-II reactor is not precisely known, it is important that as much information as possible be obtained on present conditions inside the reactor. This information will serve to benchmark the various analyses already completed or underway and will also guide the development of programs to obtain more information on the TMI-II core damage. In addition, the early look will provide data for planning the reactor disassembly program.

  20. Obligatory Role for B Cells in the Development of Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christopher T; Sobey, Christopher G; Lieu, Maggie; Ferens, Dorota; Kett, Michelle M; Diep, Henry; Kim, Hyun Ah; Krishnan, Shalini M; Lewis, Caitlin V; Salimova, Ekaterina; Tipping, Peter; Vinh, Antony; Samuel, Chrishan S; Peter, Karlheinz; Guzik, Tomasz J; Kyaw, Tin S; Toh, Ban-Hock; Bobik, Alexander; Drummond, Grant R

    2015-11-01

    Clinical hypertension is associated with raised serum IgG antibodies. However, whether antibodies are causative agents in hypertension remains unknown. We investigated whether hypertension in mice is associated with B-cell activation and IgG production and moreover whether B-cell/IgG deficiency affords protection against hypertension and vascular remodeling. Angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (0.7 mg/kg per day; 28 days) was associated with (1) a 25% increase in the proportion of splenic B cells expressing the activation marker CD86, (2) an 80% increase in splenic plasma cell numbers, (3) a 500% increase in circulating IgG, and (4) marked IgG accumulation in the aortic adventitia. In B-cell-activating factor receptor-deficient (BAFF-R(-/-)) mice, which lack mature B cells, there was no evidence of Ang II-induced increases in serum IgG. Furthermore, the hypertensive response to Ang II was attenuated in BAFF-R(-/-) (Δ30±4 mm Hg) relative to wild-type (Δ41±5 mm Hg) mice, and this response was rescued by B-cell transfer. BAFF-R(-/-) mice displayed reduced IgG accumulation in the aorta, which was associated with 80% fewer aortic macrophages and a 70% reduction in transforming growth factor-β expression. BAFF-R(-/-) mice were also protected from Ang II-induced collagen deposition and aortic stiffening (assessed by pulse wave velocity analysis). Finally, like BAFF-R deficiency, pharmacological depletion of B cells with an anti-CD20 antibody attenuated Ang II-induced hypertension by ≈35%. Hence, these studies demonstrate that B cells/IgGs are crucial for the development of Ang II-induced hypertension and vessel remodeling in mice. Thus, B-cell-targeted therapies-currently used for autoimmune diseases-may hold promise as future treatments for hypertension.

  1. Development of a simultaneous high resolution typing method for three SLA class II genes, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1 and the analysis of SLA class II haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Le, MinhThong; Choi, Hojun; Choi, Min-Kyeung; Cho, Hyesun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Seo, Han Geuk; Cha, Se-Yeon; Seo, Kunho; Dadi, Hailu; Park, Chankyu

    2015-06-15

    The characterization of the genetic variations of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is essential to understand the relationship between the genetic diversity of MHC molecules and disease resistance and susceptibility in adaptive immunity. We previously reported the development of high-resolution individual locus typing methods for three of the most polymorphic swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) class II loci, namely, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1. In this study, we extensively modified our previous protocols and developed a method for the simultaneous amplification of the three SLA class II genes and subsequent analysis of individual loci using direct sequencing. The unbiased and simultaneous amplification of alleles from the all three hyper-polymorphic and pseudogene containing genes such as MHC genes is extremely challenging. However, using this method, we demonstrated the successful typing of SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1 for 31 selected individuals comprising 26 different SLA class II haplotypes which were identified from 700 animals using the single locus typing methods. The results were identical to the known genotypes from the individual locus typing. The new method has significant benefits over the individual locus typing, including lower typing cost, use of less biomaterial, less effort and fewer errors in handling large samples for multiple loci. We also extensively characterized the haplotypes of SLA class II genes and reported three new haplotypes. Our results should serve as a basis to investigate the possible association between polymorphisms of MHC class II and differences in immune responses to exogenous antigens.

  2. Development of an advanced mobile base for personal mobility and manipulation appliance generation II robotic wheelchair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwu; Candiotti, Jorge; Shino, Motoki; Chung, Cheng-Shiu; Grindle, Garrett G.; Ding, Dan; Cooper, Rory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper describes the development of a mobile base for the Personal Mobility and Manipulation Appliance Generation II (PerMMA Gen II robotic wheelchair), an obstacle-climbing wheelchair able to move in structured and unstructured environments, and to climb over curbs as high as 8 inches. The mechanical, electrical, and software systems of the mobile base are presented in detail, and similar devices such as the iBOT mobility system, TopChair, and 6X6 Explorer are described. Findings The mobile base of PerMMA Gen II has two operating modes: “advanced driving mode” on flat and uneven terrain, and “automatic climbing mode” during stair climbing. The different operating modes are triggered either by local and dynamic conditions or by external commands from users. A step-climbing sequence, up to 0.2 m, is under development and to be evaluated via simulation. The mathematical model of the mobile base is introduced. A feedback and a feed-forward controller have been developed to maintain the posture of the passenger when driving over uneven surfaces or slopes. The effectiveness of the controller has been evaluated by simulation using the open dynamics engine tool. Conclusion Future work for PerMMA Gen II mobile base is implementation of the simulation and control on a real system and evaluation of the system via further experimental tests. PMID:23820149

  3. The Development of Value Clarification Skills: Initial Efforts in an Eighth Grade Social Studies Class, Part 2. Occasional Paper Series No. 75-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingman, Barry

    The first part of this manuscript relates the initial efforts of a teacher who attempted to apply the value clarification approach in an eighth grade social studies class. The approach is based on Louis Rath's seven-part approach to values clarification which encourages children to choose and to prize one's beliefs and behaviors, and to act on…

  4. Selection and characterization of DNA aptamers for the development of light-up biosensor to detect Cd(II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Jine; Xu, Lijun; Chen, Hongxia; Pei, Renjun

    2016-07-01

    In order to develop a facile, cost-effective and quick-testing light-up biosensor with excellent specificity for cadmium ions (Cd(II)) detection, a modified selection method based on target-induced release of strands was used to isolate aptamers of Cd (II) with high specificity. Circular Dichroism (CD) data confirmed that one of the selected aptamers underwent a distinct conformational change on addition of Cd (II). A biosensor for Cd(II) was developed based on the Cd(II)-induced release of fluorescence-labeled aptamer from complex with a quencher-labeled short complementary sequence. The sensing platform displayed a Cd(II) concentration-dependent increase of fluorescence intensity in the low micromolar range and had an excellent selectivity in the presence of various interfering metal ions. Such biosensor could potentially be used for the detection of Cd(II) in environmental samples.

  5. Selection and characterization of DNA aptamers for the development of light-up biosensor to detect Cd(II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Jine; Xu, Lijun; Chen, Hongxia; Pei, Renjun

    2016-07-01

    In order to develop a facile, cost-effective and quick-testing light-up biosensor with excellent specificity for cadmium ions (Cd(II)) detection, a modified selection method based on target-induced release of strands was used to isolate aptamers of Cd (II) with high specificity. Circular Dichroism (CD) data confirmed that one of the selected aptamers underwent a distinct conformational change on addition of Cd (II). A biosensor for Cd(II) was developed based on the Cd(II)-induced release of fluorescence-labeled aptamer from complex with a quencher-labeled short complementary sequence. The sensing platform displayed a Cd(II) concentration-dependent increase of fluorescence intensity in the low micromolar range and had an excellent selectivity in the presence of various interfering metal ions. Such biosensor could potentially be used for the detection of Cd(II) in environmental samples. PMID:27154706

  6. Mars Exploration Rovers Launch Contingency Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Brian E.; Frostbutter, David A.; Parthasarathy, Karungulam N.; Heyler, Gene A.; Chang, Yale

    2004-02-01

    On 10 June 2003 at 1:58 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and 7 July 2003 at 11:18 p.m. EDT, two separate spacecraft/rovers were successfully launched to Mars atop a Delta II 7925 and Delta II 7925H, respectively. Each spacecraft/rover carried eight Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs) for thermal conditioning of electronics during the cold Martian nights. As a part of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration/U. S. Department of Energy safety effort, a contingency plan was prepared to address the unlikely events of an accidental suborbital reentry or out-of-orbit reentry. The objective of the contingency plan was to develop and implement procedures to predict, within the first hour, the probable Earth Impact Footprints (EIFs) for the LWRHUs or other possible spacecraft debris after an accidental reentry. No ablation burn-through of the heat sources' aeroshells was expected, as a result of earlier testing. Any predictions would be used in subsequent notification and recovery efforts. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, as part of a multi-agency team, was responsible for prediction of the EIFs, and the time of reentry from a potential orbital decay. The tools used to predict the EIFs included a Three-Degree-of-Freedom (3DOF) trajectory simulation code, a Six-Degree-of-Freedom (6DOF) code, a database of aerodynamic coefficients for the LWRHUs and other spacecraft debris, secure links to obtain tracking data, and a high fidelity special perturbation orbit integrator code to predict time of spacecraft reentry from orbital decay. This paper will discuss the contingency plan and process, as well as highlight the improvements made to the analytical tools. Improvements to the 3DOF, aerodynamic database, and orbit integrator and inclusion of the 6DOF have significantly enhanced the prediction capabilities. In the days before launch, the trajectory simulation codes were exercised and predictions of hypothetical EIFs were produced

  7. Expression of tubulin beta II in neuroepithelial tumors: reflection of architectural changes in the developing human brain.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yasuo; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Munehiko; Oda, Eriko; Tokunaga, Osamu; Shigemori, Minoru

    2005-08-01

    Tubulin beta II (Tub-II) is widely distributed in the developing neuronal axons and dendrites. Recent studies have demonstrated that Tub-II is also important in the early development of the human brain, and Tub-II represents a marker for progenitor and neural stem cells. To elucidate the correlation between the developing brain and neuroepithelial tumors (NETs), the present study assessed Tub-II expression by NETs and normal brain tissue using immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. In the gliomas, decreased numbers and staining intensities of Tub-II-positive cells tended to be associated with increased differentiation. Conversely, neuronal neoplasms displayed high percentages and strong staining intensities among the Tub-II-positive cells, irrespective of differentiation. In neuronal neoplasms and neoplasms with neuronal differentiation, Tub-II staining was far more intense and more homogeneous than Tub-II staining in gliomas. These results indicate that the expression of Tub-II in NETs may reflect architectural changes in the developing brain and may support the hypothesis that neuroepithelial tumors originate from glioneuronal progenitor cells capable of generating astrocytic, and neuronal cell types.

  8. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1982-09-01

    Report III, Volume 1 contains those specifications numbered A through J, as follows: General Specifications (A); Specifications for Pressure Vessels (C); Specifications for Tanks (D); Specifications for Exchangers (E); Specifications for Fired Heaters (F); Specifications for Pumps and Drivers (G); and Specifications for Instrumentation (J). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project, and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available to the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors. Report III, Volume 1 also contains the unique specifications prepared for Plants 8, 15, and 27. These specifications will be substantially reviewed during Phase I of the project, and modified as necessary for use during the engineering, procurement, and construction of this project.

  9. Development of High Stability Supports for NSLS-II RF BPMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kosciuk,B.; Alforque, R.; Bacha, B.; Cameron, P.; Lincoln, F.; Ravindranath, V.; Pinayev, I.; Sharma, S.; Singh, O.

    2009-05-04

    The NSLS-II Light Source being built at Brookhaven National Laboratory is expected to provide submicron stability of the electron orbit in the storage ring in order to fully utilize the very small emittances of the electron beam. This requires high stability supports for BPM pickup electrodes located near insertion device sources. Here we provide details for the design and development of these supports as well as measurement of thermal and vibrational stability of a prototype support.

  10. Developing The Physics Desing for NDCS-II, A Unique Pulse-Compressing Ion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J -; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-09-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the 'warm dense matter' regime at {approx}< 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a {approx}500 ns pulse of Li{sup +} ions to {approx} 1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over {approx} 15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  11. DEVELOPING THE PHYSICS DESIGN FOR NDCX-II, A UNIQUE PULSE-COMPRESSING ION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Grote, D. P.; Lund, S. M.; Sharp, W. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J-Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Leitner, M. A.; Logan, B. G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2009-07-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory(a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the"warm dense matter" regime at<~;; 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a ~;;500 ns pulse of Li+ ions to ~;;1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over ~;;15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  12. Development and Validation of the Juvenile Sexual Offense Recidivism Risk Assessment Tool-II.

    PubMed

    Epperson, Douglas L; Ralston, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    This article describes the development and initial validation of the Juvenile Sexual Offense Recidivism Risk Assessment Tool-II (JSORRAT-II). Potential predictor variables were extracted from case file information for an exhaustive sample of 636 juveniles in Utah who sexually offended between 1990 and 1992. Simultaneous and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were used to identify the group of variables that was most predictive of subsequent juvenile sexual recidivism. A simple categorical scoring system was applied to these variables without meaningful loss of accuracy in the development sample for any sexual (area under the curve [AUC] = .89) and sexually violent (AUC = .89) juvenile recidivism. The JSORRAT-II was cross-validated on an exhaustive sample of 566 juveniles who had sexually offended in Utah in 1996 and 1997. Reliability of scoring the tool across five coders was quite high (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = .96). Relative to the development sample, however, there was considerable shrinkage in the indices of predictive accuracy for any sexual (AUC = .65) and sexually violent (AUC = .65) juvenile recidivism. The reduced level of accuracy was not explained by severity of the index sexual offense, time at risk, or missing data. Capitalization on chance and other explanations for the possible reduction in predictive accuracy are explored, and potential uses and limitations of the tool are discussed. PMID:24492618

  13. Development and Validation of the Juvenile Sexual Offense Recidivism Risk Assessment Tool-II.

    PubMed

    Epperson, Douglas L; Ralston, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    This article describes the development and initial validation of the Juvenile Sexual Offense Recidivism Risk Assessment Tool-II (JSORRAT-II). Potential predictor variables were extracted from case file information for an exhaustive sample of 636 juveniles in Utah who sexually offended between 1990 and 1992. Simultaneous and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were used to identify the group of variables that was most predictive of subsequent juvenile sexual recidivism. A simple categorical scoring system was applied to these variables without meaningful loss of accuracy in the development sample for any sexual (area under the curve [AUC] = .89) and sexually violent (AUC = .89) juvenile recidivism. The JSORRAT-II was cross-validated on an exhaustive sample of 566 juveniles who had sexually offended in Utah in 1996 and 1997. Reliability of scoring the tool across five coders was quite high (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = .96). Relative to the development sample, however, there was considerable shrinkage in the indices of predictive accuracy for any sexual (AUC = .65) and sexually violent (AUC = .65) juvenile recidivism. The reduced level of accuracy was not explained by severity of the index sexual offense, time at risk, or missing data. Capitalization on chance and other explanations for the possible reduction in predictive accuracy are explored, and potential uses and limitations of the tool are discussed.

  14. Effects of major histocompatibility complex class II knockout on mouse bone mechanical properties during development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, Steven J.; Bateman, Ted A.; Smith, Erin E.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) knockout on the development of the mouse peripheral skeleton. These C2D mice had less skeletal development at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age compared to wild-type C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. The C2D mice had decreased femur mechanical, geometric and compositional measurements compared to wild type mice at each of these ages. C2D femur stiffness (S), peak force in 3-pt bending (Pm), and mineral mass (Min-M) were 74%, 64% and 66%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values at 8 weeks of age. Similar differences were measured at 12 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 71%, 72% and 73%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values) and at 16 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 80%, 66% and 61%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values). MHC II knockout delays the development of adult bone properties and is accompanied by lower body mass compared to wild-type controls.

  15. Efforts in Public Relations on Fusion in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; van Oost, G.

    2001-10-01

    An overview will be given of different published materials currently in use in Europe for public relations on fusion. We will also present a CD-ROM for individual and classroom use, containing (i) a general background on different energy forms, (ii) general principles of fusion, (iii) current research efforts and (iv) future prospects of fusion. This CD-ROM is currently in English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian. Fusion posters developed in collaboration with CPEP in Dutch, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese will be shown. Several new brochures and leaflets intended to increase the public awareness on fusion in Europe will be on display.

  16. Recent developments of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian containment code ALICE-II. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The ANL arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian containment code ALICE was developed for use in fast reactor containment studies and is particularly suited for problems involving complex fluid-structure interactions. Many improvements have been made which has resulted in a second version of the code, ALICE-II. A selection of some important improvements are given in this paper. To realistically analyze the above-core hydrodynamics containing a movable upper internal structure (UIS), a 3-D pipe element has been adopted to calculate the response of the UIS columns that connect the UIS to the vessel head. A corotational coordinate scheme for large displacement, small strain, elastic-plastic structural-dynamic analysis is utilized in the formulation. Both geometric and material nonlinearities are considered. The governing equations are integrated explicitly using a central difference procedure. Many sample problems are presented, including comparisons of ALICE-II and ICECO-CEL results on the APRICOT Phase 3 problems.

  17. Development and comparison of a TOPAZ-II system model with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Paramonov, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S. . Inst. for Space Nuclear Power Studies)

    1994-11-01

    An integrated model of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor system is developed and compared with measurements from the TOPAZ-II, V-71 unit tests. For a given reactor thermal power, the model calculates the coolant flow rate, temperature, and pressure throughout the system; load electric power; and overall system efficiency. Model predictions showed good agreement with the experimental data. The calculated coolant temperatures and pressure are within 15 K (< 2%) and 12% of the measurements, respectively. Analysis showed that at the nominal operating thermal power of the system (115 kW), and NaK coolant is highly subcooled. The largest subcooling of 365 K occurs at the exit of the electromagnetic pump, where coolant pressure is highest, and the lowest subcooling of 275 K occurs at the exit of the reactor core, where coolant temperature is highest.

  18. Current status of medical radiation exposure in Korea - recent efforts to develop a radiation exposure control system focussed on justification and optimisation.

    PubMed

    Do, K-H; Jung, S E

    2016-06-01

    Radiation exposure from diagnostic medical imaging has increased in Korea. Radiological societies play a key role in radiation safety issues in Korea, including guidelines, accreditation, advocacy, scientific activity, and education. Any medical radiation exposure must be justified, and examinations using ionising radiation must be optimised. Education of referring physicians and radiologists is also important for justification. Medical physicists and radiographers have an important role to play in quality management and optimisation. Regulations are essential to control medical radiation exposure. Therefore, national organisations have made a significant effort to regulate and monitor medical radiation exposure using guidelines, accreditation, and even the law. Medical radiation exposure must be controlled, and this could be achieved by continuous interest from health professionals and organisations. PMID:27026586

  19. A massive global effort.

    PubMed

    Mcnamara, R S

    1994-06-01

    The former president of the World Bank sees rapid growth as one of the greatest barriers to economic growth and social well-being of people in developing countries. Growth rates are so high that three billion people will be added to global population over the next thirty years. It is clear that the reduction in population growth rates must be accelerated. Only by acting now can we deal with the problem without coercive policies and programs. The author argues that high population growth aggravates poverty in developing countries, adversely affects the role and status of women and the health and opportunities of their children, and increases the danger that the present courses of economic development in developed and developing countries are unsustainable and threaten to destroy our physical environment. He reviews population growth, past and projected, and considers the relationship between population growth and sustainable development; the relationship of population growth to economic development and the alleviation of poverty; the impact of population growth rates on the status of women and children; implications of the adverse effects of high fertility rates for population policy; a program to reduce rates of population growth; financial requirements of the proposed program; organizing to carry out the program; and a leadership role for Japan in family planning programs.

  20. The Philosophy of Teaching Adult Students. Quality Professional Development Project. Professional Development Manual II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Community Coll., Jacksonville.

    This workbook is one of six professional development manuals designed to help new adult education (AE) instructors find their personal philosophy of teaching adult students. The pretest and post-test appear first. Five units provide useful information on five diverse topics developed by leading (AE) experts and experienced (AE) instructors. Each…

  1. Perceived distributed effort in team ball sports.

    PubMed

    Beniscelli, Violeta; Tenenbaum, Gershon; Schinke, Robert Joel; Torregrosa, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we explored the multifaceted concept of perceived mental and physical effort in team sport contexts where athletes must invest individual and shared efforts to reach a common goal. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 15 Catalan professional coaches (3 women and 12 men, 3 each from the following sports: volleyball, basketball, handball, soccer, and water polo) to gain their views of three perceived effort-related dimensions: physical, psychological, and tactical. From a theoretical thematic analysis, it was found that the perception of effort is closely related to how effort is distributed within the team. Moreover, coaches viewed physical effort in relation to the frequency and intensity of the players' involvement in the game. They identified psychological effort in situations where players pay attention to proper cues, and manage emotions under difficult circumstances. Tactical effort addressed the decision-making process of players and how they fulfilled their roles while taking into account the actions of their teammates and opponents. Based on these findings, a model of perceived distributed effort was developed, which delineates the elements that compose each of the aforementioned dimensions. Implications of perceived distributed effort in team coordination and shared mental models are discussed. PMID:24404807

  2. Perceived distributed effort in team ball sports.

    PubMed

    Beniscelli, Violeta; Tenenbaum, Gershon; Schinke, Robert Joel; Torregrosa, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we explored the multifaceted concept of perceived mental and physical effort in team sport contexts where athletes must invest individual and shared efforts to reach a common goal. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 15 Catalan professional coaches (3 women and 12 men, 3 each from the following sports: volleyball, basketball, handball, soccer, and water polo) to gain their views of three perceived effort-related dimensions: physical, psychological, and tactical. From a theoretical thematic analysis, it was found that the perception of effort is closely related to how effort is distributed within the team. Moreover, coaches viewed physical effort in relation to the frequency and intensity of the players' involvement in the game. They identified psychological effort in situations where players pay attention to proper cues, and manage emotions under difficult circumstances. Tactical effort addressed the decision-making process of players and how they fulfilled their roles while taking into account the actions of their teammates and opponents. Based on these findings, a model of perceived distributed effort was developed, which delineates the elements that compose each of the aforementioned dimensions. Implications of perceived distributed effort in team coordination and shared mental models are discussed.

  3. New Horizons Launch Contingency Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yale; Lear, Matthew H.; McGrath, Brian E.; Heyler, Gene A.; Takashima, Naruhisa; Owings, W. Donald

    2007-01-01

    On 19 January 2006 at 2:00 PM EST, the NASA New Horizons spacecraft (SC) was launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), FL, onboard an Atlas V 551/Centaur/STAR™ 48B launch vehicle (LV) on a mission to explore the Pluto Charon planetary system and possibly other Kuiper Belt Objects. It carried a single Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). As part of the joint NASA/US Department of Energy (DOE) safety effort, contingency plans were prepared to address the unlikely events of launch accidents leading to a near-pad impact, a suborbital reentry, an orbital reentry, or a heliocentric orbit. As the implementing organization. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) had expanded roles in the New Horizons launch contingency effort over those for the Cassini mission and Mars Exploration Rovers missions. The expanded tasks included participation in the Radiological Control Center (RADCC) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), preparation of contingency plans, coordination of space tracking assets, improved aerodynamics characterization of the RTG's 18 General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules, and development of spacecraft and RTG reentry breakup analysis tools. Other JHU/APL tasks were prediction of the Earth impact footprints (ElFs) for the GPHS modules released during the atmospheric reentry (for purposes of notification and recovery), prediction of the time of SC reentry from a potential orbital decay, pre-launch dissemination of ballistic coefficients of various possible reentry configurations, and launch support of an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) on the JHU/APL campus. For the New Horizons launch, JHU/APL personnel at the RADCC and at the EOC were ready to implement any real-time launch contingency activities. A successful New Horizons launch and interplanetary injection precluded any further contingency actions. The New Horizons launch contingency was an interagency effort by several organizations. This paper

  4. APS Education and Diversity Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestridge, Katherine; Hodapp, Theodore

    2015-11-01

    American Physical Society (APS) has a wide range of education and diversity programs and activities, including programs that improve physics education, increase diversity, provide outreach to the public, and impact public policy. We present the latest programs spearheaded by the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics (CSWP), with highlights from other diversity and education efforts. The CSWP is working to increase the fraction of women in physics, understand and implement solutions for gender-specific issues, enhance professional development opportunities for women in physics, and remedy issues that impact gender inequality in physics. The Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics, Professional Skills Development Workshops, and our new Professional Skills program for students and postdocs are all working towards meeting these goals. The CSWP also has site visit and conversation visit programs, where department chairs request that the APS assess the climate for women in their departments or facilitate climate discussions. APS also has two significant programs to increase participation by underrepresented minorities (URM). The newest program, the APS National Mentoring Community, is working to provide mentoring to URM undergraduates, and the APS Bridge Program is an established effort that is dramatically increasing the number of URM PhDs in physics.

  5. Angiotensin II accelerates mammary gland development independently of high blood pressure in pregnancy-associated hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Baasanjav, Altansarnai; Kwon, Chulwon; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Ishida, Junji; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a vasopressor hormone that has critical roles in maintenance of normal blood pressure and pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. We previously generated pregnancy-associated hypertensive (PAH) mice by mating female human angiotensinogen transgenic mice with male human renin transgenic mice. PAH mice exhibit hypertension in late pregnancy by overproducing AngII. A recent study demonstrated that angiotensin II type I (AT1) receptor is expressed in mammary epithelial cells and its signaling is critical for mammary gland involution after weaning. However, the role of AngII-AT1 receptor signaling in the development of mammary gland during pregnancy remains unclear. In this study, to investigate the role of AngII-AT1 receptor signaling in mammary gland development during pregnancy, we analyzed the mammary gland of PAH mice. Histological and gene expression analyses revealed that lobuloalveolar development was accelerated with increased milk protein production and lipid accumulation in the mammary gland of PAH mice. Furthermore, AT1 receptor blocker treatment suppressed acceleration of mammary gland development in PAH mice, while the treatment of hydralazine, another antihypertensive drug, did not. These data suggest that AngII-AT1 receptor-induced signaling accelerates mammary gland development during pregnancy through hypertension-independent mechanism.

  6. Developing Productive Dispositions during Small-Group Work in Two Sixth-Grade Mathematics Classrooms: Teachers' Facilitation Efforts and Students' Self-Reported Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Through this exploratory study, I developed conjectures about classroom conditions that had the potential to support (or not) the development of productive dispositions toward mathematics. To do so, I listened to sixth-grade students' voices about their experiences with small-group work in 2 mathematics classrooms and contrasted their teachers'…

  7. Selachian tooth development: II. Immunolocalization of amelogenin polypeptides in epithelium during secretory amelogenesis in Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Slavkin, H C; Samuel, N; Bringas, P; Nanci, A; Santos, V

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the distribution of amelogenin polypeptides in an order of elasmobranchs using indirect immunofluorescence with rabbit polyclonal antibodies prepared to purified murine amelogenins. We find that amelogenins are definitely present within the inner enamel epithelium prior to the production of the extracellular matrix component termed "enameloid" (row II developing tooth organs). During subsequent stages of selachian tooth development (row III tooth organs), immunofluorescence staining data indicated localization of amelogenin antigens within epithelium as well as the enameloid extracellular matrix. The results from these immunohistochemical studies suggest that the 16-20 kdalton amelogenins, which are characteristic of murine inner enamel epithelial cells undergoing terminal biochemical differentiation into secretory ameloblasts, may also be regarded as molecular markers for amelogenesis in developing teeth in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias.

  8. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the Breckinridge Project and summarizes the results achieved during the development phase of the project performed under a Cooperative Agreement with the United States Department of Energy. The Breckinridge Project provides for the design, construction and operation of a 50,000 barrel per day coal liquefaction facility in Breckinridge County, Kentucky. The development of the basic technology used in the Breckinridge Project dates back to the late 1950's and the invention by Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., (HRI) of the ebullated-bed reactor and the H-OIL process. The H-COAL process is based on the H-OIL technology. This coal liquefaction process produces clean low-sulfur petroleum substitutes suitable for most types of hydrocarbon-based fuel and chemical uses regardless of the sulfur content of the coal. A large H-COAL Pilot Plant in operation at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, is converting 220 tons of coal per day into 600 barrels of distillate products by catalytic hydrogenation. The estimated capital cost of the commercial facility is $3.17 billion, and the associated out-of-pocket operating cost is $18 per barrel, both in January 1981 dollars. Financial analysis shows the project to be an attractive investment under certain leveraged conditions which are possible through the assistance of the Synthetic Fuels Corporation. Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. is currently working with the Synthetic Fuels Corporation and potential partners to develop financing for the commercial venture. Critical permits are being obtained and an Environmental Impact Statement is being prepared pursuant to initiating site preparation in early 1983. Commercial operations are expected to start up in early 1988.

  9. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Report V, Volume 4 provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to Instrument and Plant Air Systems (Plant 36), Telecommunication Systems (Plant 37), Inert Gas Systems (Plant 38), Purge and Flush Oil Systems (Plant 39), Site Development and Roads (Plant 40), Buildings (Plant 41), Solid Waste Management (Plant 42), and Landfill (Plant 44). Instrument and Plant Air Systems (Plant 36) includes all equipment and piping necessary to supply instrument and utility air to the process plants and offsite facilities. Telecommunication Systems (Plant 37) includes the equipment and wiring for: communication throughout the facility; communication between plant data processing systems and offsite computing facilities; and communication with transportation carriers. Inert Gas Systems (Plant 38) provides high purity and low purity nitrogen streams for plant startup and normal operation. Purge and Flush Oil Systems (Plant 39) provides purge and flush oils to various plants. Site Development and Roads (Plant 40) provides site leveling, the addition of roads, fencing, and drainage, and the placement of fills, pilings, footings, and foundations for plants. Buildings (Plant 41) provides buildings for equipment and for personnel, including utilities, lighting, sanitary facilities, heating, air conditioning, and ventilation. Solid Waste Management (Plant 42) identifies, characterizes, segregates, and transports the various types of solid wastes to either Landfill (Plant 44) or outside disposal sites. Landfill (Plant 44) provides disposal of both nonhazardous and hazardous solid wastes. Information is included (as applicable) for each of the eight plants described.

  10. Major Histocompatibility Class II Pathway Is Not Required for the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Willemin, Gilles; Roger, Catherine; Bauduret, Armelle; Minehira, Kaori

    2013-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms within major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) genes have been associated with an increased risk of drug-induced liver injury. However, it has never been addressed whether the MHC II pathway plays an important role in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the most common form of liver disease. We used a mouse model that has a complete knockdown of genes in the MHC II pathway (MHCII(Δ/Δ)). Firstly we studied the effect of high-fat diet-induced hepatic inflammation in these mice. Secondly we studied the development of carbon-tetra-chloride- (CCl4-) induced hepatic cirrhosis. After the high-fat diet, both groups developed obesity and hepatic steatosis with a similar degree of hepatic inflammation, suggesting no impact of the knockdown of MHC II on high-fat diet-induced inflammation in mice. In the second study, we confirmed that the CCl4 injection significantly upregulated the MHC II genes in wild-type mice. The CCl4 treatment significantly induced genes related to the fibrosis formation in wild-type mice, whereas this was lower in MHCII(Δ/Δ) mice. The liver histology, however, showed no detectable difference between groups, suggesting that the MHC II pathway is not required for the development of hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl4.

  11. Analysis Efforts Supporting NSTX Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    H.Zhang, P. Titus, P. Rogoff, A.Zolfaghari, D. Mangra, M. Smith

    2010-11-29

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio, spherical torus (ST) configuration device which is located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) This device is presently being updated to enhance its physics by doubling the TF field to 1 Tesla and increasing the plasma current to 2 Mega-amperes. The upgrades include a replacement of the centerstack and addition of a second neutral beam. The upgrade analyses have two missions. The first is to support design of new components, principally the centerstack, the second is to qualify existing NSTX components for higher loads, which will increase by a factor of four. Cost efficiency was a design goal for new equipment qualification, and reanalysis of the existing components. Showing that older components can sustain the increased loads has been a challenging effort in which designs had to be developed that would limit loading on weaker components, and would minimize the extent of modifications needed. Two areas representing this effort have been chosen to describe in more details: analysis of the current distribution in the new TF inner legs, and, second, analysis of the out-of-plane support of the existing TF outer legs.

  12. Development of DNA affinity techniques for the functional characterization of purified RNA polymerase II transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.; Cohen, R.B.; Brendler, T.; Safer, B.

    1987-05-01

    Affinity adsorption, precipitation, and partitioning techniques have been developed to purify and characterize RNA Pol II transcription components from whole cell extracts (WCE) (HeLa) and nuclear extracts (K562). The titration of these extracts with multicopy constructs of the Ad2 MLP but not pUC8, inhibits transcriptional activity. DNA-binding factors precipitated by this technique are greatly enriched by centrifugation. Using this approach, factors binding to the upstream promoter sequence (UPS) of the Ad2 MLP have been rapidly isolated by Mono Q, Mono S, and DNA affinity chromatography. By U.V. crosslinking to nucleotides containing specific TSP-phosphodiester bonds within the recognition sequence, this factor is identified as a M/sub r/ = 45,000 polypeptide. To generate an assay system for the functional evaluation of single transcription components, a similar approach using synthetic oligonucleotide sequences spanning single promoter binding sites has been developed. The addition of a synthetic 63-mer containing the UPS element of the Ad2 MLP to HeLa WCE inhibited transcription by 60%. The addition of partially purified UPS binding protein, but not RNA Pol II, restored transcriptional activity. The addition of synthetic oligonucleotides containing other regulatory sequences not present in the Ad2 MLP was without effect.

  13. Multimedia Technology in Language and Culture Restoration Efforts at San Juan Pueblo: A Brief History of the Development of the Tewa Language Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Sue-Ellen; Tuttle, Siri G.; Martinez, Esther

    1998-01-01

    The Tewa Language Project CD-ROM was developed at the University of Washington in collaboration with San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico, to restore the use of spoken and written Tewa and to repatriate cultural property. The CD-ROM contains an interactive multimedia dictionary, songs, stories, photographs, land and water data, and linguistic resources…

  14. Elimination of Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minority Communities: Developing Data Indicators To Assess the Progress of Community-Based Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edberg, Mark C.; Wong, Frank Y.; Woo, Violet; Doong, Tuei

    2003-01-01

    Describes the development of a pilot uniform data set (UDS) intended to serve as the primary data collection mechanism for all grants and standard cooperative agreements funded by the U.S. Office of Minority Health. The UDS is the product of a formative research project with implications for other program evaluations. (SLD)

  15. Women Are "The Key to Progress." The Situation of Women in Developing Countries and German Efforts To Improve Their Situation. IN Visitors' Information Special Report, SO 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krugmann-Randolf, Inga

    Women in developing countries carry out three-quarters of all work in rural areas, are often exposed to great health risks through frequent childbirth, and are disadvantaged compared with men in education and training. Modernization has burdened women with new responsibilities and more work but has improved health care. The economic and social…

  16. The Regeneration Challenge in the Developed World: Insights Generated from a Capabilities Approach Applied to the Understanding of Regeneration Efforts in Post-Industrial Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Nelarine; Trueman, Myfanwy

    2008-01-01

    An important aspect of the urban story of many cities in the developed world is their "regeneration" after many years of long-term social, economic and environmental decline. This is especially so in cities that have sought to reverse a long-standing, negative reputation and pejorative image. Based on the context of post-industrial cities in the…

  17. An examination of participants who develop an eating disorder despite completing an eating disorder prevention program: implications for improving the yield of prevention efforts.

    PubMed

    Horney, Audra C; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Numerous trials provide support for the Body Project, an eating disorder prevention program wherein young women with body image concerns critique the thin ideal. Despite medium to large effects, some participants subsequently develop an eating disorder, suggesting that intervention or recruitment procedures could be improved. This study investigated baseline and acute intervention predictors of DSM-5 eating disorder development during a 3-year follow-up among Body Project participants. Combined data from two trials compare participants who experienced eating disorder onset during follow-up (n = 20) to those who did not (n = 216). Participants who did versus did not develop an eating disorder started the intervention with higher eating disorder symptoms (η (2) = 0.08), negative affect (η (2) = 0.06), thin-ideal internalization (η (2) = 0.02), and body dissatisfaction (η (2) = 0.02); the same baseline predictors of eating disorder onset emerged in controls. Attenuated pre-post reductions in eating disorder symptoms (η (2) = 0.01) predicted eating disorder onset but not after controlling for baseline levels. Given that Body Project and control participants who later developed an eating disorder started with initial elevations in risk factors and eating disorder symptoms, it might be useful to develop a more intensive variant of this program for those exhibiting greater risk at baseline and to deliver the prevention program earlier to prevent initial escalation of risk. The fact that nonresponders also showed greater negative affect and eating disorder symptoms suggests that it might be useful to add activities to improve affect and increase dissonance about disordered eating.

  18. An examination of participants who develop an eating disorder despite completing an eating disorder prevention program: implications for improving the yield of prevention efforts.

    PubMed

    Horney, Audra C; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Numerous trials provide support for the Body Project, an eating disorder prevention program wherein young women with body image concerns critique the thin ideal. Despite medium to large effects, some participants subsequently develop an eating disorder, suggesting that intervention or recruitment procedures could be improved. This study investigated baseline and acute intervention predictors of DSM-5 eating disorder development during a 3-year follow-up among Body Project participants. Combined data from two trials compare participants who experienced eating disorder onset during follow-up (n = 20) to those who did not (n = 216). Participants who did versus did not develop an eating disorder started the intervention with higher eating disorder symptoms (η (2) = 0.08), negative affect (η (2) = 0.06), thin-ideal internalization (η (2) = 0.02), and body dissatisfaction (η (2) = 0.02); the same baseline predictors of eating disorder onset emerged in controls. Attenuated pre-post reductions in eating disorder symptoms (η (2) = 0.01) predicted eating disorder onset but not after controlling for baseline levels. Given that Body Project and control participants who later developed an eating disorder started with initial elevations in risk factors and eating disorder symptoms, it might be useful to develop a more intensive variant of this program for those exhibiting greater risk at baseline and to deliver the prevention program earlier to prevent initial escalation of risk. The fact that nonresponders also showed greater negative affect and eating disorder symptoms suggests that it might be useful to add activities to improve affect and increase dissonance about disordered eating. PMID:25342026

  19. An Examination of Participants Who Develop an Eating Disorder Despite Completing an Eating Disorder Prevention Program: Implications for Improving the Yield of Prevention Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Numerous trials provide support for the Body Project, an eating disorder prevention program wherein young women with body image concerns critique the thin ideal. Despite medium to large effects, some participants subsequently develop an eating disorder, suggesting that intervention or recruitment procedures could be improved. This study investigated baseline and acute intervention predictors of DSM-5 eating disorder development during a 3-year follow-up among Body Project participants. Combined data from two trials compare participants who experienced eating disorder onset during follow-up (n=20) to those who did not (n=216). Participants who did versus did not develop an eating disorder started the intervention with higher eating disorder symptoms (η2=0.08), negative affect (η2=0.06), thin-ideal internalization (η2=0.02), and body dissatisfaction (η2=0.02); the same baseline predictors of eating disorder onset emerged in controls. Attenuated pre–post reductions in eating disorder symptoms (η2=0.01) predicted eating disorder onset but not after controlling for baseline levels. Given that Body Project and control participants who later developed an eating disorder started with initial elevations in risk factors and eating disorder symptoms, it might be useful to develop a more intensive variant of this program for those exhibiting greater risk at baseline and to deliver the prevention program earlier to prevent initial escalation of risk. The fact that nonresponders also showed greater negative affect and eating disorder symptoms suggests that it might be useful to add activities to improve affect and increase dissonance about disordered eating. PMID:25342026

  20. [Development of highly sensitive assay for detection of low serum level of PIVKA-II and its clinical usefulness].

    PubMed

    Sakizono, K; Oita, T; Kuroda, M; Kasakura, S

    1996-09-01

    PIVKA-II is well known as a tumor marker of hepatocellular carcinoma. We describe the adaptations to render a commercially available PIVKA-II immunoassay kit (Eitest MONO P-II: Eisai Co., Ltd, Tokyo) more sensitive and evaluated clinical usefulness of this highly sensitive assay for early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. We measured serum PIVKA-II concentrations with the Eitest kit as described for the kit. To measure serum PIVKA-II concentrations below the sensitivity limit of the Eitest kit (0.0625AU/ml), linearity was determined using a series of dilutions of standard antigen diluted in standard diluent, including PIVKA-II concentrations of 0.002, 0.004, 0.008, 0.016, 0.031, 0.0625AU/ml. The assay was found to be liner from 0.004AU/ml. In this way, one can detect as low PIVKA-II concentrations as 0.004AU/ml. The repeatability-assay coefficients of variation (CV%) obtained from sixteen repeated assays of four sera were distributed between 3.63 and 18.75% and the reproducibility-assay coefficients of variation (CV%) obtained from ten repeated assays of four sera were distributed between 6.27 and 14.04%. We determined the serial changes in serum PIVKA-II levels of two patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after the resection of hepatic tumor. In these patients, elevation of serum PIVKA-II level determined by the highly sensitive assay preceded the detection of relapse by imaging diagnostic procedures. In summary, the assay system we developed has good accuracy and reproducibility for assaying low concentrations of PIVKA-II in serum and is suitable for detecting small increases in PIVKA-II concentrations. This assay system may be useful to earlier detect a relapse of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Retrospective CMORPH Reprocessing Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarosh, Y.; Joyce, R.; Xie, P.

    2008-05-01

    constellation, there is enough to retrospectively reprocess CMORPH well beyond the current archive start. Also IR based PMW calibrated rainfall estimates will be calculated as part of the retrospective reprocessing. These estimates will be blended for times and locations that the PMW information is too old for relative accuracy. This blended method (CMORPH-IR) combines the CMORPH and IR based estimates via an error model developed by running test CMORPH processing, albeit withholding random high quality PMW estimates, and determining the error/skill of the CMORPH relative to the IR-based rainfall as a function of season, surface type, region, and age of PMW information in half hourly increments from PMW scan time. The retrospective processing will be performed for Year 2002 and proceed backward. Detailed results will be reported at the meeting.

  2. Downscaling the marine modelling effort: Development, application and assessment of a 3D ecosystem model implemented in a small coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovoyiannis, V. N.; Tsirtsis, G. E.

    2013-07-01

    The present study deals with the development, application and evaluation of a modelling tool, implemented along with a field sampling program, in a limited coastal area in the Northeast Aegean. The aim was to study, understand and quantify physical circulation and water column ecological processes in a high resolution simulation of a past annual cycle. The marine ecosystem model consists of a three dimensional hydrodynamic component suitable for coastal areas (Princeton Ocean Model) coupled to a simple ecological model of five variables, namely, phytoplankton, nitrate, ammonia, phosphate and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. The ecological parameters (e.g. half saturation constants and maximum uptake rates for nutrients) were calibrated using a specially developed automated procedure. Model errors were evaluated using qualitative, graphic techniques and were quantified with a number of goodness-of-fit measures. Regarding physical variables, the goodness-of-fit of model to field data varied from fairly to quite good. Indicatively, the cost function, expressed as mean value per sampling station, ranged from 0.15 to 0.23 for temperature and 0.81 to 3.70 for current speed. The annual cycle of phytoplankton biomass was simulated with sufficient accuracy (e.g. mean cost function ranging from 0.49 to 2.67), partly attributed to the adequate reproduction of the dynamics of growth limiting nutrients, nitrate, ammonia and the main limiting nutrient, phosphate, whose mean cost function ranged from 0.97 to 1.88. Model results and field data provided insight to physical processes such as the development of a wind-driven, coastal jet type of surface alongshore flow with a subsurface countercurrent flowing towards opposite direction and the formation of rotational flows in the embayments of the coastline when the offshore coastal current speed approaches values of about 0.1 m/s. The percentage of field measurements where the N:P ratio was found over 16:1 varied between

  3. Conformal Ablative Thermal Protection System for Planetary and Human Exploration Missions: Overview of the Technology Maturation Efforts Funded by NASA's Game Changing Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A.; Arnold, James O.; Gasch, Matthew J.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Fan, Wendy; Szalai, Christine E.; Wercinski, Paul F.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2012-01-01

    The Office of Chief Technologist (OCT), NASA has identified the need for research and technology development in part from NASA's Strategic Goal 3.3 of the NASA Strategic Plan to develop and demonstrate the critical technologies that will make NASA's exploration, science, and discovery missions more affordable and more capable. Furthermore, the Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) is a primary avenue to achieve the Agency's 2011 strategic goal to "Create the innovative new space technologies for our exploration, science, and economic future." In addition, recently released "NASA space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities," by the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academy of Sciences stresses the need for NASA to invest in the very near term in specific EDL technologies. The report points out the following challenges (Page 2-38 of the pre-publication copy released on February 1, 2012): Mass to Surface: Develop the ability to deliver more payload to the destination. NASA's future missions will require ever-greater mass delivery capability in order to place scientifically significant instrument packages on distant bodies of interest, to facilitate sample returns from bodies of interest, and to enable human exploration of planets such as Mars. As the maximum mass that can be delivered to an entry interface is fixed for a given launch system and trajectory design, the mass delivered to the surface will require reduction in spacecraft structural mass; more efficient, lighter thermal protection systems; more efficient lighter propulsion systems; and lighter, more efficient deceleration systems. Surface Access: Increase the ability to land at a variety of planetary locales and at a variety of times. Access to specific sites can be achieved via landing at a specific location (s) or transit from a single designated landing location, but it is currently infeasible to transit long distances and through extremely rugged terrain, requiring landing close to the

  4. Technical Manual for the Conceptual Learning and Development Assessment Series II: Cutting Tool. Technical Report No. 435. Reprinted December 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLuzio, Geneva J.; And Others

    This document accompanies Conceptual Learning and Development Assessment Series II: Cutting Tool, a test constructed to chart the conceptual development of individuals. As a technical manual, it contains information on the rationale, development, standardization, and reliability of the test, as well as essential information and statistical data…

  5. The adaptor protein SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity against lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L; Stein, Paul L; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-12-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT-cell TCR transgenic mouse model, we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells, but not thymic epithelial cells, meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Furthermore, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development by controlling early growth response 2 protein and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IFN regulatory factor 4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP.

  6. Cognitive effort: A neuroeconomic approach.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Andrew; Braver, Todd S

    2015-06-01

    Cognitive effort has been implicated in numerous theories regarding normal and aberrant behavior and the physiological response to engagement with demanding tasks. Yet, despite broad interest, no unifying, operational definition of cognitive effort itself has been proposed. Here, we argue that the most intuitive and epistemologically valuable treatment is in terms of effort-based decision-making, and advocate a neuroeconomics-focused research strategy. We first outline psychological and neuroscientific theories of cognitive effort. Then we describe the benefits of a neuroeconomic research strategy, highlighting how it affords greater inferential traction than do traditional markers of cognitive effort, including self-reports and physiologic markers of autonomic arousal. Finally, we sketch a future series of studies that can leverage the full potential of the neuroeconomic approach toward understanding the cognitive and neural mechanisms that give rise to phenomenal, subjective cognitive effort. PMID:25673005

  7. Cognitive effort: A neuroeconomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Braver, Todd S.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive effort has been implicated in numerous theories regarding normal and aberrant behavior and the physiological response to engagement with demanding tasks. Yet, despite broad interest, no unifying, operational definition of cognitive effort itself has been proposed. Here, we argue that the most intuitive and epistemologically valuable treatment is in terms of effort-based decision-making, and advocate a neuroeconomics-focused research strategy. We first outline psychological and neuroscientific theories of cognitive effort. Then we describe the benefits of a neuroeconomic research strategy, highlighting how it affords greater inferential traction than do traditional markers of cognitive effort, including self-reports and physiologic markers of autonomic arousal. Finally, we sketch a future series of studies that can leverage the full potential of the neuroeconomic approach toward understanding the cognitive and neural mechanisms that give rise to phenomenal, subjective cognitive effort. PMID:25673005

  8. An international effort towards developing standards for best practices in analysis, interpretation and reporting of clinical genome sequencing results in the CLARITY Challenge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is tremendous potential for genome sequencing to improve clinical diagnosis and care once it becomes routinely accessible, but this will require formalizing research methods into clinical best practices in the areas of sequence data generation, analysis, interpretation and reporting. The CLARITY Challenge was designed to spur convergence in methods for diagnosing genetic disease starting from clinical case history and genome sequencing data. DNA samples were obtained from three families with heritable genetic disorders and genomic sequence data were donated by sequencing platform vendors. The challenge was to analyze and interpret these data with the goals of identifying disease-causing variants and reporting the findings in a clinically useful format. Participating contestant groups were solicited broadly, and an independent panel of judges evaluated their performance. Results A total of 30 international groups were engaged. The entries reveal a general convergence of practices on most elements of the analysis and interpretation process. However, even given this commonality of approach, only two groups identified the consensus candidate variants in all disease cases, demonstrating a need for consistent fine-tuning of the generally accepted methods. There was greater diversity of the final clinical report content and in the patient consenting process, demonstrating that these areas require additional exploration and standardization. Conclusions The CLARITY Challenge provides a comprehensive assessment of current practices for using genome sequencing to diagnose and report genetic diseases. There is remarkable convergence in bioinformatic techniques, but medical interpretation and reporting are areas that require further development by many groups. PMID:24667040

  9. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  10. Development and Verification of a TOPAZ-II Electromagnetic Pump Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Paramonov, Dmitry V.

    1994-07-01

    An integrated model of the TOPAZ-II electromagnetic (EM) pump is developed and incorporated into the Thermionic Transient Analysis Model (TITAM). The magnetic field strength of the induction coil depends not only on the current supplied by the pump TFEs, but also on the temperature of the coil. All electric and thermal properties of the coolant, wall material of pump ducts, and the electric leads are taken to be temperature dependent. The pump model is benchmarked with experimental data at different coolant temperatures. Results show the pump model to be in good agreement with experimental data. The maximum deviation in the mass flow predictions obtained at different coolant temperatures and pump currents is less than 0.1 kg/s.

  11. Apollo Block I Spacesuit Development and Apollo Block II Spacesuit Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBarron, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Jim McBarron has over 40 years of experience with the U.S. Air Force pressure suit and NASA spacesuit development and operations. As a result of his experience, he shared his significant knowledge about the requirements and modifications made to the Gemini spacesuit, which were necessary to support the Apollo Block I Program. In addition, he provided an overview of the Apollo Block II Spacesuit competition test program conducted by the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center. Topics covered included the program's chronology; competition test program ground rules, scoring details, and final test results; and the implementation of resulting modifications to the Apollo Spacesuit Program. He concluded his presentation by identifying noteworthy lessons learned.

  12. Lighting the way: photonics leaders II (PL2) optics and photonics teacher professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, Pamela O.; Hilliard-Clark, Joyce; Bowles, Tuere; Carpenter, Eric

    2014-07-01

    A sample group of nineteen teachers completed the second phase of the Photonics Leaders II Optics and Photonics professional development program. Participants took a basic Physics content knowledge test that was designed by a Professor of Physics. The test was completed before the teachers participated in the program and at the end of the program to gather data for statistical inquiry. Statistical studies on pre-test and post-test data indicated significant gains in physics content knowledge over time, and that instructors teaching at the middle school level or only teaching one subject area scored significantly lower during the pretest. Reports from previous participants are summarized to disseminate the percentage of teachers who have incorporated at least one workshop activity and the kind of activity performed. The concerns and limitations reported by previous participants are reviewed as well.

  13. Development and Control of Mine Detection Robot COMET-II and COMET-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonami, Kenzo; Huang, Qingjiu; Komizo, Daisuke; Fukao, Yoichiro; Asai, Yoshitomo; Shiraishi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Masaki; Ikedo, Yosuke

    In this paper, we elucidate the development and the multitask cooperative control of humanitarian demining assistance robots. In particular, the aim in this paper is to propose the first platform robots for humanitarian demining as a global pioneering project. Here we propose two kinds of mine detection robots which consists of six-legged walking robots with two manipulators for added stability, mobility, and functionality. One of the proposed mine detection robots is the COMET-II which is a 120kg class robot driven by electric power. The other robot is the full autonomous mine detection robot the COMET-III which is a 1 ton class robot driven by hydraulic power with a gasoline engine. The COMET-III has a crawler and six legs and it can continue a mine detection operation for four hours. An improved version of this kind of robot will be engaged for mine detection operation in actual mine fields in the near future.

  14. The need for thorough phase II studies in medicines development for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gray, Julian A; Fleet, David; Winblad, Bengt

    2015-10-26

    An important factor in the universal failure in phase III trials in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease in the past decade is the lack of phase II clinical data prior to entering phase III, with common reliance on biomarker results alone. Conduction of two learn-confirm cycles according to the Sheiner model would allow go/no-go decision making to include reliable clinical efficacy data prior to conducting phase III and would likely bring the rate of late stage failure more into line with that of other neurological indications. In studies in earlier disease stages, combined phase IIB/III adaptive approaches merit consideration in view of the long timelines of each study, though advantages and disadvantages of this approach versus the classical development pathway still need careful assessment.

  15. Granular bed filter development program, Phase II. Quarterly report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Moresco, L. L.; Ferguson, J.

    1981-08-01

    Phase I included the development of a mathematical model, a cold flow parametric test series in a 0.746 Nm/sup 3//s GBF, and investigations of potential dust plugging problems at the inlet screen. Collection efficiencies of 99% and filter outlet loadings less than 0.0074 g/m/sup 3/ were demonstrated. The objectives of Phase II are to investigate the effects of elevated temperature and coal combustion particulate on GBF filtration performance; to update the analytical model developed in Phase I to reflect high temperature effects; to optimize filter internal configuration; to perform parametric and long duration tests to characterize the effects of filter design improvements on filtration efficiencies. Hot flow testing to date has confirmed that the GBF configured with inlet and outlet screens has exhibited a tendency for extensive and irreversible ash plugging. The potential advantages of a screenless configuration, having higher filtration efficiency, has been confirmed. This report describes the continuation of work pertinent to the development and design improvement of the GBF system, specifically addressing: (1) the development of governing equations derived for the 3-dimensional GBF mathematical model; (2) the initial results of subcontracted experiments to establish correlations of particulate capture mechanisms for use in the numerical 3-dimensional model; and (3) the design and physical modifications incorporated into the Model 4 GBF hot test setup for the final series of hot gas tests.

  16. Development of a multi-component chemically reactive detection conjugate for the determination of Hg(II) in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Tian, Xiang-Li; Li, Yan-Song; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Zhao-Hui; Yang, Li; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Wang, Xin-Rui; Meng, Xian-Mei; Liu, Jing-Qiu

    2012-04-29

    Mercury ions (Hg(II)) are considered highly toxic and hazardous element even at low levels. The contamination of Hg(II) is a global problem. To develop selective and sensitive technique for the detection of Hg(II) has attracted considerable attention. In this study, a multi-component chemically reactive detection conjugate for determination of Hg(II) has been synthesized and a competitive format assay was proposed. In the technique, the chemically reactive capture conjugate was coated on the plate. The reactive detection conjugate was then captured by the capture conjugate. TMB solution was added and catalyzed by HRP molecules immobilized on AuNPs. Finally, the developed enzymatic signal was measured at 450 nm. The linear range of the assay was 0.35-350 ppb with a detection limit of 0.1 ppb. The average recoveries of Hg(II) from mineral water, tap water and lake water were 100.03%, 103.13% and 102.03%, respectively. All coefficients of variation (CVs) were less than 10%. The results are closely correlated with those from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which indicated that the developed technique is a reliable method for and sensitive detection of Hg(II) in water samples.

  17. Development of a multi-component chemically reactive detection conjugate for the determination of Hg(II) in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Tian, Xiang-Li; Li, Yan-Song; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Zhao-Hui; Yang, Li; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Wang, Xin-Rui; Meng, Xian-Mei; Liu, Jing-Qiu

    2012-04-29

    Mercury ions (Hg(II)) are considered highly toxic and hazardous element even at low levels. The contamination of Hg(II) is a global problem. To develop selective and sensitive technique for the detection of Hg(II) has attracted considerable attention. In this study, a multi-component chemically reactive detection conjugate for determination of Hg(II) has been synthesized and a competitive format assay was proposed. In the technique, the chemically reactive capture conjugate was coated on the plate. The reactive detection conjugate was then captured by the capture conjugate. TMB solution was added and catalyzed by HRP molecules immobilized on AuNPs. Finally, the developed enzymatic signal was measured at 450 nm. The linear range of the assay was 0.35-350 ppb with a detection limit of 0.1 ppb. The average recoveries of Hg(II) from mineral water, tap water and lake water were 100.03%, 103.13% and 102.03%, respectively. All coefficients of variation (CVs) were less than 10%. The results are closely correlated with those from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which indicated that the developed technique is a reliable method for and sensitive detection of Hg(II) in water samples. PMID:22483216

  18. Expression of PAT and NPT II proteins during the developmental stages of a genetically modified pepper developed in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Si Myung; Kim, Jae Kwang; Ryu, Tae Hun; Suh, Seok Cheol; Cho, Hyun Suk

    2010-10-27

    Estimation of the protein levels introduced in a biotechnology-derived product is conducted as part of an overall safety assessment. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyze phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPT II) protein expression in a genetically modified (GM) pepper plant developed in Korea. PAT and NPT II expression levels, based on both dry weight and fresh weight, were variable among different plant generations and plant sections from isolated genetically modified organism (GMO) fields at four developmental stages. PAT expression was highest in leaves at anthesis (11.44 μg/gdw and 2.17 μg/gfw) and lowest in roots (0.12 μg/gdw and 0.01 μg/gfw). NPT II expression was also highest in leaves at anthesis (17.31 μg/gdw and 3.41 μg/gfw) and lowest in red pepper (0.65 μg/gdw and 0.12 μg/gfw). In pollen, PAT expression was 0.59-0.62 μg/gdw, while NPT II was not detected. Both PAT and NPT II showed a general pattern of decreased expression with progression of the growing season. As expected, PAT and NPT II protein expression was not detectable in control pepper plants.

  19. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sumit; Krok, Michael

    2011-02-08

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  20. Phase II: Field Detector Development For Undeclared/Declared Nuclear Testing For Treaty Verfiation Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kriz, M.; Hunter, D.; Riley, T.

    2015-10-02

    Radioactive xenon isotopes are a critical part of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the detection or confirmation of nuclear weapons tests as well as on-site treaty verification monitoring. On-site monitoring is not currently conducted because there are no commercially available small/robust field detector devices to measure the radioactive xenon isotopes. Xenon is an ideal signature to detect clandestine nuclear events since they are difficult to contain and can diffuse and migrate through soils due to their inert nature. There are four key radioxenon isotopes used in monitoring: 135Xe (9 hour half-life), 133mXe (2 day half-life), 133Xe (5 day half-life) and 131mXe (12 day half-life) that decay through beta emission and gamma emission. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a leader in the field of gas collections and has developed highly selective molecular sieves that allow for the collection of xenon gas directly from air. Phase I assessed the development of a small, robust beta-gamma coincidence counting system, that combines collection and in situ detection methodologies. Phase II of the project began development of the custom electronics enabling 2D beta-gamma coincidence analysis in a field portable system. This will be a significant advancement for field detection/quantification of short-lived xenon isotopes that would not survive transport time for laboratory analysis.

  1. Learning Environment and Student Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopland, Arnt O.; Nyhus, Ole Henning

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between satisfaction with learning environment and student effort, both in class and with homework assignments. Design/methodology/approach: The authors use data from a nationwide and compulsory survey to analyze the relationship between learning environment and student effort. The…

  2. A New-Class Antibacterial-Almost. Lessons in Drug Discovery and Development: A Critical Analysis of More than 50 Years of Effort toward ATPase Inhibitors of DNA Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV.

    PubMed

    Bisacchi, Gregory S; Manchester, John I

    2015-01-01

    The introduction into clinical practice of an ATPase inhibitor of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (topo IV) would represent a new-class agent for the treatment of resistant bacterial infections. Novobiocin, the only historical member of this class, established the clinical proof of concept for this novel mechanism during the late 1950s, but its use declined rapidly and it was eventually withdrawn from the market. Despite significant and prolonged effort across the biopharmaceutical industry to develop other agents of this class, novobiocin remains the only ATPase inhibitor of gyrase and topo IV ever to progress beyond Phase I. In this review, we analyze the historical attempts to discover and develop agents within this class and highlight factors that might have hindered those efforts. Within the last 15 years, however, our technical understanding of the molecular details of the inhibition of the gyrase and topo IV ATPases, the factors governing resistance development to such inhibitors, and our knowledge of the physical properties required for robust clinical drug candidates have all matured to the point wherein the industry may now address this mechanism of action with greater confidence. The antibacterial spectrum within this class has recently been extended to begin to include serious Gram negative pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. In spite of this recent technical progress, adverse economics associated with antibacterial R&D over the last 20 years has diminished industry's ability to commit the resources and perseverance needed to bring new-class agents to launch. Consequently, a number of recent efforts in the ATPase class have been derailed by organizational rather than scientific factors. Nevertheless, within this context we discuss the unique opportunity for the development of ATPase inhibitors of gyrase and topo IV as new-class antibacterial agents with broad spectrum potential. PMID

  3. Interfering polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII/STX mRNA inhibits neurite growth during early hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Brocco, Marcela A; Frasch, Alberto C C

    2006-08-21

    Polysialic acid (PSA) attached to NCAM is involved in cell-cell interactions participating in structural and functional plasticity of neuronal circuits. Two polysialyltransferases, ST8SiaII/STX and ST8SiaIV/PST, polysialylate NCAM. We previously suggested that ST8SiaII/STX is the key enzyme for polysialylation in hippocampus. Here, polysialyltransferase mRNA interference experiments showed that, knock down of ST8SiaIV/PST transcripts did not affect PSA expression, but PSA was almost absent from neuronal surfaces when ST8SiaII/STX mRNA was interfered. Non-polysialylated neurons bore a similar number of neurites per cell than polysialylated neurons. However, non-polysialylated processes were shorter and a lower density of synaptophysin clusters accompanied this reduced neuritic growth. Therefore, ST8SiaII/STX expression is essential to allow a correct neuritic development at initial stages of hippocampus ontogeny.

  4. Development of a Tender-Energy Microprobe for Geosciences at NSLS and NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, Paul A.

    2014-08-30

    We propose to develop a tender-energy (1-8 keV operational range, optimized for 1-5 keV) X-ray microprobe, to bring the functionality and scientific benefits of hard (>5 keV) X-ray microprobes to a largely untapped domain of lighter, geologically-important elements. This proposal seeks to extend and enhance user-facility capabilities particularly optimized for research in Geosciences. This will be accomplished through development and implementation of unique new synchrotron instrumentation for high-performance microspectroscopy and imaging in the distinctive tender energy range. This new user facility at Beamline X15B at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) will benefit the specific Earth Science research programs described in this proposal, and will be available for use by the broader community through the merit-based General User program and through the User Cooperative that operates X15B. Its development will provide immediate benefit to regional and national Earth Science research conducted at the NSLS. It will achieve even higher performance at the Tender Energy Spectroscopy (TES) Beamline at NSLS-II, a new state-of-the-art synchrotron under construction and scheduled to begin operation in 2014. Project Objectives: Our goals are threefold: 1. Develop superlative capabilities to extend hard X-ray microprobe functionality and ease of use to the tender energy range. 2. Bring high-performance XAS (including full EXAFS) to the micron scale, over the range of 1-8 keV. 3. Deliver high flux and element sensitivity for geoscience applications. Our user facility will be designed and optimized for tender-energy microbeam applications and techniques for Earth Science research, including XRF imaging and high-quality extended XAS. Its key attributes will be an energy range of 1 to 8 keV, user-tunable spot size ranging from 40x14 to 3x2 μm, high flux up to 2x1011 photons/s, beam positional stability and energy calibration stability optimized for high-quality and

  5. Membrane/distillation hybrid process research and development. Final report, phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Mazanec, T.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report covers work conducted under the grant awarded to BP by DOE in late 1991 entitled {open_quotes}Membrane/Distillation Hybrid Process Research and Development.{close_quotes} The program was directed towards development and commercialization of the BP process for separation of vapor phase olefins from non-olefins via facilitated transport using an aqueous facilitator. The program has come to a very successful conclusion, with formation of a partnership between BP and Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) to market and commercialize the technology. The focus of this report is the final portion of the program, during which engineering re-design, facilitator optimization, economic analysis, and marketing have been the primary activities. At the end of Phase II BP was looking to partner with an engineering firm to advance the selective olefin recovery (SOR) technology from the lab/demo stage to full commercialization. In August 1995 BP and SWEC reached an agreement to advance the technology by completing additional Phase III work with DOE and beginning marketing activities.

  6. Iron(II) sulfate release from drop-formed lipophilic matrices developed by special hot-melt technology.

    PubMed

    Pallagi, E; Vass, K; Pintye-Hódi, K; Kása, P; Falkay, G; Eros, I; Szabó-Révész, P

    2004-03-01

    Iron(II) sulfate-containing lipophilic matrices were developed by a special hot-melt technology (melt solidification in drops), using stearin, white wax and their mixture as conventional bed materials. The special technology resulted in spherical particles which can be filled directly into capsules; these store iron as a depot and ensure a slow and uniform release, whereby the irritation of the gastric mucosa by the iron can be decreased. The rates of dissolution of the iron(II) sulfate from the various lipophilic matrices were different, but fundamentally low. Kinetic calculations demonstrated that the rate of dissolution of the iron(II) sulfate was of approximately zero kinetic order. The results of in vivo experiments on rabbits correlated well with the in vitro data. The plasma curves for the animals treated with the iron(II) sulfate preparations varied with the excipients in the depot products. The properties and ratio of the bed materials influenced the release of the iron(II) sulfate. In all probability, the release of the active agent can be regulated through the use of a melt of stearin and white wax in different ratios. The development products functioned as a sustained-release system and ensured elimination of the irritation of the gastric mucosa. At the same time, the results justified the applicability of the special hot-melt technology in the development of the solid dosage form. PMID:15018986

  7. The Mathematics Education I and II Courses' Effect on Teacher Candidates' Development of Number Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaman, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the number sense performance of the classroom teacher candidates taking the Mathematics Education I and II courses. Moreover, it investigates whether there is a change in the number sense performance of the teacher candidates following the Mathematics Education I and II courses. Embedded experimental…

  8. SERVER DEVELOPMENT FOR NSLS-II PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Kraimer, M.

    2011-03-28

    The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. The server software under development is available via an open source sourceforge project named epics-pvdata, which consists of modules pvData, pvAccess, pvIOC, and pvService. Examples of two services that already exist in the pvService module are itemFinder, and gather. Each service uses pvData to store in-memory transient data, pvService to transfer data over the network, and pvIOC as the service engine. The performance benchmarking for pvAccess and both gather service and item finder service are presented in this paper. The performance comparison between pvAccess and Channel Access are presented also. For an ultra low emittance synchrotron radiation light source like NSLS II, the control system requirements, especially for beam control are tight. To control and manipulate the beam effectively, a use case study has been performed to satisfy the requirement and theoretical evaluation has been performed. The analysis shows that model based control is indispensable for beam commissioning and routine operation. However, there are many challenges such as how to re-use a design model for on-line model based control, and how to combine the numerical methods for modeling of a realistic lattice with the analytical techniques for analysis of its properties. To satisfy the requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture for the software framework for beam commissioning and operation is critical. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating and plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service

  9. EA Shuttle Document Retention Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effort of code EA at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to identify and acquire databases and documents from the space shuttle program that are adjudged important for retention after the retirement of the space shuttle.

  10. Contextualizing Earth Science Professional Development Courses for Geoscience Teachers in Boston: Earth Science II (Solid Earth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, M. S.; Kamerer, B.; Vugrin, M.; Miller, M.

    2009-12-01

    Earth Science II: The Solid Earth -- Earth History and Planetary Science -- is the second of two Earth Science courses, and one of eleven graduate level science Contextualized Content Courses (CCC), that have been developed by the Boston Science Partnership as part of an NSF-funded Math Science Partnership program. A core goal of these courses is to provide high level science content to middle and high school teachers while modeling good instructional practices directly tied to the Boston Public Schools and Massachusetts science curriculum frameworks. All of these courses emphasize hands-on, lab-based, inquiry-driven, student-centered lessons. The Earth Science II team aimed to strictly adhere to ABC (Activity Before Concept) and 5E/7E models of instruction, and limited lecture or teacher-centered instruction to the later “Explanation” stages of all lessons. We also introduced McNeill and Krajick’s Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER) model of scientific explanation for middle school classroom discourse, both as a powerful scaffold leading to higher levels of accountable talk in the classroom, and to model science as a social construct. Daily evaluations, dutifully filled out by the course participants and diligently read by the course instructors, were quite useful in adapting instruction to the needs of the class on a real-time basis. We find the structure of the CCC teaching teams - university-based faculty providing expert content knowledge, K-12-based faculty providing age appropriate pedagogies and specific links to the K-12 curriculum - quite a fruitful, two-way collaboration. From the students’ perspective, one of the most useful takeaways from the university-based faculty was “listening to experts model out loud how they reason,” whereas some of the more practical takeaways (i.e., lesson components directly portable to the classroom?) came from the K-12-based faculty. The main takeaways from the course as a whole were the promise to bring more hands

  11. VaxCelerate II: rapid development of a self-assembling vaccine for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Pierre; Moise, Leonard; Luza, Cybelle; Chantaralawan, Kanawat; Lezeau, Lynchy; Yuan, Jianping; Field, Mary; Richer, Daniel; Boyle, Christine; Martin, William D; Fishman, Jordan B; Berg, Eric A; Baker, David; Zeigler, Brandon; Mais, Dale E; Taylor, William; Coleman, Russell; Warren, H Shaw; Gelfand, Jeffrey A; De Groot, Anne S; Brauns, Timothy; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective vaccines against emerging infectious diseases (EID) can take as much or more than a decade to progress from pathogen isolation/identification to clinical approval. As a result, conventional approaches fail to produce field-ready vaccines before the EID has spread extensively. Lassa is a prototypical emerging infectious disease endemic to West Africa for which no successful vaccine is available. We established the VaxCelerate Consortium to address the need for more rapid vaccine development by creating a platform capable of generating and pre-clinically testing a new vaccine against specific pathogen targets in less than 120 d A self-assembling vaccine is at the core of the approach. It consists of a fusion protein composed of the immunostimulatory Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock protein 70 (MtbHSP70) and the biotin binding protein, avidin. Mixing the resulting protein (MAV) with biotinylated pathogen-specific immunogenic peptides yields a self-assembled vaccine (SAV). To meet the time constraint imposed on this project, we used a distributed R&D model involving experts in the fields of protein engineering and production, bioinformatics, peptide synthesis/design and GMP/GLP manufacturing and testing standards. SAV immunogenicity was first tested using H1N1 influenza specific peptides and the entire VaxCelerate process was then tested in a mock live-fire exercise targeting Lassa fever virus. We demonstrated that the Lassa fever vaccine induced significantly increased class II peptide specific interferon-γ CD4(+) T cell responses in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice compared to peptide or MAV alone controls. We thereby demonstrated that our SAV in combination with a distributed development model may facilitate accelerated regulatory review by using an identical design for each vaccine and by applying safety and efficacy assessment tools that are more relevant to human vaccine responses than current animal models.

  12. Combinatorial Development of Water Splitting Catalysts Based on the Oxygen Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, Neal

    2010-03-31

    The use of methods to create large arrays of potential catalysts for the reaction H2O ½ O2 + 2H+ on the anode of an electrolysis system were investigated. This reaction is half of the overall reaction involved in the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. This method consisted of starting with an array of electrodes and developing patterned electrochemical approaches for creating a different, defined peptide at each position in the array. Methods were also developed for measuring the rate of reaction at each point in the array. In this way, the goal was to create and then tests many thousands of possible catalysts simultaneously. This type of approach should lead to an ability to optimize catalytic activity systematically, by iteratively designing and testing new libraries of catalysts. Optimization is important to decrease energy losses (over-potentials) associated with the water splitting reaction and thus for the generation of hydrogen. Most of the efforts in this grant period were focused on developing the chemistry and analytical methods required to create pattern peptide formation either using a photolithography approach or an electrochemical approach for dictating the positions of peptide bond formation. This involved testing a large number of different reactions and conditions. We have been able to find conditions that have allowed us to pattern peptide bond formation on both glass slides using photolithographic methods and on electrode arrays made by the company Combimatrix. Part of this effort involved generating novel approaches for performing mass spectroscopy directly from the patterned arrays. We have also been able to demonstrate the ability to measure current at each electrode due to electrolysis of water. This was performed with customized instrumentation created in collaboration with Combimatrix. In addition, several different molecular designs for peptides that bound metals (primarily Mn) were developed and synthesized and metal

  13. Orthopedic coordination of dentofacial development in skeletal Class II malocclusion in conjunction with edgewise therapy. Part I.

    PubMed

    Bass, N M

    1983-11-01

    The skeletal Class II malocclusion may be considered to develop as a failure of the coordinating process to maintain harmonious relationships within the developing dentofacial apparatus. If the skeletal elements are too far apart for adaptation to occur and/or if there are functional abnormalities of the orofacial musculature which inhibit coordination from taking place, a malocclusion will result. An orthopedic technique and appliance system has been developed with the intention of improving those factors responsible for the development and perpetuation of the skeletal Class II malocclusion in a primary stage of treatment. This is accomplished by means of restraint and redirection of forward maxillary growth and an increase in the velocity of mandibular growth. Concurrently, adverse soft-tissue influences are eliminated or ameliorated. Edgewise appliance therapy is subsequently carried out for the final correction. The subject is considered in two articles. This first article describes the effects of the restraint of maxillary growth on craniofacial development and the dental changes produced by a maxillary removable splint with extraoral traction and shows how they can be used clinically for correction of the skeletal Class II malocclusion. The experimental and clinical evidence supporting this approach is considered, and case histories show the clinical use of the maxillary splint. This form of maxillary therapy for the skeletal Class II malocclusion has limitations, and it is desirable for it to be incorporated into a comprehensive orthopedic system.

  14. Mice lacking glutamate carboxypeptidase II develop normally, but are less susceptible to traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Xu, Siyi; Cui, Zhenwen; Zhang, Mingkun; Lin, Yingying; Cai, Lei; Wang, Zhugang; Luo, Xingguang; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Yong; Luo, Qizhong; Jiang, Jiyao; Neale, Joseph H; Zhong, Chunlong

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) is a transmembrane zinc metallopeptidase found mainly in the nervous system, prostate and small intestine. In the nervous system, glia-bound GCPII mediates the hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) into glutamate and N-acetylaspartate. Inhibition of GCPII has been shown to attenuate excitotoxicity associated with enhanced glutamate transmission under pathological conditions. However, different strains of mice lacking the GCPII gene are reported to exhibit striking phenotypic differences. In this study, a GCPII gene knockout (KO) strategy involved removing exons 3-5 of GCPII. This generated a new GCPII KO mice line with no overt differences in standard neurological behavior compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. However, GCPII KO mice were significantly less susceptible to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). GCPII gene KO significantly lessened neuronal degeneration and astrocyte damage in the CA2 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus 24 h after moderate TBI. In addition, GCPII gene KO reduced TBI-induced deficits in long-term spatial learning/memory tested in the Morris water maze and motor balance tested via beam walking. Knockout of the GCPII gene is not embryonic lethal and affords histopathological protection with improved long-term behavioral outcomes after TBI, a result that further validates GCPII as a target for drug development consistent with results from studies using GCPII peptidase inhibitors. PMID:25872793

  15. Staff nurse empowerment and effort-reward imbalance.

    PubMed

    Kluska, Kinga M; Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Kerr, Michael S

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an expanded model of Rosabeth Moss Kanter's Structural Theory of Organizational Behaviour (Kanter 1977; Laschinger, Finegan, Shamian and Wilk 2001) by examining the relationship between nurses' empowerment and their perceptions of effort-reward imbalance (Siegrist 1996). A sample of 112 staff nurses employed in teaching hospitals in Ontario participated in this study (58% return rate). A descriptive correlational survey design was used to collect data by eLiciting responses to five self-report instruments: the Conditions of Work Effectiveness II, the Job Activities Scale II, and the Organizational Relationships Scale II (Laschinger, Finegan, Shamian and Wilk 2001), the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) scale (Siegrist and Peter 1999a) and a demographic questionnaire. Staff nurses were only moderately empowered, and 24.1% perceived their work to have more efforts than rewards, according to Siegrist's guidelines.

  16. Staff nurse empowerment and effort-reward imbalance.

    PubMed

    Kluska, Kinga M; Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Kerr, Michael S

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an expanded model of Rosabeth Moss Kanter's Structural Theory of Organizational Behaviour (Kanter 1977; Laschinger, Finegan, Shamian and Wilk 2001) by examining the relationship between nurses' empowerment and their perceptions of effort-reward imbalance (Siegrist 1996). A sample of 112 staff nurses employed in teaching hospitals in Ontario participated in this study (58% return rate). A descriptive correlational survey design was used to collect data by eLiciting responses to five self-report instruments: the Conditions of Work Effectiveness II, the Job Activities Scale II, and the Organizational Relationships Scale II (Laschinger, Finegan, Shamian and Wilk 2001), the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) scale (Siegrist and Peter 1999a) and a demographic questionnaire. Staff nurses were only moderately empowered, and 24.1% perceived their work to have more efforts than rewards, according to Siegrist's guidelines. PMID:15503922

  17. Development of advanced blanket performance under irradiation and system integration through JUPITER-II project

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Katsunori; Kohyama, Akira; Tanaka, Satoru; Namba, C.; Terai, T.; Kunugi, T.; Muroga, Takeo; Hasegawa, Akira; Sagara, A.; Berk, S.; Zinkle, Steven J.; Sze, Dai Kai; Petti, D. A.; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Morley, Neil B.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Snead, Lance L.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes an outline of the activities of the JUPITER-II collaboration (japan-USA program of Irradiation/Integration test for Fusion Research-II), Which has bee carried out through six years (2001-2006) under Phase 4 of the collabroation implemented by Amendment 4 of Annex 1 to the DOE (United States Department of Energy)-MEXT (Ministry of Education ,Culture,Sports,Science and Technology) Cooperation. This program followed the RTNS-II Program (Phase1:1982-4986), the FFTF/MOTA Program (Phase2:1987-1994) and the JUPITER Program (Phase 3: 1995-2000) [1].

  18. Developmental Screenings in Rural Settings: A Comparison of the Child Development Review and the Denver II Developmental Screening Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brachlow, Allison; Jordan, Augustus E.; Tervo, Raymond

    2001-01-01

    Two developmental screening tests were applied to 73 children, aged 1 month-6.7 years, in Sioux Falls and the Cheyenne River Reservation (South Dakota). There were no racial differences; compared to urban children, rural reservation children of any race were more likely to pass the Child Development Review and to fail the Denver II Developmental…

  19. A Standardized Certification Program for Case Managers Serving Frail Elderly Texans. Module II: Assessment and Care Plan Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusky, Richard A.; And Others

    This learning module is one of three training modules that were developed for members of the Texas Gerontological Consortium for Continuing Education to use in preparing case managers working in human service professions coordinating community-based programs for frail elderly Texans. Module II deals with the following topics: assessment (role of…

  20. Dopamine, Behavioral Economics, and Effort

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M.; Nunes, Eric J.; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders. PMID:19826615

  1. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders. PMID:19826615

  2. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders.

  3. Overview of EDSP Tier II Larval Amphibian Growth and Development Assay histopathology and statistics

    EPA Science Inventory

    These presentations are meant to provide expert pathologists and statisticians with background information on the Tier II LAGDA design. Expert pathologists at this workshop are charged with providing guidance on histopathology considerations unique to the LAGDA. Expert statisti...

  4. Facets of job effort in bus driver health: deconstructing "effort" in the effort-reward imbalance model.

    PubMed

    Tse, John L M; Flin, Rhona; Mearns, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    This research aimed to test the relative value of developing and using job-specific facets of effort and testing them using J. Siegrist's (1996) effort-reward imbalance (ERI) theory to extend understanding of how one might determine job strain in urban bus driving. In addition, the interactive effects of the ERI model are further investigated to address the lack of research into the relationships of the model's constructs. Using focus groups and published papers, a measure of bus driver effort was created, which was subsequently completed by 186 male U.K. bus drivers as part of a questionnaire study. The results were factor analyzed to create 4 facets of effort, which demonstrated additional variance in predicting strain, above and beyond J. Siegrist's original effort construct. One facet, workload and fatigue, was observed to be a particularly important contributor to strain. The analyses further indicated that the ERI model's assumptions that ERI creates job strain could not be completely upheld, although poorer levels of reward and higher levels of overcommitment were strong main predictors of job strain. Research and applied implications are considered.

  5. Peer Victimization and Effortful Control

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Roopa V.; Kochenderfer-Ladd, Becky; Eisenberg, Nancy; Thompson, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    The relations among peer victimization, effortful control, school engagement, and academic achievement were examined in a group of 390 (212 boys and 178 girls) racially diverse (38.20% Latino and 46.70% White) 6- to 10-year-old children. Specifically, a multimethod, multi-informant approach was used in which data were gathered using self-report, peer-report, and teacher-report questionnaires at three points in time: twice during the initial year of the study when children were in first and third grades and once in the fall of their second-grade and fourth-grade years, respectively. Findings showed that peer victimization was negatively correlated with effortful control; however, longitudinal analyses conducted to examine causal priority were inconclusive. Results from structural equation modeling were consistent with the hypotheses that school engagement mediated the relations between peer victimization and academic achievement, as well as between effortful control and academic achievement. PMID:23105166

  6. Effort thrombosis: recognition and management while underway.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P B; MacGillivray, D C; Almond, M D

    1991-10-01

    Effort thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian veins is an uncommon cause of upper extremity swelling. Prompt recognition and treatment of this disorder is important in order to minimize the complications of pulmonary embolism and postphlebitic syndrome that can occur with this condition. This can be very challenging while underway or in the field. A sailor who developed effort vein thrombosis while underway on board the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln is presented to review the presentation and management of this disorder, particularly as it applies to active duty military personnel.

  7. Class I and class II major histocompatibility molecules play a role in bone marrow-derived macrophage development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Simske, S. J.; Beharka, A. A.; Balch, S.; Luttges, M. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play significant roles in T cell development and immune function. We show that MHCI- and MHCII-deficient mice have low numbers of macrophage precursors and circulating monocytes, as well as abnormal bone marrow cell colony-stimulating factor type 1 secretion and bone composition. We suggest that MHCI and MHCII molecules play a significant role in macrophage development.

  8. Endocardial Cushion Morphogenesis and Coronary Vessel Development Require Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter-Transcription Factor II

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fu-Jung; You, Li-Ru; Yu, Cheng-Tai; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Tsai, Sophia Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Septal defects and coronary vessel anomalies are common congenital heart defects, yet their ontogeny and the underlying genetic mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII, NR2F2) in cardiac organogenesis. Methods and Results We analyzed embryos deficient in COUP-TFII and observed a spectrum of cardiac defects, including atrioventricular septal defect, thin-walled myocardium, and abnormal coronary morphogenesis. We show by expression analysis that COUP-TFII is expressed in the endocardium and the epicardium but not in the myocardium of the ventricle. Using endothelial-specific COUP-TFII mutants and molecular approaches, we show that COUP-TFII deficiency resulted in endocardial cushion hypoplasia. This was attributed to the reduced growth and survival of atrioventricular cushion mesenchymal cells and defective epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) in the underlying endocardium. In addition, the endocardial EMT defect was accompanied by downregulation of Snai1, one of the master regulators of EMT, and upregulation of vascular endothelial-cadherin. Furthermore, we show that although COUP-TFII does not play a major role in the formation of epicardial cell cysts, it is critically important for the formation of epicardium. Ablation of COUP-TFII impairs epicardial EMT and coronary plexus formation. Conclusion Our results reveal that COUP-TFII plays cell-autonomous roles in the endocardium and the epicardium for endocardial and epicardial EMT, which are required for proper valve and coronary vessel formation during heart development. PMID:22962329

  9. Palmitoylethanolamide and luteolin ameliorate development of arthritis caused by injection of collagen type II in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) is an endogenous fatty acid amide belonging to the family of the N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). Recently, several studies demonstrated that PEA is an important analgesic, antiinflammatory, and neuroprotective mediator. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin formulation on the modulation of the inflammatory response in mice subjected to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods CIA was induced by an intradermally injection of 100 μl of the emulsion (containing 100 μg of bovine type II collagen (CII)) and complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) at the base of the tail. On day 21, a second injection of CII in CFA was administered. Mice subjected to CIA were administered PEA (10 mg/kg 10% ethanol, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) or co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) every 24 hours, starting from day 25 to 35. Results Mice developed erosive hind-paw arthritis when immunized with CII in CFA. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA first appeared as periarticular erythema and edema in the hindpaws. The incidence of CIA was 100% by day 28 in the CII-challenged mice, and the severity of CIA progressed over a 35-day period with a resorption of bone. The histopathology of CIA included erosion of the cartilage at the joint. Treatment with PEA or PEA + luteolin ameliorated the clinical signs at days 26 to 35 and improved histologic status in the joint and paw. The degree of oxidative and nitrosative damage was significantly reduced in PEA + luteolin-treated mice, as indicated by nitrotyrosine and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were significantly reduced by PEA + luteolin treatment. Conclusions We demonstrated that PEA co-ultramicronized with luteolin exerts an antiinflammatory effect during chronic inflammation and ameliorates CIA. PMID:24246048

  10. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown reduces testis size and decreases testosterone secretion during pubertal development in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second mammalian isoform of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-II) functions quite differently from the classical form (GnRH-I) as it is a poor stimulator of gonadotropin release. Unlike most species, a functional GnRHR-II has been identified in swine. Our laboratory detected GnRHR-IIs on Leyd...

  11. Test Anxiety and Effort-Toward-Comprehension in Sentence Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedl, John J., Jr.; Bartlett, James

    Using an effort toward comprehension paradigm developed by P. M. Auble, J. J. Franks, and S. A. Soraci, Jr. (1979), the worry component of state test anxiety was related to long-term memory for sentence encoding conditions that involved comprehension, but low effort (embedded-cue) and comprehension-high effort (post-cue). A noncomprehension…

  12. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part II: Becoming an Entrepreneur. Unit A: Developing the Business Plan. Research and Development Series No. 194 B-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the seven instructional units in Part II is establishing a business. Unit A focuses on developing a business…

  13. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2005-10-14

    The commercialization path of the Calderon technology for making a feedstock for steelmaking with assistance from DOE initially focused on making coke and work was done which proved that the Calderon technology is capable of making good coke for hard driving blast furnaces. U.S. Steel which participated in such demonstration felt that the Calderon technology would be more meaningful in lowering the costs of making steel by adapting it to the making of iron--thus obviating the need for coke. U.S. Steel and Calderon teamed up to jointly work together to demonstrate that the Calderon technology will produce in a closed system iron units from iron concentrate (ore) and coal competitively by eliminating pelletizing, sintering, coking and blast furnace operation. If such process steps could be eliminated, a huge reduction in polluting emissions and greenhouse gases (including CO{sub 2}) relating to steelmaking would ensue. Such reduction will restructure the steel industry away from the very energy-intensive steelmaking steps currently practiced and drastically reduce costs of making steel. The development of a technology to lower U.S. steelmaking costs and become globally competitive is a priority of major importance. Therefore, the development work which Calderon is conducting presently under this Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy becomes more crucial than ever. During the 3rd quarter of 2005 which the present report covers, virtually all the effort to advance the Calderon technology to make iron units was concentrated towards forming a team with a steelmaker who needs both iron units in the form of hot metal and a substitute for natural gas (SNG), both being major contributors to higher costs in steelmaking. Calderon felt that a very good candidate would be Steel Dynamics (SDI) by virtue that it operates a rotary hearth facility in Butler, Indiana that uses large amounts of natural gas to reduce briquettes made from ore and coal that they subsequently melt

  14. How to improve the clinical development paradigm and its division into phases I, II and III.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, Marion; Moore, Nicholas; Lechat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    of improvement of the medical benefit (ASMR) [level II/III or IV/V]. Such requests mainly concern uncertainties regarding the transposability, the patient profile or correct usage in real life. Among the studies whose results were provided, in 15 cases the results were in line with expectations, in 6 cases they resulted in downward re-evaluations and the final 3 cases were inconclusive. The final recommendations of the round table were: Defining the medical need that is not covered by working in consultation (Industry and Health Authorities); Providing a Complementary Investigations Plan (PIC) after the MA at a very early stage to reinforce the early MA, and/or HTA (health technology assessment) preparation and monitoring (possible constraining actions); Enhanced use of modelling techniques and their transposability; "Intussusception" of phases to optimise the development of a complete dossier; Early "scientific opinions" (EMA, French Health Products Safety Agency [Afssaps], French Health Authority [HAS]); Raising the awareness of the authorities, industry, doctors and patients with regard to controlled observational studies; Developing the use of public data bases. PMID:21851796

  15. How to improve the clinical development paradigm and its division into phases I, II and III.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, Marion; Moore, Nicholas; Lechat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    of improvement of the medical benefit (ASMR) [level II/III or IV/V]. Such requests mainly concern uncertainties regarding the transposability, the patient profile or correct usage in real life. Among the studies whose results were provided, in 15 cases the results were in line with expectations, in 6 cases they resulted in downward re-evaluations and the final 3 cases were inconclusive. The final recommendations of the round table were: Defining the medical need that is not covered by working in consultation (Industry and Health Authorities); Providing a Complementary Investigations Plan (PIC) after the MA at a very early stage to reinforce the early MA, and/or HTA (health technology assessment) preparation and monitoring (possible constraining actions); Enhanced use of modelling techniques and their transposability; "Intussusception" of phases to optimise the development of a complete dossier; Early "scientific opinions" (EMA, French Health Products Safety Agency [Afssaps], French Health Authority [HAS]); Raising the awareness of the authorities, industry, doctors and patients with regard to controlled observational studies; Developing the use of public data bases.

  16. Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockout strains enable functional analysis of genes required for cyst development and latent infection.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Falla, Alejandra; Rommereim, Leah M; Tomita, Tadakimi; Gigley, Jason P; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Weiss, Louis M; Bzik, David J

    2011-09-01

    Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts (Δku80) deficient in nonhomologous end joining were developed to delete the dominant pathway mediating random integration of targeting episomes. Gene targeting frequency in the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain measured at the orotate (OPRT) and the uracil (UPRT) phosphoribosyltransferase loci was highly efficient. To assess the potential of the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain to examine gene function affecting cyst biology and latent stages of infection, we targeted the deletion of four parasite antigen genes (GRA4, GRA6, ROP7, and tgd057) that encode characterized CD8(+) T cell epitopes that elicit corresponding antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell populations associated with control of infection. Cyst development in these type II mutant strains was not found to be strictly dependent on antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell host responses. In contrast, a significant biological role was revealed for the dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 in cyst development since brain tissue cyst burdens were drastically reduced specifically in mutant strains with GRA4 and/or GRA6 deleted. Complementation of the Δgra4 and Δgra6 mutant strains using a functional allele of the deleted GRA coding region placed under the control of the endogenous UPRT locus was found to significantly restore brain cyst burdens. These results reveal that GRA proteins play a functional role in establishing cyst burdens and latent infection. Collectively, our results suggest that a type II Δku80 Δhxgprt genetic background enables a higher-throughput functional analysis of the parasite genome to reveal fundamental aspects of parasite biology controlling virulence, pathogenesis, and transmission.

  17. Predicting outcome after traumatic brain injury: development of prognostic scores based on the IMPACT and the APACHE II.

    PubMed

    Raj, Rahul; Siironen, Jari; Kivisaari, Riku; Hernesniemi, Juha; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2014-10-15

    Prediction models are important tools for heterogeneity adjustment in clinical trials and for the evaluation of quality of delivered care to patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We sought to improve the predictive performance of the IMPACT (International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials) prognostic model by combining it with the APACHE II (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II) for 6-month outcome prediction in patients with TBI treated in the intensive care unit. A total of 890 patients with TBI admitted to a large urban level 1 trauma center in 2009-2012 comprised the study population. The IMPACT and the APACHE II scores were combined using binary logistic regression. A randomized, split-sample technique with secondary bootstrapping was used for model development and internal validation. Model performance was assessed by discrimination (by area under the curve [AUC]), calibration, precision, and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Overall 6-month mortality was 22% and unfavorable neurological outcome 47%. The predictive power of the new combined IMPACT-APACHE II models was significantly superior, compared to the original IMPACT models (AUC, 0.81-0.82 vs. 0.84-0.85; p<0.05) for 6-month mortality prediction, but not for unfavorable outcome prediction (AUC, 0.81-0.82 vs. 0.83; p>0.05). However, NRI showed a significant improvement in risk stratification of patients with unfavorable outcome by the IMPACT-APACHE II models, compared to the original models (NRI, 5.4-23.2%; p<0.05). Internal validation using split-sample and resample bootstrap techniques yielded equivalent results, indicating low grade of overestimation. Our findings show that by combining the APACHE II with the IMPACT, improved 6-month outcome predictive performance is achieved. This may be applicable for heterogeneity adjustment in forthcoming TBI studies.

  18. The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort (TAME) is an agile enterprising demonstration sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The project experimented with new approaches to product realization and assessed their impacts on performance, cost, flow time, and agility. The purpose of the project was to design the electrical and mechanical features of an integrated telemetry processor, establish the manufacturing processes, and produce an initial production lot of two to six units. This paper outlines the major methodologies utilized by the TAME, describes the accomplishments that can be attributed to each methodology, and finally, examines the lessons learned and explores the opportunities for improvement associated with the overall effort. The areas for improvement are discussed relative to an ideal vision of the future for agile enterprises. By the end of the experiment, the TAME reduced production flow time by approximately 50% and life cycle cost by more than 30%. Product performance was improved compared with conventional DOE production approaches.

  19. The Development of Secondary Education in Japan after World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okuda, Shinjo; Hishimura, Yukihiko

    Under Allied influence following World War II, the Japanese educational system was reorganized on a 6-3-3 basis, with the first 9 years compulsory. The lower secondary curriculum established in 1947 included many compulsory subjects--Japanese, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, Music, Drawing and Fine Arts, Physical Education, and Vocational…

  20. Two Studies of Tier II Literacy Development: Throwing Sixth Graders a Lifeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Anne W.; Duesbery, Luke; Pyle, Nicole B.; Brandon, Regina R.; McIntosh, Angela S.

    2011-01-01

    Two experimental studies at one urban middle school investigated the effects of the combination of Tier I and Tier II evidence-based reading instruction compared to Tier I alone on struggling sixth-grade readers (N = 109). All participants received free or reduced-price lunch, and 95% were considered English learners at some point in their school…

  1. We the Teachers: Impact II Catalog of Teacher-Developed Projects 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, NY.

    IMPACT II was created in 1979 to reward and recognize creative New York City public school teachers. Through its teacher-to-teacher network, successful projects are replicated. This catalog is a collection of profiles describing 52 exemplary projects. The profiles are organized by subject area and then divided by grade level into the following…

  2. [Interconnection of the angiopathy and neuropathy development mechanism at patients with type II pancreatic diabetes].

    PubMed

    Saltykov, B B; Zinov'eva, O E

    2012-01-01

    In the article we summarized literature data, covered genesis of angiopathy and neuropathy at patients with type II diabetes. In the genesis of disease different metabolic, immune, hypoxic, genetic and others factors, caused affection of arteries, microcirculation and the peripheral nervous system, play an important role. Increasing changes of the great and minute vessels are interconnected with diabetic neuropathy

  3. Design of Studies for Development of BPA Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Accounting Policy Phase II, Volume II, 1985-1988 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kneese, Allen V.

    1988-08-01

    The incremental costs of corrective measures to lessen the environmental impacts of the hydroelectric system are expected to increase and difficult questions to arise about the costs, effectiveness, and justification of alternative measures and their systemwide implications. The BPA anticipate this situation by launching a forward-looking research program aimed at providing methodological tools and data suitable for estimating the productivity and cost implications of mitigation alternatives in a timely manner with state-of-the-art accuracy. Resources for the Future (RFF) agreed at the request of the BPA to develop a research program which would provide an analytical system designed to assist the BPA Administrator and other interested and responsible parties in evaluating the ecological and economic aspects of alternative protection, enhancement, and mitigation measures. While this progression from an ecological understanding to cost-effectiveness analyses is straightforward in concept, the complexities of the Columbia River system make the development of analytical methods far from simple in practice. The Phase 2 final report outlines the technical issues involved in developing an analytical system and proposes a program of research to address these issues. The report is presented in the Summary Report (Volume 1), and the present volume which consists of three technical reports: Part I, Modeling the Salmon and Steelhead Fisheries of the Columbia River Basin; Part II, Models for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis; and Part III, Ocean Fisheries Harvest Management.

  4. Development of nonfibrotic left ventricular hypertrophy in an ANG II-induced chronic ovine hypertension model.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Niklas; Scherschel, Katharina; Schad, Claudia; Lau, Denise; Reitmeier, Aline; Kuklik, Pawel; Muellerleile, Kai; Yamamura, Jin; Zeller, Tanja; Steven, Daniel; Baldus, Stephan; Schäffer, Benjamin; Jungen, Christiane; Eickholt, Christian; Wassilew, Katharina; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Willems, Stephan; Meyer, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for many cardiovascular diseases and leads to subsequent concomitant pathologies such as left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Translational approaches using large animals get more important as they allow the use of standard clinical procedures in an experimental setting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a minimally invasive ovine hypertension model using chronic angiotensin II (ANG II) treatment and to characterize its effects on cardiac remodeling after 8 weeks. Sheep were implanted with osmotic minipumps filled with either vehicle control (n = 7) or ANG II (n = 9) for 8 weeks. Mean arterial blood pressure in the ANG II-treated group increased from 87.4 ± 5.3 to 111.8 ± 6.9 mmHg (P = 0.00013). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging showed an increase in left ventricular mass from 112 ± 12.6 g to 131 ± 18.7 g after 7 weeks (P = 0.0017). This was confirmed by postmortem measurement of left ventricular wall thickness which was higher in ANG II-treated animals compared to the control group (18 ± 4 mm vs. 13 ± 2 mm, respectively, P = 0.002). However, ANG II-treated sheep did not reveal any signs of fibrosis or inflammatory infiltrates as defined by picrosirius red and H&E staining on myocardial full thickness paraffin sections of both atria and ventricles. Measurements of plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α were inconspicuous in all animals. Furthermore, multielectrode surface mapping of the heart did not show any differences in epicardial conduction velocity and heterogeneity. These data demonstrate that chronic ANG II treatment using osmotic minipumps presents a reliable, minimally invasive approach to establish hypertension and nonfibrotic LVH in sheep. PMID:27613823

  5. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Thomas James

    2014-10-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed effective fiducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection sufficient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125--128 were analyzed for the first time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel "mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have significant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them difficult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent fiducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for

  6. Highly sensitive sensing of zinc(II) by development and characterization of a PVC-based fluorescent chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksuner, Nur; Henden, Emur; Yenigul, Berrin; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Cukurovali, Alaaddin

    2011-03-01

    A sensor membrane with excellent performance based on 1-methyl-1-phenyl-3-[1-hydroxyimino-2-(succinimido)ethyl]cyclobutane has been developed for the determination of zinc(II) ions. The sensing membrane is capable of determining zinc(II) with an outstanding high selectivity over a dynamic range between 8.0 × 10 -8 and 1.6 × 10 -4 mol L -1 with a limit of detection of 2.5 × 10 -8 mol L -1 (1.6 μg L -1). It can be easily and completely regenerated by using 0.1 mol L -1 EDTA solution. The optical sensor developed here was found to be stable, cost effective, easy to prepare, and has unique selectivity towards Zn 2+ ion with respect to common metal ions. The proposed sensor was then applied for the determination of zinc in tap water and hair samples with satisfactory results.

  7. The Berkeley piggyback SETI program - SERENDIP II. [Search for Extraterrestrial Radio Emission from Nearby Developed Intelligent Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, S.; Werthimer, D.; Lindsay, V.

    1988-01-01

    The SERENDIP (Search for Extraterrestrial Radio Emission from Nearby Developed Intelligent Populations) II system is currently operating at NRAO's 300-ft telescope in Greenbank, WV. The paper reports on the characteristics of this system in combination with this telescope, as well as elements of an off-line analysis program which are intended to identify signals of special interest. The sensitivity and relative probability of acquisition are evaluated.

  8. Mapping Fishing Effort through AIS Data.

    PubMed

    Natale, Fabrizio; Gibin, Maurizio; Alessandrini, Alfredo; Vespe, Michele; Paulrud, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Several research initiatives have been undertaken to map fishing effort at high spatial resolution using the Vessel Monitoring System (VMS). An alternative to the VMS is represented by the Automatic Identification System (AIS), which in the EU became compulsory in May 2014 for all fishing vessels of length above 15 meters. The aim of this paper is to assess the uptake of the AIS in the EU fishing fleet and the feasibility of producing a map of fishing effort with high spatial and temporal resolution at European scale. After analysing a large AIS dataset for the period January-August 2014 and covering most of the EU waters, we show that AIS was adopted by around 75% of EU fishing vessels above 15 meters of length. Using the Swedish fleet as a case study, we developed a method to identify fishing activity based on the analysis of individual vessels' speed profiles and produce a high resolution map of fishing effort based on AIS data. The method was validated using detailed logbook data and proved to be sufficiently accurate and computationally efficient to identify fishing grounds and effort in the case of trawlers, which represent the largest portion of the EU fishing fleet above 15 meters of length. Issues still to be addressed before extending the exercise to the entire EU fleet are the assessment of coverage levels of the AIS data for all EU waters and the identification of fishing activity in the case of vessels other than trawlers. PMID:26098430

  9. Mapping Fishing Effort through AIS Data

    PubMed Central

    Natale, Fabrizio; Gibin, Maurizio; Alessandrini, Alfredo; Vespe, Michele; Paulrud, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Several research initiatives have been undertaken to map fishing effort at high spatial resolution using the Vessel Monitoring System (VMS). An alternative to the VMS is represented by the Automatic Identification System (AIS), which in the EU became compulsory in May 2014 for all fishing vessels of length above 15 meters. The aim of this paper is to assess the uptake of the AIS in the EU fishing fleet and the feasibility of producing a map of fishing effort with high spatial and temporal resolution at European scale. After analysing a large AIS dataset for the period January-August 2014 and covering most of the EU waters, we show that AIS was adopted by around 75% of EU fishing vessels above 15 meters of length. Using the Swedish fleet as a case study, we developed a method to identify fishing activity based on the analysis of individual vessels’ speed profiles and produce a high resolution map of fishing effort based on AIS data. The method was validated using detailed logbook data and proved to be sufficiently accurate and computationally efficient to identify fishing grounds and effort in the case of trawlers, which represent the largest portion of the EU fishing fleet above 15 meters of length. Issues still to be addressed before extending the exercise to the entire EU fleet are the assessment of coverage levels of the AIS data for all EU waters and the identification of fishing activity in the case of vessels other than trawlers. PMID:26098430

  10. Has Malaysia's antidrug effort been effective?

    PubMed

    Scorzelli, J F

    1992-01-01

    It is a common belief that a massive effort in law enforcement, preventive education and rehabilitation will result in the elimination of a country's drug problem. Based on this premise. Malaysia in 1983 implemented such a multifaceted anti-drug strategy, and the results of a 1987 study by the author suggested that Malaysia's effort had begun to contribute to a steady decrease in the number of identified drug abusers. Although the number of drug-addicted individuals declined, the country's recidivism rates were still high. Because of this high relapse rate, Malaysia expanded their rehabilitation effort and developed a community transition program. In order to determine the impact of these changes on the country's battle against drug abuse, a follow-up study was conducted in 1990. The results of this study did not clearly demonstrate that the Malaysian effort had been successful in eliminating the problem of drug abuse, and raised some questions concerning the effectiveness of the country's drug treatment programs.

  11. Qualitative Evaluation of Health Information Exchange Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Joan S.; Guappone, Kenneth P.

    2007-01-01

    Because most health information exchange (HIE) initiatives are as yet immature, formative evaluation is recommended so that what is learned through evaluation can be immediately applied to assist in HIE development efforts. Qualitative methods can be especially useful for formative evaluation because they can guide ongoing HIE growth while taking context into consideration. This paper describes important HIE-related research questions and outlines appropriate qualitative research techniques for addressing them. PMID:17904914

  12. Development and pharmacological characterization of conformationally constrained urotensin II-related peptide agonists.

    PubMed

    Chatenet, David; Folch, Benjamin; Feytens, Debby; Létourneau, Myriam; Tourwé, Dirk; Doucet, Nicolas; Fournier, Alain

    2013-12-12

    Urotensin II (UII) and its paralog peptide, urotensin II-related peptide (URP), exert not only common but also divergent actions through the activation of UT, a specific membrane-bound receptor that belongs to the 1A G protein-coupled receptor subclass. In this study, we have designed and synthesized new URP analogues in which the intracyclic Trp residue was replaced with natural, unnatural, and constrained amino acids to determine important physicochemical features for receptor binding and activation. The biological data, highlighting the potent agonistic behavior of [Tiq(4)]URP and [Tpi(4)]URP, also suggest that the Trp residue, and more specifically the indole ring, is not critical for receptor interaction and could in fact be involved in the intramolecular stabilization of the bioactive conformation of URP. Finally, these analogues, which are intracyclic constrained URP-based agonists, could represent useful pharmacological tools for the study of the urotensinergic system. PMID:24251366

  13. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  14. High-power RF window and coupler development for the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Fant, K.; Hodgson, J.; Judkins, J.; Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and testing of the RF windows designed to transmit power to the PEP-II 476 MHz cavities. Design choices to maximize the reliability of the window are discussed. Fabrication technologies for the window are described and finite-element analysis of the assembly process is presented. Conditioning and high-power testing of the window are discussed. Design of the coupler assembly including the integration of the window and other components is reported.

  15. CURRENT STATUS OF INSERTION DEVICE DEVELOPMENT AT THE NSLS-II AND ITS FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, T.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Harder, D.A.; He, P.; Kitegi, C.; Rank, J.; Rhein, C.; Rakowsky, G.; Spataro, C.

    2011-03-28

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is currently under construction. Procurement of various insertion devices (IDs) has begun. This ring assumes a very high beam stability requirement which imposes tighter field specifications on insertion devices (IDs) compared to the rings of previous generation. The state of the art ID Magnetic Measurement Facility is being set up in order to be able to certify the stringent requirements on the magnetic field of NSLS-II IDs. The IDs in the project baseline scope include six 3.5m long damping wigglers (DWs) with 100mm period length and 15mm pole gap, two 2.0m Elliptically Polarizing Undulator (EPU) with 49mm period and 11.5mm minimum magnetic gap, two 3.0m long 20mm period and one 1.5m long 21mm period IVU, which the minimum gap of these is 5mm and 5.5mm, respectively. Recently a special device for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) beamline has been added to the collection of baseline devices. Three pole wigglers with a 28mm magnetic gap and a peak field over 1 Tesla will be utilized to accommodate the users of the type of radiation which is currently produced with bending magnets at the NSLS.

  16. Development of the Second Generation Berry Impact Recording Device (BIRD II)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Li, Changying

    2015-01-01

    To quantitatively measure the impacts during blueberry harvesting and post-harvest handling, this study designed the second generation Berry Impact Recording Device (BIRD II) sensor with a size of 21 mm in diameter and a weight of 3.9 g, which reduced the size by 17% and the weight by 50% compared to the previous prototype. The sensor was able to measure accelerations up to 346 g at a maximum frequency of 2 KHz. Universal Serial Bus (USB) was used to directly connect the sensor with the computer, removing the interface box used previously. LabVIEW-based PC software was designed to configure the sensor, download and process the data. The sensor was calibrated using a centrifuge. The accuracy of the sensor was between −1.76 g to 2.17 g, and the precision was between 0.21 g to 0.81 g. Dynamic drop tests showed that BIRD II had smaller variance in measurements than BIRD I. In terms of size and weight, BIRD II is more similar to an average blueberry fruit than BIRD I, which leads to more accurate measurements of the impacts for blueberries. PMID:25664430

  17. Insulin-like growth factors I and II are produced in the metanephros and are required for growth and development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S A; Ryan, G; Hammerman, M R

    1991-06-01

    The role(s) of one family of polypeptide growth factors in a developing organ system was examined. Renal anlagen (metanephroi) were surgically removed from 13-d-old rat embryos and grown in organ culture for up to 6 d. Over this period of time when placed in serum-free defined media, the metanephroi increased in size and morphologic complexity. Messenger RNAs for both insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF I and IGF II, were present in the metanephroi. Immunoreactive IGF I and IGF II were produced by the renal anlagen and released into culture media. Levels were relatively constant during the 6 d in culture and averaged 3.5 X 10(-9) M IGF I and 8.3 X 10(-9) M IGF II in media removed from metanephroi after contact for 24 h. IGF binding protein activity was not detected in culture media. Growth and development of metanephroi in vitro was prevented by the addition of anti-IGF I or anti-IGF II antibodies to organ cultures. IGF II produced by metanephroi was active in an IGF II biological assay system and addition of anti-IGF II receptor antibodies to organ cultures prevented growth and development, consistent with the action of IGF II in metanephroi being mediated via the IGF II receptor. The data demonstrate production of both IGF I and IGF II by developing rat metanephroi in organ culture. Each of these peptides is necessary for growth and development of the renal anlage to take place in vitro. Our findings suggest that both IGF I and IGF II are produced within the developing metanephros in vivo and promote renal organogenesis.

  18. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, Thomas James

    2014-12-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed e ective ducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection su cient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125 - 128 were analyzed for the rst time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel \\mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have signi cant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them di cult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent ducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for mid- to low

  19. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: II. Exposure Monitoring Surveys and Development of Exposure Groups

    PubMed Central

    Coble, Joseph B.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Vermeulen, Roel; Yereb, Daniel; Stanevich, Rebecca; Blair, Aaron; Silverman, Debra T.; Attfield, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Air monitoring surveys were conducted between 1998 and 2001 at seven non-metal mining facilities to assess exposure to respirable elemental carbon (REC), a component of diesel exhaust (DE), for an epidemiologic study of miners exposed to DE. Personal exposure measurements were taken on workers in a cross-section of jobs located underground and on the surface. Air samples taken to measure REC were also analyzed for respirable organic carbon (ROC). Concurrent measurements to assess exposure to nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), two gaseous components of DE, were also taken. The REC measurements were used to develop quantitative estimates of average exposure levels by facility, department, and job title for the epidemiologic analysis. Each underground job was assigned to one of three sets of exposure groups from specific to general: (i) standardized job titles, (ii) groups of standardized job titles combined based on the percentage of time in the major underground areas, and (iii) larger groups based on similar area carbon monoxide (CO) air concentrations. Surface jobs were categorized based on their use of diesel equipment and proximity to DE. A total of 779 full-shift personal measurements were taken underground. The average REC exposure levels for underground jobs with five or more measurements ranged from 31 to 58 μg m−3 at the facility with the lowest average exposure levels and from 313 to 488 μg m−3 at the facility with the highest average exposure levels. The average REC exposure levels for surface workers ranged from 2 to 6 μg m−3 across the seven facilities. There was much less contrast in the ROC compared with REC exposure levels measured between surface and underground workers within each facility, as well as across the facilities. The average ROC levels underground ranged from 64 to 195 μg m−3, while on the surface, the average ROC levels ranged from 38 to 71 μg m−3 by facility, an ∼2- to 3-fold difference. The average NO and

  20. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume 1. Model evolution and development

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The Energy Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.), under Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship, has been engaged in the development of a comprehensive mechanistic model of Fluidized Bed Combustors (FBC). The primary aims of this modeling effort are the generation and to the extent possible, validation of an analytical framework for the design and scale-up of fluidized bed combustors. In parallel with this modeling effort, M.I.T. also embarked upon the development of an FBC-Data Base Management System (FBC-DBMS) aimed at facilitating the coordination, interpretation and utilization of the experimental data that are or will become available from diverse sources, as well as in the identification of areas of large uncertainty or having a paucity of experimental results. The synergistic operation of the FBC-Model and FBC-Data Base promises to offer a powerful tool for the design and optimization of FBC's and represents the ultimate goal of the M.I.T. effort. The modeling effort was initially focused upon evaluation and application of state-of-the-art models. The initial system model was divided into five basic components: fluid dynamics, combustion, sulfur capture, heat transfer and emissions. Due to the technical complexity of modeling FBC operation and the initial primitive nature of models for these components, it was deemed necessary to be able to incorporate evolutionary improvements in understanding and correlating FBC phenomena: the M.I.T. system model is, therefore, modular in nature, i.e., each sub-model can be replaced by an updated or equivalent sub-model without necessitating reprogramming of the entire system model.

  1. Development of a high integrity container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island unit II

    SciTech Connect

    Holzworth, R.E.; Chapman, R.L.; Burton, H.M.; Bixby, W.W.

    1981-01-01

    The EPICOR II ion exchange system used to decontaminate approximately 1900 m/sup 3/ of contaminated water in the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Building (AFHB) generated 50 highly loaded and 22 lesser loaded organic resin liners. The 22 lesser loaded resins were shipped to a commercial disposal site, but the highly loaded liners have been stored on the island since their generation. One highly loaded liner, or prefilter, was shipped to Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) in May, 1981 as part of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Three Mile Island Information and Examination Program. The prefilter is being characterized to determine the behavior of the waste form with respect to time and the internal environment and to provide an information base for use in management and regulatory decisions relative to the storage, processing, and disposal of these wastes. Due to the unique characteristics of these wastes, the US DOE is sponsoring programs, such as the BCL Sorbent Experiments Program, to evaluate their characteristics and to provide a High Integrity Container (HIC) Development Program which would improve waste suitability for disposal at a land burial facility. This paper addresses regulatory considerations, establishment of design criteria, proposed design concepts, system demonstration, and status of the HIC Development Program for storage, transportation, and disposal of high specific activity, low level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II as typified by EPICOR II ion exchange media and liners.

  2. Comparison of swelling and cavity microstructural development for type 316 stainless steel irradiated in EBR-II and HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Comparison of swelling and cavity microstructures for one heat of 20% cold-worked (CW) type 316 stainless steel (316) irradiated at 500 to 650/sup 0/C in EBR-II (up to 75 dpa) and HFIR (up to 61 dpa) suggests that void growth and swelling are suppressed by the higher helium generation found in HFIR. Instead of voids, many small bubbles develop in the CW 316 in HFIR and resist conversion to voids. However, similar comparison of solution-annealed (SA) 316 irradiated in EBR-II and HFIR at 500 to 550/sup 0/C leads to an opposite conclusion; void swelling is enhanced by helium in HFIR. Many more bubbles nucleate in SA 316 at low fluence in HFIR compared to EBR-II, but bimodel distributions and rapid coarsening eventually lead to high swelling due to high concentrations of matrix ands precipitate-associated voids in HFIR. A key to the swelling resistance of the CW 316 in HFIR appears to be the development of a sufficiently cavity-dominated sink system in the early stages of evolution.

  3. Arabidopsis class I and class II TCP transcription factors regulate jasmonic acid metabolism and leaf development antagonistically.

    PubMed

    Danisman, Selahattin; van der Wal, Froukje; Dhondt, Stijn; Waites, Richard; de Folter, Stefan; Bimbo, Andrea; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Muino, Jose M; Cutri, Lucas; Dornelas, Marcelo C; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H

    2012-08-01

    TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR1 (TCP) transcription factors control developmental processes in plants. The 24 TCP transcription factors encoded in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome are divided into two classes, class I and class II TCPs, which are proposed to act antagonistically. We performed a detailed phenotypic analysis of the class I tcp20 mutant, showing an increase in leaf pavement cell sizes in 10-d-old seedlings. Subsequently, a glucocorticoid receptor induction assay was performed, aiming to identify potential target genes of the TCP20 protein during leaf development. The LIPOXYGENASE2 (LOX2) and class I TCP9 genes were identified as TCP20 targets, and binding of TCP20 to their regulatory sequences could be confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. LOX2 encodes for a jasmonate biosynthesis gene, which is also targeted by class II TCP proteins that are under the control of the microRNA JAGGED AND WAVY (JAW), although in an antagonistic manner. Mutation of TCP9, the second identified TCP20 target, resulted in increased pavement cell sizes during early leaf developmental stages. Analysis of senescence in the single tcp9 and tcp20 mutants and the tcp9tcp20 double mutants showed an earlier onset of this process in comparison with wild-type control plants in the double mutant only. Both the cell size and senescence phenotypes are opposite to the known class II TCP mutant phenotype in JAW plants. Altogether, these results point to an antagonistic function of class I and class II TCP proteins in the control of leaf development via the jasmonate signaling pathway. PMID:22718775

  4. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2002-07-30

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  5. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2003-01-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  6. Phase II Calderon Process to Produce Direct Reduced Iron Research and Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2003-06-30

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  7. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2003-04-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  8. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2002-10-29

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  9. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II)

    SciTech Connect

    LBNL; Roy, P.K.; Greenway, W.; Kwan, J.W.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.

    2011-04-20

    To heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter with intense ion beams, low mass ions, such as lithium, have an energy loss peak (dE/dx) at a suitable kinetic energy. The Heavy Ion Fusion Sciences (HIFS) program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will carry out warm dense matter experiments using Li{sup +} ion beam with energy 1.2-4 MeV in order to achieve uniform heating up to 0.1-1 eV. The accelerator physics design of Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) has a pulse length at the ion source of about 0.5 {micro}s. Thus for producing 50 nC of beam charge, the required beam current is about 100 mA. Focusability requires a normalized (edge) emittance {approx}2 {pi}-mm-mrad. Here, lithium aluminosilicate ion sources, of {beta}-eucryptite, are being studied within the scope of NDCX-II construction. Several small (0.64 cm diameter) lithium aluminosilicate ion sources, on 70%-80% porous tungsten substrate, were operated in a pulsed mode. The distance between the source surface and the mid-plane of the extraction electrode (1 cm diameter aperture) was 1.48 cm. The source surface temperature was at 1220 C to 1300 C. A 5-6 {micro}s long beam pulsed was recorded by a Faraday cup (+300 V on the collector plate and -300 V on the suppressor ring). Figure 1 shows measured beam current density (J) vs. V{sup 3/2}. A space-charge limited beam density of {approx}1 mA/cm{sup 2} was measured at 1275 C temperature, after allowing a conditioning time of about {approx} 12 hours. Maximum emission limited beam current density of {ge} 1.8mA/cm{sup 2} was recorded at 1300 C with 10-kV extractions. Figure 2 shows the lifetime of two typical sources with space-charge limited beam current emission at a lower extraction voltage (1.75 kV) and at temperature of 1265 {+-} 7 C. These data demonstrate a constant, space-charge limited beam current for 20-50 hours. The lifetime of a source is determined by the loss of lithium from the alumino

  10. Development of a Rhodium(II)-Catalyzed Chemoselective C(sp(3) )-H Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun; Zhu, Lei; Lan, Yu; Rao, Yu

    2015-10-12

    We report the first example of Rh(II) -catalyzed chemoselective double C(sp(3) )-H oxygenation, which can directly transform various toluene derivatives into highly valuable aromatic aldehydes with great chemoselectivity and practicality. The critical combination of catalyst Rh(OAc)2 , oxidant Selectfluor, and solvents of TFA/TFAA promises the successful delivery of the oxidation with satisfactory yields. A possible mechanism involving a unique carbene-Rh complex is proposed, and has been supported by both experiments and theoretical calculations.

  11. Final Report on the NCAR VTMX Effort

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, David; Pinto, James; Brown, William; Cohen, Stephen; Morley, Bruce

    2007-02-13

    The NCAR effort is primarily focused on the analysis of a diverse suite of measurements taken at the southern end of the Salt Lake City Valley within the Jordan Narrows. These measurements include wind profiler, surface, lidar, radiosonde, multi-layered tether-sonde and sodar measurements. We are also collaborating with other VTMX investigators through linking our measurements within the Jordan Narrows with their investigations. The instrumentation was provided to interested VTMX investigators and was used extensively. Thus the NCAR data set played a large role in the results of the overall experiment. Our work under this proposal includes analysis of the observations, mesoscale modeling efforts in support of our VTMX analysis and general instrumentation development aimed at improving the measurement of vertical transport and mixing under stable conditions. This report is subdivided by research objectives.

  12. The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. [KENTORT II process--50-lb/hr

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Vego, A.; Taulbee, D.; Stehn, J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II). The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zone for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The work performed during this year involved projects that will contribute physical and chemical data for the final design of the 50-lb/hr retort. A cold-flow model of the 50-lb/hr retort was built and tested. The unit demonstrated stable operation and proper fluidization of all beds. Good control of solid recirculation up to the maximum design rate for each loop (200 and 500 lb/hr, respectively) was achieved simultaneously. Basically, the cold-flow model is completely operational and translation of the cold-flow design parameters to the design of the retort is ready to begin. In another aspect of the program, a study of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors passed over processed shales was initiated. The addition of a mass spectrometer to the system to monitor total carbon, nitrogen and sulfur evolution in real-time was successful. Coking activities of processed shales were ranked as follows: combusted shale > gasified shale > pyrolyzed shale. Arrangements for conducting an evaluation of KENTORT-derived oil for asphalt applications were finalized and testing was initiated.

  13. ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1 fetal mouse lung type II cell development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zscheppang, Katja; Giese, Ulrike; Hoenzke, Stefan; Wiegel, Dorothea; Dammann, Christiane E L

    2013-12-01

    TTF-1 is an important transcription factor in lung development and lung disease and is essential for lung cell differentiation, specifically surfactant protein (Sftp) expression. The molecular mechanisms that drive the expression and transcriptional control of TTF-1 are not fully understood. In the fetal lung, ErbB4 functions as a transcriptional co-factor and regulates the timely onset of fetal Sftp expression. We speculate that ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1 and regulates Sftpb expression via this pathway in alveolar type II cells. Neuregulin-induced ErbB4 and TTF-1 signaling interactions were studied by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Overexpression of ErbB4 and TTF-1 was analyzed in its effect on cell viability, Sftpb expression, TTF-1 expression, and Sftpb and TTF-1 promoter activity. The effect of ErbB4 deletion and ErbB4 nuclear translocation on TTF-1 expression was studied in primary fetal type II epithelial cells, isolated from transgenic HER4(heart(-/-)) mice. ErbB4 ligand neuregulin induces ErbB4 and TTF-1 co-precipitation and nuclear colocalization. Combined ErbB4 and TTF-1 overexpression inhibits cell viability, while promoting Sftpb expression more than single overexpression of each protein. NRG stimulates TTF-1 expression in ErbB4-overexpressing epithelial cells, while this effect is absent in ErbB4-depleted cells. In primary fetal type II cells, ErbB4 nuclear translocation is critical for its regulation of TTF-1-induced Sftpb upregulation. TTF-1 overexpression did not overcome this important requirement. We conclude that ErbB4 is a critical upstream regulator of TTF-1 in type II epithelial cells and that this interaction is important for Sftpb regulation.

  14. Insulin-like growth factors I and II in the sole Solea senegalensis: cDNA cloning and quantitation of gene expression in tissues and during larval development.

    PubMed

    Funes, V; Asensio, E; Ponce, M; Infante, C; Cañavate, J P; Manchado, M

    2006-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) play an important role as modulators of development, growth, and reproduction. This study aimed to isolate the IGF-I and IGF-II cDNAs and determine their temporal expression pattern in different organs and throughout larval development in Senegal sole. The rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was used to obtain both full-length IGFs sequences. A high sequence similarity with other teleosts sequences was observed. Domains B and A revealed as the most evolutionary conserved. Steady-state copy numbers of IGF-I and IGF-II were also quantified in different Senegal sole tissues by real-time PCR. IGF-I and IGF-II expressed ubiquitously with the highest mRNA levels in liver (88 x 10(6) molecules/microg total RNA) and gills (14.0 x 10(6) molecules/microg total RNA) respectively. IGF-II mRNA levels were higher than IGF-I in prehatching embryos and premetamorphic larvae with a significant drop before the commencement of eye migration in metamorphosis. The abundance of IGF-II transcripts correlated positively with the growth rate during larval development. The putative role of IGF-II on metamorphosis and larval growth is discussed.

  15. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2004-04-27

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  16. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2004-10-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  17. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2005-07-29

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  18. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon; Reina Calderon

    2004-01-27

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  19. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2003-10-22

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  20. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2006-04-19

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  1. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2006-01-30

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  2. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2005-01-25

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  3. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2005-01-26

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  4. Phase II Calderon Process to Produce Direct Reduced Iron Research and Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2007-03-31

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase 1 was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  5. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2004-07-28

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  6. How the field of thyroid endocrinology developed in France after World War II.

    PubMed

    Fragu, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    This microhistory analyzes the transformation of French medical practice after World War II. Before the 1940s, coordinated clinical and experimental studies on a patient with thyroid disease were nonexistent. Starting in 1945, thyroid endocrinology was pushed forward by the use of radioiodine, which led pediatricians to rethink the hereditary transmission of thyroid diseases, stimulated by the school of biochemistry headed by Jean Roche, who participated in the elucidation of thyroid-hormone metabolism. Roche knew how to listen to hospital clinicians, who, in return, gave him free access to patients to conduct investigations on thyroid metabolism. Radioiodine proved to be sufficiently flexible to respond to the respective information needs of clinicians and biochemists, and was also responsible for the profound transformation of scientific reasoning: the chemical framework that had dominated thyroid studies since the discovery of thyroid iodine (1896) was replaced by the hormone paradigm. PMID:12955965

  7. Development of High Level Trigger Software for Belle II at SuperKEKB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Mineo, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Belle collaboration has been trying for 10 years to reveal the mystery of the current matter-dominated universe. However, much more statistics is required to search for New Physics through quantum loops in decays of B mesons. In order to increase the experimental sensitivity, the next generation B-factory, SuperKEKB, is planned. The design luminosity of SuperKEKB is 8 x 1035cm-2s-1 a factor 40 above KEKB's peak luminosity. At this high luminosity, the level 1 trigger of the Belle II experiment will stream events of 300 kB size at a 30 kHz rate. To reduce the data flow to a manageable level, a high-level trigger (HLT) is needed, which will be implemented using the full offline reconstruction on a large scale PC farm. There, physics level event selection is performed, reducing the event rate by ~ 10 to a few kHz. To execute the reconstruction the HLT uses the offline event processing framework basf2, which has parallel processing capabilities used for multi-core processing and PC clusters. The event data handling in the HLT is totally object oriented utilizing ROOT I/O with a new method of object passing over the UNIX socket connection. Also under consideration is the use of the HLT output as well to reduce the pixel detector event size by only saving hits associated with a track, resulting in an additional data reduction of ~ 100 for the pixel detector. In this contribution, the design and implementation of the Belle II HLT are presented together with a report of preliminary testing results.

  8. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report Phase-II. Contractual reporting period October-December 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, Edward; The Salix Consortium

    2000-03-23

    The project undertaken by the Salix Consortium is a multi-phased, multi-partner endeavor. Phase 1 focused on initial development and testing of the technology and forging the necessary agreements to demonstrate commercial willow production. The Phase 1 objectives have been successfully completed: preparing design plans for 2 utility pulverized coal boilers for 20 MW of biopower capacity; developing fuel supply plans for the project with a goal of establishing 365 ha (900 ac) of willow; obtaining power production commitments from the power companies for Phase 2; obtaining construction and environmental permits; and developing an experimental strategy for crop production and power generation improvements needed to assure commercial success. The R and D effort also addresses environmental issues pertaining to introduction of the willow energy system.

  9. Development of a Movable Plunger Tuner for the High Power RF Cavity for the PEP II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, H.D.; Fant, K.; Neubauer, Mark Stephen; Rimmer, R.A.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-08-26

    A 10 cm diameter by 5 cm travel plunger tuner was developed for the PEP-II RF copper cavity system. The single cell cavity including the tuner is designed to operate up to 150 kW of dissipated RF power. Spring finger contacts to protect the bellows from RF power are specially placed 8.5 cm away from the inside wall of the cavity to avoid fundamental and higher order mode resonances. The spring fingers are made of dispersion-strengthened copper to accommodate relatively high heating. The design, alignment, testing and performance of the tuner is described.

  10. Context-dependent modulation of Pol II CTD phosphatase SSUP-72 regulates alternative polyadenylation in neuronal development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Zhou, Yu; Qi, Yingchuan B.; Khivansara, Vishal; Li, Hairi; Chun, Sang Young; Kim, John K.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Jin, Yishi

    2015-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is widespread in neuronal development and activity-mediated neural plasticity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. We used systematic genetic studies and genome-wide surveys of the transcriptional landscape to identify a context-dependent regulatory pathway controlling APA in the Caenorhabditis elegans nervous system. Loss of function in ssup-72, a Ser5 phosphatase for the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD), dampens transcription termination at a strong intronic polyadenylation site (PAS) in unc-44/ankyrin yet promotes termination at the weak intronic PAS of the MAP kinase dlk-1. A nuclear protein, SYDN-1, which regulates neuronal development, antagonizes the function of SSUP-72 and several nuclear polyadenylation factors. This regulatory pathway allows the production of a neuron-specific isoform of unc-44 and an inhibitory isoform of dlk-1. Dysregulation of the unc-44 and dlk-1 mRNA isoforms in sydn-1 mutants impairs neuronal development. Deleting the intronic PAS of unc-44 results in increased pre-mRNA processing of neuronal ankyrin and suppresses sydn-1 mutants. These results reveal a mechanism by which regulation of CTD phosphorylation controls coding region APA in the nervous system. PMID:26588990

  11. Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control (II&C) Research and Development Facility Buildout and Project Execution of LWRS II&C Pilot Projects 1 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Farris; Johanna Oxstrand; Gregory Weatherby

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research, development, and deployment on light water reactor sustainability (LWRS), in which the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe operational life extension of current reactors. As technologies are introduced that change the operation of the plant, the LWRS pilot projects can help identify their best-advanced uses and help demonstrate the safety of these technologies. In early testing of operator performance given these emerging technologies will ensure the safety and usability of systems prior to large-scale deployment and costly verification and validation at the plant. The aim of these collaborations, demonstrations, and approaches are intended to lessen the inertia that sustains the current status quo of today's II&C systems technology, and to motivate transformational change and a shift in strategy to a long-term approach to II&C modernization that is more sustainable. Research being conducted under Pilot Project 1 regards understanding the conditions and behaviors that can be modified, either through process improvements and/or technology deployment, to improve the overall safety and efficiency of outage control at nuclear facilities. The key component of the research in this pilot project is accessing the delivery of information that will allow researchers to simulate the control room, outage control center (OCC) information, and plant status data. The simulation also allows researchers to identify areas of opportunity where plant operating status and outage activities can be analyzed to increase overall plant efficiency. For Pilot Project 3 the desire is to demonstrate the ability of technology deployment and the subsequent impact on maximizing the 'Collective Situational Awareness' of the various stakeholders in a commercial nuclear power plant. Specifically, the desire is to show positive results in plant

  12. Determination of joint efforts in the human body during maximum ramp pushing efforts.

    PubMed

    Raison, M; Gaudez, C; Le Bozec, S; Willems, P Y

    2007-01-01

    Determining with accuracy, the internal efforts in the human body is a great challenge in Biomechanics, particularly in Physical Therapy and Ergonomics. In this context, the present study develops a human body model that permits a non-invasive determination of the joint efforts produced by a seated subject performing maximum ramp pushing efforts. The joint interactions during these experiments are provided by a dynamic inverse model of the human body, using a symbolically generated recursive Newton-Euler formalism. The theoretical investigation is presented in two steps, with increasing complexity and relevance:The dynamic model confirms some previous studies of the effects of biomechanical factors on the performance of the task and is proposed as an accurate method for determining the joint efforts in dynamic contexts. Finally, this application is a preliminary benchmark case that will be extended to: *physical therapy, in order to analyse the joint and muscle efforts in various motion contexts, particularly for patients with fibromyalgia and patients with lumbar diseases; *accidentology, in order to analyse and simulate car occupant dynamics before a crash.

  13. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume II. Infrastructure and community-services requirements, Island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, G.A.; Buevens, W.R.

    1982-06-01

    The requirements of infrastructure and community services necessary to accommodate the development of geothermal energy on the Island of Hawaii for electricity production are identified. The following aspects are covered: Puna District-1981, labor resources, geothermal development scenarios, geothermal land use, the impact of geothermal development on Puna, labor resource requirments, and the requirements for government activity.

  14. Rain Hampers Tsunami Relief Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The cleanup and relief efforts from the recent tsunamis continue in coastal communities that were ravaged by the waves all across the Indian Ocean. Heavy rains have further complicated the matter and added to the misery in parts of eastern Sri Lanka. Between December 28, 2004, and January 5, 2005, up to 10 to 15 inches of rain may have fallen along the southeast coast of the island, and as much as 20 inches (red areas) fell just offshore. This rainfall map was created by the TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, which monitors rainfall over the global tropics. The map shows that many other regions around the Indian Ocean were also affected by the rains, including Malaysia and parts of Sumatra. The heaviest rains fell on December 31 and January 4. The rains were likely the result of a combination of the northeast monsoon interacting with the topography and an active phase of what is known as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) (or 30-60 day oscillation). The MJO is a large-scale disturbance that propagates eastward from the Indian Ocean into the West Pacific Ocean, bringing extended periods of unsettled weather with it. Individual convective complexes within the MJO can last on the order of a day. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA. NASA image produced by Hal Pierce (SSAI/NASA GSFC) and caption by Steve Lang (SSAI/NASA GSFC).

  15. Implementing real-time robotic systems using CHIMERA II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David B.; Schmitz, Donald E.; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the CHIMERA II programming environment and operating system, which was developed for implementing real-time robotic systems. Sensor-based robotic systems contain both general- and special-purpose hardware, and thus the development of applications tends to be a time-consuming task. The CHIMERA II environment is designed to reduce the development time by providing a convenient software interface between the hardware and the user. CHIMERA II supports flexible hardware configurations which are based on one or more VME-backplanes. All communication across multiple processors is transparent to the user through an extensive set of interprocessor communication primitives. CHIMERA II also provides a high-performance real-time kernel which supports both deadline and highest-priority-first scheduling. The flexibility of CHIMERA II allows hierarchical models for robot control, such as NASREM, to be implemented with minimal programming time and effort.

  16. Educational Outreach Efforts at the NNDC

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    2014-06-15

    Isotopes and nuclides are important in our everyday life. The general public and most students are never exposed to the concepts of stable and radioactive isotopes/nuclides. The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) is involved in an international project to develop a Periodic Table of the Isotopes for the educational community to illustrate the importance of isotopes and nuclides in understanding the world around us. This effort should aid teachers in introducing these concepts to students from the high school to the graduate school level.

  17. Educational Outreach Efforts at the NNDC

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N. E.

    2014-06-01

    We found that isotopes and nuclides are important in our everyday life. The general public and most students are never exposed to the concepts of stable and radioactive isotopes/nuclides. The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) is involved in an international project to develop a Periodic Table of the Isotopes for the educational community to illustrate the importance of isotopes and nuclides in understanding the world around us. Our effort should aid teachers in introducing these concepts to students from the high school to the graduate school level.

  18. Evolution of state outreach efforts under SCHIP.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan R; Rosenbach, Margo L

    2007-01-01

    States have shown creativity and adaptability in developing outreach strategies to promote State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) enrollment. As the program has matured and the fiscal environment has tightened, States have learned what efforts are successful and have tailored their approaches accordingly. This article reviews the evolution of State outreach strategies under SCHIP, using qualitative information from all 50 States and the District of Columbia. Early campaigns were aimed at building broad awareness of SCHIP. Over time, States have adapted their outreach campaigns to close the gaps in enrolling hard-to-reach populations, by modifying their target populations, messages, methods, organizational strategies, and emphasis.

  19. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2002-04-25

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work performed to-date is encouraging by virtue that product was produced with the lowest cost raw material (ore concentrate), and the energy source being exclusively coal. The product was melted and cast. The equipment has been debugged and preparations are taking place towards the integration of the process to produce directly molten iron and/or molten steel. Also it is planned to conclude the 72 hours test at reasonably continuous steady state during next quarter.

  20. DNA methylation status of cyp17-II gene correlated with its expression pattern and reproductive endocrinology during ovarian development stages of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Ding, YuXia; He, Feng; Wen, HaiShen; Li, JiFang; Ni, Meng; Chi, MeiLi; Qian, Kun; Bu, Yan; Zhang, DongQian; Si, YuFeng; Zhao, JunLi

    2013-09-15

    Cytochrome P450c17-II (cyp17-II, 17α-hydroxylase) is responsible for the production of steroid hormones during oocyte maturation in vertebrates. The comparative expression pattern of cyp17-II gene during the gonadal development stages will provide important insights into its function of gonadal development. In addition, epigenetic modification especially DNA methylation plays a vital role in regulation of gene expression. The adult female Japanese flounder at different ovarian development stage (from stages II to V) was obtained in this experiment. The expression of cyp17-II gene in the ovary of Japanese flounder during the gonadal development stages was measured by quantitative PCR. Reproductive traits included gonadosomatic index (GSI), plasma estradiol-17β (E2) and testosterone (T) were also measured. Moreover, whole CpG dinucleotides methylation status of the two CpG rich regions in cyp17-II coding region was detected by bisulfate sequencing. In the ovary, the cyp17-II gene had the lowest mRNA expression at the early ovarian development stage, but then increased afterward. The variation trends of T and E2 level were consistent with the cyp17-II expression pattern in ovary. In contrast, the whole methylation levels of each CpG rich region (exon 4 and 6) in cyp17-II coding region were declined from stages II to IV, then increased at stage V. The methylation levels of whole CpG sites in each CpG rich region were inversely correlated with the values of ovarian cyp17-II gene expression, T and E2 level, and GSI. Based on the present study, we proposed that cyp17-II may regulate the level of steroid hormone, and then stimulate the oocyte growth and maturation. The cyp17-II gene transcriptional activity was possibly affected by the methylation level of CpG rich regions in coding region. These findings will help in the study of the molecular mechanism of fish reproduction and endocrine physiology.

  1. The Curiosity and Exploration Inventory-II: Development, Factor Structure, and Psychometrics

    PubMed Central

    Kashdan, Todd B.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Silvia, Paul J.; Winterstein, Beate P.; Breen, William E.; Terhar, Daniel; Steger, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    Given curiosity’s fundamental role in motivation, learning, and well-being, we sought to refine the measurement of trait curiosity with an improved version of the Curiosity and Exploration Inventory (CEI; Kashdan, Rose, & Fincham, 2004). A preliminary pool of 36 items was administered to 311 undergraduate students, who also completed measures of emotion, emotion regulation, personality, and well-being. Factor analyses indicated a two factor model—motivation to seek out knowledge and new experiences (Stretching; 5 items) and a willingness to embrace the novel, uncertain, and unpredictable nature of everyday life (Embracing; 5 items). In two additional samples (ns = 150 and 119), we cross-validated this factor structure and provided initial evidence for construct validity. This includes positive correlations with personal growth, openness to experience, autonomy, purpose in life, self-acceptance, psychological flexibility, positive affect, and positive social relations, among others. Applying item response theory (IRT) to these samples (n = 578), we showed that the items have good discrimination and a desirable breadth of difficulty. The item information functions and test information function were centered near zero, indicating that the scale assesses the mid-range of the latent curiosity trait most reliably. The findings thus far provide good evidence for the psychometric properties of the 10-item CEI-II. PMID:20160913

  2. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Jiyan; Liu, Jinsong; Yuan, Xiao; Jin, Fengtao

    2009-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH(2)OH)(4) (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code. PMID:19405658

  3. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Jiyan; Liu, Jinsong; Yuan, Xiao; Jin, Fengtao

    2009-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH2OH)4 (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code.

  4. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yang; Yang Jiamin; Zhang Jiyan; Liu Jinsong; Yuan Xiao; Jin Fengtao

    2009-04-15

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code.

  5. Developments in Polarization and Energy Control of APPLE-II Undulators at Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, E. C.; Bencok, P.; Dobrynin, A.; Rial, E. C. M.; Rose, A.; Steadman, P.; Thompson, C.; Thomson, A.; Wang, H.

    2013-03-01

    A pair of 2m long APPLE-II type undulators have been built for the I10 BLADE beamline at Diamond Light Source. These 48mm period devices have gap as well as four moveable phase axes which provide the possibility to produce the full range of elliptical polarizations as well as linear polarization tilted through a full 180deg. The mechanical layout chosen has a 'master and slave' arrangement of the phase axes on the top and bottom. This arrangement allows the use of symmetries to provide operational ease for both changing energy using only the master phase while keeping fixed linear horizontal or circular polarization, as well as changing linear polarization angle while keeping fixed energy [1]. The design allows very fast motion of the master phase arrays, without sacrifice of accuracy, allowing the possibility of mechanical polarization switching at 1Hz for dichroism experiments. We present the mechanical design features of these devices, as well as the results of magnetic measurements and shimming from before installation. Finally, we present the results of characterization of these devices by the beamline, including polarimetry, which has been done on the various modes of motion to control energy and polarization. These modes of operation have been available to users since 2011.

  6. NASA cryogenic fluid management space experiment efforts, 1960-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A history of technological development for subcritical cryogenic fluid management (CFM) through space experiments is given for the period 1960 to 1990. Space experiments with liquid hydrogen were conducted in the early 1960's. Efforts since then have consisted of studies and designs of potential space experiments. A chronology of CFM space experiments and design efforts is included.

  7. Estimating Software Effort Hours for Major Defense Acquisition Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallshein, Corinne C.

    2010-01-01

    Software Cost Estimation (SCE) uses labor hours or effort required to conceptualize, develop, integrate, test, field, or maintain program components. Department of Defense (DoD) SCE can use initial software data parameters to project effort hours for large, software-intensive programs for contractors reporting the top levels of process maturity,…

  8. Mental Effort in Binary Categorization Aided by Binary Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzer, Assaf; Meyer, Joachim; Parmet, Yisrael

    2013-01-01

    Binary cueing systems assist in many tasks, often alerting people about potential hazards (such as alarms and alerts). We investigate whether cues, besides possibly improving decision accuracy, also affect the effort users invest in tasks and whether the required effort in tasks affects the responses to cues. We developed a novel experimental tool…

  9. Implementing Successful Geoscience Education and Outreach Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, L. W.

    2004-12-01

    Successful geoscience Education and Outreach (E&O) efforts associated with a research program benefit from effective planning and a commitment by scientists/researchers to become more knowledgeable about and involved in education. Several suggested strategies have evolved based on experience in Earth science E&O with K-16 educators and students during the past 10 years. E&O programs and materials should be developed at appropriate levels ("start from where they're at") and utilize information, skills and topics that are most relevant to students and teachers. Hands-on and inquiry-based activities that teach or reinforce fundamental science understanding and skills, while introducing new topics, results and discoveries, are particularly effective. It is useful to design materials that can provide for a range of time commitment, level of technical skills, and effort, so that introductory to in-depth curriculum units can be implemented. Use of the Internet and working with teachers can be effective methods for dissemination and taking advantage of a "multiplying factor". Obtaining feedback and evaluation of the programs and developed materials, and connecting the materials to national or state education standards are also highly recommended. Most importantly, scientists should become more involved in the science education community. Attending and presenting papers at appropriate science education sessions or workshops, or state or national science teacher meetings (the annual National Science Teachers Association convention is an excellent place to start) can be a significant educational experience for the scientist/researcher. Effective geoscience E&O programs have significant potential for enhancing K-16 education and scientific literacy, and can help attract students to the sciences. Perhaps surprisingly, these efforts have substantial positive impact on the scientist/researcher as well.

  10. Reducing muscle effort in walking through powered exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, T; Zanotto, D; Stegall, P; Carrozza, M C; Agrawal, S K

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel assistive control for lower limb exoskeletons. The controller provides the user with a scaled version of the Winter's nominal torque profile, which is adapted online to the specific gait features of the user. The proposed assistive controller is implemented on the ALEX II exoskeleton and tested on two healthy subjects. Experimental results show that when assisted by the exoskeleton users can reduce the muscle effort compared to free walking. PMID:23366786

  11. Development of a benchtop baking method for chemically leavened crackers. II. Validation of the method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A benchtop baking method has been developed to predict the contribution of gluten functionality to overall flour performance for chemically leavened crackers. Using a diagnostic formula and procedure, dough rheology was analyzed to evaluate the extent of gluten development during mixing and machinin...

  12. The Course of Life: Psychoanalytic Contributions Toward Understanding Personality Development. Vol. II: Latency, Adolescence and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenspan, Stanley I., Ed.; Pollock, George H., Ed.

    This volume is the second in "The Course of Life" series which contains original contributions from an international group of scientists and clinicians who have produced much of current knowledge about the phases of human personality development. These contributions cover the continuum of human development from the prenatal phase through childhood…

  13. Physics Lectures and Laboratories. A Model To Improve Preservice Elementary Science Teacher Development. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresser, Miles

    A group of scientists and science educators has developed and pilot tested an integrated physical science program designed for preservice elementary school teachers. This document includes the syllabus and class materials for the Physics block of the physical science courses developed by the group. Included are diagrams, lecture notes, homework…

  14. Radio for Education and Development: Case Studies, Volume II. World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 266.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, Peter L.; And Others

    Use of radio for nonformal education and development communications and the technical and economic considerations related to radio services are covered in this second volume of case studies on use of radio for education and development. Under radio and nonformal education are: an evaluation of radio schools as part of the popular promotion…

  15. Evaluation of the 1983-84 ECIA, Chapter II Program Development for the Artistically Talented Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldinher, Martin R.

    The Program Development for Artistically Talented Project (ATP) in the Dade County Schools, Florida, funded by the Education Consolidation Improvement Act, Chapter 2, was designed to provide technical support to the locally funded program for artistically talented elementary students through: (1) the development of a curriculum/program guide; and…

  16. Innovation through developing consumers communities. Part II: Digitalizing the innovation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avasilcai, S.; Galateanu (Avram, E.

    2015-11-01

    The current research recognises the concept of innovation as the main driver for organisational growth and profitability. The companies seek to develop new ways to engage consumers and customers into co - creation value through the product design, development and distribution processes. However the main concern is manifested for new and creative ways of customization products based on consumers’ requirements and needs. Thus the need for innovative virtual instruments arose as the demand from social communities for personalised products or services increased. Basically companies should develop own innovative platforms, where consumers can participate, with ideas, concepts or other relevant contributions, and interact with designers or engineers for product development. This paper aims to present the most important features of platform development within BMW Group as a concept and as innovative instrument. From this point of view it is important to enhance past experiences of the company in the field of co - creation projects. There will be highlighted the dual consumers’ character as co - creator and co - evaluator based on their involvement in the proposed and developed projects and platform structure. The significant impact on platform functioning it has the diversity of company's concerns for Research & Development and innovation activities. From this point of view there will be assessed the platform structure, the main proposed themes and the evaluation process. The main outcome is to highlight the significance of platform development as innovative tool for consumers’ communities’ enhancement. Based on the analysis of “BMW Co-Creation Lab”, there will be revealed the main consumers concerns in terms of safety, comfort and appearance of the products. Thus it is important to understand the evaluation process of gathered ideas and intellectual property policy. The importance of platform development and implementation will be highlighted by company

  17. Prioritizing earthquake and tsunami alerting efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Allen, S.; Aranha, M. A.; Chung, A. I.; Hellweg, M.; Henson, I. H.; Melgar, D.; Neuhauser, D. S.; Nof, R. N.; Strauss, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The timeline of hazards associated with earthquakes ranges from seconds for the strong shaking at the epicenter, to minutes for strong shaking at more distant locations in big quakes, to tens of minutes for a local tsunami. Earthquake and tsunami warning systems must therefore include very fast initial alerts, while also taking advantage of available time in bigger and tsunami-generating quakes. At the UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory we are developing a suite of algorithms to provide the fullest possible information about earthquake shaking and tsunami inundation from seconds to minutes after a quake. The E-larmS algorithm uses the P-wave to rapidly detect an earthquake and issue a warning. It is currently issuing alerts to test users in as little as 3 sec after the origin time. Development of a new waveform detector may lead to even faster alerts. G-larmS uses permanent deformation estimates from GNSS stations to estimate the geometry and extent of rupture underway providing more accurate ground shaking estimates in big (M>~7) earthquakes. It performed well in the M6.0 2014 Napa earthquake. T-larmS is a new algorithm designed to extend alert capabilities to tsunami inundation. Rapid estimates of source characteristics for subduction zones event can not only be used to warn of the shaking hazard, but also the local tsunami inundation hazard. These algorithms are being developed, implemented and tested with a focus on the western US, but are also now being tested in other parts of the world including Israel, Turkey, Korea and Chile. Beta users in the Bay Area are receiving the alerts and beginning to implement automated actions. They also provide feedback on users needs, which has led to the development of the MyEEW smartphone app. This app allows beta users to receive the alerts on their cell phones. All these efforts feed into our ongoing assessment of directions and priorities for future development and implementation efforts.

  18. Development of a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system on the Plasma Material Interaction System (PLAMIS-II) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, I. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, K. I.; Choi, Y.-S.; Cho, S. G.; Bae, M. K.; Lee, D.-H.; Hong, S. H.; Lho, T.; Chung, K.-S.

    2015-12-01

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed for the plasma material interaction system (PLAMIS-II) device, which is equipped with a unique plasma gun composed of a LaB6 cathode and two anodes with electromagnets to generate a focused dense plasma. PLAMIS-II simulates the interactions of plasma with different materials and is to be used for the test of plasma facing components of fusion devices. The LIF system is composed of a seed laser with Littmann/Metcalf cavity and a master oscillator power amplifier to pump 3d4F7/2 metastable argon ion to 4p4D5/2 level at the wavelength of 668.61 nm, which has the following input parameters: laser power = 20 mW, line width < 100 kHz, and a mode-hop free tuning range > 70 GHz. For in-situ measurement of laser wavelength, the wavelength spectrum of an iodine cell was measured by a photo-transistor during LIF measurement. To measure argon ion temperature (Ti) and drift velocity (vd) in PLAMIS-II, the fluorescence light with the wavelength of 442.72 nm, emitted from 4p4D5/2 level to 4s4P3/2 level and passing through 1 nm band-width filter, was collected by the photomultiplier tube combined with a lock-in amplifier and a chopper with frequency of 3 kHz. Initial data of Ti and vd were analysed in terms of gas flow rate and applied power.

  19. Development of a 30 cm-cube Electron-Tracking Compton Camera for the SMILE-II Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumura, Y.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Parker, J. D.; Mizumoto, T.; Sonoda, S.; Tomono, D.; Sawano, T.; Nakamura, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Komura, S.; Nakamura, S.; Oda, M.; Miuchi, K.; Kabuki, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kurosawa, S.; Iwaki, S.

    2014-05-01

    To explore the sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray window for astronomy, we have developed the Electron-Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), and carried out the first performance test in laboratory conditions using several gamma-ray sources in the sub-MeV energy band. Using a simple track analysis for a quick first test of the performance, the gamma-ray imaging capability was demonstrated with clear images and 5.3 degrees of angular resolution measure (ARM) measured at 662 keV. As the greatest impact of this work, a gamma-ray detection efficiency on the order of 10-4 was achieved at the sub-MeV gamma-ray band, which is one order of magnitude higher than our previous experiment. This angular resolution and detection efficiency enables us to detect the Crab Nebula at the 5σ level with several hours observation at balloon altitude in middle latitude. Furthermore, good consistency of efficiencies between this performance test and simulation including only physical processes is very important; it means we achieve nearly 100% detection of Compton recoil electrons and means that our predictions of performance enhancement resulting from future upgrades are more realistic. We are planning to confirm the imaging capability of the ETCC by observation of celestial objects in the SMILE-II (Sub-MeV gamma ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment II). The SMILE-II and following SMILE-III project will be an important key of sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray astronomy.

  20. Early psychosocial intervention for youth at risk for bipolar I or II disorder: a one-year treatment development trial

    PubMed Central

    Miklowitz, David J; Chang, Kiki D; Taylor, Dawn O; George, Elizabeth L; Singh, Manpreet K; Schneck, Christopher D; Dickinson, L Miriam; Howe, Meghan E; Garber, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies have identified behavioral phenotypes that predispose genetically vulnerable youth to a later onset of bipolar I or II disorder, but few studies have examined whether early psychosocial intervention can reduce risk of syndromal conversion. In a one-year open trial, we tested a version of family-focused treatment adapted for youth at high risk for bipolar disorder (FFT-HR). Methods A referred sample of 13 children (mean 13.4 ± 2.69 years; 4 boys, 9 girls) who had a parent with bipolar I or II disorder participated at one of two outpatient specialty clinics. Youth met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder (n = 8), cyclothymic disorder (n = 1), or bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (n = 4), with active mood symptoms in the past month. Participants were offered FFT-HR (12 sessions in four months) with their parents, plus psychotropic medications as needed. Independent evaluators assessed depressive symptoms, hypomanic symptoms, and global functioning at baseline and then every four months for one year, with retrospective severity and impairment ratings made for each week of the follow-up interval. Results Families were mostly adherent to the treatment protocol (85% retention), and therapists administered the FFT-HR manual with high levels of fidelity. Youth showed significant improvements in depression, hypomania, and psychosocial functioning scores on the Adolescent Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. They also showed significant improvements in Young Mania Rating Scale and Children’s Depression Rating Scale scores. Conclusions FFT-HR is a promising intervention for youth at high risk for BD. Larger-scale randomized trials that follow youth into young adulthood will be necessary to determine whether early psychosocial intervention can reduce the probability of developing bipolar I or II disorder among genetically vulnerable youth. PMID:21320254

  1. Paediatric radiology seen from Africa. Part II: recognising research advantages in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Andronikou, Savvas; Mngomezulu, Victor

    2011-07-01

    Radiologists in developing countries cite numerous reasons for poor research output including heavier workloads, poor remuneration (resulting in "brain drain"), poor infrastructure, language barriers, lack of modern imaging equipment, and a disease spectrum that may be of little interest to journals and readers in the developed world. On the other hand, large populations of patients suffering from distinctive diseases, cost-effective healthcare systems, and a set-up with highly centralised tertiary referral hospitals, may be seen as advantages to those willing to tap into this as a data source for research. The lack of resources may even stimulate cost-effective innovations relevant to the needs of poor communities. This paper challenges preconceived ideas and identifies advantages for radiologists in developing countries to producing good research and publications. It also cautions against "annexation of sites" by stakeholders from developed countries, and suggests simple solutions to maximise research output without a significant financial cost.

  2. Advanced turbine systems phase II - conceptual design and product development. Final report, August 1993--July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The National Energy Strategy (NES) calls for a balanced program of greater energy efficiency, use of alternative fuels, and the environmentally responsible development of all U.S. energy resources. Consistent with the NES, a Department of Energy (DOE) program has been created to develop Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). The technical ATS requirements are based upon two workshops held in Greenville, SC that were sponsored by DOE and hosted by Clemson University. The objective of this 8-year program, managed jointly by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, and, Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy, is to develop natural-gas-fired base load power plants that will have cycle efficiencies greater than 60%, lower heating value (LHV), be environmentally superior to current technology, and also be cost competitive. The program will include work to transfer advanced technology to the coal- and biomass-fueled systems being developed in other DOE programs.

  3. The flipped classroom for professional development: part II. making podcasts and videos.

    PubMed

    Smith, Charlene M; McDonald, Katie

    2013-11-01

    As described in Part I, podcasts and videos are educational technologies used to flip the classroom. This column describes the technology options for creating podcasts and videos and offers tips on developing podcasts and videos.

  4. Development and fabrication of improved Schottky power diodes, phases I and II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, L. F.; Garfinkle, M.; Taft, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    Reproducible methods for the fabrication of silicon Schottky diodes were developed for the metals tungsten, aluminum, conventional platinum silicide and low temperature platinum silicide. Barrier heights and barrier lowering were measured permitting the accurate prediction of ideal forward and reverse diode performance. Processing procedures were developed which permit the fabrication of large area (approximately 1 sqcm) mesa-geometry power Schottky diodes with forward and reverse characteristics that approach theoretical values.

  5. Cities in the developing world: agenda for action following Habitat II.

    PubMed

    Annez, P; Friendly, A

    1996-12-01

    This article discusses the issue of priorities in development in urban centers of developing countries. Urbanization is advancing rapidly in the developing world. There are needs for adequate infrastructure, environmental protection, and fiscal reform. Development can result in a reduction in poverty, if properly conducted. By the turn of the century, 8 of the world's 10 megacities will be located in developing countries. There are already the megacities of Mexico City, Sao Paulo, Bombay, Calcutta, and Shanghai. By 2015 there will be 27 megacities, and urban population in developing countries will amount to over 4 billion. By 2020, 50% of total population in developing countries and 80% of total population in Latin America will be urban, of which 25% will live in poverty. Economic progress is at risk if cities cannot develop effective roads and transportation systems, public transportation, communications, sanitation services, and adequate shelters. The City Summit was held in June 1996 in Istanbul. The World Bank announced priorities for funding of urban health initiatives for reducing lead and particulate emissions, for providing sanitation and clean water to slum areas, and for securing sustainable, business-like city finances. The World Bank, the City Summit's Global Plan of Action, and Parliamentarians for Global Action support the reduction of lead emissions from gasoline and air. Cost-effective approaches include refitting public transportation vehicles with cleaner-burning engines or engines relying on natural gas, reducing emissions from industrial and power plants, and shifting domestic fuel sources from coal to natural gas. The World Bank in Slovenia and Beijing is financially supporting this household conversion. Reductions in soot and dust levels reduce public health costs, lost work time due to illness, and mortality. The cost to the poor for basic services is too high. Decentralization, community involvement, and cost sharing are viable options.

  6. Cities in the developing world: agenda for action following Habitat II.

    PubMed

    Annez, P; Friendly, A

    1996-12-01

    This article discusses the issue of priorities in development in urban centers of developing countries. Urbanization is advancing rapidly in the developing world. There are needs for adequate infrastructure, environmental protection, and fiscal reform. Development can result in a reduction in poverty, if properly conducted. By the turn of the century, 8 of the world's 10 megacities will be located in developing countries. There are already the megacities of Mexico City, Sao Paulo, Bombay, Calcutta, and Shanghai. By 2015 there will be 27 megacities, and urban population in developing countries will amount to over 4 billion. By 2020, 50% of total population in developing countries and 80% of total population in Latin America will be urban, of which 25% will live in poverty. Economic progress is at risk if cities cannot develop effective roads and transportation systems, public transportation, communications, sanitation services, and adequate shelters. The City Summit was held in June 1996 in Istanbul. The World Bank announced priorities for funding of urban health initiatives for reducing lead and particulate emissions, for providing sanitation and clean water to slum areas, and for securing sustainable, business-like city finances. The World Bank, the City Summit's Global Plan of Action, and Parliamentarians for Global Action support the reduction of lead emissions from gasoline and air. Cost-effective approaches include refitting public transportation vehicles with cleaner-burning engines or engines relying on natural gas, reducing emissions from industrial and power plants, and shifting domestic fuel sources from coal to natural gas. The World Bank in Slovenia and Beijing is financially supporting this household conversion. Reductions in soot and dust levels reduce public health costs, lost work time due to illness, and mortality. The cost to the poor for basic services is too high. Decentralization, community involvement, and cost sharing are viable options. PMID

  7. Continuous fiber ceramic composites. Phase II - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, James

    1997-10-31

    This report documents Atlantic Research Corporation's (ARC) Phase 11 effort on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) program. This project is supported by the DOE cooperative agreement DE-FCO2-92CE40998. Such DOE support does not constitute an endorsement of the views expressed in this report. ARC'S CFCC Phase II effort began during October 1993 and was suspended in March of 1997 when, for business considerations, ARC closed the Amercom operation. This report covers progress from Phase II program inception through Amercom closure. ARC'S Phase II effort built upon the results of the Phase I Applications Assessment and Process Engineering developments to produce CFCC test components for end-user evaluation. Initially, the Phase 11 effort planned to develop and produce three CFCC components: CFCC compression rings for stationary diesel engines, CFCC hot gas fans for industrial furnace applications, and CFCC hot gas filters for current and advanced coal fired power cycles. As the program progressed, the development effort for the diesel engine piston rings was suspended. This decision was based on technical issues, cost factors and reduced program funding; the status of CFCC diesel engine piston ring development will be discussed in detail in section 2.2.1.

  8. Cultural Dimensions of Digital Library Development, Part II: The Cultures of Innovation in Five European National Libraries (Narratives of Development)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalbello, Marija

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the narrative accounts of the beginnings of digital library programs in five European national libraries: Biblioteca nacional de Portugal, Bibliotheque nationale de France, Die Deutsche Bibliothek, the National Library of Scotland, and the British Library. Based on interviews with policy makers and developers of digital…

  9. Spatial harmonics and pattern specification in early Drosophila development. Part II. The four colour wheels model.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, S A; Goodwin, B C

    1990-06-01

    We review the evidence presented in Part I showing that transcripts and protein products of maternal, gap, pair-rule, and segment polarity genes exhibit increasingly complex, multipeaked longitudinal waveforms in the early Drosophila embryo. The central problem we address in Part II is the use the embryo makes of these wave forms to specify longitudinal pattern. Based on the fact that mutants of many of these genes generate deletions and mirror symmetrical duplications of pattern elements on length scales ranging from about half the egg to within segments, we propose that position is specified by measuring a "phase angle" by use of the ratios of two or more variables. Pictorially, such a phase angle can be thought of as a colour on a colour wheel. Any such model contains a phaseless singularity where all or many phases, or colours, come together. We suppose as well that positional values sufficiently close to the singularity are meaningless, hence a "dead zone". Duplications and deletions are accounted for by deformation of the cycle of morphogen values occurring along the antero-posterior axis. If the cycle of values surrounds the singularity and lies outside the dead zone, pattern is normal. If the curve transects the dead zone, pattern elements are deleted. If the curve lies entirely on one side of the singularity, pattern elements are deleted and others are duplicated with mirror symmetry. The existence of different wavelength transcript patterns in maternal, gap, pair-rule, and segment polarity genes and the roles of those same genes in generating deletions and mirror symmetrical duplications on a variety of length scales lead us to propose that position is measured simultaneously on at least four colour wheels, which cycle different numbers of times along the anterior-posterior axis. These yield progressively finer grained positional information. Normal pattern specification requires a unique angle, outside of the dead zone, from each of the four wheels

  10. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  11. [Development of pharmacy in the Leskovac region for the period from liberation from the Turks until World War II].

    PubMed

    Milić, Petar; Milić, Slavica

    2013-01-01

    From the historical point of view, there are three time periods when the process of modernization of Serbian society took place. First period includes the interval from the beginning of the 19th century until the end of World War I, when the Serbian country was reestablished as Serbian Knezevina (princedom) and in 1882 as Serbian Kingdom. Second period includes an interval from the unity of Serbia into the Kingdom of Serbs, Croatians and Slovenians, which was established at the end of World War I (1918) and in 1929 changed the name into the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, which lasted until the end of World War II. The third period includes time after World War II. In this paper, the social-economical conditions in the Leskovac area during the first two periods of modernization were described, as well as the pharmacy development emphasizing the characteristic of the pharmaceutics. The Leskovac area belongs to most recently liberated areas in Serbia, i.e. Leskovac was liberated at the end of 1877. Nevertheless, the first pharmacy was opened in Leskovac in 1862, during the reign of the Turks. The authors being the people from Leskovac as well as the pharmacists believe that they contributed to better overview of the activities of people from modernization period, paying them well-deserved recognition.

  12. Economic growth, biodiversity loss and conservation effort.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Simon; Adger, W Neil

    2003-05-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between economic growth, biodiversity loss and efforts to conserve biodiversity using a combination of panel and cross section data. If economic growth is a cause of biodiversity loss through habitat transformation and other means, then we would expect an inverse relationship. But if higher levels of income are associated with increasing real demand for biodiversity conservation, then investment to protect remaining diversity should grow and the rate of biodiversity loss should slow with growth. Initially, economic growth and biodiversity loss are examined within the framework of the environmental Kuznets hypothesis. Biodiversity is represented by predicted species richness, generated for tropical terrestrial biodiversity using a species-area relationship. The environmental Kuznets hypothesis is investigated with reference to comparison of fixed and random effects models to allow the relationship to vary for each country. It is concluded that an environmental Kuznets curve between income and rates of loss of habitat and species does not exist in this case. The role of conservation effort in addressing environmental problems is examined through state protection of land and the regulation of trade in endangered species, two important means of biodiversity conservation. This analysis shows that the extent of government environmental policy increases with economic development. We argue that, although the data are problematic, the implications of these models is that conservation effort can only ever result in a partial deceleration of biodiversity decline partly because protected areas serve multiple functions and are not necessarily designated to protect biodiversity. Nevertheless institutional and policy response components of the income biodiversity relationship are important but are not well captured through cross-country regression analysis.

  13. Development of a TaqMan Probe-Based Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction (iiPCR) Assay for Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Race 4.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hong; Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Tsai-De; Hong, Li-Ling; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Chang, Pi-Fang Linda

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a novel and inexpensive detection method based on a TaqMan probe-based insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) method for the rapid detection of Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) race 4, which is currently among the most serious fungal vascular diseases worldwide. By using the portable POCKIT™ device with the novel primer set iiFoc-1/iiFoc-2, the Foc race 4 iiPCR assay (including DNA amplification and signal monitoring) could be completed within one hour. The developed Foc race 4 iiPCR assay is thus a user-friendly and efficient platform designed specifically for the detection of Foc race 4. The detection limit of this optimized Foc iiPCR system was estimated to be 1 copy of the target standard DNA as well as 1 fg of the Foc genomic DNA. This approach can serve as a rapid detection method for in planta detection of Foc race 4 in field-infected banana. It was concluded that this molecular detection procedure based on iiPCR has good potential for use as an efficient detection method. PMID:27448242

  14. Development of a TaqMan Probe-Based Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction (iiPCR) Assay for Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Race 4

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Tsai-De; Hong, Li-Ling; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Chang, Pi-Fang Linda

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a novel and inexpensive detection method based on a TaqMan probe-based insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) method for the rapid detection of Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) race 4, which is currently among the most serious fungal vascular diseases worldwide. By using the portable POCKIT™ device with the novel primer set iiFoc-1/iiFoc-2, the Foc race 4 iiPCR assay (including DNA amplification and signal monitoring) could be completed within one hour. The developed Foc race 4 iiPCR assay is thus a user-friendly and efficient platform designed specifically for the detection of Foc race 4. The detection limit of this optimized Foc iiPCR system was estimated to be 1 copy of the target standard DNA as well as 1 fg of the Foc genomic DNA. This approach can serve as a rapid detection method for in planta detection of Foc race 4 in field-infected banana. It was concluded that this molecular detection procedure based on iiPCR has good potential for use as an efficient detection method. PMID:27448242

  15. Sixth Grade Students' Development of Historical Perspective: World War II and the Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogawa, Masato

    This study investigated how the use of various teaching methods influenced perspective taking skills of sixth grade middle school students during a unit of instruction on World War II. Three questions directed the study: (1) What do students know about World War II prior to a unit of study on World War II; (2) What do students know about World War…

  16. Expanded bed chromatography of proteins in small-diameter columns. II. Methods development and scale up.

    PubMed

    Ghose, S; Chase, H

    2000-01-01

    The scaled down system developed in Part I of this series was further validated by using a 1-cm diameter column for method development studies for the separation of two model proteins, alcohol dehydrogenase and alpha-glucosidase, from unclarified yeast homogenate by hydrophobic interaction expanded bed chromatography based on the STREAMLINE matrix. The efficacy of solids removal and establishment of optimal binding and separation condition by stepwise elution were investigated. Equilibration of the EBA column and loading at high salt strengths affected the subsequent recovery of the two target proteins. Although good resolution between the target proteins could be achieved, peak tailing was found to be a consistent problem. The optimised separation protocol was scaled up 25-fold to a column diameter of 5.0 cm. The results were in good agreement with the run conducted in the 1-cm column, indicating the potential of using the small columns as an viable approach for method scouting and development studies.

  17. Design and development of a laminated Fresnel lens for point-focus PV systems. Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, R.C.

    1982-12-01

    A laminated glass-plastic lens parquet using injection molded point focus Fresnel lenses is described. The second phase of a program aimed at investigating the cost effectiveness of a glass-plastic concentrator lens assembly is reported. The first phase dealt with the development of a first generation lens design, the selection of the preferred glass coverplate and glass-to-lens adhesive and initial injection molding lens molding trials. The second phase has dealt with the development of an improved lens design, a full size parquet lamination process, and a second group of injection molding lens molding trials.

  18. Cognitive effort avoidance and detection in people with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gold, James M; Kool, Wouter; Botvinick, Matthew M; Hubzin, Leeka; August, Sharon; Waltz, James A

    2015-03-01

    Many people with schizophrenia exhibit avolition, a difficulty initiating and maintaining goal-directed behavior, considered to be a key negative symptom of the disorder. Recent evidence indicates that patients with higher levels of negative symptoms differ from healthy controls in showing an exaggerated cost of the physical effort needed to obtain a potential reward. We examined whether patients show an exaggerated avoidance of cognitive effort, using the demand selection task developed by Kool, McGuire, Rosen, and Botvinick (Journal of Experimental Psychology. General, 139, 665-682, 2010). A total of 83 people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 71 healthy volunteers participated in three experiments where instructions varied. In the standard task (Experiment 1), neither controls nor patients showed expected cognitive demand avoidance. With enhanced instructions (Experiment 2), controls demonstrated greater demand avoidance than patients. In Experiment 3, patients showed nonsignificant reductions in demand avoidance, relative to controls. In a control experiment, patients showed significantly reduced ability to detect the effort demands associated with different response alternatives. In both groups, the ability to detect effort demands was associated with increased effort avoidance. In both groups, increased cognitive effort avoidance was associated with higher IQ and general neuropsychological ability. No significant correlations between demand avoidance and negative symptom severity were observed. Thus, it appears that individual differences in general intellectual ability and effort detection are related to cognitive effort avoidance and likely account for the subtle reduction in effort avoidance observed in schizophrenia.

  19. Insulin-like growth factors I and II in starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus): molecular cloning and differential expression during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongjiang; Zang, Kun; Liu, Xuezhou; Shi, Bao; Li, Cunyu; Shi, Xueying

    2015-02-01

    In order to elucidate the possible roles of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) in the embryonic development of Platichthys stellatus, their cDNAs were isolated and their spatial expression pattern in adult organs and temporal expression pattern throughout embryonic development were examined by quantitative real-time PCR assay. The IGF-I cDNA sequence was 1,268 bp in length and contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 558 bp, which encoded 185 amino acid residues. With respect to IGF-II, the full-length cDNA was 899 bp in length and contained a 648-bp ORF, which encoded 215 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequences of IGF-I and IGF-II exhibited high identities with their fish counterparts. The highest IGF-I mRNA level was found in the liver for both sexes, whereas the IGF-II gene was most abundantly expressed in female liver and male liver, gill, and brain. The sex-specific and spatial expression patterns of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs are thought to be related to the sexually dimorphic growth and development of starry flounder. Both IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs were detected in unfertilized eggs, which indicated that IGF-I and IGF-II were parentally transmitted. Nineteen embryonic development stages were tested. IGF-I mRNA level remained high from unfertilized eggs to low blastula followed by a significant decrease at early gastrula and then maintained a lower level. In contrast, IGF-II mRNA level was low from unfertilized eggs to high blastula and peaked at low blastula followed by a gradual decrease. Moreover, higher levels of IGF-I mRNA than that of IGF-II were found from unfertilized eggs to high blastula, vice versa from low blastula to newly hatched larva, and the different expression pattern verified the differential roles of IGF-I and IGF-II in starry flounder embryonic development. These results could help in understanding the endocrine mechanism involved in the early development and growth of starry flounder.

  20. Insulin-like growth factors I and II in starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus): molecular cloning and differential expression during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongjiang; Zang, Kun; Liu, Xuezhou; Shi, Bao; Li, Cunyu; Shi, Xueying

    2015-02-01

    In order to elucidate the possible roles of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) in the embryonic development of Platichthys stellatus, their cDNAs were isolated and their spatial expression pattern in adult organs and temporal expression pattern throughout embryonic development were examined by quantitative real-time PCR assay. The IGF-I cDNA sequence was 1,268 bp in length and contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 558 bp, which encoded 185 amino acid residues. With respect to IGF-II, the full-length cDNA was 899 bp in length and contained a 648-bp ORF, which encoded 215 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequences of IGF-I and IGF-II exhibited high identities with their fish counterparts. The highest IGF-I mRNA level was found in the liver for both sexes, whereas the IGF-II gene was most abundantly expressed in female liver and male liver, gill, and brain. The sex-specific and spatial expression patterns of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs are thought to be related to the sexually dimorphic growth and development of starry flounder. Both IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs were detected in unfertilized eggs, which indicated that IGF-I and IGF-II were parentally transmitted. Nineteen embryonic development stages were tested. IGF-I mRNA level remained high from unfertilized eggs to low blastula followed by a significant decrease at early gastrula and then maintained a lower level. In contrast, IGF-II mRNA level was low from unfertilized eggs to high blastula and peaked at low blastula followed by a gradual decrease. Moreover, higher levels of IGF-I mRNA than that of IGF-II were found from unfertilized eggs to high blastula, vice versa from low blastula to newly hatched larva, and the different expression pattern verified the differential roles of IGF-I and IGF-II in starry flounder embryonic development. These results could help in understanding the endocrine mechanism involved in the early development and growth of starry flounder. PMID:25424555

  1. A Cooperative Effort: That's the Key

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Richard M.

    1976-01-01

    Counselors are the mental health specialists in the schools, according to the author. As such, they should call upon the community's mental health services in an effort to provide better school services through a cooperative effort. (Author/HMV)

  2. MHC II-β chain gene expression studies define the regional organization of the thymus in the developing bony fish Dicentrarchus labrax (L.).

    PubMed

    Picchietti, S; Abelli, L; Guerra, L; Randelli, E; Proietti Serafini, F; Belardinelli, M C; Buonocore, F; Bernini, C; Fausto, A M; Scapigliati, G

    2015-02-01

    MHC II-β chain gene transcripts were quantified by real-time PCR and localised by in situ hybridization in the developing thymus of the teleost Dicentrarchus labrax, regarding the specialization of the thymic compartments. MHC II-β expression significantly rose when the first lymphoid colonization of the thymus occurred, thereafter increased further when the organ progressively developed cortex and medulla regions. The evolving patterns of MHC II-β expression provided anatomical insights into some mechanisms of thymocyte selection. Among the stromal cells transcribing MHC II-β, scattered cortical epithelial cells appeared likely involved in the positive selection, while those abundant in the cortico-medullary border and medulla in the negative selection. These latter most represent dendritic cells, based on typical localization and phenotype. These findings provide further proofs that efficient mechanisms leading to maturation of naïve T cells are operative in teleosts, strongly reminiscent of the models conserved in more evolved gnathostomes.

  3. National Information Policy Developments Worldwide II: Universal Access-Addressing the Digital Divide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Adrienne; Oppenheim, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Describes the results of a literature survey on recent developments in national information policies in the area of universal access that tries to ensure equal access to information, and considers the digital divide. Highlights include policies in Australia, Canada, the European Union, Hong Kong, the United States, and Okinawa. (Contains 64…

  4. Professional Teacher Education II; A Programed Design Developed by the AACTE Teacher Education and Media Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Washington, DC.

    The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) Media Project was developed to determine whether (1) the gap between the producer and the user of educational innovations could be bridged; (2) a meaningful way to present the results of educational research to the user could be designed; and (3) the integrated and functional use…

  5. Print-Script as Initial Handwriting Style II: Effects on the Development of Reading and Spelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsdottir, Ragnheidur

    1996-01-01

    No differences in the development of reading and spelling were found between 103 Norwegian children learning print-script as their initial handwriting style and 104 Norwegian students who learned disjointed cursive letters initially. The longitudinal study extended from first to fifth grade. (SLD)

  6. Rural Development in Africa: A Bibliography (Part II: North, South, West). Training & Methods Series, Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Land Tenure Center.

    Compiled in December 1971, this bibliography lists approximately 940 books, journals, periodicals, and unpublished mimeographs dealing with rural development in north, west, and southern Africa. All materials are dated between 1953 and 1971. Entries are listed by country under the following headings: agriculture, economic affairs, social affairs,…

  7. Development of a Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones Phase II 2nd Report

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Doughty, Christine; Gasperikova, Erika; Peterson, John; Conrad, Mark; Cook, Paul; Tiemi, Onishi

    2011-03-31

    This is the 2nd report on the three-year program of the 2nd phase of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement. As such, this report is a compendium of the results by Kiho et al. (2011) and those by LBNL.

  8. Relevance Revisited: Curriculum Development in the Humanities. No. II: Administrative Strategies for Curriculum Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondale, Clarence C., Ed.

    Papers presented in advance of a workshop on "administrative strategies" for curricular change in the humanities and brief summaries of discussions taking place at the workshop are provided. Background papers include: "Curricular Change and the Humanities," by Edward A. Lindell; "Developing Administrative Strategies for Curricular Change," by…

  9. Education, Training and the Future of Work II: Developments in Vocational Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flude, Mike, Ed.; Sieminski, Sandy, Ed.

    This book contains 13 papers on developments in vocational education and training in Great Britain and the future of work. The following papers are included: "Introduction" (Geoff Esland, Mike Flude, Sandy Sieminski); "The Roles of the State and the Social Partners in Vocational Education and Training Systems" (Andy Green); "Education Training and…

  10. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume II, Country Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Howard; And Others

    This document, the second of three volumes concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, presents country profiles for Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Viet-Nam, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The profile emphasizes background, higher education, educational…

  11. Manual for the Bateria de Examenes de Aptitud General (BEAG). Section II. Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment of Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Office of Research and Development.

    The development and norming of a Spanish language edition of the United States Employment Service (USES) General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB) is described. The new edition, called the Bateria de Examenes de Aptitud General (BEAG), was designed to replace an earlier translation, the BGPA, prepared for use in Puerto Rico. Forms A and B were…

  12. Improving Students' Understanding of Quantum Measurement. II. Development of Research-Based Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha

    2012-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of research-based learning tools such as the Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorials and peer-instruction tools to reduce students' common difficulties with issues related to measurement in quantum mechanics. A preliminary evaluation shows that these learning tools are effective in improving students'…

  13. 40 CFR 52.823 - PM10 State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... committed to comply with the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... PM-10 data, to an extent consistent with minimum EPA requirements (note the network description... develop a PM-10 emission inventory for the areas submitted as part of any PM-10 SIP pursuant to items...

  14. 40 CFR 52.823 - PM10 State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... committed to comply with the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... PM-10 data, to an extent consistent with minimum EPA requirements (note the network description... develop a PM-10 emission inventory for the areas submitted as part of any PM-10 SIP pursuant to items...

  15. 40 CFR 52.823 - PM10 State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... committed to comply with the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... PM-10 data, to an extent consistent with minimum EPA requirements (note the network description... develop a PM-10 emission inventory for the areas submitted as part of any PM-10 SIP pursuant to items...

  16. 40 CFR 52.823 - PM10 State Implementation Plan Development in Group II Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... committed to comply with the PM10 regulations as set forth in 40 CFR part 51. In a letter to Morris Kay, EPA... PM-10 data, to an extent consistent with minimum EPA requirements (note the network description... develop a PM-10 emission inventory for the areas submitted as part of any PM-10 SIP pursuant to items...

  17. EPA Office of Research and Development - I/I Research Information Update

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nation’s sanitary sewer infrastructure is aging, and is currently one of the top national water program priorities. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Sanitary Sewer Overflow Analysis and Planning (SSOAP) Toolbox to assist communities in devel...

  18. Biosensor technology for the detection of illegal drugs II: antibody development and detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilpert, Reinhold; Bauer, Christian; Binder, Florian; Grol, Michael; Hallermayer, Klaus; Josel, Hans-Peter; Klein, Christian; Maier, Josef; Makower, Alexander; Oberpriller, Helmut; Ritter, Josef

    1994-10-01

    In a joint project of Deutsche Aerospace, Boehringer Mannheim and the University of Potsdam portable devices for the detection of illegal drugs, based on biosensor technology, are being developed. The concept enrichment of the drug from the gas phase and detection by immunological means. This publication covers the development of specific antibodies and various detection procedures. Antibodies with a high affinity for cocaine have been developed with the aid of specially synthesized immunogens. A competitive detection procedure with biosensors based on optical grating couplers and applying particulate labels has been established, showing a lower detection limit of 10-10 mol/l for cocaine. Additionally, a combination of a displacement-immunoreactor and an enzymatically amplified electrode was investigated, which at present still suffers from insufficient sensitivity of the immunoreactor. An alternative, fleece-matrix based test procedure, where enrichment and detection steps are integrated in a single unit, is promising in terms of simplicity and sensitivity. A simple swab-test for the detection of cocaine at surfaces has been developed, which has a lower detection limit of about 10 ng and which can be performed within one minute.

  19. Understanding physical developer (PD): Part I--Is PD targeting lipids?

    PubMed

    de la Hunty, Mackenzie; Moret, Sébastien; Chadwick, Scott; Lennard, Chris; Spindler, Xanthe; Roux, Claude

    2015-12-01

    Physical developer (PD) is a fingermark development technique that involves the selective reduction of silver onto fingermark residue. PD can develop marks on porous substrates even if they have been wet, leading to the logical, long held belief that the reagent targets the water insoluble constituents in the fingermark residue. The present research has tested this hypothesis as part of a broader study that aims to identify the targets of physical developer. Spot tests of some fatty acids, cholesterol and squalene, treated with PD, showed that only cholesterol produced significant silver deposition. PD is known to be particularly effective on aged marks, however cholesterol degrades over time. These observations indicate that PD reactivity with fingermarks cannot solely be due to the presence of cholesterol. Fingermarks were deposited on paper and washed with various organic solvents before being treated with PD. PD effectiveness was intermittent on both solvent washed and unwashed sides of both natural and groomed marks; however, it was seen to effectively develop groomed samples that had been exposed to common lipid extraction solvents, shown to have removed the lipids by visualisation using the lipid stain Nile red. PD effectiveness was most affected by exposure of samples to solvents that could dissolve water soluble components, showing that the removal of these constituents (by either water, or other solvents) decreases the amount of silver deposited on the fingermark residue by the working solution. Close observation of PD developed samples showed variation in silver deposition uniformity when comparing a developed ridge to a pore site located on that ridge. Some samples showed an absence of silver, and other showed an increase of silver at pore locations. This indicates that the material excreted by the pores on the finger has an effect on silver deposition, suggesting that PD may be specifically targeting eccrine constituents that are present along the

  20. Understanding Physical Developer (PD): Part II--Is PD targeting eccrine constituents?

    PubMed

    de la Hunty, Mackenzie; Moret, Sébastien; Chadwick, Scott; Lennard, Chris; Spindler, Xanthe; Roux, Claude

    2015-12-01

    Physical developer (PD) is a fingermark development technique that deposits silver onto fingermark ridges. It is the only technique currently in routine operational use that gives results on porous substrates that have been wet. There is a reasonable understanding of the working solution chemistry, but the chemical constituent(s) contained in fingermark residue that are specifically targeted by PD are largely unknown. A better understanding of the PD technique will permit a more informed selection of alternative or complementary detection methods, and greater usage in operational laboratories. Recent research by our group has shown that PD does not selectively target the lipids present in the residue. This research investigated the hypothesis that PD targets the eccrine constituents in fingermark residue. This was tested by comparison of PD and indanedione-zinc (Ind-Zn) treated natural fingermarks that had been deposited successively, and marks that had been deposited with a ten second interval in between depositions. Such an interval allows for the regeneration of secretions from the pores located on the ridges of the fingers. On fingermark depletions with no time interval between depositions, PD and Ind-Zn treated depletions successively (and comparatively) decreased in development intensity as the amount of residue diminished. Short time intervals in between successive depletions resulted in additional secretions from the pores intermittently occurring, the increased development of which was visualised by treatment with both PD and Ind-Zn. The changes in development intensity were seen with both techniques on the same split depletions in a series, comparably and proportionately. These results indicate that the components targeted by PD are contained in the material excreted by the friction ridge pores through its mirrored development with Ind-Zn. Repetition of the experiments on marks that only contained eccrine material showed good Ind-Zn development but poor

  1. Understanding physical developer (PD): Part I--Is PD targeting lipids?

    PubMed

    de la Hunty, Mackenzie; Moret, Sébastien; Chadwick, Scott; Lennard, Chris; Spindler, Xanthe; Roux, Claude

    2015-12-01

    Physical developer (PD) is a fingermark development technique that involves the selective reduction of silver onto fingermark residue. PD can develop marks on porous substrates even if they have been wet, leading to the logical, long held belief that the reagent targets the water insoluble constituents in the fingermark residue. The present research has tested this hypothesis as part of a broader study that aims to identify the targets of physical developer. Spot tests of some fatty acids, cholesterol and squalene, treated with PD, showed that only cholesterol produced significant silver deposition. PD is known to be particularly effective on aged marks, however cholesterol degrades over time. These observations indicate that PD reactivity with fingermarks cannot solely be due to the presence of cholesterol. Fingermarks were deposited on paper and washed with various organic solvents before being treated with PD. PD effectiveness was intermittent on both solvent washed and unwashed sides of both natural and groomed marks; however, it was seen to effectively develop groomed samples that had been exposed to common lipid extraction solvents, shown to have removed the lipids by visualisation using the lipid stain Nile red. PD effectiveness was most affected by exposure of samples to solvents that could dissolve water soluble components, showing that the removal of these constituents (by either water, or other solvents) decreases the amount of silver deposited on the fingermark residue by the working solution. Close observation of PD developed samples showed variation in silver deposition uniformity when comparing a developed ridge to a pore site located on that ridge. Some samples showed an absence of silver, and other showed an increase of silver at pore locations. This indicates that the material excreted by the pores on the finger has an effect on silver deposition, suggesting that PD may be specifically targeting eccrine constituents that are present along the

  2. NSLS-II Digital RF Controller Logic and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Holub, B.; Gao, F.; Kulpin, J.; Marques, C.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Towne, N.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) accelerator consists of the Storage Ring, the Booster Ring and Linac along with their associated cavities. Given the number, types and variety of functions of these cavities, we sought to limit the logic development effort by reuse of parameterized code on one hardware platform. Currently there are six controllers installed in the NSLS-II system. There are two in the Storage ring, two in the Booster ring, one in the Linac and one in the Master Oscillator Distribution system.

  3. Development and demonstration of a lignite-pelletizing process. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The current work began with scale-up of laboratory equipment to commercial size equipment. For this purpose, BCI used an existing pilot plant that had been assembled to pelletize and indurate taconite ore. BCI determined therewith that lignite pellets can be produced continuously on a pilot scale using the basic process developed in the laboratory. The resulting pellets were found to be similar to the laboratory pellets at equivalent binder compositions. Tests of product made during a 5-ton test run are reported. A 50-ton demonstration test run was made with the pilot plant. Pellet production was sustained for a two-week period. The lignite pelletizing process has, therefore, been developed to the point of demonstration in a 50-ton test. BCI has completed and cost estimated a conceptually designed 4000 TPD facility. BCI believes it has demonstrated a technically feasible process to agglomerate lignite by using an asphalt emulsion binder. Product quality is promising. Capital and operating costs appear acceptable to justify continuing support and development. The next step should focus on three areas: production development, process refinement, and cost reduction. For further development, BCI recommends consideration of a 5 to 10 ton/h pilot plant or a 20 to 40 ton/h module of a full sized plant, the lower first cost of the former being offset by the ability to incorporate the latter into a future production unit. Other specific recommendations are made for future study that could lead to process and cost improvements: Binder Formulation, disc Sizing, Drier Bed Depth, and Mixing Approach. Pellet use other than power plant fuel is considered.

  4. Grassroots Efforts: If You Plant Them, They Will Grow!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kimberly S.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a four-tiered framework for the development of advocacy skills among teacher preparation professionals that reflects grassroots advocacy efforts and endorses the value of the physical and health education disciplines.

  5. Finding relationships between effort and other variables in the SEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.; Panlilio-Yap, N. Monina

    1985-01-01

    Estimating the amount of effort required for a software development project is one of the major aspects of resource estimation for that project. In this study, the relationship between effort and other variables for 23 Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) projects that were developed for NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center was examined. These variables fell into two categories: those which can be determined in the early stages of project development and may therefore be useful in a baseline equation for predicting effort in future projects, and those which can be used mainly to characterize or evaluate effort requirements and thus enhance the understanding of the software development process in this environment. Some results of the analyses are presented.

  6. The Canon Group's effort: working toward a merged model.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, C; Huff, S M; Hersh, W R; Pattison-Gordon, E; Cimino, J J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a representational schema for clinical data for use in exchanging data and applications, using a collaborative approach. DESIGN: Representational models for clinical radiology were independently developed manually by several Canon Group members who had diverse application interests, using sample reports. These models were merged into one common model through an iterative process by means of workshops, meetings, and electronic mail. RESULTS: A core merged model for radiologic findings present in a set of reports that subsumed the models that were developed independently. CONCLUSIONS: The Canon Group's modeling effort focused on a collaborative approach to developing a representational schema for clinical concepts, using chest radiography reports as the initial experiment. This effort resulted in a core model that represents a consensus. Further efforts in modeling will extend the representational coverage and will also address issues such as scalability, automation, evaluation, and support of the collaborative effort. PMID:7895135

  7. Sampling and Measurement Error in Faculty Activity and Effort Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Edgar; Kutina, Kenneth L.

    1974-01-01

    Evaluates a stratified sampling method developed at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine to estimate mean faculty effort devoted to programs from randomly selected faculty samples over three consecutive years. (Author/PG)

  8. Tobacco control efforts in Europe.

    PubMed

    Britton, John; Bogdanovica, Ilze

    2013-05-01

    Smoking is prevalent across Europe, but the severity and stage of the smoking epidemic, and policy responses to it, vary substantially between countries. Much progress is now being made in prohibition of paid-for advertising and in promotion of smoke-free policies, but mass media campaigns are widely underused, provision of services for smokers trying to quit is generally poor, and price policies are undermined by licit and illicit cheap supplies. Monitoring of prevalence is inadequate in many countries, as is investment in research and capacity to address this largest avoidable cause of death and disability across Europe. However, grounds for optimism are provided by progress in implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, and in the development of a new generation of nicotine-containing devices that could enable more widespread adoption of harm-reduction strategies. The effect of commercial vested interests has been and remains a major barrier to progress. PMID:23642700

  9. [A contribution to the development of advertising in pharmacy II. Historical development of regulation of advertising of medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Vranová, Vilma

    2012-10-01

    The article deals with the development of regulation of advertising of medicinal products in the Czech Lands of the Habsburg Monarchy and Czechoslovakia in the years 1775-1938. Advertising medicines had and has its specifics and its regulation had been addressed by specific standards and linked to other health laws and regulations. Regulation of advertising of medicinal products has undergone a long process from the initial total ban on advertising to the establishment of clear rules, some of which, such as restrictions on advertising prescription-only medicines only to the professional healthcare press, are still valid.

  10. Potential future applications for the tracking and data relay satellite II (TDRS II) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    During the conceptual design phases of the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) II system provision was made for a future service growth (FSG) payload with an undefined mission. The intent of the FSG was to provide a resource for TDRS II applications which would be available to meet a change in requirements for the operational TDRS II system. This paper summarizes the effect of the consideration of potential FSG applications imposed on the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) II system. The following applications were considered as FSG candidates: An optical 650 Mbps space-to-space link (SSL) coupled to an optical or RF downlink, an RF or optical crosslink to extend the baseline TDRS II system coverage, -zone of exclusion (ZOE) closure, relay for lunar communications either RF or optically, and relay for Martian communications either RF or optically. This paper summarizes work done in the 1990 time frame on the above stated applications. Since then, NASA has sponsored several studies (during phase B of the TDRS II development cycle) of the ZOE closure application of the FSG. The purpose of this paper is to report on the efforts previously considered for the FSG. A previous paper was presented at the 1991 Congress related to the second application above. This paper extends this effort to the four stated applications.

  11. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-30

    The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

  12. Preadolescent and adolescent endocrinology: physiology and physiopathology. II. Hormonal changes during abnormal pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Sizonenko, P C

    1978-08-01

    Based on the knowledge of the physiology of regulation of gonadotropins and gonadal steroids, basal levels of these hormones might be indicative of the etiologic factors of abnormal pubertal development. In addition, stimulatory tests may help in the diagnosis of such conditions. It is interesting that the pubertal maturation of the adrenal cortex is independent of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The role of the adrenal cortex for the pubertal development remains questionable: adrenal androgens are low in isosexual precocious puberty, low in delayed adolescence, and normal in hyper- or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The importance of this role is doubled in congenital virilizing adrenal hyperplasia. When the disease is untreated, although adrenal androgens in excess advance bone age and hypothalamic maturation, girls remain prepubertal. When the therapeutic control is good, normal puberty occurs. The action of the adrenal androgens on growth and puberty remains to be determined.

  13. Generic development of topical dermatologic products, Part II: quality by design for topical semisolid products.

    PubMed

    Chang, Rong-Kun; Raw, Andre; Lionberger, Robert; Yu, Lawrence

    2013-07-01

    The emergence of quality by design as a relatively new systematic science and risk-based approach has added a new dimension to pharmaceutical development and manufacturing. This review attempts to discuss the quality by design elements and concepts applied for topical semisolid products. Quality by design begins with defining a quality target product profile as well as critical quality attributes. Subsequently, this is followed by risk identification/risk analysis/risk evaluation to recognize critical material attributes and critical process parameters, in conjunction with design of experiments or other appropriate methods to establish control strategies for the drug product. Several design-of-experiment examples are included as practical strategies for the development and optimization of formulation and process for topical drug products.

  14. Training the Developing Brain Part II: Cognitive Considerations for Youth Instruction and Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Adam M.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Lesnick, Samantha; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Myer, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Growing numbers of youth participating in competitive, organized physical activity has led to a concern for the risk of sports related injuries during important periods of human development. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of Integrative Neuromuscular Training (INT) to enhance athletic performance and to reduce the risk of sports related injuries in youth. Successful implementation of INT necessitates instruction from knowledgeable and qualified instructors who understand the unique physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of youth to provide appropriate training instruction and feedback. Principles of a classical theory of cognitive development provide a useful context for discussion of developmentally appropriate methods and strategies for INT instruction of youth. INT programs that consider these developmentally appropriate approaches will provide a controlled, efficacious environment for youth to improve athletic performance and to reduce risk of sports related injury; thus, promoting a healthy, active lifestyle beyond an individual’s formative years. PMID:25968858

  15. Organization and development of pediatric medical-psychiatric units. Part II: Clinical management issues.

    PubMed

    Kahan, B B; Sexson, S B

    1991-11-01

    Scant literature exists regarding combined medical-psychiatric units for pediatric populations. The present article is the second in a two-part series describing issues relevant to the organization and development of such a unit within a tertiary-care children's hospital. Case examples of medical-psychiatry patients are presented, together with summary patient statistics for the first 3 years of operation. Additionally, issues regarding the physical layout, treatment program, and staffing are discussed. PMID:1765256

  16. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials sciences and technologies; chemistry and materials, explosives, special nuclear materials (SNM), and tritium. (2) Design sciences and advanced computation; physics, conceptual design and assessment, and computation and modeling. (3) Advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities; system engineering science and technology, and electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components. Section I gives a brief summary of 23 major defense program (DP) research and technology facilities and shows how these major facilities are organized by program elements. Section II gives a more detailed breakdown of the over 200 research and technology facilities being used at the Laboratories to support the Defense Programs mission.

  17. Development and evaluation of a pliable biological valved conduit. Part II: Functional and hemodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sung, H W; Witzel, T H; Hata, C; Tu, R; Shen, S H; Lin, D; Noishiki, Y; Tomizawa, Y; Quijano, R C

    1993-04-01

    Many congenital cardiac malformations may require a valved conduit for the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract. In spite of many endeavors made in the last 25 years, the clinical results of right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction with currently available valved conduits are still not satisfactory. Specific problems encountered clinically include suboptimal hemodynamic performance, conduit kinking or compression, and fibrous peeling from the luminal surface. To address these deficiencies, we undertook the development of a biological valved conduit: a bovine external jugular vein graft with a retained native valve cross-linked with a diglycidyl ether (DE). This study, using a canine model, was to evaluate the functional and hemodynamic performance of this newly developed valved conduit. Three 14 mm conduits, implanted as bypass grafts, right ventricle to pulmonary artery, were evaluated. The evaluation was conducted with a noninvasive color Doppler flow mapping system at pre-implantation, immediately post implantation, one- and three-months post implantation, and prior to retrieval (five-months post implantation). The two-dimensional tomographic inspection of the leaflet motion at various periods post implantation showed that the valvular leaflets in the DE treated conduit was quite pliable. No cardiac failure or valvular dysfunction was observed in any of the studied cases. The color Doppler flow mapping study demonstrated that the valve in the DE treated conduit was competent, with no conduit kinking or compression observed in any of the three cases. The spectral Doppler velocity study evidenced that the transvalvular pressure gradients of the DE treated conduit were minimal as compared to those of the currently available conduits. In conclusion, from the functional and hemodynamic performance points of view, this newly developed valved conduit is superior to those currently available. PMID:8325697

  18. Protocol—the RAMESES II study: developing guidance and reporting standards for realist evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Wong, Geoff; Jagosh, Justin; Greenhalgh, Joanne; Manzano, Ana; Westhorp, Gill; Pawson, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Realist evaluation is an increasingly popular methodology in health services research. For realist evaluations (RE) this project aims to: develop quality and reporting standards and training materials; build capacity for undertaking and critically evaluating them; produce resources and training materials for lay participants, and those seeking to involve them. Methods To achieve our aims, we will: (1) Establish management and governance infrastructure; (2) Recruit an interdisciplinary Delphi panel of 35 participants with diverse relevant experience of RE; (3) Summarise current literature and expert opinion on best practice in RE; (4) Run an online Delphi panel to generate and refine items for quality and reporting standards; (5) Capture ‘real world’ experiences and challenges of RE—for example, by providing ongoing support to realist evaluations, hosting the RAMESES JISCmail list on realist research, and feeding problems and insights from these into the deliberations of the Delphi panel; (6) Produce quality and reporting standards; (7) Collate examples of the learning and training needs of researchers, students, reviewers and lay members in relation to RE; (8) Develop, deliver and evaluate training materials for RE and deliver training workshops; and (9) Develop and evaluate information and resources for patients and other lay participants in RE (eg, draft template information sheets and model consent forms) and; (10) Disseminate training materials and other resources. Planned outputs: (1) Quality and reporting standards and training materials for RE. (2) Methodological support for RE. (3) Increase in capacity to support and evaluate RE. (4) Accessible, plain-English resources for patients and the public participating in RE. Discussion The realist evaluation is a relatively new approach to evaluation and its overall place in the is not yet fully established. As with all primary research approaches, guidance on quality assurance and uniform

  19. Sidoarjo mudflow phenomenon and its mitigation efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, H. T.; Williams, V.

    2009-12-01

    diverted into the Porong River through a mud pump system. Also we continuously monitor changes in eruption behavior and try to anticipate the consequences, particularly after the Ring Dyke (of main vent) collapsed and became useless in controlling the flow. In September 2009 spectacular eruption intensity with kick and wave developed and is continuing. Surface and subsurface investigations continue ceaselessly to try to understand the forces driving the eruption. There are no precedents for mitigation of such a large scale mud volcano in a densely populated area that seems destined to continue for a very long time. This makes all efforts to stop eruption together with the emergency efforts, which have to be conducted simultaneously with recovery and reconstruction efforts that cover all basic needs of people live in the area. This is why BPLS has to develop innovative and creative efforts, mainly by applying the basic principle of learning by doing.

  20. The Dubai Community Psychiatric Survey: II. Development of the Socio-cultural Change Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Bebbington, P; Ghubash, R; Hamdi, E

    1993-04-01

    The Dubai Community Psychiatric Survey was carried out to assess the effect of very rapid social change on the mental health of women in Dubai, one of the United Arab Emirates. In order to measure social change at an individual level, we developed a questionnaire covering behaviour and attitudes in a wide range of situations, the Socio-cultural Change Questionnaire (ScCQ). In this paper we give an account of the considerations that determined the form of the ScCQ, its structural characteristics, and its validity.