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Sample records for ii fracture mechanics

  1. Fracture of Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Joints on Cu Substrates. II: Fracture Mechanism Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Huang, Z.; Dutta, I.; Sidhu, R.; Renavikar, M.; Mahajan, R.

    2012-02-01

    A methodology to construct fracture mechanism maps for Sn-3.8%Ag-0.7%Cu (SAC387) solder joints attached to Cu substrates has been developed. The map, which delineates the operative mechanisms of fracture along with corresponding joint fracture toughness values, is plotted in a space described by two microstructure-dependent parameters, with the abscissa describing the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) and the ordinate representing the strain-rate-dependent solder yield strength. The plot space encompasses the three major mechanisms by which joints fail, namely (i) cohesive fracture of solder, (ii) cleavage fracture of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMC), and (iii) fracture of the solder-IMC interface. Line contours of constant fracture toughness values, as well as constant fraction of each of the above mechanisms, are indicated on the plots. The plots are generated by experimentally quantifying the dependence of the operative fracture mechanism(s) on the two microstructure-dependent parameters (IMC geometry and solder yield strength) as functions of strain rate, reflow parameters, and post-reflow aging. Separate maps are presented for nominally mode I and equi-mixed mode loading conditions (loading angle ϕ = 0° and 45°, respectively). The maps allow rapid assessment of the operative fracture mechanism(s) along with estimation of the expected joint fracture toughness value for a given loading condition (strain rate and loading angle) and joint microstructure without conducting actual tests, and may serve as a tool for both prediction and microstructure design.

  2. The mechanism of fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    In this book eighty-five papers look at fractures. Topics covered are fracture mechanics, fracture mechanisms, evaluating fracture resistance, fracture toughness, predicting crack growth, surface cracking, crack initiation and propagation, weld fractures, engineering applications of fracture mechanics, fracture and failure in nonmetallic materials, dynamic fractures, test techniques, radiation embrittlement, applications of fracture mechanics, design concepts, and creep.

  3. Fracture Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-01-31

    2219 -T851 aluminum (fractures at low stresses). The parameter KF is alloy compact specimens 1 2 and demonstrate consistent a function of specimen...Congress of 20. Walker, E. K., "The Effect of Stress Ratio Applied Mechanics, 1924. During Crack Propagation and Fatigue for 2024-T3 and 7015- T6 Aluminum ...34Stress- Corrosion Cracking in 12. Kaufman, J. G., and Nelson, F. G., "More Ti-6A1-4V Titanium Alloy in Nitrogen Tetroxide," on Specimen Size Effect in 2219

  4. Salter-Harris I and II fractures of the distal tibia: does mechanism of injury relate to premature physeal closure?

    PubMed

    Rohmiller, Michael T; Gaynor, Tracey P; Pawelek, Jeff; Mubarak, Scott J

    2006-01-01

    The distal tibial physis is the second most commonly injured physis in long bones. Recent reports demonstrate a high rate of premature physeal closure (PPC) in Salter-Harris (SH) type I or II fractures of the distal tibia. At our institution, 137 distal tibial SH type I or II fractures were treated from 1994 to 2002. Reviews were performed on all patients and 91 fractures met inclusion criteria. Patients were categorized according to treatment. We report a PPC rate of 39.6% in SH type I or II fractures of the distal tibial physis. We found a difference in PPC based on injury mechanism. The rate of PPC in patients with a supination-external-rotation-type injury was 35%, whereas patients with pronation-abduction-type injuries developed PPC in 54% of cases. Type of treatment may prevent PPC in some fractures. The most important determinant of PPC is the fracture displacement following reduction. PPC is a common problem following SH type I or II fractures of the distal tibia. Operative treatment may decrease the frequency of PPC in some fractures. Regardless of treatment method, we recommend anatomic reduction to decrease the risk of PPC.

  5. Posterior periosteal disruption in Salter-Harris Type II fractures of the distal femur: evidence for a hyperextension mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Shah, Rajvee; Murray, Martha M; Kleinman, Paul K

    2009-12-01

    Patterns of periosteal disruption are important factors in assessing the mechanism of injury of radiologically evident Salter-Harris (SH) fractures. The purpose of this study is to assess the frequency of posterior periosteal disruption on MRI in radiographically occult or subtle SH type II fractures of the distal femur and to evaluate associated soft-tissue findings that support a hyperextension mechanism of injury. We found that all children in our experience with occult or subtle SH type II fractures of the distal femur have posterior periosteal disruption and other MRI findings to indicate a hyperextension mechanism of injury. Direct indicators of fracture may be inconspicuous, and the presence of posterior periosteal disruption is a clue that should prompt a search for other features of this serious pediatric injury, which may be followed by limb shortening or angular deformity.

  6. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B.; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-01

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  7. Mechanics of tungsten blistering II: Analytical treatment and fracture mechanical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Muyuan; You, Jeong-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Since a decade the blistering of pure tungsten under hydrogen implantation has been one of the major research topics in relation to the plasma-wall interaction of tungsten-armored first wall. Overall blistering may reduce the erosion lifetime of the wall. Mature blisters grown by high internal pressure are likely to burst leading to exfoliation of the surface. Therefore, the control and suppression of blistering is an important concern for sustainable operation of the tungsten-armored plasma-facing components. In this context, a quantitative assessment of the mechanical conditions for blister bulging and growth is an important concern. In this article a theoretical framework is presented to describe the bulging deformation of tungsten blisters and to estimate the mechanical driving force of blister growth. The validity of the analytical formulations based on the theory of elastic plates is evaluated with the help of finite element analysis. Plastic strains and J-integral values at the blister boundary edge are assessed by means of numerical simulation. Extensive parametric studies were performed for a range of blister geometry (cap aspect ratio), gas pressure, yield stress and hardening rate. The characteristic features of the blistering mechanics are discussed and the cracking energy is quantitatively estimated for the various combinations of parameters.

  8. The mechanism of fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the fracture mechanics of metals. Topics considered at the conference included microcrack mechanics, pressurized thermal shock behavior of LWR pressure vessels, stress intensity factors, submerged arc welding, weldments in power plants, pipeline weld quality, natural gas tanks, cast iron for spent nuclear fuel shipping casks, pipe ruptures, physical radiation effects, pressure tubes, hydrogen embrittlement, critical flaw size curves, and the fracture mechanics of steels in turbines of power stations.

  9. Fracture mechanics expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, E.; Elfer, N.; Casadaban, C.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to fracture mechanics, an analytical method used extensively in the National Space Transportation System to conservatively predict the remaining service life of an article when a flaw or a material defect is detected. These analyses are performed on hardware containing material defects that have been detected by various nondestructive inspection techniques. An expert system being developed to streamline the process so that hardware dispositions may be obtained in a timely and consistent manner is discussed. The expert system reduces the potential for errors due to the manual transcription between the various software programs involved in completing a fracture mechanics analysis. NEXPERT Object, the expert system development shell selected for this purpose, allows the various software programs used in fracture mechanics analyses to be accessed and manipulated from the same platform.

  10. Fracture mechanics expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, E.; Elfer, N.; Casadaban, C. )

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to fracture mechanics, an analytical method used extensively in the National Space Transportation System to conservatively predict the remaining service life of an article when a flaw or a material defect is detected. These analyses are performed on hardware containing material defects that have been detected by various nondestructive inspection techniques. An expert system being developed to streamline the process so that hardware dispositions may be obtained in a timely and consistent manner is discussed. The expert system reduces the potential for errors due to the manual transcription between the various software programs involved in completing a fracture mechanics analysis. NEXPERT Object, the expert system development shell selected for this purpose, allows the various software programs used in fracture mechanics analyses to be accessed and manipulated from the same platform. 7 refs.

  11. Fracture mechanics expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, E.; Elfer, N.; Casadaban, C.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to fracture mechanics, an analytical method used extensively in the National Space Transportation System to conservatively predict the remaining service life of an article when a flaw or a material defect is detected. These analyses are performed on hardware containing material defects that have been detected by various nondestructive inspection techniques. An expert system being developed to streamline the process so that hardware dispositions may be obtained in a timely and consistent manner is discussed. The expert system reduces the potential for errors due to the manual transcription between the various software programs involved in completing a fracture mechanics analysis. NEXPERT Object, the expert system development shell selected for this purpose, allows the various software programs used in fracture mechanics analyses to be accessed and manipulated from the same platform.

  12. Fracture mechanics and parapsychology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, G. P.

    2010-08-01

    The problem of postcritical deformation of materials beyond the ultimate strength is considered a division of fracture mechanics. A simple example is used to show the relationship between this problem and parapsychology, which studies phenomena and processes where the causality principle fails. It is shown that the concept of postcritical deformation leads to problems with no solution

  13. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  14. Fracture mechanics validity limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.; Ernst, Hugo A.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture behavior is characteristics of a dramatic loss of strength compared to elastic deformation behavior. Fracture parameters have been developed and exhibit a range within which each is valid for predicting growth. Each is limited by the assumptions made in its development: all are defined within a specific context. For example, the stress intensity parameters, K, and the crack driving force, G, are derived using an assumption of linear elasticity. To use K or G, the zone of plasticity must be small as compared to the physical dimensions of the object being loaded. This insures an elastic response, and in this context, K and G will work well. Rice's J-integral has been used beyond the limits imposed on K and G. J requires an assumption of nonlinear elasticity, which is not characteristic of real material behavior, but is thought to be a reasonable approximation if unloading is kept to a minimum. As well, the constraint cannot change dramatically (typically, the crack extension is limited to ten-percent of the initial remaining ligament length). Rice, et al investigated the properties required of J-type parameters, J(sub x), and showed that the time rate, dJ(sub x)/dt, must not be a function of the crack extension rate, da/dt. Ernst devised the modified-J parameter, J(sub M), that meets this criterion. J(sub M) correlates fracture data to much higher crack growth than does J. Ultimately, a limit of the validity of J(sub M) is anticipated, and this has been estimated to be at a crack extension of about 40-percent of the initial remaining ligament length. None of the various parameters can be expected to describe fracture in an environment of gross plasticity, in which case the process is better described by deformation parameters, e.g., stress and strain. In the current study, various schemes to identify the onset of the plasticity-dominated behavior, i.e., the end of fracture mechanics validity, are presented. Each validity limit parameter is developed in

  15. Linear elastic fracture mechanics primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1992-01-01

    This primer is intended to remove the blackbox perception of fracture mechanics computer software by structural engineers. The fundamental concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented with emphasis on the practical application of fracture mechanics to real problems. Numerous rules of thumb are provided. Recommended texts for additional reading, and a discussion of the significance of fracture mechanics in structural design are given. Griffith's criterion for crack extension, Irwin's elastic stress field near the crack tip, and the influence of small-scale plasticity are discussed. Common stress intensities factor solutions and methods for determining them are included. Fracture toughness and subcritical crack growth are discussed. The application of fracture mechanics to damage tolerance and fracture control is discussed. Several example problems and a practice set of problems are given.

  16. Mechanisms of intergranular fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, D.

    1999-08-01

    The authors present a study of the atomistic mechanisms of crack propagation along grain boundaries in metals and alloys. The failure behavior showing cleavage crack growth and/or crack-tip dislocation emission is demonstrated using atomistic simulations for an embedded-atom model. The simulations follow the quasi-equilibrium growth of a crack as the stress intensity applied increases. Dislocations emitted from crack tips normally blunt the crack and inhibit cleavage, inducing ductile behavior. When the emitted dislocations stay near the crack tip (sessile dislocations), they do blunt the crack but brittle cleavage can occur after the emission of a sufficient number of dislocations. The fracture process occurs as a combination of dislocation emission/micro-cleavage portions that are controlled by the local atomistic structure of the grain boundary. The grain boundary is shown to be a region where dislocation emission is easier, a mechanism that competes with the lower cohesive strength of the boundary region.

  17. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  18. Electronics reliability fracture mechanics. Volume 2: Fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallis, J.; Duncan, L.; Buechler, D.; Backes, P.; Sandkulla, D.

    1992-05-01

    This is the second of two volumes. The other volume (WL-TR-92-3015) is 'Causes of Failures of Shop Replaceable Units and Hybrid Microcircuits.' The objective of the Electronics Reliability Fracture Mechanics (ERFM) program was to develop and demonstrate a life prediction technique for electronic assemblies, when subjected to environmental stresses of vibration and thermal cycling, based upon the mechanical properties of the materials and packaging configurations which make up an electronic system. The application of fracture mechanics to microscale phenomena in electronic assemblies was a pioneering research effort. The small scale made the experiments very difficult; for example, the 1-mil-diameter bond wires in microelectronic devices are 1/3 the diameter of a human hair. A number of issues had to be resolved to determine whether a fracture mechanics modelling approach is correct for the selected failures; specifically, the following two issues had to be resolved: What fraction of the lifetime is spent in crack initiation? Are macro fracture mechanics techniques, used in large structures such as bridges, applicable to the tiny structures in electronic equipment? The following structural failure mechanisms were selected for modelling: bondwire fracture from mechanical cycling; bondwire fracture from thermal (power) cycling; plated through hole (PTH) fracture from thermal cycling. The bondwire fracture test specimens were A1-1 percent Si wires, representative of wires used in the parts in the modules selected for detailed investigation in this program (see Vol. 1 of this report); 1-mil-diameter wires were tested in this program. The PTH test specimens were sections of 14-layer printed wiring boards of the type used.

  19. Geometrically Frustrated Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Noah; Koning, Vinzenz; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    When a flat elastic sheet is forced to conform to a surface with Gaussian curvature, stresses arise in the sheet. The mismatch between initial and final metrics gives rise to new fracture behavior which cannot be achieved by boundary loading alone. Using experiments of PDMS sheets frustrated on 3D-printed surfaces and a linearized analytical model, we demonstrate the ability of curvature to govern the sheets' fracture phenomenology. In this talk, we first show that curvature can both stimulate and suppress fracture initiation, depending on the position and orientation of the initial slit. Secondly, we show that curvature can steer the path of a crack as it propagates through the material. Lastly, the curvature can arrest cracks which would otherwise continue to propagate.

  20. Fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1989-01-01

    The present investigation of the fracture of alumina and zirconia polycrystalline ceramic specimens of precracked-disk type, in diametral compression, evaluated fracture toughness in pure mode I, combined mode I/mode II, and pure mode II, depending on the alignment of the center crack relative to the loading diameter. The mixed-mode fracture-toughness envelope thus obtained exhibits significant deviation to higher fracture toughness in mode II, relative to the predictions of linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. Crack-surface resistance due to grain-interlocking and abrasion are identified as the primary sources of increased fracture resistance in mode II loading of the polycrystalline ceramics.

  1. Modelling the graphite fracture mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquemoud, C.; Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.

    2012-07-01

    In order to define a design criterion for graphite components, it is important to identify the physical phenomena responsible for the graphite fracture, to include them in a more effective modelling. In a first step, a large panel of experiments have been realised in order to build up an important database; results of tensile tests, 3 and 4 point bending tests on smooth and notched specimens have been analysed and have demonstrated an important geometry related effects on the behavior up to fracture. Then, first simulations with an elastic or an elastoplastic bilinear constitutive law have not made it possible to simulate the experimental fracture stress variations with the specimen geometry, the fracture mechanisms of the graphite being at the microstructural scale. That is the reason why a specific F.E. model of the graphite structure has been developed in which every graphite grain has been meshed independently, the crack initiation along the basal plane of the particles as well as the crack propagation and coalescence have been modelled too. This specific model has been used to test two different approaches for fracture initiation: a critical stress criterion and two criteria of fracture mechanic type. They are all based on crystallographic considerations as a global critical stress criterion gave unsatisfactory results. The criteria of fracture mechanic type being extremely unstable and unable to represent the graphite global behaviour up to the final collapse, the critical stress criterion has been preferred to predict the results of the large range of available experiments, on both smooth and notched specimens. In so doing, the experimental observations have been correctly simulated: the geometry related effects on the experimental fracture stress dispersion, the specimen volume effects on the macroscopic fracture stress and the crack propagation at a constant stress intensity factor. In addition, the parameters of the criterion have been related to

  2. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwissler, J. G.; Adams, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture mechanics of cellular glasses (for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solr concentrator reflecting panels) are discussed. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials were developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region 1 may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

  3. Fracture mechanics and corrosion fatigue.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcevily, A. J.; Wei, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics, particularly in relation to the study of problems in environment-enhanced fatigue crack growth. The usefulness of this approach in developing understanding of the mechanisms for environmental embrittlement and its engineering utility are discussed. After a brief review of the evolution of the fracture mechanics approach and the study of environmental effects on the fatigue behavior of materials, a study is made of the response of materials to fatigue and corrosion fatigue, the modeling of the mechanisms of the fatigue process is considered, and the application of knowledge of fatigue crack growth to the prediction of the high cycle life of unnotched specimens is illustrated.

  4. Compressive fracture morphology and mechanism of metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-11-01

    We quantitatively investigated the fracture morphologies of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 and Pd78Cu6Si16 metallic glasses (MGs) under compression. The characteristic features of the compressive fracture morphology were captured, and the shear vein patterns were found to be not a one-to-one correspondence between two opposing fracture surfaces in an identical sample. This finding experimentally confirms that the compressive failure behaves in a fracture mode of pure shear (mode II). Quantitative measurements show that a ˜1 μm thickness layer with materials not only inside but also adjacent to the major shear band contributes to the formation of shear vein patterns. The critical shear strain to break a shear band was found to be more than 105% and higher in more ductile MGs under compression than tension. Estimation on the temperature rise at the fracture moment indicates that only ˜5% of the total elastic energy stored in the sample converts into the heat required for melting the layer to form the vein patterns. The mode II fracture toughness was also estimated based on the quantitative measurements of shear vein pattern and found larger than the mode I fracture toughness. Finally, the deformation and fracture mechanisms of MGs under tension and compression were compared and discussed. These results may improve the understanding on the fracture behaviors and mechanisms of MGs and may provide instructions on future design for ductile MGs with high resistance for fracture.

  5. Some recent theoretical and experimental developments in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Eftis, J.; Hones, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental developments in four distinct areas of fracture mechanics research are described. These are as follows: experimental comparisons of different nonlinear fracture toughness measures, including the nonlinear energy, R curve, COD and J integral methods; the singular elastic crack-tip stress and displacement equations and the validity of the proposition of their general adequacy as indicated, for example, by the biaxially loaded infinite sheet with a flat crack; the thermodynamic nature of surface energy induced by propagating cracks in relation to a general continuum thermodynamic description of brittle fracture; and analytical and experimental aspects of Mode II fracture, with experimental data for certain aluminum, steel and titanium alloys.

  6. (Fracture mechanics of inhomogeneous materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.

    1990-10-01

    Discussions were held with Japanese researchers concerning (1) the Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics in Inhomogeneous Materials and Structures (EPI) Program, and (2) ongoing large-scale pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) experiments in Japan. In the EPI Program, major activities in the current fiscal year include round-robin analyses of measured data from inhomogeneous base metal/weld metal compact- tension (CT) specimens fabricated from welded plates of A533 grade B class 1 steel. The round-robin task involves participants from nine research organizations in Japan and is scheduled for completion by the end of 1990. Additional experiments will be performed on crack growth in inhomogeneous CT specimens and three-point bend (3PB) specimens 10 mm thick. The data will be compared with that generated previously from 19-mm-thick-specimens. A new type of inhomogeneous surface-cracked specimen will be tested this year, with ratio of crack depth to surface length (a/c) satisfying 0.2 {le} (a/c) {le} 0. 8 and using a 3PB type of applied load. Plans are under way to fabricate a new welded plate of A533 grade B class 1 steel (from a different heat than that currently being tested) in order to provide an expanded fracture-toughness data base. Other topics concerning fracture-prevention issues in reactor pressure vessels were discussed with each of the host organizations, including an overview of ongoing work in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program.

  7. Numerical Analysis in Fracture Mechanics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-20

    in the following. A. 2-D Elastic-Plastic Crack Problem In 1975, ASTh Committee E24.01.09 undertook a task to compare numerical solutions to elastic...Penalty Function and Superposition Method", Fracture Mechanics, 12th Symposium, ed. by P. C. Paris, ASTh SIP 700, p. 439, 1980. [44) Barsoum, R...Landes, J. A. Begley and G. A. Clarke, ASTh SIP 668, p. 65, 1979. [46) Benzley, S., "Nonlinear Calculations With a Quadratic Quarter-point Crack Tip

  8. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    SciTech Connect

    Zwissler, J.G.; Adams, M.A.

    1981-02-01

    Cellular glasses are prime candidate materials for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solar concentrator reflecting panels. These materials are brittle, however, and susceptible to mechanical failure from slow crack growth caused by a stress corrosion mechanism. The results are detailed of one part of a program established to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize the behavior of these and commercially available materials. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials are developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region I may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

  9. Mechanical Coal-Face Fracturer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Radial points on proposed drill bit take advantage of natural fracture planes of coal. Radial fracture points retracted during drilling and impacted by piston to fracture coal once drilling halts. Group of bits attached to array of pneumatic drivers to fracture large areas of coal face.

  10. Mechanical performance of external fixators with wires for the treatment of bone fractures--Part II: Wire tension and slippage.

    PubMed

    Delprete, C; Gola, M M

    1993-02-01

    The work shows correct procedures needed in order to gather reliable data from measurement of displacements versus axial load in a laboratory mounting of the Ilizarov external fixator. The mechanism of settling after load cycling is investigated. Detension under load is a major problem of wires. By means of vibration frequency measurements, tests on single wire allow determination of reduction in wire tension due to transverse loading: it is found that, almost independently from the amount of clamp tightening, the tension reaches a lower limit related only to the transverse load and not related to pretension. It is shown that, for higher clamp tightening torques, wire detension must be attributed to permanent plastic deformation of the wires; moreover, it is shown that the unavoidable errors in the spacing of the tensioned wires lead to marked decrease of their stiffness under transverse load.

  11. Compendium of fracture mechanics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallworth, R.; Wilson, C.; Meyers, C.

    1990-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analysis results are presented from the following structures/components analyzed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) between 1982 and 1989: space shuttle main engine (SSME), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), external tank attach ring, B-1 stand LOX inner tank, and solid rocket booster (SRB). Results from the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) second stage blade parametric analysis determine a critical flaw size for a wide variety of stress intensity values. The engine 0212 failure analysis was a time dependent fracture life assessment. Results indicated that the disk ruptured due to an overspeed condition. Results also indicated that very small flaws in the curvic coupling area could propagate and lead to failure under normal operating conditions. It was strongly recommended that a nondestructive evaluation inspection schedule be implemented. The main ring of the HST, scheduled to launch in 1990, was analyzed by safe-life and fail-safe analyses. First safe-life inspection criteria curves for the ring inner and outer skins and the fore and aft channels were derived. Afterwards the skins and channels were determined to be fail-safe by analysis. A conservative safe-life analysis was done on the 270 redesign external tank attach ring. Results from the analysis were used to determine the nondestructive evaluation technique required.

  12. Entablature: fracture types and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, A. E. S.; Blake, S.; Tuffen, H.

    2014-05-01

    Entablature is the term used to describe zones or tiers of irregular jointing in basaltic lava flows. It is thought to form when water from rivers dammed by the lava inundates the lava flow surface, and during lava-meltwater interaction in subglacial settings. A number of different fracture types are described in entablature outcrops from the Búrfell lava and older lava flows in Þjórsárdalur, southwest Iceland. These are: striae-bearing, column-bounding fractures and pseudopillow fracture systems that themselves consist of two different fracture types—master fractures with dimpled surface textures and subsidiary fractures with curved striae. The interaction of pseudopillow fracture systems and columnar jointing in the entablature produces the chevron fracture patterns that are commonly observed in entablature. Cube-jointing is a more densely fractured version of entablature, which likely forms when more coolant enters the hot lava. The entablature tiers display closely spaced striae and dendritic crystal shapes which indicate rapid cooling. Master fracture surfaces show a thin band with an evolved composition at the fracture surface; mineral textures in this band also show evidence of quenching of this material. This is interpreted as gas-driven filter pressing of late-stage residual melt that is drawn into an area of low pressure immediately preceding or during master fracture formation by ductile extensional fracture of hot, partially crystallised lava. This melt is then quenched by an influx of water and/or steam when the master fracture fully opens. Our findings suggest that master fractures are the main conduit for coolant entering the lava flow during entablature formation.

  13. Fracture healing: mechanisms and interventions

    PubMed Central

    Einhorn, Thomas A.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures are the most common large-organ, traumatic injuries to humans. The repair of bone fractures is a postnatal regenerative process that recapitulates many of the ontological events of embryonic skeletal development. Although fracture repair usually restores the damaged skeletal organ to its pre-injury cellular composition, structure and biomechanical function, about 10% of fractures will not heal normally. This article reviews the developmental progression of fracture healing at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels. Innate and adaptive immune processes are discussed as a component of the injury response, as are environmental factors, such as the extent of injury to the bone and surrounding tissue, fixation and the contribution of vascular tissues. We also present strategies for fracture treatment that have been tested in animal models and in clinical trials or case series. The biophysical and biological basis of the molecular actions of various therapeutic approaches, including recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins and parathyroid hormone therapy, are also discussed. PMID:25266456

  14. Finite element methods in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Moyer, E. T., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Finite-element methodology specific to the analysis of fracture mechanics problems is reviewed. Primary emphasis is on the important algorithmic developments which have enhanced the numerical modeling of fracture processes. Methodologies to address elastostatic problems in two and three dimensions, elastodynamic problems, elastoplastic problems, special considerations for three-dimensional nonlinear problems, and the modeling of stable crack growth are reviewed. In addition, the future needs of the fracture community are discussed and open questions are identified.

  15. Equations For Selected Fracture-Mechanics Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubsey, Raymond T.; Orange, Thomas W.; Pierce, William S.; Shannon, John L., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Equations describing crack-mouth-opening displacements, stress-intensity factors, and related fracture-mechanics parameters of chevron-notched short bar and rod specimens presented in report. Equations in forms suitable for determining fracture toughnesses from maximum loads, for determining crack-extension-resistance curves, and for setting sensitivities of testing instruments. Useful in facilitating testing and interpretation of data from tests of brittle metals, ceramics, and glasses, formed into chevron-notched specimens for fracture testing according to concepts.

  16. Fracture mechanisms and fracture control in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wone-Chul

    Four basic failure modes--delamination, delamination buckling of composite sandwich panels, first-ply failure in cross-ply laminates, and compression failure--are analyzed using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and the J-integral method. Structural failures, including those at the micromechanical level, are investigated with the aid of the models developed, and the critical strains for crack propagation for each mode are obtained. In the structural fracture analyses area, the fracture control schemes for delamination in a composite rib stiffener and delamination buckling in composite sandwich panels subjected to in-plane compression are determined. The critical fracture strains were predicted with the aid of LEFM for delamination and the J-integral method for delamination buckling. The use of toughened matrix systems has been recommended for improved damage tolerant design for delamination crack propagation. An experimental study was conducted to determine the onset of delamination buckling in composite sandwich panel containing flaws. The critical fracture loads computed using the proposed theoretical model and a numerical computational scheme closely followed the experimental measurements made on sandwich panel specimens of graphite/epoxy faceskins and aluminum honeycomb core with varying faceskin thicknesses and core sizes. Micromechanical models of fracture in composites are explored to predict transverse cracking of cross-ply laminates and compression fracture of unidirectional composites. A modified shear lag model which takes into account the important role of interlaminar shear zones between the 0 degree and 90 degree piles in cross-ply laminate is proposed and criteria for transverse cracking have been developed. For compressive failure of unidirectional composites, pre-existing defects play an important role. Using anisotropic elasticity, the stress state around a defect under a remotely applied compressive load is obtained. The experimentally

  17. Combined mode I and mode II fracture of monolithic ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tikare, Veena; Choi, Sung R.

    1993-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behaviors of a coarse-grained silicon nitride, a fine-grained silicon nitride, and an alumina were investigated. These ceramics were fractured from two types of fracture initiating flaws: small surface flaws and large single edge precracks. The small surface flaws were introduced by Knoop indentation in flexural samples at various angles to the tensile stress direction and fractured in four-point bending. The samples with large precracks were fractured in the asymmetric four-point-bend geometry. The mixed-mode fracture toughness values obtained from the two flaw configurations were in good agreement with each other. All three ceramics displayed very similar mixed-mode fracture behavior, although their microstructures were not similar. Comparison of experimental data to mixed-mode fracture theories revealed that the minimum strain energy density theory best described the mixed-mode fracture behavior of all three ceramics.

  18. Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Characterization of a Graphite Epoxy Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Johnston, William M.; Toland, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and delamination onset and growth characterization data were generated for IM7/8552 graphite epoxy composite materials from two suppliers for use in fracture mechanics analyses. Both the fracture toughness testing and the fatigue testing were conducted using the End-notched Flexure (ENF) test. The ENF test for mode II fracture toughness is currently under review by ASTM as a potential standard test method. This current draft ASTM protocol was used as a guide to conduct the tests on the IM7/8552 material. This report summarizes the test approach, methods, procedures and results of this characterization effort.

  19. Fracture mechanism of a thermal barrier coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenko, V. M.; Ravilov, R. G.; Drevnyak, V. V.; Petrova, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The fracture mechanism of the thermal barrier coating of gas turbine blades is studied. The causes of the fracture of the ceramic layer are discussed and the possible ways to increase the fatigue life of the thermal barrier coating are considered.

  20. Fracture mechanics evaluation of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    A data base of mechanical and fracture properties for GaAs was generated. The data for single crystal GaAs will be used to design reusable GaAs solar modules. Database information includes; (1) physical property characterizations; (2) fracture behavior evaluations; and (3) strength of cells determined as a function of cell processing and material parameters.

  1. A new fracturing mechanism for granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessinger, Brad A.; Liu, Zhong; Cook, Neville G. W.; Myer, Larry R.

    Borehole breakout experiments are performed on sintered glass bead bricks and a new microscale fracturing mechanism is described that results in a macroscopic fracture plane oriented perpendicular to the uniaxial compressive loading stress. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) is used to inspect the fracture surfaces and it is found that fracture propagation occurs through a process of grain debonding and ejection from the sample. A two-dimensional boundary integral simulation models the effect of grain removal on subsequent fracturing by reducing the Young's modulus of failed grains, thereby allowing the compressive loading stress to be transferred to adjoining grains and grain contacts. It is found that this stress concentration is sufficient to induce additional grain failure and macroscopic fracture growth perpendicular to the applied load.

  2. Microstructural effects on fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    Fracture toughness of polycrystalline alumina and ceria partially-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (CeO2-TZP) ceramics were assessed in combined mode I and mode II loading using precracked disk specimens in diametral compression. Stress states ranging from pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II were obtained by aligning the center crack at specific angles relative to the loading diameter. The resulting mixed-mode fracture toughness envelope showed significant deviation to higher fracture toughness in mode II relative to the predictions of the linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. Critical comparison with corresponding results on soda-lime glass and fracture surface observations showed that crack surface resistance arising from grain interlocking and abrasion was the main source of the increased fracture toughness in mode II loading of the polycrystalline ceramics. The normalized fracture toughness for pure mode II loading, (KII/KIc), increased with increasing grain size for the CeO2-TZP ceramics. Quantitative fractography confirmed an increased percentage of transgranular fracture of the grains in mode II loading.

  3. Microstructural effects on fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    Fracture toughness of polycrystalline alumina and ceria partially-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (CeO2-TZP) ceramics were assessed in combined mode I and mode II loading using precracked disk specimens in diametral compression. Stress states ranging from pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II were obtained by aligning the center crack at specific angles relative to the loading diameter. The resulting mixed-mode fracture toughness envelope showed significant deviation to higher fracture toughness in mode II relative to the predictions of the linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. Critical comparison with corresponding results on soda-lime glass and fracture surface observations showed that crack surface resistance arising from grain interlocking and abrasion was the main source of the increased fracture toughness in mode II loading of the polycrystalline ceramics. The normalized fracture toughness for pure mode II loading, (KII/KIc), increased with increasing grain size for the CeO2-TZP ceramics. Quantitative fractography confirmed an increased percentage of transgranular fracture of the grains in mode II loading.

  4. Fracture mechanism of borated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.Y.; Soliman, S.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Balliett, T.A.

    2000-05-01

    The mechanical properties and fracture mechanism of irradiated and unirradiated boron containing Type 304 stainless steel are studied. Four different batches with different boron weight percentages are used. One of these batches was manufactured by a conventional wrought technique, while the others were manufactured by a powder metallurgy technique. The irradiated specimens were subjected to a fluence level of 5 x 10{sup 19} or 1 {times} 10{sup 21} n/m{sup 2}. The mechanical and fracture tests were performed at temperatures of 233, 298, and 533 K. No significant effects on the mechanical properties or fracture behavior were observed as a result of neutron irradiation and/or temperature. The ductility and toughness of the borated steel were found to decrease with increasing boron content. The effect of boride on void nucleation and linkage was found to play an important role in the fracture behavior of borated steel.

  5. Fracture Mechanics of Delamination. Initiation and Growth.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    transverse cracking, delamina- tion, x- radiography , fracture mechanics, strain energy release rate, finite element, initiation and growth criteria...Battelle Columbus Laboratories, Metals and Ceramics Information Center, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201. . . .1 Bell Aerospace Company, Buffalo , NY

  6. Fracture-mechanics studies of cementitious composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jenq, Y.S.

    1987-01-01

    Attempts have been made to apply fracture mechanics to concrete. However, the experimentally observed fracture parameters for concrete were found to be dependent on specimen size. This thesis first addresses studies of size effect on fracture parameters. Following the size-effect studies, applications of the fracture mechanics to concrete and steel-fiber-reinforced concrete are developed. An experimental program is first designed to investigate the factors that cause the size-effect on the fracture parameters used for concrete. The fracture parameters studied are critical stress intensity factor, critical strain energy release rate, critical crack tip opening displacement and fracture energy. The pre-critical stable crack growth is found to be the major factor that causes the size effect on the conventional critical stress intensity factor. Based on the observation of experimental results, the critical stress intensity factor and critical crack-tip opening displacement are proposed as the two basic fracture parameters. A theoretical model is developed for steel-fiber-reinforced concrete. Based on the studies of plain concrete, the contribution of the matrix in steel-fiber-reinforced concrete can be characterized using the proposed model.

  7. Integration of NDE Reliability and Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, F. L.; Doctor, S. R.; Heas!er, P. G.; Morris, C. J.; Pitman, S. G.; Selby, G. P.; Simonen, F. A.

    1981-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting a four-phase program for measuring and evaluating the effectiveness and reliability of in-service inspection (lSI} performed on the primary system piping welds of commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Phase I of the program is complete. A survey was made of the state of practice for ultrasonic rsr of LWR primary system piping welds. Fracture mechanics calculations were made to establish required nondestrutive testing sensitivities. In general, it was found that fatigue flaws less than 25% of wall thickness would not grow to failure within an inspection interval of 10 years. However, in some cases failure could occur considerably faster. Statistical methods for predicting and measuring the effectiveness and reliability of lSI were developed and will be applied in the "Round Robin Inspections" of Phase II. Methods were also developed for the production of flaws typical of those found in service. Samples fabricated by these methods wilI be used in Phase II to test inspection effectiveness and reliability. Measurements were made of the influence of flaw characteristics {i.e., roughness, tightness, and orientation) on inspection reliability. These measurernents, as well as the predictions of a statistical model for inspection reliability, indicate that current reporting and recording sensitivities are inadequate.

  8. A Hierarchical Approach to Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, Erik; Taasan, Shlomo

    2004-01-01

    Recent research conducted under NASA LaRC's Creativity and Innovation Program has led to the development of an initial approach for a hierarchical fracture mechanics. This methodology unites failure mechanisms occurring at different length scales and provides a framework for a physics-based theory of fracture. At the nanoscale, parametric molecular dynamic simulations are used to compute the energy associated with atomic level failure mechanisms. This information is used in a mesoscale percolation model of defect coalescence to obtain statistics of fracture paths and energies through Monte Carlo simulations. The mathematical structure of predicted crack paths is described using concepts of fractal geometry. The non-integer fractal dimension relates geometric and energy measures between meso- and macroscales. For illustration, a fractal-based continuum strain energy release rate is derived for inter- and transgranular fracture in polycrystalline metals.

  9. Fracture mechanics of snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.

    2001-07-01

    Dense snow avalanches are analyzed by modeling the snow slab as an elastic and brittle plate, attached by static friction to the underlying ground. The grade of heterogeneity in the local fracture (slip) thresholds, and the ratio of the average substrate slip threshold to the average slab fracture threshold, are the decisive parameters for avalanche dynamics. For a strong pack of snow there appears a stable precursor of local slips when the frictional contacts are weakened (equivalent to rising temperature), which eventually trigger a catastrophic crack growth that suddenly releases the entire slab. In the opposite limit of very high slip thresholds, the slab simply melts when the temperature is increased. In the intermediate regime, and for a homogeneous slab, the model display features typical of real snow avalanches. The model also suggests an explanation to why avalanches are impossible to forecast reliably based on precursor observations. This explanation may as well be applicable to other catastrophic rupture phenomena such as earthquakes.

  10. Fracture mechanics of snow avalanches.

    PubMed

    Aström, J A; Timonen, J

    2001-07-01

    Dense snow avalanches are analyzed by modeling the snow slab as an elastic and brittle plate, attached by static friction to the underlying ground. The grade of heterogeneity in the local fracture (slip) thresholds, and the ratio of the average substrate slip threshold to the average slab fracture threshold, are the decisive parameters for avalanche dynamics. For a strong pack of snow there appears a stable precursor of local slips when the frictional contacts are weakened (equivalent to rising temperature), which eventually trigger a catastrophic crack growth that suddenly releases the entire slab. In the opposite limit of very high slip thresholds, the slab simply melts when the temperature is increased. In the intermediate regime, and for a homogeneous slab, the model display features typical of real snow avalanches. The model also suggests an explanation to why avalanches are impossible to forecast reliably based on precursor observations. This explanation may as well be applicable to other catastrophic rupture phenomena such as earthquakes.

  11. Rabotnov damageparameter and description of delayed fracture: Results, current status, application to fracture mechanics, and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, L. V.; Igonin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a review of studies of delayed fracture and fracture mechanics problems in which the hypotheses and ideas of Yu. N. Rabotnov and L. M. Kachanov on the mechanisms of delayed fracture under creep conditions are extended to describe fracture processes using scalar and tensor measures of damage. The results of current research in the theory of elasticity, the mathematical theory of plasticity and creep, the mechanics of composites, and linear and nonlinear fracture mechanics, with material damage taken into account.

  12. Fracture mechanics SCC testing of weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Dietzel, W.; Daum, K.H.; Strieder, K.; Kocak, M.

    1994-12-31

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) studies of shielded metal arc (SMAW) weld joints of a C-Mn steel were performed using a fracture mechanics based test technique. The specimens contained multipass ferritic weldments with two nitrogen contents and were tested in the As-Welded (AW) condition. Fatigue precracked compact tension (CT) specimens with the cracks in the weld metals were subjected to slow rising displacement rates in the order of 1 {mu}m/h, measured in the load lines of the specimens. The tests were conducted at room temperature in ASTM substitute ocean water under conditions of hydrogen charging (cathodic polarization at {minus}900 mV vs Ag/AgCl, de-aerated solution). Results obtained in these tests in terms of CTOD-R curves are compared with corresponding data obtained in standardized fracture mechanics tests performed in laboratory air. The aim of this work was to assess the feasibility of a rising displacement type of test for SCC testing of weldments. It was also intended to compare the influences of the nitrogen content on the fracture behavior of these welds in air and under conditions of environmentally assisted cracking by using fracture mechanics concepts. The evaluation of the rising displacement SCC tests shows that differences in the fracture behavior observed for testing in laboratory air which could be attributed to the effect of nitrogen are almost completely overridden by the influence of die corrosive environment. Investigations of the fracture surfaces show that the uptake of hydrogen from the aqueous environment in both cases led to a strong embrittlement which is responsible for the decrease in fracture toughness.

  13. Crack branching in carbon steel. Fracture mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syromyatnikova, A. S.; Alekseev, A. A.; Levin, A. I.; Lyglaev, A. V.

    2010-04-01

    The fracture surfaces of pressure vessels made of carbon steel that form during crack branching propagation are examined by fractography. Crack branching is found to occur at a crack velocity higher than a certain critical value V > V c . In this case, the material volume that is involved in fracture and depends on the elastoplastic properties of the material and the sample width has no time to dissipate the energy released upon crack motion via the damage mechanisms intrinsic in the material under given deformation conditions (in our case, via cracking according to intragranular cleavage).

  14. Size Effects in Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Recent Theoretical and Experimental Developments in Fracture Mechanics", Fracture 1977, 1 (1977) 695-723. 40 S. Mindess and J. S. Nadeau," Effect of Notch...0.4 1.42 b 2.0 0.80 b Mindess and Nadeau [40], 1.0 3.98 0.86 b Mortar, 3PB 8.03 0.80 b 12.0 0.82 b 16.0 0.84 b 20.0 0.83 b Concrete, 3PB 1.0 3.54 1.08

  15. A review of fracture mechanics life technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besuner, P. M.; Harris, D. O.; Thomas, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Lifetime prediction technology for structural components subjected to cyclic loads is examined. The central objectives of the project are: (1) to report the current state of the art, and (2) recommend future development of fracture mechanics-based analytical tools for modeling subcritical fatigue crack growth in structures. Of special interest is the ability to apply these tools to practical engineering problems and the developmental steps necessary to bring vital technologies to this stage. The authors conducted a survey of published literature and numerous discussions with experts in the field of fracture mechanics life technology. One of the key points made is that fracture mechanics analyses of crack growth often involve consideration of fatigue and fracture under extreme conditions. Therefore, inaccuracies in predicting component lifetime will be dominated by inaccuracies in environment and fatigue crack growth relations, stress intensity factor solutions, and methods used to model given loads and stresses. Suggestions made for reducing these inaccuracies include development of improved models of subcritical crack growth, research efforts aimed at better characterizing residual and assembly stresses that can be introduced during fabrication, and more widespread and uniform use of the best existing methods.

  16. Applications of advanced fracture mechanics to fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanninen, M. F.; O'Donoghue, P. E.; Green, S. T.; Leung, C. P.; Roy, S.; Burnside, O. H.

    Multi-site damage (MSD) in the form of cracking at rivet holes in lap splice joints has been identified as a serious threat to the integrity of commercial aircraft nearing their design life targets. Consequently, to assure the safety of aircraft that have accumulated large numbers of flights, flight hours and years in service requires requires inspection procedures that are based on the possibility that MSD may be present. For inspections of aircraft components to be properly focused on me defect sizes that are critical for structural integrity, fracture analyses are needed. The current methods are essentially those of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) which are strictly valid only for cracks that extend in a quasi-static manner under small-scale crack tip plasticity conditions. While LEFM is very likely to be appropriate for subcritical crack growth, quantifying the conditions for fracture instability and subsequent propagation may require advanced fracture mechanics techniques. The specific focus in this paper was to identify the conditions in which inelastic-dynamic effects occur in (1) the linking up Of local damage in a lap splice joint to form a major crack, and (2) large-scale fuselage failure by a rapidly occurring fluid structure interaction process.

  17. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the Seventeenth National Symposium, Albany, NY, August 7-9, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. M. (Editor); Chait, R. (Editor); Smith, C. W. (Editor); Wilhem, D. P. (Editor); Andrews, W. A. (Editor); Newman, J. C. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference gives attention to topics in the application of fracture mechanics, subcritical crack growth phenomena, fracture testing methods, ductile fracture behavior, and fracture mechanisms and their analysis. Specific papers treat the resistance curve approach to composite materials characterization, fracture toughness in ductile iron and cast steel, hold-time effects in elevated temperature fatigue crack propagation, creep crack growth under nonsteady conditions, viscoplastic fatigue in a superalloy at elevated temperatures, fracture testing with arc bend specimens, one-point bend impact test application, and a compact mode II fracture specimen. Also discussed are the computation of stable crack growth using the J-integral, the use of plastic energy dissipation to characterize crack growth, the extension of surface cracks under cyclic loading, the minimum time criterion for crack instability in structural materials, dynamic crack propagation and branching under biaxial loading, and boundary layer effects in cracked bodies.

  18. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  19. Fracture mechanics analyses for skin-stiffener debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Sistla, R.; Krishnamurthy, T.; Lotts, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    The debond configurations presently subjected to 3D FEM fracture mechanics analyses are respectively of the flange-skin strip and skin-stiffener configuration type. Two methods employing the virtual crack closure technique were used to evaluate the strain energy release rate, or 'G-value' distributions across the debond front. Both methods yielded nearly identical G-value distributions for the debond configurations studied; they were compared with plane strain and shell analyses results from the literature for the flange skin strip configuration, and found to be in good agreement. Mode II is dominant for the skin-stiffener debond configuration.

  20. Fracture Mechanisms in Iron and Nickel Aluminides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-15

    ITmc rE co"i 41 ) 0) Final Report I Contract N00014-84-K-0276 FRACTURE MECHANISMS IN IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES covering the period 1/3/84 - 31/5/88...THIS PAGE ABSTRACT -he high cycle fatigue ( HCF ) resistance of several boron-doped Ni3AI alloys has been determined over a range of test temperatures...were transgranular in the Ni-rich alloys and intergranular or interdendritic in Ni-26%A).. HCF lives decreased sharply at temperatures above 500dC

  1. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  2. References and conference proceedings towards the understanding of fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toor, P. M.; Hudson, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    A list of books, reports, periodicals, and conference proceedings, as well as individual papers, centered on specific aspects of fracture phenomenon has been compiled by the ASTM Committee E-24 on Fracture Testing. A list of basic references includes the articles on the development of fracture toughness, evaluation of stress intensity factors, fatigue crack growth, fracture testing, fracture of brittle materials, and fractography. Special attention is given to the references on application of fracture mechanics to new designs and on reevaluation of failed designs, many of them concerned with naval and aircraft structures.

  3. Fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of some common small-crack test specimens, the underlying causes of the small-crack effect, and the fracture-mechanics parameters that have been used to correlate or predict their growth behavior. This review concentrates on continuum mechanics concepts and on the nonlinear behavior of small cracks. The paper reviews some stress-intensity factor solutions for small-crack test specimens and develops some simple elastic-plastic J integral and cyclic J integral expressions that include the influence of crack-closure. These parameters were applied to small-crack growth data on two aluminum alloys, and a fatigue life prediction methodology is demonstrated. For these materials, the crack-closure transient from the plastic wake was found to be the major factor in causing the small-crack effect.

  4. Osteoimmune Mechanisms of Segmental Bone Fracture Healing and Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    it is essential to understand additional mechanisms that play a crucial role in bone healing through participation of cells other than osteoblasts...osteoclasts and their respective progenitors. Bone fractures heal with overlapping phases of inflammation, cell proliferation, and bone remodeling...fracture healing. During fracture repair, there is an abundant infiltration of immune cells at the fracture site that not only mediate the inflammatory

  5. Mechanics of fracture - Fundamentals and some recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Subramonian, N.; Lee, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    An overview is presented of the fundamental aspects of and recent developments in fracture mechanics. Reference is made to linear elastic fracture mechanics including the state of stresses and displacements in the vicinity of cracks, effects of crack geometry and orientation on stress intensity factors, energy balance of Griffith, Irwin's stress intensity concept, and linear elastic fracture mechanics testing for fracture toughness. Other aspects of this paper include the non-linear behavior of materials and their influence on fracture mechanics parameters, consideration of viscoelasticity and plasticity, non-linear fracture toughness parameters as C.O.D., R-curve and J-integral, and a non-linear energy method, proposed by Liebowitz. Finite element methods applied to fracture mechanics problems are indicated. Also, consideration has been given to slow crack growth, dynamic effects on K(IC), Sih's criterion for fracture, Lee and Liebowitz's criterion relating crack growth with plastic energy, and applications of fracture mechanics to aircraft design. Suggestions are offered for future research efforts to be undertaken in fracture mechanics.

  6. Patterns and perspectives in applied fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    This lecture begins with a overview of applied fracture mechanics pertinent to safety of pressure vessels. It then progresses to a chronological panorama of experimental and analytical results. To be useful and dependable in safety analysis of real structures, new analysis developments must be physically realistic, which means that they must accurately describe physical cause and effect. Consequently, before mathematical modeling can begin, cause and effect must be established from experimental data. This can be difficult and time consuming, but worth the effort. Accordingly, the theme of this paper is that the search for patterns is constant and vital. This theme is illustrated by the development of small, single-specimen, fracture toughness testing techniques. It is also illustrated by the development, based on two different published large-strain, elastic-plastic, three-dimensional finite-element analyses, of a hypothesis concerning three-dimensional loss of constraint. When a generalization of Irwin`s thickness-normalized plastic-zone parameter, reaches a value close to 2{pi}, the through-thickness contraction strain at the apex of the near-tip logarithmic-spiral slip-line region becomes the dominant negative strain accommodating crack opening. Because slip lines passing from the midplane to the stress-free side surfaces do not have to curve, once these slip lines are established, stresses near the crack tip are only elevated by strain hardening and constraint becomes significantly relaxed. This hypothesis, based on published three-dimensional elastic-plastic analyses, provides a potentially valuable means for gaining additional insight into constraint effects on fracture toughness by considering the roles played by the plastic strains as well as the stresses that develop near a crack tip.

  7. Patterns and perspectives in applied fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkle, John G.; Reuter, Walter G.; Underwood, John H.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    This lecture begins with a overview of applied fracture mechanics pertinent to safety of pressure vessels. It then progresses to a chronological panorama of experimental and analytical results. To be useful and dependable in safety analysis of real structures, new analysis developments must be physically realistic, which means that they must accurately describe physical cause and effect. Consequently, before mathematical modeling can begin, cause and effect must be established from experimental data. This can be difficult and time consuming, but worth the effort. Accordingly, the theme of this paper is that the search for patterns is constant and vital. This theme is illustrated by the development of small, single-specimen, fracture toughness testing techniques. It is also illustrated by the development, based on two different published large-strain, elastic-plastic, three-dimensional finite-element analyses, of a hypothesis concerning three-dimensional loss of constraint. When a generalization of Irwin's thickness-normalized plastic-zone parameter reaches a value close to 2 pi, the through-thickness contraction strain at the apex of the near-tip logarithmic-spiral slip-line region becomes the dominant negative strain accommodating crack opening. Because slip lines passing from the midplane to the stress-free side surfaces do not have to curve, once these slip lines are established, stresses near the crack tip are only elevated by strain hardening and constraint becomes significantly relaxed. This hypothesis, based on published three-dimensional elastic-plastic analyses, provides a potentially valuable means for gaining additional insight into constraint effects on fracture toughness by considering the roles played by the plastic strains as well as the stresses that develop near a crack tip.

  8. Fatigue fracture mechanism maps for a type 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Yamaguchi, K.; Hayakawa, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Takeuchi, E.; Matsuoka, S.

    2004-04-01

    Fatigue fracture mechanism maps at room temperature and 573 K for a type 304 stainless steel were constructed by correlating the crack propagation rate with information obtained on the fracture surface. Depending on the crack propagation rate, ranging from 1 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-11 m/cycle, three types of fracture surfaces were observed. One was a striation region; the second was a “featureless” fracture region, which appeared rough under scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation; and the third was crystallographic fracture region, which appeared smooth under SEM observation. The area fractions and the indexes of the fracture surfaces were quantified and identified by the etch-pit method. From the results, crack initiation and propagation mechanisms were cleared and fatigue fracture mechanism maps were constructed. The maps may be useful for investigating the cause of the fatigue failure accident of structures made of type 304 steels.

  9. Mechanisms for fast flow in unsaturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin

    1998-03-01

    Although fractures in rock are well-recognized as pathways for fast percolation of water, the possibility that fast flow could occur along unsaturated fracture pathways is commonly not considered in vadose zone hydrology. In this study, two mechanisms for fast flow along unsaturated fractures were investigated, film flow and surface zone flow. The importance of fracture surface roughness was demonstrated through experiments conducted on ceramic blocks having simple surface topographies. Those experiments showed that film flow on fracture surfaces is largely due to flow along continuous surface channels which become water-filled at near-zero matric (capillary) potentials. The second mechanism, surface zone flow, is important when the permeability of the rock along fractures (fracture skin) is significantly greater than that of the bulk rock matrix. Surface zone fast flow was demonstrated through water imbibition (sorptivity) experiments. These mechanisms help explain observations of rapid solute transport in unsaturated subsurface environments.

  10. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J.; Schulz, H.; Sievers, J.

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

  11. Mechanical stratigraphic controls on natural fracture spacing and penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnis, Ronald N.; Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; Smart, Kevin J.; Lehrmann, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Fine-grained low permeability sedimentary rocks, such as shale and mudrock, have drawn attention as unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. Fracturing - both natural and induced - is extremely important for increasing permeability in otherwise low-permeability rock. We analyze natural extension fracture networks within a complete measured outcrop section of the Ernst Member of the Boquillas Formation in Big Bend National Park, west Texas. Results of bed-center, dip-parallel scanline surveys demonstrate nearly identical fracture strikes and slight variation in dip between mudrock, chalk, and limestone beds. Fracture spacing tends to increase proportional to bed thickness in limestone and chalk beds; however, dramatic differences in fracture spacing are observed in mudrock. A direct relationship is observed between fracture spacing/thickness ratio and rock competence. Vertical fracture penetrations measured from the middle of chalk and limestone beds generally extend to and often beyond bed boundaries into the vertically adjacent mudrock beds. In contrast, fractures in the mudrock beds rarely penetrate beyond the bed boundaries into the adjacent carbonate beds. Consequently, natural bed-perpendicular fracture connectivity through the mechanically layered sequence generally is poor. Fracture connectivity strongly influences permeability architecture, and fracture prediction should consider thin bed-scale control on fracture heights and the strong lithologic control on fracture spacing.

  12. [Bone fracture and the healing mechanisms. The mechanical stress for fracture healing in view of distraction osteogenesis].

    PubMed

    Yukata, Kiminori; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Yasui, Natsuo

    2009-05-01

    It is generally accepted that moderate mechanical stress influences the course of fracture healing. A flexible fixation of the fractured site can induce fracture callus formation, whereas an unstable fixation can lead to a nonunion. The relationship between mechanical stress and the process of bone regeneration or healing remains incompletely understood. Distraction osteogenesis is a surgical technique that, using appropriate mechanical tension-stress, does not break the callus but rather it stimulates and maintains osteogenesis. The common principles of distraction osteogenesis are osteotomy and slow progressive distraction by an external fixation device. Interest in bone regeneration associated with mechanical stress might lead to better understanding of the fracture healing process.

  13. Mechanics and fracture of hybrid material interface bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jialai

    Considering current and future applications of hybrid materials and structures in civil engineering, the strength and durability of interface bond between the conventional materials and composites are critical to development of such products. Conventional methods mostly used for analysis of isotropic materials may not be well suitable or accurate enough for a system made of anisotropic materials with relatively low shear stiffness. A need exists for developing more accurate and explicit analytical solutions for hybrid material interface analysis and related novel experimental characterization techniques. In this study, a combined analytical and experimental approach to characterize hybrid material interface bond is developed. Using a shear deformable plate theory and an elastic interface model, a mechanics approach for interface analysis of hybrid material bond under general loading is first proposed. The resulting closed-form solution of interface stress distribution is used to compute strain energy release rate (SERB) and stress intensity factor (SIF) of the interface with or without adhesive bond. This approach is then extended to delamination of composite structures under generic loading conditions. Second, novel experimental approaches for characterization of hybrid material bonded interfaces are presented. To account for the crack tip deformations, a tapered beam on elastic foundation (TBEF) is developed. Based on the TBEF model, analysis and design of two novel fracture specimens, Tapered Double Cantilever Beam (TDCB) and Tapered End Notched Flexure (TENF), are proposed, and they are effectively used in fracture toughness tests of bonded interface under Mode-I and Mode-II loadings, respectively. A constant compliance rate change over certain crack length range is achieved for the TDCB and TENF specimens, and it alleviates the necessity of experimental compliance calibration tests. The fracture toughness data obtained from the experiments are useful to

  14. Experimental investigations of the influence of material and thickness on fracture under pure mode II loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.

    2010-06-01

    Experimental investigation to the effects of thickness and material on mode II fracture were performed. Tension-shear specimens made of aluminium alloy LC4CS and 7050-T7452 with thicknesses of 2, 4, 8 and 14 mm were used. All crack tip appearances and fracture profiles of the specimens were observed. Mode II fracture toughness were calculated. It is shown that material and thickness play an important role in mode II fracture. The fracture of LC4CS appears shear fracture under all kinds of thicknesses, however the fracture of 7050-T7452 is tensile fracture when thickness is larger or equal to 8mm, and shear initiation along the original crack plane, then turnaround and tensile failure when thickness is smaller than 8mm. Mode II fracture toughness is independent of thickness.

  15. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  16. Elastic - Plastic Fracture Mechanics. A Critical Review. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK MICS COMMITTEE MARITIME COLLE GE Dr. William Sandberg Dr. W. R. Porter AMERICAN IRON AND STEEL INSTITUTE WELDING RESEARCH... welded steel structures. Fundamental concepts and underlying assumptions are described. Standardized test methods and recent developments are reviewed...fracture mechanics, as applied to welded steel structures. First, the fundamental concepts and underlying assumptions of fracture mechanics are described

  17. Fluid driven fracture mechanics in highly anisotropic shale: a laboratory study with application to hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehne, Stephan; Benson, Philip; Koor, Nick; Enfield, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The finding of considerable volumes of hydrocarbon resources within tight sedimentary rock formations in the UK led to focused attention on the fundamental fracture properties of low permeability rock types and hydraulic fracturing. Despite much research in these fields, there remains a scarcity of available experimental data concerning the fracture mechanics of fluid driven fracturing and the fracture properties of anisotropic, low permeability rock types. In this study, hydraulic fracturing is simulated in a controlled laboratory environment to track fracture nucleation (location) and propagation (velocity) in space and time and assess how environmental factors and rock properties influence the fracture process and the developing fracture network. Here we report data on employing fluid overpressure to generate a permeable network of micro tensile fractures in a highly anisotropic shale ( 50% P-wave velocity anisotropy). Experiments are carried out in a triaxial deformation apparatus using cylindrical samples. The bedding planes are orientated either parallel or normal to the major principal stress direction (σ1). A newly developed technique, using a steel guide arrangement to direct pressurised fluid into a sealed section of an axially drilled conduit, allows the pore fluid to contact the rock directly and to initiate tensile fractures from the pre-defined zone inside the sample. Acoustic Emission location is used to record and map the nucleation and development of the micro-fracture network. Indirect tensile strength measurements at atmospheric pressure show a high tensile strength anisotropy ( 60%) of the shale. Depending on the relative bedding orientation within the stress field, we find that fluid induced fractures in the sample propagate in two of the three principal fracture orientations: Divider and Short-Transverse. The fracture progresses parallel to the bedding plane (Short-Transverse orientation) if the bedding plane is aligned (parallel) with the

  18. Effects of pulp capping materials on fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kucukyilmaz, Ebru; Yasa, Bilal; Akcay, Merve; Savas, Selcuk; Kavrik, Fevzi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cavity design and the type of pulp capping materials on the fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted, sound molar teeth were selected for the study. A dovetail cavity on the mesio-occlusal and a slot cavity on disto-occlusal surfaces of each tooth were prepared, and the teeth were divided 4 groups which one of them as a control group. The pulp capping materials (TheraCal LC, Calcimol LC, Dycal) applied on pulpo-axial wall of each cavity, and the restoration was completed with composite resin. The teeth were subjected to a compressive load in a universal mechanical testing machine. The surfaces of the tooth and restoration were examined under a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using factorial analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Results: For pulp capping materials, the highest fracture load (931.15 ± 203.81 N) and the lowest fracture load (832.28 ± 245.75 N) were calculated for Control and Dycal group, respectively. However, there were no statistically significant differences among all groups (P > 0.05). The fracture load of the dovetail groups was significantly higher than those of the slot cavity groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Dovetail cavity design shows better fracture resistance in Class II composite restorations, independent of used or not used pulp capping materials. PMID:26038653

  19. Effects of pulp capping materials on fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Kucukyilmaz, Ebru; Yasa, Bilal; Akcay, Merve; Savas, Selcuk; Kavrik, Fevzi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cavity design and the type of pulp capping materials on the fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations. Sixty freshly extracted, sound molar teeth were selected for the study. A dovetail cavity on the mesio-occlusal and a slot cavity on disto-occlusal surfaces of each tooth were prepared, and the teeth were divided 4 groups which one of them as a control group. The pulp capping materials (TheraCal LC, Calcimol LC, Dycal) applied on pulpo-axial wall of each cavity, and the restoration was completed with composite resin. The teeth were subjected to a compressive load in a universal mechanical testing machine. The surfaces of the tooth and restoration were examined under a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using factorial analysis of variance and Tukey's test. For pulp capping materials, the highest fracture load (931.15 ± 203.81 N) and the lowest fracture load (832.28 ± 245.75 N) were calculated for Control and Dycal group, respectively. However, there were no statistically significant differences among all groups (P > 0.05). The fracture load of the dovetail groups was significantly higher than those of the slot cavity groups (P < 0.05). Dovetail cavity design shows better fracture resistance in Class II composite restorations, independent of used or not used pulp capping materials.

  20. Gunshot induced indirect femoral fracture: mechanism of injury and fracture morphology.

    PubMed

    Kieser, David C; Carr, D J; Leclair, S C J; Horsfall, I; Theis, J C; Swain, M V; Kieser, J A

    2013-12-01

    Indirect ballistic fractures occur when a projectile passes close to, but not contacting, the bone. The mechanism of how these fractures occur is not yet proven, but recently the acoustic shockwave has been excluded as a cause. The objective of this study is to determine whether the expanding temporary cavity, the collapse of this cavity or its oscillation causes these fractures. In addition, we describe the fracture morphology and biomechanical causes of this injury. 40 fresh deer femora were strain gauged and embedded in ballistic gelatin before being shot with four different projectiles with varying distances off the bone. Pressure recordings, chronographs and radar allowed assessment of local pressures and energy transfer. High-speed video allowed the temporal relationship between the temporary cavity and fracture formation to be analysed, while sample dissection allowed the fracture morphology to be described. The fractures produced were consistently wedge-shaped and caused by the expansion of the temporary cavity, flexing the bone beyond its yield point, causing tension failure on the cortex opposite the expanding temporary cavity and a compression wedge on the side of the cavity. Local pressure was not predictive of fracture formation but the energy transfer to the gelatin block was predictive. Indirect fractures are caused by the expansion of the temporary cavity and relate to the proximity of this cavity to the bone. Fractures occur from flexion of the bone and classically display wedge-shaped fracture patterns with the apex of the wedge pointing away from the expanding cavity.

  1. Mixed-mode Mechanism of Hydraulic Fracture Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, R. S.; Germanovich, L.; Wu, R.

    2006-12-01

    Mixed-mode I+III loading is one of the primary causes of fracture front segmentation. Although such segmented fractures have been observed both in nature and laboratory, we are not aware of direct laboratory experiments on the mode III mechanism of segmentation of hydraulically induced fractures. In this work, we developed a laboratory technique and a theoretical model for studying not only the effect of mode III loading on the onset of hydraulic fracture segmentation, but also the effect of segmentation on the subsequent growth of hydraulic fractures. In quasi-brittle materials, even a small mode III component may cause fracture segmentation due to a tensile stress field induced near the fracture front [Rice, 1968]. Previously, this has been confirmed in experiments with non-hydraulic fractures [Knauss, 1970; Cooke and Pollard, 1996]. In one occasion, quasi-hydraulic fractures propagated in fast, uncontrollable manner [Sommer, 1969]. This is why, we focused on controlled hydraulic fractures with a rather small KIII/KI ratio (1-10 %). For mixed mode I+III experiments, we used transparent, cylindrical PMMA samples with circular internal fractures perpendicular to the sample axis. Fracture orientation was controlled by thermoelastic stresses induced in each sample by preheating it before creating a fracture. In order to apply mode III loading to the initial fracture, a constant torque was applied to the specimen while fluid was injected into the fracture at a constant rate to pressurize it and to induce mode I loading. The velocity of fracture propagation was constrained by controlling the rate of fluid injection. In spite of a small magnitude of the mode III component, we observed segmented fracture fronts in all tested samples. The segments had similar dimensions and shape elongated around the perimeter of the initial fracture. When the fractures were further pressurized by injecting additional fluid into the sample, second-order segments developed along the fronts

  2. Breakdown of Continuum Fracture Mechanics at the Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Takahiro; Ouchi, Kenji; Chihara, Yuu; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Materials fail by the nucleation and propagation of a crack, the critical condition of which is quantitatively described by fracture mechanics that uses an intensity of singular stress field characteristically formed near the crack-tip. However, the continuum assumption basing fracture mechanics obscures the prediction of failure of materials at the nanoscale due to discreteness of atoms. Here, we demonstrate the ultimate dimensional limit of fracture mechanics at the nanoscale, where only a small number of atoms are included in a singular field of continuum stress formed near a crack tip. Surprisingly, a singular stress field of only several nanometers still governs fracture as successfully as that at the macroscale, whereas both the stress intensity factor and the energy release rate fail to describe fracture below a critically confined singular field of 2–3 nm, i.e., breakdown of fracture mechanics within the framework of the continuum theory. We further propose an energy-based theory that explicitly accounts for the discrete nature of atoms, and demonstrate that our theory not only successfully describes fracture even below the critical size but also seamlessly connects the atomic to macroscales. It thus provides a more universal fracture criterion, and novel atomistic insights into fracture. PMID:25716684

  3. Patient-reported outcome following nonsurgical management of type II odontoid process fractures in adults

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Maged D; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Nassir, Rafiq Muhammed; Bhatt, Pragnesh; Kamel, Mahmoud H

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transverse (type II) odontoid process fracture is among the most commonly encountered cervical spine fractures. Nonsurgical management through external immobilization is occasionally preferred to surgical management but is criticized for its higher rates of failure and lower patient satisfaction. Our aim is to analyze patient-reported outcomes in patients who underwent nonsurgical treatment for type II odontoid fractures. Methods: We identified patients >18-year-old who underwent external immobilization as a treatment for isolated type II odontoid fracture between 2007 and 2012. We collected demographic parameters, clinical presentation, mode of injury, imaging studies and modality and duration of treatment (soft collar, halo-vest, or both). Patients were contacted by telephone to participate in a 15-min survey addressing their recovery including their subjective rate of return to preinjury level of functioning. Results: Fifteen patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and participated in our survey. Patients were followed up for an average of 19 months after injury. Overall mean age was 61 years. Injury followed a mechanical fall or a road traffic accident in 11 and 4 cases, respectively. External immobilization was achieved by halo vest only in nine patients, soft collar only in two patients (13%), and through a sequential combination in the remaining 4 (27%). This was deployed for a mean of 7.8 months. Radiological studies at the last follow-up showed bony healing (27%), fibrous nonunion (60%), and persistent instability (13%). Patients reported gradual recovery of function throughout the 1st year after injury with levels above 70% of preinjury functioning achieved by 13% of patients at 6 months, 33% at 9 months, and 47% at 12 months. Overall satisfaction with nonsurgical management was 68%. Conclusion: In selected patients with type II odontoid fractures, external immobilization represents a good option with acceptable course of recovery. PMID

  4. Fracture Mechanics for Composites: State of the Art and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Krueger, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Interlaminar fracture mechanics has proven useful for characterizing the onset of delaminations in composites and has been used with limited success primarily to investigate onset in fracture toughness specimens and laboratory size coupon type specimens. Future acceptance of the methodology by industry and certification authorities however, requires the successful demonstration of the methodology on the structural level. In this paper, the state-of-the-art in fracture toughness characterization, and interlaminar fracture mechanics analysis tools are described. To demonstrate the application on the structural level, a panel was selected which is reinforced with stringers. Full implementation of interlaminar fracture mechanics in design however remains a challenge and requires a continuing development effort of codes to calculate energy release rates and advancements in delamination onset and growth criteria under mixed mode conditions.

  5. Hinged external fixation for Regan-Morrey type I and II fractures and fracture-dislocations.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Alberto; D'amico, Salvatore; Combi, Alberto; Benazzo, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Elbow fracture-dislocation is always demanding to manage due to the considerable soft-tissue swelling or damage involved, which can make an early open approach and ligamentous reconstruction impossible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of elbow hinged external fixation (HEF) as a definitive treatment in patients with elbow dislocations associated with Regan-Morrey (R-M) type I and II coronoid fractures and soft-tissue damage. We treated 11 patients between 2010 and 2012 with HEF. Instability tests and standard X-ray examinations were performed before surgery and 1-3 to 3-6 months after surgery, respectively. All patients underwent a preoperative CT scan. Outcomes were assessed with a functional assessment scale (Mayo Elbow Performance Score, MEPS) that included 4 parameters: pain, ROM, stability, and function. The results were good or excellent in all 11 patients, and no patient complained of residual instability. Radiographic examination showed bone metaplasia involving the anterior and medial sides of the joint in 5 patients. HEF presented several advantages: it improves elbow stability and it avoids long and demanding surgery in particular in cases with large soft tissue damage. We therefore consider elbow HEF to be a viable option for treating R-M type I and II fracture-dislocations.

  6. Fracture Mechanisms of Layer-By-Layer Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheng, Eugene R.

    A layer-by-layer(LBL) manufactured material is examined in detail in this thesis. Improvements are made to the method of its manufacture. Efforts are made to understand its fracture mechanisms and take advantage of these fracture mechanisms in the absorption of impact energy. A novel series of experiments has been performed on LBL manufactured thin films to demonstrate their unique fracture mechanisms. Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) (PU/PAA) and PU/PAA/(PU/Clay)5 nanocomposite films readily undergo Interlaminar mode II fracture, because of the relatively weak elctrostatic bonds between monolayers. Tensile tests performed while under observation by a scanning electron microscope demonstrate the tendency of these nanocomposite films to undergo interlaminar mode II fracture even when loads are applied in the plane of nanocomposite film. It is concluded that these mechanisms of energy dissipation are responsible for the enhanced toughness of these films when used as layers between glass blocks in the prevention of impact damage to the glass. A novel automated manufacturing facility has been designed and built to deposit large sheets of Layer-by-Layer nanocomposite film. These large sheets are incorporated into a borosillicate glass composite in order to compare the ballistic characteristics of LBL PU based nanocomposite films to a single cast layer of polyurethane. It is demonstrated that shear fracture is the mode of failure in the blocks containing the nanocomposite film. The shear fracture surface in the nanocomposite after it has undergone a ballistic impact is characterized. Additional experiments are performed to characterize the interlaminar fracture stresses and toughnesses of the nanocomposite LBL layers, to assist in the implementation of a numerical crack band model that describes the nanocomposite film. The computational model predicts the failure of the ballistic nanocomposite samples, and the predicted V50 velocity is found to be in good agreement with

  7. Analysis of failure following anterior screw fixation of Type II odontoid fractures in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Philipp, Helmut; Meusburger, Berthold; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2011-11-01

    Anterior screw fixation of Type II odontoid fractures has been recommended. Only few publications analyse the mechanism of failure in geriatric patients. We reviewed 18 male and 15 female patients aged 65 and above for parameters that influence the development of postoperative loss of correction, delayed union or non-union. Patients were stratified in two groups: 21 cases in Group A (union) and 12 patients in Group B (loss of correction, delayed union, non-union, revision surgery). Statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) could be detected between failure to heal and: (1) degenerative changes in the atlanto-odontoid joint, (2) severity of osteoporosis in the odontoid process, (3) posterior oblique fracture type, (4) suboptimal fracture reduction, (5) suboptimal position of implant following demanding intraoperative conditions, (6) quality of fracture compression and (7) severity of fracture comminution. The overall morbidity and mortality rates were 29.0 and 8.6%, respectively. Our results indicate that these factors should be addressed regarding the selection of the operative treatment method in the geriatric patient.

  8. Adaptive Finite-Element Computation In Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses recent progress in use of solution-adaptive finite-element computational methods to solve two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics. Method also shown extensible to three-dimensional problems.

  9. Fracture mechanics /Dryden Lecture/. [aerospace structural design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.

    1974-01-01

    A historical outline of the engineering discipline of fracture mechanics is presented, and current analytical procedures are summarized. The current status of the discipline is assessed, and engineering applications are discussed, along with recommended directions for future study.

  10. A nonlinear high temperature fracture mechanics basis for strainrange partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Halford, Gary R.

    1989-01-01

    A direct link was established between Strainrange Partitioning (SRP) and high temperature fracture mechanics by deriving the general SRP inelastic strain range versus cyclic life relationships from high temperature, nonlinear, fracture mechanics considerations. The derived SRP life relationships are in reasonable agreement based on the experience of the SRP behavior of many high temperature alloys. In addition, fracture mechanics has served as a basis for derivation of the Ductility-Normalized SRP life equations, as well as for examination of SRP relations that are applicable to thermal fatigue life prediction. Areas of additional links between nonlinear fracture mechanics and SRP were identified for future exploration. These include effects of multiaxiality as well as low strain, nominally elastic, long life creep fatigue interaction.

  11. Application of fracture mechanics to graphite under complex stress conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahr, G. T.; Valachovic, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the applicability of linear-elastic fracture mechanics to graphite under multiaxial stress conditions. The specimens were thick-walled graphite cylinders with flat heads which were internally pressurized. Two series of specimens were used. The first series had complete circumferential notches machined diagonally into the head-cylinder juncture region, while the second series was unnotched. The methods of linear-elastic fracture mechanics and a finite-element analysis were used to predict pressures to cause fracture for both notched and unnotched specimens.

  12. Ship Fracture Mechanisms Investigation. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    the spar deck, but is belcw the nominal yield for mild steel of 32,000 psi. 3-13 Initiation Site Arrest Down- Toward Ship’s bottom Up- Toward Figure 3...hatch. The deck material in the vicinity of fracture was 46mm (1.81 inch)"EH33" normalized steel . Description of the Circumstances at the Time of...finally installing "CS" normalized steel doubler plate over the existing deck plate at the hatch corners. This repair fractured in the spring of 1976

  13. Multiscale rotational mechanism of fracture propagation in geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Esin, Maxim

    2015-10-01

    We consider rotational mechanism of macrocrack propagation based on breakage of the bonds between mutually rotating grains. The mechanism is multiscale with the macroscopic scale corresponding to the macrocrack, the next, smaller scale corresponding to the grain rotations and the smallest scale corresponding to the microcracks formed in the bonds whose propagation causes the bond breakage. The bond breakage is initiated by their bending or twisting caused by the corresponding moments. The sign of the moments only affects the side of the bond where the microfracturing starts. The independence of the microfracturing of the sign of the moment stresses provides a unified way of describing such apparently different types of fractures as tensile (Mode I) cracks, compaction bands (Mode I anticracks) and shear bands (Mode II and III). Modelling of this mechanism is based on the Cosserat theory. The bending/twisting moments are controlled by the corresponding components of moment stress. In the cases, when the Cosserat characteristic lengths are comparable with the grain sizes, the Cosserat theory is reduced to the couple-stress theory. It is found that the stress exhibits the square root singularity that coincides with the conventional ones, while the moment stress has singularity of the power -3/2. The J-integral, however, reflects only stress singularities, while the moment stress singularities do not contribute to the energy release rate. Subsequently, the energy criterion of macrofracture propagation can be based on the conventional J-integral and is not affected by the strong moment stress singularity.

  14. Size effect law and fracture mechanics of the triggering of dry snow slab avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bažant, ZdeněK. P.; Zi, Goangseup; McClung, David

    2003-02-01

    A size effect law for fracture triggering in dry snow slabs of high enough length-to-thickness ratio is formulated, based on simplified one-dimensional analysis by equivalent linear elastic fracture mechanics. Viscoelastic effects during fracture are neglected. The derived law, which is analogous to Bažant's energetic size effect law developed for concrete and later for sea ice, fiber composites, rocks, and ceramics, is shown to agree with two-dimensional finite element analysis of mode II cohesive crack model with a finite residual shear stress. Fitting the proposed size effect law to fracture data for various slab thicknesses permits identifying the material fracture parameters. The value of preexisting shear stress in a thin weak zone of finite length is shown to have significant effect. There exists a certain critical snow depth, depending on the preexisting stress value, below which the size effect disappears. Practical applications require considering that the material properties (particularly the mode II fracture toughness or fracture energy) at the snow slab base are not constant but depend strongly on the slab thickness. This means that one must distinguish the material size effect from the structural size effect, and the combined size effect law must be obtained by introducing into the structural size effect law dependence of its parameters on snow thickness. The thickness dependence of these parameters can be obtained by matching the combined law to avalanche observations. Matching Perla's field data on 116 avalanches suggests that the mode II fracture toughness is approximately proportional to 1.8 power of snow thickness.

  15. Fracture Mechanics for Structural Adhesive Bonds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    51 24 Magnified fracture surface photographs for specimen 52 CLS-I 25 Pure mode I sustained-load crack grouth 54 26 Pure mode ! SCC Data in 3 27CK...the technical and economic feasibility of primary adhesively bonded structure. The Air Force aircraft structural integrity program document MEI-STD

  16. Fracture mechanisms of a 2124 aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Nack J.

    1992-09-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the effects of microstructure on the fracture behavior of a 2124 aluminum composite reinforced with SiC whiskers. Particular emphasis was placed on the role of matrix intermetallic particles, inhomogeneous distribution of whiskers, and whisker breakage in the fracture process. Various tests were conducted on the composite to identify the micromechanical processes that were involved in microvoid or microcrack formation. Detailed microstructural analyses showed that the aluminum matrix contained a significant amount of coarse manganese-containing particles of various sizes which could have been formed during composite processing. In situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) fracture study of the crack initiation and propagation processes clearly showed that these coarse particles fractured prior to matrix/whisker decohesion or whisker breakage, suggesting that the manganese-containing par- ticles significantly accelerated crack initiation in the 2124 Al-SiCw composite. For a better ma- trix alloy for use in the composite, it is suggested that microalloying elements must be monitored to prevent the formation of the coarse intermetallic particles.

  17. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr. (Editor); Loss, F. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are: fracture analysis methods evaluation; instability prediction using the K sub R-curve approach; and the deformation failure assessment diagram. Consideration is also given to: instability prediction based on the modified J, J sub M-resistance curve approach; and stable crack growth and instability prediction on the V by means of the V sub R-curve method.

  18. Fracture mechanics for delamination problems in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    A fracture mechanics approach to the well-known delamination problem in composite materials is presented. Based on the theory of anisotropic laminate elasticity and interlaminar fracture mechanics concepts, the composite delamination problem is formulated and solved. The exact order of the delamination crack-tip stress singularity is determined. Asymptotic stress and displacement fields for an interlaminar crack are obtained. Fracture mechanics parameters such as mixed-mode stress intensity factors, KI, KII, KIII, and the energy release rate, G, for composite delamination problems are defined. To illustrate the fundamental nature of the delamination crack behavior, solutions for edge-delaminated graphite-epoxy composites under uniform axial extension are presented. Effects of fiber orientation, ply thickness, and delamination length on the interlaminar fracture are examined.

  19. Work of fracture of a composite resin: fracture-toughening mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Carmen; Osorio, Raquel; Toledano, Manuel; de Aza, Salvador

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate those mechanical parameters able to describe the fracture behavior of dental composite resins. A commercially available fine-particle micro-hybrid resin composite was used. Classical parameters as Young's modulus, strength distribution, and critical stress intensity factor were considered. Strength values were determined using the diametrical compression of discs test and for the critical stress intensity factor both unstable and controlled fracture tests were used. Controlled fracture tests allowed determining the work of fracture. Microstructure was studied by optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The obtained properties have been Young's modulus, 17.7 +/- 0.6 GPa; Weibull modulus, m = 14 (upper and lower limits for 90% confidence: 17 and 10); characteristic strength 51 MPa (upper and lower limits for 90% confidence: 53 and 49 MPa); critical stress intensity factor in mode I, K(IC) = 1.3 +/- 0.1 and work of fracture, gamma(wof) = 8-9 J/m(2). Pores and bubbles formed during the packing of the composite were identified as critical defects in the tested specimens. Crack deflection and branching have been identified as toughening mechanisms. Classical mechanical parameters (Young's modulus, hardness...) are not able to efficiently predict the major clinical failure mode of composite resins by fatigue. Work of fracture analysis, which is dependant on microstructural parameters such as particle size and shape, have to be included when testing mechanical properties of dental composite resins in future research studies. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. In Vitro Fracture of Human Cortical Bone: Local Fracture Criteria and Toughening Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R; Stolken, J; Kinney, J; Ritchie, R

    2004-08-18

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture that encompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure and defines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research on the response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/or disease. Micro-mechanical models for fracture incorporating such local failure criteria have been widely developed for metallic and ceramic materials systems; however, few such deliberations have been undertaken for the fracture of bone. In fact, although the fracture event in mineralized tissues such as bone is commonly believed to be locally strain controlled, until recently there has been little experimental evidence to support this widely held belief. In the present study, a series of in vitro experiments involving a double-notch bend test geometry are performed in order to shed further light on the nature of the local cracking events that precede catastrophic fracture in bone and to define their relationship to the microstructure. Specifically, crack-microstructure interactions are examined to determine the salient toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone and to characterize how these may affect the anisotropy in fracture properties. Based on preliminary micro-mechanical models of these processes, in particular crack deflection and uncracked ligament bridging, the relative importance of these toughening mechanisms is established.

  1. Material properties and fracture mechanics in relation to ceramic machining

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, L.V.

    1993-12-02

    Material removal rate, surface finish, and subsurface damage are largely governed by fracture mechanics and plastic deformation, when ceramics are machined using abrasive methods. A great deal of work was published on the fracture mechanics of ceramics in the late 1970s and early 1980s, although this work has never resulted in a comprehensive model of the fixed abrasive grinding process. However, a recently published model describes many of the most important features of the loose abrasive machining process, for example depth of damage, surface roughness, and material removal rate. Many of the relations in the loose abrasive machining model can be readily discerned from fracture mechanics models, in terms of material properties. By understanding the mechanisms of material removal, from a material properties perspective, we can better estimate how one material will machine in relation to another. Although the fracture mechanics models may have been developed for loose abrasive machining, the principles of crack initiation and propagation are equally valuable for fixed abrasive machining. This report provides a brief review of fracture in brittle materials, the stress distribution induced by abrasives, critical indenter loads, the extension of cracks, and the relation of the fracture process to material removal.

  2. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of compact bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiahau

    Bone is a composite composed mainly of organics, minerals and water. Most studies on the fracture toughness of bone have been conducted at room temperature. Considering that the body temperature of animals is higher than room temperature, and that bone has a high volumetric percentage of organics (generally, 35--50%), the effect of temperature on fracture toughness of bone should be studied. Single-edged V-shaped notched (SEVN) specimens were prepared to measure the fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib in water at 0, 10, 23, 37 and 50°C. The fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib were found to decrease from 7.0 to 4.3 MPa·m1/2 and from 5.5 to 4.1 MPa·m1/2, respectively, over a temperature range of 50°C. The decreases were attributed to inability of the organics to sustain greater stresses at higher temperatures. We studied the effects of water and organics on fracture toughness of bone using water-free and organics-free SEVN specimens at 23°C. Water-free and organics-free specimens were obtained by placing fresh bone specimen in a furnace at different temperatures. Water and organics significantly affected the fracture toughness of bone. Fracture toughness of the water-free specimens was 44.7% (bovine femur) and 32.4% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh-bone specimens. Fracture toughness of the organics-free specimens was 92.7% (bovine femur) and 91.5% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh bone specimens. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) is widely used to study bone. However, bone often has small to moderate scale yielding during testing. We used J integral, an elastic-plastic fracture-mechanics parameter, to study the fracture process of bone. The J integral of bovine femur increased from 6.3 KJ/mm2 at 23°C to 6.7 KJ/mm2 at 37°C. Although the fracture toughness of bovine bone decreases as the temperature increases, the J integral results show a contrary trend. The energy spent in advancing the crack beyond the linear

  3. Multiescalar studies of fracturing mechanisms in fluvial-lacustrine basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon-Freyre, D.; Cerca, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Hernandez-Marin, M.

    2007-05-01

    Fracturing of clayey fluvial and lacustrine deposits has become a major problem in several cities of central Mexico. The available data reveals the coexistence of several factors determining fracturing at different scales. As main factors we analyze the variation in compressibility of sediments causing differential deformation and withdrawal of groundwater causing a drop in pore pressure. Compressibility depends on consolidation, a term that in soil mechanics refers to the expulsion of interstitial water, and provokes volume decrease and land subsidence. Although major volume decrease occurs in the vertical scale, consolidation of silty clayey materials generates also horizontal tensile stresses. Considering that this factor can be determining to the generation of fractures, the deformational conditions of clayey, silty and sandy sequences is analyzed integrating their stratigraphy and mechanical characteristics. A particular emphasis is made in the mineralogical heterogeneity of the clay fraction that can be related to compressibility variations and can generate micro-fracturing by differential deformation. As study case we analyze the mechanical and geological properties of two sedimentary sequences with contrasting hydraulic and mechanical behavior. Our results show that the paleoenvironmental history of sediments can be used to determine a specific type of fracturing. Thus, the fracturing in fluvial lacustrine deposits is not a random phenomenon but is highly dependent of the geological properties of materials.

  4. The Mechanics of Long Bone Fractures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-31

    frequently at the rapid loading rates, indi- cating the relationship of fracture to energy dissipation, since crack formation is an energy...plotted in Figure 15. It can be seen that for angles as large as 100 the error is small. ERROR DUE TC fNCUNATfON OF SCANN NO PLANE TO :_ONGOTUD!NA!_ BONE...aspects. Flying Personnel Research Committee, FPRC/1166, 1961. 10. Lovejoy, C.O., and Barton, T.J.: A simple, rapid method of obtaining geometrical

  5. Adhesive fracture mechanics. [stress analysis for bond line interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. J.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    In studies of fracture mechanics the adhesive fracture energy is regarded as a fundamental property of the adhesive system. It is pointed out that the value of the adhesive fracture energy depends on surface preparation, curing conditions, and absorbed monolayers. A test method reported makes use of a disk whose peripheral part is bonded to a substrate material. Pressure is injected into the unbonded central part of the disk. At a certain critical pressure value adhesive failure can be observed. A numerical stress analysis involving arbitrary geometries is conducted.

  6. Advances in the fracture mechanics of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, W

    1987-01-01

    As cortical bone is a semi-brittle solid, its fracture is dependent not only on the magnitude of the applied stress, but also on the nature of any intrinsic or introduced cracks. Consequently a variety of fracture mechanics techniques have been utilised to evaluate the fracture toughness of cortical bone, including the single edge notched, centre notched cylindrical and compact tension methods, and values have been established for the critical stress intensity factor (Kc) and the critical strain energy release rate (Gc). The Kc and Gc values obtained depend on the orientation of the cortical bone, as well as on bone density, the velocity of crack propagation and specimen geometry. The significance of these fracture mechanics parameters for cortical bone is critically reviewed.

  7. Interaction of hydraulic and buckling mechanisms in blowout fractures.

    PubMed

    Nagasao, Tomohisa; Miyamoto, Junpei; Jiang, Hua; Tamaki, Tamotsu; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi

    2010-04-01

    The etiology of blowout fractures is generally attributed to 2 mechanisms--increase in the pressure of the orbital contents (the hydraulic mechanism) and direct transmission of impacts on the orbital walls (the buckling mechanism). The present study aims to elucidate whether or not an interaction exists between these 2 mechanisms. We performed a simulation experiment using 10 Computer-Aided-Design skull models. We applied destructive energy to the orbits of the 10 models in 3 different ways. First, to simulate pure hydraulic mechanism, energy was applied solely on the internal walls of the orbit. Second, to simulate pure buckling mechanism, energy was applied solely on the inferior rim of the orbit. Third, to simulate the combined effect of the hydraulic and buckling mechanisms, energy was applied both on the internal wall of the orbit and inferior rim of the orbit. After applying the energy, we calculated the areas of the regions where fracture occurred in the models. Thereafter, we compared the areas among the 3 energy application patterns. When the hydraulic and buckling mechanisms work simultaneously, fracture occurs on wider areas of the orbital walls than when each of these mechanisms works separately. The hydraulic and buckling mechanisms interact, enhancing each other's effect. This information should be taken into consideration when we examine patients in whom blowout fracture is suspected.

  8. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings

    DOE PAGES

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-09-19

    The purpose of this paper is to (i) review field data on stress-induced permeability changes in fractured rock; (ii) describe estimation of fractured rock stress-permeability relationships through model calibration against such field data; and (iii) discuss observations of temperature and chemically mediated fracture closure and its effect on fractured rock permeability. The field data that are reviewed include in situ block experiments, excavation-induced changes in permeability around tunnels, borehole injection experiments, depth (and stress) dependent permeability, and permeability changes associated with a large-scale rock-mass heating experiment. Data show how the stress-permeability relationship of fractured rock very much depends on localmore » in situ conditions, such as fracture shear offset and fracture infilling by mineral precipitation. Field and laboratory experiments involving temperature have shown significant temperature-driven fracture closure even under constant stress. Such temperature-driven fracture closure has been described as thermal overclosure and relates to better fitting of opposing fracture surfaces at high temperatures, or is attributed to chemically mediated fracture closure related to pressure solution (and compaction) of stressed fracture surface asperities. Back-calculated stress-permeability relationships from field data may implicitly account for such effects, but the relative contribution of purely thermal-mechanical and chemically mediated changes is difficult to isolate. Therefore, it is concluded that further laboratory and in situ experiments are needed to increase the knowledge of the true mechanisms behind thermally driven fracture closure, and to further assess the importance of chemical-mechanical coupling for the long-term evolution of fractured rock permeability.« less

  9. On the Role of Dimensionless Elastic Fracture Mechanics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-03

    34.’ . . . .- . . - . . . - ... - . .. . . . . . -8-.V 6. B.M. Wundt , "A Unified Interpretation of Room Temperature Strength of Notched...Fracture mechanics technology applied to heavy section steel structures. Proc. Second Int. Conf. Fracture, Brighton, U.K., 825-850 (1969). J.G. Williams ...207s (1948). D.H. Winne and B.M. Wundt , Application of the Griffith-Irwin theory of crack propagation to the bursting behavior of disks, including

  10. Mechanical testing - In situ fracture device for Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    An in situ fracture device for Auger spectroscopy is described. The device is designed to handle small tensile specimens or small double-cantilever beam specimens and is fully instrumented with load and displacement transducers so that quantitative stress-strain measurements can be made directly. Some initial test results for specimens made from 4130 and 1020 steel are presented. Results indicate that impurity segregation at interfaces other than grain boundary may play a significant role in the mechanism of ductile fracture.

  11. Modeling elastic tensile fractures in snow using nonlocal damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borstad, C. P.; McClung, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The initiation and propagation of tensile fractures in snow and ice are fundamental to numerous important physical processes in the cryosphere, from iceberg calving to ice shelf rift propagation to slab avalanche release. The heterogeneous nature of snow and ice, their proximity to the melting temperature, and the varied governing timescales typically lead to nonlinear fracture behavior which does not follow the predictions of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Furthermore, traditional fracture mechanics is formally inapplicable for predicting crack initiation in the absence of a pre-existing flaw or stress concentration. An alternative to fracture mechanics is continuum damage mechanics, which accounts for the material degradation associated with cracking in a numerically efficient framework. However, damage models which are formulated locally (e.g. stress and strain are defined as point properties) suffer from mesh-sensitive crack trajectories, spurious localization of damage and improper fracture energy dissipation with mesh refinement. Nonlocal formulations of damage, which smear the effects of the material heterogeneity over an intrinsic length scale related to the material microstructure, overcome these difficulties and lead to numerically efficient and mesh-objective simulations of the tensile failure of heterogeneous materials. We present the results of numerical simulations of tensile fracture initiation and propagation in cohesive snow using a nonlocal damage model. Seventeen beam bending experiments, both notched and unnotched, were conducted using blocks of cohesive dry snow extracted from an alpine snowpack. Material properties and fracture parameters were calculated from the experimental data using beam theory and quasi-brittle fracture mechanics. Using these parameters, a nonlocal isotropic damage model was applied to two-dimensional finite element meshes of the same scale as the experiments. The model was capable of simulating the propagation

  12. RSRM nozzle actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Peggy

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report for the actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test. The test plan (CTP-0071) outlined a two-phase test program designed to answer questions about the fracture criticality of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzle actuator bracket. An analysis conducted using the NASA/FLAGRO fracture mechanics computer program indicated that the actuator bracket might be a fracture critical component. In the NASA/FLAGRO analysis, a simple lug model was used to represent the actuator bracket. It was calculated that the bracket would fracture if subjected to an actuator stall load in the presence of a 0.10 in. corner crack at the actuator attachment hole. The 0.10 in. crack size corresponds to the nondestructive inspection detectability limit for the actuator bracket. The inspection method used is the dye penetrant method. The actuator stall load (103,424 lb) is the maximum load which the actuator bracket is required to withstand during motor operation. This testing was designed to establish the accuracy of the analytical model and to directly determine whether the actuator bracket is capable of meeting fracture mechanics safe-life requirements.

  13. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT’s truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m0.5, typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene. PMID:26989774

  14. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT's truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m(0.5), typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene.

  15. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing.

  16. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  17. Electron radiation effects on Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness of GFRP and CFRP composites

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, N.; Tohdoh, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1989-01-01

    The degradation properties of epoxy-based fiber-reinforced-plastics (FRP) composites irradiated by high-energy electrons were studied using the Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness G/sub IIc/, measured by end-notched flexure tests. The radiation-induced degradation mechanisms were investigated through G/sub IIc/ and the scanning electron micrographs of fracture surfaces. For GFRP, the significant decrease in G/sub IIc/ was found. Debonding of glass fibers and epoxy matrix (or degradation of silane coupling agents) plays an important role in degradation in addition to resin degradation. Thus, the improvement of the radiation resistance of fiber-resin interfaces as well as matrix itself is of supreme importance in order to increase the radiation resistance of GFRP. For CFRP, on the other hand, no degradation in fiber-resin interfaces was found and the slight decrease in G/sub IIc/ seems to be due to the resin degradation. 18 references, 6 figures.

  18. Resistance to maxillary premolar fractures after restoration of class II preparations with resin composite or ceromer.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Cláudia Regina Buainain; Miranda, Maria Isabel Serra; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi; Flores, Victor Humberto Orbegoso; Vaz, Luís Geraldo; Guimarães, Catanzaro

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance to fracture of intact and restored human maxillary premolars. Thirty noncarious human maxillary premolars, divided into three groups of 10, were submitted to mechanical tests to evaluate their resistance to fracture. Group 1 consisted of intact teeth. Teeth in group 2 received mesio-occlusodistal cavity preparations and were restored with direct resin composite restorations. Teeth in group 3 received mesio-occlusodistal cavity preparations and were restored with ceromer inlays placed with the indirect technique. After restoration, teeth were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and then thermocycled for 500 cycles at temperatures of 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. Statistical analysis revealed that group 3 (178.765 kgf) had a significantly greater maximum rupture load than did group 1 (120.040 kgf). There was no statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2 or between groups 2 and 3. Class II cavity preparations restored with indirect ceromer inlays offered greater resistance to fracture than did intact teeth. The fracture resistance of teeth restored with resin composite was not significantly different from that of either the ceromer or intact teeth.

  19. Fracture prediction for the proximal femur using finite element models: Part II--Nonlinear analysis.

    PubMed

    Lotz, J C; Cheal, E J; Hayes, W C

    1991-11-01

    In Part I we reported the results of linear finite element models of the proximal femur generated using geometric and constitutive data collected with quantitative computed tomography. These models demonstrated excellent agreement with in vitro studies when used to predict ultimate failure loads. In Part II, we report our extension of those finite element models to include nonlinear behavior of the trabecular and cortical bone. A highly nonlinear material law, originally designed for representing concrete, was used for trabecular bone, while a bilinear material law was used for cortical bone. We found excellent agreement between the model predictions and in vitro fracture data for both the onset of bone yielding and bone fracture. For bone yielding, the model predictions were within 2 percent for a load which simulated one-legged stance and 1 percent for a load which simulated a fall. For bone fracture, the model predictions were within 1 percent and 17 percent, respectively. The models also demonstrated different fracture mechanisms for the two different loading configurations. For one-legged stance, failure within the primary compressive trabeculae at the subcapital region occurred first, leading to load transfer and, ultimately, failure of the surrounding cortical shell. However, for a fall, failure of the cortical and trabecular bone occurred simultaneously within the intertrochanteric region. These results support our previous findings that the strength of the subcapital region is primarily due to trabecular bone whereas the strength of the intertrochanteric region is primarily due to cortical bone.

  20. Facial fractures with concomitant open globe injury: mechanisms and fracture patterns associated with blindness.

    PubMed

    Vaca, Elbert E; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Kelamis, Joseph A; Dorafshar, Amir H; Christy, Michael R; Manson, Paul N; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2013-06-01

    Treatment of facial fractures in the setting of open-globe injuries poses a management dilemma because of the often disparate treatment priorities of multidisciplinary trauma teams and the lack of prognostic data regarding visual outcomes. Patients in the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Registry sustaining facial fractures with concomitant open-globe injuries from January of 1998 to August of 2010 were identified. Odds ratios were calculated to identify demographic and clinical variables associated with blindness, and multivariate regression analysis was performed. A total of 99 patients were identified with 105 open-globe injuries. Seventy-nine percent of injuries were blinding, whereas 4.8 percent of globes achieved a final visual acuity greater than or equal to 20/400. Blindness was associated with penetrating injury, increasing number of facial fractures, zygomaticomaxillary complex fracture, admission Glasgow Coma Scale score less than or equal to 8, and globe injury spanning all three eye zones. Fracture repair was performed more frequently (62.5 percent) and more quickly (average time to fracture repair, 4.5 days) in cases of primary globe enucleation/evisceration when compared with complete (21.2 percent; 8 days; p=0.35) or incomplete (42.9 percent; 11 days; p=0.058) primary globe repair. Penetrating injury mechanism and zone of eye injury appear to be better indicators of visual prognosis than facial fracture patterns. Given the high rates of blindness, secondary enucleation, and delay of fracture repair in patients that were not primarily enucleated, the authors recommend that orbital fracture repair not be delayed in the hopes of eventual visual recovery in cases of high-velocity projectile trauma. Risk, III.

  1. Fixation of unstable type II clavicle fractures with distal clavicle plate and suture button.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Peter S; Sears, Benjamin W; Lazarus, Mark R; Frieman, Barbara G

    2014-11-01

    This article reports on a technique to treat unstable type II distal clavicle fractures using fracture-specific plates and coracoclavicular augmentation with a suture button. Six patients with clinically unstable type II distal clavicle fractures underwent treatment using the above technique. All fractures demonstrated radiographic union at 9.6 (8.4-11.6) weeks with a mean follow-up of 15.6 (12.4-22.3) months. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Penn Shoulder Score, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores were 97.97 (98.33-100), 96.4 (91-99), and 95 (90-100), respectively. One patient required implant removal. Fracture-specific plating with suture-button augmentation for type II distal clavicle fractures provides reliable rates of union without absolute requirement for implant removal.

  2. Fracture mechanics life analytical methods verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favenesi, J. A.; Clemons, T. G.; Riddell, W. T.; Ingraffea, A. R.; Wawrzynek, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate NASCRAC (trademark) version 2.0, a second generation fracture analysis code, for verification and validity. NASCRAC was evaluated using a combination of comparisons to the literature, closed-form solutions, numerical analyses, and tests. Several limitations and minor errors were detected. Additionally, a number of major flaws were discovered. These major flaws were generally due to application of a specific method or theory, not due to programming logic. Results are presented for the following program capabilities: K versus a, J versus a, crack opening area, life calculation due to fatigue crack growth, tolerable crack size, proof test logic, tearing instability, creep crack growth, crack transitioning, crack retardation due to overloads, and elastic-plastic stress redistribution. It is concluded that the code is an acceptable fracture tool for K solutions of simplified geometries, for a limited number of J and crack opening area solutions, and for fatigue crack propagation with the Paris equation and constant amplitude loads when the Paris equation is applicable.

  3. [HAND FRACTURES IN CHILDREN - CAUSES AND MECHANISMS OF INJURY].

    PubMed

    Antabak, Anko; Barišić, Branimir; Andabak, Matej; Papeš, Dino; Romić, Ivan; Fuchs, Nino; Luetić, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Hand is extremely exposed to various loads and traumas of everyday tasks and activities, resulting in fist fractures being fairly common injuries. The most common mechanism of injury is a direct blow. This retrospective study analyzed the data on 274 children admitted for hand fractures at Clinical Hospital Center Zagreb in the period from 2006 to 2014. The study included 76 girls (28%) and 198 boys (72%). The average patient age was 11.9 years and most were between 10 and 13 years of age. Phalangeal fractures accounted for 80%, metacarpal fractures for 17%, and carpal fractures for 3% of all injuries. Most commonly injuries occurred during recreation (4 1%), at home (37%), at school (18%) and in the street (4%). Direct blow was the major cause of injury (76%), and 24% were caused by fall. Injuries during sport activities are the most common cause of the hand fractures in pediatric population and direct blow is the main mechanism of injury. The peak incidence is at the age of 10-13 years in boys and girls, so prevention should be aimed at this age group. Preventive actions should be focused on injuries that tend to occur in parks, schools and during sport activities.

  4. Relating Cohesive Zone Model to Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The conditions required for a cohesive zone model (CZM) to predict a failure load of a cracked structure similar to that obtained by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis are investigated in this paper. This study clarifies why many different phenomenological cohesive laws can produce similar fracture predictions. Analytical results for five cohesive zone models are obtained, using five different cohesive laws that have the same cohesive work rate (CWR-area under the traction-separation curve) but different maximum tractions. The effect of the maximum traction on the predicted cohesive zone length and the remote applied load at fracture is presented. Similar to the small scale yielding condition for an LEFM analysis to be valid. the cohesive zone length also needs to be much smaller than the crack length. This is a necessary condition for a CZM to obtain a fracture prediction equivalent to an LEFM result.

  5. Statistical fracture mechanics approach to the strength of brittle rock

    SciTech Connect

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1981-06-01

    Statistical fracture mechanics concepts used in the past for rock are critically reviewed and modifications are proposed which are warranted by (1) increased understanding of fracture provided by modern fracture mechanics and (2) laboratory test data both from the literature and from this research. Over 600 direct and indirect tension tests have been performed on three different rock types; Stripa Granite, Sierra White Granite and Carrara Marble. In several instances assumptions which are common in the literature were found to be invalid. A three parameter statistical fracture mechanics model with Mode I critical strain energy release rate as the variant is presented. Methodologies for evaluating the parameters in this model as well as the more commonly employed two parameter models are discussed. The experimental results and analysis of this research indicate that surfacially distributed flaws, rather than volumetrically distributed flaws are responsible for rupture in many testing situations. For several of the rock types tested, anisotropy (both in apparent tensile strength and size effect) precludes the use of contemporary statistical fracture mechanics models.

  6. Fracture mechanics criteria for turbine engine hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of several fracture mechanics data correlation parameters to predicting the crack propagation life of turbine engine hot section components was evaluated. An engine survey was conducted to determine the locations where conventional fracture mechanics approaches may not be adequate to characterize cracking behavior. Both linear and nonlinear fracture mechanics analyses of a cracked annular combustor liner configuration were performed. Isothermal and variable temperature crack propagation tests were performed on Hastelloy X combustor liner material. The crack growth data was reduced using the stress intensity factor, the strain intensity factor, the J integral, crack opening displacement, and Tomkins' model. The parameter which showed the most effectiveness in correlation high temperature and variable temperature Hastelloy X crack growth data was crack opening displacement.

  7. Mechanical transport in two-dimensional networks of fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, H.K.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives of this research are to evaluate directional mechanical transport parameters for anisotropic fracture systems, and to determine if fracture systems behave like equivalent porous media. The tracer experiments used to measure directional tortuosity, longitudinal geometric dispersivity, and hydraulic effective porosity are conducted with a uniform flow field and measurements are made from the fluid flowing within a test section where linear length of travel is constant. Since fluid flow and mechanical transport are coupled processes, the directional variations of specific discharge and hydraulic effective porosity are measured in regions with constant hydraulic gradients to evaluate porous medium equivalence for the two processes, respectively. If the fracture region behaves like an equivalent porous medium, the system has the following stable properties: (1) specific discharge is uniform in any direction and can be predicted from a permeability tensor; and (2) hydraulic effective porosity is directionally stable. Fracture systems with two parallel sets of continuous fractures satisfy criterion 1. However, in these systems hydraulic effective porosity is directionally dependent, and thus, criterion 2 is violated. Thus, for some fracture systems, fluid flow can be predicted using porous media assumptions, but it may not be possible to predict transport using porous media assumptions. Two discontinuous fracture systems were studied which satisfied both criteria. Hydraulic effective porosity for both systems has a value between rock effective porosity and total porosity. A length-density analysis (LDS) of Canadian fracture data shows that porous media equivalence for fluid flow and transport is likely when systems have narrow aperture distributions. 54 references, 90 figures, 7 tables.

  8. Crack Tip Plasticity in Dynamic Fracture Mechanics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    0.1. Ant.r.d) ~IIIi. . • ~~~~• ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~ . - ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ - 1 CRACK TIP PLASTICITY IN DYNANI C FRACTU ...force——from the material’s fracture property——the resistance. The material property represents the energy dissipated ~n flow into the crack tip and...the flow stress varied - arbitrarily along the length of the strip yield zone. The flow stress val- ues were assigned in accord with a known strain

  9. Fracture mechanics of delamination defects in multilayer dielectric coatings.

    PubMed

    Liddell, H P H; Mehrotra, K; Lambropoulos, J C; Jacobs, S D

    2013-11-10

    During the fabrication of multilayer-dielectric (MLD) thin-film-coated optics, such as the diffraction gratings used in OMEGA EP's pulse compressors, acid piranha cleaning can lead to the formation of chemically induced delamination defects. We investigate the causes of these defects and describe a mechanism for the deformation and failure of the MLD coating in response to hydrogen peroxide in the cleaning solution. A fracture mechanics model is developed and used to calculate the crack path that maximizes the energy-release rate, which is found to be consistent with the characteristic fracture pattern observed in MLD coating delamination defects.

  10. Unexpected Salter-Harris type II fracture of the proximal phalanx of the second toe: a chiropractic perspective.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Mark

    2015-12-01

    To discuss the diagnosis and management of a Salter-Harris type II fracture in a nine-year-old girl who was managed conservatively. A nine-year-old girl fell while playing in bare feet in the grass. She experienced pain when she walked or moved her toe. There was minor swelling and bruising. Plain film radiographs revealed a Salter-Harris type II fracture of the 2(nd) proximal phalanx. Her toe was stabilized and she was referred to an orthopedist. Orthopedic management involved a taping procedure. After three weeks, her fracture healed and she was pain free. Chiropractors may consider radiography of post-traumatic injury sites even with equivocal examination findings despite histories suggesting seemingly innocuous mechanisms of injury.

  11. Unexpected Salter-Harris type II fracture of the proximal phalanx of the second toe: a chiropractic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Murdock, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss the diagnosis and management of a Salter-Harris type II fracture in a nine-year-old girl who was managed conservatively. Clinical Features: A nine-year-old girl fell while playing in bare feet in the grass. She experienced pain when she walked or moved her toe. There was minor swelling and bruising. Intervention and Outcome: Plain film radiographs revealed a Salter-Harris type II fracture of the 2nd proximal phalanx. Her toe was stabilized and she was referred to an orthopedist. Orthopedic management involved a taping procedure. After three weeks, her fracture healed and she was pain free. Summary: Chiropractors may consider radiography of post-traumatic injury sites even with equivocal examination findings despite histories suggesting seemingly innocuous mechanisms of injury. PMID:26816417

  12. Fracture mechanics analysis of a high-pressure hydrogen facility compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vroman, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation and analysis of a high-pressure hydrogen facility compressor is chronicled, and a life prediction based on fracture mechanics is presented. Crack growth rates in SA 105 Gr II steel are developed for the condition of sustained loading, using a hypothesis of hydrogen embrittlement associated with plastic zone reverse yielding. The resultant formula is compared with test data obtained from laboratory specimens.

  13. Equine cortical bone exhibits rising R-curve fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Malik, C L; Stover, S M; Martin, R B; Gibeling, J C

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies of the fracture properties of cortical bone have suggested that the fracture toughness increases with crack length, which is indicative of rising R-curve behavior. Based on this indirect evidence and the similarity of bone to ceramic matrix composites, we hypothesized that bone would exhibit rising R-curve behavior in the transverse orientation and that the characteristics of the R-curves would be regionally dependent within the cortex due to variations in bone microstructure and toughening mechanisms. To test these hypotheses, we conducted R-curve experiments on specimens from equine third metacarpal bones using standard fracture mechanics testing methods. Compact type specimens from the dorsal and lateral regions in the middle of the diaphysis were oriented for crack propagation transverse to the longitudinal axis of the bone. The test results demonstrate that equine cortical bone exhibits rising R-curve behavior during transverse crack propagation as hypothesized. Statistical analyses of the crack growth initiation toughness, K0, the peak toughness, Kpeak, and the crack extension at peak toughness, deltaa, revealed significant regional differences in these characteristics. Specifically, the lateral cortex displayed higher crack growth initiation and peak toughnesses. The dorsal cortex exhibited greater crack extension at the peak of crack growth resistance. Scanning electron microscopy revealed osteon pullout on fracture surfaces from the dorsal cortex and but not in the lateral cortex. Taken together, the significant differences in R-curves and the SEM fractography indicate that the fracture mechanisms acting in equine cortical bone are regionally dependent.

  14. In-plane response and mode II fracture response of Z-pin woven laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hseng-Ji

    Textile composites are proven to be an attractive choice over traditional pre-preg based composites because of reduced manufacturing costs and improved transverse mechanical properties. However, similar to traditional pre-preg composites, 2D laminates consisting of multiple layers of laminae still suffer from delamination under impact or transverse loads. Z-pin (carbon fiber of small diameter inserted in the thickness direction-z) composites are a means to provide higher through-thethickness stiffness and strength that 2D woven composites lack. In this thesis, The influences of Z-pin density and Z-pin diameter on the response of Z-pin under in-plane loads (compression) and transverse loads (mode II fracture) are examined. Both experiments and numerical simulations were performed to address the problems. Compression tests were conducted first and failure mechanism in each loading scenario was identified, through optical and mechanical measurements, during and after the tests. This was followed by the development of different numerical models of varying degree of sophistication, which include in-plane 2D models, (used to study fiber distortion and damage due to Z-pin insertion), multi-layer 2D models, (used to provide an inexpensive multi-layer model to study the effect of phase difference due to stacking consolidation), and multi-layer-multi-cell models (used to provide a full 3D multi-layer and multi-representative unit cell description). The second part of this thesis investigates the mode II fracture response under static and dynamic loading. Discrete Cohesive Zone Model (DCZM) was adopted to obtain the fracture toughness in conjunction with experimental data. In dynamic test, a crack advance gage (CAG) was designed to capture the exact time when the crack begins to propagate. By use of these CAGs, the corresponding crack propagation speed between different CAGs can be computed accordingly. These observations are supplemented through high speed optical images

  15. Measurements of residual stress in fracture mechanics coupons

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B; Hill, Michael R; Nav Dalen, John E

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of residual stress in coupons used for fracture mechanics testing. The primary objective of the measurements is to quantify the distribution of residual stress acting to open (and/or close) the crack across the crack plane. The slitting method and the contour method are two destructive residual stress measurement methods particularly capable of addressing that objective, and these were applied to measure residual stress in a set of identically prepared compact tension (C(T)) coupons. Comparison of the results of the two measurement methods provides some useful observations. Results from fracture mechanics tests of residual stress bearing coupons and fracture analysis, based on linear superposition of applied and residual stresses, show consistent behavior of coupons having various levels of residual stress.

  16. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  17. FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES GARDEN I AND II: EVALUATION OF THE DEVIATION IN LATERAL VIEW.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Natália Zalc; Melo, Lucas da Ponte; Nordon, David Gonçalves; Silva, Fernando Brandão de Andrade E; Kojima, Kodi Edson; Silva, Jorge Santos

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the rate of deviation in the lateral radiographic incidence in patients with femoral neck fracture classified as non-diverted in the anteroposterior view (Garden I and II). Nineteen selected patients with femoral neck fractures classified as Garden I and II were retrospectively evaluated, estimating the degree of deviation in the lateral view. Fifteen cases (79%) presented deviations in lateral view, with a mean of 18.6 degrees (±15.5). Most fractures of the femoral neck classified as Garden I and II present some degree of posterior deviation in the X-ray lateral view. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study.

  18. The mechanics of brittle fracture and faulting on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Elissa I.

    The surface of Venus exhibits all types of brittle fracture and faulting at all scales. The fractures often exhibit characteristic patterns indicative of the mechanical processes responsible for their formation. In this dissertation I investigate two types of fracture patterns: (1) radial fracture systems related to the emplacement of subsurface dikes, and (2) secondary fractures associated with strike-slip faulting. This work combines detailed structural mapping based on Magellan data with two- and three-dimensional boundary element models of fracture processes to explain the observed deformation and place it in the framework of global tectonics on Venus. I describe two radial fracture systems and compare their geometry to analytical models of dike emplacement from a central magma chamber to constrain the stress fields acting at the time of their formation. Two-dimensional numerical models were implemented to consider the effects of dike initiation, propagation, and interaction. I propose that the stress perturbation around a dike can control the spacing between dikes, and the magnitude of this perturbation is related to the three-dimensional dike shape. Using three-dimensional boundary element models of the stress field around a tabular dike, I determine the relationship between dike aspect ratio (height/length) and spacing. Dike spacing increases as the aspect ratio increases; this relationship is used to infer the height of subsurface dikes. For the analysis of secondary fractures associated with strike-slip faulting, I investigate the spatial and temporal relationships between a ridge belt and an extensive fracture system along the belt boundary in Lavinia Planitia, Venus. I propose that the fractures formed as the result of right-lateral shear localized along the ridge belt, which acted as a pre-existing weak zone hundreds of kilometers long. First-order models of the ridge belt as a crack-like fault plane indicate that the localization and orientation of the

  19. Prediction of fracture risk. II: Other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ross, P D

    1996-12-01

    Many osteoporotic fractures are probably preventable-by definition, prevention requires identification of those at risk prior to fracture. There is a continuum in fracture risk and a very wide range in risk among individuals. Bone density, previous fractures, and the frequency and types of falls are important risk factors for fractures. There are also many other risk factors for bone loss, falls, and fractures. People with multiple risk factors are at greater risk than those with either a single risk factor or none. Identification of risk factors can help when planning interventions. For example, dietary deficiencies are amenable to dietary modification or supplementation; however, the effects of many risk factors have not been quantified separately, making it difficult to determine the importance. In addition, it is not possible to accurately predict current bone density and fracture risk from risk factors for bone loss; bone density should always be measured directly.

  20. Investigation of the fracture mechanics of boride composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clougherty, E. V.; Pober, R. L.; Kaufman, L.

    1972-01-01

    Significant results were obtained in fabrication studies of the role of metallic additives of Zr, Ti, Ni, Fe and Cr on the densification of ZrB2. All elemental additions lower the processing temperatures required to effect full densification of ZrB2. Each addition effects enhanced densification by a clearly distinguishable and different mechanism and the resulting fabricated materials are different. A significant improvement in strength and fracture toughness was obtained for the ZrB2/Ti composition. Mechanical characterization studies for the ZrB2/SiC/C composites and the new ZrB2/Metal materials produced data relevant to the effect of impacting load on measured impact energies, a specimen configuration for which controlled fracture could occur in a suitably hard testing apparatus, and fracture strength data. Controlled fracture--indicative of measurable fracture toughness--was obtained for the ZrB2-SiC-C composite, and a ZrB2/Ti composite fabricated from ZrB2 with an addition of 30 weight per cent Ti. The increased strength and toughness of the ZrB2/Ti composite is consistent with the presence of a significantly large amount of a fine grained acicular phase formed by reaction of Ti with ZrB2 during processing.

  1. Fracture mechanics applied to the machining of brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, G.D.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research has begun on incorporating fracture mechanics into a model of the orthogonal cutting of brittle materials. Residual stresses are calculated for the machined material by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian finite element models and then used in the calculation of stress intensity factors by the Green`s Function Method.

  2. Probabilistic fracture mechanics and optimum fracture control of the solid rocket motor case of the shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1977-01-01

    Development of a procedure for the reliability analysis of the solid rocket motor case of the space shuttle is described. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and consideration of a probability distribution for the initial flaw sizes. The reliability analysis can be used to select design variables, such as the thickness of the SRM case, projected design life and proof factor, on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds. Effects of fracture control plans such as the non-destructive inspections and the material erosion between missions can also be considered in the developed methodology for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure can be easily modified to consider other similar structures and different fracture control plans.

  3. Unique Mechanism of Chance Fracture in a Young Adult Male

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Aaron; Walsh, Ryan; Devita, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Since the first description of the Chance fracture in 1948, there have been few case reports of unique mechanisms causing this classical flexion-extension injury to the spine in motor vehicle accidents, sports injury, and falls. To our knowledge, this injury has not been reported from a fall with the mechanistic forces acting laterally on the spine and with spinal support in place. We present a 21-year-old male who slid down a flight of stairs onto his side wearing a heavy mountaineering style backpack, subsequently sustaining a Chance fracture of his first lumbar vertebrae. PMID:23599852

  4. Unique mechanism of chance fracture in a young adult male.

    PubMed

    Birch, Aaron; Walsh, Ryan; Devita, Diane

    2013-03-01

    Since the first description of the Chance fracture in 1948, there have been few case reports of unique mechanisms causing this classical flexion-extension injury to the spine in motor vehicle accidents, sports injury, and falls. To our knowledge, this injury has not been reported from a fall with the mechanistic forces acting laterally on the spine and with spinal support in place. We present a 21-year-old male who slid down a flight of stairs onto his side wearing a heavy mountaineering style backpack, subsequently sustaining a Chance fracture of his first lumbar vertebrae.

  5. Pediatric Facial Fractures: Interpersonal Violence as a Mechanism of Injury.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Ian C; Kordahi, Anthony M; Lee, Edward S; Granick, Mark S

    2015-07-01

    Interpersonal violence is a relatively infrequent cause of injury to the craniofacial skeleton in the pediatric population. The presentation of fractures as a result of different causes varies dramatically and can have a direct impact on management. The current study compares facial fractures in a pediatric population as a result of interpersonal violence with other mechanisms of injury. A retrospective review of all of the facial fractures at a level 1 trauma center in an urban environment was performed for the years 2000 to 2012. Patients ≤18 years were included. Patient demographics were collected, as well as location of fractures, concomitant injuries, services consulted, and surgical management strategies. Patients were placed into 2 groups, those sustaining an injury as a result of interpersonal violence and all others. A significance value of 5% was used. During this period, there were 3147 facial fractures treated at our institution, 353 of which were in pediatric patients. Upon further review, 68 patients were excluded because of insufficient data for analysis, leaving 285 patients for review. There were 124 (43.5%) patients identified as sustaining a fracture as a result of interpersonal violence. Those sustaining a fracture as a result of interpersonal violence were statistically (P < 0.05) more likely to be boys and to have sustained a fracture of the mandible. The most common services consulted for this group of patients was plastic surgery and oral and maxillofacial surgery. This group of patients was statistically (P < 0.05) more likely to be admitted specifically for management of a facial fracture and statistically (P < 0.05) more likely to be treated operatively with rigid internal fixation. Those sustaining a fracture as a result of interpersonal violence were significantly less likely to have other systemic injuries such as spinal fractures, intracranial fractures, long bone fractures, and pelvic/thoracic fractures. This group was

  6. The fracture properties and toughening mechanisms of bone and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Kurt John

    The mechanical properties of bone and dentin and in particular their fracture properties, are the subject of intense research. The relevance of these properties is increasing as our population ages and fracture incidence impacts the lives of a greater portion of the population. A robust framework is needed to understand the fracture properties of bone and dentin to guide researchers as they attempt to characterize the effects of aging, disease, and pharmaceutical treatments on the properties of these mineralized tissues. In the present work, this framework is provided and applied to human bone, human dentin, and animal bone. In situ electron microscopy was also used to identify the salient toughening mechanisms in bone and dentin. It was found that bone and dentin are extrinsically toughened materials and consequently their fracture properties are best characterized utilizing a crack-growth resistance approach. A description of the different mechanical measurements commonly employed when using small animal models (rats and mice) to evaluate the influence of drug therapies on bone fragility is provided. A study where these properties were measured for a large population of wild-type rats and mice was also conducted. Given my findings, it was determined that for the most complete understanding of small animal bone it was necessary to measure strength and toughness. Strength measurements probe the flaw distribution and toughness measurements to evaluate the resistance to facture in the presence of a single dominant worst-case flaw.

  7. Hydraulic Fracture Extending into Network in Shale: Reviewing Influence Factors and Their Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design. PMID:25032240

  8. Hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale: reviewing influence factors and their mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design.

  9. Physical and mechanical modelling of neutron irradiation effect on ductile fracture. Part 1. Prediction of fracture strain and fracture toughness of austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, Boris; Sorokin, Alexander; Smirnov, Valeriy; Potapova, Vera

    2014-09-01

    A physical-and-mechanical model of ductile fracture has been developed to predict fracture toughness and fracture strain of irradiated austenitic steels taking into account stress-state triaxiality and radiation swelling. The model is based on criterion of plastic collapse of a material unit cell controlled by strain hardening of a material and criterion of voids coalescence due to channel shearing of voids. The model takes into account deformation voids nucleation and growth of deformation and vacancy voids. For justification of the model experimental data on fracture strain and fracture toughness of austenitic steel 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade irradiated up to maximal dose 150 dpa with various swelling were used. Experimental data on fracture strain and fracture toughness were compared with the results predicted by the model. It has been shown that for prediction of the swelling effect on fracture toughness the dependence of process zone size on swelling should be taken into account.

  10. A new fracture assessment approach coupling HR-pQCT imaging and fracture mechanics-based finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ani; Bruno, Peter; Zhou, Bin; Shi, X Tony; Guo, X Edward

    2013-04-26

    A new fracture assessment approach that combines HR-pQCT imaging with fracture mechanics-based finite element modeling was developed to evaluate distal radius fracture load. Twenty distal radius images obtained from postmenopausal women (fracture, n=10; nonfracture, n=10) were processed to obtain a cortical and a whole bone model for each subject. The geometrical properties of each model were evaluated and the corresponding fracture load was determined under realistic fall conditions using cohesive finite element modeling. The results showed that the whole bone fracture load can be estimated based on the cortical fracture load for nonfracture (R(2)=0.58, p=0.01) and pooled data (R(2)=0.48, p<0.001) but not for the fracture group. The portion of the whole bone fracture load carried by the cortical bone increased with increasing cortical fracture load (R(2)≥0.5, p<0.05) indicating that a more robust cortical bone carries a larger percentage of whole bone fracture load. Cortical thickness was found to be the best predictor of both cortical and whole bone fracture load for all groups (R(2) range: 0.49-0.96, p<0.02) with the exception of fracture group whole bone fracture load showing the predictive capability of cortical geometrical properties in determining whole bone fracture load. Fracture group whole bone fracture load was correlated with trabecular thickness (R(2)=0.4, p<0.05) whereas the nonfracture and the pooled group did not show any correlation with the trabecular parameters. In summary, this study introduced a new modeling approach that coupled HR-pQCT imaging with fracture mechanics-based finite element simulations, incorporated fracture toughness and realistic fall loading conditions in the models, and showed the significant contribution of the cortical compartment to the overall fracture load of bone. Our results provide more insight into the fracture process in bone and may lead to improved fracture load predictions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  11. A NEW FRACTURE ASSESSMENT APPROACH COUPLING HR-pQCT IMAGING AND FRACTURE MECHANICS-BASED FINITE ELEMENT MODELING

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Ani; Bruno, Peter; Zhou, Bin; Shi, X. Tony; Guo, X. Edward

    2013-01-01

    A new fracture assessment approach that combines HR-pQCT imaging with fracture mechanics-based finite element modeling was developed to evaluate distal radius fracture load. Twenty distal radius images obtained from postmenopausal women (fracture, n = 10; nonfracture, n = 10) were processed to obtain a cortical and a whole bone model for each subject. The geometrical properties of each model were evaluated and the corresponding fracture load was determined under realistic fall conditions using cohesive finite element modeling. The results showed that the whole bone fracture load can be estimated based on the cortical fracture load for nonfracture (R2 = 0.58, p = 0.01) and pooled data (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.001) but not for the fracture group. The portion of the whole bone fracture load carried by the cortical bone increased with increasing cortical fracture load (R2 ≥ 0.5, p < 0.05) indicating that a more robust cortical bone carries a larger percentage of whole bone fracture load. Cortical thickness was found to be the best predictor of both cortical and whole bone fracture load for all groups (R2 range: 0.49–0.96, p < 0.02) with the exception of fracture group whole bone fracture load showing the predictive capability of cortical geometrical properties in determining whole bone fracture load. Fracture group whole bone fracture load was correlated with trabecular thickness (R2 = 0.4, p < 0.05) whereas the nonfracture and the pooled group did not show any correlation with the trabecular parameters. In summary, this study introduced a new modeling approach that coupled HR-pQCT imaging with fracture mechanics-based finite element simulations, incorporated fracture toughness and realistic fall loading conditions in the models, and showed the significant contribution of the cortical compartment to the overall fracture load of bone. Our results provide more insight into the fracture process in bone and may lead to improved fracture load predictions. PMID:23497802

  12. RNA Polymerase II Transcription: Structure and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A.; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    A minimal RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription system comprises the polymerase and five general transcription factors (GTFs) TFIIB, -D, -E, -F, and -H. The addition of Mediator enables a response to regulatory factors. The GTFs are required for promoter recognition and the initiation of transcription. Following initiation, pol II alone is capable of RNA transcript elongation and of proofreading. Structural studies reviewed here reveal roles of GTFs in the initiation process and shed light on the transcription elongation mechanism. PMID:23000482

  13. Fracture mechanics analysis of composite microcracking - Experimental results in fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, J. A.; Liu, S.

    1990-01-01

    The Nairn (1989) variational mechanics analysis, which yields the energy release rate of a microcrack's formation between two existing microcracks, has proven useful in the fracture mechanics interpretation of cross-ply laminates' microcracking. Attention is presently given to the application of this energy release rate analysis to a fracture mechanics-based interpretation of microcrack formation during fatigue loading, for the case of fatigue experiments on three layups of Avimid K/IM6 laminates and four layups of Fiberite 934/T300 laminates. The single master Paris-law plot onto which the data from all layups of a given material system fall is claimed to offer a complete characterization of that system's microcrack-formation resistance during fatigue loading.

  14. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Lambert, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA which may contain flaws. The project is divided into three tasks that deal with (1) constraint and thickness effects, (2) three-dimensional cracks, and (3) the Leak-Before-Burst (LBB) criterion. This report period (March 1994 to August 1994) is a continuation of attempts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional' or planar configuration specimens (Chapter Two), especially, the determination of, and use of, crack face separation data. Also, included, are a variety of fracture resistance testing results (J(m)R-curve format) and a discussion regarding two materials of NASA interest (6061-T651 Aluminum alloy and 1N718-STA1 nickel-base super alloy) involving a bases for like constraint in terms of ligament dimensions, and their comparison to the resulting J(m)R-curves (Chapter Two).

  15. Fracture control methods for space vehicles. Volume 2: Assessment of fracture mechanics technology for space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehret, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The concepts explored in a state of the art review of those engineering fracture mechanics considered most applicable to the space shuttle vehicle include fracture toughness, precritical flaw growth, failure mechanisms, inspection methods (including proof test logic), and crack growth predictive analysis techniques.

  16. Deformation and fracture of Macadamia nuts Part 2: Microstructure and fracture mechanics analysis of nutshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Hui; Mai, Yiu-Wing

    A study of the microstructure and mechanical properties of Macadamia nutshells subjected to various heat treatments is given in Part 2 of this paper. It is found that the nutshell has a three-dimensional, close-packed, cell structure. The cells have a diameter to length ratio of about 1 to 3, and the orientation of the cells is reasonably isotropic with no apparent variation with either position or direction. The material behaves in a very brittle manner under tension and compression. Based on the elastic stress analysis of a nut under diametrical compression and the mechanical properties of the shell, it is shown that cracks that cause the final fracture are initiated from the inner surface beneath the loading point. A theoretical model is proposed and predictions of the fracture load for Macadamia nuts are in good agreement with experimental results.

  17. Extensive Type II Muscle Fiber Atrophy in Elderly Female Hip Fracture Patients.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Irene Fleur; Snijders, Tim; Smeets, Joey S J; Leenders, Marika; van Kranenburg, Janneau; den Hoed, Marcel; Verdijk, Lex B; Poeze, Martijn; van Loon, Luc J C

    2017-10-01

    Sarcopenia, or the loss of muscle mass and strength, is known to increase the risk for falls and (hip) fractures in older people. The objective of this study was to assess the skeletal muscle fiber characteristics in elderly female hip fracture patients. Percutaneous needle biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis muscle in 15 healthy young women (20 ± 0.4 years), 15 healthy elderly women (79 ± 1.7 years), and 15 elderly women with a fall-related hip fracture (82 ± 1.5 years). Immunohistochemical analyses were performed to assess Type I and Type II muscle fiber size, and myonuclear and satellite cell content. Type II muscle fiber size was significantly different between all groups (p < .05), with smaller Type II muscle fibers in the hip fracture patients (2,609 ± 185 µm2) compared with healthy elderly group (3,723 ± 322 µm2) and the largest Type II muscle fibers in the healthy young group (4,755 ± 335 µm2). Furthermore, Type I muscle fiber size was significantly lower in the hip fracture patients (4,684 ± 211 µm2) compared with the healthy elderly group (5,842 ± 316 µm2, p = .02). The number of myonuclei per Type II muscle fiber was significantly lower in the healthy elderly and hip fracture group compared with the healthy young group (p = .011 and p = .002, respectively). Muscle fiber satellite cell content did not differ between groups. Elderly female hip fracture patients show extensive Type II muscle fiber atrophy when compared with healthy young or age-matched healthy elderly controls. Type II muscle fiber atrophy is an important hallmark of sarcopenia and may predispose to falls and (hip) fractures in the older population.

  18. Management of Type II Odontoid Fracture for Osteoporotic Bone Structure: Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Cosar, Murat; Ozer, A Fahir; Alkan, Bahadır; Guven, Mustafa; Akman, Tarık; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Ceylan, Davut; Tokmak, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Anterior transodontoid screw fixation technique is generally chosen for the management of type II odontoid fractures. The nonunion of type II odontoid fractures is still a major problem especially in elderly and osteoporotic patients. Eleven osteoporotic type II odontoid fracured patients were presented in this article. We have divided 11 patients in two groups as classical and Ozer's technique. We have also compared (radiologically and clinically) the classical anterior transodontoid screw fixation (group II: 6 cases) and Ozer's transodontoid screw fixation technique (group I: 5 cases) retrospectively. There was no difference regaring the clinical features of the groups. However, the radiological results showed 100% fusion for Ozer's screw fixation technique and 83% fusion for the classical screw fixation technique. In conclusion, we suggest that Ozer's technique may help to increase the fusion capacity for osteoporotic type II odontoid fractures.

  19. RNA polymerase II transcription: structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2013-01-01

    A minimal RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription system comprises the polymerase and five general transcription factors (GTFs) TFIIB, -D, -E, -F, and -H. The addition of Mediator enables a response to regulatory factors. The GTFs are required for promoter recognition and the initiation of transcription. Following initiation, pol II alone is capable of RNA transcript elongation and of proofreading. Structural studies reviewed here reveal roles of GTFs in the initiation process and shed light on the transcription elongation mechanism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation.

  20. Quantitative Integration of Ndt with Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics for the Assessment of Fracture Risk in Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, J. H.; Cioclov, D.; Dobmann, G.; Boller, C.

    2010-02-01

    In the context of probabilistic paradigm of fracture risk assessment in structural components a computer simulation rationale is presented which has at the base the integration of Quantitative Non-destructive Inspection and Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics. In this study the static failure under static loading is assessed in the format known as Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD). The fracture risk is evaluated in probabilistic terms. The superposed probabilistic pattern over the deterministic one is implemented via Monte-Carlo sampling. The probabilistic fracture simulation yields a more informative analysis in terms of probability of failure. The ability to simulate the influence of the quality and reliability of non-destructive inspection (NDI) is an important feature of this approach. It is achieved by integrating, algorithmically, probabilistic FAD analysis and the Probability of Detection (POD). The POD information can only be applied in a probabilistic analysis and leads to a refinement of the assessment. By this means, it can be ascertained the decrease of probability of failure when POD-characterized NDI is applied. Therefore, this procedure can be used as a tool for inspection based life time conceptions. In this paper results of sensitivity analyses are presented with the aim to outline, in terms of non-failure probabilities, the benefits of applying NDI, in various qualities, in comparison with the situation when NDI is lacking. A better substantiation is enabled of both the component reliability management and the costs-effectiveness of NDI timing.

  1. Extrinsic fracture mechanisms in two laminated metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; Syn, C.; Riddle, R.; Sherby, O.

    1994-11-29

    The crack growth behavior and fracture toughness of two laminated metal composites (6090/SiC/25p laminated with 5182 and ultrahigh-carbon steel laminated with brass) have been studied in both ``crack arrester`` and ``crack divider`` orientations. The mechanisms of crack growth were analyzed and extrinsic toughening mechanisms were found to contribute significantly to the toughness. The influence of laminate architecture (layer thickness and component volume function), component material properties and residual stress on these mechanisms and the resulting crack growth resistance are discussed.

  2. [Bone fracture and the healing mechanisms. Pathophysiology and classification of osteoporotic fractures].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Hideaki

    2009-05-01

    Bone provides momentary strength and fatigue strength, and bone strength decreases with age. In elderly men and women with fragile bones osteoporotic fractures frequently occur. Fragility fracture occurs as a consequence of the decrease in momentary strength, and fragility fracture is one of the pathological fractures. In patients with the decrease in fatigue strength, insufficiency fractures frequently occurs. Insufficiency fracture is the same term as stress or fatigue fracture.

  3. Mechanical Stability and Reversible Fracture of Vault Particles

    PubMed Central

    Llauró, Aida; Guerra, Pablo; Irigoyen, Nerea; Rodríguez, José F.; Verdaguer, Núria; de Pablo, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Vaults are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells, with an unclear cellular function and promising applications as vehicles for drug delivery. In this article, we examine the local stiffness of individual vaults and probe their structural stability with atomic force microscopy under physiological conditions. Our data show that the barrel, the central part of the vault, governs both the stiffness and mechanical strength of these particles. In addition, we induce single-protein fractures in the barrel shell and monitor their temporal evolution. Our high-resolution atomic force microscopy topographies show that these fractures occur along the contacts between two major vault proteins and disappear over time. This unprecedented systematic self-healing mechanism, which enables these particles to reversibly adapt to certain geometric constraints, might help vaults safely pass through the nuclear pore complex and potentiate their role as self-reparable nanocontainers. PMID:24507609

  4. Discrete fracture patterns of virus shells reveal mechanical building blocks.

    PubMed

    Ivanovska, Irena L; Miranda, Roberto; Carrascosa, Jose L; Wuite, Gijs J L; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2011-08-02

    Viral shells are self-assembled protein nanocontainers with remarkable material properties. They combine simplicity of construction with toughness and complex functionality. These properties make them interesting for bionanotechnology. To date we know little about how virus structure determines assembly pathways and shell mechanics. We have here used atomic force microscopy to study structural failure of the shells of the bacteriophage Φ29. We observed rigidity patterns following the symmetry of the capsid proteins. Under prolonged force exertion, we observed fracture along well-defined lines of the 2D crystal lattice. The mechanically most stable building block of the shells was a trimer. Our approach of "reverse engineering" the virus shells thus made it possible to identify stable structural intermediates. Such stable intermediates point to a hierarchy of interactions among equal building blocks correlated with distinct next-neighbor interactions. The results also demonstrate that concepts from macroscopic materials science, such as fracture, can be usefully employed in molecular engineering.

  5. Physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula (Salter-Harris Type I, II, III, and IV fractures).

    PubMed

    Podeszwa, David A; Mubarak, Scott J

    2012-06-01

    Physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula are common and can be seen at any age, although most are seen in the adolescent. An understanding of the unique anatomy of the skeletally immature ankle in relation to the mechanism of injury will help one understand the injury patterns seen in this population. A thorough clinical exam is critical to the diagnosis and treatment of these injuries and the avoidance of potentially catastrophic complications. Nondisplaced physeal fractures of the distal tibia and fibula can be safely treated nonoperatively. Displaced fractures should undergo a gentle reduction with appropriate anesthesia while multiple reduction attempts should be avoided. Gapping of the physis >3 mm after reduction should raise the suspicion of entrapped periosteum that will increase the risk of premature physeal closure. Open reduction of displaced Salter-Harris type III and IV fractures is critical to maintain joint congruity and minimize the risk of physeal arrest.

  6. Stress Fracture Etiology as Dependent on Mechanically Induced Fluid Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Martin, M . B. Schaffler, and C. H . Turner. Bone microdamage and skeletal fragility in osteoporotic and stress fractures. J.Bone Miner.Res. 12:6...ulnae (Adams et al., 1995). Endosteal and periosteal were labeled weekly using tetracycline solution (15 ing- new bone formation, as well as...Transport mechanism operating Huiskes, R.. Weinans, H ., Grootenboer, H.J., Dalstra, M ., Fudala. B., between blood supply and osteocytes in long bones

  7. Micro and Macro Mechanics of Fracture in Ceramics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-30

    originates from resistant second phase particles in the path of a propagating crack. The crack tends to bow between the particles, causing the stress...increases until the fracture toughness of the particle is reached, whereupon crack advance ensues. The penetrability (or resistance ) of the second phase... resistance interfaces. Crack deflection has been associated with improved mechanical properties; I-3 however, the specific quantitative relation between the

  8. A case study in technology utilization: Fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This review of NASA contributions to the technology of fracture mechanics illustrates a fundamental role of the Space Agency in a single technical area. While primarily pursuing its goal of minimizing the weight of flight hardware, NASA engineers have generated innovations having broad impact in nonaerospace communities. A review is given of how these specific NASA innovations are communicated to the technical community outside the Space Agency, and current application areas are outlined.

  9. A Salter Harris type II fracture of the distal ulna in a fourteen month female neutered Great Dane.

    PubMed

    Langley-Hobbs, S J

    2005-01-01

    A displaced Salter Harris type II fracture of the distal ulna and a minimally displaced Salter Harris type II fracture of the distal radius were diagnosed in a fourteen month female neutered Great Dane dog. Fracture reduction was challenging but treatment was successful. Aetiology of the unusual fracture is discussed. Long bone physes may close later in giant breeds, early neutering can cause a further delay.

  10. Wide-range displacement expressions for standard fracture mechanics specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. A.; Gross, B.; Leger, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Wide-range algebraic expressions for the displacement of cracked fracture mechanics specimens are developed. For each specimen two equations are given: one for the displacement as a function of crack length, the other for crack length as a function of displacement. All the specimens that appear in ASTM Test for Plane-Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic Materials (E 399) are represented in addition to the crack mouth displacement for a pure bending specimen. For the compact tension sample and the disk-shaped compact tension sample, the displacement at the crack mouth and at the load line are both considered. Only the crack mouth displacements for the arc-shaped tension samples are presented. The agreement between the displacements or crack lengths predicted by the various equations and the corresponding numerical data from which they were developed are nominally about 3 percent or better. These expressions should be useful in all types of fracture testing including fracture toughness, K-resistance, and fatigue crack growth.

  11. Results of fracture mechanics tests on PNC SUS 304 plate

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.; Blackburn, L.D.

    1985-08-01

    PNC provided SUS 304 plate to be irradiated in FFTF at about 400/sup 0/C to a target fluence of 5 x 10/sup 21/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). The actual irradiation included two basically different exposure levels to assure that information would be available for the exposure of interest. After irradiation, tensile properties, fatigue-crack growth rates and J-integral fracture toughness response were determined. These same properties were also measured for the unirradiated material so radiation damage effects could be characterized. This report presents the results of this program. It is expected that these results would be applicable for detailed fracture analysis of reactor components. Recent advances in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics enable reasonably accurate predictions of failure conditions for flawed stainless steel components. Extensive research has focused on the development of J-integral-based engineering approach for assessing the load carrying capacity of low-strength, high-toughness structural materials. Furthermore, Kanninen, et al., have demonstrated that J-integral concepts can accurately predict the fracture response for full-scale cracked structures manufactured from Type 304 stainless steel.

  12. Mechanisms of extraocular muscle injury in orbital fractures.

    PubMed

    Iliff, N; Manson, P N; Katz, J; Rever, L; Yaremchuk, M

    1999-03-01

    The gross and microscopic events that occur after orbital blowout fractures were evaluated to assess the mechanisms of diplopia and muscle injury. Intramuscular and intraorbital pressures were evaluated in experimental animals, in cadavers, and at the time of orbital fracture explorations for repair of orbital fractures in humans. Histologic and circulatory changes, muscle pressure recordings, and operative observations were evaluated. Creation of a compartment syndrome was evaluated to include a histologic evaluation of the orbital fibrous sheath network for the extraocular muscles and the intramuscular vasculature. These experiments and observations do not support the role of a compartment syndrome in ocular motility disturbances because (1) intramuscular pressures were subcritical in both humans and animals; (2) no limiting fascial compartment could be demonstrated; and (3) microangiograms and histologic evaluations did not confirm areas of compartmental ischemic necrosis. Muscle contusion, scarring within and around the orbital fibrous sheath network, nerve contusion, and incarceration within fractures remain the probable causes of diplopia, with the most likely explanations being muscle contusion and fibrosis or incarceration involving the muscular fascial network.

  13. Wide-range displacement expressions for standard fracture mechanics specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. A.; Gross, B.; Leger, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Wide-range algebraic expressions for the displacement of cracked fracture mechanics specimens are developed. For each specimen two equations are given: one for the displacement as a function of crack length, the other for crack length as a function of displacement. All the specimens that appear in ASTM Test for Plane-Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic Materials (E 399) are represented in addition to the crack mouth displacement for a pure bending specimen. For the compact tension sample and the disk-shaped compact tension sample, the displacement at the crack mouth and at the load line are both considered. Only the crack mouth displacements for the arc-shaped tension samples are presented. The agreement between the displacements or crack lengths predicted by the various equations and the corresponding numerical data from which they were developed are nominally about 3 percent or better. These expressions should be useful in all types of fracture testing including fracture toughness, K-resistance, and fatigue crack growth.

  14. State-of-the-art report on piping fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Olson, R.J.; Scott, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report is an in-depth summary of the state-of-the-art in nuclear piping fracture mechanics. It represents the culmination of 20 years of work done primarily in the US, but also attempts to include important aspects from other international efforts. Although the focus of this work was for the nuclear industry, the technology is also applicable in many cases to fossil plants, petrochemical/refinery plants, and the oil and gas industry. In compiling this detailed summary report, all of the equations and details of the analysis procedure or experimental results are not necessarily included. Rather, the report describes the important aspects and limitations, tells the reader where he can go for further information, and more importantly, describes the accuracy of the models. Nevertheless, the report still contains over 150 equations and over 400 references. The main sections of this report describe: (1) the evolution of piping fracture mechanics history relative to the developments of the nuclear industry, (2) technical developments in stress analyses, material property aspects, and fracture mechanics analyses, (3) unresolved issues and technically evolving areas, and (4) a summary of conclusions of major developments to date.

  15. What is the best treatment for displaced Salter-Harris II physeal fractures of the distal tibia?

    PubMed

    Park, Hoon; Lee, Dong Hoon; Han, Seung Hwan; Kim, Sungmin; Eom, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2017-09-19

    Background and purpose - The optimal treatment of displaced Salter-Harris (SH) II fractures of the distal tibia is controversial. We compared the outcomes of operative and nonoperative treatment of SH II distal tibial fractures with residual gap of >3 mm. Factors that may be associated with the incidence of premature physeal closure (PPC) were analyzed. Patients and methods - We retrospectively reviewed 95 patients who were treated for SH II distal tibial fractures with residual gap of >3 mm after closed reduction. Patients were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: Group 1 included 25 patients with nonoperative treatment, irrespective of size of residual gap (patients treated primarily at other hospitals). Group 2 included 70 patients with operative treatment. All patients were followed for ≥ 12 months after surgery, with a mean follow-up time of 21 months. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors for the occurrence of PPC. Results - The incidence of PPC in patients who received nonoperative treatment was 13/52, whereas PPC incidence in patients who received operative treatment was 24/70 (p = 0.1). Multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that significant risk factors for the occurrence of PPC were age at injury, and injury mechanism. The method of treatment, sex, presence of fibular fracture, residual displacement after closed reduction, and implant type were not predictive factors for the occurrence of PPC. Interpretation - Operative treatment for displaced SH II distal tibial fractures did not seem to reduce the incidence of PPC compared with nonoperative treatment. We cannot exclude that surgery may be of value in younger children with pronation-abduction or pronation-external rotation injuries.

  16. Fracture and Stress Evolution on Europa: New Insights Into Fracture Interpretation and Ice Thickness Estimates Using Fracture Mechanics Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon

    2004-01-01

    The work completed during the funding period has provided many important insights into fracturing behavior in Europa's ice shell. It has been determined that fracturing through time is likely to have been controlled by the effects of nonsynchronous rotation stresses and that as much as 720 deg of said rotation may have occurred during the visible geologic history. It has been determined that there are at least two distinct styles of strike-slip faulting and that their mutual evolutionary styles are likely to have been different, with one involving a significant dilational component during shear motion. It has been determined that secondary fracturing in perturbed stress fields adjacent to older structures such as faults is a prevalent process on Europa. It has been determined that cycloidal ridges are likely to experience shear stresses along the existing segment portions as they propagate, which affects propagation direction and ultimately induces tailcracking at the segment tip than then initiates a new cycle of cycloid segment growth. Finally, it has been established that mechanical methods (e.g., flexure analysis) can be used to determine the elastic thickness of the ice shell, which, although probably only several km thick, is likely to be spatially variable, being thinner under bands but thicker under ridged plains terrain.

  17. Elasto-plastic fracture mechanics of crack growth in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, P. D.; Newson, T. A.

    2003-04-01

    A predominant variable in soil structure formation and degradation is crack propagation. Empirical models exist to predict fracture but these do not describe the underlying physical processes. Theoretical fracture mechanics models have been applied to soil, but most are not applicable when soil is in a wet, plastic state. Since the onset of crack formation in soil tends to occur in this condition, physically sound elasto-plastic fracture mechanics approaches are long overdue. We address this weakness by applying a new elasto-plastic fracture mechanics approach to describe crack formation in plastic soil. Samples are fractured using a deep-notch (modified 4-point) bend test, with data on load transmission, sample bending, crack growth, and crack mouth opening collected to assess the crack opening angle (COA), the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) and the plastic energy dissipation rate (Dpl). These are all material properties that can be used directly to predict and describe crack propagation. CTOA will be used to discuss the results here, although a full description of the other parameters will be provided in the conference presentation. It provides a powerful parameter for describing soil cracking since CTOA is induced by soil shrinkage (an easily measured parameter) and can be used to describe elasto-plastic fracture in finite element modelling packages. The test variables we have studied to date are clay platelet orientation, soil texture, clay mineralogy, and pore water salinity. All samples were formed by consolidating a soil slurry with a 120 kPa vertical stress. Tests on pure kaolinite showed that platelet orientation did not affect CTOA which was 0.23 ± 0.02 for both conditions. Soil texture did have a marked influence, however, with silica sand:kaolinite mixes of 20:80 and 40:60 reducing CTOA to 0.14 ± 0.02 and 0.12 ± 0.01 respectively. These lower values of CTOA indicate that less strain is required to induce fracture when the amount of clay is lowered

  18. Mechanical Properties for Fracture Analysis of Mild Steel Storage Tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-03-03

    Mechanical properties of 1950's vintage, A285 Grade B carbon steels have been compiled for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis of storage tanks (Lam and Sindelar, 1999). The properties are from standard Charpy V-notch (CVN), 0.4T planform Compact Tension (C(T)), and Tensile (T) specimens machined from archival steel from large water piping. The piping and storage tanks were constructed in the 1950s from semi-killed, hot-rolled carbon steel plate specified as A285 Grade B. Evaluation of potential aging mechanisms at both service conditions shows no loss in fracture resistance of the steel in either case.Site and literature data show that the A285, Grade B steel, at and above approximately 70 degrees Fahrenheit, is in the upper transition to upper shelf region for absorbed energy and is not subject to cleavage cracking or a brittle fracture mode. Furthermore, the tank sidewalls are 1/2 or 5/8-inch thick, and therefore, the J-resistance (JR) curve that characterizes material resistance to stable crack extension under elastic-plastic deformation best defines the material fracture toughness. The JR curves for several heats of A285, Grade B steel tested at 40 degrees Fahrenheit, a temperature near the average ductile-to-brittle (DBTT) transition temperature (CVN {at} 15 ft-lb), are presented. This data is applicable to evaluate flaw stability of the storage tanks that are operated above 70 degrees Fahrenheit since, even at 40 degrees Fahrenheit, crack advance is observed to proceed by ductile tearing.

  19. Mechanical and fracture behavior of calcium phosphate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jew, Victoria Chou

    Apatite-based calcium phosphate cements are currently employed to a limited extent in the biomedical and dental fields. They present significant potential for a much broader range of applications, particularly as a bone mineral substitute for fracture fixation. Specifically, hydroxyapatite (HA) is known for its biocompatibility and non-immunogenicity, attributed to its similarity to the mineral phase of natural bone. The advantages of a cement-based HA include injectability, greater resorbability and osteoconductivity compared to sintered HA, and an isothermal cement-forming reaction that avoids necrosis during cement setting. Although apatite cements demonstrate good compressive strength, tensile properties are very weak compared to natural bone. Applications involving normal weight-bearing require better structural integrity than apatite cements currently provide. A more thorough understanding of fracture behavior can elucidate failure mechanisms and is essential for the design of targeted strengthening methods. This study investigated a hydroxyapatite cement using a fracture mechanics approach, focusing on subcritical crack growth properties. Subcritical crack growth can lead to much lower load-bearing ability than critical strength values predict. Experiments show that HA cement is susceptible to crack growth under both cyclic fatigue-crack growth and stress corrosion cracking conditions, but only environmental, not mechanical, mechanisms contribute to crack extension. This appears to be the first evidence ever presented of stress corrosion crack growth behavior in calcium phosphate cements. Stress corrosion cracking was examined for a range of environmental conditions. Variations in pH have surprisingly little effect. Behavior in water at elevated temperature (50°C) is altered compared to water at ambient temperature (22°C), but only for crack-growth velocities below 10-7 m/s. However, fracture resistance of dried HA cement in air increases significantly

  20. Compensating Mechanisms That Minimize Flux Variability Through Unsaturated Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, J. R.; Su, G. W.

    2001-12-01

    Fast flow in fractures and macropores is a major cause of discrepancy between measurements and unsaturated flow models. Most models treat preferential flow as diffuse Darcy-Richards flow, so it is important to ascertain whether the mechanisms of unsaturated fracture flow accord with Darcy's law. The key issue is whether water flux is directly proportional to driving force with a proportionality factor, the hydraulic conductivity (K), that is independent of flux and force. We consider flow in a partially water-filled fracture with continuously supplied (e.g. ponded) water, responding to a change in driving force such as a change in tilt angle with respect to gravity. Four general flow modes, alone or in combination, can account for the dominant portion of the flow for these conditions, as shown by the experimental studies of Su and others (1999) and Tokunaga and Wan (1997). (1) Film flow occurs within a sheet or film that contacts a wall of the fracture. (2) Connected rivulet flow occurs when a rivulet that bridges across the fracture aperture by capillary force is consistently connected across the domain of interest from the inflow point to the outflow point. (3) Snapping rivulet flow occurs if the rivulet sometimes but not always extends continuously across the domain. (4) Pulsating-blob flow occurs in isolated blobs that bridge across the fracture aperture and move across the domain of interest without ever extending completely between the inflow and outflow points. Where fractures are large enough that the air-water interfaces are free to change shape or position in response to an externally applied change, each flow mode has its own characteristic relation between force and flow rate. This contrasts with the air-water interfaces commonly visualized in fine-textured media, in which the interface is constrained to a particular shape and position by capillarity and adsorption, so that the consistent geometry of the effective flow conduits leads to Darcian flow. In

  1. The Shear Mechanisms of Natural Fractures during the Hydraulic Stimulation of Shale Gas Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Li, Xiao

    2016-08-23

    The shearing of natural fractures is important in the permeability enhancement of shale gas reservoirs during hydraulic fracturing treatment. In this work, the shearing mechanisms of natural fractures are analyzed using a newly proposed numerical model based on the displacement discontinuities method. The fluid-rock coupling system of the model is carefully designed to calculate the shearing of fractures. Both a single fracture and a complex fracture network are used to investigate the shear mechanisms. The investigation based on a single fracture shows that the non-ignorable shearing length of a natural fracture could be formed before the natural fracture is filled by pressurized fluid. Therefore, for the hydraulic fracturing treatment of the naturally fractured shale gas reservoirs, the shear strength of shale is generally more important than the tensile strength. The fluid-rock coupling propagation processes of a complex fracture network are simulated under different crustal stress conditions and the results agree well with those of the single fracture. The propagation processes of complex fracture network show that a smaller crustal stress difference is unfavorable to the shearing of natural fractures, but is favorable to the formation of complex fracture network.

  2. The Shear Mechanisms of Natural Fractures during the Hydraulic Stimulation of Shale Gas Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The shearing of natural fractures is important in the permeability enhancement of shale gas reservoirs during hydraulic fracturing treatment. In this work, the shearing mechanisms of natural fractures are analyzed using a newly proposed numerical model based on the displacement discontinuities method. The fluid-rock coupling system of the model is carefully designed to calculate the shearing of fractures. Both a single fracture and a complex fracture network are used to investigate the shear mechanisms. The investigation based on a single fracture shows that the non-ignorable shearing length of a natural fracture could be formed before the natural fracture is filled by pressurized fluid. Therefore, for the hydraulic fracturing treatment of the naturally fractured shale gas reservoirs, the shear strength of shale is generally more important than the tensile strength. The fluid-rock coupling propagation processes of a complex fracture network are simulated under different crustal stress conditions and the results agree well with those of the single fracture. The propagation processes of complex fracture network show that a smaller crustal stress difference is unfavorable to the shearing of natural fractures, but is favorable to the formation of complex fracture network. PMID:28773834

  3. Measurement of residual stresses using fracture mechanics weight functions

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.

    2000-10-01

    A residual stress measurement method has been developed to quantify through-the-thickness residual stresses. Accurate measurement of residual stresses is crucial for many engineering structures. Fabrication processes such as welding and machining generate residual stresses that are difficult to predict. Residual stresses affect the integrity of structures through promoting failures due to brittle fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear. In this work, the weight function theory of fracture mechanics is used to measure residual stresses. The weight function theory is an important development in computational fracture mechanics. Stress intensity factors for arbitrary stress distribution on the crack faces can be accurately and efficiently computed for predicting crack growth. This paper demonstrates that the weight functions are equally useful in measuring residual stresses. In this method, an artificial crack is created by a thin cut in a structure containing residual stresses. The cut relieves the residual stresses normal to the crack-face and allows the relieved residual stresses to deform the structure. Strain gages placed adjacent to the cut measure the relieved strains corresponding to incrementally increasing depths of the cut. The weight functions of the cracked body relate the measured strains to the residual stresses normal to the cut within the structure. The procedure details, such as numerical integration of the singular functions in applying the weight function method, will be discussed.

  4. [Bone fracture and the healing mechanisms. Fragility fracture and bone quality].

    PubMed

    Mawatari, Taro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2009-05-01

    Fracture occurs in bone having less than normal elastic resistance without any violence. Numerous terms have been used to classify various types of fractures from low trauma events; "fragility fracture", "stress fracture", "insufficiency fracture", "fatigue fracture", "pathologic fracture", etc. The definitions of these terms and clinical characteristics of these fractures are discussed. Also state-of-the-art bone quality assessments; Finite element analysis of clinical CT scans, assessments of the Microdamage, and the Cross-links of Collagen are introduced in this review.

  5. Some basic fracture mechanics concepts in functionally graded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Z.-H.; Batra, R. C.

    1996-08-01

    In this paper, the crack-tip fields in a general nonhomogeneous material are summarized. The fracture toughness and R-curve of functionally graded materials (FGMs) are studied based on the crack-bridging concept and a rule of mixtures. It is shown that the fracture toughness is significantly increased when a crack grows from the ceramic-rich region into the metal-rich region in an alumina-nickel FGM. By applying the concept of the toughening mechanism to the study of the strength behavior of FGMs, it is found that the residual strength of the alumina-nickel FGM with an edge crack on the ceramic side is quite notch insensitive.

  6. Physeal fractures, part II: fate of interposed periosteum in a physeal fracture.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Helen E; Phieffer, Laura S; Wattenbarger, J Michael

    2002-01-01

    This study describes the histologic features of periosteum interposed into a physeal fracture of the rat proximal tibia. Periosteum was introduced into a physeal fracture in two groups of animals: those with an intact physis after fracture, and those with the medial half of the physis surgically ablated. Specimens of the proximal tibia underwent histologic analysis at 2, 4, 6, 10, and 21 days after fracture to determine the histologic features of interposed periosteum in a physeal fracture. In animals with an intact physis, interposed periosteum underwent one of two fates: it was degraded by giant cells in the fracture plane, which allowed cellular infiltration, or if the periosteum was closely surrounded by physeal cartilage, the physis grew around it and appeared to force it toward the metaphysis. In animals whose physis received surgical ablation, physeal bar formation was always present, with poor organization of the remaining lateral growth plate. Histologic evidence from this study also underscores the fact that physeal bar formation occurs from the migration of osteoblasts and osteoclasts along vertical septa.

  7. Mechanical design optimization of bioabsorbable fixation devices for bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Lovald, Scott T; Khraishi, Tariq; Wagner, Jon; Baack, Bret

    2009-03-01

    Bioabsorbable bone plates can eliminate the necessity for a permanent implant when used to fixate fractures of the human mandible. They are currently not in widespread use because of the low strength of the materials and the requisite large volume of the resulting bone plate. The aim of the current study was to discover a minimally invasive bioabsorbable bone plate design that can provide the same mechanical stability as a standard titanium bone plate. A finite element model of a mandible with a fracture in the body region is subjected to bite loads that are common to patients postsurgery. The model is used first to determine benchmark stress and strain values for a titanium plate. These values are then set as the limits within which the bioabsorbable bone plate must comply. The model is then modified to consider a bone plate made of the polymer poly-L/DL-lactide 70/30. An optimization routine is run to determine the smallest volume of bioabsorbable bone plate that can perform and a titanium bone plate when fixating fractures of this considered type. Two design parameters are varied for the bone plate design during the optimization analysis. The analysis determined that a strut style poly-L-lactide-co-DL-lactide plate of 690 mm2 can provide as much mechanical stability as a similar titanium design structure of 172 mm2. The model has determined a bioabsorbable bone plate design that is as strong as a titanium plate when fixating fractures of the load-bearing mandible. This is an intriguing outcome, considering that the polymer material has only 6% of the stiffness of titanium.

  8. [Radius fractures in children--causes and mechanisms of injury].

    PubMed

    Antabak, Anko; Stanić, Lana; Matković, Nikša; Papeš, Dino; Romić, Ivan; Fuchs, Nino; Luetić, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Radius fractures are the most common fractures in childhood. The main mechanism of injury is fall onto an outstretched hand. This retrospective study analyzed the data on 201 children admitted for radius fractures at KBC-Zagreb in the period 2011-2013. The study included 85 girls (42.3%) and 116 boys (57.7%) . The average age of the children was 9.6 years. Radius was injured in the distal segment in 79.1% of children. The sites of injuries were: park, campi and beach (24.9% of all children), playground, skate park and swimming pool (23.9%), kindergarten or school (20.9%), at home and around the house (17.9%), in the street (11.4%) and in the store or at a hotel (0.9%). The boys were mostly injured at playgrounds, during skating and at swimming pools (37.1% of all boys), while girls were mostly injured in parks, camps and at beach (42.4% girls). Fall was the major cause of the injury (49.3%), and children usually fell during ice skating and skating (32.3% of all falls). In 20.4% the injury was caused by pushing and hitting. The smallest percentage (9.5%) of children were injured in traffic accidents while riding a bike (only one child was hit by a car). Sport related activities caused injuries in 53.7% of the cases. Sport activities are the most important cause of the radial fractures in the pediatric population and falls during sports are the main mechanism of injury. The peak incidence is at 12 years for boys and at 10 years for girls, so intervention and/or prevention should be aimed at the age groups. Preventive actions should be focused on injuries that tend to occur in parks, schools and during sport activities.

  9. Compartment syndrome with an isolated Salter Harris II fracture of the distal tibia.

    PubMed

    Cox, George; Thambapillay, Siva; Templeton, Peter A

    2008-02-01

    A 14-year-old boy sustained a Salter Harris II fracture to his right distal tibia after a fall from his skateboard. He rapidly went on to develop the signs and symptoms of compartment syndrome, and he underwent emergency fasciotomy. This resulted in relief of his symptoms. After this procedure, his fracture was fixed with a single anteroposterior screw. He made a full and uncomplicated recovery, with no clinical or radiological evidence of epiphyseal growth arrest.

  10. Use of adjoint methods in the probabilistic finite element approach to fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wing Kam; Besterfield, Glen; Lawrence, Mark; Belytschko, Ted

    1988-01-01

    The adjoint method approach to probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM) is presented. When the number of objective functions is small compared to the number of random variables, the adjoint method is far superior to the direct method in evaluating the objective function derivatives with respect to the random variables. The PFEM is extended to probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) using an element which has the near crack-tip singular strain field embedded. Since only two objective functions (i.e., mode I and II stress intensity factors) are needed for PFM, the adjoint method is well suited.

  11. Teriparatide anabolic therapy as potential treatment of type II dens non-union fractures

    PubMed Central

    Pola, Enrico; Pambianco, Virginia; Colangelo, Debora; Formica, Virginia M; Autore, Giovanni; Nasto, Luigi A

    2017-01-01

    Odontoid fractures account for 5% to 15% of all cervical spine injuries and 1% to 2% of all spine fractures. Type II fractures are the most common fracture pattern in elderly patients. Treatment (rigid and non-rigid immobilization, anterior screw fixation of the odontoid and posterior C1-C2 fusion) remains controversial and represents a unique challenge for the treating surgeon. The aims of treatment in the elderly is to quickly restore pre-injury function while decreasing morbidity and mortality associated with inactivity, immobilization with rigid collar and prolonged hospitalization. Conservative treatment of type II odontoid fractures is associated with relatively high rates of non-union and in a few cases delayed instability. Options for treatment of symptomatic non-unions include surgical fixation or prolonged rigid immobilization. In this report we present the case of a 73-year-old woman with post-traumatic odontoid non-union successfully treated with Teriparatide systemic anabolic therapy. Complete fusion and resolution of the symptoms was achieved 12 wk after the onset of the treatment. Several animal and clinical studies have confirmed the potential role of Teriparatide in enhancing fracture healing. Our case suggests that Teriparatide may have a role in improving fusion rates of C2 fractures in elderly patients. PMID:28144584

  12. Distal humeral Salter Harris (Type II) fracture repair by an ulnar osteotomy approach in a horse.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Benjamin J; Richardson, Dean W

    2010-08-01

    To report repair of a comminuted distal humeral type II Salter-Harris fracture using an ulnar osteotomy approach and locking compression plates (LCP). Case report. A 3-month-old Standardbred filly with a type II Salter-Harris fracture of the distal humerus. Radiographic and computed tomography examinations were performed to assist surgical planning. The distal humeral fracture was approached by an ulnar osteotomy and repaired using a 7-hole broad LCP and screws inserted in lag fashion. The osteotomy was subsequently repaired using a 7-hole narrow LCP. The distal humeral fracture was successfully approached and stabilized by an ulnar osteotomy approach. At 6-month follow-up, the filly was ambulating comfortably with a normal cosmetic appearance. An ulnar osteotomy approach was readily performed and allowed for repair of a type II Salter-Harris fracture of the distal humerus. The equine distal humerus can be accessed readily using an ulnar osteotomy approach. LCPs allow for repair of complicated fractures that have previously been associated with a grave prognosis.

  13. Mechanical degradation of fuel cell membranes under fatigue fracture tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasany, Ramin M. H.; Sadeghi Alavijeh, Alireza; Kjeang, Erik; Wang, G. G.; Rajapakse, R. K. N. D.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cyclic stresses on the fatigue and mechanical stability of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes are experimentally investigated under standard fuel cell conditions. The experiments are conducted ex-situ by subjecting membrane specimens to cyclic uniaxial tension at controlled temperature and relative humidity. The fatigue lifetime is measured in terms of the number of cycles until ultimate fracture. The results indicate that the membrane fatigue lifetime is a strong function of the applied stress, temperature, and relative humidity. The fatigue life increases exponentially with reduced stresses in all cases. The effect of temperature is found to be more significant than that of humidity, with reduced fatigue life at high temperatures. The maximum membrane strain at fracture is determined to decrease exponentially with increasing membrane lifetime. At a given fatigue life, a membrane exposed to fuel cell conditions is shown to accommodate more plastic strain before fracture than one exposed to room conditions. Overall, the proposed ex-situ membrane fatigue experiment can be utilized to benchmark the fatigue lifetime of new materials in a fraction of the time and cost associated with conventional in-situ accelerated stress testing methods.

  14. Survival Predictions of Ceramic Crowns Using Statistical Fracture Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, S; Katsube, N; Seghi, R R; Rokhlin, S I

    2017-01-01

    This work establishes a survival probability methodology for interface-initiated fatigue failures of monolithic ceramic crowns under simulated masticatory loading. A complete 3-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis model of a minimally reduced molar crown was developed using commercially available hardware and software. Estimates of material surface flaw distributions and fatigue parameters for 3 reinforced glass-ceramics (fluormica [FM], leucite [LR], and lithium disilicate [LD]) and a dense sintered yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YZ) were obtained from the literature and incorporated into the model. Utilizing the proposed fracture mechanics-based model, crown survival probability as a function of loading cycles was obtained from simulations performed on the 4 ceramic materials utilizing identical crown geometries and loading conditions. The weaker ceramic materials (FM and LR) resulted in lower survival rates than the more recently developed higher-strength ceramic materials (LD and YZ). The simulated 10-y survival rate of crowns fabricated from YZ was only slightly better than those fabricated from LD. In addition, 2 of the model crown systems (FM and LD) were expanded to determine regional-dependent failure probabilities. This analysis predicted that the LD-based crowns were more likely to fail from fractures initiating from margin areas, whereas the FM-based crowns showed a slightly higher probability of failure from fractures initiating from the occlusal table below the contact areas. These 2 predicted fracture initiation locations have some agreement with reported fractographic analyses of failed crowns. In this model, we considered the maximum tensile stress tangential to the interfacial surface, as opposed to the more universally reported maximum principal stress, because it more directly impacts crack propagation. While the accuracy of these predictions needs to be experimentally verified, the model can provide a fundamental understanding of the

  15. Imaging appearance of entrapped periosteum within a distal femoral Salter-Harris II fracture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Johnathan; Abel, Mark F; Fox, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Salter Harris II fractures of the distal femur are associated with a high incidence of complications, especially premature physeal closure. Many risk factors for this high rate of premature physeal closure have been proposed. More recently, entrapment of periosteum within the physis has been suggested as an additional predisposing factor for premature physeal closure. The radiographic diagnosis of entrapped soft tissues, including periosteum, can be suggested in the setting of a Salter-Harris II fracture when the fracture does not reduce and physeal widening >3 mm remains. We report a patient who sustained a distal femoral Salter-Harris II fracture following a valgus injury. The patient had persistent distal medial physeal widening >5 mm following attempted reduction. A subsequent MRI revealed a torn periosteum entrapped within the distal femoral physis. Following removal of the periosteum, the patient developed a leg length discrepancy which required physiodesis of the contralateral distal femur. We present this case to raise awareness of the importance of having a high index of suspicion of periosteal entrapment in the setting of Salter-Harris II fractures since most consider entrapped periosteum an indication for surgery.

  16. [Surgical treatment for Mayo II B comminuted fracture of the olecranon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Ping, Li-yuan; Wang, Wei; Yang, Bao-gen

    2016-02-01

    To study clinical effects of surgery for the treatment of Mayo II B comminuted fracture in ulna olecranon. From May 2008 to March 2015, a total of 37 patients with Mayo II B comminuted fracture in ulua olecranon were treated, including 20 males and 17 females, ranging in age from 40 to 65 years old ,with an average of 53 years old. All the patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation within 4 to 7 days after injuries. All the patients had pain and functional disorder uf elbow joint. The X-ray and CT examination showed ulna olecranon comminuted fracture of Mayo II B. Postoperative complications were observed ,and Broberg-Morrey criteria was used tu evaluate therapeutic effects. All the patients were followed up ,and the duraiton ranged from 9 to 30 months ,with a mean of 15 months. Two patients had surface infection around incision ,and were healed by changing dressings. No other complications occurred such as needle slipping to stimulate skin ,screw loosening and wire broken. One patient had slight uneveness of joint surface without obvious functional disorder. According to Broberg-Morrey elbow fracture curative effect criteria, 11 paients got an excellent result, 24 good and 2 fair,and the total score was 87.0 ± 7.3. For the Mayo II B comminuted fracture in ulna olecranon, preoperative preparation, intraoperative restoring of the articular surface smooth and reasonable internal fixation, and postoperative rehabilitation actively, can obtain satisfactory clinical effects.

  17. Operative treatment of type II supracondylar humerus fractures: does time to surgery affect complications?

    PubMed

    Larson, A Noelle; Garg, Sumeet; Weller, Amanda; Fletcher, Nicholas D; Schiller, Jonathan R; Kwon, Michael; Browne, Richard; Copley, Lawson A; Ho, Christine A

    2014-06-01

    Because of the changing referral patterns, operative pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures are increasingly being treated at tertiary referral centers. To expedite patient flow, type II fractures are sometimes pinned in a delayed manner. We sought to determine if delay in surgical treatment of modified Gartland type II supracondylar humerus fractures would affect the rate of complications following closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. We performed a retrospective review of a consecutive series of 399 modified Gartland type II supracondylar fractures treated operatively at a tertiary referral center over 4 years. Mean patient age in the type II group was 5 years (range, 1 to 15 y). A total of 48% were pinned within 24 hours, 52% pinned >24 hours after the injury. No difference was in detected in rates of major complications between the early and delayed treatment group. Four percent of patients sustained a complication (16 patients). There were no compartment syndromes, vascular injuries, or permanent nerve injuries. Complications included nerve injury (3), physical therapy referral for stiffness (3), pin site infection (2 treated with oral antibiotics, 4 treated with debridement), refracture (2), and loss of fixation or broken hardware (2). Of the 3 patients who sustained nerve injuries, all underwent surgery within 24 hours of injury. One patient developed an ulnar motor and sensory nerve palsy after fixation with crossed K-wires. This resolved by 7 weeks postoperatively. Two patients presented with an anterior interosseous nerve palsy-1 resolved 1 week after surgery, the other by 8 weeks postoperatively. Delay in surgery did not result in an increased rate of major complications following closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of type II supracondylar humerus fractures in children. Further prospective work is necessary to determine if there are subtle treatment benefits from emergent treatment of type II supracondylar humerus fractures. Level III

  18. The method of lines in three dimensional fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J.; Berke, L.

    1980-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the calculation of design parameters for fracture mechanics by the method of lines (MOL) is presented. Three dimensional elastic and elasto-plastic formulations are examined and results from previous and current research activities are reported. The application of MOL to the appropriate partial differential equations of equilibrium leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations. Solutions of these equations are obtained by the Peano-Baker and by the recurrance relations methods. The advantages and limitations of both solution methods from the computational standpoint are summarized.

  19. Probabilistic/Fracture-Mechanics Model For Service Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, T., Jr.; Annis, C. G., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program makes probabilistic estimates of lifetime of engine and components thereof. Developed to fill need for more accurate life-assessment technique that avoids errors in estimated lives and provides for statistical assessment of levels of risk created by engineering decisions in designing system. Implements mathematical model combining techniques of statistics, fatigue, fracture mechanics, nondestructive analysis, life-cycle cost analysis, and management of engine parts. Used to investigate effects of such engine-component life-controlling parameters as return-to-service intervals, stresses, capabilities for nondestructive evaluation, and qualities of materials.

  20. Probabilistic fracture mechanics code for PWR steam generator tube maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Granger, B. ); Pitner, P. ); Flesch, B. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the COMPROMIS code developed by Electricite de France (EDF) to optimize the maintenance of PWR steam generator (SG) tube bundles. This model, based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, quantifies the impact of in-service inspections and maintenance actions on the risk of failure of an SG tube, with allowance as random variable for all the relevant parameters (distribution of crack sizes, detection and sizing capability, crack initiation and propagation, critical sizes, leak before break risk). The code is SG-specific and is designed to allow realtime evaluation based on manufacturing and inspection data banks.

  1. (Environmental and geophysical modeling, fracture mechanics, and boundary element methods)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.J.

    1990-11-09

    Technical discussions at the various sites visited centered on application of boundary integral methods for environmental modeling, seismic analysis, and computational fracture mechanics in composite and smart'' materials. The traveler also attended the International Association for Boundary Element Methods Conference at Rome, Italy. While many aspects of boundary element theory and applications were discussed in the papers, the dominant topic was the analysis and application of hypersingular equations. This has been the focus of recent work by the author, and thus the conference was highly relevant to research at ORNL.

  2. Probabilistic/Fracture-Mechanics Model For Service Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, T., Jr.; Annis, C. G., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program makes probabilistic estimates of lifetime of engine and components thereof. Developed to fill need for more accurate life-assessment technique that avoids errors in estimated lives and provides for statistical assessment of levels of risk created by engineering decisions in designing system. Implements mathematical model combining techniques of statistics, fatigue, fracture mechanics, nondestructive analysis, life-cycle cost analysis, and management of engine parts. Used to investigate effects of such engine-component life-controlling parameters as return-to-service intervals, stresses, capabilities for nondestructive evaluation, and qualities of materials.

  3. Uncommon Variant of Type II Monteggia Fracture with Concomitant Distal Humeral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Jihad F.; El Rassi, George S.; Abd El Nour, Hicham G.; El Asmar, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Monteggia fracture-dislocation, a common injury sustained by pediatric population, is a rare entity in adults. It was first observed by Giovanni Battista Monteggia and later classified by Bado into 4 groups. The term “Monteggia equivalent or variant” was introduced to describe certain injuries with similar radiographic pattern and biomechanism of injury. Since then various types and their variants have been described in the literature. We present a complex fracture pattern in a 55-year-old male not previously described in the literature along with its treatment modality and favorable outcome. PMID:26550509

  4. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves.

    PubMed

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-06-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m(-2) VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%-73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates.

  5. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-01-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m−2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%–73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates. PMID:27877680

  6. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-06-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m-2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%-73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates.

  7. Conventional and microfilled composite resins. Part II. Chip fractures.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, P; Ameye, C; Vanherle, G

    1982-11-01

    Dentists are accustomed to advantages and disadvantages in the materials at their disposal. This article was concerned with one disadvantage of microfilled composite resins, namely, chip fractures. Probably due to their higher coefficient of thermal expansion, higher water sorption, higher polymerization shrinkage, and lower tensile strengths, cohesive as well as adhesive chip fractures occur three to four times more often with microfilled composite resins than with conventional composite resins. Microfilled composite resins are indicated for esthetic purposes. They are contraindicated for Class IV and stress-bearing restorations. They are indicated for limited use in Class I restorations where esthetics is of primary importance. The technique of use must include acid-etching and intermediate bonding. The microfilled composite resins enjoy a smooth finish and high luster. This offers advantages in areas where smoothness is paramount. They may replace conventional composite resins for resurfacing existing restorations and veneering stained or mottled anterior teeth. They are indicated for treatment of cervical erosion.

  8. Fracture resistance of premolars with bonded class II amalgams.

    PubMed

    Dias de Souza, Grace Mendonça; Pereira, Gisele Damiana Silveira; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with MOD cavity preparation and simulated periodontal ligament. The teeth were restored with silver amalgam (G1), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and silver amalgam (G2) and Panavia F and silver amalgam (G3). After restorations were made, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours at 100% humidity and submitted to the compression test in the Universal Testing Machine (Instron). The statistical analysis of the results (ANOVA and Tukey Test) revealed that the fracture resistance of group 2 (G2=105.720 kgF) was superior to those of groups 1 (G1=72.433 kgF) and 3 (G3=80.505 kgF) that did not differ between them.

  9. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2- 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of K(sub I)/K(sub II) were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  10. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2- 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of K(sub I)/K(sub II) were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  11. Fracture mechanisms in multilayer phosphorene assemblies: from brittle to ductile.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-05-24

    The outstanding mechanical performance of nacre has stimulated numerous studies on the design of artificial nacres. Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material, has a crystalline in-plane structure and non-bonded interaction between adjacent flakes. Therefore, multi-layer phosphorene assemblies (MLPs), in which phosphorene flakes are piled up in a staggered manner, may exhibit outstanding mechanical performance, especially exceptional toughness. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the dependence of the mechanical properties on the overlap distance between adjacent phosphorene layers and the number of phosphorene flakes per layer. The results indicate that when the flake number is equal to 1, a transition of fracture patterns is observed by increasing the overlap distance, from a ductile failure controlled by interfacial friction to a brittle failure dominated by the breakage of covalent bonds inside phosphorene flakes. Moreover, the failure pattern can be tuned by changing the number of flakes in each phosphorene layer. The results imply that the ultimate strength follows a power law with the exponent -0.5 in terms of the flake number, which is in good agreement with our analytical model. Furthermore, the flake number in each phosphorene layer is optimized as 2 when the temperature is 1 K in order to potentially achieve both high toughness and strength. Moreover, our results regarding the relations between mechanical performance and overlap distance can be explained well using a shear-lag model. However, it should be pointed out that increasing the temperature of MLPs could cause the transition of fracture patterns from ductile to brittle. Therefore, the optimal flake number depends heavily on temperature to achieve both its outstanding strength and toughness. Overall, our findings unveil the fundamental mechanism at the nanoscale for MLPs as well as provide a method to design phosphorene-based structures with targeted properties

  12. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to the PTS issue

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the NRC effort to obtain a resolution to the PWR PTS issue, a probabilistic approach has been applied that includes a probabilistic fracture-mechanics (PFM) analysis. The PFM analysis is performed with OCA-P, a computer code that performs thermal, stress and fracture-mechanics analyses and estimates the conditional probability of vessel failure, P(F/E), using Monte Carlo techniques. The stress intensity factor (K/sub I/) is calculated for two- and three-dimensional surface flaws using superposition techniques and influence coefficients. Importance-sampling techniques are used, as necessary, to limit to a reasonable value the number of vessels actually calculated. Analyses of three PWR plants indicate that (1) the critical initial flaw depth is very small (5 to 15 mm), (2) the benefit of warm prestressing and the role of crack arrest are transient dependent, (3) crack arrest does not occur for the dominant transients, and (4) the single largest uncertainty in the overall probabilistic analysis is the number of surface flaws per vessel. 30 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Fracture mechanics parameters for failure prediction of composite resins.

    PubMed

    De Groot, R; Van Elst, H C; Peters, M C

    1988-06-01

    This study contains the first part of a research project in which the applicability of fracture mechanics parameters to predict failure of a restored tooth was investigated. Fracture mechanics parameters have been used in dental research before, but were restricted to comparative studies between various brands of composites. The critical values of the opening mode stress intensity factor (KI), its equivalents, the strain energy release rate (GI), and the J integral (JI), were measured with single-edge notched-bend (SENB) specimens of dental composite in a three-point bend test. The measured values of KIc for Silux (KIc = 0.99 +/- 0.03 MNm-3/2) and P-30 (KIc = 1.88 +/- 0.12 MNm-3/2), compared with values from the literature, show quantitative agreement. The J integral was computed by means of finite element analysis (FEA) on a two-dimensional model of the SENB specimens. The critical value of the J integral (measured with SENB specimens, notch depth-to-width ratio (a/W) = 1/2) was used to predict failure of specimens having an arbitrary geometry. In this study, failure was predicted for SENB specimens with notch depth-to-width ratio (a/W) = 1/4 and 3/4. The predicted deflection and load at failure correspond well with the measured deflection and load.

  14. Concomitant fracture of bilateral occipital condyle and inferior clivus: what is the mechanism of injury?

    PubMed Central

    Ulu, Mustafa Onur; Albayram, Sait; Aydin, Sabri; Ulusoy, Levent; Hanci, Murat

    2006-01-01

    With the routine use of multi-slice high resolution computed tomography, increasing number of occipital condyle fractures have been reported in the last decade. The authors report a very rare case of bilateral occipital condyle fracture complicated by the fracture of the inferior clivus and discuss the possible mechanisms of injury. PMID:17180399

  15. Fracture mechanics investigation of oil shale to aid in understanding the explosive fragmentation process. Final technical report, January 1983-July 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, K.P.

    1984-09-01

    This report summarizes goals and findings achieved in developing technologies to improve the overall efficiency of oil shale recovery processes. The objectives are to (a) develop theoretical fracture mechanics tools that are applicable to transversely isotropic materials such as sedimentary rock, more particularly oil shale; and (b) develop a fracture mechanics test procedure that can be conveniently used for rock specimens. Such a test procedure would: utilize the geometry of a typical rock core for the test; require a minimum amount of specimen machining; and provide meaningful, reproducible data that corresponds well to test data obtained from conventional fracture mechanics tests. Critical review of the state-of-the-art of fracture mechanics on layered rocks has been completed. Recommendations are made for innovative and promising methods for oil shale fracture mechanics. Numerical and analytical studies of mixed mode fracture mechanics are investigated. Transversely isotropic properties of oil shale are input using isoparametric finite elements with singular elements at the crack tip. The model is a plate with an edge crack whose angle with the edge varies to study the effect of mixed mode fracture under various conditions. The three-dimensional plate is in tension, and stress, energy methods are used in the fracture analysis. Precracked disks of oil shale cored perpendicular to bedding planes are analyzed numerically. Stress intensity factors are determined by (i) strain energy method, and (ii) elliptic simulation method. 47 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Coupled Flow and Mechanics in Porous and Fractured Media*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Newell, P.; Bishop, J.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models describing subsurface flow through deformable porous materials are important for understanding and enabling energy security and climate security. Some applications of current interest come from such diverse areas as geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, hydro-fracturing for stimulation of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and modeling electrochemistry-induced swelling of fluid-filled porous electrodes. Induced stress fields in any of these applications can lead to structural failure and fracture. The ultimate goal of this research is to model evolving faults and fracture networks and flow within the networks while coupling to flow and mechanics within the intact porous structure. We report here on a new computational capability for coupling of multiphase porous flow with geomechanics including assessment of over-pressure-induced structural damage. The geomechanics is coupled to the flow via the variation in the fluid pore pressures, whereas the flow problem is coupled to mechanics by the concomitant material strains which alter the pore volume (porosity field) and hence the permeability field. For linear elastic solid mechanics a monolithic coupling strategy is utilized. For nonlinear elastic/plastic and fractured media, a segregated coupling is presented. To facilitate coupling with disparate flow and mechanics time scales, the coupling strategy allows for different time steps in the flow solve compared to the mechanics solve. If time steps are synchronized, the controller allows user-specified intra-time-step iterations. The iterative coupling is dynamically controlled based on a norm measuring the degree of variation in the deformed porosity. The model is applied for evaluation of the integrity of jointed caprock systems during CO2 sequestration operations. Creation or reactivation of joints can lead to enhanced pathways for leakage. Similarly, over-pressures can induce flow along faults. Fluid flow rates in fractures are strongly dependent on the

  17. Critically Stressed Fractures as Conduits: Mechanically-Chemically-Mediated Anisotropy of the Effective Permeability of Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, P. S.; Nejati, M.; Paluszny, A.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been suggested that fractures that are critically oriented with respect to the in situ stress field are the most likely to be hydraulically conductive. This observation is revisited from the point of view of chemically mediated compaction processes, using numerical multi-physics, multi-scale simulations. Fracture contact is computed explicitly for discrete fracture networks, to find local displacements and contact tractions, which govern the initial permeability of the fractures. Subsequent flow simulations compute the full permeability tensor of the network. Local normal tractions then inform a series of transient reactive-transport, elastic-contact simulations at the grain scale that model the compaction of the fracture void space due to pressure-solution and free-face precipitation, assuming the pore-fluid in equilibrium concentration. The ensuing change of fracture transmissivity feeds back to the discrete fracture network model, wherein changes in the permeability tensor are evaluated. The eigenvectors of the initial permeability tensor reflect the higher permeability of fractures having shear/normal stress ratios near 0.6, which are characterized by relatively high permeability due to their combination of shear displacement and normal compression. The resulting preferred flow direction of the network becomes more pronounced over time as fractures that are subject to larger normal stresses experience stronger compaction, for two reasons. Firstly, larger normal traction over the surfaces provides a stronger drive for pressure solution at the contacting asperities. Secondly, these fractures are subject to smaller shear displacement. Their void space has less pronounced channels and is more sensitive to hydraulic sealing due to contact-zone percolation during the compaction process. It is concluded that mechanically-chemically mediated closure processes contribute to critically stressed fractures being likely hydraulic conduits.

  18. Radium release mechanisms during hydraulic fracturing of Marcellus Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Landis, J. D.; Renock, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Wastewater co-produced with methane from Devonian Marcellus Shale is hypersaline and enriched in Ra. Recent studies find that water injected during hydraulic fracturing can leach out significant quantities of Na, Ca, Ba and Sr from solid phases in the shale over just hours to days. Here, we show with water-rock leaching experiments that the measured 226Ra/228Ra ratios of Marcellus wastewater could also derive from rapid leaching of mineral and organic phases of the shale. Radium isotopes 226Ra (t1/2 = 1600 a) and 228Ra (t1/2 = 5.8 a) are produced through radioactive decay of 238U (t1/2 = 4.5 Ga) and 232Th (t1/2 = 14 Ga), respectively. In the absence of processes that fractionate U, Th and Ra from one another, the decay rates of each parent-daughter pair become identical over 5 half-lives of the daughter radionuclide reaching a condition of secular equilibrium. Water-rock interaction may induce pronounced deviations from secular equilibrium in the water phase, however. Such is the case during hydraulic fracturing, where Ra is soluble and mobile, and is orphaned from insoluble U and Th parents. Once 226Ra and 228Ra are mobilized no fractionation between these isotopes is expected during their transport to the surface. Thus the 226Ra/228Ra ratio in wastewater provides a fingerprint of Ra source(s). Leaching Marcellus Shale with pure water under anoxic conditions releases mainly 228Ra from clays; extraction of 228Ra from radiation damaged sites is likely the dominant contributing mechanism. Using a novel isotope dilution technique we find that 90% of the Ra released in pure water partitions back onto rock (possibly clays). In comparison, leaching with high ionic strength solutions induces the release of 226Ra from mainly organics; the breakdown of organic matter in these solutions may be the driving mechanism controlling 226Ra release in solution. Radium released by high ionic strength solutions strongly partitions into water and results in the development of leachates

  19. Mechanical evaluation of two canine iliac fracture fixation systems.

    PubMed

    Vangundy, T E; Hulse, D A; Nelson, J K; Boothe, H W

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-three canine pelves were tested bilaterally to determine the stiffness and strength of intact ilium and stabilized oblique iliac osteotomies that simulated a common clinical fracture. Fixation systems tested were three 4.0 mm cancellous screws inserted ventral to dorsal across the osteotomy site and one laterally placed five hole 3.5 mm dynamic compression plate. Specimens were mechanically tested to failure under torsional, axial, or axial plus bending loads. Lag screw fixation was stiffer and stronger than plate fixation in all testing modes. The differences were statistically significant (p less than .05) in the torsional and axial plus bending loading modes. Fatigue testing was performed on implanted specimens with low-level cyclic loading under axial plus bending loading conditions. Physiologic loading conditions failed to produce mechanical failure of either fixation system after 100,000 cycles.

  20. Salter-Harris II forearm fracture reduction and fixation using a buttress plate.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jonathan; Webb, Mark; v Fearon, Paul

    2014-01-31

    Distal radius fractures are common injuries in children. Those that affect the growth plate (physis) need to be managed carefully as inadequate management may lead to long-term deformity and a reduction in function. However, different management strategies all have drawbacks and controversy exists over how best to manage these cases. This is the case of a 13-year-old girl who presented with a Salter Harris II fracture, which was managed using a novel approach of utilising a T plate in a buttress mode to stabilise the fracture after anatomical reduction. This provided effective fracture fixation and should allow good bone healing without causing any iatrogenic growth plate damage and without fixing a plate across the physis, which may need removal in the future.

  1. Salter-Harris II forearm fracture reduction and fixation using a buttress plate

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Jonathan; Webb, Mark; Fearon, Paul v

    2014-01-01

    Distal radius fractures are common injuries in children. Those that affect the growth plate (physis) need to be managed carefully as inadequate management may lead to long-term deformity and a reduction in function. However, different management strategies all have drawbacks and controversy exists over how best to manage these cases. This is the case of a 13-year-old girl who presented with a Salter Harris II fracture, which was managed using a novel approach of utilising a T plate in a buttress mode to stabilise the fracture after anatomical reduction. This provided effective fracture fixation and should allow good bone healing without causing any iatrogenic growth plate damage and without fixing a plate across the physis, which may need removal in the future. PMID:24488665

  2. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  3. Fracture Mechanics Modelling of an In Situ Concrete Spalling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siren, Topias; Uotinen, Lauri; Rinne, Mikael; Shen, Baotang

    2015-07-01

    During the operation of nuclear waste disposal facilities, some sprayed concrete reinforced underground spaces will be in use for approximately 100 years. During this time of use, the local stress regime will be altered by the radioactive decay heat. The change in the stress state will impose high demands on sprayed concrete, as it may suffer stress damage or lose its adhesion to the rock surface. It is also unclear what kind of support pressure the sprayed concrete layer will apply to the rock. To investigate this, an in situ experiment is planned in the ONKALO underground rock characterization facility at Olkiluoto, Finland. A vertical experimental hole will be concreted, and the surrounding rock mass will be instrumented with heat sources, in order to simulate an increase in the surrounding stress field. The experiment is instrumented with an acoustic emission system for the observation of rock failure and temperature, as well as strain gauges to observe the thermo-mechanical interactive behaviour of the concrete and rock at several levels, in both rock and concrete. A thermo-mechanical fracture mechanics study is necessary for the prediction of the damage before the experiment, in order to plan the experiment and instrumentation, and for generating a proper prediction/outcome study due to the special nature of the in situ experiment. The prediction of acoustic emission patterns is made by Fracod 2D and the model later compared to the actual observed acoustic emissions. The fracture mechanics model will be compared to a COMSOL Multiphysics 3D model to study the geometrical effects along the hole axis.

  4. Non-union (type II) odontoid fracture: A case report of a motor vehicle accident

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, RG

    1986-01-01

    A case report is presented of a young man injured in a motor vehicle accident who subsequently suffered neck and shoulder pain with no radiation. The pain, aggravated by motion and relieved by neck massage, had persisted for five months. Investigation by plain film radiographs, prior to treatment suggested an odontoid fracture. Tomographic radiographs revealed a type II non-union odontoid fracture. Spinal manipulation was contraindicated and this patient went on to surgical stabilization. A type II odontoid fracture non-union should be ruled out in any patient presenting with a history of a motor vehicle accident with head trauma, before manipulation is considered. ImagesFigure 2aFigure 2bFigure 2cFigure 3aFigure 3bFigure 3cFigure 4aFigure 4bFigure 5aFigure 5b

  5. Heading the ball: a case of a Le Fort II fracture in a football match.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Ebru; Onur, Ozge; Denizbasi, Arzu; Kosargelir, Mehmet; Akoglu, Haldun; Ibrahim, Abdullah

    2011-03-15

    Facial injuries can impair a patient's ability to eat, speak and interact with others. Severe injuries occur as a result of interpersonal or domestic violence, or in motor vehicle collisions, including those involving motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles. The authors present a case of LeFort II fracture caused by a collision of opponents while heading the ball in a football match.

  6. Fundamental mechanisms of tensile fracture in aluminum sheet undirectionally reinforced with boron filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental study of the tensile-fracture process in aluminum sheet unidirectionally reinforced with boron filament. The tensile strength of the material is severely limited by a noncumulative fracture mechanism which involves the initiation and sustenance of a chain reaction of filament fractures at a relatively low stress level. Matrix fracture follows in a completely ductile manner. The minimum filament stress for initiation of the fracture mechanism is shown to be approximately 1.17 GN/sq m (170 ksi), and appears to be independent of filament diameter, number of filament layers, and the strength of the filament-matrix bond. All the commonly observed features of tensile fracture surfaces are explained in terms of the observed noncumulative fracture mechanism.

  7. Fracture mechanics of bone--the effects of density, specimen thickness and crack velocity on longitudinal fracture.

    PubMed

    Behiri, J C; Bonfield, W

    1984-01-01

    The fracture mechanics parameters of critical stress intensity factor (Kc) and critical strain energy release rate (Gc) for longitudinal fracture of bovine tibia cortical bone were determined by the compact tension method. It was demonstrated that, for a given bone density, Kc and Gc depended on the loading rate, and resultant crack velocity, with a maximum in fracture toughness (Kc approximately 6.3 MNm-3/2, Gc approximately 2900 Jm-2) at a crack velocity approximately 10(-3) ms-1. For a given loading rate, or crack velocity, an increase in bone density, in the range from 1.92 to 2.02 Mgm-3, produced increases in Kc and Gc, but a variation in specimen thickness (from 0.5 to 2 mm) had no effect on the measured fracture mechanics parameters.

  8. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics and Optimum Fracture Control Analytical Procedures for a Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1977-01-01

    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis is used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects of failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions are also considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure can be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different failure prevention plans.

  9. The Schwickerath adhesion test: A fracture mechanics analysis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, G A; Swain, M V

    2015-08-01

    The Schwickerath three point bending adhesion test is the basis of the International Standard ISO 9693:1999 procedure for assessing porcelain bonding to metals [1]. It has also been used to evaluate the adhesion of porcelain to zirconia. The purpose of this paper is a fracture mechanics analysis of this test, which allows determination of the crack-length load-displacement and toughness dependence of cracks extending along or near the interface. Linear elastic mechanics is used to develop expressions for the strain energy and compliance of Schwickerath geometry specimens as a function of crack extension along or near the interface. From the derivative of the compliance as a function of crack growth the strain energy release rate (G, N/m) is determined. The energy release rate for interface crack extension of Schwickerath geometry specimens is determined. It is found that a simple relationship between the minima of the force-displacement response and the strain energy release rate G exists. Further development enables the predicted force-displacement response as a function of crack length to be derived for different values of G. Experimental results of porcelain bonded to zirconia with and without notches of various lengths machined along the interface verify the expressions and analysis developed. With the fracture mechanics analysis developed in this paper it is possible to determine the quality of adhesion in Schwickerath specimens by the interface toughness in addition to the nominal interface shear bond strength. As the toughness of brittle materials has much less scatter than its strength, the interface toughness characterization of the adhesion should allow for a better distinction between the adhesion quality of bonding. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Laser micromachining for fatigue and fracture mechanics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M. C.; Li, B.; Gadag, S.; Chou, K. C.

    2010-04-01

    A laser micromachining (LMM) method to initiate flaws for fatigue and fracture mechanics applications is successfully demonstrated. Dynamic response of moving energy pulses during LMM of titanium alloy (Ti-3.5Al-2.5V) was numerically simulated by an integrated energy approach using temperature-dependent thermophysical properties and 3D heat transfer code. Stress and strain analyses were performed for a titanium tube of 9.53 mm outer diameter (OD) and 0.81 mm wall thickness (WT) with a 0.23 mm deep and 1.83-mm-long longitudinal laser micro-machined notch, using nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA). For comparison, an electric-discharge-machined (EDM) notched tube with the same notch profile as the laser-prepared tube was also investigated. The calculated hoop stress and strain amplitudes at the notch root of the EDM-prepared tube were approximately 64% and 63% of the stress and strain amplitudes in the laser-prepared tube, respectively, when two tubes were subjected to inner pressures for R ratio of 0.03 and Δ P=45, 50, and 55 MPa. Fatigue life due to crack initiation process can be minimized using LMM method. The described LMM method is, therefore, more appropriate than EDM for accomplishing flaw formation to study fatigue and fracture behavior of various materials.

  11. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Boatwright, D. W.; Curtin, W. J.; Lambert, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an EPFM methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA containing defects. This report covers a computer modelling algorithm used to simulate the growth of a semi-elliptical surface crack; the presentation of a finite element investigation that compared the theoretical (HRR) stress field to that produced by elastic and elastic-plastic models; and experimental efforts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional', or planar configuration specimens.

  12. Fracture Mechanics Analysis of LH2 Feed Line Flow Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark A.; Dawicke, David S.; Brzowski, Matthew B.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Harris, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    Inspections of the Space Shuttle Main Engine revealed fatigue cracks growing from slots in the flow liner of the liquid hydrogen (LH2) feed lines. During flight, the flow liners experience complex loading induced by flow of LH2 and the resonance characteristics of the structure. The flow liners are made of Inconel 718 and had previously not been considered a fracture critical component. However, fatigue failure of a flow liner could have catastrophic effect on the Shuttle engines. A fracture mechanics study was performed to determine if a damage tolerance approach to life management was possible and to determine the sensitivity to the load spectra, material properties, and crack size. The load spectra were derived separately from ground tests and material properties were obtained from coupon tests. The stress-intensity factors for the fatigue cracks were determined from a shell-dynamics approach that simulated the dominant resonant frequencies. Life predictions were obtained using the NASGRO life prediction code. The results indicated that adequate life could not be demonstrated for initial crack lengths of the size that could be detected by traditional NDE techniques.

  13. Fracture and mechanical stratigraphy for Mississippian-Pennsylvanian age carbonates, Ozark Dome, NW Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppers, M.; Burberry, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying natural fracture patterns in an area gives a detailed look into the local tectonic history. Comparing those fractures to the mechanical properties of the rocks provides key insights into predicting fractures in the subsurface. The Ozark Dome is an ideal study area for fracture research due to multiple fracturing events resulting from the multi-stage deformation Ouachita Orogeny during the late Paleozoic. This study used field observations of lithology and fracture attributes over ~10 outcrops in the Mississppian-Pennsylvanian (360-298 ma) carbonate sequence of the Ozark Plateau. Outcrops were chosen having excellent lithological exposure up the sequence from the Boone to Atoka formations and with 3D representations of the fracture patterns. In all, the area investigated covered nearly 60 square miles. Fracture attributes collected included fracture intensity, length, and abutting relationships; and rock hardness data collected from a Schmidt Hammer. Data was analyzed using programs such as Stereonet and MOVE structural software that generated rose diagrams, structural cross sections, and products. Initial results indicate 4 main fracture orientations that resulted from at least 3 discrete phases of deformation during the Miss-Penn. Initial results also indicate that the present-day mechanical stratigraphy is not the same one that existed during the deformation phases. Work done at the Tiger Blvd. outcrops showed at least 2 distinct mechanical units. Fractures observed at the outcrop did not respect mechanical bed boundaries, and showed no relationship to the differences in mechanical properties observed. This study will aid in the interpretation of fractures in regards to mechanical stratigraphy, which allows for a better understanding of subsurface fracture prediction in carbonate sequences worldwide. Finally, the fracture work here will also help in elucidating the tectonic history of the field area during the Mississippian and Pennsylvanian.

  14. Outcomes of Nonoperative Treatment of Salter-Harris II Distal Radius Fractures: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Meredith C; Bohm, Kyle C; Rizkala, Amir R; Ward, Christina M

    2016-03-01

    Despite the frequent occurrence of these injuries, we know little about the natural history of Salter-Harris II (SH II) distal radius fractures. We conducted a systematic review of studies examining the radiographic and clinical outcomes of nonoperatively managed SH II distal radius fractures. Systematic searches of the MEDLINE and Cochrane computerized literature databases and manual searches of bibliographies were performed. We reviewed both descriptive and quantitative data. Seven studies including 434 SH II fractures were reviewed. Two studies reported clinical outcomes based on patient age, but neither study described a statistical correlation between patient age and outcome. Two studies discussed the effect of age on radiographic outcome and reported higher rates of anatomic remodeling in children 10 years or younger. Two studies with long-term (average follow-up greater than 8 years) clinical results reported complication rates of 5%. Long-term follow-up of radiographic outcomes appeared in 4 studies with variable results. Five studies reported the frequency of premature physeal arrest after SH II fractures, with results ranging from 0% to 4.3%. Based on this review, no recommendations can be made as to what defines an acceptable reduction or which fractures would benefit from surgical intervention. Angular deformity seems to correct to an acceptable alignment in patients less than 10 years of age, but these younger patients seem to be at higher risk for symptomatic shortening if a growth arrest occurs. Redisplacement after reduction is fairly common, and other more severe complications such as pain, loss of motion, and nerve injury can occur.

  15. Outcomes of Nonoperative Treatment of Salter-Harris II Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Meredith C.; Bohm, Kyle C.; Rizkala, Amir R.; Ward, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the frequent occurrence of these injuries, we know little about the natural history of Salter-Harris II (SH II) distal radius fractures. We conducted a systematic review of studies examining the radiographic and clinical outcomes of nonoperatively managed SH II distal radius fractures. Methods: Systematic searches of the MEDLINE and Cochrane computerized literature databases and manual searches of bibliographies were performed. We reviewed both descriptive and quantitative data. Results: Seven studies including 434 SH II fractures were reviewed. Two studies reported clinical outcomes based on patient age, but neither study described a statistical correlation between patient age and outcome. Two studies discussed the effect of age on radiographic outcome and reported higher rates of anatomic remodeling in children 10 years or younger. Two studies with long-term (average follow-up greater than 8 years) clinical results reported complication rates of 5%. Long-term follow-up of radiographic outcomes appeared in 4 studies with variable results. Five studies reported the frequency of premature physeal arrest after SH II fractures, with results ranging from 0% to 4.3%. Conclusions: Based on this review, no recommendations can be made as to what defines an acceptable reduction or which fractures would benefit from surgical intervention. Angular deformity seems to correct to an acceptable alignment in patients less than 10 years of age, but these younger patients seem to be at higher risk for symptomatic shortening if a growth arrest occurs. Redisplacement after reduction is fairly common, and other more severe complications such as pain, loss of motion, and nerve injury can occur. PMID:27418886

  16. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2 - 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma- sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  17. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2 - 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma- sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  18. Chemical and Mechanical Alteration of Fractures: Micro-Scale Simulations and Comparison to Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, P.; Detwiler, R. L.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Morris, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Fractures are often the main pathways for subsurface fluid flow especially in rocks with low matrix porosity. Therefore, the hydro-mechanical properties of fractures are of fundamental concern for subsurface CO2 sequestration, enhanced geothermal energy production, enhanced oil recovery, and nuclear waste disposal. Chemical and mechanical stresses induced during these applications may lead to significant alteration of the hydro-mechanical properties of fractures. Laboratory experiments aimed at understanding the chemo-hydro-mechanical response of fractures have shown a range of results that contradict simple conceptual models. For example, under conditions favoring mineral dissolution, where one would expect an overall increase in permeability and fracture aperture, permeability increases under some conditions and decreases under others. Recent experiments have attempted to link these core-scale observations to the relevant small-scale processes occurring within fractures. Results suggest that the loss of mechanical strength in asperities due to chemical alteration may cause non-uniform deformation and alteration of fracture apertures. However, it remains difficult to directly measure the coupled chemical and mechanical processes that lead to alteration of contacting fracture surfaces, which challenges our ability to predict the long-term evolution of the hydro-mechanical properties of fractures. Here, we present a computational model that uses micro-scale surface roughness and explicitly couples dissolution and elastic deformation to calculate local alterations in fracture aperture under chemical and mechanical stresses. Chemical alteration of the fracture surfaces is modeled using a depth-averaged algorithm of fracture flow and reactive transport. Then, we deform the resulting altered fracture-surfaces using an algorithm that calculates the elastic deformation. Nonuniform dissolution may cause the location of the resultant force between the two contacting

  19. Diameter of basalt columns derived from fracture mechanics bifurcation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bahr, H-A; Hofmann, M; Weiss, H-J; Bahr, U; Fischer, G; Balke, H

    2009-05-01

    The diameter of columnar joints forming in cooling basalt and drying starch increases with decreasing growth rate. This observation can be reproduced with a linear-elastic three-dimensional fracture mechanics bifurcation analysis, which has been done for a periodic array of hexagonal columnar joints by considering a bifurcation mode compatible with observations on drying starch. In order to be applicable to basalt columns, the analysis has been carried out with simplified stationary temperature fields. The critical diameter differs from the one derived with a two-dimensional model by a mere factor of 1/2. By taking into account the latent heat released at the solidification front, the results agree fairly well with observed column diameters.

  20. Simple spline-function equations for fracture mechanics calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents simple spline-function equations for fracture mechanics calculations. A spline function is a sequence of piecewise polynomials of degree n greater than 1 whose coefficients are such that the function and its first n-1 derivatives are continuous. Second-degree spline equations are presented for the compact, three point bend, and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens. Some expressions can be used directly, so that for a cyclic crack propagation test using a compact specimen, the equation given allows the cracklength to be calculated from the slope of the load-displacement curve. For an R-curve test, equations allow the crack length and stress intensity factor to be calculated from the displacement and the displacement ratio.

  1. Microstructural fracture mechanics in high-cycle fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, E.R. de los; Navarro, A.

    1997-12-31

    Microstructural Fracture Mechanics principles are used to develop a model of crack growth in long life fatigue. In its simplest form microstructural modelling considers the material as a polycrystal of uniform grain size D, with a crack system divided into three zones: the crack, the plastic zone and the microstructural barrier zone. The solution of the equilibrium equation allows for the calculation of the stresses sustained by the crack wake, plastic zone, barrier zone and elastic enclave, and the crack tip plastic displacement {phi}. Crack growth rate is calculated through a Paris type relationship in terms of {phi}, i.e., da/dN = C{phi}{sup n}. Conditions for crack arrest and instability are established.

  2. A mechanism-based approach to modeling ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Hammi, Youssef; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Klein, Patrick A.; Foulk, James W., III; McFadden, Sam X.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile fracture in metals has been observed to result from the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids. The evolution of this damage is inherently history dependent, affected by how time-varying stresses drive the formation of defect structures in the material. At some critically damaged state, the softening response of the material leads to strain localization across a surface that, under continued loading, becomes the faces of a crack in the material. Modeling localization of strain requires introduction of a length scale to make the energy dissipated in the localized zone well-defined. In this work, a cohesive zone approach is used to describe the post-bifurcation evolution of material within the localized zone. The relations are developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework that incorporates temperature and rate-dependent evolution relationships motivated by dislocation mechanics. As such, we do not prescribe the evolution of tractions with opening displacements across the localized zone a priori. The evolution of tractions is itself an outcome of the solution of particular, initial boundary value problems. The stress and internal state of the material at the point of bifurcation provides the initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of the cohesive zone. The models we develop are motivated by in-situ scanning electron microscopy of three-point bending experiments using 6061-T6 aluminum and 304L stainless steel, The in situ observations of the initiation and evolution of fracture zones reveal the scale over which the failure mechanisms act. In addition, these observations are essential for motivating the micromechanically-based models of the decohesion process that incorporate the effects of loading mode mixity, temperature, and loading rate. The response of these new cohesive zone relations is demonstrated by modeling the three-point bending configuration used for the experiments. In addition, we survey other methods with the potential

  3. Are C2 pars-pedicle screws alone for type II Hangman's fracture overrated?

    PubMed

    Salunke, Pravin; Sahoo, Sushanta K; Krishnan, Prasad; Chaterjee, Debarshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat Bir Singh

    2016-02-01

    The recent trend for treatment of certain cases of type II Hangman's fracture has been towards motion preserving surgery. This is claimed to be achieved with placement of pedicle screws across the fracture fragments. However, the long term outcome in clinical scenario is not yet clear, neither are the factors determining suitability of such a technique. We have retrospectively analyzed the results of 11 patients of type II Hangman's fracture, according to the extent of translation. Nine patients underwent stabilization of fracture with C2 pedicle screws and 2 were managed with halo immobilization. The conservative management failed in one and this patient underwent internal fixation using pars-pedicle screw as well. The long term clinical and radiological (CT and dynamic X-rays) outcome was analyzed. All patients including the one with halo immobilization, showed solid fusion across the fracture fragments. With the exception of one patient none had any clinical symptoms. This lone patient complained of restricted neck movements. Three different types of radiological results were observed. Two patients with translation >8mm showed C2-3 body fusion. Three of 6 patients with minimal translational (3-4mm) showed facet fusion. Three patients with moderate translational dislocation (4.5-5.5mm) showed persisting C2-3 angular instability. The C2 pedicle screw is a good technique for osteosynthesis. However, the claimed long term advantage of motion segment preservation with this technique remains doubtful. It may be suitable for those fractures with minimal translation (<4mm), where the superiority of surgery, itself, over external immobilization is questionable. C2-3 fusion is preferable for those fractures with translation >4mm as these are unstable and C2 pedicle screws alone are likely to have less desirable results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral shaft fractures: role for mechanics and bone quality.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Marjolein C H; Boskey, Adele L

    2012-08-29

    Bisphosphonates are highly effective agents for reducing osteoporotic fractures in women and men, decreasing fracture incidence at the hip and spine up to 50%. In a small subset of patients, however, these agents have recently been associated with 'atypical femoral fractures' (AFFs) in the subtrochanteric region or the diaphysis. These fractures have several atypical characteristics, including occurrence with minimal trauma; younger age than typical osteoporotic fractures; occurrence at cortical, rather than cancellous sites; early radiographic appearance similar to that of a stress fracture; transverse fracture pattern rather than the familiar spiral or transverse-oblique morphologies; initiation on the lateral cortex; and high risk of fracture on the contralateral side, at the same location as the initial fracture. Fracture is a mechanical phenomenon that occurs when the loads applied to a structure such as a long bone exceed its load-bearing capacity, either due to a single catastrophic overload (traumatic failure) or as a result of accumulated damage and crack propagation at sub-failure loads (fatigue failure). The association of AFFs with no or minimal trauma suggests a fatigue-based mechanism that depends on cortical cross-sectional geometry and tissue material properties. In the case of AFFs, bisphosphonate treatment may alter cortical tissue properties, as these agents are known to alter bone remodeling. This review discusses the use of bisphosphonates, their effects on bone remodeling, mechanics and tissue composition, their significance as an effective therapy for osteoporosis, and why these agents may increase fracture risk in a small population of patients.

  5. Fracture-Based Mesh Size Requirements for Matrix Cracks in Continuum Damage Mechanics Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Mabson, Gerald E.; Ramnath, Madhavadas; Hyder, Imran

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the ability of progressive damage analysis (PDA) finite element (FE) models to predict transverse matrix cracks in unidirectional composites. The results of the analyses are compared to closed-form linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) solutions. Matrix cracks in fiber-reinforced composite materials subjected to mode I and mode II loading are studied using continuum damage mechanics and zero-thickness cohesive zone modeling approaches. The FE models used in this study are built parametrically so as to investigate several model input variables and the limits associated with matching the upper-bound LEFM solutions. Specifically, the sensitivity of the PDA FE model results to changes in strength and element size are investigated.

  6. On study of nonclassical problems of fracture and failure mechanics and related mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, A. N.

    2009-01-01

    Nonclassical problems of fracture and failure mechanics that have been analyzed by the author and his collaborators at the S. P. Timoshenko Institute of Mechanics (Kiev, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine) during the past forty years are considered in brief. The results of the analysis are presented in a form that would be quite informative for the majority of experts interested in various fundamental and applied aspects of fracture and failure problems including the identification of related mechanisms. This paper was prepared on invitation of the Editorial Board of the journal "Annals. The European Academy of Sciences" and may be considered as an Extended Pascal Medal Lecture (The 2007 Blaise Pascal Medal in Materials Sciences of the EAS)

  7. Type II restriction endonucleases: structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pingoud, A; Fuxreiter, M; Pingoud, V; Wende, W

    2005-03-01

    Type II restriction endonucleases are components of restriction modification systems that protect bacteria and archaea against invading foreign DNA. Most are homodimeric or tetrameric enzymes that cleave DNA at defined sites of 4-8 bp in length and require Mg2+ ions for catalysis. They differ in the details of the recognition process and the mode of cleavage, indicators that these enzymes are more diverse than originally thought. Still, most of them have a similar structural core and seem to share a common mechanism of DNA cleavage, suggesting that they evolved from a common ancestor. Only a few restriction endonucleases discovered thus far do not belong to the PD...D/ExK family of enzymes, but rather have active sites typical of other endonuclease families. The present review deals with new developments in the field of Type II restriction endonucleases. One of the more interesting aspects is the increasing awareness of the diversity of Type II restriction enzymes. Nevertheless, structural studies summarized herein deal with the more common subtypes. A major emphasis of this review will be on target site location and the mechanism of catalysis, two problems currently being addressed in the literature.

  8. Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-02

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0003 Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests Zhenjun Yang UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER...Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER EOARD 12-2100 5b. GRANT NUMBER F8655-12-1... fracture behavior of CFRP using state-of-the-art X-Ray Computed Tomography (XCT) was investigated experimentally in order to develop an innovative

  9. Damage Tolerance Assessment Handbook. Volume 1. Introduction Fracture Mechanics Fatigue Crack Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Volume ,: Introduction NJ 08405 Fracture Mechanics Fatigue Crack Propagation Research and Special Programs Administration John A. Volpe National...Load-displacement plot [Adapted from John M. Barson/Stanley T. Rolfe, Fracture and Fatigue Control in Structures. Applications of Fracture Mechanics...Methods ASTM STP 527, American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA, 1973. 2-19. Ratwani, M.M. and Wilhem , DP. Develonment and EvaluAtion of

  10. [Case-control study on bone setting manipulation for the treatment of over degree II supination-eversion fractures of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Qi, Yue-Feng; Chen, Fa-Lin; Bao, Shu-Ren; Li, Cheng-Huan; Zhao, Xing-Wei; Liu, Shi-Ming; Chen, Wen-Xue; Li, Ye; Wang, Peng

    2012-08-01

    To explore therapeutic effects of bone setting manipulation for the treatment of over degree II supination-eversion fractures of ankle,and analyze manipulative reduction mechanism. From 2005 to 2008, 95 patients with over degree II supination-eversion fractures of ankle were treated respectively by manipulation and operation. There were 43 cases [11 males and 32 females with an average age of (44.95 +/- 12.65) years] in manipulation group, and 2 cases were degree II, 11 cases were degree III, and 30 cases were degree IV. There were 52 cases [21 males and 31 females with an average age of (39.96 +/- 13.28) years] in operative group,and 6 cases were degree II, 18 cases were degree III, and 28 cases were degree IV. Bone setting manipulation and hard splint external fixation were applied to manipulative group. Operative reduction internal fixation was performed in operative group. X-ray was used to evaluate reduction of fracture before and after treatment, 2 months after treatment. Ankle joint function was evaluated according to Olerud-Molander scoring system after 6 months treatment. All patients were followed up with good reduction. Three cases occurred wound complication in operative group, but not in manipulative group. In manipulation group, 19 cases got excellent results, 20 cases good and 4 cases fair; while in operative group, 30 cases got excellent results, 20 cases good and 2 cases poor. There were no significant differences in fracture reduction and ankle joint function recovery between two groups (P > 0.05). Efficacy of operative treatment was better than that of manipulative treatment at degree IV fracture (P < 0.05). Bone setting manipulation is a good method for treating supination-eversion ankle joint fractures, which has advantages of simple and safe operation, reliable efficacy. For ankle join fracture at degree IV, manipulative reduction should be adopted earlier, and operative treatment also necessary

  11. Combined Isolated Laugier's Fracture and Distal Radial Fracture: Management and Literature Review on the Mechanism of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Walid; Alaya, Zeineb; Naouar, Nader; Ben Ayeche, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated fracture of the trochlea is an uncommon condition requiring a particular mechanism of injury. Its association with a distal radial fracture is rare. We aimed through this case report to identify the injury mechanism and to assess surgical outcomes. Case Presentation. We report a 26-year-old female who was admitted to our department for elbow trauma following an accidental fall on her outstretched right hand with her elbow extended and supinated. On examination, the right elbow was swollen with tenderness over the anteromedial aspect of the distal humerus. The elbow range was restricted. Standard radiographs showed an intra-articular half-moon-shaped fragment lying proximal and anterior to the distal humerus. There was a comminuted articular fracture of the distal radius with an anterior displacement. A computed tomography revealed an isolated shear fracture of the trochlea without any associated lesion of the elbow. The patient was surgically managed. Anatomical reduction was achieved and the fracture was fixed with 2 Kirschner wires. The distal radial fracture was treated by open reduction and plate fixation. The postoperative course was uneventful with a good recovery. Conclusion. Knowledge of such entity would be useful to indicate the suitable surgical management and eventually to obtain good functional outcomes. PMID:28070435

  12. A fracture-mechanics-based approach to fracture control in biomedical devices manufactured from superelastic Nitinol tube.

    PubMed

    Robertson, S W; Ritchie, R O

    2008-01-01

    Several key fracture-mechanics parameters associated with the onset of subcritical and critical cracking, specifically the fracture toughness, crack-resistance curve, and fatigue threshold, have recently been reported for the superelastic alloy Nitinol, in the product form of the thin-walled tube that is used to manufacture several biomedical devices, most notably endovascular stents. In this study, we use these critical parameters to construct simple decision criteria for assessing the quantitative effect of crack-like defects in such Nitinol devices with respect to their resistance to failure by deformation or fracture. The criteria are based on the (equivalent) crack-initiation fracture toughness and fatigue threshold stress-intensity range, together with the general yield strength and fatigue endurance strength, and are used to construct a basis for design against single-event (overload) failures as well as for time-/cycle-delayed failures associated with fatigue.

  13. Modification of fracture surfaces by dissolution. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.

    1983-01-01

    This study focuses upon how and to what extent dissolution related fluid/rock interactions modify the morphology and roughness of surfaces on Sioux Quartzite. Dissolution experiments consisted of reacting small discs of Sioux Quartzite in sealed gold capsules containing either distilled water or 0.05 N to 4.0 N aqueous solutions of Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Samples were reacted at 200/sup 0/C and 20 to 30 MPa fluid pressures for 2 to 5 days. Two markedly different starting surface textures were used: polished, optically flat surfaces and tensile fracture surfaces. An exploratory experiment also was performed to assess the occurrence of a pressure solution phenomenon on a polished quartzite surface at contact regions of indenting quartz sand grains. Scanning electron microscopy studies indicate progressive increases in the amount of dissolution produced significant changes of surface roughness for both initial surface textures. Surface roughness increased measurably, with the initially polished surfaces exhibiting the more dramatic changes. The pressure solution experiments did not produce definite results, but several surface features are suggestive of dissolution enhancement at load carrying contacts. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Impact of Injury Mechanisms on Patterns and Management of Facial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Greathouse, S Travis; Adkinson, Joshua M; Garza, Ramon; Gilstrap, Jarom; Miller, Nathan F; Eid, Sherrine M; Murphy, Robert X

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms causing facial fractures have evolved over time and may be predictive of the types of injuries sustained. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of mechanisms of injury on the type and management of facial fractures at our Level 1 Trauma Center. The authors performed an Institutional Review Board-approved review of our network's trauma registry from 2006 to 2010, documenting age, sex, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, facial fracture patterns (nasal, maxillary/malar, orbital, mandible), and reconstructions. Mechanism rates were compared using a Pearson χ2 test. The database identified 23,318 patients, including 1686 patients with facial fractures and a subset of 1505 patients sustaining 2094 fractures by motor vehicle collision (MVC), fall, or assault. Nasal fractures were the most common injuries sustained by all mechanisms. MVCs were most likely to cause nasal and malar/maxillary fractures (P < 0.01). Falls were the least likely and assaults the most likely to cause mandible fractures (P < 0.001), the most common injury leading to surgical intervention (P < 0.001). Although not statistically significant, fractures sustained in MVCs were the most likely overall to undergo surgical intervention. Age, number of fractures, and alcohol level were statistically significant variables associated with operative management. Age and number of fractures sustained were associated with operative intervention. Although there is a statistically significant correlation between mechanism of injury and type of facial fracture sustained, none of the mechanisms evaluated herein are statistically associated with surgical intervention. Clinical Question/Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, III.

  15. Coupled hydro-mechanical simulations of discrete fluid-driven fracture propagation through fractured rock masses using a lattice modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    Fluid-driven fractures are critically important in a number of geoengineering application, such as to increase the permeability of an oil/gas reservoir and stimulate the productivity. On the contrary, near the underground storage sites for radioactive wastes or carbon dioxide, the propagation of fractures induced by pressurized gas should be avoided to detain the pollutants. Numerous numerical models have been developed to reproduce the physical phenomena of the fluid-driven fractures and have better understanding of the fracturing mechanism. However, it is still challenging to explicitly model the fluid-driven fracture propagation because it involves tightly coupled hydro-mechanical behavior with a singularity at the crack tip and complex interactions with pre-existing discontinuities in heterogeneous rock masses. This study investigates hydraulic fracture propagation and formation of discrete fracture networks using a coupled hydro-mechanical simulation code, TOUGH-RBSN. The modeling tool combines a multiphase fluid flow and heat transport simulator, TOUGH2, with a geomechanical and fracture-damage model, called the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN). Fractures are modeled as discrete features, and hydrological properties (e.g., permeability, porosity) of fracture elements are evaluated by fracture opening and aperture changes calculated at time steps of the simulations. Modeling capabilities for hydraulic fracturing processes are presented through simulations of a virtual fractured reservoir consisting of multiple pre-existing natural fractures. Case studies are conducted by changing the reservoir configurations, such as confining stress condition (e.g., degree of stress anisotropy), the matrix permeability, and the viscosity of injected fluid. In the preliminary results, the stress field and the fluid pressure distribution are provided to demonstrate modeling of complex hydro-mechanical interactions between propagating fractures and pre-existing fractures. The

  16. Mechanical weakening of devitalized teeth: three-dimensional Finite Element Analysis and prediction of tooth fracture.

    PubMed

    Zelic, K; Vukicevic, A; Jovicic, G; Aleksandrovic, S; Filipovic, N; Djuric, M

    2015-09-01

    To determine to which extent cavity preparation and each step of dentine removal in the process of root canal treatment (access cavity preparation and root canal enlargement) both individually and jointly contribute to the weakening of the tooth. Numerical analysis using finite element method (FEM) of separate and combined influence of two-surface Class II preparation and root canal treatment was undertaken to evaluate the decrease in tooth strength. The influence of the two stages in root canal treatment, access cavity preparation and root canal enlargement, was also analysed separately and jointly. After each of these phases, the crown was restored with composite resin, and the FEA was performed only on restored teeth. To estimate the influence of all these procedures on tooth fracture resistance numerically, a Failure Index based on the maximum principal stress criterion (MPCS) was applied. Compressive and tensile stresses were analysed separately and corresponding Failure Indices were calculated. A two-surface resin composite restoration weakened the tooth by 23.25%. Nevertheless, the Failure Indices showed that this tooth was not likely to fracture even under high occlusal stress (710N). However, after access cavity preparation, the Failure Indices reached the point where, under high occlusal force that may occur in the posterior area, a tooth fracture occurred. The enlargement of root canals had an additional, but relatively small impact on tooth weakening, making the tooth even more susceptible to fracture. The combined influence of both cavity preparation and root canal enlargement led to weakening of 62.6% under a load of 710N, ultimately causing tooth fracture. The combined finite element method and the maximum principal stress analysis gave insight into the fracture mechanisms of teeth with two-surface composite restorations followed by root canal preparation. Removal of tooth tissue, despite its subsequent restoration with dental materials, weakened the

  17. On the localization of fracture in highly constrained polymeric layer subjected to mode II loading

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, M.Y.M.; Chai, H.

    1996-12-31

    The tight spatial constraints imposed on the interlayer by the relatively rigid substrates in adhesive bonding may impede the natural development and growth of damage sources such as voids, kinks and microcracks. This may lead to extensive nonlinear deformations and intense strain localization prior to fracture in ductile or brittle adhesive systems. Moreover, the localized deformation in the bond may be highly triaxial regardless of the nature of the far-field loading. Fracture criteria based on conventional linear elastic fracture mechanics and small-scale yielding condition may not be applicable on large strain. Therefore, the purpose of the authors work is to focus on the local deformation at the crack tip in an effort to demonstrate a fracture criterion, which is independent of the specimen geometry, for the situation in large (or small) plastic deformation.

  18. Restoration of non-carious cervical lesions Part II. Restorative material selection to minimise fracture.

    PubMed

    Ichim, I P; Schmidlin, P R; Li, Q; Kieser, J A; Swain, M V

    2007-12-01

    It is still largely unknown as to what material parameter requirements would be most suitable to minimise the fracture and maximising the retention rate of the restoration of cervical non-carious lesions (NCCL). The present paper, as a first of its kind, proposes a radical approach to address the problems of material improvement, namely: numerical-based, fracture and damage mechanics materials optimisation engineering. It investigates the influence of the elastic modulus (E) on the failure of cervical restorative materials and aims to identify an E value that will minimise mechanical failure under clinically realistic loading conditions. The present work relies on the principle that a more flexible restorative material would partially buffer the local stress concentration. We employ a "most favourable" parametric analysis of the restorative's elastic modulus using a fracture mechanics model embedded into finite element method. The advanced numerical modelling adopts a Rankine and rotating crack material fracture model coupled to a non-linear analysis in an explicit finite element framework. The present study shows that the restorative materials currently used in non-carious cervical lesions are largely unsuitable in terms of resistance to fracture of the restoration and we suggest that the elastic modulus of such a material should be in the range of 1GPa. We anticipate that the presented methodology would provide more informative guidelines for the development of dental restorative materials, which could be tailored to specific clinical applications cognisant of the underlying mechanical environment.

  19. Nonsurgical treatment of Mason type II radial head fractures in athletes. A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Guzzini, M; Vadalà, A; Agrò, A; Di Sanzo, V; Pironi, D; Redler, A; Serlorenzi, P; Proietti, L; Civitenga, C; Mazza, D; Lanzetti, R M; Ferretti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The best treatment for moderately displaced radial head fractures (Mason type II) still remains controversial. In cases of isolated fractures, there is no evidence that a fragment displacement of ≥ 2 mm gives poor results in conservatively treated fractures. We retrospectively reviewed 52 patients (31M, 21F) affected by an isolated Mason type II fracture, treated with a long arm cast for two weeks between 2008 and 2013. All patients had practiced sports before being injured. They were all either bicyclists, or baseball, boxers, basketball, rugby, tennis or football players. The mean follow-up was 36 months. Elbow and forearm range of motion were measured. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score, the Broberg and Morrey rating system and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Score (DASH score) were analyzed. Follow-up radiographs were examined for evidence of consolidation, late displacement, early arthritis and non-unions. Flexion was slightly impaired in the injured limb when compared to the uninjured limb (137°± 6° versus 139°±5°) as were extension (-3°±6° versus 1°±4°, p < 0.05), supination (86°±6° versus 88°±3°), pronation (87°±4° versus 88°±6°) and valgus deviation (10°±4° versus 8°±3°, p < 0.05). 40 patients had no elbow complaints; 9 patients experienced occasional pain, 2 a mild instability of the elbow, and 4 a mild loss of grip strength. The DASH score was excellent in 48 patients (92.31%). In only 6 cases (11.53%) degenerative changes were greater in formerly injured elbows than in uninjured elbows. All patients returned to their previous sports activities. Isolated Mason type II fractures can have a good or excellent mid-term functional outcome even when treated conservatively.

  20. Mixed-mode I+II fracture characterization of human cortical bone using the Single Leg Bending test.

    PubMed

    Silva, F G A; de Moura, M F S F; Dourado, N; Xavier, J; Pereira, F A M; Morais, J J L; Dias, M I R

    2016-02-01

    Mixed-mode I+II fracture characterization of human cortical bone was analyzed in this work. A miniaturized version of the Single Leg Bending test (SLB) was used owing to its simplicity. A power law criterion was verified to accurately describe the material fracture envelop under mixed-mode I+II loading. The crack tip opening displacements measured by digital image correlation were used in a direct method to determine the cohesive law mimicking fracture behavior of cortical bone. Cohesive zone modeling was used for the sake of validation. Several fracture quantities were compared with the experimental results and the good agreement observed proves the appropriateness of the proposed procedure for fracture characterization of human bone under mixed-mode I+II loading.

  1. Atlanto-axial dislocation complicating a type II odontoid fracture. Reduction and final fixation.

    PubMed

    Riouallon, G; Pascal-Moussellard, H

    2014-05-01

    A case of traumatic posterolateral C1-C2 dislocation associated with odontoid fracture is reported. This is a rare case of traumatic posterolateral C1-C2 dislocation associated with odontoid fracture. Its management is discussed. A traumatic dislocation of atlanto-axial joint associated with an odontoid fracture remains a rare injury. No case of posterior dislocation has been reported so far in the literature with this type of management. The case is of a 25 year-old-man with a primary atlanto-axial posterolateral dislocation associated with a type II displaced odontoid fracture without any neurological complication. The patient underwent gentle traction during 24 hours with a halo frame. An incomplete reduction was achieved. Two days later, a complete reduction was obtained thanks to a preoperative manual traction maintained by a Mayfield (R) modified skull clamp. Anterior C1-C2 fixation was performed according to Vaccaro's technique. The patient wore a cervical collar and underwent physiotherapy during three months. To our best knowledge, this case represents the first traumatic atlanto-axial dislocation associated with an odontoid fracture which was treated through retropaharyngeal approach. This had been rendered possible thanks to the final reduction maneuver in extension.

  2. Morphology Evolution on the Fracture Surface and Fracture Mechanisms of Multiphase Nanostructured ZrCu-Base Alloys.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feng; Zhu, Lin; Zou, Qian; Wang, Lei; Han, Xue; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2017-03-13

    A multiphase nanostructured ZrCu-base bulk alloy which showed a unique microstructure consisting of sub-micrometer scale Zr₂Cu solid solution, nano-sized twinned plate-like ZrCu martensite (ZrCu (M)), and retained ZrCu (B2) austenite was fabricated by copper mold casting. The observation of periodic morphology evolution on the fracture surface of the multiphase nanostructured ZrCu-base alloys has been reported, which suggested a fluctuant local stress intensity along the crack propagation. It is necessary to investigate the compressive deformation behavior and the fracture mechanism of the multiphase alloy and the relation to the unique microstructures. The results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the deformation and fracture mechanisms of multiphase hybrid nanostructured ZrCu-based alloys and give guidance on how to improve the ductility/toughness of bulk ZrCu-based alloys.

  3. Buckling and hydraulic mechanisms in orbital blowout fractures: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Fateh; Kirkpatrick, Niall A; Lyne, Jonathan; Urdang, Michael; Waterhouse, Norman

    2006-05-01

    Since the first description of orbital blowout fractures, there has been much confusion as to their etiology. Two principal mechanisms have been proposed to explain their production, the buckling and the hydraulic mechanisms caused, respectively, by trauma to the orbital rim and the globe of the eye. The aim of this study was to evaluate both mechanisms qualitatively and quantitatively. Our protocol used intact cadavers, quantifiable intraocular pressure, variable and quantifiable force, and quantifiable bone strain distribution with strain gauge analysis. One orbit of each cadaver was used to simulate each of the two mechanisms, allowing direct comparison. Fractures produced by the buckling mechanism were limited to the anterior part of the orbital floor, with strain readings reaching up to 3756 microepsilon. Posteriorly, strain did not exceed 221 microepsilon. In contrast, hydraulic-type fractures were much larger, involving anterior and posterior parts of the floor as well as the medial wall of the orbit. Here, strain exceeded 3756 microepsilon in both parts of the floor. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the average energy required to fracture the orbital floor by the buckling mechanism is 1.54 J, whereas an average energy of 1.22 J is needed to produce this fracture by the hydraulic mechanism. Our results suggest that efforts to establish one or another mechanism as the primary etiology are misplaced. Both mechanisms produce orbital blowout fractures, with different and specific characteristics. We believe this provides the basis for our reclassification of such fractures.

  4. Mechanical and petrophysical study of fractured shale materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnelye, A.; Schubnel, A.; David, C.; Henry, P.; Guglielmi, Y.; Gout, C.; Dick, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of shales are of major importance for upper crustal fault hydro-mechanical behavior. In particular, relationships between applied stress, textural anisotropy and transport properties. These relations can be investigated in the laboratory and here, was used shales from Tournemire (southern France). Triaxial tests were performed in order to determine the elasto-plastic yield envelope on 3 sets of samples with 3various bedding orientations (0°, 45°, and 90°). For each set, experiments were carried out at increasing confining pressures (2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80MPa). They were performed under nominally drained conditions, at strain rates ranging between 5x10-7 s-1 - 1x10-5 s-1up to failure. During each experiment, P and S wave elastic velocities were continuously measured, in order to monitor the evolution of elastic anisotropy. Results show that the orientation of principal stress relative to bedding plays an important role on the brittle strength. Minimum strength is observed for samples deformed at 45° to bedding. Strength anisotropy increases both with confining pressure and strain rate. We interpret this result as the cohesive strength (and fracture toughness) being strain rate dependent. Although brittle failure and stress drops were systematically observed, deformation remained aseismic. This confirms that shales are good lithological candidates for shallow aseismic creep and slow slip events. Brittle failure was preceded by the development of P wave anisotropy, due to both crack growth and mineral re-orientation. Anisotropy variations were largest for samples deformed perpendicular to bedding, at the onset of rupture. Anisotropy reversal was observed at the highest confining pressures. For samples deformed parallel to bedding, the P wave anisotropy development is weaker. For both of these orientations, Thomsens parameters were inverted from the elastic wave data in order to quantify the evolution of elastic anisotropy. We

  5. Irreducible Salter Harris type II distal tibial physeal fracture secondary to interposition of the posterior tibial tendon: a case report.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Robert; Fallat, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric distal tibial fractures generally occur without significant long-term sequelae, and patients are commonly able to return to their preinjury activities after proper management. The literature reports excellent outcomes after anatomical reduction of distal tibial and ankle physeal fractures with closed or open treatment. Treatment options include simple immobilization of nondisplaced fractures, and closed or open reduction for restoration of anatomic alignment of displaced fractures. Soft tissue interposition within the fracture can threaten successful closed reduction, and may warrant open management if closed reduction fails to produce a satisfactory result. Despite the documented possibility of soft tissue interposition preventing closed reduction of pediatric ankle fractures, there is a paucity of literature reporting this complication. We report a unique case of an irreducible Salter-Harris type II distal tibial physeal fracture secondary to interposition of the posterior tibial tendon. Copyright 2010 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Fracture Simulation of Solution-Treated AA 5754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Singh, Akhilendra

    2017-06-01

    In this work, mechanical properties and fracture toughness of as-received and solution-treated aluminum alloy 5754 (AA 5754) are experimentally evaluated. Solution heat treatment of the alloy is performed at 530 °C for 2 h, and then, quenching is done in water. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, impact toughness, hardness, fatigue life, brittle fracture toughness (K_{Ic} ) and ductile fracture toughness (J_{Ic} ) are evaluated for as-received and solution-treated alloy. Extended finite element method has been used for the simulation of tensile and fracture behavior of material. Heaviside function and asymptotic crack tip enrichment functions are used for modelling of the crack in the geometry. Ramberg-Osgood material model coupled with fracture energy is used to simulate the crack propagation. Fracture surfaces obtained from various mechanical tests are characterized by scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness of carbon fabric composite laminates with carbon nanotube oriented by magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinguang; Zhou, Zhenggang

    2017-03-01

    Inspired by the residual iron nanoparticles wrapped in the CNTs tips, we developed a method to induce efficient orientation of multiwalled CNTs bundles by relatively low magnetic fields. Laminates were fabricated to investigate the effect of magnet oriented CNTs on GIIC properties. Microstructure anisotropy of nanotube bundles demonstrated the orientation of CNT bundles by magnet. Furthermore, the application of magnet increased mode II interlaminar fracture toughness by 29% compared to plain laminates.

  8. Crack blunting, crack bridging and resistance-curve fracture mechanics in dentin: effect of hydration.

    PubMed

    Kruzic, J J; Nalla, R K; Kinney, J H; Ritchie, R O

    2003-12-01

    Few studies have focused on a description of the fracture toughness properties of dentin in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, i.e., fracture resistance increasing with crack extension, particularly in light of the relevant toughening mechanisms involved. Accordingly, in the present study, fracture mechanics based experiments were conducted on elephant dentin in order to determine such R-curves, to identify the salient toughening mechanisms and to discern how hydration may affect their potency. Crack bridging by uncracked ligaments, observed directly by microscopy and X-ray tomography, was identified as a major toughening mechanism, with further experimental evidence provided by compliance-based experiments. In addition, with hydration, dentin was observed to display significant crack blunting leading to a higher overall fracture resistance than in the dehydrated material. The results of this work are deemed to be of importance from the perspective of modeling the fracture behavior of dentin and in predicting its failure in vivo.

  9. Mechanical test and fractal analysis on anisotropic fracture of cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Dagang; Chen, Bin; Ye, Wei; Gou, Jihua; Fan, Jinghong

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. It is indicated that the fracture energy along the transversal direction of the bone is distinctly larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture surfaces of the three different directions are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is shown that the roughness of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is obviously larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. It is also revealed that the osteons in the bone are perpendicular to the fracture surface of the transversal direction and parallel to the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. Based on these experimental results, the fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces of different directions are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. The calculated results show that the fractal dimension of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture energies of different directions are also calculated based on their fractal models. It is denoted that the fracture energy of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The calculated results are in good agreement with the tested results.

  10. Spartan Release Engagement Mechanism (REM) stress and fracture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, D. S.; West, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The revised stress and fracture analysis of the Spartan REM hardware for current load conditions and mass properties is presented. The stress analysis was performed using a NASTRAN math model of the Spartan REM adapter, base, and payload. Appendix A contains the material properties, loads, and stress analysis of the hardware. The computer output and model description are in Appendix B. Factors of safety used in the stress analysis were 1.4 on tested items and 2.0 on all other items. Fracture analysis of the items considered fracture critical was accomplished using the MSFC Crack Growth Analysis code. Loads and stresses were obtaind from the stress analysis. The fracture analysis notes are located in Appendix A and the computer output in Appendix B. All items analyzed met design and fracture criteria.

  11. A closed phalangeal neck fracture with 180-degree rotation of the phalangeal head and concurrent displaced Salter-Harris II fracture.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2012-07-01

    Closed type III phalangeal neck fractures with 180-degree rotation is a rare iatrogenic injury that occurs following failed attempts at closed reduction. Prior to closed reduction, the phalangeal head is in 90-degree rotation. Longitudinal traction during closed reduction then converts the deformity into 180-degree rotation. We present the first documented noniatrogenic case of phalangeal neck fracture with 180-degree rotation that was also associated with a displaced Salter-Harris II fracture at the same joint. The blood supply of the phalangeal head in that scenario is discussed along with precautions that should be taken during open reduction and internal fixation to avoid avascular necrosis of the phalangeal head.

  12. Delayed fixation of displaced type II and III pediatric femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Md Quamar; Iraqi, AA; Sherwani, MKA; Abbas, M; Alam, Afzal; Sabir, Amir Bin; Asif, Naiyer

    2009-01-01

    Background: Time from injury to fixation of femoral neck fractures has been postulated as a vital determinant for rate of complications; however, no prospective study is available in the English literature. Delay, unfortunately, is inevitable in developing countries. The aim of the present study is to retrospectively review the outcome after delayed fixation of displaced type II and III femoral neck fractures in children. Materials and Methods: Using a standard assessment chart, we retrospectively reviewed medical records of all pediatric patients having femoral neck fractures presenting to our institution from June 1999 to May 2006. Inclusion criteria were children between 5 and 15 years of age sustaining displaced Delbet type II and III femoral neck fractures having a complete follow-up of at least 2 years. Patients with known metabolic disease, poliomyelitis or cerebral palsy, were excluded from the study. After application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 22 patients having 22 fractures (13 type II and 9 type III) were studied. Surgery could be performed after a mean delay of 11.22 days (ranging from 2 to 21 days). Closed reduction was achieved in 14 cases and 8 cases required open reduction through anterolateral approach. Result: Osteonecrosis was noted in eight patients (36.37%) who included two of nine patients (22.22%) operated in the first week, three of eight patients (37.51%) operated in the second week, and three of five patients (60%) operated in the third week of injury. Nonunion was seen in four (18.18%) cases, and two of them were associated with failure of implants. One was treated by valgus osteotomy and the other by Meyer's procedure. Fractures united in both children but the latter developed avascular necrosis. Functional results, as assessed using Ratliff's criteria, were good in 14 (63.63%), fair in 2 (9%), and poor in 6 (27.27%) patients. Conclusion: Delay in fixation, type of fracture, and ability to achieve and maintain reduction are

  13. The therapeutic attitude in distal radial Salter and Harris type I and II fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Bumei, Gheorghe; Gavriliu, Stefan; Georgescu, Ileana; Vlad, Costel; Draghici, Isabela; Hurmuz, Lucia; Dan, Daniela; Hodorogea, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Salter Harris Fractures type, especially type I and II are treated by orthopedic reduction in the emergency room or operating room, under general anesthesia, followed by plaster immobilization. Neglected or incorrectly treated fractures, leading to malunion and radiocarpal subluxations which require surgical procedure. This paper proposes to evaluate the correctly applied orthopedic treatment and the expose of an original surgical technique in case of neglected and incorrectly treated fractures, leading to mal-unions and impediments in the radiocarpal mobility and aesthetics. we studied a group of 238 children with Salter Harris fractures type I and II, treated in "M.S. Curie" Emergency Hospital for Children, Bucharest. Out of the studied group, 200 children were treated by orthopedic reduction and immobilization in a plaster device. Malunions present within 38 children due to neglected or mistreated fractures, underwent open reduction with internal osteosynthesis by a technique that avoids violating the growth cartilage. This technique involves making an internal fixation with the radial joint surface in a normal position. Children receiving proper orthopedic reduction and immobilization in plaster device, 200 patients, were cured after 30-45 days of immobilization, depending on age and joint mobility which were within normal range. The 38 children with malunions underwent surgery to rectify the position of the radial joint surface. Postoperative results were good, proper position of the radiocarpal joint were made during the surgical procedure. The intemal fixation is ensured by a transepiphyseal wire and after 30 days of immobilization in a plaster device the patients started the recovery treatment. Radiocarpal joint mobility returned to normal after a variable period of 3 to 6 months, depending on the patient's age. Salter Harris I and II fractures are absolute indication for orthopedic treatment, in a matter of emergency, preferably in the operating room under

  14. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  15. Chemically- and mechanically-mediated influences on the transport and mechanical characteristics of rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Min, K.-B.; Rutqvist, J.; Elsworth, D.

    2009-02-01

    A model is presented to represent changes in the mechanical and transport characteristics of fractured rock that result from coupled mechanical and chemical effects. The specific influence is the elevation of dissolution rates on contacting asperities, which results in a stress- and temperature-dependent permanent closure. A model representing this pressure-dissolution-like behavior is adapted to define the threshold and resulting response in terms of fundamental thermodynamic properties of a contacting fracture. These relations are incorporated in a stress-stiffening model of fracture closure to define the stress- and temperature-dependency of aperture loss and behavior during stress and temperature cycling. These models compare well with laboratory and field experiments, representing both decoupled isobaric and isothermal responses. The model was applied to explore the impact of these responses on heated structures in rock. The result showed a reduction in ultimate induced stresses over the case where chemical effects were not incorporated, with permanent reduction in final stresses after cooling to ambient conditions. Similarly, permeabilities may be lower than they were in the case where chemical effects were not considered, with a net reduction apparent even after cooling to ambient temperature. These heretofore-neglected effects may have a correspondingly significant impact on the performance of heated structures in rock, such as repositories for the containment of radioactive wastes.

  16. Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Interface Crack Problems - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in fracture mechanics analyses of the interfacial crack problem are reviewed. The intent of the review is to renew the awareness of the oscillatory singularity at the crack tip of a bimaterial interface and the problems that occur when calculating mode mixity using numerical methods such as the finite element method in conjunction with the virtual crack closure technique. Established approaches to overcome the nonconvergence issue of the individual mode strain energy release rates are reviewed. In the recent literature many attempts to overcome the nonconvergence issue have been developed. Among the many approaches found only a few methods hold the promise of providing practical solutions. These are the resin interlayer method, the method that chooses the crack tip element size greater than the oscillation zone, the crack tip element method that is based on plate theory and the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. Each of the methods is validated on a very limited set of simple interface crack problems. However, their utility for a wide range of interfacial crack problems is yet to be established.

  17. Fracture-mechanics parameters of the composite-enamel bond.

    PubMed

    de Groot, R; van Elst, H C; Peters, M C

    1990-01-01

    In a previous study, the critical values of the opening mode stress intensity factor (K1), its equivalent, the strain energy-release rate (G1), and the J integral (J1) (in the elastic case being equal to that of G1) were determined for resin composite. In this study, the strength of the composite-tooth interface was investigated. The critical values of K1 and J1 were measured with single-edge notched-bend (SENB) specimens of resin composite bonded to enamel, with the notch at midspan at the bonded interface. Due to enamel's anisotropy, the values of Klc and Jlc to be used in a fracture-mechanics application for failure prediction of a structure depend on the enamel prism orientation relative to the adhesive interface. Where interfacial failure is to be expected, the following values for Jlc and Klc can be used: Silux, Jlc = 145 +/- 35 Jm-2 and Klc = 0.84 +/- 0.16 MNm-3/2; P-30, Jlc = 163 +/- 13 Jm-2 and Klc = 1.02 +/- 0.07 MNm-3/2. Where enamel failure is expected or where the failure mode cannot be predicted, the following values can be applied: Silux, Jlc = 89 +/- 15 Jm-2 and Klc = 0.84 +/- 0.16 MNm-3/2; P-30, Jlc = 89 +/- 15 Jm-2 and Klc = 0.75 +/- 0.10 MNm-3/2.

  18. Understanding cracking failures of coatings: A fracture mechanics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Ryong

    A fracture mechanics analysis of coating (paint) cracking was developed. A strain energy release rate (G(sub c)) expression due to the formation of a new crack in a coating was derived for bending and tension loadings in terms of the moduli, thicknesses, Poisson's ratios, load, residual strain, etc. Four-point bending and instrumented impact tests were used to determine the in-situ fracture toughness of coatings as functions of increasing baking (drying) time. The system used was a thin coating layer on a thick substrate layer. The substrates included steel, aluminum, polycarbonate, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), and Noryl. The coatings included newly developed automotive paints. The four-point bending configuration promoted nice transversed multiple coating cracks on both steel and polymeric substrates. The crosslinked type automotive coatings on steel substrates showed big cracks without microcracks. When theoretical predictions for energy release rate were compared to experimental data for coating/steel substrate samples with multiple cracking, the agreement was good. Crosslinked type coatings on polymeric substrates showed more cracks than theory predicted and the G(sub c)'s were high. Solvent evaporation type coatings on polymeric substrates showed clean multiple cracking and the G(sub c)'s were higher than those obtained by tension analysis of tension experiments with the same substrates. All the polymeric samples showed surface embrittlement after long baking times using four-point bending tests. The most apparent surface embrittlement was observed in the acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) substrate system. The impact properties of coatings as a function of baking time were also investigated. These experiments were performed using an instrumented impact tester. There was a rapid decrease in G(sub c) at short baking times and convergence to a constant value at long baking times. The surface embrittlement conditions and an embrittlement toughness

  19. Cell wall swelling, fracture mode, and the mechanical properties of cherry fruit skins are closely related.

    PubMed

    Brüggenwirth, Martin; Knoche, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Cell wall swelling, fracture mode (along the middle lamellae vs. across cell walls), stiffness, and pressure at fracture of the sweet cherry fruit skin are closely related. Skin cracking is a common phenomenon in many crops bearing fleshy fruit. The objectives were to investigate relationships between the mode of fracture, the extent of cell wall swelling, and the mechanical properties of the fruit skin using sweet cherry (Prunus avium) as a model. Cracking was induced by incubating whole fruit in deionised water or by fracturing exocarp segments (ESs) in biaxial tensile tests. The fracture mode of epidermal cells was investigated by light microscopy. In biaxial tensile tests, the anticlinal cell walls of the ES fractured predominantly across the cell walls (rather than along) and showed no cell wall swelling. In contrast, fruit incubated in water fractured predominantly along the anticlinal epidermal cell walls and the cell walls were swollen. Swelling of cell walls also occurred when ESs were incubated in malic acid, in hypertonic solutions of sucrose, or in water. Compared to the untreated controls, these treatments resulted in more frequent fractures along the cell walls, lower pressures at fracture (p fracture), and lower moduli of elasticity (E, i.e., less stiff). Conversely, compared to the untreated controls, incubating the ES in CaCl2 and in high concentrations of ethanol resulted in thinner cell walls, in less frequent fractures along the cell walls, higher E and p fracture. Our study demonstrates that fracture mode, stiffness, and pressure at fracture are closely related to cell wall swelling. A number of other factors, including cultivar, ripening stage, turgor, CaCl2, and malic acid, exert their effects only indirectly, i.e., by affecting cell wall swelling.

  20. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the 22nd National Symposium, Atlanta, GA, June 26-28, 1990. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A. (Editor); Saxena, Ashok (Editor); Mcdowell, David L. (Editor); Atluri, Satya N. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor); Raju, Ivatury S. (Editor); Epstein, Jonathan S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Current research on fracture mechanics is reviewed, focusing on ductile fracture; high-temperature and time-dependent fracture; 3D problems; interface fracture; microstructural aspects of fatigue and fracture; and fracture predictions and applications. Particular attention is given to the determination and comparison of crack resistance curves from wide plates and fracture mechanics specimens; a relationship between R-curves in contained and uncontained yield; the creep crack growth behavior of titanium alloy Ti-6242; a crack growth response in three heat resistant materials at elevated temperature; a crack-surface-contact model for determining effective-stress-intensity factors; interfacial dislocations in anisotropic bimaterials; an effect of intergranular crack branching on fracture toughness evaluation; the fracture toughness behavior of exservice chromium-molybdenum steels; the application of fracture mechanics to assess the significance of proof loading; and a load ratio method for estimating crack extension.

  1. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the 22nd National Symposium, Atlanta, GA, June 26-28, 1990. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A. (Editor); Saxena, Ashok (Editor); Mcdowell, David L. (Editor); Atluri, Satya N. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor); Raju, Ivatury S. (Editor); Epstein, Jonathan S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Current research on fracture mechanics is reviewed, focusing on ductile fracture; high-temperature and time-dependent fracture; 3D problems; interface fracture; microstructural aspects of fatigue and fracture; and fracture predictions and applications. Particular attention is given to the determination and comparison of crack resistance curves from wide plates and fracture mechanics specimens; a relationship between R-curves in contained and uncontained yield; the creep crack growth behavior of titanium alloy Ti-6242; a crack growth response in three heat resistant materials at elevated temperature; a crack-surface-contact model for determining effective-stress-intensity factors; interfacial dislocations in anisotropic bimaterials; an effect of intergranular crack branching on fracture toughness evaluation; the fracture toughness behavior of exservice chromium-molybdenum steels; the application of fracture mechanics to assess the significance of proof loading; and a load ratio method for estimating crack extension.

  2. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  3. Fracture strength and elastic modulus as a function of porosity for hydroxyapatite and other brittle materials, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Case, Eldon D; Ren, Fei; Shu, Yutian; Baumann, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Part I of this paper discussed the Weibull modulus m, versus porosity P behavior of brittle materials, including HA. While the Weibull modulus m deals with the scatter in fracture strength data, this paper (Part II) focuses on two additional key mechanical properties of porous materials, namely the average fracture strength f , and Young s modulus E, for P in the interval from P zero to P PG (the porosity of the unfired compacts). The f versus P data for HA from this study and the literature data for alumina, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and silicon nitride are describedwell by functions of , where = 1 P/PG = the degree of densification. A similar function of applies to the E versus P behavior of HA from this study and data from the literature for alumina, titanium and YSZ. All of the data analyzed in this study (Part II) are based on partially and fully sintered powder compacts (excluding green powder compacts), thus the f / 0 versus and E /E0 versus relationships may apply only to such specimens.

  4. Moisture desorption in mechanically masticated fuels: effects of particle fracturing and fuelbed compaction

    Treesearch

    Jesse K. Kreye; J.Morgan Varner; Eric E. Knapp

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical mastication is increasingly used as a wildland fuel treatment, reducing standing trees and shrubs to compacted fuelbeds of fractured woody fuels. One major shortcoming in our understanding of these fuelbeds is how particle fracturing influences moisture gain or loss, a primary determinant of fire behaviour. To better understand fuel moisture dynamics, we...

  5. A numerical model of hydro-thermo-mechanical coupling in a fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Kathleen Marie

    1996-06-01

    Coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical codes with the ability to model fractured materials are used for predicting groundwater flow behavior in fractured aquifers containing thermal sources. The potential applications of such a code include the analysis of groundwater behavior within a geothermal reservoir. The capability of modeling hydro-thermo systems with a dual porosity, fracture flow model has been previously developed in the finite element code, FEHM. FEHM has been modified to include stress coupling with the dual porosity feature. FEHM has been further developed to implicitly couple the dependence of fracture hydraulic conductivity on effective stress within two dimensional, saturated aquifers containing fracture systems. The cubic law for flow between parallel plates was used to model fracture permeability. The Bartin-Bandis relationship was used to determine the fracture aperture within the cubic law. The code used a Newton Raphson iteration to implicitly solve for six unknowns at each node. Results from a model of heat flow from a reservoir to the moving fluid in a single fracture compared well with analytic results. Results of a model showing the increase in fracture flow due to a single fracture opening under fluid pressure compared well with analytic results. A hot dry rock, geothermal reservoir was modeled with realistic time steps indicating that the modified FEHM code does successfully model coupled flow problems with no convergence problems.

  6. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects.

    PubMed

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper.

  7. Cracked finite elements proposed for NASTRAN. [based on application of finite element method to fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aberson, J. A.; Anderson, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The recent introduction of special crack-tip singularity elements, usually referred to as cracked elements, has brought the power and flexibility of the finite-element method to bear much more effectively on fracture mechanics problems. This paper recalls the development of two cracked elements and presents the results of some applications proving their accuracy and economy. Judging from the available literature on numerical methods in fracture mechanics, it seems clear that the elements described have been used more extensively than any others in practical fracture mechanics applications.

  8. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects

    PubMed Central

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  9. Smoking is a predictor of worse trabecular mechanical performance in hip fragility fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vale, Ana Catarina; Aleixo, Inês; Pena, Ana Sofia; Faustino, Alexandra; Sepriano, Alexandre; Polido-Pereira, Joaquim; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Lucas, Raquel; Romeu, José Carlos; Monteiro, Jacinto; Vaz, Maria Fátima; Fonseca, João Eurico; Canhão, Helena

    2012-11-01

    Clinical risk factors (CRFs) are established predictors of fracture events. However, the influence of individual CRFs on trabecular mechanical fragility is still a subject of debate. In this study, we aimed to assess differences, adjusted for CRFs, between bone macrostructural parameters measured in ex-vivo specimens from hip fragility fracture patients and osteoarthritis patients, and to determine whether individual CRFs could predict trabecular bone mechanical behavior in hip fragility fractures. Additionally, we also looked for associations between the 10-year risk of major and hip fracture calculated by FRAX and trabecular bone mechanical performance. In this case-control study, a group of fragility fracture patients were compared with a group of osteoarthritis patients, both having undergone hip replacement surgery. A clinical protocol was applied in order to collect CRFs [body mass index (BMI), prior fragility fracture, parental history of hip fracture, long-term use of oral glucocorticoids, rheumatoid arthritis, current smoking, alcohol consumption, age and gender]. The 10-year probability of fracture was calculated. Serum bone turnover markers were determined and dual X-ray absorptiometry performed. Femoral head diameter was evaluated and trabecular bone cylinders were drilled for mechanical testing to determine bone strength, stiffness and toughness. We evaluated 40 hip fragility fracture and 52 osteoarthritis patients. Trabecular bone stiffness was significantly lower (p = 0.042) in hip fragility fracture patients when compared to osteoarthritic individuals, adjusted for age, gender and BMI. No other macrostructural parameter was statistically different between the groups. In hip fragility fracture patients, smoking habits (β = -0.403; p = 0.018) and female gender (β = -0.416; p = 0.008) were independently associated with lower stiffness. In addition, smoking was also independently associated with worse trabecular strength (β = -0.323; p

  10. Analysis of seismic sources for different mechanisms of fracture growth for microseismic monitoring applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duchkov, A. A.; Stefanov, Yu. P.

    2015-10-27

    We have developed and illustrated an approach for geomechanic modeling of elastic wave generation (microsiesmic event occurrence) during incremental fracture growth. We then derived properties of effective point seismic sources (radiation patterns) approximating obtained wavefields. These results establish connection between geomechanic models of hydraulic fracturing and microseismic monitoring. Thus, the results of the moment tensor inversion of microseismic data can be related to different geomechanic scenarios of hydraulic fracture growth. In future, the results can be used for calibrating hydrofrac models. We carried out a series of numerical simulations and made some observations about wave generation during fracture growth. In particular when the growing fracture hits pre-existing crack then it generates much stronger microseismic event compared to fracture growth in homogeneous medium (radiation pattern is very close to the theoretical dipole-type source mechanism)

  11. The peel test in experimental adhesive fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Several testing methods have been proposed for obtaining critical energy release rate or adhesive fracture energy in bond systems. These tests include blister, cone, lap shear, and peel tests. Peel tests have been used for many years to compare relative strengths of different adhesives, different surface preparation techniques, etc. The present work demonstrates the potential use of the peel test for obtaining adhesive fracture energy values.

  12. The peel test in experimental adhesive fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Several testing methods have been proposed for obtaining critical energy release rate or adhesive fracture energy in bond systems. These tests include blister, cone, lap shear, and peel tests. Peel tests have been used for many years to compare relative strengths of different adhesives, different surface preparation techniques, etc. The present work demonstrates the potential use of the peel test for obtaining adhesive fracture energy values.

  13. Mechanisms of Fracture and Fragmentation by Explosive Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-21

    crater. (2) Radial fractures initiate and propagate immediately from the explosive borehole; (3) spall fractures form after the P-wave reflects from the... reflection from a free boundary change from compression to tension. (1.2) These very high tensile stresses exceed the tensile strength of the material...model. Due to the restrictions in using the dynamic polariscope information is lacking both from the standpoint of a three dimensional state of stress

  14. Mechanisms and Management of Stress Fractures in Physically Active Persons

    PubMed Central

    Romani, William A.; Gieck, Joe H.; Perrin, David H.; Saliba, Ethan N.; Kahler, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the anatomy of bone and the physiology of bone remodeling as a basis for the proper management of stress fractures in physically active people. Data Sources: We searched PubMed for the years 1965 through 2000 using the key words stress fracture, bone remodeling, epidemiology, and rehabilitation. Data Synthesis: Bone undergoes a normal remodeling process in physically active persons. Increased stress leads to an acceleration of this remodeling process, a subsequent weakening of bone, and a higher susceptibility to stress fracture. When a stress fracture is suspected, appropriate management of the injury should begin immediately. Effective management includes a cyclic process of activity and rest that is based on the remodeling process of bone. Conclusions/Recommendations: Bone continuously remodels itself to withstand the stresses involved with physical activity. Stress fractures occur as the result of increased remodeling and a subsequent weakening of the outer surface ofthe bone. Once a stress fracture is suspected, a cyclic management program that incorporates the physiology of bone remodeling should be initiated. The cyclic program should allow the physically active person to remove the source of the stress to the bone, maintain fitness, promote a safe return to activity, and permit the bone to heal properly. PMID:16558676

  15. Injection-Sensitive Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracture Interaction with Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuprakov, D.; Melchaeva, O.; Prioul, R.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a new analytical model, called OpenT, that solves the elasticity problem of a hydraulic fracture (HF) contact with a pre-existing discontinuity natural fracture (NF) and the condition for HF re-initiation at the NF. The model also accounts for fluid penetration into the permeable NFs. For any angle of fracture intersection, the elastic problem of a blunted dislocation discontinuity is solved for the opening and sliding generated at the discontinuity. The sites and orientations of a new tensile crack nucleation are determined based on a mixed stress- and energy-criterion. In the case of tilted fracture intersection, the finite offset of the new crack initiation point along the discontinuity is computed. We show that aside from known controlling parameters such stress contrast, cohesional and frictional properties of the NFs and angle of intersection, the fluid injection parameters such as the injection rate and the fluid viscosity are of first-order in the crossing behavior. The model is compared to three independent laboratory experiments, analytical criteria of Blanton, extended Renshaw-Pollard, as well as fully coupled numerical simulations. The relative computational efficiency of OpenT model (compared to the numerical models) makes the model attractive for implementation in modern engineering tools simulating hydraulic fracture propagation in naturally fractured environments.

  16. Non-Linear Analysis of Mode II Fracture in the end Notched Flexure Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizov, V.

    2016-03-01

    Analysis is carried-out of fracture in the End Notched Flex- ure (ENF) beam configuration, taking into account the material nonlin- earity. For this purpose, the J-integral approach is applied. A non-linear model, based on the Classical beam theory is used. The mechanical be- haviour of the ENF configuration is described by the Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain curve. It is assumed that the material possesses the same properties in tension and compression. The influence is evaluated of the material constants in the Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain equation on the fracture behaviour. The effect of the crack length on the J-integral value is investigated, too. The analytical approach, developed in the present paper, is very useful for parametric analyses, since the simple formulae obtained capture the essentials of the non-linear fracture in the ENF con- figuration.

  17. Effects of Temperature on Mode II Fracture Toughness of Multidirectional CFRP Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoung Soo; Wang, Wen Xue; Takao, Yoshihiro; Ben, Goichi

    End notched flexure (ENF) tests were performed to investigate the effects of temperature and fiber orientation on Mode II interlaminar fracture behavior, GIIC (GII at the crack initiation), of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites, T800H/#3631. The values of GIIC for three kinds of laminates, [012//012], [22.5/-22.5/08/-22.5/22.5//-22.5/22.5/08/22.5/-22.5] and [45/-45/08/-45/45//-45/45/08/45/-45], with a pre-cracked interface, that is // in each laminate, were obtained at three temperatures, i.e. -100°C, 25°C and 150°C. It is shown that GIIC is obviously affected by the temperature and fiber orientation. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation was also carried out to investigate the fracture surface. SEM analysis suggested that the decreased Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness for all kinds of specimens at high temperature could be attributed to temperature-induced matrix property change or fiber-matrix interfacial weakening.

  18. Surgical treatment of intraarticular calcaneous fractures of sanders' types II and III. Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pelliccioni, Adriano Augusto Antoniazzi; Bittar, Cíntia Kelly; Zabeu, José Luis Amim

    2012-01-01

    Objective This paper aims to identify the most effective surgical technique for intraarticular calcaneal fractures of Sanders' types II and III. Methods Systematic review of comparative randomized clinical trials on surgical treatment of the intraarticular fractures of the calcaneus (Sanders types II and III) that used the questionnaire of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society. The studies were identified and retrieved in the following databases - LILACS, MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO, EMBASE, Science Direct, Scopus, Journals@Ovid, ISI Web of Knowledge, Evidence Based Medicine, besides consulting the references of studies accessed. The keywords used Boolean logic (AND and OR): "calcaneus fracture, calcaneous, calcaneal; surgical treatment, management; open reduction, minimally invasive, percutaneous reduction; internal fixation, external fixation. Results We identified only three randomized comparative trials. Each study compared a different technique (external fixation, percutaneous fixation with Kirchner wires and cannulated screws fixation) to the open reduction with internal fixation using plate and screws (considered the standard technique). Conclusion Comparing the series, percutaneous fixation using Kirschner wires presented the best results, however, evidence is insufficient to assert superiority of this treatment in comparison with other surgical techniques. PMID:24453579

  19. Biomechanical Assessment of Stabilization of Simulated Type II Odontoid Fracture with Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Roy T.; Klocke, Noelle; Yandamuri, Soumya S.; Bobinski, Lukas; Duff, John M.; Bucklen, Brandon S.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Researchers created a proper type II dens fracture (DF) and quantified a novel current posterior fixation technique with spacers at C1–C2. A clinical case study supplements this biomechanical analysis. Purpose Researchers explored their hypothesis that spacers combined with posterior instrumentation (PI) reduce range of motion significantly, possibly leading to better fusion outcomes. Overview of Literature Literature shows that the atlantoaxial joint is unique in allowing segmental rotary motion, enabling head turning. With no intervertebral discs at these joints, multiple ligaments bind the axis to the skull base and to the atlas; an intact odontoid (dens) enhances stability. The most common traumatic injury at these strong ligaments is a type II odontoid fracture. Methods Each of seven specimens (C0–C3) was tested on a custom-built six-degrees-of-freedom spine simulator with constructs of intact state, type II DF, C1–C2 PI, PI with joint capsulotomy (PIJC), PI with spacers (PIS) at C1–C2, and spacers alone (SA). A bending moment of 2.0 Nm (1.5°/sec) was applied in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR). One-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was performed. Results DF increased motion to 320%, 429%, and 120% versus intact (FE, LB, and AR, respectively). PI significantly reduced motion to 41%, 21%, and 8%. PIJC showed negligible changes from PI. PIS reduced motion to 16%, 14%, and 3%. SA decreased motion to 64%, 24%, and 54%. Reduced motion facilitated solid fusion in an 89-year-old female patient within 1 year. Conclusions Type II odontoid fractures can lead to acute or chronic instability. Current fixation techniques use C1–C2 PI or an anterior dens screw. Addition of spacers alongside PI led to increased biomechanical rigidity over intact motion and may offer an alternative to established surgical fixation techniques. PMID:28243364

  20. Subcritical fracture propagation in rocks: An examination using the methods of fracture mechanics and non-destructive testing. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tensile rock fracture is presented with an emphasis on characterizing time dependent crack growth using the methods of fracture mechanics. Subcritical fracture experiments were performed in moist air on glass and five different rock types at crack velocities using the double torsion technique. The experimental results suggest that subcritical fracture resistance in polycrystals is dominated by microstructural effects. Evidence for gross violations of the assumptions of linear elastic fracture mechanics and double torsion theory was found in the tests on rocks. In an effort to obtain a better understanding of the physical breakdown processes associated with rock fracture, a series of nondestructive evaluation tests were performed during subcritical fracture experiments on glass and granite. Comparison of the observed process zone shape with that expected on the basis of a critical normal principal tensile stress criterion shows that the zone is much more elongated in the crack propagation direction than predicted by the continuum based microcracking model alone.

  1. Tensile Deformation and Fracture Mechanism of Bulk Bimodal Ultrafine-Grained Al-Mg Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zonghoon; Radmilovic, Velimir; Ahn, Byungmin; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Nutt, Steven R.

    2010-04-01

    The tensile fractures of ultrafine-grained (UFG) Al-Mg alloy with a bimodal grain size were investigated at the micro- and macroscale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with focused ion beam (FIB), and optical microscopy. The nanoscale voids and crack behaviors near the tensile fracture surfaces were revealed in various scale ranges and provided the evidence to determine the underlying tensile deformation and fracture mechanisms associated with the bulk bimodal metals. The bimodal grain structures exhibit unusual deformation and fracture mechanisms similar to ductile-phase toughening of brittle materials. The ductile coarse grains in the UFG matrix effectively impede propagation of microcracks, resulting in enhanced ductility and toughness while retaining high strength. In view of the observations collected, we propose a descriptive model for tensile deformation and fracture of bimodal UFG metals.

  2. Applicability of Fracture Mechanics Methodology to Cracking and Fracture of Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    cracking and fracture. The publicized, annotated bibliography was the one by S. Mindess entitled "The Cracking and Fracture of Concrete: An Annotated...7 --- 109 157.0 Mindess , S.. J. S. Nadeau and J. M. Hay, Effects of Different Curing Conditions on Slow Crack Growth in Cement Paste, Cement and...Concrete Research. Vol. 4, 1974, pp. 953-965 158.0 Nadeau, J3. S.. S. Mindess and J3. MI. Hay, Slow Crack Growth in Cement Paste, Journal of the

  3. Commentary on the management of type II odontoid process fractures in octogenarians: Article by Graffeo et al. and Editorial by Falavigna (J Neurosurgery Spine August 19, 2016)

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Establishing a clear treatment paradigm for octogenarians with type II odontoid fractures in hampered by a literature replete with level III articles. Methods: In the study by Graffeo et al., the authors evaluated 111 patients over the age of 79 (average age: 87) with type II odontoid fractures undergoing nonoperative (94 patients) vs. operative intervention (17 total; 15 posterior and 2 anterior). They studied multiple variables and utilized several scales [abbreviated injury scale (AIS), injury severity score (ISS), and the Glasgow coma scale (GCS)] to determine the outcomes of nonoperative vs. operative management. Results: Graffeo et al. concluded that there were no significant differences between nonoperative and operative management for type II odontoid fractures in octogenarians. They found similar frequencies of additional cervical fractures, mechanisms of injury, GCS of 8 or under, AIS/ISS scores, and disposition to “nonhome” facilities. Furthermore, both appeared to have increased mortality rates at 1-year post injury; 13% during hospitalization, 26% within the first post-injury month, and 41% at 1 year. Conclusions: In the editorial by Falavigna, his major criticism of Graffeo's article was the marked disparity in the number of patients in the operative (17 patients) vs. the nonoperative group (94 patients), making it difficult to accept any conclusions as “significant”. He further noted that few prior studies provided level I evidence, and that most, like this one, were level III analyses that did not “significantly” advance our knowledge as to whether to treat octogenarians with type II odontoid fractures operatively vs. nonoperatively. PMID:28028444

  4. Integrity of the osteocyte bone cell network in osteoporotic fracture: Implications for mechanical load adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliwaba, J. S.; Truong, L.; Codrington, J. D.; Fazzalari, N. L.

    2010-06-01

    The human skeleton has the ability to modify its material composition and structure to accommodate loads through adaptive modelling and remodelling. The osteocyte cell network is now considered to be central to the regulation of skeletal homeostasis; however, very little is known of the integrity of the osteocyte cell network in osteoporotic fragility fracture. This study was designed to characterise osteocyte morphology, the extent of osteocyte cell apoptosis and expression of sclerostin protein (a negative regulator of bone formation) in trabecular bone from the intertrochanteric region of the proximal femur, for postmenopausal women with fragility hip fracture compared to age-matched women who had not sustained fragility fracture. Osteocyte morphology (osteocyte, empty lacunar, and total lacunar densities) and the degree of osteocyte apoptosis (percent caspase-3 positive osteocyte lacunae) were similar between the fracture patients and non-fracture women. The fragility hip fracture patients had a lower proportion of sclerostin-positive osteocyte lacunae in comparison to sclerostin-negative osteocyte lacunae, in contrast to similar percent sclerostin-positive/sclerostin-negative lacunae for non-fracture women. The unexpected finding of decreased sclerostin expression in trabecular bone osteocytes from fracture cases may be indicative of elevated bone turnover and under-mineralisation, characteristic of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Further, altered osteocytic expression of sclerostin may be involved in the mechano-responsiveness of bone. Optimal function of the osteocyte cell network is likely to be a critical determinant of bone strength, acting via mechanical load adaptation, and thus contributing to osteoporotic fracture risk.

  5. Mechanical behavior and fracture characteristics of off-axis fiber composites. 2: Theory and comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical behavior and stresses inducing fracture modes of unidirectional high-modulus graphite-fiber/epoxy composites subjected to off-axis tensile loads were investigated theoretically. The investigation included the use of composite mechanics, combined-stress failure criteria, and finite-element stress analysis. The results are compared with experimental data and led to the formulation of criteria and convenient plotting procedures for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying these fracture modes.

  6. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle wing-leading edge consists of panels that are made of reinforced carbon-carbon. Coating spallation was observed near the slip-side region of the panels that experience extreme heating. To understand this phenomenon, a root-cause investigation was conducted. As part of that investigation, fracture mechanics analyses of the slip-side joggle regions of the hot panels were conducted. This paper presents an overview of the fracture mechanics analyses.

  7. Nonsurgical treatment of Mason type II radial head fractures in athletes. A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    GUZZINI, M.; VADALÀ, A.; AGRÒ, A.; DI SANZO, V.; PIRONI, D.; REDLER, A.; SERLORENZI, P.; PROIETTI, L.; CIVITENGA, C.; MAZZA, D.; LANZETTI, R.M.; FERRETTI, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The best treatment for moderately displaced radial head fractures (Mason type II) still remains controversial. In cases of isolated fractures, there is no evidence that a fragment displacement of ≥ 2 mm gives poor results in conservatively treated fractures. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 52 patients (31M, 21F) affected by an isolated Mason type II fracture, treated with a long arm cast for two weeks between 2008 and 2013. All patients had practiced sports before being injured. They were all either bicyclists, or baseball, boxers, basketball, rugby, tennis or football players. The mean follow-up was 36 months. Elbow and forearm range of motion were measured. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score, the Broberg and Morrey rating system and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Score (DASH score) were analyzed. Follow-up radiographs were examined for evidence of consolidation, late displacement, early arthritis and non-unions. Results Flexion was slightly impaired in the injured limb when compared to the uninjured limb (137°± 6° versus 139°±5°) as were extension (–3°±6° versus 1°±4°, p < 0.05), supination (86°±6° versus 88°±3°), pronation (87°±4° versus 88°±6°) and valgus deviation (10°±4° versus 8°±3°, p < 0.05). 40 patients had no elbow complaints; 9 patients experienced occasional pain, 2 a mild instability of the elbow, and 4 a mild loss of grip strength. The DASH score was excellent in 48 patients (92.31%). In only 6 cases (11.53%) degenerative changes were greater in formerly injured elbows than in uninjured elbows. All patients returned to their previous sports activities. Conclusions Isolated Mason type II fractures can have a good or excellent mid-term functional outcome even when treated conservatively. PMID:28098055

  8. Clastic patterned ground in Lomonosov crater, Mars: examining fracture controlled formation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Alexander M.; Balme, Matthew R.; Patel, Manish R.; Hagermann, Axel

    2017-10-01

    The area surrounding Lomonosov crater on Mars has a high density of seemingly organised boulder patterns. These form seemingly sorted polygons and stripes within kilometre scale blockfields, patches of boulder strewn ground which are common across the Martian high latitudes. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain the formation of clastic patterned ground on Mars. It has been proposed that these structures could have formed through freeze-thaw sorting, or conversely by the interaction of boulders with underlying fracture polygons. In this investigation a series of sites were examined to evaluate whether boulder patterns appear to be controlled by the distribution of underlying fractures and test the fracture control hypotheses for their formation. It was decided to focus on this suite of mechanisms as they are characterised by a clear morphological relationship, namely the presence of an underlying fracture network which can easily be evaluated over a large area. It was found that in the majority of examples at these sites did not exhibit fracture control. Although fractures were present at many sites there were very few sites where the fracture network appeared to be controlling the boulder distribution. In general these were not the sites with the best examples of organization, suggesting that the fracture control mechanisms are not the dominant geomorphic process organising the boulders in this area.

  9. Effects of cement augmentation on the mechanical stability of multilevel spine after vertebral compression fracture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Pelletier, Matthew H.; Walsh, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies on the effects of cement augmentation or vertebroplasty on multi-level spine after vertebral compression fractures are lacking. This paper seeks to establish a 3-vertebrae ovine model to determine the impact of compression fracture on spine biomechanics, and to discover if cement augmentation can restore mechanical stability to fractured spine. Methods Five lumbar spine segments (L1-L3) were obtained from 5-year-old female Merino sheep. Standardized wedge-compression fractures were generated in each L2 vertebra, and then augmented with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement mixed with 30% barium sulphate powder. Biomechanical pure moment testing in axial rotation (AR), flexion/extension (FE) and lateral bending (LB) was carried out in the intact, fractured and repaired states. Range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ) parameters were compared, and plain radiographs taken at every stage. Results Except for a significant increase in ROM between the intact and fractured states in AR between L1 and L2 (P<0.05), there were no other significant differences in ROM or NZ between the other groups. There was a trend towards an increase in ROM and NZ in all directions after fracture, but this did not reach significance. Normal biomechanics was only minimally restored after augmentation. Conclusions Results suggest that cement augmentation could not restore mechanical stability of fractured spine. Model-specific factors may have had a role in these findings. Caution should be exercised when applying these results to humans. PMID:27683707

  10. Variations in Fracturing Mechanisms Observed by Broadband Microseismic Monitoring of Hydraulic Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Niu, F.; Chen, H.; Zuo, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is the key stimulation technology to improve unconventional hydrocarbon recovery nowadays. Stimulation increases permeability of tight formations by causing fractures at depth. It involves pumping high-pressure fluid into reservoir rocks to force the opening of cracks, which could allow oil and gas to flow freely. The progress of a fracturing operation must be monitored carefully as fracturing could activate existing faults, leading the fluid mixed with chemicals to propagate beyond the targeted treatment zone. In order to study dynamic processes involved in hydraulic fracturing, we deployed a small-scale seismic array consisting of 22 broadband seismographs at the surface above a hydraulic fracturing area to monitor the whole fracturing progress. We made continuous recording for 20 days, and detected a total of 961 microseismic events with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) recordings. We found that these events occurred either during the fracturing operation or after the fluid pumping. Some of the events also do not seem to be directly induced by the pumping, based on their locations and sizes. We determined the focal mechanisms of all events using the P-wave polarity data, and found that both the microseismicity and their focal mechanisms exhibit significant spatial and temporal variations. This variability can be associated with the hydraulic treatment, pre-existing faults, as well as the evolving stress field during the treatment. We computed the Coulomb stress changes of the observed seismicity to seek its contribution to the observed seismic variability.

  11. A Fracture-Mechanical Model of Crack Growth and Interaction: Application to Pre-eruptive Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, C.; Sammonds, P.; Kilburn, C.

    2007-12-01

    A greater understanding of the physical processes occurring within a volcano is a key aspect in the success of eruption forecasting. By considering the role of fracture growth, interaction and coalescence in the formation of dykes and conduits as well as the source mechanism for observed seismicity we can create a more general, more applicable model for precursory seismicity. The frequency of volcano-tectonic earthquakes, created by fracturing of volcanic rock, often shows a short-term increase prior to eruption. Using fracture mechanics, the model presented here aims to determine the conditions necessary for the acceleration in fracture events which produces the observed pre-eruptive seismicity. By focusing on the cause of seismic events rather than simply the acceleration patterns observed, the model also highlights the distinction between an accelerating seismic sequence ending with an eruption and a short-term increase which returns to background levels with no activity occurring, an event also observed in the field and an important capability if false alarms are to be avoided. This 1-D model explores the effects of a surrounding stress field and the distribution of multi-scale cracks on the interaction and coalescence of these cracks to form an open pathway for magma ascent. Similarly to seismic observations in the field, and acoustic emissions data from the laboratory, exponential and hyperbolic accelerations in fracturing events are recorded. Crack distribution and inter-crack distance appears to be a significant controlling factor on the evolution of the fracture network, dominating over the effects of a remote stress field. The generality of the model and its basis on fundamental fracture mechanics results makes it applicable to studies of fracture networks in numerous situations. For example looking at the differences between high temperature fracture processes and purely brittle failure the model can be similarly applied to fracture dynamics in the

  12. How tough is bone? Application of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to bone.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiahau; Mecholsky, John J; Clifton, Kari B

    2007-02-01

    Bone, with a hierarchical structure that spans from the nano-scale to the macro-scale and a composite design composed of nano-sized mineral crystals embedded in an organic matrix, has been shown to have several toughening mechanisms that increases its toughness. These mechanisms can stop, slow, or deflect crack propagation and cause bone to have a moderate amount of apparent plastic deformation before fracture. In addition, bone contains a high volumetric percentage of organics and water that makes it behave nonlinearly before fracture. Many researchers used strength or critical stress intensity factor (fracture toughness) to characterize the mechanical property of bone. However, these parameters do not account for the energy spent in plastic deformation before bone fracture. To accurately describe the mechanical characteristics of bone, we applied elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to study bone's fracture toughness. The J integral, a parameter that estimates both the energies consumed in the elastic and plastic deformations, was used to quantify the total energy spent before bone fracture. Twenty cortical bone specimens were cut from the mid-diaphysis of bovine femurs. Ten of them were prepared to undergo transverse fracture and the other 10 were prepared to undergo longitudinal fracture. The specimens were prepared following the apparatus suggested in ASTM E1820 and tested in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The average J integral of the transverse-fractured specimens was found to be 6.6 kPa m, which is 187% greater than that of longitudinal-fractured specimens (2.3 kPa m). The energy spent in the plastic deformation of the longitudinal-fractured and transverse-fractured bovine specimens was found to be 3.6-4.1 times the energy spent in the elastic deformation. This study shows that the toughness of bone estimated using the J integral is much greater than the toughness measured using the critical stress intensity factor. We suggest that the J integral method is

  13. The effect of local bone density on mechanical failure after internal fixation of pertrochanteric fractures.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhua; Xie, Bingju; Chen, Shanxi; Lin, Guangmao; Yang, Guojing; Zhang, Lei

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the effect of local hip bone density on mechanical failure after fixation of pertrochanteric fractures and to establish possible risk factors for the failures. A total of 136 consecutive patients presenting a closed unilateral pertrochanteric fracture were enrolled. The patients were treated with a sliding hip screw or an intramedullary nail. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements for bone density of the contralateral hip were made within 4 weeks postoperatively. Follow-up evaluations on the standard radiographs were documented for any mechanical failure including loss of reduction, screw or blade cut-out, lateral migration of the screw or blade, and implant breakage. Secondary outcomes were also recorded including patient characteristics and fixation construct variables as possible predictors for mechanical failure. At a minimum of 2 years of follow-up, 38 patients were reported with mechanical failure at an estimated risk of 27.9 %. The local bone density measurements for the study population showed no difference between patients with (0.710 g/cm(2)) and without (0.726 g/cm(2)) mechanical failure (P = 0.180). We also observed no significant correlation between local bone density and failure in patients with good fracture reduction (P = 0.862). The multivariate regression analysis identified fracture type (P < 0.001) and quality of fracture reduction (P < 0.001) as being independent predictors for mechanical failure, whereas local bone density was not (P = 0.658). Local hip bone density does not appear to have a significant influence on mechanical failure after internal fixation of pertrochanteric fractures. Stable fractures and fractures with good reduction are expected to obtain satisfactory outcomes.

  14. Multi-Scale Fracture Mechanics of 3-D Reinforced Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-26

    technique and cohesive formulation for crack extension. A representative volume element (RVE) approach employed for homogenized stiffness and stress...the mesh-independent crack propagation technique and cohesive formulation for crack extension. A representative volume element (RVE) approach employed...technology for application and development of progressive fracture modeling, SCSAM is a technique for modeling complex multiple site initiation and

  15. The application of fracture mechanics to failure analysis of photovoltaic solar modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    Cracking of silicon solar cells and solar module transparent cover panels such as glass or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is a major cause of photovoltaic solar module failure in field service. Silicon and cover materials are brittle, and cracking of these materials is expected to result from the extension of preexisting flaws under stress. Study of the cracking mechanisms is therefore an appropriate area for the application of fracture mechanics principles. In this study, fracture mechanics techniques were employed to identify the mode of crack propagation, to examine the fracture-initiating flaw, to estimate the nature and magnitude of fracture stress in the field, and to predict analytically the service lifetime. Recommendations for corrective actions are also made.

  16. Influence of grain size on the mechanism of fracture of the aluminum alloy V95

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, A. N.; Brodova, I. G.; Shirinkina, I. G.; Lyapunova, E. A.; Naimark, O. B.

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical behavior and mechanisms of fracture of the ultrafine-crystalline (UFC) and the coarse-crystalline (CC) aluminum alloy V95 (Al-6.0 Zn-2.3 Mg-2.0 Cu-0.4 Mn (wt %)) manufactured via using severe plastic deformation, namely, by dynamic equal-channel angular pressing (DCAP), have been studied. It has been demonstrated that the UFC material exhibits improved mechanical properties in comparison with the CC analog. A correlation analysis of fracture surfaces and the determination of the Hurst exponent have made it possible to perform a comparative estimation of the uniformity of the fracture structure and of the fractions of ductile and brittle fractures in the samples with the structure-scale characteristics different in value.

  17. Correlating laboratory observations of fracture mechanical properties to hydraulically-induced microseismicity in geothermal reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen L. Karner, Ph.D

    2006-02-01

    To date, microseismicity has provided an invaluable tool for delineating the fracture network produced by hydraulic stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. While the locations of microseismic events are of fundamental importance, there is a wealth of information that can be gleaned from the induced seismicity (e.g. fault plane solutions, seismic moment tensors, source characteristics). Closer scrutiny of the spatial and temporal evolution of seismic moment tensors can shed light on systematic characteristics of fractures in the geothermal reservoir. When related to observations from laboratory experiments, these systematic trends can be interpreted in terms of mechanical processes that most likely operate in the fracture network. This paper reports on mechanical properties that can be inferred from observations of microseismicity in geothermal systems. These properties lead to interpretations about fracture initiation, seismicity induced after hydraulic shut-in, spatial evolution of linked fractures, and temporal evolution of fracture strength. The correlations highlight the fact that a combination of temperature, stressing rate, time, and fluid-rock interactions can alter the mechanical and fluid transport properties of fractures in geothermal systems.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of osteoporotic hip fractures in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Föger-Samwald, Ursula; Vekszler, György; Hörz-Schuch, Edith; Salem, Sylvia; Wipperich, Markus; Ritschl, Peter; Mousavi, Mehdi; Pietschmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A common manifestation of age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis are fractures of the hip. Age-related osteoporosis is thought to be determined by a number of intrinsic factors including genetics, hormonal changes, changes in levels of oxidative stress, or an inflammatory status associated with the aging process. The aim of this study was to investigate gene expression and bone architecture in bone samples derived from elderly osteoporotic women with hip fractures (OP) in comparison to bone samples from age matched women with osteoarthritis of the hip (OA). Femoral heads and adjacent neck tissue were collected from 10 women with low-trauma hip fractures (mean age 83±6) and consecutive surgical hip replacement. Ten bone samples from patients undergoing hip replacement due to osteoarthritis (mean age 80±5) served as controls. One half of each bone sample was subjected to gene expression analysis. The second half of each bone sample was analyzed by microcomputed tomography. From each half, samples from four different regions, the central and subcortical region of the femoral head and neck, were analyzed. We could show a significantly decreased expression of the osteoblast related genes RUNX2, Osterix, Sclerostin, WNT10B, and Osteocalcin, a significantly increased ratio of RANKL to Osteoprotegerin, and a significantly increased expression of the enzymes superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and glutathione peroxidase GPX3, and of the inflammatory cytokine IL6 in bone samples from hip fracture patients compared to controls. Major microstructural changes in OP bone were seen in the neck and were characterized by a significant decrease of bone volume, trabecular number, and connectivity density and a significant increase of trabecular separation. In conclusion, our data give evidence for a decreased expression of osteoblast related genes and increased expression of osteoclast related genes. Furthermore, increased expression of SOD2 and GPX3 suggest increased

  19. Micro-mechanical analysis of damage growth and fracture in discontinuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, James G.; Richardson, David E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental verification is presented for a new two parameter fracture model based on the equivalent remote biaxial stresses (ERBS). A detailed comparison is made between the new theory and the constant K(sub IC) approach of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). Fracture is predicted through a failure curve representing the change in a variable fracture toughness K(sub IC) with the ERBS ratio B(sub E). The nonsingular term (T) in the series expansion of the near crack-tip transverse stress is included in the model. Experimental results for polymethyl methacrylate (PPMA) show that the theory can account for the effects of geometry on fracture toughness as well as indicate the initiation of crack branching. It is shown that the new criterion predicts failure for PMMA with a 95 percent confidence zone which is nearly three times smaller than that of the LEFM K(sub IC) approach.

  20. The phase-field approach as a tool for experimental validations in fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dally, Tim; Weinberg, Kerstin

    2017-07-01

    In a phase-field approach to fracture crack propagation is modeled by means of an additional continuous field. In this paper, two problems of linear elastic fracture mechanics are studied experimentally and numerically in order to evaluate the practicability of the phase-field approach and to validate the measured parameters. At first, a three-point bending experiment of silicon dies is simulated assuming static plate bending. Then, wave propagation and spallation in a Hopkinson bar test are analyzed in a dynamic regime. The simulations show that phase-field fracture reproduces the experimental results with high accuracy. The results are comparable to other fracture simulations, e.g., the cohesive element technique. In total, the phase-field approach to fracture is capable of tracking crack evolution in a very convenient and quantitatively correct way.

  1. Biomechanical analysis of the mechanism of elbow fracture-dislocations by compression force.

    PubMed

    Wake, Hirofumi; Hashizume, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keiichiro; Inoue, Hajime; Nagayama, Noriyuki

    2004-01-01

    Fracture-dislocations of the coronoid and olecranon were produced experimentally, and their onset mechanisms were analyzed to clarify the effects of compression force on the coronoid and olecranon. The study used two-dimensional finite element method (2D-FEM) simulations and static loading experiments. The latter applied axial force distally to 40 cadaveric elbows. Posterior fracture-dislocations occurred between 15 degrees of extension and 30 degrees of flexion, anterior or posterior fracture-dislocations at 60 degrees, and only anterior fracture-dislocations at 90 degrees. Injuries were mainly to anterior or posterior support structures. The 2D-FEM simulations showed that the stress concentration areas moved from the coronoid process to the olecranon as position changed from extension to flexion. The very high frequency of concurrent fracture-dislocations of radial head or neck in the current study indicated that the radial head may also function as a stabilizer in the anterior support system.

  2. On the mechanical interaction between a fluid-filled fracture and the earth's surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Holzhausen, G.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanical interaction between a fluid-filled fracture (e.g., hydraulic fracture joint, or igneous dike) and the earth's surface is analyzed using a two-dimensional elastic solution for a slit of arbitrary inclination buried beneath a horizontal free surface and subjected to an arbitrary pressure distribution. The solution is obtained by iteratively superimposing two fundamental sets of analytical solutions. For uniform internal pressure the slit behaves essentially as if it were in an infinite region if the depth-to-center is three times greater than the half-length. For shallower slits interaction with the free surface is pronounced: stresses and displacements near the slit differ by more than 10% from values for the deeply buried slit. The following changes are noted as the depth-to-center decreases: 1. (1) the mode I stress intensity factor increases for both ends of the slit, but more rapidly at the upper end; 2. (2) the mode II stress-intensity factor is significantly different from zero (except for vertical slits) suggesting propagation out of the original plane of the slit; 3. (3) displacements of the slit wall are asymmetric such that the slit gaps open more widely near the upper end. Similar changes are noted if fluid density creates a linear pressure gradient that is smaller than the lithostatic gradient. Under such conditions natural fractures should propagate preferentially upward toward the earth's surface requiring less pressure as they grow in length. If deformation near the surface is of interest, the model should account explicitly for the free surface. Stresses and displacements at the free surface are not approximated very well by values calculated along a line in an infinite region, even when the slit is far from the line. As depth-to-center of a shallow pressurized slit decreases, the following changes are noted: 1. (1) displacements of the free surface increase to the same order of magnitude as the displacements of the slit walls, 2. (2

  3. Radiology of Fractures in Intoxicated Emergency Department Patients: Locations, Mechanisms, Presentation, and Initial Interpretation Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuka; Nozaki, Taiki; Starkey, Jay; Okajima, Yuka; Ohde, Sachiko; Matsusako, Masaki; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of alcohol intoxication to time-to-presentation following injury, fracture type, mechanism of injury leading to fracture, and initial diagnostic radiology interpretation performance of emergency physicians versus diagnostic radiologists in patients who present to the emergency department (ED) and are subsequently diagnosed with fracture. Medical records of 1286 patients who presented to the ED and were diagnosed with fracture who also underwent plain film or computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively reviewed. The subjects were divided into intoxicated and sober groups. Patient characteristics, injury-to-presentation time, fracture location, and discrepancies between initial clinical and radiological evaluations were compared. Of 1286 subjects, 181 patients were included in the intoxicated group. Only intoxicated patients presented with head/neck fractures more than 24 hours after injury. The intoxicated group showed a higher rate of head/neck fractures (skull 23.2% vs 5.8%, face and orbit 30.4% vs 9.5%; P < 0.001) and a lower rate of extremity injuries. The rate of nondiagnosis of fractures by emergency physicians later identified by radiologists was the same in both groups (7.7% vs 7.7%, P = 0.984). While the same proportion of intoxicated patients presented more than 24 hours following injury, only intoxicated patients presented with craniofacial and cervical spinal fractures during this period. Alcohol-related injuries are more often associated with head/neck fractures but less extremity injuries. The rate of fractures missed by emergency physicians but later diagnosed by radiologists was the same in intoxicated and sober patients. PMID:26091471

  4. E. coli RS2GFP Retention Mechanisms in Laboratory-Scale Fractured Rocks: A Statistical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. N.; Qu, J.; Dickson, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    With billions of gallons of groundwater being withdrawn every day in the US and Canada, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms which jeopardize this resource and the health of those who rely on it. Porous media aquifers have typically been considered to provide significant filtration of particulate matter (e.g. microorganisms), while the fractures in fractured rock aquifers and aquitards are considered to act as contaminant highways allowing a large fraction of pathogens to travel deep into an aquifer relatively quickly. Recent research results indicate that fractured rocks filter out more particulates than typically believed. The goal of the research presented here is to quantify the number of E. coli RS2GFP retained in a single, saturated, laboratory-scale fracture, and to relate the retention of E. coli RS2GFP to the aperture field characteristics and groundwater flow rate. To achieve this goal, physical experiments were conducted at the laboratory-scale to quantify the retention of E. coli RS2GFP through several single, saturated, dolomitic limestone fractures under a range of flow rates. These fractures were also cast with a transparent epoxy in order to visualize the transport mechanisms in the various different aperture fields. The E. coli RS2GFP is tagged with a green-fluorescent protein (GFP) that is used to obtain visualization data when excited by ultraviolet light. A series of experiments was conducted, each of which involved the release of a known number of E. coli RS2GFP at the upstream end of the fracture and measuring the effluent concentration profile. These experiments were conducted using both the natural rock and transparent cast of several different aperture fields, under a range of flow rates. The effects of different aperture field characteristics and flow rates on the retention of E. coli RS2GFP will be determined by conducting a statistical analysis of the retention data under different experimental conditions. The images captured

  5. Salter-Harris II fractures of the distal tibia: does surgical management reduce the risk of premature physeal closure?

    PubMed

    Russo, Franco; Moor, Molly A; Mubarak, Scott J; Pennock, Andrew T

    2013-01-01

    postreduction displacement, patient age (P=0.36), sex (P=0.39), mechanism of injury (P=0.13), time to fracture management (P=0.51), amount of initial displacement (P=0.34), number of reduction attempts (P=0.43), and operative treatment (P=0.47) did not significantly influence PPC. Patients with displaced SH II distal tibia fractures pose a challenging problem for the treating physician with a high rate of PPC (43% overall). Although surgical fixation with anatomic reduction and removal of interposed tissue may be necessary to improve joint alignment, it does not reduce the incidence of PPC and may increase the need for subsequent surgeries.

  6. Tensile fracture resistance mechanisms in brittle polycrystals: An ultrasonics and in situ microscopy investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Peter L.

    1987-07-01

    A zone of distributed microcracking is often suggested to accompany tensile macrocrack propagation in rocks and ceramics. The microcracking is said to be largely responsible for (1) high values of fracture energy, (2) increasing resistance to fracture with crack extension and (3) the dependence of fracture mechanics data on the experimental setup. In the present paper, the material breakdown processes in imperfectly elastic Westerly granite are investigated using ultrasonic wave probing and in situ microscopy during mode I fracture experiments. These observations are compared with an in situ reflection/transmission microscopy investigation of mode I fracture in a near-ideal elastic polycrystalline alumina (Al2O3). As defined by the spatial distribution of longitudinal and surface wave attenuation in wedge-loaded double-cantilever beam specimens of Westerly granite, the fracture process zone is elongate in the direction of fracture propagation (15-40 mm long by 1-2 grain dimensions wide; grain size 0.75 mm). As revealed by in situ reflection microscopy, the ultrasonic wave energy is partially transmitted through the developing fracture surfaces via two sources of crack interface traction: (1) remnant islands of unfractured material left behind the advancing fracture front and (2) geometrical interlocking of the microstructurally rough fracture surfaces. A similar zone of crack flank tractions is found in the alumina (greater than 2000 μm long; grain size 20-100 μm). No evidence of a diffuse kidney-shaped cloud of microcracking distributed ahead of the main fracture tip (predicted by many fracture models) was found in either material. Instead, interface-localized microcracking was observed to operate at positions where the tractions, or restraining forces, are transmitted across the nascent fracture surfaces. Crack flank tractions shield the main crack tip from high levels of stress and are relieved by friction-induced microcracking and microcrack rupture of intact

  7. A revisit to high-rate mode-II fracture characterization of composites with Kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Jin, Huiqing

    2010-03-01

    Nowadays composite materials have been extensively utilized in many military and industrial applications. For example, the newest Boeing 787 uses 50% composite (mostly carbon fiber reinforced plastic) in production. However, the weak delamination strength of fiber reinforced composites, when subjected to external impact such as ballistic impact, has been always potential serious threats to the safety of passengers. Dynamic fracture toughness is a critical indicator of the performance from delamination in such impact events. Quasi-static experimental techniques for fracture toughness have been well developed. For example, end notched flexure (ENF) technique, which is illustrated in Fig. 1, has become a typical method to determined mode-II fracture toughness for composites under quasi-static loading conditions. However, dynamic fracture characterization of composites has been challenging. This has resulted in conflictive and confusing conclusions in regard to strain rate effects on fracture toughness of composites.

  8. Mechanisms of orbital floor fractures: a clinical, experimental, and theoretical study.

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, J D; Warwar, R E; Ballal, D R; Ballal, R D

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the two accepted mechanisms of the orbital blow-out fracture (the hydraulic and the buckling theories) from a clinical, experimental, and theoretical standpoint. METHODS: Clinical cases in which blow-out fractures resulted from both a pure hydraulic mechanism and a pure buckling mechanism are presented. Twenty-one intact orbital floors were obtained from human cadavers. A metal rod was dropped, experimentally, onto each specimen until a fracture was produced, and the energy required in each instance was calculated. A biomathematical model of the human bony orbit, depicted as a thin-walled truncated conical shell, was devised. Two previously published (by the National Aeronautics Space Administration) theoretical structural engineering formulas for the fracture of thin-walled truncated conical shells were used to predict the energy required to fracture the bone of the orbital floor via the hydraulic and buckling mechanisms. RESULTS: Experimentally, the mean energy required to fracture the bone of the human cadaver orbital floor directly was 78 millijoules (mj) (range, 29-127 mj). Using the engineering formula for the hydraulic theory, the predicted theoretical energy is 71 mj (range, 38-120 mj); for the buckling theory, the predicted theoretical energy is 68 mj (range, 40-106 mj). CONCLUSION: Through this study, we have experimentally determined the amount of energy required to fracture the bone of the human orbital floor directly and have provided support for each mechanism of the orbital blow-out fracture from a clinical and theoretical basis. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5A FIGURE 5B FIGURE 5E FIGURE 5F PMID:10703119

  9. Evolution of Stiffness and Permeability in Fractures Subject to - and Mechanically-Activated Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faoro, I.; Elsworth, D.; Candela, T.

    2013-12-01

    Strong feedbacks link thermal gradients (T), hydrologic flow (H), chemical alteration (C) and mechanical deformation (M) in fractured rock. These processes are strongly interconnected since one process effects the initiation and progress of another. Dissolution and precipitation of minerals are affected by temperature and stress, and can result in significant changes in permeability and solute transport characteristics. Understanding these couplings is important for oil, gas, and geothermal reservoir engineering and for waste disposal in underground repositories and reservoirs. In order to experimentally investigate the interactions between THCM processes in a natural stressed fracture, we report on heated ( up to 150C) flow-through experiments on fractured core samples of Westerly granite. These experiments are performed to examine the influence of thermally and mechanically activated dissolution on the mechanical (stress/strain) and transport (permeability) characteristics of fractures. The evolutions of both the permeability and stiffness of the sample are recorded as the experimental thermal conditions change and chemical alteration progresses. Furthermore efflux of dissolved mineral mass is measured periodically to provide a record of the net mass removal, to correlate this with observed changes in fracture aperture, defined by the flow test. During the experiments the fracture shows high hydraulic sensitivity to the changing conditions of stress and temperature. Significant variation of the effluent fluid chemistry is observed. We argue that the formation of clay (Kaolinite) is the main mechanism responsible for the permanent change in permeability recorded at higher confining stresses (40 MPa).

  10. Operative Treatment of Fifth Metatarsal Jones Fractures (Zones II and III) in the NBA.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Martin; DeSandis, Bridget; Allen, Answorth; Levitsky, Matthew; O'Malley, Quinn; Williams, Riley

    2016-05-01

    Proximal fractures of the fifth metatarsal (zone II and III) are common in the elite athlete and can be difficult to treat because of a tendency toward delayed union, nonunion, or refracture. The purpose of this case series was to report our experience in treating 10 NBA players, determine the healing rate, return to play, refracture rate, and role of foot type in these athletes. The records of 10 professional basketball players were retrospectively reviewed. Seven athletes underwent standard percutaneous internal fixation with bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) whereas the other 3 had open bone grafting primarily in addition to fixation and BMAC. Radiographic features evaluated included fourth-fifth intermetatarsal, fifth metatarsal lateral deviation, calcaneal pitch, and metatarsus adductus angles. Radiographic healing was observed at an overall average of 7.5 weeks and return to play was 9.8 weeks. Three athletes experienced refractures. There were no significant differences in clinical features or radiographic measurements except that the refracture group had the highest metatatarsus adductus angles. Most athletes were pes planus and 9 of 10 had a bony prominence under the fifth metatarsal styloid. This is the largest published series of operatively treated professional basketball players who exemplify a specific patient population at high risk for fifth metatarsal fracture. These players were large and possessed a unique foot type that seemed to be associated with increased risk of fifth metatarsal fracture and refracture. This foot type had forefoot metatarsus adductus and a fifth metatarsal that was curved with a prominent base. We continue to use standard internal fixation with bone marrow aspirate but advocate additional prophylactic open bone grafting in patients with high fourth-to-fifth intermetatarsal, fifth metatarsal lateral deviation, and metatarsus adductus angles as well as prominent fifth metatarsal styloids in order to improve fracture

  11. Mechanisms of Fracture and Creep of Structural Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-30

    FRACTURE AND CREEP OF STRUCTURAL ALLOYS D. A. Koss Department of Materials Science and Engineering The Pennsylvania State University University Park , PA...of Materials Science and Engineering REPCrt: N6,8 Penn State University University Park , PA 16802 Report No. 4 9. SPONSORING MON T ORING AGENCY NAMES...Effects of Stress State on Void Linkin [with Andrew Geltmacher, Ph.D. candidate, Dr. Peter Matic, Naval Research Laboratory, and Dr. Mike Stout, Los

  12. Direct Observations of Fracture and the Damage Mechanics of Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-31

    microplasticity up to the fracture load. d. It shculd have low enough strength in tension and compression to enable strength measurements at easily accessible...15jm. SEM examination of the grains after large amounts of deformation indicated that the grains are brittle without any evidence of microplasticity . In...and microplasticity in polycrystalline alumina", J.Mater.Sci., 12(1977)791-796. 93. J Lankford, "Compressive microfracture and indentation damage in A1

  13. Scaling of Crack Surfaces and Implications for Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Stéphane; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Bouchaud, Elisabeth; Valentin, Gérard

    2000-08-01

    The scaling laws describing the roughness development of crack surfaces are incorporated into the Griffith criterion. We show that, in the case of a Family-Vicsek scaling, the energy balance leads to a purely elastic brittle behavior. On the contrary, it appears that an anomalous scaling reflects an R-curve behavior associated with a size effect of the critical resistance to crack growth in agreement with the fracture process of heterogeneous brittle materials exhibiting a microcracking damage.

  14. Scaling of crack surfaces and implications for fracture mechanics

    PubMed

    Morel; Schmittbuhl; Bouchaud; Valentin

    2000-08-21

    The scaling laws describing the roughness development of crack surfaces are incorporated into the Griffith criterion. We show that, in the case of a Family-Vicsek scaling, the energy balance leads to a purely elastic brittle behavior. On the contrary, it appears that an anomalous scaling reflects an R-curve behavior associated with a size effect of the critical resistance to crack growth in agreement with the fracture process of heterogeneous brittle materials exhibiting a microcracking damage.

  15. Investigation of the fracture mechanics of boride composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, L.; Clougherty, E. V.; Nesor, H.

    1971-01-01

    Fracture energies of WC-6Co, Boride 5 (ZrB2+SiC), Boride 8(ZrB2+SiC+C) and Boride 8-M2(ZrB2+SiC+C) were measured by slow bend and impact tests of notched charpy bars. Cobalt bonded tungsten carbide exhibited impact energies of 0.76 ft-lb or 73.9 in-lb/square inch. Boride 5 and the Boride 8 exhibit impact energies one third and one quarter of that observed for WC-6Co comparing favorably with measurements for SiC and Si3N4. Slow bend-notched bar-fracture energies for WC-6Co were near 2.6 in-lb/square inch or 1/20 the impact energies. Slow bend energies for Boride 8-M2, Boride 8 and Boride 5 were 58%, 42% and 25% of the value observed for WC-6Co. Fractograph showed differences for WC-6Co where slow bend testing resulted in smooth transgranular cleavage while samples broken by impact exhibited intergranular failures. By contrast the boride fractures showed no distinction based on testing method. Fabrication studies were conducted to effect alteration of the boride composites by alloying and introduction of graphite cloth.

  16. Fracture mechanics analysis of the dentine-luting cement interface.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A K; Mitchell, C A; Orr, J F

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the fracture toughness of adhesive interfaces between dentine and clinically relevant, thin layers of dental luting cements. Cements tested included a conventional glass-ionomer, F (Fuji 1), a resin-modified glass-ionomer, FP (Fuji Plus) and a compomer cement, D (DyractCem). Ten miniature short-bar chevron notch specimens were manufactured for each cement, each comprising a 40 microm thick chevron of lute, between two 1.5 mm thick blocks of bovine dentine, encased in resin composite. The interfacial K(IC) results (MN/m3/2) were median (range): F; 0.152 (0.14-0.16), FP; 0.306 (0.27-0.37), D; 0.351 (0.31-0.37). Non-parametric statistical analysis showed that the fracture toughness of F was significantly lower (p <0.05) than those of FP or D, and all were significantly lower than values for monolithic cement specimens. Scanning electron microscopy of the specimens suggested crack propagation along the interface. However, energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that failure was cohesive within the cement. It is concluded that the fracture toughness of luting cement was lowered by cement-dentine interactions.

  17. Fracture mechanisms of retrieved titanium screw thread in dental implant.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Ichikawa, Tetsuo; Murakami, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Youji; Asaoka, Kenzo

    2002-06-01

    Titanium and its alloy are increasingly attracting attention for use as biomaterials. However, delayed fracture of titanium dental implants has been reported, and factors affecting the acceleration of corrosion and fatigue have to be determined. The fractured surface of a retrieved titanium screw and metallurgical structures of a dental implant system were analyzed. The outer surface of the retrieved screw had a structure different from that of the as-received screw. It was confirmed that a shear crack initiated at the root of the thread and propagated into the inner section of the screw. Gas chromatography revealed that the retrieved screw had absorbed a higher amount of hydrogen than the as-received sample. The grain structure of a titanium screw, immersed in a solution known to induce hydrogen absorption, showed features similar to those of the retrieved screw. It was concluded that titanium in a biological environment absorbs hydrogen and this may be the reason for delayed fracture of a titanium implant.

  18. Mechanisms of angiotensin II natriuresis and antinatriuresis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M E; Hall, J E; Montani, J P; Guyton, A C; Langford, H G; Cornell, J E

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of changes in renal arterial pressure (RAP), renal hemodynamics, and tubular reabsorption in mediating the natriuretic and antinatriuretic actions of angiotensin II (ANG II). In seven anesthetized dogs, endogenous ANG II formation was blocked with captopril, and ANG II was infused intravenously at rates of 5-1,215 ng X kg-1 X min-1 while RAP was either servo-controlled at the preinfusion level or permitted to increase. When RAP was servo-controlled, ANG II infusion at all rates from 5-1,215 ng X kg-1 X min-1 decreased urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) and fractional sodium excretion (FENa) while increasing fractional reabsorption of lithium (FRLi) (an index of proximal tubular fractional sodium reabsorption) and causing no change in calculated distal tubule fractional sodium reabsorption (FRDNa). When RAP was permitted to increase, ANG II infusion rates up to 45 ng X kg-1. min-1 also decreased UNaV and FENa while increasing FRLi and causing no change in FRDNa. However, at 135 ng X kg-1 X min-1 and above, UNaV and FENa increased while FRLi and FRDNa decreased when RAP was allowed to rise, even though renal blood flow and filtration fraction were not substantially different from the values observed when RAP was servo-controlled. Filtered sodium load was slightly higher when RAP was permitted to increase during ANG II infusion compared with when RAP was servo-controlled, although the differences were not statistically significant. Thus, even very large doses of ANG II cause antinatriuresis when RAP is prevented from increasing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the Nineteenth National Symposium, San Antonio, TX, June 30-July 2, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume provide an overview of current theoretical and experimental research in the field of fracture mechanics. Topics discussed include three-dimensional issues, computational and analytical issues, damage tolerance and fatigue, elastoplastic fracture, dynamic inelastic fracture, and crack arrest theory and applications. Papers are presented on approximate methods for analysis of dynamic crack growth and arrest, constraint-loss model for the growth of surface fatigue cracks, fatigue crack growth in aircraft main landing gear wheels, and near-threshold crack growth in nickel-base superalloys.

  20. Assessment of strength-limiting flaws in ceramic heat exchanger components INEL support: Fracture mechanics and nondestructive evaluation technology. Final report, June 1, 1986--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, W.R.; Reuter, W.G.

    1993-06-01

    An examination of a siliconized SiC material, CS101K, has been performed to determine if linear fracture mechanics concepts can be used to characterize and predict the behavior of this material. Phase II of this project showed that a value that appeared to represent the true fracture toughness could be measured using small specimens with a machined notch, if the notch root radius was less than 75 {mu}m. Methods to produce sharply cracked specimens were then investigated to verify this hypothesis. A new technique, called the {open_quotes}beam support{close_quotes} precracking method, was subsequently developed and used to make sharply cracked SE(B) specimens. Tests of these specimens showed a slightly rising R-curve-type of behavior, with elevated values of plane strain fracture toughness. Interference of the crack surfaces in the precrack wake was hypothesized as the most likely cause of these phenomena. Subsequent testing with various precrack lengths provided preliminary verification of the hypothesis. Test results show that, for fracture mechanics-based design and assessment, adequate values of fracture toughness can be obtained from EDM-notched specimens, instead of the more costly precracked specimens. These results imply that, for the Si-SiC material tested, caution is warranted when using any of the methods of assessing fracture toughness that use a sharp precrack. It is also reasoned that these results may generally be more applicable to the coarser-grained structural ceramics that exhibit a rougher fracture surface. Based on results of testing EDM-notched bend specimens in 1250{degrees}C air, no degradation of material properties were observed for exposures, under applied stress, up to 900 h. Instead, some increase in fracture toughness was measured for these conditions. These same tests indicated that the threshold stress intensity factor for stress corrosion cracking (static fatigue) in the hot air environment was the same as the fracture toughness.

  1. The fracture mechanics of human bone: influence of disease and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Busse, Björn; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-01-01

    Aging and bone diseases are associated with increased fracture risk. It is therefore pertinent to seek an understanding of the origins of such disease-related deterioration in bone's mechanical properties. The mechanical integrity of bone derives from its hierarchical structure, which in healthy tissue is able to resist complex physiological loading patterns and tolerate damage. Indeed, the mechanisms through which bone derives its mechanical properties make fracture mechanics an ideal framework to study bone's mechanical resistance, where crack-growth resistance curves give a measure of the intrinsic resistance to the initiation of cracks and the extrinsic resistance to the growth of cracks. Recent research on healthy cortical bone has demonstrated how this hierarchical structure can develop intrinsic toughness at the collagen fibril scale mainly through sliding and sacrificial bonding mechanisms that promote plasticity. Furthermore, the bone-matrix structure develops extrinsic toughness at much larger micrometer length-scales, where the structural features are large enough to resist crack growth through crack-tip shielding mechanisms. Although healthy bone tissue can generally resist physiological loading environments, certain conditions such as aging and disease can significantly increase fracture risk. In simple terms, the reduced mechanical integrity originates from alterations to the hierarchical structure. Here, we review how human cortical bone resists fracture in healthy bone and how changes to the bone structure due to aging, osteoporosis, vitamin D deficiency and Paget's disease can affect the mechanical integrity of bone tissue. PMID:26380080

  2. A Numerical Study of Factors Affecting Fracture-Fluid Cleanup and Produced Gas/Water in Marcellus Shale: Part II

    DOE PAGES

    Seales, Maxian B.; Dilmore, Robert; Ertekin, Turgay; ...

    2017-04-01

    Horizontal wells combined with successful multistage-hydraulic-fracture treatments are currently the most-established method for effectively stimulating and enabling economic development of gas-bearing organic-rich shale formations. Fracture cleanup in the stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) is critical to stimulation effectiveness and long-term well performance. But, fluid cleanup is often hampered by formation damage, and post-fracture well performance frequently falls to less than expectations. A systematic study of the factors that hinder fracture-fluid cleanup in shale formations can help optimize fracture treatments and better quantify long-term volumes of produced water and gas. Fracture-fluid cleanup is a complex process influenced by mutliphase flow through porousmore » media (relative permeability hysteresis, capillary pressure), reservoir-rock and -fluid properties, fracture-fluid properties, proppant placement, fracture-treatment parameters, and subsequent flowback and field operations. Changing SRV and fracture conductivity as production progresses further adds to the complexity of this problem. Numerical simulation is the best and most-practical approach to investigate such a complicated blend of mechanisms, parameters, their interactions, and subsequent effect on fracture-fluid cleanup and well deliverability. Here, a 3D, two-phase, dual-porosity model was used to investigate the effect of mutliphase flow, proppant crushing, proppant diagenesis, shut-in time, reservoir-rock compaction, gas slippage, and gas desorption on fracture-fluid cleanup and well performance in Marcellus Shale. Our findings have shed light on the factors that substantially constrain efficient fracture-fluid cleanup in gas shales, and we have provided guidelines for improved fracture-treatment designs and water management.« less

  3. Development and fracture mechanics data for 6Al-6V-2 Sn titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiftal, C. F.; Beck, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture mechanics properties of 6Al-6V-2Sn titanium in the annealed, solution-treated, and aged condition are presented. Tensile, fracture toughness, cyclic flaw growth, and sustained-load threshold tests were conducted. Both surface flaw and compact tension-specimen geometries were employed. Temperatures and/or environments used were -65 F (220 K) air, ambient, 300 F (422 K) air, and room-temperature air containing 10 and 100% relative humidity.

  4. Inclusion size effect on the fatigue crack propagation mechanism and fracture mechanics of a superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denda, Takeshi; Bretz, Perter L.; Tien, John K.

    1992-02-01

    Low cycle fatigue life of nickel-base superalloys is enhanced as a consequence of inclusion reduction in the melt process; however, the functional dependencies between fatigue characteristics and inclusions have not been well investigated. In this study, the propagation mechanism of the fatigue crack initiated from inclusions is examined in fine-grained IN718, which is a representative turbine disc material for jet engines. There is a faceted-striated crack transition on the fracture surfaces. This faceted-striated transition also appears in the da/dN vs crack length curves. It is observed that the faceted crack propagation time can be more than 50 pct of total lifetime in the low cycle fatigue test. The significance of inclusion size effect is explained on the premise that the faceted fatigue crack propagation time scales with the inclusion size, which is taken as the initial crack length. A predictive protocol for determining inclusion size effect is given.

  5. Modeling naturally fractured reservoirs: From experimental rock mechanics to flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Margaretha Catharina Maria

    Fractures have a big impact on reservoir production but are inherently difficult to quantify. This study gives a robust and practical workflow to obtain a mechanically consistent naturally fractured reservoir model without direct sampling of the fracture network. The three tiers of the workflow are: (1) subcritical testing, (2) geomechanical modeling, and (3) flow modeling. Subcritical fracture index, a rock property, has been shown to influence fracture attributes such as length, spacing and connectivity. Subcritical tests show that the average subcritical index for sandstones in ambient air is around 62, whereas the average value for microstructurally comparable carbonates samples is 120. Thin-section analysis shows that an increase in cement content increases the subcritical index. Furthermore, sandstone samples containing more than 15% carbonate cement, sandstone samples containing more than 40% clay, and pure carbonate samples exhibit a large drop in subcritical index when the environment is changed from ambient air or oil to fresh water or brine. Geomechanical modeling has shown that the mechanical bed thickness has a large influence on fracture pattern characteristics and has the potential to overshadow fracture pattern changes due to strain level, strain anisotropy and subcritical index. Furthermore, an increase in strain anisotropy reduces the number of dominant through-going fracture sets and decreases the fracture spacing between the through-going fractures. This spacing variation not only influences the preferential drainage direction, it can also enhance the drainage efficiency, because more rock is exposed to the through-going fractures which are more likely to be intersected by a borehole. The level of detail provided by the geomechanical model greatly exceeds the level of detail normally used in reservoir simulation. Therefore, upscaling of the geomechanically generated fracture patterns is necessary for practical flow modeling. This study shows

  6. Damage mechanics approach to remove the constraint dependence of elastic-plastic fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.-J.; Kuang, Z.-B.

    1995-02-01

    It is now generally agreed that the applicability of a one-parameter J-based ductile fracture approach is limited to so-called high constraint crack geometries, and that the elastic-plastic fracture toughness J(Ic) is not a material constant but strongly specimen geometry constraint-dependent. In this paper, the constraint effect on elastic-plastic fracture toughness is investigated by use of a continuum damage mechanics approach. Based on a new local damage theory for ductile fracture (proposed by the author) which has a clear physical meaning and can describe both deformation and constraint effects on ductile fracture, a relationship is described between the conventional elastic-plastic fracture toughness, J(Ic), and crack tip constraint, characterized by crack tip stress triaxiality T. Then, a new parameter J(dc) (and associated criterion, J(d) = J(dc)) for ductile fracture is proposed. Experiments show that toughness variation with specimen geometry constraint changes can effectively be removed by use of the constraint correction procedure proposed in this paper, and that the new parameter J(dc) is a material constant independent of specimen geometry (constraint). This parameter can serve as a new parameter to differentiate the elastic-plastic fracture toughness of engineering materials, which provides a new approach for fracture assessments of structures. It is not necessary to determine which laboratory specimen matches the structural constraint; rather, any specimen geometry can be tested to measure the size-independent fracture toughness J(dc). The potential advantage is clear and the results are very encouraging.

  7. A Mixed-Mode (I-II) Fracture Criterion for AS4/8552 Carbon/Epoxy Composite Laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnati, Sidharth Reddy

    A majority of aerospace structures are subjected to bending and stretching loads that introduce peel and shear stresses between the plies of a composite laminate. These two stress components cause a combination of mode I and II fracture modes in the matrix layer of the composite laminate. The most common failure mode in laminated composites is delamination that affects the structural integrity of composite structures. Damage tolerant designs of structures require two types of materials data: mixed-mode (I-II) delamination fracture toughness that predicts failure and delamination growth rate that predicts the life of the structural component. This research focuses determining mixed-mode (I-II) fracture toughness under a combination of mode I and mode II stress states and then a fracture criterion for AS4/8552 composite laminate, which is widely used in general aviation. The AS4/8552 prepreg was supplied by Hexcel Corporation and autoclave fabricated into a 20-ply unidirectional laminate with an artificial delamination by a Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) film at the mid-plane. Standard split beam specimens were prepared and tested in double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notched flexure modes to determine mode I (GIC) and II (GIIC) fracture toughnesses, respectively. The DCB specimens were also tested in a modified mixed-mode bending apparatus at GIIm /GT ratios of 0.18, 0.37, 0.57 and 0.78, where GT is total and GIIm is the mode II component of energy release rates. The measured fracture toughness, GC, was found to follow the locus a power law equation. The equation was validated for the present and literature experimental data.

  8. Mechanical behavior and fracture characteristics of off-axis fiber composites. 1: Experimental investigation. [at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanical behavior, fracture surfaces, and fracture modes of unidirectional high-modulus graphite-fiber/epoxy composites subjected to off-axis tensile loads were investigated experimentally. The investigation included the generation of stress-strain-to-fracture data and scanning electron microscope studies of the fractured surfaces. The results led to the identification of fracture modes and distinct fracture surface characteristics for off-axis tensile loading. The results also led to the formulation of critical for identifying and characterizing these fracture modes and their associated fracture surfaces. The results presented and discussed herein were used in the theoretical investigation and comparisons described in Part 2. These results should also provide a good foundation for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying fracture modes in both off-axis and angle-plied laminates.

  9. Association of microstructural and mechanical properties of cancellous bone and their fracture risk assessment tool scores.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dengke; Li, Xin; Tao, Cheng; Dai, Ruchun; Ni, Jiangdong; Liao, Eryuan

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the association between fracture probabilities determined by using the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in osteoporosis (OP) and osteoarthritis (OA) patients with hip replacements. By using FRAX, we evaluated fracture risks of the 102 patients with bone replacements. Using micro CT scanning, we obtained the analysis parameters of microstructural properties of cancellous bone. Through morphometric observations, fatigue tests and compression tests, we obtained parameters of mechanical properties of cancellous bones. Relevant Pearson analysis was performed to investigate the association between the fracture probability and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in patients. Fifteen risk factors in FRAX were compared between OP and OA patients. FRAX hip fracture risk score and major osteoporotic in OP and OA patients were significantly different. FRAX was associated with tissue bone mineral density and volumetric bone mineral density. Our study suggests that the probabilities of major osteoporotic and hip fracture using FRAX is associated with bone mass but not with micro bone quality.

  10. Association of microstructural and mechanical properties of cancellous bone and their fracture risk assessment tool scores

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dengke; Li, Xin; Tao, Cheng; Dai, Ruchun; Ni, Jiangdong; Liao, Eryuan

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the association between fracture probabilities determined by using the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in osteoporosis (OP) and osteoarthritis (OA) patients with hip replacements. By using FRAX, we evaluated fracture risks of the 102 patients with bone replacements. Using micro CT scanning, we obtained the analysis parameters of microstructural properties of cancellous bone. Through morphometric observations, fatigue tests and compression tests, we obtained parameters of mechanical properties of cancellous bones. Relevant Pearson analysis was performed to investigate the association between the fracture probability and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in patients. Fifteen risk factors in FRAX were compared between OP and OA patients. FRAX hip fracture risk score and major osteoporotic in OP and OA patients were significantly different. FRAX was associated with tissue bone mineral density and volumetric bone mineral density. Our study suggests that the probabilities of major osteoporotic and hip fracture using FRAX is associated with bone mass but not with micro bone quality. PMID:26064297

  11. A Mixed-Mode I/II Fracture Criterion and Its Application in Crack Growth Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Michael A.; Deng, Xiaomin; Ma, Fashang; Newman, James S., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A crack tip opening displacement (CTOD)-based, mixed mode fracture criterion is developed for predicting the onset and direction of crack growth. The criterion postulates that crack growth occurs in either the Mode I or Mode II direction, depending on whether the maximum in either the opening or the shear component of CTOD, measured at a specified distance behind the crack tip, attains a critical value. For crack growth direction prediction, the proposed CTOD criterion is shown to be equivalent to seven commonly used crack growth criteria under linearly elastic and asymptotic conditions. Under elastic-plastic conditions the CTOD criterion's prediction of the dependence of the crack growth direction on the crack-up mode mixity is in excellent agreement with the Arcan test results. Furthermore, the CTOD criterion correctly predicts the existence of a crack growth transition from mode I to mode II as the mode mixity approaches the mode II loading condition. The proposed CTOD criterion has been implemented in finite element crack growth simulation codes Z1P2DL and FRANC2DL to predict the crack growth paths in (a) a modified Arcan test specimen and fixture made of AL 2024-T34 and (b) a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen made of AL 7050. A series of crack growth simulations have been carried out for the crack growth tests in the Arcan and DCB specimens and the results further demonstrate the applicability of the mixed mode CTOD fracture criterion crack growth predictions and residual strength analyses for airframe materials.

  12. Updated Fatigue-Crack-Growth And Fracture-Mechanics Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, Venkataraman; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA/FLAGRO 2.0 developed as analytical aid in predicting growth and stability of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of aerospace systems. Used for fracture-control analysis of space hardware. Organized into three modules to maximize efficiency in operation. Useful in: (1) crack-instability/crack-growth analysis, (2) processing raw crack-growth data from laboratory tests, and (3) boundary-element analysis to determine stresses and stress-intensity factors. Written in FORTRAN 77 and ANSI C.

  13. Fracture Mechanics for Structural Adhesive Bonds. Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-01

    fracture toughness) tests in laboratory air and susteined- load, hot- water -immersed tests. Results of fatigue crack growth tests are presented at two...joint specimens immersed in hot water . Two different finite element analysis procedures are used to calculate strain energy release rate as a function of...Air at f = 15 Hz 53 19 Mode I da/dN in Hot Water 55 20 Effect of Fatigue Test Time on the Environmental da/dN Properties of FM-73m in Pure Mode I 56

  14. A comparison of the fracture resistance of three machinable ceramics after thermal and mechanical fatigue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Arola, Dwayne; Han, Zhihui; Zhang, Xiuyin

    2014-10-01

    Mechanical and thermal fatigue may affect ceramic restorations in the oral environment. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of thermal and mechanical cycling on the fracture load and fracture patterns of 3 machinable ceramics. Seventy-two human third molar teeth were prepared for bonding ceramic specimens of Sirona CEREC Blocs, IPS e.maxCAD, or inCoris ZI meso blocks. The 24 specimens of each ceramic were divided into 4 groups (n=6), which underwent no preloading (control), thermocycling (5°C-55°C, 2000 cycles), mechanical cycling (10(5) cycles, 100 N), and thermocycling (5°C-55°C, 2000 cycles) plus mechanical cycling (10(5) cycles, 100 N). The specimens were subsequently loaded to failure, and both stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the fracture patterns. The data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Fisher exact probability test (α=.05). Mechanical and thermal cycling had a significant influence on the critical load to failure of the 3 ceramics. No significant difference was found between mechanical cycling for 10(5) times and thermocycling for 2000 times within the same ceramic. The specimens of inCoris ZI experienced significantly higher fracture loads for all the groups. The fracture patterns of the 3 machinable ceramics showed that failure mainly occurred at the cement-dentin interface. The effects of combined thermal and mechanical cycling on the fracture load of ceramics were more significant than any individual mode of cyclic fatigue. Overall, the inCoris ZI resisted thermal and mechanical fatigue better than the Sirona CEREC and IPS e.maxCAD. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fracture mechanics analyses of ceramic/veneer interface under mixed-mode loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the interface fracture performance of zirconia/veneer bilayered structure, which plays an important role in dental all-ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture mechanics performance of zirconia/veneer interface in a wide range of mode-mixities (at phase angles ranging from 0° to 90°), and to examine the effect of mechanical properties of the materials and the interface on the fracture initiation and crack path of an interfacial crack. A modified sandwich test configuration with an oblique interfacial crack was proposed and calibrated to choose the appropriate geometry dimensions by means of finite element analysis. The specimens with different interface inclination angles were tested to failure under three-point bending configuration. Interface fracture parameters were obtained with finite element analyses. Based on the interfacial fracture mechanics, three fracture criteria for crack kinking were used to predict crack initiation and propagation. In addition, the effects of residual stresses due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between zirconia and veneer on the crack behavior were evaluated. The crack initiation and propagation were well predicted by the three fracture criteria. For specimens at phase angle of 0, the cracks propagated in the interface; whereas for all the other specimens the cracks kinked into the veneer. Compressive residual stresses in the veneer can improve the toughness of the interface structure. The results suggest that, in zirconia/veneer bilayered structure the veneer is weaker than the interface, which can be used to explain the clinical phenomenon that veneer chipping rate is larger than interface delamination rate. Consequently, a veneer material with larger fracture toughness is needed to decrease the failure rate of all-ceramic restorations. And the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch of the substrates can be larger to produce larger compressive

  16. Natural hydraulic fractures and the mechanical stratigraphy of shale-dominated strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imber, Jonathan; Armstrong, Howard; Atar, Elizabeth; Clancy, Sarah; Daniels, Susan; Grattage, Joshua; Herringshaw, Liam; Trabucho-Alexandre, João; Warren, Cassandra; Wille, Jascha; Yahaya, Liyana

    2016-04-01

    .2-4.3 fractures per m, consistent with field observations that this formation is more highly fractured than the Cleveland Ironstone Formation. Semi-quantitative estimates of the mineralogical "brittleness index" suggest the highly fractured, clay-rich Mulgrave Shale Member of the Whitby Mudstone Formation has a low brittleness. Our results are therefore inconsistent with the widely held assumption that natural fracture density is greatest within units characterised by a high brittleness index. We propose that stratigraphic variations in fracture densities are more likely to result from the different distributions of crack driving stresses; formations containing decimetre-scale, and most likely stiff, carbonate layers (such as the Cleveland Ironstone Formation) will have differing crack driving stresses compared with silt- and mudstone dominated successions (such as the Whitby Mudstone Formation). The high fracture density observed within the Mulgrave Shale Member is also consistent with propagation of natural hydraulic fractures driven by fluid overpressure caused by maturation of organic matter concentrated within this unit. The next step is to investigate the relative importance of maturation-driven overpressure v. mechanical heterogeneity by analysing the stratigraphic variations in fracture density within the underlying, organic-matter lean Redcar Mudstone Formation.

  17. [Patella fractures in knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Roth, A; Ghanem, M; Fakler, J

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic patella fractures occur both with and without retropatellar joint replacement. A non-operative treatment yields satisfactory results with low morbidity. It can be applied in minimally displaced fractures that have an intact retropatellar component and an intact extensor mechanism, combined with an initial immobilization. The surgical treatment is associated with relatively poor results and with high complication rates. There was only minor improvement of functional results, no matter which surgical technique was used. Surgical intervention is still required in fractures with a loosening of the patellar component, considerable dislocations of fragments, and damage to or rupture of the extensor mechanism. In particular, type II fractures require repair of the extensor mechanism and the fracture or patellectomy. Type III fractures require a revision or resection of the patella, a patelloplasty or total patellectomy. In addition, early or late reconstruction using allograft to restore the extensor mechanism can be taken in consideration.

  18. Fracture mechanics in fiber reinforced composite materials, taking as examples B/A1 and CRFP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. W. M.

    1982-01-01

    The validity of linear elastic fracture mechanics and other fracture criteria was investigated with laminates of boron fiber reinforced aluminum (R/A1) and of carbon fiber reinforced epoxide (CFRP). Cracks are assessed by fracture strength Kc or Kmax (critical or maximum value of the stress intensity factor). The Whitney and Nuismer point stress criterion and average stress criterion often show that Kmax of fiber composite materials increases with increasing crack length; however, for R/A1 and CFRP the curve showing fracture strength as a function of crack length is only applicable in a small domain. For R/A1, the reason is clearly the extension of the plastic zone (or the damage zone n the case of CFRP) which cannot be described with a stress intensity factor.

  19. Hydraulic and mechanical properties of natural fractures in low-permeability rock

    SciTech Connect

    Pyrack-Nolte, L.J.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive laboratory study of the mechanical displacement, permeability, and void geometry of single rock fractures in a quartz monzonite are summarized and analyzed. A metal-injection technique was developed that provided quantitative data on the precise geometry of the void spaces between the fracture surfaces and the areas of contact at different stresses. At effective stresses of less than 20 MPa fluid flow was proportional to the mean fracture aperture raised to a power greater than 3. As stress was increased, contact area was increased and void spaces become interconnected by small tortuous channels that constitute the principal impediment to fluid flow. At effective stresses higher than 20 MPa, the mean fracture aperture continued to diminish with increasing stress, but this had little effect on flow because the small tortuous flow channels deformed little with increasing stress.

  20. Problems of dynamic fracture mechanics without contact of the crack faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz', A. N.; Zozulya, V. V.

    1994-10-01

    In this, the first part of the survey we have discussed only certain aspects of dynamic fracture mechanics. The surveyed material has been selected with a preference for the most highly developed parts of the theory, specifically those elements which have direct bearing on the second part of the survey. We have also included information on the dynamic fracture mechanics of initially stressed materials, in the development of which one of the authors has been a major contributor. Since many problems of dynamic fracture mechanics have been overlooked in the survey, we have added supplementary references to the literature. Various aspects of the strength and fracture of materials under dynamic loading are set forth in [11, 12, 40, 57, 60, 73, 80, 83]. Criteria of the initiation, motion, branching, and arrest of cracks are discussed in [7, 9, 60, 102, 111, 113, 124]. Among the most interesting elements of dynamic fracture mechanics are the problems of crack propagation. Certain analytical results pertinent to this topic have been obtained in [43-45, 47, 67-72, 78, 87, 92, 96, 97].

  1. The Mechanical Benefit of Medial Support Screws in Locking Plating of Proximal Humerus Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Pan, Yao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Changqing; Zeng, Bingfang; Chen, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical advantages of medial support screws (MSSs) in the locking proximal humeral plate for treating proximal humerus fractures. Methods Thirty synthetic left humeri were randomly divided into 3 subgroups to establish two-part surgical neck fracture models of proximal humerus. All fractures were fixed with a locking proximal humerus plate. Group A was fixed with medial cortical support and no MSSs; Group B was fixed with 3 MSSs but without medial cortical support; Group C was fixed with neither medial cortical support nor MSSs. Axial compression, torsional stiffness, shear stiffness, and failure tests were performed. Results Constructs with medial support from cortical bone showed statistically higher axial and shear stiffness than other subgroups examined (P<0.0001). When the proximal humerus was not supported by medial cortical bone, locking plating with medial support screws exhibited higher axial and torsional stiffness than locking plating without medial support screws (P≤0.0207). Specimens with medial cortical bone failed primarily by fracture of the humeral shaft or humeral head. Specimens without medial cortical bone support failed primarily by significant plate bending at the fracture site followed by humeral head collapse or humeral head fracture. Conclusions Anatomic reduction with medial cortical support was the stiffest construct after a simulated two-part fracture. Significant biomechanical benefits of MSSs in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures were identified. The reconstruction of the medial column support for proximal humerus fractures helps to enhance mechanical stability of the humeral head and prevent implant failure. PMID:25084520

  2. Relationship between microstructure, material distribution, and mechanical properties of sheep tibia during fracture healing process.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiazi; Gong, He; Huang, Xing; Fang, Juan; Zhu, Dong; Fan, Yubo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between microstructural parameters, material distribution, and mechanical properties of sheep tibia at the apparent and tissue levels during the fracture healing process. Eighteen sheep underwent tibial osteotomy and were sacrificed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Radiographs and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanning were taken for microstructural assessment, material distribution evaluation, and micro-finite element analysis. A displacement of 5% compressive strain on the longitudinal direction was applied to the micro-finite element model, and apparent and tissue-level mechanical properties were calculated. Principle component analysis and linear regression were used to establish the relationship between principle components (PCs) and mechanical parameters. Visible bony callus formation was observed throughout the healing process from radiographic assessment. Apparent mechanical property increased at 8 weeks, but tissue-level mechanical property did not increase significantly until 12 weeks. Three PCs were extracted from microstructural parameters and material distribution, which accounted for 87.592% of the total variation. The regression results showed a significant relationship between PCs and mechanical parameters (R>0.8, P<0.05). Results of this study show that microstructure and material distribution based on micro-CT imaging could efficiently predict bone strength and reflect the bone remodeling process during fracture healing, which provides a basis for exploring the fracture healing mechanism and may be used as an approach for fractured bone strength assessment.

  3. Fracture processes and mechanisms of crack growth resistance in human enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Devendra; Park, Saejin; Quinn, George D.; Arola, Dwayne

    2010-07-01

    Human enamel has a complex micro-structure that varies with distance from the tooth’s outer surface. But contributions from the microstructure to the fracture toughness and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance have not been explored in detail. In this investigation the apparent fracture toughness of human enamel and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance were evaluated using the indentation fracture approach and an incremental crack growth technique. Indentation cracks were introduced on polished surfaces of enamel at selected distances from the occlusal surface. In addition, an incremental crack growth approach using compact tension specimens was used to quantify the crack growth resistance as a Junction of distance from the occlusal surface. There were significant differences in the apparent toughness estimated using the two approaches, which was attributed to the active crack length and corresponding scale of the toughening mechanisms.

  4. Non-double-couple mechanisms of microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sileny, J.; Hill, D.P.; Eisner, L.; Cornet, F.H.

    2009-01-01

    We have inverted polarity and amplitude information of representative microearthquakes to investigate source mechanisms of seismicity induced by hydraulic fracturing in the Carthage Cotton Valley, east Texas, gas field. With vertical arrays of four and eight three-component geophones in two monitoring wells, respectively, we were able to reliably determine source mechanisms of the strongest events with the best signal-to-noise ratio. Our analysis indicates predominantly non-double-couple source mechanisms with positive volumetric component consistent with opening cracks oriented close to expected hydraulic fracture orientation. Our observations suggest the induced events are directly the result of opening cracks by fluid injection, in contrast to many previous studies where the seismicity is interpreted to be primarily shearing caused by pore pressure diffusion into the surrounding rock or associated with shear stresses created at the hydraulic fracture tip. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. 1-stage primary arthroplasty of mechanically failed internally fixated of hip fractures with deep wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Klatte, Till O; O’Loughlin, Padraigh F; Citak, Mustafa; Rueger, Johannes M; Gehrke, Thorsten; Kendoff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Mechanically failed internal fixation following hip fracture is often treated by salvage arthroplasty. If deep wound infection is present, a 2-stage procedure is often used. We have used a 1-stage procedure in infected cases, and we now report the outcome. Patients and methods We reviewed 16 cases of deep wound infection after mechanically failed hip fracture fixation, treated between 1994 and 2010. In all patients, a joint prosthesis was implanted in a 1-stage procedure. Results After an average follow-up period of 12 (2–18) years, no reinfection was detected. In 4 cases, a hip dislocation occurred and 3 of these needed further surgery. Interpretation A 1-stage procedure for arthroplasty of an infected, mechanically failed hip fracture fixation is feasible and carries a low risk of infection. PMID:23799345

  6. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  7. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  8. Mechanical stimulation enhanced estrogen receptor expression and callus formation in diaphyseal long bone fracture healing in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic rats.

    PubMed

    Chow, S K H; Leung, K S; Qin, J; Guo, A; Sun, M; Qin, L; Cheung, W H

    2016-10-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic fracture was reported to exhibit delayed expression. Mechanical stimulation enhanced ER-α expression in osteoporotic fracture callus at the tissue level. ER was also found to be required for the effectiveness of vibrational mechanical stimulation treatment in osteoporotic fracture healing. Estrogen receptor(ER) is involved in mechanical signal transduction in bone metabolism. Its expression was reported to be delayed in osteoporotic fracture healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles played by ER during osteoporotic fracture healing enhanced with mechanical stimulation. Ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic SD rats that received closed femoral fractures were divided into five groups, (i) SHAM, (ii) SHAM-VT, (iii) OVX, (iv) OVX-VT, and (v) OVX-VT-ICI, where VT stands for whole-body vibration treatment and ICI for ER antagonization by ICI 182,780. Callus formation and gene expression were assessed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks postfracture. In vitro osteoblastic differentiation, mineralization, and ER-α expression were assessed. The delayed ER expression was found to be enhanced by vibration treatment. Callus formation enhancement was shown by callus morphometry and micro-CT analysis. Enhancement effects by vibration were partially abolished when ER was modulated by ICI 182,780, in terms of callus formation capacity at 2-4 weeks and ER gene and protein expression at all time points. In vitro, ER expression in osteoblasts was not enhanced by VT treatment, but osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization were enhanced under estrogen-deprived condition. When osteoblastic cells were modulated by ICI 182,780, enhancement effects of VT were eliminated. Vibration was able to enhance ER expression in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic fracture healing. ER was essential in mechanical signal transduction and enhancement in callus formation effects during osteoporotic fracture healing enhanced by vibration

  9. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of strength-mismatching

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, D.M.; Ganti, S.; McClintock, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Approximate solutions to stress-fields are provided for a strength-mismatched interface crack in small-scale yielding (SSY) for non-hardening and low hardening materials. Variations of local deformation intensities, characterized by a J-type contour integral, are proposed. The softer material experiences a higher deformation intensity level, J{sub S}, while the harder material sees a much lower deformation intensity level, J{sub H}, compared to that obtained from the applied J near the respective homogeneous crack-tips. For a low hardening material, the stress fields are obtained by scaling from an elastic/perfectly-plastic problem, based on an effective mismatch, M{sub eff}, which is a function of mismatch, M, and the hardening exponent, n. Triaxial stress build-up is discussed quantitatively in terms of M. The influence of strength-mismatch on cleavage fracture is discussed using Weibull statistics.

  10. Flow visualization of flow into 8 point-source fractures II: The effect of fracture non-uniformity and fluid crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P.E.; Zhu, Q.

    1994-12-31

    Recently, the flow of fluids into a fracture from a point source has been the subject of several different papers. Cleary and Fonseca first suggested that convective transport should play a major role in the placement of proppant when the flow into a fracture was from a point source. Clark and Courington presented data showing that for non-viscosified fluids convection was the dominant mechanism of transport. However, they showed, that for uniform fractures, viscosifying the fluid made a large difference in the transport mechanism. In a later paper, Clark and Zhu presented data for nonuniform fractures and viscosified fluids weighted with either salt or silica flour that showed that the presence of minor non-uniformities serve to negate the effect of convection even more than viscosifying the fluids. In this work, the authors have extended the work presented in the previous two papers to high viscosity Newtonian fluids and crosslinked fluids. The experiments have all been done with various concentrations of silica flour to simulate added proppant. Both changing the nature of the non-uniformities and crosslinking the polymer solution have a profound affect on the flow into the fracture and the convective process.

  11. Salter-Harris type II fracture of the femoral bone in a 14-year-old boy - case report.

    PubMed

    Kuleta-Bosak, Elżbieta; Bożek, Paweł; Kluczewska, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Ryszard; Machnik-Broncel, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Distal femoral physis fractures with displacement are rare injuries seen in adolescents related with high incidence of complication. They may lead to premature physeal closure consequently, to growth arrest and bone deformity. The case of a 14-year-old boy with Salter-Harris type II displaced fracture underwent surgery with open reduction has been described. CT examination with multiplanar reconstruction was used in pre-operative assessment of distal femur growth plate fracture. Knowledge of classification, prognosis and methods of treatment is necessary in accurate pre- and postoperative assessment of physial fractures in adolescents. CT and multiplanar reconstruction improve the understanding of patterns of injury, relative prevalence and accuracy of pre-operative planning.

  12. Salter-Harris type II fracture of the femoral bone in a 14-year-old boy – case report

    PubMed Central

    Kuleta-Bosak, Elżbieta; Bożek, Paweł; Kluczewska, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Ryszard; Machnik-Broncel, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Distal femoral physis fractures with displacement are rare injuries seen in adolescents related with high incidence of complication. They may lead to premature physeal closure consequently, to growth arrest and bone deformity. Case Report: The case of a 14-year-old boy with Salter-Harris type II displaced fracture underwent surgery with open reduction has been described. CT examination with multiplanar reconstruction was used in pre-operative assessment of distal femur growth plate fracture. Conclusions: Knowledge of classification, prognosis and methods of treatment is necessary in accurate pre- and postoperative assessment of physial fractures in adolescents. CT and multiplanar reconstruction improve the understanding of patterns of injury, relative prevalence and accuracy of pre-operative planning. PMID:22802768

  13. Auto Mechanics. Volume II. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ivan J.

    To assist teachers and students in understanding the latest concepts and functions of the automobile, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and knowledge necessary for auto mechanics. Developed by an advisory committee of instructors and mechanics in the industry, this manual consists of the following four sections: engine rebuilding;…

  14. Auto Mechanics. Volume II. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ivan J.

    To assist teachers and students in understanding the latest concepts and functions of the automobile, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and knowledge necessary for auto mechanics. Developed by an advisory committee of instructors and mechanics in the industry, this manual consists of the following four sections: engine rebuilding;…

  15. A numerical manifold method model for analyzing fully coupled hydro-mechanical processes in porous rock masses with discrete fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mengsu; Rutqvist, Jonny; Wang, Yuan

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a numerical manifold method (NMM) model was developed for fully coupled analysis of hydro-mechanical (HM) processes in porous rock masses with discrete fractures. Using an NMM two-cover-mesh system of mathematical and physical covers, fractures are conveniently discretized by dividing the mathematical cover along fracture traces to physical cover, resulting in a discontinuous model on a non-conforming mesh. In this model, discrete fracture deformation (e.g. open and slip) and fracture fluid flow within a permeable and deformable porous rock matrix are rigorously considered. For porous rock, direct pore-volume coupling was modeled based on an energy-work scheme. For mechanical analysis of fractures, a fracture constitutive model for mechanically open states was introduced. For fluid flow in fractures, both along-fracture and normal-to-fracture fluid flow are modeled without introducing additional degrees of freedom. When the mechanical aperture of a fracture is changing, its hydraulic aperture and hydraulic conductivity is updated. At the same time, under the effect of coupled deformation and fluid flow, the contact state may dynamically change, and the corresponding contact constraint is updated each time step. Therefore, indirect coupling is realized under stringent considerations of coupled HM effects and fracture constitutive behavior transfer dynamically. To verify the new model, examples involving deformable porous media containing a single and two sets of fractures were designed, showing good accuracy. Last, the model was applied to analyze coupled HM behavior of fractured porous rock domains with complex fracture networks under effects of loading and injection.

  16. Mechanism of histone survival during transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Kulaeva, Olga I; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2010-01-01

    This work is related to and stems from our recent NSMB paper, "Mechanism of chromatin remodeling and recovery during passage of RNA polymerase II" (December 2009). Synopsis. Recent genomic studies from many laboratories have suggested that nucleosomes are not displaced from moderately transcribed genes. Furthermore, histones H3/H4 carrying the primary epigenetic marks are not displaced or exchanged (in contrast to H2A/H2B histones) during moderate transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in vivo. These exciting observations suggest that the large molecule of Pol II passes through chromatin structure without even transient displacement of H3/H4 histones. The most recent analysis of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-type mechanism of chromatin remodeling in vitro (described in our NSMB 2009 paper) suggests that nucleosome survival is tightly coupled with formation of a novel intermediate: a very small intranucleosomal DNA loop (Ø-loop) containing transcribing Pol II. In the submitted manuscript we critically evaluate one of the key predictions of this model: the lack of even transient displacement of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription in vitro. The data suggest that, indeed, histones H3/H4 are not displaced during Pol II transcription in vitro. These studies are directly connected with the observation in vivo on the lack of exchange of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription.

  17. An Overview of Innovative Strategies for Fracture Mechanics at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Engineering fracture mechanics has played a vital role in the development and certification of virtually every aerospace vehicle that has been developed since the mid-20th century. NASA Langley Research Center s Durability, Damage Tolerance and Reliability Branch has contributed to the development and implementation of many fracture mechanics methods aimed at predicting and characterizing damage in both metallic and composite materials. This paper presents a selection of computational, analytical and experimental strategies that have been developed by the branch for assessing damage growth under monotonic and cyclic loading and for characterizing the damage tolerance of aerospace structures

  18. Permeability Evolution of Fractured Anhydrite Caused by Chemical and Mechanical Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, R. L.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Ameli, P.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration requires competent structural seals (caprock) to prevent leakage over decadal time scales. Injection of large volumes of CO2 perturbs the target formation from chemical and mechanical equilibrium leading to the possible creation or enhancement of leakage pathways. We investigate the potential for leakage pathways (fractures) to grow over time under reservoir conditions in a series of anhydrite (Ca2SO4) cores. To simulate a potential leakage event in the laboratory, we fractured and jacketed the cores, and placed them in a flow-through reactor vessel. A high-pressure syringe pump applied confining stresses ranging from 7 to 17 MPa and another syringe pump pushed water through the sample at a constant flow rate with pressure control at the outlet. Effluent was sampled periodically and analyzed for Ca2+ and SO42- using an ion chromatograph. Before and after each experiment, we characterized the surfaces of the fractures using a high-resolution optical profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. Careful alignment of the surfaces during optical profiling allowed reproduction of the fracture aperture before and after each experiment. We present results from several experiments each carried out under different conditions in similar fractured anhydrite cores. One involved a well-mated pre-existing fracture and results showed that the permeability of the fractured core was similar to the intact rock matrix (O(10-18 m2); chemical alteration of the core was largely limited to the inflow face of the core and the fracture surfaces remained largely unaltered. To enhance permeability during subsequent experiments, we imposed a small (380 μm) shear displacement between the fracture surfaces resulting in a four-order-of-magnitude increase in initial permeability. The first of these was run at a constant flow rate of 0.6 ml/min for a period of 7 days. The measured pressure gradient within the core increased slowly for a period of 4 days followed

  19. The effects of glass ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of open-sandwich class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Güray Efes, Begüm; Yaman, Batu Can; Gümüştaş, Burak; Tıryakı, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the effects of glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of Class II amalgam and composite restorations. Group 1 cavities were restored with amalgam and Group 4 cavities with nanofill composite after the application of a dentin-bonding agent. For the remaining groups, light-cured-glass-ionomer liner was used in a gingival floor proximal box (Groups 2, 5) or flowable composite was used as a liner (Groups 3, 6), the remainder of the cavity was restored with amalgam (Groups 2, 3) or composite (Groups 5, 6). The restorations were loaded in compression to failure. The data was analyzed using Tukey's multiple comparison test. The fracture resistance was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group 3 than in all other groups, except Group 2 (p>0.05). Flowable composite, glass-ionomer liners increased the fracture resistance of open-sandwich Class II amalgam restorations.

  20. The Feasibility of Two Screws Anterior Fixation for Type II Odontoid Fracture Among Arabs.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Yousef; Kombar, Osama Rabie; Al-Saeed, Osama; Aleidan, Aljarrah; Samir, Ahmed; Esmaeel, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Retrospective, cross-sectional study. To evaluate the feasibility of two screws anterior fixation of the odontoid process among Arab adults. Anterior screw fixation is the treatment of choice for type II odontoid fractures. In order to perform the procedure safely, the diameter of the odontoid process should be wide enough to allow for the placement of one or two screws. A retrospective review of 156 computed tomography scans of the cervical spine was done. The included patients were Arabs, adults (at least 18 years old), and had no evidence of upper cervical spine trauma, deformity, infection, tumor, or surgery. The minimum external transverse diameter (METD), minimum internal transverse diameter (MITD), minimum external anteroposterior diameter (MEAD), and minimum internal anteroposterior diameter (MIAD) of the odontoid process were measured. A P value of ≤0.05 was considered as the cutoff level of statistical significance. Our study included 94 (60.3%) males and 62 (39.7%) females. The mean age of the subjects was 37.8 ± 16.9 years (range 18-85). The mean values of the METD, MITD, MEAD, and MIAD were 8.7 ± 1.0 mm, 6.0 ± 1.1 mm, 10.3 ± 1.0 mm, and 7.4 ± 1.1 mm, respectively. Men had larger diameters compared to women. This was statistically significant for METD (P = 0.035) and MEAD (P < 0.001). The METD was <9.0 mm in 95 (60.9%) subjects, while the MITD was <8.0 mm in 153 (98.1%) subjects. These findings were not significantly different between males and females. Two screws anterior fixation of type II odontoid fracture is not feasible among the majority of Arabs. 3.

  1. Three- to nine-year survival estimates and fracture mechanisms of zirconia- and alumina-based restorations using standardized criteria to distinguish the severity of ceramic fractures.

    PubMed

    Moráguez, Osvaldo D; Wiskott, H W Anselm; Scherrer, Susanne S

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study were set as follows: 1. To provide verifiable criteria to categorize the ceramic fractures into non-critical (i.e., amenable to polishing) or critical (i.e., in need of replacement) 2. To establish the corresponding survival rates for alumina and zirconia restorations 3. To establish the mechanism of fracture using fractography Fifty-eight patients restored with 115 alumina-/zirconia-based crowns and 26 zirconia-based fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) were included. Ceramic fractures were classified into four types and further subclassified into "critical" or "non-critical." Kaplan-Meier survival estimates were calculated for "critical fractures only" and "all fractures." Intra-oral replicas were taken for fractographic analyses. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates for "critical fractures only" and "all fractures" were respectively: Alumina single crowns: 90.9 and 68.3 % after 9.5 years (mean 5.71 ± 2.6 years). Zirconia single crowns: 89.4 and 80.9 % after 6.3 years (mean 3.88 ± 1.2 years). Zirconia FDPs: 68.6 % (critical fractures) and 24.6 % (all fractures) after 7.2 and 4.6 years respectively (FDP mean observation time 3.02 ± 1.4 years). No core/framework fractures were detected. Survival estimates varied significantly depending on whether "all" fractures were considered as failures or only those deemed as "critical". For all restorations, fractographic analyses of failed veneering ceramics systematically demonstrated heavy occlusal wear at the failure origin. Therefore, the relief of local contact pressures on unsupported ceramic is recommended. Occlusal contacts on mesial or distal ridges should systematically be eliminated. A classification standard for ceramic fractures into four categories with subtypes "critical" and "non-critical" provides a differentiated view of the survival of ceramic restorations.

  2. Fracture characterization of human cortical bone under mode II loading using the end-notched flexure test.

    PubMed

    Silva, F G A; de Moura, M F S F; Dourado, N; Xavier, J; Pereira, F A M; Morais, J J L; Dias, M I R; Lourenço, P J; Judas, F M

    2016-10-25

    Fracture characterization of human cortical bone under mode II loading was analyzed using a miniaturized version of the end-notched flexure test. A data reduction scheme based on crack equivalent concept was employed to overcome uncertainties on crack length monitoring during the test. The crack tip shear displacement was experimentally measured using digital image correlation technique to determine the cohesive law that mimics bone fracture behavior under mode II loading. The developed procedure was validated by finite element analysis using cohesive zone modeling considering a trapezoidal with bilinear softening relationship. Experimental load-displacement curves, resistance curves and crack tip shear displacement versus applied displacement were used to validate the numerical procedure. The excellent agreement observed between the numerical and experimental results reveals the appropriateness of the proposed test and procedure to characterize human cortical bone fracture under mode II loading. The proposed methodology can be viewed as a novel valuable tool to be used in parametric and methodical clinical studies regarding features (e.g., age, diseases, drugs) influencing bone shear fracture under mode II loading.

  3. Accurate in vitro identification of fracture onset in bones: failure mechanism of the proximal human femur.

    PubMed

    Juszczyk, Mateusz Maria; Cristofolini, Luca; Salvà, Marco; Zani, Lorenzo; Schileo, Enrico; Viceconti, Marco

    2013-01-04

    Bone fractures have extensively been investigated, especially for the proximal femur. While failure load can easily be recorded, and the fracture surface is readily accessible, identification of the point of fracture initiation is difficult. Accurate location of fracture initiation is extremely important to understand the multi-scale determinants of bone fracture. In this study, a recently developed technique based on electro-conductive lines was applied to the proximal femoral metaphysis to elucidate the fracture mechanism. Eight cadaveric femurs were prepared with 15-20 electro-conductive lines (crack-grid) covering the proximal region. The crack-grid was connected to a dedicated data-logger that monitored electrical continuity of each line at 700 kHz. High-speed videos (12,000 frames/s, 0.1-0.2 mm pixel size) of the destructive tests were acquired. Most crack-grid-lines failed in a time-span of 0.08-0.50 ms, which was comparable to that identified in the high-speed videos, and consistent with previous video recordings. However, on all specimens 1-3 crack-grid-lines failed significantly earlier (2-200 ms) than the majority of the crack-grid-lines. The first crack-grid-line to fail was always the closest one to the point of fracture initiation identified in the high-speed videos (superior-lateral neck region). Then the crack propagated simultaneously, at comparable velocity on the anterior and posterior sides of the neck. Such a failure pattern has never been observed before, as spatial resolution of the high-speed videos prevented from observing the initial opening of a crack. This mechanism (fracture onset, time-lag, followed by catastrophic failure) can be explained with a transfer of load to the internal trabecular structure caused by the initial fracture of the thin cortical shell. This study proves the suitability of the crack-grid method to investigate bone fractures associated to tensile stress. The crack-grid method enables significantly faster sampling

  4. American Society of Biomechanics Journal of Biomechanics Award 2013: cortical bone tissue mechanical quality and biological mechanisms possibly underlying atypical fractures.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Joseph R; Bajaj, Devendra; Fritton, J Christopher

    2015-04-13

    The biomechanics literature contains many well-understood mechanisms behind typical fracture types that have important roles in treatment planning. The recent association of "atypical" fractures with long-term use of drugs designed to prevent osteoporosis has renewed interest in the effects of agents on bone tissue-level quality. While this class of fracture was recognized prior to the introduction of the anti-resorptive bisphosphonate drugs and recently likened to stress fractures, the mechanism(s) that lead to atypical fractures have not been definitively identified. Thus, a causal relationship between these drugs and atypical fracture has not been established. Physicians, bioengineers and others interested in the biomechanics of bone are working to improve fracture-prevention diagnostics, and the design of treatments to avoid this serious side-effect in the future. This review examines the mechanisms behind the bone tissue damage that may produce the atypical fracture pattern observed increasingly with long-term bisphosphonate use. Our recent findings and those of others reviewed support that the mechanisms behind normal, healthy excavation and tunnel filling by bone remodeling units within cortical tissue strengthen mechanical integrity. The ability of cortical bone to resist the damage induced during cyclic loading may be altered by the reduced remodeling and increased tissue age resulting from long-term bisphosphonate treatment. Development of assessments for such potential fractures would restore confidence in pharmaceutical treatments that have the potential to spare millions in our aging population from the morbidity and death that often follow bone fracture.

  5. Case histories involving fatigue and fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Charleston, SC, Mar. 21, 22, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. Michael (Editor); Rich, Thomas P. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Papers are presented on cracking at nozzle corners in the nuclear pressure vessel industry, applied fracture mechanics for assessing defect significance in a crude oil pipeline, failure analysis of a large wind-tunnel compressor blade, analysis of a compressor-wheel failure, and preventing fracture by inspection and analysis. Consideration is also given to the fatigue crack growth predictions of welded aircraft structures containing flaws in the residual stress field, the fatigue and fracture mechanics analysis of a compression loaded aircraft structure, fracture of an aircraft horizontal stabilizer, fatigue life analysis of fuel tank skins under combined loads, and aircraft structural maintenance recommendations based on fracture mechanics analysis. Additional papers discuss an analysis of two metal-forming die failures, an analysis of a failed saw arbor, and the role of fracture mechanics in assessing the effect on fatigue life of design changes in welded fabrications.

  6. Disadvantages of interfragmentary shear on fracture healing--mechanical insights through numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Malte; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Simon, Ulrich; Wehner, Tim

    2014-07-01

    The outcome of secondary fracture healing processes is strongly influenced by interfragmentary motion. Shear movement is assumed to be more disadvantageous than axial movement, however, experimental results are contradictory. Numerical fracture healing models allow simulation of the fracture healing process with variation of single input parameters and under comparable, normalized mechanical conditions. Thus, a comparison of the influence of different loading directions on the healing process is possible. In this study we simulated fracture healing under several axial compressive, and translational and torsional shear movement scenarios, and compared their respective healing times. Therefore, we used a calibrated numerical model for fracture healing in sheep. Numerous variations of movement amplitudes and musculoskeletal loads were simulated for the three loading directions. Our results show that isolated axial compression was more beneficial for the fracture healing success than both isolated shearing conditions for load and displacement magnitudes which were identical as well as physiological different, and even for strain-based normalized comparable conditions. Additionally, torsional shear movements had less impeding effects than translational shear movements. Therefore, our findings suggest that osteosynthesis implants can be optimized, in particular, to limit translational interfragmentary shear under musculoskeletal loading. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evaluation of fracture strength of metal/epoxy joint by interface mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Yoshikazu

    1995-11-01

    Tension tests of metal/epoxy joints with or without interface cracks were conducted and fracture criteria of the joints were discussed based on interface mechanics. The variation of the fracture strength of each specimen was large, and the strength showed Gaussian distribution. The fracture strength of smooth specimens was lower for wider specimens, but the cumulative probability of fracture of smooth specimens was not controlled by the stress singularity parameter. In interface cracked specimens, the cracks were propagated either along the interface or in epoxy resin, depending on crack length. When cracks propagated along the interface, the cumulative probability of the fracture of the specimen was controlled by the real part of the complex stress intensity factor along the interface, K{sub 1}. When cracks kinked to epoxy resin, the angle was almost identical to that of the maximum tangential stress, {sigma}{sub {theta}max}. In this case, the cumulative probability of fracture was controlled by the value of K{sub {theta}max}.

  8. Constraints on bed scale fracture chronology with a FEM mechanical model of folding: The case of Split Mountain (Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, W.; Guiton, M. L. E.; Leroy, Y. M.; Daniel, J.-M.; Callot, J.-P.

    2012-11-01

    A technique is presented for improving the structural analysis of natural fractures development in large scale fold structures. A 3D restoration of a fold provides the external displacement loading conditions to solve, by the finite element method, the forward mechanical problem of an idealized rock material with a stress-strain relationship based on the activation of pervasive fracture sets. In this elasto-plasticity constitutive law, any activated fracture set contributes to the total plastic strain by either an opening or a sliding mode of rock failure. Inherited versus syn-folding fracture sets development can be studied using this mechanical model. The workflow of this methodology was applied to the Weber sandstone formation deformed by forced folding at Split Mountain Anticline, Utah for which the different fracture sets were created and developed successively during the Sevier and the syn-folding Laramide orogenic phases. The field observations at the top stratigraphic surface of the Weber sandstone lead to classify the fracture sets into a pre-fold WNW-ESE fracture set, and a NE-SW fracture set post-dating the former. The development and relative chronology of the fracture sets are discussed based on the geomechanical modeling results. Starting with a 3D restoration of the Split Mountain Anticline, three fold-fracture development models were generated, alternately assuming that the WNW-ESE fracture set is either present or absent prior to folding process. Depending on the initial fracture configuration, the calculated fracture patterns are markedly different, showing that assuming a WNW-ESE joint set to predate the fold best correlates with field observations. This study is a first step addressing the complex problem of identification of fold-related fracturing events using an elementary concept of rock mechanics. When tight to complementary field observations, including petrography, diagenesis and burial history, the approach can be used to better

  9. Hip fracture presenting as mechanical low back pain subsequent to a fall: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Gleberzon, Brian; Hyde, David

    2006-01-01

    This case chronicles the assessment and clinical management of a 54 year old female patient who presented with post traumatic lower back, hip and lower extremity pain, initially attributed to mechanical low back pain but ultimately diagnosed as a hip fracture. This case study illustrates a number of important issues germane to chiropractic care. These are; the importance of using different assessment procedures, combined with clinical experience, in order to differentiate between those patients with clinical conditions that are amenable to conservative care from those that are not; the usefulness of a tuning fork test as a clinical tool in differentiating between hip fracture and mechanical spinal pain syndromes and; the impact of falls and fractures among older Canadian patients. PMID:17549186

  10. Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

  11. Effect of root canal preparation, type of endodontic post and mechanical cycling on root fracture strength

    PubMed Central

    RIPPE, Marília Pivetta; SANTINI, Manuela Favarin; BIER, Carlos Alexandre Souza; BALDISSARA, Paolo; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of the type of root canal preparation, intraradicular post and mechanical cycling on the fracture strength of roots. Material and Methods eighty human single rooted teeth were divided into 8 groups according to the instruments used for root canal preparation (manual or rotary instruments), the type of intraradicular post (fiber posts- FRC and cast post and core- CPC) and the use of mechanical cycling (MC) as follows: Manual and FRC; Manual, FRC and MC; Manual and CPC; Manual, CPC and MC; Rotary and FRC; Rotary, FRC and MC; Rotary and CPC; Rotary, CPC and MC. The filling was performed by lateral compactation. All root canals were prepared for a post with a 10 mm length, using the custom #2 bur of the glass fiber post system. For mechanical cycling, the protocol was applied as follows: an angle of incidence of 45°, 37°C, 88 N, 4 Hz, 2 million pulses. All groups were submitted to fracture strength test in a 45° device with 1 mm/ min cross-head speed until failure occurred. Results The 3-way ANOVA showed that the root canal preparation strategy (p<0.03) and post type (p<0.0001) affected the fracture strength results, while mechanical cycling (p=0.29) did not. Conclusion The root canal preparation strategy only influenced the root fracture strength when restoring with a fiber post and mechanical cycling, so it does not seem to be an important factor in this scenario. PMID:25025556

  12. Data Resolution and Scale-dependent Fracture Clustering: Implications for Deformation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A.; Aydin, A.; Mukerji, T.; Cilona, A.

    2015-12-01

    zones that have relatively uniform spacing while higher resolution data capture both thin and short splay joints and shear joints that form fracture clusters. Therefore, it may be concluded that data resolution is critical for identifying deformation mechanisms and their products.

  13. Effects of chemical alteration on fracture mechanical properties in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, O. A.; Eichhubl, P.; Olson, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Fault and fracture networks often control the distribution of fluids and heat in hydrothermal and epithermal systems, and in related geothermal and mineral resources. Additional chemical influences on conduit evolution are well documented, with dissolution and precipitation of mineral species potentially changing the permeability of fault-facture networks. Less well understood are the impacts of chemical alteration on the mechanical properties governing fracture growth and fracture network geometry. We use double-torsion (DT) load relaxation tests under ambient air conditions to measure the mode-I fracture toughness (KIC) and subcritical fracture growth index (SCI) of variably altered rock samples obtained from outcrop in Dixie Valley, NV. Samples from southern Dixie Valley include 1) weakly altered granite, characterized by minor sericite in plagioclase, albitization and vacuolization of feldspars, and incomplete replacement of biotite with chlorite, and 2) granite from an area of locally intense propylitic alteration with chlorite-calcite-hematite-epidote assemblages. We also evaluated samples of completely silicified gabbro obtained from the Dixie Comstock epithermal gold deposit. In the weakly altered granite KIC and SCI are 1.3 ±0.2 MPam1/2 (n=8) and 59 ±25 (n=29), respectively. In the propylitic assemblage KIC is reduced to 0.6 ±0.1 MPam1/2 (n=11), and the SCI increased to 75 ±36 (n = 33). In both cases, the altered materials have lower fracture toughness and higher SCI than is reported for common geomechanical standards such as Westerly Granite (KIC ~1.7 MPam1/2; SCI ~48). Preliminary analysis of the silicified gabbro shows a significant increase in fracture toughness, 3.6 ±0.4 MPam1/2 (n=2), and SCI, 102 ±45 (n=19), compared to published values for gabbro (2.9 MPam1/2 and SCI = 32). These results suggest that mineralogical and textural changes associated with different alteration assemblages may result in spatially variable rates of fracture

  14. Mechanical properties and fracture strength of cathodically polarized prestressing wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kiszowski, S.; Hartt, W.H.

    1996-11-01

    Constant extension rate testing experiments were performed upon prestressing steel wire specimens prepared from three lots of Grade 270 and one lot of Grade 250 material for the purpose of characterizing susceptibility to environmental cracking under conditions associated with cathodic protection of prestressed concrete components and structures. Smooth, notched (six different geometries) and pitted (four different geometries) specimens were tested in air and deaerated saturated Ca(OH){sub 2}-distilled water at potentials of {minus}0.90 and {minus}1.30 v (SCE) and strength and ductility properties characterized. Relatively low strength was recorded for steel specimens at {minus}09.90 v from material for which the weight percent chromium was relatively high (0.24 w/o compared to 0.02 w/o). Under conditions that are likely to be most relevant to service, fracture load correlated with the amount by which the local wire cross section area was reduced, either from a notch or pit, and was independent of depth of the irregularity and of root radius to the extent to which these were addressed. It was concluded that it may be unsafe to apply cathodically protection to prestressing wire, even in situations where potential is maintained in the regime where hydrogen embrittlement should not occur.

  15. Advances in Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the advances that have been made in stress analyses of cracked aircraft components, in the understanding of the fatigue and fatigue-crack growth process, and in the prediction of residual strength of complex aircraft structures with widespread fatigue damage. Finite-element analyses of cracked structures are now used to determine accurate stress-intensity factors for cracks at structural details. Observations of small-crack behavior at open and rivet-loaded holes and the development of small-crack theory has lead to the prediction of stress-life behavior for components with stress concentrations under aircraft spectrum loading. Fatigue-crack growth under simulated aircraft spectra can now be predicted with the crack-closure concept. Residual strength of cracked panels with severe out-of-plane deformations (buckling) in the presence of stiffeners and multiple-site damage can be predicted with advanced elastic-plastic finite-element analyses and the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. These advances are helping to assure continued safety of aircraft structures.

  16. Are knee mechanics during early stance related to tibial stress fracture in runners?

    PubMed

    Milner, Clare E; Hamill, Joseph; Davis, Irene

    2007-07-01

    Tibial stress fractures are a serious overuse injury in runners. Greater vertical loading rates and tibial shock have been found in runners with previous tibial stress fracture compared to controls. The timing of these variables occurs very early in the stance phase and suggests that conditions shortly after footstrike may be important in determining injury risk. The purpose of this study was to further investigate lower extremity mechanics in early stance in runners with a history of tibial stress fracture. In addition, the relationships between these variables were explored. Twenty-three runners with a history of tibial stress fracture were investigated. They were compared with 23 age and mileage matched control subjects with no previous lower extremity bony injuries. Data were collected as subjects ran at 3.7 m/s. All variables of interest were computed over the period from footstrike to the impact peak of the vertical ground reaction force. Independent t-tests and effect sizes were used to assess the differences between the groups. Pearson Product Moment correlations were used to determine whether initial stance variables were related to tibial shock in the two groups. Sagittal plane knee stiffness was significantly greater in the tibial stress fracture group. Stiffness was also positively correlated with shock. Knee excursion, knee angle at footstrike and shank angle at footstrike were not different between groups. These findings provide further support for the relationship between mechanics during initial loading and tibial stress fractures in runners. This relationship may be important in terms of retraining gait to reduce the risk of stress fracture in runners.

  17. Discrete fracture modeling of hydro-mechanical damage processes in geological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents a modeling approach for investigating coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) behavior, including fracture development, within geomaterials and structures. In the model, the coupling procedure consists of an effective linkage between two codes: TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and an implementation of the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) method, a discrete (lattice) modeling approach to represent geomechanical behavior. One main advantage of linking these two codes is that they share the same geometrical mesh structure based on the Voronoi discretization, so that a straightforward representation of discrete fracture networks (DFN) is available for fluid flow processes. The capabilities of the TOUGH-RBSN model are demonstrated through simulations of hydraulic fracturing, where fluid pressure-induced fracturing and damage-assisted flow are well represented. The TOUGH-RBSN modeling methodology has been extended to enable treatment of geomaterials exhibiting anisotropic characteristics. In the RBSN approach, elastic spring coefficients and strength parameters are systematically formulated based on the principal bedding direction, which facilitate a straightforward representation of anisotropy. Uniaxial compression tests are simulated for a transversely isotropic material to validate the new modeling scheme. The model is also used to simulate excavation fracture damage for the HG-A microtunnel in the Opalinus Clay rock, located at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. The Opalinus Clay has transversely isotropic material properties caused by natural features such as bedding, foliation, and flow structures. Preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts were observed following excavation, which are believed to be strongly influenced by the mechanical anisotropy of the rock material. The simulation results are qualitatively

  18. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis for the life extension estimate of the high flux isotope reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.

    1997-05-01

    The state of the vessel steel embrittlement as a result of neutron irradiation can be measured by its increase in the nil ductility temperature (NDT). This temperature is sometimes referred to as the brittle-ductile transition temperature (DBT) for fracture. The life extension of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel is calculated by using the method of fracture mechanics. A new method of fracture probability calculation is presented in this paper. The fracture probability as a result of the hydrostatic pressure test (hydrotest) is used to determine the life of the vessel. The hydrotest is performed in order to determine a safe vessel static pressure. It is then followed by using fracture mechanics to project the safe reactor operation time from the time of the satisfactory hydrostatic test. The life extension calculation provides the following information on the remaining life of the reactor as a function of the NDT increase: (1) the life of the vessel is determined by the probability of vessel fracture as a result of hydrotest at several hydrotest pressures and vessel embrittlement conditions, (2) the hydrotest time interval vs the NDT increase rate, and (3) the hydrotest pressure vs the NDT increase rate. It is understood that the use of a complete range of uncertainties of the NDT increase is equivalent to the entire range of radiation damage that can be experienced by the vessel steel. From the numerical values for the probabilities of the vessel fracture as a result of hydrotest, it is estimated that the reactor vessel life can be extended up to 50 EFPY (100 MW) with the minimum vessel operating temperature equal to 85{degrees}F.

  19. Interval coding. II. Dendrite-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Brent; Oswald, Anne-Marie M; Maler, Leonard

    2007-04-01

    The rich temporal structure of neural spike trains provides multiple dimensions to code dynamic stimuli. Popular examples are spike trains from sensory cells where bursts and isolated spikes can serve distinct coding roles. In contrast to analyses of neural coding, the cellular mechanics of burst mechanisms are typically elucidated from the neural response to static input. Bridging the mechanics of bursting with coding of dynamic stimuli is an important step in establishing theories of neural coding. Electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) pyramidal neurons respond to static inputs with a complex dendrite-dependent burst mechanism. Here we show that in response to dynamic broadband stimuli, these bursts lack some of the electrophysiological characteristics observed in response to static inputs. A simple leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF)-style model with a dendrite-dependent depolarizing afterpotential (DAP) is sufficient to match both the output statistics and coding performance of experimental spike trains. We use this model to investigate a simplification of interval coding where the burst interspike interval (ISI) codes for the scale of a canonical upstroke rather than a multidimensional stimulus feature. Using this stimulus reduction, we compute a quantization of the burst ISIs and the upstroke scale to show that the mutual information rate of the interval code is maximized at a moderate DAP amplitude. The combination of a reduced description of ELL pyramidal cell bursting and a simplification of the interval code increases the generality of ELL burst codes to other sensory modalities.

  20. Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Nickel-Based Superalloy Inconel 718 Powders onto AISI 4140 Alloy Steel Substrates: Interface Bond and Fracture Failure Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hoyeol; Cong, Weilong; Zhang, Hong-Chao; Liu, Zhichao

    2017-01-01

    As a prospective candidate material for surface coating and repair applications, nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN718) was deposited on American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 4140 alloy steel substrate by laser engineered net shaping (LENS) to investigate the compatibility between two dissimilar materials with a focus on interface bonding and fracture behavior of the hybrid specimens. The results show that the interface between the two dissimilar materials exhibits good metallurgical bonding. Through the tensile test, all the fractures occurred in the as-deposited IN718 section rather than the interface or the substrate, implying that the as-deposited interlayer bond strength is weaker than the interfacial bond strength. From the fractography using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS), three major factors affecting the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part are (i) metallurgical defects such as incompletely melted powder particles, lack-of-fusion porosity, and micropores; (ii) elemental segregation and Laves phase, and (iii) oxide formation. The fracture failure mechanism is a combination of all these factors which are detrimental to the mechanical properties and structural integrity by causing premature fracture failure of the as-deposited IN718. PMID:28772702

  1. Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Nickel-Based Superalloy Inconel 718 Powders onto AISI 4140 Alloy Steel Substrates: Interface Bond and Fracture Failure Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoyeol; Cong, Weilong; Zhang, Hong-Chao; Liu, Zhichao

    2017-03-25

    As a prospective candidate material for surface coating and repair applications, nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN718) was deposited on American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 4140 alloy steel substrate by laser engineered net shaping (LENS) to investigate the compatibility between two dissimilar materials with a focus on interface bonding and fracture behavior of the hybrid specimens. The results show that the interface between the two dissimilar materials exhibits good metallurgical bonding. Through the tensile test, all the fractures occurred in the as-deposited IN718 section rather than the interface or the substrate, implying that the as-deposited interlayer bond strength is weaker than the interfacial bond strength. From the fractography using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS), three major factors affecting the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part are (i) metallurgical defects such as incompletely melted powder particles, lack-of-fusion porosity, and micropores; (ii) elemental segregation and Laves phase, and (iii) oxide formation. The fracture failure mechanism is a combination of all these factors which are detrimental to the mechanical properties and structural integrity by causing premature fracture failure of the as-deposited IN718.

  2. Thermodynamic and fracture mechanical processes in the context of frost wedging in ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plate, Carolin; Müller, Ralf; Humbert, Angelika; Gross, Dietmar

    2015-04-01

    Ice shelves, the link between ice shields or glaciers and the ocean are sensitive elements of the polar environment. The ongoing break up and disintegration of huge ice shelf parts or entire ice shelf demands for an explication of the underlying processes. The first analyses of crack growth and break up events in ice shelves date back to more than half a century. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that trigger and influence the collapse of whole ice shelf parts are not yet fully understood. Popular presumptions link ice shelf disintegration to surface meltwater and hydro fracturing, explaining break up events in warm polar seasons. Fracture events during colder seasons are possibly triggered by more complex mechanisms. A well-documented break up event at the Wilkins Ice Shelf bridge inspires the possibility of frost wedging as disintegration cause. The present study shows a two-dimensional thermo-dynamical model simulating the growth of an ice lid in a water-filled crevasse for measured surface temperatures. The influence of the crevasse geometry and the ice shelf temperature are shown. The resulting lid thickness is then used for the linear elastic fracture mechanical analysis. The maximum crack depth is estimated by comparing the computed stress intensity factors to critical values KIc obtained from literature. The thermodynamic as well as the fracture mechanical simulation are performed using the commercial finite element code COMSOL. The computation of KI follows in post processing routines in MATLAB exploiting the benefits of the concept of configurational forces.

  3. New computing systems and their impact on structural and fracture mechanics calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, Harold; Moyer, Thomas E., Jr.; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1991-01-01

    Advances made in computer technology and their impact on structural and fracture mechanics calculations are reviewed, and the computational needs for future structural systems are discussed. Special attention is given to the computer hardware, the network technology, the performance of new computing systems, and the supersystems and parallel processing and their impact on structure technology. The differences between different machines are identified.

  4. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  5. Structural Reliability of Ceramics at High Temperature: Mechanisms of Fracture and Fatigue Crack Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    2005-08-01

    Final report of our DOE funded research program. Aim of the research program was to provide a fundamental basis from which the mechanical reliability of layered structures may be understood, and to provide guidelines for the development of technologically relevant layered material structures with optimum resistance to fracture and subcritical debonding. Progress in the program to achieve these goals is described.

  6. A potential-of-mean-force approach for fracture mechanics of heterogeneous materials using the lattice element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubie, Hadrien; Radjaï, Farhang; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2017-08-01

    Fracture of heterogeneous materials has emerged as a critical issue in many engineering applications, ranging from subsurface energy to biomedical applications, and requires a rational framework that allows linking local fracture processes with global fracture descriptors such as the energy release rate, fracture energy and fracture toughness. This is achieved here by means of a local and a global potential-of-mean-force (PMF) inspired Lattice Element Method (LEM) approach. In the local approach, fracture-strength criteria derived from the effective interaction potentials between mass points are shown to exhibit a scaling commensurable with the energy dissipation of fracture processes. In the global PMF-approach, fracture is considered as a sequence of equilibrium states associated with minimum potential energy states analogous to Griffith's approach. It is found that this global approach has much in common with a Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) approach, in which mass points are randomly removed following a maximum dissipation criterion until the energy release rate reaches the fracture energy. The duality of the two approaches is illustrated through the application of the PMF-inspired LEM for fracture propagation in a homogeneous linear elastic solid using different means of evaluating the energy release rate. Finally, by application of the method to a textbook example of fracture propagation in a heterogeneous material, it is shown that the proposed PMF-inspired LEM approach captures some well-known toughening mechanisms related to fracture energy contrast, elasticity contrast and crack deflection in the considered two-phase layered composite material.

  7. Extension type II pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures: a radiographic outcomes study of closed reduction and cast immobilization.

    PubMed

    Camus, Tristan; MacLellan, Brent; Cook, Peter Christopher; Leahey, John Lorne; Hyndman, John C; El-Hawary, Ron

    2011-06-01

    The treatment of Gartland type II pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures remains controversial. Some argue that closed reduction and cast immobilization is sufficient to treat these fractures, whereas others advocate closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. The purpose of this radiographic outcomes study was to determine whether closed reduction and cast immobilization could successfully obtain and maintain acceptable reduction of extension type II supracondylar humerus fractures. Prereduction, immediate postreduction, and final radiographs of 155 extension type II fractures that were treated nonoperatively were measured according to the parameters determined earlier to assess the position and alignment of the fracture fragments. These included the anterior humeral line, humerocapitellar angle, Baumann's angle, the Gordon index, and the Griffet index. The average age of the 155 patients at the time of injury was 5.3 years (range: 1 to 13 y). Analysis of the final radiographs, at the final follow-up of 5.3 months, showed that in 80% of patients, the anterior humeral line remained anterior to the mid-third segment of the capitellum (radiographic extension deformity), the mean humerocapitellar angle was 23.77 degrees (range: -11 to 50 degrees), the mean Baumann's angle was 79.40 degrees (range: 62 to 97 degrees), the mean Gordon index was 4.59%, and 44% of patients had a Griffet index between 1 and 3. From this radiographic review, it was observed that not all fractures treated with closed reduction and cast immobilization achieved anatomic position and alignment at final follow-up; however, the long-term clinical and radiographic significance of these findings remains unknown.

  8. MRI diagnosis of trapped periosteum following incomplete closed reduction of distal tibial Salter-Harris II fracture.

    PubMed

    Raman, Subha; Wallace, E Christine

    2011-12-01

    Irreducible fracture of the distal tibial physis due to interposed soft tissue including periosteum is well documented in the orthopedic literature but is uncommon. This condition has been associated with subsequent growth disturbance and requires open reduction. There are very few prior reports of MRI depiction of soft tissue interposition and none of periosteal interposition in the distal tibial physis. This is a relatively common location of physeal injury and related growth disturbance. We present a case of periosteum trapped in the distal tibial physis, diagnosed on MRI, in a Salter-Harris II fracture and its management implications.

  9. Fracture mechanics research at NASA related to the aging commercial transport fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.

    1992-07-01

    NASA is conducting the Airframe Structural Integrity Program in support of the aging commercial transport fleet. This interdisciplinary program is being worked in cooperation with the U.S. airframe manufacturers, airline operators, and the FAA. Advanced analysis methods are under development and an extensive testing program is under way to study fatigue crack growth and fracture in complex built-up shell structures. Innovative nondestructive examination technologies are also being developed to provide large area inspection capability to detect corrosion, disbonds, and cracks. Recent fracture mechanics results applicable to predicting the growth of cracks under monotonic and cyclic loading at rivets in fuselage lap-splice joints are reviewed.

  10. Identification of Fracture Toughness for Discrete Damage Mechanics Analysis of Glass-Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, E. J.; Cosso, F. A.; Martinez, X.

    2014-08-01

    A methodology for determination of the intralaminar fracture toughness is presented, based on fitting discrete damage mechanics (DDM) model predictions to available experimental data. DDM is constitutive model that, when incorporated into commercial finite element software via user material subroutines, is able to predict intralaminar transverse and shear damage initiation and evolution in terms of the fracture toughness of the composite. The applicability of the DDM model is studied by comparison to available experimental data for Glass-Epoxy laminates. Sensitivity of the DDM model to h- and p-refinement is studied. Also, the effect of in-situ correction of strength is highlighted.

  11. Local Crack Branching as a Mechanism for Instability in Dynamic Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Eran; Gross, Steven P.; Fineberg, Jay

    1995-06-01

    The motion of a crack in dynamic fracture has been shown to be governed by a dynamical instability causing oscillations in its velocity and structure on the fracture surface. We present experimental evidence indicating that the mechanism for instability is attempted local crack branching. At the instability onset, a crack will locally change its topology and sprout small, microscopic side branches. The trajectories of these local branches are independent of the crack velocity and exhibit scaling behavior. A connection between microscopic and macroscopic crack branching is established.

  12. Code System for Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Circumferential Surface Cracks in Pipes.

    SciTech Connect

    BRUST, F.

    1999-07-28

    Version 00 The NRCPIPES software is designed to perform elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis for a circumferential surface cracked pipe, i.e., to establish the fracture-failure condition in terms of sustainable load (or stress) or displacement. The NRCPIPES software also includes several evaluation procedures and acceptance criteria for circumferential surface flaws based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI criteria, the British R6 Revision 3 Option 1 criteria, and the original Net-Section-Collapse (limit-load) analysis.

  13. Tissue-Level Mechanical Properties of Bone Contributing to Fracture Risk.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Granke, Mathilde; Singleton, Robert C; Pharr, George M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue-level mechanical properties characterize mechanical behavior independently of microscopic porosity. Specifically, quasi-static nanoindentation provides measurements of modulus (stiffness) and hardness (resistance to yielding) of tissue at the length scale of the lamella, while dynamic nanoindentation assesses time-dependent behavior in the form of storage modulus (stiffness), loss modulus (dampening), and loss factor (ratio of the two). While these properties are useful in establishing how a gene, signaling pathway, or disease of interest affects bone tissue, they generally do not vary with aging after skeletal maturation or with osteoporosis. Heterogeneity in tissue-level mechanical properties or in compositional properties may contribute to fracture risk, but a consensus on whether the contribution is negative or positive has not emerged. In vivo indentation of bone tissue is now possible, and the mechanical resistance to microindentation has the potential for improving fracture risk assessment, though determinants are currently unknown.

  14. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun -Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-26

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Here, we demonstrate physical and mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. Lastly, this study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high-performance Li-ion batteries.

  15. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-01

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Here, we demonstrate physical and mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. This study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high-performance Li-ion batteries.

  16. Establishing the Foundations of the Mechanics of Fracture of Materials Compressed Along Cracks (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    The basic results of establishing the foundations of the mechanics of fracture of homogeneous materials compressed along cracks and inhomogeneous (composite) materials compressed along interface cracks are analyzed. These results were obtained using elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic material models. This review consists of three parts. The first part discusses the basic concept that the start (onset) of fracture is the mechanism of local instability near the cracks located in a single plane or parallel planes. The fracture criterion and the basic problems arising in this division of fracture mechanics are also formulated. Two basic approaches to establishing the foundations of the mechanics of fracture of materials compressed along cracks are outlined. One approach, so-called beam approximation, is based on various applied theories of stability of thin-walled systems (including the Bernoulli, Kirchhoff-Love, Timoshenko-type hypotheses, etc.). This approach is essentially approximate and introduces an irreducible error into the calculated stresses. The other approach is based on the basic equations and methods of the three-dimensional linearized theory of stability of deformable bodies for finite and small subcritical strains. This approach does not introduce major errors typical for the former approach and allows obtaining results with accuracy acceptable for mechanics. The second part offers a brief analysis of the basic results obtained with the first approach and a more detailed analysis of the basic results obtained with the second approach, including the consideration of the exact solutions for interacting cracks in a single plane and in parallel planes and results for some structural materials. The third part reports new results for interacting cracks in very closely spaced (or coinciding, as an asymptotic case) planes. These results may be considered a transition from the second approach (three-dimensional linearized theory of elastic stability) to the

  17. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics of Reactor Pressure Vessels with Populations of Flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Backman, Marie; Williams, Paul; Hoffman, William; Alfonsi, Andrea; Dickson, Terry; Bass, B. Richard; Klasky, Hilda

    2016-09-01

    This report documents recent progress in developing a tool that uses the Grizzly and RAVEN codes to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of reactor pressure vessels in light water reactor nuclear power plants. The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. Because of the central role of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a nuclear power plant, particular emphasis is being placed on developing capabilities to model fracture in embrittled RPVs to aid in the process surrounding decision making relating to life extension of existing plants. A typical RPV contains a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation at one or more of these flaws during a transient event. This report documents development and initial testing of a capability to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics of large populations of flaws in RPVs using reduced order models to compute fracture parameters. The work documented here builds on prior efforts to perform probabilistic analyses of a single flaw with uncertain parameters, as well as earlier work to develop deterministic capabilities to model the thermo-mechanical response of the RPV under transient events, and compute fracture mechanics parameters at locations of pre-defined flaws. The capabilities developed as part of this work provide a foundation for future work, which will develop a platform that provides the flexibility needed to consider scenarios that cannot be addressed with the tools used in current practice.

  18. Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Stitched Stiffener-Skin Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, I. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis based on plate finite elements and the virtual crack closure technique has been implemented to study the effect of stitching on mode I and mode II strain energy release rates for debond configurations. The stitches were modeled as discrete nonlinear fastener elements with a compliance determined by experiment. The axial and shear behavior of the stitches was considered, however, the two compliances and failure loads were assumed to be independent. Both a double cantilever beam (mode I) and a mixed mode skin-stiffener debond configuration were studied. In the double cantilever beam configurations, G(sub I) began to decrease once the debond had grown beyond the first row of stitches and was reduced to zero for long debonds. In the mixed-mode skin-stiffener configurations, G(sub I) showed a similar behavior as in the double cantilever beam configurations, however, G(sub u), continued to increase with increasing debond length.

  19. Current concepts in the treatment of Anderson Type II odontoid fractures in the elderly in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Löhrer, L; Raschke, M J; Thiesen, D; Hartensuer, R; Surke, C; Ochman, S; Vordemvenne, T

    2012-04-01

    Although currently there are many different recommendations and strategies in the therapy of odontoid fractures in the elderly, there are still no generally accepted guidelines for a structured and standardised treatment. Moreover, the current opinion of spine surgeons regarding the optimal treatment of odontoid fractures Type II of the elderly is unknown. In order to have an objective insight into the diverging strategies for the management of Anderson Type II odontoid fractures and form a basis for future comparisons, this study investigated the current concepts and preferences of orthopaedic, neuro- and trauma surgeons. Spine surgeons from 34 medical schools and 8 hospitals in Germany, 4 university hospitals in Austria and 5 in Switzerland were invited to participate in an online survey using a 12-item 1-sided questionnaire. A total of 44 interviewees from 34 medical institutions participated in the survey, consisting of trauma (50%), orthopaedic (20.5%) and neurosurgeons (27.3%). Out of these, 70.5% treated 1-20 fractures per year; 63.6% favoured the anterior screw fixation as therapy for Type II odontoid fractures, the open posterior Magerl transarticular C1/C2 fusion, the posterior Harms C1/C2 fusion, and conservative immobilisation by cervical orthosis was preferred by 9.1% in each case. 59.1% preferred the anterior odontoid screw fixation as an appropriate treatment of Anderson Type II odontoid fractures in the elderly. 79.5% chose cervical orthosis for postsurgical treatment. Following operative treatment, nonunion rates were reported to be <10% and <20% by 40.9% and 70% of the surgeons, respectively. 56.8% reported changing from primary conservative to secondary operative treatment in <10% of cases. The most favoured technique in revision surgery of nonunions was the open posterior Magerl transarticular fusion technique, chosen by 38.6% of respondents. 18.2% preferred the posterior Harms C1/C2 fusion technique, 11.4% the percutaneous posterior Magerl

  20. Deformation and Fracture Mechanisms of Bone and Nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rizhi; Gupta, Himadri S.

    2011-08-01

    Bone and nacre are the most-known biological hard tissues to materials researchers. Although highly mineralized, both bone and nacre are amazingly tough and exhibit remarkable inelasticity, properties that are still beyond the reach of many modern ceramic materials. Very interestingly, the two hard tissues seem to have adopted totally different structural strategies for achieving mechanical robustness. Starting from a true nanocomposite of the mineralized collagen fibril and following up to seven levels of hierarchical organization, bone is built on a structure with extreme complexity. In contrast, nacre possesses a structure of surprising simplicity. Polygonal mineral tablets of micrometer size are carefully cemented together into a macroscopic wonder. A comparative analysis of the structure-property relations in bone and nacre helps us to unveil the underlying mechanisms of this puzzling phenomenon. In this review, we critically compare the various levels of structures and their mechanical contributions between bone and nacre, with a focus on inelasticity and the toughening process. We demonstrate that, although nacre and bone differ from each other in many aspects, they have adopted very similar deformation and toughening mechanisms.

  1. Coupled chemical alteration and mechanical deformation in fractures: Insights from laboratory-scale imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, R. L.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Ameli, P.

    2012-12-01

    Perturbations from mechanical and chemical equilibrium can lead to significant alterations in fracture permeability and corresponding changes in fracture mechanical properties. Under conditions favoring mineral dissolution, alterations caused by chemical disequilibrium depend on the dimensionless Damkohler number (Da=kL/Vb, where k is an effective reaction rate, L is the length scale of the fracture, V is a mean flow velocity and b is the mean fracture aperture). At small values of Da, dissolution is relatively uniform throughout the fracture, whereas at high values of Da, instabilities in the reaction front lead to the formation of dissolution channels, and increased permeability at all values of Da. However, the addition of mechanical stresses can lead to contrasting behavior (i.e., either permeability increase or permeability decrease) due to the alteration of contact regions between the fracture surfaces. Quantifying the rates and relative impacts of different mechanisms in such experiments is necessary, particularly if we wish to use results to support predictions of field-scale behavior under different conditions. However, laboratory-scale experiments aimed at understanding coupled chemical and mechanical disequilibrium typically rely upon core-scale observations that provide insufficient details about the evolution of contacting asperities and the resulting stress induced deformation. We present results from a set of experiments in fractured cores through which we flowed reactive fluids. The cores were reservoir- and cap-rock (limestone and anhydrite, respectively) from the Weyburn CO2 sequestration project in Saskatchewan. In addition to differential pore pressures and effluent chemistry we measured the surface topography (+/- 1 μm) of each sample before and after each experiment at high spatial resolution (20 x 20 μm). We fabricated a jig for accurately aligning the halves of the core on the profilometer stage and developed and tested numerical routines

  2. Fracture properties of polycrystalline silicon - a material for micro-electro-mechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.C.; Jones, P.T.

    1995-12-31

    A great deal of research has been performed during the past few years to apply the microfabrication technology used for making integrated circuits to the manufacture of microscopic pressure sensors, accelerometers, and other micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). One result of this work has been the choice of polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) as a primary structural material employed in MEMS devices, particularly when the polysilicon has been doped with such elements as phosphorus for improved electrical and mechanical properties. As MEMS devices become more relied upon for real world applications, it will be necessary to establish design rules to ensure adequate product lifetimes. However, very little work has been done to deter- mine the failure mechanisms of polysilicon. The work presented here offers an experimental evaluation of the ultimate strength and fracture toughness of polysilicon with regard to the effects of exposure to hydrofluoric acid, a commonly used etchant in MEMS fabrication. A series of micromechanical structures have been designed to measure the strain at fracture and fracture toughness of a thin film. These test structures are patterned onto a thin film of polysilicon covering a silicon wafer using standard microfabrication techniques. Since the structures have dimensions on the order of microns, hundreds of multiple test structures are patterned on a single wafer providing a large amount of statistical data. Results using these structures indicate that prolonged exposure to HF can result in a decrease in the fracture strength of polysilicon.

  3. Simulation of crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete by fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Li, Victor C

    2004-02-01

    Mode I crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) is simulated by a fracture mechanics approach. A superposition method is applied to calculate the crack tip stress intensity factor. The model relies on the fracture toughness of hardened cement paste (K{sub IC}) and the crack bridging law, so-called stress-crack width ({sigma}-{delta}) relationship of the material, as the fundamental material parameters for model input. As two examples, experimental data from steel FRC beams under three-point bending load are analyzed with the present fracture mechanics model. A good agreement has been found between model predictions and experimental results in terms of flexural stress-crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) diagrams. These analyses and comparisons confirm that the structural performance of concrete and FRC elements, such as beams in bending, can be predicted by the simple fracture mechanics model as long as the related material properties, K{sub IC} and ({sigma}-{delta}) relationship, are known.

  4. Critical Chemical-Mechanical Couplings that Define Permeability Modifications in Pressure-Sensitive Rock Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Derek Elsworth; Abraham Grader; Susan Brantley

    2007-04-25

    This work examined and quantified processes controlling changes in the transport characteristics of natural fractures, subjected to coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical (TMC) effects. Specifically, it examined the effects of mineral dissolution and precipitation mediated by mechanical effects, using laboratory through-flow experiments concurrently imaged by X-ray CT. These were conducted on natural and artificial fractures in cores using water as the permeant. Fluid and mineral mass balances are recorded and are correlated with in-sample saturation, porosity and fracture aperture maps, acquired in real-time by X-ray CT-imaging at a maximum spatial resolution of 15-50 microns per pixel. Post-test, the samples were resin-impregnated, thin-sectioned, and examined by microscopy to define the characteristics of dissolution and precipitation. The test-concurrent X-ray imaging, mass balances, and measurements of permeability, together with the post-test microscopy, were used to define dissolution/precipitation processes, and to constrain process-based models. These models define and quantify key processes of pressure solution, free-face dissolution, and shear-dilation, and the influence of temperature, stress level, and chemistry on the rate of dissolution, its distribution in space and time, and its influence on the mechanical and transport properties of the fracture.

  5. Flexible parallel implicit modelling of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical processes in fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacace, Mauro; Jacquey, Antoine B.

    2017-09-01

    Theory and numerical implementation describing groundwater flow and the transport of heat and solute mass in fully saturated fractured rocks with elasto-plastic mechanical feedbacks are developed. In our formulation, fractures are considered as being of lower dimension than the hosting deformable porous rock and we consider their hydraulic and mechanical apertures as scaling parameters to ensure continuous exchange of fluid mass and energy within the fracture-solid matrix system. The coupled system of equations is implemented in a new simulator code that makes use of a Galerkin finite-element technique. The code builds on a flexible, object-oriented numerical framework (MOOSE, Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment) which provides an extensive scalable parallel and implicit coupling to solve for the multiphysics problem. The governing equations of groundwater flow, heat and mass transport, and rock deformation are solved in a weak sense (either by classical Newton-Raphson or by free Jacobian inexact Newton-Krylow schemes) on an underlying unstructured mesh. Nonlinear feedbacks among the active processes are enforced by considering evolving fluid and rock properties depending on the thermo-hydro-mechanical state of the system and the local structure, i.e. degree of connectivity, of the fracture system. A suite of applications is presented to illustrate the flexibility and capability of the new simulator to address problems of increasing complexity and occurring at different spatial (from centimetres to tens of kilometres) and temporal scales (from minutes to hundreds of years).

  6. Effect of CO2-induced reactions on the mechanical behaviour of fractured wellbore cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterbeek, Timotheus; Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Geomechanical damage, such as fracturing of wellbore cement, can severely impact well integrity in CO2 storage fields. Chemical reactions between the cement and CO2-bearing fluids may subsequently alter the cement's mechanical properties, either enhancing or inhibiting damage accumulation during ongoing changes in wellbore temperature and stress-state. To evaluate the potential for such effects, we performed triaxial compression tests on Class G Portland cement, conducted at down-hole temperature (80 ° C) and effective confining pressures ranging from 1 to 25 MPa. After deformation, samples displaying failure on localised shear fractures were reacted with CO2-H2O, and then subjected to a second triaxial test to assess changes in mechanical properties. Using results from the first phase of deformation, baseline yield and failure criteria were constructed for virgin cement. These delineate stress conditions where unreacted cement is most prone to dilatational (permeability-enhancing) failure. Once shear-fractures formed, later reaction with CO2 did not produce further geomechanical weakening. Instead, after six weeks of reaction, we observed up to 83% recovery of peak-strength and increased frictional strength (15-40%) in the post-failure regime, due to calcium carbonate precipitation in the fractures. As such, our results suggest more or less complete mechanical healing on timescales of the order of months.

  7. The 1/r1/r singularity in weakly nonlinear fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchbinder, Eran; Livne, Ariel; Fineberg, Jay

    2009-09-01

    Material failure by crack propagation essentially involves a concentration of large displacement-gradients near a crack's tip, even at scales where no irreversible deformation and energy dissipation occurs. This physical situation provides the motivation for a systematic gradient expansion of general nonlinear elastic constitutive laws that goes beyond the first order displacement-gradient expansion that is the basis for linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). A weakly nonlinear fracture mechanics theory was recently developed by considering displacement-gradients up to second order. The theory predicts that, at scales within a dynamic lengthscale ℓ from a crack's tip, significant logr displacements and 1/r displacement-gradient contributions arise. Whereas in LEFM the 1/r singularity generates an unbalanced force and must be discarded, we show that this singularity not only exists but is also necessary in the weakly nonlinear theory. The theory generates no spurious forces and is consistent with the notion of the autonomy of the near-tip nonlinear region. The J-integral in the weakly nonlinear theory is also shown to be path-independent, taking the same value as the linear elastic J-integral. Thus, the weakly nonlinear theory retains the key tenets of fracture mechanics, while providing excellent quantitative agreement with measurements near the tip of single propagating cracks. As ℓ is consistent with lengthscales that appear in crack tip instabilities, we suggest that this theory may serve as a promising starting point for resolving open questions in fracture dynamics.

  8. The effect of hydrogen on strain hardening and fracture mechanism of high-nitrogen austenitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, G. G.; Astafurova, E. G.; Melnikov, E. V.; Moskvina, V. A.; Vojtsik, V. F.; Galchenko, N. K.; Zakharov, G. N.

    2016-07-01

    High-nitrogen austenitic steels are perspective materials for an electron-beam welding and for producing of wear-resistant coatings, which can be used for application in aggressive atmospheres. The tensile behavior and fracture mechanism of high-nitrogen austenitic steel Fe-20Cr-22Mn-1.5V-0.2C-0.6N (in wt.%) after electrochemical hydrogen charging for 2, 10 and 40 hours have been investigated. Hydrogenation of steel provides a loss of yield strength, uniform elongation and tensile strength. The degradation of tensile properties becomes stronger with increase in charging duration - it occurs more intensive in specimens hydrogenated for 40 hours as compared to ones charged for 2-10 hours. Fracture analysis reveals a hydrogen-induced formation of brittle surface layers up to 6 μm thick after 40 hours of saturation. Hydrogenation changes fracture mode of steel from mixed intergranular-transgranular to mainly transgranular one.

  9. Analysis of Fracture Mechanism for Al-Mg/SiCp Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleque, M. A.; Adebisi, A. A.; Izzati, N.

    2017-03-01

    The present study aims to examine the fracture mechnism of silicon carbide particle (SiCp) reinforced aluminium matrix composite (AMC) material with 1 wt% addition of magnesium is fabricated using the stir casting process. The aluminium composite (Al-Mg/SiCp) is investigated for fatigue life and impact strength considering reinforcement weight fraction and influence of temperature on fracture toughness. The fabricated composite was tested using fatigue testing machine and charpy impact tester. Fractographic observations were evaluated with the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the fracture surface. It was found that increasing the SiCp weight fraction increased the fatigue life of the composite. Moreover, the 20 wt% SiCp Al-Mg composite attained the highest number of cycle and fatigue life compared to other variations. The mechanism responsible for the phenomena includes load transfer from the Al matrix alloy phase to the high strength and stiffness of the incorporated SiCp. The temperature variation influenced the impact strength of the composite and improved fracture toughness is achieved at 150 °C. It can be concluded from this study that reinforcement weight fraction and temperature affects the fracture behavior of the composites.

  10. Continuum mechanics analysis of fracture progression in the vitrified cryoprotective agent DP6

    PubMed Central

    Steif, Paul S.; Palastro, Matthew C.; Rabin, Yoed

    2008-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to study the continuum mechanics effects associated with cryopreservation, the current report focuses on the prediction of fracture formation in cryoprotective agents. Fractures had been previously observed in 1 mℓ samples of the cryoprotective agent cocktail DP6, contained in a standard 15 mℓ glass vial, and subjected to various cooling rates. These experimental observations were obtained by means of a cryomacroscope, which has been recently presented by the current research team. High and low cooling rates were found to produce very distinct patterns of cracking. The current study seeks to explain the observed patterns on the basis of stresses predicted from finite element analysis, which relies on a simple viscoelastic constitutive model and on estimates of the critical stress for cracking. The current study demonstrates that the stress which results in instantaneous fracture at low cooling rates is consistent with the stress to initiate fracture at high cooling rate. This consistency supports the credibility of the proposed constitutive model and analysis, and the unified criterion for fracturing, that is, a critical stress threshold. PMID:18412493

  11. C2-fractures: part II. A morphometrical analysis of computerized atlantoaxial motion, anatomical alignment and related clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koller, Heiko; Acosta, Frank; Forstner, Rosemarie; Zenner, Juliane; Resch, Herbert; Tauber, Mark; Lederer, Stefan; Auffarth, Alexander; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2009-08-01

    Knowledge on the outcome of C2-fractures is founded on heterogenous samples with cross-sectional outcome assessment focusing on union rates, complications and technical concerns related to surgical treatment. Reproducible clinical and functional outcome assessments are scant. Validated generic and disease specific outcome measures were rarely applied. Therefore, the aim of the current study is to investigate the radiographic, functional and clinical outcome of a patient sample with C2-fractures. Out of a consecutive series of 121 patients with C2 fractures, 44 met strict inclusion criteria and 35 patients with C2-fractures treated either nonsurgically or surgically with motion-preserving techniques were surveyed. Outcome analysis included validated measures (SF-36, NPDI, CSOQ), and a functional CT-scanning protocol for the evaluation of C1-2 rotation and alignment. Mean follow-up was 64 months and mean age of patients was 52 years. Classification of C2-fractures at injury was performed using a detailed morphological description: 24 patients had odontoid fractures type II or III, 18 patients had fracture patterns involving the vertebral body and 11 included a dislocated or a burst lateral mass fracture. Thirty-one percent of patients were treated with a halo, 34% with a Philadelphia collar and 34% had anterior odontoid screw fixation. At follow-up mean atlantoaxial rotation in left and right head position was 20.2 degrees and 20.6 degrees, respectively. According to the classification system of posttreatment C2-alignment established by our group in part I of the C2-fracture study project, mean malunion score was 2.8 points. In 49% of patients the fractures healed in anatomical shape or with mild malalignment. In 51% fractures healed with moderate or severe malalignment. Self-rated outcome was excellent or good in 65% of patients and moderate or poor in 35%. The raw data of varying nuances allow for comparison in future benchmark studies and metaanalysis. Detailed

  12. Effect of seismic waves on the hydro-mechanical properties of fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lak, Meysam; Baghbanan, Alireza; Hashemolhoseini, Hamid

    2017-07-01

    The transmission of seismic waves in a particular region may influence the hydraulic properties of a rock mass, including permeability, which is one of the most important. To determine the effect of a seismic wave on the hydraulic behavior of a fractured rock mass, systematic numerical modeling was conducted. A number of discrete fracture network (DFN) models with a size of 20 m × 20 m were used as geometrical bases, and a discrete element method (DEM) was employed as a numerical simulation tool. Three different boundary conditions without (Type I) and with static (Type II) and dynamic (Type III) loading were performed on the models, and then their permeability was calculated. The results showed that permeability in Type III models was respectively 62.7% and 44.2% higher than in Type I and Type II models. This study indicates that seismic waves can affect deep earth, and, according to the results, seismic waves increase the permeability and change the flow rate patterns in a fractured rock mass.

  13. Can Deterministic Mechanical Size Effects Contribute to Fracture and Microdamage Accumulation in Trabecular Bone?

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Thomas; Allen, Matthew R.; Burr, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Failure of bone under monotonic and cyclic loading is related to the bone mineral density, the quality of the bone matrix and the evolution of microcracks. The theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics has commonly been applied to describe fracture in bone. Evidence is presented that bone failure can be described through a non-linear theory of fracture. Thereby, deterministic size effects are introduced. Concepts of a non-linear theory are applied to discern how the interaction among bone matrix constituents (collagen and mineral), microcrack characteristics, and trabecular architecture can create distinctively differences in the fracture resistance at the bone tissue level. The nonlinear model is applied to interpret pre-clinical data concerning the effects of anti-osteoporotic agents on bone properties. The results show that bisphosphonate (BP) treatments that suppress bone remodeling will change trabecular bone in ways such that the size of the failure process zone relative to the trabecular thickness is reduced. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) that suppress bone remodeling will change trabecular bone in ways such that the size of the failure process zone relative to the trabecular thickness is increased. The consequences of these changes are reflected in bone mechanical response and predictions are consistent with experimental observations in the animal model which show that BP treatment is associated with more brittle fracture and microcracks without altering the average length of the cracks, whereas SERM treatments lead to a more ductile fracture and mainly increase crack length with a smaller increase in microcrack density. The model suggests that BPs may be more effective in cases in which bone mass is very low, whereas SERMS may be more effective when milder osteoporotic symptoms are present. PMID:20398678

  14. Application of a Fracture Methodology for Studying the Mechanics that Govern Failure of Aluminum Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanis, Konstantinos Panagiotis; Wierzbicki, Tomasz; Papazoglou, Vassilios John

    The existence of cracks besides the effect of structural degradation can cause partial or total failure of a structure. Usually, structures are designed to resist yielding, buckling and fatigue, but not fracture due to limited existing data on large scalemodels. As a result, robust methods and procedures to design structures against fracture have not been developed, although the industry is seeking to achieve more efficient concepts and designs with advanced safety and performance using optimized structural design. The rapidly increasing application of lightweight materials and thin-walled structures in several industries requires fundamental understanding of the mechanisms and mechanics of fracture that govern stiffened panels. A methodology consisting of the application of advanced fracture models, material calibration, and validation through component testing is provided that will increase the survivability envelope of new structures. This paper presents its application that will enable designers to evaluate critical areas within a structure with respect to crack initiation, propagation, optimum material usage, and computational cost. It is based on the effect of stiffening configurations on fracture of aluminum marine structures by studying the structural response of various stiffened plates, represented by small-scale compact tension (CT) and intermediate-scale specimens, which are compared with unstiffened plates. It is shown that mapping of crack patterns in stiffened plates is feasible. Numerical modeling and analyses of ductile fracture initiation and propagation on a precracked geometry using a commercial finite element code (ABAQUS), taking into account the behavior of simple uncracked material, has been performed showing a very good agreement with small and intermediate scale tests.

  15. An experimental study of deep brain stimulation lead fracture: possible fatigue mechanisms and prevention approach.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changqing; Mo, Xiaolong; Dong, Yantao; Meng, Fangang; Hao, Hongwei; Zhang, Jianguo; Feng, Xiqiao; Li, Luming

    2015-06-01

    Lead fracture is a common and troublesome hardware-related complication in deep brain stimulation therapy. Frequent cervical movements are suspected as the main cause, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We propose the integrity of the helical structure of the lead wires is important and conduct systematic experiments to demonstrate this. We aim to provide a new view on how lead fracture takes place. Flexural fatigue tests were conducted on intact and stretched lead wires with a custom-made testing machine. Number of cycles until failure was recorded as the fatigue life, and the fracture morphology was observed under optical and scanning electron microscopes. The fatigue life of the lead wires showed dramatic decline with the severity of deformation, from 434,112 ± 10,277 cycles for an intact specimen down to 19,435 ± 2,622 cycles for a specimen elongated by approximately 20%. The morphology of the fractures revealed characteristic beach marks and striations indicating a fatigue failure. We demonstrate that integrity of the helical structure of the wires is crucial to the fatigue performance of the lead. Although the results cannot be directly extrapolated to human subjects, they suggest a possible lead fracture mechanism. The implanted lead may undergo deformation due to large-amplitude motions (e.g., falls) and develop fracture due to the deterioration in fatigue resistance, especially when it is placed at or migrates to the neck. It may be possible to effectively protect the lead by using certain surgical techniques during implantation, such as placing the connector on the calvaria or in a drilled trough at the retroauricular region with reliable fixation. © 2014 International Neuromodulation Society.

  16. Analysis of propagation mechanisms of stimulation-induced fractures in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael; Renner, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    Effectivity of geothermal energy production depends crucially on the heat exchange between the penetrated hot rock and the circulating water. Hydraulic stimulation of rocks at depth intends to create a network of fractures that constitutes a large area for exchange. Two endmembers of stimulation products are typically considered, tensile hydro-fractures that propagate in direction of the largest principal stress and pre-existing faults that are sheared when fluid pressure reduces the effective normal stress acting on them. The understanding of the propagation mechanisms of fractures under in-situ conditions is still incomplete despite intensive research over the last decades. Wing-cracking has been suggested as a mechanism of fracture extension from pre-existent faults with finite length that are induced to shear. The initiation and extension of the wings is believed to be in tensile mode. Open questions concern the variability of the nominal material property controlling tensile fracture initiation and extension, the mode I facture toughness KIC, with in-situ conditions, e.g., its mean-stress dependence. We investigated the fracture-propagation mechanism in different rocks (sandstones and granites) under varying conditions mimicking those representative for geothermal systems. To determine KIC-values we performed 3-point bending experiments. We varied the confining pressure, the piston velocity, and the position of the chevron notch relative to the loading configuration. Additional triaxial experiments at a range of confining pressures were performed to study wing crack propagation from artificial flaws whose geometrical characteristics, i.e., length, width, and orientation relative to the axial load are varied. We monitored acoustic emissions to constrain the spacio-temporal evolution of the fracturing. We found a significant effect of the length of the artificial flaw and the confining pressure on wing-crack initiation but did not observe a systematic dependence

  17. Recent finite element studies in plasticity and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, J. R.; Mcmeeking, R. M.; Parks, D. M.; Sorensen, E. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reviews recent work on fundamentals of elastic-plastic finite-element analysis and its applications to the mechanics of crack opening and growth in ductile solids. The presentation begins with a precise formulation of incremental equilibrium equations and their finite-element forms in a manner valid for deformations of arbitrary magnitude. Special features of computational procedures are outlined for accuracy in view of the near-incompressibility of elastic-plastic response. Applications to crack mechanics include the analysis of large plastic deformations at a progressively opening crack tip, the determination of J integral values and of limitations to J characterizations of the intensity of the crack tip field, and the determination of crack tip fields in stable crack growth.

  18. Phenomenological and mechanics aspects of nondestructive evaluation and characterization by sound and ultrasound of material and fracture properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S. W.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in fracture mechanics and elastic wave theory enhance the understanding of many physical phenomena in a mathematical context. Available literature in the material, and fracture characterization by NDT, and the related mathematical methods in mechanics that provide fundamental underlying principles for its interpretation and evaluation are reviewed. Information on the energy release mechanism of defects and the interaction of microstructures within the material is basic in the formulation of the mechanics problems that supply guidance for nondestructive evaluation (NDE).

  19. Direct Studies of Fracture Mechanisms in Metals at Highest Magnification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    or even high purity and therefore will deform before and after void initiation according to recog- nized mechanisms of workhardening in pure metals...discussion it is clear that in precipitation hardened alloys material between voids must suffer extensive plastic deformation during neck formation and the...motion of dislocation groups and their specific behavior during plastic deformation to rupture at record- ing speeds of 30 frames per second. In order

  20. The mechanics of tessellations - bioinspired strategies for fracture resistance.

    PubMed

    Fratzl, Peter; Kolednik, Otmar; Fischer, F Dieter; Dean, Mason N

    2016-01-21

    Faced with a comparatively limited palette of minerals and organic polymers as building materials, evolution has arrived repeatedly on structural solutions that rely on clever geometric arrangements to avoid mechanical trade-offs in stiffness, strength and flexibility. In this tutorial review, we highlight the concept of tessellation, a structural motif that involves periodic soft and hard elements arranged in series and that appears in a vast array of invertebrate and vertebrate animal biomaterials. We start from basic mechanics principles on the effects of material heterogeneities in hypothetical structures, to derive common concepts from a diversity of natural examples of one-, two- and three-dimensional tilings/layerings. We show that the tessellation of a hard, continuous surface - its atomization into discrete elements connected by a softer phase - can theoretically result in maximization of material toughness, with little expense to stiffness or strength. Moreover, the arrangement of soft/flexible and hard/stiff elements into particular geometries can permit surprising functions, such as signal filtering or 'stretch and catch' responses, where the constrained flexibility of systems allows a built-in safety mechanism for ensuring that both compressive and tensile loads are managed well. Our analysis unites examples ranging from exoskeletal materials (fish scales, arthropod cuticle, turtle shell) to endoskeletal materials (bone, shark cartilage, sponge spicules) to attachment devices (mussel byssal threads), from both invertebrate and vertebrate animals, while spotlighting success and potential for bio-inspired manmade applications.

  1. Photosensitization mechanism of Cu(ii) porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Uranga, Jon; Matxain, Jon M; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M; Casanova, David

    2017-08-09

    This work presents the mechanism of the photoinduced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by paramagnetic copper porphyrins in aqueous solution. Electronic structure calculations within the framework of the (time-dependent) density functional theory, (TD)DFT, reveal the details regarding the development of the atomistic and electronic structures of the copper porphyrin in solution along the set of chemical reactions accessible upon photoactivation. This study identifies the key parameters controlling the feasibility of the various reaction pathways that drive the formation of specific reactive oxygen species, ROS, i.e. superoxide, peroxyl and hydroxyl radicals. An important outcome of our results is the rationalization of how the water solvent molecules play a crucial role in most steps of the overall reaction. The present study is illustrated by focusing on one specific copper porphyrin for which precise experimental data have recently been measured, and can readily be generalized to the whole family of paramagnetic porphyrins. The conclusions of this work shed light on the rational design of metalloporphyrins as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy.

  2. Mechanisms of ZnII-Activated Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Major, Jody L.; Boiteau, Rene M.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the mechanism of a series of ZnII-activated magnetic resonance contrast agents that modulate the access of water to a paramagnetic GdIII ion to create an increase in relaxivity upon binding of ZnII. In the absence and presence of ZnII, the coordination at the GdIII center is modulated by appended ZnII binding groups. These groups were systematically varied to optimize the change in coordination upon ZnII binding. We observe that at least one appended aminoacetate must be present as a coordinating group to bind GdIII and effectively inhibit access of water. At least two binding groups are required to efficiently bind ZnII, creating an unsaturated complex and allowing access of water. 13C isotopic labeling of the acetate binding groups for NMR spectroscopy provides evidence of a change in the metal coordination of these groups upon the addition of ZnII supporting our proposed mechanism of activation as presented. PMID:18928280

  3. Cryomacroscopy of vitrification, Part II: Experimental observations and analysis of fracture formation in vitrified VS55 and DP6

    PubMed Central

    Steif, Paul S.; Palastro, Matthew; Wan, Chen-rei; Baicu, Simona; Taylor, Michael J.; Rabin, Yoed

    2006-01-01

    A new imaging device, termed a “cryomacroscope”, was used to observe macrofractures in the cryoprotectant cocktails DP6 and VS55. Details of the design and construction of the cryomacroscope were presented in Part I of this report, which focused on describing the apparatus and observations of crystallization. Part I and the current paper (Part II) describe events that occur as 1 mℓ of cryoprotectant contained in a glass vial is cooled from room temperature down to cryogenic temperatures (∼ −135°C). The presence of cracking, as well as patterns in their position and orientation, are found to be dependent on the cooling rate and on the specific cryoprotectant cocktail. Cracks, if present, disappear upon rewarming, although they appear to be sites for later preferential crystallization. Computations which predict temperatures and mechanical stresses are used to explain observations of cracking. In conjunction with these reports, additional photos of cryomacroscopy of vitrification, crystallization, and fracture formation are available at http://www.me.cmu.edu/faculty1/rabin/CryomacroscopyImages01.htm. PMID:16900261

  4. Role of large-scale slip in mode II fracture of bimaterial interface produced by diffusion bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M. R.; Ghosh, A. K.

    2001-08-01

    Bimaterial interfaces present in diffusion-bonded (and in-situ) composites are often not flat interfaces. The unevenness of the interface can result not only from interface reaction products but also from long-range waviness associated with the surfaces of the component phases bonded together. Experimental studies aimed at determining interface mechanical properties generally ignore the departure in the local stress due to waviness and assume a theoretically flat interface. Furthermore, the commonly used testing methods involving superimposed tension often renders the interface so extremely brittle that if microplastic effects were present it becomes impossible to perceive them. This article examines the role of waviness of the interface and microplastic effects on crack initiation. To do this, a test was selected that provides significant stability against crack growth by superimposing compressive stresses. Mode II interface fracture was studied for NiAl/Mo model laminates using a recently developed asymmetrically loaded shear (ALS) interface shear test. The ALS test may be viewed as opposite of the laminate bend test. In the bend test, shear at the interface is created via tension on one surface of the bend, while in the ALS test, shear is created by compression on one side of the interface relative to the other. Normal to the interface, near the crack tip, an initially compressive state is replaced by slight tension due to Poisson’s expansion of the unbonded part of the compressed beam.

  5. Metal cutting simulation of 4340 steel using an accurate mechanical description of meterial strength and fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Maudlin, P.J.; Stout, M.G.

    1996-09-01

    Strength and fracture constitutive relationships containing strain rate dependence and thermal softening are important for accurate simulation of metal cutting. The mechanical behavior of a hardened 4340 steel was characterized using the von Mises yield function, the Mechanical Threshold Stress model and the Johnson- Cook fracture model. This constitutive description was implemented into the explicit Lagrangian FEM continuum-mechanics code EPIC, and orthogonal plane-strain metal cutting calculations were performed. Heat conduction and friction at the toolwork-piece interface were included in the simulations. These transient calculations were advanced in time until steady state machining behavior (force) was realized. Experimental cutting force data (cutting and thrust forces) were measured for a planning operation and compared to the calculations. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Electronics reliability fracture mechanics. Volume 1: Causes of failures of shop replaceable units and hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallis, J.; Buechler, D.; Erickson, J.; Westerhuyzen, D. V.; Strokes, R.

    1992-05-01

    This is the first of two volumes. The other volume (WL-TR-91-3119) is 'Fracture Mechanics'. The objective of the Electronics Reliability Fracture Mechanics (ERFM) program was to develop and demonstrate a life prediction technique for electronic assemblies, when subjected to environmental stress of vibration and thermal cycling, based upon the mechanical properties of the materials and packaging configurations which make up an electronic system. A detailed investigation was performed of the following two shop replaceable units (SRUs): Timing and Control Module (P/N 3562102) and Linear Regulator Module (P/N 3569800). The SRUs are in the Programmable Signal Processor (3137042) Line Replaceable Unit (LRU) of the Hughes AN/APG-63 Radar for the F-15 Aircraft.

  7. Nonlinear fracture mechanics-based analysis of thin wall cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Leis, Brian N.; Forte, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a simple analysis technique to predict the crack initiation, growth, and rupture of large-radius, R, to thickness, t, ratio (thin wall) cylinders. The method is formulated to deal both with stable tearing as well as fatigue mechanisms in applications to both surface and through-wall axial cracks, including interacting surface cracks. The method can also account for time-dependent effects. Validation of the model is provided by comparisons of predictions to more than forty full scale experiments of thin wall cylinders pressurized to failure.

  8. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Subsurface Defects in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Joggles Subjected to Thermo-Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Song, Kyongchan

    2011-01-01

    Coating spallation events have been observed along the slip-side joggle region of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels. One potential contributor to the spallation event is a pressure build up within subsurface voids or defects due to volatiles or water vapor entrapped during fabrication, refurbishment, or normal operational use. The influence of entrapped pressure on the thermo-mechanical fracture-mechanics response of reinforced carbon-carbon with subsurface defects is studied. Plane-strain simulations with embedded subsurface defects are performed to characterize the fracture mechanics response for a given defect length when subjected to combined elevated-temperature and subsurface-defect pressure loadings to simulate the unvented defect condition. Various subsurface defect locations of a fixed-length substrate defect are examined for elevated temperature conditions. Fracture mechanics results suggest that entrapped pressure combined with local elevated temperatures have the potential to cause subsurface defect growth and possibly contribute to further material separation or even spallation. For this anomaly to occur, several unusual circumstances would be required making such an outcome unlikely but plausible.

  9. Understanding Irreversible Degradation of Nb3Sn Wires with Fundamental Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yuhu; Calzolaio, Ciro; Senatore, Carmine

    2014-08-01

    Irreversible performance degradation of advanced Nb3Sn superconducting wires subjected to transverse or axial mechanical loading is a critical issue for the design of large-scale fusion and accelerator magnets such as ITER and LHC. Recent SULTAN tests indicate that most cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER coils made of Nb3Sn wires processed by various fabrication techniques show similar performance degradation under cyclic loading. The irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and local strain accumulation in Nb3Sn wires cannot be described by the existing strand scaling law. Fracture mechanic modeling combined with X-ray diffraction imaging of filament micro-crack formation inside the wires under mechanical loading may reveal exciting insights to the wire degradation mechanisms. We apply fundamental fracture mechanics with a singularity approach to study influence of wire filament microstructure of initial void size and distribution to local stress concentration and potential crack propagation. We report impact of the scale and density of the void structure on stress concentration in the composite wire materials for crack initiation. These initial defects result in an irreversible degradation of the critical current beyond certain applied stress. We also discuss options to minimize stress concentration in the design of the material microstructure for enhanced wire performance for future applications.

  10. The Merging of Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Concepts: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The seventh Jerry L. Swedlow Memorial Lecture presents a review of some of the technical developments, that have occurred during the past 40 years, which have led to the merger of fatigue and fracture mechanics concepts. This review is made from the viewpoint of 'crack propagation.' As methods to observe the 'fatigue' process have improved, the formation of fatigue micro-cracks have been observed earlier in life and the measured crack sizes have become smaller. These observations suggest that fatigue damage can now be characterized by 'crack size.' In parallel, the crack-growth analysis methods, using stress-intensity factors, have also improved. But the effects of material inhomogeneities, crack-fracture mechanisms, and nonlinear behavior must now be included in these analyses. The discovery of crack-closure mechanisms, such as plasticity, roughness, and oxide/corrosion/fretting product debris, and the use of the effective stress-intensity factor range, has provided an engineering tool to predict small- and large-crack-growth rate behavior under service loading, conditions. These mechanisms have also provided a rationale for developing, new, damage-tolerant materials. This review suggests that small-crack growth behavior should be viewed as typical behavior, whereas large-crack threshold behavior should be viewed as the anomaly. Small-crack theory has unified 'fatigue' and 'fracture mechanics' concepts; and has bridged the cap between safe-life and durability/damage-tolerance design concepts.

  11. The mechanism of thoracolumbar burst fracture may be related to the basivertebral foramen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuyang; Li, Shengyun; Zhao, Xing; Christiansen, Blaine A; Fan, Shunwu; Zhao, Fengdong; Chen, Jian

    2017-08-17

    The basivertebral foramen (BF), located in the middle posterior wall of the vertebral body, may induce local weakness and contribute to the formation of a retropulsed bone fragment (RBF) in thoracolumbar burst fracture (TLBF). We hypothesize that the mechanism of TLBF is related to the BF. To clarify the relationship between retropulsed bone fragments and the basivertebral foramen in thoracolumbar burst fractures, and to explain the results using biomechanical experiments and micro-CT. A comprehensive research involving clinical radiology, micro-CT, and biomechanical experiments on cadaveric spines. A total of 162 consecutive patients diagnosed with thoracolumbar burst fracture with RBFs, drawn from 256 patients who had reported accidents or injuries to their thoracolumbar spine. Dimensions and location of the RBFs in relation to the BF. CT reconstruction imaging was used to measure the dimensions and location of RBFs in 162 patients (length, height, width of RBF and vertebral body). Furthermore, micro-CT scans were obtained of ten cadaveric spines. Each vertebral body was divided into three layers (Superior, Middle, Inferior), and each layer was divided further into 9 regions (R1 - R9). Microarchitecture parameters were calculated from micro-CT scans, including Bone Volume Fraction (BV/TV), Connectivity (Conn.D), Trabecular number (Tb.N), Trabecular Thickness (Tb.Th) and Bone Mineral Density (BMD). Differences were analyzed between regions and layers. Burst fractures were simulated on cadaveric spines in order to explore the fracture line location and test the relationship between RBFs and BF. This study was partially supported by 2016 National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81672208) (¥520,000). RBF width was usually one-third of the width of the vertebral body, whereas RBF length and height were approximately half of the corresponding vertebral body dimensions. Measures of trabecular bone quality were generally lowest in those central and superior

  12. First-order Description of the Mechanical Fracture Behavior of Fine-Grained Surficial Marine Sediments During Gas Bubble Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    10 F04O29 BARRY ET AL.: BUBBLE GROWTH BY FRACTURE P04029 Figure 3. Map of field site. Canard, Nova Scotia, Canada. appears to approximate the...Bottinger. and T. Dahm (2005), Buoyancy-driven fracture ascent: Experiments in layered gelatine. J. Volcano!. Geotherm . Res., 144. 273-285. doi...Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE First-order description of the mechanical fracture behavior of fine-grained

  13. A study of failure in bonded lap joints using fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Haiyang

    Although adhesively bonded lap joint has already been widely applied in structures, the strength prediction of the joint is still a challenge. Among many parameters which affect the failure load of the lap joint, the adhesive layer thickness is a very important one. In this study, fracture mechanics is used to analyze the failure mechanism of the lap joint and evaluate the thickness effect on strength of the lap joint. Generally, the adhesive material is softer than the substrates and the crack in the adhesive layer is constrained by the rigid boundaries. The stress field is changed due to the effect of the rigid boundaries. For linear elastic material, the K-Dominance zone is highly reduced and the traditional constant stress intensity factor prediction over-predicts the failure load of the specimens. Constant effective fracture toughness is proposed for better strength prediction by considering of the non-singular stress term ahead of the crack tip. For elastic-plastic material, CTOA is proven to be insensitive to the constraining of the rigid boundaries and can be used as the failure criterion for fracture analysis. Both experimental and FEA simulation show that constant CTOA criterion well predicts the adhesive thickness effect on strength of the DCB specimens for mode I fracture failure. The failure initiation mode of single lap joint is analyzed and the constant CTOA criterion is also proven to be capable to prediction the strength of single lap joint.

  14. Exploring particulate retention mechanisms through visualization of E. coli transport through a single, saturated fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. G.; Dickson, S. E.; Schutten, M.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater is an extremely valuable resource; a large body of work has been conducted towards remediating, tracking and reducing its contamination. Even so, there are large gaps within the current understanding of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, particularly within fractured media. Fractured media has the ability transport contaminants over longer distances in less time relative to porous media. Furthermore, colloids display unique transport characteristics in comparison to dissolved constituents, including the fact that they typically exhibit earlier initial arrival times. Of particular concern to human health are pathogenic microorganisms, which often originate from fecal contamination. Escherichia coli is a common indicator for fecal contamination; some strains are pathogenic, causing acute illness and sometimes death, in humans. A comprehensive understanding of the transport and retention of E. coli in fractured media will improve our ability to accurately assess whether a site is at risk of becoming contaminated by pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, the goal of this work is to expand our mechanistic understanding particulate retention, specifically E. coli, in fractures, and the influence of flow rate on these mechanisms. In order to achieve this goal, clear epoxy casts were fabricated of two dolomitic limestone fractures retrieved from a quarry in Guelph, Ontario. Each aperture field was characterized through hydraulic and tracer tests, and measured directly using the light transmission technique. E. coli RS2-GFP, which is a non-pathogenic strain of E. coli that has been tagged with a green fluorescent protein, was injected into the cast under three separate specific discharges ranging from 5 - 30 m/d. These experiments were conducted on an ultraviolet light source, and a high resolution charged-couple device (CCD) camera was employed to take photos at regular intervals in order to capture the dominant flow paths and the areas of retention

  15. Basic mechanism of transcription by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase II-like enzymes carry out transcription of genomes in Eukaryota, Archaea, and some viruses. They also exhibit fundamental similarity to RNA polymerases from bacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. In this review we take an inventory of recent studiesilluminating different steps of basic transcription mechanism, likely common for most multi-subunit RNA polymerases. Through the amalgamation of structural and computational chemistry data we attempt to highlight the most feasible reaction pathway for the two-metal nucleotidyl transfer mechanism, and to evaluate the way catalysis can be linked to translocation in the mechano-chemical cycle catalyzed by RNA polymerase II. PMID:22982365

  16. Salter-Harris type II metacarpal and metatarsal fracture in three foals. Treatment by minimally-invasive lag screw osteosynthesis combined with external coaptation.

    PubMed

    Klopfenstein Bregger, Micaël D; Fürst, Anton E; Kircher, Patrick R; Kluge, Katharina; Kummer, Martin

    2016-05-18

    To describe minimally-invasive lag screw osteosynthesis combined with external coaptation for the treatment of Salter-Harris type II third metacarpal and third metatarsal bone fractures. Three foals aged two weeks to four months with a Salter-Harris type II third metacarpal or third metatarsal fracture. Surgery was carried out under general anaesthesia in lateral recumbency. After fracture reduction, the metaphyseal fragment was stabilized with two cortical screws placed in lag fashion under fluoroscopic control. A cast was applied for at least two weeks. All foals had a good outcome with complete fracture healing and return to complete soundness without any angular limb deformity. All foals had moderate transient digital hyperextension after cast removal. Internal fixation of Salter-Harris type II third metacarpal or third metatarsal fractures with two cortical screws in lag fashion, combined with external coaptation provided good stabilization and preserved the longitudinal growth potential of the injured physis.

  17. Mechanisms regulating resistance to inhibitors of topoisomerase II

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Ram N.; Ganapathi, Mahrukh K.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of topoisomerase II (topo II) are clinically effective in the management of hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The efficacy of anti-tumor drugs targeting topo II is often limited by resistance and studies with in vitro cell culture models have provided several insights on potential mechanisms. Multidrug transporters that are involved in the efflux and consequently reduced cytotoxicity of diverse anti-tumor agents suggest that they play an important role in resistance to clinically active drugs. However, in clinical trials, modulating the multidrug-resistant phenotype with agents that inhibit the efflux pump has not had an impact. Since reduced drug accumulation per se is insufficient to explain tumor cell resistance to topo II inhibitors several studies have focused on characterizing mechanisms that impact on DNA damage mediated by drugs that target the enzyme. Mammalian topo IIα and topo IIβ isozymes exhibit similar catalytic, but different biologic, activities. Whereas topo IIα is associated with cell division, topo IIβ is involved in differentiation. In addition to site specific mutations that can affect drug-induced topo II-mediated DNA damage, post-translation modification of topo II primarily by phosphorylation can potentially affect enzyme-mediated DNA damage and the downstream cytotoxic response of drugs targeting topo II. Signaling pathways that can affect phosphorylation and changes in intracellular calcium levels/calcium dependent signaling that can regulate site-specific phosphorylation of topoisomerase have an impact on downstream cytotoxic effects of topo II inhibitors. Overall, tumor cell resistance to inhibitors of topo II is a complex process that is orchestrated not only by cellular pharmacokinetics but more importantly by enzymatic alterations that govern the intrinsic drug sensitivity. PMID:23914174

  18. Fracture Behavior Investigation of a Typical Sandstone Under Mixed-Mode I/II Loading Using the Notched Deep Beam Bending Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2017-08-01

    The brittle fracture behavior of rocks under mixed-mode loading is important in rock engineering. First, a new configuration called the notched deep beam (NDB) specimen was introduced for the fracture testing of rock materials under mixed-mode I/II loading, and a series of finite element analyses were performed to calibrate the dimensionless fracture parameters (i.e., Y I, Y II and T^{*}). The results showed that an NDB specimen subjected to three-point bending is able to generate pure mode I loading, pure mode II loading, and any mixed-mode loading in between. Then, several NDB specimens made of sandstone were used to investigate the brittle fracture behavior of rock under mixed-mode I/II loading. The fracture surfaces were theoretically described using a statistical method, and the results indicated that all the fracture surfaces generated under different mixed-mode loading were statistically identical; to some extent, these results experimentally showed that only tensile fracture occurs under mixed-mode I/II loading. The obtained fracture strengths were then analyzed using several brittle fracture criteria. The empirical criterion, maximum energy release rate criterion, generalized maximum tangential stress (GMTS) criterion, and improved R-criterion accurately predicted the fracture strength envelope of the sandstone. Finally, based on the concepts of point stress and mean stress, the micro-crack zones (MCZs) under different mixed-mode loading were theoretically estimated based on the MTS and GMTS criteria. The critical radius of MCZ in the crack propagation direction was not a constant for all mixed-mode loading conditions regardless of whether the T-stress was considered. This result suggests that the size of the core region used to predict the crack initiation direction and fracture strength based on the GMTS criterion should be chosen more carefully.

  19. A mechanical model for predicting the probability of osteoporotic hip fractures based in DXA measurements and finite element simulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoporotic hip fractures represent major cause of disability, loss of quality of life and even mortality among the elderly population. Decisions on drug therapy are based on the assessment of risk factors for fracture, from BMD measurements. The combination of biomechanical models with clinical studies could better estimate bone strength and supporting the specialists in their decision. Methods A model to assess the probability of fracture, based on the Damage and Fracture Mechanics has been developed, evaluating the mechanical magnitudes involved in the fracture process from clinical BMD measurements. The model is intended for simulating the degenerative process in the skeleton, with the consequent lost of bone mass and hence the decrease of its mechanical resistance which enables the fracture due to different traumatisms. Clinical studies were chosen, both in non-treatment conditions and receiving drug therapy, and fitted to specific patients according their actual BMD measures. The predictive model is applied in a FE simulation of the proximal femur. The fracture zone would be determined according loading scenario (sideway fall, impact, accidental loads, etc.), using the mechanical properties of bone obtained from the evolutionary model corresponding to the considered time. Results BMD evolution in untreated patients and in those under different treatments was analyzed. Evolutionary curves of fracture probability were obtained from the evolution of mechanical damage. The evolutionary curve of the untreated group of patients presented a marked increase of the fracture probability, while the curves of patients under drug treatment showed variable decreased risks, depending on the therapy type. Conclusion The FE model allowed to obtain detailed maps of damage and fracture probability, identifying high-risk local zones at femoral neck and intertrochanteric and subtrochanteric areas, which are the typical locations of osteoporotic hip fractures. The

  20. Fracture mechanics for the design of ceramic multilayer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, T. H.; Gong, X.; Suo, Z.

    1996-01-01

    In a multilayer actuator, each internal electrode terminates an edge inside the active ceramic. Around the edge, the nonuniform electric field generates an incompatible strain field, which, in its turn, generates stresses and may cause the ceramic to crack. The industry has been exploring alternative electrode configurations to alleviate the stress concentration. The effort has been empirical and benefited little from numerical simulations. An inherent difficulty is that the actuator ceramics have nonlinear electro-mechanical interactions, of which no unified mathematical description is now available. In this paper, we develop a crack nucleation model that includes essential features of this nonlinearity. The model applies to both paraelectrics and ferroelectrics. Attention is focused on situations where the small-scale saturation conditions prevail. That is, the driving voltage is low enough so that the bulk of the ceramics is linearly dielectric, except for a cylinder of a small radius around the electrode edge. Inside the cylinder, large strains result from electrostriction or polar rotation. We identify a parameter group that determines the cracking condition; details in the material description only affect a dimensionless coefficient. Everything else being fixed, a critical layer thickness exists, below which a multilayer actuator will not crack around its internal electrode edges. Merits and limitations of the small-scale saturation model are discussed. We analyze this model analytically for a paraelectric with perfect polarization saturation, and estimate the value of the dimensionless coefficient in the model.

  1. Effects of mechanical fracturing and experimental trampling on Hawaiian corals.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Ku'ulei; Cox, Evelyn; Newtson, Craig

    2003-03-01

    In situ trampling occurred under experimental conditions to quantify the differences in the responses to anthropogenic trampling in four dominant species of Hawaiian corals, Porites compressa, Porites lobata, Montipora capitata, and Pocillopora meandrina. Trampling was simulated daily for a period of nine days at which time further breakage was minimal. Forty treatment colonies produced 559 fragments. Trampling was followed by an 11-month recovery period. Coral colony and fragment mortality was low. All four species were highly tolerant of inflicted damage, suggesting that some species of corals can withstand limited pulse events that allow time for recovery. Growth rates following trampling were significantly lower in the treatment groups for three of the four species. This study demonstrated that very few trampling events can produce significant changes in growth even after a long recovery period. Survivorship of fragments is clearly size- and species-dependent in M. capitata and P. compressa. Smaller fragments (<5 cm) had higher mortality than larger fragments (>5 cm). High breakage rates for M. capitata and P. compressa are consistent with the near shore, low-energy regions they inhabit-the same environment frequented by skin divers and waders. Mechanical tests were conducted to determine tensile and compressive strengths. Pocillopora meandrina exhibited the strongest skeletal strength, followed in decreasing order by Porites lobata, Porites compressa, and Montipora capitata. The skeletal strength obtained from the experiments correlate with the wave energy present in the environments in the regions they inhabit, suggesting that structural strength of corals is an adaptive response to hydraulic stress.

  2. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Evaluation of Selected Passive Components – Technical Letter Report

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Fredric A.; Doctor, Steven R.; Gosselin, Stephen R.; Rudland, David L.; Xu, H.; Wilkowski, Gery M.; Lydell, Bengt O.

    2007-05-31

    This report addresses the potential application of probabilistic fracture mechanics computer codes to support the Proactive Materials Degradation Assessment (PMDA) program as a method to predict component failure probabilities. The present report describes probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations that were performed for selected components using the PRO-LOCA and PRAISE computer codes. The calculations address the failure mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue for components and operating conditions that are known to make particular components susceptible to cracking. It was demonstrated that the two codes can predict essentially the same failure probabilities if both codes start with the same fracture mechanics model and the same inputs to the model. Comparisons with field experience showed that both codes predict relatively high failure probabilities for components under operating conditions that have resulted in field failures. It was found that modeling assumptions and inputs tended to give higher calculated failure probabilities than those derived from data on field failures. Sensitivity calculations were performed to show that uncertainties in the probabilistic calculations were sufficiently large to explain the differences between predicted failure probabilities and field experience.

  3. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan

    2010-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses of subsurface defects within the joggle regions of the Space Shuttle wing-leading-edge RCC panels are performed. A 2D plane strain idealized joggle finite element model is developed to study the fracture behavior of the panels for three distinct loading conditions - lift-off and ascent, on-orbit, and entry. For lift-off and ascent, an estimated bounding aerodynamic pressure load is used for the analyses, while for on-orbit and entry, thermo-mechanical analyses are performed using the extreme cold and hot temperatures experienced by the panels. In addition, a best estimate for the material stress-free temperature is used in the thermo-mechanical analyses. In the finite element models, the substrate and coating are modeled separately as two distinct materials. Subsurface defects are introduced at the coating-substrate interface and within the substrate. The objective of the fracture mechanics analyses is to evaluate the defect driving forces, which are characterized by the strain energy release rates, and determine if defects can become unstable for each of the loading conditions.

  4. Fracture mechanics correlation of boron/aluminum coupons containing stress risers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adsit, N. R.; Waszczak, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of boron/aluminum near stress risers has been studied and reported. This effort was directed toward defining the tensile behavior of both unidirectional and (0/ plus or minus 45) boron/aluminum using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). The material used was 5.6-mil boron in 6061 aluminum, consolidated using conventional diffusion bonding techniques. Mechanical properties are reported for both unidirectional and (0/ plus or minus 45) boron/aluminum, which serve as control data for the fracture mechanics predictions. Three different flawed specimen types were studied. In each case the series of specimens remained geometrically similar to eliminate variations in finite size correction factors. The fracture data from these tests were reduced using two techniques. They both used conventional LEFM methods, but the existence of a characteristic flaw was assumed in one case and not the other. Both the data and the physical behavior of the specimens support the characteristic flaw hypothesis. Cracks were observed growing slowly in the (0/ plus or minus 45) laminates, until a critical crack length was reached at which time catastrophic failure occurred.

  5. Fracture mechanics correlation of boron/aluminum coupons containing stress risers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adsit, N. R.; Waszczak, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of boron/aluminum near stress risers has been studied and reported. This effort was directed toward defining the tensile behavior of both unidirectional and (0/ plus or minus 45) boron/aluminum using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). The material used was 5.6-mil boron in 6061 aluminum, consolidated using conventional diffusion bonding techniques. Mechanical properties are reported for both unidirectional and (0/ plus or minus 45) boron/aluminum, which serve as control data for the fracture mechanics predictions. Three different flawed specimen types were studied. In each case the series of specimens remained geometrically similar to eliminate variations in finite size correction factors. The fracture data from these tests were reduced using two techniques. They both used conventional LEFM methods, but the existence of a characteristic flaw was assumed in one case and not the other. Both the data and the physical behavior of the specimens support the characteristic flaw hypothesis. Cracks were observed growing slowly in the (0/ plus or minus 45) laminates, until a critical crack length was reached at which time catastrophic failure occurred.

  6. Fracture Mechanical Analysis of Open Cell Ceramic Foams Under Thermal Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settgast, C.; Abendroth, M.; Kuna, M.

    2016-11-01

    Ceramic foams made by replica techniques containing sharp-edged cavities, which are potential crack initiators and therefore have to be analyzed using fracture mechanical methods. The ceramic foams made of novel carbon bonded alumina are used as filters in metal melt filtration applications, where the filters are exposed to a thermal shock. During the casting process the filters experience a complex thermo-mechanical loading, which is difficult to measure. Modern numerical methods allow the simulation of such complex processes. As a simplified foam structure an open Kelvin cell is used as a representative volume element. A three-dimensional finite element model containing realistic sharp-edged cavities and three-dimensional sub-models along these sharp edges are used to compute the transient temperature, stress and strain fields at the Kelvin foam. The sharp edges are evaluated using fracture mechanical methods like the J-integral technique. The results of this study describe the influence of the pore size, relative density of the ceramic foam, the heat transfer and selected material parameters on the fracture mechanical behaviour.

  7. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. Part 2: Delamination behavior and fracture mechanics parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    Based on theories of laminate anisotropic elasticity and interlaminar fracture, the complete solution structure associated with a composite delamination is determined. Fracture mechanics parameters characterizing the interlaminar crack behavior are defined from asymptotic stress solutions for delaminations with different crack-tip deformation configurations. A numerical method employing singular finite elements is developed to study delaminations in fiber composites with any arbitrary combinations of lamination, material, geometric, and crack variables. The special finite elements include the exact delamination stress singularity in its formulation. The method is shown to be computationally accurate and efficient, and operationally simple. To illustrate the basic nature of composite delamination, solutions are shown for edge-delaminated (0/-0/-0/0) and (+ or - 0/+ or - 0/90/90 deg) graphite-epoxy systems under uniform axial extenstion. Three-dimensional crack-tip stress intensity factors, associated energy release rates, and delamination crack-closure are determined for each individual case. The basic mechanics and mechanisms of composite delamination are studied, and fundamental characteristics unique to recently proposed tests for interlaminar fracture toughness of fiber composite laminates are examined.

  8. A study of fracture mechanisms in ATD roller bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph H.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate how microstructures, especially anisotropy, affects internal stresses and the overall mechanical response of bearings. Samples with the stress axis along the aligned carbide direction possessed high modulus values compared to those with their axis perpendicular to the carbide stringers. The difference in the modulus was found to be more than a factor of two. A series of experiments was conducted on rolled samples to further investigate this effect; the two sets of results were consistent with each other. The degree of anisotropy of the microstructure in terms of the carbide and matrix orientations was determined using x-ray diffraction. The stress state determination was conducted using neutron diffraction. It was found that there was little variation in the distribution of the internal stresses amongst different samples, indicating that small changes in the processing and geometrical conditions did not result in significant variations in the internal stress. A nominal tensile hoop stress of 39 ksi was obtained for the inner raceway. Furthermore, during the course of the investigation, it was apparent that there was a need to determine the stress state induced by the shrink fitting process. Therefore, a series of experiments was conducted using strain gages to identify the stress distribution in a shrink fitting process in three different types of geometries. Correlations were obtained to estimate the highest stress values in the outer and inner groove geometry. A finite element program based on the ANSYS system was developed to compute the stress distribution in the inner raceway geometry. This analysis indicates that the highest tensile stress in the system occurs at the ID of the ring with a stress value of over 5 times that of the applied radial stress. Results from all these facets were correlated with one another. It appears that the material does not fail as a result of any one single factor, but results from a combination of

  9. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  10. Stress fracture of the hamate body and fourth metacarpal base following military style push-ups: an unusual trauma mechanism.

    PubMed

    Busche, Marc N; Knobloch, Karsten; Rosenthal, Herbert; Vogt, Peter M

    2008-12-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old male soldier, who sustained stress fractures of the hamate body and fourth metacarpal base due to his daily knuckle push-up routine in the military. We introduce repetitive microtrauma due to daily knuckle push-ups as an unusual, but potential trauma mechanism for metacarpal and carpal stress fractures.

  11. Nonfatal sport-related craniofacial fractures: characteristics, mechanisms, and demographic data in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    MacIsaac, Zoe M; Berhane, Hebist; Cray, James; Zuckerbraun, Noel S; Losee, Joseph E; Grunwaldt, Lorelei J

    2013-06-01

    Few reports exist on sport-related craniofacial fracture injuries in the pediatric population. Most patients with craniofacial injuries are adults, and most studies on pediatric sport injuries do not focus specifically on craniofacial fractures. The authors' goal was to provide a retrospective, descriptive review of the common mechanisms of sport-related craniofacial injuries in the pediatric population, identifying the characteristics of these injuries and providing a description of the demographics of this population. The study population included children between the ages of 0 and 18 years who were seen in the emergency department at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center between 2000 and 2005. Of the 1508 patients identified, 167 had injuries caused by sport-related trauma (10.6 percent). After evaluation in the emergency department, 45.5 percent were hospitalized, and 15.0 percent of these were admitted to the intensive care unit. The peak incidence of sport-related injuries occurred between the ages of 13 and 15 years (40.7 percent). Nasal (35.9 percent), orbital (33.5 percent), and skull fractures (30.5 percent) were most common, whereas fractures of the maxilla (12.6 percent), mandible (7.2 percent), zygomaticomaxillary complex (4.2 percent), and naso-orbitoethmoid complex (1.2 percent) were observed less frequently. Baseball and softball were most frequently associated with the craniofacial injuries (44.3 percent), whereas basketball (7.2 percent) and football (3.0 percent) were associated with fewer injuries. The most common mechanisms of injury were throwing, catching, or hitting a ball (34.1 percent) and collision with other players (24.5 percent). These data may allow targeted or sport-specific craniofacial fracture injury prevention strategies.

  12. Mechanisms of hydrogen-assisted fracture in austenitic stainless steel welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, Dorian K.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Novak, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the hydrogen-assisted fracture susceptibility of gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welds in the nitrogen-strengthened, austenitic stainless steels 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn (21-6-9) and 22Cr-13Ni-5Mn (22-13-5). In addition, mechanisms of hydrogen-assisted fracture in the welds were identified using electron microscopy and finite-element modeling. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics experiments were conducted on hydrogen-charged GTA welds at 25 C. Results showed that hydrogen dramatically lowered the fracture toughness from 412 kJ/m{sup 2} to 57 kJ/m{sup 2} in 21-6-9 welds and from 91 kJ/m{sup 2} to 26 kJ/m{sup 2} in 22-13-5 welds. Microscopy results suggested that hydrogen served two roles in the fracture of welds: it promoted the nucleation of microcracks along the dendritic structure and accelerated the link-up of microcracks by facilitating localized deformation. A continuum finite-element model was formulated to test the notion that hydrogen could facilitate localized deformation in the ligament between microcracks. On the assumption that hydrogen decreased local flow stress in accordance with the hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility argument, the finite-element results showed that deformation was localized in a narrow band between two parallel, overlapping microcracks. In contrast, in the absence of hydrogen, the finite-element results showed that deformation between microcracks was more uniformly distributed.

  13. Fracture mechanics approach to hydrogen-assisted microdamage in eutectoid steel

    SciTech Connect

    Toribio, J.

    1997-01-01

    A fracture mechanics approach to hydrogen-assisted microdamage in eutectoid steel is presented. Fractographic analysis revealed micromechanical effects of hydrogen in the form of tearing topography surface (TTS). The progress of this microdamage is modeled as a macroscopic crack that extends the original fatigue precrack and involves linear elastic fracture mechanics principles. In this case, the change from hydrogen-assisted microdamage (TTS) to cleavagelike topography takes place when a critical stress intensity factor (K{sub H}) is reached, and this value depends on the amount of hydrogen which penetrated the vicinity of the actual crack tip (the fatigue precrack plus the TTS area). It is shown that the value K{sub H} depends on experimental variables--mainly on the fatigue precracking regime--and its value may be associated with a characteristic level of stress intensity factor in the crack growth kinetics curve.

  14. Computational Investigation of Fundamental Mechanisms Contributing to Fracture Dissolution and the Evolution of Hypogene Karst Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Rajaram, H.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Zyvoloski, G.; Stauffer, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    Hypogene karst systems evolve by dissolution resulting from the cooling of water flowing upward against the geothermal gradient in limestone formations. We present a comprehensive coupled-process model of fluid flow, heat transfer, reactive transport and buoyancy effects to investigate the origin of hypogene karst systems by fracture dissolution. Our model incorporates the temperature and pressure dependence of the solubility and dissolution kinetics of calcite. Our formulation inherently incorporates mechanisms such as “mixing corrosion” that have been implicated in the formation of hypogene cave systems. It also allows for rigorous representation of temperature-dependent fluid density and its consequences at various stages of karstification. The model is applied to investigate karstification over geological time scales in a network of faults/fractures that serves as a vertical conduit for upward flow. We considered two different conceptual hydrogeologic models. In the first model, the upward flow is controlled by a constant pressure gradient. In the second model, the flow is induced by topographic effects in a mountainous hydrologic system. During the very early stages of fracture growth, there is a positive feedback between fluid flow rate, heat transfer and dissolution. In this stage the dissolution rate is largely controlled by the retrograde solubility of calcite and aperture growth occurs throughout the fracture. For the first model, there is a period of slow continuous increase in the mass flow rate through the fracture, which is followed by an abrupt rapid increase. We refer to the time when this rapid increase occurs as the maturation time. For the second model of a mountainous hydrologic system, the fluid flux through the fracture remains nearly constant even though the fracture permeability and aperture increase. This is largely because the permeability of the country rock does not increase significantly. While this limits the fluid flux through the

  15. Geomechanical Simulation of Fluid-Driven Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Makhnenko, R.; Nikolskiy, D.; Mogilevskaya, S.; Labuz, J.

    2012-11-30

    The project supported graduate students working on experimental and numerical modeling of rock fracture, with the following objectives: (a) perform laboratory testing of fluid-saturated rock; (b) develop predictive models for simulation of fracture; and (c) establish educational frameworks for geologic sequestration issues related to rock fracture. These objectives were achieved through (i) using a novel apparatus to produce faulting in a fluid-saturated rock; (ii) modeling fracture with a boundary element method; and (iii) developing curricula for training geoengineers in experimental mechanics, numerical modeling of fracture, and poroelasticity.

  16. Unusual Mechanism of Injury Resulting in a Thoracic Chance Fracture in a Rodeo Athlete: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Boham, Mikaela; O'Connell, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To introduce the characteristics of a Chance fracture and increase awareness of the mechanism of injury that may occur during athletic activity. Background: A T12 Chance fracture was diagnosed in an 18-year-old male rodeo athlete. The rider was forced into extreme lumbothoracic hyperflexion when the horse bucked within the chute, pinning the rider's legs to his chest. Differential Diagnosis: Burst fracture, abdominal organ rupture, spinal dislocation, spinal cord injury, disk herniation, pars interarticularis fracture, spinal nerve injury, paralysis. Treatment: The patient underwent an open reduction and fixation of the thoracic fracture. Posterior stabilization was obtained with nonsegmental instrumentation. Allograft and autografts were used for posterolateral arthrodesis at T11–T12 and T12–L1. Uniqueness: Motor vehicle crashes with occupants wearing lap-type–only restraints account for nearly all previously reported Chance fractures. When only lap seatbelts are worn, the pelvis is stabilized, and the torso continues moving forward with impact. The stabilized body segment for this individual was reversed. Nearly 3 years after the initial surgery, fixation, and infection, the bareback rider has returned to full participation in rodeo. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first reported diagnosis of a T12 Chance fracture in a rodeo athlete. When animals buck, athletes can be forced into hyperflexion, exposing them to Chance fractures. Therefore, anyone treating rodeo athletes must suspect possible spinal fracture when this mechanism is present and must treat all athletes with early conservative management and hospital referral. PMID:24520836

  17. The effect of adhesive layer elasticity on the fracture mechanics of a blister test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical model of a blister type specimen for evaluating adhesive bond strength was developed. Plate theory with shear deformation was used to model the deformation of the plate, and elastic deformation of the adhesive layer is taken into account. It is shown that the inclusion of the elastic deformation of the adhesive layer can have a significant influence in the energy balance calculations of fracture mechanics.

  18. Applications of FEM and BEM in two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Steeve, B. E.; Swanson, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison of the finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) for the solution of two-dimensional plane strain problems in fracture mechanics is presented in this paper. Stress intensity factors (SIF's) were calculated using both methods for elastic plates with either a single-edge crack or an inclined-edge crack. In particular, two currently available programs, ANSYS for finite element analysis and BEASY for boundary element analysis, were used.

  19. Fracture toughness testing and toughening mechanisms of some commercial cobalt-free hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1998-04-27

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited to provide a wear resistant surface for structural base materials. Commercial low cobalt hardfacing alloys are being evaluated to reduce plant activation levels. Since hardfacing alloys typically must be resistant to cracking to assure adequate in service performance, fracture toughness is a critical material property. Fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) measurements of Fe base, Ni-base, and Co-base hardfacing were performed in accordance with ASTM E399-90 procedure in an effort to identify a tough cobalt-free alternative. Reduced scatter in K{sub IC} data was observed for the Fe base hardfacing, and the 95% lower bound K{sub IC} values were generally higher than the Ni-base Hardfacing alloys. Preliminary crack growth data obtained during precracking indicate that the Ni-base hardfacing possess better fatigue crack growth resistance. However, none of the Fe-base or Ni-base hardfacing have K{sub IC} values that are comparable to the reference Co-base hard facing. The test specimens were machined from thick (0.5 inches) weld deposits, and the microstructures of the test specimens are compared with the more prototypic, thinner deposits. Microstructural and fractographic examinations are used to characterize the fracture mechanisms and delineate the operative toughening mechanisms. Crack deflection and crack bridging toughening mechanisms are shown to be relevant for most of the commercial hardfacing.

  20. On the similarity in the formation mechanism of the fracture structure of a rock massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasar'yan, A. G.; Sytenkov, V. N.; Fedyanina, L. T.; Shemetov, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    Local segments of the Earth's crust reside at the mechanical nonequilibrium and continuously obtain and dissipate mechanical energy. The energy exchange between the structural elements of a geophysical medium determines its state, especially if the medium is fragmented into blocks. The stationary state of a rock differs from its static equilibrium by the fact that the mechanical energy is conserved because the energy input is equal to the energy dissipation. From this point of view, the cracks, the faults, and the block structure are not simply the manifestations of rock destruction, but rather the mode of existence of a medium with large irreversible deformations. Then, the fracture structure, whose formation is actually a response of a rock to large irreversible deformation, becomes, in terms of physics, the characteristic of the state of a geophysical medium; for example, it allows one to assess the parameters of the deformation processes during the period of formation of the fracture structure. The present paper addresses the identification of the features of the fracture structure in geological objects of different scales.

  1. Resistance Against the Intrinsic Rate of Fracture Mechanics Parameters for Polymeric Materials Under Moderate Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, R.; Seidler, S.; Grellmann, W.

    2005-09-01

    This study contributes towards understanding crack toughness as resistance against the intrinsic rate of fracture mechanics parameters. Up to now only few investigations have been done under moderate impact loading conditions. Based on experimental investigations using the crack resistance (R) concept, it has been shown that the stop block method combined with the multiple-specimen technique is a unique method for polymers under impact loading conditions in comparison with different R-curve methods. Other methods for the determination of R curve such as the low-blow technique are normally not applicable for polymers due to their time-dependent mechanical properties. The crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) rate is a measurement of the rate sensibility of stable fracture process depending on the type of deformation, which can provide deep insights into the micromechanics and activation mechanisms during the fracture processes. In the polymeric materials mostly investigated, one can understand the stable crack propagation with three-stage processes; crack-tip blunting/crack initiation, non-stationary stable crack growth and steady-state stable crack growth (an equilibrium state). In this stable crack propagation, the values of normalized CTOD rate converge rapidly to a ‘matrix’-specific threshold. The stop block method in the multiple-specimen technique assures the criteria of the time-independent strain field around the crack tip and constant crack speed therewith and the J-integral is a valid toughness parameter.

  2. Hydro-mechanical coupled simulation of hydraulic fracturing using the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Dong Joon

    This thesis presents the development and validation of an advanced hydro-mechanical coupled finite element program analyzing hydraulic fracture propagation within unconventional hydrocarbon formations under various conditions. The realistic modeling of hydraulic fracturing is necessarily required to improve the understanding and efficiency of the stimulation technique. Such modeling remains highly challenging, however, due to factors including the complexity of fracture propagation mechanisms, the coupled behavior of fracture displacement and fluid pressure, the interactions between pre-existing natural and initiated hydraulic fractures and the formation heterogeneity of the target reservoir. In this research, an eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) scheme is developed allowing for representation of single or multiple fracture propagations without any need for re-meshing. Also, the coupled flows through the fracture are considered in the program to account for their influence on stresses and deformations along the hydraulic fracture. In this research, a sequential coupling scheme is applied to estimate fracture aperture and fluid pressure with the XFEM. Later, the coupled XFEM program is used to estimate wellbore bottomhole pressure during fracture propagation, and the pressure variations are analyzed to determine the geometry and performance of the hydraulic fracturing as pressure leak-off test. Finally, material heterogeneity is included into the XFEM program to check the effect of random formation property distributions to the hydraulic fracture geometry. Random field theory is used to create the random realization of the material heterogeneity with the consideration of mean, standard deviation, and property correlation length. These analyses lead to probabilistic information on the response of unconventional reservoirs and offer a more scientific approach regarding risk management for the unconventional reservoir stimulation. The new stochastic approach

  3. American Society of Biomechanics Journal of Biomechanics Award 2013: Cortical bone tissue mechanical quality and biological mechanisms possibly underlying atypical fractures

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Joseph R.; Bajaj, Devendra; Fritton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The biomechanics literature contains many well-understood mechanisms behind typical fracture types that have important roles in treatment planning. The recent association of “atypical” fractures with long-term use of drugs designed to prevent osteoporosis has renewed interest in the effects of agents on bone tissue-level quality. While this class of fracture was recognized prior to the introduction of the anti-resorptive bisphosphonate drugs and recently likened to stress fractures, the mechanism(s) that lead to atypical fractures have not been definitively identified. Thus, a causal relationship between these drugs and atypical fracture has not been established. Physicians, bioengineers and others interested in the biomechanics of bone are working to improve fracture-prevention diagnostics, and the design of treatments to avoid this serious side-effect in the future. This review examines the mechanisms behind the bone tissue damage that may produce the atypical fracture pattern observed increasingly with long-term bisphosphonate use. Our recent findings and those of others reviewed support that the mechanisms behind normal, healthy excavation and tunnel filling by bone remodeling units within cortical tissue strengthen mechanical integrity. The ability of cortical bone to resist the damage induced during cyclic loading may be altered by the reduced remodeling and increased tissue age resulting from long-term bisphosphonate treatment. Development of assessments for such potential fractures would restore confidence in pharmaceutical treatments that have the potential to spare millions in our aging population from the morbidity and death that often follow bone fracture. PMID:25683519

  4. Mechanisms Used for Genomic Proliferation by Thermophilic Group II Introns

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Georg; Ghanem, Eman; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2010-01-01

    Mobile group II introns, which are found in bacterial and organellar genomes, are site-specific retroelments hypothesized to be evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retrotransposons in higher organisms. Most bacteria, however, contain no more than one or a few group II introns, making it unclear how introns could have proliferated to higher copy numbers in eukaryotic genomes. An exception is the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, which contains 28 closely related copies of a group II intron, constituting ∼1.3% of the genome. Here, by using a combination of bioinformatics and mobility assays at different temperatures, we identified mechanisms that contribute to the proliferation of T. elongatus group II introns. These mechanisms include divergence of DNA target specificity to avoid target site saturation; adaptation of some intron-encoded reverse transcriptases to splice and mobilize multiple degenerate introns that do not encode reverse transcriptases, leading to a common splicing apparatus; and preferential insertion within other mobile introns or insertion elements, which provide new unoccupied sites in expanding non-essential DNA regions. Additionally, unlike mesophilic group II introns, the thermophilic T. elongatus introns rely on elevated temperatures to help promote DNA strand separation, enabling access to a larger number of DNA target sites by base pairing of the intron RNA, with minimal constraint from the reverse transcriptase. Our results provide insight into group II intron proliferation mechanisms and show that higher temperatures, which are thought to have prevailed on Earth during the emergence of eukaryotes, favor intron proliferation by increasing the accessibility of DNA target sites. We also identify actively mobile thermophilic introns, which may be useful for structural studies, gene targeting in thermophiles, and as a source of thermostable reverse transcriptases. PMID:20543989

  5. Progressive fracture in quartzite samples as a result of chemo-mechanical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking reduces brittle fracture strength through the interaction of chemical and mechanical processes. In order to better understand the coupling of these processes in natural rock samples, we set up a long-term test in which six Alta-Quartzite samples (AQ 1-6, 300 x 30 x 70 mm) were brought to failure in stepped single edge notch bending (SENB) creep tests. Distilled water was introduced to the notch in four of these samples (AQ 1-2, 4-5), while reference samples remained dry. Samples were pre-loaded to 60% of their intact strength, as determined from preliminary short-term tests, to generate sharp initial cracks at the end of the saw-cut notch. They were then unloaded, before being re-loaded in steps of 5-10 % of the intact flexural strength starting at 0% for AQ1-3 and at 50% for AQ4-6. Strains were measured using electrical resistivity strain gages 2 mm below the notch. For comparable loading paths, measured strains were up to an order of magnitude higher in samples which had water introduced, and approached tertiary creep at 70-80% of the dry maximum load. Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture path of the 'wet notch' quartzite samples revealed various alterations in conformity with the stress field. Observations include etch pits aligned parallel to the principal stress direction, terrace dissolution in the plane of the principal tensile stress, as well as stress direction dependent contrast of highly to not corroded surface, following microstructural, e.g. foliation planes. These fracture features indicate the importance of coupled chemical and mechanical processes, particularly along grain boundaries, crystal planes and microstructural interfaces. Chemo-mechanical interactions are likely to facilitate progressive fracture of surface bedrocks in natural setting. Stress corrosion cracking is thus an important control on the promotion of rock slope failure, bedrock incision and building material damage.

  6. Criterion for mixed mode fracture in composite bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A study was undertaken to characterize the debond growth mechanism of adhesively bonded composite joints under mode I, mixed mode I-II, and mode II static loadings. The bonded system consisted of graphite-epoxy composite adherends bonded with a toughened epoxy adhesive. The mode I, mode II and mixed mode I-II fracture energies of the tested adhesives were found to be equal to each other. The criterion for mixed mode fracture in composite bonded joints was found.

  7. Study on Initiation Mechanisms of Hydraulic Fracture Guided by Vertical Multi-radial Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tiankui; Liu, Binyan; Qu, Zhanqing; Gong, Diguang; Xin, Lei

    2017-07-01

    The conventional hydraulic fracturing fails in the target oil development zone (remaining oil or gas, closed reservoir, etc.) which is not located in the azimuth of maximum horizontal in situ stress of available wellbores. The technology of directional propagation of hydraulic fracture guided by vertical multi-radial boreholes is innovatively developed. The effects of in situ stress, wellbore internal pressure and fracturing fluid percolation effect on geostress field distribution are taken into account, a mechanical model of two radial boreholes (basic research unit) is established, and the distribution and change rule of the maximum principal stress on the various parameters have been studied. The results show that as the radial borehole azimuth increases, the preferential rock tensile fracturing in the axial plane of radial boreholes becomes increasingly difficult. When the radial borehole azimuth increases to a certain extent, the maximum principal stress no longer appears in the azimuth of the radial boreholes, but will go to other orientations outside the axial plane of radial boreholes and the maximum horizontal stress orientation. Therefore, by reducing the ratio between the distance of the radial boreholes and increasing the diameter of the radial boreholes can enhance the guiding strength. In the axial plane of the radical boreholes, particularly in the radial hole wall, position closer to the radial boreholes is more prone to rock tensile destruction. Even in the case of large radial borehole azimuth, rock still preferentially ruptures in this position. The more the position is perpendicularly far from the axis of the wellbore, the lesser it will be affected by wellbore, and the lesser the tensile stress of each point. Meanwhile, at a certain depth, due to the decrease in the impact of the wellbore and the impact of the two radial boreholes increases accordingly, at the further position from the wellbore axis, the tensile fracture is the most prone to

  8. Study of fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composite by acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, Sotoaki; Suzuki, Megumu

    1995-11-01

    The fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composites are studied by acoustic emission technique for examining the effects of fiber contents. The loads P{sub b} and P{sub c} which the damage mechanisms change are obtained at the inflection points of the total AE energy curve the energy gradient method. The damages are generated by fiber breaking at the load point of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in B material, and by the fiber breaking and the debonding between resin and fiber at the load points of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in C material.

  9. Computational implementation of the multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model for salt

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.; Munson, D.E.

    1996-05-01

    The Multi-Mechanism Deformation (M-D) model for creep in rock salt has been used in three-dimensional computations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a potential waste, repository. These computational studies are relied upon to make key predictions about long-term behavior of the repository. Recently, the M-D model was extended to include creep-induced damage. The extended model, the Multi-Mechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, is considerably more complicated than the M-D model and required a different technology from that of the M-D model for a computational implementation.

  10. A novel Lagrangian approach for the stable numerical simulation of fault and fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Franceschini, Andrea; Ferronato, Massimiliano Janna, Carlo; Teatini, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    The simulation of the mechanics of geological faults and fractures is of paramount importance in several applications, such as ensuring the safety of the underground storage of wastes and hydrocarbons or predicting the possible seismicity triggered by the production and injection of subsurface fluids. However, the stable numerical modeling of ground ruptures is still an open issue. The present work introduces a novel formulation based on the use of the Lagrange multipliers to prescribe the constraints on the contact surfaces. The variational formulation is modified in order to take into account the frictional work along the activated fault portion according to the principle of maximum plastic dissipation. The numerical model, developed in the framework of the Finite Element method, provides stable solutions with a fast convergence of the non-linear problem. The stabilizing properties of the proposed model are emphasized with the aid of a realistic numerical example dealing with the generation of ground fractures due to groundwater withdrawal in arid regions. - Highlights: • A numerical model is developed for the simulation of fault and fracture mechanics. • The model is implemented in the framework of the Finite Element method and with the aid of Lagrange multipliers. • The proposed formulation introduces a new contribution due to the frictional work on the portion of activated fault. • The resulting algorithm is highly non-linear as the portion of activated fault is itself unknown. • The numerical solution is validated against analytical results and proves to be stable also in realistic applications.

  11. Mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of polyimide (SINTIMID) at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data Sys